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Sample records for energy density pressure

  1. Thermodynamic analysis of energy density in pressure retarded osmosis: The impact of solution volumes and costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reimund, Kevin K.

    2015-01-01

    A general method was developed for estimating the volumetric energy efficiency of pressure retarded osmosis via pressure-volume analysis of a membrane process. The resulting model requires only the osmotic pressure, π, and mass fraction, w, of water in the concentrated and dilute feed solutions to estimate the maximum achievable specific energy density, uu, as a function of operating pressure. The model is independent of any membrane or module properties. This method utilizes equilibrium analysis to specify the volumetric mixing fraction of concentrated and dilute solution as a function of operating pressure, and provides results for the total volumetric energy density of similar order to more complex models for the mixing of seawater and riverwater. Within the framework of this analysis, the total volumetric energy density is maximized, for an idealized case, when the operating pressure is π(1+√w -1 ), which is lower than the maximum power density operating pressure, Δπ/2, derived elsewhere, and is a function of the solute osmotic pressure at a given mass fraction. It was also found that a minimum 1.45 kmol of ideal solute is required to produce 1 kWh of energy while a system operating at "maximum power density operating pressure" requires at least 2.9 kmol. Utilizing this methodology, it is possible to examine the effects of volumetric solution cost, operation of a module at various pressure, and operation of a constant pressure module with various feed.

  2. Thermodynamic analysis of energy density in pressure retarded osmosis: The impact of solution volumes and costs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reimund, Kevin K. [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering; McCutcheon, Jeffrey R. [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering; Wilson, Aaron D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-08-01

    A general method was developed for estimating the volumetric energy efficiency of pressure retarded osmosis via pressure-volume analysis of a membrane process. The resulting model requires only the osmotic pressure, π, and mass fraction, w, of water in the concentrated and dilute feed solutions to estimate the maximum achievable specific energy density, uu, as a function of operating pressure. The model is independent of any membrane or module properties. This method utilizes equilibrium analysis to specify the volumetric mixing fraction of concentrated and dilute solution as a function of operating pressure, and provides results for the total volumetric energy density of similar order to more complex models for the mixing of seawater and riverwater. Within the framework of this analysis, the total volumetric energy density is maximized, for an idealized case, when the operating pressure is π/(1+√w⁻¹), which is lower than the maximum power density operating pressure, Δπ/2, derived elsewhere, and is a function of the solute osmotic pressure at a given mass fraction. It was also found that a minimum 1.45 kmol of ideal solute is required to produce 1 kWh of energy while a system operating at “maximum power density operating pressure” requires at least 2.9 kmol. Utilizing this methodology, it is possible to examine the effects of volumetric solution cost, operation of a module at various pressure, and operation of a constant pressure module with various feed.

  3. Density functional and theoretical study of the temperature and pressure dependency of the plasmon energy of solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attarian Shandiz, M.; Gauvin, R.

    2014-01-01

    The temperature and pressure dependency of the volume plasmon energy of solids was investigated by density functional theory calculations. The volume change of crystal is the major factor responsible for the variation of valence electron density and plasmon energy in the free electron model. Hence, to introduce the effect of temperature and pressure for the density functional theory calculations of plasmon energy, the temperature and pressure dependency of lattice parameter was used. Also, by combination of the free electron model and the equation of state based on the pseudo-spinodal approach, the temperature and pressure dependency of the plasmon energy was modeled. The suggested model is in good agreement with the results of density functional theory calculations and available experimental data for elements with the free electron behavior.

  4. Comparison of energy efficiency and power density in pressure retarded osmosis and reverse electrodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Ngai Yin; Elimelech, Menachem

    2014-09-16

    Pressure retarded osmosis (PRO) and reverse electrodialysis (RED) are emerging membrane-based technologies that can convert chemical energy in salinity gradients to useful work. The two processes have intrinsically different working principles: controlled mixing in PRO is achieved by water permeation across salt-rejecting membranes, whereas RED is driven by ion flux across charged membranes. This study compares the energy efficiency and power density performance of PRO and RED with simulated technologically available membranes for natural, anthropogenic, and engineered salinity gradients (seawater-river water, desalination brine-wastewater, and synthetic hypersaline solutions, respectively). The analysis shows that PRO can achieve both greater efficiencies (54-56%) and higher power densities (2.4-38 W/m(2)) than RED (18-38% and 0.77-1.2 W/m(2)). The superior efficiency is attributed to the ability of PRO membranes to more effectively utilize the salinity difference to drive water permeation and better suppress the detrimental leakage of salts. On the other hand, the low conductivity of currently available ion exchange membranes impedes RED ion flux and, thus, constrains the power density. Both technologies exhibit a trade-off between efficiency and power density: employing more permeable but less selective membranes can enhance the power density, but undesired entropy production due to uncontrolled mixing increases and some efficiency is sacrificed. When the concentration difference is increased (i.e., natural → anthropogenic → engineered salinity gradients), PRO osmotic pressure difference rises proportionally but not so for RED Nernst potential, which has logarithmic dependence on the solution concentration. Because of this inherently different characteristic, RED is unable to take advantage of larger salinity gradients, whereas PRO power density is considerably enhanced. Additionally, high solution concentrations suppress the Donnan exclusion effect of the

  5. The energy density distribution of an ideal gas and Bernoulli’s equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Leonardo S. F.

    2018-05-01

    This work discusses the energy density distribution in an ideal gas and the consequences of Bernoulli’s equation and the corresponding relation for compressible fluids. The aim of this work is to study how Bernoulli’s equation determines the energy flow in a fluid, although Bernoulli’s equation does not describe the energy density itself. The model from molecular dynamic considerations that describes an ideal gas at rest with uniform density is modified to explore the gas in motion with non-uniform density and gravitational effects. The difference between the component of the speed of a particle that is parallel to the gas speed and the gas speed itself is called ‘parallel random speed’. The pressure from the ‘parallel random speed’ is denominated as parallel pressure. The modified model predicts that the energy density is the sum of kinetic and potential gravitational energy densities plus two terms with static and parallel pressures. The application of Bernoulli’s equation and the corresponding relation for compressible fluids in the energy density expression has resulted in two new formulations. For incompressible and compressible gas, the energy density expressions are written as a function of stagnation, static and parallel pressures, without any dependence on kinetic or gravitational potential energy densities. These expressions of the energy density are the main contributions of this work. When the parallel pressure was uniform, the energy density distribution for incompressible approximation and compressible gas did not converge to zero for the limit of null static pressure. This result is rather unusual because the temperature tends to zero for null pressure. When the gas was considered incompressible and the parallel pressure was equal to static pressure, the energy density maintained this unusual behaviour with small pressures. If the parallel pressure was equal to static pressure, the energy density converged to zero for the limit of the

  6. Flexible Semitransparent Energy Harvester with High Pressure Sensitivity and Power Density Based on Laterally Aligned PZT Single-Crystal Nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Quan-Liang; He, Guang-Ping; Di, Jie-Jian; Song, Wei-Li; Hou, Zhi-Ling; Tan, Pei-Pei; Wang, Da-Wei; Cao, Mao-Sheng

    2017-07-26

    A flexible semitransparent energy harvester is assembled based on laterally aligned Pb(Zr 0.52 Ti 0.48 )O 3 (PZT) single-crystal nanowires (NWs). Such a harvester presents the highest open-circuit voltage and a stable area power density of up to 10 V and 0.27 μW/cm 2 , respectively. A high pressure sensitivity of 0.14 V/kPa is obtained in the dynamic pressure sensing, much larger than the values reported in other energy harvesters based on piezoelectric single-crystal NWs. Furthermore, theoretical and finite element analyses also confirm that the piezoelectric voltage constant g 33 of PZT NWs is competitive to the lead-based bulk single crystals and ceramics, and the enhanced pressure sensitivity and power density are substantially linked to the flexible structure with laterally aligned PZT NWs. The energy harvester in this work holds great potential in flexible and transparent sensing and self-powered systems.

  7. High Energy Density Sciences with High Power Lasers at SACLA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, Ryosuke

    2013-10-01

    One of the interesting topics on high energy density sciences with high power lasers is creation of extremely high pressures in material. The pressures of more than 0.1 TPa are the energy density corresponding to the chemical bonding energy, resulting in expectation of dramatic changes in the chemical reactions. At pressures of more than TPa, most of material would be melted on the shock Hugoniot curve. However, if the temperature is less than 1eV or lower than a melting point at pressures of more than TPa, novel solid states of matter must be created through a pressured phase transition. One of the interesting materials must be carbon. At pressures of more than TPa, the diamond structure changes to BC and cubic at more than 3TPa. To create such novel states of matter, several kinds of isentropic-like compression techniques are being developed with high power lasers. To explore the ``Tera-Pascal Science,'' now we have a new tool which is an x-ray free electron laser as well as high power lasers. The XFEL will clear the details of the HED states and also efficiently create hot dense matter. We have started a new project on high energy density sciences using an XFEL (SACLA) in Japan, which is a HERMES (High Energy density Revolution of Matter in Extreme States) project.

  8. High Energy Density Laboratory Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Lebedev, Sergey V

    2007-01-01

    During the past decade, research teams around the world have developed astrophysics-relevant research utilizing high energy-density facilities such as intense lasers and z-pinches. Every two years, at the International conference on High Energy Density Laboratory Astrophysics, scientists interested in this emerging field discuss the progress in topics covering: - Stellar evolution, stellar envelopes, opacities, radiation transport - Planetary Interiors, high-pressure EOS, dense plasma atomic physics - Supernovae, gamma-ray bursts, exploding systems, strong shocks, turbulent mixing - Supernova remnants, shock processing, radiative shocks - Astrophysical jets, high-Mach-number flows, magnetized radiative jets, magnetic reconnection - Compact object accretion disks, x-ray photoionized plasmas - Ultrastrong fields, particle acceleration, collisionless shocks. These proceedings cover many of the invited and contributed papers presented at the 6th International Conference on High Energy Density Laboratory Astrophys...

  9. Research on high energy density plasmas and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    Recently, technologies on lasers, accelerators, and pulse power machines have been significantly advanced and input power density covers the intensity range from 10 10 W/cm 2 to higher than 10 20 W/cm 2 . As the results, high pressure gas and solid targets can be heated up to very high temperature to create hot dense plasmas which have never appeared on the earth. The high energy density plasmas opened up new research fields such as inertial confinement fusion, high brightness X-ray radiation sources, interiors of galactic nucleus,supernova, stars and planets, ultra high pressure condensed matter physics, plasma particle accelerator, X-ray laser, and so on. Furthermore, since these fields are intimately connected with various industrial sciences and technologies, the high energy density plasma is now studied in industries, government institutions, and so on. This special issue of the Journal of Plasma Physics and Nuclear Fusion Research reviews the high energy density plasma science for the comprehensive understanding of such new fields. In May, 1998, the review committee for investigating the present status and the future prospects of high energy density plasma science was established in the Japan Society of Plasma Science and Nuclear Fusion Research. We held three committee meetings to discuss present status and critical issues of research items related to high energy density plasmas. This special issue summarizes the understandings of the committee. This special issue consists of four chapters: They are Chapter 1: Physics important in the high energy density plasmas, Chapter 2: Technologies related to the plasma generation; drivers such as lasers, pulse power machines, particle beams and fabrication of various targets, Chapter 3: Plasma diagnostics important in high energy density plasma experiments, Chapter 4: A variety of applications of high energy density plasmas; X-ray radiation, particle acceleration, inertial confinement fusion, laboratory astrophysics

  10. Combined high-power ultrasound and high-pressure homogenization nanoemulsification: The effect of energy density, oil content and emulsifier type and content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calligaris, Sonia; Plazzotta, Stella; Valoppi, Fabio; Anese, Monica

    2018-05-01

    Combinations of ultrasound (US) and high-pressure homogenization (HPH) at low-medium energy densities were studied as alternative processes to individual US and HPH to produce Tween 80 and whey protein stabilized nanoemulsions, while reducing the energy input. To this aim, preliminary trials were performed to compare emulsification efficacy of single and combined HPH and US treatments delivering low-medium energy densities. Results highlighted the efficacy of US-HPH combined process in reducing the energy required to produce nanoemulsions stabilized with both Tween 80 and whey protein isolate. Subsequently, the effect of emulsifier content (1-3% w/w), oil amount (10-20% w/w) and energy density (47-175 MJ/m 3 ) on emulsion mean particle diameter was evaluated by means of a central composite design. Particles of 140-190 nm were obtained by delivering 175 MJ/m 3 energy density at emulsions containing 3% (w/w) Tween 80 and 10% (w/w) oil. In the case of whey protein isolate stabilized emulsions, a reduced emulsifier amount (1% w/w) and intermediate energy density (120 MJ/m 3 ) allowed a minimum droplet size around 220-250 nm to be achieved. Results showed that, in both cases, at least 50% of the energy density should be delivered by HPH to obtain the minimum particle diameter. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Transition density and pressure in hot neutron stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Jun; Chen Liewen; Ko, Che Ming; Li Baoan

    2010-01-01

    Using the momentum-dependent effective interaction (MDI) for nucleons, we have studied the transition density and pressure at the boundary between the inner crust and the liquid core of hot neutron stars. We find that their values are larger in neutrino-trapped neutron stars than in neutrino-free neutron stars. Furthermore, both are found to decrease with increasing temperature of a neutron star as well as increasing slope parameter of the nuclear symmetry energy, except that the transition pressure in neutrino-trapped neutron stars for the case of small symmetry energy slope parameter first increases and then decreases with increasing temperature. We have also studied the effect of the nuclear symmetry energy on the critical temperature above which the inner crust in a hot neutron star disappears and found that with increasing value of the symmetry energy slope parameter, the critical temperature decreases slightly in neutrino-trapped neutron stars but first decreases and then increases in neutrino-free neutron stars.

  12. The Riemann problem for the relativistic full Euler system with generalized Chaplygin proper energy density-pressure relation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Zhiqiang

    2018-04-01

    The relativistic full Euler system with generalized Chaplygin proper energy density-pressure relation is studied. The Riemann problem is solved constructively. The delta shock wave arises in the Riemann solutions, provided that the initial data satisfy some certain conditions, although the system is strictly hyperbolic and the first and third characteristic fields are genuinely nonlinear, while the second one is linearly degenerate. There are five kinds of Riemann solutions, in which four only consist of a shock wave and a centered rarefaction wave or two shock waves or two centered rarefaction waves, and a contact discontinuity between the constant states (precisely speaking, the solutions consist in general of three waves), and the other involves delta shocks on which both the rest mass density and the proper energy density simultaneously contain the Dirac delta function. It is quite different from the previous ones on which only one state variable contains the Dirac delta function. The formation mechanism, generalized Rankine-Hugoniot relation and entropy condition are clarified for this type of delta shock wave. Under the generalized Rankine-Hugoniot relation and entropy condition, we establish the existence and uniqueness of solutions involving delta shocks for the Riemann problem.

  13. Laser fusion and high energy density science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodama, Ryosuke

    2005-01-01

    High-power laser technology is now opening a variety of new fields of science and technology using laser-produced plasmas. The laser plasma is now recognized as one of the important tools for the investigation and application of matter under extreme conditions, which is called high energy density science. This chapter shows a variety of applications of laser-produced plasmas as high energy density science. One of the more attractive industrial and science applications is the generation of intense pulse-radiation sources, such as the generation of electro-magnetic waves in the ranges of EUV (Extreme Ultra Violet) to gamma rays and laser acceleration of charged particles. The laser plasma is used as an energy converter in this regime. The fundamental science applications of high energy density physics are shown by introducing laboratory astrophysics, the equation of state of high pressure matter, including warm dense matter and nuclear science. Other applications are also presented, such as femto-second laser propulsion and light guiding. Finally, a new systematization is proposed to explore the possibility of the high energy density plasma application, which is called high energy plasma photonics''. This is also exploration of the boundary regions between laser technology and beam optics based on plasma physics. (author)

  14. Extreme states of matter high energy density physics

    CERN Document Server

    Fortov, Vladimir E

    2016-01-01

    With its many beautiful colour pictures, this book gives fascinating insights into the unusual forms and behaviour of matter under extremely high pressures and temperatures. These extreme states are generated, among other things, by strong shock, detonation and electric explosion waves, dense laser beams,electron and ion beams, hypersonic entry of spacecraft into dense atmospheres of planets, and in many other situations characterized by extremely high pressures and temperatures.Written by one of the world's foremost experts on the topic, this book will inform and fascinate all scientists dealing with materials properties and physics, and also serve as an excellent introduction to plasma-, shock-wave and high-energy-density physics for students and newcomers seeking an overview. This second edition is thoroughly revised and expanded, in particular with new material on high energy-density physics, nuclear explosions and other nuclear transformation processes.

  15. Probability density function method for variable-density pressure-gradient-driven turbulence and mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakosi, Jozsef; Ristorcelli, Raymond J.

    2010-01-01

    Probability density function (PDF) methods are extended to variable-density pressure-gradient-driven turbulence. We apply the new method to compute the joint PDF of density and velocity in a non-premixed binary mixture of different-density molecularly mixing fluids under gravity. The full time-evolution of the joint PDF is captured in the highly non-equilibrium flow: starting from a quiescent state, transitioning to fully developed turbulence and finally dissipated by molecular diffusion. High-Atwood-number effects (as distinguished from the Boussinesq case) are accounted for: both hydrodynamic turbulence and material mixing are treated at arbitrary density ratios, with the specific volume, mass flux and all their correlations in closed form. An extension of the generalized Langevin model, originally developed for the Lagrangian fluid particle velocity in constant-density shear-driven turbulence, is constructed for variable-density pressure-gradient-driven flows. The persistent small-scale anisotropy, a fundamentally 'non-Kolmogorovian' feature of flows under external acceleration forces, is captured by a tensorial diffusion term based on the external body force. The material mixing model for the fluid density, an active scalar, is developed based on the beta distribution. The beta-PDF is shown to be capable of capturing the mixing asymmetry and that it can accurately represent the density through transition, in fully developed turbulence and in the decay process. The joint model for hydrodynamics and active material mixing yields a time-accurate evolution of the turbulent kinetic energy and Reynolds stress anisotropy without resorting to gradient diffusion hypotheses, and represents the mixing state by the density PDF itself, eliminating the need for dubious mixing measures. Direct numerical simulations of the homogeneous Rayleigh-Taylor instability are used for model validation.

  16. Statistical properties of kinetic and total energy densities in reverberant spaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Finn; Molares, Alfonso Rodriguez

    2010-01-01

    Many acoustical measurements, e.g., measurement of sound power and transmission loss, rely on determining the total sound energy in a reverberation room. The total energy is usually approximated by measuring the mean-square pressure (i.e., the potential energy density) at a number of discrete....... With the advent of a three-dimensional particle velocity transducer, it has become somewhat easier to measure total rather than only potential energy density in a sound field. This paper examines the ensemble statistics of kinetic and total sound energy densities in reverberant enclosures theoretically...... positions. The idea of measuring the total energy density instead of the potential energy density on the assumption that the former quantity varies less with position than the latter goes back to the 1930s. However, the phenomenon was not analyzed until the late 1970s and then only for the region of high...

  17. High energy density propulsion systems and small engine dynamometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hays, Thomas

    2009-07-01

    Scope and Method of Study. This study investigates all possible methods of powering small unmanned vehicles, provides reasoning for the propulsion system down select, and covers in detail the design and production of a dynamometer to confirm theoretical energy density calculations for small engines. Initial energy density calculations are based upon manufacturer data, pressure vessel theory, and ideal thermodynamic cycle efficiencies. Engine tests are conducted with a braking type dynamometer for constant load energy density tests, and show true energy densities in excess of 1400 WH/lb of fuel. Findings and Conclusions. Theory predicts lithium polymer, the present unmanned system energy storage device of choice, to have much lower energy densities than other conversion energy sources. Small engines designed for efficiency, instead of maximum power, would provide the most advantageous method for powering small unmanned vehicles because these engines have widely variable power output, loss of mass during flight, and generate rotational power directly. Theoretical predictions for the energy density of small engines has been verified through testing. Tested values up to 1400 WH/lb can be seen under proper operating conditions. The implementation of such a high energy density system will require a significant amount of follow-on design work to enable the engines to tolerate the higher temperatures of lean operation. Suggestions are proposed to enable a reliable, small-engine propulsion system in future work. Performance calculations show that a mature system is capable of month long flight times, and unrefueled circumnavigation of the globe.

  18. Effect of gas filling pressure and operation energy on ion and neutron emission in a medium energy plasma focus device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niranjan, Ram; Rout, R. K.; Srivastava, Rohit; Kaushik, T. C.

    2018-03-01

    The effects of gas filling pressure and operation energy on deuterium ions and neutrons have been studied in a medium energy plasma focus device, MEPF-12. The deuterium gas filling pressure was varied from 1 to 10 mbar at an operation energy of 9.7 kJ. Also, the operation energy was varied from 3.9 to 9.7 kJ at a deuterium gas filling pressure of 4 mbar. Time resolved emission of deuterium ions was measured using a Faraday cup. Simultaneously, time integrated and time resolved emissions of neutrons were measured using a silver activation detector and plastic scintillator detector, respectively. Various characteristics (fluence, peak density, and most probable energy) of deuterium ions were estimated using the Faraday cup signal. The fluence was found to be nearly independent of the gas filling pressure and operation energy, but the peak density and most probable energy of deuterium ions were found to be varying. The neutron yield was observed to be varying with the gas filling pressure and operation energy. The effect of ions on neutrons emission was observed at each operation condition.

  19. Condensation pressures in small pores: An analytical model based on density functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilson, R.H.; Griffiths, S.K.

    1999-01-01

    Integral methods are used to derive an analytical expression describing fluid condensation pressures in slit pores bounded by parallel plane walls. To obtain this result, the governing equations of density functional theory (DFT) are integrated across the pore width assuming that fluid densities within adsorbed layers are spatially uniform. The thickness, density, and free energy of these layers are expressed as composite functions constructed from asymptotic limits applicable to small and large pores. By equating the total free energy of the adsorbed layers to that of a liquid-full pore, we arrive at a closed-form expression for the condensation pressure in terms of the pore size, surface tension, and Lennard-Jones parameters of the adsorbent and adsorbate molecules. The resulting equation reduces to the Kelvin equation in the large-pore limit. It further reproduces the condensation pressures computed by means of the full DFT equations for all pore sizes in which phase transitions are abrupt. Finally, in the limit of extremely small pores, for which phase transitions may be smooth and continuous, this simple analytical expression provides a good approximation to the apparent condensation pressure indicated by the steepest portion of the adsorption isotherm computed via DFT. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  20. Tailoring electron energy distribution functions through energy confinement in dual radio-frequency driven atmospheric pressure plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Neill, C.; Waskoenig, J. [Centre for Plasma Physics, School of Maths and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Gans, T. [Centre for Plasma Physics, School of Maths and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); York Plasma Institute, Department of Physics, University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom)

    2012-10-08

    A multi-scale numerical model based on hydrodynamic equations with semi-kinetic treatment of electrons is used to investigate the influence of dual frequency excitation on the effective electron energy distribution function (EEDF) in a radio-frequency driven atmospheric pressure plasma. It is found that variations of power density, voltage ratio, and phase relationship provide separate control over the electron density and the mean electron energy. This is exploited to directly influence both the phase dependent and time averaged effective EEDF. This enables tailoring the EEDF for enhanced control of non-equilibrium plasma chemical kinetics at ambient pressure and temperature.

  1. High energy density fusing using the Compact Torus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartman, C.W.

    1989-01-01

    My remarks are concerned with employing the Compact Torus magnetic field configuration to produce fusion energy. In particular, I would like to consider high energy density regimes where the pressures generated extend well beyond the strength of materials. Under such conditions, where nearby walls are vaporized and pushed aside each shot, the technological constraints are very different from usual magnetic fusion and may admit opportunities for an improved fusion reactor design. 5 refs., 3 figs

  2. Condensation pressures in small pores: An analytical model based on density functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. H. Nilson; S. K. Griffiths

    1999-02-01

    Adsorption and condensation are critical to many applications of porous materials including filtration, separation, and the storage of gases. Integral methods are used to derive an analytical expression describing fluid condensation pressures in slit pores bounded by parallel plane walls. To obtain this result, the governing equations of Density Functional Theory (DFT) are integrated across the pore width assuming that fluid densities within adsorbed layers are spatially uniform. The thickness, density, and energy of these layers are expressed as composite functions constructed from asymptotic limits applicable to small and large pores. By equating the total energy of the adsorbed layers to that of a liquid-full pore, the authors arrive at a closed-form expression for the condensation pressure in terms of the pore size, surface tension, and Lennard-Jones parameters of the adsorbent and adsorbate molecules. The resulting equation reduces to the Kelvin equation in the large-pore limit. It further reproduces the condensation pressures computed by means of the full DFT equations for all pore sizes in which phase transitions are abrupt. Finally, in the limit of extremely small pores, for which phase transitions may be smooth and continuous, this simple analytical expression provides a good approximation to the apparent condensation pressure indicated by the steepest portion of the adsorption isotherm computed via DFT.

  3. Energy and pressure requirements for compression of swine solid fraction compost

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niccolò Pampuro

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The excessive amount of pig slurry spread on soil has contributed to nitrate water pollution both in surface and in ground waters, especially in areas classified as vulnerable zones to nitrate in accordance with European Regulation (91/676/CEE. Several techniques have been developed to manage livestock slurries as cheaply and conveniently as possible and to reduce potential risks of environmental pollution. Among these techniques, solid-liquid separation of slurry is a common practice in Italy. The liquid fraction can be used for irrigation and the solid fraction, after aerobic stabilization, produces an organic compost rich in humic substances. However, compost derived from swine solid fraction is a low density material (bulk density less than 500 kgm–3. This makes it costly to transport composted swine solid fraction from production sites to areas where it could be effectively utilized for value-added applications such as in soil fertilization. Densification is one possible way to enhance the storage and transportation of the compost. This study therefore investigates the effect of pressure (20- 110 MPa and pressure application time (5-120 s on the compaction characteristics of compost derived from swine solid fraction. Two different types of material have been used: composted swine solid fraction derived from mechanical separation and compost obtained by mixing the first material with wood chips. Results obtained showed that both the pressure applied and the pressure application time significantly affect the density of the compacted samples; while the specific compression energy is significantly affected only by the pressure. Best predictor equations were developed to predict compact density and the specific compression energy required by the densification process. The specific compression energy values based on the results from this study (6-32 kJkg–1 were significantly lower than the specific energy required to manufacture pellets from

  4. Magnetic energy density and plasma energy density in the Venus wake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez De Tejada, H. A.; Durand-Manterola, H. J.; Lundin, R.; Barabash, S.; Zhang, T.; Reyes-Ruiz, M.; Sauvaud, J.

    2013-05-01

    Magnetic energy density and plasma energy density in the Venus wake H. Pérez-de-Tejada1, H. Durand-Manterola1, R. Lundin2, S. Barabash2, T. L. Zhang3, A. Sauvaud4, M. Reyes-Ruiz5. 1 - Institute of Geophysics, UNAM, México, D. F. 2 - Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Umea, Sweden 3 - Space Research Institute, Graz, Austria 4 - CESR, Toulouse, France 5 - Institute of Astronomy, UNAM, Ensenada, México Measurements conducted in the Venus wake with the magnetometer and the Aspera-4 plasma instrument of the Venus Express spacecraft show that average values of the kinetic energy density of the plasma in that region are comparable to average local values of the magnetic energy density. Observations were carried out in several orbits of the Venus Express near the midnight plane and suggest that the total energy content in the Venus wake is distributed with nearly comparable values between the plasma and the magnetic field. Processes associated with the solar wind erosion of planetary ions from the polar magnetic regions of the ionosphere are involved in the comparable distribution of both energy components.

  5. High-energy-density physics foundation of inertial fusion and experimental astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Drake, R Paul

    2018-01-01

    The raw numbers of high-energy-density physics are amazing: shock waves at hundreds of km/s (approaching a million km per hour), temperatures of millions of degrees, and pressures that exceed 100 million atmospheres. This title surveys the production of high-energy-density conditions, the fundamental plasma and hydrodynamic models that can describe them and the problem of scaling from the laboratory to the cosmos. Connections to astrophysics are discussed throughout. The book is intended to support coursework in high-energy-density physics, to meet the needs of new researchers in this field, and also to serve as a useful reference on the fundamentals. Specifically the book has been designed to enable academics in physics, astrophysics, applied physics and engineering departments to provide in a single-course, an introduction to fluid mechanics and radiative transfer, with dramatic applications in the field of high-energy-density systems. This second edition includes pedagogic improvements to the presentation ...

  6. Optimization of hydrostatic pressure at varied sonication conditions--power density, intensity, very low frequency--for isothermal ultrasonic sludge treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delmas, Henri; Le, Ngoc Tuan; Barthe, Laurie; Julcour-Lebigue, Carine

    2015-07-01

    This work aims at investigating for the first time the key sonication (US) parameters: power density (DUS), intensity (IUS), and frequency (FS) - down to audible range, under varied hydrostatic pressure (Ph) and low temperature isothermal conditions (to avoid any thermal effect). The selected application was activated sludge disintegration, a major industrial US process. For a rational approach all comparisons were made at same specific energy input (ES, US energy per solid weight) which is also the relevant economic criterion. The decoupling of power density and intensity was obtained by either changing the sludge volume or most often by changing probe diameter, all other characteristics being unchanged. Comprehensive results were obtained by varying the hydrostatic pressure at given power density and intensity. In all cases marked maxima of sludge disintegration appeared at optimum pressures, which values increased at increasing power intensity and density. Such optimum was expected due to opposite effects of increasing hydrostatic pressure: higher cavitation threshold then smaller and fewer bubbles, but higher temperature and pressure at the end of collapse. In addition the first attempt to lower US frequency down to audible range was very successful: at any operation condition (DUS, IUS, Ph, sludge concentration and type) higher sludge disintegration was obtained at 12 kHz than at 20 kHz. The same values of optimum pressure were observed at 12 and 20 kHz. At same energy consumption the best conditions - obtained at 12 kHz, maximum power density 720 W/L and 3.25 bar - provided about 100% improvement with respect to usual conditions (1 bar, 20 kHz). Important energy savings and equipment size reduction may then be expected. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Plasma Photonic Devices for High Energy Density Science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodama, R.

    2005-01-01

    High power laser technologies are opening a variety of attractive fields of science and technology using high energy density plasmas such as plasma physics, laboratory astrophysics, material science, nuclear science including medical applications and laser fusion. The critical issues in the applications are attributed to the control of intense light and enormous density of charged particles including efficient generation of the particles such as MeV electrons and protons with a current density of TA/cm2. Now these application possibilities are limited only by the laser technology. These applications have been limited in the control of the high power laser technologies and their optics. However, if we have another device consisted of the 4th material, i.e. plasma, we will obtain a higher energy density condition and explore the application possibilities, which could be called high energy plasma device. One of the most attractive devices has been demonstrated in the fast ignition scheme of the laser fusion, which is cone-guiding of ultra-intense laser light in to high density regions1. This is one of the applications of the plasma device to control the ultra-intense laser light. The other role of the devices consisted of transient plasmas is control of enormous energy-density particles in a fashion analogous to light control with a conventional optical device. A plasma fibre (5?m/1mm), as one example of the devices, has guided and deflected the high-density MeV electrons generated by ultra-intense laser light 2. The electrons have been well collimated with either a lens-like plasma device or a fibre-like plasma, resulting in isochoric heating and creation of ultra-high pressures such as Giga bar with an order of 100J. Plasmas would be uniquely a device to easily control the higher energy density particles like a conventional optical device as well as the ultra-intense laser light, which could be called plasma photonic device. (Author)

  8. Simplified local density model for adsorption over large pressure ranges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rangarajan, B.; Lira, C.T.; Subramanian, R.

    1995-01-01

    Physical adsorption of high-pressure fluids onto solids is of interest in the transportation and storage of fuel and radioactive gases; the separation and purification of lower hydrocarbons; solid-phase extractions; adsorbent regenerations using supercritical fluids; supercritical fluid chromatography; and critical point drying. A mean-field model is developed that superimposes the fluid-solid potential on a fluid equation of state to predict adsorption on a flat wall from vapor, liquid, and supercritical phases. A van der Waals-type equation of state is used to represent the fluid phase, and is simplified with a local density approximation for calculating the configurational energy of the inhomogeneous fluid. The simplified local density approximation makes the model tractable for routine calculations over wide pressure ranges. The model is capable of prediction of Type 2 and 3 subcritical isotherms for adsorption on a flat wall, and shows the characteristic cusplike behavior and crossovers seen experimentally near the fluid critical point

  9. The pressure, internal energy, and conductivity of tantalum plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apfelbaum, E.M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Joint Institute for High Temperatures, Department of Computational Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2017-11-15

    The pressure, internal energy, and conductivity of a tantalum plasma were calculated at the temperatures 10-100 kK and densities less than 3 g/cm{sup 3}. The plasma composition, pressure, and internal energy were obtained by means of the corresponding system of the coupled mass action law equations. We have considered atom ionization up to +3. The conductivity was calculated within the relaxation time approximation. Comparisons of our results with available measurements and calculation data show good agreement in the area of correct applicability of the present model. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  10. Internal wave energy flux from density perturbations in nonlinear stratifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Frank M.; Allshouse, Michael R.; Swinney, Harry L.; Morrison, P. J.

    2017-11-01

    Tidal flow over the topography at the bottom of the ocean, whose density varies with depth, generates internal gravity waves that have a significant impact on the energy budget of the ocean. Thus, understanding the energy flux (J = p v) is important, but it is difficult to measure simultaneously the pressure and velocity perturbation fields, p and v . In a previous work, a Green's-function-based method was developed to calculate the instantaneous p, v , and thus J , given a density perturbation field for a constant buoyancy frequency N. Here we extend the previous analytic Green's function work to include nonuniform N profiles, namely the tanh-shaped and linear cases, because background density stratifications that occur in the ocean and some experiments are nonlinear. In addition, we present a finite-difference method for the general case where N has an arbitrary profile. Each method is validated against numerical simulations. The methods we present can be applied to measured density perturbation data by using our MATLAB graphical user interface EnergyFlux. PJM was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Contract DE-FG05-80ET-53088. HLS and MRA were supported by ONR Grant No. N000141110701.

  11. Changes in permittivity and density of molecular liquids under high pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiselev, Vladimir D; Kornilov, Dmitry A; Konovalov, Alexander I

    2014-04-03

    We collected and analyzed the density and permittivity of 57 nonpolar and dipolar molecular liquids at different temperatures (143 sets) and pressures (555 sets). No equation was found that could accurately predict the change to polar liquid permittivity by the change of its density in the range of the pressures and temperatures tested. Consequently, the influence of high hydrostatic pressure and temperature on liquid permittivity may be a more complicated process compared to density changes. The pressure and temperature coefficients of permittivity can be drastically larger than the pressure and temperature coefficients of density, indicating that pressure and particularly temperature significantly affect the structure of molecular liquids. These changes have less influence on the density change but can strongly affect the permittivity change. The clear relationship between the tangent and secant moduli of the permittivity curvatures under pressure for various molecular liquids at different temperatures was obtained, from which one can calculate the Tait equation coefficients from the experimental values of the pressure influence on the permittivity at ambient pressure.

  12. An exposition on Friedmann cosmology with negative energy densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemiroff, Robert J.; Joshi, Ravi; Patla, Bijunath R.

    2015-01-01

    How would negative energy density affect a classic Friedmann cosmology? Although never measured and possibly unphysical, certain realizations of quantum field theories leaves the door open for such a possibility. In this paper we analyze the evolution of a universe comprising varying amounts of negative energy forms. Negative energy components have negative normalized energy densities, Ω < 0. They include negative phantom energy with an equation of state parameter w < −1, negative cosmological constant: w=−1, negative domain walls: w = −2/3, negative cosmic strings: w=−1/3, negative mass: w = 0, negative radiation: w = 1/3 and negative ultralight: w > 1/3. Assuming that such energy forms generate pressure like perfect fluids, the attractive or repulsive nature of negative energy components are reviewed. The Friedmann equation is satisfied only when negative energy forms are coupled to a greater magnitude of positive energy forms or positive curvature. We show that the solutions exhibit cyclic evolution with bounces and turnovers.The future and fate of such universes in terms of curvature, temperature, acceleration, and energy density are reviewed. The end states are dubbed ''big crunch,' '' big void,' or ''big rip' and further qualified as ''warped',''curved', or ''flat',''hot' versus ''cold', ''accelerating' versus ''decelerating' versus ''coasting'. A universe that ends by contracting to zero energy density is termed ''big poof.' Which contracting universes ''bounce' in expansion and which expanding universes ''turnover' into contraction are also reviewed

  13. SiO2 Glass Density to Lower-Mantle Pressures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petitgirard, Sylvain; Malfait, Wim J.; Journaux, Baptiste

    2017-01-01

    and present Earth. SiO2 is the main constituent of Earth's mantle and is the reference model system for the behavior of silicate melts at high pressure. Here, we apply our recently developed x-ray absorption technique to the density of SiO2 glass up to 110 GPa, doubling the pressure range...... for such measurements. Our density data validate recent molecular dynamics simulations and are in good agreement with previous experimental studies conducted at lower pressure. Silica glass rapidly densifies up to 40 GPa, but the density trend then flattens to become asymptotic to the density of SiO2 minerals above 60...... GPa. The density data present two discontinuities at similar to 17 and similar to 60 GPa that can be related to a silicon coordination increase from 4 to a mixed 5/6 coordination and from 5/6 to sixfold, respectively. SiO2 glass becomes denser than MgSiO3 glass at similar to 40 GPa, and its density...

  14. Metal azides under pressure: An emerging class of high energy ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Advanced Centre of Research in High Energy Materials (ACRHEM), University of ... behaviour of LiN3 and KN3 by means of density functional calculations. ... and 4.08 eV (KN3) and as pressure increases the band gap decreases and show ...

  15. High-energy density physics at Los Alamos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byrnes, P.; Younger, S.M.

    1993-03-01

    This brochure describes the facilities of the Above Ground Experiments II (AGEX II) and the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) programs at Los Alamo. Combined, these programs represent, an unparalleled capability to address important issues in high-energy density physics that are critical to the future defense, energy, and research needs of th e United States. The mission of the AGEX II program at Los Alamos is to provide additional experimental opportunities for the nuclear weapons program. For this purpose we have assembled at Los Alamos the broadest array of high-energy density physics facilities of any laboratory in the world. Inertial confinement fusion seeks to achieve thermonuclear burn on a laboratory scale through the implosion of a small quantity of deuterium and tritium fuel to very high Pressure and temperature.The Los Alamos ICF program is focused on target physics. With the largest scientific computing center in the world, We can perform calculations of unprecedented sophistication and precision. We field experiments at facilities worldwide-including our own Trident and Mercury lasers-to confirm our understanding and to provide the necessary data base to proceed toward the historic goal of controlled fusion in the laboratory. In addition to direct programmatic high-energy density physics is a nc scientific endeavor in itself. The ultrahigh magnetic fields produced in our high explosive pulsed-power generators can be used in awide variety of solid state physics and temperature superconductor studies. The structure and dynamics of planetary atmospheres can be simulated through the compression of gas mixtures

  16. The impact of edge gradients in the pressure, density, ion temperature, and electron temperature on edge-localized modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleva, Robert G.; Guzdar, Parvez N.

    2011-01-01

    The magnitude of the energy and particle fluxes in simulations of edge-localized modes (ELMs) is determined by the edge gradients in the pressure, density, ion temperature, and electron temperature. The total edge pressure gradient is the dominant influence on ELMs by far. An increase (decrease) of merely 2% in the pressure gradient results in an increase (decrease) of more than a factor of ten in the size of the ELM bursts. At a fixed pressure gradient, the size of the ELM bursts decreases as the density gradient increases, while the size of the bursts increases as the electron temperature gradient or, especially, the ion temperature gradient increases.

  17. Energy penetration into arrays of aligned nanowires irradiated with relativistic intensities: Scaling to terabar pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargsten, Clayton; Hollinger, Reed; Capeluto, Maria Gabriela; Kaymak, Vural; Pukhov, Alexander; Wang, Shoujun; Rockwood, Alex; Wang, Yong; Keiss, David; Tommasini, Riccardo; London, Richard; Park, Jaebum; Busquet, Michel; Klapisch, Marcel; Shlyaptsev, Vyacheslav N; Rocca, Jorge J

    2017-01-01

    Ultrahigh-energy density (UHED) matter, characterized by energy densities >1 × 10 8 J cm -3 and pressures greater than a gigabar, is encountered in the center of stars and inertial confinement fusion capsules driven by the world's largest lasers. Similar conditions can be obtained with compact, ultrahigh contrast, femtosecond lasers focused to relativistic intensities onto targets composed of aligned nanowire arrays. We report the measurement of the key physical process in determining the energy density deposited in high-aspect-ratio nanowire array plasmas: the energy penetration. By monitoring the x-ray emission from buried Co tracer segments in Ni nanowire arrays irradiated at an intensity of 4 × 10 19 W cm -2 , we demonstrate energy penetration depths of several micrometers, leading to UHED plasmas of that size. Relativistic three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, validated by these measurements, predict that irradiation of nanostructures at intensities of >1 × 10 22 W cm -2 will lead to a virtually unexplored extreme UHED plasma regime characterized by energy densities in excess of 8 × 10 10 J cm -3 , equivalent to a pressure of 0.35 Tbar.

  18. Density ratios in compressions driven by radiation pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.

    1988-01-01

    It has been suggested that in the cannonball scheme of laser compression the pellet may be considered to be compressed by the 'brute force' of the radiation pressure. For such a radiation-driven compression, an energy balance method is applied to give an equation fixing the radius compression ratio K which is a key parameter for such intense compressions. A shock model is used to yield specific results. For a square-pulse driving power compressing a spherical pellet with a specific heat ratio of 5/3, a density compression ratio Γ of 27 is computed. Double (stepped) pulsing with linearly rising power enhances Γ to 1750. The value of Γ is not dependent on the absolute magnitude of the piston power, as long as this is large enough. Further enhancement of compression by multiple (stepped) pulsing becomes obvious. The enhanced compression increases the energy gain factor G for a 100 μm DT pellet driven by radiation power of 10 16 W from 6 for a square pulse power with 0.5 MJ absorbed energy to 90 for a double (stepped) linearly rising pulse with absorbed energy of 0.4 MJ assuming perfect coupling efficiency. (author)

  19. Energy Systems High-Pressure Test Laboratory | Energy Systems Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facility | NREL Energy Systems High-Pressure Test Laboratory Energy Systems High-Pressure Test Laboratory In the Energy Systems Integration Facility's High-Pressure Test Laboratory, researchers can safely test high-pressure hydrogen components. Photo of researchers running an experiment with a hydrogen fuel

  20. Ultrasonically determined fill pressure and density in closed spherical shells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asaki, T.J.

    1998-01-01

    Experiments have been conducted in which the D 2 fill pressure has been determined for several closed millimeter-size aluminum and beryllium shells. The vibrational resonance frequency spectrum of the shells was used to calculate the sound velocity of the interior gas. This velocity, along with the equation-of-state, determined the gas pressure and density. The accuracy in determining the fill conditions is within 0.5% in both pressure and density for near critical density (ρ approx-gt 9 mol/L) gas over a wide range of temperatures (190 K to 300 K). Reduced accuracy was apparent at low density. An attempt was made to determine the fill density of one shell by acoustic observation of the dew point temperature. While this temperature was recorded very accurately, the uncertainty in the saturated vapor density curve near the critical point yielded inaccurate results. These methods were shown to be unaffected by small deviations in the sphericity of the gas-filled cavity

  1. Energy Penetration into Arrays of Aligned Nanowires Irradiated with Relativistic Intensities: Scaling to Terabar Pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bargsten, Clayton [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States); Hollinger, Reed [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States); Capeluto, Maria Gabriela [Univ. of Buenos Aires (Argentina); Kaymak, Vural [Heinrich Heine Univ., Dusseldorf (Germany); Pukhov, Alexander [Heinrich Heine Univ., Dusseldorf (Germany); Wang, Shoujun [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States); Rockwood, Alex [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States); Wang, Yong [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States); Keiss, David [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States); Tommasini, Riccardo [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); London, Richard [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Park, Jaebum [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Busquet, Michel [ARTEP Inc., Ellicott City, MD (United States); Klapisch, M [ARTEP Inc., Ellicott City, MD (United States); Shlyaptsev, Vyacheslav N. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States); Rocca, Jorge J. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

    2016-11-11

    Ultra-high-energy-density (UHED) matter, characterized by energy densities > 1 x 108 J cm-3 and pressures greater than a gigabar, is encountered in the center of stars and in inertial confinement fusion capsules driven by the world’s largest lasers. Similar conditions can be obtained with compact, ultra-high contrast, femtosecond lasers focused to relativistic intensities onto targets composed of aligned nanowire arrays. Here we report the measurement of the key physical process in determining the energy density deposited in high aspect ratio nanowire array plasmas: the energy penetration. By monitoring the x-ray emission from buried Co tracer segments in Ni nanowire arrays irradiated at an intensity of 4 x 1019 W cm-2, we demonstrate energy penetration depths of several μm, leading to UHED plasmas of that size. Relativistic 3D particle-in-cell-simulations, validated by these measurements, predict that irradiation of nanostructures at intensities of > 1 x 1022 W cm-2 will lead to a virtually unexplored extreme UHED plasma regime characterized by energy densities in excess of 8 x 1010 J cm-3, equivalent to a pressure of 0.35 Tbar.

  2. Numerical analysis of energy density and particle density in high energy heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Yuanyong; Lu Zhongdao

    2004-01-01

    Energy density and particle density in high energy heavy-ion collisions are calculated with infinite series expansion method and Gauss-Laguerre formulas in numerical integration separately, and the results of these two methods are compared, the higher terms and linear terms in series expansion are also compared. The results show that Gauss-Laguerre formulas is a good method in calculations of high energy heavy-ion collisions. (author)

  3. Energy vs. density on paths toward more exact density functionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kepp, Kasper P

    2018-03-14

    Recently, the progression toward more exact density functional theory has been questioned, implying a need for more formal ways to systematically measure progress, i.e. a "path". Here I use the Hohenberg-Kohn theorems and the definition of normality by Burke et al. to define a path toward exactness and "straying" from the "path" by separating errors in ρ and E[ρ]. A consistent path toward exactness involves minimizing both errors. Second, a suitably diverse test set of trial densities ρ' can be used to estimate the significance of errors in ρ without knowing the exact densities which are often inaccessible. To illustrate this, the systems previously studied by Medvedev et al., the first ionization energies of atoms with Z = 1 to 10, the ionization energy of water, and the bond dissociation energies of five diatomic molecules were investigated using CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pV5Z as benchmark at chemical accuracy. Four functionals of distinct designs was used: B3LYP, PBE, M06, and S-VWN. For atomic cations regardless of charge and compactness up to Z = 10, the energy effects of the different ρ are energy-wise insignificant. An interesting oscillating behavior in the density sensitivity is observed vs. Z, explained by orbital occupation effects. Finally, it is shown that even large "normal" problems such as the Co-C bond energy of cobalamins can use simpler (e.g. PBE) trial densities to drastically speed up computation by loss of a few kJ mol -1 in accuracy. The proposed method of using a test set of trial densities to estimate the sensitivity and significance of density errors of functionals may be useful for testing and designing new balanced functionals with more systematic improvement of densities and energies.

  4. Global model analysis of negative ion generation in low-pressure inductively coupled hydrogen plasmas with bi-Maxwellian electron energy distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huh, Sung-Ryul; Kim, Nam-Kyun; Jung, Bong-Ki; Chung, Kyoung-Jae; Hwang, Yong-Seok; Kim, Gon-Ho

    2015-01-01

    A global model was developed to investigate the densities of negative ions and the other species in a low-pressure inductively coupled hydrogen plasma with a bi-Maxwellian electron energy distribution. Compared to a Maxwellian plasma, bi-Maxwellian plasmas have higher populations of low-energy electrons and highly vibrationally excited hydrogen molecules that are generated efficiently by high-energy electrons. This leads to a higher reaction rate of the dissociative electron attachment responsible for negative ion production. The model indicated that the bi-Maxwellian electron energy distribution at low pressures is favorable for the creation of negative ions. In addition, the electron temperature, electron density, and negative ion density calculated using the model were compared with the experimental data. In the low-pressure regime, the model results of the bi-Maxwellian electron energy distributions agreed well quantitatively with the experimental measurements, unlike those of the assumed Maxwellian electron energy distributions that had discrepancies

  5. Thermal Condensate Structure and Cosmological Energy Density of the Universe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Capolupo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to study thermal vacuum condensate for scalar and fermion fields. We analyze the thermal states at the temperature of the cosmic microwave background (CMB and we show that the vacuum expectation value of the energy momentum tensor density of photon fields reproduces the energy density and pressure of the CMB. We perform the computations in the formal framework of the Thermo Field Dynamics. We also consider the case of neutrinos and thermal states at the temperature of the neutrino cosmic background. Consistency with the estimated lower bound of the sum of the active neutrino masses is verified. In the boson sector, nontrivial contribution to the energy of the universe is given by particles of masses of the order of 10−4 eV compatible with the ones of the axion-like particles. The fractal self-similar structure of the thermal radiation is also discussed and related to the coherent structure of the thermal vacuum.

  6. Density, viscosity, and saturated vapor pressure of ethyl trifluoroacetate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Zhixian; Jiang, Haiming; Li, Ling; Wang, Hongxing; Qiu, Ting

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Density of ethyl trifluoroacetate was measured and its thermal expansion coefficient was determined. • Viscosity of ethyl trifluoroacetate was measured and fitted to the Andrade equation. • Saturated vapor pressure of ethyl trifluoroacetate was reported. • The Clausius–Clapeyron equation was used to calculate the molar evaporation enthalpy of ethyl trifluoroacetate. - Abstract: The properties of ethyl trifluoroacetate (CF 3 COOCH 2 CH 3 ) were measured as a function of temperature: density (278.08 to 322.50) K, viscosity (293.45 to 334.32) K, saturated vapor pressure (293.35 to 335.65) K. The density data were fitted to a quadratic polynomial equation, and the viscosity data were regressed to the Andrade equation. The correlation coefficient (R 2 ) of equations for density and viscosity are 0.9997 and 0.9999, respectively. The correlation between saturated vapor pressures and temperatures was achieved with a maximum absolute relative deviation of 0.142%. In addition, the molar evaporation enthalpy in the range of T = (293.35 to 335.65) K was estimated by the Clausius–Clapeyron equation

  7. Investigation of density-wave oscillation in parallel boiling channels under high pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ming Xiao; Xuejun Chen; Mingyuan Zhang

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents experimental results on density-wave instability in parallel boiling channels. Experiments have been done in a high pressure steam-water loop. Different types of two-phase flow instabilities have been observed, including density-wave oscillation, pressure-drop type oscillation, thermal oscillation and secondary density-wave oscillation. The secondary density-wave oscillation appears at very low exit steam quality (less than 0.1) and at the positive portion of Δ P-G curves with both channels' flow rate oscillating in phase. Density-wave oscillation can appear at pressure up to 192 bar and disappear over 207 bar. (6 figures) (Author)

  8. Pressure-Dependent Electronic and Transport Properties of Bulk Platinum Oxide by Density Functional Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kansara, Shivam; Gupta, Sanjeev K.; Sonvane, Yogesh; Nekrasov, Kirill A.; Kichigina, Natalia V.

    2018-02-01

    The structural, electronic, and vibrational properties of bulk platinum oxide (PtO) at compressive pressures in the interval from 0 GPa to 35 GPa are investigated using the density functional theory. The calculated electronic band structure of PtO shows poor metallicity at very low density of states on the Fermi level. However, the hybrid pseudopotential calculation yielded 0.78 eV and 1.30 eV direct band and indirect gap, respectively. Importantly, our results predict that PtO has a direct band gap within the framework of HSE06, and it prefers equally zero magnetic order at different pressures. In the Raman spectra, peaks are slightly shifted towards higher frequency with the decrease in pressure. We have also calculated the thermoelectric properties, namely the electronic thermal conductivity and electrical conductivity, with respect to temperature and thermodynamic properties such as entropy, specific heat at constant volume, enthalpy and Gibbs free energy with respect to pressure. The result shows that PtO is a promising candidate for use as a catalyst, in sensors, as a photo-cathode in water electrolysis, for thermal decomposition of inorganic salt and fuel cells.

  9. Solvation pressure as real pressure: I. Ethanol and starch under negative pressure

    CERN Document Server

    Uden, N W A V; Faux, D A; Tanczos, A C; Howlin, B; Dunstan, D J

    2003-01-01

    The reality of the solvation pressure generated by the cohesive energy density of liquids is demonstrated by three methods. Firstly, the Raman spectrum of ethanol as a function of cohesive energy density (solvation pressure) in ethanol-water and ethanol-chloroform mixtures is compared with the Raman spectrum of pure ethanol under external hydrostatic pressure and the solvation pressure and hydrostatic pressure are found to be equivalent for some transitions. Secondly, the bond lengths of ethanol are calculated by molecular dynamics modelling for liquid ethanol under pressure and for ethanol vapour. The difference in bond lengths between vapour and liquid are found to be equivalent to the solvation pressure for the C-H sub 3 , C-H sub 2 and O-H bond lengths, with discrepancies for the C-C and C-O bond lengths. Thirdly, the pressure-induced gelation of potato starch is measured in pure water and in mixtures of water and ethanol. The phase transition pressure varies in accordance with the change in solvation pre...

  10. Single-particle energies and density of states in density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Aggelen, H.; Chan, G. K.-L.

    2015-07-01

    Time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) is commonly used as the foundation to obtain neutral excited states and transition weights in DFT, but does not allow direct access to density of states and single-particle energies, i.e. ionisation energies and electron affinities. Here we show that by extending TD-DFT to a superfluid formulation, which involves operators that break particle-number symmetry, we can obtain the density of states and single-particle energies from the poles of an appropriate superfluid response function. The standard Kohn- Sham eigenvalues emerge as the adiabatic limit of the superfluid response under the assumption that the exchange- correlation functional has no dependence on the superfluid density. The Kohn- Sham eigenvalues can thus be interpreted as approximations to the ionisation energies and electron affinities. Beyond this approximation, the formalism provides an incentive for creating a new class of density functionals specifically targeted at accurate single-particle eigenvalues and bandgaps.

  11. Nuclear symmetry energy in density dependent hadronic models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haddad, S.

    2008-12-01

    The density dependence of the symmetry energy and the correlation between parameters of the symmetry energy and the neutron skin thickness in the nucleus 208 Pb are investigated in relativistic Hadronic models. The dependency of the symmetry energy on density is linear around saturation density. Correlation exists between the neutron skin thickness in the nucleus 208 Pb and the value of the nuclear symmetry energy at saturation density, but not with the slope of the symmetry energy at saturation density. (author)

  12. Batteries. Higher energy density than gasoline?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, Michael; Werber, Mathew; Schwartz, Peter V.

    2009-01-01

    The energy density of batteries is two orders of magnitude below that of liquid fuels. However, this information alone cannot be used to compare batteries to liquid fuels for automobile energy storage media. Because electric motors have a higher energy conversion efficiency and lower mass than combustion engines, they can provide a higher deliverable mechanical energy density than internal combustion for most transportation applications. (author)

  13. On exact and approximate exchange-energy densities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Springborg, Michael; Dahl, Jens Peder

    1999-01-01

    Based on correspondence rules between quantum-mechanical operators and classical functions in phase space we construct exchange-energy densities in position space. Whereas these are not unique but depend on the chosen correspondence rule, the exchange potential is unique. We calculate this exchange......-energy density for 15 closed-shell atoms, and compare it with kinetic- and Coulomb-energy densities. It is found that it has a dominating local-density character, but electron-shell effects are recognizable. The approximate exchange-energy functionals that have been proposed so far are found to account only...

  14. RADIATION PRESSURE-SUPPORTED ACCRETION DISKS: VERTICAL STRUCTURE, ENERGY ADVECTION, AND CONVECTIVE STABILITY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu Weimin

    2012-01-01

    By taking into account the local energy balance per unit volume between the viscous heating and the advective cooling plus the radiative cooling, we investigate the vertical structure of radiation pressure-supported accretion disks in spherical coordinates. Our solutions show that the photosphere of the disk is close to the polar axis and therefore the disk seems to be extremely thick. However, the density profile implies that most of the accreted matter exists in a moderate range around the equatorial plane. We show that the well-known polytropic relation between the pressure and the density is unsuitable for describing the vertical structure of radiation pressure-supported disks. More importantly, we find that the energy advection is significant even for slightly sub-Eddington accretion disks. We argue that the non-negligible advection may help us understand why the standard thin disk model is likely to be inaccurate above ∼0.3 Eddington luminosity, which was found by some works on black hole spin measurement. Furthermore, the solutions satisfy the Solberg-Høiland conditions, which indicate the disk to be convectively stable. In addition, we discuss the possible link between our disk model and ultraluminous X-ray sources.

  15. SURFACE SYMMETRY ENERGY OF NUCLEAR ENERGY DENSITY FUNCTIONALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolov, N; Schunck, N; Nazarewicz, W; Bender, M; Pei, J

    2010-12-20

    We study the bulk deformation properties of the Skyrme nuclear energy density functionals. Following simple arguments based on the leptodermous expansion and liquid drop model, we apply the nuclear density functional theory to assess the role of the surface symmetry energy in nuclei. To this end, we validate the commonly used functional parametrizations against the data on excitation energies of superdeformed band-heads in Hg and Pb isotopes, and fission isomers in actinide nuclei. After subtracting shell effects, the results of our self-consistent calculations are consistent with macroscopic arguments and indicate that experimental data on strongly deformed configurations in neutron-rich nuclei are essential for optimizing future nuclear energy density functionals. The resulting survey provides a useful benchmark for further theoretical improvements. Unlike in nuclei close to the stability valley, whose macroscopic deformability hangs on the balance of surface and Coulomb terms, the deformability of neutron-rich nuclei strongly depends on the surface-symmetry energy; hence, its proper determination is crucial for the stability of deformed phases of the neutron-rich matter and description of fission rates for r-process nucleosynthesis.

  16. Calculations of nuclear energies using the energy density formalism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pu, W.W.T.

    1975-01-01

    The energy density formalism (EDF) is used to investigate two problems. In this formalism the energy of the nucleus is expressed as a functional of its density. The nucleus energy is obtained by minimizing the functional with respect to the density. The first problem has to do with the stability of nuclei having shapes of different degrees of central depression (bubble shapes). It is shown that the bubble shapes are energetically favorable only for unrealistically large nuclei. Particularly, the super heavy nucleus that has been suggested (Z = 114, N = 184) prefers a shape with constant central density. These results are in good agreement with earlier calculations using the liquid drop model. The second problem concerns an anomaly detected experimentally in the isotope shift of mercury. The isotope shifts among a long chain of mercury isotopes show a sudden change as the neutron number is reduced. In particular, the experimental result suggests that the effective size of the charge distributions of 183 Hg and 185 Hg are as large as that of 196 Hg. Such sudden changes in other nuclei have been attributed to a sudden onset of permanent quadruple deformation. In the case of mercury there is no experimental evidence for deformed shapes. It was, therefore, suggested that the proton distribution might develop a central depression in the lighter isotopes. The EDF is used to investigate the mercury isotope shift anomaly following the aforementioned suggestion. Specifically, nucleon densities with different degrees of central depression are generated. Energies corresponding to these densities are obtained. To allow for shell effects, nucleon densities are obtained from single-particle wave functions. Calculations are made for a few mercury isotopes, especially for 184 Hg. The results are that in all cases the energy is lower for densities corresponding to a solid spherical shape

  17. Energy harvesting from hydraulic pressure fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunefare, K A; Skow, E A; Erturk, A; Savor, J; Verma, N; Cacan, M R

    2013-01-01

    State-of-the-art hydraulic hose and piping systems employ integral sensor nodes for structural health monitoring to avoid catastrophic failures. Energy harvesting in hydraulic systems could enable self-powered wireless sensor nodes for applications such as energy-autonomous structural health monitoring and prognosis. Hydraulic systems inherently have a high energy intensity associated with the mean pressure and flow. Accompanying the mean pressure is the dynamic pressure ripple, which is caused by the action of pumps and actuators. Pressure ripple is a deterministic source with a periodic time-domain behavior conducive to energy harvesting. An energy harvester prototype was designed for generating low-power electricity from pressure ripples. The prototype employed an axially-poled off-the-shelf piezoelectric stack. A housing isolated the stack from the hydraulic fluid while maintaining a mechanical coupling allowing for dynamic-pressure-induced deflection of the stack. The prototype exhibited an off-resonance energy harvesting problem since the fundamental resonance of the piezoelectric stack was much higher than the frequency content of the pressure ripple. The prototype was designed to provide a suitable power output for powering sensors with a maximum output of 1.2 mW. This work also presents electromechanical model simulations and experimental characterization of the piezoelectric power output from the pressure ripple in terms of the force transmitted into the harvester. (paper)

  18. Densities at high pressures and derived properties of thiophenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antón, V.; Lomba, L.; Cea, P.; Giner, B.; Lafuente, C.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The pρT behaviour of four members of the thiophene family has been studied. • The experimental results have been correlated with the TRIDEN equation. • Isobaric expansibilities, isothermal compressibilities and internal pressures have been calculated. • The results were discussed in terms of structural differences among thiophenes. - Abstract: This contribution reports the densities in wide temperature (from 283.15 to 338.15 K) and pressure (from 0.1 to 65.0 MPa) ranges of four members of the thiophene family (thiophene, 2-methylthiophene, 3-methylthiophene and 2,5-dimethylthiophene). These densities have been satisfactorily correlated by means of the TRIDEN equation. From these data, several derived properties as isobaric expansibility, isothermal compressibility, and internal pressure have been estimated. Using all these properties, interesting information about molecular organization can be deduced.

  19. Simulations of nanocrystals under pressure: Combining electronic enthalpy and linear-scaling density-functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corsini, Niccolò R. C., E-mail: niccolo.corsini@imperial.ac.uk; Greco, Andrea; Haynes, Peter D. [Department of Physics and Department of Materials, Imperial College London, Exhibition Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Hine, Nicholas D. M. [Department of Physics and Department of Materials, Imperial College London, Exhibition Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Cavendish Laboratory, J. J. Thompson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Molteni, Carla [Department of Physics, King' s College London, Strand, London WC2R 2LS (United Kingdom)

    2013-08-28

    We present an implementation in a linear-scaling density-functional theory code of an electronic enthalpy method, which has been found to be natural and efficient for the ab initio calculation of finite systems under hydrostatic pressure. Based on a definition of the system volume as that enclosed within an electronic density isosurface [M. Cococcioni, F. Mauri, G. Ceder, and N. Marzari, Phys. Rev. Lett.94, 145501 (2005)], it supports both geometry optimizations and molecular dynamics simulations. We introduce an approach for calibrating the parameters defining the volume in the context of geometry optimizations and discuss their significance. Results in good agreement with simulations using explicit solvents are obtained, validating our approach. Size-dependent pressure-induced structural transformations and variations in the energy gap of hydrogenated silicon nanocrystals are investigated, including one comparable in size to recent experiments. A detailed analysis of the polyamorphic transformations reveals three types of amorphous structures and their persistence on depressurization is assessed.

  20. Perspectives on High-Energy-Density Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, R. Paul

    2008-11-01

    Much of 21st century plasma physics will involve work to produce, understand, control, and exploit very non-traditional plasmas. High-energy density (HED) plasmas are often examples, variously involving strong Coulomb interactions and few particles per Debeye sphere, dominant radiation effects, strongly relativistic effects, or strongly quantum-mechanical behavior. Indeed, these and other modern plasma systems often fall outside the early standard theoretical definitions of ``plasma''. This presentation will focus on two types of HED plasmas that exhibit non-traditional behavior. Our first example will be the plasmas produced by extremely strong shock waves. Shock waves are present across the entire realm of plasma densities, often in space or astrophysical contexts. HED shock waves (at pressures > 1 Mbar) enable studies in many areas, from equations of state to hydrodynamics to radiation hydrodynamics. We will specifically consider strongly radiative shocks, in which the radiative energy fluxes are comparable to the mechanical energy fluxes that drive the shocks. Modern HED facilities can produce such shocks, which are also present in dense, energetic, astrophysical systems such as supernovae. These shocks are also excellent targets for advanced simulations due to their range of spatial scales and complex radiation transport. Our second example will be relativistic plasmas. In general, these vary from plasmas containing relativistic particle beams, produced for some decades in the laboratory, to the relativistic thermal plasmas present for example in pulsar winds. Laboratory HED relativistic plasmas to date have been those produced by laser beams of irradiance ˜ 10^18 to 10^22 W/cm^2 or by accelerator-produced HED electron beams. These have applications ranging from generation of intense x-rays to production of proton beams for radiation therapy to acceleration of electrons. Here we will focus on electron acceleration, a spectacular recent success and a rare

  1. Direct measurement of electron density in microdischarge at atmospheric pressure by Stark broadening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Lifang; Ran Junxia; Mao Zhiguo

    2005-01-01

    We present a method and results for measurement of electron density in atmospheric-pressure dielectric barrier discharge. The electron density of microdischarge in atmospheric pressure argon is measured by using the spectral line profile method. The asymmetrical deconvolution is used to obtain Stark broadening. The results show that the electron density in single filamentary microdischarge at atmospheric pressure argon is 3.05x10 15 cm -3 if the electron temperature is 10,000 K. The result is in good agreement with the simulation. The electron density in dielectric barrier discharge increases with the increase of applied voltage

  2. Characteristic densities of low- and high-pressure liquid SnI4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchizaki, Kazuhiro; Hamaya, Nozomu; Katayama, Yoshinori

    2013-01-01

    An in situ synchrotron x-ray absorption measurement was carried out to estimate the density of liquid SnI 4 . The characteristic densities of the low- and high-pressure liquids were found to be 4.6-4.7 and 4.9-5.0 g/cm 3 , respectively, and their region is separated at around 1.7 GPa. The difference in density, although a slight amount of 0.3-0.4 g/cm 3 , strongly suggests the existence of a weak but discontinuous phase transition at that pressure between the two liquid regions. (author)

  3. Pressure and surface tension of soild-liquid interface using Tarazona density functional theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M.

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available   The weighted density functional theory proposed by Tarazona is applied to study the solid-liquid interface. In the last two decades the weighted density functional became a useful tool to consider the properties of inhomogeneous liquids. In this theory, the role of the size of molecules or the particles of which the matter is composed, was found to be important. In this resarch we study a hard sphere fluid beside a hard wall. For this study the liquid is an inhomogeneous system. We use the definition of the direct correlation function as a second derivative of free energy with respect to the density. We use this definition and the definition of the weighting function, then we minimize the grand potential with respect to the density to get the Euler Lagrange equation and we obtain an integral equation to find the inhomogeneous density profile. The obtained density profile as a function of the distance from the wall, for different bulk density is plotted in three dimensions. We also calculate the pressure and compare it with the Carnahan-starling results, and finally we obtained the surface tension at liquid-solid interface and compared it with the results of Monte Carlo simulation.

  4. High density energy storage capacitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitham, K.; Howland, M.M.; Hutzler, J.R.

    1979-01-01

    The Nova laser system will use 130 MJ of capacitive energy storage and have a peak power capability of 250,000 MW. This capacitor bank is a significant portion of the laser cost and requires a large portion of the physical facilities. In order to reduce the cost and volume required by the bank, the Laser Fusion Program funded contracts with three energy storage capacitor producers: Aerovox, G.E., and Maxwell Laboratories, to develop higher energy density, lower cost energy storage capacitors. This paper describes the designs which resulted from the Aerovox development contract, and specifically addresses the design and initial life testing of a 12.5 kJ, 22 kV capacitor with a density of 4.2 J/in 3 and a projected cost in the range of 5 cents per joule

  5. Pressure Systems Stored-Energy Threshold Risk Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulsen, Samuel S.

    2009-08-25

    Federal Regulation 10 CFR 851, which became effective February 2007, brought to light potential weaknesses regarding the Pressure Safety Program at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The definition of a pressure system in 10 CFR 851 does not contain a limit based upon pressure or any other criteria. Therefore, the need for a method to determine an appropriate risk-based hazard level for pressure safety was identified. The Laboratory has historically used a stored energy of 1000 lbf-ft to define a pressure hazard; however, an analytical basis for this value had not been documented. This document establishes the technical basis by evaluating the use of stored energy as an appropriate criterion to establish a pressure hazard, exploring a suitable risk threshold for pressure hazards, and reviewing the methods used to determine stored energy. The literature review and technical analysis concludes the use of stored energy as a method for determining a potential risk, the 1000 lbf-ft threshold, and the methods used by PNNL to calculate stored energy are all appropriate. Recommendations for further program improvements are also discussed

  6. Dietary energy density: Applying behavioural science to weight management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolls, B J

    2017-09-01

    Studies conducted by behavioural scientists show that energy density (kcal/g) provides effective guidance for healthy food choices to control intake and promote satiety. Energy density depends upon a number of dietary components, especially water (0 kcal/g) and fat (9 kcal/g). Increasing the proportion of water or water-rich ingredients, such as vegetables or fruit, lowers a food's energy density. A number of studies show that when the energy density of the diet is reduced, both adults and children spontaneously decrease their ad libitum energy intake. Other studies show that consuming a large volume of a low-energy-dense food such as soup, salad, or fruit as a first course preload can enhance satiety and reduce overall energy intake at a meal. Current evidence suggests that energy density influences intake through a complex interplay of cognitive, sensory, gastrointestinal, hormonal and neural influences. Other studies that focus on practical applications show how the strategic incorporation of foods lower in energy density into the diet allows people to eat satisfying portions while improving dietary patterns. This review discusses studies that have led to greater understanding of the importance of energy density for food intake regulation and weight management.

  7. Measurements of Pfirsch-Schlueter current and pressure profile for the high density ECH plasmas in Heliotron DR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morimoto, S.; Yanagi, N.; Nakasuga, M.; Obiki, T.; Iiyoshi, A.; Uo, K.

    1988-01-01

    The Pfirsch-Schlueter current and pressure profiles are estimated from magnetic measurements for high density electron cyclotron heating (ECH) plasmas (n-bar e =(2-3)x10 13 cm -3 , T e0 =200-400 eV, (β) 0 (1-(r/a) 2 ) s , is about two in macroscopically stable plasmas. A fast loss of plasma energy from the centre to the periphery is observed during the onset of the MHD instability. This method of measuring the pressure profile shape is simple and useful for heliotron type devices. (author). 20 refs, 8 figs, 1 tab

  8. Interfacial Tension and Surface Pressure of High Density Lipoprotein, Low Density Lipoprotein, and Related Lipid Droplets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ollila, O. H. S.; Lamberg, A.; Lehtivaara, M.

    2012-01-01

    ) are essentially lipid droplets surrounded by specific proteins, their main function being to transport cholesterol. Interfacial tension and surface pressure of these particles are of great interest because they are related to the shape and the stability of the droplets and to protein adsorption at the interface....... Here we use coarse-grained molecular-dynamics simulations to consider a number of related issues by calculating the interfacial tension in protein-free lipid droplets, and in HDL and LDL particles mimicking physiological conditions. First, our results suggest that the curvature dependence......Lipid droplets play a central role in energy storage and metabolism on a cellular scale. Their core is comprised of hydrophobic lipids covered by a surface region consisting of amphiphilic lipids and proteins. For example, high and low density lipoproteins (HDL and LDL, respectively...

  9. Comparison of three methods to reduce energy density. Effects on daily energy intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Rachel A; Roe, Liane S; Rolls, Barbara J

    2013-07-01

    Reductions in food energy density can decrease energy intake, but it is not known if the effects depend on the way that energy density is reduced. We investigated whether three methods of reducing energy density (decreasing fat, increasing fruit and vegetables, and adding water) differed in their effects on energy intake across the day. In a crossover design, 59 adults ate breakfast, lunch, and dinner in the laboratory once a week for 4 weeks. Across conditions, the entrées were either standard in energy density or were reduced in energy density by 20% using one of the three methods. Each meal included a manipulated entrée along with unmanipulated side dishes, and all foods were consumed ad libitum. Reducing the energy density of entrées significantly decreased daily energy intake compared to standard entrées (mean intake 2667 ± 77 kcal/day; 11,166 ± 322 kJ/day). The mean decrease was 396 ± 44 kcal/day (1658 ± 184 kJ/day) when fat was reduced, 308 ± 41 kcal/day (1290 ± 172 kJ/day) when fruit and vegetables were increased, and 230 ± 35 kcal/day (963 ± 147 kJ/day) when water was added. Daily energy intake was lower when fat was decreased compared to the other methods. These findings indicate that a variety of diet compositions can be recommended to reduce overall dietary energy density in order to moderate energy intake. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Energy-Based Tetrahedron Sensor for High-Temperature, High-Pressure Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, Kent L.; Sommerfeldt, Scott D.; Blotter, Jonathan D.

    2012-01-01

    An acoustic energy-based probe has been developed that incorporates multiple acoustic sensing elements in order to obtain the acoustic pressure and three-dimensional acoustic particle velocity. With these quantities, the user can obtain various energy-based quantities, including acoustic energy density, acoustic intensity, and acoustic impedance. In this specific development, the probe has been designed to operate in an environment characterized by high temperatures and high pressures as is found in the close vicinity of rocket plumes. Given these capabilities, the probe is designed to be used to investigate the acoustic conditions within the plume of a rocket engine or jet engine to facilitate greater understanding of the noise generation mechanisms in those plumes. The probe features sensors mounted inside a solid sphere. The associated electronics for the probe are contained within the sphere and the associated handle for the probe. More importantly, the design of the probe has desirable properties that reduce the bias errors associated with determining the acoustic pressure and velocity using finite sum and difference techniques. The diameter of the probe dictates the lower and upper operating frequencies for the probe, where accurate measurements can be acquired. The current probe design implements a sphere diameter of 1 in. (2.5 cm), which limits the upper operating frequency to about 4.5 kHz. The sensors are operational up to much higher frequencies, and could be used to acquire pressure data at higher frequencies, but the energy-based measurements are limited to that upper frequency. Larger or smaller spherical probes could be designed to go to lower or higher frequency range

  11. Exchange-correlation energies of atoms from efficient density functionals: influence of the electron density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Jianmin; Ye, Lin-Hui; Duan, Yuhua

    2017-12-01

    The primary goal of Kohn-Sham density functional theory is to evaluate the exchange-correlation contribution to electronic properties. However, the accuracy of a density functional can be affected by the electron density. Here we apply the nonempirical Tao-Mo (TM) semilocal functional to study the influence of the electron density on the exchange and correlation energies of atoms and ions, and compare the results with the commonly used nonempirical semilocal functionals local spin-density approximation (LSDA), Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE), Tao-Perdew-Staroverov-Scuseria (TPSS), and hybrid functional PBE0. We find that the spin-restricted Hartree-Fock density yields the exchange and correlation energies in good agreement with the Optimized Effective Potential method, particularly for spherical atoms and ions. However, the errors of these semilocal and hybrid functionals become larger for self-consistent densities. We further find that the quality of the electron density have greater effect on the exchange-correlation energies of kinetic energy density-dependent meta-GGA functionals TPSS and TM than on those of the LSDA and GGA, and therefore, should have greater influence on the performance of meta-GGA functionals. Finally, we show that the influence of the density quality on PBE0 is slightly reduced, compared to that of PBE, due to the exact mixing.

  12. Integrative Strategy for Effective Teaching of Density and Pressure in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Integrative Strategy for Effective Teaching of Density and Pressure in Senior Secondary Schools: A Guide to Physics teachers. U Stephen, J T Mkpanang. Abstract. The problem of many teachers throughout the world is not what to teach but how to teach what. In this paper, integrative strategy for effective teaching of density ...

  13. Structure of high-density amorphous ice under pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klotz, S.; Hamel, G.; Loveday, J.S.; Nelmes, R.J.; Guthrie, M.; Soper, A.K.

    2002-01-01

    We report in situ neutron diffraction studies of high-density amorphous ice (HDA) at 100 K at pressures up to 2.2 GPa. We find that the compression is achieved by a strong contraction (∼20%) of the second neighbor coordination shell, so that at 2.2 GPa it closely approaches the first coordination shell, which itself remains intact in both structure and size. The hydrogen bond orientations suggest an absence of hydrogen bonding between first and second shells and that HDA has increasingly interpenetrating hydrogen bond networks under pressure

  14. Comparison of three methods to reduce energy density: effects on daily energy intake

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Rachel A.; Roe, Liane S.; Rolls, Barbara J.

    2013-01-01

    Reductions in food energy density can decrease energy intake, but it is not known if the effects depend on the way that energy density is reduced. We investigated whether three methods of reducing energy density (decreasing fat, increasing fruit and vegetables, and adding water) differed in their effects on energy intake across the day. In a crossover design, 59 adults ate breakfast, lunch, and dinner in the laboratory once a week for four weeks. Across conditions, the entrées were either sta...

  15. High-Power-Density, High-Energy-Density Fluorinated Graphene for Primary Lithium Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guiming Zhong

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Li/CFx is one of the highest-energy-density primary batteries; however, poor rate capability hinders its practical applications in high-power devices. Here we report a preparation of fluorinated graphene (GFx with superior performance through a direct gas fluorination method. We find that the so-called “semi-ionic” C-F bond content in all C-F bonds presents a more critical impact on rate performance of the GFx in comparison with sp2 C content in the GFx, morphology, structure, and specific surface area of the materials. The rate capability remains excellent before the semi-ionic C-F bond proportion in the GFx decreases. Thus, by optimizing semi-ionic C-F content in our GFx, we obtain the optimal x of 0.8, with which the GF0.8 exhibits a very high energy density of 1,073 Wh kg−1 and an excellent power density of 21,460 W kg−1 at a high current density of 10 A g−1. More importantly, our approach opens a new avenue to obtain fluorinated carbon with high energy densities without compromising high power densities.

  16. Pressure and surface tension of solid-liquid interface using Tara zona density functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moradi, M.; Kavosh Tehrani, M.

    2001-01-01

    The weighted density functional theory proposed by Tara zona is applied to study the solid-liquid interface. In the last two decades the weighted density functional became a useful tool to consider the properties of inhomogeneous liquids. In this theory, the role of the size of molecules or the particles of which the matter is composed, was found to be important. In this research we study a hard sphere fluid beside a hard wall. For this study the liquid is an inhomogeneous system. We use the definition of the direct correlation function as a second derivative of free energy with respect to the density. We use this definition and the definition of the weighting function, then we minimize the grand potential with respect to the density to get the Euler Lagrange equation and we obtain an integral equation to find the inhomogeneous density profile. The obtained density profile as a function of the distance from the wall, for different bulk density is pitted in three dimensions. We also calculate the pressure and compare it with the Carnahan-Starling results, and finally we obtained the surface tension at liquid-solid interface and compared it with the results of Monte Carlo simulation

  17. Are energy-dense foods really cheaper? Reexamining the relation between food price and energy density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipsky, Leah M

    2009-11-01

    The inverse relation between energy density (kcal/g) and energy cost (price/kcal) has been interpreted to suggest that produce (fruit, vegetables) is more expensive than snacks (cookies, chips). The objective of this study was to show the methodologic weakness of comparing energy density with energy cost. The relation between energy density and energy cost was replicated in a random-number data set. Additionally, observational data were collected for produce and snacks from an online supermarket. Variables included total energy (kcal), total weight (g), total number of servings, serving size (g/serving), and energy density (kcal/g). Price measures included energy cost ($/kcal), total price ($), unit price ($/g), and serving price ($/serving). Two-tailed t tests were used to compare price measures by food category. Relations between energy density and price measures within food categories were examined with the use of Spearman rank correlation analysis. The relation between energy density and energy cost was shown to be driven by the algebraic properties of these variables. Food category was strongly correlated with both energy density and food price measures. Energy cost was higher for produce than for snacks. However, total price and unit price were lower for produce. Serving price and serving size were greater for produce than for snacks. Within food categories, energy density was uncorrelated with most measures of food price, except for a weak positive correlation with serving price within the produce category. The findings suggest the relation between energy density and food price is confounded by food category and depends on which measure of price is used.

  18. Condensation energy density in Bi-2212 superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsushita, Teruo; Kiuchi, Masaru; Haraguchi, Teruhisa; Imada, Takeki; Okamura, Kazunori; Okayasu, Satoru; Uchida, Satoshi; Shimoyama, Jun-ichi; Kishio, Kohji

    2006-01-01

    The relationship between the condensation energy density and the anisotropy parameter, γ a , has been derived for Bi-2212 superconductors in various anisotropic states by analysing the critical current density due to columnar defects introduced by heavy ion irradiation. The critical current density depended on the size of the defects, determined by the kind and irradiation energy of the ions. A significantly large critical current density of 17.0 MA cm -2 was obtained at 5 K and 0.1 T even for the defect density of a matching field of 1 T in a specimen irradiated with iodine ions. The dependence of the critical current density on the size of the defects agreed well with the prediction from the summation theory of pinning forces, and the condensation energy density could be obtained consistently from specimens irradiated with different ions. The condensation energy density obtained increased with decreasing γ a over the entire range of measurement temperature, and reached about 60% of the value for the most three-dimensional Y-123 observed by Civale et al at 5 K. This gives the reason for the very strong pinning in Bi-2212 superconductors at low temperatures. The thermodynamic critical field obtained decreased linearly with increasing temperature and extrapolated to zero at a certain characteristic temperature, T * , lower than the critical temperature, T c . T * , which seems to be associated with the superconductivity in the block layers, was highest for the optimally doped specimen. This shows that the superconductivity becomes more inhomogeneous as the doped state of a superconductor deviates from the optimum condition

  19. Energy density of marine pelagic fish eggs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis-Vestergaard, J.

    2002-01-01

    Analysis of the literature on pelagic fish eggs enabled generalizations to be made of their energy densities, because the property of being buoyant in sea water appears to constrain the proximate composition of the eggs and thus to minimize interspecific variation. An energy density of 1.34 J mul......(-1) of total egg volume is derived for most species spawning eggs without visible oil globules. The energy density of eggs with oil globules is predicted by (σ) over cap = 1.34 + 40.61 x (J mul(-1)) where x is the fractional volume of the oil globule. (C) 2002 The Fisheries Society of the British...

  20. Symmetry Energy as a Function of Density and Mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danielewicz, Pawel; Lee, Jenny

    2007-01-01

    Energy in nuclear matter is, in practice, completely characterized at different densities and asymmetries, when the density dependencies of symmetry energy and of energy of symmetric matter are specified. The density dependence of the symmetry energy at subnormal densities produces mass dependence of nuclear symmetry coefficient and, thus, can be constrained by that latter dependence. We deduce values of the mass dependent symmetry coefficients, by using excitation energies to isobaric analog states. The coefficient systematic, for intermediate and high masses, is well described in terms of the symmetry coefficient values of a a V = (31.5-33.5) MeV for the volume coefficient and a a S = (9-12) MeV for the surface coefficient. These two further correspond to the parameter values describing density dependence of symmetry energy, of L∼95 MeV and K sym ∼25 MeV

  1. Dispersion relation and Landau damping of waves in high-energy density plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Jun; Ji Peiyong

    2012-01-01

    We present a theoretical investigation on the propagation of electromagnetic waves and electron plasma waves in high energy density plasmas using the covariant Wigner function approach. Based on the covariant Wigner function and Dirac equation, a relativistic quantum kinetic model is established to describe the physical processes in high-energy density plasmas. With the zero-temperature Fermi–Dirac distribution, the dispersion relation and Landau damping of waves containing the relativistic quantum corrected terms are derived. The relativistic quantum corrections to the dispersion relation and Landau damping are analyzed by comparing our results with those obtained in classical and non-relativistic quantum plasmas. We provide a detailed discussion on the Landau damping obtained in classical plasmas, non-relativistic Fermi plasmas and relativistic Fermi plasmas. The contributions of the Bohm potential, the Fermi statistics pressure and relativistic effects to the dispersion relation and Landau damping of waves are quantitatively calculated with real plasma parameters. (paper)

  2. COMBINATION OF DENSITY AND ENERGY MODULATION IN MICROBUNCHING ANALYSIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, Cheng Ying [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Li, Rui [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Microbunching instability (MBI) has been one of the most challenging issues in the transport of high-brightness electron beams for modern recirculating or energy recovery linac machines. Recently we have developed and implemented a Vlasov solver [1] to calculate the microbunching gain for an arbitrary beamline lattice, based on the extension of existing theoretical formulation [2-4] for the microbunching amplification from an initial density perturbation to the final density modulation. For more thorough analyses, in addition to the case of (initial) density to (final) density amplification, we extend in this paper the previous formulation to more general cases, including energy to density, density to energy and energy to energy amplifications for a recirculation machine. Such semi-analytical formulae are then incorporated into our Vlasov solver, and qualitative agreement is obtained when the semi-analytical Vlasov results are compared with particle tracking simulation using ELEGANT [5].

  3. Toward Low-Cost, High-Energy Density, and High-Power Density Lithium-Ion Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianlin; Du, Zhijia; Ruther, Rose E.; AN, Seong Jin; David, Lamuel Abraham; Hays, Kevin; Wood, Marissa; Phillip, Nathan D.; Sheng, Yangping; Mao, Chengyu; Kalnaus, Sergiy; Daniel, Claus; Wood, David L.

    2017-09-01

    Reducing cost and increasing energy density are two barriers for widespread application of lithium-ion batteries in electric vehicles. Although the cost of electric vehicle batteries has been reduced by 70% from 2008 to 2015, the current battery pack cost (268/kWh in 2015) is still >2 times what the USABC targets (125/kWh). Even though many advancements in cell chemistry have been realized since the lithium-ion battery was first commercialized in 1991, few major breakthroughs have occurred in the past decade. Therefore, future cost reduction will rely on cell manufacturing and broader market acceptance. This article discusses three major aspects for cost reduction: (1) quality control to minimize scrap rate in cell manufacturing; (2) novel electrode processing and engineering to reduce processing cost and increase energy density and throughputs; and (3) material development and optimization for lithium-ion batteries with high-energy density. Insights on increasing energy and power densities of lithium-ion batteries are also addressed.

  4. Postmortem validation of breast density using dual-energy mammography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molloi, Sabee, E-mail: symolloi@uci.edu; Ducote, Justin L.; Ding, Huanjun; Feig, Stephen A. [Department of Radiological Sciences, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States)

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: Mammographic density has been shown to be an indicator of breast cancer risk and also reduces the sensitivity of screening mammography. Currently, there is no accepted standard for measuring breast density. Dual energy mammography has been proposed as a technique for accurate measurement of breast density. The purpose of this study is to validate its accuracy in postmortem breasts and compare it with other existing techniques. Methods: Forty postmortem breasts were imaged using a dual energy mammography system. Glandular and adipose equivalent phantoms of uniform thickness were used to calibrate a dual energy basis decomposition algorithm. Dual energy decomposition was applied after scatter correction to calculate breast density. Breast density was also estimated using radiologist reader assessment, standard histogram thresholding and a fuzzy C-mean algorithm. Chemical analysis was used as the reference standard to assess the accuracy of different techniques to measure breast composition. Results: Breast density measurements using radiologist reader assessment, standard histogram thresholding, fuzzy C-mean algorithm, and dual energy were in good agreement with the measured fibroglandular volume fraction using chemical analysis. The standard error estimates using radiologist reader assessment, standard histogram thresholding, fuzzy C-mean, and dual energy were 9.9%, 8.6%, 7.2%, and 4.7%, respectively. Conclusions: The results indicate that dual energy mammography can be used to accurately measure breast density. The variability in breast density estimation using dual energy mammography was lower than reader assessment rankings, standard histogram thresholding, and fuzzy C-mean algorithm. Improved quantification of breast density is expected to further enhance its utility as a risk factor for breast cancer.

  5. Postmortem validation of breast density using dual-energy mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molloi, Sabee; Ducote, Justin L.; Ding, Huanjun; Feig, Stephen A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Mammographic density has been shown to be an indicator of breast cancer risk and also reduces the sensitivity of screening mammography. Currently, there is no accepted standard for measuring breast density. Dual energy mammography has been proposed as a technique for accurate measurement of breast density. The purpose of this study is to validate its accuracy in postmortem breasts and compare it with other existing techniques. Methods: Forty postmortem breasts were imaged using a dual energy mammography system. Glandular and adipose equivalent phantoms of uniform thickness were used to calibrate a dual energy basis decomposition algorithm. Dual energy decomposition was applied after scatter correction to calculate breast density. Breast density was also estimated using radiologist reader assessment, standard histogram thresholding and a fuzzy C-mean algorithm. Chemical analysis was used as the reference standard to assess the accuracy of different techniques to measure breast composition. Results: Breast density measurements using radiologist reader assessment, standard histogram thresholding, fuzzy C-mean algorithm, and dual energy were in good agreement with the measured fibroglandular volume fraction using chemical analysis. The standard error estimates using radiologist reader assessment, standard histogram thresholding, fuzzy C-mean, and dual energy were 9.9%, 8.6%, 7.2%, and 4.7%, respectively. Conclusions: The results indicate that dual energy mammography can be used to accurately measure breast density. The variability in breast density estimation using dual energy mammography was lower than reader assessment rankings, standard histogram thresholding, and fuzzy C-mean algorithm. Improved quantification of breast density is expected to further enhance its utility as a risk factor for breast cancer

  6. Density slope of the nuclear symmetry energy from the neutron skin thickness of heavy nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Liewen; Ko Che Ming; Xu Jun; Li Baoan

    2010-01-01

    Expressing explicitly the parameters of the standard Skyrme interaction in terms of the macroscopic properties of asymmetric nuclear matter, we show in the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock approach that unambiguous correlations exist between observables of finite nuclei and nuclear matter properties. We find that existing data on neutron skin thickness Δr np of Sn isotopes give an important constraint on the symmetry energy E sym (ρ 0 ) and its density slope L at saturation density ρ 0 . Combining these constraints with those from recent analyses of isospin diffusion and the double neutron/proton ratio in heavy-ion collisions at intermediate energies leads to a more stringent limit on L approximately independent of E sym (ρ 0 ). The implication of these new constraints on the Δr np of 208 Pb as well as the core-crust transition density and pressure in neutron stars is discussed.

  7. Minimal nuclear energy density functional

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulgac, Aurel; Forbes, Michael McNeil; Jin, Shi; Perez, Rodrigo Navarro; Schunck, Nicolas

    2018-04-01

    We present a minimal nuclear energy density functional (NEDF) called "SeaLL1" that has the smallest number of possible phenomenological parameters to date. SeaLL1 is defined by seven significant phenomenological parameters, each related to a specific nuclear property. It describes the nuclear masses of even-even nuclei with a mean energy error of 0.97 MeV and a standard deviation of 1.46 MeV , two-neutron and two-proton separation energies with rms errors of 0.69 MeV and 0.59 MeV respectively, and the charge radii of 345 even-even nuclei with a mean error ɛr=0.022 fm and a standard deviation σr=0.025 fm . SeaLL1 incorporates constraints on the equation of state (EoS) of pure neutron matter from quantum Monte Carlo calculations with chiral effective field theory two-body (NN ) interactions at the next-to-next-to-next-to leading order (N3LO) level and three-body (NNN ) interactions at the next-to-next-to leading order (N2LO) level. Two of the seven parameters are related to the saturation density and the energy per particle of the homogeneous symmetric nuclear matter, one is related to the nuclear surface tension, two are related to the symmetry energy and its density dependence, one is related to the strength of the spin-orbit interaction, and one is the coupling constant of the pairing interaction. We identify additional phenomenological parameters that have little effect on ground-state properties but can be used to fine-tune features such as the Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn sum rule, the excitation energy of the giant dipole and Gamow-Teller resonances, the static dipole electric polarizability, and the neutron skin thickness.

  8. Nonlocal kinetic-energy-density functionals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Gonzalez, P.; Alvarellos, J.E.; Chacon, E.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we present nonlocal kinetic-energy functionals T[n] within the average density approximation (ADA) framework, which do not require any extra input when applied to any electron system and recover the exact kinetic energy and the linear response function of a homogeneous system. In contrast with previous ADA functionals, these present good behavior of the long-range tail of the exact weight function. The averaging procedure for the kinetic functional (averaging the Fermi momentum of the electron gas, instead of averaging the electron density) leads to a functional without numerical difficulties in the calculation of extended systems, and it gives excellent results when applied to atoms and jellium surfaces. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  9. Density and energy of supernova remnants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canto, J [Manchester Univ. (UK). Dept. of Astronomy

    1977-12-01

    The effects of an interstellar magnetic field on the gas flow behind a strong shock front are considered. The ambient density and energy of supernova remnants are estimated from the intensity ratio of sulphur lines I(6717)/I(6731). It is found that, on average, the ambient density around galactic supernova remnants is 4 cm/sup -3/. The total energy appears to be the same for all supernova remnants (to within a factor = approximately 5). A mean value of 4 10/sup 51/ erg is found.

  10. New aspects of high energy density plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hotta, Eiki

    2005-10-01

    The papers presented at the symposium on 'New aspects of high energy density plasma' held at National Institute for Fusion Science are collected in this proceedings. The papers reflect the present status and recent progress in the experiments and theoretical works on high energy density plasma produced by pulsed power technology. The 13 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  11. High-energy-density physics researches based on pulse power technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horioka, Kazuhiko; Nakajima, Mitsuo; Kawamura, Tohru; Sasaki, Toru; Kondo, Kotaro; Yano, Yuuri

    2006-01-01

    Plasmas driven by pulse power device are of interest, concerning the researches on high-energy-density (HED) physics. Dense plasmas are produced using pulse power driven exploding discharges in water. Experimental results show that the wire plasma is tamped and stabilized by the surrounding water and it evolves through a strongly coupled plasma state. A shock-wave-heated, high temperature plasma is produced in a compact pulse power device. Experimental results show that strong shock waves can be produced in the device. In particular, at low initial pressure condition, the shock Mach number reaches 250 and this indicates that the shock heated region is dominated by radiation processes. (author)

  12. A high energy density relaxor antiferroelectric pulsed capacitor dielectric

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, Hwan Ryul; Lynch, Christopher S. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2016-01-14

    Pulsed capacitors require high energy density and low loss, properties that can be realized through selection of composition. Ceramic (Pb{sub 0.88}La{sub 0.08})(Zr{sub 0.91}Ti{sub 0.09})O{sub 3} was found to be an ideal candidate. La{sup 3+} doping and excess PbO were used to produce relaxor antiferroelectric behavior with slim and slanted hysteresis loops to reduce the dielectric hysteresis loss, to increase the dielectric strength, and to increase the discharge energy density. The discharge energy density of this composition was found to be 3.04 J/cm{sup 3} with applied electric field of 170 kV/cm, and the energy efficiency, defined as the ratio of the discharge energy density to the charging energy density, was 0.920. This high efficiency reduces the heat generated under cyclic loading and improves the reliability. The properties were observed to degrade some with temperature increase above 80 °C. Repeated electric field cycles up to 10 000 cycles were applied to the specimen with no observed performance degradation.

  13. Tunable non-interacting free-energy functionals: development and applications to low-density aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trickey, Samuel; Karasiev, Valentin

    We introduce the concept of tunable orbital-free non-interacting free-energy density functionals and present a generalized gradient approximation (GGA) with a subset of parameters defined from constraints and a few free parameters. Those free parameters are tuned to reproduce reference Kohn-Sham (KS) static-lattice pressures for Al at T=8 kK for bulk densities between 0.6 and 2 g/cm3. The tuned functional then is used in OF molecular dynamics (MD) simulations for Al with densities between 0.1 and 2 g/cm3 and T between 6 and 50 kK to calculate the equation of state and generate configurations for electrical conductivity calculations. The tunable functional produces accurate results. Computationally it is very effective especially at elevated temperature. Kohn-Shiam calculations for such low densities are affordable only up to T=10 kK, while other OF approximations, including two-point functionals, fail badly in that regime. Work supported by US DoE Grant DE-SC0002139.

  14. Alkyl ammonium cation stabilized biocidal polyiodides with adaptable high density and low pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Chunlin; Parrish, Damon A; Shreeve, Jean'ne M

    2014-05-26

    The effective application of biocidal species requires building the active moiety into a molecular back bone that can be delivered and decomposed on demand under conditions of low pressure and prolonged high-temperature detonation. The goal is to destroy storage facilities and their contents while utilizing the biocidal products arising from the released energy to destroy any remaining harmful airborne agents. Decomposition of carefully selected iodine-rich compounds can produce large amounts of the very active biocides, hydroiodic acid (HI) and iodine (I2). Polyiodide anions, namely, I3(-), I5(-), which are excellent sources of such biocides, can be stabilized through interactions with large, symmetric cations, such as alkyl ammonium salts. We have designed and synthesized suitable compounds of adaptable high density up to 3.33 g cm(-3) that are low-pressure polyiodides with various alkyl ammonium cations, deliverable iodine contents of which range between 58.0-90.9%. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Nonlocal exchange and kinetic-energy density functionals for electronic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glossman, M.D.; Rubio, A.; Balbas, L.C.; Alonso, J.A.

    1992-01-01

    The nonlocal weighted density approximation (WDA) to the exchange and kinetic-energy functionals of many electron systems proposed several years ago by Alonso and Girifalco is used to compute, within the framework of density functional theory, the ground-state electronic density and total energy of noble gas atoms and of neutral jellium-like sodium clusters containing up to 500 atoms. These results are compared with analogous calculations using the well known Thomas-Fermi-Weizsacker-Dirac (TFWD) approximations for the kinetic (TFW) and exchange (D) energy density functionals. An outstanding improvement of the total and exchange energies, of the density at the nucleus and of the expectation values is obtained for atoms within the WDA scheme. For sodium clusters the authors notice a sizeable contribution of the nonlocal effects to the total energy and to the density profiles. In the limit of very large clusters these effects should affect the surface energy of the bulk metal

  16. Density functional study of the pressure tensor for inhomogeneous Lennard—Jones fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Zong-Li; Liu Zhi-Cheng; Kang Yan-Shuang; Ma Heng-Xin; Kang Yan-Mei

    2012-01-01

    Based on classical density functional theory, an expression of the pressure tensor for inhomogeneous fluids is presented. This takes into account greater correlation between particles, especially for systems that are geometrically confined or involve an interface. The density and pressure components of Lennard-Jones fluids confined in hard and softened nano-cavities are calculated. A comparison between the results of this work and IK expression suggests that the agreement depends on temperature. The interfacial tension for hard sphere fluids agrees well with the Monte Carlo result when the bulk density is not too large. The results of the solid-fluid interfacial tension for Lennard—Jones fluids demonstrate that different types of external potentials modulate the interfacial tension in different manners. (condensed matter: structural, mechanical, and thermal properties)

  17. Density dependence of the nuclear energy-density functional

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papakonstantinou, Panagiota; Park, Tae-Sun; Lim, Yeunhwan; Hyun, Chang Ho

    2018-01-01

    Background: The explicit density dependence in the coupling coefficients entering the nonrelativistic nuclear energy-density functional (EDF) is understood to encode effects of three-nucleon forces and dynamical correlations. The necessity for the density-dependent coupling coefficients to assume the form of a preferably small fractional power of the density ρ is empirical and the power is often chosen arbitrarily. Consequently, precision-oriented parametrizations risk overfitting in the regime of saturation and extrapolations in dilute or dense matter may lose predictive power. Purpose: Beginning with the observation that the Fermi momentum kF, i.e., the cubic root of the density, is a key variable in the description of Fermi systems, we first wish to examine if a power hierarchy in a kF expansion can be inferred from the properties of homogeneous matter in a domain of densities, which is relevant for nuclear structure and neutron stars. For subsequent applications we want to determine a functional that is of good quality but not overtrained. Method: For the EDF, we fit systematically polynomial and other functions of ρ1 /3 to existing microscopic, variational calculations of the energy of symmetric and pure neutron matter (pseudodata) and analyze the behavior of the fits. We select a form and a set of parameters, which we found robust, and examine the parameters' naturalness and the quality of resulting extrapolations. Results: A statistical analysis confirms that low-order terms such as ρ1 /3 and ρ2 /3 are the most relevant ones in the nuclear EDF beyond lowest order. It also hints at a different power hierarchy for symmetric vs. pure neutron matter, supporting the need for more than one density-dependent term in nonrelativistic EDFs. The functional we propose easily accommodates known or adopted properties of nuclear matter near saturation. More importantly, upon extrapolation to dilute or asymmetric matter, it reproduces a range of existing microscopic

  18. Electrode/Dielectric Strip For High-Energy-Density Capacitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Shiao-Ping S.

    1994-01-01

    Improved unitary electrode/dielectric strip serves as winding in high-energy-density capacitor in pulsed power supply. Offers combination of qualities essential for high energy density: high permittivity of dielectric layers, thinness, and high resistance to breakdown of dielectric at high electric fields. Capacitors with strip material not impregnated with liquid.

  19. Ultra-stiff metallic glasses through bond energy density design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnabel, Volker; Köhler, Mathias; Music, Denis; Bednarcik, Jozef; Clegg, William J; Raabe, Dierk; Schneider, Jochen M

    2017-07-05

    The elastic properties of crystalline metals scale with their valence electron density. Similar observations have been made for metallic glasses. However, for metallic glasses where covalent bonding predominates, such as metalloid metallic glasses, this relationship appears to break down. At present, the reasons for this are not understood. Using high energy x-ray diffraction analysis of melt spun and thin film metallic glasses combined with density functional theory based molecular dynamics simulations, we show that the physical origin of the ultrahigh stiffness in both metalloid and non-metalloid metallic glasses is best understood in terms of the bond energy density. Using the bond energy density as novel materials design criterion for ultra-stiff metallic glasses, we are able to predict a Co 33.0 Ta 3.5 B 63.5 short range ordered material by density functional theory based molecular dynamics simulations with a high bond energy density of 0.94 eV Å -3 and a bulk modulus of 263 GPa, which is 17% greater than the stiffest Co-B based metallic glasses reported in literature.

  20. Alternative definitions of the frozen energy in energy decomposition analysis of density functional theory calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Paul R; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2016-02-28

    In energy decomposition analysis (EDA) of intermolecular interactions calculated via density functional theory, the initial supersystem wavefunction defines the so-called "frozen energy" including contributions such as permanent electrostatics, steric repulsions, and dispersion. This work explores the consequences of the choices that must be made to define the frozen energy. The critical choice is whether the energy should be minimized subject to the constraint of fixed density. Numerical results for Ne2, (H2O)2, BH3-NH3, and ethane dissociation show that there can be a large energy lowering associated with constant density orbital relaxation. By far the most important contribution is constant density inter-fragment relaxation, corresponding to charge transfer (CT). This is unwanted in an EDA that attempts to separate CT effects, but it may be useful in other contexts such as force field development. An algorithm is presented for minimizing single determinant energies at constant density both with and without CT by employing a penalty function that approximately enforces the density constraint.

  1. Probing the density content of the nuclear symmetry energy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The nature of equation of state for the neutron star matter is crucially governed by the density dependence of the nuclear symmetry energy. We attempt to probe the behaviour of the nuclear symmetry energy around the saturation density by exploiting the empirical values for volume and surface symmetry energy ...

  2. Thermodynamic and energy efficiency analysis of power generation from natural salinity gradients by pressure retarded osmosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Ngai Yin; Elimelech, Menachem

    2012-05-01

    The Gibbs free energy of mixing dissipated when fresh river water flows into the sea can be harnessed for sustainable power generation. Pressure retarded osmosis (PRO) is one of the methods proposed to generate power from natural salinity gradients. In this study, we carry out a thermodynamic and energy efficiency analysis of PRO work extraction. First, we present a reversible thermodynamic model for PRO and verify that the theoretical maximum extractable work in a reversible PRO process is identical to the Gibbs free energy of mixing. Work extraction in an irreversible constant-pressure PRO process is then examined. We derive an expression for the maximum extractable work in a constant-pressure PRO process and show that it is less than the ideal work (i.e., Gibbs free energy of mixing) due to inefficiencies intrinsic to the process. These inherent inefficiencies are attributed to (i) frictional losses required to overcome hydraulic resistance and drive water permeation and (ii) unutilized energy due to the discontinuation of water permeation when the osmotic pressure difference becomes equal to the applied hydraulic pressure. The highest extractable work in constant-pressure PRO with a seawater draw solution and river water feed solution is 0.75 kWh/m(3) while the free energy of mixing is 0.81 kWh/m(3)-a thermodynamic extraction efficiency of 91.1%. Our analysis further reveals that the operational objective to achieve high power density in a practical PRO process is inconsistent with the goal of maximum energy extraction. This study demonstrates thermodynamic and energetic approaches for PRO and offers insights on actual energy accessible for utilization in PRO power generation through salinity gradients. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  3. Ultimate energy density of observable cold baryonic matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattimer, James M; Prakash, Madappa

    2005-03-25

    We demonstrate that the largest measured mass of a neutron star establishes an upper bound to the energy density of observable cold baryonic matter. An equation of state-independent expression satisfied by both normal neutron stars and self-bound quark matter stars is derived for the largest energy density of matter inside stars as a function of their masses. The largest observed mass sets the lowest upper limit to the density. Implications from existing and future neutron star mass measurements are discussed.

  4. Electronic structure and optical properties of AIN under high pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zetao; Dang Suihu; Li Chunxia

    2011-01-01

    We have calculated the electronic structure and optical properties of Wurtzite structure AIN under different high pressure with generalized gradient approximation (GGA) in this paper. The total energy, density of state, energy band structure and optical absorption and reflection properties under high pressure are calculated. By comparing the changes of the energy band structure, we obtained AIN phase transition pressure for 16.7 GPa, which is a direct band structure transforming to an indirect band structure. Meanwhile, according to the density of states distribution and energy band structure, we analyzed the optical properties of AIN under high-pressure, the results showed that the absorption spectra moved from low-energy to high-energy. (authors)

  5. Electron density measurement of non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma using dispersion interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Shinji; Kasahara, Hiroshi; Akiyama, Tsuyoshi

    2017-10-01

    Medical applications of non-equilibrium atmospheric plasmas have recently been attracting a great deal of attention, where many types of plasma sources have been developed to meet the purposes. For example, plasma-activated medium (PAM), which is now being studied for cancer treatment, has been produced by irradiating non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma with ultrahigh electron density to a culture medium. Meanwhile, in order to measure electron density in magnetic confinement plasmas, a CO2 laser dispersion interferometer has been developed and installed on the Large Helical Device (LHD) at the National Institute for Fusion Science, Japan. The dispersion interferometer has advantages that the measurement is insensitive to mechanical vibrations and changes in neutral gas density. Taking advantage of these properties, we applied the dispersion interferometer to electron density diagnostics of atmospheric pressure plasmas produced by the NU-Global HUMAP-WSAP-50 device, which is used for producing PAM. This study was supported by the Grant of Joint Research by the National Institutes of Natural Sciences (NINS).

  6. Negative vacuum energy densities and the causal diamond measure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salem, Michael P.

    2009-01-01

    Arguably a major success of the landscape picture is the prediction of a small, nonzero vacuum energy density. The details of this prediction depend in part on how the diverging spacetime volume of the multiverse is regulated, a question that remains unresolved. One proposal, the causal diamond measure, has demonstrated many phenomenological successes, including predicting a distribution of positive vacuum energy densities in good agreement with observation. In the string landscape, however, the vacuum energy density is expected to take positive and negative values. We find the causal diamond measure gives a poor fit to observation in such a landscape - in particular, 99.6% of observers in galaxies seemingly just like ours measure a vacuum energy density smaller than we do, most of them measuring it to be negative.

  7. Rydberg energies using excited state density functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, C.-L.; Wu Qin; Van Voorhis, Troy

    2008-01-01

    We utilize excited state density functional theory (eDFT) to study Rydberg states in atoms. We show both analytically and numerically that semilocal functionals can give quite reasonable Rydberg energies from eDFT, even in cases where time dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) fails catastrophically. We trace these findings to the fact that in eDFT the Kohn-Sham potential for each state is computed using the appropriate excited state density. Unlike the ground state potential, which typically falls off exponentially, the sequence of excited state potentials has a component that falls off polynomially with distance, leading to a Rydberg-type series. We also address the rigorous basis of eDFT for these systems. Perdew and Levy have shown using the constrained search formalism that every stationary density corresponds, in principle, to an exact stationary state of the full many-body Hamiltonian. In the present context, this means that the excited state DFT solutions are rigorous as long as they deliver the minimum noninteracting kinetic energy for the given density. We use optimized effective potential techniques to show that, in some cases, the eDFT Rydberg solutions appear to deliver the minimum kinetic energy because the associated density is not pure state v-representable. We thus find that eDFT plays a complementary role to constrained DFT: The former works only if the excited state density is not the ground state of some potential while the latter applies only when the density is a ground state density.

  8. Moderate energy ions for high energy density physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grisham, L.R.

    2004-01-01

    This paper gives the results of a preliminary exploration of whether moderate energy ions (≅0.3-3 MeV/amu) could be useful as modest-cost drivers for high energy density physics experiments. It is found that if the target thickness is chosen so that the ion beam enters and then leaves the target in the vicinity of the peak of the dE/dX (stopping power) curve, high uniformity of energy deposition may be achievable while also maximizing the amount of energy per beam particle deposited within the target

  9. Foldable, High Energy Density Lithium Ion Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, Shravan

    Lithium Ion Batteries (LIBs) have become ubiquitous owing to its low cost, high energy density and, power density. Due to these advantages, LIBs have garnered a lot of attention as the primary energy storage devices in consumer electronics and electric vehicles. Recent advances in the consumer electronics research and, the drive to reduce greenhouse gases have created a demand for a shape conformable, high energy density batteries. This thesis focuses on the aforementioned two aspects of LIBs: (a) shape conformability (b) energy density and provides potential solutions to enhance them. This thesis is divided into two parts viz. (i) achieving foldability in batteries and, (ii) improving its energy density. Conventional LIBs are not shape conformable due to two limitations viz. inelasticity of metallic foils, and delamination of the active materials while bending. In the first part of the thesis (in Chapter 3), this problem is solved by replacing metallic current collector with Carbon Nanotube Macrofilms (CNMs). CNMs are superelastic films comprising of porous interconnected nanotube network. Using Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulation, we found that in the presence of an interconnected nanotube network CNMs can be fully folded. This is because the resultant stress due to bending and, the effective bending angle at the interface is reduced due to the network of nanotubes. Hence, unlike an isolated nanotube (which ruptures beyond 120 degrees of bending), a network of nanotubes can be completely folded. Thus, by replacing metallic current collector foils with CNMs, the flexibility limitation of a conventional LIB can be transcended. The second part of this thesis focusses on enhancing the energy density of LIBs. Two strategies adopted to achieve this goal are (a) removing the dead weight of the batteries, and (b) incorporating high energy density electrode materials. By incorporating CNMs, the weight of the batteries was reduced by 5-10 times due to low mass loading of

  10. Melting-pressure and density equations of 3He at temperatures from 0.001 to 30 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Yonghua; Chen Guobang

    2005-01-01

    Nonsegmented equations for melting pressure and density at temperatures from 0.001 K to 30 K have been developed to fit the reference data. The maximum and average deviations between the melting pressure equation and the totaling 298 reference data are 2.17% and 0.218%, respectively. For the density equations, the average deviations are 0.236% for the liquid side and 0.218% for the solid side. Both the melting pressure curve and melting density curves predicted by the submitted equations approach their minimums at about 0.315 K

  11. First-principles equation-of-state table of silicon and its effects on high-energy-density plasma simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, S. X.; Gao, R.; Ding, Y.; Collins, L. A.; Kress, J. D.

    2017-04-01

    Using density-functional theory-based molecular-dynamics simulations, we have investigated the equation of state for silicon in a wide range of plasma density and temperature conditions of ρ =0.001 -500 g /c m3 and T =2000 -108K . With these calculations, we have established a first-principles equation-of-state (FPEOS) table of silicon for high-energy-density (HED) plasma simulations. When compared with the widely used SESAME-EOS model (Table 3810), we find that the FPEOS-predicted Hugoniot is ˜20% softer; for off-Hugoniot plasma conditions, the pressure and internal energy in FPEOS are lower than those of SESAME EOS for temperatures above T ≈ 1-10 eV (depending on density), while the former becomes higher in the low-T regime. The pressure difference between FPEOS and SESAME 3810 can reach to ˜50%, especially in the warm-dense-matter regime. Implementing the FPEOS table of silicon into our hydrocodes, we have studied its effects on Si-target implosions. When compared with the one-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamics simulation using the SESAME 3810 EOS model, the FPEOS simulation showed that (1) the shock speed in silicon is ˜10% slower; (2) the peak density of an in-flight Si shell during implosion is ˜20% higher than the SESAME 3810 simulation; (3) the maximum density reached in the FPEOS simulation is ˜40% higher at the peak compression; and (4) the final areal density and neutron yield are, respectively, ˜30% and ˜70% higher predicted by FPEOS versus the traditional simulation using SESAME 3810. All of these features can be attributed to the larger compressibility of silicon predicted by FPEOS. These results indicate that an accurate EOS table, like the FPEOS presented here, could be essential for the precise design of targets for HED experiments.

  12. Casimir energy density for spherical universes in n-dimensional spacetime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oezcan, Mustafa

    2006-01-01

    We consider the Casimir effect for the massless conformal scalar field in an n-dimensional, closed, static universe. We calculate the renormalized vacuum energy density using the covariant point-splitting method, the mode-sum regularization and the renormalized vacuum energy with the zeta-function regularization. We observe that all odd spacetime dimensions give us the zero renormalized vacuum energy density. For even spacetime dimensions the renormalized vacuum energy density oscillates in sign. The result agrees with three regularization techniques. The Casimir energy density for spherical universes in n-dimensional spacetime is regarded as interesting both to understand the correspondence between the sign of the effect and the dimension of manifold in topology and as a key to confirming the Casimir energy for half spherical universes (manifold with boundary) in n-dimensional spacetime

  13. Acute effects of consumption of energy drinks on intraocular pressure and blood pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilechie AA

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available A Alex Ilechie, Sandra TettehDepartment of Optometry, University of Cape Coast, GhanaBackground: Energy drinks contain a wide variety of ingredients including caffeine, for which there have been conflicting reports regarding its effects on intraocular pressure (IOP and blood pressure. The aim of this study was to investigate the acute effects of an energy drink (Red Bull® on the IOP and blood pressure of healthy young adults.Methods: Thirty healthy university students of either gender, aged 18–30 (mean 23.20 ± 2.81 years were randomly selected to participate in this study. The subjects were randomly divided into two groups (experimental and control and were asked to abstain from caffeine for 48 hours prior to and during the study. Baseline IOP and blood pressure were measured. The experimental group (n = 15 consumed one can of the energy drink (containing 85 mg of caffeine in 250 mL and measurements were repeated at 30, 60, and 90 minutes, while the control group drank 250 mL of water and were tested over the same time period.Results: When compared with baseline, a significant decrease (P < 0.05 in mean IOP at 60 and 90 minutes was observed in the experimental group. There was no corresponding change in systolic or diastolic blood pressure.Conclusion: Our results suggest that energy drinks (ie, Red Bull produce a significant reduction in IOP but have no effect on blood pressure. These findings may be interpreted as reflecting the effect of the combination of caffeine and taurine in the Red Bull energy drink. This effect may result from the known hypotensive effect of taurine, and warrants further study.Keywords: acute effect, intraocular pressure, blood pressure, glaucoma, caffeine, taurine

  14. Potential Energy Landscape of the Liquid-Liquid Phase Transition in Water and the transformation between Low-Density and High-Density Amorphous Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovambattista, N.; Sciortino, F.; Starr, F. W.; Poole, P. H.

    The potential energy landscape (PEL) formalism is a valuable approach within statistical mechanics for describing supercooled liquids and glasses. We use the PEL formalism and computer simulations to study the transformation between low-density (LDL) and high-density liquid (HDL) water, and between low-density (LDA) and high-density amorphous ice (HDA). We employ the ST2 water model that exhibits a LDL-HDL first-order phase transition and a sharp LDA-HDA transformation, as observed in experiments. Our results are consistent with the view that LDA and HDA configurations are associated with two distinct regions (megabasins) of the PEL that are separated by a potential energy barrier. At higher temperature, we find that LDL configurations are located in the same megabasin as LDA, and that HDL configurations are located in the same megabasin as HDA. We show that the pressure-induced LDL-HDL and LDA-HDA transformations occur along paths that interconnect these two megabasins, but that the path followed by the liquid and the amorphous ice differ. We also study the liquid-to-ice-VII first-order phase transition. The PEL properties across this transition are qualitatively similar to the changes found during the LDA-HDA transformation, supporting the interpretation that the LDA-HDA transformation is a first-order-like phase transition between out-of-equilibrium states.

  15. Influence of sample preparation on the transformation of low-density to high-density amorphous ice: An explanation based on the potential energy landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovambattista, Nicolas; Starr, Francis W.; Poole, Peter H.

    2017-07-01

    Experiments and computer simulations of the transformations of amorphous ices display different behaviors depending on sample preparation methods and on the rates of change of temperature and pressure to which samples are subjected. In addition to these factors, simulation results also depend strongly on the chosen water model. Using computer simulations of the ST2 water model, we study how the sharpness of the compression-induced transition from low-density amorphous ice (LDA) to high-density amorphous ice (HDA) is influenced by the preparation of LDA. By studying LDA samples prepared using widely different procedures, we find that the sharpness of the LDA-to-HDA transformation is correlated with the depth of the initial LDA sample in the potential energy landscape (PEL), as characterized by the inherent structure energy. Our results show that the complex phenomenology of the amorphous ices reported in experiments and computer simulations can be understood and predicted in a unified way from knowledge of the PEL of the system.

  16. In situ neutron diffraction studies of high density amorphous ice under pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klotz, Stefan; Straessle, Th; Saitta, A M; Rousse, G; Hamel, G; Nelmes, R J; Loveday, J S; Guthrie, M

    2005-01-01

    We review recent in situ neutron diffraction studies on the structural pressure dependence and the recrystallization of dense amorphous ices up to 2 GPa. Progress in high pressure techniques and data analysis methods allows the reliable determination of all three partial structure factors of amorphous ice under pressure. The strong pressure dependence of the g OO (r) correlation function shows that the isothermal compression of high density amorphous ice (HDA) at 100 K is achieved by a contraction (∼ 20%) of the second-neighbour coordination shell leading to a strong increase in coordination. The g DD (r) and g OD (r) structure factors are, in contrast, only weakly sensitive to pressure. These data allow a comparison with structural features of the recently reported 'very high density amorphous ice' (VHDA) which indicates that VHDA at ambient pressure is very similar to compressed HDA, at least up to the second-neighbour shell. The recrystallization of HDA has been investigated in the range 0.3-2 GPa. It is shown that hydrogen-disordered phases are produced which normally grow only from the liquid, such as ice XII, and in particular ice IV. These findings are in good agreement with results on quench-recovered samples

  17. Using Magnetic Fields to Create and Control High Energy Density Matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrmann, Mark [Sandia National Laboratory

    2012-05-09

    The recently refurbished Z facility at Sandia National Laboratories is the world’s largest pulsed power driver. Z can efficiently deliver currents as large as 26 Million Amperes to centimeter scale loads. These large currents create large magnetic fields that, in turn, create very large pressures in conducting materials. These very large pressures have been used to create unique conditions for high energy density science experiments for a variety of applications. Recently, we have been exploring the use of very strong magnetic fields to significantly relax the requirements for achieving inertial confinement fusion self heating1. The magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) concept relies on a cylindrically imploding liner, an axial magnetic field, and a laser heated fuel region. We hope to achieve significant fusion yield on the Z facility with this concept. Initial experiments assessing the growth of the Magneto-Rayleigh Taylor instability are promising and recent calculational work has identified an approach to achieving high gain with this concept.

  18. Density functional study of the group II phosphide semiconductor compounds under hydrostatic pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mokhtari, Ali [Simulation Laboratory, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Shahrekord University, PB 115, Shahrekord (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: mokhtari@sci.sku.ac.ir

    2008-04-02

    The full-potential all-electron linearized augmented plane wave plus local orbital (FP-LAPW+lo) method, as implemented in the suite of software WIEN2k, has been used to systematically investigate the structural and electronic properties of the group II phosphide semiconductor compounds M{sub 3}P{sub 2} (M = Be, Mg and Ca). The exchange-correlation functional was approximated as a generalized gradient functional introduced by Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (GGA96) and Engel-Vosko (EV-GGA). Internal parameters were optimized by relaxing the atomic positions in the force directions using the Hellman-Feynman approach. The structural parameters, bulk modules, cohesive energy, band structures and density of states have been calculated and compared to the available experimental and theoretical results. These compounds are predicted to be semiconductors with the direct band gap of about 1.60, 2.55 and 2.62 eV for Be{sub 3}P{sub 2}, Mg{sub 3}P{sub 2} and Ca{sub 3}P{sub 2}, respectively. The effects of hydrostatic pressure on the behavior of band parameters such as band gap, valence bandwidths and anti-symmetric gap (the energy gap between two parts of the valence bands) are investigated using both GGA96 and EV-GGA. The contribution of s, p and d orbitals of different atoms to the density of states is discussed in detail.

  19. Density functional study of the group II phosphide semiconductor compounds under hydrostatic pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mokhtari, Ali

    2008-01-01

    The full-potential all-electron linearized augmented plane wave plus local orbital (FP-LAPW+lo) method, as implemented in the suite of software WIEN2k, has been used to systematically investigate the structural and electronic properties of the group II phosphide semiconductor compounds M 3 P 2 (M = Be, Mg and Ca). The exchange-correlation functional was approximated as a generalized gradient functional introduced by Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (GGA96) and Engel-Vosko (EV-GGA). Internal parameters were optimized by relaxing the atomic positions in the force directions using the Hellman-Feynman approach. The structural parameters, bulk modules, cohesive energy, band structures and density of states have been calculated and compared to the available experimental and theoretical results. These compounds are predicted to be semiconductors with the direct band gap of about 1.60, 2.55 and 2.62 eV for Be 3 P 2 , Mg 3 P 2 and Ca 3 P 2 , respectively. The effects of hydrostatic pressure on the behavior of band parameters such as band gap, valence bandwidths and anti-symmetric gap (the energy gap between two parts of the valence bands) are investigated using both GGA96 and EV-GGA. The contribution of s, p and d orbitals of different atoms to the density of states is discussed in detail

  20. The Pressure and Magnetic Flux Density Analysis of Helical-Type DC Electromagnetic Pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Geun Hyeong; Kim, Hee Reyoung

    2016-01-01

    The developed pressure was made by only electromagnetic force eliminating probability of impurities contact, therefore the high reactivity materials such as alkali were best match to electromagnetic pump. The heavy ion accelerator facility by Rare Isotope Science Project (RISP) in Korea is trying to construct accelerator using liquid lithium for high efficiency of acceleration by decreasing charge state. The helical-type DC electromagnetic pump was employed to make a charge stripper that decrease charge state of heavy ion. The specification of electromagnetic pump was developed pressure of 15 bar with flowrate of 6 cc/s in the condition of 200℃. The pressure of DC electromagnetic pump was analyzed in the aspects of current and number of duct turns. The developed pressure was almost proportional to input current because relatively low flowrate made negligible of the electromotive force and hydraulic pressure drop. The pressure and magnetic flux density of helical-type DC electromagnetic pump were analyzed. The pressure was proportion to input current and number of duct turns, and magnetic flux density was higher when ferromagnet was applied at electromagnetic pump. It seems that number of duct turns could be increase and ferromagnet could be applied in order to increase pressure of DC electromagnetic pump with constant input current

  1. Experimental density and viscosity measurements of di(2ethylhexyl)sebacate at high pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paredes, Xavier; Fandino, Olivia; Pensado, Alfonso S.; Comunas, Maria J.P.; Fernandez, Josefa

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: → We measure viscosities for di(2-ethylhexyl)sebacate from (298.15 to 398.15) K and up to 60 MPa. → We measure densities for DEHS from (298.15 to 373.15) K and from (0.1 to 60) MPa. → The reported and lit. data were used in a viscosity correlation from (273 to 491) K and up to 1.1 GPa. → This correlation could be used in industrial equipment that operate at high pressures. - Abstract: Experimental densities and dynamic viscosities of di(2-ethylhexyl)sebacate (DEHS) are the object of study in this work. DEHS could be a useful industrial reference fluid for moderately high viscosity at high pressures as it is often used as a pressure transmitting fluid. At atmospheric pressure the density and viscosity measurements have been performed in a rotational SVM 3000 Stabinger viscometer from (273.15 to 373.15) K, whereas from (0.1 to 60) MPa and from (298.15 to 398.15) K an automated Anton Paar DMA HPM vibrating-tube densimeter, and a high-pressure rolling-ball viscometer were used. Several Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann type equations were used to fit the experimental values of viscosity to the pressure and temperature. The measured viscosity data have been used together with previous data found in the literature to establish a correlation of the viscosity surface η(T, p) of DEHS, covering a temperature range from (273 to 491) K and pressure up to 1.1 GPa. This correlation could be used in industrial equipment like viscometers and other devices that operate at high pressures. Our viscosity data have also been fitted as a function of temperature and volume to the thermodynamic scaling model of Roland et al. [C.M. Roland, S. Bair, R. Casalini, J. Chem. Phys. 125 (2006) 124508].

  2. The topology of the Coulomb potential density. A comparison with the electron density, the virial energy density, and the Ehrenfest force density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Lizé-Mari; Eaby, Alan; Dillen, Jan

    2017-12-15

    The topology of the Coulomb potential density has been studied within the context of the theory of Atoms in Molecules and has been compared with the topologies of the electron density, the virial energy density and the Ehrenfest force density. The Coulomb potential density is found to be mainly structurally homeomorphic with the electron density. The Coulomb potential density reproduces the non-nuclear attractor which is observed experimentally in the molecular graph of the electron density of a Mg dimer, thus, for the first time ever providing an alternative and energetic foundation for the existence of this critical point. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. The relation between food price, energy density and diet quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margareta Bolarić

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Low energy density diet, high in fruits and vegetables, is related to lower obesity risk and to better health status, but is more expensive. High energy density diet, high in added sugar and fats, is more affordable, but is related to higher obesity and chronic diseases risk. The aim of this study was to report prices according to energy density (low vs. high of food items and to show how food affordability could affect food choice and consumers’ health. Data was collected for 137 raw and processed foods from three purchase sites in Zagreb (one representative for supermarket, one smaller shop and green market. Results showed that low energy density food is more expensive than high energy density food (for example, the price of 1000 kcal from green zucchini (15 kcal/100 g is 124.20 kn while the price of 1000 kcal from sour cream (138 kcal/100 g is 13.99 kn. Food energy price was significantly different (p<0.05 between food groups with highest price for vegetable products (159.04 ± 36.18 kn/1000 kcal and raw vegetables (97.90 ± 50.13 kn/1000 kcal and lowest for fats (8.49 ± 1.22 kn/1000 kcal and cereals and products (5.66 ± 0.76 kn/1000 kcal. Negative correlation (Spearman r=-0.72, p<0.0001 was observed for energy density (kcal/100 g and price of 1000 kcal. Therefore, it is advisable to develop strategies in order to reduce price of low energy density food and encourage its intake since it would improve diet quality, which could lead to better costumers’ health.

  4. High Energy Density Polymer Film Capacitors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Boufelfel, Ali

    2006-01-01

    High-energy-density capacitors that are compact and light-weight are extremely valuable in a number of critical DoD systems that include portable field equipment, pulsed lasers, detection equipment...

  5. Remarks on saturation of energy confinement in high density regime on LHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Hiroshi; Morita, Shigeru; Murakami, Sadayoshi

    2003-01-01

    A study on energy confinement times in currentless helical plasmas has indicated a preferable density dependence like τ E ∝ n-bar e 0.5-0.6 . However, saturation of energy confinement time has been often observed during the density ramping-up phase by gas puffing in NBI heated plasmas in LHD. The power balance analysis indicates that the thermal diffusivity is improved by the increase in local density while the global energy confinement time loses the dependence on the density. The flat or hollow density profile, which is distinguished in the density-ramping phase, promotes a broad heat power deposition. This change explains the apparent contradiction between the density dependence of the thermal diffusivity and the global energy confinement time. This result suggests that central heating can maintain a favorable density dependence of the energy confinement time in the high density regime. (author)

  6. High energy density capacitors fabricated by thin film technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbee, T W; Johnson, G W; Wagner, A V.

    1999-01-01

    Low energy density in conventional capacitors severely limits efforts to miniaturize power electronics and imposes design limitations on electronics in general. We have successfully applied physical vapor deposition technology to greatly increase capacitor energy density. The high dielectric breakdown strength we have achieved in alumina thin films allows high energy density to be achieved with this moderately low dielectric constant material. The small temperature dependence of the dielectric constant, and the high reliability, high resistivity, and low dielectric loss of Al 2 O 3 , make it even more appealing. We have constructed single dielectric layer thin film capacitors and shown that they can be stacked to form multilayered structures with no loss in yield for a given capacitance. Control of film growth morphology is critical for achieving the smooth, high quality interfaces between metal and dielectric necessary for device operation at high electric fields. Most importantly, high rate deposition with extremely low particle generation is essential for achieving high energy storage at a reasonable cost. This has been achieved by reactive magnetron sputtering in which the reaction to form the dielectric oxide has been confined to the deposition surface. By this technique we have achieved a yield of over 50% for 1 cm 2 devices with an energy density of 14 J per cubic centimeter of Al 2 O 3 dielectric material in 1.2 kV, 4 nF devices. By further reducing defect density and increasing the dielectric constant of the material, we will be able to increase capacitance and construct high energy density devices to meet the requirements of applications in power electronics

  7. Semi-local machine-learned kinetic energy density functional with third-order gradients of electron density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seino, Junji; Kageyama, Ryo; Fujinami, Mikito; Ikabata, Yasuhiro; Nakai, Hiromi

    2018-06-01

    A semi-local kinetic energy density functional (KEDF) was constructed based on machine learning (ML). The present scheme adopts electron densities and their gradients up to third-order as the explanatory variables for ML and the Kohn-Sham (KS) kinetic energy density as the response variable in atoms and molecules. Numerical assessments of the present scheme were performed in atomic and molecular systems, including first- and second-period elements. The results of 37 conventional KEDFs with explicit formulae were also compared with those of the ML KEDF with an implicit formula. The inclusion of the higher order gradients reduces the deviation of the total kinetic energies from the KS calculations in a stepwise manner. Furthermore, our scheme with the third-order gradient resulted in the closest kinetic energies to the KS calculations out of the presented functionals.

  8. Density Functional Methods for Shock Physics and High Energy Density Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desjarlais, Michael

    2017-06-01

    Molecular dynamics with density functional theory has emerged over the last two decades as a powerful and accurate framework for calculating thermodynamic and transport properties with broad application to dynamic compression, high energy density science, and warm dense matter. These calculations have been extensively validated against shock and ramp wave experiments, are a principal component of high-fidelity equation of state generation, and are having wide-ranging impacts on inertial confinement fusion, planetary science, and shock physics research. In addition to thermodynamic properties, phase boundaries, and the equation of state, one also has access to electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity, and lower energy optical properties. Importantly, all these properties are obtained within the same theoretical framework and are manifestly consistent. In this talk I will give a brief history and overview of molecular dynamics with density functional theory and its use in calculating a wide variety of thermodynamic and transport properties for materials ranging from ambient to extreme conditions and with comparisons to experimental data. I will also discuss some of the limitations and difficulties, as well as active research areas. Sandia is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  9. Relation between plasma plume density and gas flow velocity in atmospheric pressure plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yambe, Kiyoyuki; Taka, Shogo; Ogura, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    We have studied atmospheric pressure plasma generated using a quartz tube, helium gas, and copper foil electrode by applying RF high voltage. The atmospheric pressure plasma in the form of a bullet is released as a plume into the atmosphere. To study the properties of the plasma plume, the plasma plume current is estimated from the difference in currents on the circuit, and the drift velocity is measured using a photodetector. The relation of the plasma plume density n plu , which is estimated from the current and the drift velocity, and the gas flow velocity v gas is examined. It is found that the dependence of the density on the gas flow velocity has relations of n plu ∝ log(v gas ). However, the plasma plume density in the laminar flow is higher than that in the turbulent flow. Consequently, in the laminar flow, the density increases with increasing the gas flow velocity

  10. Energy and impacts of pressure vessel explosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurttila, H.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper the explosion energy is considered to be same as the energy of pressure vessel discharge. This is the maximum energy which can be obtained from the process. The energy can be used or it can cause the violence of an explosion accident. (orig.)

  11. Fifth International Conference on High Energy Density Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beg, Farhat

    2017-07-05

    The Fifth International Conference on High Energy Density Physics (ICHED 2015) was held in the Catamaran Hotel in San Diego from August 23-27, 2015. This meeting was the fifth in a series which began in 2008 in conjunction with the April meeting of the American Physical Society (APS). The main goal of this conference has been to bring together researchers from all fields of High Energy Density Science (HEDS) into one, unified meeting.

  12. REFERENCE ON THERMOPHYSICAL PROPERTIES: DENSITY AND VISCOSITY OF WATER FOR ATMOSPHERIC PRESSURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elin Yusibani

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A reference on thermophysical properties, density and viscosity, for water at atmospheric pressure has been developed in MS Excel (as a macros. Patterson’s density equations and Kestin’s viscosity equations have been chosen as a basic equation in the VBA programming as a user-defined function. These results have been compared with REFPROF as a wellknow standart reference

  13. States of high energy density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, M.

    1988-02-01

    The transverse energy, E/sub tau/ spectra for O 16 and S 32 incident for various elements at 200 GeVnucleon are shown. The target and projectile dependencies of the data are discussed. The energy density achieved is estimated. For O 16 on Tungsten the multiplicity spectrum is also presented as well as the pseudorapidity spectra as a function of the transverse energy. The multiplicity cross section dσdN as measured in the backward hemisphere (0.9 < /eta/ < 2.9/ is found to be very similar in shape to the transverse energy distribution dσdE/tau/ reflecting the particular geometry of nucleus nucleus nucleus collisions. The dependence on the atomic mass of the target, A/sub tau/ and projectile A/sub p/ is not what one would expect from naive considerations

  14. High-pressure and high-temperature physical properties of LiF studied by density functional theory calculations and molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiao-Wei; Liu, Zi-Jiang; Quan, Wei-Long; Song, Ting; Khenata, Rabah; Bin-Omran, Saad

    2018-05-01

    Using the revised Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof generalized gradient approximation based on first-principles plane-wave pseudopotential density functional theory, the high-pressure structural phase transition of LiF is explored. From the analysis of Gibbs free energies, we find that no phase transition occurs for LiF in the presented pressure range from 0 to 1000 GPa, and this result is consistent with the theoretical prediction obtained via ab initio calculations [N.A. Smirnov, Phys. Rev. B 83 (2011) 014109]. Using the classical molecular dynamics technique with effective pair potentials which consist of the Coulomb, dispersion, and repulsion interaction, the melting phase diagram of LiF is determined. The obtained normalized volumes under pressure are in good agreement with our density functional theory results and the available experimental data. Meanwhile, with the help of the quasi-harmonic Debye model in which the phononic effects are considered, the thermodynamic properties of interest, including the volume thermal expansion coefficient, isothermal bulk modulus and its first and second pressure derivatives, heat capacity at constant volume, entropy, Debye temperature, and Grüneisen parameter of LiF are predicted systematically. All the properties of LiF with the stable NaCl-type structure in the temperature range of 0-4900 K and the pressure up to 1000 GPa are summarized.

  15. Molecular solar thermal energy storage in photoswitch oligomers increases energy densities and storage times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansø, Mads; Petersen, Anne Ugleholdt; Wang, Zhihang; Erhart, Paul; Nielsen, Mogens Brøndsted; Moth-Poulsen, Kasper

    2018-05-16

    Molecular photoswitches can be used for solar thermal energy storage by photoisomerization into high-energy, meta-stable isomers; we present a molecular design strategy leading to photoswitches with high energy densities and long storage times. High measured energy densities of up to 559 kJ kg -1 (155 Wh kg -1 ), long storage lifetimes up to 48.5 days, and high quantum yields of conversion of up to 94% per subunit are demonstrated in norbornadiene/quadricyclane (NBD/QC) photo-/thermoswitch couples incorporated into dimeric and trimeric structures. By changing the linker unit between the NBD units, we can at the same time fine-tune light-harvesting and energy densities of the dimers and trimers so that they exceed those of their monomeric analogs. These new oligomers thereby meet several of the criteria to be met for an optimum molecule to ultimately enter actual devices being able to undergo closed cycles of solar light-harvesting, energy storage, and heat release.

  16. Density and Viscosity Measurement of Diesel Fuels at Combined High Pressure and Elevated Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl Schaschke

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We report the measurement of the viscosity and density of various diesel fuels, obtained from British refineries, at elevated pressures up to 500 MPa and temperatures in the range 298 K to 373 K. The measurement and prediction procedures of fluid properties under high pressure conditions is of increasing interest in many processes and systems including enhanced oil recovery, automotive engine fuel injection, braking, and hydraulic systems. Accurate data and understanding of the fluid characteristic in terms of pressure, volume and temperature is required particularly where the fluid is composed of a complex mixture or blend of aliphatic or aromatic hydrocarbons. In this study, high pressure viscosity data was obtained using a thermostatically-controlled falling sinker-type high pressure viscometer to provide reproducible and reliable viscosity data based on terminal velocity sinker fall times. This was supported with density measurements using a micro-pVT device. Both high-pressure devices were additionally capable of illustrating the freezing points of the hydrocarbon mixtures. This work has, thus, provided data that can extend the application of mixtures of commercially available fuels and to test the validity of available predictive density and viscosity models. This included a Tait-style equation for fluid compressibility prediction. For complex diesel fuel compositions, which have many unidentified components, the approach illustrates the need to apply appropriate correlations, which require accurate knowledge or prediction of thermodynamic properties.

  17. Four-loop vacuum energy density of the SU(Nc) + adjoint Higgs theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kajantie, K.; Rummukainen, K.; Schroder, Y.; Laine, M.

    2003-01-01

    We compute the dimensionally regularised four-loop vacuum energy density of the SU(N c ) gauge + adjoint Higgs theory, in the disordered phase. 'Scalarisation', or reduction to a small set of master integrals of the type appearing in scalar field theories, is carried out in d dimensions, employing general partial integration identities through an algorithm developed by Laporta, while the remaining scalar integrals are evaluated in d=3-2ε dimensions, by expanding in ε 6 ln(1/g)), O(g 6 ) to the pressure, while the general methods are applicable also to studies of critical phenomena in QED-like statistical physics systems. (author)

  18. Cosmic-ray energy densities in star-forming galaxies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Persic Massimo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The energy density of cosmic ray protons in star forming galaxies can be estimated from π0-decay γ-ray emission, synchrotron radio emission, and supernova rates. To galaxies for which these methods can be applied, the three methods yield consistent energy densities ranging from Up ~ 0.1 − 1 eV cm−3 to Up ~ 102 − 103 eV cm−3 in galaxies with low to high star-formation rates, respectively.

  19. Longitudinal density modulation and energy conversion in intense beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, J. R.; Neumann, J. G.; Tian, K.; O'Shea, P. G.

    2007-01-01

    Density modulation of charged particle beams may occur as a consequence of deliberate action, or may occur inadvertently because of imperfections in the particle source or acceleration method. In the case of intense beams, where space charge and external focusing govern the beam dynamics, density modulation may, under some circumstances, be converted to velocity modulation, with a corresponding conversion of potential energy to kinetic energy. Whether this will occur depends on the properties of the beam and the initial modulation. This paper describes the evolution of discrete and continuous density modulations on intense beams and discusses three recent experiments related to the dynamics of density-modulated electron beams

  20. Anti-Ferroelectric Ceramics for High Energy Density Capacitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditya Chauhan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available With an ever increasing dependence on electrical energy for powering modern equipment and electronics, research is focused on the development of efficient methods for the generation, storage and distribution of electrical power. In this regard, the development of suitable dielectric based solid-state capacitors will play a key role in revolutionizing modern day electronic and electrical devices. Among the popular dielectric materials, anti-ferroelectrics (AFE display evidence of being a strong contender for future ceramic capacitors. AFE materials possess low dielectric loss, low coercive field, low remnant polarization, high energy density, high material efficiency, and fast discharge rates; all of these characteristics makes AFE materials a lucrative research direction. However, despite the evident advantages, there have only been limited attempts to develop this area. This article attempts to provide a focus to this area by presenting a timely review on the topic, on the relevant scientific advancements that have been made with respect to utilization and development of anti-ferroelectric materials for electric energy storage applications. The article begins with a general introduction discussing the need for high energy density capacitors, the present solutions being used to address this problem, and a brief discussion of various advantages of anti-ferroelectric materials for high energy storage applications. This is followed by a general description of anti-ferroelectricity and important anti-ferroelectric materials. The remainder of the paper is divided into two subsections, the first of which presents various physical routes for enhancing the energy storage density while the latter section describes chemical routes for enhanced storage density. This is followed by conclusions and future prospects and challenges which need to be addressed in this particular field.

  1. Plasma sheet pressure anisotropies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stiles, G.S.; Hones, E.W. Jr; Bame, S.J.; Asbridge, J.R.

    1978-01-01

    The ecliptic plane components of the pressure tensors for low-energy ( or =1.2 approximately 25% of the time. Due to the low energy density of the electrons, however, this anisotropy is not itself sufficient to balance the tension of the magnetic field

  2. Novel nanostructured materials for high energy density supercapacitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, C.Z.; Zhang, X.G. [Nanjing Univ. of Aeronautics and Astronautics (China). College of Material Science and Engineering

    2010-07-01

    Researchers are currently examining methods of improving energy density while not sacrificing the high power density of supercapacitors. In this study, nanostructured materials assembled from nanometer-sized building blocks with mesoporosity were synthesized in order investigate diffusion time, kinetics, and capacitances. Petal-like cobalt hydroxide Co(OH){sub 2} mesocrystals, urchin-like Co(OH){sub 2} and dicobalt tetroxide (Co{sub 2}O{sub 4}) ordered arrays as well as N{sub i}O microspheres were assembled from 0-D nanoparticles, 1-D mesoporous nanowires and nanobelts, and 2-D mesoporous nanopetals. The study showed that all the synthesized nanostructured materials delivered larger energy densities while showing electrochemical stability at high rates.

  3. Energy density of lake whitefish Coregonus clupeaformis in Lakes Huron and Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pothoven, S.A.; Nalepa, T.F.; Madenjian, C.P.; Rediske, R.R.; Schneeberger, P.J.; He, J.X.

    2006-01-01

    We collected lake whitefish Coregonus clupeaformis off Alpena and Tawas City, Michigan, USA in Lake Huron and off Muskegon, Michigan USA in Lake Michigan during 2002–2004. We determined energy density and percent dry weight for lake whitefish from both lakes and lipid content for Lake Michigan fish. Energy density increased with increasing fish weight up to 800 g, and then remained relatively constant with further increases in fish weight. Energy density, adjusted for weight, was lower in Lake Huron than in Lake Michigan for both small (≤800 g) and large fish (>800 g). Energy density did not differ seasonally for small or large lake whitefish or between adult male and female fish. Energy density was strongly correlated with percent dry weight and percent lipid content. Based on data from commercially caught lake whitefish, body condition was lower in Lake Huron than Lake Michigan during 1981–2003, indicating that the dissimilarity in body condition between the lakes could be long standing. Energy density and lipid content in 2002–2004 in Lake Michigan were lower than data for comparable sized fish collected in 1969–1971. Differences in energy density between lakes were attributed to variation in diet and prey energy content as well as factors that affect feeding rates such as lake whitefish density and prey abundance.

  4. Probing the nuclear symmetry energy at high densities with nuclear reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leifels, Y.

    2017-11-01

    The nuclear equation of state is a topic of highest current interest in nuclear structure and reactions as well as in astrophysics. The symmetry energy is the part of the equation of state which is connected to the asymmetry in the neutron/proton content. During recent years a multitude of experimental and theoretical efforts on different fields have been undertaken to constraint its density dependence at low densities but also above saturation density (ρ_0=0.16 fm ^{-3} . Conventionally the symmetry energy is described by its magnitude S_v and the slope parameter L , both at saturation density. Values of L = 44 -66MeV and S_v=31 -33MeV have been deduced in recent compilations of nuclear structure, heavy-ion reaction and astrophysics data. Apart from astrophysical data on mass and radii of neutron stars, heavy-ion reactions at incident energies of several 100MeV are the only means do access the high density behaviour of the symmetry energy. In particular, meson production and collective flows upto about 1 AGeV are predicted to be sensitive to the slope of the symmetry energy as a function of density. From the measurement of elliptic flow of neutrons with respect to charged particles at GSI, a more stringent constraint for the slope of the symmetry energy at supra-saturation densities has been deduced. Future options to reach even higher densities will be discussed.

  5. A Dual-Stimuli-Responsive Sodium-Bromine Battery with Ultrahigh Energy Density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Faxing; Yang, Hongliu; Zhang, Jian; Zhang, Panpan; Wang, Gang; Zhuang, Xiaodong; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio; Feng, Xinliang

    2018-06-01

    Stimuli-responsive energy storage devices have emerged for the fast-growing popularity of intelligent electronics. However, all previously reported stimuli-responsive energy storage devices have rather low energy densities (energy density, electrochromic effect, and fast thermal response is demonstrated. Remarkably, the fabricated Na//Br 2 battery exhibits a large operating voltage of 3.3 V and an energy density up to 760 Wh kg -1 , which outperforms those for the state-of-the-art stimuli-responsive electrochemical energy storage devices. This work offers a promising approach for designing multi-stimuli-responsive and high-energy rechargeable batteries without sacrificing the electrochemical performance. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. High energy density, long life energy storage capacitor dielectric system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, D.H.; Wilson, S.R.

    1977-01-01

    The evolution of energy storage dielectric systems shows a dramatic improvement in life and joule density, culminating in a 50% to 300% life improvement of polypropylene film-paper-phthalate ester over paper-castor oil depending on service. The physical and electrical drawbacks of castor oil are not present in the new system, allowing the capacitor designer to utilize the superior insulation resistance, dielectric strength, and corona resistance to full advantage. The result is longer life for equal joule density or greater joule density for equal life. Field service proof of the film-Geconol system superiority is based on 5 megajoule in operation and 16 megajoule on order

  7. Energy-saving analysis of hydraulic hybrid excavator based on common pressure rail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Wei; Jiang, Jihai; Su, Xiaoyu; Karimi, Hamid Reza

    2013-01-01

    Energy-saving research of excavators is becoming one hot topic due to the increasing energy crisis and environmental deterioration recently. Hydraulic hybrid excavator based on common pressure rail (HHEC) provides an alternative with electric hybrid excavator because it has high power density and environment friendly and easy to modify based on the existing manufacture process. This paper is focused on the fuel consumption of HHEC and the actuator dynamic response to assure that the new system can save energy without sacrificing performance. Firstly, we introduce the basic principle of HHEC; then, the sizing process is presented; furthermore, the modeling period which combined mathematical analysis and experiment identification is listed. Finally, simulation results show that HHEC has a fast dynamic response which can be accepted in engineering and the fuel consumption can be reduced 21% to compare the original LS excavator and even 32% after adopting another smaller engine.

  8. A Low-Cost Neutral Zinc-Iron Flow Battery with High Energy Density for Stationary Energy Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Congxin; Duan, Yinqi; Xu, Wenbin; Zhang, Huamin; Li, Xianfeng

    2017-11-20

    Flow batteries (FBs) are one of the most promising stationary energy-storage devices for storing renewable energy. However, commercial progress of FBs is limited by their high cost and low energy density. A neutral zinc-iron FB with very low cost and high energy density is presented. By using highly soluble FeCl 2 /ZnBr 2 species, a charge energy density of 56.30 Wh L -1 can be achieved. DFT calculations demonstrated that glycine can combine with iron to suppress hydrolysis and crossover of Fe 3+ /Fe 2+ . The results indicated that an energy efficiency of 86.66 % can be obtained at 40 mA cm -2 and the battery can run stably for more than 100 cycles. Furthermore, a low-cost porous membrane was employed to lower the capital cost to less than $ 50 per kWh, which was the lowest value that has ever been reported. Combining the features of low cost, high energy density and high energy efficiency, the neutral zinc-iron FB is a promising candidate for stationary energy-storage applications. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Effects of N2O and O2 addition to nitrogen Townsend dielectric barrier discharges at atmospheric pressure on the absolute ground-state atomic nitrogen density

    KAUST Repository

    Es-sebbar, Et-touhami

    2012-11-27

    Absolute ground-state density of nitrogen atoms N (2p3 4S3/2) in non-equilibrium Townsend dielectric barrier discharges (TDBDs) at atmospheric pressure sustained in N2/N2O and N2/O2 gas mixtures has been measured using Two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence (TALIF) spectroscopy. The quantitative measurements have been obtained by TALIF calibration using krypton as a reference gas. We previously reported that the maximum of N (2p3 4S3/2) atom density is around 3 × 1014 cm-3 in pure nitrogen TDBD, and that this maximum depends strongly on the mean energy dissipated in the gas. In the two gas mixtures studied here, results show that the absolute N (2p3 4S3/2) density is strongly affected by the N2O and O2 addition. Indeed, the density still increases exponentially with the energy dissipated in the gas but an increase in N2O and O2 amounts (a few hundreds of ppm) leads to a decrease in nitrogen atom density. No discrepancy in the order of magnitude of N (2p3 4S3/2) density is observed when comparing results obtained in N2/N2O and N2/O2 mixtures. Compared with pure nitrogen, for an energy of ∼90 mJ cm-3, the maximum of N (2p3 4S3/2) density drops by a factor of 3 when 100 ppm of N2O and O2 are added and it reduces by a factor of 5 for 200 ppm, to reach values close to our TALIF detection sensitivity for 400 ppm (1 × 1013 cm -3 at atmospheric pressure). © 2013 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  10. Pressure and density measurements of selected fluid-bearing zones at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winstanley, D.; Carrasco, R.; Zurkoff, J.

    1986-01-01

    A field effort is presently being conducted at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) to collect accurate pressure and density information from the Culebra and Magenta dolomite members of the Rustler formation. The spatial variation of fluid density that occurs in these water-bearing units requires the use of numerical models to accurately solve for flow direction and velocity. The groundwater regime is a vital element in possible release scenarios of radionuclide-bearing fluid from the repository. Field tests were conducted on four wells utilizing a testing apparatus composed of two pressure and temperature monitoring systems and a point water sampler. Pressure versus depth plots are linear with a correlation coefficient of 0.999 or greater. Comparison of the calculated density and measured density of water obtained at depth agree within 2 percent of density measurements obtained after continuous pumping of the formation for several days before sampling. The temperature gradients ranged from 0.4 0 to 0.6 0 C per 100 feet. The data presented here are preliminary and serve as developmental information for the detailed operating plan currently under preparation

  11. Clustering and Symmetry Energy in a Low Density Nuclear Gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowalski, S.; Natowitz, J.B.; Shlomo, S.; Wada, R.; Hagel, K.; Wang, J.; Materna, T.; Chen, Z.; Ma, Y.G.; Qin, L.; Botvina, A.S.; Fabris, D.; Lunardon, M.; Moretto, S.; Nebbia, G.; Pesente, S.; Rizzi, V.; Viesti, G.; Cinausero, M.; Prete, G.; Keutgen, T.; El Masri, Y.; Majka, Z.; Ono, A.

    2007-01-01

    Temperature and density dependent symmetry energy coefficients have been derived from isoscaling analyses of the yields of nuclei with A= 64 Zn projectiles with 92 Mo and 197 Au target nuclei. The symmetry energies at low density are larger than those obtained in mean field calculations, reflecting the clustering of low density nuclear matter. They are in quite good agreement with results of a recently proposed Virial Equation of State calculation

  12. Local density approximations for relativistic exchange energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacDonald, A.H.

    1986-01-01

    The use of local density approximations to approximate exchange interactions in relativistic electron systems is reviewed. Particular attention is paid to the physical content of these exchange energies by discussing results for the uniform relativistic electron gas from a new point of view. Work on applying these local density approximations in atoms and solids is reviewed and it is concluded that good accuracy is usually possible provided self-interaction corrections are applied. The local density approximations necessary for spin-polarized relativistic systems are discussed and some new results are presented

  13. Energy Density and Weight Loss: Feel Full on Fewer Calories

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Behavior. 2009;97:609. Rouhani MH, et al. Associations between dietary energy density and obesity: A systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies. Nutrition. 2016;32:1037. Stelmach-Mardas M, et al. Link between food energy density and body weight changes in obese ...

  14. Studies of the energy density functional and its derivatives in atomic and molecular systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robles, J.

    1986-01-01

    The first chapter is a review of formal density functional theory, (DFT). In the second chapter, approximations to exact DFT are reviewed. In chapter three, the author proposes a modified molecular Thomas-Fermi, (TF) theory. He proceeds by imposing a continuity condition on the density. This avoids the singularities at the nuclei of classical TF. The method is sanctioned by Teller and Balasz theorems. However, it is found that while the classical TF theory is improved, the present method still predicts no-binding. In chapter four, it is suggested that the correlation energy, (E/sub c/), is proportional to the exchange energy, (K), E/sub c/ = cK. This idea is tested with Hartree-Fock (HF) and DFT data. In HF, c = 1/40 for atoms and c = 1/25 for molecules. Furthermore, the method is used to estimate dissociation energies. Thereafter, the author studies the chemical potential, (μ), of atoms (chapter five) and molecules (chapter six). In chapter seven, the concept of local pressure in an inhomogeneous electronic system is studied and extended, within the local thermodynamic formulation of DFT. Finally, appendix A provides the required mathematical framework (basic functional calculus) to understand this work, while appendix B is essentially a summary of the HF method

  15. Neutron and proton densities and the symmetry energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodmer, A.R.; Usmani, Q.N.

    2003-01-01

    The neutron/proton distributions in nuclei, in particular, the n-p difference, are considered in a 'macroscopic' Thomas-Fermi approach. The density dependence F(ρ) of the symmetry-energy density, where ρ is the total density, drives this difference in the absence of Coulomb and density-gradient contributions when we obtain an explicit solution for the difference in terms of F. If F is constant then the n-p difference and, in particular, the difference δR between the neutron and proton rms radii are zero. The Coulomb energy and gradient terms are treated variationally. The latter make only a small contribution to the n-p difference, and this is then effectively determined by F. The Coulomb energy reduces δR. Switching off the Coulomb contribution to the n-p difference then gives the maximum δR for a given F. Our numerical results are for 208 Pb. We consider a wide range of F; for these, both δR and the ratio χ of the surface to volume symmetry-energy coefficient depend, approximately, only on an integral involving F -1 . For δR < or approx. 0.45 fm this dependence is one valued and approximately linear for small δR, and this integral is then effectively determined by δR. There is a strong correlation between δR and χ, allowing an approximate determination of χ from δR. δR has a maximum of congruent with 0.65 fm

  16. Nuclear energy density functional from chiral pion-nucleon dynamics revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Kaiser, N.; Weise, W.

    2009-01-01

    We use a recently improved density-matrix expansion to calculate the nuclear energy density functional in the framework of in-medium chiral perturbation theory. Our calculation treats systematically the effects from $1\\pi$-exchange, iterated $1\\pi$-exchange, and irreducible $2\\pi$-exchange with intermediate $\\Delta$-isobar excitations, including Pauli-blocking corrections up to three-loop order. We find that the effective nucleon mass $M^*(\\rho)$ entering the energy density functional is iden...

  17. Generation of high-power-density atmospheric pressure plasma with liquid electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Lifang; Mao Zhiguo; Yin Zengqian; Ran Junxia

    2004-01-01

    We present a method for generating atmospheric pressure plasma using a dielectric barrier discharge reactor with two liquid electrodes. Four distinct kinds of discharge, including stochastic filaments, regular square pattern, glow-like discharge, and Turing stripe pattern, are observed in argon with a flow rate of 9 slm. The electrical and optical characteristics of the device are investigated. Results show that high-power-density atmospheric pressure plasma with high duty ratio in space and time can be obtained. The influence of wall charges on discharge power and duty ratio has been discussed

  18. Hydrostatic pressure effects on the state density and optical transitions in quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galindez-Ramirez, G; Perez-Merchancano, S T; Paredes Gutierrez, H; Gonzalez, J D

    2010-01-01

    Using the effective mass approximation and variational method we have computed the effects of hydrostatic pressure on the absorption and photoluminescence spectra in spherical quantum dot GaAs-(Ga, Al) As, considering a finite confinement potential of this particular work we show the optical transitions in quantum of various sizes in the presence of hydrogenic impurities and hydrostatic pressure effects. Our first result describes the spectrum of optical absorption of 500 A QD for different values of hydrostatic pressure P = 0, 20 and 40 Kbar. The absorption peaks are sensitive to the displacement of the impurity center to the edge of the quantum dot and even more when the hydrostatic pressure changes in both cases showing that to the extent that these two effects are stronger quantum dots respond more efficiently. Also this result can be seen in the study of the photoluminescence spectrum as in the case of acceptor impurities consider them more efficiently capture carriers or electrons that pass from the conduction band to the valence band. Density states with randomly distributed impurity show that the additional peaks in the curves of the density of impurity states appear due to the presence of the additional hydrostatic pressure effects.

  19. Two-Dimensional Electron Density Measurement of Positive Streamer Discharge in Atmospheric-Pressure Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inada, Yuki; Ono, Ryo; Kumada, Akiko; Hidaka, Kunihiko; Maeyama, Mitsuaki

    2016-09-01

    The electron density of streamer discharges propagating in atmospheric-pressure air is crucially important for systematic understanding of the production mechanisms of reactive species utilized in wide ranging applications such as medical treatment, plasma-assisted ignition and combustion, ozone production and environmental pollutant processing. However, electron density measurement during the propagation of the atmospheric-pressure streamers is extremely difficult by using the conventional localized type measurement systems due to the streamer initiation jitters and the irreproducibility in the discharge paths. In order to overcome the difficulties, single-shot two-dimensional electron density measurement was conducted by using a Shack-Hartmann type laser wavefront sensor. The Shack-Hartmann sensor with a temporal resolution of 2 ns was applied to pulsed positive streamer discharges generated in an air gap between pin-to-plate electrodes. The electron density a few ns after the streamer initiation was 7*1021m-3 and uniformly distributed along the streamer channel. The electron density and its distribution profile were compared with a previous study simulating similar streamers, demonstrating good agreement. This work was supported in part by JKA and its promotion funds from KEIRIN RACE. The authors like to thank Mr. Kazuaki Ogura and Mr. Kaiho Aono of The University of Tokyo for their support during this work.

  20. Microscopically based energy density functionals for nuclei using the density matrix expansion. II. Full optimization and validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro Pérez, R.; Schunck, N.; Dyhdalo, A.; Furnstahl, R. J.; Bogner, S. K.

    2018-05-01

    Background: Energy density functional methods provide a generic framework to compute properties of atomic nuclei starting from models of nuclear potentials and the rules of quantum mechanics. Until now, the overwhelming majority of functionals have been constructed either from empirical nuclear potentials such as the Skyrme or Gogny forces, or from systematic gradient-like expansions in the spirit of the density functional theory for atoms. Purpose: We seek to obtain a usable form of the nuclear energy density functional that is rooted in the modern theory of nuclear forces. We thus consider a functional obtained from the density matrix expansion of local nuclear potentials from chiral effective field theory. We propose a parametrization of this functional carefully calibrated and validated on selected ground-state properties that is suitable for large-scale calculations of nuclear properties. Methods: Our energy functional comprises two main components. The first component is a non-local functional of the density and corresponds to the direct part (Hartree term) of the expectation value of local chiral potentials on a Slater determinant. Contributions to the mean field and the energy of this term are computed by expanding the spatial, finite-range components of the chiral potential onto Gaussian functions. The second component is a local functional of the density and is obtained by applying the density matrix expansion to the exchange part (Fock term) of the expectation value of the local chiral potential. We apply the UNEDF2 optimization protocol to determine the coupling constants of this energy functional. Results: We obtain a set of microscopically constrained functionals for local chiral potentials from leading order up to next-to-next-to-leading order with and without three-body forces and contributions from Δ excitations. These functionals are validated on the calculation of nuclear and neutron matter, nuclear mass tables, single-particle shell structure

  1. Densities, viscosities, and isobaric heat capacities of the system (1-butanol + cyclohexane) at high pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torín-Ollarves, Geraldine A.; Martín, M. Carmen; Chamorro, César R.; Segovia, José J.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The densities of cyclohexane and its mixtures with 1-butanol were measured. • The excess molar volumes were calculated and correlated. • The viscosities were measured at atmospheric pressure. • The isobaric heat capacities were measured at p = (0.1 to 25) MPa at T = (293.15 and 313.15) K. • A positive deviation from the ideal behavior is observed. - Abstract: The cyclohexane and the system of 1-butanol + cyclohexane have been characterized using densities, viscosities and isobaric heat capacities measurements. For that, the densities were measured in a high-pressure vibrating tube densimeter at five temperatures from (293.15 to 333.15) K and pressures up to 100 MPa. The measurements were correlated with the empirical Tamman–Tait equation. Moreover, the isobaric heat capacities of the binary system were measured in a high-pressure automated flow calorimeter at T = (293.15 and 313.15) K and pressures up to 25 MPa for pure cyclohexane and in admixture with 1-butanol. The excess molar heat capacities were assessed for the mixture and a positive deviation from the ideality was obtained, except for a small part in the region rich in alkanol. The viscosity measurements were carried out, at the calorimeter conditions, for correcting the experimental values of isobaric heat capacities due to friction along the tube. The viscosity was measured at atmospheric pressure in a Stabinger Anton Paar SVM 3000 viscometer in the temperature range of (293.15 to 333.15) K for cyclohexane and the mixtures. At high pressure, the viscosities were estimated using Lucas method

  2. Spatial distribution of ion energy related on electron density in a plasma channel generated in gas clusters by a femtosecond laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nam, S. M.; Han, J. M.; Cha, Y. H.; Lee, Y. W.; Rhee, Y. J.; Cha, H. K.

    2008-01-01

    Neutron generation through Coulomb explosion of deuterium contained gas clusters is known as one of the very effective methods to produce fusion neutrons using a table top terawatt laser. The energy of ions produced through Coulomb explosions is very important factor to generate neutrons efficiently. Until the ion energy reaches around∼MeV level, the D D fusion reaction probability increases exponentially. The understanding of laser beam propagation and laser energy deposition in clusters is very important to improve neutron yields. As the laser beam propagates through clusters medium, laser energy is absorbed in clusters by ionization of molecules consisting clusters. When the backing pressure of gas increases, the average size of clusters increases and which results in higher energy absorption and earlier termination of laser propagation. We first installed a Michelson interferometer to view laser beam traces in a cluster plume and to measure spatial electron density profiles of a plasma channel which was produced by a laser beam. And then we measured the energy of ions distributed along the plasma channel with a translating slit to select ions from narrow parts of a plasma channel. In our experiments, methane gas was used to produce gas clusters at a room temperature and the energy distribution of proton ions for different gas backing pressure were measured by the time of flight method using dual micro channel plates. By comparing the distribution of ion energies and electron densities, we could understand the condition for effective laser energy delivery to clusters

  3. On the kinetic energy density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lombard, R.J.; Mas, D.; Moszkowski, S.A.

    1991-01-01

    We discuss two expressions for the density of kinetic energy which differ by an integration by parts. Using the Wigner transform we shown that the arithmetic mean of these two terms is closely analogous to the classical value. Harmonic oscillator wavefunctions are used to illustrate the radial dependence of these expressions. We study the differences they induce through effective mass terms when performing self-consistent calculations. (author)

  4. Reconstruction of the electron energy distribution function from probe characteristics at intermediate and high pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arslanbekov, R.R.; Kolokolov, N.B.; Kudryavtsev, A.A.; Khromov, N.A.

    1991-01-01

    Gorbunov et al. have developed a kinetic theory of the electron current drawn by a probe, which substantially extends the region of applicability of the probe method for determining the electron energy distribution function, enabling probes to be used for intermediate and high pressures (up to p ≤ 0.5 atm for monatomic gases). They showed that for λ var-epsilon >> a + d (where a is the probe radius, d is the sheath thickness, and λ var-epsilon is the electron energy relaxation length) the current density j e (V) drawn by the probe is related to the unperturbed distribution function by an integral equation involving the distribution function. The kernal of the integral equation can be written as a function of the diffusion parameter. In the present paper the method of quadrature sums is employed in order to obtain the electron energy distribution function from probe characteristics at intermediate and high pressures. This technique enables them to recover the distribution function from the integral equation when the diffusion parameter has an arbitrary energy dependence ψ 0 (var-epsilon) in any given energy range. The effectiveness of the method is demonstrated by application to both model problems and experimental data

  5. Comparison of renewable fuels based on their land use using energy densities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkman, T. J.; Benders, R. M. J.

    2010-01-01

    In this article energy densities of selected renewable fuels are determined. Energy density is defined here as the annual energy production per hectare, taking energy inputs into account. Using 5 scenarios, consisting of 1 set focusing on technical differences and 1 set focusing on geographical

  6. Flaw density examinations of a clad boiling water reactor pressure vessel segment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, K.V.; McClung, R.W.

    1986-01-01

    Flaw density is the greatest uncertainty involved in probabilistic analyses of reactor pressure vessel failure. As part of the Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program, studies have been conducted to determine flaw density in a section of reactor pressure vessel cut from the Hope Creek Unit 2 vessel [nominally 0.7 by 3 m (2 by 10 ft)]. This section (removed from the scrapped vessel that was never in service) was evaluated nondestructively to determine the as-fabricated status. We had four primary objectives: (1) evaluate longitudinal and girth welds for flaws with manual ultrasonics, (2) evaluate the zone under the nominal 6.3-mm (0.25-in.) clad for cracking (again with manual ultrasonics), (3) evaluate the cladding for cracks with a high-sensitivity fluorescent penetrant method, and (4) determine the source of indications detected

  7. Metal hydrides based high energy density thermal battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, Zhigang Zak; Zhou, Chengshang; Fan, Peng; Udell, Kent S.; Bowman, Robert C.; Vajo, John J.; Purewal, Justin J.; Kekelia, Bidzina

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The principle of the thermal battery using advanced metal hydrides was demonstrated. • The thermal battery used MgH 2 and TiMnV as a working pair. • High energy density can be achieved by the use of MgH 2 to store thermal energy. - Abstract: A concept of thermal battery based on advanced metal hydrides was studied for heating and cooling of cabins in electric vehicles. The system utilized a pair of thermodynamically matched metal hydrides as energy storage media. The pair of hydrides that was identified and developed was: (1) catalyzed MgH 2 as the high temperature hydride material, due to its high energy density and enhanced kinetics; and (2) TiV 0.62 Mn 1.5 alloy as the matching low temperature hydride. Further, a proof-of-concept prototype was built and tested, demonstrating the potential of the system as HVAC for transportation vehicles

  8. Towards a sustainable global energy supply infrastructure: Net energy balance and density considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kessides, Ioannis N.; Wade, David C.

    2011-01-01

    This paper employs a framework of dynamic energy analysis to model the growth potential of alternative electricity supply infrastructures as constrained by innate physical energy balance and dynamic response limits. Coal-fired generation meets the criteria of longevity (abundance of energy source) and scalability (ability to expand to the multi-terawatt level) which are critical for a sustainable energy supply chain, but carries a very heavy carbon footprint. Renewables and nuclear power, on the other hand, meet both the longevity and environmental friendliness criteria. However, due to their substantially different energy densities and load factors, they vary in terms of their ability to deliver net excess energy and attain the scale needed for meeting the huge global energy demand. The low power density of renewable energy extraction and the intermittency of renewable flows limit their ability to achieve high rates of indigenous infrastructure growth. A significant global nuclear power deployment, on the other hand, could engender serious risks related to proliferation, safety, and waste disposal. Unlike renewable sources of energy, nuclear power is an unforgiving technology because human lapses and errors can have ecological and social impacts that are catastrophic and irreversible. Thus, the transition to a low carbon economy is likely to prove much more challenging than early optimists have claimed. - Highlights: → We model the growth potential of alternative electricity supply infrastructures. → Coal is scalable and abundant but carries a heavy carbon footprint. → Renewables and nuclear meet the longevity and environmental friendliness criteria. → The low power density and intermittency of renewables limit their growth potential. → Nuclear power continues to raise concerns about proliferation, safety, and waste.

  9. Ionic conduction in sodium azide under high pressure: Experimental and theoretical approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qinglin; Ma, Yanzhang; Sang, Dandan; Wang, Xiaoli; Liu, Cailong; Hu, Haiquan; Wang, Wenjun; Zhang, Bingyuan; Fan, Quli; Han, Yonghao; Gao, Chunxiao

    2018-04-01

    Alkali metal azides can be used as starting materials for the synthesis of polymeric nitrogen, a potential material of high energy density. In this letter, we report the ionic transport behavior in sodium azide under high pressure by in situ impedance spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations. The ionic transportation consists of ion transfer and Warburg diffusion processes. The ionic migration channels and barrier energy were given for the high-pressure phases. The enhanced ionic conductivity of the γ phase with pressure is because of the formation of space charge regions in the grain boundaries. This ionic conduction and grain boundary effect in NaN3 under pressures could shed light on the better understanding of the conduction mechanism of alkali azides and open up an area of research for polymeric nitrogen in these compounds and other high-energy-density polynitrides.

  10. Strain Energy Density in the Elastodynamics of the Spacetime Continuum and the Electromagnetic Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Millette P. A.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the strain energy density of the spacetime continuum in the Elasto- dynamics of the Spacetime Continuum by applying continuum m echanical results to strained spacetime. The strain energy density is a scalar. W e find that it is separated into two terms: the first one expresses the dilatation energy density (the “mass” longitu- dinal term while the second one expresses the distortion en ergy density (the “massless” transverse term. The quadratic structure of the energy rel ation of Special Relativity is found to be present in the theory. In addition, we find that the kinetic energy pc is car- ried by the distortion part of the deformation, while the dil atation part carries only the rest-mass energy. The strain energy density of the electrom agnetic energy-momentum stress tensor is calculated. The dilatation energy density (the rest-mass energy density of the photon is found to be 0 as expected. The transverse dis tortion energy density is found to include a longitudinal electromagnetic energy fl ux term, from the Poynting vector, that is massless as it is due to distortion, not dilatation, of the spacetime con- tinuum. However, because this energy flux is along the direct ion of propagation (i.e. longitudinal, it gives rise to the particle aspect of the el ectromagnetic field, the photon.

  11. Estimation of energy density of Li-S batteries with liquid and solid electrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunmei; Zhang, Heng; Otaegui, Laida; Singh, Gurpreet; Armand, Michel; Rodriguez-Martinez, Lide M.

    2016-09-01

    With the exponential growth of technology in mobile devices and the rapid expansion of electric vehicles into the market, it appears that the energy density of the state-of-the-art Li-ion batteries (LIBs) cannot satisfy the practical requirements. Sulfur has been one of the best cathode material choices due to its high charge storage (1675 mAh g-1), natural abundance and easy accessibility. In this paper, calculations are performed for different cell design parameters such as the active material loading, the amount/thickness of electrolyte, the sulfur utilization, etc. to predict the energy density of Li-S cells based on liquid, polymeric and ceramic electrolytes. It demonstrates that Li-S battery is most likely to be competitive in gravimetric energy density, but not volumetric energy density, with current technology, when comparing with LIBs. Furthermore, the cells with polymer and thin ceramic electrolytes show promising potential in terms of high gravimetric energy density, especially the cells with the polymer electrolyte. This estimation study of Li-S energy density can be used as a good guidance for controlling the key design parameters in order to get desirable energy density at cell-level.

  12. Full charge-density calculation of the surface energy of metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vitos, Levente; Kollár, J..; Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1994-01-01

    of a spherically symmetrized charge density, while the Coulomb and exchange-correlation contributions are calculated by means of the complete, nonspherically symmetric charge density within nonoverlapping, space-filling Wigner-Seitz cells. The functional is used to assess the convergence and the accuracy......We have calculated the surface energy and the work function of the 4d metals by means of an energy functional based on a self-consistent, spherically symmetric atomic-sphere potential. In this approach the kinetic energy is calculated completely within the atomic-sphere approximation (ASA) by means...... of the linear-muffin-tin-orbitals (LMTO) method and the ASA in surface calculations. We find that the full charge-density functional improves the agreement with recent full-potential LMTO calculations to a level where the average deviation in surface energy over the 4d series is down to 10%....

  13. Kinetic-energy density functional: Atoms and shell structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Gonzalez, P.; Alvarellos, J.E.; Chacon, E.

    1996-01-01

    We present a nonlocal kinetic-energy functional which includes an anisotropic average of the density through a symmetrization procedure. This functional allows a better description of the nonlocal effects of the electron system. The main consequence of the symmetrization is the appearance of a clear shell structure in the atomic density profiles, obtained after the minimization of the total energy. Although previous results with some of the nonlocal kinetic functionals have given incipient structures for heavy atoms, only our functional shows a clear shell structure for most of the atoms. The atomic total energies have a good agreement with the exact calculations. Discussion of the chemical potential and the first ionization potential in atoms is included. The functional is also extended to spin-polarized systems. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  14. Scalings of energy confinement and density limit in stellarator/heliotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudo, S.; Takeiri, Y.; Zushi, H.; Sano, F.; Itoh, K.; Kondo, K.; Iiyoshi, A.

    1989-04-01

    Empirical scaling of energy confinement observed experimentally in stellarator/heliotron (Heliotron E, Wendelstein 7A, L2, Heliotron DR) under the condition that plasmas are heated by ECH and/or NbI is proposed. Empirical scaling of density limit obtainable under the optimum condition is proposed. These scalings are compared with those of tokamaks. The energy confinement scaling has similar power dependence as 'L mode scaling' of tokamaks. The density limit scaling seems also to indicate the upper limit of achievable density in many tokamaks. Combining the energy confinement time and the density limit scaling a transport-limited beta value is also deduced. Thus, from the viewpoint of designing a machine, there should be some compromise in determing magnetic field strength on plasma axis, average minor radius and major radius, because their dependence on confinement time and transport-limited beta value is contradicting. (J.P.N.)

  15. Nuclear energy density functional from chiral pion-nucleon dynamics revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, N.; Weise, W.

    2010-05-01

    We use a recently improved density-matrix expansion to calculate the nuclear energy density functional in the framework of in-medium chiral perturbation theory. Our calculation treats systematically the effects from 1 π-exchange, iterated 1 π-exchange, and irreducible 2 π-exchange with intermediate Δ-isobar excitations, including Pauli-blocking corrections up to three-loop order. We find that the effective nucleon mass M(ρ) entering the energy density functional is identical to the one of Fermi-liquid theory when employing the improved density-matrix expansion. The strength F(ρ) of the ( surface-term as provided by the pion-exchange dynamics is in good agreement with that of phenomenological Skyrme forces in the density region ρ/2short-range spin-orbit interaction. The strength function F(ρ) multiplying the square of the spin-orbit density comes out much larger than in phenomenological Skyrme forces and it has a pronounced density dependence.

  16. Density and vapour pressure of mixed-solvent desiccant systems (propylene glycol or dipropylene glycol or tripropylene glycol + magnesium chloride + water)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Shang-Yi; Soriano, Allan N.; Leron, Rhoda B.; Li, Meng-Hui

    2014-01-01

    In this present work, new experimental data for density and vapour pressure of the mixed-solvent desiccant systems containing {40 wt% glycol (propylene or dipropylene or tripropylene) + (4 or 9 or 16 wt%) magnesium chloride salt + water} were reported for temperatures up to 343.15 K at normal atmospheric condition. The density and vapour pressure data obtained are presented as a function of temperature and composition. An empirical equation was used to correlate the temperature and compositional dependence of the density values. A model based on the mean spherical approximation for aqueous electrolyte solutions incorporating the pseudo-solvent approach was used to represent the vapour pressure as a function of temperature and composition. Satisfactory results were obtained for both density and vapour pressure calculations

  17. Metal hydrides based high energy density thermal battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Zhigang Zak, E-mail: zak.fang@utah.edu [Department of Metallurgical Engineering, The University of Utah, 135 South 1460 East, Room 412, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0114 (United States); Zhou, Chengshang; Fan, Peng [Department of Metallurgical Engineering, The University of Utah, 135 South 1460 East, Room 412, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0114 (United States); Udell, Kent S. [Department of Metallurgical Engineering, The University of Utah, 50 S. Central Campus Dr., Room 2110, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0114 (United States); Bowman, Robert C. [Department of Metallurgical Engineering, The University of Utah, 135 South 1460 East, Room 412, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0114 (United States); Vajo, John J.; Purewal, Justin J. [HRL Laboratories, LLC, 3011 Malibu Canyon Road, Malibu, CA 90265 (United States); Kekelia, Bidzina [Department of Metallurgical Engineering, The University of Utah, 50 S. Central Campus Dr., Room 2110, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0114 (United States)

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • The principle of the thermal battery using advanced metal hydrides was demonstrated. • The thermal battery used MgH{sub 2} and TiMnV as a working pair. • High energy density can be achieved by the use of MgH{sub 2} to store thermal energy. - Abstract: A concept of thermal battery based on advanced metal hydrides was studied for heating and cooling of cabins in electric vehicles. The system utilized a pair of thermodynamically matched metal hydrides as energy storage media. The pair of hydrides that was identified and developed was: (1) catalyzed MgH{sub 2} as the high temperature hydride material, due to its high energy density and enhanced kinetics; and (2) TiV{sub 0.62}Mn{sub 1.5} alloy as the matching low temperature hydride. Further, a proof-of-concept prototype was built and tested, demonstrating the potential of the system as HVAC for transportation vehicles.

  18. Dependence of compressive strength of green compacts on pressure, density and contact area of powder particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salam, A.; Akram, M.; Shahid, K.A.; Javed, M.; Zaidi, S.M.

    1994-08-01

    The relationship between green compressive strength and compacting pressure as well as green density has been investigated for uniaxially pressed aluminium powder compacts in the range 0 - 520 MPa. Two linear relationships occurred between compacting pressure and green compressive strength which corresponded to powder compaction stages II and III respectively, increase in strength being large during stage II and quite small in stage III with increasing pressure. On the basis of both, the experimental results and a previous model on cold compaction of powder particles, relationships between green compressive strength and green density and interparticle contact area of the compacts has been established. (author) 9 figs

  19. Trivial constraints on orbital-free kinetic energy density functionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Kai; Trickey, S. B.

    2018-03-01

    Approximate kinetic energy density functionals (KEDFs) are central to orbital-free density functional theory. Limitations on the spatial derivative dependencies of KEDFs have been claimed from differential virial theorems. We identify a central defect in the argument: the relationships are not true for an arbitrary density but hold only for the minimizing density and corresponding chemical potential. Contrary to the claims therefore, the relationships are not constraints and provide no independent information about the spatial derivative dependencies of approximate KEDFs. A simple argument also shows that validity for arbitrary v-representable densities is not restored by appeal to the density-potential bijection.

  20. High Energy Density Physics and Exotic Acceleration Schemes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowan, T.; Colby, E.

    2005-01-01

    The High Energy Density and Exotic Acceleration working group took as our goal to reach beyond the community of plasma accelerator research with its applications to high energy physics, to promote exchange with other disciplines which are challenged by related and demanding beam physics issues. The scope of the group was to cover particle acceleration and beam transport that, unlike other groups at AAC, are not mediated by plasmas or by electromagnetic structures. At this Workshop, we saw an impressive advancement from years past in the area of Vacuum Acceleration, for example with the LEAP experiment at Stanford. And we saw an influx of exciting new beam physics topics involving particle propagation inside of solid-density plasmas or at extremely high charge density, particularly in the areas of laser acceleration of ions, and extreme beams for fusion energy research, including Heavy-ion Inertial Fusion beam physics. One example of the importance and extreme nature of beam physics in HED research is the requirement in the Fast Ignitor scheme of inertial fusion to heat a compressed DT fusion pellet to keV temperatures by injection of laser-driven electron or ion beams of giga-Amp current. Even in modest experiments presently being performed on the laser-acceleration of ions from solids, mega-amp currents of MeV electrons must be transported through solid foils, requiring almost complete return current neutralization, and giving rise to a wide variety of beam-plasma instabilities. As keynote talks our group promoted Ion Acceleration (plenary talk by A. MacKinnon), which historically has grown out of inertial fusion research, and HIF Accelerator Research (invited talk by A. Friedman), which will require impressive advancements in space-charge-limited ion beam physics and in understanding the generation and transport of neutralized ion beams. A unifying aspect of High Energy Density applications was the physics of particle beams inside of solids, which is proving to

  1. Realistic level densities in fragment emission at high excitation energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mustafa, M.G.; Blann, M.; Ignatyuk, A.V.

    1993-01-01

    Heavy fragment emission from a 44 100 Ru compound nucleus at 400 and 800 MeV of excitation is analyzed to study the influence of level density models on final yields. An approach is used in which only quasibound shell-model levels are included in calculating level densities. We also test the traditional Fermi gas model for which there is no upper energy limit to the single particle levels. We compare the influence of these two level density models in evaporation calculations of primary fragment excitations, kinetic energies and yields, and on final product yields

  2. Determination of dislocation density in Zr-2.5Nb pressure tubes by x-ray

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Suk; Isaenkova, Perlovich; Cheong, Y. M.; Kim, S. S.; Yim, K. S.; Kwon, Sang Chul

    2000-11-01

    For X-ray determination of the dislocation density in CANDU Zr-2.5%Nb pressure tubes, a program was developed, using the Fourier analysis of X-ray line profiles and calculation of dislocation density by values of the coherent block size and the lattice distortion. The coincidence of obtained values of c- and a-dislocations with those, determined by the X-ray method for the same tube in AECL, was assumed to be the main criterion of validity of the developed program. The final variant of the program allowed to attain a rather close coincidence of calculated dislocation densities with results of AECL. The dislocation density was determined in all the zirconium grains with different orientations based on the texture of the stree-relieved CANDU tube. The complete distribution of c-dislocation density in -Zr grains depecding on their crystallographic orientations was constructed. The distribution of a-dislocation density within the texture maximum at L-direction, containing prismatic axes of all grains, was constructed as well. The analysis of obtained distributions testifies that -Zr grains of the stree-relieved CANDU tube significantly differ in their dislocation densities. Plotted diagrams of correlation between the dislocation density and the pole density allow to estimate the actual connection between texture and dislocation distribution in the studied tube. The distributions of volume fractions of all the zirconium grains depending on their dislocation density were calculated both for c- and a-dislocations. The distributions characterizes quantitatively the inhomogeneity of substructure conditions in the stress-relieved CANDU tube. the optimal procedure for determination of Nb content in {beta}-phases of CANDU Zr-2.5%Nb pressure tubes was also established.

  3. Pressure dependence of electron density distribution and d-p-π hybridization in titanate perovskite ferroelectrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Takamitsu; Nakamoto, Yuki; Ahart, Muhtar; Mao, Ho-kwang

    2018-04-01

    Electron density distributions of PbTi O3 , BaTi O3 , and SrTi O3 were determined by synchrotron x-ray powder diffraction up to 55 GPa at 300 K and ab initio quantum chemical molecular orbital (MO) calculations, together with a combination of maximum entropy method calculations. The intensity profiles of Bragg peaks reveal split atoms in both ferroelectric PbTi O3 and BaTi O3 , reflecting the two possible positions occupied by the Ti atom. The experimentally obtained atomic structure factor was used for the determination of the deformation in electron density and the d-p-π hybridization between dx z (and dy z) of Ti and px (and py) of O in the Ti-O bond. Ab initio MO calculations proved the change of the molecular orbital coupling and of Mulliken charges with a structure transformation. The Mulliken charge of Ti in the Ti O6 octahedron increased in the ionicity with increasing pressure in the cubic phase. The bonding nature is changed with a decrease in the hybridization of the Ti-O bond and the localization of the electron density with increasing pressure. The hybridization decreases with pressure and disappears in the cubic paraelectric phase, which has a much more localized electron density distribution.

  4. Local energy equation for two-electron atoms and relation between kinetic energy and electron densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    March, N.H.

    2002-08-01

    In early work, Dawson and March [J. Chem. Phys. 81, 5850 (1984)] proposed a local energy method for treating both Hartree-Fock and correlated electron theory. Here, an exactly solvable model two-electron atom with pure harmonic interactions is treated in its ground state in the above context. A functional relation between the kinetic energy density t(r) at the origin r=0 and the electron density p(r) at the same point then emerges. The same approach is applied to the Hookean atom; in which the two electrons repel with Coulombic energy e 2 /r 12 , with r 12 the interelectronic separation, but are still harmonically confined. Again the kinetic energy density t(r) is the focal point, but now generalization away from r=0 is also effected. Finally, brief comments are added about He-like atomic ions in the limit of large atomic number. (author)

  5. The creation of high energy densities with antimatter beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibbs, W.R.; Kruk, J.W.; Rice Univ., Houston, TX

    1989-01-01

    The use of antiprotons (and antideuterons) for the study of the behavior of nuclear matter at high energy density is considered. It is shown that high temperatures and high energy densities can be achieved for small volumes. Also investigated is the strangeness production in antimatter annihilation. It is found that the high rate of Lambda production seen in a recent experiment is easily understood. The Lambda and K-short rapidity distributions are also reproduced by the model considered. 11 refs., 6 figs

  6. Solvent density inhomogeneities and solvation free energies in supercritical diatomic fluids: a density functional approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husowitz, B; Talanquer, V

    2007-02-07

    Density functional theory is used to explore the solvation properties of a spherical solute immersed in a supercritical diatomic fluid. The solute is modeled as a hard core Yukawa particle surrounded by a diatomic Lennard-Jones fluid represented by two fused tangent spheres using an interaction site approximation. The authors' approach is particularly suitable for thoroughly exploring the effect of different interaction parameters, such as solute-solvent interaction strength and range, solvent-solvent long-range interactions, and particle size, on the local solvent structure and the solvation free energy under supercritical conditions. Their results indicate that the behavior of the local coordination number in homonuclear diatomic fluids follows trends similar to those reported in previous studies for monatomic fluids. The local density augmentation is particularly sensitive to changes in solute size and is affected to a lesser degree by variations in the solute-solvent interaction strength and range. The associated solvation free energies exhibit a nonmonotonous behavior as a function of density for systems with weak solute-solvent interactions. The authors' results suggest that solute-solvent interaction anisotropies have a major influence on the nature and extent of local solvent density inhomogeneities and on the value of the solvation free energies in supercritical solutions of heteronuclear molecules.

  7. Low Density Symmetry Energy Effects and the Neutron Star Crust Properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubis, S.; Alvarez-Castillo, D.E.; Porebska, J.

    2010-01-01

    The form of the nuclear symmetry energy E s around saturation point density leads to a different crust-core transition point in the neutron star and affects the crust properties. We show that the knowledge of E s close to the saturation point is not sufficient to determine the position of the transition point and the very low density behaviour is required. We also claim that crust properties are strongly influenced by the very high density behaviour of E s , so in order to conclude about the form of low density part of the symmetry energy from astrophysical data one must isolate properly the high density part. (authors)

  8. Energy-dense fast food products cost less: an observational study of the energy density and energy cost of Australian fast foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellard, Lyndal; Havill, Michelle; Hughes, Clare; Watson, Wendy L; Chapman, Kathy

    2015-12-01

    To examine the association between energy cost and energy density of fast food products. Twenty Sydney outlets of the five largest fast food chains were surveyed four times. Price and kilojoule data were collected for all limited-time-only menu items (n=54) and a sample of standard items (n=67). Energy cost ($/kilojoule) and energy density (kilojoules/gram) of menu items were calculated. There was a significant inverse relationship between menu item energy density and energy cost (pFast food chains could provide a wider range of affordable, lower-energy foods, use proportional pricing of larger serve sizes, or change defaults in meals to healthier options. More research is required to determine the most effective strategy to reduce the negative impact of fast food on the population's diet. Current pricing in the fast food environment may encourage unhealthier purchases. © 2015 Public Health Association of Australia.

  9. Electron Density in Atmospheric Pressure Microwave Surface Wave Discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jasinski, M.; Zakrzewski, Z.; Mizeraczyk, J.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we present results of the spectroscopic measurements of the electron density in a microwave surface wave sustained discharges in Ar and Ne at atmospheric pressure. The discharge in the form of a plasma column was generated inside a quartz tube cooled with a dielectric liquid. The microwave power delivered to the discharge via rectangular waveguide was applied in the range of 200-1500 W. In all investigations presented in this paper, the gas flow rate was relatively low (0.5 l/min), so the plasma column was generated in the form of a single filament, and the lengths of the upstream and downstream plasma columns were almost the same. The electron density in the plasma columns was determined using the method based on the Stark broadening of H β spectral line, including plasma region inside the waveguide which was not investigated earlier

  10. Large Hadron Collider at CERN: Beams generating high-energy-density matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahir, N A; Schmidt, R; Shutov, A; Lomonosov, I V; Piriz, A R; Hoffmann, D H H; Deutsch, C; Fortov, V E

    2009-04-01

    This paper presents numerical simulations that have been carried out to study the thermodynamic and hydrodynamic responses of a solid copper cylindrical target that is facially irradiated along the axis by one of the two Large Hadron Collider (LHC) 7 TeV/ c proton beams. The energy deposition by protons in solid copper has been calculated using an established particle interaction and Monte Carlo code, FLUKA, which is capable of simulating all components of the particle cascades in matter, up to multi-TeV energies. These data have been used as input to a sophisticated two-dimensional hydrodynamic computer code BIG2 that has been employed to study this problem. The prime purpose of these investigations was to assess the damage caused to the equipment if the entire LHC beam is lost at a single place. The FLUKA calculations show that the energy of protons will be deposited in solid copper within about 1 m assuming constant material parameters. Nevertheless, our hydrodynamic simulations have shown that the energy deposition region will extend to a length of about 35 m over the beam duration. This is due to the fact that first few tens of bunches deposit sufficient energy that leads to high pressure that generates an outgoing radial shock wave. Shock propagation leads to continuous reduction in the density at the target center that allows the protons delivered in subsequent bunches to penetrate deeper and deeper into the target. This phenomenon has also been seen in case of heavy-ion heated targets [N. A. Tahir, A. Kozyreva, P. Spiller, D. H. H. Hoffmann, and A. Shutov, Phys. Rev. E 63, 036407 (2001)]. This effect needs to be considered in the design of a sacrificial beam stopper. These simulations have also shown that the target is severely damaged and is converted into a huge sample of high-energy density (HED) matter. In fact, the inner part of the target is transformed into a strongly coupled plasma with fairly uniform physical conditions. This work, therefore, has

  11. Knot soliton in DNA and geometric structure of its free-energy density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Shi, Xuguang

    2018-03-01

    In general, the geometric structure of DNA is characterized using an elastic rod model. The Landau model provides us a new theory to study the geometric structure of DNA. By using the decomposition of the arc unit in the helical axis of DNA, we find that the free-energy density of DNA is similar to the free-energy density of a two-condensate superconductor. By using the φ-mapping topological current theory, the torus knot soliton hidden in DNA is demonstrated. We show the relation between the geometric structure and free-energy density of DNA and the Frenet equations in differential geometry theory are considered. Therefore, the free-energy density of DNA can be expressed by the curvature and torsion of the helical axis.

  12. Binding Energy, Vapor Pressure and Melting Point of Semiconductor Nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    H. H. Farrell; C. D. Van Siclen

    2007-01-01

    Current models for the cohesive energy of nanoparticles generally predict a linear dependence on the inverse particle diameter for spherical clusters, or, equivalently, on the inverse of the cube root of the number of atoms in the cluster. Although this is generally true for metals, we find that for the group IV semiconductors, C, Si and Ge, this linear dependence does not hold. Instead, using first principles, density functional theory calculations to calculate the binding energy of these materials, we find a quadratic dependence on the inverse of the particle size. Similar results have also been obtained for the metallic group IV elements Sn and Pb. This is in direct contradiction to current assumptions. Further, as a consequence of this quadratic behavior, the vapor pressure of semiconductor nanoparticles rises more slowly with decreasing size than would be expected. In addition, the melting point of these nanoparticles will experience less suppression than experienced by metal nanoparticles with comparable bulk binding energies. This non-linearity also affects sintering or Ostwald ripening behavior of these nanoparticles as well as other physical properties that depend on the nanoparticle binding energy. The reason for this variation in size dependence involves the covalent nature of the bonding in semiconductors, and even in the 'poor' metals. Therefore, it is expected that this result will hold for compound semiconductors as well as the elemental semiconductors

  13. Impact of the pedestal plasma density on dynamics of edge localized mode crashes and energy loss scaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, X. Q., E-mail: xxu@llnl.gov [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Ma, J. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Institute for Fusion Studies, University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Li, G. Q. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei (China)

    2014-12-15

    The latest BOUT++ studies show an emerging understanding of dynamics of edge localized mode (ELM) crashes and the consistent collisionality scaling of ELM energy losses with the world multi-tokamak database. A series of BOUT++ simulations are conducted to investigate the scaling characteristics of the ELM energy losses vs collisionality via a density scan. Linear results demonstrate that as the pedestal collisionality decreases, the growth rate of the peeling-ballooning modes decreases for high n but increases for low n (1 < n < 5), therefore the width of the growth rate spectrum γ(n) becomes narrower and the peak growth shifts to lower n. Nonlinear BOUT++ simulations show a two-stage process of ELM crash evolution of (i) initial bursts of pressure blob and void creation and (ii) inward void propagation. The inward void propagation stirs the top of pedestal plasma and yields an increasing ELM size with decreasing collisionality after a series of micro-bursts. The pedestal plasma density plays a major role in determining the ELM energy loss through its effect on the edge bootstrap current and ion diamagnetic stabilization. The critical trend emerges as a transition (1) linearly from ballooning-dominated states at high collisionality to peeling-dominated states at low collisionality with decreasing density and (2) nonlinearly from turbulence spreading dynamics at high collisionality into avalanche-like dynamics at low collisionality.

  14. Nanocomposites with increased energy density through high aspect ratio PZT nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Haixiong; Lin, Yirong; Andrews, Clark; Sodano, Henry A

    2011-01-07

    High energy storage plays an important role in the modern electric industry. Herein, we investigated the role of filler aspect ratio in nanocomposites for energy storage. Nanocomposites were synthesized using lead zirconate titanate (PZT) with two different aspect ratio (nanowires, nanorods) fillers at various volume fractions dispersed in a polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) matrix. The permittivity constants of composites containing nanowires (NWs) were higher than those with nanorods (NRs) at the same inclusion volume fraction. It was also indicated that the high frequency loss tangent of samples with PZT nanowires was smaller than for those with nanorods, demonstrating the high electrical energy storage efficiency of the PZT NW nanocomposite. The high aspect ratio PZT NWs showed a 77.8% increase in energy density over the lower aspect ratio PZT NRs, under an electric field of 15 kV mm(-1) and 50% volume fraction. The breakdown strength was found to decrease with the increasing volume fraction of PZT NWs, but to only change slightly from a volume fraction of around 20%-50%. The maximum calculated energy density of nanocomposites is as high as 1.158 J cm(-3) at 50% PZT NWs in PVDF. Since the breakdown strength is lower compared to a PVDF copolymer such as poly(vinylidene fluoride-tertrifluoroethylene-terchlorotrifluoroethylene) P(VDF-TreEE-CTFE) and poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) P(VDF-HFP), the energy density of the nanocomposite could be significantly increased through the use of PZT NWs and a polymer with greater breakdown strength. These results indicate that higher aspect ratio fillers show promising potential to improve the energy density of nanocomposites, leading to the development of advanced capacitors with high energy density.

  15. Towards improved local hybrid functionals by calibration of exchange-energy densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arbuznikov, Alexei V.; Kaupp, Martin

    2014-01-01

    A new approach for the calibration of (semi-)local and exact exchange-energy densities in the context of local hybrid functionals is reported. The calibration functions are derived from only the electron density and its spatial derivatives, avoiding spatial derivatives of the exact-exchange energy density or other computationally unfavorable contributions. The calibration functions fulfill the seven more important out of nine known exact constraints. It is shown that calibration improves substantially the definition of a non-dynamical correlation energy term for generalized gradient approximation (GGA)-based local hybrids. Moreover, gauge artifacts in the potential-energy curves of noble-gas dimers may be corrected by calibration. The developed calibration functions are then evaluated for a large range of energy-related properties (atomization energies, reaction barriers, ionization potentials, electron affinities, and total atomic energies) of three sets of local hybrids, using a simple one-parameter local-mixing. The functionals are based on (a) local spin-density approximation (LSDA) or (b) Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) exchange and correlation, and on (c) Becke-88 (B88) exchange and Lee-Yang-Parr (LYP) correlation. While the uncalibrated GGA-based functionals usually provide very poor thermochemical data, calibration allows a dramatic improvement, accompanied by only a small deterioration of reaction barriers. In particular, an optimized BLYP-based local-hybrid functional has been found that is a substantial improvement over the underlying global hybrids, as well as over previously reported LSDA-based local hybrids. It is expected that the present calibration approach will pave the way towards new generations of more accurate hyper-GGA functionals based on a local mixing of exchange-energy densities

  16. KIDS Nuclear Energy Density Functional: 1st Application in Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Hana; Papakonstantinou, Panagiota; Hyun, Chang Ho; Oh, Yongseok

    We apply the KIDS (Korea: IBS-Daegu-Sungkyunkwan) nuclear energy density functional model, which is based on the Fermi momentum expansion, to the study of properties of lj-closed nuclei. The parameters of the model are determined by the nuclear properties at the saturation density and theoretical calculations on pure neutron matter. For applying the model to the study of nuclei, we rely on the Skyrme force model, where the Skyrme force parameters are determined through the KIDS energy density functional. Solving Hartree-Fock equations, we obtain the energies per particle and charge radii of closed magic nuclei, namely, 16O, 28O, 40Ca, 48Ca, 60Ca, 90Zr, 132Sn, and 208Pb. The results are compared with the observed data and further improvement of the model is shortly mentioned.

  17. TEMPO-based catholyte for high-energy density nonaqueous redox flow batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiaoliang; Xu, Wu; Vijayakumar, Murugesan; Cosimbescu, Lelia; Liu, Tianbiao; Sprenkle, Vincent; Wang, Wei

    2014-12-03

    A TEMPO-based non-aqueous electrolyte with the TEMPO concentration as high as 2.0 m is demonstrated as a high-energy-density catholyte for redox flow battery applications. With a hybrid anode, Li|TEMPO flow cells using this electrolyte deliver an energy efficiency of ca. 70% and an impressively high energy density of 126 W h L(-1) . © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Ambipolar zinc-polyiodide electrolyte for a high-energy density aqueous redox flow battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bin; Nie, Zimin; Vijayakumar, M; Li, Guosheng; Liu, Jun; Sprenkle, Vincent; Wang, Wei

    2015-02-24

    Redox flow batteries are receiving wide attention for electrochemical energy storage due to their unique architecture and advantages, but progress has so far been limited by their low energy density (~25 Wh l(-1)). Here we report a high-energy density aqueous zinc-polyiodide flow battery. Using the highly soluble iodide/triiodide redox couple, a discharge energy density of 167 Wh l(-1) is demonstrated with a near-neutral 5.0 M ZnI2 electrolyte. Nuclear magnetic resonance study and density functional theory-based simulation along with flow test data indicate that the addition of an alcohol (ethanol) induces ligand formation between oxygen on the hydroxyl group and the zinc ions, which expands the stable electrolyte temperature window to from -20 to 50 °C, while ameliorating the zinc dendrite. With the high-energy density and its benign nature free from strong acids and corrosive components, zinc-polyiodide flow battery is a promising candidate for various energy storage applications.

  19. High Energy Density Dielectrics for Pulsed Power Applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wu, Richard L; Bray, Kevin R

    2008-01-01

    This report was developed under a SBIR contract. Aluminum oxynitride (AlON) capacitors exhibit several promising characteristics for high energy density capacitor applications in extreme environments...

  20. Revisiting the density scaling of the non-interacting kinetic energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgoo, Alex; Teale, Andrew M; Tozer, David J

    2014-07-28

    Scaling relations play an important role in the understanding and development of approximate functionals in density functional theory. Recently, a number of these relationships have been redefined in terms of the Kohn-Sham orbitals [Calderín, Phys. Rev. A: At., Mol., Opt. Phys., 2013, 86, 032510]. For density scaling the author proposed a procedure involving a multiplicative scaling of the Kohn-Sham orbitals whilst keeping their occupation numbers fixed. In the present work, the differences between this scaling with fixed occupation numbers and that of previous studies, where the particle number change implied by the scaling was accommodated through the use of the grand canonical ensemble, are examined. We introduce the terms orbital and ensemble density scaling for these approaches, respectively. The natural ambiguity of the density scaling of the non-interacting kinetic energy functional is examined and the ancillary definitions implicit in each approach are highlighted and compared. As a consequence of these differences, Calderín recovered a homogeneity of degree 1 for the non-interacting kinetic energy functional under orbital scaling, contrasting recent work by the present authors [J. Chem. Phys., 2012, 136, 034101] where the functional was found to be inhomogeneous under ensemble density scaling. Furthermore, we show that the orbital scaling result follows directly from the linearity and the single-particle nature of the kinetic energy operator. The inhomogeneity of the non-interacting kinetic energy functional under ensemble density scaling can be quantified by defining an effective homogeneity. This quantity is shown to recover the homogeneity values for important approximate forms that are exact for limiting cases such as the uniform electron gas and one-electron systems. We argue that the ensemble density scaling provides more insight into the development of new functional forms.

  1. Radiation pressure acceleration: The factors limiting maximum attainable ion energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulanov, S. S.; Esarey, E.; Schroeder, C. B. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Bulanov, S. V. [KPSI, National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology, Kizugawa, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); A. M. Prokhorov Institute of General Physics RAS, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Kando, M. [KPSI, National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology, Kizugawa, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Pegoraro, F. [Physics Department, University of Pisa and Istituto Nazionale di Ottica, CNR, Pisa 56127 (Italy); Leemans, W. P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Physics Department, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    Radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) is a highly efficient mechanism of laser-driven ion acceleration, with near complete transfer of the laser energy to the ions in the relativistic regime. However, there is a fundamental limit on the maximum attainable ion energy, which is determined by the group velocity of the laser. The tightly focused laser pulses have group velocities smaller than the vacuum light speed, and, since they offer the high intensity needed for the RPA regime, it is plausible that group velocity effects would manifest themselves in the experiments involving tightly focused pulses and thin foils. However, in this case, finite spot size effects are important, and another limiting factor, the transverse expansion of the target, may dominate over the group velocity effect. As the laser pulse diffracts after passing the focus, the target expands accordingly due to the transverse intensity profile of the laser. Due to this expansion, the areal density of the target decreases, making it transparent for radiation and effectively terminating the acceleration. The off-normal incidence of the laser on the target, due either to the experimental setup, or to the deformation of the target, will also lead to establishing a limit on maximum ion energy.

  2. Excitation energy and angular momentum dependence of the nuclear level densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Razavi, R.; Kakavand, T.; Behkami, A. N.

    2007-01-01

    We have investigated the excitation energy (E) dependence of nuclear level density for Bethe formula and constant temperature model. The level density parameter aa nd the back shifted energy from the Bethe formula are obtained by fitting the complete level schemes. Also the level density parameters from the constant temperature model have been determined for several nuclei. we have shown that the microscopic theory provides more precise information on the nuclear level densities. On the other hand, the spin cut-off parameter and effective moment of inertia are determined by studying of the angular momentum (J) dependence of the nuclear level density, and effective moment of inertia is compared with rigid body value.

  3. A blended pressure/density based method for the computation of incompressible and compressible flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossow, C.-C.

    2003-01-01

    An alternative method to low speed preconditioning for the computation of nearly incompressible flows with compressible methods is developed. For this approach the leading terms of the flux difference splitting (FDS) approximate Riemann solver are analyzed in the incompressible limit. In combination with the requirement of the velocity field to be divergence-free, an elliptic equation to solve for a pressure correction to enforce the divergence-free velocity field on the discrete level is derived. The pressure correction equation established is shown to be equivalent to classical methods for incompressible flows. In order to allow the computation of flows at all speeds, a blending technique for the transition from the incompressible, pressure based formulation to the compressible, density based formulation is established. It is found necessary to use preconditioning with this blending technique to account for a remaining 'compressible' contribution in the incompressible limit, and a suitable matrix directly applicable to conservative residuals is derived. Thus, a coherent framework is established to cover the discretization of both incompressible and compressible flows. Compared with standard preconditioning techniques, the blended pressure/density based approach showed improved robustness for high lift flows close to separation

  4. Generation of sub-gigabar-pressure shocks by a hyper-velocity impact in the collider driven by laser-induced cavity pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badziak, J.; Kucharik, M.; Liska, R.

    2018-02-01

    The generation of high-pressure shocks in the newly proposed collider in which the projectile impacting a solid target is driven by the laser-induced cavity pressure acceleration (LICPA) mechanism is investigated using two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations. The dependence of parameters of the shock generated in the target by the impact of a gold projectile on the impacted target material and the laser driver energy is examined. It is found that both in case of low-density (CH, Al) and high-density (Au, Cu) solid targets the shock pressures in the sub-Gbar range can be produced in the LICPA-driven collider with the laser energy of only a few hundreds of joules, and the laser-to-shock energy conversion efficiency can reach values of 10 - 20 %, by an order of magnitude higher than the conversion efficiencies achieved with other laser-based methods used so far.

  5. An Electrochemical Capacitor with Applicable Energy Density of 7.4 Wh/kg at Average Power Density of 3000 W/kg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Teng; Lu, Xihong; Wang, Hanyu; Wang, Gongming; Mathis, Tyler; Liu, Tianyu; Li, Cheng; Tong, Yexiang; Li, Yat

    2015-05-13

    Electrochemical capacitors represent a new class of charge storage devices that can simultaneously achieve high energy density and high power density. Previous reports have been primarily focused on the development of high performance capacitor electrodes. Although these electrodes have achieved excellent specific capacitance based on per unit mass of active materials, the gravimetric energy densities calculated based on the weight of entire capacitor device were fairly small. This is mainly due to the large mass ratio between current collector and active material. We aimed to address this issue by a 2-fold approach of minimizing the mass of current collector and increasing the electrode performance. Here we report an electrochemical capacitor using 3D graphene hollow structure as current collector, vanadium sulfide and manganese oxide as anode and cathode materials, respectively. 3D graphene hollow structure provides a lightweight and highly conductive scaffold for deposition of pseudocapacitive materials. The device achieves an excellent active material ratio of 24%. Significantly, it delivers a remarkable energy density of 7.4 Wh/kg (based on the weight of entire device) at the average power density of 3000 W/kg. This is the highest gravimetric energy density reported for asymmetric electrochemical capacitors at such a high power density.

  6. Lithium-Based High Energy Density Flow Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugga, Ratnakumar V. (Inventor); West, William C. (Inventor); Kindler, Andrew (Inventor); Smart, Marshall C. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Systems and methods in accordance with embodiments of the invention implement a lithium-based high energy density flow battery. In one embodiment, a lithium-based high energy density flow battery includes a first anodic conductive solution that includes a lithium polyaromatic hydrocarbon complex dissolved in a solvent, a second cathodic conductive solution that includes a cathodic complex dissolved in a solvent, a solid lithium ion conductor disposed so as to separate the first solution from the second solution, such that the first conductive solution, the second conductive solution, and the solid lithium ionic conductor define a circuit, where when the circuit is closed, lithium from the lithium polyaromatic hydrocarbon complex in the first conductive solution dissociates from the lithium polyaromatic hydrocarbon complex, migrates through the solid lithium ionic conductor, and associates with the cathodic complex of the second conductive solution, and a current is generated.

  7. Physics and applications of high energy density plasmas. Extreme state driven by pulsed electromagnetic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horioka, Kazuhiko

    2002-06-01

    The papers presented at the symposium on ''Physics and application of high energy density plasmas, held December 20-21, 2001 at NIFS'' are collected in this proceedings. The topics covered in the meeting include dense z-pinches, plasma focus, intense charged particle beams, intense radiation sources, discharge pumped X-ray lasers, their diagnostics, and applications of them. The papers reflect the present status and trends in the research field of high energy density plasmas. (author)

  8. Hydrate-melt electrolytes for high-energy-density aqueous batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Yuki; Usui, Kenji; Sodeyama, Keitaro; Ko, Seongjae; Tateyama, Yoshitaka; Yamada, Atsuo

    2016-10-01

    Aqueous Li-ion batteries are attracting increasing attention because they are potentially low in cost, safe and environmentally friendly. However, their low energy density (water and the limited selection of suitable negative electrodes, is problematic for their future widespread application. Here, we explore optimized eutectic systems of several organic Li salts and show that a room-temperature hydrate melt of Li salts can be used as a stable aqueous electrolyte in which all water molecules participate in Li+ hydration shells while retaining fluidity. This hydrate-melt electrolyte enables a reversible reaction at a commercial Li4Ti5O12 negative electrode with a low reaction potential (1.55 V versus Li+/Li) and a high capacity (175 mAh g-1). The resultant aqueous Li-ion batteries with high energy density (>130 Wh kg-1) and high voltage (˜2.3-3.1 V) represent significant progress towards performance comparable to that of commercial non-aqueous batteries (with energy densities of ˜150-400 Wh kg-1 and voltages of ˜2.4-3.8 V).

  9. Workshop on extremely high energy density plasmas and their diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishii, Shozo (ed.)

    2001-09-01

    Compiled are the papers presented at the workshop on 'Extremely High Energy Density Plasmas and Their Diagnostics' held at National Institute for Fusion Science. The papers cover physics and applications of extremely high-energy density plasmas such as dense z-pinch, plasma focus, and intense pulsed charged beams. Separate abstracts were presented for 7 of the papers in this report. The remaining 25 were considered outside the subject scope of INIS. (author)

  10. Workshop on extremely high energy density plasmas and their diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Shozo

    2001-09-01

    Compiled are the papers presented at the workshop on 'Extremely High Energy Density Plasmas and Their Diagnostics' held at National Institute for Fusion Science. The papers cover physics and applications of extremely high-energy density plasmas such as dense z-pinch, plasma focus, and intense pulsed charged beams. Separate abstracts were presented for 7 of the papers in this report. The remaining 25 were considered outside the subject scope of INIS. (author)

  11. Dietary Energy Density in the Australian Adult Population from National Nutrition Surveys 1995 to 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grech, Amanda Lee; Rangan, Anna; Allman-Farinelli, Margaret

    2017-12-01

    It is hypothesized that the observed proliferation of energy-dense, nutrient-poor foods globally is an important contributing factor to the development of the obesity epidemic. However, evidence that the population's dietary energy density has increased is sparse. The World Cancer Research Fund recommends that dietary energy density be density of the Australian population has changed between 1995 and 2012. A secondary analysis of two cross-sectional Australian national nutrition surveys from 1995 and 2011/2012 was conducted. Participants of the surveys included adults aged 18 years and older (1995 n=10,986 and 2011/2012 n=9,435) completing 24-hour dietary recalls, including a second recall for a subset of the population (10.4% in 1995 and 64.6% in 2011/2012). Outcome measures included the change in dietary energy density (calculated as energy/weight of food [kcal/g] for food only) between surveys. The National Cancer Institute method for "estimating ratios of two dietary components that are consumed nearly every day" was used to determine the usual distribution and the percentage of participants reporting energy density density was 1.59 (0.26) kcal/g and 1.64 (0.32) kcal/g (Pdensity recommendations. For those aged 70 years and older, the percentage with energy density density density has increased between the two surveys and few people consumed low energy-dense diets in line with recommendations. The change was largely due to increased energy density of older adult's diets, while young adults had high dietary energy density at both time points. These data suggest efforts now focus on the evaluation of the role of modifying energy density of the diet to reduce the risk of weight gain in adults. Copyright © 2017 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of energy content and energy density of pre-portioned entrées on energy intake

    OpenAIRE

    Blatt, Alexandria D.; Williams, Rachel A.; Roe, Liane S.; Rolls, Barbara J.

    2012-01-01

    Pre-portioned entrées are commonly consumed to help control portion size and limit energy intake. The influence of entrée characteristics on energy intake, however, has not been well studied. We determined how the effects of energy content and energy density (ED, kcal/g) of pre-portioned entrées combine to influence daily energy intake. In a crossover design, 68 non-dieting adults (28 men and 40 women) were provided with breakfast, lunch, and dinner on one day a week for four weeks. Each meal...

  13. Low-pressure phase diagram of crystalline benzene from quantum Monte Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azadi, Sam, E-mail: s.azadi@ucl.ac.uk [Departments of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Thomas Young Center, London Centre for Nanotechnology, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Cohen, R. E. [Extreme Materials Initiative, Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution for Science, Washington, DC 20015 (United States); Department of Earth- and Environmental Sciences, Ludwig Maximilians Universität, Munich 80333 (Germany); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2016-08-14

    We studied the low-pressure (0–10 GPa) phase diagram of crystalline benzene using quantum Monte Carlo and density functional theory (DFT) methods. We performed diffusion quantum Monte Carlo (DMC) calculations to obtain accurate static phase diagrams as benchmarks for modern van der Waals density functionals. Using density functional perturbation theory, we computed the phonon contributions to the free energies. Our DFT enthalpy-pressure phase diagrams indicate that the Pbca and P2{sub 1}/c structures are the most stable phases within the studied pressure range. The DMC Gibbs free-energy calculations predict that the room temperature Pbca to P2{sub 1}/c phase transition occurs at 2.1(1) GPa. This prediction is consistent with available experimental results at room temperature. Our DMC calculations give 50.6 ± 0.5 kJ/mol for crystalline benzene lattice energy.

  14. Non-local energy density functionals: models plus some exact general results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    March, N.H.

    2001-02-01

    Holas and March (Phys. Rev. A51, 2040, 1995) gave a formally exact expression for the force - δV xc (r-tilde)/δr-tilde associated with the exchange-correlation potential V xc (r-tilde) of density functional theory. This forged a precise link between first- and second-order density matrices and V xc (r-tilde). Here models are presented in which these low-order matrices can be related to the ground-state electron density. This allows non-local energy density functionals to be constructed within the framework of such models. Finally, results emerging from these models have led to the derivation of some exact 'nuclear cusp' relations for exchange and correlation energy densities in molecules, clusters and condensed phases. (author)

  15. Statistical mechanics of light elements at high pressure. VII. A perturbative free energy for arbitrary mixtures of H and He

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubbard, W.B.; Dewitt, H.E.

    1985-01-01

    A model free energy is presented which accurately represents results from 45 high-precision Monte Carlo calculations of the thermodynamics of hydrogen-helium mixtures at pressures of astrophysical and planetophysical interest. The free energy is calculated using free-electron perturbation theory (dielectric function theory), and is an extension of the expression given in an earlier paper in this series. However, it fits the Monte Carlo results more accurately, and is valid for the full range of compositions from pure hydrogen to pure helium. Using the new free energy, the phase diagram of mixtures of liquid metallic hydrogen and helium is calculated and compared with earlier results. Sample results for mixing volumes are also presented, and the new free energy expression is used to compute a theoretical Jovian adiabat and compare the adiabat with results from three-dimensional Thomas-Fermi-Dirac theory. The present theory gives slightly higher densities at pressures of about 10 megabars. 20 references

  16. Statistical mechanics of light elements at high pressure. VII - A perturbative free energy for arbitrary mixtures of H and He

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, W. B.; Dewitt, H. E.

    1985-01-01

    A model free energy is presented which accurately represents results from 45 high-precision Monte Carlo calculations of the thermodynamics of hydrogen-helium mixtures at pressures of astrophysical and planetophysical interest. The free energy is calculated using free-electron perturbation theory (dielectric function theory), and is an extension of the expression given in an earlier paper in this series. However, it fits the Monte Carlo results more accurately, and is valid for the full range of compositions from pure hydrogen to pure helium. Using the new free energy, the phase diagram of mixtures of liquid metallic hydrogen and helium is calculated and compared with earlier results. Sample results for mixing volumes are also presented, and the new free energy expression is used to compute a theoretical Jovian adiabat and compare the adiabat with results from three-dimensional Thomas-Fermi-Dirac theory. The present theory gives slightly higher densities at pressures of about 10 megabars.

  17. Kaon Condensation in Neutron Stars and High Density Behaviour of Nuclear Symmetry Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubis, S.; Kutschera, M.

    1999-01-01

    We study the influence of a high density behaviour of the nuclear symmetry energy on a kaon condensation in neutron stars. We find that the symmetry energy typical for several realistic nuclear potentials, which decreases at high densities, inhibits kaon condensation for weaker kaon-nucleon couplings at any density. There exists a threshold coupling above which the kaon condensate forms at densities exceeding some critical value. This is in contrast to the case of rising symmetry energy, as e.g. for relativistic mean field models, when the kaon condensate can form for any coupling at a sufficiently high density. Properties of the condensate are also different in both cases. (author)

  18. Kaon Condensation in Neutron Stars and High Density Behaviour of Nuclear Symmetry Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubis, S.; Kutschera, M.

    1999-04-01

    We study the influence of a high density behaviour of the nuclear symmetry energy on a kaon condensation in neutron stars. We find that the symmetry energy typical for several realistic nuclear potentials, which decreases at high densities, inhibits kaon condensation for weaker kaon-nucleon couplings at any density. There exists a threshold coupling above which the kaon condensate forms at densities exceeding some critical value. This is in contrast to the case of rising symmetry energy, as e.g. for relativistic mean field models, when the kaon condensate can form for any coupling at a sufficiently high density. Properties of the condensate are also different in both cases

  19. Density of Fe-3.5 wt% C liquid at high pressure and temperature and the effect of carbon on the density of the molten iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimoyama, Yuta; Terasaki, Hidenori; Ohtani, Eiji; Urakawa, Satoru; Takubo, Yusaku; Nishida, Keisuke; Suzuki, Akio; Katayama, Yoshinori

    2013-11-01

    Carbon is a plausible light element candidate in the Earth’s outer core. We measured the density of liquid Fe-3.5 wt% C up to 6.8 GPa and 2200 K using an X-ray absorption method. The compression curve of liquid Fe-C was fitted using the third-order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state. The bulk modulus and its pressure derivative are K0,1500K = 55.3 ± 2.5 GPa and (dK0/dP)T = 5.2 ± 1.5, and the thermal expansion coefficient is α = 0.86 ± 0.04 × 10-4 K-1. The Fe-C density abruptly increases at pressures between 4.3 and 5.5 GPa in the range of present temperatures. Compared with the results of previous density measurements of liquid Fe-C, the effect of carbon on the density of liquid Fe shows a nonideal mixing behavior. The abrupt density increase and nonideal mixing behavior are important factors in determining the light element content in the Earth’s core.

  20. Self-contained filtered density function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouri, A. G.; Nik, M. B.; Givi, P.; Livescu, D.; Pope, S. B.

    2017-09-01

    The filtered density function (FDF) closure is extended to a "self-contained" format to include the subgrid-scale (SGS) statistics of all of the hydro-thermo-chemical variables in turbulent flows. These are the thermodynamic pressure, the specific internal energy, the velocity vector, and the composition field. In this format, the model is comprehensive and facilitates large-eddy simulation (LES) of flows at both low and high compressibility levels. A transport equation is developed for the joint pressure-energy-velocity-composition filtered mass density function (PEVC-FMDF). In this equation, the effect of convection appears in closed form. The coupling of the hydrodynamics and thermochemistry is modeled via a set of stochastic differential equation for each of the transport variables. This yields a self-contained SGS closure. For demonstration, LES is conducted of a turbulent shear flow with transport of a passive scalar. The consistency of the PEVC-FMDF formulation is established, and its overall predictive capability is appraised via comparison with direct numerical simulation (DNS) data.

  1. Color ferromagnetic vacuum states in QCD and two-loop energy densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, H.B.; Ninomiya, M.

    1979-12-01

    Two-loop energy densities of color ferromagnetic states are obtained using the β-function calculated to two-loop approximation and the exact formula for the energy density of such a state. This is used to derive bounds on the MIT bag constant correcting the previous bound in one-loop approximation. For a constant field color ferromagnetic ansatz state the bound on the QCD scale parameter Λsub(p) 3 -vacuum ansatz with two-loop and instanton correction gives Λsub(p)<= 0.16 GeV. Tt is stressed that the 'perturbative vacuum', which is identified with the inside bag state is a somewhat ill defined concept due to a path-dependence in the integral giving the energy density. (Auth.)

  2. Melting temperature, vapor density, and vapor pressure of molybdenum pentafluoride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, Jr, R F; Douglas, T B [National Bureau of Standards, Washington, D.C. (USA). Inst. for Materials Research

    1977-12-01

    A sample of MoF/sub 5/ was prepared by reaction of MoF/sub 6/(g) and Mo(c). Melting curves of temperature against time established the melting temperature at zero impurity to be 318.85 K, the enthalpy of fusion to be 6.1 kJ mol/sup -1/ (+ - 5 per cent), and the cryoscopic impurity of the sample to be 0.15 mole per cent. In the presence of MoF/sub 6/(g) which was added to suppress disproportionation, the vapor density of MoF/sub 5/ over the liquid was measured by the transpiration method at 343, 363, and 383 K, the total MoF/sub 5/ that evaporated being determined by permanganate titration. The total vapor pressure of MoF/sub 5/ oligomers over the liquid was measured by a simple static method at 373 and 392 K, while melting temperatures were taken alternately to monitor possible contamination of the sample. Although the vapor pressures were adjusted for disproportionation, solution of MoF/sub 6/ in MoF/sub 5/ (1), and wall adsorption of MoF/sub 6/ their percentage uncertainty is probably several times that of the vapor densities. A combination of the two properties indicates the average extent of association of the saturated vapor to be near 2, which is the value for the dimer species (MoF/sub 5/)/sub 2/.

  3. Energy density functional analysis of shape coexistence in 44S

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Z. P.; Yao, J. M.; Vretenar, D.; Nikšić, T.; Meng, J.

    2012-01-01

    The structure of low-energy collective states in the neutron-rich nucleus 44 S is analyzed using a microscopic collective Hamiltonian model based on energy density functionals (EDFs). The calculated triaxial energy map, low-energy spectrum and corresponding probability distributions indicate a coexistence of prolate and oblate shapes in this nucleus.

  4. Physics and applications of high energy density plasmas. Extreme state driven by pulsed electromagnetic energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horioka, Kazuhiko (ed.)

    2002-06-01

    The papers presented at the symposium on ''Physics and application of high energy density plasmas, held December 20-21, 2001 at NIFS'' are collected in this proceedings. The topics covered in the meeting include dense z-pinches, plasma focus, intense charged particle beams, intense radiation sources, discharge pumped X-ray lasers, their diagnostics, and applications of them. The papers reflect the present status and trends in the research field of high energy density plasmas. (author)

  5. Postmortem validation of breast density using dual-energy mammography

    OpenAIRE

    Molloi, Sabee; Ducote, Justin L.; Ding, Huanjun; Feig, Stephen A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Mammographic density has been shown to be an indicator of breast cancer risk and also reduces the sensitivity of screening mammography. Currently, there is no accepted standard for measuring breast density. Dual energy mammography has been proposed as a technique for accurate measurement of breast density. The purpose of this study is to validate its accuracy in postmortem breasts and compare it with other existing techniques. Methods: Forty postmortem breasts were imaged using a dua...

  6. Equation satisfied by electron-electron mutual Coulomb repulsion energy density functional

    OpenAIRE

    Joubert, Daniel P.

    2011-01-01

    The electron-electron mutual Coulomb repulsion energy density functional satisfies an equation that links functionals and functional derivatives at N-electron and (N-1)-electron densities for densities determined from the same adiabatic scaled external potential for the N-electron system.

  7. Cosmological constant problem and renormalized vacuum energy density in curved background

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohri, Kazunori [Theory Center, IPNS, KEK, Tsukuba 305-0801, Ibaraki (Japan); Matsui, Hiroki, E-mail: kohri@post.kek.jp, E-mail: matshiro@post.kek.jp [The Graduate University of Advanced Studies (Sokendai), Tsukuba 305-0801, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2017-06-01

    The current vacuum energy density observed as dark energy ρ{sub dark}≅ 2.5×10{sup −47} GeV{sup 4} is unacceptably small compared with any other scales. Therefore, we encounter serious fine-tuning problem and theoretical difficulty to derive the dark energy. However, the theoretically attractive scenario has been proposed and discussed in literature: in terms of the renormalization-group (RG) running of the cosmological constant, the vacuum energy density can be expressed as ρ{sub vacuum}≅ m {sup 2} H {sup 2} where m is the mass of the scalar field and rather dynamical in curved spacetime. However, there has been no rigorous proof to derive this expression and there are some criticisms about the physical interpretation of the RG running cosmological constant. In the present paper, we revisit the RG running effects of the cosmological constant and investigate the renormalized vacuum energy density in curved spacetime. We demonstrate that the vacuum energy density described by ρ{sub vacuum}≅ m {sup 2} H {sup 2} appears as quantum effects of the curved background rather than the running effects of cosmological constant. Comparing to cosmological observational data, we obtain an upper bound on the mass of the scalar fields to be smaller than the Planck mass, m ∼< M {sub Pl}.

  8. Energy density, stopping and flow in ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorge, H.; von Keitz, A.; Mattiello, R.; Stoecker, H.; Greiner, W.

    1990-01-01

    The Lorentz invariant molecular dynamics approach (RQMD) is employed to investigate the space-time evolution of heavy ion collisions at energies (E kin = 10AGeV hor-ellipsis 200AGeV). The calculations for various nucleus nucleus reactions show a high degree of stopping power. The importance of secondary rescattering at these beam energies is demonstrated. The computed nucleon rapidity distributions are compared to available experimental data. It is demonstrated that nonlinear, collective effects like full stopping of target and projectile and matter flow could be expected for heavy projectiles only. For nuclear collisions in the Booster era at BNL and for the lead beam at CERN SPS the authors predict a stimulating future: then a nearly equilibrated, long lived (8 fm/c) macroscopic volume of very high energy density (> 1 GeV/fm 3 ) and baryon density (> 5 times ground state density) is produced

  9. Building a universal nuclear energy density functional

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertsch, G F

    2007-01-01

    This talk describes a new project in SciDAC II in the area of low-energy nuclear physics. The motivation and goals of the SciDAC are presented as well as an outline of the theoretical and computational methodology that will be employed. An important motivation is to have more accurate and reliable predictions of nuclear properties including their binding energies and low-energy reaction rates. The theoretical basis is provided by density functional theory, which the only available theory that can be systematically applied to all nuclei. However, other methodologies based on wave function methods are needed to refine the functionals and to make applications to dynamic processes

  10. Path analysis of the energy density of wood in eucalyptus clones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couto, A M; Teodoro, P E; Trugilho, P F

    2017-03-16

    Path analysis has been used for establishing selection criteria in genetic breeding programs for several crops. However, it has not been used in eucalyptus breeding programs yet. In the present study, we aimed to identify the wood technology traits that could be used as the criteria for direct and indirect selection of eucalyptus genotypes with high energy density of wood. Twenty-four eucalyptus clones were evaluated in a completely randomized design with five replications. The following traits were assessed: basic wood density, total extractives, lignin content, ash content, nitrogen content, carbon content, hydrogen content, sulfur content, oxygen content, higher calorific power, holocellulose, and energy density. After verifying the variability of all evaluated traits among the clones, a two-dimensional correlation network was used to determine the phenotypic patterns among them. The obtained coefficient of determination (0.94) presented a higher magnitude in relation to the effect of the residual variable, and it served as an excellent model for explaining the genetic effects related to the variations observed in the energy density of wood in all eucalyptus clones. However, for future studies, we recommend evaluating other traits, especially the morphological traits, because of the greater ease in their measurement. Selecting clones with high basic density is the most promising strategy for eucalyptus breeding programs that aim to increase the energy density of wood because of its high heritability and magnitude of the cause-and-effect relationship with this trait.

  11. Connections between population density, energy use, and GHG emissions in water networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filion, Y.R. [Queen' s Univ., Kingston, ON (Canada). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    2007-07-01

    There is a growing concern that urban sprawl and highly dispersed urban infrastructure in cities is posing significant environmental impacts. However, there is no agreement on the suitability of interventions such as population intensification on reducing environmental impacts. This paper investigated the connection between population intensification and environmental impact in water distribution networks. Specifically, it examined the relationship between population density, annual per capita energy use, and annual per capita greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in water distribution networks. It also examined which population densities produce low levels of annual per capita energy use and GHG emissions. An analytical model of a trunk main was developed to connect population density to energy use and GHG emissions. The model considered energy use in five life activities of the trunk main, namely pipe fabrication, pipe repair, water pumping, and pipe recycling and/or disposal. The energy use model was combined with emission factors and electricity fuel-source mixtures from four Canadian regions (Atlantic Provinces, Quebec, Ontario, and Alberta) to compute representative levels of annual per capita GHGs emitted by the trunk main. It was concluded that increasing population density from 10 ca/ha to 150 ca/ha reduced energy use and GHG emissions by 67per cent and that increasing population density beyond 150 ca/ha produces no significant decrease in annual per capita energy use and GHG emissions. Further analysis on looped networks is required to verify these preliminary findings. 10 refs., 3 tabs., 2 figs.

  12. Highly Compressed Ion Beams for High Energy Density Science

    CERN Document Server

    Friedman, Alex; Briggs, Richard J; Callahan, Debra; Caporaso, George; Celata, C M; Davidson, Ronald C; Faltens, Andy; Grant-Logan, B; Grisham, Larry; Grote, D P; Henestroza, Enrique; Kaganovich, Igor D; Lee, Edward; Lee, Richard; Leitner, Matthaeus; Nelson, Scott D; Olson, Craig; Penn, Gregory; Reginato, Lou; Renk, Tim; Rose, David; Sessler, Andrew M; Staples, John W; Tabak, Max; Thoma, Carsten H; Waldron, William; Welch, Dale; Wurtele, Jonathan; Yu, Simon

    2005-01-01

    The Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory (HIF-VNL) is developing the intense ion beams needed to drive matter to the High Energy Density (HED) regimes required for Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) and other applications. An interim goal is a facility for Warm Dense Matter (WDM) studies, wherein a target is heated volumetrically without being shocked, so that well-defined states of matter at 1 to 10 eV are generated within a diagnosable region. In the approach we are pursuing, low to medium mass ions with energies just above the Bragg peak are directed onto thin target "foils," which may in fact be foams or "steel wool" with mean densities 1% to 100% of solid. This approach complements that being pursued at GSI, wherein high-energy ion beams deposit a small fraction of their energy in a cylindrical target. We present the requirements for warm dense matter experiments, and describe suitable accelerator concepts, including novel broadband traveling wave pulse-line, drift-tube linac, RF, and single-gap approa...

  13. Energy density of a dissipative polarizable solid by a Lagrangean formalism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Englman, R.; Yahalom, A.

    2003-01-01

    A Lagrangean for the dynamics of an electromagnetic field in a dispersive and dissipative material is constructed (adapting some ideas by Bekenstein and Hannay) and an expression for the energy density that is positive is obtained from it. The expression contains extra (sink) degrees of freedom that represent dissipating modes. In simplified cases the sink modes can be eliminated to yield an energy density expression in terms of the electromagnetic fields, the polarization and the magnetization only, but which contains parameters associated with the sink modes. The method of adding extra modes can be used to set up a Lagrangean formalism for dissipative systems in general, such that will reinstate time-translation invariance and will yield a unique energy density

  14. Diffuse Waves and Energy Densities Near Boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Sesma, F. J.; Rodriguez-Castellanos, A.; Campillo, M.; Perton, M.; Luzon, F.; Perez-Ruiz, J. A.

    2007-12-01

    Green function can be retrieved from averaging cross correlations of motions within a diffuse field. In fact, it has been shown that for an elastic inhomogeneous, anisotropic medium under equipartitioned, isotropic illumination, the average cross correlations are proportional to the imaginary part of Green function. For instance coda waves are due to multiple scattering and their intensities follow diffusive regimes. Coda waves and the noise sample the medium and effectively carry information along their paths. In this work we explore the consequences of assuming both source and receiver at the same point. From the observable side, the autocorrelation is proportional to the energy density at a given point. On the other hand, the imaginary part of the Green function at the source itself is finite because the singularity of Green function is restricted to the real part. The energy density at a point is proportional with the trace of the imaginary part of Green function tensor at the source itself. The Green function availability may allow establishing the theoretical energy density of a seismic diffuse field generated by a background equipartitioned excitation. We study an elastic layer with free surface and overlaying a half space and compute the imaginary part of the Green function for various depths. We show that the resulting spectrum is indeed closely related to the layer dynamic response and the corresponding resonant frequencies are revealed. One implication of present findings lies in the fact that spatial variations may be useful in detecting the presence of a target by its signature in the distribution of diffuse energy. These results may be useful in assessing the seismic response of a given site if strong ground motions are scarce. It suffices having a reasonable illumination from micro earthquakes and noise. We consider that the imaginary part of Green function at the source is a spectral signature of the site. The relative importance of the peaks of

  15. Relationship of Sodium Intake and Blood Pressure Varies With Energy Intake: Secondary Analysis of the DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension)-Sodium Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murtaugh, Maureen A; Beasley, Jeannette M; Appel, Lawrence J; Guenther, Patricia M; McFadden, Molly; Greene, Tom; Tooze, Janet A

    2018-05-01

    Dietary Na recommendations are expressed as absolute amounts (mg/d) rather than as Na density (mg/kcal). Our objective was to determine whether the strength of the relationship of Na intake with blood pressure (BP) varied with energy intake. The DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension)-Sodium trial was a randomized feeding trial comparing 2 diets (DASH and control) and 3 levels of Na density. Participants with pre- or stage 1 hypertension consumed diets for 30 days in random order; energy intake was controlled to maintain body weight. This secondary analysis of 379 non-Hispanic black and white participants used mixed-effects models to assess the association of Na and energy intakes with BP. The relationships between absolute Na and both systolic and diastolic BP varied with energy intake. BP rose more steeply with increasing Na at lower energy intake than at higher energy intake ( P interaction<0.001). On the control diet with 2300 mg Na, both systolic and diastolic BP were higher (3.0 mm Hg; 95% confidence interval, 0.2-5.8; and 2.7 mm Hg; 95% confidence interval, 1.0-4.5, respectively) among those with lower energy intake (higher Na density) than among those with higher energy intake (lower Na density). The association of Na with systolic BP was stronger at lower levels of energy intake in both blacks and whites ( P <0.001). The association of Na and diastolic BP varied with energy intake only among blacks ( P =0.001). Sodium density should be considered as a metric for expressing dietary Na recommendations. © 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.

  16. Various high precision measurements of pressure in atomic energy industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aritomi, Masanori; Inoue, Akira; Hosoma, Takashi; Tanaka, Izumi; Gabane, Tsunemichi.

    1987-01-01

    As for the pressure measurement in atomic energy industry, it is mostly the measurement using differential pressure transmitters and pressure transmitters for process measurement with the general accuracy of measurement of 0.2 - 0.5 % FS/year. However, recently for the development of nuclear fusion reactors and the establishment of nuclear fuel cycle accompanying new atomic energy technology, there are the needs of the pressure measurement having higher accuracy of 0.01 % FS/year and high resolution, and quartz vibration type pressure sensors appeared. New high accuracy pressure measurement techniques were developed by the advance of data processing and the rationalization of data transmission. As the results, the measurement of the differential pressure of helium-lithium two-phase flow in the cooling system of nuclear fusion reactors, the high accuracy measuring system for the level of plutonium nitrate and other fuel substance in tanks in fuel reprocessing and conversion, the high accuracy measurement of atmospheric pressure and wind velocity in ducts, chimneys and tunnels in nuclear facilities and so on became feasible. The principle and the measured data of quartz vibration type pressure sensors are shown. (Kako, I.)

  17. Distributions of the ion temperature, ion pressure, and electron density over the current sheet surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyrie, N. P.; Markov, V. S.; Frank, A. G.; Vasilkov, D. G.; Voronova, E. V.

    2016-01-01

    The distributions of the ion temperature, ion pressure, and electron density over the width (the major transverse dimension) of the current sheet have been studied for the first time. The current sheets were formed in discharges in argon and helium in 2D and 3D magnetic configurations. It is found that the temperature of argon ions in both 2D and 3D magnetic configurations is almost uniform over the sheet width and that argon ions are accelerated by the Ampère force. In contrast, the distributions of the electron density and the temperature of helium ions are found to be substantially nonuniform. As a result, in the 2D magnetic configuration, the ion pressure gradient across the sheet width makes a significant contribution (comparable with the Ampère force) to the acceleration of helium ions, whereas in the 3D magnetic configuration, the Ampère force is counterbalanced by the pressure gradient.

  18. Distributions of the ion temperature, ion pressure, and electron density over the current sheet surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyrie, N. P., E-mail: kyrie@fpl.gpi.ru; Markov, V. S., E-mail: natalya.kyrie@yandex.ru; Frank, A. G.; Vasilkov, D. G.; Voronova, E. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Prokhorov General Physics Institute (Russian Federation)

    2016-06-15

    The distributions of the ion temperature, ion pressure, and electron density over the width (the major transverse dimension) of the current sheet have been studied for the first time. The current sheets were formed in discharges in argon and helium in 2D and 3D magnetic configurations. It is found that the temperature of argon ions in both 2D and 3D magnetic configurations is almost uniform over the sheet width and that argon ions are accelerated by the Ampère force. In contrast, the distributions of the electron density and the temperature of helium ions are found to be substantially nonuniform. As a result, in the 2D magnetic configuration, the ion pressure gradient across the sheet width makes a significant contribution (comparable with the Ampère force) to the acceleration of helium ions, whereas in the 3D magnetic configuration, the Ampère force is counterbalanced by the pressure gradient.

  19. Idempotent Dirac density matrix for ten-electron central field inhomogeneous electron liquids in terms of electron- and kinetic energy-densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    March, N.H.

    2006-08-01

    A differential equation for the Dirac density matrix γ(r, r'), given ground-state electron- and kinetic energy-densities, has been derived by March and Suhai for one- and two-level occupancy. For ten-electron spin-compensated spherical systems, it is shown here that γ ≡ γ[ρ, t g ] where ρ and t g are electron- and kinetic energy-densities. The philosophy of March and Suhai is confirmed beyond two-level filling. An important byproduct of the present approach is an explicit expression for the one-body potential of DFT in terms of the p-shell electron density. (author)

  20. Constraints on the cosmological relativistic energy density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zentner, Andrew R.; Walker, Terry P.

    2002-01-01

    We discuss bounds on the cosmological relativistic energy density as a function of redshift, reviewing the big bang nucleosynthesis and cosmic microwave background bounds, updating bounds from large scale structure, and introducing a new bound from the magnitude-redshift relation for type Ia supernovae. We conclude that the standard and well-motivated assumption that relativistic energy is negligible during recent epochs is not necessitated by extant data. We then demonstrate the utility of these bounds by constraining the mass and lifetime of a hypothetical massive big bang relic particle

  1. Raman spectroscopic characterization of CH4 density over a wide range of temperature and pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Linbo; Chou, I-Ming; Burruss, Robert; Hu, Ruizhong; Bi, Xianwu

    2014-01-01

    The positions of the CH4 Raman ν1 symmetric stretching bands were measured in a wide range of temperature (from −180 °C to 350 °C) and density (up to 0.45 g/cm3) using high-pressure optical cell and fused silica capillary capsule. The results show that the Raman band shift is a function of both methane density and temperature; the band shifts to lower wavenumbers as the density increases and the temperature decreases. An equation representing the observed relationship among the CH4 ν1 band position, temperature, and density can be used to calculate the density in natural or synthetic CH4-bearing inclusions.

  2. High energy density supercapacitors using macroporous kitchen sponges

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Macroporous, low-cost and recyclable kitchen sponges are explored as effective electrode platforms for supercapacitor devices. A simple and scalable process has been developed to fabricate MnO 2-carbon nanotube (CNT)-sponge supercapacitor electrodes using ordinary kitchen sponges. Two organic electrolytes (1 M of tetraethylammonium tetrafluoroborate (Et 4NBF 4) in propylene carbonate (PC), 1 M of LiClO 4 in PC) are utilized with the sponge-based electrodes to improve the energy density of the symmetrical supercapacitors. Compared to aqueous electrolyte (1 M of Na 2SO 4 in H 2O), the energy density of supercapacitors tripled in Et 4NBF 4 electrolyte, and further increased by six times in LiClO 4 electrolyte. The long-term cycling performance in different electrolytes was examined and the morphology changes of the electrode materials were also studied. The good electrochemical performance in both aqueous and organic electrolytes indicates that the MnO 2-CNT-sponge is a promising low-cost electrode for energy storage systems. © 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  3. Influence of emitter temperature on the energy deposition in a low-pressure plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levko, Dmitry; Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    2016-01-01

    The influence of emitter temperature on the energy deposition into low-pressure plasma is studied by the self-consistent one-dimensional Particle-in-Cell Monte Carlo Collisions model. Depending on the emitter temperature, different modes of discharge operation are obtained. The mode type depends on the plasma frequency and does not depend on the ratio between the densities of beam and plasma electrons. Namely, plasma is stable when the plasma frequency is small. For this plasma, the energy transfer from emitted electrons to plasma electrons is inefficient. The increase in the plasma frequency results first in the excitation of two-stream electron instability. However, since the thermal velocity of plasma electrons is smaller than the electrostatic wave velocity, the resonant wave-particle interaction is inefficient for the energy deposition into the plasma. Further increase in the plasma frequency leads to the distortion of beam of emitted electrons. Then, the electrostatic wave generated due to two-stream instability decays into multiple slower waves. Phase velocities of these waves are comparable with the thermal velocity of plasma electrons which makes possible the resonant wave-particle interaction. This results in the efficient energy deposition from emitted electrons into the plasma.

  4. Flexible asymmetric supercapacitors with high energy and high power density in aqueous electrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yingwen; Zhang, Hongbo; Lu, Songtao; Varanasi, Chakrapani V.; Liu, Jie

    2013-01-01

    Supercapacitors with both high energy and high power densities are critical for many practical applications. In this paper, we discuss the design and demonstrate the fabrication of flexible asymmetric supercapacitors based on nanocomposite electrodes of MnO2, activated carbon, carbon nanotubes and graphene. The combined unique properties of each of these components enable highly flexible and mechanically strong films that can serve as electrodes directly without using any current collectors or binders. Using these flexible electrodes and a roll-up approach, asymmetric supercapacitors with 2 V working voltage were successfully fabricated. The fabricated device showed excellent rate capability, with 78% of the original capacitance retained when the scan rate was increased from 2 mV s-1 to 500 mV s-1. Owing to the unique composite structure, these supercapacitors were able to deliver high energy density (24 W h kg-1) under high power density (7.8 kW kg-1) conditions. These features could enable supercapacitor based energy storage systems to be very attractive for a variety of critical applications, such as the power sources in hybrid electric vehicles and the back-up powers for wind and solar energy, where both high energy density and high power density are required.Supercapacitors with both high energy and high power densities are critical for many practical applications. In this paper, we discuss the design and demonstrate the fabrication of flexible asymmetric supercapacitors based on nanocomposite electrodes of MnO2, activated carbon, carbon nanotubes and graphene. The combined unique properties of each of these components enable highly flexible and mechanically strong films that can serve as electrodes directly without using any current collectors or binders. Using these flexible electrodes and a roll-up approach, asymmetric supercapacitors with 2 V working voltage were successfully fabricated. The fabricated device showed excellent rate capability, with 78% of

  5. Coaxial wet-spun yarn supercapacitors for high-energy density and safe wearable electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kou, Liang; Huang, Tieqi; Zheng, Bingna; Han, Yi; Zhao, Xiaoli; Gopalsamy, Karthikeyan; Sun, Haiyan; Gao, Chao

    2014-01-01

    Yarn supercapacitors have great potential in future portable and wearable electronics because of their tiny volume, flexibility and weavability. However, low-energy density limits their development in the area of wearable high-energy density devices. How to enhance their energy densities while retaining their high-power densities is a critical challenge for yarn supercapacitor development. Here we propose a coaxial wet-spinning assembly approach to continuously spin polyelectrolyte-wrapped graphene/carbon nanotube core-sheath fibres, which are used directly as safe electrodes to assembly two-ply yarn supercapacitors. The yarn supercapacitors using liquid and solid electrolytes show ultra-high capacitances of 269 and 177 mF cm−2 and energy densities of 5.91 and 3.84 μWh cm−2, respectively. A cloth supercapacitor superior to commercial capacitor is further interwoven from two individual 40-cm-long coaxial fibres. The combination of scalable coaxial wet-spinning technology and excellent performance of yarn supercapacitors paves the way to wearable and safe electronics. PMID:24786366

  6. Coaxial wet-spun yarn supercapacitors for high-energy density and safe wearable electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kou, Liang; Huang, Tieqi; Zheng, Bingna; Han, Yi; Zhao, Xiaoli; Gopalsamy, Karthikeyan; Sun, Haiyan; Gao, Chao

    2014-05-01

    Yarn supercapacitors have great potential in future portable and wearable electronics because of their tiny volume, flexibility and weavability. However, low-energy density limits their development in the area of wearable high-energy density devices. How to enhance their energy densities while retaining their high-power densities is a critical challenge for yarn supercapacitor development. Here we propose a coaxial wet-spinning assembly approach to continuously spin polyelectrolyte-wrapped graphene/carbon nanotube core-sheath fibres, which are used directly as safe electrodes to assembly two-ply yarn supercapacitors. The yarn supercapacitors using liquid and solid electrolytes show ultra-high capacitances of 269 and 177 mF cm-2 and energy densities of 5.91 and 3.84 μWh cm-2, respectively. A cloth supercapacitor superior to commercial capacitor is further interwoven from two individual 40-cm-long coaxial fibres. The combination of scalable coaxial wet-spinning technology and excellent performance of yarn supercapacitors paves the way to wearable and safe electronics.

  7. Functional derivative of noninteracting kinetic energy density functional

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Shubin; Ayers, Paul W.

    2004-01-01

    Proofs from different theoretical frameworks, namely, the Hohenbergh-Kohn theorems, the Kohn-Sham scheme, and the first-order density matrix representation, have been presented in this paper to show that the functional derivative of the noninteracting kinetic energy density functional can uniquely be expressed as the negative of the Kohn-Sham effective potential, arbitrary only to an additive orbital-independent constant. Key points leading to the current result as well as confusion about the quantity in the literature are briefly discussed

  8. An x-ray backlit Talbot-Lau deflectometer for high-energy-density electron density diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdivia, M. P.; Stutman, D.; Stoeckl, C.; Theobald, W.; Mileham, C.; Begishev, I. A.; Bromage, J.; Regan, S. P.

    2016-02-01

    X-ray phase-contrast techniques can measure electron density gradients in high-energy-density plasmas through refraction induced phase shifts. An 8 keV Talbot-Lau interferometer consisting of free standing ultrathin gratings was deployed at an ultra-short, high-intensity laser system using K-shell emission from a 1-30 J, 8 ps laser pulse focused on thin Cu foil targets. Grating survival was demonstrated for 30 J, 8 ps laser pulses. The first x-ray deflectometry images obtained under laser backlighting showed up to 25% image contrast and thus enabled detection of electron areal density gradients with a maximum value of 8.1 ± 0.5 × 1023 cm-3 in a low-Z millimeter sized sample. An electron density profile was obtained from refraction measurements with an error of x-ray source-size, similar to conventional radiography.

  9. Chemical bond as a test of density-gradient expansions for kinetic and exchange energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perdew, J.P.; Levy, M.; Painter, G.S.; Wei, S.; Lagowski, J.B.

    1988-01-01

    Errors in kinetic and exchange contributions to the molecular bonding energy are assessed for approximate density functionals by reference to near-exact Hartree-Fock values. From the molecular calculations of Allan et al. and of Lee and Ghosh, it is demonstrated that the density-gradient expansion does not accurately describe the noninteracting kinetic contribution to the bonding energy, even when this expansion is carried to fourth order and applied in its spin-density-functional form to accurate Hartree-Fock densities. In a related study, it is demonstrated that the overbinding of molecules such as N 2 and F 2 , which occurs in the local-spin-density (LSD) approximation for the exchange-correlation energy, is not attributable to errors in the self-consistent LSD densities. Contrary to expectations based upon the Gunnarsson-Jones nodality argument, it is found that the LSD approximation for the exchange energy can seriously overbind a molecule even when bonding does not create additional nodes in the occupied valence orbitals. LSD and exact values for the exchange contribution to the bonding energy are displayed and discussed for several molecules

  10. (p,V{sub m},T,x) measurements for aqueous LiNO{sub 3} solutions[Density; Concentration; Electrolyte solutions; Equation of state; Lithium nitrate; Saturated density; Saturated pressure; Temperature; Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdulagatov, I.M. E-mail: ilmutdin@boulder.nist.govmangur@datacom.ru; Azizov, N.D. E-mail: Nazim_Azizov@yahoo.com

    2004-01-01

    (p,V{sub m},T,x) properties of four aqueous LiNO{sub 3} solutions (0.181, 0.526, 0.963, and 1.728) mol {center_dot} kg{sup -1} H{sub 2}O were measured in the liquid phase with a constant-volume piezometer immersed in a precision liquid thermostat. Measurements were made for 10 isotherms between (298 and 573) K. The range of pressure was from (2 to 40) MPa. The total uncertainty of density, pressure, temperature, and concentration measurements were estimated to be less than 0.06 %, 0.05 %, 10 mK, and 0.014 %, respectively. The values of saturated density were determined by extrapolating experimental (p,{rho}) data to the vapor-pressure at fixed temperature and composition using an interpolating equation. A polynomial type of equation of state for specific volume was obtained as a function of temperature, pressure, and composition by a least-squares method from the experimental data. The average absolute deviation (AAD) between measured and calculated values from this polynomial equation for density was 0.02 %. Measured values of solution density were compared with values calculated from Pitzer's ion-interaction equation. The agreement is within (0.2 to 0.4) % depending of concentration range.

  11. Four-loop vacuum energy density of the SU($N_c$) + adjoint Higgs theory

    CERN Document Server

    Kajantie, Keijo; Rummukainen, K; Schröder, Y

    2003-01-01

    We compute the dimensionally regularised four-loop vacuum energy density of the SU(N_c) gauge + adjoint Higgs theory, in the disordered phase. ``Scalarisation'', or reduction to a small set of master integrals of the type appearing in scalar field theories, is carried out in d dimensions, employing general partial integration identities through an algorithm developed by Laporta, while the remaining scalar integrals are evaluated in d = 3 - 2\\epsilon dimensions, by expanding in \\epsilon << 1 and evaluating a number of coefficients. The results have implications for the thermodynamics of finite temperature QCD, allowing to determine perturbative contributions of orders O(g^6 ln(1/g)), O(g^6) to the pressure, while the general methods are applicable also to studies of critical phenomena in QED-like statistical physics systems.

  12. High energy density and efficiency achieved in nanocomposite film capacitors via structure modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yi; Shen, Zhong-Hui; Shen, Yang; Lin, Yuanhua; Nan, Ce-Wen

    2018-03-01

    Flexible dielectric polymer films with high energy storage density and high charge-discharge efficiency have been considered as promising materials for electrical power applications. Here, we design hierarchical structured nanocomposite films using nonlinear polymer poly(vinylidene fluoride-HFP) [P(VDF-HFP)] with inorganic h-boron nitride (h-BN) nanosheets by electrospinning and hot-pressing methods. Our results show that the addition of h-BN nanosheets and the design of the hierarchical multilayer structure in the nanocomposites can remarkably enhance the charge-discharge efficiency and energy density. A high charge-discharge efficiency of 78% and an energy density of 21 J/cm3 can be realized in the 12-layered PVDF/h-BN nanocomposite films. Phase-field simulation results reveal that the spatial distribution of the electric field in these hierarchical structured films affects the charge-discharge efficiency and energy density. This work provides a feasible route, i.e., structure modulation, to improve the energy storage performances for nanocomposite films.

  13. A low pressure bipolar nickel-hydrogen battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golben, M.; Nechev, K.; DaCosta, D.H.; Rosso, M.J.

    1997-12-01

    Ergenics is developing a low pressure high power rechargeable battery for electric vehicles and other large battery applications. The Hy-Stor{trademark} battery couples a bipolar nickel-hydrogen electrochemical system with the high energy storage density of metal hydride technology. In addition to its long cycle life, high specific power, and energy density, this battery offers safety and economic advantages over other rechargeable batteries. Results from preliminary testing of the first Hy-Stor battery are presented.

  14. [Recommended values of energy density in soup or gruel-like foods, for feeding of preschool children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araya, H; Alviña, M; Vera, G; Pak, N

    1991-03-01

    The low energy density of the diets has been proposed by several authors as an essential factor which conditions the inadequate energy intake of preschool children of developing countries. However, there are few controlled studies in relation to the volumes which children are able to consume when energy density changes. The objective of this research was to establish recommended values of energy density for preparations with a soup or gruel consistency. The study was carried out in 100 preschool children from 3 to 4 years old who attended a Day Care Center in Santiago, Chile. Six formulas of a mixture of extruded pea-rice with different energy densities and viscosities: 0.8, 1.2 and 1.6 kcal/g and 3,000 and 9,000 cp. were studied. These experimental conditions were obtained modifying the product concentration and adding malt flour. Food consumption was determined at lunch time. Energy adequacy was calculated using the 1985 FAO-OMS-UNU requirements. Children increased significantly their energy intake when energy density of both types of consistency, soup or gruel, was higher. Energy adequacy ranged from 15% when preparations had an energy density of 0.8 kcal/g to 35%, when the preparations had an energy density of 1.6 kcal/g. The formulas which had 1.6 kcal/g fulfilled 100% of the energy requirements of preschool children for lunch time, and should be the recommended energy density for soup or gruels, when they are given as the only food. The energy density of 1.2 kcal/g needs a food complement which supplies 120 kcal, and lower values would be inadequate for preschool children feeding purposes.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Vacuum Energy and Inflation: 3. Newtonian Cosmology & GR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggins, Elisha

    2013-01-01

    This is paper #3 in a series of four papers on "vacuum energy" and inflation. In paper #1 [see EJ1024183] we discussed an example of what we have been calling vacuum energy. It is an energy with negative pressure whose energy density remains constant in an expanding space. We showed that an energy density with these properties exists…

  16. Relationship between turbulence energy and density variance in the solar neighbourhood molecular clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kainulainen, J.; Federrath, C.

    2017-11-01

    The relationship between turbulence energy and gas density variance is a fundamental prediction for turbulence-dominated media and is commonly used in analytic models of star formation. We determine this relationship for 15 molecular clouds in the solar neighbourhood. We use the line widths of the CO molecule as the probe of the turbulence energy (sonic Mach number, ℳs) and three-dimensional models to reconstruct the density probability distribution function (ρ-PDF) of the clouds, derived using near-infrared extinction and Herschel dust emission data, as the probe of the density variance (σs). We find no significant correlation between ℳs and σs among the studied clouds, but we cannot rule out a weak correlation either. In the context of turbulence-dominated gas, the range of the ℳs and σs values corresponds to the model predictions. The data cannot constrain whether the turbulence-driving parameter, b, and/or thermal-to-magnetic pressure ratio, β, vary among the sample clouds. Most clouds are not in agreement with field strengths stronger than given by β ≲ 0.05. A model with b2β/ (β + 1) = 0.30 ± 0.06 provides an adequate fit to the cloud sample as a whole. Based on the average behaviour of the sample, we can rule out three regimes: (i) strong compression combined with a weak magnetic field (b ≳ 0.7 and β ≳ 3); (ii) weak compression (b ≲ 0.35); and (iii) a strong magnetic field (β ≲ 0.1). When we include independent magnetic field strength estimates in the analysis, the data rule out solenoidal driving (b < 0.4) for the majority of the solar neighbourhood clouds. However, most clouds have b parameters larger than unity, which indicates a discrepancy with the turbulence-dominated picture; we discuss the possible reasons for this.

  17. Effects of Consuming Preloads with Different Energy Density and Taste Quality on Energy Intake and Postprandial Blood Glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tey, Siew Ling; Salleh, Nurhazwani; Henry, Christiani Jeyakumar; Forde, Ciaran G

    2018-01-31

    Consumption of reduced energy dense foods and drink has the potential to reduce energy intake and postprandial blood glucose concentrations. In addition, the taste quality of a meal (e.g., sweet or savoury) may play a role in satiation and food intake. The objective of this randomised crossover study was to examine whether energy density and taste quality has an impact on energy intake and postprandial blood glucose response. Using a preload design, participants were asked to consume a sweet ("Cheng Teng") or a savoury (broth) preload soup in high energy density (HED; around 0.50 kcal/g; 250 kcal) or low energy density (LED; around 0.12 kcal/g; 50 kcal) in mid-morning and an ad libitum lunch was provided an hour after the preload. Participants recorded their food intake for the rest of the day after they left the study site. Energy compensation and postprandial blood glucose response were measured in 32 healthy lean males (mean age = 28.9 years, mean BMI = 22.1 kg/m²). There was a significant difference in ad libitum lunch intake between treatments ( p = 0.012), with higher intake in sweet LED and savoury LED compared to sweet HED and savoury HED. Energy intake at subsequent meals and total daily energy intake did not differ between the four treatments (both p ≥ 0.214). Consumption of HED preloads resulted in a larger spike in postprandial blood glucose response compared with LED preloads, irrespective of taste quality ( p < 0.001). Energy density rather than taste quality plays an important role in energy compensation and postprandial blood glucose response. This suggests that regular consumption of low energy-dense foods has the potential to reduce overall energy intake and to improve glycemic control.

  18. Effects of Consuming Preloads with Different Energy Density and Taste Quality on Energy Intake and Postprandial Blood Glucose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siew Ling Tey

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Consumption of reduced energy dense foods and drink has the potential to reduce energy intake and postprandial blood glucose concentrations. In addition, the taste quality of a meal (e.g., sweet or savoury may play a role in satiation and food intake. The objective of this randomised crossover study was to examine whether energy density and taste quality has an impact on energy intake and postprandial blood glucose response. Using a preload design, participants were asked to consume a sweet (“Cheng Teng” or a savoury (broth preload soup in high energy density (HED; around 0.50 kcal/g; 250 kcal or low energy density (LED; around 0.12 kcal/g; 50 kcal in mid-morning and an ad libitum lunch was provided an hour after the preload. Participants recorded their food intake for the rest of the day after they left the study site. Energy compensation and postprandial blood glucose response were measured in 32 healthy lean males (mean age = 28.9 years, mean BMI = 22.1 kg/m2. There was a significant difference in ad libitum lunch intake between treatments (p = 0.012, with higher intake in sweet LED and savoury LED compared to sweet HED and savoury HED. Energy intake at subsequent meals and total daily energy intake did not differ between the four treatments (both p ≥ 0.214. Consumption of HED preloads resulted in a larger spike in postprandial blood glucose response compared with LED preloads, irrespective of taste quality (p < 0.001. Energy density rather than taste quality plays an important role in energy compensation and postprandial blood glucose response. This suggests that regular consumption of low energy-dense foods has the potential to reduce overall energy intake and to improve glycemic control.

  19. Graphene and carbon nanotube composite electrodes for supercapacitors with ultra-high energy density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Qian; Tang, Jie; Ma, Jun; Zhang, Han; Shinya, Norio; Qin, Lu-Chang

    2011-10-21

    We describe a graphene and single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) composite film prepared by a blending process for use as electrodes in high energy density supercapacitors. Specific capacitances of 290.6 F g(-1) and 201.0 F g(-1) have been obtained for a single electrode in aqueous and organic electrolytes, respectively, using a more practical two-electrode testing system. In the organic electrolyte the energy density reached 62.8 Wh kg(-1) and the power density reached 58.5 kW kg(-1). The addition of single-walled carbon nanotubes raised the energy density by 23% and power density by 31% more than the graphene electrodes. The graphene/CNT electrodes exhibited an ultra-high energy density of 155.6 Wh kg(-1) in ionic liquid at room temperature. In addition, the specific capacitance increased by 29% after 1000 cycles in ionic liquid, indicating their excellent cyclicity. The SWCNTs acted as a conductive additive, spacer, and binder in the graphene/CNT supercapacitors. This work suggests that our graphene/CNT supercapacitors can be comparable to NiMH batteries in performance and are promising for applications in hybrid vehicles and electric vehicles. This journal is © the Owner Societies 2011

  20. Sr-doped Lanthanum Nickelate Nanofibers for High Energy Density Supercapacitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Yi; Lin, Baoping; Sun, Ying; Yang, Hong; Zhang, Xueqin

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The electrode made by LNF-0.7 possessed excellent performance (719 F g −1 ) at Na 2 SO 4 electrolyte • LNF-0.7//LNF-0.7 symmetric supercapacitor device were firstly prepared • The maximum energy density of 81.4 Wh·kg −1 are achieved at a power density of 500W·kg −1 • This symmetric supercapacitor also shows an excellent cycling life - Abstract: The series La x Sr 1−x NiO 3−δ (0.3≤x≤1) nanofibers (LNF-x) samples are prepared by using electrospun method. We investigate the structure and the electrochemical properties of LNF-x in detail. As a result, LNF-x nanofibers present a perovskite structure, and the LNF-0.7 sample with high specific surface area display remarkable performance as an electrode material for supercapacitors. The maximum specific capacitance value of 719 F·g −1 at a current density of 2 A·g −1 , which retains 505 F·g −1 at a high current density of 20 A·g −1 , is obtained for LNF-0.7 electrode in 1 M Na 2 SO 4 aqueous electrolyte. Moreover, the LNF-0.7//LNF-0.7 symmetric supercapacitor device using 1 M Na 2 SO 4 aqueous solution is successfully demonstrated. The capacitor device can operate at a cell voltage as high as 2 V, and it exhibits an energy density of 30.5 Wh·kg −1 at a high power density of 10 kW·kg −1 and a high energy density of 81.4 Wh·kg −1 at a low power density of 500 W·kg −1 . More importantly, this symmetric supercapacitor also shows an excellent cycling performance with 90% specific capacitance retention after 2000 charging and discharging cycles. Those results offer a suitable design of electrode materials for high-performance supercapacitors

  1. High Temperature, high pressure equation of state density correlations and viscosity correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tapriyal, D.; Enick, R.; McHugh, M.; Gamwo, I.; Morreale, B.

    2012-07-31

    Global increase in oil demand and depleting reserves has derived a need to find new oil resources. To find these untapped reservoirs, oil companies are exploring various remote and harsh locations such as deep waters in Gulf of Mexico, remote arctic regions, unexplored deep deserts, etc. Further, the depth of new oil/gas wells being drilled has increased considerably to tap these new resources. With the increase in the well depth, the bottomhole temperature and pressure are also increasing to extreme values (i.e. up to 500 F and 35,000 psi). The density and viscosity of natural gas and crude oil at reservoir conditions are critical fundamental properties required for accurate assessment of the amount of recoverable petroleum within a reservoir and the modeling of the flow of these fluids within the porous media. These properties are also used to design appropriate drilling and production equipment such as blow out preventers, risers, etc. With the present state of art, there is no accurate database for these fluid properties at extreme conditions. As we have begun to expand this experimental database it has become apparent that there are neither equations of state for density or transport models for viscosity that can be used to predict these fundamental properties of multi-component hydrocarbon mixtures over a wide range of temperature and pressure. Presently, oil companies are using correlations based on lower temperature and pressure databases that exhibit an unsatisfactory predictive capability at extreme conditions (e.g. as great as {+-} 50%). From the perspective of these oil companies that are committed to safely producing these resources, accurately predicting flow rates, and assuring the integrity of the flow, the absence of an extensive experimental database at extreme conditions and models capable of predicting these properties over an extremely wide range of temperature and pressure (including extreme conditions) makes their task even more daunting.

  2. Minimum wall pressure coefficient of orifice plate energy dissipater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan-zheng Ai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Orifice plate energy dissipaters have been successfully used in large-scale hydropower projects due to their simple structure, convenient construction procedure, and high energy dissipation ratio. The minimum wall pressure coefficient of an orifice plate can indirectly reflect its cavitation characteristics: the lower the minimum wall pressure coefficient is, the better the ability of the orifice plate to resist cavitation damage is. Thus, it is important to study the minimum wall pressure coefficient of the orifice plate. In this study, this coefficient and related parameters, such as the contraction ratio, defined as the ratio of the orifice plate diameter to the flood-discharging tunnel diameter; the relative thickness, defined as the ratio of the orifice plate thickness to the tunnel diameter; and the Reynolds number of the flow through the orifice plate, were theoretically analyzed, and their relationships were obtained through physical model experiments. It can be concluded that the minimum wall pressure coefficient is mainly dominated by the contraction ratio and relative thickness. The lower the contraction ratio and relative thickness are, the larger the minimum wall pressure coefficient is. The effects of the Reynolds number on the minimum wall pressure coefficient can be neglected when it is larger than 105. An empirical expression was presented to calculate the minimum wall pressure coefficient in this study.

  3. Pressure-drop and density-wave instability thresholds in boiling channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurgenci, H.; Yildirim, T.; Kakac, S.; Veziroglu, T.N.

    1987-01-01

    In this study, a criterion for linearized stability with respect to both the pressure-drop and the density-wave oscillations is developed for a single-channel upflow boiling system operating between constant pressures with upstream compressibility introduced through a surge tank. Two different two-phase flow models, namely a constant-property homogeneous flow model a variable-property drift-flux model, have been employed. The conservation equations for both models and the equations of surge tank dynamics are first linearized for small perturbation and the stability of the resulting set of equations for each model are examined by use of Nyquist plots. As a measure of the relative instability of the system, the amounts of the inlet throttling necessary to stabilize the system at particular operating points have been calculated. The results are compared with experimental findings. Comparisons show that the drift-flux formulation offers a simple and reliable way of determining the instability thresholds

  4. Non-transferable van der Waals potentials: Insulators at high pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maggs, A.C.; Ashcroft, N.W.

    1987-01-01

    For a simple model whose cohesion is dominated by dispersion forces we show that the expansion of the energy in terms of multi-center interactions is ill conditioned at a low density. This density is physically realizable for systems with highly polarizable atoms, and in these circumstances an alternative expression for the internal energy is required. For polarizable systems the requisite densities are readily achievable with the use of modern high pressure capabilities, and have consequences for the interpretation of equation of state data in terms of potential energy functions. 13 refs., 3 figs

  5. Globally optimal superconducting magnets part I: minimum stored energy (MSE) current density map.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tieng, Quang M; Vegh, Viktor; Brereton, Ian M

    2009-01-01

    An optimal current density map is crucial in magnet design to provide the initial values within search spaces in an optimization process for determining the final coil arrangement of the magnet. A strategy for obtaining globally optimal current density maps for the purpose of designing magnets with coaxial cylindrical coils in which the stored energy is minimized within a constrained domain is outlined. The current density maps obtained utilising the proposed method suggests that peak current densities occur around the perimeter of the magnet domain, where the adjacent peaks have alternating current directions for the most compact designs. As the dimensions of the domain are increased, the current density maps yield traditional magnet designs of positive current alone. These unique current density maps are obtained by minimizing the stored magnetic energy cost function and therefore suggest magnet coil designs of minimal system energy. Current density maps are provided for a number of different domain arrangements to illustrate the flexibility of the method and the quality of the achievable designs.

  6. Advanced intermediate temperature sodium-nickel chloride batteries with ultra-high energy density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guosheng; Lu, Xiaochuan; Kim, Jin Y.; Meinhardt, Kerry D.; Chang, Hee Jung; Canfield, Nathan L.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.

    2016-02-01

    Sodium-metal halide batteries have been considered as one of the more attractive technologies for stationary electrical energy storage, however, they are not used for broader applications despite their relatively well-known redox system. One of the roadblocks hindering market penetration is the high-operating temperature. Here we demonstrate that planar sodium-nickel chloride batteries can be operated at an intermediate temperature of 190 °C with ultra-high energy density. A specific energy density of 350 Wh kg-1, higher than that of conventional tubular sodium-nickel chloride batteries (280 °C), is obtained for planar sodium-nickel chloride batteries operated at 190 °C over a long-term cell test (1,000 cycles), and it attributed to the slower particle growth of the cathode materials at the lower operating temperature. Results reported here demonstrate that planar sodium-nickel chloride batteries operated at an intermediate temperature could greatly benefit this traditional energy storage technology by improving battery energy density, cycle life and reducing material costs.

  7. Self-contained filtered density function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nouri, Arash G.; Pope, Stephen B.

    2017-01-01

    The filtered density function (FDF) closure is extended to a “self-contained” format to include the subgrid-scale (SGS) statistics of all of the hydro-thermo-chemical variables in turbulent flows. These are the thermodynamic pressure, the specific internal energy, the velocity vector, and the composition field. In this format, the model is comprehensive and facilitates large-eddy simulation (LES) of flows at both low and high compressibility levels. A transport equation is developed for the joint pressure-energy-velocity-composition filtered mass density function (PEVC-FMDF). In this equation, the effect of convection appears in closed form. The coupling of the hydrodynamics and thermochemistry is modeled via a set of stochastic differential equation for each of the transport variables. This yields a self-contained SGS closure. We demonstrated how LES is conducted of a turbulent shear flow with transport of a passive scalar. Finally, the consistency of the PEVC-FMDF formulation is established, and its overall predictive capability is appraised via comparison with direct numerical simulation (DNS) data.

  8. Applications of Skyrme energy-density functional to fusion reactions spanning the fusion barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Min; Wang, Ning; Li Zhuxia; Wu Xizhen; Zhao Enguang

    2006-01-01

    The Skyrme energy density functional has been applied to the study of heavy-ion fusion reactions. The barriers for fusion reactions are calculated by the Skyrme energy density functional with proton and neutron density distributions determined by using restricted density variational (RDV) method within the same energy density functional together with semi-classical approach known as the extended semi-classical Thomas-Fermi method. Based on the fusion barrier obtained, we propose a parametrization of the empirical barrier distribution to take into account the multi-dimensional character of real barrier and then apply it to calculate the fusion excitation functions in terms of barrier penetration concept. A large number of measured fusion excitation functions spanning the fusion barriers can be reproduced well. The competition between suppression and enhancement effects on sub-barrier fusion caused by neutron-shell-closure and excess neutron effects is studied

  9. Learning about the energy density of liquid and semi-solid foods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hogenkamp, P.S.; Stafleu, A.; Mars, M.; Graaf C. de

    2012-01-01

    Background:People learn about a food's satiating capacity by exposure and consequently adjust their energy intake.Objective:To investigate the effect of energy density and texture on subsequent energy intake adjustments during repeated consumption.Design:In a randomized crossover design,

  10. Learning about the energy density of liquid and semi-solid foods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hogenkamp, P.S.; Stafleu, A.; Mars, M.; Graaf, de C.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: People learn about a food's satiating capacity by exposure and consequently adjust their energy intake. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of energy density and texture on subsequent energy intake adjustments during repeated consumption. DESIGN: In a randomized crossover design,

  11. Centrifugal potential energy : an astounding renewable energy concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oduniyi, I.A. [Aled Conglomerate Nigeria Ltd., Lagos (Nigeria)

    2010-07-01

    A new energy concept known as centrifugal potential energy was discussed. This new energy concept is capable of increasing the pressure, temperature and enthalpy of a fluid, without having to apply work or heat transfer to the fluid. It occurs through a change in the centrifugal potential energy of the flowing fluid in a rotating frame of reference or a centrifugal force field, where work is performed internally by the centrifugal weight of the fluid. This energy concept has resulted in new energy equations, such as the Rotational Frame Bernoulli's Equation for liquids and the Rotational Frame Steady-Flow Energy Equation for gases. Applications of these equations have been incorporated into the design of centrifugal field pumps and compressors. Rather than compressing a fluid with a physical load transfer, these devices can compress a fluid via the effect of centrifugal force applied to the object. A large amount of energy is therefore produced when this high pressure compressed working fluid expands in a turbine. When water is used as the working fluid, it could reach renewable energy densities in the range of 25-100 kJ/kg of water. When atmospheric air is used, it could reach energy densities in the range of 500-1,500 kJ/kg of air.

  12. Ambient RF energy scavenging: GSM and WLAN power density measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, H.J.; Reniers, A.C.F.; Theeuwes, J.A.C.

    2009-01-01

    To assess the feasibility of ambient RF energy scavenging, a survey of expected power density levels distant from GSM-900 and GSM-1800 base stations has been conducted and power density measurements have been performed in a WLAN environment. It appears that for distances ranging from 25 m to 100 m

  13. Spinning solutions in general relativity with infinite central density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flammer, P. D.

    2018-05-01

    This paper presents general relativistic numerical simulations of uniformly rotating polytropes. Equations are developed using MSQI coordinates, but taking a logarithm of the radial coordinate. The result is relatively simple elliptical differential equations. Due to the logarithmic scale, we can resolve solutions with near-singular mass distributions near their center, while the solution domain extends many orders of magnitude larger than the radius of the distribution (to connect with flat space-time). Rotating solutions are found with very high central energy densities for a range of adiabatic exponents. Analytically, assuming the pressure is proportional to the energy density (which is true for polytropes in the limit of large energy density), we determine the small radius behavior of the metric potentials and energy density. This small radius behavior agrees well with the small radius behavior of large central density numerical results, lending confidence to our numerical approach. We compare results with rotating solutions available in the literature, which show good agreement. We study the stability of spherical solutions: instability sets in at the first maximum in mass versus central energy density; this is also consistent with results in the literature, and further lends confidence to the numerical approach.

  14. Comment on 'Kinetic energy as a density functional'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holas, A.; March, N.H.

    2002-01-01

    In a recent paper, Nesbet [Phys. Rev. A 65, 010502(R) (2001)] has proposed dropping ''the widespread but unjustified assumption that the existence of a ground-state density functional for the kinetic energy, T s [ρ], of an N-electron system implies the existence of a density-functional derivative, δT s [ρ]/δρ(r), equivalent to a local potential function,'' because, according to his arguments, this derivative 'has the mathematical character of a linear operator that acts on orbital wave functions'. Our Comment demonstrates that the statement called by Nesbet an 'unjustified assumption' happens, in fact, to be a rigorously proven theorem. Therefore, his previous conclusions stemming from his different view of this derivative, which undermined the foundations of density-functional theory, can be discounted

  15. Energy dispersive X-ray diffraction at high pressure in CHESS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruoff, A.L.; Baublitz, M.A. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray techniques were used with a diamond anvil cell in the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS). It was shown that quantitative relative intensity measurement could be made when the pressure was hydrostatic and the crystals were relatively defect free. The crystal structures of the high pressure polymorphs of Ge, GaAs, GaP, and AlSb were studied. Ge exhibits the β-tetragonal structure as found by Jamieson; however, the transition pressure is 80 +- 5 kbars. GaAs exhibits an orthorhombic structure above 172 +- 7 kbars, GaP the β-Sn structure above 215 +- 8 kbars, and AlSb an orthorhombic structure above 77 +- 5 kbars. (Auth.)

  16. Foundations of high-energy-density physics physical processes of matter at extreme conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Larsen, Jon

    2017-01-01

    High-energy-density physics explores the dynamics of matter at extreme conditions. This encompasses temperatures and densities far greater than we experience on Earth. It applies to normal stars, exploding stars, active galaxies, and planetary interiors. High-energy-density matter is found on Earth in the explosion of nuclear weapons and in laboratories with high-powered lasers or pulsed-power machines. The physics explored in this book is the basis for large-scale simulation codes needed to interpret experimental results whether from astrophysical observations or laboratory-scale experiments. The key elements of high-energy-density physics covered are gas dynamics, ionization, thermal energy transport, and radiation transfer, intense electromagnetic waves, and their dynamical coupling. Implicit in this is a fundamental understanding of hydrodynamics, plasma physics, atomic physics, quantum mechanics, and electromagnetic theory. Beginning with a summary of the topics and exploring the major ones in depth, thi...

  17. Total-energy Assisted Tight-binding Method Based on Local Density Approximation of Density Functional Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Takeo; Nishino, Shinya; Yamamoto, Susumu; Suzuki, Takashi; Ikeda, Minoru; Ohtani, Yasuaki

    2018-06-01

    A novel tight-binding method is developed, based on the extended Hückel approximation and charge self-consistency, with referring the band structure and the total energy of the local density approximation of the density functional theory. The parameters are so adjusted by computer that the result reproduces the band structure and the total energy, and the algorithm for determining parameters is established. The set of determined parameters is applicable to a variety of crystalline compounds and change of lattice constants, and, in other words, it is transferable. Examples are demonstrated for Si crystals of several crystalline structures varying lattice constants. Since the set of parameters is transferable, the present tight-binding method may be applicable also to molecular dynamics simulations of large-scale systems and long-time dynamical processes.

  18. Density and starting-energy dependent effective interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Norio; Nagata, Sinobu; Kasuga, Teruo

    1979-01-01

    A new effective potential constructed from the reaction matrix calculation of nuclear matters is proposed, taking three-body effects into account. Starting from the two-body scattering equation for nuclear matters, an equation with averaged momentum is introduced as the definition of effective interaction. The parameters in the equation are the Fermi momentum and the starting energy. The nuclear density dependence and the starting energy dependence are independently treated in the potential. The effective interactions including three-body effects were calculated. The dependence on the starting energy is large. The effective interaction is more attractive in the triplet E state, and assures overall saturation without any artificial renormalization. The reaction matrix calculation can be well reproduced by the calculation with this effective potential. The results of calculation for the binding energy of He-4 and O-16 and the shell model matrix elements of O-16 are represented. (Kato, T.)

  19. Cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma with ultra-high electron density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Hiromasa; Mizuno, Masaaki; Toyokuni, Shinya; Maruyama, Shoichi; Kodera, Yasuhiro; Terasaki, Hiroko; Adachi, Tetsuo; Kato, Masashi; Kikkawa, Fumitaka; Hori, Masaru

    2015-01-01

    Cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is a big challenge in plasma medicine. Reactive species generated from plasma are key factors for treating cancer cells, and thus, non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma with high electron density has been developed and applied for cancer treatment. Various cancer cell lines have been treated with plasma, and non-thermal atmospheric plasma clearly has anti-tumor effects. Recent innovative studies suggest that plasma can both directly and indirectly affect cells and tissues, and this observation has widened the range of applications. Thus, cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is promising. Animal experiments and understanding the mode of action are essential for clinical application in the future. A new academic field that combines plasma science, the biology of free radicals, and systems biology will be established

  20. Cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma with ultra-high electron density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Hiromasa [Institute of Innovation for Future Society, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Center for Advanced Medicine and Clinical Research, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Mizuno, Masaaki [Center for Advanced Medicine and Clinical Research, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Toyokuni, Shinya [Department of Pathology and Biological Responses, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Maruyama, Shoichi [Department of Nephrology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Kodera, Yasuhiro [Department of Gastroenterological Surgery (Surgery II), Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Terasaki, Hiroko [Department of Ophthalmology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Adachi, Tetsuo [Laboratory of Clinical Pharmaceutics, Gifu Pharmaceutical University, 501-1196 Gifu (Japan); Kato, Masashi [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Kikkawa, Fumitaka [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Hori, Masaru [Institute of Innovation for Future Society, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan)

    2015-12-15

    Cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is a big challenge in plasma medicine. Reactive species generated from plasma are key factors for treating cancer cells, and thus, non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma with high electron density has been developed and applied for cancer treatment. Various cancer cell lines have been treated with plasma, and non-thermal atmospheric plasma clearly has anti-tumor effects. Recent innovative studies suggest that plasma can both directly and indirectly affect cells and tissues, and this observation has widened the range of applications. Thus, cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is promising. Animal experiments and understanding the mode of action are essential for clinical application in the future. A new academic field that combines plasma science, the biology of free radicals, and systems biology will be established.

  1. Report of the Interagency Task Force on High Energy Density Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2007-08-01

    Identifies the needs for improving Federal stewardship of specific aspects of high energy density physics, particularly the study of high energy density plasmas in the laboratory, and strengthening university activities in this latter discipline. The report articulates how HEDP fits into the portfolio of federally funded missions and includes agency actions to be taken that are necessary to further this area of study consistent with Federal priorities and plans, while being responsive to the needs of the scientific community.

  2. Report of the Interagency Task Force on High Energy Density Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    Identifies the needs for improving Federal stewardship of specific aspects of high energy density physics, particularly the study of high energy density plasmas in the laboratory, and strengthening university activities in this latter discipline. The report articulates how HEDP fits into the portfolio of federally funded missions and includes agency actions to be taken that are necessary to further this area of study consistent with Federal priorities and plans, while being responsive to the needs of the scientific community

  3. Wind power statistics and an evaluation of wind energy density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamil, M.; Parsa, S.; Majidi, M. [Materials and Energy Research Centre, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    1995-11-01

    In this paper the statistical data of fifty days` wind speed measurements at the MERC- solar site are used to find out the wind energy density and other wind characteristics with the help of the Weibull probability distribution function. It is emphasized that the Weibull and Rayleigh probability functions are useful tools for wind energy density estimation but are not quite appropriate for properly fitting the actual wind data of low mean speed, short-time records. One has to use either the actual wind data (histogram) or look for a better fit by other models of the probability function. (Author)

  4. Solid neutron matter the energy density in the relativistic harmonic approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cattani, M.; Fernandes, N.C.

    A relativistic expression for the energy density as a function of particle density for solid neutron matter is obtained using Dirac's equation with a truncated harmonic potential. Ultrabaric and superluminous effects are not found in our approach [pt

  5. Pressure retarded osmosis for energy production: membrane materials and operating conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, H; Choi, J-S; Lee, S

    2012-01-01

    Pressure retarded osmosis (PRO) is a novel membrane process to produce energy. PRO has the potential to convert the osmotic pressure difference between fresh water (i.e. river water) and seawater to electricity. Moreover, it can recover energy from highly concentrated brine in seawater desalination. Nevertheless, relatively little research has been undertaken for fundamental understanding of the PRO process. In this study, the characteristics of the PRO process were examined using a proof-of-concept device. Forward osmosis (FO), reverse osmosis (RO), and nanofiltration (NF) membranes were compared in terms of flux rate and concentration polarization ratio. The results indicated that the theoretical energy production by PRO depends on the membrane type as well as operating conditions (i.e. back pressure). The FO membrane had the highest energy efficiency while the NF membrane had the lowest efficiency. However, the energy production rate was low due to high internal concentration polarization (ICP) in the PRO membrane. This finding suggests that the control of the ICP is essential for practical application of PRO for energy production.

  6. High energy-density science on the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, E.M.; Cauble, R.; Remington, B.A.

    1997-08-01

    The National Ignition Facility, as well as its French counterpart Le Laser Megajoule, have been designed to confront one of the most difficult and compelling problem in shock physics - the creation of a hot, compassed DT plasma surrounded and confined by cold, nearly degenerate DT fuel. At the same time, these laser facilities will present the shock physics community with unique tools for the study of high energy density matter at states unreachable by any other laboratory technique. Here we describe how these lasers can contribute to investigations of high energy density in the area of material properties and equations of state, extend present laboratory shock techniques such as high-speed jets to new regimes, and allow study of extreme conditions found in astrophysical phenomena.

  7. Level densities of iron isotopes and lower-energy enhancement of y-strength function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voinov, A V; Grimes, S M; Agvaanluvsan, U; Algin, E; Belgya, T; Brune, C R; Guttormsen, M; Hornish, M J; Massey, T N; Mitchell, G; Rekstad, J; Schiller, A; Siem, S

    2005-01-01

    The neutron spectrum from the 55 Mn(d,n) 56 Fe reaction has been measured at E d = 7 MeV. The level density of 56 Fe obtained from neutron evaporation spectrum has been compared to the level density from Oslo-type 57 Fe( 3 He, aγ) 56 Fe experiment [1]. The good agreement supports the recent results [1, 8] including an availability of a low-energy enhancement in the γ-strength function for iron isotopes. The new level density function allowed us to investigate an excitation energy dependence of this enhancement, which is shown to increase with increasing excitation energy

  8. An investigation of Ar metastable state density in low pressure dual-frequency capacitively coupled argon and argon-diluted plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Wen-Yao; Xu, Yong; Peng, Fei; Guo, Qian; Li, Xiao-Song; Zhu, Ai-Min; Liu, Yong-Xin; Wang, You-Nian

    2015-01-01

    An tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy has been used to determine the Ar*( 3 P 2 ) and Ar*( 3 P 0 ) metastable atoms densities in dual-frequency capacitively coupled plasmas. The effects of different control parameters, such as high-frequency power, gas pressure and content of Ar, on the densities of two metastable atoms and electron density were discussed in single-frequency and dual-frequency Ar discharges, respectively. Particularly, the effects of the pressure on the axial profile of the electron and Ar metastable state densities were also discussed. Furthermore, a simple rate model was employed and its results were compared with experiments to analyze the main production and loss processes of Ar metastable states. It is found that Ar metastable state is mainly produced by electron impact excitation from the ground state, and decayed by diffusion and collision quenching with electrons and neutral molecules. Besides, the addition of CF 4 was found to significantly increase the metastable destruction rate by the CF 4 quenching, especially for large CF 4 content and high pressure, it becomes the dominant depopulation process

  9. Energy harvesting from arterial blood pressure for powering embedded brain sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanda, Aditya; Karami, M. Amin

    2016-04-01

    This paper investigates energy harvesting from arterial blood pressure via the piezoelectric effect by using a novel streaked cylinder geometry for the purpose of powering embedded micro-sensors in the brain. Initially, we look at the energy harvested by a piezoelectric cylinder placed inside an artery acted upon by blood pressure. Such an arrangement would be tantamount to constructing a stent out of piezoelectric materials. A stent is a cylinder placed in veins and arteries to prevent obstruction in blood flow. The governing equations of a conductor coated piezoelectric cylinder are obtained using Hamilton's principle. Pressure acting in arteries is radially directed and this is used to simplify the modal analysis and obtain the transfer function relating pressure to the induced voltage across the surface of the harvester. The power harvested by the cylindrical harvester is obtained for different shunt resistances. Radially directed pressure occurs elsewhere and we also look at harvesting energy from oil flow in pipelines. Although the energy harvested by the cylindrical energy harvester is significant at resonance, the natural frequency of the system is found to be very high. To decrease the natural frequency, we propose a novel streaked stent design by cutting it along the length, transforming it to a curved plate and decreasing the natural frequency. The governing equations corresponding to the new geometry are derived using Hamilton's principle and modal analysis is used to obtain the transfer function.

  10. Energy density and rate limitations in structural composite supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, J. F.; Gienger, E.; Wetzel, E. D.; Xu, K.

    2012-06-01

    The weight and volume of conventional energy storage technologies greatly limits their performance in mobile platforms. Traditional research efforts target improvements in energy density to reduce device size and mass. Enabling a device to perform additional functions, such as bearing mechanical load, is an alternative approach as long as the total mass efficiency exceeds that of the individual materials it replaces. Our research focuses on structural composites that function as batteries and supercapacitors. These multifunctional devices could be used to replace conventional structural components, such as vehicle frame elements, to provide significant system-level weight reductions and extend mission times. Our approach is to design structural properties directly into the electrolyte and electrode materials. Solid polymer electrolyte materials bind the system and transfer load to the fibers while conducting ions between the electrodes. Carbon fiber electrodes provide a route towards optimizing both energy storage and load-bearing capabilities, and may also obviate the need for a separate current collector. The components are being integrated using scalable, cost-effective composite processing techniques that are amenable to complex part shapes. Practical considerations of energy density and rate behavior are described here as they relate to materials used. Our results highlight the viability as well as the challenges of this multifunctional approach towards energy storage.

  11. Fluctuations in transverse energy and mulitplicity, energy densities, and neutral pion spectra in nucleus-nucleus collisions at 200 GeV/nucleon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The main goal of the CERN heavy-ion experiments is the search for an indication that the predicted state of deconfined quarks and gluons, the quark-gluon plasma (QGP), has been produced. The quantity most crucial to the probability of QGP formation is the thermalized energy density attained during the heavy-ion reaction. The amount of energy radiated transverse to the beam direction is the experimental quantity which is believed to be a measure of the amount of energy deposition in the reaction, and hence to reflect the energy density attained. In this presentation we consider the systematics of transverse energy production at CERN SPS energies, and we use the results to make estimates, under various assumptions, of attained energy densities

  12. Vacuum stress energy density and its gravitational implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, Ricardo; Fulling, Stephen A.; Kaplan, Lev; Kirsten, Klaus; Liu, Zhonghai; Milton, Kimball A.

    2008-04-01

    In nongravitational physics the local density of energy is often regarded as merely a bookkeeping device; only total energy has an experimental meaning—and it is only modulo a constant term. But in general relativity the local stress-energy tensor is the source term in Einstein's equation. In closed universes, and those with Kaluza-Klein dimensions, theoretical consistency demands that quantum vacuum energy should exist and have gravitational effects, although there are no boundary materials giving rise to that energy by van der Waals interactions. In the lab there are boundaries, and in general the energy density has a nonintegrable singularity as a boundary is approached (for idealized boundary conditions). As pointed out long ago by Candelas and Deutsch, in this situation there is doubt about the viability of the semiclassical Einstein equation. Our goal is to show that the divergences in the linearized Einstein equation can be renormalized to yield a plausible approximation to the finite theory that presumably exists for realistic boundary conditions. For a scalar field with Dirichlet or Neumann boundary conditions inside a rectangular parallelepiped, we have calculated by the method of images all components of the stress tensor, for all values of the conformal coupling parameter and an exponential ultraviolet cutoff parameter. The qualitative features of contributions from various classes of closed classical paths are noted. Then the Estrada-Kanwal distributional theory of asymptotics, particularly the moment expansion, is used to show that the linearized Einstein equation with the stress-energy near a plane boundary as source converges to a consistent theory when the cutoff is removed. This paper reports work in progress on a project combining researchers in Texas, Louisiana and Oklahoma. It is supported by NSF Grants PHY-0554849 and PHY-0554926.

  13. Energy-Recovery Pressure-Reducer in District Heating System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dariusz Borkowski

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Already existing man-made infrastructures that create water flow and unused pressure are interesting energy sources to which micro-hydropower plants can be applied. Apart from water supply systems (WSSs, which are widely described in the literature, significant hydropower potential can also be found in district heating systems (DHSs. In this paper, a prototype, a so-called energy-recovery pressure-reducer (ERPR, utilized for a DHS, is presented. It consisted of a pump as a turbine coupled to a permanent magnet synchronous generator (PMSG. The latter was connected to the power grid through the power electronic unit (PEU. The variable-speed operation allowed one to modify the turbine characteristics to match the substation’s hydraulic conditions. The proposed ERPR device could be installed in series to the existing classic pressure reducing valve (PRV as an independent device that reduces costs and simplifies system installation. The test results of the prototype system located in a substation of Cracow’s DHS are presented. The steady-state curves and regulation characteristics show the prototype’s operating range and efficiency. In this study, the pressure-reducer impact on the electrical and hydraulic systems, and on the environment, were analyzed. The operation tests during the annual heating season revealed an average system’s efficiency of 49%.

  14. Chemically and Thermally Stable High Energy Density Silicone Composites, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Thermal energy storage systems with 300 -- 1000 kJ/kg energy density through either phase changes or chemical heat absorption are sought by NASA. This proposed...

  15. The phase diagram of water at negative pressures: virtual ices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conde, M M; Vega, C; Tribello, G A; Slater, B

    2009-07-21

    The phase diagram of water at negative pressures as obtained from computer simulations for two models of water, TIP4P/2005 and TIP5P is presented. Several solid structures with lower densities than ice Ih, so-called virtual ices, were considered as possible candidates to occupy the negative pressure region of the phase diagram of water. In particular the empty hydrate structures sI, sII, and sH and another, recently proposed, low-density ice structure. The relative stabilities of these structures at 0 K was determined using empirical water potentials and density functional theory calculations. By performing free energy calculations and Gibbs-Duhem integration the phase diagram of TIP4P/2005 was determined at negative pressures. The empty hydrates sII and sH appear to be the stable solid phases of water at negative pressures. The phase boundary between ice Ih and sII clathrate occurs at moderate negative pressures, while at large negative pressures sH becomes the most stable phase. This behavior is in reasonable agreement with what is observed in density functional theory calculations.

  16. Double-layer capacitors with a higher energy density; Doppelschichtkondensatoren mit hoeherem Energieinhalt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Presser, Volker [Leibniz-Institut fuer Neue Materialien (INM) gGmbH, Saarbruecken (Germany). Juniorforschungs-Gruppe Energie-Materialien; Universitaet des Saarlandes, Saarbruecken (Germany)

    2013-05-15

    Electrical double-layer capacitors, also known as supercapacitors (SC) are devices for electrical energy storage used for fast acceleration of hybrid cars or for the energy recovery during breaking operations. In contrast, lithium-ion batteries (LIB) are used as energy storage devices to provide an extended travel distance for plug-in hybrid cars and electric vehicles. Current research aims to overcome the major limitations of both technologies (SC: low energy density/LIB: slow recharge and limited service life) and hybrid cells are considered a promising solution. The goal is to improve the performance and energy density of storage devices which can be achieved, as shown by the Leibniz-Institute for New Materials (INM), with the use of nanotechnology. (orig.)

  17. Modelling of the energy density deposition profiles of ultrashort laser pulses focused in optical media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vidal, F; Lavertu, P-L; Bigaouette, N; Moore, F; Brunette, I; Giguere, D; Kieffer, J-C; Olivie, G; Ozaki, T

    2007-01-01

    The propagation of ultrashort laser pulses in dense optical media is investigated theoretically by solving numerically the nonlinear Schroedinger equation. It is shown that the maximum energy density deposition as a function of the pulse energy presents a well-defined threshold that increases with the pulse duration. As a consequence of plasma defocusing, the maximum energy density deposition is generally smaller and the size of the energy deposition zone is generally larger for shorter pulses. Nevertheless, significant values of the energy density deposition can be obtained near threshold, i.e., at lower energy than for longer pulses

  18. Effect of temperature and density fluctuations on the spatially heterogeneous dynamics of glass-forming Van der Waals liquids under high pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koperwas, K; Grzybowski, A; Grzybowska, K; Wojnarowska, Z; Sokolov, A P; Paluch, M

    2013-09-20

    In this Letter, we show how temperature and density fluctuations affect the spatially heterogeneous dynamics at ambient and elevated pressures. By using high-pressure experimental data for van der Waals liquids, we examine contributions of the temperature and density fluctuations to the dynamics heterogeneity. We show that the dynamic heterogeneity decreases significantly with increasing pressure at a constant structural relaxation time (isochronal condition), while the broadening of the relaxation spectrum remains constant. This observation questions the relationship between spectral broadening and dynamic heterogeneity.

  19. Remnant cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and blood pressure as mediators from obesity to ischemic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varbo, Anette; Benn, Marianne; Smith, George Davey; Timpson, Nicholas J; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2015-02-13

    Obesity leads to increased ischemic heart disease (IHD) risk, but the risk is thought to be mediated through intermediate variables and may not be caused by increased weight per se. To test the hypothesis that the increased IHD risk because of obesity is mediated through lipoproteins, blood pressure, glucose, and C-reactive protein. Approximately 90 000 participants from Copenhagen were included in a Mendelian randomization design with mediation analyses. Associations were examined using conventional measurements of body mass index and intermediate variables and using genetic variants associated with these. During ≤22 years of follow-up 13 945 participants developed IHD. The increased IHD risk caused by obesity was partly mediated through elevated levels of nonfasting remnant cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, through elevated blood pressure, and possibly also through elevated nonfasting glucose levels; however, reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and elevated C-reactive protein levels were not mediators in genetic analyses. The 3 intermediate variables that explained the highest excess risk of IHD from genetically determined obesity were low-density lipoprotein cholesterol with 8%, systolic blood pressure with 7%, and remnant cholesterol with 7% excess risk of IHD. Corresponding observational excess risks using conventional body mass index were 21%, 11%, and 20%, respectively. The increased IHD risk because of obesity was partly mediated through elevated levels of nonfasting remnant and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and through elevated blood pressure. Our results suggest that there may be benefit to gain by reducing levels of these risk factors in obese individuals not able to achieve sustained weight loss. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. Impact of pressure on the dynamic behavior of CO2 hydrate slurry in a stirred tank reactor applied to cold thermal energy storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dufour, Thomas; Hoang, Hong Minh; Oignet, Jérémy; Osswald, Véronique; Clain, Pascal; Fournaison, Laurence; Delahaye, Anthony

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: •CO 2 hydrate storage was studied in a stirred tank reactor under pressure. •CO 2 hydrates can store three times more energy than water during the same time. •Increasing CO 2 hydrate pressure decreases charge time for the same stored energy. •CO 2 hydrate storage allow average power exchange to be maintained along the process. -- Abstract: Phase change material (PCM) slurries are considered as high-performance fluids for secondary refrigeration and cold thermal energy storage (CTES) systems thanks to their high energy density. Nevertheless, the efficiency of such system is limited by storage dynamic. In fact, PCM charging or discharging rate is governed by system design (storage tank, heat exchanger), heat transfer fluid temperature and flow rate (cold or hot source), and PCM temperature. However, with classical PCM (ice, paraffin…), phase change temperature depends only on material/fluid nature and composition. In the case of gas hydrates, phase change temperature is also controlled by pressure. In the current work, the influence of pressure on cold storage with gas hydrates was studied experimentally using a stirred tank reactor equipped with a cooling jacket. A tank reactor model was also developed to assess the efficiency of this storage process. The results showed that pressure can be used to adjust phase change temperature of CO 2 hydrates, and consequently charging/discharging time. For the same operating conditions and during the same charging time, the amount of stored energy using CO 2 hydrates can be three times higher than that using water. By increasing the initial pressure from 2.45 to 3.2 MPa (at 282.15 K), it is also possible to decrease the charging time by a factor of 3. Finally, it appears that the capacity of pressure to increase CO 2 -hydrate phase-change temperature can also improve system efficiency by decreasing thermal losses.

  1. Indirect Measurement of Energy Density of Soft PZT Ceramic Utilizing Mechanical Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unruan, Muangjai; Unruan, Sujitra; Inkong, Yutthapong; Yimnirun, Rattikorn

    2017-11-01

    This paper reports on an indirect measurement of energy density of soft PZT ceramic utilizing mechanical stress. The method works analogous to the Olsen cycle and allows for a large amount of electro-mechanical energy conversion. A maximum energy density of 350 kJ/m3/cycle was found under 0-312 MPa and 1-20 kV/cm of applied mechanical stress and electric field, respectively. The obtained result is substantially higher than the results reported in previous studies of PZT materials utilizing a direct piezoelectric effect.

  2. The symmetry energy at suprasaturation density and the ASY-EOS experiment at GSI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Filippo E.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The ASY-EOS experiment at GSI laboratory measured the direct and elliptic flow of neutrons and light charged particles in the reaction 197Au+197 Au at 400 A MeV incident energy. The ratio of elliptic flow of neutrons with respect to that of the light charged particles was used as main experimental observable to probe the density dependence of the symmetry energy term of the nuclear equation of state. Results, obtained by comparison of the experimental data with the UrQMD model predictions, strongly support a moderately soft to linear density dependence of the symmetry energy at suprasaturation densities below 2ρ0.

  3. Method for controlling low-energy high current density electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.N.; Oswald, R.B. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    A method and an apparatus for controlling the angle of incidence of low-energy, high current density electron beams are disclosed. The apparatus includes a current generating diode arrangement with a mesh anode for producing a drifting electron beam. An auxiliary grounded screen electrode is placed between the anode and a target for controlling the average angle of incidence of electrons in the drifting electron beam. According to the method of the present invention, movement of the auxiliary screen electrode relative to the target and the anode permits reliable and reproducible adjustment of the average angle of incidence of the electrons in low energy, high current density relativistic electron beams

  4. US Heavy Ion Beam Research for Energy Density Physics Applications and Fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidson, R.C.; Logan, B.G.; Barnard, J.J.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Briggs, R.J.; Callahan D.A.; Kireeff Covo, M.; Celata, C.M.; Cohen, R.H.; Coleman, J.E.; Debonnel, C.S.; Grote, D.P.; Efthimiom, P.C.; Eylon, S.; Friedman, A.; Gilson, E.P.; Grisham, L.R.; Henestroza, E.; Kaganovich, I.D.; Kwan, J.W.; Lee, E.P.; Lee, W.W.; Leitner, M.; Lund, S.M.; Meier, W.R.; Molvik, A.W.; Olson, C.L.; Penn, G.E.; Qin, H.; Roy, P.K.; Rose, D.V.; Sefkow, A.; Seidl, P.A.; Sharp, W.M.; Startsev, E.A.; Tabak, M.; Thoma, C.; Vay, J-L; Wadron, W.L.; Wurtele, J.S.; Welch, D.R.; Westenskow, G.A.; Yu, S.S.

    2005-01-01

    Key scientific results from recent experiments, modeling tools, and heavy ion accelerator research are summarized that explore ways to investigate the properties of high energy density matter in heavy-ion-driven targets, in particular, strongly-coupled plasmas at 0.01 to 0.1 times solid density for studies of warm dense matter, which is a frontier area in high energy density physics. Pursuit of these near-term objectives has resulted in many innovations that will ultimately benefit heavy ion inertial fusion energy. These include: neutralized ion beam compression and focusing, which hold the promise of greatly improving the stage between the accelerator and the target chamber in a fusion power plant; and the Pulse Line Ion Accelerator (PLIA), which may lead to compact, low-cost modular linac drivers

  5. Exploration of Plasma Jets Approach to High Energy Density Physics. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Chiping [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2013-08-26

    High-energy-density laboratory plasma (HEDLP) physics is an emerging, important area of research in plasma physics, nuclear physics, astrophysics, and particle acceleration. While the HEDLP regime occurs at extreme conditions which are often found naturally in space but not on the earth, it may be accessible by colliding high intensity plasmas such as high-energy-density plasma jets, plasmoids or compact toroids from plasma guns. The physics of plasma jets is investigated in the context of high energy density laboratory plasma research. This report summarizes results of theoretical and computational investigation of a plasma jet undergoing adiabatic compression and adiabatic expansion. A root-mean-squared (rms) envelope theory of plasma jets is developed. Comparison between theory and experiment is made. Good agreement between theory and experiment is found.

  6. Structure and stability of ZrSiO4 under hydrostatic pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marques, M.; Florez, M.; Recio, J.M.

    2006-01-01

    -anvil cell using energy-dispersive synchrotron x-ray diffraction with emphasis on the pressure range 0-15 GPa. Static total-energy calculations have been performed within the density functional theory at local density and generalized gradient approximation levels using a plane-wave pseudopotential scheme....... Our quantum-mechanical simulations explore the pressure response of the two observed tetragonal structures (zircon- and scheelite-type reidite) as well as of other potential post-scheelite polymorphs up to about 60 GPa. We find very good agreement between our experimental and calculated pressure......-volume values for the low-pressure phase of ZrSiO4. A microscopic analysis of the bulk compressibility of zircon and reidite in terms of polyhedral and atomic contributions is proposed to clarify some of the discrepancies found in recent theoretical and experimental studies. Our results show the relevant role...

  7. High pressure gas driven liquid metal MHD homopolar generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Yasuyuki

    1988-01-01

    A liquid metal MHD homopolar generator is proposed to be used as a high repetition rate pulsed power supply. In the generator, the thermal energy stored in a high pressure gas (He) reservoir is rapidly converted into kinetic energy of a rotating liquid metal (NaK) cylinder which is contracted by a gas driven annular free piston. The rotational kinetic energy is converted into electrical energy by making use of the homopolar generator principle. The conversion efficiency is calculated to be 47% in generating electrical energy of 20 kJ/pulse (1.7 MW peak power) at a repetition rate of 7 Hz. From the viewpoint of energy storage, the high pressure gas reservoir with a charging pressure of 15 MPa is considered to ''electrically'' store the energy at a density of 10 MJ/m 3 . (author)

  8. The energy and pressure balance in the corona

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McWhirter, R.W.P.; Wilson, R.

    1976-01-01

    This paper reviews theoretical models for the solar corona based on energy and pressure calculations. Processes included in these calculations are: (a) heating of the outer corona by mechanical waves; (b) convective out-flow of gas giving rise to the solar wind; (c) thermal conductions; (d) radiated power loss. Possible observations to help answer some of the outstanding questions about the energy balance are suggested. (author)

  9. Quantification of breast density using dual-energy mammography with liquid phantom calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lam, Alfonso R; Ding, Huanjun; Molloi, Sabee

    2014-01-01

    Breast density is a widely recognized potential risk factor for breast cancer. However, accurate quantification of breast density is a challenging task in mammography. The current use of plastic breast-equivalent phantoms for calibration provides limited accuracy in dual-energy mammography due to the chemical composition of the phantom. We implemented a breast-equivalent liquid phantom for dual-energy calibration in order to improve the accuracy of breast density measurement. To design these phantoms, three liquid compounds were chosen: water, isopropyl alcohol, and glycerol. Chemical compositions of glandular and adipose tissues, obtained from NIST database, were used as reference materials. Dual-energy signal of the liquid phantom at different breast densities (0% to 100%) and thicknesses (1 to 8 cm) were simulated. Glandular and adipose tissue thicknesses were estimated from a higher order polynomial of the signals. Our results indicated that the linear attenuation coefficients of the breast-equivalent liquid phantoms match those of the target material. Comparison between measured and known breast density data shows a linear correlation with a slope close to 1 and a non-zero intercept of 7%, while plastic phantoms showed a slope of 0.6 and a non-zero intercept of 8%. Breast density results derived from the liquid calibration phantoms showed higher accuracy than those derived from the plastic phantoms for different breast thicknesses and various tube voltages. We performed experimental phantom studies using liquid phantoms and then compared the computed breast density with those obtained using a bovine tissue model. The experimental data and the known values were in good correlation with a slope close to 1 (∼1.1). In conclusion, our results indicate that liquid phantoms are a reliable alternative for calibration in dual-energy mammography and better reproduce the chemical properties of the target material. (paper)

  10. Energy and nutrient density of foods in relation to their carbon footprint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drewnowski, Adam; Rehm, Colin D; Martin, Agnes; Verger, Eric O; Voinnesson, Marc; Imbert, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    A carbon footprint is the sum of greenhouse gas emissions (GHGEs) associated with food production, processing, transporting, and retailing. We examined the relation between the energy and nutrient content of foods and associated GHGEs as expressed as g CO2 equivalents. GHGE values, which were calculated and provided by a French supermarket chain, were merged with the Composition Nutritionnelle des Aliments (French food-composition table) nutrient-composition data for 483 foods and beverages from the French Agency for Food, Environmental and Occupational Health and Safety. Foods were aggregated into 34 food categories and 5 major food groups as follows: meat and meat products, milk and dairy products, frozen and processed fruit and vegetables, grains, and sweets. Energy density was expressed as kcal/100 g. Nutrient density was determined by using 2 alternative nutrient-density scores, each based on the sum of the percentage of daily values for 6 or 15 nutrients, respectively. The energy and nutrient densities of foods were linked to log-transformed GHGE values expressed per 100 g or 100 kcal. Grains and sweets had lowest GHGEs (per 100 g and 100 kcal) but had high energy density and a low nutrient content. The more-nutrient-dense animal products, including meat and dairy, had higher GHGE values per 100 g but much lower values per 100 kcal. In general, a higher nutrient density of foods was associated with higher GHGEs per 100 kcal, although the slopes of fitted lines varied for meat and dairy compared with fats and sweets. Considerations of the environmental impact of foods need to be linked to concerns about nutrient density and health. The point at which the higher carbon footprint of some nutrient-dense foods is offset by their higher nutritional value is a priority area for additional research. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  11. An investigation of pulsed high density plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timmermans, C.J.

    1984-01-01

    In this thesis a wall-stabilized argon cascade arc is studied at values of pulsed pressure up to 14 bar and a pulsed current range up to 2200 A with a time duration of about 2 ms. The basic plasma is a CW cascade arc with a 5 mm diameter plasma column and a length of 90 mm, which operates at a 60 A DC current and at one atmosphere filling pressure. The author starts with an extensive summary of the CW arc investigations. After a brief introduction of the basic transport equations the mass equations of the constituent particles are treated using the extended collisional radiative model. The energy balance equations and the momentum balance are discussed. The electron density is determined from measurements of the continuum radiation. The final chapter contains the experimental results on the electron temperatures and electron densities in the pressure and current pulsed plasma. Attention is given to the deviations from local thermodynamic equilibrium values of the ground level densities of the different argon systems. (Auth.)

  12. The effect of pressure on the charge-density wave and superconductivity in ZrTe sub 3

    CERN Document Server

    Yamaya, K; Yasuzuka, S; Okajima, Y; Tanda, S

    2002-01-01

    The charge-density-wave (CDW) transition temperature, T sub C sub D sub W , of ZrTe sub 3 is found to increase for pressures up to 0.6 GPa, while the superconducting transition temperature, T sub c , decreases with increasing pressure. According to a band calculation, it is found that the pressure-induced enhancement of the CDW and suppression of the superconductivity are not simply explained by the effect of nesting of the Fermi surface, suggesting the possibility of a new relation for the competition between the CDW and superconductivity.

  13. Energy and exergy analysis of electricity generation from natural gas pressure reducing stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neseli, Mehmet Alparslan; Ozgener, Onder; Ozgener, Leyla

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Forecasting the recoverable energy from natural gas pressure reduction stations. • Electricity generation through pressure reduction stations via turboexpanders. • A thermodynamics analysis of PRS. - Abstract: Electricity generation or power recovery through pressure reduction stations (PRS) for general use has not been realized in Izmir. The main objective of the present study was to do a case study for calculating electricity to be recovered in one natural gas pressure reduction stations in Izmir. It is the first forecasting study to obtain energy from natural gas pressure-reducing stations in Izmir. Energy can be obtained from natural gas PRS with turbo-expanders instead of using throttle valves or regulators from the PRS. The exergy performance of PRS with TE is evaluated in this study. Exergetic efficiencies of the system and components are determined to assess their individual performances. Based upon pressure change and volumetric flow rate, it can be obtained by recovering average estimated installed capacity and annual energy 494.24 kW, 4113.03 MW h, respectively. In terms of estimated installed capacity power and annual energy, the highest level is 764.88 kW, approximately 6365.34 MW h, in Aliaga PRS. Also it can be seen that CO 2 emission factor average value is 295.45 kg/MW h

  14. Energy considerations in spraying process of a spill-return pressure-swirl atomizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jedelsky, Jan; Jicha, Miroslav

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We analyse energy conversion in simplex and spill-return pressure-swirl atomizer. • Inlet (pressure) energy converts into liquid motion with nozzle efficiency ∼58%. • Kinetic energy of developed spray at closed spill line is ∼33% of the inlet energy. • It consists of energy of droplets (∼2/3) and entrained air (1/3). • Atomization efficiency is <0.3%; it declines with inlet pressure and spill opening. - Abstract: The work focuses on energy conversion during the internal flow, discharge and formation of the spray from a pressure-swirl (PS) atomizer in the simplex as well as spill-return mode. Individual energy forms are described in general and assessed experimentally for a particular PS atomizer and light heating oil as a medium. The PS spray was observed at various loads to investigate the liquid breakup process and the spray characteristics. Spatially resolved diameters and droplet velocities, measured by means of phase-Doppler anemometry, served for estimation of the energy characteristics in the PS spray. The input energy given by the potential energy of the supplied liquid partially converts into the kinetic energy (KE) in the swirling ports with hydraulic loss in per cent scale. Most of the pressure drop is associated with rotational motion in the swirl chamber with total conversion efficiency at the exit orifice ∼58%. The rest of the input energy ends up as friction loss, leaving room for improvement. The overall value (ID 32 ) of the Sauter mean diameter of droplets in the spray, D 32 , varies with pressure drop Δp l powered to −0.1. The radial profiles of D 32 widen with the increase in spill/feed ratio (SFR), but the ID 32 remain almost constant within the studied SFR range. The spray KE at closed spill line covers the droplet KE (21–26%) and that of entrained air (10–13%), both moderately varying with Δp l . The specific KEs of both the liquid and air markedly drop down with the spill line

  15. Minimal length, Friedmann equations and maximum density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Awad, Adel [Center for Theoretical Physics, British University of Egypt,Sherouk City 11837, P.O. Box 43 (Egypt); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Ain Shams University,Cairo, 11566 (Egypt); Ali, Ahmed Farag [Centre for Fundamental Physics, Zewail City of Science and Technology,Sheikh Zayed, 12588, Giza (Egypt); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Benha University,Benha, 13518 (Egypt)

    2014-06-16

    Inspired by Jacobson’s thermodynamic approach, Cai et al. have shown the emergence of Friedmann equations from the first law of thermodynamics. We extend Akbar-Cai derivation http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevD.75.084003 of Friedmann equations to accommodate a general entropy-area law. Studying the resulted Friedmann equations using a specific entropy-area law, which is motivated by the generalized uncertainty principle (GUP), reveals the existence of a maximum energy density closed to Planck density. Allowing for a general continuous pressure p(ρ,a) leads to bounded curvature invariants and a general nonsingular evolution. In this case, the maximum energy density is reached in a finite time and there is no cosmological evolution beyond this point which leaves the big bang singularity inaccessible from a spacetime prospective. The existence of maximum energy density and a general nonsingular evolution is independent of the equation of state and the spacial curvature k. As an example we study the evolution of the equation of state p=ωρ through its phase-space diagram to show the existence of a maximum energy which is reachable in a finite time.

  16. Energy autonomous pressure sensor for automotive applications; Energieautarker Drucksensor fuer Anwendungen im Automobil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurth, Martin [A. Raymond GmbH und CoKG, Loerrach (Germany)

    2013-04-01

    In this contribution a wireless, energy autonomous sensor micro-system is presented. The innovation of this wireless system is that it has been designed as an energy autonomous sensor system especially for use in vehicles. The newly developed pressure sensor system is intended to measure the pressure in the fuel system of vehicles and to wirelessly transmit it in the 2.4 GHz-frequency band to a receiver. The sensor system is powered by an electromagnetic energy harvester driven by vibration and transmits the measured data as soon as there is sufficient energy available in the system. As a consequence the system's data rate varies depending on the system energy level and consequently on the vibration power available. So the basic idea is to supply an energy storage system, e. g. a capacitor, with energy until a certain threshold value is achieved. This threshold value was defined such that the stored energy is sufficient for measuring the pressure and the temperature and transmitting these values to the receiver. After successful transmission the circuit goes back into the state of ''energy collection''. In order to realize a system setup as compact as possible consisting of pressure sensor, energy converter with energy storage, controller, and HF module, we have developed and implemented a housing constructed as a PCB/MID support frame.

  17. Nonlinear dielectric thin films for high-power electric storage with energy density comparable with electrochemical supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Kui; Chen, Shuting; Rahimabady, Mojtaba; Mirshekarloo, Meysam Sharifzadeh; Yu, Shuhui; Tay, Francis Eng Hock; Sritharan, Thirumany; Lu, Li

    2011-09-01

    Although batteries possess high energy storage density, their output power is limited by the slow movement of charge carriers, and thus capacitors are often required to deliver high power output. Dielectric capacitors have high power density with fast discharge rate, but their energy density is typically much lower than electrochemical supercapacitors. Increasing the energy density of dielectric materials is highly desired to extend their applications in many emerging power system applications. In this paper, we review the mechanisms and major characteristics of electric energy storage with electrochemical supercapacitors and dielectric capacitors. Three types of in-house-produced ferroic nonlinear dielectric thin film materials with high energy density are described, including (Pb(0.97)La(0.02))(Zr(0.90)Sn(0.05)Ti(0.05))O(3) (PLZST) antiferroelectric ceramic thin films, Pb(Zn(1/3)Nb(2/3))O(3-)Pb(Mg(1/3)Nb(2/3))O(3-)PbTiO(3) (PZN-PMN-PT) relaxor ferroelectric ceramic thin films, and poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF)-based polymer blend thin films. The results showed that these thin film materials are promising for electric storage with outstandingly high power density and fairly high energy density, comparable with electrochemical supercapacitors.

  18. Local thermodynamic equilibrium in rapidly heated high energy density plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aslanyan, V.; Tallents, G. J.

    2014-01-01

    Emission spectra and the dynamics of high energy density plasmas created by optical and Free Electron Lasers (FELs) depend on the populations of atomic levels. Calculations of plasma emission and ionization may be simplified by assuming Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE), where populations are given by the Saha-Boltzmann equation. LTE can be achieved at high densities when collisional processes are much more significant than radiative processes, but may not be valid if plasma conditions change rapidly. A collisional-radiative model has been used to calculate the times taken by carbon and iron plasmas to reach LTE at varying densities and heating rates. The effect of different energy deposition methods, as well as Ionization Potential Depression are explored. This work shows regimes in rapidly changing plasmas, such as those created by optical lasers and FELs, where the use of LTE is justified, because timescales for plasma changes are significantly longer than the times needed to achieve an LTE ionization balance

  19. Rankine cycle condenser pressure control using an energy conversion device bypass valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Timothy C; Nelson, Christopher R; Zigan, James A

    2014-04-01

    The disclosure provides a waste heat recovery system and method in which pressure in a Rankine cycle (RC) system of the WHR system is regulated by diverting working fluid from entering an inlet of an energy conversion device of the RC system. In the system, an inlet of a controllable bypass valve is fluidly coupled to a working fluid path upstream of an energy conversion device of the RC system, and an outlet of the bypass valve is fluidly coupled to the working fluid path upstream of the condenser of the RC system such that working fluid passing through the bypass valve bypasses the energy conversion device and increases the pressure in a condenser. A controller determines the temperature and pressure of the working fluid and controls the bypass valve to regulate pressure in the condenser.

  20. High-density carbon nanotube wet-laid buckypapers with enhanced strength and conductivity using a high-pressure homogenization process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jun; Jang, Si Hoon; Park, No Hyung; Jeong, Won Young; Lim, Dae Young [Human and Culture Convergence Technology Group, Korea Institute of Industrial Technology (KITECH), Ansan (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Jun Young; Yang, Seung Jae [Dept. of Applied Organic Materials Engineering, Inha University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    In this work, we prepared homogeneously dispersed carbon nanotubes in water using a high-pressure homogenizer, while high-density carbon nanotube buckypapers were prepared by wet-laid process. The strength and conductivity of the buckypaper were increased dramatically after the high-pressure homogenization because of the increased density and uniformity of the paper. In addition, the buckypapers containing various additives and treated with SOCl{sub 2} exhibited further increase of strength and conductivity resulting from the binding and the p-type doping effect. The buckypapers with high electrical conductivity exhibited superior electromagnetic interference shielding effectiveness that could be applied for structural shielding materials.

  1. Understanding the major uncertainties in the nuclear symmetry energy at suprasaturation densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Chang; Li Baoan

    2010-01-01

    Within the interacting Fermi gas model for isospin asymmetric nuclear matter, effects of the in-medium three-body interaction and the two-body short-range tensor force owing to the ρ meson exchange, as well as the short-range nucleon correlation on the high-density behavior of the nuclear symmetry energy, are demonstrated respectively in a transparent way. Possible physics origins of the extremely uncertain nuclear symmetry energy at suprasaturation densities are discussed.

  2. Vapour pressures, densities, and viscosities of the (water + lithium bromide + potassium acetate) system and (water + lithium bromide + sodium lactate) system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucas, Antonio de; Donate, Marina; Rodriguez, Juan F.

    2006-01-01

    Measurements of thermophysical properties (vapour pressure, density, and viscosity) of the (water + lithium bromide + potassium acetate) system LiBr:CH 3 COOK = 2:1 by mass ratio and the (water + lithium bromide + sodium lactate) system LiBr:CH 3 CH(OH)COONa = 2:1 by mass ratio were measured. The system, a possible new working fluid for absorption heat pump, consists of absorbent (LiBr + CH 3 COOK) or (LiBr + CH 3 CH(OH)COONa) and refrigerant H 2 O. The vapour pressures were measured in the ranges of temperature and absorbent concentration from T = (293.15 to 333.15) K and from mass fraction 0.20 to 0.50, densities and viscosities were measured from T = (293.15 to 323.15) K and from mass fraction 0.20 to 0.40. The experimental data were correlated with an Antoine-type equation. Densities and viscosities were measured in the same range of temperature and absorbent concentration as that of the vapour pressure. Regression equations for densities and viscosities were obtained with a minimum mean square error criterion

  3. Hydrophobic and low density silica aerogels dried at ambient pressure using TEOS precursor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurav, Jyoti L.; Rao, A. Venkateswara; Bangi, Uzma K.H.

    2009-01-01

    In the conventional ambient pressure drying of silica aerogels, tedious repetitive gel washing and solvent exchange steps (∼6 days) are involved. Therefore, in the present studies, we intended to reduce the processing time of TEOS based ambient pressure dried silica aerogels. Solvents such as methanol, hexane and Hexamethyldisilazane (HMDZ) as surface chemical modification agents have been used. To get good quality aerogels in terms of low density, high porosity, high contact angle and low volume shrinkage in less processing time, we varied MeOH/TEOS, HMDZ/TEOS molar ratios, oxalic acid (A) and NH 4 OH (B) concentrations and stirring time from 1 to 27.7, 0.34 to 2.1, 0 to 0.1 M, 0 to 2 M and 15 to 90 min respectively. The transparent and low-density aerogels were obtained for TEOS:MeOH:acidic H 2 O:basic H 2 O:HMDZ molar ratio of 1:16.5:0.81:0.50:0.681 respectively. The thermal stability and hydrophobicity have been confirmed with Thermogravimetric and Differential Thermal (TG-DT) analyses and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy. Microstructural study was carried out by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM)

  4. Acoustic Radiation Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantrell, John H.

    2018-01-01

    The theoretical foundation of acoustic radiation pressure in plane wave beams is reexamined. It is shown from finite deformation theory and the Boltzmann-Ehrenfest Adiabatic Principle that the Brillouin stress tensor (BST) is the radiation stress in Lagrangian coordinates (not Eulerian coordinates) and that the terms in the BST are not the momentum flux density and mean excess Eulerian stress but are simply contributions to the variation in the wave oscillation period resulting from changes in path length and true wave velocity, respectively, from virtual variations in the strain. It is shown that the radiation stress in Eulerian coordinates is the mean Cauchy stress (not the momentum flux density, as commonly assumed) and that Langevin's second relation does not yield an assessment of the mean Eulerian pressure, since the enthalpy used in the traditional derivations is a function of the thermodynamic tensions - not the Eulerian pressure. It is shown that the transformation between Lagrangian and Eulerian quantities cannot be obtained from the commonly-used expansion of one of the quantities in terms of the particle displacement, since the expansion provides only the difference between the value of the quantity at two different points in Cartesian space separated by the displacement. The proper transformation is obtained only by employing the transformation coefficients of finite deformation theory, which are defined in terms of the displacement gradients. Finite deformation theory leads to the result that for laterally unconfined, plane waves the Lagrangian and Eulerian radiation pressures are equal with the value (1/4)(2K) along the direction of wave propagation, where (K) is the mean kinetic energy density, and zero in directions normal to the propagation direction. This is contrary to the Langevin result that the Lagrangian radiation pressure in the propagation direction is equal to (2K) and the BST result that the Eulerian radiation pressure in that direction

  5. High-Energy-Density Metal-Oxygen Batteries: Lithium-Oxygen Batteries vs Sodium-Oxygen Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kyeongse; Agyeman, Daniel Adjei; Park, Mihui; Yang, Junghoon; Kang, Yong-Mook

    2017-12-01

    The development of next-generation energy-storage devices with high power, high energy density, and safety is critical for the success of large-scale energy-storage systems (ESSs), such as electric vehicles. Rechargeable sodium-oxygen (Na-O 2 ) batteries offer a new and promising opportunity for low-cost, high-energy-density, and relatively efficient electrochemical systems. Although the specific energy density of the Na-O 2 battery is lower than that of the lithium-oxygen (Li-O 2 ) battery, the abundance and low cost of sodium resources offer major advantages for its practical application in the near future. However, little has so far been reported regarding the cell chemistry, to explain the rate-limiting parameters and the corresponding low round-trip efficiency and cycle degradation. Consequently, an elucidation of the reaction mechanism is needed for both lithium-oxygen and sodium-oxygen cells. An in-depth understanding of the differences and similarities between Li-O 2 and Na-O 2 battery systems, in terms of thermodynamics and a structural viewpoint, will be meaningful to promote the development of advanced metal-oxygen batteries. State-of-the-art battery design principles for high-energy-density lithium-oxygen and sodium-oxygen batteries are thus reviewed in depth here. Major drawbacks, reaction mechanisms, and recent strategies to improve performance are also summarized. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Dynamic target high pressure control of a VRF system for heating energy savings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, Geun Young; Lee, Je Hyeon; Kim, Inhan

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • We developed the dynamic target high pressure control of a VRF system. • We created the VRF control model using the EnergyPlus runtime language. • Multicalorimeter experimental results indicate that the energy efficiency improved by 21%. • EnergyPlus simulations demonstrate that the annual heating energy consumption was lowered by 22%. - Abstract: Variable refrigerant flow (VRF) systems are widely used because of their ability to provide individualized comfort control with energy-saving potential. This study develops load responsive high pressure control of a VRF system with the aim of reducing the heating energy consumption of a VRF system under part load conditions. The developed control consists of two parts: one part that determines the level of heating load, and the other that assigns a target high pressure based on the level of heating load. In this way, the compressor speed can be accurately matched to heating load, which improves the energy performance of the VRF system. A series of multicalorimeter experiments revealed that the heating capacity of the VRF system varied by 45% by modulating the target high pressure and that its efficiency was enhanced by 21% by changing the high pressure from 30 kgf/cm"2 to 25 kgf/cm"2. To evaluate the annual heating energy performance of the VRF system with the developed control, a custom computer code was developed to implement the developed control using a programming language called EnergyPlus Runtime Language. Simulation outcomes showed that the annual heating energy consumption of a medium-size office building was reduced by 22% when the developed control was applied.

  7. Flexible Aqueous Li-Ion Battery with High Energy and Power Densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chongyin; Ji, Xiao; Fan, Xiulin; Gao, Tao; Suo, Liumin; Wang, Fei; Sun, Wei; Chen, Ji; Chen, Long; Han, Fudong; Miao, Ling; Xu, Kang; Gerasopoulos, Konstantinos; Wang, Chunsheng

    2017-11-01

    A flexible and wearable aqueous symmetrical lithium-ion battery is developed using a single LiVPO 4 F material as both cathode and anode in a "water-in-salt" gel polymer electrolyte. The symmetric lithium-ion chemistry exhibits high energy and power density and long cycle life, due to the formation of a robust solid electrolyte interphase consisting of Li 2 CO 3 -LiF, which enables fast Li-ion transport. Energy densities of 141 Wh kg -1 , power densities of 20 600 W kg -1 , and output voltage of 2.4 V can be delivered during >4000 cycles, which is far superior to reported aqueous energy storage devices at the same power level. Moreover, the full cell shows unprecedented tolerance to mechanical stress such as bending and cutting, where it not only does not catastrophically fail, as most nonaqueous cells would, but also maintains cell performance and continues to operate in ambient environment, a unique feature apparently derived from the high stability of the "water-in-salt" gel polymer electrolyte. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Energetic evaluation of high pressure PEM electrolyzer systems for intermediate storage of renewable energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bensmann, B.; Hanke-Rauschenbach, R.; Peña Arias, I.K.; Sundmacher, K.

    2013-01-01

    Three pathways for high pressure hydrogen production by means of water electrolysis are energetically compared. Besides the two classic paths, comprising either the pressurization of the product gas (path I) or the mechanical pressurization of the feed water (path II), a third path is discussed. It involves the electrochemical co-compression during the electrolysis. The energetic evaluation is based on a uniform model description of the different hydrogen production pathways. It consists of integral, steady-state balances for energy, entropy and mass as well as a modern equation of state. From this the reversible energy demand is used to identify the inherent thermodynamic drawbacks of the pathways. The additional consideration of irreversibilities allows for the determination of efficiency losses due to device specific characteristics. For hydrogen delivery pressures of up to 40 bar the classical pathways are out-performed by path III. Since the hydrogen is already produced at elevated pressure this eliminates the need for an energy consuming mechanical hydrogen compression and spares the additional energy demand due to the oxygen pressurization. However, with increasing pressure differences the hydrogen back-diffusion strongly decreases the Faradaic efficiency of the asymmetric electrolyzer that has to be compensated by an additional energy supply

  9. Polarized Raman spectroscopic study of relaxed high density amorphous ices under pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yoshiharu; Tominaga, Yasunori

    2010-10-28

    We have made high density amorphous ice (HDA) by the pressure-induced amorphization of hexagonal ice at 77 K and measured the volume change on isobaric heating in a pressure range between 0.1 and 1.5 GPa. The volume of HDA on heating below ∼0.35 GPa increases, while the volume of HDA on heating above ∼0.35 GPa decreases. The polarized OH-stretching Raman spectra of the relaxed HDAs are compared with that of the unannealed HDA. The relaxed HDAs are prepared at 0.2 GPa at 130 K and 1.5 GPa at 160 K. It is found that the relatively strong totally symmetric OH-stretching vibration mode around 3100 cm(-1) exists in the depolarized reduced Raman spectrum χ(VH)(") of the unannealed HDA and that its intensity rapidly decreases by relaxation. The χ(VH)(") profiles of the relaxed HDA are similar to those of liquid water. These results indicate that the HDA reaches a nearly equilibrium state by annealing and the intrinsic state of HDA relates to a liquid state. The pressure-volume curve of the relaxed HDA at 140 K seems to be smooth in the pressure range below 1.5 GPa.

  10. High Energy-Density Lithium-Sulfur Batteries with Extended Cycle Life, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Conventional lithium-ion batteries demonstrate great potential for energy storage applications but they face some major challenges such as low energy density and...

  11. Restoring the consistency with the contact density theorem of a classical density functional theory of ions at a planar electrical double layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Dirk

    2014-11-01

    Classical density functional theory (DFT) of fluids is a fast and efficient theory to compute the structure of the electrical double layer in the primitive model of ions where ions are modeled as charged, hard spheres in a background dielectric. While the hard-core repulsive component of this ion-ion interaction can be accurately computed using well-established DFTs, the electrostatic component is less accurate. Moreover, many electrostatic functionals fail to satisfy a basic theorem, the contact density theorem, that relates the bulk pressure, surface charge, and ion densities at their distances of closest approach for ions in equilibrium at a smooth, hard, planar wall. One popular electrostatic functional that fails to satisfy the contact density theorem is a perturbation approach developed by Kierlik and Rosinberg [Phys. Rev. A 44, 5025 (1991)PLRAAN1050-294710.1103/PhysRevA.44.5025] and Rosenfeld [J. Chem. Phys. 98, 8126 (1993)JCPSA60021-960610.1063/1.464569], where the full free-energy functional is Taylor-expanded around a bulk (homogeneous) reference fluid. Here, it is shown that this functional fails to satisfy the contact density theorem because it also fails to satisfy the known low-density limit. When the functional is corrected to satisfy this limit, a corrected bulk pressure is derived and it is shown that with this pressure both the contact density theorem and the Gibbs adsorption theorem are satisfied.

  12. Visualization and analysis of pulsed ion beam energy density profile with infrared imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isakova, Y. I.; Pushkarev, A. I.

    2018-03-01

    Infrared imaging technique was used as a surface temperature-mapping tool to characterize the energy density distribution of intense pulsed ion beams on a thin metal target. The technique enables the measuring of the total ion beam energy and the energy density distribution along the cross section and allows one to optimize the operation of an ion diode and control target irradiation mode. The diagnostics was tested on the TEMP-4M accelerator at TPU, Tomsk, Russia and on the TEMP-6 accelerator at DUT, Dalian, China. The diagnostics was applied in studies of the dynamics of the target cooling in vacuum after irradiation and in the experiments with target ablation. Errors caused by the target ablation and target cooling during measurements have been analyzed. For Fluke Ti10 and Fluke Ti400 infrared cameras, the technique can achieve surface energy density sensitivity of 0.05 J/cm2 and spatial resolution of 1-2 mm. The thermal imaging diagnostics does not require expensive consumed materials. The measurement time does not exceed 0.1 s; therefore, this diagnostics can be used for the prompt evaluation of the energy density distribution of a pulsed ion beam and during automation of the irradiation process.

  13. One-dimensional time-dependent fluid model of a very high density low-pressure inductively coupled plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaplin, Vernon H.; Bellan, Paul M.

    2015-12-01

    A time-dependent two-fluid model has been developed to understand axial variations in the plasma parameters in a very high density (peak ne≳ 5 ×1019 m-3 ) argon inductively coupled discharge in a long 1.1 cm radius tube. The model equations are written in 1D with radial losses to the tube walls accounted for by the inclusion of effective particle and energy sink terms. The ambipolar diffusion equation and electron energy equation are solved to find the electron density ne(z ,t ) and temperature Te(z ,t ) , and the populations of the neutral argon 4s metastable, 4s resonant, and 4p excited state manifolds are calculated to determine the stepwise ionization rate and calculate radiative energy losses. The model has been validated through comparisons with Langmuir probe ion saturation current measurements; close agreement between the simulated and measured axial plasma density profiles and the initial density rise rate at each location was obtained at pA r=30 -60 mTorr . We present detailed results from calculations at 60 mTorr, including the time-dependent electron temperature, excited state populations, and energy budget within and downstream of the radiofrequency antenna.

  14. Population density and efficiency in energy consumption: An empirical analysis of service establishments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morikawa, Masayuki

    2012-01-01

    This study, using novel establishment-level microdata from the Energy Consumption Statistics, empirically analyzes the effect of urban density on energy intensity in the service sector. According to the analysis, the efficiency of energy consumption in service establishments is higher for densely populated cities. Quantitatively, after controlling for differences among industries, energy efficiency increases by approximately 12% when the density in a municipality population doubles. This result suggests that, given a structural transformation toward the service economy, deregulation of excessive restrictions hindering urban agglomeration, and investment in infrastructure in city centers would contribute to environmentally friendly economic growth.

  15. Symmetry energy of the nucleus in the relativistic Thomas-Fermi approach with density-dependent parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, S.

    2017-11-01

    The symmetry energy of a nucleus is determined in a local density approximation and integrating over the entire density distribution of the nucleus, calculated utilizing the relativistic density-dependent Thomas-Fermi approach. The symmetry energy is found to decrease with increasing neutron excess in the nucleus. The isovector coupling channel reduces the symmetry energy, and this effect increases with increased neutron excess. The isovector coupling channel increases the symmetry energy integral in ^{40}Ca and reduces it in ^{48}Ca, and the interplay between the isovector and the isoscalar channels of the nuclear force explains this isotope effect.

  16. Density-scaling exponents and virial potential-energy correlation ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This paper investigates the relation between the density-scaling exponent γ and the virial potential energy correlation coefficient R at several thermodynamic state points in three dimensions for the generalized (2n, n) Lennard-Jones (LJ) system for n = 4, 9, 12, 18, as well as for the standard n = 6 LJ system in two,three, and ...

  17. Learning about the energy density of liquid and semi-solid foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogenkamp, P S; Stafleu, A; Mars, M; de Graaf, C

    2012-09-01

    People learn about a food's satiating capacity by exposure and consequently adjust their energy intake. To investigate the effect of energy density and texture on subsequent energy intake adjustments during repeated consumption. In a randomized crossover design, participants (n=27, age: 21±2.4 years, body mass index: 22.2±1.6 kg m(-2)) repeatedly consumed highly novel foods that were either low-energy-dense (LE: 30 kcal per 100 g) or high-energy-dense (HE: 130 kcal per 100 g), and either liquid or semi-solid, resulting in four product conditions. In each condition, a fixed portion of test food was consumed nine times as an obligatory part of breakfast, lunch and dinner on 3 consecutive days. All meals continued with an ad libitum buffet; food items for evening consumption were provided and the intake (kcal per day) was measured. Buffet intake depended on energy density and day of consumption of the test foods (day*energy interaction: P=0.02); daily buffet intake increased from day 1 (1745±577 kcal) to day 3 (1979±567 kcal) in the LE conditions; intake did not change in the HE conditions (day 1: 1523±429 kcal, day 3: 1589±424 kcal). Food texture did not affect the intake (P=0.56). Intake did depend on energy density of the test foods; participants increased their buffet intake over days in response to learning about the satiating capacity of the LE foods, but did not change buffet intake over days when repeatedly consuming a HE food as part of their meal. The adjustments in intake were made irrespective of the food texture.

  18. Energy-density enhancement of carbon-nanotube-based supercapacitors with redox couple in organic electrolyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jinwoo; Kim, Byungwoo; Yoo, Young-Eun; Chung, Haegeun; Kim, Woong

    2014-11-26

    We demonstrate for the first time that the incorporation of a redox-active molecule in an organic electrolyte can increase the cell voltage of a supercapacitor. The redox molecule also contributes to increasing the cell capacitance by a faradaic redox reaction, and therefore the energy density of the supercapacitor can be significantly increased. More specifically, the addition of redox-active decamethylferrocene in an organic electrolyte results in an approximately 27-fold increase in the energy density of carbon-nanotube-based supercapacitors. The resulting high energy density (36.8 Wh/kg) stems from the increased cell voltage (1.1 V→2.1 V) and cell capacitance (8.3 F/g→61.3 F/g) resulting from decamethylferrocene addition. We found that the voltage increase is associated with the potential of the redox species relative to the electrochemical stability window of the supporting electrolyte. These results will be useful in identifying new electrolytes for high-energy-density supercapacitors.

  19. Cowichan Valley energy mapping and modelling. Report 2 - Energy consumption and density mapping. Final report. [Vancouver Island, Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-06-15

    The driving force behind the Integrated Energy Mapping and Analysis project was the identification and analysis of a suite of pathways that the Cowichan Valley Regional District (CVRD) can utilise to increase its energy resilience, as well as reduce energy consumption and GHG emissions, with a primary focus on the residential sector. Mapping and analysis undertaken will support provincial energy and GHG reduction targets, and the suite of pathways outlined will address a CVRD internal target that calls for 75% of the region's energy within the residential sector to come from locally sourced renewables by 2050. The target has been developed as a mechanism to meet resilience and climate action target. The maps and findings produced are to be integrated as part of a regional policy framework currently under development. The second task in the overall project was the mapping of regional energy consumption density. Combined with the findings from task one, this enables comparison of energy consumption density per area unit with the renewable energy resource availability. In addition, it provides an energy baseline against which future energy planning activities can be evaluated. The mapping of the energy consumption density was divided into categories to correspond with local British Columbia Assessment Authority (BCAA) reporting. The residential sub-categories were comprised of single family detached dwellings, single family attached dwellings, apartments, and moveable dwellings. For commercial and industrial end-users the 14 sub-categories are also in line with BCAA as well as the on-going provincial TaNDM project of which the CVRD is a partner. The results of task two are documented in this report. (LN)

  20. AMODS and High Energy Density Sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhee, Y.-J.

    2011-01-01

    Following a brief introduction to the Lab for Quantum Optics (LFQO) in KAERI, which has been devoted to the research on atomic spectroscopy for more than 20 years with precision measurement of atomic parameters such as isotope shift, hyperfine structures, autoionization levels and so on as well as with theoretical analysis of atomic systems by developing relativistic calculation methodologies for laser propagation and population dynamics, electron impact ionization, radiative transitions of high Z materials, etc for the application to isotope separation, the AMODS (Atomic Molecular and Optical Database Systems) which was established in 1997 and has been a member of International Data Center Network of IAEA since then is explained by giving an information on the data sources and internal structure of the compilation of AMODS. Since AMODS was explained in detail during last DCN meeting, just a brief introduction is given this time. Then more specific research themes carried out in LFQO in conjunction with A+M data are discussed, including (1) electron impact ionization processes of W, Mo, Be, C, etc, (2) spectra of highly charged ions of W, Xe, and Si, (3) dielectronic recombination process of Fe ion. Also given are the talk about research activities about the simulations of high energy density experiments such as those performed at (1) GEKKO laser facility (Japan) for X-ray photoionization of low temperature Si plasma, which can explain the unsolved arguments on the X-ray spectra of black holes and/or neutron stars, (2) VULCAN laser facility (UK) for two dimensional compression of cylindrical target and investigation of hot electron transport in the compressed target plasma to understand the fast ignition process of laser fusion, (3) LULI laser facility (France) and TITAN laser facility (USA) for one dimensional compression of aluminum targets with different laser energies, and (4) PALS facility (Czech Republic) for 'Laser Induced Cavity Pressure Acceleration' to

  1. Energy-momentum density of graphite by electron-momentum spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vos, M.; Fang, Z.; Canney, S.; Kheifets, A.; McCarthy, I.E.; Weigold, E.

    1996-11-01

    The energy-resolved electron momentum density of graphite has been measured along a series of well-defined directions using electron momentum spectroscopy (EMS). This is the first measurement of this kind performed on a single-crystal target with a thoroughly controlled orientation which clearly demonstrates the different nature of the σ and π bands in graphite. Good agreement between the calculated density and the measured one is found, further establishing that fact that EMS yields more direct and complete information on the valence electronic structure that any other method. 12 refs., 2 figs

  2. Ultrafast dynamics in CeTe{sub 3} near the pressure-induced charge-density-wave transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tauch, Jonas; Obergfell, Manuel [Department of Physics and Center for Applied Photonics, University of Konstanz (Germany); Schaefer, Hanjo [Department of Physics and Center for Applied Photonics, University of Konstanz (Germany); Institute of Physics, Ilmenau University of Technology (Germany); Demsar, Jure [Department of Physics and Center for Applied Photonics, University of Konstanz (Germany); Institute of Physics, Ilmenau University of Technology (Germany); Institute of Physics, Johannes Gutenberg-University Mainz (Germany); Giraldo, Paula; Fisher, Ian R. [Geballe Laboratory for Advanced Materials and Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University (United States); Pashkin, Alexej [Department of Physics and Center for Applied Photonics, University of Konstanz (Germany); Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    Femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy is an efficient tool for studying ultrafast dynamics in strongly correlated electronic systems, in particular, compounds with a charge-density-wave (CDW) order. Application of external pressure often leads to a suppression of a CDW state due to an impairment of the Fermi surface nesting. We combine time-resolved optical spectroscopy and diamond anvil cell technology to study electron and lattice dynamics in tri-telluride compound CeTe{sub 3}. Around pressures of 4 GPa we observe a gradual vanishing of the relaxation process related to the recombination of the photoexcited quasiparticles. The coherent oscillations of the phonon modes coupled to the CDW order parameter demonstrate even more dramatic suppression with increasing pressure. These observations clearly indicate a transition into the metallic state of CeTe{sub 3} induced by the external pressure.

  3. Donor-related optical absorption spectra in GaAs-(Ga,Al)As quantum wells: hydrostatic pressure effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, S.Y.; Duque, C.A.; Porras-Montenegro, N.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Donor-related optical-absorption spectra for GaAs-(Ga,Al)As quantum wells under hydrostatic pressure are investigated. A variational procedure in the e effective-mass approximation is used in order to obtain binding energies and wave functions. As a general feature, we observe that the binding energy increases with the pressure and with the decreasing of the width of the well. The pressure-related Γ-X crossover has been taken into account in the whole calculation. For the low-pressure regime we observe a linear binding energy behavior, whereas for high pressure the main effect associated with the height of the barrier is the bending of the binding energy curves towards smaller values. Two special structures in the density of impurity states and in the donor-related optical-absorption spectra are observed: an edge associated with transitions involving impurities at the center of the well and a peak associated with transitions related to impurities at the edges of the quantum well. Also, we observe shifts to higher energies of the density of impurity states as a function of the binding energy, as well as changes in the intensity with a red shift of the absorption effect with the hydrostatic pressure. (author)

  4. Silver Niobate Lead-Free Antiferroelectric Ceramics: Enhancing Energy Storage Density by B-Site Doping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lei; Gao, Jing; Liu, Qing; Zhang, Shujun; Li, Jing-Feng

    2018-01-10

    Lead-free dielectric ceramics with high recoverable energy density are highly desired to sustainably meet the future energy demand. AgNbO 3 -based lead-free antiferroelectric ceramics with double ferroelectric hysteresis loops have been proved to be potential candidates for energy storage applications. Enhanced energy storage performance with recoverable energy density of 3.3 J/cm 3 and high thermal stability with minimal energy density variation (<10%) over a temperature range of 20-120 °C have been achieved in W-modified AgNbO 3 ceramics. It is revealed that the W 6+ cations substitute the B-site Nb 5+ and reduce the polarizability of B-site cations, leading to the enhanced antiferroelectricity, which is confirmed by the polarization hysteresis and dielectric tunability. It is believed that the polarizability of B-site cations plays a dominant role in stabilizing the antiferroelectricity in AgNbO 3 system, in addition to the tolerance factor, which opens up a new design approach to achieve stable antiferroelectric materials.

  5. Duality of quasilocal gravitational energy and charges with nonorthogonal boundaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sung-Won; Kim, Won Tae; Oh, John J.; Yee, Ki Hyuk

    2003-01-01

    We study the duality of quasilocal energy and charges with nonorthogonal boundaries in the (2+1)-dimensional low-energy string theory. Quasilocal quantities shown in previous work and also some new variables arising from considering the nonorthogonal boundaries are presented, and the boost relations between these quantities are discussed. Moreover, we show that the dual properties of quasilocal variables, such as quasilocal energy density, momentum densities, surface stress densities, dilaton pressure densities, and Neveu-Schwarz charge density, are still valid in the moving observer's frame

  6. Detecting solar chameleons through radiation pressure

    CERN Document Server

    Baum, S.; Hoffmann, D.H.H.; Karuza, M.; Semertzidis, Y.K.; Upadhye, A.; Zioutas, K.

    2014-10-24

    Light scalar fields can drive the accelerated expansion of the universe. Hence, they are obvious dark energy candidates. To make such models compatible with tests of General Relativity in the solar system and "fifth force" searches on Earth, one needs to screen them. One possibility is the so-called "chameleon" mechanism, which renders an effective mass depending on the local matter density. If chameleon particles exist, they can be produced in the sun and detected on earth exploiting the equivalent of a radiation pressure. Since their effective mass scales with the local matter density, chameleons can be reflected by a dense medium if their effective mass becomes greater than their total energy. Thus, under appropriate conditions, a flux of solar chameleons may be sensed by detecting the total instantaneous momentum transferred to a suitable opto-mechanical force/pressure sensor. We calculate the solar chameleon spectrum and the reach in the chameleon parameter space of an experiment using the preliminary re...

  7. Edge-enriched, porous carbon-based, high energy density supercapacitors for hybrid electric vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong Jung; Yang, Cheol-Min; Park, Ki Chul; Kaneko, Katsumi; Kim, Yoong Ahm; Noguchi, Minoru; Fujino, Takeshi; Oyama, Shigeki; Endo, Morinobu

    2012-03-12

    Supercapacitors can store and deliver energy by a simple charge separation, and thus they could be an attractive option to meet transient high energy density in operating fuel cells and in electric and hybrid electric vehicles. To achieve such requirements, intensive studies have been carried out to improve the volumetric capacitance in supercapacitors using various types and forms of carbons including carbon nanotubes and graphenes. However, conventional porous carbons are not suitable for use as electrode material in supercapacitors for such high energy density applications. Here, we show that edge-enriched porous carbons are the best electrode material for high energy density supercapacitors to be used in vehicles as an auxiliary powertrain. Molten potassium hydroxide penetrates well-aligned graphene layers vertically and consequently generates both suitable pores that are easily accessible to the electrolyte and a large fraction of electrochemically active edge sites. We expect that our findings will motivate further research related to energy storage devices and also environmentally friendly electric vehicles. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Quantum Chromodynamics and Nuclear Physics at Extreme Energy Density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, B.; Bass, S.A.; Chandrasekharan, S.; Mehen, T.; Springer, R.P.

    2005-11-07

    The report describes research in theoretical quantum chromodynamics, including effective field theories of hadronic interactions, properties of strongly interacting matter at extreme energy density, phenomenology of relativistic heavy ion collisions, and algorithms and numerical simulations of lattice gauge theory and other many-body systems.

  9. Quantum Chromodynamics and Nuclear Physics at Extreme Energy Density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, B.; Bass, S.A.; Chandrasekharan, S.; Mehen, T.; Springer, R.P.

    2005-01-01

    The report describes research in theoretical quantum chromodynamics, including effective field theories of hadronic interactions, properties of strongly interacting matter at extreme energy density, phenomenology of relativistic heavy ion collisions, and algorithms and numerical simulations of lattice gauge theory and other many-body systems.

  10. Microelectromechanical high-density energy storage/rapid release system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, M. Steven; Allen, James J.; Meeks, Kent D.; Jensen, Brian D.; Miller, Samuel L.

    1999-08-01

    One highly desirable characteristic of electrostatically driven microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) is that they consume very little power. The corresponding drawback is that the force they produce may be inadequate for many applications. It has previously been demonstrated that gear reduction units or microtransmissions can substantially increase the torque generated by microengines. Operating speed, however, is also reduced by the transmission gear ratio. Some applications require both high speed and high force. If this output is only required for a limited period of time, then energy could be stored in a mechanical system and rapidly released upon demand. We have designed, fabricated, and demonstrated a high-density energy storage/rapid release system that accomplishes this task. Built using a 5-level surface micromachining technology, the assembly closely resembles a medieval crossbow. Energy releases on the order of tens of nanojoules have already been demonstrated, and significantly higher energy systems are under development.

  11. Mechanical confinement for improved energy storage density in BNT-BT-KNN lead-free ceramic capacitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditya Chauhan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available With the advent of modern power electronics, embedded circuits and non-conventional energy harvesting, the need for high performance capacitors is bound to become indispensible. The current state-of-art employs ferroelectric ceramics and linear dielectrics for solid state capacitance. However, lead-free ferroelectric ceramics propose to offer significant improvement in the field of electrical energy storage owing to their high discharge efficiency and energy storage density. In this regards, the authors have investigated the effects of compressive stress as a means of improving the energy storage density of lead-free ferroelectric ceramics. The energy storage density of 0.91(Bi0.5Na0.5TiO3-0.07BaTiO3-0.02(K0.5Na0.5NbO3 ferroelectric bulk ceramic was analyzed as a function of varying levels of compressive stress and operational temperature .It was observed that a peak energy density of 387 mJ.cm-3 was obtained at 100 MPa applied stress (25oC. While a maximum energy density of 568 mJ.cm-3 was obtained for the same stress at 80oC. These values are indicative of a significant, 25% and 84%, improvement in the value of stored energy compared to an unloaded material. Additionally, material's discharge efficiency has also been discussed as a function of operational parameters. The observed phenomenon has been explained on the basis of field induced structural transition and competitive domain switching theory.

  12. Augmented potential, energy densities, and virial relations in the weak- and strong-interaction limits of DFT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuckovic, Stefan; Levy, Mel; Gori-Giorgi, Paola

    2017-12-01

    The augmented potential introduced by Levy and Zahariev [Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 113002 (2014)] is shifted with respect to the standard exchange-correlation potential of the Kohn-Sham density functional theory by a density-dependent constant that makes the total energy become equal to the sum of the occupied orbital energies. In this work, we analyze several features of this approach, focusing on the limit of infinite coupling strength and studying the shift and the corresponding energy density at different correlation regimes. We present and discuss coordinate scaling properties of the augmented potential, study its connection to the response potential, and use the shift to analyze the classical jellium and uniform gas models. We also study other definitions of the energy densities in relation to the functional construction by local interpolations along the adiabatic connection. Our findings indicate that the energy density that is defined in terms of the electrostatic potential of the exchange-correlation hole is particularly well suited for this purpose.

  13. Biopolymer-nanocarbon composite electrodes for use as high-energy high-power density electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakaya, Mehmet; Roberts, Mark; Arcilla-Velez, Margarita; Zhu, Jingyi; Podila, Ramakrishna; Rao, Apparao

    2014-03-01

    Supercapacitors (SCs) address our current energy storage and delivery needs by combining the high power, rapid switching, and exceptional cycle life of a capacitor with the high energy density of a battery. Although activated carbon is extensively used as a supercapacitor electrode due to its inexpensive nature, its low specific capacitance (100-120 F/g) fundamentally limits the energy density of SCs. We demonstrate that a nano-carbon based mechanically robust, electrically conducting, free-standing buckypaper electrode modified with an inexpensive biorenewable polymer, viz., lignin increases the electrode's specific capacitance (~ 600-700 F/g) while maintaining rapid discharge rates. In these systems, the carbon nanomaterials provide the high surface area, electrical conductivity and porosity, while the redox polymers provide a mechanism for charge storage through Faradaic charge transfer. The design of redox polymers and their incorporation into nanomaterial electrodes will be discussed with a focus on enabling high power and high energy density electrodes. Research supported by US NSF CMMI Grant 1246800.

  14. Impact of Variable-Density Flow on the Value-of-Information from Pressure and Concentration Data for Saline Aquifer Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, S.; Williams, J. R.; Juanes, R.; Kang, P. K.

    2017-12-01

    Managed aquifer recharge (MAR) is becoming an important solution for ensuring sustainable water resources and mitigating saline water intrusion in coastal aquifers. Accurate estimates of hydrogeological parameters in subsurface flow and solute transport models are critical for making predictions and managing aquifer systems. In the presence of a density difference between the injected freshwater and ambient saline groundwater, the pressure field is coupled to the spatial distribution of salinity distribution, and therefore experiences transient changes. The variable-density effects can be quantified by a mixed convection ratio between two characteristic types of convection: free convection due to density contrast, and forced convection due to a hydraulic gradient. We analyze the variable-density effects on the value-of-information of pressure and concentration data for saline aquifer characterization. An ensemble Kalman filter is used to estimate permeability fields by assimilating the data, and the performance of the estimation is analyzed in terms of the accuracy and the uncertainty of estimated permeability fields and the predictability of arrival times of breakthrough curves in a realistic push-pull setting. This study demonstrates that: 1. Injecting fluids with the velocity that balances the two characteristic convections maximizes the value of data for saline aquifer characterization; 2. The variable-density effects on the value of data for the inverse estimation decrease as the permeability heterogeneity increases; 3. The advantage of joint inversion of pressure and concentration data decreases as the coupling effects between flow and transport increase.

  15. High-energy density nonaqueous all redox flow lithium battery enabled with a polymeric membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Chuankun; Pan, Feng; Zhu, Yun Guang; Huang, Qizhao; Lu, Li; Wang, Qing

    2015-11-01

    Redox flow batteries (RFBs) are considered one of the most promising large-scale energy storage technologies. However, conventional RFBs suffer from low energy density due to the low solubility of the active materials in electrolyte. On the basis of the redox targeting reactions of battery materials, the redox flow lithium battery (RFLB) demonstrated in this report presents a disruptive approach to drastically enhancing the energy density of flow batteries. With LiFePO4 and TiO2 as the cathodic and anodic Li storage materials, respectively, the tank energy density of RFLB could reach ~500 watt-hours per liter (50% porosity), which is 10 times higher than that of a vanadium redox flow battery. The cell exhibits good electrochemical performance under a prolonged cycling test. Our prototype RFLB full cell paves the way toward the development of a new generation of flow batteries for large-scale energy storage.

  16. High–energy density nonaqueous all redox flow lithium battery enabled with a polymeric membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Chuankun; Pan, Feng; Zhu, Yun Guang; Huang, Qizhao; Lu, Li; Wang, Qing

    2015-01-01

    Redox flow batteries (RFBs) are considered one of the most promising large-scale energy storage technologies. However, conventional RFBs suffer from low energy density due to the low solubility of the active materials in electrolyte. On the basis of the redox targeting reactions of battery materials, the redox flow lithium battery (RFLB) demonstrated in this report presents a disruptive approach to drastically enhancing the energy density of flow batteries. With LiFePO4 and TiO2 as the cathodic and anodic Li storage materials, respectively, the tank energy density of RFLB could reach ~500 watt-hours per liter (50% porosity), which is 10 times higher than that of a vanadium redox flow battery. The cell exhibits good electrochemical performance under a prolonged cycling test. Our prototype RFLB full cell paves the way toward the development of a new generation of flow batteries for large-scale energy storage. PMID:26702440

  17. A fully discrete energy stable scheme for a phase filed moving contact line model with variable densities and viscosities

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Guangpu

    2018-01-26

    In this paper, a fully discrete scheme which considers temporal and spatial discretizations is presented for the coupled Cahn-Hilliard equation in conserved form with the dynamic contact line condition and the Navier-Stokes equation with the generalized Navier boundary condition. Variable densities and viscosities are incorporated in this model. A rigorous proof of energy stability is provided for the fully discrete scheme based on a semi-implicit temporal discretization and a finite difference method on the staggered grids for the spatial discretization. A splitting method based on the pressure stabilization is implemented to solve the Navier-Stokes equation, while the stabilization approach is also used for the Cahn-Hilliard equation. Numerical results in both 2-D and 3-D demonstrate the accuracy, efficiency and decaying property of discrete energy of the proposed scheme.

  18. High energy density Z-pinch plasmas using flow stabilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shumlak, U., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Golingo, R. P., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Nelson, B. A., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Bowers, C. A., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Doty, S. A., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Forbes, E. G., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Hughes, M. C., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Kim, B., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Knecht, S. D., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Lambert, K. K., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Lowrie, W., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Ross, M. P., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Weed, J. R., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu [Aerospace and Energetics Research Program, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, 98195-2250 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    The ZaP Flow Z-Pinch research project[1] at the University of Washington investigates the effect of sheared flows on MHD instabilities. Axially flowing Z-pinch plasmas are produced that are 100 cm long with a 1 cm radius. The plasma remains quiescent for many radial Alfvén times and axial flow times. The quiescent periods are characterized by low magnetic mode activity measured at several locations along the plasma column and by stationary visible plasma emission. Plasma evolution is modeled with high-resolution simulation codes – Mach2, WARPX, NIMROD, and HiFi. Plasma flow profiles are experimentally measured with a multi-chord ion Doppler spectrometer. A sheared flow profile is observed to be coincident with the quiescent period, and is consistent with classical plasma viscosity. Equilibrium is determined by diagnostic measurements: interferometry for density; spectroscopy for ion temperature, plasma flow, and density[2]; Thomson scattering for electron temperature; Zeeman splitting for internal magnetic field measurements[3]; and fast framing photography for global structure. Wall stabilization has been investigated computationally and experimentally by removing 70% of the surrounding conducting wall to demonstrate no change in stability behavior.[4] Experimental evidence suggests that the plasma lifetime is only limited by plasma supply and current waveform. The flow Z-pinch concept provides an approach to achieve high energy density plasmas,[5] which are large, easy to diagnose, and persist for extended durations. A new experiment, ZaP-HD, has been built to investigate this approach by separating the flow Z-pinch formation from the radial compression using a triaxial-electrode configuration. This innovation allows more detailed investigations of the sheared flow stabilizing effect, and it allows compression to much higher densities than previously achieved on ZaP by reducing the linear density and increasing the pinch current. Experimental results and

  19. Azobenzene-functionalized carbon nanotubes as high-energy density solar thermal fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolpak, Alexie M; Grossman, Jeffrey C

    2011-08-10

    Solar thermal fuels, which reversibly store solar energy in molecular bonds, are a tantalizing prospect for clean, renewable, and transportable energy conversion/storage. However, large-scale adoption requires enhanced energy storage capacity and thermal stability. Here we present a novel solar thermal fuel, composed of azobenzene-functionalized carbon nanotubes, with the volumetric energy density of Li-ion batteries. Our work also demonstrates that the inclusion of nanoscale templates is an effective strategy for design of highly cyclable, thermally stable, and energy-dense solar thermal fuels.

  20. Densities and apparent molar volumes of aqueous LiI solutions at temperatures from (296 to 600) K and at pressures up to 30 MPa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdulagatov, I.M.; Azizov, N.D.

    2004-01-01

    Densities of five aqueous LiI solutions (0.0906, 0.2832, 0.6621, 1.6046, and 3.0886) mol . kg -1 H 2 O were measured in the liquid phase with a constant-volume piezometer immersed in a precision liquid thermostat. Measurements were made along various isotherms between (296.95 and 600.25) K. The range of pressure was (0.1 to 30) MPa. The total uncertainty of density, pressure, temperature, and concentration measurements was estimated to be less than 0.06%, 0.05%, 15 mK, and 0.014%, respectively. To check and confirm the accuracy of the measurements, (p,V m ,T,x) data were taken for pure water at selected temperatures and pressures. Experimental and calculated (IAPWS formulation) densities for pure water show excellent agreement within their experimental uncertainties (average absolute deviation is 0.02%). Values of saturated densities were determined by extrapolating experimental p - ρ data to the vapour pressure at fixed temperature and composition using a linear interpolating equation. Apparent molar volumes were derived using measured values of density for solutions and pure water. The apparent molar volumes were extrapolated to zero concentration (m → 0) to yield partial molar volumes of electrolyte (LiI) at infinite dilution. The temperature, pressure, and concentration dependence of apparent and partial molar volumes was studied. The measured values of density, apparent and partial molar volume were compared with data reported in the literature by other authors. A polynomial type of equation of state for specific volume was obtained as a function of temperature, pressure, and composition by a least-squares method using the experimental data. The average absolute deviation (AAD) between measured and calculated values from this polynomial equation for density was 0.065%

  1. An accurate calibration method for high pressure vibrating tube densimeters in the density interval (700 to 1600) kg . m-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanmamed, Yolanda A.; Dopazo-Paz, Ana; Gonzalez-Salgado, Diego; Troncoso, Jacobo; Romani, Luis

    2009-01-01

    A calibration procedure of vibrating tube densimeters for density measurement of liquids in the intervals (700 to 1600) kg . m -3 , (283.15 to 323.15) K, and (0.1 to 60) MPa is presented. It is based on the modelization of the vibrating tube as a thick-tube clamped at one end (cantilever) whose stress and thermal behaviour follows the ideas proposed in the Forced Path Mechanical Calibration model (FPMC). Model parameters are determined using two calibration fluids with densities certified at atmospheric pressure (dodecane and tetracholoroethylene) and a third one with densities known as a function of pressure (water). It is applied to the Anton Paar 512P densimeter, obtaining density measurements with an expanded uncertainty less than 0.2 kg . m -3 in the working intervals. This accuracy comes from the combination of several factors: densimeter behaves linearly in the working density interval, densities of both calibration fluids cover that interval and they have a very low uncertainty, and the mechanical behaviour of the tube is well characterized by the considered model. The main application of this method is the precise measurement of high density fluids for which most of the calibration procedures are inaccurate.

  2. Electron density and gas density measurements in a millimeter-wave discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaub, S. C., E-mail: sschaub@mit.edu; Hummelt, J. S.; Guss, W. C.; Shapiro, M. A.; Temkin, R. J. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology 167 Albany St., Bldg. NW16, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    Electron density and neutral gas density have been measured in a non-equilibrium air breakdown plasma using optical emission spectroscopy and two-dimensional laser interferometry, respectively. A plasma was created with a focused high frequency microwave beam in air. Experiments were run with 110 GHz and 124.5 GHz microwaves at powers up to 1.2 MW. Microwave pulses were 3 μs long at 110 GHz and 2.2 μs long at 124.5 GHz. Electron density was measured over a pressure range of 25 to 700 Torr as the input microwave power was varied. Electron density was found to be close to the critical density, where the collisional plasma frequency is equal to the microwave frequency, over the pressure range studied and to vary weakly with input power. Neutral gas density was measured over a pressure range from 150 to 750 Torr at power levels high above the threshold for initiating breakdown. The two-dimensional structure of the neutral gas density was resolved. Intense, localized heating was found to occur hundreds of nanoseconds after visible plasma formed. This heating led to neutral gas density reductions of greater than 80% where peak plasma densities occurred. Spatial structure and temporal dynamics of gas heating at atmospheric pressure were found to agree well with published numerical simulations.

  3. Electron density and gas density measurements in a millimeter-wave discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaub, S. C.; Hummelt, J. S.; Guss, W. C.; Shapiro, M. A.; Temkin, R. J.

    2016-01-01

    Electron density and neutral gas density have been measured in a non-equilibrium air breakdown plasma using optical emission spectroscopy and two-dimensional laser interferometry, respectively. A plasma was created with a focused high frequency microwave beam in air. Experiments were run with 110 GHz and 124.5 GHz microwaves at powers up to 1.2 MW. Microwave pulses were 3 μs long at 110 GHz and 2.2 μs long at 124.5 GHz. Electron density was measured over a pressure range of 25 to 700 Torr as the input microwave power was varied. Electron density was found to be close to the critical density, where the collisional plasma frequency is equal to the microwave frequency, over the pressure range studied and to vary weakly with input power. Neutral gas density was measured over a pressure range from 150 to 750 Torr at power levels high above the threshold for initiating breakdown. The two-dimensional structure of the neutral gas density was resolved. Intense, localized heating was found to occur hundreds of nanoseconds after visible plasma formed. This heating led to neutral gas density reductions of greater than 80% where peak plasma densities occurred. Spatial structure and temporal dynamics of gas heating at atmospheric pressure were found to agree well with published numerical simulations.

  4. Improving hot-spot pressure for ignition in high-adiabat Inertial Confinement Fusion implosion

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Dongguo; Zhu, Shaoping; Pei, Wenbing; Zou, Shiyang; Zheng, Wudi; Gu, Jianfa; Dai, Zhensheng

    2017-01-01

    A novel capsule target design to improve the hot-spot pressure in the high-adiabat implosion for inertial confinement fusion is proposed, where a layer of comparatively high-density material is used as a pusher between the fuel and the ablator. This design is based on our theoretical finding of the stagnation scaling laws, which indicates that the hot spot pressure can be improved by increasing the kinetic energy density $\\rho_d V_{imp}^2/2$ ($\\rho_d$ is the shell density when the maximum she...

  5. Attained energy densities and neutral pion spectra in nucleus-nucleus collisions at 200 GeV/nucleon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plasil, F.; Albrecht, R.; Awes, T.C.

    1989-01-01

    The main goal of the CERN heavy-ion experiments is the search for an indication that the predicted state of deconfined quarks and gluons, the quark-gluon plasma (QGP), has been produced. The quantity most crucial to the probability of QGP formation is the thermalized energy density attained during the heavy-ion reaction. The amount of energy radiated transverse to the beam direction is the experimental quantity which is believed to be a measure of the amount of energy deposition in the reaction, and hence to reflect the energy density attained. In this presentation we consider the systematics of transverse energy production at CERN SPS energies, and we use the results to make estimates, under various assumptions, of attained energy densities. 18 refs., 2 figs

  6. Energy Evolution Mechanism and Confining Pressure Effect of Granite under Triaxial Loading-Unloading Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao; Miao, Sheng-jun

    2018-05-01

    Rock mass undergoes some deformational failure under the action of external loads, a process known to be associated with energy dissipation and release. A triaxial loading-unloading cycle test was conducted on granite in order to investigate the energy evolution pattern of rock mass under the action of external loads. The study results demonstrated: (1) The stress peaks increased by 50% and 22% respectively and the pre-peak weakening became more apparent in the ascending process of the confining pressure from 10MPa to 30MPa; the area enclosed by the hysteresis loop corresponding to 30MPa diminished by nearly 60% than that corresponding to 10MPa, indicating a higher confining pressure prohibits rock mass from plastic deformation and shifts strain toward elastic deformation. (2) In the vicinity of the strength limit, the slope of dissipation energy increased to 1.6 from the original 0.7 and the dissipation energy grew at an accelerating rate, demonstrating stronger propagation and convergence of internal cracks. (3) At a pressure of 70% of the stress peak, the elastic energy of the granite accounted for 88% of its peak value, suggesting the rock mechanical energy from the outside mostly changes into the elastic energy inside the rock, with little energy loss.(4) Prior to test specimen failure, the axial bearing capacity dropped with a decreasing confining pressure in an essentially linear way, and the existence of confirming pressure played a role in stabilizing the axial bearing capacity.

  7. Hydrostatic-pressure effects on the donor binding energy in GaAs-(Ga, Al)As quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Merchancano, S T; Paredes-Gutierrez, H; Silva-Valencia, J

    2007-01-01

    The binding energy of shallow hydrogenic impurities in a spherical quantum dot under isotropic hydrostatic pressure is calculated using a variational approach within the effective mass approximation. The binding energy is computed as a function of hydrostatic pressure, dot size and impurity position. The results show that the impurity binding energy increases with the pressure for any position of the impurity. Also, we have found that the binding energy depends on the location of the impurity and the pressure effects are less pronounced for impurities on the edge

  8. Time-frequency energy density precipitation method for time-of-flight extraction of narrowband Lamb wave detection signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y; Huang, S L; Wang, S; Zhao, W

    2016-05-01

    The time-of-flight of the Lamb wave provides an important basis for defect evaluation in metal plates and is the input signal for Lamb wave tomographic imaging. However, the time-of-flight can be difficult to acquire because of the Lamb wave dispersion characteristics. This work proposes a time-frequency energy density precipitation method to accurately extract the time-of-flight of narrowband Lamb wave detection signals in metal plates. In the proposed method, a discrete short-time Fourier transform is performed on the narrowband Lamb wave detection signals to obtain the corresponding discrete time-frequency energy density distribution. The energy density values at the center frequency for all discrete time points are then calculated by linear interpolation. Next, the time-domain energy density curve focused on that center frequency is precipitated by least squares fitting of the calculated energy density values. Finally, the peak times of the energy density curve obtained relative to the initial pulse signal are extracted as the time-of-flight for the narrowband Lamb wave detection signals. An experimental platform is established for time-of-flight extraction of narrowband Lamb wave detection signals, and sensitivity analysis of the proposed time-frequency energy density precipitation method is performed in terms of propagation distance, dispersion characteristics, center frequency, and plate thickness. For comparison, the widely used Hilbert-Huang transform method is also implemented for time-of-flight extraction. The results show that the time-frequency energy density precipitation method can accurately extract the time-of-flight with relative error of wave detection signals.

  9. Liquid density of HFE-7200 and HFE-7500 from T = (283 to 363) K at pressures up to 100 MPa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, Dan; Li, Ying; Meng, Xianyang; Wu, Jiangtao

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Liquid densities are reported for HFE-7200 and HFE-7500 at temperatures from (283 to 363) K, pressures up to 100 MPa. • The expanded uncertainty (k = 2) of density measurement for HFE-7200 and HFE-7500 were 0.04% and 0.03%, respectively. • Modified Tait equations were correlated with the experimental data. • The isobaric thermal expansivity and isothermal compressibility of HFE-7200 and HFE-7500 were calculated. -- Abstract: The liquid densities of HFE-7200 (1-ethoxy-1,1,2,2,3,3,4,4,4-nonafluorobutane, CAS Registry Number: 163702-05-4) and HFE-7500 (3-ethoxyperfluoro(2-methylhexane), CAS Registry Number: 297730-93-9) have been measured over the temperature range from (283 to 363) K and pressures up to 100 MPa by using a high pressure vibrating-tube densimeter. R134a has been used as a reference fluid to validate the densimeter. The uncertainty of each obtained datum was estimated, and the maximum expanded uncertainty with a level of confidence of 0.95 (k = 2) of density measurement for HFE-7200 and HFE-7500 were 0.04% and 0.03%, respectively. The measured liquid densities were correlated with the modified Tait equation and the maximum deviation is less than 0.03%. The isothermal compressibility and isobaric thermal expansivity were also calculated

  10. High Energy Density Li-Ion Batteries Designed for Low Temperature Applications, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The state-of-the-art Li-ion batteries do not fully meet the energy density, power density and safety requirements specified by NASA for future exploration missions....

  11. High Density Thermal Energy Storage with Supercritical Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganapathi, Gani B.; Wirz, Richard

    2012-01-01

    A novel approach to storing thermal energy with supercritical fluids is being investigated, which if successful, promises to transform the way thermal energy is captured and utilized. The use of supercritical fluids allows cost-affordable high-density storage with a combination of latent heat and sensible heat in the two-phase as well as the supercritical state. This technology will enhance penetration of several thermal power generation applications and high temperature water for commercial use if the overall cost of the technology can be demonstrated to be lower than the current state-of-the-art molten salt using sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate eutectic mixtures.

  12. Effects of energy content and energy density of pre-portioned entrées on energy intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blatt, Alexandria D; Williams, Rachel A; Roe, Liane S; Rolls, Barbara J

    2012-10-01

    Pre-portioned entrées are commonly consumed to help control portion size and limit energy intake. The influence of entrée characteristics on energy intake, however, has not been well studied. We determined how the effects of energy content and energy density (ED, kcal/g) of pre-portioned entrées combine to influence daily energy intake. In a crossover design, 68 non-dieting adults (28 men and 40 women) were provided with breakfast, lunch, and dinner on 1 day a week for 4 weeks. Each meal included a compulsory, manipulated pre-portioned entrée followed by a variety of unmanipulated discretionary foods that were consumed ad libitum. Across conditions, the entrées were varied in both energy content and ED between a standard level (100%) and a reduced level (64%). Results showed that in men, decreases in the energy content and ED of pre-portioned entrées acted independently and added together to reduce daily energy intake (both P kcal/day; P lunch, but at dinner and for the entire day the effects depended on the interaction of the two factors (P daily energy intake in women by 14% (289 ± 35 kcal/day; P daily energy intake and could influence the effectiveness of such foods for weight management.

  13. On the accuracy of van der Waals inclusive density-functional theory exchange-correlation functionals for ice at ambient and high pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santra, Biswajit; Klimes, Jirí; Tkatchenko, Alexandre; Alfè, Dario; Slater, Ben; Michaelides, Angelos; Car, Roberto; Scheffler, Matthias

    2013-10-21

    Density-functional theory (DFT) has been widely used to study water and ice for at least 20 years. However, the reliability of different DFT exchange-correlation (xc) functionals for water remains a matter of considerable debate. This is particularly true in light of the recent development of DFT based methods that account for van der Waals (vdW) dispersion forces. Here, we report a detailed study with several xc functionals (semi-local, hybrid, and vdW inclusive approaches) on ice Ih and six proton ordered phases of ice. Consistent with our previous study [B. Santra, J. Klimeš, D. Alfè, A. Tkatchenko, B. Slater, A. Michaelides, R. Car, and M. Scheffler, Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 185701 (2011)] which showed that vdW forces become increasingly important at high pressures, we find here that all vdW inclusive methods considered improve the relative energies and transition pressures of the high-pressure ice phases compared to those obtained with semi-local or hybrid xc functionals. However, we also find that significant discrepancies between experiment and the vdW inclusive approaches remain in the cohesive properties of the various phases, causing certain phases to be absent from the phase diagram. Therefore, room for improvement in the description of water at ambient and high pressures remains and we suggest that because of the stern test the high pressure ice phases pose they should be used in future benchmark studies of simulation methods for water.

  14. New class of two-dimensional bimetallic nanoplatelets for high energy density and electrochemically stable hybrid supercapacitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Zhiting; Ma, Peng; Ulstrup, Jens

    2017-01-01

    Currently, the application of supercapacitors (SCs) in portable electronic devices and vehicles is limited by their low energy density. Developing high-energy density SCs without sacrificing their advantages, such as their long-term stability and high power density, has thus become an increasing...... and a 96.1% retention of the initial capacitance over 5,000 cycles. We exploited the novel 2D nanoplatelets as cathode materials to assemble a hybrid SC for full-cell tests. The resulting SCs operated in a wide potential window of 0 - 1.7 V, exhibited a high energy density over 50 Wh·kg-1, and sustained...

  15. Dynamics of the spatial electron density distribution of EUV-induced plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Horst, R. M.; Beckers, J.; Osorio, E. A.; Banine, V. Y.

    2015-11-01

    We studied the temporal evolution of the electron density distribution in a low pressure pulsed plasma induced by high energy extreme ultraviolet (EUV) photons using microwave cavity resonance spectroscopy (MCRS). In principle, MCRS only provides space averaged information about the electron density. However, we demonstrate here the possibility to obtain spatial information by combining multiple resonant modes. It is shown that EUV-induced plasmas, albeit being a rather exotic plasma, can be explained by known plasma physical laws and processes. Two stages of plasma behaviour are observed: first the electron density distribution contracts, after which it expands. It is shown that the contraction is due to cooling of the electrons. The moment when the density distribution starts to expand is related to the inertia of the ions. After tens of microseconds, the electrons reached the wall of the cavity. The speed of this expansion is dependent on the gas pressure and can be divided into two regimes. It is shown that the acoustic dominated regime the expansion speed is independent of the gas pressure and that in the diffusion dominated regime the expansion depends reciprocal on the gas pressure.

  16. Dynamics of the spatial electron density distribution of EUV-induced plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van der Horst, R M; Beckers, J; Banine, V Y; Osorio, E A

    2015-01-01

    We studied the temporal evolution of the electron density distribution in a low pressure pulsed plasma induced by high energy extreme ultraviolet (EUV) photons using microwave cavity resonance spectroscopy (MCRS). In principle, MCRS only provides space averaged information about the electron density. However, we demonstrate here the possibility to obtain spatial information by combining multiple resonant modes. It is shown that EUV-induced plasmas, albeit being a rather exotic plasma, can be explained by known plasma physical laws and processes. Two stages of plasma behaviour are observed: first the electron density distribution contracts, after which it expands. It is shown that the contraction is due to cooling of the electrons. The moment when the density distribution starts to expand is related to the inertia of the ions. After tens of microseconds, the electrons reached the wall of the cavity. The speed of this expansion is dependent on the gas pressure and can be divided into two regimes. It is shown that the acoustic dominated regime the expansion speed is independent of the gas pressure and that in the diffusion dominated regime the expansion depends reciprocal on the gas pressure. (fast track communication)

  17. Ultrahigh-Energy Density Lithium-Ion Cable Battery Based on the Carbon-Nanotube Woven Macrofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ziping; Liu, Kaixi; Lv, Chao; Zhong, Shengwen; Wang, Qinghui; Liu, Ting; Liu, Xianbin; Yin, Yanhong; Hu, Yingyan; Wei, Di; Liu, Zhongfan

    2018-05-01

    Moore's law predicts the performance of integrated circuit doubles every two years, lasting for more than five decades. However, the improvements of the performance of energy density in batteries lag far behind that. In addition, the poor flexibility, insufficient-energy density, and complexity of incorporation into wearable electronics remain considerable challenges for current battery technology. Herein, a lithium-ion cable battery is invented, which is insensitive to deformation due to its use of carbon nanotube (CNT) woven macrofilms as the charge collectors. An ultrahigh-tap density of 10 mg cm -2 of the electrodes can be obtained, which leads to an extremely high-energy density of 215 mWh cm -3 . The value is approximately seven times than that of the highest performance reported previously. In addition, the battery displays very stable rate performance and lower internal resistance than conventional lithium-ion batteries using metal charge collectors. Moreover, it demonstrates excellent convenience for connecting electronics as a new strategy is applied, in which both electrodes can be integrated into one end by a CNT macrorope. Such an ultrahigh-energy density lithium-ion cable battery provides a feasible way to power wearable electronics with commercial viability. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Note: A high-energy-density Tesla-type pulse generator with novel insulating oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sheng; Su, Jiancang; Fan, Xuliang

    2017-09-01

    A 10-GW high-energy-density Tesla-type pulse generator is developed with an improved insulating liquid based on a modified Tesla pulser—TPG700, of which the pulse forming line (PFL) is filled with novel insulating oil instead of transformer oil. Properties of insulating oil determining the stored energy density of the PFL are analyzed, and a criterion for appropriate oil is proposed. Midel 7131 is chosen as an application example. The results of insulating property experiment under tens-of-microsecond pulse charging demonstrate that the insulation capability of Midel 7131 is better than that of KI45X transformer oil. The application test in Tesla pulser TPG700 shows that the output power is increased to 10.5 GW with Midel 7131. The output energy density of TPG700 increases for about 60% with Midel 7131.

  19. High hydrostatic pressure specifically affects molecular dynamics and shape of low-density lipoprotein particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golub, M.; Lehofer, B.; Martinez, N.; Ollivier, J.; Kohlbrecher, J.; Prassl, R.; Peters, J.

    2017-04-01

    Lipid composition of human low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and its physicochemical characteristics are relevant for proper functioning of lipid transport in the blood circulation. To explore dynamical and structural features of LDL particles with either a normal or a triglyceride-rich lipid composition we combined coherent and incoherent neutron scattering methods. The investigations were carried out under high hydrostatic pressure (HHP), which is a versatile tool to study the physicochemical behavior of biomolecules in solution at a molecular level. Within both neutron techniques we applied HHP to probe the shape and degree of freedom of the possible motions (within the time windows of 15 and 100 ps) and consequently the flexibility of LDL particles. We found that HHP does not change the types of motion in LDL, but influences the portion of motions participating. Contrary to our assumption that lipoprotein particles, like membranes, are highly sensitive to pressure we determined that LDL copes surprisingly well with high pressure conditions, although the lipid composition, particularly the triglyceride content of the particles, impacts the molecular dynamics and shape arrangement of LDL under pressure.

  20. Interplay of multiple charge-density-waves and superconductivity in DyTe{sub 3} at high pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zocco, Diego A. [Institute for Solid State Physics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Department of Physics, University of California, San Diego, CA 92093 (United States); Kapuvari, Andreas; Sauer, Aaron; Weber, Frank [Institute for Solid State Physics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Paraskevas, Parisiadis; Garbarino, Gaston [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, F-38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Fisher, Ian [Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University, CA 94305 (United States); Hamlin, James; Maple, Brian [Department of Physics, University of California, San Diego, CA 92093 (United States)

    2015-07-01

    DyTe{sub 3} is a quasi-two-dimensional system in which two successive incommensurate charge-density-wave (CDW) states appear upon cooling at ambient pressure (T{sub CDW,1} = 306 K, T{sub CDW,2} = 49 K). The suppression with pressure of the CDW order is followed by the emergence of superconductivity above 1 GPa and below 1.5 K, as shown by our measurements of electrical resistivity and ac-susceptibility. X-ray diffraction (XRD) experiments under pressure indicate that the lower CDW state merges with the upper one at an intermediate pressure, suggesting that the double-CDW state could be accessed directly below a single T{sub CDW}(P) line. The phase diagram obtained from XRD is compared with the results of our recent electrical resistivity experiments.

  1. Mechanical confinement for improved energy storage density in BNT-BT-KNN lead-free ceramic capacitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chauhan, Aditya; Patel, Satyanarayan; Vaish, Rahul, E-mail: rahul@iitmandi.ac.in [School of Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Mandi, 175 001 (India)

    2014-08-15

    With the advent of modern power electronics, embedded circuits and non-conventional energy harvesting, the need for high performance capacitors is bound to become indispensible. The current state-of-art employs ferroelectric ceramics and linear dielectrics for solid state capacitance. However, lead-free ferroelectric ceramics propose to offer significant improvement in the field of electrical energy storage owing to their high discharge efficiency and energy storage density. In this regards, the authors have investigated the effects of compressive stress as a means of improving the energy storage density of lead-free ferroelectric ceramics. The energy storage density of 0.91(Bi{sub 0.5}Na{sub 0.5})TiO{sub 3}-0.07BaTiO{sub 3}-0.02(K{sub 0.5}Na{sub 0.5})NbO{sub 3} ferroelectric bulk ceramic was analyzed as a function of varying levels of compressive stress and operational temperature .It was observed that a peak energy density of 387 mJ.cm{sup -3} was obtained at 100 MPa applied stress (25{sup o}C). While a maximum energy density of 568 mJ.cm{sup -3} was obtained for the same stress at 80{sup o}C. These values are indicative of a significant, 25% and 84%, improvement in the value of stored energy compared to an unloaded material. Additionally, material's discharge efficiency has also been discussed as a function of operational parameters. The observed phenomenon has been explained on the basis of field induced structural transition and competitive domain switching theory.

  2. Density-functional theory based on the electron distribution on the energy coordinate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Hideaki

    2018-03-01

    We developed an electronic density functional theory utilizing a novel electron distribution n(ɛ) as a basic variable to compute ground state energy of a system. n(ɛ) is obtained by projecting the electron density n({\\boldsymbol{r}}) defined on the space coordinate {\\boldsymbol{r}} onto the energy coordinate ɛ specified with the external potential {\\upsilon }ext}({\\boldsymbol{r}}) of interest. It was demonstrated that the Kohn-Sham equation can also be formulated with the exchange-correlation functional E xc[n(ɛ)] that employs the density n(ɛ) as an argument. It turned out an exchange functional proposed in our preliminary development suffices to describe properly the potential energies of several types of chemical bonds with comparable accuracies to the corresponding functional based on local density approximation. As a remarkable feature of the distribution n(ɛ) it inherently involves the spatially non-local information of the exchange hole at the bond dissociation limit in contrast to conventional approximate functionals. By taking advantage of this property we also developed a prototype of the static correlation functional E sc including no empirical parameters, which showed marked improvements in describing the dissociations of covalent bonds in {{{H}}}2,{{{C}}}2{{{H}}}4 and {CH}}4 molecules.

  3. Modelling of microwave sustained capillary plasma columns at atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pencheva, M; Petrova, Ts; Benova, E; Zhelyazkov, I

    2006-01-01

    In this work we present a model of argon microwave sustained discharge at high pressure (1 atm), which includes two self-consistently linked parts - electrodynamic and kinetic ones. The model is based on a steady-state Boltzmann equation in an effective field approximation coupled with a collisional-radiative model for high-pressure argon discharge numerically solved together with Maxwell's equation for an azimuthally symmetric TM surface wave and wave energy balance equation. It is applied for the purpose of theoretical description of the discharge in a stationary state. The phase diagram, the electron energy distribution function as well as the dependences of the electron and heavy particles densities and the mean input power per electron on the electron number density and wave number are presented

  4. Modern foraging: Presence of food and energy density influence motivational processing of food advertisements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Rachel L

    2016-12-01

    More energy dense foods are preferable from an optimal foraging perspective, which suggests these foods are more motivationally relevant due to their greater capability of fulfilling biological imperatives. This increase in motivational relevance may be exacerbated in circumstances where foraging will be necessary. This study examined how food energy density and presence of food in the immediate environment interacted to influence motivational processing of food advertisements. N = 58 adults viewed advertisements for foods varying in energy density in contexts where the advertised food was actually present in the viewing room or not. Advertisements for more energy dense foods elicited greater skin conductivity level compared to ads for less energy dense foods when food was not present. All ads elicited decreases in corrugator supercilii activation indicating positive emotional response resultant from appetitive motivational activation, though the greatest activation was exhibited toward higher energy density foods when food was present. This supports an optimal foraging perspective and has implications for healthy eating interventions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Frontiers in pulse-power-based high energy density plasma physics and its applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horioka, Kazuhiko

    2008-03-01

    The papers in this volume of report were presented at the Symposium on Frontiers in Pulse-power-based High Energy Density Physics' held by National Institute for Fusion Science. The topics include the present status of high energy density plasma researches, extreme ultraviolet sources, intense radiation sources, high power ion beams, and R and D of related pulse power technologies. The 13 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  6. Development and validation of spectroscopic methods for monitoring density changes in pressurized gaseous and supercritical fluid systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blatchford, Marc A; Wallen, Scott L

    2002-04-15

    The further development of new processes utilizing liquid or supercritical CO2 as a solvent will benefit from the rational design of new CO2-philes. Understanding solvation structures and mechanisms of these molecules is an important part of this process. In such studies, determining the change in density as a function of the measured thermodynamic conditions (pressure and temperature) provides an excellent means of directly monitoring the solution conditions in the detection volume for a given technique. By integrating spectroscopic peaks, changes in area can be used to determine changes in analyte concentration in the detection volume, and thus, it should be possible to monitor the system density in situ. In the present study, we examine the utility of Raman and NMR spectroscopy as a means of following changes in solution density conditions and validate this approach in pure fluids and gases (N2 and CO2) and supercritical fluid mixtures (acetaldehyde vapor in N2). In addition, we present the design of a simple, inexpensive cell for conducting Raman and NMR measurements under moderate pressure conditions.

  7. Structural relaxation and thermal conductivity of high-pressure formed, high-density di-n-butyl phthalate glass and pressure induced departures from equilibrium state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johari, G P; Andersson, Ove

    2017-06-21

    We report a study of structural relaxation of high-density glasses of di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP) by measuring thermal conductivity, κ, under conditions of pressure and temperature (p,T) designed to modify both the vibrational and configurational states of a glass. Various high-density glassy states of DBP were formed by (i) cooling the liquid under a fixed high p and partially depressurizing the glass, (ii) isothermal annealing of the depressurized glass, and (iii) pressurizing the glass formed by cooling the liquid under low p. At a given low p, κ of the glass formed by cooling under high p is higher than that of the glass formed by cooling under low p, and the difference increases as glass formation p is increased. κ of the glass formed under 1 GPa is ∼20% higher at ambient p than κ of the glass formed at ambient p. On heating at low p, κ decreases until the glass to liquid transition range is reached. This is the opposite of the increase in κ observed when a glass formed under a certain p is heated under the same p. At a given high p, κ of the low-density glass formed by cooling at low p is lower than that of the high-density glass formed by cooling at that high p. On heating at high p, κ increases until the glass to liquid transition range is reached. The effects observed are due to a thermally assisted approach toward equilibrium at p different from the glass formation p. In all cases, the density, enthalpy, and entropy would change until the glasses become metastable liquids at a fixed p, thus qualitatively relating κ to variation in these properties.

  8. Studies on Impingement Effects of Low Density Jets on Surfaces — Determination of Shear Stress and Normal Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathian, Sarith. P.; Kurian, Job

    2005-05-01

    This paper presents the results of the Laser Reflection Method (LRM) for the determination of shear stress due to impingement of low-density free jets on flat plate. For thin oil film moving under the action of aerodynamic boundary layer the shear stress at the air-oil interface is equal to the shear stress between the surface and air. A direct and dynamic measurement of the oil film slope is measured using a position sensing detector (PSD). The thinning rate of oil film is directly measured which is the major advantage of the LRM over LISF method. From the oil film slope history, direct calculation of the shear stress is done using a three-point formula. For the full range of experiment conditions Knudsen numbers varied till the continuum limit of the transition regime. The shear stress values for low-density flows in the transition regime are thus obtained using LRM and the measured values of shear show fair agreement with those obtained by other methods. Results of the normal pressure measurements on a flat plate in low-density jets by using thermistors as pressure sensors are also presented in the paper. The normal pressure profiles obtained show the characteristic features of Newtonian impact theory for hypersonic flows.

  9. Ultrathin Coaxial Fiber Supercapacitors Achieving High Energy and Power Densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Caiwei; Xie, Yingxi; Sanghadasa, Mohan; Tang, Yong; Lu, Longsheng; Lin, Liwei

    2017-11-15

    Fiber-based supercapacitors have attracted significant interests because of their potential applications in wearable electronics. Although much progress has been made in recent years, the energy and power densities, mechanical strength, and flexibility of such devices are still in need of improvement for practical applications. Here, we demonstrate an ultrathin microcoaxial fiber supercapacitor (μCFSC) with high energy and power densities (2.7 mW h/cm 3 and 13 W/cm 3 ), as well as excellent mechanical properties. The prototype with the smallest reported overall diameter (∼13 μm) is fabricated by successive coating of functional layers onto a single micro-carbon-fiber via a scalable process. Combining the simulation results via the electrochemical model, we attribute the high performance to the well-controlled thin coatings that make full use of the electrode materials and minimize the ion transport path between electrodes. Moreover, the μCFSC features high bending flexibility and large tensile strength (more than 1 GPa), which make it promising as a building block for various flexible energy storage applications.

  10. Density measurements of liquid 2-propanol at temperatures between (280 and 393) K and at pressures up to 10 MPa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stringari, Paolo; Scalabrin, Giancarlo; Valtz, A.; Richon, D.

    2009-01-01

    Liquid densities for 2-propanol have been measured at T = (280, 300, 325, 350, 375, and 393) K from about atmospheric pressure up to 10 MPa using a vibrating tube densimeter. The period of vibration has been converted into density using the Forced Path Mechanical Calibration method. The R134a has been used as reference fluid for T ≤ 350 K and water for T > 350 K. The uncertainty of the measurements is lower than ±0.05%. The measured liquid densities have been correlated with a Starling BWR equation with an overall AAD of 0.025%. The same BWR equation agrees within an AAD lower than 0.2% with the experimental values available in the literature over the same temperature and pressure range

  11. Range-separated density-functional theory for molecular excitation energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebolini, E.

    2014-01-01

    Linear-response time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) is nowadays a method of choice to compute molecular excitation energies. However, within the usual adiabatic semi-local approximations, it is not able to describe properly Rydberg, charge-transfer or multiple excitations. Range separation of the electronic interaction allows one to mix rigorously density-functional methods at short range and wave function or Green's function methods at long range. When applied to the exchange functional, it already corrects most of these deficiencies but multiple excitations remain absent as they need a frequency-dependent kernel. In this thesis, the effects of range separation are first assessed on the excitation energies of a partially-interacting system in an analytic and numerical study in order to provide guidelines for future developments of range-separated methods for excitation energy calculations. It is then applied on the exchange and correlation TDDFT kernels in a single-determinant approximation in which the long-range part of the correlation kernel vanishes. A long-range frequency-dependent second-order correlation kernel is then derived from the Bethe-Salpeter equation and added perturbatively to the range-separated TDDFT kernel in order to take into account the effects of double excitations. (author)

  12. Neutron stars as probes of extreme energy density matter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-05-07

    May 7, 2015 ... Neutron stars have long been regarded as extraterrestrial laboratories from which we can learn about extreme energy density matter at low temperatures. In this article, some of the recent advances made in astrophysical observations and related theory are highlighted. Although the focus is on the much ...

  13. Common-Pressure-Vessel Nickel-Hydrogen Battery Development

    OpenAIRE

    Otzinger, Burton; Wheeler, James

    1991-01-01

    The dual-cell, common-pressure vessel, nickel-hydrogen configuration has recently emerged as an option for small satellite nickel-hydrogen battery application. An important incentive is that the dual-cell, CPV configured battery presents a 30 percent reduction in volume and nearly 50 percent reduction in mounting footprint, when compared with an equivalent battery of individual pressure- vessel (IPV) cells. In addition energy density and cost benefits are significant. Eagle-Picher Industries ...

  14. Energy recovery by pressure retarded osmosis (PRO) in SWRO–PRO integrated processes

    KAUST Repository

    Wan, Chun Feng

    2015-11-11

    Pressure retarded osmosis (PRO) is a promising technology to reduce the specific energy consumption of a seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) plant. In this study, it is projected that 25.6-40.7millionkWh/day of energy can be recovered globally, if the brines from SWRO are used as the draw solution and diluted to the seawater level in a PRO system. Detailed integrated SWRO-PRO processes are developed in this study with the option to form a closed-loop SWRO-PRO process that can substantially reduce the pretreatment cost of desalination. The governing mathematical models that describe both the transport phenomena on a module level and the energy flow on a system level are developed to evaluate the performances of the SWRO-PRO processes. The model aims to investigate the performance of the hollow fibers as dilution occurs and provides guidelines on hollow fiber module design and process operation. Determining the dilution factor and the corresponding operating pressure of PRO is the key to optimize the integrated process. The specific energy consumptions of three SWRO-involved processes; namely, (1) SWRO without a pressure exchanger, (2) SWRO with a pressure exchanger, and (3) SWRO with pressure exchangers and PRO are compared. The results show that the specific energy consumptions for the above three processes are 5.51, 1.79 and 1.08kWh/(m of desalinated water) for a 25% recovery SWRO plant; and 4.13, 2.27 and 1.14kWh/(m of desalinated water) for a 50% recovery SWRO plant, using either freshwater or wastewater as the feed solution in PRO.

  15. Lower Bound on the Energy Density in Classical and Quantum Field Theories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Aron C

    2017-04-14

    A novel method for deriving energy conditions in stable field theories is described. In a local classical theory with one spatial dimension, a local energy condition always exists. For a relativistic field theory, one obtains the dominant energy condition. In a quantum field theory, there instead exists a quantum energy condition, i.e., a lower bound on the energy density that depends on information-theoretic quantities. Some extensions to higher dimensions are briefly discussed.

  16. Time-frequency energy density precipitation method for time-of-flight extraction of narrowband Lamb wave detection signals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Y., E-mail: thuzhangyu@foxmail.com; Huang, S. L., E-mail: huangsling@tsinghua.edu.cn; Wang, S.; Zhao, W. [State Key Laboratory of Power Systems, Department of Electrical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2016-05-15

    The time-of-flight of the Lamb wave provides an important basis for defect evaluation in metal plates and is the input signal for Lamb wave tomographic imaging. However, the time-of-flight can be difficult to acquire because of the Lamb wave dispersion characteristics. This work proposes a time-frequency energy density precipitation method to accurately extract the time-of-flight of narrowband Lamb wave detection signals in metal plates. In the proposed method, a discrete short-time Fourier transform is performed on the narrowband Lamb wave detection signals to obtain the corresponding discrete time-frequency energy density distribution. The energy density values at the center frequency for all discrete time points are then calculated by linear interpolation. Next, the time-domain energy density curve focused on that center frequency is precipitated by least squares fitting of the calculated energy density values. Finally, the peak times of the energy density curve obtained relative to the initial pulse signal are extracted as the time-of-flight for the narrowband Lamb wave detection signals. An experimental platform is established for time-of-flight extraction of narrowband Lamb wave detection signals, and sensitivity analysis of the proposed time-frequency energy density precipitation method is performed in terms of propagation distance, dispersion characteristics, center frequency, and plate thickness. For comparison, the widely used Hilbert–Huang transform method is also implemented for time-of-flight extraction. The results show that the time-frequency energy density precipitation method can accurately extract the time-of-flight with relative error of <1% and thus can act as a universal time-of-flight extraction method for narrowband Lamb wave detection signals.

  17. Time-frequency energy density precipitation method for time-of-flight extraction of narrowband Lamb wave detection signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Y.; Huang, S. L.; Wang, S.; Zhao, W.

    2016-01-01

    The time-of-flight of the Lamb wave provides an important basis for defect evaluation in metal plates and is the input signal for Lamb wave tomographic imaging. However, the time-of-flight can be difficult to acquire because of the Lamb wave dispersion characteristics. This work proposes a time-frequency energy density precipitation method to accurately extract the time-of-flight of narrowband Lamb wave detection signals in metal plates. In the proposed method, a discrete short-time Fourier transform is performed on the narrowband Lamb wave detection signals to obtain the corresponding discrete time-frequency energy density distribution. The energy density values at the center frequency for all discrete time points are then calculated by linear interpolation. Next, the time-domain energy density curve focused on that center frequency is precipitated by least squares fitting of the calculated energy density values. Finally, the peak times of the energy density curve obtained relative to the initial pulse signal are extracted as the time-of-flight for the narrowband Lamb wave detection signals. An experimental platform is established for time-of-flight extraction of narrowband Lamb wave detection signals, and sensitivity analysis of the proposed time-frequency energy density precipitation method is performed in terms of propagation distance, dispersion characteristics, center frequency, and plate thickness. For comparison, the widely used Hilbert–Huang transform method is also implemented for time-of-flight extraction. The results show that the time-frequency energy density precipitation method can accurately extract the time-of-flight with relative error of <1% and thus can act as a universal time-of-flight extraction method for narrowband Lamb wave detection signals.

  18. Coulomb displacement energies and neutron density distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shlomo, S.

    1979-01-01

    We present a short review of the present status of the theory of Coulomb displacement energies, ΔEsub(c), discussing the Okamoto-Nolem-Schiffer anomaly and its solution. We emphasize, in particular, that contrary to previous hopes, ΔEsub(c) does not determine rsub(ex), the root-mean square (rms) radius of the excess (valence) neutron density distribution. Instead, ΔEsub(c) is very sensitive to the value of Δr = rsub(n) - rsub(p), the difference between the rms radii of the density distributions of all neutrons and all protons. For neutron rich nuclei, such as 48 Ca and 208 Pb, a value of Δr = 0.1 fm is found to be consistent with ΔEsub(c). This value of Δr, which is considerably smaller than that (of 0.2 - 0.3 fm) predicted by some common Hartree-Fock calculations, seems to be confirmed by very recent experimental results. (orig.)

  19. Energy Performance and Pressure Fluctuation of a Multiphase Pump with Different Gas Volume Fractions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinsong Zhang

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Large petroleum resources in deep sea, and huge market demands for petroleum need advanced petroleum extraction technology. The multiphase pump, which can simultaneously transport oil and gas with considerable efficiency, has been a crucial technology in petroleum extraction. A numerical approach with mesh generation and a Navier-Stokes equation solution is employed to evaluate the effects of gas volume fraction on energy performance and pressure fluctuations of a multiphase pump. Good agreement of experimental and calculation results indicates that the numerical approach can accurately simulate the multiphase flow in pumps. The pressure rise of a pump decreases with the increasing of flow rate, and the pump efficiency decreases with the increasing of GVF (the ratio of the gas volume to the whole volume. Results show that the dominant frequencies of pressure fluctuation in the impeller and diffuser are eleven and three times those of the impeller rotational frequency, respectively. Due to the larger density of water and centrifugal forces, the water aggregates to the shroud and the gas gathers to the hub, which renders the distribution of GVF in the pump uneven. A vortex develops at the blade suction side, near the leading edge, induced by the leakage flow, and further affects the pressure fluctuation in the impeller. The obvious vortex in the diffuser indicates that the design of the divergence angle of the diffuser is not optimal, which induces flow separation due to large diffusion ratio. A uniform flow pattern in the impeller indicates good hydraulic performance of the pump.

  20. Research and Evaluation of the Energy Flux Density of the Mobile Phone Electromagnetic Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranas Baltrėnas

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The article analyses variations in the energy flux density of the electromagnetic field of 10 mobile phones depending on distance. The studies have been conducted using three modes: sending a text message, receiving a text message and connecting a mobile phone to the Internet. When text messages are received or sent from a mobile phone, the values of the energy flux density of the mobile phone electromagnetic field exceed the safe allowable limit and make 10 μW / cm². A distance of 10, 20 and 30 cm from a mobile phone is effective protection against the energy flux density of the electromagnetic field when writing texts, receiving messages or connecting to the mobile Internet.Article in Lithuanian

  1. High Energy Ion Acceleration by Extreme Laser Radiation Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-14

    published in the internationally leading journal Physical Review Letters. We continued to progress this pionee 15.  SUBJECT TERMS ion therapy, heavy ion ...Thomson parabola spectrometer: To separate and provide a measurement of the charge -to-mass ratio and energy spectrum of the different ion species...AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2017-0015 High energy ion acceleration by extreme laser radiation pressure Paul McKenna UNIVERSITY OF STRATHCLYDE VIZ ROYAL COLLEGE

  2. Creating high energy density in nuclei with energetic antiparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibbs, W.R.

    1986-01-01

    The possibility of creating a phase change in nuclear matter using energetic antiprotons and antideuterons is examined. It is found that energy densities of the order of 2 GeV/c can be obtained for periods of approx.2 fm/c with the proper experimental selection of events. 10 refs., 7 figs

  3. OH density measured by PLIF in a nanosecond atmospheric pressure diffuse discharge in humid air under steep high voltage pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouaras, K.; Magne, L.; Pasquiers, S.; Tardiveau, P.; Jeanney, P.; Bournonville, B.

    2018-04-01

    The spatiotemporal distributions of the OH radical density are measured using planar laser induced fluorescence in the afterglow of a nanosecond diffuse discharge at atmospheric pressure in humid air. The diffuse discharge is generated between a pin and a grounded plate electrodes within a gap of 18 mm. The high voltage pulse applied to the pin ranges from 65 to 85 kV with a rise time of 2 ns. The specific electrical energy transferred to the gas ranges from 5 to 40 J l‑1. The influence of H2O concentration is studied from 0.5% to 1.5%. An absolute calibration of OH density is performed using a six-level transient rate equation model to simulate the dynamics of OH excitation by the laser, taking into account collisional processes during the optical pumping and the fluorescence. Rayleigh scattering measurements are used to achieve the geometrical part of the calibration. A local maximum of OH density is found in the pin area whatever the operating conditions. For 85 kV and 1% of H2O, this peak reaches a value of 2.0 × 1016 cm‑3 corresponding to 8% of H2O dissociation. The temporal decay of the spatially averaged OH density is found to be similar as in the afterglow of a homogeneous photo-triggered discharge for which a self-consistent modeling is done. These tools are then used to bring discussion elements on OH kinetics.

  4. Short-term overeating results in incomplete energy intake compensation regardless of energy density or macronutrient composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apolzan, John W; Bray, George A; Hamilton, Marc T; Zderic, Theodore W; Han, Hongmei; Champagne, Catherine M; Shepard, Desti; Martin, Corby K

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of overeating (140% of energy requirements) a high-fat low-energy density diet (HF/LED, 1.05 kcal/g), high-fat high-energy density diet (HF/HED, 1.60 kcal/g), and high-carbohydrate (HC) LED (1.05 kcal/g) for 2-days on subsequent 4-day energy intake (EI), activity levels, appetite, and mood. Using a randomized cross-over design, energy expenditure and EI were standardized during overeating. In 20 adults with a mean ± SD BMI of 30.7 ± 4.6 kg/m(2) , EI was not suppressed until the second day after overeating and accounted for ∼30% of the excess EI. Reductions in EI did not differ among the three diets or across days. Overeating had no effect on subsequent energy expenditure but steps/day decreased after the HC/LED and HF/HED. Sleep time was increased after the HF/HED compared to both LEDs. After overeating a HF/HED vs. HF/LED, carbohydrate cravings, hunger, prospective food consumption, and sadness increased and satisfaction, relaxation, and tranquility decreased. Diet type, time, or their interaction had no impact on compensation over 4 days. No adaptive thermogenesis was observed. The HF/HED vs. HF/LED had detrimental effects on food cravings, appetite, and mood. These results suggest short-term overeating is associated with incomplete compensation. Copyright © 2013 The Obesity Society.

  5. High-β, improved confinement reversed-field pinch plasmas at high density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wyman, M. D.; Chapman, B. E.; Ahn, J. W.; Almagri, A. F.; Anderson, J. K.; Den Hartog, D. J.; Ebrahimi, F.; Ennis, D. A.; Fiksel, G.; Gangadhara, S.; Goetz, J. A.; O'Connell, R.; Oliva, S. P.; Prager, S. C.; Reusch, J. A.; Sarff, J. S.; Stephens, H. D.; Bonomo, F.; Franz, P.; Brower, D. L.

    2008-01-01

    In Madison Symmetric Torus [Dexter et al., Fusion Technol. 19, 131 (1991)] discharges where improved confinement is brought about by modification of the current profile, pellet injection has quadrupled the density, reaching n e =4x10 19 m -3 . Without pellet injection, the achievable density in improved confinement discharges had been limited by edge-resonant tearing instability. With pellet injection, the total beta has been increased to 26%, and the energy confinement time is comparable to that at low density. Pressure-driven local interchange and global tearing are predicted to be linearly unstable. Interchange has not yet been observed experimentally, but there is possible evidence of pressure-driven tearing, an instability usually driven by the current gradient in the reversed-field pinch

  6. Frontiers for Discovery in High Energy Density Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davidson, R. C.; Katsouleas, T.; Arons, J.; Baring, M.; Deeney, C.; Di Mauro, L.; Ditmire, T.; Falcone, R.; Hammer, D.; Hill, W.; Jacak, B.; Joshi, C.; Lamb, F.; Lee, R.; Logan, B. G.; Melissinos, A.; Meyerhofer, D.; Mori, W.; Murnane, M.; Remington, B.; Rosner, R.; Schneider, D.; Silvera, I.; Stone, J.; Wilde, B.; Zajc. W.

    2004-07-20

    The report is intended to identify the compelling research opportunities of high intellectual value in high energy density physics. The opportunities for discovery include the broad scope of this highly interdisciplinary field that spans a wide range of physics areas including plasma physics, laser and particle beam physics, nuclear physics, astrophysics, atomic and molecular physics, materials science and condensed matter physics, intense radiation-matter interaction physics, fluid dynamics, and magnetohydrodynamics

  7. Application of an excited state LDA exchange energy functional for the calculation of transition energy of atoms within time-independent density functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shamim, Md; Harbola, Manoj K, E-mail: sami@iitk.ac.i, E-mail: mkh@iitk.ac.i [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur 208 016 (India)

    2010-11-14

    Transition energies of a new class of excited states (two-gap systems) of various atoms are calculated in time-independent density functional formalism by using a recently proposed local density approximation exchange energy functional for excited states. It is shown that the excitation energies calculated with this functional compare well with those calculated with exact exchange theories.

  8. Application of an excited state LDA exchange energy functional for the calculation of transition energy of atoms within time-independent density functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shamim, Md; Harbola, Manoj K

    2010-01-01

    Transition energies of a new class of excited states (two-gap systems) of various atoms are calculated in time-independent density functional formalism by using a recently proposed local density approximation exchange energy functional for excited states. It is shown that the excitation energies calculated with this functional compare well with those calculated with exact exchange theories.

  9. Reply to Comment on 'On the importance of the free energy for elasticity under pressure'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcus, P M; Qiu, S L

    2004-01-01

    All criticisms by Steinle-Neumann and Cohen of the correctness of our calculations of equilibrium structure and elastic constants under pressure from the Gibbs free energy are answered and the criticisms are rejected. The difference between the free energy and the internal energy as functions of structure is described to clarify the use of the free energy. The meaning of elastic constants in a system under pressure is discussed in order to derive the basic quadratic expansion of the free energy in the strains. The coefficients in the expansion are the elastic constants under pressure and are in agreement with well-known work. We give reasons why calculations based on the Gibbs free energy are simpler and more accurate than the usual calculations based on minima of the energy at constant volume. (reply)

  10. Phonon-assisted tunneling and its dependence on pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, P.N.; Singh, A.P.; Thakur, B.N.

    1999-01-01

    First the mechanism of phonon-assisted tunneling has been investigated. The indirect tunnel current density has been computed after taking the amplitude of the time dependent perturbation as the energy of the lattice vibration. Later the pressure dependence of the phonon-assisted tunnel current has been computed using Payne's expression for the dependence of phonon frequency on pressure. Very good qualitative agreements are obtained between predicted and observed characteristics. (author)

  11. Energy Cost of Avoiding Pressure Oscillations in a Discrete Fluid Power Force System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anders Hedegaard; Pedersen, Henrik Clemmensen

    2015-01-01

    In secondary valve controlled discrete fluid power force systems the valve opening trajectory greatly influences the pressure dynamics in the actuator chambers. For discrete fluid power systems featuring hoses of significant length pressure oscillations due to fast valve switching is well......-known. This paper builds upon theoretical findings on how shaping of the valve opening may reduce the cylinder pressure oscillations. The current paper extents the work by implementing the valve opening characteristics reducing the pressure oscillations on a full scale power take-off test-bench for wave energy...... will present measurements comparing pressure dynamics for two valve opening algorithms. In addition the paper will give a theoretical investigation of the energy loss during valve shifting and finally measurements of average power output from the power take-off system in various sea states are compared...

  12. Measurement and modelling of high pressure density and interfacial tension of (gas + n-alkane) binary mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Luís M.C.; Chapoy, Antonin; Burgass, Rod; Tohidi, Bahman

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • (Density + IFT) measurements are performed in synthetic reservoir fluids. • Measured systems include CO_2, CH_4 and N_2 with n-decane. • Novel data are reported for temperatures up to 443 K and pressures up to 69 MPa. • Predictive models are tested in 16 (gas + n-alkane) systems. • Best modelling results are achieved with the Density Gradient Theory. - Abstract: The deployment of more efficient and economical extraction methods and processing facilities of oil and gas requires the accurate knowledge of the interfacial tension (IFT) of fluid phases in contact. In this work, the capillary constant a of binary mixtures containing n-decane and common gases such as carbon dioxide, methane and nitrogen was measured. Experimental measurements were carried at four temperatures (313, 343, 393 and 442 K) and pressures up to 69 MPa, or near the complete vaporisation of the organic phase into the gas-rich phase. To determine accurate IFT values, the capillary constants were combined with saturated phase density data measured with an Anton Paar densitometer and correlated with a model based on the Peng–Robinson 1978 equation of state (PR78 EoS). Correlated density showed an overall percentage absolute deviation (%AAD) to measured data of (0.2 to 0.5)% for the liquid phase and (1.5 to 2.5)% for the vapour phase of the studied systems and P–T conditions. The predictive capability of models to accurately describe both the temperature and pressure dependence of the saturated phase density and IFT of 16 (gas + n-alkane) binary mixtures was assessed in this work by comparison with data gathered from the literature and measured in this work. The IFT models considered include the Parachor, the Linear Gradient Theory (LGT) and the Density Gradient Theory (DGT) approaches combined with the Volume-Translated Predictive Peng–Robinson 1978 EoS (VT-PPR78 EoS). With no adjustable parameters, the VT-PPR78 EoS allowed a good description of both solubility and

  13. A High Power Density Single-Phase PWM Rectifier With Active Ripple Energy Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ruxi [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Wang, Fei [ORNL; Boroyevich, Dushan [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Burgos, Rolando [ABB; Lai, Rixin [General Electric; Ning, Puqi [ORNL; Rajashekara, Kaushik [Rolls Royce

    2011-01-01

    It is well known that single-phase pulse width modulation rectifiers have second-order harmonic currents and corresponding ripple voltages on the dc bus. The low-frequency harmonic current is normally filtered using a bulk capacitor in the bus, which results in low power density. However, pursuing high power density in converter design is a very important goal in the aerospace applications. This paper studies methods for reducing the energy storage capacitor for single-phase rectifiers. The minimum ripple energy storage requirement is derived independently of a specific topology. Based on theminimum ripple energy requirement, the feasibility of the active capacitor s reduction schemes is verified. Then, we propose a bidirectional buck boost converter as the ripple energy storage circuit, which can effectively reduce the energy storage capacitance. The analysis and design are validated by simulation and experimental results.

  14. An interface energy density-based theory considering the coherent interface effect in nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yin; Chen, Shaohua; Fang, Daining

    2017-02-01

    To characterize the coherent interface effect conveniently and feasibly in nanomaterials, a continuum theory is proposed that is based on the concept of the interface free energy density, which is a dominant factor affecting the mechanical properties of the coherent interface in materials of all scales. The effect of the residual strain caused by self-relaxation and the lattice misfit of nanomaterials, as well as that due to the interface deformation induced by an external load on the interface free energy density is considered. In contrast to the existing theories, the stress discontinuity at the interface is characterized by the interface free energy density through an interface-induced traction. As a result, the interface elastic constant introduced in previous theories, which is not easy to determine precisely, is avoided in the present theory. Only the surface energy density of the bulk materials forming the interface, the relaxation parameter induced by surface relaxation, and the mismatch parameter for forming a coherent interface between the two surfaces are involved. All the related parameters are far easier to determine than the interface elastic constants. The effective bulk and shear moduli of a nanoparticle-reinforced nanocomposite are predicted using the proposed theory. Closed-form solutions are achieved, demonstrating the feasibility and convenience of the proposed model for predicting the interface effect in nanomaterials.

  15. Predictors of Dietary Energy Density among Preschool Aged Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilmani N.T. Fernando

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Childhood obesity is a global problem with many contributing factors including dietary energy density (DED. This paper aims to investigate potential predictors of DED among preschool aged children in Victoria, Australia. Secondary analysis of longitudinal data for 209 mother–child pairs from the Melbourne Infant Feeding, Activity and Nutrition Trial was conducted. Data for predictors (maternal child feeding and nutrition knowledge, maternal dietary intake, home food availability, socioeconomic status were obtained through questionnaires completed by first-time mothers when children were aged 4 or 18 months. Three 24-h dietary recalls were completed when children were aged ~3.5 years. DED was calculated utilizing three methods: “food only”, “food and dairy beverages”, and “food and all beverages”. Linear regression analyses were conducted to identify associations between predictors and these three measures of children’s DED. Home availability of fruits (β: −0.82; 95% CI: −1.35, −0.29, p = 0.002 for DEDfood; β: −0.42; 95% CI: −0.82, −0.02, p = 0.041 for DEDfood+dairy beverages and non-core snacks (β: 0.11; 95% CI: 0.02, 0.20, p = 0.016 for DEDfood; β: 0.09; 95% CI: 0.02, 0.15, p = 0.010 for DEDfood+dairy beverages were significantly associated with two of the three DED measures. Providing fruit at home early in a child’s life may encourage the establishment of healthful eating behaviors that could promote a diet that is lower in energy density later in life. Home availability of non-core snacks is likely to increase the energy density of preschool children’s diets, supporting the proposition that non-core snack availability at home should be limited.

  16. Energy Density, Energy Intake, and Body Weight Regulation in Adults12345

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karl, J. Philip; Roberts, Susan B.

    2014-01-01

    The role of dietary energy density (ED) in the regulation of energy intake (EI) is controversial. Methodologically, there is also debate about whether beverages should be included in dietary ED calculations. To address these issues, studies examining the effects of ED on EI or body weight in nonelderly adults were reviewed. Different approaches to calculating dietary ED do not appear to alter the direction of reported relations between ED and body weight. Evidence that lowering dietary ED reduces EI in short-term studies is convincing, but there are currently insufficient data to determine long-term effectiveness for weight loss. The review also identified key barriers to progress in understanding the role of ED in energy regulation, in particular the absence of a standard definition of ED, and the lack of data from multiple long-term clinical trials examining the effectiveness of low-ED diet recommendations for preventing both primary weight gain and weight regain in nonobese individuals. Long-term clinical trials designed to examine the impact of dietary ED on energy regulation, and including multiple ED calculation methods within the same study, are still needed to determine the importance of ED in the regulation of EI and body weight. PMID:25398750

  17. Interferometric determination of electron density in a high pressure hydrogen arc. 1. Calculation of refraction index

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radtke, R; Guenther, K; Ulbricht, R [Akademie der Wissenschaften der DDR, Berlin. Zentralinstitut fuer Elektronenphysik

    1980-01-14

    The refraction index of a hydrogen plasma in LTE was calculated as a function of the wavelength of observation, temperature and pressure, taking into account bound-bound and bound-free transitions of the neutral atom. According to the present calculation, the influence of excited states at higher temperatures is smaller than indicated by Baum et al (Plasma Phys.; 17: 79 (1975)) for argon. Using the calculations presented here, the interferometric investigation of a high pressure hydrogen arc should allow the determination of the electron density with an accuracy of the order of 1%.

  18. Frontiers of particle beam and high energy density plasma science using pulse power technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masugata, Katsumi

    2011-04-01

    The papers presented at the symposium on “Frontiers of Particle Beam and High Energy Density Plasma Science using Pulse Power Technology” held in November 20-21, 2009 at National Institute for Fusion Science are collected. The papers reflect the present status and resent progress in the experiment and theoretical works on high power particle beams and high energy density plasmas produced by pulsed power technology. (author)

  19. Strongly Interacting Matter at Very High Energy Density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLerran, L.

    2011-01-01

    The authors discuss the study of matter at very high energy density. In particular: what are the scientific questions; what are the opportunities to makes significant progress in the study of such matter and what facilities are now or might be available in the future to answer the scientific questions? The theoretical and experimental study of new forms of high energy density matter is still very much a 'wild west' field. There is much freedom for developing new concepts which can have order one effects on the way we think about such matter. It is also a largely 'lawless' field, in that concepts and methods are being developed as new information is generated. There is also great possibility for new experimental discovery. Most of the exciting results from RHIC experiments were unanticipated. The methods used for studying various effects like flow, jet quenching, the ridge, two particle correlations etc. were developed as experiments evolved. I believe this will continue to be the case at LHC and as we use existing and proposed accelerators to turn theoretical conjecture into tangible reality. At some point this will no doubt evolve into a precision science, and that will make the field more respectable, but for my taste, the 'wild west' times are the most fun.

  20. Detecting solar chameleons through radiation pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baum, S.; Cantatore, G.; Hoffmann, D.H.H.; Karuza, M.; Semertzidis, Y.K.; Upadhye, A.; Zioutas, K.

    2014-01-01

    Light scalar fields can drive the accelerated expansion of the universe. Hence, they are obvious dark energy candidates. To make such models compatible with tests of General Relativity in the solar system and “fifth force” searches on Earth, one needs to screen them. One possibility is the so-called “chameleon” mechanism, which renders an effective mass depending on the local matter density. If chameleon particles exist, they can be produced in the sun and detected on Earth exploiting the equivalent of a radiation pressure. Since their effective mass scales with the local matter density, chameleons can be reflected by a dense medium if their effective mass becomes greater than their total energy. Thus, under appropriate conditions, a flux of solar chameleons may be sensed by detecting the total instantaneous momentum transferred to a suitable opto-mechanical force/pressure sensor. We calculate the solar chameleon spectrum and the reach in the chameleon parameter space of an experiment using the preliminary results from a force/pressure sensor, currently under development at INFN Trieste, to be mounted in the focal plane of one of the X-Ray telescopes of the CAST experiment at CERN. We show, that such an experiment signifies a pioneering effort probing uncharted chameleon parameter space

  1. Detecting solar chameleons through radiation pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baum, S., E-mail: sebastian.baum@cern.ch [Uppsala Universitet, Box 516, SE 75120, Uppsala (Sweden); European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Gèneve (Switzerland); Cantatore, G. [Università di Trieste, Via Valerio 2, 34127 Trieste (Italy); INFN Trieste, Padriciano 99, 34149 Trieste (Italy); Hoffmann, D.H.H. [Institut für Kernphysik, TU-Darmstadt, Schlossgartenstr. 9, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Karuza, M. [INFN Trieste, Padriciano 99, 34149 Trieste (Italy); Phys. Dept. and CMNST, University of Rijeka, R. Matejcic 2, Rijeka (Croatia); Semertzidis, Y.K. [Center for Axion and Precision Physics Research (IBS), Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Physics, KAIST, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Upadhye, A. [Physics Department, University of Wisconsin–Madison, 1150 University Avenue, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Zioutas, K., E-mail: konstantin.zioutas@cern.ch [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Gèneve (Switzerland); University of Patras, GR 26504 Patras (Greece)

    2014-12-12

    Light scalar fields can drive the accelerated expansion of the universe. Hence, they are obvious dark energy candidates. To make such models compatible with tests of General Relativity in the solar system and “fifth force” searches on Earth, one needs to screen them. One possibility is the so-called “chameleon” mechanism, which renders an effective mass depending on the local matter density. If chameleon particles exist, they can be produced in the sun and detected on Earth exploiting the equivalent of a radiation pressure. Since their effective mass scales with the local matter density, chameleons can be reflected by a dense medium if their effective mass becomes greater than their total energy. Thus, under appropriate conditions, a flux of solar chameleons may be sensed by detecting the total instantaneous momentum transferred to a suitable opto-mechanical force/pressure sensor. We calculate the solar chameleon spectrum and the reach in the chameleon parameter space of an experiment using the preliminary results from a force/pressure sensor, currently under development at INFN Trieste, to be mounted in the focal plane of one of the X-Ray telescopes of the CAST experiment at CERN. We show, that such an experiment signifies a pioneering effort probing uncharted chameleon parameter space.

  2. Optimum extracted H- and D- current densities from gas-pressure-limited high-power hydrogen/deuterium tandem ion sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiskes, J.R.

    1993-01-01

    The tandem hydrogen/deuterium ion source is modelled for the purpose of identifying the maximum current densities that can be extracted subject to the gas-pressure constraints proposed for contemporary beam-line systems. Optimum useful extracted current densities are found to be in the range of approximately 7 to 10 mA cm -2 . The sensitivity of these current densities is examined subject to uncertainties in the underlying atomic/molecular rate processes; A principal uncertainty remains the quantification of the molecular vibrational distribution following H 3 + wall collisions

  3. Cowichan Valley energy mapping and modelling. Report 5 - Energy density mapping projections. Final report. [Vancouver Island, Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-06-15

    The driving force behind the Integrated Energy Mapping and Analysis project was the identification and analysis of a suite of pathways that the Cowichan Valley Regional District (CVRD) can utilise to increase its energy resilience, as well as reduce energy consumption and GHG emissions, with a primary focus on the residential sector. Mapping and analysis undertaken will support provincial energy and GHG reduction targets, and the suite of pathways outlined will address a CVRD internal target that calls for 75% of the region's energy within the residential sector to come from locally sourced renewables by 2050. The target has been developed as a mechanism to meet resilience and climate action target. The maps and findings produced are to be integrated as part of a regional policy framework currently under development. Task 5 focused on energy projection mapping to estimate and visualise the energy consumption density and GHG emissions under different scenarios. The scenarios from task 4 were built around the energy consumption density of the residential sector under future land use patterns and rely on different energy source combinations (the suite of pathways). In task 5 the energy usage under the different scenarios were fed back into GIS, thereby giving a visual representation of forecasted residential energy consumption per unit area. The methodology is identical to that used in task 2 where current usage was mapped, whereas the mapping in this task is for future forecasts. These results are documented in this report. In addition, GHG mapping under the various scenarios was also undertaken. (LN)

  4. Advanced Cathode Material For High Energy Density Lithium-Batteries, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced cathode materials having high red-ox potential and high specific capacity offer great promise to the development of high energy density lithium-based...

  5. Analysis of electronic models for solar cells including energy resolved defect densities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glitzky, Annegret

    2010-07-01

    We introduce an electronic model for solar cells including energy resolved defect densities. The resulting drift-diffusion model corresponds to a generalized van Roosbroeck system with additional source terms coupled with ODEs containing space and energy as parameters for all defect densities. The system has to be considered in heterostructures and with mixed boundary conditions from device simulation. We give a weak formulation of the problem. If the boundary data and the sources are compatible with thermodynamic equilibrium the free energy along solutions decays monotonously. In other cases it may be increasing, but we estimate its growth. We establish boundedness and uniqueness results and prove the existence of a weak solution. This is done by considering a regularized problem, showing its solvability and the boundedness of its solutions independent of the regularization level. (orig.)

  6. Approximations to the electron energy distribution and positive column models for low-pressure discharge light sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lister, G G; Sheverev, V A; Uhrlandt, D

    2002-01-01

    The applicability of 'fluid' models based on analytic approximations of the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) and of kinetic models for low-pressure discharge light sources is discussed. Traditionally, 'fluid' models of fluorescent lamps assume that the EEDF is Maxwellian up to the energy of the first excited state. It is shown that such an approach is sufficiently accurate in most cases of conventional as well as of 'highly loaded' fluorescent lamps. However, this assumption is strongly violated for many rare gas glow discharges for mercury free light sources. As an example, a neon dc discharge is studied. The densities of the four lowest excited states and the electric field have been measured. The experimental results can be fairly well reproduced by a kinetic positive column model. This article was scheduled to appear in issue 14 of J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. To access this special issue please follow this link: http://stacks.iop.org/0022-3727/35/i=14/

  7. U.S. Heavy Ion Beam Research for High Energy Density Physics Applications and Fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidson, R.C.; Logan, B.G.; Barnard, J.J.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Briggs, R.J.

    2005-01-01

    Key scientific results from recent experiments, modeling tools, and heavy ion accelerator research are summarized that explore ways to investigate the properties of high energy density matter in heavy-ion-driven targets, in particular, strongly-coupled plasmas at 0.01 to 0.1 times solid density for studies of warm dense matter, which is a frontier area in high energy density physics. Pursuit of these near-term objectives has resulted in many innovations that will ultimately benefit heavy ion inertial fusion energy. These include: neutralized ion beam compression and focusing, which hold the promise of greatly improving the stage between the accelerator and the target chamber in a fusion power plant; and the Pulse Line Ion Accelerator (PLIA), which may lead to compact, low-cost modular linac drivers

  8. Analyzing the dependence of oxygen incorporation current density on overpotential and oxygen partial pressure in mixed conducting oxide electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Zixuan; Chen, Di; Chueh, William C

    2017-08-30

    The oxygen incorporation reaction, which involves the transformation of an oxygen gas molecule to two lattice oxygen ions in a mixed ionic and electronic conducting solid, is a ubiquitous and fundamental reaction in solid-state electrochemistry. To understand the reaction pathway and to identify the rate-determining step, near-equilibrium measurements have been employed to quantify the exchange coefficients as a function of oxygen partial pressure and temperature. However, because the exchange coefficient contains contributions from both forward and reverse reaction rate constants and depends on both oxygen partial pressure and oxygen fugacity in the solid, unique and definitive mechanistic assessment has been challenging. In this work, we derive a current density equation as a function of both oxygen partial pressure and overpotential, and consider both near and far from equilibrium limits. Rather than considering specific reaction pathways, we generalize the multi-step oxygen incorporation reaction into the rate-determining step, preceding and following quasi-equilibrium steps, and consider the number of oxygen ions and electrons involved in each. By evaluating the dependence of current density on oxygen partial pressure and overpotential separately, one obtains the reaction orders for oxygen gas molecules and for solid-state species in the electrode. We simulated the oxygen incorporation current density-overpotential curves for praseodymium-doped ceria for various candidate rate-determining steps. This work highlights a promising method for studying the exchange kinetics far away from equilibrium.

  9. Normal lumbar spine bone mineral densities with single-energy CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendrick, R.E.; Ritenour, E.R.; Geis, J.R.; Thickman, D.; Freeman, K.

    1988-01-01

    The authors report trabecular spine densities determined by single-energy CT in 267 healthy women, aged 22 to 75 years. Volunteers were scanned at eight sites with use of identical fourth-generation CT scanners, postpatient calibration phantoms, and analysis software that accounts for beam hardening as a function of patient size. Results indicate that a cubic polynomial best represents the decrease in bone density (in milligrams per milliliter of K 2 HPO 4 ) with age (in years): Bone Density = 140.9 + 4.44(Age) - 0.133(Age) 2 + 0.0008(Age) 3 , with statistical significance over the best linear and quadratic polynomial fits (P < .001). The mean bone densities of healthy women above age 30 years are found to be lower by an average of 8 mg/mL than reported by Cann et al, whose data indicate that the greatest loss in trabecular bone density in healthy women occurs in the 50-59-year group, while out data indicate greatest loss in the 60-75 year age group

  10. Study of elastic and thermodynamic properties of uranium dioxide under high temperature and pressure with density functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Mu; Wang Feng; Zheng Zhou; Liu Xiankun; Jiang Tao

    2013-01-01

    The elastic and thermodynamic properties of UO 2 under extreme physical condition are studied by using the density functional theory and quasi-harmonic Debye model. Results show that UO 2 is still stable ionic crystal under high temperatures, and pressures. Tetragonal shear constant is steady under high pressures and temperatures, while elastic constant C 44 is stable under high temperatures, but rises with pressure sharply. Bulk modulus, shear modulus and Young's modulus increase with pressure rapidly, but temperature would not cause evident debasement of the moduli, all of which indicate that UO 2 has excellent mechanical properties. Heat capacity of different pressures increases with temperature and is close to the Dulong-Petit limit near 1000 K. Debye temperature decreases with temperature, and increases with pressure. Under low pressure, thermal expansion coefficient raises with temperature rapidly, and then gets slow at higher pressure and temperature. Besides, the thermal expansion coefficient of UO 2 is much lower than that of other nuclear materials. (authors)

  11. Continuum corrections to the level density and its dependence on excitation energy, n-p asymmetry, and deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charity, R.J.; Sobotka, L.G.

    2005-01-01

    In the independent-particle model, the nuclear level density is determined from the neutron and proton single-particle level densities. The single-particle level density for the positive-energy continuum levels is important at high excitation energies for stable nuclei and at all excitation energies for nuclei near the drip lines. This single-particle level density is subdivided into compound-nucleus and gas components. Two methods are considered for this subdivision: In the subtraction method, the single-particle level density is determined from the scattering phase shifts. In the Gamov method, only the narrow Gamov states or resonances are included. The level densities calculated with these two methods are similar; both can be approximated by the backshifted Fermi-gas expression with level-density parameters that are dependent on A, but with very little dependence on the neutron or proton richness of the nucleus. However, a small decrease in the level-density parameter is predicted for some nuclei very close to the drip lines. The largest difference between the calculations using the two methods is the deformation dependence of the level density. The Gamov method predicts a very strong peaking of the level density at sphericity for high excitation energies. This leads to a suppression of deformed configurations and, consequently, the fission rate predicted by the statistical model is reduced in the Gamov method

  12. Pressure-dependent shallow donor binding energy in InGaN/GaN square QWWs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghazi, Haddou El; Jorio, Anouar; Zorkani, Izeddine

    2013-01-01

    Using a variational approach, we perform a theoretical study of hydrostatic pressure effect on the ground-state of axial hydrogenic shallow-donor impurity binding energy in InGaN/GaN square quantum well wire (SQWWs) as a function of the side length within the effective-mass scheme and finite potential barrier. The pressure dependence of wire length, effective mass, dielectric constant and potential barrier are taken into account. Numerical results show that: (i) the binding energy is strongly affected by the wire length and the external applied pressure and (ii) its maximum moves to the narrow wire in particular for height pressure.

  13. Density and energy distribution of epithermal secondary electrons in a plasma with fast charged particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayakumar, R.; Fleischmann, H.H.

    1989-01-01

    The production of intermediate energy secondary electrons in plasmas through collisions with fast charged particles is investigated. The density and the distribution of the secondary electrons are obtained by calculating the generation, slow down and diffusion rates, using basic Rutherford collision cross sections. It is shown that the total density of secondaries is much smaller than the fast particle density and that the energy distribution has roughly a 1/√E dependence. The higher generation secondary populations are also obtained. (orig.)

  14. Cesium under pressure: First-principles calculation of the bcc-to-fcc phase transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlesi, S.; Franchini, A.; Bortolani, V.; Martinelli, S.

    1999-05-01

    In this paper we present the ab initio calculation of the structural properties of cesium under pressure. The calculation of the total energy is done in the local-density approximation of density-functional theory, using a nonlocal pseudopotential including the nonlinear core corrections proposed by Louie et al. The calculation of the pressure-volume diagram for both bcc and fcc structures allows us to prove that the transition from bcc to fcc structure is a first-order transition.

  15. Observation and modeling of mixing-layer development in high-energy-density, blast-wave-driven shear flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Stefano, C. A.; Kuranz, C. C.; Klein, S. R.; Drake, R. P.; Malamud, G.; Henry de Frahan, M. T.; Johnsen, E.; Shimony, A.; Shvarts, D.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Martinez, D.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we examine the hydrodynamics of high-energy-density (HED) shear flows. Experiments, consisting of two materials of differing density, use the OMEGA-60 laser to drive a blast wave at a pressure of ∼50 Mbar into one of the media, creating a shear flow in the resulting shocked system. The interface between the two materials is Kelvin-Helmholtz unstable, and a mixing layer of growing width develops due to the shear. To theoretically analyze the instability's behavior, we rely on two sources of information. First, the interface spectrum is well-characterized, which allows us to identify how the shock front and the subsequent shear in the post-shock flow interact with the interface. These observations provide direct evidence that vortex merger dominates the evolution of the interface structure. Second, simulations calibrated to the experiment allow us to estimate the time-dependent evolution of the deposition of vorticity at the interface. The overall result is that we are able to choose a hydrodynamic model for the system, and consequently examine how well the flow in this HED system corresponds to a classical hydrodynamic description

  16. The clinical determination of absolute density in bone utilizing single and dual energy compton scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huddleston, A.L.; Weaver, J.

    1980-01-01

    Several methods important in the clinical diagnosis of skeletal diseases have been proposed for the determination of bone mass, such as photon absorptiometry, computed tomography, and neutron activation. None of these present methods provides for the determination of the physical density of bone. In the Radiological Physics Research Laboratory at the University of Virginia, the principles of Compton scattering are being investigated with the intent of determining the electron density and the physical density of human bone. A Compton-scatter densitometer has been constructed for the in vivo density determination of the femoral head. This technique utilizes of collimated low energy gamma source and detector system. The method has been tested in cadavers and in known density samples and has an accuracy of 2 %. A second densitometer has been designed for the in vivo determination of electron density of the vertebrae based upon a new technique which employs dual energy Compton scattering in the spinal column. These systems will be discussed; and the principles of dual energy Compton scatter densitometry will be presented. The importance of these isotope techniques and the feasibility of in vivo density determination in the vertebrae and femoral head will be discussed as they relate to clinical diagnosis and research. (author)

  17. Arrays of Synthetic Atoms: Nanocapacitor Batteries with Large Energy Density and Small Leak Currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-28

    AFRL-RV-PS- AFRL-RV-PS- TR-2017-0169 TR-2017-0169 ARRAYS OF SYNTHETIC ATOMS: NANOCAPACITOR BATTERIES WITH LARGE ENERGY DENSITY AND SMALL LEAK...1-0247 Arrays of Synthetic Atoms: Nanocapacitor Batteries with Large Energy Density and Small Leak Currents 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...large dielectric strength to a nanoscale rechargeable battery . We fabricated arrays of one-, two- and three-dimensional synthetic atoms and comparison

  18. Density measurements under pressure for the binary system 1-propanol plus toluene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeberg-Mikkelsen, Claus Kjær; Andersen, Simon Ivar

    2005-01-01

    and seven isobars up to 30 MPa. The uncertainty of the reported densities is less than 0.05%. The measured data has been used to study the influence of temperature, pressure, and composition on the isothermal compressibility and the isobaric thermal expansivity as well as the excess molar volume, which...... shows a complex sigmoid behavior involving both positive and negative values. This complex behavior has been interpreted as the result of changes in the free volume due to volume expansion and compressibility as a result of the breaking of hydrogen bonds of the self-associating alcohol molecules...

  19. Structural and electronic properties of high pressure phases of lead chalcogenides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, John; Scolfaro, Luisa; Myers, Thomas

    2012-10-01

    Lead chalcogenides, most notably PbTe and PbSe, have become an active area of research due to their thermoelectric properties. The high figure of merit (ZT) of these materials has brought much attention to them, due to their ability to convert waste heat into electricity. Variation in synthesis conditions gives rise to a need for analysis of structural and thermoelectric properties of these materials at different pressures. In addition to the NaCl structure at ambient conditions, lead chalcogenides have a dynamic orthorhombic (Pnma) intermediate phase and a higher pressure yet stable CsCl phase. By altering the lattice constant, we simulate the application of external pressure; this has notable effects on ground state total energy, band gap, and structural phase. Using the General Gradient Approximation (GGA) in Density Functional Theory (DFT), we calculate the phase transition pressures by finding the differences in enthalpy from total energy calculations. For each phase, elastic constants, bulk modulus, shear modulus, Young's modulus, and hardness are calculated, using two different approaches. In addition to structural properties, we analyze the band structure and density of states at varying pressures, paying special note to thermoelectric implications.

  20. Investigating the influence of pressure and temperature on malaysian crude oil density and viscosity for improved recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahoor, M.K.; Derahman, M.N.

    2012-01-01

    Malaysia has great potential as a crude oil or fossil fuel producing country. To increase oil production, behavior of Malaysian Crude Oil has been analyzed with reference to temperature and pressure variations. The effect of these parameters on crude oil density and viscosity has been observed, to select the methodology to be adopted for increases recovery by implementing enhanced oil recovery (EOR) project. Based on this study it has been decided to further explore the feasibility of increasing reservoir pressure. (author)

  1. Agglomeration of amorphous silicon film with high energy density excimer laser irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Ming; Ishihara, Ryoichi; Metselaar, Wim; Beenakker, Kees

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, agglomeration phenomena of amorphous Si (α-Si) films due to high energy density excimer laser irradiation are systematically investigated. The agglomeration, which creates holes or breaks the continuous Si film up into spherical beads, is a type of serious damage. Therefore, it determines an upper energy limit for excimer laser crystallization. It is speculated that the agglomeration is caused by the boiling of molten Si. During this process, outbursts of heterogeneously nucleated vapor bubbles are promoted by the poor wetting property of molten silicon on the SiO 2 layer underneath. The onset of the agglomeration is defined by extrapolating the hole density as a function of the energy density of the laser pulse. A SiO 2 capping layer (CL) is introduced on top of the α-Si film to investigate its influence on the agglomeration. It is found that effects of the CL depend on its thickness. The CL with a thickness less than 300 nm can be used to suppress the agglomeration. A thin CL acts as a confining layer and puts a constraint on bubble burst, and hence suppresses the agglomeration

  2. Enhanced energy density of carbon-based supercapacitors using Cerium (III) sulphate as inorganic redox electrolyte

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Díaz, Patricia; González, Zoraida; Santamaría, Ricardo; Granda, Marcos; Menéndez, Rosa; Blanco, Clara

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: •Ce 2 (SO 4 ) 3 /H 2 SO 4 redox electrolyte as a new route to increase the energy density of SCs. •Increased operating cell voltage with no electrolyte decomposition. •Redox reactions on the battery-type electrode. •The negative electrode retains its capacitor behaviour. •Outstanding energy density values compared to those measured in H 2 SO 4 . -- ABSTRACT: The energy density of carbon based supercapacitors (CBSCs) was significantly increased by the addition of an inorganic redox species [Ce 2 (SO 4 ) 3 ] to an aqueous electrolyte (H 2 SO 4 ). The development of the faradaic processes on the positive electrode not only significantly increased the capacitance but also the operational cell voltage of these devices (up to 1.5 V) due to the high redox potentials at which the Ce 3+ /Ce 4+ reactions occur. Therefore, in asymmetric CBSCs assembled using an activated carbon as negative electrode and MWCNTs as the positive one, the addition of Ce 2 (SO 4 ) 3 moderately increases the energy density of the device (from 1.24 W h kg −1 to 5.08 W h kg −1 ). When a modified graphite felt is used as positive electrode the energy density of the cell reaches values as high as 13.84 W h kg −1 . The resultant systems become asymmetric hybrid devices where energy is stored due to the electrical double layer formation in the negative electrode and the development of the faradaic process in the positive electrode, which acts as a battery-type electrode

  3. Note: Interpolation for evaluation of a two-dimensional spatial profile of plasma densities at low gas pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Se-Jin; Kim, Young-Chul; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2011-01-01

    An interpolation algorithm for the evaluation of the spatial profile of plasma densities in a cylindrical reactor was developed for low gas pressures. The algorithm is based on a collisionless two-dimensional fluid model. Contrary to the collisional case, i.e., diffusion fluid model, the fitting algorithm depends on the aspect ratio of the cylindrical reactor. The spatial density profile of the collisionless fitting algorithm is presented in two-dimensional images and compared with the results of the diffusion fluid model.

  4. Testing DARKexp against energy and density distributions of Millennium-II halos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nolting, Chris; Williams, Liliya L.R. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, 116 Church Street SE, Minneapolis, MN, 55454 (United States); Boylan-Kolchin, Michael [Department of Astronomy, The University of Texas at Austin, 2515 Speedway, Stop C1400, Austin, TX, 78712 (United States); Hjorth, Jens, E-mail: nolting@astro.umn.edu, E-mail: llrw@astro.umn.edu, E-mail: mbk@astro.as.utexas.edu, E-mail: jens@dark-cosmology.dk [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, Copenhagen, DK-2100 Denmark (Denmark)

    2016-09-01

    We test the DARKexp model for relaxed, self-gravitating, collisionless systems against equilibrium dark matter halos from the Millennium-II simulation. While limited tests of DARKexp against simulations and observations have been carried out elsewhere, this is the first time the testing is done with a large sample of simulated halos spanning a factor of ∼ 50 in mass, and using independent fits to density and energy distributions. We show that DARKexp, a one shape parameter family, provides very good fits to the shapes of density profiles, ρ( r ), and differential energy distributions, N ( E ), of individual simulated halos. The best fit shape parameter φ{sub 0} obtained from the two types of fits are correlated, though with scatter. Our most important conclusions come from ρ( r ) and N ( E ) that have been averaged over many halos. These show that the bulk of the deviations between DARKexp and individual Millennium-II halos come from halo-to-halo fluctuations, likely driven by substructure, and other density perturbations. The average ρ( r ) and N ( E ) are quite smooth and follow DARKexp very closely. The only deviation that remains after averaging is small, and located at most bound energies for N ( E ) and smallest radii for ρ( r ). Since the deviation is confined to 3–4 smoothing lengths, and is larger for low mass halos, it is likely due to numerical resolution effects.

  5. The effect of barite mud on the division of the detector energy window in density logging while drilling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Li; Sun Jianmeng; Yu Huawei; Jiang Dong; Zhang Jing

    2012-01-01

    In the litho-density logging, formation density and lithology were acquired by calculating the total counts in certain energy window. Therefore, the division of the energy window directly affects the evaluation of density and lithology value. In the process of the energy window division, mud type affects the determination of the range of energy window. In this work, Monte Carlo simulation method was applied to study the range of energy window regarding to water mud and barite mud, respectively. The results show that the range of the energy window with barite mud is less than that of the water mud, and lithology identification will have greater' error in the barite mud. It is important to analyze influencing factors and improve the measurement accuracy of the litho-density logging. (authors)

  6. Estimation of adsorption-induced pore pressure and confinement in a nanoscopic slit pore by a density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grégoire, David; Malheiro, Carine; Miqueu, Christelle

    2018-03-01

    This study aims at characterising the adsorption-induced pore pressure and confinement in nanoscopic pores by molecular non-local density functional theory (DFT). Considering its important potential industrial applications, the adsorption of methane in graphitic slit pores has been selected as the test case. While retaining the accuracy of molecular simulations at pore scale, DFT has a very low computational cost that allows obtaining highly resolved pore pressure maps as a function of both pore width and thermodynamic conditions. The dependency of pore pressure on these parameters (pore width, pressure and temperature) is carefully analysed in order to highlight the effect of each parameter on the confined fluid properties that impact the solid matrix.

  7. Evolution of pressures and correlations in the glasma produced in high energy nuclear collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggieri, M.; Liu, J. H.; Oliva, L.; Peng, G. X.; Greco, V.

    2018-04-01

    We consider the SU(2) glasma with Gaussian fluctuations and study its evolution by means of classical Yang-Mills equations solved numerically on a lattice. Neglecting in this first study the longitudinal expansion, we follow the evolution of the pressures of the system and compute the effect of the fluctuations in the early stage up to t ≈2 fm /c , that is the time range in which the glasma is relevant for high energy collisions. We measure the ratio of the longitudinal over the transverse pressure, PL/PT, and we find that unless the fluctuations carry a substantial amount of the energy density at the initial time, they do not change significantly the evolution of PL/PT in the early stage and that the system remains quite anisotropic. We also measure the longitudinal fields correlators both in the transverse plane and along the longitudinal direction: while at initial time fields appear to be anticorrelated in the transverse plane, this anticorrelation disappears in the very early stage, and the correlation length in the transverse plane increases. On the other hand, we find a dependence of the gauge invariant correlator on the longitudinal coordinate, which we interpret as a partial loss of correlation induced by the dynamics that we dub the gauge invariant string breaking. We finally study the effect of fluctuations on the longitudinal correlations: we find that string breaking is accelerated by the fluctuations and waiting for a sufficiently long time fluctuations lead to the complete breaking of the color strings.

  8. Five-dimensional visualization of phase transition in BiNiO3 under high pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yijin; Wang, Junyue; Yang, Wenge; Azuma, Masaki; Mao, Wendy L.

    2014-01-01

    Colossal negative thermal expansion was recently discovered in BiNiO 3 associated with a low density to high density phase transition under high pressure. The varying proportion of co-existing phases plays a key role in the macroscopic behavior of this material. Here, we utilize a recently developed X-ray Absorption Near Edge Spectroscopy Tomography method and resolve the mixture of high/low pressure phases as a function of pressure at tens of nanometer resolution taking advantage of the charge transfer during the transition. This five-dimensional (X, Y, Z, energy, and pressure) visualization of the phase boundary provides a high resolution method to study the interface dynamics of high/low pressure phase

  9. Effect of light energy density on conversion degree and hardness of dual-cured resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komori, Paula Carolina de Paiva; de Paula, Andréia Bolzan; Martin, Airton Abrāo; Tango, Rubens Nisie; Sinhoreti, Mario Alexandre Coelho; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of different light energy densities on conversion degree (CD) and Knoop hardness number (KHN) of RelyX ARC (RLX) resin cement. After manipulation according to the manufacturer's instructions, RLX was inserted into a rubber mold (0.8 mm x 5 mm) and covered with a Mylar strip. The tip of the light-curing unit (LCU) was positioned in contact with the Mylar surface. Quartz-tungsten-halogen (QTH) and light-emitting diode (LED) LCUs with light densities of 10, 20 and 30 J/cm2 were used to light-cure the specimens. After light curing, the specimens were stored dry in lightproof containers at 37 degrees C. After 24 hours, the CD was analyzed by FT-Raman and, after an additional 24-hours, samples were submitted to Knoop hardness testing. The data of the CD (%) and KHN were submitted to two-way ANOVA and the Tukey's test (alpha = 0.05). QTH and LED were effective light curing units. For QTH, there were no differences among the light energy densities for CD or KHN. For LED, there was a significant reduction in CD with the light energy density set at 10 J/cm2. KHN was not influenced by the light-curing unit and by its light energy density.

  10. Measurements relating fire radiative energy density and surface fuel consumption - RxCADRE 2011 and 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew T. Hudak; Matthew B. Dickinson; Benjamin C. Bright; Robert L. Kremens; E. Louise Loudermilk; Joseph J. O' Brien; Benjamin S. Hornsby; Roger D. Ottmar

    2016-01-01

    Small-scale experiments have demonstrated that fire radiative energy is linearly related to fuel combusted but such a relationship has not been shown at the landscape level of prescribed fires. This paper presents field and remotely sensed measures of pre-fire fuel loads, consumption, fire radiative energy density (FRED) and fire radiative power flux density (FRFD),...

  11. Walnut consumption in a weight reduction intervention: effects on body weight, biological measures, blood pressure and satiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rock, Cheryl L; Flatt, Shirley W; Barkai, Hava-Shoshana; Pakiz, Bilge; Heath, Dennis D

    2017-12-04

    Dietary strategies that help patients adhere to a weight reduction diet may increase the likelihood of weight loss maintenance and improved long-term health outcomes. Regular nut consumption has been associated with better weight management and less adiposity. The objective of this study was to compare the effects of a walnut-enriched reduced-energy diet to a standard reduced-energy-density diet on weight, cardiovascular disease risk factors, and satiety. Overweight and obese men and women (n = 100) were randomly assigned to a standard reduced-energy-density diet or a walnut-enriched (15% of energy) reduced-energy diet in the context of a behavioral weight loss intervention. Measurements were obtained at baseline and 3- and 6-month clinic visits. Participants rated hunger, fullness and anticipated prospective consumption at 3 time points during the intervention. Body measurements, blood pressure, physical activity, lipids, tocopherols and fatty acids were analyzed using repeated measures mixed models. Both study groups reduced body weight, body mass index and waist circumference (time effect p weight was -9.4 (0.9)% vs. -8.9 (0.7)% (mean [SE]), for the standard vs. walnut-enriched diet groups, respectively. Systolic blood pressure decreased in both groups at 3 months, but only the walnut-enriched diet group maintained a lower systolic blood pressure at 6 months. The walnut-enriched diet group, but not the standard reduced-energy-density diet group, reduced total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) at 6 months, from 203 to 194 mg/dL and 121 to 112 mg/dL, respectively (p weight loss that is comparable to a standard reduced-energy-density diet in the context of a behavioral weight loss intervention. Although weight loss in response to both dietary strategies was associated with improvements in cardiovascular disease risk factors, the walnut-enriched diet promoted more favorable effects on LDL-C and systolic blood pressure. The trial

  12. Interesting pressure dependence of power factor in BiTeI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, San-Dong; Wang, Jian-Li

    2016-01-01

    We investigate pressure dependence of electronic structures and thermoelectric properties in BiTeI by using a modified Becke and Johnson exchange potential. Spin–orbit coupling (SOC) effects are also included due to giant Rashba splitting. Thermoelectric properties are illuminated through solving Boltzmann transport equations within the constant scattering time approximation. The calculated energy band gap of 0.36 eV agrees well with the experimental value of 0.38 eV. As the pressure increases, the energy band gap first decreases, and then increases. The Rashba energy has the opposite trend with the energy band gap. SOC has obvious detrimental influence on the power factor in both n-type and p-type doping. For low doping concentration, the power factor has the same trend with the energy band gap with increasing pressure, but shows a monotonic changing trend in high doping. It is found that the pressure can induce a significantly enhanced power factor in high n-type doping, which can be understood as pressure leading to two-dimensional-like density of states in the conduction bands. These results suggest that BiTeI may be a potential candidate for efficient thermoelectricity in n-type doping by pressure, turning an ordinary insulator into a topological insulator. (paper)

  13. Vacuum Energy and Inflation: 4. An Inflationary Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggins, Elisha

    2013-01-01

    This is the fourth paper in a series of four. The first paper in the series, "Vacuum Energy and Inflation: 1. A Liter of Vacuum Energy" [EJ1024183] discusses an example of vacuum energy. Vacuum energy is explained as an energy with a negative pressure whose energy density remains constant in an expanding space. Paper 2, "Vacuum…

  14. Kinetic and electron-electron energies for convex sums of ground state densities with degeneracies and fractional electron number

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, Mel, E-mail: ayers@mcmaster.ca, E-mail: mlevy@tulane.edu [Department of Chemistry, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Department of Physics, North Carolina A and T State University, Greensboro, North Carolina 27411 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana 70118 (United States); Anderson, James S. M.; Zadeh, Farnaz Heidar; Ayers, Paul W., E-mail: ayers@mcmaster.ca, E-mail: mlevy@tulane.edu [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-05-14

    Properties of exact density functionals provide useful constraints for the development of new approximate functionals. This paper focuses on convex sums of ground-level densities. It is observed that the electronic kinetic energy of a convex sum of degenerate ground-level densities is equal to the convex sum of the kinetic energies of the individual degenerate densities. (The same type of relationship holds also for the electron-electron repulsion energy.) This extends a known property of the Levy-Valone Ensemble Constrained-Search and the Lieb Legendre-Transform refomulations of the Hohenberg-Kohn functional to the individual components of the functional. Moreover, we observe that the kinetic and electron-repulsion results also apply to densities with fractional electron number (even if there are no degeneracies), and we close with an analogous point-wise property involving the external potential. Examples where different degenerate states have different kinetic energy and electron-nuclear attraction energy are given; consequently, individual components of the ground state electronic energy can change abruptly when the molecular geometry changes. These discontinuities are predicted to be ubiquitous at conical intersections, complicating the development of universally applicable density-functional approximations.

  15. Similarity and self-similarity in high energy density physics: application to laboratory astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falize, E.

    2008-10-01

    The spectacular recent development of powerful facilities allows the astrophysical community to explore, in laboratory, astrophysical phenomena where radiation and matter are strongly coupled. The titles of the nine chapters of the thesis are: from high energy density physics to laboratory astrophysics; Lie groups, invariance and self-similarity; scaling laws and similarity properties in High-Energy-Density physics; the Burgan-Feix-Munier transformation; dynamics of polytropic gases; stationary radiating shocks and the POLAR project; structure, dynamics and stability of optically thin fluids; from young star jets to laboratory jets; modelling and experiences for laboratory jets

  16. Charge Energy Transport in Hopping Systems with Rapidly Decreasing Density of States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendels, Dan; Organic Electronics Group Technion Team

    2014-03-01

    An accurate description of the carrier hopping topology in the energy domain of hopping systems incorporating a rapidly decreasing density of states and the subsequent energetic position of these systems' so called effective conduction band is crucial for rationalizing and quantifying these systems' thermo-electric properties, doping related phenomena and carrier gradient effects such as the emergence of the General Einstein Relation under degenerate conditions. Additionally, as will be shown, the 'mobile' carriers propagating through the system can have excess energies reaching 0.3eV above the system quasi-Fermi energy. Hence, since these mobile carriers are most prone to reach systems interfaces and interact with oppositely charged carriers, their excess energy should be considered in determining the efficiencies of energy dependent processes such as carrier recombination and exciton dissociation. In light of the stated motivations, a comprehensive numerical and analytical study of the topology of hopping in the energetic density of such systems (i.e. the statistics regarding which energy values carriers visit most and in what manner) was implemented and the main statistical features of the hopping process that determine the position in energy of the system's effective conduction band were distilled. The obtained results also help shed light on yet to be elucidated discrepancies between predictions given by the widely employed transport energy concept and Monte Carlo simulations.

  17. A Novel Constant-Pressure Pumped Hydro Combined with Compressed Air Energy Storage System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erren Yao

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available As intermittent renewable energy is receiving increasing attention, the combination of intermittent renewable energy with large-scale energy storage technology is considered as an important technological approach for the wider application of wind power and solar energy. Pumped hydro combined with compressed air energy storage system (PHCA is one of the energy storage systems that not only integrates the advantages but also overcomes the disadvantages of compressed air energy storage (CAES systems and pumped hydro energy storage systems to solve the problem of energy storage in China’s arid regions. Aiming at the variable working conditions of PHCA system technology, this study proposes a new constant-pressure PHCA. The most significant characteristics of this system were that the water pump and hydroturbine work under stable conditions and this improves the working efficiency of the equipment without incurring an energy loss. In addition, the constant-pressure PHCA system was subjected to energy and exergy analysis, in expectation of exploring an attractive solution for the large-scale storage of existing intermittent renewable energy.

  18. Diagnostic study of low-pressure Ar-O2 remote plasma generated in HCD-L 300 system: Relative density of O atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saloum, S.; Naddaf, M.

    2007-01-01

    The relative density of O atom of Ar-O 2 remote plasma excited in a low pressure 13.56 HMz hollow cathode discharge system has been investigated. The measurements were carried out at a total pressure of 0.05 mbar, radiofrequency (RF) power of 200 W and at three different axial distances in the plasma chamber below the outlet of the discharge source. Using optical emission spectroscopy (OES), the relative density of O ground state was determined from intensity ratio of O(844.6 nm) and Ar(750.4 nm) lines. The electron temperature and O 2 + densities have been measured using double langmuir probe measurements. The kinetic study of Ar-O 2 plasma, combined with both spectroscopy and langmuir probe measurements, revealed that the main production mechanism of the excited O(3p 3 P) is direct excitation by electron impact. A maximum of O ground state relative density and correspondingly a minimum of O 2 + density are obtained for the ratio O 2 /Ar: 60/40. The maximum O density in the remote zone is found to be 4.5 times higher than at the outlet of source. (author)

  19. Limiting density ratios in piston-driven compressions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.

    1985-07-01

    By using global energy and pressure balance applied to a shock model it is shown that for a piston-driven fast compression, the maximum compression ratio is not dependent on the absolute magnitude of the piston power, but rather on the power pulse shape. Specific cases are considered and a maximum density compression ratio of 27 is obtained for a square-pulse power compressing a spherical pellet with specific heat ratio of 5/3. Double pulsing enhances the density compression ratio to 1750 in the case of linearly rising compression pulses. Using this method further enhancement by multiple pulsing becomes obvious. (author)

  20. Atlas Pulsed Power Facility for High Energy Density Physics Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, R.B.; Ballard, E.O.; Barr, G.W.; Bowman, D.W.; Chochrane, J.C.; Davis, H.A.; Elizondo, J.M.; Gribble, R.F.; Griego, J.R.; Hicks, R.D.; Hinckley, W.B.; Hosack, K.W.; Nielsen, K.E.; Parker, J.V.; Parsons, M.O.; Rickets, R.L.; Salazar, H.R.; Sanchez, P.G.; Scudder, D.W.; Shapiro, C.; Thompson, M.C.; Trainor, R.J.; Valdez, G.A.; Vigil, B.N.; Watt, R.G.; Wysock, F.J.

    1999-01-01

    The Atlas facility, now under construction at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), will provide a unique capability for performing high-energy-density experiments in support of weapon-physics and basic-research programs. It is intended to be an international user facility, providing opportunities for researchers from national laboratories and academic institutions around the world. Emphasizing institutions around the world. Emphasizing hydrodynamic experiments, Atlas will provide the capability for achieving steady shock pressures exceeding 10-Mbar in a volume of several cubic centimeters. In addition, the kinetic energy associated with solid liner implosion velocities exceeding 12 km/s is sufficient to drive dense, hydrodynamic targets into the ionized regime, permitting the study of complex issues associated with strongly-coupled plasmas. The primary element of Atlas is a 23-MJ capacitor bank, comprised of 96 separate Marx generators housed in 12 separate oil-filled tanks, surrounding a central target chamber. Each tank will house two, independently-removable maintenance units, with each maintenance unit consisting of four Marx modules. Each Marx module has four capacitors that can each be charged to a maximum of 60 kilovolts. When railgap switches are triggered, the marx modules erect to a maximum of 240 kV. The parallel discharge of these 96 Marx modules will deliver a 30-MA current pulse with a 4-5-micros risetime to a cylindrical, imploding liner via 24 vertical, tri-plate, oil-insulated transmission lines. An experimental program for testing and certifying all Marx and transmission line components has been completed. A complete maintenance module and its associated transmission line (the First Article) are now under construction and testing. The current Atlas schedule calls for construction of the machine to be complete by August, 2000. Acceptance testing is scheduled to begin in November, 2000, leading to initial operations in January, 2001

  1. Simultaneous realization of high density edge transport barrier and improved L-mode on CHS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minami, Takashi; Okamura, Shoichi; Suzuki, Chihiro

    2008-10-01

    An edge transport barrier (ETB) formation and an improved L-mode (IL mode) have been simultaneously realized in high density region (n-bar e - 1.2x10 20 m -3 ) on Compact Helical System (CHS). When the ETB is formed during the IL mode, the density reduction in the edge region is suppressed by the barrier formation. As a result of the continuous increasing of the temperature by the IL mode, the stored energy during the combined mode increased up to the maximum stored energy (W p - 9.4 kJ) recorded in CHS experiments. The plasma pressure in the peripheral region increases up to three times larger than that of the L-mode, and the large edge plasma pressure gradient is formed accompanying the pedestal structure. That is caused by the anomalous transport reduction that is confirmed from the sharp drop of the density fluctuation in the edge region. The neutral particle reduction in the peripheral region and the metallic impurity accumulation in the core plasma are simultaneously observed during the high density ETB formation. (author)

  2. Evaluation of the Automatic Density Compensation for Pressurizer Level Measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Insoo; Min, Seohong; Ahn, Myunghoon

    2014-01-01

    When using two transmitters, it is difficult for the operators to identify the correct level of the pressurizer (PZR) upon failure of one of the two transmitters. For this reason, Korean Utility Requirements Document (KURD) requires that the operators to use three independent level indicators. Two hot calibrated transmitters and one cold calibrated transmitter compose PZR level transmitters in APR1400. In this paper, the deviation between cold calibration and hot calibration is evaluated, and the application of compensated PZR level measurement and uncompen-sated PZR level measurement during the normal operation of APR1400 are introduced. The PZR level signals for APR1400 come in three channels. To satisfy the KURD requirements for PZR level measurement, and at the same time to accomplish correction design and implementation, applicability and differences between hot calibration and cold calibration, compensated level and uncompensated level were evaluated as follows: For proper indication of PZR levels under normal operating condition, two of the three transmitters went through hot calibration and the remaining one transmitter went through cold calibration. This was to allow indicating entire regions of PZR regardless of the plant operation modes. For automatic density compensation per KURD requirements, the algorithm of the density compensated PZR level implemented in the DCS controller and PRV logic is adopted as a signal validation method

  3. Performance characterization of solid oxide cells under high pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Xiufu; Bonaccorso, Alfredo Damiano; Graves, Christopher R.

    2014-01-01

    in both fuel cell mode and electrolysis mode. In electrolysis mode at low current density, the performance improvement was counteracted by the increase in open circuit voltage, but it has to be born in mind that the pressurised gas contains higher molar free energy. Operating at high current density...... hydrocarbon fuels, which is normally performed at high pressure to achieve a high yield. Operation of SOECs at elevated pressure will therefore facilitate integration with the downstream fuel synthesis and is furthermore advantageous as it increases the cell performance. In this work, recent pressurised test...... results of a planar Ni-YSZ (YSZ: Yttria stabilized Zirconia) supported solid oxide cell are presented. The test was performed at 800 °C at pressures up to 15 bar. A comparison of the electrochemical performance of the cell at 1 and 3 bar shows a significant and equal performance gain at higher pressure...

  4. Band structure of CdTe under high pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayam, Sr. Gerardin; Nirmala Louis, C.; Amalraj, A.

    2005-01-01

    The band structures and density of states of cadmium telluride (CdTe) under various pressures ranging from normal to 4.5 Mbar are obtained. The electronic band structure at normal pressure of CdTe (ZnS structure) is analyzed and the direct band gap value is found to be 1.654 eV. CdTe becomes metal and superconductor under high pressure but before that it undergoes structural phase transition from ZnS phase to NaCl phase. The equilibrium lattice constant, bulk modulus and the phase transition pressure at which the compounds undergo structural phase transition from ZnS to NaCl are predicted from the total energy calculations. The density of states at the Fermi level (N(E F )) gets enhanced after metallization, which leads to the superconductivity in CdTe. In our calculation, the metallization pressure (P M = 1.935 Mbar) and the corresponding reduced volume ((V/V 0 ) M = 0.458) are estimated. Metallization occurs via direct closing of band gap at Γ point. (author)

  5. Radio frequency energy coupling to high-pressure optically pumped nonequilibrium plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plonjes, Elke; Palm, Peter; Lee, Wonchul; Lempert, Walter R.; Adamovich, Igor V.

    2001-01-01

    This article presents an experimental demonstration of a high-pressure unconditionally stable nonequilibrium molecular plasma sustained by a combination of a continuous wave CO laser and a sub-breakdown radio frequency (rf) electric field. The plasma is sustained in a CO/N 2 mixture containing trace amounts of NO or O 2 at pressures of P=0.4 - 1.2atm. The initial ionization of the gases is produced by an associative ionization mechanism in collisions of two CO molecules excited to high vibrational levels by resonance absorption of the CO laser radiation with subsequent vibration-vibration (V-V) pumping. Further vibrational excitation of both CO and N 2 is produced by free electrons heated by the applied rf field, which in turn produces additional ionization of these species by the associative ionization mechanism. In the present experiments, the reduced electric field, E/N, is sufficiently low to preclude field-induced electron impact ionization. Unconditional stability of the resultant cold molecular plasma is enabled by the negative feedback between gas heating and the associative ionization rate. Trace amounts of nitric oxide or oxygen added to the baseline CO/N 2 gas mixture considerably reduce the electron - ion dissociative recombination rate and thereby significantly increase the initial electron density. This allows triggering of the rf power coupling to the vibrational energy modes of the gas mixture. Vibrational level populations of CO and N 2 are monitored by infrared emission spectroscopy and spontaneous Raman spectroscopy. The experiments demonstrate that the use of a sub-breakdown rf field in addition to the CO laser allows an increase of the plasma volume by about an order of magnitude. Also, CO infrared emission spectra show that with the rf voltage turned on the number of vibrationally excited CO molecules along the line of sight increase by a factor of 3 - 7. Finally, spontaneous Raman spectra of N 2 show that with the rf voltage the vibrational

  6. Module-scale analysis of pressure retarded osmosis: performance limitations and implications for full-scale operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straub, Anthony P; Lin, Shihong; Elimelech, Menachem

    2014-10-21

    We investigate the performance of pressure retarded osmosis (PRO) at the module scale, accounting for the detrimental effects of reverse salt flux, internal concentration polarization, and external concentration polarization. Our analysis offers insights on optimization of three critical operation and design parameters--applied hydraulic pressure, initial feed flow rate fraction, and membrane area--to maximize the specific energy and power density extractable in the system. For co- and counter-current flow modules, we determine that appropriate selection of the membrane area is critical to obtain a high specific energy. Furthermore, we find that the optimal operating conditions in a realistic module can be reasonably approximated using established optima for an ideal system (i.e., an applied hydraulic pressure equal to approximately half the osmotic pressure difference and an initial feed flow rate fraction that provides equal amounts of feed and draw solutions). For a system in counter-current operation with a river water (0.015 M NaCl) and seawater (0.6 M NaCl) solution pairing, the maximum specific energy obtainable using performance properties of commercially available membranes was determined to be 0.147 kWh per m(3) of total mixed solution, which is 57% of the Gibbs free energy of mixing. Operating to obtain a high specific energy, however, results in very low power densities (less than 2 W/m(2)), indicating that the trade-off between power density and specific energy is an inherent challenge to full-scale PRO systems. Finally, we quantify additional losses and energetic costs in the PRO system, which further reduce the net specific energy and indicate serious challenges in extracting net energy in PRO with river water and seawater solution pairings.

  7. Isotope effect with energy-dependent density of states and impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, P.J.; Carbotte, J.P.

    1992-01-01

    We have calculated the total isotope coefficient β in a model where there is energy-dependent structure in the electronic density of states. We model the structure with a simple Lorentzian. In our calculation, doping has the effect of shifting the Fermi level and broadening the structure in the density of states. We have treated the dopants both as normal and as magnetic impurities. The asymmetry observed in the experimental data is found in our results. However, the complete range of values observed is difficult to reproduce. We question also whether the shifts in Fermi level required in such models are reasonable

  8. Unlocking High-Salinity Desalination with Cascading Osmotically Mediated Reverse Osmosis: Energy and Operating Pressure Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Yip, Ngai Yin

    2018-02-20

    Current practice of using thermally driven methods to treat hypersaline brines is highly energy-intensive and costly. While conventional reverse osmosis (RO) is the most efficient desalination technique, it is confined to purifying seawater and lower salinity sources. Hydraulic pressure restrictions and elevated energy demand render RO unsuitable for high-salinity streams. Here, we propose an innovative cascading osmotically mediated reverse osmosis (COMRO) technology to overcome the limitations of conventional RO. The innovation utilizes the novel design of bilateral countercurrent reverse osmosis stages to depress the hydraulic pressure needed by lessening the osmotic pressure difference across the membrane, and simultaneously achieve energy savings. Instead of the 137 bar required by conventional RO to desalinate 70 000 ppm TDS hypersaline feed, the highest operating pressure in COMRO is only 68.3 bar (-50%). Furthermore, up to ≈17% energy saving is attained by COMRO (3.16 kWh/m 3 , compared to 3.79 kWh/m 3 with conventional RO). When COMRO is employed to boost the recovery of seawater desalination to 70% from the typical 35-50%, energy savings of up to ≈33% is achieved (2.11 kWh/m 3 , compared to 3.16 kWh/m 3 with conventional RO). Again, COMRO can operate at a moderate hydraulic pressure of 80 bar (25% lower than 113 bar of conventional RO). This study highlights the encouraging potential of energy-efficient COMRO to access unprecedented high recovery rates and treat hypersaline brines at moderate hydraulic pressures, thus extending the capabilities of membrane-based technologies for high-salinity desalination.

  9. Development of a pressure based vortex-shedding meter: measuring unsteady mass-flow in variable density gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, C L; Winroth, M; Alfredsson, P H

    2016-01-01

    An entirely pressure-based vortex-shedding meter has been designed for use in practical time-dependent flows. The meter is capable of measuring mass-flow rate in variable density gases in spite of the fact that fluid temperature is not directly measured. Unlike other vortex meters, a pressure based meter is incredibly robust and may be used in industrial type flows; an environment wholly unsuitable for hot-wires for example. The meter has been tested in a number of static and dynamic flow cases, across a range of mass-flow rates and pressures. The accuracy of the meter is typically better than about 3% in a static flow and resolves the fluctuating mass-flow with an accuracy that is better than or equivalent to a hot-wire method. (paper)

  10. Newly discovered failure mode in high energy density, energy storage capacitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boicourt, G.P.; Kemp, E.L.

    1978-07-01

    High energy density pulse capacitors, typified by the 10-kV, 170-μF unit, have become widely used in recent years. These units primarily were designed for lower cost and higher energy per unit volume. The life characteristics of these units have never been determined fully, but they have already been shown capable of lives much longer than originally expected. The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory is now conducting an extended program to determine the long-term capabilities of these capacitors. This program is aimed not only at finding the statistical parameters of the failure distribution but also at determining the physical failure modes characteristic of such units. Recently, a new failure mode was found. This failure mode has prevented test samples of polypropylene-paper-dioctyl phthalate units from actually reaching the true potential life of the insulation. In this report, the new failure mechanism is examined and suggestions are made that could eliminate the failure mode

  11. A computational study of pressure-induced structural transition in ThSb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trinadh, Ch.U.M.; Rajagopalan, M.; Natarajan, S.

    1997-01-01

    The pressure induced phase transition from NaCl-type to CsCl-type structure in ThSb was studied using total energy calculations by tight-binding linear muffin tin orbital (TBLMTO) method within atomic sphere approximation (ASA). The density of states (DOS) at ambient pressure was compared with resonant photoemission studies (PES). The variation in interatomic distances during the transition was found to be in agreement with high pressure x-ray diffraction (HPXRD) studies. (author)

  12. A study on density functional theory of the effect of pressure on the formation and migration enthalpies of intrinsic point defects in growing single crystal Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sueoka, Koji; Kamiyama, Eiji; Kariyazaki, Hiroaki

    2012-05-01

    In 1982, Voronkov presented a model describing point defect behavior during the growth of single crystal Si from a melt and derived an expression to predict if the crystal was vacancy- or self-interstitial-rich. Recently, Vanhellemont claimed that one should take into account the impact of compressive stress introduced by the thermal gradient at the melt/solid interface by considering the hydrostatic pressure dependence of the formation enthalpy of the intrinsic point defects. To evaluate the impact of thermal stress more correctly, the pressure dependence of both the formation enthalpy (Hf) and the migration enthalpy (Hm) of the intrinsic point defects should be taken into account. Furthermore, growing single crystal Si is not under hydrostatic pressure but almost free of external pressure (generally in Ar gas under reduced pressure). In the present paper, the dependence of Hf and Hm on the pressure P, or in other words, the pressure dependence of the formation energy (Ef) and the relaxation volume (vf), is quantified by density functional theory calculations. Although a large number of ab initio calculations of the properties of intrinsic point defects have been published during the last years, calculations for Si crystals under pressure are rather scarce. For vacancies V, the reported pressure dependences of HfV are inconsistent. In the present study, by using 216-atom supercells with a sufficient cut-off energy and mesh of k-points, the neutral I and V are found to have nearly constant formation energies EfI and EfV for pressures up to 1 GPa. For the relaxation volume, vfI is almost constant while vfV decreases linearly with increasing pressure P. In case of the hydrostatic pressure Ph, the calculated formation enthalpy HfI and migration enthalpy HmI at the [110] dumbbell site are given by HfI = 3.425 - 0.057 × Ph (eV) and HmI = 0.981 - 0.039 × Ph (eV), respectively, with Ph given in GPa. The calculated HfV and HmV dependencies on Ph given by HfV = 3.543 - 0

  13. Exploring charge density analysis in crystals at high pressure: data collection, data analysis and advanced modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casati, Nicola; Genoni, Alessandro; Meyer, Benjamin; Krawczuk, Anna; Macchi, Piero

    2017-08-01

    The possibility to determine electron-density distribution in crystals has been an enormous breakthrough, stimulated by a favourable combination of equipment for X-ray and neutron diffraction at low temperature, by the development of simplified, though accurate, electron-density models refined from the experimental data and by the progress in charge density analysis often in combination with theoretical work. Many years after the first successful charge density determination and analysis, scientists face new challenges, for example: (i) determination of the finer details of the electron-density distribution in the atomic cores, (ii) simultaneous refinement of electron charge and spin density or (iii) measuring crystals under perturbation. In this context, the possibility of obtaining experimental charge density at high pressure has recently been demonstrated [Casati et al. (2016). Nat. Commun. 7, 10901]. This paper reports on the necessities and pitfalls of this new challenge, focusing on the species syn-1,6:8,13-biscarbonyl[14]annulene. The experimental requirements, the expected data quality and data corrections are discussed in detail, including warnings about possible shortcomings. At the same time, new modelling techniques are proposed, which could enable specific information to be extracted, from the limited and less accurate observations, like the degree of localization of double bonds, which is fundamental to the scientific case under examination.

  14. Leak detection in medium density polyethylene (MDPE) pipe using pressure transient method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, M. M.; Ghazali, M. F.; PiRemli, M. A.; Hamat, A. M. A.; Adnan, N. F.

    2015-12-01

    Water is an essential part of commodity for a daily life usage for an average person, from personal uses such as residential or commercial consumers to industries utilization. This study emphasizes on detection of leaking in medium density polyethylene (MDPE) pipe using pressure transient method. This type of pipe is used to analyze the position of the leakage in the pipeline by using Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition Method (EEMD) with signal masking. Water hammer would induce an impulse throughout the pipeline that caused the system turns into a surge of water wave. Thus, solenoid valve is used to create a water hammer through the pipelines. The data from the pressure sensor is collected using DASYLab software. The data analysis of the pressure signal will be decomposed into a series of wave composition using EEMD signal masking method in matrix laboratory (MATLAB) software. The series of decomposition of signals is then carefully selected which reflected intrinsic mode function (IMF). These IMFs will be displayed by using a mathematical algorithm, known as Hilbert transform (HT) spectrum. The IMF signal was analysed to capture the differences. The analyzed data is compared with the actual measurement of the leakage in term of percentage error. The error recorded is below than 1% and it is proved that this method highly reliable and accurate for leak detection.

  15. Pressure effects on spin density wave in Cr rich Cr-Al, Si, Mn, Fe and Co alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuki, Jun-ichiro; Endoh, Yasuo; Ishikawa, Yoshikazu

    1982-01-01

    The effect of pressure on the spin density wave (SDW) state in Cr rich Cr-Al, Si, Nn, Fe and Co alloys has been elucidated by neutron diffraction studies. We found that the change of the SDW wave vector Q, by applying pressure, 1/Q. delta Q/ delta P, is linearly related to the decrease of T sub(N) with increasing pressure 1/T sub(N). delta T sub(N)/ delta P and that all the results from the Cr-Si, Fe and Co alloys fall on a single straight line independent of their concentrations. Their magnetic phase diagrams in a temperature-pressure coordinate system can be related to the alloy phase diagram by employing an empirical rule that applying pressure corresponds to a decrese in the electron to atom ratio. The non transition metal Si impurity has been found to act as an electron donor, while the effect of Al is not interpreted by the two band nesting model. (author)

  16. High Discharge Energy Density at Low Electric Field Using an Aligned Titanium Dioxide/Lead Zirconate Titanate Nanowire Array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dou; Liu, Weiwei; Guo, Ru; Zhou, Kechao; Luo, Hang

    2018-02-01

    Polymer-based capacitors with high energy density have attracted significant attention in recent years due to their wide range of potential applications in electronic devices. However, the obtained high energy density is predominantly dependent on high applied electric field, e.g., 400-600 kV mm -1 , which may bring more challenges relating to the failure probability. Here, a simple two-step method for synthesizing titanium dioxide/lead zirconate titanate nanowire arrays is exploited and a demonstration of their ability to achieve high discharge energy density capacitors for low operating voltage applications is provided. A high discharge energy density of 6.9 J cm -3 is achieved at low electric fields, i.e., 143 kV mm -1 , which is attributed to the high relative permittivity of 218.9 at 1 kHz and high polarization of 23.35 µC cm -2 at this electric field. The discharge energy density obtained in this work is the highest known for a ceramic/polymer nanocomposite at such a low electric field. The novel nanowire arrays used in this work are applicable to a wide range of fields, such as energy harvesting, energy storage, and photocatalysis.

  17. Nanostructured Electrode Materials Derived from Metal-Organic Framework Xerogels for High-Energy-Density Asymmetric Supercapacitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, Asif; Zou, Ruqiang; Wang, Qingfei; Xia, Wei; Tabassum, Hassina; Qiu, Bin; Zhao, Ruo

    2016-01-27

    This work successfully demonstrates metal-organic framework (MOF) derived strategy to prepare nanoporous carbon (NPC) with or without Fe3O4/Fe nanoparticles by the optimization of calcination temperature as highly active electrode materials for asymmetric supercapacitors (ASC). The nanostructured Fe3O4/Fe/C hybrid shows high specific capacitance of 600 F/g at a current density of 1 A/g and excellent capacitance retention up to 500 F/g at 8 A/g. Furthermore, hierarchically NPC with high surface area also obtained from MOF gels displays excellent electrochemical performance of 272 F/g at 2 mV/s. Considering practical applications, aqueous ASC (aASC) was also assembled, which shows high energy density of 17.496 Wh/kg at the power density of 388.8 W/kg. The high energy density and excellent capacity retention of the developed materials show great promise for the practical utilization of these energy storage devices.

  18. Influence of natural organic matter fouling and osmotic backwash on pressure retarded osmosis energy production from natural salinity gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Ngai Yin; Elimelech, Menachem

    2013-01-01

    Pressure retarded osmosis (PRO) has the potential to produce clean, renewable energy from natural salinity gradients. However, membrane fouling can lead to diminished water flux productivity, thus reducing the extractable energy. This study investigates organic fouling and osmotic backwash cleaning in PRO and the resulting impact on projected power generation. Fabricated thin-film composite membranes were fouled with model river water containing natural organic matter. The water permeation carried foulants from the feed river water into the membrane porous support layer and caused severe water flux decline of ∼46%. Analysis of the water flux behavior revealed three phases in membrane support layer fouling. Initial foulants of the first fouling phase quickly adsorbed at the active-support layer interface and caused a significantly greater increase in hydraulic resistance than the subsequent second and third phase foulants. The water permeability of the fouled membranes was lowered by ∼39%, causing ∼26% decrease in projected power density. A brief, chemical-free osmotic backwash was demonstrated to be effective in removing foulants from the porous support layer, achieving ∼44% recovery in projected power density. The substantial performance recovery after cleaning was attributed to the partial restoration of the membrane water permeability. This study shows that membrane fouling detrimentally impacts energy production, and highlights the potential strategies to mitigate fouling in PRO power generation with natural salinity gradients.

  19. Effect of pressurization on helical guided wave energy velocity in fluid-filled pipes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubuc, Brennan; Ebrahimkhanlou, Arvin; Salamone, Salvatore

    2017-03-01

    The effect of pressurization stresses on helical guided waves in a thin-walled fluid-filled pipe is studied by modeling leaky Lamb waves in a stressed plate bordered by fluid. Fluid pressurization produces hoop and longitudinal stresses in a thin-walled pipe, which corresponds to biaxial in-plane stress in a plate waveguide model. The effect of stress on guided wave propagation is accounted for through nonlinear elasticity and finite deformation theory. Emphasis is placed on the stress dependence of the energy velocity of the guided wave modes. For this purpose, an expression for the energy velocity of leaky Lamb waves in a stressed plate is derived. Theoretical results are presented for the mode, frequency, and directional dependent variations in energy velocity with respect to stress. An experimental setup is designed for measuring variations in helical wave energy velocity in a thin-walled water-filled steel pipe at different levels of pressure. Good agreement is achieved between the experimental variations in energy velocity for the helical guided waves and the theoretical leaky Lamb wave solutions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The calculations of small molecular conformation energy differences by density functional method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topol, I. A.; Burt, S. K.

    1993-03-01

    The differences in the conformational energies for the gauche (G) and trans(T) conformers of 1,2-difluoroethane and for myo-and scyllo-conformer of inositol have been calculated by local density functional method (LDF approximation) with geometry optimization using different sets of calculation parameters. It is shown that in the contrast to Hartree—Fock methods, density functional calculations reproduce the correct sign and value of the gauche effect for 1,2-difluoroethane and energy difference for both conformers of inositol. The results of normal vibrational analysis for1,2-difluoroethane showed that harmonic frequencies calculated in LDF approximation agree with experimental data with the accuracy typical for scaled large basis set Hartree—Fock calculations.

  1. Path-integral computation of superfluid densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollock, E.L.; Ceperley, D.M.

    1987-01-01

    The normal and superfluid densities are defined by the response of a liquid to sample boundary motion. The free-energy change due to uniform boundary motion can be calculated by path-integral methods from the distribution of the winding number of the paths around a periodic cell. This provides a conceptually and computationally simple way of calculating the superfluid density for any Bose system. The linear-response formulation relates the superfluid density to the momentum-density correlation function, which has a short-ranged part related to the normal density and, in the case of a superfluid, a long-ranged part whose strength is proportional to the superfluid density. These facts are discussed in the context of path-integral computations and demonstrated for liquid 4 He along the saturated vapor-pressure curve. Below the experimental superfluid transition temperature the computed superfluid fractions agree with the experimental values to within the statistical uncertainties of a few percent in the computations. The computed transition is broadened by finite-sample-size effects

  2. Saturated phase densities of (CO_2 + H_2O) at temperatures from (293 to 450) K and pressures up to 64 MPa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efika, Emmanuel C.; Hoballah, Rayane; Li, Xuesong; May, Eric F.; Nania, Manuela; Sanchez-Vicente, Yolanda; Martin Trusler, J.P.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Saturated phase densities of CO_2 + H_2O were measured with a 1.5 kg · m"−"3 uncertainty. • Aqueous phase densities can be predicted within 3 kg · m"−"3 using empirical models. • The CO_2-rich phase density was within 8 kg · m"−"3 of pure CO_2 at the same (p, T). • The cubic EOS of Spycher and Pruess deviates from the data by up to about 8 kg · m"−"3. - Abstract: An apparatus consisting of an equilibrium cell connected to two vibrating tube densimeters and two syringe pumps was used to measure the saturated phase densities of (CO_2 + H_2O) at temperatures from (293 to 450) K and pressures up to 64 MPa, with estimated average standard uncertainties of 1.5 kg · m"−"3 for the CO_2-rich phase and 1.0 kg · m"−"3 for the aqueous phase. The densimeters were housed in the same thermostat as the equilibrium cell and were calibrated in situ using pure water, CO_2 and helium. Following mixing, samples of each saturated phase were displaced sequentially at constant pressure from the equilibrium cell into the vibrating tube densimeters connected to the top (CO_2-rich phase) and bottom (aqueous phase) of the cell. The aqueous phase densities are predicted to within 3 kg · m"−"3 using empirical models for the phase compositions and partial molar volumes of each component. However, a recently developed multi-parameter equation of state (EOS) for this binary mixture, Gernert and Span [32], was found to under predict the measured aqueous phase density by up to 13 kg · m"−"3. The density of the CO_2-rich phase was always within about 8 kg · m"−"3 of the density for pure CO_2 at the same pressure and temperature; the differences were most positive near the critical density, and became negative at temperatures above about 373 K and pressures below about 10 MPa. For this phase, the multi-parameter EOS of Gernert and Span describes the measured densities to within 5 kg · m"−"3, whereas the computationally-efficient cubic EOS model of

  3. Energy–pressure relation for low-dimensional gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Mancarella

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A particularly simple relation of proportionality between internal energy and pressure holds for scale-invariant thermodynamic systems (with Hamiltonians homogeneous functions of the coordinates, including classical and quantum – Bose and Fermi – ideal gases. One can quantify the deviation from such a relation by introducing the internal energy shift as the difference between the internal energy of the system and the corresponding value for scale-invariant (including ideal gases. After discussing some general thermodynamic properties associated with the scale-invariance, we provide criteria for which the internal energy shift density of an imperfect (classical or quantum gas is a bounded function of temperature. We then study the internal energy shift and deviations from the energy–pressure proportionality in low-dimensional models of gases interpolating between the ideal Bose and the ideal Fermi gases, focusing on the Lieb–Liniger model in 1d and on the anyonic gas in 2d. In 1d the internal energy shift is determined from the thermodynamic Bethe ansatz integral equations and an explicit relation for it is given at high temperature. Our results show that the internal energy shift is positive, it vanishes in the two limits of zero and infinite coupling (respectively the ideal Bose and the Tonks–Girardeau gas and it has a maximum at a finite, temperature-depending, value of the coupling. Remarkably, at fixed coupling the energy shift density saturates to a finite value for infinite temperature. In 2d we consider systems of Abelian anyons and non-Abelian Chern–Simons particles: as it can be seen also directly from a study of the virial coefficients, in the usually considered hard-core limit the internal energy shift vanishes and the energy is just proportional to the pressure, with the proportionality constant being simply the area of the system. Soft-core boundary conditions at coincident points for the two-body wavefunction introduce

  4. Energy–pressure relation for low-dimensional gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mancarella, Francesco; Mussardo, Giuseppe; Trombettoni, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    A particularly simple relation of proportionality between internal energy and pressure holds for scale-invariant thermodynamic systems (with Hamiltonians homogeneous functions of the coordinates), including classical and quantum – Bose and Fermi – ideal gases. One can quantify the deviation from such a relation by introducing the internal energy shift as the difference between the internal energy of the system and the corresponding value for scale-invariant (including ideal) gases. After discussing some general thermodynamic properties associated with the scale-invariance, we provide criteria for which the internal energy shift density of an imperfect (classical or quantum) gas is a bounded function of temperature. We then study the internal energy shift and deviations from the energy–pressure proportionality in low-dimensional models of gases interpolating between the ideal Bose and the ideal Fermi gases, focusing on the Lieb–Liniger model in 1d and on the anyonic gas in 2d. In 1d the internal energy shift is determined from the thermodynamic Bethe ansatz integral equations and an explicit relation for it is given at high temperature. Our results show that the internal energy shift is positive, it vanishes in the two limits of zero and infinite coupling (respectively the ideal Bose and the Tonks–Girardeau gas) and it has a maximum at a finite, temperature-depending, value of the coupling. Remarkably, at fixed coupling the energy shift density saturates to a finite value for infinite temperature. In 2d we consider systems of Abelian anyons and non-Abelian Chern–Simons particles: as it can be seen also directly from a study of the virial coefficients, in the usually considered hard-core limit the internal energy shift vanishes and the energy is just proportional to the pressure, with the proportionality constant being simply the area of the system. Soft-core boundary conditions at coincident points for the two-body wavefunction introduce a length scale

  5. High Density Hydrogen Storage in Metal Hydride Composites with Air Cooling

    OpenAIRE

    Dieterich, Mila; Bürger, Inga; Linder, Marc

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION In order to combine fluctuating renewable energy sources with the actual demand of electrical energy, storages are essential. The surplus energy can be stored as hydrogen to be used either for mobile use, chemical synthesis or reconversion when needed. One possibility to store the hydrogen gas at high volumetric densities, moderate temperatures and low pressures is based on a chemical reaction with metal hydrides. Such storages must be able to absorb and desorb the hydrogen qu...

  6. Blood pressure of urban school children in relation to road-traffic noise, traffic density and presence of public transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paunovic, Katarina; Belojevic, Goran; Jakovljevic, Branko

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the relationship between noise levels, traffic density and the presence of public transport and children's blood pressure. Another aim was to assess the applicability of public transport as a proxy indicator of noise exposure. A cross-sectional study involved 1113 children aged 7-11 years from a central municipality in Belgrade. Equivalent noise levels were measured in front of all schools and in the middle of all streets. Traffic density was defined as number of light and heavy vehicles per hour. The number of public transport vehicles was calculated from official timetables. Children's addresses were matched with noise levels and transport maps. A physician measured blood pressure with the sphygmomanometer. Children attending schools with public transport running nearby had by 1.3 mmHg higher systolic pressure than did children from schools without public transport. This relationship was independent from children's age, gender, and body mass index, family history of hypertension, some dwelling characteristics, and lifestyle habits. The association between diastolic pressure and public transport was statistically insignificant. The study indicated a possible positive association between the presence of public transport in the vicinity of schools with systolic blood pressure in 7-11 year-old schoolchildren. The presence of public transport may serve as an auxiliary indicator of noise exposure in undeveloped countries with limited capacities for noise measurement or modeling.

  7. A study of fast electron energy transport in relativistically intense laser-plasma interactions with large density scalelengths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, R. H. H.; Norreys, P. A. [Department of Physics, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, Didcot, Oxford OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Perez, F.; Baton, S. D. [LULI, Ecole Polytechnique, UMR 7605, CNRS/CEA/UPMC, Route de Saclay, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Santos, J. J.; Nicolai, Ph.; Hulin, S. [Univ. Bordeaux/CNRS/CEA, CELIA, UMR 5107, 33405 Talence (France); Ridgers, C. P. [Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Davies, J. R. [GoLP, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusao Nuclear - Laboratorio Associado, Instituto Superior Tecnico, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Lancaster, K. L.; Trines, R. M. G. M. [Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, Didcot, Oxford OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Bell, A. R.; Tzoufras, M. [Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, Didcot, Oxford OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Rose, S. J. [Department of Physics, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2012-05-15

    A systematic experimental and computational investigation of the effects of three well characterized density scalelengths on fast electron energy transport in ultra-intense laser-solid interactions has been performed. Experimental evidence is presented which shows that, when the density scalelength is sufficiently large, the fast electron beam entering the solid-density plasma is best described by two distinct populations: those accelerated within the coronal plasma (the fast electron pre-beam) and those accelerated near or at the critical density surface (the fast electron main-beam). The former has considerably lower divergence and higher temperature than that of the main-beam with a half-angle of {approx}20 Degree-Sign . It contains up to 30% of the total fast electron energy absorbed into the target. The number, kinetic energy, and total energy of the fast electrons in the pre-beam are increased by an increase in density scalelength. With larger density scalelengths, the fast electrons heat a smaller cross sectional area of the target, causing the thinnest targets to reach significantly higher rear surface temperatures. Modelling indicates that the enhanced fast electron pre-beam associated with the large density scalelength interaction generates a magnetic field within the target of sufficient magnitude to partially collimate the subsequent, more divergent, fast electron main-beam.

  8. Laser-based air data system for aircraft control using Raman and elastic backscatter for the measurement of temperature, density, pressure, moisture, and particle backscatter coefficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraczek, Michael; Behrendt, Andreas; Schmitt, Nikolaus

    2012-01-10

    Flight safety in all weather conditions demands exact and reliable determination of flight-critical air parameters. Air speed, temperature, density, and pressure are essential for aircraft control. Conventional air data systems can be impacted by probe failure caused by mechanical damage from hail, volcanic ash, and icing. While optical air speed measurement methods have been discussed elsewhere, in this paper, a new concept for optically measuring the air temperature, density, pressure, moisture, and particle backscatter is presented, being independent on assumptions on the atmospheric state and eliminating the drawbacks of conventional aircraft probes by providing a different measurement principle. The concept is based on a laser emitting laser pulses into the atmosphere through a window and detecting the signals backscattered from a fixed region just outside the disturbed area of the fuselage flows. With four receiver channels, different spectral portions of the backscattered light are extracted. The measurement principle of air temperature and density is based on extracting two signals out of the rotational Raman (RR) backscatter signal of air molecules. For measuring the water vapor mixing ratio-and thus the density of the moist air-a water vapor Raman channel is included. The fourth channel serves to detect the elastic backscatter signal, which is essential for extending the measurements into clouds. This channel contributes to the detection of aerosols, which is interesting for developing a future volcanic ash warning system for aircraft. Detailed and realistic optimization and performance calculations have been performed based on the parameters of a first prototype of such a measurement system. The impact and correction of systematic error sources, such as solar background at daytime and elastic signal cross talk appearing in optically dense clouds, have been investigated. The results of the simulations show the high potential of the proposed system for

  9. Free energy of the Lennard-Jones solid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoef, van der M.A.

    2000-01-01

    We have determined a simple expression for the absolute Helmholtz free energy of the fcc Lennard-Jones solid from molecular dynamics simulations. The pressure and energy data from these simulations have been fitted to a simple functional form (18 parameters) for densities ranging from around

  10. Diet density during the first week of life: Effects on energy and nitrogen balance characteristics of broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamot, D M; Sapkota, D; Wijtten, P J A; van den Anker, I; Heetkamp, M J W; Kemp, B; van den Brand, H

    2017-07-01

    This study aimed to determine effects of diet density on growth performance, energy balance, and nitrogen (N) balance characteristics of broiler chickens during the first wk of life. Effects of diet density were studied using a dose-response design consisting of 5 dietary fat levels (3.5, 7.0, 10.5, 14.0, and 17.5%). The relative difference in dietary energy level was used to increase amino acid levels, mineral levels, and the premix inclusion level at the same ratio. Chickens were housed in open-circuit climate respiration chambers from d 0 to 7 after hatch. Body weight was measured on d 0 and 7, whereas feed intake was determined daily. For calculation of energy balances, O2 and CO2 exchange were measured continuously and all excreta from d 0 to 7 was collected and analyzed at d 7. Average daily gain (ADG) and average daily feed intake (ADFI) decreased linearly (P = 0.047 and P density. Gross energy (GE) intake and metabolizable energy (ME) intake were not affected by diet density, but the ratio between ME and GE intake decreased linearly with increasing diet density (P = 0.006). Fat, N, and GE efficiencies (expressed as gain per unit of nutrient intake), heat production, and respiratory exchange ratio (CO2 to O2 ratio) decreased linearly (P density increased. Energy retention, N intake, and N retention were not affected by diet density. We conclude that a higher diet density in the first wk of life of broiler chickens did not affect protein and fat retention, whereas the ME to GE ratio decreased linearly with increased diet density. This suggests that diet density appears to affect digestibility rather than utilization of nutrients. © 2017 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  11. Metamaterial Model of Tachyonic Dark Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor I. Smolyaninov

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Dark energy with negative pressure and positive energy density is believed to be responsible for the accelerated expansion of the universe. Quite a few theoretical models of dark energy are based on tachyonic fields interacting with itself and normal (bradyonic matter. Here, we propose an experimental model of tachyonic dark energy based on hyperbolic metamaterials. Wave equation describing propagation of extraordinary light inside hyperbolic metamaterials exhibits 2 + 1 dimensional Lorentz symmetry. The role of time in the corresponding effective 3D Minkowski spacetime is played by the spatial coordinate aligned with the optical axis of the metamaterial. Nonlinear optical Kerr effect bends this spacetime resulting in effective gravitational force between extraordinary photons. We demonstrate that this model has a self-interacting tachyonic sector having negative effective pressure and positive effective energy density. Moreover, a composite multilayer SiC-Si hyperbolic metamaterial exhibits closely separated tachyonic and bradyonic sectors in the long wavelength infrared range. This system may be used as a laboratory model of inflation and late time acceleration of the universe.

  12. Interpretation of monoclinic hafnia valence electron energy-loss spectra by time-dependent density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, L.; Guedj, C.; Bernier, N.; Blaise, P.; Olevano, V.; Sottile, F.

    2016-04-01

    We present the valence electron energy-loss spectrum and the dielectric function of monoclinic hafnia (m -HfO2) obtained from time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) predictions and compared to energy-filtered spectroscopic imaging measurements in a high-resolution transmission-electron microscope. Fermi's golden rule density-functional theory (DFT) calculations can capture the qualitative features of the energy-loss spectrum, but we find that TDDFT, which accounts for local-field effects, provides nearly quantitative agreement with experiment. Using the DFT density of states and TDDFT dielectric functions, we characterize the excitations that result in the m -HfO2 energy-loss spectrum. The sole plasmon occurs between 13 and 16 eV, although the peaks ˜28 and above 40 eV are also due to collective excitations. We furthermore elaborate on the first-principles techniques used, their accuracy, and remaining discrepancies among spectra. More specifically, we assess the influence of Hf semicore electrons (5 p and 4 f ) on the energy-loss spectrum, and find that the inclusion of transitions from the 4 f band damps the energy-loss intensity in the region above 13 eV. We study the impact of many-body effects in a DFT framework using the adiabatic local-density approximation (ALDA) exchange-correlation kernel, as well as from a many-body perspective using "scissors operators" matched to an ab initio G W calculation to account for self-energy corrections. These results demonstrate some cancellation of errors between self-energy and excitonic effects, even for excitations from the Hf 4 f shell. We also simulate the dispersion with increasing momentum transfer for plasmon and collective excitation peaks.

  13. Energy recovery by pressure retarded osmosis (PRO) in SWRO–PRO integrated processes

    KAUST Repository

    Wan, Chun Feng; Chung, Neal Tai-Shung

    2015-01-01

    Pressure retarded osmosis (PRO) is a promising technology to reduce the specific energy consumption of a seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) plant. In this study, it is projected that 25.6-40.7millionkWh/day of energy can be recovered globally

  14. The international pressures on the energy market in Iberian America and Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavos Coimbra, G.

    2006-01-01

    This paper analyses Brazilian nuclear energy history, and addresses recent events, such as the international political pressures, the International Atomic Energy Agency/IAEA position, the new facts about nuclear energy in the world, the international energy market and the Iberian-America, the news about the Brazilian nuclear energy area, the best opportunities of good business in the Brazilian nuclear sector, the Brazilian Government and the Brazilian public position, in relation to International Law. (author)

  15. Evolution effects of the copper surface morphology on the nucleation density and growth of graphene domains at different growth pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hedayat, Seyed Mahdi [Transport Phenomena & Nanotechnology Lab., School of Chemical Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Karimi-Sabet, Javad, E-mail: j_karimi@alum.sharif.edu [NFCRS, Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shariaty-Niassar, Mojtaba, E-mail: mshariat@ut.ac.ir [Transport Phenomena & Nanotechnology Lab., School of Chemical Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-03-31

    Highlights: • Manipulation of the Cu surface morphology in a wide range by electropolishing treatment. • Comparison of the nucleation density of graphene at low pressure and atmospheric pressure CVD processes. • Controlling the evolution of the Cu surface morphology inside a novel confined space. • Growth of large-size graphene domains. - Abstract: In this work, we study the influence of the surface morphology of the catalytic copper substrate on the nucleation density and the growth rate of graphene domains at low and atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD and APCVD) processes. In order to obtain a wide range of initial surface morphology, precisely controlled electropolishing methods were developed to manipulate the roughntreess value of the as-received Cu substrate (RMS = 30 nm) to ultra-rough (RMS = 130 nm) and ultra-smooth (RMS = 2 nm) surfaces. The nucleation and growth of graphene domains show obviously different trends at LPCVD and APCVD conditions. In contrast to APCVD condition, the nucleation density of graphene domains is almost equal in substrates with different initial roughness values at LPCVD condition. We show that this is due to the evolution of the surface morphology of the Cu substrate during the graphene growth steps. By stopping the surface sublimation of copper substrate in a confined space saturated with Cu atoms, the evolution of the Cu surface was impeded. This results in the reduction of the nucleation density of graphene domains up to 24 times in the pre-smoothed Cu substrates at LPCVD condition.

  16. Evolution effects of the copper surface morphology on the nucleation density and growth of graphene domains at different growth pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedayat, Seyed Mahdi; Karimi-Sabet, Javad; Shariaty-Niassar, Mojtaba

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Manipulation of the Cu surface morphology in a wide range by electropolishing treatment. • Comparison of the nucleation density of graphene at low pressure and atmospheric pressure CVD processes. • Controlling the evolution of the Cu surface morphology inside a novel confined space. • Growth of large-size graphene domains. - Abstract: In this work, we study the influence of the surface morphology of the catalytic copper substrate on the nucleation density and the growth rate of graphene domains at low and atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD and APCVD) processes. In order to obtain a wide range of initial surface morphology, precisely controlled electropolishing methods were developed to manipulate the roughntreess value of the as-received Cu substrate (RMS = 30 nm) to ultra-rough (RMS = 130 nm) and ultra-smooth (RMS = 2 nm) surfaces. The nucleation and growth of graphene domains show obviously different trends at LPCVD and APCVD conditions. In contrast to APCVD condition, the nucleation density of graphene domains is almost equal in substrates with different initial roughness values at LPCVD condition. We show that this is due to the evolution of the surface morphology of the Cu substrate during the graphene growth steps. By stopping the surface sublimation of copper substrate in a confined space saturated with Cu atoms, the evolution of the Cu surface was impeded. This results in the reduction of the nucleation density of graphene domains up to 24 times in the pre-smoothed Cu substrates at LPCVD condition.

  17. Energy sprawl, land taking and distributed generation: towards a multi-layered density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moroni, Stefano; Antoniucci, Valentina; Bisello, Adriano

    2016-01-01

    The transition from fossil fuels to renewable resources is highly desirable to reduce air pollution, and improve energy efficiency and security. Many observers are concerned, however, that the diffusion of systems based on renewable resources may give rise to energy sprawl, i.e. an increasing occupation of available land to build new energy facilities of this kind. These critics foresee a transition from the traditional fossil-fuel systems, towards a renewable resource system likewise based on large power stations and extensive energy grids. A different approach can be taken to reduce the risk of energy sprawl, and this will happen if the focus is as much on renewable sources as on the introduction of distributed renewable energy systems based on micro plants (photovoltaic panels on the roofs of buildings, micro wind turbines, etc.) and on multiple micro-grids. Policy makers could foster local energy enterprises by: introducing new enabling rules; making more room for contractual communities; simplifying the compliance process; proposing monetary incentives and tax cuts. We conclude that the diffusion of innovation in this field will lead not to an energy sprawl but to a new energy system characterized by a multi-layered density: a combination of technology, organization, and physical development. - Highlights: • Energy sprawl is not a necessary consequence of the transition to renewable sources. • A polycentric, distributed renewable energy system reduces land consumption. • This polycentric model is founded on building-related renewable energy production and micro-grids. • Enabling rules, simplified compliance, and tax cuts can foster this result. • The concept of multi-layered density is proposed as a new framework for interpreting this scenario.

  18. Particle accelerator physics and technolog