WorldWideScience

Sample records for energy density formalism

  1. Self-consistent versus experimental densities in the ion-ion potential derived using the energy density formalism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guirao, A.; Vinas, X. (Dept. de Estructura y Constituyentes de la Materia, Univ. Barcelona (Spain)); Diaz, J. (Dept. de Fisica Atomica Molecular y Nuclear, Burjassot (Spain) IFIC, Burjassot (Spain))

    1992-06-01

    We have used the energy density formalism together with Skyrme forces to build up the real part of the ion-ion potential. We have analysed the elastic scattering data for the {sup 40}Ca+{sup 40}Ca reaction at several bombarding energies including a phenomenological imaginary part. The results obtained using as input the nuclear density derived from electron scattering are compared with those from theoretical semiclassical calculations of different degree of complexity. Finally, we study the role of some properties of the nuclear interactions on some magnitudes that can be compared with the experimental ones. (orig.).

  2. Systematic analysis of hot Yb{sup *} isotopes using the energy density formalism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Deepika; Sharma, Manoj K.; Rajni [Thapar University, School of Physics and Materials Science, Patiala (India); Kumar, Raj [University of Padova, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Padova (Italy); Gupta, Raj K. [Panjab University, Department of Physics, Chandigarh (India)

    2014-10-15

    A systematic study of the spin-orbit density interaction potential is carried out, with spherical as well as deformed choices of nuclei, for a variety of near-symmetric and asymmetric colliding nuclei leading to various isotopes of the compound nucleus Yb{sup *}, using the semiclassical extended Thomas-Fermi formulation (ETF) of the Skyrme energy density formalism (SEDF). We observe that the spin-orbit density interaction barrier height (V{sub JB}) and barrier position (R{sub JB}) increase systematically with the increase in number of neutrons in both the projectile and target, for spherical systems. On allowing deformation effects with optimum orientations, the barrier-height increases by a large order of magnitude, as compared to the spherical case, in going from {sup 156}Yb{sup *} to {sup 172}Yb{sup *} nuclear systems formed via near-symmetric Ni+Mo or asymmetric O+Sm colliding nuclei, except that for the oblate-shaped nuclei, the V{sub JB} is the highest and R{sub JB} shifts towards a smaller (compact) interaction radius. The temperature does not change the behavior of spin-orbit density dependent (V{sub J}) and independent (V{sub P}) interaction potentials, except for some minor changes in the magnitude. The orientation degree of freedom also plays an important role in modifying the barrier characteristics and hence produces a large effect on the fusion cross section. The fusion excitation function of the compound nuclei {sup 160,} {sup 164}Yb{sup *} formed in different incoming channels, show clearly that the new forces GSkI and KDE0v1 respond better than the old SIII force. Among the first two, KDE0v1 seems to perform better. The fusion cross-sections are also predicted for a few other isotopes of Yb{sup *}. (orig.)

  3. Dynamics of the pionium with the density matrix formalism

    CERN Document Server

    Afanasyev, L; Tarasov, A; Voskresenskaya, O O; 10.1088/0953-4075/37/24/003

    2004-01-01

    The evolution of pionium, the pi /sup +/ pi /sup -/ hydrogen-like atom, passing through matter is described by the density matrix formalism in the first Born approximation. We compare the probability-based calculations with the more precise density matrix formalism which takes into account the interference effects, and consider their influence on the pionium break-up probability. We apply our general result to the specific conditions of the DIRAC experiment at CERN.

  4. High Energy Density Capacitors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA?s future space science missions cannot be realized without the state of the art energy storage devices which require high energy density, high reliability, and...

  5. Excited states properties of organic molecules: from density functional theory to the GW and Bethe-Salpeter Green's function formalisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faber, C; Boulanger, P; Attaccalite, C; Duchemin, I; Blase, X

    2014-03-13

    Many-body Green's function perturbation theories, such as the GW and Bethe-Salpeter formalisms, are starting to be routinely applied to study charged and neutral electronic excitations in molecular organic systems relevant to applications in photovoltaics, photochemistry or biology. In parallel, density functional theory and its time-dependent extensions significantly progressed along the line of range-separated hybrid functionals within the generalized Kohn-Sham formalism designed to provide correct excitation energies. We give an overview and compare these approaches with examples drawn from the study of gas phase organic systems such as fullerenes, porphyrins, bacteriochlorophylls or nucleobases molecules. The perspectives and challenges that many-body perturbation theory is facing, such as the role of self-consistency, the calculation of forces and potential energy surfaces in the excited states, or the development of embedding techniques specific to the GW and Bethe-Salpeter equation formalisms, are outlined.

  6. High Energy Density Electrolytic Capacitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, David A.

    1996-01-01

    A new type of electrolytic capacitor which combines an electrolytic capacitor anode with an electrochemical capacitor cathode was developed. The resulting capacitor has a four time higher energy density than standard electrolytic capacitors, with comparable electric performance. The prototype, a 480 microFarad, 200 V device, has an energy density exceeding 4 J/cc. Now a 680 microFarad 50 V, MIL-style all tantalum device has been constructed and is undergoing qualification testing. Pending a favorable outcome, work will begin on other ratings. The potential for commercially significant development exists in applying this technology to aluminum-based electrolytic capacitors. It is possible to at least double the energy density of aluminum electrolytics, while using existing manufacturing methods, and without adding material expense. Data presented include electrical characteristics and performance measurements of the 200 V and 50 V hybrid capacitors and results from ongoing qualification testing of the MIL-style tantalum capacitors.

  7. High Energy Density Laboratory Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Lebedev, Sergey V

    2007-01-01

    During the past decade, research teams around the world have developed astrophysics-relevant research utilizing high energy-density facilities such as intense lasers and z-pinches. Every two years, at the International conference on High Energy Density Laboratory Astrophysics, scientists interested in this emerging field discuss the progress in topics covering: - Stellar evolution, stellar envelopes, opacities, radiation transport - Planetary Interiors, high-pressure EOS, dense plasma atomic physics - Supernovae, gamma-ray bursts, exploding systems, strong shocks, turbulent mixing - Supernova remnants, shock processing, radiative shocks - Astrophysical jets, high-Mach-number flows, magnetized radiative jets, magnetic reconnection - Compact object accretion disks, x-ray photoionized plasmas - Ultrastrong fields, particle acceleration, collisionless shocks. These proceedings cover many of the invited and contributed papers presented at the 6th International Conference on High Energy Density Laboratory Astrophys...

  8. Formal validation of supervisory energy management systems for microgrids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sugumar, Gayathri; Selvamuthukumaran, R.; Dragicevic, T.

    2017-01-01

    An energy management system of a microgrid (MG) has several basic objectives; e.g. to maximize the utilization of renewable energy resources (RES), to protect the internal components from overloading, and to ensure that the MG operates reliably under any operating conditions. Although many contro...... flow technique to manage the energy flow in an MG. The results are validated and verified with UPPAAL, a powerful industrial tool which is commonly used to verify the correctness of real-time systems like supervisory controllers, communication protocols and others.......An energy management system of a microgrid (MG) has several basic objectives; e.g. to maximize the utilization of renewable energy resources (RES), to protect the internal components from overloading, and to ensure that the MG operates reliably under any operating conditions. Although many control...... techniques are available in the literature to monitor and control the energy flows among distributed RES in MGs, formal verification of those techniques was not proposed yet. The emphasis of this paper is to design and validate energy management system for a MG which consists of a solar photovoltaic (PV...

  9. High energy density aluminum battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Gilbert M.; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Dai, Sheng; Dudney, Nancy J.; Manthiram, Arumugan; McIntyre, Timothy J.; Sun, Xiao-Guang; Liu, Hansan

    2016-10-11

    Compositions and methods of making are provided for a high energy density aluminum battery. The battery comprises an anode comprising aluminum metal. The battery further comprises a cathode comprising a material capable of intercalating aluminum or lithium ions during a discharge cycle and deintercalating the aluminum or lithium ions during a charge cycle. The battery further comprises an electrolyte capable of supporting reversible deposition and stripping of aluminum at the anode, and reversible intercalation and deintercalation of aluminum or lithium at the cathode.

  10. Beyond the local density approximation : improving density functional theory for high energy density physics applications.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattsson, Ann Elisabet; Modine, Normand Arthur; Desjarlais, Michael Paul; Muller, Richard Partain; Sears, Mark P.; Wright, Alan Francis

    2006-11-01

    A finite temperature version of 'exact-exchange' density functional theory (EXX) has been implemented in Sandia's Socorro code. The method uses the optimized effective potential (OEP) formalism and an efficient gradient-based iterative minimization of the energy. The derivation of the gradient is based on the density matrix, simplifying the extension to finite temperatures. A stand-alone all-electron exact-exchange capability has been developed for testing exact exchange and compatible correlation functionals on small systems. Calculations of eigenvalues for the helium atom, beryllium atom, and the hydrogen molecule are reported, showing excellent agreement with highly converged quantumMonte Carlo calculations. Several approaches to the generation of pseudopotentials for use in EXX calculations have been examined and are discussed. The difficult problem of finding a correlation functional compatible with EXX has been studied and some initial findings are reported.

  11. Ultimate Energy Densities for Electromagnetic Pulses

    OpenAIRE

    Tsang, Mankei

    2008-01-01

    The ultimate electric and magnetic energy densities that can be attained by bandlimited electromagnetic pulses in free space are calculated using an ab initio quantized treatment, and the quantum states of electromagnetic fields that achieve the ultimate energy densities are derived. The ultimate energy densities also provide an experimentally accessible metric for the degree of localization of polychromatic photons.

  12. Energy density of marine pelagic fish eggs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis-Vestergaard, J.

    2002-01-01

    Analysis of the literature on pelagic fish eggs enabled generalizations to be made of their energy densities, because the property of being buoyant in sea water appears to constrain the proximate composition of the eggs and thus to minimize interspecific variation. An energy density of 1.34 J mul...

  13. Development of the cyclic cluster model formalism for Kohn-Sham auxiliary density functional theory methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janetzko, Florian; Köster, Andreas M.; Salahub, Dennis R.

    2008-01-01

    The development of the cyclic cluster model (CCM) formalism for Kohn-Sham auxiliary density functional theory (KS-ADFT) methods is presented. The CCM is a direct space approach for the calculation of perfect and defective systems under periodic boundary conditions. Translational symmetry is introduced in the CCM by integral weighting. A consistent weighting scheme for all two-center and three-center interactions appearing in the KS-ADFT method is presented. For the first time, an approach for the numerical integration of the exchange-correlation potential within the cyclic cluster formalism is derived. The presented KS-ADFT CCM implementation was applied to covalent periodic systems. The results of cyclic and molecular cluster model (MCM) calculations for trans-polyacetylene, graphene, and diamond are discussed as examples for systems periodic in one, two, and three dimensions, respectively. All structures were optimized. It is shown that the CCM results represent the results of MCM calculations in the limit of infinite molecular clusters. By analyzing the electronic structure, we demonstrate that the symmetry of the corresponding periodic systems is retained in CCM calculations. The obtained geometric and electronic structures are compared with available data from the literature.

  14. Institute for High Energy Density Science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wootton, Alan [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    2017-01-13

    The project objective was for the Institute of High Energy Density Science (IHEDS) at the University of Texas at Austin to help grow the High Energy Density (HED) science community, by connecting academia with the Z Facility (Z) and associated staff at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). IHEDS was originally motivated by common interests and complementary capabilities at SNL and the University of Texas System (UTX), in 2008.

  15. Universal Nuclear Energy Density Functional

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, Joseph; Furnstahl, Richard; Horoi, Mihai; Lusk, Rusty; Nazarewicz, Witold; Ng, Esmond; Thompson, Ian; Vary, James

    2012-12-01

    An understanding of the properties of atomic nuclei is crucial for a complete nuclear theory, for element formation, for properties of stars, and for present and future energy and defense applications. During the period of Dec. 1 2006 – Jun. 30, 2012, the UNEDF collaboration carried out a comprehensive study of all nuclei, based on the most accurate knowledge of the strong nuclear interaction, the most reliable theoretical approaches, the most advanced algorithms, and extensive computational resources, with a view towards scaling to the petaflop platforms and beyond. Until recently such an undertaking was hard to imagine, and even at the present time such an ambitious endeavor would be far beyond what a single researcher or a traditional research group could carry out.

  16. Density-based energy decomposition analysis for intermolecular interactions with variationally determined intermediate state energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qin; Ayers, Paul W; Zhang, Yingkai

    2009-10-28

    The first purely density-based energy decomposition analysis (EDA) for intermolecular binding is developed within the density functional theory. The most important feature of this scheme is to variationally determine the frozen density energy, based on a constrained search formalism and implemented with the Wu-Yang algorithm [Q. Wu and W. Yang, J. Chem. Phys. 118, 2498 (2003)]. This variational process dispenses with the Heitler-London antisymmetrization of wave functions used in most previous methods and calculates the electrostatic and Pauli repulsion energies together without any distortion of the frozen density, an important fact that enables a clean separation of these two terms from the relaxation (i.e., polarization and charge transfer) terms. The new EDA also employs the constrained density functional theory approach [Q. Wu and T. Van Voorhis, Phys. Rev. A 72, 24502 (2005)] to separate out charge transfer effects. Because the charge transfer energy is based on the density flow in real space, it has a small basis set dependence. Applications of this decomposition to hydrogen bonding in the water dimer and the formamide dimer show that the frozen density energy dominates the binding in these systems, consistent with the noncovalent nature of the interactions. A more detailed examination reveals how the interplay of electrostatics and the Pauli repulsion determines the distance and angular dependence of these hydrogen bonds.

  17. Analytical evaluation of energy derivatives in extended systems. I. Formalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jun-Qiang; Bartlett, Rodney J.

    1998-09-01

    A method is developed to analytically evaluate energy derivatives for extended systems. Linear dependence among basis functions, which almost always occurs in extended systems and brings instability to the coupled-perturbed equations, is automatically eliminated in this method. The remaining independent basis functions are transformed into semiorthogonal orbitals. The derivatives of the orbitals and the overlap matrix over them are obtained via a set of coupled-perturbed equations, similar to those of the coupled-perturbed Hartree-Fock (CPHF) equations which are used to calculate the derivatives of the Hartree-Fock (HF) orbitals and the orbital energies. By introducing symmetrized coordinates, these coupled-perturbed equations can be easily solved. Explicit expressions for calculating gradients and Hessians of the HF energy for extended systems are given. With this method, we can calculate energy derivatives with respect to displacements of the nuclei, including those which break the translational symmetry. Therefore, the method not only provides an efficient and accurate approach to calculate energy derivatives of any order, but also enables us to determine the force constants for individual nuclei, the interatomic force constants, and phonon dispersion curves in the whole Brillouin zone. With this method, the computational cost to calculate phonon spectrum with k≠0 in the Brillouin zone is the same as that needed for the spectrum at k=0.

  18. Symmetry energy in nuclear density functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazarewicz, W. [University of Tennessee Knoxville, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Knoxville, Tennessee (United States); Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (United States); University of Warsaw, Faculty of Physics, Warsaw (Poland); Reinhard, P.G. [Universitaet Erlangen/Nuernberg, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Erlangen (Germany); Satula, W. [University of Warsaw, Faculty of Physics, Warsaw (Poland); Vretenar, D. [University of Zagreb, Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Zagreb (Croatia)

    2014-02-15

    The nuclear symmetry energy represents a response to the neutron-proton asymmetry. In this paper we discuss various aspects of symmetry energy in the framework of nuclear density functional theory, considering both non-relativistic and relativistic self-consistent mean-field realizations side by side. Key observables pertaining to bulk nucleonic matter and finite nuclei are reviewed. Constraints on the symmetry energy and correlations between observables and symmetry energy parameters, using statistical covariance analysis, are investigated. Perspectives for future work are outlined in the context of ongoing experimental efforts. (orig.)

  19. Strongly Interacting Matter at High Energy Density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLerran,L.

    2008-09-07

    This lecture concerns the properties of strongly interacting matter (which is described by Quantum Chromodynamics) at very high energy density. I review the properties of matter at high temperature, discussing the deconfinement phase transition. At high baryon density and low temperature, large N{sub c} arguments are developed which suggest that high baryonic density matter is a third form of matter, Quarkyonic Matter, that is distinct from confined hadronic matter and deconfined matter. I finally discuss the Color Glass Condensate which controls the high energy limit of QCD, and forms the low x part of a hadron wavefunction. The Glasma is introduced as matter formed by the Color Glass Condensate which eventually thermalizes into a Quark Gluon Plasma.

  20. Energy and centrality dependence of rapidity densities at RHIC energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X N; Gyulassy, M

    2001-04-16

    The energy and centrality dependence of the charged multiplicity per participant nucleon is shown to be able to differentiate between final state saturation and fixed scale perturbative QCD models of initial entropy production in high-energy heavy-ion collisions. The energy dependence is shown to test the nuclear enhancement of the minijet component of the initial conditions, while the centrality dependence provides a key test of whether gluon saturation is reached at RHIC energies. The HIJING model predicts that the rapidity density per participant increases with centrality, while the saturation model prediction is essentially independent of centrality.

  1. Studying conformally flat spacetimes with an elastic stress energy tensor using 1 + 3 formalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, I.; Ramos, M. P. Machado

    2015-12-01

    Conformally flat spacetimes with an elastic stress-energy tensor having diagonal trace-free anisotropic pressure are investigated using 1 + 3 formalism. The 1 + 3 Bianchi and Jacobi identities and Einstein field equations are written for a particular case with a conformal factor dependent on only one spatial coordinate. Solutions with non zero anisotropic pressure are obtained.

  2. Thermal Condensate Structure and Cosmological Energy Density of the Universe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Capolupo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to study thermal vacuum condensate for scalar and fermion fields. We analyze the thermal states at the temperature of the cosmic microwave background (CMB and we show that the vacuum expectation value of the energy momentum tensor density of photon fields reproduces the energy density and pressure of the CMB. We perform the computations in the formal framework of the Thermo Field Dynamics. We also consider the case of neutrinos and thermal states at the temperature of the neutrino cosmic background. Consistency with the estimated lower bound of the sum of the active neutrino masses is verified. In the boson sector, nontrivial contribution to the energy of the universe is given by particles of masses of the order of 10−4 eV compatible with the ones of the axion-like particles. The fractal self-similar structure of the thermal radiation is also discussed and related to the coherent structure of the thermal vacuum.

  3. Energy density, energy costs and income - how are they related?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterlander, Wilma E; de Haas, Wendy E; van Amstel, Inge; Schuit, Albertine J; Twisk, Jos W R; Visser, Marjolein; Seidell, Jacob C; Steenhuis, Ingrid H M

    2010-10-01

    To examine the association between energy density and energy costs in single food items and composed diets, and to explore differences in energy density and energy cost between income levels. A cross-sectional study using data from two Dutch cohort studies and recent national food prices. Food prices were retrieved from two market leader supermarkets. Data on dietary intake were measured using a computerized face-to-face interview (cohort 1) and 24 h recalls (cohort 2). The Netherlands. A sample of 373 young adults from the Amsterdam Growth and Health Longitudinal Study (AGHLS, measured in 2000) and a sample of 200 community-dwelling elderly from the Longitudinal Ageing Study Amsterdam (LASA, measured in 2007). We found significant inverse associations between energy density and energy costs in single food items (r = -0.436, P women r = -0.413, P women r = -0.562, P Future research, using precise food expenditures, is of main importance in studying the economics of obesity and in the aim of making the healthier choice easier.

  4. SURFACE SYMMETRY ENERGY OF NUCLEAR ENERGY DENSITY FUNCTIONALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolov, N; Schunck, N; Nazarewicz, W; Bender, M; Pei, J

    2010-12-20

    We study the bulk deformation properties of the Skyrme nuclear energy density functionals. Following simple arguments based on the leptodermous expansion and liquid drop model, we apply the nuclear density functional theory to assess the role of the surface symmetry energy in nuclei. To this end, we validate the commonly used functional parametrizations against the data on excitation energies of superdeformed band-heads in Hg and Pb isotopes, and fission isomers in actinide nuclei. After subtracting shell effects, the results of our self-consistent calculations are consistent with macroscopic arguments and indicate that experimental data on strongly deformed configurations in neutron-rich nuclei are essential for optimizing future nuclear energy density functionals. The resulting survey provides a useful benchmark for further theoretical improvements. Unlike in nuclei close to the stability valley, whose macroscopic deformability hangs on the balance of surface and Coulomb terms, the deformability of neutron-rich nuclei strongly depends on the surface-symmetry energy; hence, its proper determination is crucial for the stability of deformed phases of the neutron-rich matter and description of fission rates for r-process nucleosynthesis.

  5. High energy density redox flow device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiang, Yet-Ming; Carter, Craig W.; Ho, Bryan Y.; Duduta, Mihai; Limthongkul, Pimpa

    2017-10-10

    Redox flow devices are described in which at least one of the positive electrode or negative electrode-active materials is a semi-solid or is a condensed ion-storing electroactive material, and in which at least one of the electrode-active materials is transported to and from an assembly at which the electrochemical reaction occurs, producing electrical energy. The electronic conductivity of the semi-solid is increased by the addition of conductive particles to suspensions and/or via the surface modification of the solid in semi-solids (e.g., by coating the solid with a more electron conductive coating material to increase the power of the device). High energy density and high power redox flow devices are disclosed. The redox flow devices described herein can also include one or more inventive design features. In addition, inventive chemistries for use in redox flow devices are also described.

  6. Diffuse Waves and Energy Densities Near Boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Sesma, F. J.; Rodriguez-Castellanos, A.; Campillo, M.; Perton, M.; Luzon, F.; Perez-Ruiz, J. A.

    2007-12-01

    Green function can be retrieved from averaging cross correlations of motions within a diffuse field. In fact, it has been shown that for an elastic inhomogeneous, anisotropic medium under equipartitioned, isotropic illumination, the average cross correlations are proportional to the imaginary part of Green function. For instance coda waves are due to multiple scattering and their intensities follow diffusive regimes. Coda waves and the noise sample the medium and effectively carry information along their paths. In this work we explore the consequences of assuming both source and receiver at the same point. From the observable side, the autocorrelation is proportional to the energy density at a given point. On the other hand, the imaginary part of the Green function at the source itself is finite because the singularity of Green function is restricted to the real part. The energy density at a point is proportional with the trace of the imaginary part of Green function tensor at the source itself. The Green function availability may allow establishing the theoretical energy density of a seismic diffuse field generated by a background equipartitioned excitation. We study an elastic layer with free surface and overlaying a half space and compute the imaginary part of the Green function for various depths. We show that the resulting spectrum is indeed closely related to the layer dynamic response and the corresponding resonant frequencies are revealed. One implication of present findings lies in the fact that spatial variations may be useful in detecting the presence of a target by its signature in the distribution of diffuse energy. These results may be useful in assessing the seismic response of a given site if strong ground motions are scarce. It suffices having a reasonable illumination from micro earthquakes and noise. We consider that the imaginary part of Green function at the source is a spectral signature of the site. The relative importance of the peaks of

  7. Scattered wave packet formalism for the energy-resolved reaction probability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, Chia-Chun, E-mail: chiachun@mail.utexas.edu [Institute for Theoretical Chemistry and Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Wyatt, Robert E., E-mail: wyattre@mail.utexas.edu [Institute for Theoretical Chemistry and Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

    2012-01-17

    Graphical abstract: The incident, scattered, and total wave functions are obtained by solving the modified time-dependent Schroedinger equation on a reduced computational grid. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Scattered wave packet formalism provides a new method for open quantum systems. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Number of grid points is reduced for the calculation of the reaction probability. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Signature of a quantum resonance can be captured. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Excellent results are obtained for a one-dimensional model chemical reaction. - Abstract: The scattered wave packet formalism developed for a quantum subsystem interacting with reservoirs through open boundaries is utilized to calculate the energy-resolved transmission probability. The total wave function is split into incident and scattered components. Markovian outgoing wave boundary conditions are imposed on the scattered or total wave function by the polynomial method. The wave packet correlation function approach is employed to compute the energy-resolved transmission probability for a one-dimensional potential barrier and a one-dimensional model chemical reaction exhibiting a quantum resonance. Accurate results demonstrate that this formalism can significantly reduce the number of grid points required in a dynamical calculation for the reaction probability.

  8. The Keldysh formalism applied to time-dependent current-density-functional theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gidopoulos, NI; Wilson, S

    2003-01-01

    In this work we demonstrate how to derive the Kohn-Sham equations of time-dependent current-density functional theory from a generating action functional defined on a Keldysh time contour. These Kohn-Sham equations contain an exchange-correlation contribution to the vector potential. For this

  9. Investigation of pore size and energy distributions by statistical physics formalism applied to agriculture products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aouaini, Fatma; Knani, Salah; Yahia, Manel Ben; Bahloul, Neila; Ben Lamine, Abdelmottaleb; Kechaou, Nabil

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we present a new investigation that allows determining the pore size distribution (PSD) in a porous medium. This PSD is achieved by using the desorption isotherms of four varieties of olive leaves. This is by the means of statistical physics formalism and Kelvin's law. The results are compared with those obtained with scanning electron microscopy. The effect of temperature on the distribution function of pores has been studied. The influence of each parameter on the PSD is interpreted. A similar function of adsorption energy distribution, AED, is deduced from the PSD.

  10. Building a Universal Nuclear Energy Density Functional

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, Joe A. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States); Furnstahl, Dick; Horoi, Mihai; Lust, Rusty; Nazaewicc, Witek; Ng, Esmond; Thompson, Ian; Vary, James

    2012-12-30

    During the period of Dec. 1 2006 – Jun. 30, 2012, the UNEDF collaboration carried out a comprehensive study of all nuclei, based on the most accurate knowledge of the strong nuclear interaction, the most reliable theoretical approaches, the most advanced algorithms, and extensive computational resources, with a view towards scaling to the petaflop platforms and beyond. The long-term vision initiated with UNEDF is to arrive at a comprehensive, quantitative, and unified description of nuclei and their reactions, grounded in the fundamental interactions between the constituent nucleons. We seek to replace current phenomenological models of nuclear structure and reactions with a well-founded microscopic theory that delivers maximum predictive power with well-quantified uncertainties. Specifically, the mission of this project has been three-fold: First, to find an optimal energy density functional (EDF) using all our knowledge of the nucleonic Hamiltonian and basic nuclear properties; Second, to apply the EDF theory and its extensions to validate the functional using all the available relevant nuclear structure and reaction data; Third, to apply the validated theory to properties of interest that cannot be measured, in particular the properties needed for reaction theory.

  11. Probing the density content of the nuclear symmetry energy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The nature of equation of state for the neutron star matter is crucially governed by the density dependence of the nuclear symmetry energy. We attempt to probe the behaviour of the nuclear symmetry energy around the saturation density by exploiting the empirical values for volume and surface symmetry energy ...

  12. Dynamical dark energy with a constant vacuum energy density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guberina, B. [Rudjer Boskovic Institute, PO Box 180, 10002 Zagreb (Croatia)]. E-mail: guberina@thphys.irb.hr; Horvat, R. [Rudjer Boskovic Institute, PO Box 180, 10002 Zagreb (Croatia)]. E-mail: horvat@lei3.irb.hr; Nikolic, H. [Rudjer Boskovic Institute, PO Box 180, 10002 Zagreb (Croatia)]. E-mail: hrvoje@thphys.irb.hr

    2006-05-04

    We present a holographic dark-energy model in which the Newton constant G{sub N} scales in such a way as to render the vacuum energy density a true constant. Nevertheless, the model acts as a dynamical dark-energy model since the scaling of G{sub N} goes at the expense of deviation of concentration of dark-matter particles from its canonical form and/or of promotion of their mass to a time-dependent quantity, thereby making the effective equation of state (EOS) variable and different from -1 at the present epoch. Thus the model has a potential to naturally underpin Dirac's suggestion for explaining the large-number hypothesis, which demands a dynamical G{sub N} along with the creation of matter in the universe. We show that with the aid of observational bounds on the variation of the gravitational coupling, the effective-field theory IR cutoff can be strongly restricted, being always closer to the future event horizon than to the Hubble distance. As for the observational side, the effective EOS restricted by observation can be made arbitrary close to -1, and therefore the present model can be considered as a 'minimal' dynamical dark-energy scenario. In addition, for nonzero but small curvature (vertical bar {omega}{sub k0} vertical bar -bar 0.003), the model easily accommodates a transition across the phantom line for redshifts z-bar 0.2, as mildly favored by the data. A thermodynamic aspect of the scenario is also discussed.

  13. COMBINATION OF DENSITY AND ENERGY MODULATION IN MICROBUNCHING ANALYSIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, Cheng Ying [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Li, Rui [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Microbunching instability (MBI) has been one of the most challenging issues in the transport of high-brightness electron beams for modern recirculating or energy recovery linac machines. Recently we have developed and implemented a Vlasov solver [1] to calculate the microbunching gain for an arbitrary beamline lattice, based on the extension of existing theoretical formulation [2-4] for the microbunching amplification from an initial density perturbation to the final density modulation. For more thorough analyses, in addition to the case of (initial) density to (final) density amplification, we extend in this paper the previous formulation to more general cases, including energy to density, density to energy and energy to energy amplifications for a recirculation machine. Such semi-analytical formulae are then incorporated into our Vlasov solver, and qualitative agreement is obtained when the semi-analytical Vlasov results are compared with particle tracking simulation using ELEGANT [5].

  14. Chemically and Thermally Stable High Energy Density Silicone Composites Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Thermal energy storage systems with 300 ? 1000 kJ/kg energy density through either phase changes or chemical heat absorption are sought by NASA. This proposed effort...

  15. Dietary energy density: Applying behavioural science to weight management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolls, B J

    2017-09-01

    Studies conducted by behavioural scientists show that energy density (kcal/g) provides effective guidance for healthy food choices to control intake and promote satiety. Energy density depends upon a number of dietary components, especially water (0 kcal/g) and fat (9 kcal/g). Increasing the proportion of water or water-rich ingredients, such as vegetables or fruit, lowers a food's energy density. A number of studies show that when the energy density of the diet is reduced, both adults and children spontaneously decrease their ad libitum energy intake. Other studies show that consuming a large volume of a low-energy-dense food such as soup, salad, or fruit as a first course preload can enhance satiety and reduce overall energy intake at a meal. Current evidence suggests that energy density influences intake through a complex interplay of cognitive, sensory, gastrointestinal, hormonal and neural influences. Other studies that focus on practical applications show how the strategic incorporation of foods lower in energy density into the diet allows people to eat satisfying portions while improving dietary patterns. This review discusses studies that have led to greater understanding of the importance of energy density for food intake regulation and weight management.

  16. Bond energy decomposition analysis for subsystem density functional theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beyhan, S.M.; Gotz, A.W.; Visscher, L.

    2013-01-01

    We employed an explicit expression for the dispersion (D) energy in conjunction with Kohn-Sham (KS) density functional theory and frozen-density embedding (FDE) to calculate interaction energies between DNA base pairs and a selected set of amino acid pairs in the hydrophobic core of a small protein

  17. Dietary energy density, inflammation and energy balance in palliative care cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallengren, Ola; Bosaeus, Ingvar; Lundholm, Kent

    2013-02-01

    Diet energy density is correlated with energy intake in patients with advanced cancer. Little information is available about the effects of energy density on energy balance, nor about the influence of other factors, such as systemic inflammation and disease stage. We assessed whether dietary energy density or energy intake predict energy balance over 4 months in patients with advanced cancer. We examined also the influence of systemic inflammation and survival time. Energy balance was calculated from the change in body energy content by repeated dual-energy X-ray scans in 107 patients for a total of 164 4-month measurement periods. A linear mixed model was used to investigate relationships between diet energy density (kcal/g), energy intake (kcal/day) and energy balance with systemic inflammation and survival as covariates. In an unadjusted model, the energy density of solid food and energy intake were positive predictors of energy balance (P energy density and energy intake increased energy balance by 38 and 41 kcal/day, respectively. The total diet energy density did not predict energy balance (P > 0.05). Survival was positively (P energy balance. Only energy intake remained a significant predictor of energy balance after adjustment for survival and inflammatory status. Dietary energy density is positively associated with energy balance in patients with advanced cancer. Relations between energy intake, energy density and energy balance are affected by systemic inflammation. Thus, targeting systemic inflammation may be important in nutritional interventions in this patient group. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  18. Towards a kinetic energy density functional for the water molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akin-Ojo, Omololu; Shittu, Doyin

    Development of an accurate kinetic energy kinetic energy density functional (KEDF) is a holy grail. In this work, local KEDFS are parameterized for the water molecule in order to reproduce Kohn-Sham density functional theory (KS-DFT) results. Energies, forces and dipole moments from these KEDFs are presented. Problems with the convergence of the self-consistent-field (SCF) calculations are discussed together with possible solutions. and: Theoretical and Applied Physics Dept. African Univ. of Science and Technology (AUST) Abuja, Nigeria.

  19. The topology of the Coulomb potential density. A comparison with the electron density, the virial energy density, and the Ehrenfest force density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Lizé-Mari; Eaby, Alan; Dillen, Jan

    2017-12-15

    The topology of the Coulomb potential density has been studied within the context of the theory of Atoms in Molecules and has been compared with the topologies of the electron density, the virial energy density and the Ehrenfest force density. The Coulomb potential density is found to be mainly structurally homeomorphic with the electron density. The Coulomb potential density reproduces the non-nuclear attractor which is observed experimentally in the molecular graph of the electron density of a Mg dimer, thus, for the first time ever providing an alternative and energetic foundation for the existence of this critical point. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Postmortem validation of breast density using dual-energy mammography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molloi, Sabee, E-mail: symolloi@uci.edu; Ducote, Justin L.; Ding, Huanjun; Feig, Stephen A. [Department of Radiological Sciences, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States)

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: Mammographic density has been shown to be an indicator of breast cancer risk and also reduces the sensitivity of screening mammography. Currently, there is no accepted standard for measuring breast density. Dual energy mammography has been proposed as a technique for accurate measurement of breast density. The purpose of this study is to validate its accuracy in postmortem breasts and compare it with other existing techniques. Methods: Forty postmortem breasts were imaged using a dual energy mammography system. Glandular and adipose equivalent phantoms of uniform thickness were used to calibrate a dual energy basis decomposition algorithm. Dual energy decomposition was applied after scatter correction to calculate breast density. Breast density was also estimated using radiologist reader assessment, standard histogram thresholding and a fuzzy C-mean algorithm. Chemical analysis was used as the reference standard to assess the accuracy of different techniques to measure breast composition. Results: Breast density measurements using radiologist reader assessment, standard histogram thresholding, fuzzy C-mean algorithm, and dual energy were in good agreement with the measured fibroglandular volume fraction using chemical analysis. The standard error estimates using radiologist reader assessment, standard histogram thresholding, fuzzy C-mean, and dual energy were 9.9%, 8.6%, 7.2%, and 4.7%, respectively. Conclusions: The results indicate that dual energy mammography can be used to accurately measure breast density. The variability in breast density estimation using dual energy mammography was lower than reader assessment rankings, standard histogram thresholding, and fuzzy C-mean algorithm. Improved quantification of breast density is expected to further enhance its utility as a risk factor for breast cancer.

  1. Quantum Phenomena in High Energy Density Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murnane, Margaret [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Kapteyn, Henry [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2017-05-10

    The possibility of implementing efficient (phase matched) HHG upconversion of deep- UV lasers in multiply-ionized plasmas, with potentially unprecedented conversion efficiency is a fascinating prospect. HHG results from the extreme nonlinear response of matter to intense laser light:high harmonics are radiated as a result of a quantum coherent electron recollision process that occurs during laser field ionization of an atom. Under current support from this grant in work published in Science in 2015, we discovered a new regime of bright HHG in highly-ionized plasmas driven by intense UV lasers, that generates bright harmonics to photon energies >280eV

  2. Energy Density and Weight Loss: Feel Full on Fewer Calories

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... food energy density and body weight changes in obese adults. Nutrients. 2016;8:229. Jan. 20, 2017 Original article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/weight-loss/in-depth/weight-loss/art-20044318 . Mayo Clinic ...

  3. Fifth International Conference on High Energy Density Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beg, Farhat

    2017-07-05

    The Fifth International Conference on High Energy Density Physics (ICHED 2015) was held in the Catamaran Hotel in San Diego from August 23-27, 2015. This meeting was the fifth in a series which began in 2008 in conjunction with the April meeting of the American Physical Society (APS). The main goal of this conference has been to bring together researchers from all fields of High Energy Density Science (HEDS) into one, unified meeting.

  4. Cosmic-ray energy densities in star-forming galaxies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Persic Massimo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The energy density of cosmic ray protons in star forming galaxies can be estimated from π0-decay γ-ray emission, synchrotron radio emission, and supernova rates. To galaxies for which these methods can be applied, the three methods yield consistent energy densities ranging from Up ~ 0.1 − 1 eV cm−3 to Up ~ 102 − 103 eV cm−3 in galaxies with low to high star-formation rates, respectively.

  5. Workshop on extremely high energy density plasmas and their diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishii, Shozo (ed.)

    2001-09-01

    Compiled are the papers presented at the workshop on 'Extremely High Energy Density Plasmas and Their Diagnostics' held at National Institute for Fusion Science. The papers cover physics and applications of extremely high-energy density plasmas such as dense z-pinch, plasma focus, and intense pulsed charged beams. Separate abstracts were presented for 7 of the papers in this report. The remaining 25 were considered outside the subject scope of INIS. (author)

  6. High Energy Density Capacitors for Pulsed Power Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-01

    resistor in terms of shock and vibration, mounting requirements, total volume, system reliability, and cost. All of these parameters were improved...protection from shock and vibration on a deployed system. III. STATE OF THE ART FOR HIGH ENERGY DENSITY CAPACITOR AND NEAR TERM PROJECTIONS The...it t tipo ymer m qua y an capac or cons ruc on. Energy Density of 10,000 Shot High Efficiency Pulse Power Capacitors The primary driver was 1 5

  7. Energy Densities in the Strong-Interaction Limit of Density Functional Theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mirtschink, A.; Seidl, M.; Gori Giorgi, P.

    2012-01-01

    We discuss energy densities in the strong-interaction limit of density functional theory, deriving an exact expression within the definition (gauge) of the electrostatic potential of the exchange-correlation hole. Exact results for small atoms and small model quantum dots (Hooke's atoms) are

  8. High Energy Density Regenerative Fuel Cell Systems for Terrestrial Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Kenneth A.

    1999-01-01

    Regenerative Fuel Cell System (RFCS) technology for energy storage has been a NASA power system concept for many years. Compared to battery-based energy storage systems, RFCS has received relatively little attention or resources for development because the energy density and electrical efficiency were not sufficiently attractive relative to advanced battery systems. Even today, RFCS remains at a very low technology readiness level (TRL of about 2 indicating feasibility has been demonstrated). Commercial development of the Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cells for automobiles and other terrestrial applications and improvements in lightweight pressure vessel design to reduce weight and improve performance make possible a high energy density RFCS energy storage system. The results from this study of a lightweight RFCS energy storage system for a remotely piloted, solar-powered, high altitude aircraft indicate an energy density up to 790 w-h/kg with electrical efficiency of 53.4% is attainable. Such an energy storage system would allow a solar-powered aircraft to carry hundreds of kilograms of payload and remain in flight indefinitely for use in atmospheric research, earth observation, resource mapping. and telecommunications. Future developments in the areas of hydrogen and oxygen storage, pressure vessel design, higher temperature and higher- pressure fuel cell operation, unitized regenerative fuel cells, and commercial development of fuel cell technology will improve both the energy density and electrical efficiency of the RFCS.

  9. Making a happy match between orbital-free density functional theory and information energy density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alipour, Mojtaba

    2015-08-01

    In the field of computational chemistry within density functional theory (DFT), the orbital-free DFT (OF-DFT) can be considered as a promising approach for simulating large systems. In OF-DFT, only a single relation, the Euler equation, has to be solved independently from the number of electrons. In this work, the Euler equation of OF-DFT is rewritten through a new partition scheme for energy density functional. Next, based on information theory, we reformulate the resulting equation in terms of Onicescu information energy density. Plus, the new forms of Euler equation based on Shannon entropy and Fisher information are presented.

  10. The relation between food price, energy density and diet quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margareta Bolarić

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Low energy density diet, high in fruits and vegetables, is related to lower obesity risk and to better health status, but is more expensive. High energy density diet, high in added sugar and fats, is more affordable, but is related to higher obesity and chronic diseases risk. The aim of this study was to report prices according to energy density (low vs. high of food items and to show how food affordability could affect food choice and consumers’ health. Data was collected for 137 raw and processed foods from three purchase sites in Zagreb (one representative for supermarket, one smaller shop and green market. Results showed that low energy density food is more expensive than high energy density food (for example, the price of 1000 kcal from green zucchini (15 kcal/100 g is 124.20 kn while the price of 1000 kcal from sour cream (138 kcal/100 g is 13.99 kn. Food energy price was significantly different (p<0.05 between food groups with highest price for vegetable products (159.04 ± 36.18 kn/1000 kcal and raw vegetables (97.90 ± 50.13 kn/1000 kcal and lowest for fats (8.49 ± 1.22 kn/1000 kcal and cereals and products (5.66 ± 0.76 kn/1000 kcal. Negative correlation (Spearman r=-0.72, p<0.0001 was observed for energy density (kcal/100 g and price of 1000 kcal. Therefore, it is advisable to develop strategies in order to reduce price of low energy density food and encourage its intake since it would improve diet quality, which could lead to better costumers’ health.

  11. Density content of nuclear symmetry energy from nuclear observables

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-10-11

    Oct 11, 2014 ... Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 83; Issue 5 ... The nuclear symmetry energy at a given density measures the energy transferred in converting symmetric nuclear matter into the pure neutron matter. ... Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700 064, India ...

  12. A high energy density relaxor antiferroelectric pulsed capacitor dielectric

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, Hwan Ryul; Lynch, Christopher S. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2016-01-14

    Pulsed capacitors require high energy density and low loss, properties that can be realized through selection of composition. Ceramic (Pb{sub 0.88}La{sub 0.08})(Zr{sub 0.91}Ti{sub 0.09})O{sub 3} was found to be an ideal candidate. La{sup 3+} doping and excess PbO were used to produce relaxor antiferroelectric behavior with slim and slanted hysteresis loops to reduce the dielectric hysteresis loss, to increase the dielectric strength, and to increase the discharge energy density. The discharge energy density of this composition was found to be 3.04 J/cm{sup 3} with applied electric field of 170 kV/cm, and the energy efficiency, defined as the ratio of the discharge energy density to the charging energy density, was 0.920. This high efficiency reduces the heat generated under cyclic loading and improves the reliability. The properties were observed to degrade some with temperature increase above 80 °C. Repeated electric field cycles up to 10 000 cycles were applied to the specimen with no observed performance degradation.

  13. High-Energy-Density Physics at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurricane, O. A.; Herrmann, M. C.

    2017-10-01

    At modern laser facilities, energy densities ranging from 1 Mbar to many hundreds of gigabars can regularly be achieved. These high-energy states of matter last for mere moments, measured in nanoseconds to tens of picoseconds, but during those times numerous high-precision instruments can be employed, revealing remarkable compressed matter physics, radiation-hydrodynamics physics, laser-matter interaction physics, and nuclear physics processes. We review the current progress of high-energy-density physics at the National Ignition Facility and describe the underlying physical principles.

  14. Graphene supercapacitor with both high power and energy density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hao; Kannappan, Santhakumar; Pandian, Amaresh S.; Jang, Jae-Hyung; Lee, Yun Sung; Lu, Wu

    2017-11-01

    Supercapacitors, based on fast ion transportation, are specialized to provide high power, long stability, and efficient energy storage using highly porous electrode materials. However, their low energy density excludes them from many potential applications that require both high energy density and high power density performances. Using a scalable nanoporous graphene synthesis method involving an annealing process in hydrogen, here we show supercapacitors with highly porous graphene electrodes capable of achieving not only a high power density of 41 kW kg-1 and a Coulombic efficiency of 97.5%, but also a high energy density of 148.75 Wh kg-1. A high specific gravimetric and volumetric capacitance (306.03 F g-1 and 64.27 F cm-3) are demonstrated. The devices can retain almost 100% capacitance after 7000 charging/discharging cycles at a current density of 8 A g-1. The superior performance of supercapacitors is attributed to their ideal pore size, pore uniformity, and good ion accessibility of the synthesized graphene.

  15. Increasing the gravimetric energy density of organic based secondary battery cathodes using small radius cations (Li+ and Mg2+).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Burgos, Kenneth; Rodríguez-Calero, Gabriel G; Zhou, Weidong; Burkhardt, Stephen E; Abruña, Héctor D

    2013-10-02

    One of the major challenges in electrochemical energy storage (EES) is increasing the gravimetric capacity and energy density of the cathode material. Here we demonstrate how to increase the gravimetric energy density of electrical energy storage devices based on the use of organic materials through exploitation of the strong ionic coupling between a reduced carbonyl functionality and small cations such as lithium (Li(+)) and magnesium (Mg(2+)). Binding of the cation to the reduced carbonyl results in a positive shift of the formal reduction potential of the carbonyl couple. This has the effect of increasing the cell voltage which, in turn, results in an increase in the energy density. We show how this interaction can be used to dramatically increase, by up to a factor of 2, the energy density for a selected case study using 1,2-di(thiophen-2-yl)ethane-1,2-dione (DTED). We have carried out electrochemical and computational studies in order to understand the thermodynamic (positive shift of 250 mV and 1 V in the formal potential for the first and second reductions, respectively, of the carbonyl groups of DTED) and kinetic effects between small radii cations (Li(+) and Mg(2+)) and the reduced carbonyl functionality of carbonyl-based organic molecules (C-bOMs).

  16. Simple Fully Nonlocal Density Functionals for Electronic Repulsion Energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuckovic, Stefan; Gori-Giorgi, Paola

    2017-07-06

    From a simplified version of the mathematical structure of the strong coupling limit of the exact exchange-correlation functional, we construct an approximation for the electronic repulsion energy at physical coupling strength, which is fully nonlocal. This functional is self-interaction free and yields energy densities within the definition of the electrostatic potential of the exchange-correlation hole that are locally accurate and have the correct asymptotic behavior. The model is able to capture strong correlation effects that arise from chemical bond dissociation, without relying on error cancellation. These features, which are usually missed by standard density functional theory (DFT) functionals, are captured by the highly nonlocal structure, which goes beyond the "Jacob's ladder" framework for functional construction, by using integrals of the density as the key ingredient. Possible routes for obtaining the full exchange-correlation functional by recovering the missing kinetic component of the correlation energy are also implemented and discussed.

  17. Energy dependence with the number of particles: Density and reduced density matrices functionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda-Quintana, Ramón A.; Bochicchio, Roberto C.

    2014-02-01

    The energy of a physical domain within a molecular system considered as a quantum open system is analyzed as a functional of the electron distribution dependence with the number of particles. Our attention is focused upon the constrained-search functionals of the electron density, the 1- and 2-reduced density matrices (1-, 2-RDMs) for grand-canonical states. It is shown that functionals of the 2-RDM depend on the number of particles if the ground state energy is not a convex function of them.

  18. The Establishment of a Formal Midwest Renewable Energy Tracking System (M-RETS) Organization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maria Redmond; Chela Bordas O' Connor

    2010-06-30

    The objectives identified in requesting and utilizing this funding has been met. The goal was to establish a formal, multi-jurisdictional organization to: (1) ensure the policy objectives of the participating jurisdictions are addressed through increased tradability of the Renewable Energy Credits (RECs) from M-RETS and to eliminate the possibility that a single jurisdiction will be the sole arbiter of the operation of the system; (2) facilitate the establishment of REC standards including the attributes related to, the creation, trading, and interaction with other trading and tracking systems; and (3) have a centralized and established organization that will be responsible for the contracting and governance responsibilities of a multi-jurisdictional tracking system. The M-RETS Inc. Board ensures that the system remains policy neutral; that the attributes of generation are tracked in a way that allows the system users to easily identify and trade relevant RECs; that the system can add jurisdictions as needed or desired; and that the tracking system operate in such a way to allow for the greatest access possible for those participating in other tracking or trading systems by allowing those systems to negotiate with a single M-RETS entity for the import and export of RECs. M-RETS as an organizational body participates and often leads the discussions related to the standardization of RECs and increasing the tradability of M-RETS RECs. M-RETS is a founding member of the Environmental Trading Network of North America (ETNNA) and continues to take a leadership role in the development of processes to facilitate trading among tracking systems and to standardize REC definitions. The Board of Directors of M-RETS, Inc., the non-profit corporation, continues to hold telephone/internet Board meetings. Legal counsel continues working with the board and APX management on a new agreement with APX. The board expects to have an agreement and corresponding fee structure in place by

  19. Mapping the ocean energy density around sulawesi and maluku islands

    OpenAIRE

    Mahmuddin, Faisal

    2015-01-01

    In order to harvest ocean wind energy around Sulawesi and Maluku Islands, several studies have been conducted to assess the use of a mobile floating structure (MFS) in the sea areas. From the studies, the monthly locations of the MFS were determined by computing one particular location on each sea areas. The MFS locations were determined to be the locations with highest energy density every month. However, in order to obtain more optimal results, an interpolation method need to be implemented...

  20. Efficient Calculation of Energy Expectation Values in the Path Integral Formalism

    CERN Document Server

    Grujic, J

    2006-01-01

    The path integral formalism, originally introduced by Richard Feynman, represents a powerful general framework for dealing with quantum and statistical theories, as well as an extremely useful tool in many other areas of science. Their numerical integration, however, is notoriously demanding of computer time and it is one of the most challenging computational problems.

  1. Quantum Chromodynamics and Nuclear Physics at Extreme Energy Density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, B.; Bass, S.A.; Chandrasekharan, S.; Mehen, T.; Springer, R.P.

    2005-11-07

    The report describes research in theoretical quantum chromodynamics, including effective field theories of hadronic interactions, properties of strongly interacting matter at extreme energy density, phenomenology of relativistic heavy ion collisions, and algorithms and numerical simulations of lattice gauge theory and other many-body systems.

  2. Neutron stars as probes of extreme energy density matter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-05-07

    May 7, 2015 ... Neutron stars have long been regarded as extraterrestrial laboratories from which we can learn about extreme energy density matter at low temperatures. In this article, some of the recent advances made in astrophysical observations and related theory are highlighted. Although the focus is on the much ...

  3. Changes in the viscosity and energy density of weaning maize ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of replacing 25% of the basic maize flour with groundnut paste (w/w) and/or 10% of the liquid ingredients with fresh dairy milk (v/v) on the viscosity and energy density of weaning maize porridge was investigated in a 2• fractional factorial experiment. Other factors investigated included (i) particle size of the flour (ii) ...

  4. Impact of density-dependent symmetry energy and Coulomb ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-03-07

    Mar 7, 2014 ... exhausted by the pygmy dipole resonance in 68Ni+132Sn, are useful for the investigation of neutron radii and the observables which can shed light on the density dependence of symmetry energy [10,11]. The collective flow [9], pygmy dipole resonance, and neutron skin thickness [4,11] are suggested to ...

  5. Density-scaling exponents and virial potential-energy correlation ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This paper investigates the relation between the density-scaling exponent γ and the virial potential energy correlation coefficient R at several thermodynamic state points in three dimensions for the generalized (2n, n) Lennard-Jones (LJ) system for n = 4, 9, 12, 18, as well as for the standard n = 6 LJ system in two,three, and ...

  6. Probing the density content of the nuclear symmetry energy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-04-30

    Apr 30, 2014 ... Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 82; Issue 5. Probing the ... The nature of equation of state for the neutron star matter is crucially governed by the density dependence of the nuclear symmetry energy. ... Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700 064, India ...

  7. Design for a High Energy Density Kelvin-Helmholtz Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurricane, O A

    2007-10-29

    While many high energy density physics (HEDP) Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instability experiments have been fielded as part of basic HEDP and astrophysics studies, not one HEDP Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) experiment has been successfully performed. Herein, a design for a novel HEDP x-ray driven KH experiment is presented along with supporting radiation-hydrodynamic simulation and theory.

  8. Active minimization of energy density in three-dimensional enclosures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommerfeldt, Scott D.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this study was to further investigate and develop a novel approach for actively controlling the sound field in enclosures that is based on the acoustic energy density. Typically the acoustic field in an enclosure has been controlled by minimizing the sum of the squared pressures from several microphones distributed throughout the enclosure. The approach investigated in this study involved minimizing the acoustic energy density at the sensor locations, rather than the squared pressure. Research previous to this study in a simple one-dimensional enclosure showed that improved global attenuation of the acoustic field is often obtained by minimizing the energy density, rather than the pressure. The current study built on the previous research by extending the method of controlling the acoustic energy density to three-dimensional enclosures. The study was intended to help establish if improved control can still be expected in a more general enclosure. The study was designed to be both analytical/numerical and experimental in nature.

  9. Impact of density-dependent symmetry energy and Coulomb ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Research Articles Volume 82 Issue 3 March 2014 pp 515-527 ... In this paper, we study the time evolution, impact parameter, and excitation energy dependence of IMF production for the different forms of density-dependent symmetry ... School of Physics and Material Science, Thapar University, Patiala 147 004, India ...

  10. Laboratory testing of high energy density capacitors for electric vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, A.F.

    1991-10-01

    Laboratory tests of advanced, high energy density capacitors in the Battery Test Laboratory of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory have been performed to investigate their suitability for load-leveling the battery in an electric vehicle. Two types of devices were tested -- 3 V, 70 Farad, spiral wound, carbon-based, single cell devices and 20 V, 3. 5 Farad, mixed-oxide, multi-cell bipolar devices. The energy density of the devices, based on energy stored during charge to the rated voltage, was found to be 1--2 Wh/kg, which agreed well with that claimed by the manufacturers. Constant power discharge tests were performed at power densities up to 1500 W/kg. Discharges at higher power densities could have been performed had equipment been available to maintain constant power during discharges of less than one second. It was found that the capacitance of the devices were rate dependent with the rate dependency of the carbon-based devices being higher than that of the mixed-oxide devices. The resistance of both types of devices were relatively low being 20--30 milliohms. Testing done in the study showed that the advanced high energy density capacitors can be charged and discharged over cycles (PSFUDS) which approximate the duty cycle that would be encountered if the devices are used to load-level the battery in an electric vehicle. Thermal tests of the advanced capacitors in an insulated environment using the PSFUDS cycle showed the devices do not overheat with their temperatures increasing only 4--5{degrees}C for tests that lasted 5--7 hours. 7 refs., 33 figs., 11 tabs.

  11. A Simple Local Correlation Energy Functional for Spherically Confined Atoms from ab Initio Correlation Energy Density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyboishchikov, Sergei F

    2017-09-03

    We propose a simple method of calculating the electron correlation energy density ec (r) and the correlation potential Vc (r) from second-order Møller-Plesset amplitudes and its generalization for the case of a configuration interaction wavefunction, based on Nesbet's theorem. The correlation energy density obtained by this method for free and spherically confined Be and He atoms was employed to fit a local analytical density functional based on Wigner's functional. The functional is capable of producing a strong increase in the correlation energy with decreasing confined radius for the Be atom. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Diagnostic group differences in temporomandibular joint energy densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, L M; Iwasaki, L R; Gonzalez, Y M; Liu, H; Marx, D B; Nickel, J C

    2015-04-01

    Cartilage fatigue, due to mechanical work, may account for precocious development of degenerative joint disease in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). This study compared energy densities (mJ/mm³) in TMJs of three diagnostic groups. Sixty-eight subjects (44 women, 24 men) gave informed consent. Diagnostic criteria for temporomandibular disorders (DC/TMD) and imaging were used to group subjects according to presence of jaw muscle or joint pain (+P) and bilateral disk displacement (+DD). Subjects (+P+DD, n=16; -P+DD, n=16; and -P-DD, n=36) provided cone-beam computed tomography and magnetic resonance images, and jaw-tracking data. Numerical modeling was used to determine TMJ loads (Fnormal). Dynamic stereometry was used to characterize individual-specific data of stress-field dynamics during 10 symmetrical jaw-closing cycles. These data were used to estimate tractional forces (Ftraction). Energy densities were then calculated as W/Q (W=work done or mechanical energy input=tractional force×distance of stress-field translation, Q=volume of cartilage). anova and Tukey-Kramer post hoc analyses tested for intergroup differences. Mean±standard error energy density for the +P+DD group was 12.7±1.5 mJ/mm³ and significantly greater (all adjusted ppain and disk displacement. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Linear response of homogeneous nuclear matter with energy density functionals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pastore, A. [Institut d’Astronomie et d’Astrophysique, CP 226, Université Libre de Bruxelles, B-1050 Bruxelles (Belgium); Davesne, D., E-mail: davesne@ipnl.in2p3.fr [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, CNRS-IN2P3, UMR 5822, Université Lyon 1, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Navarro, J. [IFIC (CSIC University of Valencia), Apdo. Postal 22085, E-46071 Valencia (Spain)

    2015-03-01

    Response functions of infinite nuclear matter with arbitrary isospin asymmetry are studied in the framework of the random phase approximation. The residual interaction is derived from a general nuclear Skyrme energy density functional. Besides the usual central, spin–orbit and tensor terms it could also include other components as new density-dependent terms or three-body terms. Algebraic expressions for the response functions are obtained from the Bethe–Salpeter equation for the particle–hole propagator. Applications to symmetric nuclear matter, pure neutron matter and asymmetric nuclear matter are presented and discussed. Spin–isospin strength functions are analyzed for varying conditions of density, momentum transfer, isospin asymmetry, and temperature for some representative Skyrme functionals. Particular attention is paid to the discussion of instabilities, either real or unphysical, which could manifest in finite nuclei.

  14. Study of Volumetrically Heated Ultra-High Energy Density Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocca, Jorge J. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

    2016-10-27

    Heating dense matter to millions of degrees is important for applications, but requires complex and expensive methods. The major goal of the project was to demonstrate using a compact laser the creation of a new ultra-high energy density plasma regime characterized by simultaneous extremely high temperature and high density, and to study it combining experimental measurements and advanced simulations. We have demonstrated that trapping of intense femtosecond laser pulses deep within ordered nanowire arrays can heat near solid density matter into a new ultra hot plasma regime. Extreme electron densities, and temperatures of several tens of million degrees were achieved using laser pulses of only 0.5 J energy from a compact laser. Our x-ray spectra and simulations showed that extremely highly ionized plasma volumes several micrometers in depth are generated by irradiation of gold and Nickel nanowire arrays with femtosecond laser pulses of relativistic intensities. We obtained extraordinarily high degrees of ionization (e.g. we peeled 52 electrons from gold atoms, and up to 26 electrons from nickel atoms). In the process we generated Gigabar pressures only exceeded in the central hot spot of highly compressed thermonuclear fusion plasmas.. The plasma created after the dissolved wires expand, collide, and thermalize, is computed to have a thermal energy density of 0.3 GJ cm-3 and a pressure of 1-2 Gigabar. These are pressures only exceeded in highly compressed thermonuclear fusion plasmas. Scaling these results to higher laser intensities promises to create plasmas with temperatures and pressures exceeding those in the center of the sun.

  15. Extreme states of matter high energy density physics

    CERN Document Server

    Fortov, Vladimir E

    2016-01-01

    With its many beautiful colour pictures, this book gives fascinating insights into the unusual forms and behaviour of matter under extremely high pressures and temperatures. These extreme states are generated, among other things, by strong shock, detonation and electric explosion waves, dense laser beams,electron and ion beams, hypersonic entry of spacecraft into dense atmospheres of planets, and in many other situations characterized by extremely high pressures and temperatures.Written by one of the world's foremost experts on the topic, this book will inform and fascinate all scientists dealing with materials properties and physics, and also serve as an excellent introduction to plasma-, shock-wave and high-energy-density physics for students and newcomers seeking an overview. This second edition is thoroughly revised and expanded, in particular with new material on high energy-density physics, nuclear explosions and other nuclear transformation processes.

  16. Lithium-Based High Energy Density Flow Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugga, Ratnakumar V. (Inventor); West, William C. (Inventor); Kindler, Andrew (Inventor); Smart, Marshall C. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Systems and methods in accordance with embodiments of the invention implement a lithium-based high energy density flow battery. In one embodiment, a lithium-based high energy density flow battery includes a first anodic conductive solution that includes a lithium polyaromatic hydrocarbon complex dissolved in a solvent, a second cathodic conductive solution that includes a cathodic complex dissolved in a solvent, a solid lithium ion conductor disposed so as to separate the first solution from the second solution, such that the first conductive solution, the second conductive solution, and the solid lithium ionic conductor define a circuit, where when the circuit is closed, lithium from the lithium polyaromatic hydrocarbon complex in the first conductive solution dissociates from the lithium polyaromatic hydrocarbon complex, migrates through the solid lithium ionic conductor, and associates with the cathodic complex of the second conductive solution, and a current is generated.

  17. High Density Thermal Energy Storage with Supercritical Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganapathi, Gani B.; Wirz, Richard

    2012-01-01

    A novel approach to storing thermal energy with supercritical fluids is being investigated, which if successful, promises to transform the way thermal energy is captured and utilized. The use of supercritical fluids allows cost-affordable high-density storage with a combination of latent heat and sensible heat in the two-phase as well as the supercritical state. This technology will enhance penetration of several thermal power generation applications and high temperature water for commercial use if the overall cost of the technology can be demonstrated to be lower than the current state-of-the-art molten salt using sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate eutectic mixtures.

  18. Energy density and rate limitations in structural composite supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, J. F.; Gienger, E.; Wetzel, E. D.; Xu, K.

    2012-06-01

    The weight and volume of conventional energy storage technologies greatly limits their performance in mobile platforms. Traditional research efforts target improvements in energy density to reduce device size and mass. Enabling a device to perform additional functions, such as bearing mechanical load, is an alternative approach as long as the total mass efficiency exceeds that of the individual materials it replaces. Our research focuses on structural composites that function as batteries and supercapacitors. These multifunctional devices could be used to replace conventional structural components, such as vehicle frame elements, to provide significant system-level weight reductions and extend mission times. Our approach is to design structural properties directly into the electrolyte and electrode materials. Solid polymer electrolyte materials bind the system and transfer load to the fibers while conducting ions between the electrodes. Carbon fiber electrodes provide a route towards optimizing both energy storage and load-bearing capabilities, and may also obviate the need for a separate current collector. The components are being integrated using scalable, cost-effective composite processing techniques that are amenable to complex part shapes. Practical considerations of energy density and rate behavior are described here as they relate to materials used. Our results highlight the viability as well as the challenges of this multifunctional approach towards energy storage.

  19. Highly Compressed Ion Beams for High Energy Density Science

    CERN Document Server

    Friedman, Alex; Briggs, Richard J; Callahan, Debra; Caporaso, George; Celata, C M; Davidson, Ronald C; Faltens, Andy; Grant-Logan, B; Grisham, Larry; Grote, D P; Henestroza, Enrique; Kaganovich, Igor D; Lee, Edward; Lee, Richard; Leitner, Matthaeus; Nelson, Scott D; Olson, Craig; Penn, Gregory; Reginato, Lou; Renk, Tim; Rose, David; Sessler, Andrew M; Staples, John W; Tabak, Max; Thoma, Carsten H; Waldron, William; Welch, Dale; Wurtele, Jonathan; Yu, Simon

    2005-01-01

    The Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory (HIF-VNL) is developing the intense ion beams needed to drive matter to the High Energy Density (HED) regimes required for Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) and other applications. An interim goal is a facility for Warm Dense Matter (WDM) studies, wherein a target is heated volumetrically without being shocked, so that well-defined states of matter at 1 to 10 eV are generated within a diagnosable region. In the approach we are pursuing, low to medium mass ions with energies just above the Bragg peak are directed onto thin target "foils," which may in fact be foams or "steel wool" with mean densities 1% to 100% of solid. This approach complements that being pursued at GSI, wherein high-energy ion beams deposit a small fraction of their energy in a cylindrical target. We present the requirements for warm dense matter experiments, and describe suitable accelerator concepts, including novel broadband traveling wave pulse-line, drift-tube linac, RF, and single-gap approa...

  20. Frontiers for Discovery in High Energy Density Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davidson, R. C.; Katsouleas, T.; Arons, J.; Baring, M.; Deeney, C.; Di Mauro, L.; Ditmire, T.; Falcone, R.; Hammer, D.; Hill, W.; Jacak, B.; Joshi, C.; Lamb, F.; Lee, R.; Logan, B. G.; Melissinos, A.; Meyerhofer, D.; Mori, W.; Murnane, M.; Remington, B.; Rosner, R.; Schneider, D.; Silvera, I.; Stone, J.; Wilde, B.; Zajc. W.

    2004-07-20

    The report is intended to identify the compelling research opportunities of high intellectual value in high energy density physics. The opportunities for discovery include the broad scope of this highly interdisciplinary field that spans a wide range of physics areas including plasma physics, laser and particle beam physics, nuclear physics, astrophysics, atomic and molecular physics, materials science and condensed matter physics, intense radiation-matter interaction physics, fluid dynamics, and magnetohydrodynamics

  1. Enhanced magnetic anisotropy energy density for superparamagnetic particles of cobalt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, B. J.; Howson, M. A.; Greig, D.; Wiser, N.

    1996-01-01

    We use our measurements of the magnetization and the magnetoresistance for very small superparamagnetic particles of Co to obtain the low-temperature value of the magnetic anisotropy energy density, C~=3×108 erg/cm3. This is nearly two orders of magnitude larger than the corresponding value for C for bulk Co. The enormous enhancement of C for very small particles of Co is consistent with results previously reported for very small particles of Fe and of FeNi.

  2. Accurate charge density of trialanine: a comparison of the multipole formalism and the maximum entropy method (MEM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Andreas; Netzel, Jeanette; van Smaalen, Sander

    2007-04-01

    An accurate charge density study of trialanine is presented with the maximum entropy method (MEM), on the basis of the same reflection data as was used for a multipole refinement [Rödel et al. (2006). Org. Biomol. Chem. 4, 475-481]. With the MEM, the optimum fit to the data is found to correspond to a final value of chi(2) which is less than its statistical expectation value N(Ref), where N(Ref) is the number of reflections. A refinement strategy is presented that determines the optimal goal for chi(2). It is shown that the MEM and the multipole method are on a par with regard to the reproduction of atomic charges and volumes, general topological features and trends in the charge density in the bond critical points (BCPs). Regarding the values of the charge densities in the BCPs, agreement between quantum chemical calculations, the multipole method and MEM is good, but not perfect. In the case of the Laplacians, the coincidence is not as good and especially the Laplacians of the C-O bonds differ strongly. One of the reasons for the observed differences in the topological parameters in the BCPs is the fact that MEM densities still include the effects of thermal motion, whereas multipole densities are free from the effects of thermal motion. Hydrogen bonds are more convincingly reproduced by the MEM than by multipole models.

  3. Control of energy density inside turbid medium (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarma, Raktim; Yamilov, Alexey; Petrenko, Sasha; Bromberg, Yaron; Cao, Hui

    2017-02-01

    Recent breakthroughs in optical wavefront engineering have opened the possibility of controlling light intensity distribution inside highly scattering medium, but their success is limited by the open geometry of the sample and the difficulty of covering all input modes. Here we demonstrate experimentally an efficient control of energy density distribution inside a strong scattering medium. Instead of the open slab geometry, we fabricate a silicon waveguide that contains scatterers and has reflecting sidewalls. The intensity distribution inside the 2D waveguide is probed from the third dimension. With a careful design of the on-chip coupling waveguide, we can access all the input modes. Such unprecedented control of incident wavefront leads to 10 times enhancement of the total transmission or 50 times suppression. A direct probe of light intensity distribution inside the disordered structure reveals that selective excitation of open channels leads to an energy buildup deep inside the scattering medium, while the excitation of closed channels greatly reduces the penetration depth. Compared to the linear decay for random input fields, the optimized wavefront can produce an intensity profile that is either peaked near the center of the waveguide or decay exponentially with depth. The total energy stored inside the waveguide is increased 3.7 times or decreased 2 times. Since the energy density dictates light-matter interactions inside a scattering system, our results demonstrate the possibility of tailoring optical excitations as well as linear and nonlinear optical processes inside the turbid medium in an on-chip platform.

  4. Bound state densities and the Helmholtz free energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souza S.R.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Bohr's conception of the compound nucleus is based on the idea of ‘longlived’ nuclear states in which all single particles are bound. We briefly discuss the properties of the density of bound states and then use two prescriptions, that of Brack and Quentin and that of Bonche, Levit e Vautherin to calculate the equivalent temperaturedependent quantity – the Helmholtz free energy.We compare the temperature dependence of the latter, as well as that of the excitation energy and entropy, obtained using the two prescriptions in self-consistent calculations within the relativistic Hartree and Skyrme models. We then discuss the extended, temperature-dependent liquid-drop approximation to the excitation and free energies obtained from fits to the self-consistent calculations over a wide range of charge and mass numbers.

  5. Changes in charge density vs changes in formal oxidation states: The case of Sn halide perovskites and their ordered vacancy analogues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalpian, Gustavo M.; Liu, Qihang; Stoumpos, Constantinos C.; Douvalis, Alexios P.; Balasubramanian, Mahalingam; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.; Zunger, Alex

    2017-07-01

    Shifting the Fermi energy in solids by doping, defect formation, or gating generally results in changes in the charge density distribution, which reflect the ability of the bonding pattern in solids to adjust to such external perturbations. In the traditional chemistry textbook, such changes are often described by the formal oxidation states (FOS) whereby a single atom type is presumed to absorb the full burden of the perturbation (change in charge) of the whole compound. In the present paper, we analyze the changes in the position-dependence charge density due to shifts of the Fermi energy on a general physical basis, comparing with the view of the FOS picture. We use the halide perovskites CsSnX3 (X = F, Cl, Br, I) as examples for studying the general principle. When the solar absorber CsSnI3 (termed 113) loses 50% of its Sn atoms, thereby forming the ordered vacancy compound Cs2SnI6 (termed 216), the Sn is said in the FOS picture to change from Sn(II) to Sn(IV). To understand the electronic properties of these two groups we studied the 113 and 216 compound pairs CsSnCl3 and Cs2SnCl6, CsSnBr3 and Cs2SnBr6, and CsSnI3 and Cs2SnI6, complementing them by CsSnF3 and Cs2SnF6 in the hypothetical cubic structure for completing the chemical trends. These materials were also synthesized by chemical routes and characterized by x-ray diffraction, 119Sn-Mössbauer spectroscopy, and K-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy. We find that indeed in going from 113 to 216 (equivalent to the introduction of two holes per unit) there is a decrease in the s charge on Sn, in agreement with the FOS picture. However, at the same time, we observe an increase of the p charge via downshift of the otherwise unoccupied p level, an effect that tends to replenish much of the lost s charge. At the end, the change in the charge on the Sn site as a result of adding two holes to the unit cell is rather small. This effect is theoretically explained as a “self-regulating response” [Raebiger, Lany

  6. Low-energy theorems for virtual nucleon-nucleon bremsstrahlung; Formalism and results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korchin, AY; Scholten, O; VanNeck, D

    1996-01-01

    We present results for cross sections and response functions in virtual bremsstrahlung induced by nucleon-nucleon collisions NN --> NN + e(+)e(-), based on two different low-energy theorems, The first low-energy theorem is a generalization of Low's theorem for real-photon bremsstrahlung. The second

  7. Phase-field-crystal dynamics for binary systems: Derivation from dynamical density functional theory, amplitude equation formalism, and applications to alloy heterostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhi-Feng; Elder, K R; Provatas, Nikolas

    2010-08-01

    The dynamics of phase field crystal (PFC) modeling is derived from dynamical density functional theory (DDFT), for both single-component and binary systems. The derivation is based on a truncation up to the three-point direct correlation functions in DDFT, and the lowest order approximation using scale analysis. The complete amplitude equation formalism for binary PFC is developed to describe the coupled dynamics of slowly varying complex amplitudes of structural profile, zeroth-mode average atomic density, and system concentration field. Effects of noise (corresponding to stochastic amplitude equations) and species-dependent atomic mobilities are also incorporated in this formalism. Results of a sample application to the study of surface segregation and interface intermixing in alloy heterostructures and strained layer growth are presented, showing the effects of different atomic sizes and mobilities of alloy components. A phenomenon of composition overshooting at the interface is found, which can be connected to the surface segregation and enrichment of one of the atomic components observed in recent experiments of alloying heterostructures.

  8. A Unification between Dynamical System Theory and Thermodynamics Involving an Energy, Mass, and Entropy State Space Formalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wassim M. Haddad

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we combine the two universalisms of thermodynamics and dynamical systems theory to develop a dynamical system formalism for classical thermodynamics. Specifically, using a compartmental dynamical system energy flow model involving heat flow, work energy, and chemical reactions, we develop a state-space dynamical system model that captures the key aspects of thermodynamics, including its fundamental laws. In addition, we show that our thermodynamically consistent dynamical system model is globally semistable with system states converging to a state of temperature equipartition. Furthermore, in the presence of chemical reactions, we use the law of mass-action and the notion of chemical potential to show that the dynamic system states converge to a state of temperature equipartition and zero affinity corresponding to a state of chemical equilibrium.

  9. High energy density supercapacitors using macroporous kitchen sponges

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Macroporous, low-cost and recyclable kitchen sponges are explored as effective electrode platforms for supercapacitor devices. A simple and scalable process has been developed to fabricate MnO 2-carbon nanotube (CNT)-sponge supercapacitor electrodes using ordinary kitchen sponges. Two organic electrolytes (1 M of tetraethylammonium tetrafluoroborate (Et 4NBF 4) in propylene carbonate (PC), 1 M of LiClO 4 in PC) are utilized with the sponge-based electrodes to improve the energy density of the symmetrical supercapacitors. Compared to aqueous electrolyte (1 M of Na 2SO 4 in H 2O), the energy density of supercapacitors tripled in Et 4NBF 4 electrolyte, and further increased by six times in LiClO 4 electrolyte. The long-term cycling performance in different electrolytes was examined and the morphology changes of the electrode materials were also studied. The good electrochemical performance in both aqueous and organic electrolytes indicates that the MnO 2-CNT-sponge is a promising low-cost electrode for energy storage systems. © 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  10. Predictors of Dietary Energy Density among Preschool Aged Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilmani N.T. Fernando

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Childhood obesity is a global problem with many contributing factors including dietary energy density (DED. This paper aims to investigate potential predictors of DED among preschool aged children in Victoria, Australia. Secondary analysis of longitudinal data for 209 mother–child pairs from the Melbourne Infant Feeding, Activity and Nutrition Trial was conducted. Data for predictors (maternal child feeding and nutrition knowledge, maternal dietary intake, home food availability, socioeconomic status were obtained through questionnaires completed by first-time mothers when children were aged 4 or 18 months. Three 24-h dietary recalls were completed when children were aged ~3.5 years. DED was calculated utilizing three methods: “food only”, “food and dairy beverages”, and “food and all beverages”. Linear regression analyses were conducted to identify associations between predictors and these three measures of children’s DED. Home availability of fruits (β: −0.82; 95% CI: −1.35, −0.29, p = 0.002 for DEDfood; β: −0.42; 95% CI: −0.82, −0.02, p = 0.041 for DEDfood+dairy beverages and non-core snacks (β: 0.11; 95% CI: 0.02, 0.20, p = 0.016 for DEDfood; β: 0.09; 95% CI: 0.02, 0.15, p = 0.010 for DEDfood+dairy beverages were significantly associated with two of the three DED measures. Providing fruit at home early in a child’s life may encourage the establishment of healthful eating behaviors that could promote a diet that is lower in energy density later in life. Home availability of non-core snacks is likely to increase the energy density of preschool children’s diets, supporting the proposition that non-core snack availability at home should be limited.

  11. High energy density Z-pinch plasmas using flow stabilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shumlak, U., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Golingo, R. P., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Nelson, B. A., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Bowers, C. A., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Doty, S. A., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Forbes, E. G., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Hughes, M. C., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Kim, B., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Knecht, S. D., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Lambert, K. K., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Lowrie, W., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Ross, M. P., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Weed, J. R., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu [Aerospace and Energetics Research Program, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, 98195-2250 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    The ZaP Flow Z-Pinch research project[1] at the University of Washington investigates the effect of sheared flows on MHD instabilities. Axially flowing Z-pinch plasmas are produced that are 100 cm long with a 1 cm radius. The plasma remains quiescent for many radial Alfvén times and axial flow times. The quiescent periods are characterized by low magnetic mode activity measured at several locations along the plasma column and by stationary visible plasma emission. Plasma evolution is modeled with high-resolution simulation codes – Mach2, WARPX, NIMROD, and HiFi. Plasma flow profiles are experimentally measured with a multi-chord ion Doppler spectrometer. A sheared flow profile is observed to be coincident with the quiescent period, and is consistent with classical plasma viscosity. Equilibrium is determined by diagnostic measurements: interferometry for density; spectroscopy for ion temperature, plasma flow, and density[2]; Thomson scattering for electron temperature; Zeeman splitting for internal magnetic field measurements[3]; and fast framing photography for global structure. Wall stabilization has been investigated computationally and experimentally by removing 70% of the surrounding conducting wall to demonstrate no change in stability behavior.[4] Experimental evidence suggests that the plasma lifetime is only limited by plasma supply and current waveform. The flow Z-pinch concept provides an approach to achieve high energy density plasmas,[5] which are large, easy to diagnose, and persist for extended durations. A new experiment, ZaP-HD, has been built to investigate this approach by separating the flow Z-pinch formation from the radial compression using a triaxial-electrode configuration. This innovation allows more detailed investigations of the sheared flow stabilizing effect, and it allows compression to much higher densities than previously achieved on ZaP by reducing the linear density and increasing the pinch current. Experimental results and

  12. Imaging using Energy Densities of Diffuse Seismic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Sesma, F. J.; Scherbaum, F.; Luzón, F.; García-Jerez, A.; Rodriguez-Castellanos, A.; Iturrarán-Viveros, U.; Campillo, M.

    2009-12-01

    The pioneering studies of Aki (1957) have contributed to the understanding of coda waves and seismic noise. Various scattering formulations have been developed in order to explain coda (see Aki and Chouet, 1975; Sato and Fehler, 1998). When multiple scattering takes place the intensities (which are related to energy densities) follow diffusion-like equations. Due to multiple scattering, coda waves arrive at a given site from different directions. Here we assume that source and receiver are both at the same point and explore the consequences. The resulting autocorrelation is proportional to the energy density at a given point. On the other hand, the imaginary part of the Green function at the source is finite because the singularity of the Green function is restricted to the real part. Thus, the energy density at a point is proportional to the trace of the imaginary part of Green function at the source itself which is indeed such point. The relationships among energy densities and its partitions have been studied by Perton et al. (2009) and Margerin et al (2009). The Green function may be useful to imaging or inverting the subsurface structure at the site. In fact, the connection of the imaginary part of the Green function at the source with the optical theorem has been explored by Snieder et al. (2009). For horizontally layered systems this relationship for Green function was discovered by Claerbout (1968). His formulation states the relationship between the transmission response and the reflection response for P waves in a horizontally layered medium and vertical incidence. Scherbaum (1987) developed an algorithm to identify reflection coefficients based upon Claerbout results. From the normalized average autocorrelations, via Fourier inversion, pseudo-reflection seismograms, for the three components, can be obtained which in turn can be inverted for the impedance structure by exploiting Levinson recursion. Here we explore synthetic examples and assess the

  13. Nuclear clustering in the energy density functional approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebran, J.-P., E-mail: jean-paul.ebran@cea.fr [CEA,DAM,DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Khan, E. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire, Université Paris-Sud CEA, IN2P3 CNRS, F-91406 Orsay Cedex (France); Nikšić, T.; Vretenar, D. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2015-10-15

    Nuclear Energy Density Functionals (EDFs) are a microscopic tool of choice extensively used over the whole chart to successfully describe the properties of atomic nuclei ensuing from their quantum liquid nature. In the last decade, they also have proved their ability to deal with the cluster phenomenon, shedding a new light on its fundamental understanding by treating on an equal footing both quantum liquid and cluster aspects of nuclei. Such a unified microscopic description based on nucleonic degrees of freedom enables to tackle the question pertaining to the origin of the cluster phenomenon and emphasizes intrinsic mechanisms leading to the emergence of clusters in nuclei.

  14. Ultralow energy ion beam surface modification of low density polyethylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenton, Martyn J; Bradley, James W; van den Berg, Jaap A; Armour, David G; Stevens, Gary C

    2005-12-01

    Ultralow energy Ar+ and O+ ion beam irradiation of low density polyethylene has been carried out under controlled dose and monoenergetic conditions. XPS of Ar+-treated surfaces exposed to ambient atmosphere show that the bombardment of 50 eV Ar+ ions at a total dose of 10(16) cm(-2) gives rise to very reactive surfaces with oxygen incorporation at about 50% of the species present in the upper surface layer. Using pure O+ beam irradiation, comparatively low O incorporation is achieved without exposure to atmosphere (approximately 13% O in the upper surface). However, if the surface is activated by Ar+ pretreatment, then large oxygen contents can be achieved under subsequent O+ irradiation (up to 48% O). The results show that for very low energy (20 eV) oxygen ions there is a dose threshold of about 5 x 10(15) cm(-2) before surface oxygen incorporation is observed. It appears that, for both Ar+ and O+ ions in this regime, the degree of surface modification is only very weakly dependent on the ion energy. The results suggest that in the nonequilibrium plasma treatment of polymers, where the ion flux is typically 10(18) m(-2) s(-1), low energy ions (<50 eV) may be responsible for surface chemical modification.

  15. Reduced density matrix hybrid approach: Application to electronic energy transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berkelbach, Timothy C.; Reichman, David R. [Department of Chemistry, Columbia University, 3000 Broadway, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Markland, Thomas E. [Department of Chemistry, Stanford University, 333 Campus Drive, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2012-02-28

    Electronic energy transfer in the condensed phase, such as that occurring in photosynthetic complexes, frequently occurs in regimes where the energy scales of the system and environment are similar. This situation provides a challenge to theoretical investigation since most approaches are accurate only when a certain energetic parameter is small compared to others in the problem. Here we show that in these difficult regimes, the Ehrenfest approach provides a good starting point for a dynamical description of the energy transfer process due to its ability to accurately treat coupling to slow environmental modes. To further improve on the accuracy of the Ehrenfest approach, we use our reduced density matrix hybrid framework to treat the faster environmental modes quantum mechanically, at the level of a perturbative master equation. This combined approach is shown to provide an efficient and quantitative description of electronic energy transfer in a model dimer and the Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex and is used to investigate the effect of environmental preparation on the resulting dynamics.

  16. Strongly Interacting Matter at Very High Energy Density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLerran, L.

    2011-06-05

    The authors discuss the study of matter at very high energy density. In particular: what are the scientific questions; what are the opportunities to makes significant progress in the study of such matter and what facilities are now or might be available in the future to answer the scientific questions? The theoretical and experimental study of new forms of high energy density matter is still very much a 'wild west' field. There is much freedom for developing new concepts which can have order one effects on the way we think about such matter. It is also a largely 'lawless' field, in that concepts and methods are being developed as new information is generated. There is also great possibility for new experimental discovery. Most of the exciting results from RHIC experiments were unanticipated. The methods used for studying various effects like flow, jet quenching, the ridge, two particle correlations etc. were developed as experiments evolved. I believe this will continue to be the case at LHC and as we use existing and proposed accelerators to turn theoretical conjecture into tangible reality. At some point this will no doubt evolve into a precision science, and that will make the field more respectable, but for my taste, the 'wild west' times are the most fun.

  17. Emergence of running dark energy from polynomial f( R) theory in Palatini formalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szydłowski, Marek; Stachowski, Aleksander; Borowiec, Andrzej

    2017-09-01

    We consider FRW cosmology in f(R)= R+ γ R^2+δ R^3 modified framework. The Palatini approach reduces its dynamics to the simple generalization of Friedmann equation. Thus we study the dynamics in two-dimensional phase space with some details. After reformulation of the model in the Einstein frame, it reduces to the FRW cosmological model with a homogeneous scalar field and vanishing kinetic energy term. This potential determines the running cosmological constant term as a function of the Ricci scalar. As a result we obtain the emergent dark energy parametrization from the covariant theory. We study also singularities of the model and demonstrate that in the Einstein frame some undesirable singularities disappear.

  18. Emergence of running dark energy from polynomial f(R) theory in Palatini formalism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szydlowski, Marek [Jagiellonian University, Astronomical Observatory, Krakow (Poland); Jagiellonian University, Mark Kac Complex Systems Research Centre, Krakow (Poland); Stachowski, Aleksander [Jagiellonian University, Astronomical Observatory, Krakow (Poland); Borowiec, Andrzej [University of Wroclaw, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Wroclaw (Poland)

    2017-09-15

    We consider FRW cosmology in f(R)= R + γR{sup 2} + δR{sup 3} modified framework. The Palatini approach reduces its dynamics to the simple generalization of Friedmann equation. Thus we study the dynamics in two-dimensional phase space with some details. After reformulation of the model in the Einstein frame, it reduces to the FRW cosmological model with a homogeneous scalar field and vanishing kinetic energy term. This potential determines the running cosmological constant term as a function of the Ricci scalar. As a result we obtain the emergent dark energy parametrization from the covariant theory. We study also singularities of the model and demonstrate that in the Einstein frame some undesirable singularities disappear. (orig.)

  19. Physics and applications of high energy density plasmas. Extreme state driven by pulsed electromagnetic energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horioka, Kazuhiko (ed.)

    2002-06-01

    The papers presented at the symposium on ''Physics and application of high energy density plasmas, held December 20-21, 2001 at NIFS'' are collected in this proceedings. The topics covered in the meeting include dense z-pinches, plasma focus, intense charged particle beams, intense radiation sources, discharge pumped X-ray lasers, their diagnostics, and applications of them. The papers reflect the present status and trends in the research field of high energy density plasmas. (author)

  20. High Energy Density Science at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, R W

    2007-10-19

    High energy density science (HEDS), as a discipline that has developed in the United States from National Nuclear Security Agency (NNSA)-sponsored laboratory research programs, is, and will remain, a major component of the NNSA science and technology strategy. Its scientific borders are not restricted to NNSA. 'Frontiers in High Energy Density Physics: The X-Games of Contemporary Science' identified numerous exciting scientific opportunities in this field, while pointing to the need for a overarching interagency plan for its evolution. Meanwhile, construction of the first x-ray free-electron laser, the Office-of-Science-funded Linear Coherent Light Source-LCLS: the world's first free electron x-ray laser, with 100-fsec time resolution, tunable x-ray energies, a high rep rate, and a 10 order-of-magnitude increase in brightness over any other x-ray source--led to the realization that the scientific needs of NNSA and the broader scientific community could be well served by an LCLS HEDS endstation employing both short-pulse and high-energy optical lasers. Development of this concept has been well received in the community. NNSA requested a workshop on the applicability of LCLS to its needs. 'High Energy Density Science at the LCLS: NNSA Defense Programs Mission Need' was held in December 2006. The workshop provided strong support for the relevance of the endstation to NNSA strategic requirements. The range of science that was addressed covered a wide swath of the vast HEDS phase space. The unique possibilities provided by the LCLS in areas of intense interest to NNSA Defense Programs were discussed. The areas of focus included warm dense matter and equations of state, hot dense matter, and behavior of high-pressure materials under conditions of high strain-rate and extreme dynamic loading. Development of new and advanced diagnostic techniques was also addressed. This report lays out the relevant science, as brief summaries (Ch. II), expanded

  1. Constructing qualitative energy concepts in a formal educational context with 6 – 7 year old students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DIMITRIS KOLIOPOULOS

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The research presented in this paper is a preliminary empirical study of primary school children’s ability to construct a qualitative explanatory model for the ‘energy’ concept. The research results are particularly encouraging since it seems that 6-7 year old children are able, following a relevant teaching intervention, to utilize a linear causal reasoning and construct a preliminary energy model. Through the use of this model, the children are able to describe natural phenomena, such as the lighting of a lamp or the movement of a small motor using a battery or a photovoltaic cell.

  2. Using projector augmented-wave (PAW) formalism inside the density-functional perturbation theory; L'utilisation du formalisme PAW en theorie de la fonctionnelle de la densite perturbee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Audouze, Ch

    2006-07-01

    In condensed matter physics, ab-initio simulation allows to get macroscopic quantities (for example equations of state) from microscopic ones, as phonon frequencies which characterize the vibration Eigenmodes of the system. Therefore, one can theoretically predict the behavior of the material at very high pressure conditions, which can be out of reach by experiences. Computations of phonon spectrum are obtained thanks to the linear response theory, where the equations of Density Functional Theory (as the Kohn-Sham model) are perturbed around their fundamental state. The linear response functionality is one of the options included in the ABINIT code, which is an open source package developed in particular by a team of the CEA-DAM (DPTA) and the Catholic University of Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium). Nevertheless, in spite of using pseudopotentials, computations of phonon spectrum are not tractable for heavy chemical elements, even on massively parallel computers. In order to overcome this difficulty, the linear response theory had to be extended to the PAW (Projector Augmented-Waves) formalism. In this CEA report, we first detail the PAW model, giving to it a more mathematical framework. Then we establish the linear response equations within the PAW formalism, up to the third order derivative of the total energy, for an isolated molecular system and for generic perturbations. Lastly, all these results are specified to the particular case of atom displacements and for perturbations associated to the change of an external potential in which the molecule is set. (author)

  3. Excitation Energies Through the Locally Renormalized Equation-of-Motion Formalism: Singles and Doubles Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowalski, Karol

    2006-09-28

    The stationary conditions obtained from approximate coupled-cluster functional derived from the Numerator-Denominator connected Expansion (NDC) [K. Kowalski, P. Piecuch, J Chem. Phys. 122 (2005) 074107] are employed to calculate the linear response of cluster amplitudes. A simple scheme that involves singly and doubly excited amplitudes, termed locally renormalized equation-of-motion approach with singles and doubles (LR-EOMCCSD), is compared with other excited-state methods that include up to two-body operators in the wavefunction expansion. In particular, the impact of the local denominators on the excitation energies is discussed in detail. Several benchmark calculations on the CH+, C?, N?, O?, CIOCI molecules are presented to illustrate the performance of the LR-EOMCCSD approach.

  4. Sodium pentazolate: A nitrogen rich high energy density material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Brad A.; Oleynik, Ivan I.

    2016-01-01

    Sodium pentazolates NaN5 and Na2N5, new high energy density materials, are discovered during first principles crystal structure search for the compounds of varying amounts of elemental sodium and nitrogen. The pentazole anion (N5-) is stabilized in the condensed phase by sodium Na+ cations at pressures exceeding 20 GPa, and becomes metastable upon release of pressure. The sodium azide (NaN3) precursor is predicted to undergo a chemical transformation above 50 GPa into sodium pentazolates NaN5 and Na2N5. The calculated Raman spectrum of NaN5 is in agreement with the experimental Raman spectrum of a previously unidentified substance appearing upon compression and heating of NaN3.

  5. DIAGNOSTICS FOR ION BEAM DRIVEN HIGH ENERGY DENSITY PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bieniosek, F.M.; Henestroza, E.; Lidia, S.; Ni, P.A.

    2010-01-04

    Intense beams of heavy ions are capable of heating volumetric samples of matter to high energy density. Experiments are performed on the resulting warm dense matter (WDM) at the NDCX-I ion beam accelerator. The 0.3 MeV, 30-mA K{sup +} beam from NDCX-I heats foil targets by combined longitudinal and transverse neutralized drift compression of the ion beam. Both the compressed and uncompressed parts of the NDCX-I beam heat targets. The exotic state of matter (WDM) in these experiments requires specialized diagnostic techniques. We have developed a target chamber and fielded target diagnostics including a fast multi-channel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, laser Doppler-shift interferometer (VISAR), beam transmission diagnostics, and high-speed gated cameras. We also present plans and opportunities for diagnostic development and a new target chamber for NDCX-II.

  6. Building a universal nuclear energy density functional (UNEDF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazarewicz, Witold [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The long-term vision initiated with UNEDF is to arrive at a comprehensive, quantitative, and unified description of nuclei and their reactions, grounded in the fundamental interactions between the constituent nucleons. We seek to replace current phenomenological models of nuclear structure and reactions with a well-founded microscopic theory that delivers maximum predictive power with well-quantified uncertainties. Specifically, the mission of this project has been three-fold: First, to find an optimal energy density functional (EDF) using all our knowledge of the nucleonic Hamiltonian and basic nuclear properties. Second, to apply the EDF theory and its extensions to validate the functional using all the available relevant nuclear structure and reaction data. Third, to apply the validated theory to properties of interest that cannot be measured, in particular the properties needed for reaction theory.

  7. 5th International conference on High Energy Density Laboratory Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Kyrala, G.A

    2005-01-01

    During the past several years, research teams around the world have developed astrophysics-relevant utilizing high energy-density facilities such as intense lasers and z-pinches. Research is underway in many areas, such as compressible hydrodynamic mixing, strong shock phenomena, radiation flow, radiative shocks and jets, complex opacities, equations o fstat, and relativistic plasmas. Beyond this current research and the papers it is producing, plans are being made for the application, to astrophysics-relevant research, of the 2 MJ National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; the 600 kj Ligne d'Intergration Laser (LIL) and the 2 MJ Laser Megajoule (LMJ) in Bordeaux, France; petawatt-range lasers now under construction around the world; and current and future Z pinches. The goal of this conference and these proceedings is to continue focusing and attention on this emerging research area. The conference brought together different scientists interested in this emerging new fi...

  8. High Volumetric Energy Density Hybrid Supercapacitors Based on Reduced Graphene Oxide Scrolls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rani, Janardhanan R; Thangavel, Ranjith; Oh, Se-I; Woo, Jeong Min; Chandra Das, Nayan; Kim, So-Yeon; Lee, Yun-Sung; Jang, Jae-Hyung

    2017-07-12

    The low volumetric energy density of reduced graphene oxide (rGO)-based electrodes limits its application in commercial electrochemical energy storage devices that require high-performance energy storage capacities in small volumes. The volumetric energy density of rGO-based electrode materials is very low due to their low packing density. A supercapacitor with enhanced packing density and high volumetric energy density is fabricated using doped rGO scrolls (GFNSs) as the electrode material. The restacking of rGO sheets is successfully controlled through synthesizing the doped scroll structures while increasing the packing density. The fabricated cell exhibits an ultrahigh volumetric energy density of 49.66 Wh/L with excellent cycling stability (>10 000 cycles). This unique design strategy for the electrode material has significant potential for the future supercapacitors with high volumetric energy densities.

  9. High energy density physics issues related to Future Circular Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahir, N. A.; Burkart, F.; Schmidt, R.; Shutov, A.; Wollmann, D.; Piriz, A. R.

    2017-07-01

    A design study for a post-Large Hadron Collider accelerator named, Future Circular Collider (FCC), is being carried out by the International Scientific Community. A complete design report is expected to be ready by spring 2018. The FCC will accelerate two counter rotating beams of 50 TeV protons in a tunnel having a length (circumference) of 100 km. Each beam will be comprised of 10 600 proton bunches, with each bunch having an intensity of 1011 protons. The bunch length is of 0.5 ns, and two neighboring bunches are separated by 25 ns. Although there is an option for 5 ns bunch separation as well, in the present studies, we consider the former case only. The total energy stored in each FCC beam is about 8.5 GJ, which is equivalent to the kinetic energy of Airbus 380 (560 t) flying at a speed of 850 km/h. Machine protection is a very important issue while operating with such powerful beams. It is important to have an estimate of the damage caused to the equipment and accelerator components due to the accidental release of a partial or total beam at a given point. For this purpose, we carried out numerical simulations of full impact of one FCC beam on an extended solid copper target. These simulations have been done employing an energy deposition code, FLUKA, and a two-dimensional hydrodynamic code, BIG2, iteratively. This study shows that although the static range of a single FCC proton and its shower is about 1.5 m in solid copper, the entire beam will penetrate around 350 m into the target. This substantial increase in the range is due to the hydrodynamic tunneling of the beam. Our calculations also show that a large part of the target will be converted into high energy density matter including warm dense matter and strongly coupled plasmas.

  10. Energy density and energy flow of surface waves in a strongly magnetized graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Afshin

    2018-01-01

    General expressions for the energy density and energy flow of plasmonic waves in a two-dimensional massless electron gas (as a simple model of graphene) are obtained by means of the linearized magneto-hydrodynamic model and classical electromagnetic theory when a strong external magnetic field perpendicular to the system is present. Also, analytical expressions for the energy velocity, wave polarization, wave impedance, transverse and longitudinal field strength functions, and attenuation length of surface magneto-plasmon-polariton waves are derived, and numerical results are prepared.

  11. Formal matrices

    CERN Document Server

    Krylov, Piotr

    2017-01-01

    This monograph is a comprehensive account of formal matrices, examining homological properties of modules over formal matrix rings and summarising the interplay between Morita contexts and K theory. While various special types of formal matrix rings have been studied for a long time from several points of view and appear in various textbooks, for instance to examine equivalences of module categories and to illustrate rings with one-sided non-symmetric properties, this particular class of rings has, so far, not been treated systematically. Exploring formal matrix rings of order 2 and introducing the notion of the determinant of a formal matrix over a commutative ring, this monograph further covers the Grothendieck and Whitehead groups of rings. Graduate students and researchers interested in ring theory, module theory and operator algebras will find this book particularly valuable. Containing numerous examples, Formal Matrices is a largely self-contained and accessible introduction to the topic, assuming a sol...

  12. A formal derivation of the local energy transfer (LET) theory of homogeneous turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    McComb, W. D.; Yoffe, S. R.

    2017-09-01

    A statistical closure of the Navier-Stokes hierarchy which leads to equations for the two-point, two-time covariance of the velocity field for stationary, homogeneous isotropic turbulence is presented. It is a generalisation of the self-consistent field method due to Edwards (1964) for the stationary, single-time velocity covariance. The probability distribution functional P≤ft[\\mathbf{u},t\\right] is obtained, in the form of a series, from the Liouville equation by means of a perturbation expansion about a Gaussian distribution, which is chosen to give the exact two-point, two-time covariance. The triple moment is calculated in terms of an ensemble-averaged infinitesimal velocity-field propagator, and shown to yield the Edwards result as a special case. The use of a Gaussian zero-order distribution has been found to justify the introduction of a fluctuation-response relation, which is in accord with modern dynamical theories. In a sense this work completes the analogy drawn by Edwards between turbulence and Brownian motion. Originally Edwards had shown that the noise input was determined by the correlation of the velocity field with the externally applied stirring forces but was unable to determine the system response. Now we find that the system response is determined by the correlation of the velocity field with internal quasi-entropic forces. This analysis is valid to all orders of perturbation theory, and allows the recovery of the local energy transfer (LET) theory, which had previously been derived by more heuristical methods. The LET theory is known to be in good agreement with experimental results. It is also unique among two-point statistical closures in displaying an acceptable (i.e. non-Markovian) relationship between the transfer spectrum and the system response, in accordance with experimental results. As a result of the latter property, it is compatible with the Kolmogorov (K41) spectral phenomenology. In memory of Professor Sir Sam Edwards F

  13. Comparison of renewable fuels based on their land use using energy densities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkman, T. J.; Benders, R. M. J.

    2010-01-01

    In this article energy densities of selected renewable fuels are determined. Energy density is defined here as the annual energy production per hectare, taking energy inputs into account. Using 5 scenarios, consisting of 1 set focusing on technical differences and 1 set focusing on geographical

  14. Analytic energy-level densities of separable harmonic oscillators including approximate hindered rotor corrections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Döntgen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Energy-level densities are key for obtaining various chemical properties. In chemical kinetics, energy-level densities are used to predict thermochemistry and microscopic reaction rates. Here, an analytic energy-level density formulation is derived using inverse Laplace transformation of harmonic oscillator partition functions. Anharmonic contributions to the energy-level density are considered approximately using a literature model for the transition from harmonic to free motions. The present analytic energy-level density formulation for rigid rotor-harmonic oscillator systems is validated against the well-studied CO+O˙H system. The approximate hindered rotor energy-level density corrections are validated against the well-studied H2O2 system. The presented analytic energy-level density formulation gives a basis for developing novel numerical simulation schemes for chemical processes.

  15. Learning about the energy density of liquid and semi-solid foods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hogenkamp, P.S.; Stafleu, A.; Mars, M.; Graaf, de C.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: People learn about a food's satiating capacity by exposure and consequently adjust their energy intake. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of energy density and texture on subsequent energy intake adjustments during repeated consumption. DESIGN: In a randomized crossover design,

  16. Dietary Energy Density in the Australian Adult Population from National Nutrition Surveys 1995 to 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grech, Amanda Lee; Rangan, Anna; Allman-Farinelli, Margaret

    2017-12-01

    It is hypothesized that the observed proliferation of energy-dense, nutrient-poor foods globally is an important contributing factor to the development of the obesity epidemic. However, evidence that the population's dietary energy density has increased is sparse. The World Cancer Research Fund recommends that dietary energy density be energy density of the Australian population has changed between 1995 and 2012. A secondary analysis of two cross-sectional Australian national nutrition surveys from 1995 and 2011/2012 was conducted. Participants of the surveys included adults aged 18 years and older (1995 n=10,986 and 2011/2012 n=9,435) completing 24-hour dietary recalls, including a second recall for a subset of the population (10.4% in 1995 and 64.6% in 2011/2012). Outcome measures included the change in dietary energy density (calculated as energy/weight of food [kcal/g] for food only) between surveys. The National Cancer Institute method for "estimating ratios of two dietary components that are consumed nearly every day" was used to determine the usual distribution and the percentage of participants reporting energy density energy density was 1.59 (0.26) kcal/g and 1.64 (0.32) kcal/g (Penergy-density recommendations. For those aged 70 years and older, the percentage with energy density energy density energy density has increased between the two surveys and few people consumed low energy-dense diets in line with recommendations. The change was largely due to increased energy density of older adult's diets, while young adults had high dietary energy density at both time points. These data suggest efforts now focus on the evaluation of the role of modifying energy density of the diet to reduce the risk of weight gain in adults. Copyright © 2017 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. A comparison between state-specific and linear-response formalisms for the calculation of vertical electronic transition energy in solution with the CCSD-PCM method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caricato, Marco

    2013-07-28

    The calculation of vertical electronic transition energies of molecular systems in solution with accurate quantum mechanical methods requires the use of approximate and yet reliable models to describe the effect of the solvent on the electronic structure of the solute. The polarizable continuum model (PCM) of solvation represents a computationally efficient way to describe this effect, especially when combined with coupled cluster (CC) methods. Two formalisms are available to compute transition energies within the PCM framework: State-Specific (SS) and Linear-Response (LR). The former provides a more complete account of the solute-solvent polarization in the excited states, while the latter is computationally very efficient (i.e., comparable to gas phase) and transition properties are well defined. In this work, I review the theory for the two formalisms within CC theory with a focus on their computational requirements, and present the first implementation of the LR-PCM formalism with the coupled cluster singles and doubles method (CCSD). Transition energies computed with LR- and SS-CCSD-PCM are presented, as well as a comparison between solvation models in the LR approach. The numerical results show that the two formalisms provide different absolute values of transition energy, but similar relative solvatochromic shifts (from nonpolar to polar solvents). The LR formalism may then be used to explore the solvent effect on multiple states and evaluate transition probabilities, while the SS formalism may be used to refine the description of specific states and for the exploration of excited state potential energy surfaces of solvated systems.

  18. A generalized model for estimating the energy density of invertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Daniel A.; Csargo, Isak J.; Von Eschen, Aaron; Thul, Megan D.; Baker, James M.; Hayer, Cari-Ann; Howell, Jessica; Krause, Jacob; Letvin, Alex; Chipps, Steven R.

    2012-01-01

    Invertebrate energy density (ED) values are traditionally measured using bomb calorimetry. However, many researchers rely on a few published literature sources to obtain ED values because of time and sampling constraints on measuring ED with bomb calorimetry. Literature values often do not account for spatial or temporal variability associated with invertebrate ED. Thus, these values can be unreliable for use in models and other ecological applications. We evaluated the generality of the relationship between invertebrate ED and proportion of dry-to-wet mass (pDM). We then developed and tested a regression model to predict ED from pDM based on a taxonomically, spatially, and temporally diverse sample of invertebrates representing 28 orders in aquatic (freshwater, estuarine, and marine) and terrestrial (temperate and arid) habitats from 4 continents and 2 oceans. Samples included invertebrates collected in all seasons over the last 19 y. Evaluation of these data revealed a significant relationship between ED and pDM (r2  =  0.96, p joint confidence region included the intercept of 0 (−103.0 ± 707.9) and slope of 1 (1.01 ± 0.12). Use of this model requires that only dry and wet mass measurements be obtained, resulting in significant time, sample size, and cost savings compared to traditional bomb calorimetry approaches. This model should prove useful for a wide range of ecological studies because it is unaffected by taxonomic, seasonal, or spatial variability.

  19. The Atlas High-Energy Density Physics Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Harold A.

    1998-11-01

    Atlas is a pulsed-power facility under development at Los Alamos National Laboratory to drive high-energy density experiments. It is optimized for materials properties and hydrodynamics experiments under extreme conditions. The system is designed to implode heavy liner loads ( ~ 50 g) with a peak current of 30 MA delivered in 4 μs. Atlas will be operational near the end of 2000 and is designed to provide 100 shots per year. The Atlas capacitor bank consists of an array of 240-kV Marx modules storing a total of 23 MJ. The bank is resistively damped to limit fault currents and capacitor voltage reversal and will have 16 nH total initial inductance. The current is propagated radially from the Marx generators to the one-meter radius by 24 vertical, triplate, oil-insulated transmission lines. A combination of flat and conical, radially converging transmission lines will deliver the current to the load from the one-meter radius. A prototype Marx generator has been successfully tested at full charge voltage. For many applications the Atlas liner will be a nominal 50-gram-aluminum cylinder with ~ 5-cm radius and 4-cm length. Implosion velocities exceeding 1.4 cm/μs are predicted. Using composite inner layers and a variety of interior target designs, a wide array of experiments in cm^3 volumes may be performed.---Sponsored by US DOE under contract W-7405-ENG-36

  20. Building A Universal Nuclear Energy Density Functional (UNEDF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, Joe [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Furnstahl, Dick [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Horoi, Mihai [Central Michigan Univ., Mount Pleasant, MI (United States); Lusk, Rusty [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Nazarewicz, Witek [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Ng, Esmond [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Thompson, Ian [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Vary, James [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2012-09-30

    During the period of Dec. 1 2006 - Jun. 30, 2012, the UNEDF collaboration carried out a comprehensive study of all nuclei, based on the most accurate knowledge of the strong nuclear interaction, the most reliable theoretical approaches, the most advanced algorithms, and extensive computational resources, with a view towards scaling to the petaflop platforms and beyond. The long-term vision initiated with UNEDF is to arrive at a comprehensive, quantitative, and unified description of nuclei and their reactions, grounded in the fundamental interactions between the constituent nucleons. We seek to replace current phenomenological models of nuclear structure and reactions with a well-founded microscopic theory that delivers maximum predictive power with well-quantified uncertainties. Specifically, the mission of this project has been three-fold: first, to find an optimal energy density functional (EDF) using all our knowledge of the nucleonic Hamiltonian and basic nuclear properties; second, to apply the EDF theory and its extensions to validate the functional using all the available relevant nuclear structure and reaction data; third, to apply the validated theory to properties of interest that cannot be measured, in particular the properties needed for reaction theory. The main physics areas of UNEDF, defined at the beginning of the project, were: ab initio structure; ab initio functionals; DFT applications; DFT extensions; reactions.

  1. Replacing critical rare earth materials in high energy density magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCallum, R. William

    2012-02-01

    High energy density permanent magnets are crucial to the design of internal permanent magnet motors (IPM) for hybride and electric vehicles and direct drive wind generators. Current motor designs use rare earth permanent magnets which easily meet the performance goals, however, the rising concerns over cost and foreign control of the current supply of rare earth resources has motivated a search for non-rare earth based permanent magnets alloys with performance metrics which allow the design of permanent magnet motors and generators without rare earth magnets. This talk will discuss the state of non-rare-earth permanent magnets and efforts to both improve the current materials and find new materials. These efforts combine first principles calculations and meso-scale magnetic modeling with advance characterization and synthesis techniques in order to advance the state of the art in non rare earth permanent magnets. The use of genetic algorithms in first principle structural calculations, combinatorial synthesis in the experimental search for materials, atom probe microscopy to characterize grain boundaries on the atomic level, and other state of the art techniques will be discussed. In addition the possibility of replacing critical rare earth elements with the most abundant rare earth Ce will be discussed.

  2. Plasma polymerized high energy density dielectric films for capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagishi, F. G.

    1983-01-01

    High energy density polymeric dielectric films were prepared by plasma polymerization of a variety of gaseous monomers. This technique gives thin, reproducible, pinhole free, conformable, adherent, and insoluble coatings and overcomes the processing problems found in the preparation of thin films with bulk polymers. Thus, devices are prepared completely in a vacuum environment. The plasma polymerized films prepared all showed dielectric strengths of greater than 1000 kV/cm and in some cases values of greater than 4000 kV/cm were observed. The dielectric loss of all films was generally less than 1% at frequencies below 10 kHz, but this value increased at higher frequencies. All films were self healing. The dielectric strength was a function of the polymerization technique, whereas the dielectric constant varied with the structure of the starting material. Because of the thin films used (thickness in the submicron range) surface smoothness of the metal electrodes was found to be critical in obtaining high dielectric strengths. High dielectric strength graft copolymers were also prepared. Plasma polymerized ethane was found to be thermally stable up to 150 C in the presence of air and 250 C in the absence of air. No glass transitions were observed for this material.

  3. Strain Energy Density in the Elastodynamics of the Spacetime Continuum and the Electromagnetic Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Millette P. A.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the strain energy density of the spacetime continuum in the Elasto- dynamics of the Spacetime Continuum by applying continuum m echanical results to strained spacetime. The strain energy density is a scalar. W e find that it is separated into two terms: the first one expresses the dilatation energy density (the “mass” longitu- dinal term while the second one expresses the distortion en ergy density (the “massless” transverse term. The quadratic structure of the energy rel ation of Special Relativity is found to be present in the theory. In addition, we find that the kinetic energy pc is car- ried by the distortion part of the deformation, while the dil atation part carries only the rest-mass energy. The strain energy density of the electrom agnetic energy-momentum stress tensor is calculated. The dilatation energy density (the rest-mass energy density of the photon is found to be 0 as expected. The transverse dis tortion energy density is found to include a longitudinal electromagnetic energy fl ux term, from the Poynting vector, that is massless as it is due to distortion, not dilatation, of the spacetime con- tinuum. However, because this energy flux is along the direct ion of propagation (i.e. longitudinal, it gives rise to the particle aspect of the el ectromagnetic field, the photon.

  4. Proton and neutron density distributions at supranormal density in low- and medium-energy heavy-ion collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, J. R.; Danielewicz, P.; Iwata, Y.

    2017-07-01

    Background: The distribution of protons and neutrons in the matter created in heavy-ion collisions is one of the main points of interest for the collision physics, especially at supranormal densities. These distributions are the basis for predictions of the density dependence of the symmetry energy and the density range that can be achieved in a given colliding system. We report results of the first systematic simulation of proton and neutron density distributions in central heavy-ion collisions within the beam energy range of Ebeam≤800 MeV /nucl . The symmetric 40Ca+40Ca , 48Ca+48Ca , 100Sn+100Sn , and 120Sn+120Sn and asymmetric 40Ca+48Ca and 100Sn+120Sn systems were chosen for the simulations. Purpose: We simulate development of proton and neutron densities and asymmetries as a function of initial state, beam energy, and system size in the selected collisions in order to guide further experiments pursuing the density dependence of the symmetry energy. Methods: The Boltzmann-Uhlenbeck-Uehling (pBUU) transport model with four empirical models for the density dependence of the symmetry energy was employed. Results of simulations using pure Vlasov dynamics were added for completeness. In addition, the time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) model, with the SV-bas Skyrme interaction, was used to model the heavy-ion collisions at Ebeam≤40 MeV /nucl . Maximum proton and neutron densities ρpmax and ρnmax, reached in the course of a collision, were determined from the time evolution of ρp and ρn. Results: The highest total densities predicted at Ebeam=800 MeV /nucl . were of the order of ˜2.5 ρ0 (ρ0=0.16 fm-3 ) for both Sn and Ca systems. They were found to be only weakly dependent on the initial conditions, beam energy, system size, and a model of the symmetry energy. The proton-neutron asymmetry δ =(ρnmax-ρpmax) /(ρnmax+ρpmax) at maximum density does depend, though, on these parameters. The highest value of δ found in all systems and at all investigated beam

  5. High Energy Density Li-Ion Batteries Designed for Low Temperature Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The state-of-the-art Li-ion batteries do not fully meet the energy density, power density and safety requirements specified by NASA for future exploration missions....

  6. Determination of the Density of Energy States in a Quantizing Magnetic Field for Model Kane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Gulyamov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available For nonparabolic dispersion law determined by the density of the energy states in a quantizing magnetic field, the dependence of the density of energy states on temperature in quantizing magnetic fields is studied with the nonquadratic dispersion law. Experimental results obtained for PbTe were analyzed using the suggested model. The continuous spectrum of the energy density of states at low temperature is transformed into discrete Landau levels.

  7. Statistical properties of kinetic and total energy densities in reverberant spaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Finn; Molares, Alfonso Rodriguez

    2010-01-01

    . With the advent of a three-dimensional particle velocity transducer, it has become somewhat easier to measure total rather than only potential energy density in a sound field. This paper examines the ensemble statistics of kinetic and total sound energy densities in reverberant enclosures theoretically......Many acoustical measurements, e.g., measurement of sound power and transmission loss, rely on determining the total sound energy in a reverberation room. The total energy is usually approximated by measuring the mean-square pressure (i.e., the potential energy density) at a number of discrete...... positions. The idea of measuring the total energy density instead of the potential energy density on the assumption that the former quantity varies less with position than the latter goes back to the 1930s. However, the phenomenon was not analyzed until the late 1970s and then only for the region of high...

  8. Design of high energy density thermoelectric energy conversion unit by using FGM compliant pads

    CERN Document Server

    Kambe, M

    1999-01-01

    In order to provide increasingly large amounts of electrical power to space and terrestrial systems with a sufficiently high level of reliability at a reasonable cost, thermoelectric (TE) energy conversion system by using $9 functionally graded material (FGM) compliant pads has been focused. To achieve high thermal energy density in TE power conversion systems, conductively coupling the TE units to the hot and cold heat exchangers is the most effective $9 configuration. This is accomplished by two sets of FGM compliant pads. This design strategy provides (1) a high flux, direct conduction path to heat source and heat sink, (2) the structural flexibility to protect the cell from high $9 stress due to thermal expansion, (3) an extended durability by a simple FGM structure, and (4) manufacturing cost reduction by spark plasma sintering. High thermal energy density of ten times as much as conventional radioisotope $9 thermoelectric generator is expected. Manufacturing of Cu/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3//Cu symmetrical FGM co...

  9. Added soluble fiber enhances the satiating power of low-energy-density liquid yogurts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrigue, Martine M; Monsivais, Pablo; Drewnowski, Adam

    2009-11-01

    Low-energy-density foods with high satiating power may be useful tools for weight management. Energy density of yogurts can range from 0.4 to 1.8 kcal/g. To test the effects of added inulin, a soluble fiber, on the satiating properties of low-energy-density and high-energy-density yogurt beverages (16 oz or 472 mL). The study followed a within-subject preload design with repeated measures. Each participant completed six conditions, presented in a counterbalanced order. Participants were 18 men and 20 women, aged 18 to 35 years. The experimental conditions were two high-energy-density yogurt beverages (440 kcal; 0.9 kcal/g) and two low-energy-density yogurt beverages (180 kcal; 0.4 kcal/g) with or without inulin (6 g) and an equal volume of orange juice (180 kcal). A no beverage control condition was used as well. Repeated ratings of hunger, fullness, and desire to eat and energy consumption at the lunch meal served 120 minutes post-ingestion were the main measures. Repeated measures analyses of variance were used to analyze motivational ratings and energy and nutrient intakes at the test meal. Yogurt beverages and liquid orange juice significantly suppressed appetite and promoted satiety relatively to the no beverage condition. Yogurt beverages had greater satiating power than did orange juice, as evidenced by higher satiety ratings and reduced energy intakes at lunch. The satiating power of low-energy-density yogurt with inulin was comparable to that of high-energy-density yogurt. Energy presented in liquid form can have satiating power. Added fiber can potentiate the satiating properties of low-energy-density liquid yogurts. Adding fiber to low-energy-density foods may be an effective way to suppress appetite and control food intake.

  10. Role of the density, density effect and mean excitation energy in solid-state detectors for small photon fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreo, Pedro; Benmakhlouf, Hamza

    2017-02-21

    A number of recent publications on small photon beam dosimetry aim at contributing to the understanding of the response of solid-state detectors in small fields. Some of them assign the difference in response to the mass density, or to the electron density, of the sensitive detector material relative to that of water. This work analyses the role of the mass and electron density ([Formula: see text]), density effect (δ) and mean excitation energy (I-value) of some detector materials in a 6 MV photon beam of 0.5 cm radius, its rationale being that the response of a detector depends critically on the stopping-power ratio detector-to-water. The influence on the detector response of volume scaling by electron density, and of electron single and multiple scattering, is also investigated. Detector materials are water, diamond and silicon, and additional materials are included for consistency in the analysis. A detailed analysis on the ([Formula: see text]) dependence of stopping-power ratios shows that the density effect δ depends both on the electron density and on the I-value of the medium, but not on the mass density ρ alone as is usually assumed. This leads to a double dependence of stopping-power ratios on the I-value and questions the adequacy of a 'density perturbation factor' or of common interpretations of detector response in terms of ρ alone. Differences in response can be described in terms of the variation of stopping power ratios detector-to-water, mainly due to different I-values and to a lesser extent to different values of electron density. It is found that at low energies the trend of Monte Carlo-calculated electron fluence spectra inside the detector materials depends solely on their I-values. No dependence on mass density or density effect alone is observed at any energy. The trend of restricted-cema ratios to water (as a substitute of absorbed dose ratios) follows that of stopping-power ratios at 1 MeV, the most probable energy of differential

  11. The National Ignition Facility: A New Era in High Energy Density Science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, E

    2009-06-10

    The National Ignition Facility, the world's most energetic laser system, is now operational. This talk will describe NIF, the ignition campaign, and new opportunities in fusion energy and high energy density science enabled by NIF.

  12. High Energy Density Lithium Air Batteries for Oxygen Concentrators Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — For NASA's Exploration Medical Capabilities mission, extremely high specific energy power sources, with specific energy over 2000 Wh/kg, are urgently sought after....

  13. Energy Density, Energy Intake, and Body Weight Regulation in Adults12345

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karl, J. Philip; Roberts, Susan B.

    2014-01-01

    The role of dietary energy density (ED) in the regulation of energy intake (EI) is controversial. Methodologically, there is also debate about whether beverages should be included in dietary ED calculations. To address these issues, studies examining the effects of ED on EI or body weight in nonelderly adults were reviewed. Different approaches to calculating dietary ED do not appear to alter the direction of reported relations between ED and body weight. Evidence that lowering dietary ED reduces EI in short-term studies is convincing, but there are currently insufficient data to determine long-term effectiveness for weight loss. The review also identified key barriers to progress in understanding the role of ED in energy regulation, in particular the absence of a standard definition of ED, and the lack of data from multiple long-term clinical trials examining the effectiveness of low-ED diet recommendations for preventing both primary weight gain and weight regain in nonobese individuals. Long-term clinical trials designed to examine the impact of dietary ED on energy regulation, and including multiple ED calculation methods within the same study, are still needed to determine the importance of ED in the regulation of EI and body weight. PMID:25398750

  14. Pair Interaction Energy Decomposition Analysis for Density Functional Theory and Density-Functional Tight-Binding with an Evaluation of Energy Fluctuations in Molecular Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorov, Dmitri G; Kitaura, Kazuo

    2018-02-15

    Pair interaction energy decomposition analysis in the fragment molecular orbital (FMO) method is extended to treat density functional theory (DFT) and density-functional tight-binding (DFTB). Fluctuations of energy contributions are obtained from molecular dynamics simulations. Interactions at the DFT and DFTB levels are compared to the values obtained with Hartree-Fock, second-order Møller-Plesset (MP2), and coupled cluster methods. Hydrogen bonding in water clusters is analyzed. 200 ps NVT molecular dynamics simulations are performed with FMO for two ligands bound to the Trp-cage miniprotein (PDB 1L2Y ); the fluctuations of fragment energies and interactions are analyzed.

  15. Equation satisfied by electron-electron mutual Coulomb repulsion energy density functional

    OpenAIRE

    Joubert, Daniel P.

    2011-01-01

    The electron-electron mutual Coulomb repulsion energy density functional satisfies an equation that links functionals and functional derivatives at N-electron and (N-1)-electron densities for densities determined from the same adiabatic scaled external potential for the N-electron system.

  16. Density Profiles, Energy, and Oscillation Strength of a Quantum Dot in Two Dimensions with a Harmonic Oscillator External Potential using an Orbital-free Energy Functional Based on Thomas–Fermi Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhufa Alfarisa

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This research aims i to determine the density profile and calculate the ground state energy of a quantum dot in two dimensions (2D with a harmonic oscillator potential using orbital-free density functional theory, and ii to understand the effect of the harmonic oscillator potential strength on the electron density profiles in the quantum dot. This study determines the total energy functional of the quantum dot that is a functional of the density that depends only on spatial variables. The total energy functional consists of three terms. The first term is the kinetic energy functional, which is the Thomas–Fermi approximation in this case. The second term is the external potential. The harmonic oscillator potential is used in this study. The last term is the electron–electron interactions described by the Coulomb interaction. The functional is formally solved to obtain the electron density as a function of spatial variables. This equation cannot be solved analytically, and thus a numerical method is used to determine the profile of the electron density. Using the electron density profiles, the ground state energy of the quantum dot in 2D can be calculated. The ground state energies obtained are 2.464, 22.26, 90.1957, 252.437, and 496.658 au for 2, 6, 12, 20, and 56 electrons, respectively. The highest electron density is localized close to the middle of the quantum dot. The density profiles decrease with the increasing distance, and the lowest density is at the edge of the quantum dot. Generally, increasing the harmonic oscillator potential strength reduces the density profiles around the center of the quantum dot.

  17. Measurements relating fire radiative energy density and surface fuel consumption - RxCADRE 2011 and 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew T. Hudak; Matthew B. Dickinson; Benjamin C. Bright; Robert L. Kremens; E. Louise Loudermilk; Joseph J. O' Brien; Benjamin S. Hornsby; Roger D. Ottmar

    2016-01-01

    Small-scale experiments have demonstrated that fire radiative energy is linearly related to fuel combusted but such a relationship has not been shown at the landscape level of prescribed fires. This paper presents field and remotely sensed measures of pre-fire fuel loads, consumption, fire radiative energy density (FRED) and fire radiative power flux density (FRFD),...

  18. Toward Low-Cost, High-Energy Density, and High-Power Density Lithium-Ion Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianlin; Du, Zhijia; Ruther, Rose E.; AN, Seong Jin; David, Lamuel Abraham; Hays, Kevin; Wood, Marissa; Phillip, Nathan D.; Sheng, Yangping; Mao, Chengyu; Kalnaus, Sergiy; Daniel, Claus; Wood, David L.

    2017-09-01

    Reducing cost and increasing energy density are two barriers for widespread application of lithium-ion batteries in electric vehicles. Although the cost of electric vehicle batteries has been reduced by 70% from 2008 to 2015, the current battery pack cost (268/kWh in 2015) is still >2 times what the USABC targets (125/kWh). Even though many advancements in cell chemistry have been realized since the lithium-ion battery was first commercialized in 1991, few major breakthroughs have occurred in the past decade. Therefore, future cost reduction will rely on cell manufacturing and broader market acceptance. This article discusses three major aspects for cost reduction: (1) quality control to minimize scrap rate in cell manufacturing; (2) novel electrode processing and engineering to reduce processing cost and increase energy density and throughputs; and (3) material development and optimization for lithium-ion batteries with high-energy density. Insights on increasing energy and power densities of lithium-ion batteries are also addressed.

  19. High-energy-density electron beam from interaction of two successive laser pulses with subcritical-density plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. W. Wang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available It is shown by particle-in-cell simulations that a narrow electron beam with high energy and charge density can be generated in a subcritical-density plasma by two consecutive laser pulses. Although the first laser pulse dissipates rapidly, the second pulse can propagate for a long distance in the thin wake channel created by the first pulse and can further accelerate the preaccelerated electrons therein. Given that the second pulse also self-focuses, the resulting electron beam has a narrow waist and high charge and energy densities. Such beams are useful for enhancing the target-back space-charge field in target normal sheath acceleration of ions and bremsstrahlung sources, among others.

  20. High energy-density liquid rocket fuel performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, Douglas C.

    1990-01-01

    A fuel performance database of liquid hydrocarbons and aluminum-hydrocarbon fuels was compiled using engine parametrics from the Space Transportation Engine Program as a baseline. Propellant performance parameters are introduced. General hydrocarbon fuel performance trends are discussed with respect to hydrogen-to-carbon ratio and heat of formation. Aluminum-hydrocarbon fuel performance is discussed with respect to aluminum metal loading. Hydrocarbon and aluminum-hydrocarbon fuel performance is presented with respect to fuel density, specific impulse and propellant density specific impulse.

  1. The energy density of a Landau damped plasma wave

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Best, R. W. B.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper some theories about the energy of a Landau damped plasma wave are discussed and new initial conditions are proposed. Analysis of a wave packet, rather than an infinite wave, gives a clear picture of the energy transport from field to particles. Initial conditions are found which excite

  2. Energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy for nanostructured thin film density evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Prencipe, Irene; Dellasega, David; Zani, Alessandro; Rizzo, Daniele; Passoni, Matteo

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we report on two fast and non-destructive methods for nanostructured film density evaluation based on a combination of energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy for areal density measurement and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) for thickness evaluation. These techniques have been applied to films with density ranging from the density of a solid down to a few , with different compositions and morphologies. The high resolution of an electron microprobe has been exploited to characte...

  3. Dietary energy density was associated with diet quality in Brazilian adults and older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Aline; Pereira, Jaqueline Lopes; Fisberg, Regina Mara; Marchioni, Dirce Maria Lobo

    2016-02-01

    Cross-sectional and longitudinal studies present association of low dietary energy density with higher intake of vitamins, minerals and dietary fiber, lower intake of fat, and better balance of macronutrients. The objective of this study was to verify the relationship between dietary energy density and diet quality measured by an index of diet quality. This study used data from 496 adults and 445 older adults of cross-sectional population-based survey from São Paulo conducted in 2008-2009, Brazil. Dietary intake data was assessed by two 24-h dietary recalls. Dietary energy density values were calculated based on foods only method. Dietary energy density and revised Brazilian Health Eating Index and its components, were estimated by usual intake using Multiple Source Method. The relationship between dietary energy density and the total revised Brazilian Health Eating Index and its components were assessed by Gaussian family log-link model for each age group. The analyses showed an inverse association between dietary energy density and total revised Brazilian Health Eating Index in adults (T2:β = 0.96, p older adults (T2:β = 0.96, p older adults groups. Dietary energy density was associated with diet quality in Brazilian adults and older adults regardless of sex, per capita household income, body mass index, physical activity level, current smoking habits status, alcohol beverage drinking status and usual energy intake (kilocalories) from beverages. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. High Power Density, Lightweight Thermoelectric Metamaterials for Energy Harvesting Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of this project is to precisely control the flow of thermal, electrical and thermoelectrical energy by advancing the development of a new class of...

  5. Adsorption and desorption of propane on Pd (111): A van der Waals density functional study. Energy binding sites and geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    e Silva, Tadeu Leonardo Soares; Schmal, Martin

    2017-10-01

    Palladium supported catalysts used for the partial oxidation of propane reaction aiming the H2 production deserves specific characterizations and theoretical modeling for the explanation of the transition phase and energy needed for the adsorption and desorption of propane on top of the palladium atoms. On the other hand, the product distribution will depend on the adsorption and desorption capacity of the different compounds present during the reaction. In this work, the adsorption of propane on a Pd (111) surface was studied by using different approximations. A periodic method based on the Density Functional Theory (DFT) formalism employing vdW-DF functional was investigated for determining preferred binding sites of propane on palladium. The results show that the adsorption on hcp site is more stable than on top site and predictions fit well the experimental results.

  6. Note: Energy convexity and density matrices in molecular systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochicchio, Roberto C.; Rial, Diego

    2012-12-01

    A novel appropriate definition for the density matrix for an interacting Coulombic driven atomic or molecular system with non-integer number of particles is given. Our approach leads to a direct derivation of the proposal reported by Perdew et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 49, 1691 (1982)], 10.1103/PhysRevLett.49.1691 and points out its suitability and perspective advances.

  7. Probing the nuclear symmetry energy at high densities with nuclear reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leifels, Y.

    2017-11-01

    The nuclear equation of state is a topic of highest current interest in nuclear structure and reactions as well as in astrophysics. The symmetry energy is the part of the equation of state which is connected to the asymmetry in the neutron/proton content. During recent years a multitude of experimental and theoretical efforts on different fields have been undertaken to constraint its density dependence at low densities but also above saturation density (ρ_0=0.16 fm ^{-3} . Conventionally the symmetry energy is described by its magnitude S_v and the slope parameter L , both at saturation density. Values of L = 44 -66MeV and S_v=31 -33MeV have been deduced in recent compilations of nuclear structure, heavy-ion reaction and astrophysics data. Apart from astrophysical data on mass and radii of neutron stars, heavy-ion reactions at incident energies of several 100MeV are the only means do access the high density behaviour of the symmetry energy. In particular, meson production and collective flows upto about 1 AGeV are predicted to be sensitive to the slope of the symmetry energy as a function of density. From the measurement of elliptic flow of neutrons with respect to charged particles at GSI, a more stringent constraint for the slope of the symmetry energy at supra-saturation densities has been deduced. Future options to reach even higher densities will be discussed.

  8. Impact of urban density and building height on energy use in cities

    OpenAIRE

    Resch, Eirik; Bohne, Rolf André; Kvamsdal, Trond; Lohne, Jardar

    2016-01-01

    Compact cities have been attributed to lower per capita energy use. However, the complexity of relationships between the elements that constitute energy consumption in the urban system is poorly understood. Little or no research exist on the relation between energy costs of building taller, and transportation and infrastructure energy benefits of building denser. This study provides a theoretical assessment of how energy use is related to urban density in a densely populated area, to aid the ...

  9. Associations between eating frequency and energy intake, energy density, diet quality and body weight status in adults from the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yong; Hollis, James H

    2016-06-01

    To investigate associations between eating frequency and energy intake, energy density, diet quality and body weight status in adults from the USA, combined data from the 2009-2010 and 2011-2012 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) were used in this study. The first 24-h dietary recall data from eligible participants (4017 men and 3774 women) were used to calculate eating frequency, as well as energy intake, energy density and the Healthy Eating Index 2010 (HEI-2010), as a measure of diet quality. BMI and waist circumference were obtained from the NHANES body measures data. Adjusting for confounding socio-demographic characteristics and lifestyle factors, a higher eating frequency was significantly associated with higher energy intake in both men and women (both Peating frequency was also significantly associated with lower energy density in both men and women, regardless of whether beverage or water intake was included in the calculation of energy density (all Peating frequency and the HEI-2010 total score in both men and women (both PEating frequency was inversely associated with BMI in women (P=0·003), as well as waist circumference in both men (P=0·032) and women (P=0·010). Results from the present study suggested that adults with a higher eating frequency in the USA had a healthier diet with lower energy density and better diet quality, and eating frequency was inversely associated with body weight status.

  10. Estimation of energy density of Li-S batteries with liquid and solid electrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunmei; Zhang, Heng; Otaegui, Laida; Singh, Gurpreet; Armand, Michel; Rodriguez-Martinez, Lide M.

    2016-09-01

    With the exponential growth of technology in mobile devices and the rapid expansion of electric vehicles into the market, it appears that the energy density of the state-of-the-art Li-ion batteries (LIBs) cannot satisfy the practical requirements. Sulfur has been one of the best cathode material choices due to its high charge storage (1675 mAh g-1), natural abundance and easy accessibility. In this paper, calculations are performed for different cell design parameters such as the active material loading, the amount/thickness of electrolyte, the sulfur utilization, etc. to predict the energy density of Li-S cells based on liquid, polymeric and ceramic electrolytes. It demonstrates that Li-S battery is most likely to be competitive in gravimetric energy density, but not volumetric energy density, with current technology, when comparing with LIBs. Furthermore, the cells with polymer and thin ceramic electrolytes show promising potential in terms of high gravimetric energy density, especially the cells with the polymer electrolyte. This estimation study of Li-S energy density can be used as a good guidance for controlling the key design parameters in order to get desirable energy density at cell-level.

  11. Tuning the electron energy by controlling the density perturbation position in laser plasma accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Brijesh, P; Phuoc, K T; Corde, S; Lambert, G; Malka, V; Mangles, S P D; Bloom, M; Kneip, S

    2012-01-01

    A density perturbation produced in an underdense plasma was used to improve the quality of electron bunches produced in the laser-plasma wakefield acceleration scheme. Quasi-monoenergetic electrons were generated by controlled injection in the longitudinal density gradients of the density perturbation. By tuning the position of the density perturbation along the laser propagation axis, a fine control of the electron energy from a mean value of 60 MeV to 120 MeV has been demonstrated with a relative energy-spread of 15 +/- 3.6%, divergence of 4 +/- 0.8 mrad and charge of 6 +/- 1.8 pC.

  12. Measurement of total sound energy density in enclosures at low frequencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Finn

    2008-01-01

    sound energy density (potential and kinetic) is one third of the normalised spatial variance of the potential energy density (the mean square pressure) in a reverberant sound field above the Schroeder frequency. About ten years later this prediction was confirmed experimentally. However, until recently...... it has become somewhat easier to measure total rather than only potential energy density in a sound field. This paper examines the spatial uniformity of potential, kinetic and total sound energy density in enclosures theoretically and experimentally with particular emphasis on the frequency range below......Many acoustic measurements rely on determining the total sound energy in an enclosure; and this quantity is usually estimated by measuring the mean square pressure at a number of discrete positions. Almost 30 years ago it was shown theoretically that the normalised spatial variance of the total...

  13. Integrated formal operations plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cort, G.; Dearholt, W.; Donahue, S.; Frank, J.; Perkins, B.; Tyler, R.; Wrye, J.

    1994-01-05

    The concept of formal operations (that is, a collection of business practices to assure effective, accountable operations) has vexed the Laboratory for many years. To date most attempts at developing such programs have been based upon rigid, compliance-based interpretations of a veritable mountain of Department of Energy (DOE) orders, directives, notices, and standards. These DOE dictates seldom take the broad view but focus on highly specialized programs isolated from the overall context of formal operations. The result is a confusing array of specific, and often contradictory, requirements that produce a patchwork of overlapping niche programs. This unnecessary duplication wastes precious resources, dramatically increases the complexity of our work processes, and communicates a sense of confusion to our customers and regulators. Coupled with the artificial divisions that have historically existed among the Laboratory`s formal operations organizations (quality assurance, configuration management, records management, training, etc.), this approach has produced layers of increasingly vague and complex formal operations plans, each of which interprets its parent and adds additional requirements of its own. Organizational gridlock ensues whenever an activity attempts to implement these bureaucratic monstrosities. The integrated formal operations plan presented is to establish a set of requirements that must be met by an integrated formal operations program, assign responsibilities for implementation and operation of the program, and specify criteria against which the performance of the program will be measured. The accountable line manager specifies the items, processes, and information (the controlled elements) to which the formal operations program specified applies. The formal operations program is implemented using a graded approach based on the level of importance of the various controlled elements and the scope of the activities in which they are involved.

  14. Learning about the energy density of liquid and semi-solid foods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hogenkamp, P.S.; Stafleu, A.; Mars, M.; Graaf C. de

    2012-01-01

    Background:People learn about a food's satiating capacity by exposure and consequently adjust their energy intake.Objective:To investigate the effect of energy density and texture on subsequent energy intake adjustments during repeated consumption.Design:In a randomized crossover design,

  15. Formation energies of rutile metal dioxides using density functional theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez, Jose Ignacio; Hansen, Heine Anton; Rossmeisl, Jan

    2009-01-01

    the formation energy of the oxygen molecule and the electron self-interaction for localized d and f electrons are known shortcomings. In this paper we show that despite the known problems, it is possible to calculate the stability of a wide range of rutile oxides MO2, with M being Pt, Ru, Ir, Os, Pb, Re, Mn, Se...

  16. Density content of nuclear symmetry energy from nuclear observables

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the matter in the neutron stars must be charge neutral and in β-equilibrium. Such matter is highly asymmetric, it is predominantly composed of neutrons and so the symmetry energy critically controls the nuclear pressure of such a system. The nuclear part of the equation of state (EoS) for the neutron star matter can be.

  17. Local kinetic-energy density of the Airy gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vitos, Levente; Johansson, B.; Kollár, J.

    2000-01-01

    The Airy gas model is used to derive an expression for the local kinetic energy in the linear potential approximation. The expression contains an explicit Laplacian term 2/5((h) over bar(2)/2m)del(mu)(2)(r) that, according to jellium surface calculations, must be a universal feature of any accurate...

  18. Dietary energy density is positively associated with risk of pancreatic cancer in urban Shanghai Chinese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Zhang, Wei; Sun, Lu; Yu, Herbert; Ni, Quan-Xing; Risch, Harvey A; Gao, Yu-Tang

    2013-10-01

    Regular consumption of energy-dense foods predisposes to obesity and type 2 diabetes, both of which are suggested risk factors for pancreatic cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate whether energy density of foods is an independent risk factor for pancreatic cancer. In this population-based case-control study in urban Shanghai, 908 patients with pancreatic cancer and 1067 normal controls, aged 35-79 y, were recruited. The energy density for overall diet was calculated from food-frequency questionnaire data. Energy density (adjusted for age, sex, and total energy intake) was significantly higher in cases (6.08 ± 0.04 kJ/g) than in controls (5.91 ± 0.04 kJ/g) (P = 0.003). Energy density was positively associated with pancreatic cancer risk (OR: 1.16 per unit increase; 95% CI: 1.07, 1.27; P risk of pancreatic cancer was 72% greater (OR: 1.72; 95% CI: 1.25, 2.35; P = 0.001) in the highest quintile of energy density compared with the lowest quintile. In this case-control study, dietary energy density is positively associated with risk of pancreatic cancer. This association should be further investigated in prospective studies.

  19. A Low-Cost Neutral Zinc-Iron Flow Battery with High Energy Density for Stationary Energy Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Congxin; Duan, Yinqi; Xu, Wenbin; Zhang, Huamin; Li, Xianfeng

    2017-11-20

    Flow batteries (FBs) are one of the most promising stationary energy-storage devices for storing renewable energy. However, commercial progress of FBs is limited by their high cost and low energy density. A neutral zinc-iron FB with very low cost and high energy density is presented. By using highly soluble FeCl 2 /ZnBr 2 species, a charge energy density of 56.30 Wh L -1 can be achieved. DFT calculations demonstrated that glycine can combine with iron to suppress hydrolysis and crossover of Fe 3+ /Fe 2+ . The results indicated that an energy efficiency of 86.66 % can be obtained at 40 mA cm -2 and the battery can run stably for more than 100 cycles. Furthermore, a low-cost porous membrane was employed to lower the capital cost to less than $ 50 per kWh, which was the lowest value that has ever been reported. Combining the features of low cost, high energy density and high energy efficiency, the neutral zinc-iron FB is a promising candidate for stationary energy-storage applications. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Exact ensemble density functional theory for excited states in a model system: investigating the weight dependence of the correlation energy

    CERN Document Server

    Deur, Killian; Fromager, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Ensemble density functional theory (eDFT) is an exact time-independent alternative to time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) for the calculation of excitation energies. Despite its formal simplicity and advantages in contrast to TD-DFT (multiple excitations, for example, can be easily taken into account in an ensemble), eDFT is not standard which is essentially due to the lack of reliable approximate exchange-correlation (xc) functionals for ensembles. Following Burke and coworkers [Phys. Rev. B 93, 245131 (2016)], we propose in this work to construct an exact eDFT for the nontrivial asymmetric Hubbard dimer, thus providing more insight into the weight dependence of the ensemble xc energy in various correlation regimes. For that purpose, an exact analytical expression for the weight-dependent ensemble exchange energy has been derived. The complementary exact ensemble correlation energy has been computed by means of Legendre-Fenchel transforms. Interesting features like discontinuities in the ensemble xc potential in the...

  1. Effects of Consuming Preloads with Different Energy Density and Taste Quality on Energy Intake and Postprandial Blood Glucose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siew Ling Tey

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Consumption of reduced energy dense foods and drink has the potential to reduce energy intake and postprandial blood glucose concentrations. In addition, the taste quality of a meal (e.g., sweet or savoury may play a role in satiation and food intake. The objective of this randomised crossover study was to examine whether energy density and taste quality has an impact on energy intake and postprandial blood glucose response. Using a preload design, participants were asked to consume a sweet (“Cheng Teng” or a savoury (broth preload soup in high energy density (HED; around 0.50 kcal/g; 250 kcal or low energy density (LED; around 0.12 kcal/g; 50 kcal in mid-morning and an ad libitum lunch was provided an hour after the preload. Participants recorded their food intake for the rest of the day after they left the study site. Energy compensation and postprandial blood glucose response were measured in 32 healthy lean males (mean age = 28.9 years, mean BMI = 22.1 kg/m2. There was a significant difference in ad libitum lunch intake between treatments (p = 0.012, with higher intake in sweet LED and savoury LED compared to sweet HED and savoury HED. Energy intake at subsequent meals and total daily energy intake did not differ between the four treatments (both p ≥ 0.214. Consumption of HED preloads resulted in a larger spike in postprandial blood glucose response compared with LED preloads, irrespective of taste quality (p < 0.001. Energy density rather than taste quality plays an important role in energy compensation and postprandial blood glucose response. This suggests that regular consumption of low energy-dense foods has the potential to reduce overall energy intake and to improve glycemic control.

  2. High Energy Density Solid State Li-ion Battery with Enhanced Safety Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop an all solid state Li-ion battery which is capable of delivering high energy density, combined with high safety over a wide operating...

  3. Improving the energy density of hydraulic hybrid vehicles (HHVS) and evaluating plug-in HHVS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    This report describes analyses performed by researchers at The University of Toledo (UT) in : collaboration with researchers at the University of Detroit Mercy (UDM) on the project : Improving the Energy Density of Hydraulic Hybrid Vehicles (HHVs)...

  4. Nanomaterials Enabled High Energy and Power Density Li-ion Batteries Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — There is a need for high energy (~ 200 Wh/kg) and high power (> 500 W/kg) density rechargeable Li-ion batteries that are safe and reliable for several space and...

  5. High Energy Density Li-ion Batteries Designed for Low Temperature Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NEI Corporation proposes to develop a mixed metal oxide nanocomposite cathode that is designed for delivering high energy density with good rate performance at low...

  6. Foundations of high-energy-density physics physical processes of matter at extreme conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Larsen, Jon

    2017-01-01

    High-energy-density physics explores the dynamics of matter at extreme conditions. This encompasses temperatures and densities far greater than we experience on Earth. It applies to normal stars, exploding stars, active galaxies, and planetary interiors. High-energy-density matter is found on Earth in the explosion of nuclear weapons and in laboratories with high-powered lasers or pulsed-power machines. The physics explored in this book is the basis for large-scale simulation codes needed to interpret experimental results whether from astrophysical observations or laboratory-scale experiments. The key elements of high-energy-density physics covered are gas dynamics, ionization, thermal energy transport, and radiation transfer, intense electromagnetic waves, and their dynamical coupling. Implicit in this is a fundamental understanding of hydrodynamics, plasma physics, atomic physics, quantum mechanics, and electromagnetic theory. Beginning with a summary of the topics and exploring the major ones in depth, thi...

  7. Knot soliton in DNA and geometric structure of its free-energy density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Shi, Xuguang

    2017-11-13

    In general, the geometric structure of DNA is characterized using an elastic rod model. The Landau model provides us a new theory to study the geometric structure of DNA. By using the decomposition of the arc unit in the helical axis of DNA, we find that the free-energy density of DNA is similar to the free-energy density of a two-condensate superconductor. By using the φ-mapping topological current theory, the torus knot soliton hidden in DNA is demonstrated. We show the relation between the geometric structure and free-energy density of DNA and the Frenet equations in differential geometry theory are considered. Therefore, the free-energy density of DNA can be expressed by the curvature and torsion of the helical axis.

  8. High-energy-density physics foundation of inertial fusion and experimental astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Drake, R Paul

    2018-01-01

    The raw numbers of high-energy-density physics are amazing: shock waves at hundreds of km/s (approaching a million km per hour), temperatures of millions of degrees, and pressures that exceed 100 million atmospheres. This title surveys the production of high-energy-density conditions, the fundamental plasma and hydrodynamic models that can describe them and the problem of scaling from the laboratory to the cosmos. Connections to astrophysics are discussed throughout. The book is intended to support coursework in high-energy-density physics, to meet the needs of new researchers in this field, and also to serve as a useful reference on the fundamentals. Specifically the book has been designed to enable academics in physics, astrophysics, applied physics and engineering departments to provide in a single-course, an introduction to fluid mechanics and radiative transfer, with dramatic applications in the field of high-energy-density systems. This second edition includes pedagogic improvements to the presentation ...

  9. Advanced Cathode Material For High Energy Density Lithium-Batteries Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced cathode materials having high red-ox potential and high specific capacity offer great promise to the development of high energy density lithium-based...

  10. Spinor helicity methods in high-energy factorization: Efficient momentum-space calculations in the Color Glass Condensate formalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala, Alejandro; Hentschinski, Martin; Jalilian-Marian, Jamal; Tejeda-Yeomans, Maria Elena

    2017-07-01

    We use the spinor helicity formalism to calculate the cross section for production of three partons of a given polarization in Deep Inelastic Scattering (DIS) off proton and nucleus targets at small Bjorken x. The target proton or nucleus is treated as a classical color field (shock wave) from which the produced partons scatter multiple times. We reported our result for the final expression for the production cross section and studied the azimuthal angular correlations of the produced partons in [1]. Here we provide the full details of the calculation of the production cross section using the spinor helicity methods.

  11. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) and High Energy Density Science Research at LLNL (Briefing Charts)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-21

    The National Ignition Facility ( NIF ) and High Energy Density Science Research at LLNL Presentation to: IEEE Pulsed Power and Plasma Science...Conference C. J. Keane Director, NIF User Office June 21, 2013 1491978-1-4673-5168-3/13/$31.00 ©2013 IEEE Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The National Ignition Facility ( NIF ) and High Energy Density Science Research at LLNL 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT

  12. Energy density calculations for ball-lightning-like luminous silicon balls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paiva, Gerson S; Ferreira, Joacy V; Bastos, Cristiano C; Dos Santos, Marcus V; Pavao, Antonio C [Departamento de Quimica Fundamental, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Pernambuco (Brazil)

    2010-05-11

    The energy density of a luminous silicon ball [Phys. Rev. Lett. 98 048501 (2007)] is calculated for a model with a metal core surrounded by an atmosphere of silicon oxides. Experimental data combined with the molecular orbital calculations of the oxidation enthalpy lead to a mean energy density of 3.9 MJ m{sup -3}, which is within the range of estimates from other ball lightning models. This result provides good evidence to support the silicon-based model. (methodological notes)

  13. METHODOLOGICAL NOTES: Energy density calculations for ball-lightning-like luminous silicon balls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiva, Gerson S.; Ferreira, Joacy V.; Bastos, Cristiano C.; dos Santos, Marcus V.; Pavão, Antonio C.

    2010-05-01

    The energy density of a luminous silicon ball [Phys. Rev. Lett. 98 048501 (2007)] is calculated for a model with a metal core surrounded by an atmosphere of silicon oxides. Experimental data combined with the molecular orbital calculations of the oxidation enthalpy lead to a mean energy density of 3.9 MJ m-3, which is within the range of estimates from other ball lightning models. This result provides good evidence to support the silicon-based model.

  14. On the Mean Density of Matter in the Universe and Dark Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasenin, I. M.; Goiko, V. L.

    2017-10-01

    On the basis of the special relativity theory (SRT), the mean density of matter in the Universe is calculated with the relativistic kinetic energy of receding galaxies taken into account. Within the framework of the general relativity theory (GRT), we estimate the influence on the mean density of the effect of gravitation. A contradiction between the hypothesis of dark energy and conclusions following from SRT and GRT is noted.

  15. Report of the Interagency Task Force on High Energy Density Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2007-08-01

    Identifies the needs for improving Federal stewardship of specific aspects of high energy density physics, particularly the study of high energy density plasmas in the laboratory, and strengthening university activities in this latter discipline. The report articulates how HEDP fits into the portfolio of federally funded missions and includes agency actions to be taken that are necessary to further this area of study consistent with Federal priorities and plans, while being responsive to the needs of the scientific community.

  16. Advanced High Energy Density Secondary Batteries with Multi?Electron Reaction Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Renjie; Luo, Rui; Huang, Yongxin; Wu, Feng; Li, Li

    2016-01-01

    Secondary batteries have become important for smart grid and electric vehicle applications, and massive effort has been dedicated to optimizing the current generation and improving their energy density. Multi?electron chemistry has paved a new path for the breaking of the barriers that exist in traditional battery research and applications, and provided new ideas for developing new battery systems that meet energy density requirements. An in?depth understanding of multi?electron chemistries i...

  17. High-energy density nonaqueous all redox flow lithium battery enabled with a polymeric membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Chuankun; Pan, Feng; Zhu, Yun Guang; Huang, Qizhao; Lu, Li; Wang, Qing

    2015-11-01

    Redox flow batteries (RFBs) are considered one of the most promising large-scale energy storage technologies. However, conventional RFBs suffer from low energy density due to the low solubility of the active materials in electrolyte. On the basis of the redox targeting reactions of battery materials, the redox flow lithium battery (RFLB) demonstrated in this report presents a disruptive approach to drastically enhancing the energy density of flow batteries. With LiFePO4 and TiO2 as the cathodic and anodic Li storage materials, respectively, the tank energy density of RFLB could reach ~500 watt-hours per liter (50% porosity), which is 10 times higher than that of a vanadium redox flow battery. The cell exhibits good electrochemical performance under a prolonged cycling test. Our prototype RFLB full cell paves the way toward the development of a new generation of flow batteries for large-scale energy storage.

  18. Superfield formalism

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    encoded in the proof that the Grassmannian derivatives, acting on the super-. Lagrangian density, produce zero ... the anticommuting (anti-)ghost fields that are required for the proof of unitarity in the theory [25] and γµ are the usual 4 ..... A: Math. Gen. 15, 611 (1981). [7] R Delbourgo, P D Jarvis and G Thompson, Phys. Lett.

  19. Towards a Microscopic Reaction Description Based on Energy Density Functionals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nobre, G A; DIetrich, F S; Escher, J E; Thompson, I J; Dupuis, M; Terasaki, J; Engel, J

    2011-09-26

    A microscopic calculation of reaction cross sections for nucleon-nucleus scattering has been performed by explicitly coupling the elastic channel to all particle-hole excitations in the target and one-nucleon pickup channels. The particle-hole states may be regarded as doorway states through which the flux flows to more complicated configurations, and subsequently to long-lived compound nucleus resonances. Target excitations for {sup 40,48}Ca, {sup 58}Ni, {sup 90}Zr and {sup 144}Sm were described in a random-phase framework using a Skyrme functional. Reaction cross sections obtained agree very well with experimental data and predictions of a state-of-the-art fitted optical potential. Couplings between inelastic states were found to be negligible, while the pickup channels contribute significantly. The effect of resonances from higher-order channels was assessed. Elastic angular distributions were also calculated within the same method, achieving good agreement with experimental data. For the first time observed absorptions are completely accounted for by explicit channel coupling, for incident energies between 10 and 70 MeV, with consistent angular distribution results.

  20. Boron nanocrystals as high-energy-density fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shu; Nozaki, Tomohiro; Pi, Xiaodong

    2018-01-01

    Boron’s potential as a fuel or fuel additives has not been fully realized to date, largely due to the difficulty in igniting and burning it efficiently. To confront this challenge freestanding boron nanocrystals (B NCs) with tunable sizes have been synthesized by a cost-effective gas phase nonthermal plasma approach. The crystal phase of B NCs is identified to be β-rhombohedral (space group R\\bar{3m} ) by using transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy measurements. Thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry study indicates the ignition temperature of B NCs in air monotonically decreases from 529 to 524 and 506 °C as the NC size changes from 14.9 to 10.4, and 4.7 nm, and the amount of heat release correspondingly increases from 16.1 to 21.1 and 22.8 kJ g‑1. The size-dependent energy releases of B NCs are elucidated by using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  1. Energy-dense fast food products cost less: an observational study of the energy density and energy cost of Australian fast foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellard, Lyndal; Havill, Michelle; Hughes, Clare; Watson, Wendy L; Chapman, Kathy

    2015-12-01

    To examine the association between energy cost and energy density of fast food products. Twenty Sydney outlets of the five largest fast food chains were surveyed four times. Price and kilojoule data were collected for all limited-time-only menu items (n=54) and a sample of standard items (n=67). Energy cost ($/kilojoule) and energy density (kilojoules/gram) of menu items were calculated. There was a significant inverse relationship between menu item energy density and energy cost (pFast food chains could provide a wider range of affordable, lower-energy foods, use proportional pricing of larger serve sizes, or change defaults in meals to healthier options. More research is required to determine the most effective strategy to reduce the negative impact of fast food on the population's diet. Current pricing in the fast food environment may encourage unhealthier purchases. © 2015 Public Health Association of Australia.

  2. High energy density plasma science with an ultrarelativistic electron beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, C.; Blue, B.; Clayton, C. E.; Dodd, E.; Huang, C.; Marsh, K. A.; Mori, W. B.; Wang, S.; Hogan, M. J.; O'Connell, C.; Siemann, R.; Watz, D.; Muggli, P.; Katsouleas, T.; Lee, S.

    2002-05-01

    An intense, high-energy electron or positron beam can have focused intensities rivaling those of today's most powerful laser beams. For example, the 5 ps (full-width, half-maximum), 50 GeV beam at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) at 1 kA and focused to a 3 micron rms spot size gives intensities of >1020 W/cm-2 at a repetition rate of >10 Hz. Unlike a ps or fs laser pulse which interacts with the surface of a solid target, the particle beam can readily tunnel through tens of cm of steel. However, the same particle beam can be manipulated quite effectively by a plasma that is a million times less dense than air! This is because of the incredibly strong collective fields induced in the plasma by the Coulomb force of the beam. The collective fields in turn react back onto the beam leading to many clearly observable phenomena. The beam paraticles can be: (1) Deflected leading to focusing, defocusing, or even steering of the beam; (2) undulated causing the emission of spontaneous betatron x-ray radiation and; (3) accelerated or decelerated by the plasma fields. Using the 28.5 GeV electron beam from the SLAC linac a series of experiments have been carried out that demonstrate clearly many of the above mentioned effects. The results can be compared with theoretical predictions and with two-dimensional and three-dimensional, one-to-one, particle-in-cell code simulations. These phenomena may have practical applications in future technologies including optical elements in particle beam lines, synchrotron light sources, and ultrahigh gradient accelerators.

  3. Calculation of solvation free energy from quantum mechanical charge density and continuum dielectric theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mingliang; Wong, Chung F

    2006-04-13

    We have combined ultrasoft pseudopotential density functional theory utilizing plane wave basis with a Poisson-Boltzmann/solvent-accessible surface area (PB/SA) model to calculate the solvation free energy of small neutral organic compounds in water. The solute charge density obtained from density functional theory was directly used in solving the Poisson-Boltzmann equation to obtain the reaction field. The polarized electronic wave function of the solute in the solvent was solved by including the reaction field in the density functional Hamiltonian. The quantum mechanical and Poisson-Boltzmann equations were solved self-consistently until the charge density and reaction field converged. Using the solute charge density directly instead of a point-charge representation permitted asymmetric distortion and spreading out of the electron cloud. Because the electron density could leave the van der Waals surface to penetrate into the high-dielectric solvent, the reaction field generated by this density was generally smaller than that obtained by using the point-charge representation. In applying this model to calculate the solvation free energy of 31 small neutral organic molecules spanning a range of 25 kcal/mol, we obtained a root-mean-square error of only 1.3 kcal/mol if we allowed one adjustable parameter to shift the calculated solvation free energy.

  4. Resonant-state perturbation formalisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romo, W.J. (Carleton Univ., Ottawa, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Physics)

    1983-05-02

    Three different formalisms for determining bound-state, virtual-state, and resonant-state energies of a perturbed system are developed. Two of the formalisms are based on expansions of the unperturbed Green function in terms of bound-state, resonant-state and deformed-continuum-state contributions of the form developed by T. Berggren. The third formalism is based on a Mittag-Leffler expansion of the unperturbed Green function. The three formalisms are compared and the relative merits of calculation schemes based on them are examined.

  5. Effects of dietary energy density and L-carnitine supplementation on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study was conducted to determine the effects of dietary metabolisable energy (ME) density and L-carnitine supplementation on the performance, carcass traits and blood parameters of broiler chickens. The experiment was designed with three levels of dietary energy (low, medium and high) and two levels of ...

  6. The urban canyon and building energy use: Urban density versus daylight and passive solar gains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strømann-Andersen, Jakob Bjørn; Sattrup, Peter Andreas

    2011-01-01

    The link between urban density and building energy use is a complex balance between climatic factors and the spatial, material and use patterns of urban spaces and the buildings that constitute them. This study uses the concept of the urban canyon to investigate the ways that the energy performan...

  7. Energy Density in Aligned Nanowire Arrays Irradiated with Relativistic Intensities: Path to Terabar Pressure Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocca, J.; Bargsten, C.; Hollinger, R.; Shylaptsev, V.; Wang, S.; Rockwood, A.; Wang, Y.; Keiss, D.; Capeluto, M.; Kaymak, V.; Pukhov, A.; Tommasini, R.; London, R.; Park, J.

    2016-10-01

    Ultra-high-energy-density (UHED) plasmas, characterized by energy densities >1 x 108 J cm-3 and pressures greater than a gigabar are encountered in the center of stars and in inertial confinement fusion capsules driven by the world's largest lasers. Similar conditions can be obtained with compact, ultra-high contrast, femtosecond lasers focused to relativistic intensities onto aligned nanowire array targets. Here we report the measurement of the key physical process in determining the energy density deposited in high aspect ratio nanowire array plasmas: the energy penetration. By monitoring the x-ray emission from buried Co tracer segments in Ni nanowire arrays irradiated at an intensity of 4 x 1019 W cm-2, we demonstrate energy penetration depths of several μm, leading to UHED plasmas of that size. Relativistic 3D particle-in-cell-simulations validated by these measurements predict that irradiation of nanostructures at increased intensity will lead to a virtually unexplored extreme UHED plasma regime characterized by energy densities in excess of 8 x 1010 J cm-3, equivalent to a pressure of 0.35 Tbar. This work was supported by the Fusion Energy Program, Office of Science of the U.S Department of Energy, and by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency.

  8. Impact of portion size and energy density on snack intake in preschool-aged children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Looney, Shannon M; Raynor, Hollie A

    2011-03-01

    The influence of dietary environmental factors on child weight status may be important in the battle against childhood obesity. Portion size and energy density are factors shown to impact entrée energy intake in children. However, the influence of these factors on child snack energy intake has not been studied. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the impact of portion size on intake of a lower energy-dense and higher energy-dense snack in preschool-aged children. A 2×2 crossover design (within-subject factors of portion size and energy density) was conducted on Wednesdays in a preschool setting on the University of Tennessee campus from October 2008 to November 2008. Seventeen children had complete data (age 3.8±0.6 years; 10 of 17 were female; 14 of 17 were white). Foods were applesauce (lower energy dense=0.43 kcal/g) and chocolate pudding (higher energy dense=1.19 kcal/g), and portion sizes were 150 g (small) and 300 g (large). Measures included anthropometrics, hunger, liking of foods, and caretakers' child-feeding practices using validated instruments. Mixed factorial analyses of covariance, with order controlled, analyzed gram and energy snack intake across conditions. There was no significant main effect of energy density on snack intake, but the main effect of portion size on snack intake (small portion size 84.2±30.8 kcal, large portion size 99.0±52.5 kcal; P<0.05) was significant. Results indicate increased energy intake when snacks are offered in larger portion size, regardless of energy density. Snack portion size may be an environmental strategy that can reduce excessive energy intake in children. Copyright © 2011 American Dietetic Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Ambipolar zinc-polyiodide electrolyte for a high-energy density aqueous redox flow battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bin; Nie, Zimin; Vijayakumar, M.; Li, Guosheng; Liu, Jun; Sprenkle, Vincent; Wang, Wei

    2015-02-01

    Redox flow batteries are receiving wide attention for electrochemical energy storage due to their unique architecture and advantages, but progress has so far been limited by their low energy density (~25 Wh l-1). Here we report a high-energy density aqueous zinc-polyiodide flow battery. Using the highly soluble iodide/triiodide redox couple, a discharge energy density of 167 Wh l-1 is demonstrated with a near-neutral 5.0 M ZnI2 electrolyte. Nuclear magnetic resonance study and density functional theory-based simulation along with flow test data indicate that the addition of an alcohol (ethanol) induces ligand formation between oxygen on the hydroxyl group and the zinc ions, which expands the stable electrolyte temperature window to from -20 to 50 °C, while ameliorating the zinc dendrite. With the high-energy density and its benign nature free from strong acids and corrosive components, zinc-polyiodide flow battery is a promising candidate for various energy storage applications.

  10. A simple image based method for obtaining electron density and atomic number in dual energy CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczykutowicz, Timothy P.; Qi, Zhihua; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2011-03-01

    The extraction of electron density and atomic number information in computed tomography is possible when image values can be sampled using two different effective energies. The foundation for this extraction lies in the ability to express the linear attenuation coefficient using two basis functions that are dependent on electron density and atomic number over the diagnostic energy range used in CT. Material basis functions separate images into clinically familiar quantities such as 'bone' images and 'soft tissue' images. Physically, all basis function choices represent the expression of the linear attenuation coefficient in terms of a photoelectric and a Compton scattering term. The purpose of this work is to develop a simple dual energy decomposition method that requires no a priori knowledge about the energy characteristics of the imaging system. It is shown that the weighted sum of two basis images yields an electron density image where the weights for each basis image are the electron density of that basis image's basis material. Using the electron density image, effective atomic number information can also be obtained. These methods are performed solely in the image domain and require no spectrum or detector energy response information as required by some other dual energy decomposition methods.

  11. Indirect Measurement of Energy Density of Soft PZT Ceramic Utilizing Mechanical Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unruan, Muangjai; Unruan, Sujitra; Inkong, Yutthapong; Yimnirun, Rattikorn

    2017-11-01

    This paper reports on an indirect measurement of energy density of soft PZT ceramic utilizing mechanical stress. The method works analogous to the Olsen cycle and allows for a large amount of electro-mechanical energy conversion. A maximum energy density of 350 kJ/m3/cycle was found under 0-312 MPa and 1-20 kV/cm of applied mechanical stress and electric field, respectively. The obtained result is substantially higher than the results reported in previous studies of PZT materials utilizing a direct piezoelectric effect.

  12. An Ultraflexible Silicon-Oxygen Battery Fiber with High Energy Density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Jiao, Yiding; Lu, Lijun; Wang, Lie; Chen, Taiqiang; Peng, Huisheng

    2017-10-23

    To satisfy the rapid development of portable and wearable electronics, it is highly desired to make batteries with both high energy densities and flexibility. Although some progress has been made in recent decades, the available batteries share critical problems of poor energy storage capacity and low flexibility. Herein, we have developed a silicon-oxygen battery fiber with high energy density and ultra-high flexibility by designing a coaxial architecture with a lithiated silicon/carbon nanotube hybrid fiber as inner anode, a polymer gel as middle electrolyte and a bare carbon nanotube sheet as outer cathode. The fiber showed a high energy density of 512 Wh kg(-1) and could effectively work after bending for 20 000 cycles. These battery fibers have been further woven into flexible textiles for a large-scale application. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Azobenzene-functionalized carbon nanotubes as high-energy density solar thermal fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolpak, Alexie M; Grossman, Jeffrey C

    2011-08-10

    Solar thermal fuels, which reversibly store solar energy in molecular bonds, are a tantalizing prospect for clean, renewable, and transportable energy conversion/storage. However, large-scale adoption requires enhanced energy storage capacity and thermal stability. Here we present a novel solar thermal fuel, composed of azobenzene-functionalized carbon nanotubes, with the volumetric energy density of Li-ion batteries. Our work also demonstrates that the inclusion of nanoscale templates is an effective strategy for design of highly cyclable, thermally stable, and energy-dense solar thermal fuels.

  14. Cowichan Valley energy mapping and modelling. Report 2 - Energy consumption and density mapping. Final report. [Vancouver Island, Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-06-15

    The driving force behind the Integrated Energy Mapping and Analysis project was the identification and analysis of a suite of pathways that the Cowichan Valley Regional District (CVRD) can utilise to increase its energy resilience, as well as reduce energy consumption and GHG emissions, with a primary focus on the residential sector. Mapping and analysis undertaken will support provincial energy and GHG reduction targets, and the suite of pathways outlined will address a CVRD internal target that calls for 75% of the region's energy within the residential sector to come from locally sourced renewables by 2050. The target has been developed as a mechanism to meet resilience and climate action target. The maps and findings produced are to be integrated as part of a regional policy framework currently under development. The second task in the overall project was the mapping of regional energy consumption density. Combined with the findings from task one, this enables comparison of energy consumption density per area unit with the renewable energy resource availability. In addition, it provides an energy baseline against which future energy planning activities can be evaluated. The mapping of the energy consumption density was divided into categories to correspond with local British Columbia Assessment Authority (BCAA) reporting. The residential sub-categories were comprised of single family detached dwellings, single family attached dwellings, apartments, and moveable dwellings. For commercial and industrial end-users the 14 sub-categories are also in line with BCAA as well as the on-going provincial TaNDM project of which the CVRD is a partner. The results of task two are documented in this report. (LN)

  15. Thermodynamic, energy efficiency, and power density analysis of reverse electrodialysis power generation with natural salinity gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Ngai Yin; Vermaas, David A; Nijmeijer, Kitty; Elimelech, Menachem

    2014-05-06

    Reverse electrodialysis (RED) can harness the Gibbs free energy of mixing when fresh river water flows into the sea for sustainable power generation. In this study, we carry out a thermodynamic and energy efficiency analysis of RED power generation, and assess the membrane power density. First, we present a reversible thermodynamic model for RED and verify that the theoretical maximum extractable work in a reversible RED process is identical to the Gibbs free energy of mixing. Work extraction in an irreversible process with maximized power density using a constant-resistance load is then examined to assess the energy conversion efficiency and power density. With equal volumes of seawater and river water, energy conversion efficiency of ∼ 33-44% can be obtained in RED, while the rest is lost through dissipation in the internal resistance of the ion-exchange membrane stack. We show that imperfections in the selectivity of typical ion exchange membranes (namely, co-ion transport, osmosis, and electro-osmosis) can detrimentally lower efficiency by up to 26%, with co-ion leakage being the dominant effect. Further inspection of the power density profile during RED revealed inherent ineffectiveness toward the end of the process. By judicious early discontinuation of the controlled mixing process, the overall power density performance can be considerably enhanced by up to 7-fold, without significant compromise to the energy efficiency. Additionally, membrane resistance was found to be an important factor in determining the power densities attainable. Lastly, the performance of an RED stack was examined for different membrane conductivities and intermembrane distances simulating high performance membranes and stack design. By thoughtful selection of the operating parameters, an efficiency of ∼ 37% and an overall gross power density of 3.5 W/m(2) represent the maximum performance that can potentially be achieved in a seawater-river water RED system with low

  16. Theoretical Limits of Energy Density in Silicon-Carbon Composite Anode Based Lithium Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, Ranjan; Pannala, Sreekanth

    2016-06-17

    Silicon (Si) is under consideration as a potential next-generation anode material for the lithium ion battery (LIB). Experimental reports of up to 40% increase in energy density of Si anode based LIBs (Si-LIBs) have been reported in literature. However, this increase in energy density is achieved when the Si-LIB is allowed to swell (volumetrically expand) more than graphite based LIB (graphite-LIB) and beyond practical limits. The volume expansion of LIB electrodes should be negligible for applications such as automotive or mobile devices. We determine the theoretical bounds of Si composition in a Si-carbon composite (SCC) based anode to maximize the volumetric energy density of a LIB by constraining the external dimensions of the anode during charging. The porosity of the SCC anode is adjusted to accommodate the volume expansion during lithiation. The calculated threshold value of Si was then used to determine the possible volumetric energy densities of LIBs with SCC anode (SCC-LIBs) and the potential improvement over graphite-LIBs. The level of improvement in volumetric and gravimetric energy density of SCC-LIBs with constrained volume is predicted to be less than 10% to ensure the battery has similar power characteristics of graphite-LIBs.

  17. Índices de reatividade química a partir da teoria do funcional de densidade: formalismo e perspectivas Chemical reactivity indexes from density functional theory: formalism and perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélio Anderson Duarte

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available The fundaments of the modern Density Functional Theory (DFT, its basic theorems, principles and methodology are presented. This review also discuss important and widely used concepts in chemistry but that had not been precisely defined until the development of the DFT. These concepts were proposed and used from an empirical base, but now their precise definition are well established in the DFT formalism. Concepts such as chemical potential (electronegativity, hardness, softness and Fukui function are presented and their consequences to the understanding of chemical reactivity are discussed.

  18. Alternative separation of exchange and correlation energies in range-separated density-functional perturbation theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornaton, Y.; Stoyanova, A.; Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aagaard

    2013-01-01

    An alternative separation of short-range exchange and correlation energies is used in the framework of second-order range-separated density-functional perturbation theory. This alternative separation was initially proposed by Toulouse and relies on a long-range-interacting wave function instead...... of the noninteracting Kohn-Sham one. When second-order corrections to the density are neglected, the energy expression reduces to a range-separated double-hybrid (RSDH) type of functional, RSDHf, where "f" stands for "full-range integrals" as the regular full-range interaction appears explicitly in the energy...... on the potential energy curves in the equilibrium region, improving the accuracy of binding energies and equilibrium bond distances when second-order perturbation theory is appropriate....

  19. Density dependence of the symmetry energy from neutron skin thickness in finite nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinas, X.; Centelles, M. [Universitat de Barcelona, Departament d' Estructura i Constituents de la Materia and Institut de Ciencies del Cosmos, Facultat de Fisica, Barcelona (Spain); Roca-Maza, X. [Universita degli Studi di Milano (Italy); INFN, Dipartamento di Fisica, Milano (Italy); Warda, M. [Uniwersytet Marii Curie-Sklodowskiej ul. Radziszewskiego 10, Katedra Fizyki Teoretycznej, Lublin (Poland)

    2014-02-15

    The density dependence of the symmetry energy around saturation density, characterized by the slope parameter L, is studied using information provided by the neutron skin thickness in finite nuclei. An estimate for L is obtained from experimental data on neutron skins extracted from antiprotonic atoms. We also discuss the ability of parity-violating elastic electron scattering to obtain information on the neutron skin thickness in {sup 208}Pb and to constrain the density dependence of the nuclear symmetry energy. The size and shape of the neutron density distribution of {sup 208}Pb predicted by mean-field models is briefly addressed. We conclude with a comparative overview of the L values predicted by several existing determinations. (orig.)

  20. Presentation of structural properties of liquid cesium by applying cohesive energy density of the liquid state

    OpenAIRE

    Ghatee, Mohammad Hadi; Sanchooli, Mahmod

    2005-01-01

    The structural property of liquid cesium is investigated in the temperature range 900 K to 1900 K by application of semiempirical effective Lennard-Jones (8.5-4) pair potential function and employing Gillan s algorithm to solve Percus-Yevick equation. The potential function has been derived accurately by application of cohesive energy density in a wide range of pressure-density-temperature () data including data at the proximity of absolute zero temperature. The method is very much responsive...

  1. Note: A high-energy-density Tesla-type pulse generator with novel insulating oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sheng; Su, Jiancang; Fan, Xuliang

    2017-09-01

    A 10-GW high-energy-density Tesla-type pulse generator is developed with an improved insulating liquid based on a modified Tesla pulser—TPG700, of which the pulse forming line (PFL) is filled with novel insulating oil instead of transformer oil. Properties of insulating oil determining the stored energy density of the PFL are analyzed, and a criterion for appropriate oil is proposed. Midel 7131 is chosen as an application example. The results of insulating property experiment under tens-of-microsecond pulse charging demonstrate that the insulation capability of Midel 7131 is better than that of KI45X transformer oil. The application test in Tesla pulser TPG700 shows that the output power is increased to 10.5 GW with Midel 7131. The output energy density of TPG700 increases for about 60% with Midel 7131.

  2. Research and Evaluation of the Energy Flux Density of the Mobile Phone Electromagnetic Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranas Baltrėnas

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The article analyses variations in the energy flux density of the electromagnetic field of 10 mobile phones depending on distance. The studies have been conducted using three modes: sending a text message, receiving a text message and connecting a mobile phone to the Internet. When text messages are received or sent from a mobile phone, the values of the energy flux density of the mobile phone electromagnetic field exceed the safe allowable limit and make 10 μW / cm². A distance of 10, 20 and 30 cm from a mobile phone is effective protection against the energy flux density of the electromagnetic field when writing texts, receiving messages or connecting to the mobile Internet.Article in Lithuanian

  3. Correlation energy, correlated electron density, and exchange-correlation potential in some spherically confined atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyboishchikov, Sergei F

    2016-12-05

    We report correlation energies, electron densities, and exchange-correlation potentials obtained from configuration interaction and density functional calculations on spherically confined He, Be, Be(2+) , and Ne atoms. The variation of the correlation energy with the confinement radius Rc is relatively small for the He, Be(2+) , and Ne systems. Curiously, the Lee-Yang-Parr (LYP) functional works well for weak confinements but fails completely for small Rc . However, in the neutral beryllium atom the CI correlation energy increases markedly with decreasing Rc . This effect is less pronounced at the density-functional theory level. The LYP functional performs very well for the unconfined Be atom, but fails badly for small Rc . The standard exchange-correlation potentials exhibit significant deviation from the "exact" potential obtained by inversion of Kohn-Sham equation. The LYP correlation potential behaves erratically at strong confinements. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Exploration of Plasma Jets Approach to High Energy Density Physics. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Chiping [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2013-08-26

    High-energy-density laboratory plasma (HEDLP) physics is an emerging, important area of research in plasma physics, nuclear physics, astrophysics, and particle acceleration. While the HEDLP regime occurs at extreme conditions which are often found naturally in space but not on the earth, it may be accessible by colliding high intensity plasmas such as high-energy-density plasma jets, plasmoids or compact toroids from plasma guns. The physics of plasma jets is investigated in the context of high energy density laboratory plasma research. This report summarizes results of theoretical and computational investigation of a plasma jet undergoing adiabatic compression and adiabatic expansion. A root-mean-squared (rms) envelope theory of plasma jets is developed. Comparison between theory and experiment is made. Good agreement between theory and experiment is found.

  5. Electromagnetic reflection, transmission and energy density at boundaries of nonlocal media

    CERN Document Server

    Churchill, R J

    2016-01-01

    We consider a semi-infinite spatially dispersive dielectric with unequal transverse and longitudinal susceptibilities. The effect of the boundary is characterized by arbitrary reflection coefficients for polarization waves in the material that propagate to the surface. Specific values of these coefficients correspond to various additional boundary conditions (ABC) for Maxwell's equations. We derive the electromagnetic reflection and transmission coefficients at the boundary and investigate their dependence on material parameters and ABC. We also investigate the electromagnetic zero-point and thermal spectral energy density outside the dielectric. The nonlocal response removes the boundary divergence of the spectral energy density that is present in a local model. The spectral energy density shows a large dependence on the difference between the transverse and longitudinal susceptibilities, even at distances up to 10nm from the boundary.

  6. Energy density and weight change in a long-term weight-loss trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Welsh Ericka M

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health risks linked to obesity and the difficulty most have in achieving weight loss underscore the importance of identifying dietary factors that contribute to successful weight loss. Methods This study examined the association between change in dietary energy density and weight loss over time. Subjects were 213 men and women with BMI of 30–39 kg/m2 and without chronic illness enrolled in 2004 in a randomized trial evaluating behavioral treatments for long-term weight loss. Subjects completed a 62-item food frequency questionnaire at baseline and at 6, 12, and 18 months. Results Pearson correlations between BMI and energy density (kcals/g of solid food at baseline were not significantly different from zero (r = -0.02, p = 0.84. In a longitudinal analysis, change in energy density was strongly related to change in BMI. The estimated β for change in BMI (kg/m2 of those in the quartile representing greatest decrease in energy density at 18 months compared to those in the quartile with the least was -1.95 (p = 0.006. The association was especially strong in the first six months (estimated β = -1.43, the period with greatest weight loss (mean change in BMI = -2.50 kg/m2 from 0–6 months vs. 0.23 kg/m2 from 12–18 months and the greatest contrast with respect to change in energy density. Conclusion Decreased energy density predicted weight loss in this 18 month weight loss study. These findings may have important implications for individual dietary advice and public health policies targeting weight control in the general population

  7. Determination of the area density and composition of alloy film using dual alpha particle energy loss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Xiaojun, E-mail: maxj802@163.com [Institute of Modern Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Li, Bo; Gao, Dangzhong [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Xu, Jiayun [College of Physical Science and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); Tang, Yongjian [Institute of Modern Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China)

    2017-02-01

    A novel method based on dual α-particles energy loss (DAEL) is proposed for measuring the area density and composition of binary alloy films. In order to obtain a dual-energy α-particles source, an ingenious design that utilizes the transmitted α-particles traveling the thin film as a new α-particles source is presented. Using the DAEL technique, the area density and composition of Au/Cu film are determined accurately with an uncertainty of better than 10%. Finally, some measures for improving the combined uncertainty are discussed.

  8. The Kinetic Energy of Hydrocarbons as a Function of Electron Density and Convolutional Neural Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Yao, Kun

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a convolutional neural network trained to reproduce the Kohn-Sham kinetic energy of hydrocarbons from electron density. The output of the network is used as a non-local correction to the conventional local and semi-local kinetic functionals. We show that this approximation qualitatively reproduces Kohn-Sham potential energy surfaces when used with conventional exchange correlation functionals. Numerical noise inherited from the non-linearity of the neural network is identified as the major challenge for the model. Finally we examine the features in the density learned by the neural network to anticipate the prospects of generalizing these models.

  9. Extra-metabolic energy use and the rise in human hyper-density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Joseph R.; Weinberger, Vanessa P.; Marquet, Pablo A.

    2017-03-01

    Humans, like all organisms, are subject to fundamental biophysical laws. Van Valen predicted that, because of zero-sum dynamics, all populations of all species in a given environment flux the same amount of energy on average. Damuth’s ’energetic equivalence rule’ supported Van Valen´s conjecture by showing a tradeoff between few big animals per area with high individual metabolic rates compared to abundant small species with low energy requirements. We use metabolic scaling theory to compare variation in densities and individual energy use in human societies to other land mammals. We show that hunter-gatherers occurred at densities lower than the average for a mammal of our size. Most modern humans, in contrast, concentrate in large cities at densities up to four orders of magnitude greater than hunter-gatherers, yet consume up to two orders of magnitude more energy per capita. Today, cities across the globe flux greater energy than net primary productivity on a per area basis. This is possible by importing enormous amounts of energy and materials required to sustain hyper-dense, modern humans. The metabolic rift with nature created by modern cities fueled largely by fossil energy poses formidable challenges for establishing a sustainable relationship on a rapidly urbanizing, yet finite planet.

  10. Cowichan Valley energy mapping and modelling. Report 5 - Energy density mapping projections. Final report. [Vancouver Island, Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-06-15

    The driving force behind the Integrated Energy Mapping and Analysis project was the identification and analysis of a suite of pathways that the Cowichan Valley Regional District (CVRD) can utilise to increase its energy resilience, as well as reduce energy consumption and GHG emissions, with a primary focus on the residential sector. Mapping and analysis undertaken will support provincial energy and GHG reduction targets, and the suite of pathways outlined will address a CVRD internal target that calls for 75% of the region's energy within the residential sector to come from locally sourced renewables by 2050. The target has been developed as a mechanism to meet resilience and climate action target. The maps and findings produced are to be integrated as part of a regional policy framework currently under development. Task 5 focused on energy projection mapping to estimate and visualise the energy consumption density and GHG emissions under different scenarios. The scenarios from task 4 were built around the energy consumption density of the residential sector under future land use patterns and rely on different energy source combinations (the suite of pathways). In task 5 the energy usage under the different scenarios were fed back into GIS, thereby giving a visual representation of forecasted residential energy consumption per unit area. The methodology is identical to that used in task 2 where current usage was mapped, whereas the mapping in this task is for future forecasts. These results are documented in this report. In addition, GHG mapping under the various scenarios was also undertaken. (LN)

  11. A Method to Improve Electron Density Measurement of Cone-Beam CT Using Dual Energy Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo Men

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To develop a dual energy imaging method to improve the accuracy of electron density measurement with a cone-beam CT (CBCT device. Materials and Methods. The imaging system is the XVI CBCT system on Elekta Synergy linac. Projection data were acquired with the high and low energy X-ray, respectively, to set up a basis material decomposition model. Virtual phantom simulation and phantoms experiments were carried out for quantitative evaluation of the method. Phantoms were also scanned twice with the high and low energy X-ray, respectively. The data were decomposed into projections of the two basis material coefficients according to the model set up earlier. The two sets of decomposed projections were used to reconstruct CBCT images of the basis material coefficients. Then, the images of electron densities were calculated with these CBCT images. Results. The difference between the calculated and theoretical values was within 2% and the correlation coefficient of them was about 1.0. The dual energy imaging method obtained more accurate electron density values and reduced the beam hardening artifacts obviously. Conclusion. A novel dual energy CBCT imaging method to calculate the electron densities was developed. It can acquire more accurate values and provide a platform potentially for dose calculation.

  12. Black hole kinematics: The "in"-vacuum energy density and flux for different observers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Suprit; Chakraborty, Sumanta

    2014-07-01

    We have investigated the local invariant scalar observables—energy density and flux—which explicitly depend on the kinematics of the concerned observers in the thin null shell gravitational collapse geometry. The use of globally defined null coordinates allows for the definition of a unique in-vacuum for the scalar field propagating in this background. Computing the stress-energy tensor for this scalar field, we work out the energy density and flux for the static observers outside the horizon and then consider the radially in-falling observers who fall in from some specified initial radius all the way through the horizon and inside to the eventual singularity. Our results confirm the thermal Tolman-shifted energy density and fluxes for the static observers which diverge at the horizon. For the in-falling observer starting from far off, both the quantities—energy density and flux—at the horizon crossing are regular and finite. For example, the flux at the horizon for the in-falling observer from infinity is approximately 24 times the flux for the observer at infinity. Compared with the static observers in the near-horizon region, this is quite small. Both the quantities grow as the in-fall progresses inside the horizon and diverge at the singularity.

  13. Electromagnetic energy harvesting and density sensor application based on perfect metamaterial absorber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakir, Mehmet; Karaaslan, Muharrem; Dincer, Furkan; Akgol, Oguzhan; Sabah, Cumali

    2016-05-01

    The proposed study presents an electromagnetic (EM) energy harvesting and density sensor application based on a perfect metamaterial absorber (MA) in microwave frequency regime. In order to verify the absorption behavior of the structure, its absorption behavior is experimentally tested along with the energy harvesting and sensing abilities. The absorption value is experimentally found 0.9 at the resonance frequency of 4.75 GHz. In order to harvest the EM energy, chips resistors are used. In addition, the suggested model is analyzed for its dependency on polarization angles. The results show that the perfect MA can be easily and efficiently used for EM energy harvesting applications. Moreover, as an additional feature of the model, we also realized a density sensor application. It can be seen that this structure can be used as a multi-functional device and configured for many other sensing applications.

  14. Quantification of breast density using dual-energy mammography with liquid phantom calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Alfonso R; Ding, Huanjun; Molloi, Sabee

    2014-07-21

    Breast density is a widely recognized potential risk factor for breast cancer. However, accurate quantification of breast density is a challenging task in mammography. The current use of plastic breast-equivalent phantoms for calibration provides limited accuracy in dual-energy mammography due to the chemical composition of the phantom. We implemented a breast-equivalent liquid phantom for dual-energy calibration in order to improve the accuracy of breast density measurement. To design these phantoms, three liquid compounds were chosen: water, isopropyl alcohol, and glycerol. Chemical compositions of glandular and adipose tissues, obtained from NIST database, were used as reference materials. Dual-energy signal of the liquid phantom at different breast densities (0% to 100%) and thicknesses (1 to 8 cm) were simulated. Glandular and adipose tissue thicknesses were estimated from a higher order polynomial of the signals. Our results indicated that the linear attenuation coefficients of the breast-equivalent liquid phantoms match those of the target material. Comparison between measured and known breast density data shows a linear correlation with a slope close to 1 and a non-zero intercept of 7%, while plastic phantoms showed a slope of 0.6 and a non-zero intercept of 8%. Breast density results derived from the liquid calibration phantoms showed higher accuracy than those derived from the plastic phantoms for different breast thicknesses and various tube voltages. We performed experimental phantom studies using liquid phantoms and then compared the computed breast density with those obtained using a bovine tissue model. The experimental data and the known values were in good correlation with a slope close to 1 (∼1.1). In conclusion, our results indicate that liquid phantoms are a reliable alternative for calibration in dual-energy mammography and better reproduce the chemical properties of the target material.

  15. Energy and nutrient density of foods in relation to their carbon footprint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drewnowski, Adam; Rehm, Colin D; Martin, Agnes; Verger, Eric O; Voinnesson, Marc; Imbert, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    A carbon footprint is the sum of greenhouse gas emissions (GHGEs) associated with food production, processing, transporting, and retailing. We examined the relation between the energy and nutrient content of foods and associated GHGEs as expressed as g CO2 equivalents. GHGE values, which were calculated and provided by a French supermarket chain, were merged with the Composition Nutritionnelle des Aliments (French food-composition table) nutrient-composition data for 483 foods and beverages from the French Agency for Food, Environmental and Occupational Health and Safety. Foods were aggregated into 34 food categories and 5 major food groups as follows: meat and meat products, milk and dairy products, frozen and processed fruit and vegetables, grains, and sweets. Energy density was expressed as kcal/100 g. Nutrient density was determined by using 2 alternative nutrient-density scores, each based on the sum of the percentage of daily values for 6 or 15 nutrients, respectively. The energy and nutrient densities of foods were linked to log-transformed GHGE values expressed per 100 g or 100 kcal. Grains and sweets had lowest GHGEs (per 100 g and 100 kcal) but had high energy density and a low nutrient content. The more-nutrient-dense animal products, including meat and dairy, had higher GHGE values per 100 g but much lower values per 100 kcal. In general, a higher nutrient density of foods was associated with higher GHGEs per 100 kcal, although the slopes of fitted lines varied for meat and dairy compared with fats and sweets. Considerations of the environmental impact of foods need to be linked to concerns about nutrient density and health. The point at which the higher carbon footprint of some nutrient-dense foods is offset by their higher nutritional value is a priority area for additional research. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  16. Energy density of diets reported by American adults: association with food group intake, nutrient intake, and body weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kant, A K; Graubard, B I

    2005-08-01

    Recent reports suggest that dietary energy density may play a role in regulation of food intake. However, little is known about the energy density of diets consumed by free-living populations; therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine demographic, health, and nutritional correlates of energy density of self-reported diets. Using data from the NHANES III (n=13 400), dietary energy density was defined three ways: (1) energy content (kJ/g) of all foods and beverages reported or ED1, (2) energy content (kJ/g) of all foods and energy yielding beverages or ED2, and (3) energy content (kJ/g) of all foods (no beverages) or ED3. Multiple linear or logistic regression methods were used to examine the association of energy density with intake of energy, nutrients, food groups, and body mass index (BMI). We computed the ratios of within- to between-person variance for the three energy density variables using the second recall obtained from the second exam subsample of NHANES III (n=1037). The mean ED1, ED2, and ED3, respectively, were 3.84+/-0.02, 5.45+/-0.03, and 8.03+/-0.03. Dietary intakes of energy, fat, and low-nutrient-density foods were related positively, but amounts of micronutrients, fruit, and vegetables were related inversely with all types of energy density (Pdiets in the US were characterized by low fruit and vegetable intake, and high BMI.

  17. Taxonomic variation in size-density relationships challenges the notion of energy equivalence

    OpenAIRE

    Isaac, Nick J. B.; Storch, David; Carbone, Chris

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between body mass and abundance is a major focus for research in macroecology. The form of this relationship has been suggested to reflect the partitioning of energy among species. We revisit classical datasets to show that size–density relationships vary systematically among taxonomic groups, with most variation occurring at the order level. We use this knowledge to make a novel test of the ‘energy equivalence rule’, at the taxonomic scale appropriate for the data. We find n...

  18. Density dependence of the "symmetry energy" in the lattice gas model

    OpenAIRE

    Su, Q. M.; Ma, Y. G.(Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800, China); Tian, W. D.; Fang, D. Q.(Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800, China); Cai, X.Z.; Wang, K.

    2007-01-01

    Isoscaling behavior of the statistical emission fragments from the equilibrated sources with $Z$ = 30 and $N$ = 30, 33, 36 and 39, resepectively, is investigated in the framework of isospin dependent lattice gas model. The dependences of isoscaling parameters $\\alpha$ on source isospin asymmetry, temperature and freeze-out density are studied and the "symmetry energy" is deduced from isoscaling parameters. Results show that "symmetry energy" $C_{sym}$ is insensitive to the change of temperatu...

  19. New approaches for the calibration of exchange-energy densities in local hybrid functionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Toni M; Haasler, Matthias; Arbuznikov, Alexei V; Kaupp, Martin

    2016-08-21

    The ambiguity of exchange-energy densities is a fundamental challenge for the development of local hybrid functionals, or of other functionals based on a local mixing of exchange-energy densities. In this work, a systematic construction of semi-local calibration functions (CFs) for adjusting the exchange-energy densities in local hybrid functionals is provided, which directly links a given CF to an underlying semi-local exchange functional, as well as to the second-order gradient expansion of the exchange hole. Using successive steps of integration by parts allows the derivation of correction terms of increasing order, resulting in more and more complicated but also more flexible CFs. We derive explicit first- and second-order CFs (pig1 and pig2) based on B88 generalized-gradient approximation (GGA) exchange, and a first-order CF (tpig1) based on τ-dependent B98 meta-GGA exchange. We combine these CFs with different long-range damping functions and evaluate them for calibration of LDA, B88 GGA, and TPSS meta-GGA exchange-energy densities. Based on a minimization of unphysical nondynamical correlation contributions in three noble-gas dimer potential-energy curves, free parameters in the CFs are optimized, and performance of various approaches in the calibration of different exchange-energy densities is compared. Most notably, the second-order pig2 CF provides the largest flexibility with respect to the diffuseness of the damping function. This suggests that higher-order CFs based on the present integration-by-parts scheme may be particularly suitable for the flexible construction of local hybrid functionals.

  20. Iron oxide-decorated carbon for supercapacitor anodes with ultrahigh energy density and outstanding cycling stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Cao; Liu, Jilei; Wang, Yadong; Mao, Lu; Fan, Zhanxi; Shen, Zexiang; Zhang, Hua; Wang, John

    2015-05-26

    Supercapacitor with ultrahigh energy density (e.g., comparable with those of rechargeable batteries) and long cycling ability (>50000 cycles) is attractive for the next-generation energy storage devices. The energy density of carbonaceous material electrodes can be effectively improved by combining with certain metal oxides/hydroxides, but many at the expenses of power density and long-time cycling stability. To achieve an optimized overall electrochemical performance, rationally designed electrode structures with proper control in metal oxide/carbon are highly desirable. Here we have successfully realized an ultrahigh-energy and long-life supercapacitor anode by developing a hierarchical graphite foam-carbon nanotube framework and coating the surface with a thin layer of iron oxide (GF-CNT@Fe2O3). The full cell of anode based on this structure gives rise to a high energy of ∼74.7 Wh/kg at a power of ∼1400 W/kg, and ∼95.4% of the capacitance can be retained after 50000 cycles of charge-discharge. These performance features are superior among those reported for metal oxide based supercapacitors, making it a promising candidate for the next generation of high-performance electrochemical energy storage.

  1. Modern foraging: Presence of food and energy density influence motivational processing of food advertisements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Rachel L

    2016-12-01

    More energy dense foods are preferable from an optimal foraging perspective, which suggests these foods are more motivationally relevant due to their greater capability of fulfilling biological imperatives. This increase in motivational relevance may be exacerbated in circumstances where foraging will be necessary. This study examined how food energy density and presence of food in the immediate environment interacted to influence motivational processing of food advertisements. N = 58 adults viewed advertisements for foods varying in energy density in contexts where the advertised food was actually present in the viewing room or not. Advertisements for more energy dense foods elicited greater skin conductivity level compared to ads for less energy dense foods when food was not present. All ads elicited decreases in corrugator supercilii activation indicating positive emotional response resultant from appetitive motivational activation, though the greatest activation was exhibited toward higher energy density foods when food was present. This supports an optimal foraging perspective and has implications for healthy eating interventions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Equation-of-state formalism for dark energy models on the brane and the future of brane universes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Astashenok, Artyom V.; Yurov, Artyom V. [Baltic Federal University of I. Kant, Department of Theoretical Physics, Kaliningrad (Russian Federation); Elizalde, Emilio [Facultat de Ciencies, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, ICE/CSIC and IEEC Campus UAB, Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Odintsov, Sergei D. [Facultat de Ciencies, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, ICE/CSIC and IEEC Campus UAB, Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Institucio Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avancats (ICREA), Barcelona (Spain)

    2012-12-15

    Brane dark energy cosmologies, leading to various possible evolutions of our universe, are investigated. The discussion shows that while all these models can be made arbitrarily close to the standard {Lambda}CDM cosmology at present, their future evolutions can be very different, even diverge with time in a number of ways. This includes asymptotic de-Sitter evolution, Little Rip with dissolution of bound structures, and various possible singularities, as the Big Rip, a sudden future singularity (Type II), and Type III and Type IV cases. Specifically, some interesting effects coming from the brane tension are investigated. It is shown, in particular, that the Little Rip occurs faster on the brane model than in usual FRW cosmology. In the asymptotic de-Sitter regime the influence of the brane tension leads to a deviation of the value of the effective cosmological constant from that corresponding to ordinary dark energy. As a consequence, the value of the inertial force from the accelerating expansion can greatly exceed the corresponding inertial force in ordinary cosmological models. (orig.)

  3. Formal deduction of the Saint-Venant-Exner model including arbitrarily sloping sediment beds and associated energy

    CERN Document Server

    Fernández-Nieto, E D; Narbona-Reina, G; Zabsonré, J D

    2015-01-01

    In this work we present a deduction of the Saint-Venant-Exner model through an asymptotic analysis of the Navier-Stokes equations. A multi-scale analysis is performed in order to take into account that the velocity of the sediment layer is smaller than the one of the fluid layer. This leads us to consider a shallow water type system for the fluid layer and a lubrication Reynolds equation for the sediment one. This deduction provides some improvements with respect to the classical Saint-Venant-Exner model: (i) the deduced model has an associated energy. Moreover, it allows us to explain why classical models do not have an associated energy and how to modify them in order to recover a model with this property. (ii) The model incorporates naturally a necessary modification that must be taken into account in order to be applied to arbitrarily sloping beds. Furthermore, we show that this modification is different of the ones considered classically, and that it coincides with a classical one only if the solution ha...

  4. The Γ-Limit of the Two-Dimensional Ohta-Kawasaki Energy. I. Droplet Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Dorian; Muratov, Cyrill B.; Serfaty, Sylvia

    2013-11-01

    This is the first in a series of two papers in which we derive a Γ-expansion for a two-dimensional non-local Ginzburg-Landau energy with Coulomb repulsion, also known as the Ohta-Kawasaki model, in connection with diblock copolymer systems. In that model, two phases appear, which interact via a nonlocal Coulomb type energy. We focus on the regime where one of the phases has very small volume fraction, thus creating small "droplets" of the minority phase in a "sea" of the majority phase. In this paper we show that an appropriate setting for Γ-convergence in the considered parameter regime is via weak convergence of the suitably normalized charge density in the sense of measures. We prove that, after a suitable rescaling, the Ohta-Kawasaki energy functional Γ-converges to a quadratic energy functional of the limit charge density generated by the screened Coulomb kernel. A consequence of our results is that minimizers (or almost minimizers) of the energy have droplets which are almost all asymptotically round, have the same radius and are uniformly distributed in the domain. The proof relies mainly on the analysis of the sharp interface version of the energy, with the connection to the original diffuse interface model obtained via matching upper and lower bounds for the energy. We thus also obtain an asymptotic characterization of the energy minimizers in the diffuse interface model.

  5. Hybrid Fluid/Kinetic Modeling Of Magnetized High Energy Density Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, David; Held, Eric; King, Jacob; Stoltz, Peter; Masti, Robert; Srinivasan, Bhuvana

    2017-10-01

    MHD modeling with an equation of state (EOS) of the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instabily in Z indicates that it is seeded by the electro-thermal instability. Large thermodynamic drives associated with gradients at the interface between the liner and the coronal regions distort distribution functions and likely lead to non-local transport effects in a plasma which varies from weakly to strongly coupled. In this work, we discuss using effective potential theory along with a Chapman-Ensksog-like (CEL) formalism to develop hybrid fluid/kinetic modeling capabilities for these plasmas. Effective potential theory addresses the role of Coulomb collisions on transport across coupling regimes and the CEL approach bridges the gap between full-blow kinetic simulations and the EOS tables, which only depend locally on density and temperature. Quantitative results on the Spitzer problem across coupling coupling regimes will be presented as a first step. DOE Grant No. DE-SC0016525.

  6. Formalizing Arrow's theorem

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Section 4 describes my first, aborted, attempt at a formalization, while Sections 5 to 7 present the formalization that was finished. Section 5 explains how I formalized orders and preorders. Section 6 presents a fragment of the formalization in detail, and Section 7 gives an example of how the formalization can be used to get ...

  7. Density of low-energy vibrational states in a protein solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brill, A. S.; Fiamingo, F. G.; Hampton, D. A.; Levin, P. D.; Thorkildsen, R.

    1985-04-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance measurements on the aquo complex of sperm whale skeletal myoglobin in solution at T<4 K show that, at phonon energies around 20 cm-1, the density of vibrational states is that of a three-dimensional system.

  8. High-Energy-Density Physics Fundamentals, Inertial Fusion, and Experimental Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Drake, R. Paul; Horie, Yasuyuki

    2006-01-01

    The raw numbers of high-energy-density physics are amazing: shock waves at hundreds of km/s (approaching a million km per hour), temperatures of millions of degrees, and pressures that exceed 100 million atmospheres. This book introduces the reader to the fundamental tools and discoveries of high-energy-density physics. It surveys the production of high-energy-density conditions, the fundamental plasma and hydrodynamic models that can describe them and the problem of scaling from the laboratory to the cosmos. Connections to astrophysics are discussed throughout. The book is intended to support coursework in high-energy-density physics, to meet the needs of new researchers in this field, and also to serve as a useful reference on the fundamentals. Specifically the book has been designed to enable academics in physics, astrophysics, applied physics and engineering departments to provide in a single-course introduction to fluid mechanics and radiative transfer, with dramatic applications in the field of high-ene...

  9. The Potential Energy Density in Transverse String Waves Depends Critically on Longitudinal Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, David R.

    2011-01-01

    The question of the correct formula for the potential energy density in transverse waves on a taut string continues to attract attention (e.g. Burko 2010 "Eur. J. Phys." 31 L71), and at least three different formulae can be found in the literature, with the classic text by Morse and Feshbach ("Methods of Theoretical Physics" pp 126-127) stating…

  10. Density dependence of the symmetry energy from neutron skin thickness in finite nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinas, X.; Centelles, M.; Roca-Maza, X.; Warda, M. [Departament d' Estructura i Conastituents de la Materia and Institut de Ciencies del Cosmos, Facultat de Fisica, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques 1, 08028, Barcelona (Spain); Instituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Milano , Via Celoria 16, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Katedra Fizyki Teoretycznej, Uniwersytet Marii Curie-Skodowskiej ul. Radziszewskiego 10, 20-031 Lublin (Poland)

    2012-10-20

    The density dependence of the symmetry energy, characterized by the parameter L, is studied using information provided by the neutron skin thickness in finite nuclei. An estimate of L is obtained from experimental data of antiprotonic atoms. We also discuss the ability of parity violating electron scatering to obtain information about the neutron skin thickness in {sup 208}Pb.

  11. Fission properties of the Barcelona-Catania-Paris energy density functional

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robledo, L M [Dep. Fisica Teorica (Modulo 15), Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Baldo, M [Instituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Catania, Via Santa Sofia 64, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Schuck, P [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, CNRS, UMR8608, F-91406 Orsay (France); Vinas, X, E-mail: luis.robledo@uam.es [Departament d' Estructura i Constituents de la Materia and Institut de Ciencies del Cosmos, Facultat de Fisica, Universitat de Barcelona, Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2011-09-16

    Fission properties of the Barcelona-Catania-Paris (BCP) energy density functional are explored by performing constrained mean field Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) calculations along the fission path. These calculations provide us with the quantities required to estimate the spontaneous fission half lives and fragment mass distribution. The results obtained are compared to experimental data and other calculations.

  12. Advanced High Energy Density Secondary Batteries with Multi‐Electron Reaction Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Rui; Huang, Yongxin; Li, Li

    2016-01-01

    Secondary batteries have become important for smart grid and electric vehicle applications, and massive effort has been dedicated to optimizing the current generation and improving their energy density. Multi‐electron chemistry has paved a new path for the breaking of the barriers that exist in traditional battery research and applications, and provided new ideas for developing new battery systems that meet energy density requirements. An in‐depth understanding of multi‐electron chemistries in terms of the charge transfer mechanisms occuring during their electrochemical processes is necessary and urgent for the modification of secondary battery materials and development of secondary battery systems. In this Review, multi‐electron chemistry for high energy density electrode materials and the corresponding secondary battery systems are discussed. Specifically, four battery systems based on multi‐electron reactions are classified in this review: lithium‐ and sodium‐ion batteries based on monovalent cations; rechargeable batteries based on the insertion of polyvalent cations beyond those of alkali metals; metal–air batteries, and Li–S batteries. It is noted that challenges still exist in the development of multi‐electron chemistries that must be overcome to meet the energy density requirements of different battery systems, and much effort has more effort to be devoted to this. PMID:27840796

  13. Advanced High Energy Density Secondary Batteries with Multi-Electron Reaction Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Renjie; Luo, Rui; Huang, Yongxin; Wu, Feng; Li, Li

    2016-10-01

    Secondary batteries have become important for smart grid and electric vehicle applications, and massive effort has been dedicated to optimizing the current generation and improving their energy density. Multi-electron chemistry has paved a new path for the breaking of the barriers that exist in traditional battery research and applications, and provided new ideas for developing new battery systems that meet energy density requirements. An in-depth understanding of multi-electron chemistries in terms of the charge transfer mechanisms occuring during their electrochemical processes is necessary and urgent for the modification of secondary battery materials and development of secondary battery systems. In this Review, multi-electron chemistry for high energy density electrode materials and the corresponding secondary battery systems are discussed. Specifically, four battery systems based on multi-electron reactions are classified in this review: lithium- and sodium-ion batteries based on monovalent cations; rechargeable batteries based on the insertion of polyvalent cations beyond those of alkali metals; metal-air batteries, and Li-S batteries. It is noted that challenges still exist in the development of multi-electron chemistries that must be overcome to meet the energy density requirements of different battery systems, and much effort has more effort to be devoted to this.

  14. Analogy of strain energy density based bone-remodeling algorithm and structural topology optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, In Gwun; Kim, Il Yong; Kwak, Byung Ban

    2009-01-01

    In bone-remodeling studies, it is believed that the morphology of bone is affected by its internal mechanical loads. From the 1970s, high computing power enabled quantitative studies in the simulation of bone remodeling or bone adaptation. Among them, Huiskes et al. (1987, "Adaptive Bone Remodeling Theory Applied to Prosthetic Design Analysis," J. Biomech. Eng., 20, pp. 1135-1150) proposed a strain energy density based approach to bone remodeling and used the apparent density for the characterization of internal bone morphology. The fundamental idea was that bone density would increase when strain (or strain energy density) is higher than a certain value and bone resorption would occur when the strain (or strain energy density) quantities are lower than the threshold. Several advanced algorithms were developed based on these studies in an attempt to more accurately simulate physiological bone-remodeling processes. As another approach, topology optimization originally devised in structural optimization has been also used in the computational simulation of the bone-remodeling process. The topology optimization method systematically and iteratively distributes material in a design domain, determining an optimal structure that minimizes an objective function. In this paper, we compared two seemingly different approaches in different fields-the strain energy density based bone-remodeling algorithm (biomechanical approach) and the compliance based structural topology optimization method (mechanical approach)-in terms of mathematical formulations, numerical difficulties, and behavior of their numerical solutions. Two numerical case studies were conducted to demonstrate their similarity and difference, and then the solution convergences were discussed quantitatively.

  15. Silicon-Nanowire Based Lithium Ion Batteries for Vehicles With Double the Energy Density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefan, Ionel [Amprius, Inc., Sunnyvale, CA (United States); Cohen, Yehonathan [Amprius, Inc., Sunnyvale, CA (United States)

    2015-03-31

    Amprius researched and developed silicon nanowire anodes. Amprius then built and delivered high-energy lithium-ion cells that met the project’s specific energy goal and exceeded the project’s energy density goal. But Amprius’ cells did not meet the project’s cycle life goal, suggesting additional manufacturing process development is required. With DOE support, Amprius developed a new anode material, silicon, and a new anode structure, nanowire. During the project, Amprius also began to develop a new multi-step manufacturing process that does not involve traditional anode production processes (e.g. mixing, drying and calendaring).

  16. Edge-enriched, porous carbon-based, high energy density supercapacitors for hybrid electric vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong Jung; Yang, Cheol-Min; Park, Ki Chul; Kaneko, Katsumi; Kim, Yoong Ahm; Noguchi, Minoru; Fujino, Takeshi; Oyama, Shigeki; Endo, Morinobu

    2012-03-12

    Supercapacitors can store and deliver energy by a simple charge separation, and thus they could be an attractive option to meet transient high energy density in operating fuel cells and in electric and hybrid electric vehicles. To achieve such requirements, intensive studies have been carried out to improve the volumetric capacitance in supercapacitors using various types and forms of carbons including carbon nanotubes and graphenes. However, conventional porous carbons are not suitable for use as electrode material in supercapacitors for such high energy density applications. Here, we show that edge-enriched porous carbons are the best electrode material for high energy density supercapacitors to be used in vehicles as an auxiliary powertrain. Molten potassium hydroxide penetrates well-aligned graphene layers vertically and consequently generates both suitable pores that are easily accessible to the electrolyte and a large fraction of electrochemically active edge sites. We expect that our findings will motivate further research related to energy storage devices and also environmentally friendly electric vehicles. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. SU-F-J-195: On the Performance of Four Dual Energy CT Formalisms for Extracting Proton Stopping Powers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baer, E; Royle, G [University College London, London (United Kingdom); Lalonde, A; Bouchard, H [University of Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Dual energy CT can predict stopping power ratios (SPR) for ion therapy treatment planning. Several approaches have been proposed recently, however accuracy and practicability in a clinical workflow are unaddressed. The aim of this work is to provide a fair comparison of available approaches in a human-like phantom to find the optimal method for tissue characterization in a clinical situation. Methods: The SPR determination accuracy is investigated using simulated DECT images. A virtual human-like phantom is created containing 14 different standard human tissues. SECT (120 kV) and DECT images (100 kV and 140 kV Sn) are simulated using the software ImaSim. The single energy CT (SECT) stoichiometric calibration method and four recently published calibration-based DECT methods are implemented and used to predict the SPRs from simulated images. The difference between SPR predictions and theoretical SPR are compared pixelwize. Mean, standard deviation and skewness of the SPR difference distributions are used as measures for bias, dispersion and symmetry. Results: The average SPR differences and standard deviations are (0.22 ± 1.27)% for SECT, and A) (−0.26 ± 1.30)%, B) (0.08 ± 1.12)%, C) (0.06 ± 1.15)% and D) (−0.05 ± 1.05)% for the four DECT methods. While SPR prediction using SECT is showing a systematic error on SPR, the DECT methods B, C and D are unbiased. The skewness of the SECT distribution is 0.57%, and A) −0.19%, B) −0.56%, C) −0.29% and D) −0.07% for DECT methods respectively. Conclusion: The here presented DECT methods B, C and D outperform the commonly used SECT stoichiometric calibration. These methods predict SPR accurately without a bias and within ± 1.2% (68th percentile). This indicates that DECT potentially improves accuracy of range predictions in proton therapy. A validation of these findings using clinical CT images of real tissues is necessary.

  18. Analysis of electronic models for solar cells including energy resolved defect densities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glitzky, Annegret

    2010-07-01

    We introduce an electronic model for solar cells including energy resolved defect densities. The resulting drift-diffusion model corresponds to a generalized van Roosbroeck system with additional source terms coupled with ODEs containing space and energy as parameters for all defect densities. The system has to be considered in heterostructures and with mixed boundary conditions from device simulation. We give a weak formulation of the problem. If the boundary data and the sources are compatible with thermodynamic equilibrium the free energy along solutions decays monotonously. In other cases it may be increasing, but we estimate its growth. We establish boundedness and uniqueness results and prove the existence of a weak solution. This is done by considering a regularized problem, showing its solvability and the boundedness of its solutions independent of the regularization level. (orig.)

  19. Energy and centrality dependences of charged multiplicity density in relativistic nuclear collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Sá Ben-Hao; Tai, A; Zhou Dai Mei; Sa, Ben-Hao; Tai, An; Zhou, Dai-Mei

    2001-01-01

    Using a hadron and string cascade model, JPCIAE, the energy and centrality dependences of charged particle pseudorapidity density in relativistic nuclear collisions were studied. Within the framework of this model, both the relativistic $p+\\bar p$ experimental data and the PHOBOS and PHENIX $Au+Au$ data at $\\sqrt s_{nn}$=130 GeV could be reproduced fairly well without retuning the model parameters. The predictions for full RHIC energy $Au+Au$ collisions and for $Pb+Pb$ collisions at the ALICE energy were given. Participant nucleon distributions were calculated based on different methods. It was found that the number of participant nucleons, $$, is not a well defined variable both experimentally and theoretically. Therefore, it is inappropriate to use charged particle pseudorapidity density per participant pair as a function of $$ for distinguishing various theoretical models.

  20. Self-assembling graphene-anthraquinone-2-sulphonate supramolecular nanostructures with enhanced energy density for supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lifang; Gan, Shiyu; Li, Hongyan; Han, Dongxue; Li, Fenghua; Bao, Yu; Niu, Li

    2017-07-01

    Boosting the energy density of capacitive energy storage devices remains a crucial issue for facilitating applications. Herein, we report a graphene-anthraquinone supramolecular nanostructure by self-assembly for supercapacitors. The sulfonated anthraquinone exhibits high water solubility, a π-conjugated structure and redox active features, which not only serve as a spacer to interact with and stabilize graphene but also introduce extra pseudocapacitance contributions. The formed nest-like three-dimensional (3D) nanostructure with further hydrothermal treatment enhances the accessibility of ion transfer and exposes the redox-active quinone groups in the electrolytes. A fabricated all-solid-state flexible symmetric device delivers a high specific capacitance of 398.5 F g-1 at 1 A g-1 (1.5 times higher than graphene), superior energy density (52.24 Wh kg-1 at about 1 kW kg-1) and good stability (82% capacitance retention after 10 000 cycles).

  1. A Comparative Density Functional Theory and Density Functional Tight Binding Study of Phases of Nitrogen Including a High Energy Density Material N8

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Capel

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a comparative dispersion-corrected Density Functional Theory (DFT and Density Functional Tight Binding (DFTB-D study of several phases of nitrogen, including the well-known alpha, beta, and gamma phases as well as recently discovered highly energetic phases: covalently bound cubic gauche (cg nitrogen and molecular (vdW-bound N8 crystals. Among several tested parametrizations of N–N interactions for DFTB, we identify only one that is suitable for modeling of all these phases. This work therefore establishes the applicability of DFTB-D to studies of phases, including highly metastable phases, of nitrogen, which will be of great use for modelling of dynamics of reactions involving these phases, which may not be practical with DFT due to large required space and time scales. We also derive a dispersion-corrected DFT (DFT-D setup (atom-centered basis parameters and Grimme dispersion parameters tuned for accurate description simultaneously of several nitrogen allotropes including covalently and vdW-bound crystals and including high-energy phases.

  2. Learning about the energy density of liquid and semi-solid foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogenkamp, P S; Stafleu, A; Mars, M; de Graaf, C

    2012-09-01

    People learn about a food's satiating capacity by exposure and consequently adjust their energy intake. To investigate the effect of energy density and texture on subsequent energy intake adjustments during repeated consumption. In a randomized crossover design, participants (n=27, age: 21±2.4 years, body mass index: 22.2±1.6 kg m(-2)) repeatedly consumed highly novel foods that were either low-energy-dense (LE: 30 kcal per 100 g) or high-energy-dense (HE: 130 kcal per 100 g), and either liquid or semi-solid, resulting in four product conditions. In each condition, a fixed portion of test food was consumed nine times as an obligatory part of breakfast, lunch and dinner on 3 consecutive days. All meals continued with an ad libitum buffet; food items for evening consumption were provided and the intake (kcal per day) was measured. Buffet intake depended on energy density and day of consumption of the test foods (day*energy interaction: P=0.02); daily buffet intake increased from day 1 (1745±577 kcal) to day 3 (1979±567 kcal) in the LE conditions; intake did not change in the HE conditions (day 1: 1523±429 kcal, day 3: 1589±424 kcal). Food texture did not affect the intake (P=0.56). Intake did depend on energy density of the test foods; participants increased their buffet intake over days in response to learning about the satiating capacity of the LE foods, but did not change buffet intake over days when repeatedly consuming a HE food as part of their meal. The adjustments in intake were made irrespective of the food texture.

  3. Buying less and wasting less food. Changes in household food energy purchases, energy intakes and energy density between 2007 and 2012 with and without adjustment for food waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whybrow, Stephen; Horgan, Graham W; Macdiarmid, Jennie I

    2017-05-01

    Consumers in the UK responded to the rapid increases in food prices between 2007 and 2009 partly by reducing the amount of food energy bought. Household food and drink waste has also decreased since 2007. The present study explored the combined effects of reductions in food purchases and waste on estimated food energy intakes and dietary energy density. The amount of food energy purchased per adult equivalent was calculated from Kantar Worldpanel household food and drink purchase data for 2007 and 2012. Food energy intakes were estimated by adjusting purchase data for food and drink waste, using waste factors specific to the two years and scaled for household size. Scotland. Households in Scotland (n 2657 in 2007; n 2841 in 2012). The amount of food energy purchased decreased between 2007 and 2012, from 8·6 to 8·2 MJ/adult equivalent per d (Pwaste, estimated food energy intake was not significantly different (7·3 and 7·2 MJ/adult equivalent per d for 2007 and 2012, respectively; P=0·186). Energy density of foods purchased increased slightly from 700 to 706 kJ/100 g (P=0·010). While consumers in Scotland reduced the amount of food energy that they purchased between 2007 and 2012, this was balanced by reductions in household food and drink waste over the same time, resulting in no significant change in net estimated energy intake of foods brought into the home.

  4. Machine Protection and High Energy Density States in Matter for High Energy Hadron Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Blanco Sancho, Juan; Schmidt, R

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is the largest accelerator in the world. It is designed to collide two proton beams with unprecedented particle energy of 7TeV. The energy stored in each beam is 362MJ, sufficient to melt 500kg of copper. An accidental release of even a small fraction of the beam energy can result in severe damage to the equipment. Machine protection systems are essential to safely operate the accelerator and handle all possible accidents. This thesis deals with the study of different failure scenarios and its possible consequences. It addresses failure scenarios ranging from low intensity losses on high-Z materials and superconductors to high intensity losses on carbon and copper collimators. Low beam losses are sufficient to quench the superconducting magnets and the stabilized superconducting cables (bus-bars) that connects the main magnets. If this occurs and the energy from the bus-bar is not extracted fast enough it can lead to a situation similar to the accident in 2008 at LHC during pow...

  5. Electron momentum spectroscopy study of amantadine: binding energy spectra and valence orbital electron density distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvinyuk, I. V.; Zheng, Y.; Brion, C. E.

    2000-11-01

    The electron binding energy spectrum and valence orbital electron momentum density distributions of amantadine (1-aminoadamantane), an important anti-viral and anti-Parkinsonian drug, have been measured by electron momentum spectroscopy. Theoretical momentum distributions, calculated at the 6-311++G** and AUG-CC-PVTZ levels within the target Hartree-Fock and also the target Kohn-Sham density functional theory approximations, show good agreement with the experimental results. The results for amantadine are also compared with those for the parent molecule, adamantane, reported earlier (Chem. Phys. 253 (2000) 41). Based on the comparison tentative assignments of the valence region ionization bands of amantadine have been made.

  6. Strongly Interacting Matter Matter at Very High Energy Density: 3 Lectures in Zakopane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLerran, L.

    2010-06-09

    These lectures concern the properties of strongly interacting matter at very high energy density. I begin with the Color Glass Condensate and the Glasma, matter that controls the earliest times in hadronic collisions. I then describe the Quark Gluon Plasma, matter produced from the thermalized remnants of the Glasma. Finally, I describe high density baryonic matter, in particular Quarkyonic matter. The discussion will be intuitive and based on simple structural aspects of QCD. There will be some discussion of experimental tests of these ideas.

  7. Taxonomic variation in size-density relationships challenges the notion of energy equivalence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaac, Nick J B; Storch, David; Carbone, Chris

    2011-08-23

    The relationship between body mass and abundance is a major focus for research in macroecology. The form of this relationship has been suggested to reflect the partitioning of energy among species. We revisit classical datasets to show that size-density relationships vary systematically among taxonomic groups, with most variation occurring at the order level. We use this knowledge to make a novel test of the 'energy equivalence rule', at the taxonomic scale appropriate for the data. We find no obvious relationship between order-specific exponents for abundance and metabolic rate, although most orders show substantially shallower (less negative) scaling than predicted by energy equivalence. This finding implies greater energy flux among larger-bodied animals, with the largest species using two orders of magnitude more energy than the smallest. Our results reject the traditional interpretation of energy equivalence as a predictive rule. However, some variation in size-density exponents is consistent with a model of geometric constraints on foraging. This journal is © 2011 The Royal Society

  8. Evaluation of strain, dietary energy level and stocking density on broiler feathering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Moreira

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the effects of strain, stocking density and dietary energy level on the feathering of broiler chickens. Four trials were carried out between September 2000 and April 2002. There were 10,685 broiler chicks from the strains Ross 308, Cobb 500, Hybro PG, Hubbard, MPK, and Isa Vedette. The bids were reared at stocking densities varying between 10 and 16 birds/m² and were given diets containing different metabolizable energy levels. Broiler feathering was evaluated either by atrributing scores from 1 to 10 to feather covering along the thigh and back (visual inspection, or by determining the percentage weight of the feathers at 28 and 42 days of age. Increasing rearing densities resulted in poorer feathering, mainly if 12 or 13 birds/m² were compared with 16 birds/m². The strains showed different feathering; it was better in Cobb 500 and MPK birds, whereas Hubbard birds showed poorer feathering, mostly along the back. The energy level in the diet has also affected feathering scores. Medium energy level resulted in better feathering along the back at 28 days, and the low level, in better feathering along the thigh at 35 days of age. Finally, feather scores were better in females than in males.

  9. Pie-like electrode design for high-energy density lithium-sulfur batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhen; Zhang, Jin Tao; Chen, Yu Ming; Li, Ju; Lou, Xiong Wen (David)

    2015-11-01

    Owing to the overwhelming advantage in energy density, lithium-sulfur (Li-S) battery is a promising next-generation electrochemical energy storage system. Despite many efforts in pursuing long cycle life, relatively little emphasis has been placed on increasing the areal energy density. Herein, we have designed and developed a `pie' structured electrode, which provides an excellent balance between gravimetric and areal energy densities. Combining lotus root-like multichannel carbon nanofibers `filling' and amino-functionalized graphene `crust', the free-standing paper electrode (S mass loading: 3.6 mg cm-2) delivers high specific capacity of 1,314 mAh g-1 (4.7 mAh cm-2) at 0.1 C (0.6 mA cm-2) accompanied with good cycling stability. Moreover, the areal capacity can be further boosted to more than 8 mAh cm-2 by stacking three layers of paper electrodes with S mass loading of 10.8 mg cm-2.

  10. High Energy Storage Density and Impedance Response of PLZT2/95/5 Antiferroelectric Ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bi; Liu, Qiuxiang; Tang, Xingui; Zhang, Tianfu; Jiang, Yanping; Li, Wenhua; Luo, Jie

    2017-02-08

    (Pb0.97La0.02)(Zr0.95Ti0.05)O₃ (PLZT2/95/5) ceramics were successfully prepared via a solid-state reaction route. The dielectric properties were investigated in the temperature region of 26-650 °C. The dielectric diffuse anomaly in the dielectric relaxation was found in the high temperature region of 600-650 °C with increasing the measuring frequency, which was related to the dynamic thermal process of ionized oxygen vacancies generated in the high temperature. Two phase transition points were detected during heating, which were found to coexist from 150 to 200 °C. Electric field induced ferroelectric to antiferroelectric phase transition behavior of the (Pb0.97La0.02)(Zr0.95Ti0.05)O₃ ceramics was investigated in this work with an emphasis on energy storage properties. A recoverable energy-storage density of 0.83 J/cm³ and efficiency of 70% was obtained in (Pb0.97La0.02)(Zr0.95Ti0.05)O₃ ceramics at 55 kV/cm. Based on these results, (Pb0.97La0.02)(Zr0.95Ti0.05)O₃ ceramics with a large recoverable energy-storage density could be a potential candidate for the applications in high energy-storage density ceramic capacitors.

  11. Development of Fast and Reliable Free-Energy Density Functional Methods for Simulations of Dense Plasmas from Cold- to Hot-Temperature Regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasiev, V. V.

    2017-10-01

    Free-energy density functional theory (DFT) is one of the standard tools in high-energy-density physics used to determine the fundamental properties of dense plasmas, especially in cold and warm regimes when quantum effects are essential. DFT is usually implemented via the orbital-dependent Kohn-Sham (KS) procedure. There are two challenges of conventional implementation: (1) KS computational cost becomes prohibitively expensive at high temperatures; and (2) ground-state exchange-correlation (XC) functionals do not take into account the XC thermal effects. This talk will address both challenges and report details of the formal development of new generalized gradient approximation (GGA) XC free-energy functional which bridges low-temperature (ground state) and high-temperature (plasma) limits. Recent progress on development of functionals for orbital-free DFT as a way to address the second challenge will also be discussed. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  12. Effects of palatability and learned satiety on energy density influences on breakfast intake in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeomans, Martin R; Weinberg, Laura; James, Sarah

    2005-11-15

    The present report explored firstly how palatability modified the effects of energy density (ED) on short-term food intake and changes in rated appetite within a single test meal, and secondly how repeated consumption altered these relationships. Experiment 1 contrasted disguised high (HED) and low (LED) versions of a food presented in bland and palatable forms. Mass consumed varied as an interaction of palatability and ED, with subjects eating least of the bland/HED version, suggesting some un-learned satiating effects. No such compensation for ED was seen in the palatable/HED condition, and overall energy intake increased with ED. Palatability had the expected stimulatory effect on appetite, but rated hunger decreased more rapidly as a function of energy consumed in the HED conditions. Experiment 2 introduced novel distinctive flavours to examine whether repeated experience of palatable HED and LED versions resulted in learned satiety. Participants ate the same mass of LED and HED versions on first exposure, but after two training days with each food, where they consumed a fixed amount, they subsequently ate a greater mass of the LED version, consistent with learned satiety. Increased intake was accompanied by a slower rate of decline in hunger in the LED condition. Despite these changes, energy intake remained higher with the HED version. Liking for the LED version was greater than the HED version at the end, possibly due to mild aversive qualities of eating a fixed portion of the HED food during training. Together these data suggest that energy density is the major determinant of short-term energy intake in the absence of orosensory cues predictive of energy differences, but that learning of flavour-energy associations can, to some extent, allow short-term energy consumption to be regulated.

  13. Global scenarios of urban density and its impacts on building energy use through 2050.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güneralp, Burak; Zhou, Yuyu; Ürge-Vorsatz, Diana; Gupta, Mukesh; Yu, Sha; Patel, Pralit L; Fragkias, Michail; Li, Xiaoma; Seto, Karen C

    2017-08-22

    Although the scale of impending urbanization is well-acknowledged, we have a limited understanding of how urban forms will change and what their impact will be on building energy use. Using both top-down and bottom-up approaches and scenarios, we examine building energy use for heating and cooling. Globally, the energy use for heating and cooling by the middle of the century will be between 45 and 59 exajoules per year (corresponding to an increase of 7-40% since 2010). Most of this variability is due to the uncertainty in future urban densities of rapidly growing cities in Asia and particularly China. Dense urban development leads to less urban energy use overall. Waiting to retrofit the existing built environment until markets are ready in about 5 years to widely deploy the most advanced renovation technologies leads to more savings in building energy use. Potential for savings in energy use is greatest in China when coupled with efficiency gains. Advanced efficiency makes the least difference compared with the business-as-usual scenario in South Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa but significantly contributes to energy savings in North America and Europe. Systemic efforts that focus on both urban form, of which urban density is an indicator, and energy-efficient technologies, but that also account for potential co-benefits and trade-offs with human well-being can contribute to both local and global sustainability. Particularly in growing cities in the developing world, such efforts can improve the well-being of billions of urban residents and contribute to mitigating climate change by reducing energy use in urban areas.

  14. Ag incorporated Mn3O4/AC nanocomposite based supercapacitor devices with high energy density and power density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagamuthu, S; Vijayakumar, S; Muralidharan, G

    2014-12-14

    Silver incorporated Mn3O4/amorphous carbon (AC) nanocomposites are synthesized by a green chemistry method. X-ray diffraction studies revealed the structural changes in Mn3O4/AC nanocomposites attributable to the addition of silver. Cyclic voltammetry, charge-discharge and ac-impedance studies indicated that the Ag-Mn3O4/AC-5 electrode was the most suitable candidate for supercapacitor applications. From the galvanostatic charge-discharge studies, a higher specific capacitance of 981 F g(-1) at a specific current of 1 A g(-1) was obtained. An Ag-Mn3O4/AC-symmetric supercapacitor consisting of an Ag-incorporated Mn3O4/AC composite as an anode as well as a cathode, and an asymmetric supercapacitor consisting of an Ag-incorporated Mn3O4/AC composite as a cathode and an activated carbon as an anode have been fabricated. The symmetric device exhibits a specific cell capacitance of 72 F g(-1) at a specific current of 1 A g(-1) whereas the asymmetric device delivers a specific cell capacitance of 180 F g(-1) at a high current rate of 10 A g(-1). The asymmetric supercapacitor device yields a high energy density of 81 W h kg(-1). This is higher than that of lead acid batteries and comparable with that of nickel hydride batteries.

  15. Independent and combined effects of eating rate and energy density on energy intake, appetite, and gut hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karl, J Philip; Young, Andrew J; Rood, Jennifer C; Montain, Scott J

    2013-03-01

    Energy density (ED) and eating rate (ER) influence energy intake; their combined effects on intake and on postprandial pancreatic and gut hormone responses are undetermined. To determine the combined effects of ED and ER manipulation on voluntary food intake, subjective appetite, and postprandial pancreatic and gut hormone responses. Twenty nonobese volunteers each consumed high (1.6 kcal g(-1) ; HED) and low (1.2 kcal g(-1) ; LED) ED breakfasts slowly (20 g min(-1) ; SR) and quickly (80 g min(-1) ; FR) ad libitum to satiation. Appetite, and pancreatic and gut hormone concentrations were measured periodically over 3 h. Ad libitum energy intake during the subsequent lunch was then measured. Main effects of ED and ER on energy intake and a main effect of ER, but not ED, on mass of food consumed were observed, FR and HED being associated with increased intake (P energy intake was highest during FR-HED (P ≤ 0.01). Area under the curve (AUC) of appetite ratings was not different between meals. Main effects of ED and ER on insulin, peptide-YY, and glucagon-like peptide-1 AUC (P energy intake over both meals was highest during the FR-HED trial with the greatest difference between FR-HED and SR-LED trials (P ≤ 0.01). Consuming an energy dense meal quickly compounds independent effects of ER and ED on energy intake. Energy compensation at the following meal may not occur despite altered gut hormone responses. Copyright © 2013 The Obesity Society.

  16. Calibration phantoms for accurate water and lipid density quantification using dual energy mammography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, H.-M.; Ding, H.; Kumar, N.; Sennung, D.; Molloi, S.

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the feasibility of water and lipid as calibration phantoms for accurate dual energy breast density quantification. Dual energy calibration was performed on a mammography system based on scanning multi-slit Si strip photon-counting detectors using plastic water and adipose-equivalent phantoms as the basis materials. Two different methods were used to convert the dual energy decomposition measurements in plastic phantom thicknesses into the true water and lipid basis materials. The first method was based entirely on the theoretically calculated effective attenuation coefficients of the investigated materials in the mammographic energy range. The conversion matrix was determined through the linear least-squares fitting of the target material using the calculated effective attenuation coefficients of water and lipid. The second method was based on experimental calibration with plastic water phantom, adipose-equivalent phantom, and its correlation to known water and lipid thicknesses. These two methods were then validated by using an independent measurement of water and lipid mixture phantoms and postmortem breasts. The correlation between the dual energy decomposition measurements and the known values was evaluated using linear regression analysis. The averaged root-mean-square errors for water density quantification derived from the theoretical and experimental conversions were 8.6% and 1.6%, respectively. The postmortem breast tissue study also indicates that the experimentally acquired conversion coefficient improved the accuracy in water density quantification, in comparison with that from the theoretical conversion. The results show that conversion of the dual energy measurements into water and lipid thicknesses improves the accuracy in breast tissue decomposition.

  17. Light polymerization during cavity filling: influence of total energy density on shrinkage and marginal adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortolotto, Tissiana; Prando, Federico; Dietschi, Didier; Krejci, Ivo

    2014-07-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the marginal adaptation and shrinkage stress development of a micro hybrid restorative composite as a function of energy density. Linear displacement and shrinkage forces were measured with custom-made devices for energies of 4,000, 8,000, 16,000 and 32,000 mJ/cm(2) at a constant power density of 800 mW/cm(2). Marginal adaptation of composite restorations cured with the same energy density was evaluated before and after mechanical loading with 300,000 cycles at 70 N. The group "4,000 mJ/cm(2)" showed the lowest shrinkage force [2.9(0.2) kg] and linear displacement [23.5(0.7) μm] but led to the worst marginal adaptation after loading [46.4(23.5) %CM] probably due to under-curing. When the maximum energy of 32,000 mJ/cm(2) was applied, a slight increase in shrinkage forces [3.6(0.2) kg and 29.2(0.8) μm], and a slight decrease in marginal adaptation after loading [75.4(11.5) %CM] were observed, but these changes were not significantly different in comparison to groups cured with energies of 8,000 and 16,000 mJ/cm(2). For the resin composite tested in this study, no differences in marginal adaptation could be detected above the energy threshold of 8,000 mJ/cm(2).

  18. A Microelectromechanical High-Density Energy Storage/Rapid Release System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodgers, M. Steven; Allen, Jim J.; Meeks, Kent D.; Jensen, Brian D.; Miller, Sam L.

    1999-07-21

    One highly desirable characteristic of electrostatically driven microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) is that they consume very little power. The corresponding drawback is that the force they produce may be inadequate for many applications. It has previously been demonstrated that gear reduction units or microtransmissions can substantially increase the torque generated by microengines. Operating speed, however, is also reduced by the transmission gear ratio. Some applications require both high speed and high force. If this output is only required for a limited period of time, then energy could be stored in a mechanical system and rapidly released upon demand. We have designed, fabricated, and demonstrated a high-density energy storage/rapid release system that accomplishes this task. Built using a 5-level surface micromachining technology, the assembly closely resembles a medieval crossbow. Energy releases on the order of tens of nanojoules have already been demonstrated, and significantly higher energy systems are under development.

  19. Stacking faults density driven collapse of magnetic energy in hcp-cobalt nano-magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nong, H. T. T.; Mrad, K.; Schoenstein, F.; Piquemal, J.-Y.; Jouini, N.; Leridon, B.; Mercone, S.

    2017-06-01

    Cobalt nanowires with different shape parameters were synthesized via the polyol process. By calculating the magnetic energy product (BH max) both for dried nano-powder and for nanowires in their synthesis solution, we observed unexpected independent BH max values from the nanowires shape. A good alignment of the nanowires leads to a higher BH max value. Our results show that the key parameter driving the magnetic energy product of the cobalt nanowires is the stacking fault density. An exponential collapse of the magnetic energy is observed at very low percentage of structural faults. Cobalt nanowires with almost perfect hcp crystalline structures should present high magnetic energy, which is promising for application in rare earth-free permanent magnets. Oral talk at 8th International Workshop on Advanced Materials Science and Nanotechnology (IWAMSN2016), 8-12 November 2016, Ha Long City, Vietnam.

  20. Accuracy of density functional theory in predicting formation energies of ternary oxides from binary oxides and its implication on phase stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hautier, Geoffroy; Ong, Shyue Ping; Jain, Anubhav; Moore, Charles J.; Ceder, Gerbrand

    2012-04-01

    The evaluation of reaction energies between solids using density functional theory (DFT) is of practical importance in many technological fields and paramount in the study of the phase stability of known and predicted compounds. In this work, we present a comparison between reaction energies provided by experiments and computed by DFT in the generalized gradient approximation (GGA), using a Hubbard U parameter for some transition metal elements (GGA+U). We use a data set of 135 reactions involving the formation of ternary oxides from binary oxides in a broad range of chemistries and crystal structures. We find that the computational errors can be modeled by a normal distribution with a mean close to zero and a standard deviation of 24 meV/atom. The significantly smaller error compared to the more commonly reported errors in the formation energies from the elements is related to the larger cancellation of errors in energies when reactions involve chemically similar compounds. This result is of importance for phase diagram computations for which the relevant reaction energies are often not from the elements but from chemically close phases (e.g., ternary oxides versus binary oxides). In addition, we discuss the distribution of computational errors among chemistries and show that the use of a Hubbard U parameter is critical to the accuracy of reaction energies involving transition metals even when no major change in formal oxidation state is occurring.

  1. Fragment transition density method to calculate electronic coupling for excitation energy transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voityuk, Alexander A., E-mail: alexander.voityuk@icrea.cat [Institució Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançats, 08010 Barcelona, Spain and Institut de Química Computacional i Catàlisi (IQCC), Universitat de Girona 17071 Girona (Spain)

    2014-06-28

    A general approach, the Fragment Transition Density (FTD) scheme, is introduced to estimate electronic coupling for excitation energy transfer in a molecular system. Within this method, the excitation energies and transition densities of the system are used to derive the coupling matrix element. The scheme allows one to treat systems where exciton donor and acceptor are close together and their exchange interaction and orbital overlap are significant. The FTD method can be applied in combination with any quantum mechanical approach to treat excited states of general nature including single-, double-, and higher excitations. Using FTD approach, we derive excitonic couplings for several systems computed with the CIS, TD DFT and MS-CASPT2 methods. In particular, it is shown that the estimated coupling values in DNA π-stacks are strongly affected by the short-range electronic interaction of adjacent nucleobases.

  2. Rock Fracture Toughness Under Mode II Loading: A Theoretical Model Based on Local Strain Energy Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashidi Moghaddam, M.; Ayatollahi, M. R.; Berto, F.

    2018-01-01

    The values of mode II fracture toughness reported in the literature for several rocks are studied theoretically by using a modified criterion based on strain energy density averaged over a control volume around the crack tip. The modified criterion takes into account the effect of T-stress in addition to the singular terms of stresses/strains. The experimental results are related to mode II fracture tests performed on the semicircular bend and Brazilian disk specimens. There are good agreements between theoretical predictions using the generalized averaged strain energy density criterion and the experimental results. The theoretical results reveal that the value of mode II fracture toughness is affected by the size of control volume around the crack tip and also the magnitude and sign of T-stress.

  3. Energy decompositions according to physical space partitioning schemes: Treatments of the density cumulant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcoba, Diego R.; Torre, Alicia; Lain, Luis; Bochicchio, Roberto C.

    2007-09-01

    This article is a continuation of our previous paper on schemes of energy decompositions of molecular systems in the real space [D. R. Alcoba et al., J. Chem. Phys. 122, 074102 (2005)] now using correlated state functions. We study, according to physical arguments, the appropriate management of the density cumulant arising from the second-order reduced density matrix at correlated level, whose contributions can be assigned to one-center or to two-center terms in the energy partitioning. Our treatments are applied within two physical space partitioning schemes: the Bader partitioning into atomic basins and the fuzzy atom procedure. The results obtained in selected molecules are analyzed and discussed in detail.

  4. Polarization charge densities provide a predictive quantification of hydrogen bond energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klamt, Andreas; Reinisch, Jens; Eckert, Frank; Hellweg, Arnim; Diedenhofen, Michael

    2012-01-14

    A systematic density functional theory based study of hydrogen bond energies of 2465 single hydrogen bonds has been performed. In order to be closer to liquid phase conditions, different from the usual reference state of individual donor and acceptor molecules in vacuum, the reference state of donors and acceptors embedded in a perfect conductor as simulated by the COSMO solvation model has been used for the calculation of the hydrogen bond energies. The relationship between vacuum and conductor reference hydrogen bond energies is investigated and interpreted in the light of different physical contributions, such as electrostatic energy and dispersion. A very good correlation of the DFT/COSMO hydrogen bond energies with conductor polarization charge densities of separated donor and acceptor atoms was found. This provides a method to predict hydrogen bond strength in solution with a root mean square error of 0.36 kcal mol(-1) relative to the quantum chemical dimer calculations. The observed correlation is broadly applicable and allows for a predictive quantification of hydrogen bonding, which can be of great value in many areas of computational, medicinal and physical chemistry.

  5. Effective atomic numbers, electron densities and kinetic energy released in matter of vitamins for photon interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shantappa, A.; Hanagodimath, S. M.

    2014-01-01

    Effective atomic numbers, electron densities of some vitamins (Retinol, Riboflavin, Niacin, Biotin, Folic acid, Cobalamin, Phylloquinone and Flavonoids) composed of C, H, O, N, Co, P and S have been calculated for total and partial photon interactions by the direct method for energy range 1 keV-100 GeV by using WinXCOM and kinetic energy released in matter (Kerma) relative to air is calculated in energy range of 1 keV-20 MeV. Change in effective atomic number and electron density with energy is calculated for all photon interactions. Variation of photon mass attenuation coefficients with energy are shown graphically only for total photon interaction. It is observed that change in mass attenuation coefficient with composition of different chemicals is very large below 100 keV and moderate between 100 keV and 10 MeV and negligible above 10 MeV. Behaviour of vitamins is almost indistinguishable except biotin and cobalamin because of large range of atomic numbers from 1(H) to 16 (S) and 1(H) to 27(Co) respectively. K a value shows a peak due to the photoelectric effect around K-absorption edge of high- Z constituent of compound for biotin and cobalamin.

  6. Dielectric Elastomer Generator with Improved Energy Density and Conversion Efficiency Based on Polyurethane Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Guoling; Yang, Yu; Song, Feilong; Renard, Christophe; Dang, Zhi-Min; Shi, Chang-Yong; Wang, Dongrui

    2017-02-15

    Dielectric elastomer generators (DEGs), which follow the physics of variable capacitors and harvest electric energy from mechanical work, have attracted intensive attention over the past decade. The lack of ideal dielectric elastomers, after nearly two decades of research, has become the bottleneck for DEGs' practical applications. Here, we fabricated a series of polyurethane-based ternary composites and estimated their potential as DEGs to harvest electric energy for the first time. Thermoplastic polyurethane (PU) with high relative permittivity (∼8) was chosen as the elastic matrix. Barium titanate (BT) nanoparticles and dibutyl phthalate (DBP) plasticizers, which were selected to improve the permittivity and mechanical properties, respectively, were blended into the PU matrix. As compared to pristine PU, the resultant ternary composite films fabricated through a solution casting approach showed enhanced permittivity, remarkably reduced elastic modulus, and relatively good electrical breakdown strength, dielectric loss, and strain at break. Most importantly, the harvested energy density of PU was significantly enhanced when blended with BT and DBP. A composite film containing 25 phr of BT and 60 phr of DBP with the harvested energy density of 1.71 mJ/cm3 was achieved, which is about 4 times greater than that of pure PU and 8 times greater than that of VHB adhesives. Remarkably improved conversion efficiency of mechano-electric energy was also obtained via cofilling BT and DBP into PU. The results shown in this work strongly suggest compositing is a very promising way to provide better dielectric elastomer candidates for forthcoming practical DEGs.

  7. Wagging ETOM's Long Tail: MOOCs, Hangouts on Air, and Formal and Informal Undergraduate Experiences with Climate Change Science and Clean Energy Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines-Stiles, G.; Alley, R. B.; Akuginow, E.; McNeal, K.; Blockstein, D.

    2014-12-01

    Climate change can reasonably be described as a "wicked problem" meaning that it is complex, difficult and multi-faceted, although critical to equitable development and the sustainability of human civilization. But while the Wikipedia definition says such problems are "impossible" to solve, not even to try will lead to certain failure. "Earth: The Operators' Manual" (ETOM) was an NSF-funded informal science education project with 3 hour-long TV programs appearing on PBS in 2011 and 2012, along with live presentations by series host, Penn State's Richard Alley, and others at 5 major science centers. Uniquely among climate change programming, ETOM gave equal time to identifying solutions along with climate science, and made all its materials freely available via YouTube. Formal and informal science educators can register to download HD videos for classroom and outreach use, and signups have ranged from middle schools to 4-year colleges. Building on the success of the series and Alley's companion tradebook of the same name, Penn State working with Coursera invited Alley to develop a MOOC entitled "Energy, The Environment and Our Future" that similarly combined the essential science along with clean energy solutions. The course reached more than 30,000 students in the first semester of 2014. More recently the ETOM team has partnered with the National Council for Science and the Environment (NCSE) to develop "READ for the EARTH," an NSF EAGER project, offering campuses the opportunity to adopt Alley's book, the ETOM videos (including "How To Talk To An Ostrich"), NCSE's www.CAMELclimatechange.org web site and other resources for both formal and informal uses. Some campuses have used the book with honors classes, and some are exploring adapting ETOM as a first year reading experience for all freshman. Our presentation will share reactions to the MOOC, to the pilot phases of "READ for the EARTH" and present both qualitative and quantitative results. Some of the most

  8. Density-dependent energy use contributes to the self-thinning relationship of cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, James A; Baumgartner, Lee J; Suthers, Iain M; Fielder, D Stewart; Taylor, Matthew D

    2013-03-01

    In resource-limited populations, an increase in average body size can occur only with a decline in abundance. This is known as self-thinning, and the decline in abundance in food-limited populations is considered proportional to the scaling of metabolism with body mass. This popular hypothesis may be inaccurate, because self-thinning populations can also experience density-dependent competition, which could alter their energy use beyond the predictions of metabolic scaling. This study tested whether density-dependent competition has an energetic role in self-thinning, by manipulating the abundance of the fish Macquaria novemaculeata and tank size to partition the effects of competition from metabolic scaling. We found that self-thinning can be density dependent and that changes in intraspecific competition may be more influential than metabolic scaling on self-thinning relationships. The energetic mechanism we propose is that density-dependent competition causes variation in the allocation of energy to growth, which alters the energetic efficiency of self-thinning cohorts. The implication is that food-limited cohorts and populations with competitive strategies that encourage fast-growing individuals will have less body mass at equilibrium and higher mortality rates. This finding sheds light on the processes structuring populations and can be used to explain inconsistencies in the mass-abundance scaling of assemblages and communities (the energetic-equivalence rule).

  9. Improved parameterization of interatomic potentials for rare gas dimers with density-based energy decomposition analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Nengjie; Lu, Zhenyu; Wu, Qin; Zhang, Yingkai

    2014-01-01

    We examine interatomic interactions for rare gas dimers using the density-based energy decomposition analysis (DEDA) in conjunction with computational results from CCSD(T) at the complete basis set (CBS) limit. The unique DEDA capability of separating frozen density interactions from density relaxation contributions is employed to yield clean interaction components, and the results are found to be consistent with the typical physical picture that density relaxations play a very minimal role in rare gas interactions. Equipped with each interaction component as reference, we develop a new three-term molecular mechanical force field to describe rare gas dimers: a smeared charge multipole model for electrostatics with charge penetration effects, a B3LYP-D3 dispersion term for asymptotically correct long-range attractions that is screened at short-range, and a Born-Mayer exponential function for the repulsion. The resulted force field not only reproduces rare gas interaction energies calculated at the CCSD(T)/CBS level, but also yields each interaction component (electrostatic or van der Waals) which agrees very well with its corresponding reference value. PMID:24908000

  10. High-Energy-Density LCA-Coupled Structural Energetic Materials for Counter WMD Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    reactive ( thermite ) fillers as high-energy-density structural energetic materials. The specific objectives include performing fundamental studies to...a) investigate mechanics of dynamic densification and reaction initiation in Ta+Fe2O3 and Ta+Bi2O3 thermite powder mixtures and to (b) design and...initiation in the thermite filler and allow controlled fragmentation. Linear Cellular A; counter WMDs; shock-compression and impact-initiated reactions

  11. Synergistic Design of Cathode Region for the High-Energy-Density Li-S Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Chao-Ying; Liu, Si-Yu; Li, Huan-Huan; Wang, Hai-Feng; Wang, Han-Chi; Wu, Xing-Long; Sun, Hai-Zhu; Zhang, Jing-Ping

    2016-10-26

    The synergistic design of cathode region was conducted to minimize the shuttle effect of polysulfides and decrease the loading of inactive components in order to acquire high-energy-density lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries. The well-designed cathode region presented two special characteristics: one was the intertwined nanofibers interlayer based on ultrafine TiO2 nanocrystal uniformly embedded within N-doping porous carbon; the other was the lightweight and three-dimensional current collector of fibrous cellulose paper coated by reduced graphene oxide. In consequence, the decent reversible capacity of 874.8 mA h g-1 was acquired at 0.1 C with a capacity retention of 91.83% after 100 cycles. Besides, the satisfactory capacity of 670 mA h g-1 was delivered after 300 cycles at 1 C with the small decay rate of only 0.08%. Because of higher capacity and lower loading of inactive component in cathode region, the energy density of cell increased more than five times compared with unmodified cell. Moreover, to further enhance the energy density, the high-sulfur-loading electrode was fabricated. A good areal capacity of 4.27 mA h cm-2 was retained for the cell with the active material of 4 mg cm-2 and the cycle stability was also well-maintained. In addition, due to the flexibility of interlayer and current collector, Li-S full cell (in pouch cell format) was easily curved. Therefore, the synergistic design for cathode region, which combines the flexible and mass-produced interlayer and current collector together, provides an effective access to Li-S batteries with high energy density and flexibility for practical application.

  12. Development of an air-stable, high energy density printed silver oxide battery for printed electronics

    OpenAIRE

    Braam, Kyle

    2014-01-01

    Printed batteries are an emerging battery technology that has the potential to enable the production of cheap, small form factor, flexible batteries capable of powering a diverse set of existing and emerging applications such as RFID tags, flexible displays, and distributed sensors. Partially printed battery systems have been demonstrated with various chemistries, but what is needed is a low cost, air stable method of fully printing a high energy density battery. The silver oxide chemistry i...

  13. Energy decomposition analysis based on a block-localized wavefunction and multistate density functional theory

    OpenAIRE

    Mo, Yirong; Bao, Peng; Gao, Jiali

    2011-01-01

    An interaction energy decomposition analysis method based on the block-localized wavefunction (BLW-ED) approach is described. The first main feature of the BLW-ED method is that it combines concepts of valence bond and molecular orbital theories such that the intermediate and physically intuitive electron-localized states are variationally optimized by self-consistent field calculations. Furthermore, the block-localization scheme can be used both in wave function theory and in density functio...

  14. Octupole deformation properties of the Barcelona-Catania-Paris energy density functionals

    OpenAIRE

    Robledo, L. M.; Baldo, M.; Schuck, P.; Viñas, X.

    2010-01-01

    We discuss the octupole deformation properties of the recently proposed Barcelona-Catania-Paris (BCP) energy density functionals for two sets of isotopes, those of radium and barium, where it is believed that octupole deformation plays a role in the description of the ground state. The analysis is carried out in the mean field framework (Hartree- Fock- Bogoliubov approximation) by using the axially symmetric octupole moment as a constraint. The main ingredients entering the octupole collectiv...

  15. Neutron-star matter within the energy-density functional theory and neutron-star structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fantina, A. F.; Chamel, N.; Goriely, S. [Institut d' Astronomie et d' Astrophysique, CP226, Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Pearson, J. M. [Dépt. de Physique, Université de Montréal, Montréal (Québec), H3C 3J7 (Canada)

    2015-02-24

    In this lecture, we will present some nucleonic equations of state of neutron-star matter calculated within the nuclear energy-density functional theory using generalized Skyrme functionals developed by the Brussels-Montreal collaboration. These equations of state provide a consistent description of all regions of a neutron star. The global structure of neutron stars predicted by these equations of state will be discussed in connection with recent astrophysical observations.

  16. High energy-density physics: From nuclear testing to the superlasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, E.M.; Holmes, N.C.; Libby, S.B.; Remington, B.A.; Teller, E.

    1995-10-20

    We describe the role for the next-generation ``superlasers`` in the study of matter under extremely high energy density conditions, in comparison to previous uses of nuclear explosives for this purpose. As examples, we focus on three important areas of physics that have unresolved issues which must be addressed by experiment: Equations of state, hydrodynamic mixing, and the transport of radiation. We will describe the advantages the large lasers will have in a comprehensive experimental program.

  17. High energy-density physics: From nuclear testing to the superlasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teller, E.; Campbell, E.M.; Holmes, N.C.; Libby, S.B.; Remington, B.A.

    1995-08-14

    The authors describe the role for the next-generation ``superlasers`` in the study of matter under extremely high energy density conditions, in comparison to previous uses of nuclear explosives for this purpose. As examples, the authors focus on three important areas of physics that have unresolved issues which must be addressed by experiment: equations of state, turbulent hydrodynamics, and the transport of radiation. They describe the advantages the large lasers will have in a comprehensive experimental program.

  18. Bounds on the density of sources of ultra-high energy cosmic rays from the Pierre Auger Observatory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahlers, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarcz-Muniz, J.; Alves Batista, R.; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Antici'c, T.; Aramo, C.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avenier, M.; Avila, G.; Badescu, A. M.; Barber, K. B.; Barbosa, A. F.; Bardenet, R.; Baughman, B.; Baeuml, J.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K.H.; Belletoile, A.; Bellido, J. A.; BenZvi, S.; Berat, C.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Bluemer, H.; Bohacova, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, V. C.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buroker, L.; Burton, R. E.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, B.; Caramete, F.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chauvin, J.; Cheng, S.H.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Diaz, J. Chirinos; Chudoba, J.; Cilmo, M.; Clay, R. W.; Cocciolo, G.; Colalillo, R.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceicao, R.; Contreras, F.; Cook, H.; Cooper, M. J.; Coppens, J.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dallier, R.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; De Almeida, R.M.; De Domenico, M.; De Donato, C.; de Jong, S. J.; De la Vegas, G.; de Mello Junior, W. J. M.; de Nilello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Souza, V.; de Vries, K. D.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Dembinski, H.; Dhital, N.; Di Giulio, C.; Diaz Castro, M. L.; Diep, P. N.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dong, P. N.; Dorofeev, A.; dos Anjos, J. C.; Dova, M. T.; D'Urso, D.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadartal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; San Luis, P. Facal; Falcke, H.; Fang, K.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filevich, A.; Filipcic, A.; Fliescher, S.; Fox, B.; Fracchiolla, C. E.; Fraenkel, F. D.; Fratu, O.; Froehlich, U.; Fuchs, B.; Gaior, R.; Gamarra, R. F.; Gambetta, S.; Garcia, B.; Garcia Roca, S. T.; Garcia-Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garilli, G.; Gascon Bravo, A.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giller, M.; Gitto, J.; Glass, H.; Gold, M. S.; Golup, G.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gomez Berisso, M.; Gomez Vitale, P. F.; Goncalves, P.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Gookin, B.; Gorgi, A.; Gorham, P.; Gouffon, P.; Grashorn, E.; Grebe, S.; Griffith, N.; Grillo, A. F.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holmes, V. C.; Homola, P.; Horandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovsky, M.; Huber, D.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Ionita, F.; Jansen, S.; Jarne, C.; Jirtskova, S.; Josebachuili, M.; Kadija, K.; Kampert, K. H.; Karhan, P.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Kegl, B.; Keilkauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J. L.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Knapp, J.; Koang, D-H; Kotera, K.; Krohm, N.; Kroemer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuempel, D.; Kulbartz, J. K.; Kunka, N.; La Rosa, G.; LaHurd, D.; Latronico, L.; Lauer, R.; Lauscher, M.; Lautridon, P.; Le Coz, S.; Leao, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; Lopez, R.; Lopez Agueera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lu, L.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Lyberis, H.; Maccarone, M. C.; Macolino, C.; Malacari, M.; Maldera, S.; Maller, J.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, J.; Marin, V.; Maris, I. C.; Falcon, H. R. Marquez; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martinez, H.; Martinez Bravo, O.; Martraire, D.; Masias Meza, J. J.; Mathes, H. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurel, D.; Maurizio, D.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Mertsch, P.; Messina, S.; Meurer, C.; Meyhandan, R.; Mi'canovi'c, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Mitrica, B.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Ragaigne, D. Monnier; Montanet, F.; Morales, B.; Morello, C.; Moreno, J. C.; Mostafa, M.; Moura, C. A.; Muller, M. A.; Mueller, G.; Muenchmeyer, M.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navarro, J. L.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Nhung, P. T.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Nierstenhoefer, N.; Niggemann, T.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Nozka, L.; Oehlschlaeger, J.; Olinto, A.; Oliveira, M.; Ortiz, M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Parente, G.; Parra, A.; Pastor, S.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; Pekala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Pesce, R.; Petermann, E.; Petrera, S.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, Y.; Pfendner, C.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Ponce, V. H.; Pontz, M.; Porcelli, A.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rivera, H.; Rizi, V.; Roberts, J.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez Cabo, I.; Rodriguez Fernandez, G.; Rodriguez Martino, J.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodriguez-Frias, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Rouille-d'Orfeuil, B.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Ruehle, C.; Saffi, S. J.; Saftoiu, A.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Greus, F. Salesa; Salina, G.; Sanchez, F.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarkar, S.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, A.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovancova, J.; Schovanek, P.; Schroeder, F.; Schulz, J.; Schuster, D.; Sciutto, S. J.; Scuderi, M.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Sigl, G.; Silva Lopez, H. H.; Sima, O.; 'Smialkowski, A.; Smida, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Spinka, H.; Squartini, R.; Srivastava, Y. N.; Stanic, S.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Straub, M.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijaevi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Susa, T.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Szuba, M.; Tapia, A.; Tartare, M.; Tascau, O.; Tcaciuc, R.; Thao, N. T.; Thomas, D.; Tiffenberg, J.; Timmermans, C.; Tkaczyk, V.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Toma, G.; Tomankova, L.; Tome, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torralha Elippe, G.; Machado, D. Torres; Travnicek, P.; Tridapalli, D. B.; Trovato, E.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdes Galicia, J. F.; Vallno, I.; Valore, L.; van Aar, G.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Velzen, S.; van Vliet, A.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cardenas, B.; Varner, C.; Vazquez, J. R.; Vazquez, R. A.; Veberie, D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Videla, M.; Villasenor, L.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrlich, P.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Weindl, A.; Werner, F.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Widom, A.; Wieczorek, G.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczynska, B.; Wilczyriski, H.; Will, M.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Wommer, M.; Wundheiler, B.; Yamamoto, T.; Yapici, T.; Younki, P.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zamorano Garcia, B.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Zhou, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zimbres Silva, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Martin, L.

    We derive lower bounds on the density of sources of ultra-high energy cosmic rays from the lack of significant clustering in the arrival directions of the highest energy events detected at the Pierre Auger Observatory. The density of uniformly distributed sources of equal intrinsic intensity was

  19. Recoverable Wire-Shaped Supercapacitors with Ultrahigh Volumetric Energy Density for Multifunctional Portable and Wearable Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Minjie; Yang, Cheng; Song, Xuefeng; Liu, Jing; Zhao, Liping; Zhang, Peng; Gao, Lian

    2017-05-24

    Wire-shaped supercapacitors (SCs) based on shape memory materials are of considerable interest for next-generation portable and wearable electronics. However, the bottleneck in this field is how to develop the devices with excellent electrochemical performance while well-maintaining recoverability and flexibility. Herein, a unique asymmetric electrode concept is put forward to fabricate smart wire-shaped SCs with ultrahigh energy density, which is realized by using porous carbon dodecahedra coated on NiTi alloy wire and flexible graphene fiber as yarn electrodes. Notably, the wire-shaped SCs not only exhibit high flexibility that can be readily woven into real clothing but also represent the available recoverable ability. When irreversible plastic deformations happen, the deformed shape of the devices can automatically resume the initial predesigned shape in a warm environment (about 35 °C). More importantly, the wire-shaped SCs act as efficient energy storage devices, which display high volumetric energy density (8.9 mWh/cm(3)), volumetric power density (1080 mW/cm(3)), strong durability in multiple mechanical states, and steady electrochemical behavior after repeated shape recovery processes. Considering their relative facile fabrication technology and excellent electrochemical performance, this asymmetric electrode strategy produced smart wire-shaped supercapacitors desirable for multifunctional portable and wearable electronics.

  20. Facile synthesis of polyaniline nanotubes using reactive oxide templates for high energy density pseudocapacitors

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Wei

    2013-01-01

    A remarkable energy density of 84 W h kg(cell) -1 and a power density of 182 kW kg(cell) -1 have been achieved for full-cell pseudocapacitors using conducting polymer nanotubes (polyaniline) as electrode materials and ionic liquid as electrolytes. The polyaniline nanotubes were synthesized by a one-step in situ chemical polymerization process utilizing MnO2 nanotubes as sacrificial templates. The polyaniline-nanotube pseudocapacitors exhibit much better electrochemical performance than the polyaniline-nanofiber pseudocapacitors in both acidic aqueous and ionic liquid electrolytes. Importantly, the incorporation of ionic liquid with polyaniline-nanotubes has drastically improved the energy storage capacity of the PAni-nanotube pseudocapacitors by a factor of ∼5 times compared to that of the PAni-nanotube pseudocapacitors in the acidic aqueous electrolyte. Furthermore, even after 10000 cycles, the PAni-nanotube pseudocapacitors in the ionic liquid electrolyte maintain sufficient high energy density and can light LEDs for several minutes, with only 30 s quick charge. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  1. Flexible Aqueous Li-Ion Battery with High Energy and Power Densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chongyin; Ji, Xiao; Fan, Xiulin; Gao, Tao; Suo, Liumin; Wang, Fei; Sun, Wei; Chen, Ji; Chen, Long; Han, Fudong; Miao, Ling; Xu, Kang; Gerasopoulos, Konstantinos; Wang, Chunsheng

    2017-11-01

    A flexible and wearable aqueous symmetrical lithium-ion battery is developed using a single LiVPO4 F material as both cathode and anode in a "water-in-salt" gel polymer electrolyte. The symmetric lithium-ion chemistry exhibits high energy and power density and long cycle life, due to the formation of a robust solid electrolyte interphase consisting of Li2 CO3 -LiF, which enables fast Li-ion transport. Energy densities of 141 Wh kg-1 , power densities of 20 600 W kg-1 , and output voltage of 2.4 V can be delivered during >4000 cycles, which is far superior to reported aqueous energy storage devices at the same power level. Moreover, the full cell shows unprecedented tolerance to mechanical stress such as bending and cutting, where it not only does not catastrophically fail, as most nonaqueous cells would, but also maintains cell performance and continues to operate in ambient environment, a unique feature apparently derived from the high stability of the "water-in-salt" gel polymer electrolyte. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Masses of Formal Philosophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Masses of Formal Philosophy is an outgrowth of Formal Philosophy. That book gathered the responses of some of the most prominent formal philosophers to five relatively open and broad questions initiating a discussion of metaphilosophical themes and problems surrounding the use of formal methods...... in philosophy. Including contributions from a wide range of philosophers, Masses of Formal Philosophy contains important new responses to the original five questions....

  3. The impact of Hall physics on magnetized high energy density plasma jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gourdain, P.-A.; Seyler, C. E.; Atoyan, L.; Greenly, J. B.; Hammer, D. A.; Kusse, B. R.; Pikuz, S. A.; Potter, W. M.; Schrafel, P. C.; Shelkovenko, T. A. [Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    Hall physics is often neglected in high energy density plasma jets due to the relatively high electron density of such jets (n{sub e} ∼ 10{sup 19} cm{sup −3}). However, the vacuum region surrounding the jet has much lower densities and is dominated by Hall electric field. This electric field redirects plasma flows towards or away from the axis, depending on the radial current direction. A resulting change in the jet density has been observed experimentally. Furthermore, if an axial field is applied on the jet, the Hall effect is enhanced and ignoring it leads to serious discrepancies between experimental results and numerical simulations. By combining high currents (∼1 MA) and magnetic field helicity (15° angle) in a pulsed power generator such as COBRA, plasma jets can be magnetized with a 10 T axial field. The resulting field enhances the impact of the Hall effect by altering the density profile of current-free plasma jets and the stability of current-carrying plasma jets (e.g., Z-pinches)

  4. Comparison of Energy Efficiency and Power Density in Pressure Retarded Osmosis and Reverse Electrodialysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yip, NY; Elimelech, M

    2014-09-16

    Pressure retarded osmosis (PRO) and reverse electrodialysis (RED) are emerging membrane-based technologies that can convert chemical energy in salinity gradients to useful work. The two processes have intrinsically different working principles: controlled mixing in PRO is achieved by water permeation across salt-rejecting membranes, whereas RED is driven by ion flux across charged membranes. This study compares the energy efficiency and power density performance of PRO and RED with simulated technologically available membranes for natural, anthropogenic, and engineered salinity gradients (seawater-river water, desalination brine-wastewater, and synthetic hypersaline solutions, respectively). The analysis shows that PRO can achieve both greater efficiencies (54-56%) and higher power densities (2.4-38 W/m(2)) than RED (18-38% and 0.77-1.2 W/m(2)). The superior efficiency is attributed to the ability of PRO membranes to more effectively utilize the salinity difference to drive water permeation and better suppress the detrimental leakage of salts. On the other hand, the low conductivity of currently available ion exchange membranes impedes RED ion flux and, thus, constrains the power density. Both technologies exhibit a trade-off between efficiency and power density: employing more permeable but less selective membranes can enhance the power density, but undesired entropy production due to uncontrolled mixing increases and some efficiency is sacrificed. When the concentration difference is increased (i.e., natural -> anthropogenic -> engineered salinity gradients), PRO osmotic pressure difference rises proportionally but not so for RED Nernst potential, which has logarithmic dependence on the solution concentration. Because of this inherently different characteristic, RED is unable to take advantage of larger salinity gradients, whereas PRO power density is considerably enhanced. Additionally, high solution concentrations suppress the Donnan exclusion effect of the

  5. Symmetry energy of the nucleus in the relativistic Thomas-Fermi approach with density-dependent parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, S.

    2017-11-01

    The symmetry energy of a nucleus is determined in a local density approximation and integrating over the entire density distribution of the nucleus, calculated utilizing the relativistic density-dependent Thomas-Fermi approach. The symmetry energy is found to decrease with increasing neutron excess in the nucleus. The isovector coupling channel reduces the symmetry energy, and this effect increases with increased neutron excess. The isovector coupling channel increases the symmetry energy integral in ^{40}Ca and reduces it in ^{48}Ca, and the interplay between the isovector and the isoscalar channels of the nuclear force explains this isotope effect.

  6. A macroevolutionary explanation for energy equivalence in the scaling of body size and population density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damuth, John

    2007-05-01

    Across a wide array of animal species, mean population densities decline with species body mass such that the rate of energy use of local populations is approximately independent of body size. This "energetic equivalence" is particularly evident when ecological population densities are plotted across several or more orders of magnitude in body mass and is supported by a considerable body of evidence. Nevertheless, interpretation of the data has remained controversial, largely because of the difficulty of explaining the origin and maintenance of such a size-abundance relationship in terms of purely ecological processes. Here I describe results of a simulation model suggesting that an extremely simple mechanism operating over evolutionary time can explain the major features of the empirical data. The model specifies only the size scaling of metabolism and a process where randomly chosen species evolve to take resource energy from other species. This process of energy exchange among particular species is distinct from a random walk of species abundances and creates a situation in which species populations using relatively low amounts of energy at any body size have an elevated extinction risk. Selective extinction of such species rapidly drives size-abundance allometry in faunas toward approximate energetic equivalence and maintains it there.

  7. Improving Density Functional Tight Binding Predictions of Free Energy Surfaces for Slow Chemical Reactions in Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroonblawd, Matthew; Goldman, Nir

    2017-06-01

    First principles molecular dynamics using highly accurate density functional theory (DFT) is a common tool for predicting chemistry, but the accessible time and space scales are often orders of magnitude beyond the resolution of experiments. Semi-empirical methods such as density functional tight binding (DFTB) offer up to a thousand-fold reduction in required CPU hours and can approach experimental scales. However, standard DFTB parameter sets lack good transferability and calibration for a particular system is usually necessary. Force matching the pairwise repulsive energy term in DFTB to short DFT trajectories can improve the former's accuracy for reactions that are fast relative to DFT simulation times (reactions and the free energy surface are not well-known. We present a force matching approach to improve the chemical accuracy of DFTB. Accelerated sampling techniques are combined with path collective variables to generate the reference DFT data set and validate fitted DFTB potentials. Accuracy of force-matched DFTB free energy surfaces is assessed for slow peptide-forming reactions by direct comparison to DFT for particular paths. Extensions to model prebiotic chemistry under shock conditions are discussed. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  8. Dietary Energy Density, Renal Function, and Progression of Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouhani, Mohammad Hossein; Najafabadi, Mojgan Mortazavi; Esmaillzadeh, Ahmad; Feizi, Awat

    2016-01-01

    Background. There is evidence of the association between dietary energy density and chronic diseases. However, no report exists regarding the relation between DED and chronic kidney disease (CKD). Objective. To examine the association between dietary energy density (DED), renal function, and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Design. Cross-sectional. Setting. Three nephrology clinics. Subjects. Two hundred twenty-one subjects with diagnosed CKD. Main Outcome Measure. Dietary intake of patients was assessed by a validated food frequency questionnaire. DED (in kcal/g) was calculated with the use of energy content and weight of solid foods and energy yielding beverages. Renal function was measured by blood urea nitrogen (BUN), serum creatinine (Cr), and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). Results. Patients in the first tertile of DED consumed more amounts of carbohydrate, dietary fiber, potassium, phosphorus, zinc, magnesium, calcium, folate, vitamin C, and vitamin B2. After adjusting for confounders, we could not find any significant trend for BUN and Cr across tertiles of DED. In multivariate model, an increased risk of being in the higher stage of CKD was found among those in the last tertile of DED (OR: 3.15; 95% CI: 1.30, 7.63; P = 0.01). Conclusion. We observed that lower DED was associated with better nutrient intake and lower risk of CKD progression. PMID:27819022

  9. Dietary Energy Density, Renal Function, and Progression of Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hossein Rouhani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. There is evidence of the association between dietary energy density and chronic diseases. However, no report exists regarding the relation between DED and chronic kidney disease (CKD. Objective. To examine the association between dietary energy density (DED, renal function, and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD. Design. Cross-sectional. Setting. Three nephrology clinics. Subjects. Two hundred twenty-one subjects with diagnosed CKD. Main Outcome Measure. Dietary intake of patients was assessed by a validated food frequency questionnaire. DED (in kcal/g was calculated with the use of energy content and weight of solid foods and energy yielding beverages. Renal function was measured by blood urea nitrogen (BUN, serum creatinine (Cr, and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR. Results. Patients in the first tertile of DED consumed more amounts of carbohydrate, dietary fiber, potassium, phosphorus, zinc, magnesium, calcium, folate, vitamin C, and vitamin B2. After adjusting for confounders, we could not find any significant trend for BUN and Cr across tertiles of DED. In multivariate model, an increased risk of being in the higher stage of CKD was found among those in the last tertile of DED (OR: 3.15; 95% CI: 1.30, 7.63; P=0.01. Conclusion. We observed that lower DED was associated with better nutrient intake and lower risk of CKD progression.

  10. Sparingly Solvating Electrolytes for High Energy Density Lithium-Sulfur Batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Lei; Curtiss, Larry A.; Zavadil, Kevin R.; Gewirth, Andrew A.; Shao, Yuyan; Gallagher, Kevin

    2016-07-11

    Moving to lighter and less expensive battery chemistries compared to lithium-ion requires the control of energy storage mechanisms based on chemical transformations rather than intercalation. Lithium sulfur (Li/S) has tremendous theoretical specific energy, but contemporary approaches to control this solution-mediated, precipitation-dissolution chemistry requires using large excesses of electrolyte to fully solubilize the polysulfide intermediate. Achieving reversible electrochemistry under lean electrolyte operation is the only path for Li/S to move beyond niche applications to potentially transformational performance. An emerging topic for Li/S research is the use of sparingly solvating electrolytes and the creation of design rules for discovering new electrolyte systems that fundamentally decouple electrolyte volume from reaction mechanism. This perspective presents an outlook for sparingly solvating electrolytes as the key path forward for longer-lived, high-energy density Li/S batteries including an overview of this promising new concept and some strategies for accomplishing it.

  11. Optimal estimation of free energies and stationary densities from multiple biased simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Hao

    2013-01-01

    When studying high-dimensional dynamical systems such as macromolecules, quantum systems and polymers, a prime concern is the identification of the most probable states and their stationary probabilities or free energies. Often, these systems have metastable regions or phases, prohibiting to estimate the stationary probabilities by direct simulation. Efficient sampling methods such as umbrella sampling, metadynamics and conformational flooding have developed that perform a number of simulations where the system's potential is biased such as to accelerate the rare barrier crossing events. A joint free energy profile or stationary density can then be obtained from these biased simulations with weighted histogram analysis method (WHAM). This approach (a) requires a few essential order parameters to be defined in which the histogram is set up, and (b) assumes that each simulation is in global equilibrium. Both assumptions make the investigation of high-dimensional systems with previously unknown energy landscape ...

  12. Atom probe tomography simulations and density functional theory calculations of bonding energies in Cu3Au

    KAUST Repository

    Boll, Torben

    2012-10-01

    In this article the Cu-Au binding energy in Cu3Au is determined by comparing experimental atom probe tomography (APT) results to simulations. The resulting bonding energy is supported by density functional theory calculations. The APT simulations are based on the Müller-Schottky equation, which is modified to include different atomic neighborhoods and their characteristic bonds. The local environment is considered up to the fifth next nearest neighbors. To compare the experimental with simulated APT data, the AtomVicinity algorithm, which provides statistical information about the positions of the neighboring atoms, is applied. The quality of this information is influenced by the field evaporation behavior of the different species, which is connected to the bonding energies. © Microscopy Society of America 2012.

  13. Density imbalances and free energy of lipid transfer in supported lipid bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Chenyue; Faller, Roland

    2009-11-01

    Supported lipid bilayers are an abundant research platform for understanding the behavior of real cell membranes as they allow for additional mechanical stability and at the same time have a fundamental structure approximating cell membranes. However, in computer simulations these systems have been studied only rarely up to now. An important property, which cannot be easily determined by molecular dynamics or experiments, is the unsymmetrical density profiles of bilayer leaflets (density imbalance) inflicted on the membrane by the support. This imbalance in the leaflets composition has consequences for membrane structure and phase behavior, and therefore we need to understand it in detail. The free energy can be used to determine the equilibrium structure of a given system. We employ an umbrella sampling approach to obtain the free energy of a lipid crossing the membrane (i.e., lipid flip-flop) as a function of bilayer composition and hence the equilibrium composition of the supported bilayers. In this paper, we use a variant of the coarse-grained Martini model. The results of the free energy calculation lead to a 5% higher density in the proximal leaflet. Recent data obtained by large scale modeling using a water free model suggested that the proximal leaflet had 3.2% more lipids than the distal leaflet [Hoopes et al., J. Chem. Phys. 129, 175102 (2008)]. Our findings are in line with these results. We compare results of the free energy of transport obtained by pulling the lipid across the membrane in different ways. There are small quantitative differences, but the overall picture is consistent. We additionally characterize the intermediate states, which determine the barrier height and therefore the rate of translocation. Calculations on unsupported bilayers are used to validate the approach and to determine the barrier to flip-flop in a free membrane.

  14. Bubbler: A Novel Ultra-High Power Density Energy Harvesting Method Based on Reverse Electrowetting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Tsung-Hsing; Manakasettharn, Supone; Taylor, J. Ashley; Krupenkin, Tom

    2015-11-01

    We have proposed and successfully demonstrated a novel approach to direct conversion of mechanical energy into electrical energy using microfluidics. The method combines previously demonstrated reverse electrowetting on dielectric (REWOD) phenomenon with the fast self-oscillating process of bubble growth and collapse. Fast bubble dynamics, used in conjunction with REWOD, provides a possibility to increase the generated power density by over an order of magnitude, as compared to the REWOD alone. This energy conversion approach is particularly well suited for energy harvesting applications and can enable effective coupling to a broad array of mechanical systems including such ubiquitous but difficult to utilize low-frequency energy sources as human and machine motion. The method can be scaled from a single micro cell with 10-6 W output to power cell arrays with a total power output in excess of 10 W. This makes the fabrication of small light-weight energy harvesting devices capable of producing a wide range of power outputs feasible.

  15. Electrostatic solvation free energies of charged hard spheres using molecular dynamics with density functional theory interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duignan, Timothy T.; Baer, Marcel D.; Schenter, Gregory K.; Mundy, Chistopher J.

    2017-10-01

    Determining the solvation free energies of single ions in water is one of the most fundamental problems in physical chemistry and yet many unresolved questions remain. In particular, the ability to decompose the solvation free energy into simple and intuitive contributions will have important implications for models of electrolyte solution. Here, we provide definitions of the various types of single ion solvation free energies based on different simulation protocols. We calculate solvation free energies of charged hard spheres using density functional theory interaction potentials with molecular dynamics simulation and isolate the effects of charge and cavitation, comparing to the Born (linear response) model. We show that using uncorrected Ewald summation leads to unphysical values for the single ion solvation free energy and that charging free energies for cations are approximately linear as a function of charge but that there is a small non-linearity for small anions. The charge hydration asymmetry for hard spheres, determined with quantum mechanics, is much larger than for the analogous real ions. This suggests that real ions, particularly anions, are significantly more complex than simple charged hard spheres, a commonly employed representation.

  16. How accurate is Density Functional Theory in Predicting Reaction Energies Relevant to Phase Stability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hautier, Geoffroy; Ong, Shyue Ping; Jain, Anubhav; Moore, Charles J.; Ceder, Gerbrand

    2012-02-01

    Density Functional Theory (DFT) computations can be used to build computational phase diagrams that are used to understand the stability of known phases but also to assess the stability of novel, predicted compounds. The quality and predictive power of those phase diagrams rely on the accuracy of DFT in modeling reaction energies and we will present in this talk the results of a large scale comparison between experimentally measured and DFT computed reaction energies. For starters, we will show that only certain reaction energies are directly relevant to phase stability of multicomponent systems and that very often those reaction energies are not the commonly studied reactions from the elements. Using data from different experimental thermochemical tables and DFT high-throughput computing, we will present the results of a statistical study based on more than 130 reaction energies relevant to phase stability and from binary oxides to ternary oxides. We will show that the typical error are around 30 meV/at and therefore an order of magnitude lower than the errors in reaction energies from the elements. Finally, we will discuss the broad implications of our results on the evaluation of ab initio phase diagrams and on the computational prediction of new solid phases.

  17. Non Singular Origin of the Universe and its Present Vacuum Energy Density

    CERN Document Server

    Guendelman, E I

    2011-01-01

    We consider a non singular origin for the Universe starting from an Einstein static Universe, the so called "emergent universe" scenario, in the framework of a theory which uses two volume elements $\\sqrt{-{g}}d^{4}x$ and $\\Phi d^{4}x$, where $\\Phi $ is a metric independent density, used as an additional measure of integration. Also curvature, curvature square terms and for scale invariance a dilaton field $\\phi$ are considered in the action. The first order formalism is applied. The integration of the equations of motion associated with the new measure gives rise to the spontaneous symmetry breaking (S.S.B) of scale invariance (S.I.). After S.S.B. of S.I., it is found that a non trivial potential for the dilaton is generated. In the Einstein frame we also add a cosmological term that parametrizes the zero point fluctuations. The resulting effective potential for the dilaton contains two flat regions, for $\\phi \\rightarrow \\infty$ relevant for the non singular origin of the Universe, followed by an inflationa...

  18. Novel LLM series high density energy materials: Synthesis, characterization, and thermal stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagoria, Philip; Zhang, Maoxi; Tsyshevskiy, Roman; Kuklja, Maija

    Novel high density energy materials must satisfy specific requirements, such as an increased performance, reliably high stability to external stimuli, cost-efficiency and ease of synthesis, be environmentally benign, and be safe for handling and transportation. During the last decade, the attention of researchers has drifted from widely used nitroester-, nitramine-, and nitroaromatic-based explosives to nitrogen-rich heterocyclic compounds. Good thermal stability, the low melting point, high density, and moderate sensitivity make heterocycle materials attractive candidates for use as oxidizers in rocket propellants and fuels, secondary explosives, and possibly as melt-castable ingredients of high explosive formulations. In this report, the synthesis, characterization, and results of quantum-chemical DFT study of thermal stability of LLM-191, LLM-192 and LLM-200 high density energy materials are presented. Work performed under the auspices of the DOE by the LLNL (Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344). This research is supported in part by ONR (Grant N00014-12-1-0529) and NSF. We used NSF XSEDE (Grant DMR-130077) and DOE NERSC (Contract DE-AC02-05CH11231) resources.

  19. Graphene-based in-plane micro-supercapacitors with high power and energy densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhong–Shuai; Parvez, Khaled; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Micro-supercapacitors are important on-chip micro-power sources for miniaturized electronic devices. Although the performance of micro-supercapacitors has been significantly advanced by fabricating nanostructured materials, developing thin-film manufacture technologies and device architectures, their power or energy densities remain far from those of electrolytic capacitors or lithium thin-film batteries. Here we demonstrate graphene-based in-plane interdigital micro-supercapacitors on arbitrary substrates. The resulting micro-supercapacitors deliver an area capacitance of 80.7 μF cm−2 and a stack capacitance of 17.9 F cm−3. Further, they show a power density of 495 W cm−3 that is higher than electrolytic capacitors, and an energy density of 2.5 mWh cm−3 that is comparable to lithium thin-film batteries, in association with superior cycling stability. Such microdevices allow for operations at ultrahigh rate up to 1,000 V s−1, three orders of magnitude higher than that of conventional supercapacitors. Micro-supercapacitors with an in-plane geometry have great promise for numerous miniaturized or flexible electronic applications. PMID:24042088

  20. Ultra-High Energy Density Relativistic Plasmas by Ultrafast Laser Irradiation of Aligned Nanowire Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocca, J. J.; Purvis, M. A.; Shlyaptsev, V. N.; Hollinger, R. C.; Bargsten, C.; Pukhov, A.; Keiss, D.; Townsend, A.; Prieto, A.; Wang, Y.; Yin, L.; Wang, S.; Luther, B.; Woolston, M.

    2013-10-01

    Long-lived plasmas that are simultaneously dense and hot (multi-keV) have been created by spherical compression with the world's largest lasers, and by supersonic heating of volumes with densities on the order of Nec using multi-kJ lasers pulses. We demonstrate volumetric heating of near-solid density plasmas to keV temperatures using ultra-high contrast λ = 400 nm femtosecond laser pulses of only 0.5 J energy to irradiate arrays of vertically aligned nanowires with 12% average solid density. X-ray spectra show that irradiation of Ni and Au nanowires arrays with relativistic intensities ionizes plasma volumes several micrometers in depth to the He-like and Co-like (Au 52 +) stages respectively. He- α line emission greatly exceeds that of the Ni K α line. This volumetric plasma heating approach creates a new laboratory plasma regime in which extreme plasma parameters can be accessed with table-top lasers. The increased hydrodynamic-to-radiative lifetime ratio is responsible for a great increase in the x-ray emission. Work supported by Defense Threat Reduction Agency grant HDTRA-1-10-1-0079 and by the HEDLP program of the Office of Science of the U.S Department of Energy. Equipment developed under NSF grant MRI-ARRA 09-561. A.P was supported by DFG-funded project TR18.

  1. Design of robust hollow fiber membranes with high power density for osmotic energy production

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Sui

    2014-04-01

    This study highlights the design strategy of highly asymmetric hollow fiber membranes that possess both characteristics of high flux and high mechanical strength to effectively reap the osmotic energy from seawater brine with an ultrahigh power density. An advanced co-extrusion technology was employed to fabricate the polyethersulfone (PES) hollow fiber supports with diversified structures from macrovoid to sponge-like. The microstructure of the supports is found critical for the stability and water permeability of the thin film composite (TFC) membranes. A high porosity in the porous layer is needed to reduce internal concentration polarization, while a thick and relatively dense skin layer underneath the TFC layer is required to maintain good mechanical stability and stress dissipation. The pore size of the supporting layer underneath the TFC layer must be small with a narrow pore size distribution to ensure the formation of a less-defective, highly permeable and mechanically stable TFC layer. The newly developed hollow fiber comprising high asymmetry, high porosity, and a thick skin layer with a small and narrow pore size distribution underneath the TFC layer produces a maximum power density of 24.3W/m2 at 20.0bar by using 1M NaCl as the concentrated brine and deionized (DI) water as the feed. The proposed design strategy for ultrahigh power density membranes clearly advances the osmotic energy production close to commercialization with a quite cost-effective and practicable approach. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  2. Density functional calculations on structural materials for nuclear energy applications and functional materials for photovoltaic energy applications (abstract only).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domain, C; Olsson, P; Becquart, C S; Legris, A; Guillemoles, J F

    2008-02-13

    Ab initio density functional theory calculations are carried out in order to predict the evolution of structural materials under aggressive working conditions such as cases with exposure to corrosion and irradiation, as well as to predict and investigate the properties of functional materials for photovoltaic energy applications. Structural metallic materials used in nuclear facilities are subjected to irradiation which induces the creation of large amounts of point defects. These defects interact with each other as well as with the different elements constituting the alloys, which leads to modifications of the microstructure and the mechanical properties. VASP (Vienna Ab initio Simulation Package) has been used to determine the properties of point defect clusters and also those of extended defects such as dislocations. The resulting quantities, such as interaction energies and migration energies, are used in larger scale simulation methods in order to build predictive tools. For photovoltaic energy applications, ab initio calculations are used in order to search for new semiconductors and possible element substitutions for existing ones in order to improve their efficiency.

  3. Energetic multifunctionalized nitraminopyrazoles and their ionic derivatives: ternary hydrogen-bond induced high energy density materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Ping; Parrish, Damon A; Shreeve, Jean'ne M

    2015-04-15

    Diverse functionalization was introduced into the pyrazole framework giving rise to a new family of ternary hydrogen-bond induced high energy density materials. By incorporating extended cationic interactions, nitramine-based ionic derivatives exhibit good energetic performance and enhanced molecular stability. Performance parameters including heats of formation and detonation properties were calculated by using Gaussian 03 and EXPLO5 v6.01 programs, respectively. It is noteworthy to find that 5-nitramino-3,4-dinitropyrazole, 4, has a remarkable measured density of 1.97 g cm(-3) at 298 K, which is consistent with its crystal density (2.032 g cm(-3), 150 K), and ranks highest among azole-based CHNO compounds. Energetic evaluation indicates that, in addition to the molecular compound 4, some ionic derivatives, 9, 11, 12, 17, 19, and 22, also have high densities (1.83-1.97 g cm(-3)), excellent detonation pressures and velocities (P, 35.6-41.6 GPa; vD, 8880-9430 m s(-1)), as well as acceptable impact and friction sensitivities (IS, 4-30 J; FS, 40-240 N). These attractive features highlight the application potential of nitramino hydrogen-bonded interactions in the design of advanced energetic materials.

  4. Graphene, a material for high temperature devices; intrinsic carrier density, carrier drift velocity, and lattice energy

    CERN Document Server

    Yin, Yan; Wang, Li; Jin, Kuijuan; Wang, Wenzhong

    2016-01-01

    Heat has always been a killing matter for traditional semiconductor machines. The underlining physical reason is that the intrinsic carrier density of a device made from a traditional semiconductor material increases very fast with a rising temperature. Once reaching a temperature, the density surpasses the chemical doping or gating effect, any p-n junction or transistor made from the semiconductor will fail to function. Here, we measure the intrinsic Fermi level (|E_F|=2.93k_B*T) or intrinsic carrier density (n_in=3.87*10^6 cm^-2 K^-2*T^2), carrier drift velocity, and G mode phonon energy of graphene devices and their temperature dependencies up to 2400 K. Our results show intrinsic carrier density of graphene is an order of magnitude less sensitive to temperature than those of Si or Ge, and reveal the great potentials of graphene as a material for high temperature devices. We also observe a linear decline of saturation drift velocity with increasing temperature, and identify the temperature coefficients of ...

  5. Effects of laser energy density on forming accuracy and tensile strength of selective laser sintering resin coated sands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Zhifeng

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Baozhu sand particles with size between 75 μm and 150 μm were coated by resin with the ratio of 1.5 wt.% of sands. Laser sintering experiments were carried out to investigate the effects of laser energy density (E = P/v, with different laser power (P and scanning velocity (v, on the dimensional accuracy and tensile strength of sintered parts. The experimental results indicate that with the constant scanning velocity, the tensile strength of sintered samples increases with an increase in laser energy density; while the dimensional accuracy apparently decreases when the laser energy density is larger than 0.032 J·mm-2. When the laser energy density is 0.024 J·mm-2, the tensile strength shows no obvious change; but when the laser energy density is larger than 0.024 J·mm-2, the sample strength is featured by the initial increase and subsequent decrease with simultaneous increase of both laser power and scanning velocity. In this study, the optimal energy density range for laser sintering is 0.024-0.032 J·mm-2. Moreover, samples with the best tensile strength and dimensional accuracy can be obtained when P = 30-40 W and v = 1.5-2.0 m·s-1. Using the optimized laser energy density, laser power and scanning speed, a complex coated sand mould with clear contour and excellent forming accuracy has been successfully fabricated.

  6. On the fractal nature of the magnetic field energy density in the solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hnat, B.; Chapman, S. C.; Kiyani, K.; Rowlands, G.; Watkins, N. W.

    2007-08-01

    The solar wind exhibits scaling typical of intermittent turbulence in the statistics of in situ fluctuations in both the magnetic and velocity fields. Intriguingly, quantities not directly accessed by theories of ideal, incompressible, MHD turbulence, such as magnetic energy density, B 2, nevertheless show evidence of simple fractal (self-affine) statistical scaling. We apply a novel statistical technique which is a sensitive discriminator of fractality to the B 2 timeseries from WIND and ACE. We show that robust fractal behaviour occurs at solar maximum and determine the scaling exponents. The probability density function (PDF) of fluctuations at solar maximum and minimum are distinct. Power law tails are seen at maximum, and the PDF is reminiscent of a Lévy flight.

  7. Dynamics of magnetic fields in high-energy-density plasmas for fusion and astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lan; Ji, H.; Fox, W.; Hill, K.; Efthimion, P.; Nilson, P.; Igumenshchev, I.; Froula, D.; Betti, R.; Meyerhofer, D.; Fiksel, G.; Blackman, E.; Schneider, M.; Chen, H.; Smalyuk, V.; Li, H.; Casner, A.

    2015-11-01

    An overview of our recent experimental and theoretical work on the dynamics of magnetic fields in high-energy-density plasmas will be presented. This includes: (1) precision mapping of the self-generated magnetic fields in the coronal plasma and the Nernst effect on their evolution, (2) characterizing the strong magnetic field generated by a laser-driven capacitor-coil target using ultrafast proton radiography, and (3) creating MHD turbulence in Rayleigh-Taylor unstable plasmas. The experimental results are compared with resistive MHD simulations providing a stringent test for their predictions. Applications in relevance to ignition target designs in inertial confinement fusion, material strength studies in high-energy-density physics, and astrophysical systems such as plasma dynamos and magnetic reconnection will be discussed. Future experiments proposed on the National Ignition Facility will be described. This material is supported in part by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award No. DE-NA0001944, and the National Laser Users Facility under Grant No. DE-NA0002205.

  8. Energy density of sub-Antarctic fishes from the Beagle Channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, D A; Lattuca, M E; Boy, C C; Pérez, A F; Ceballos, S G; Vanella, F A; Morriconi, E R; Malanga, G F; Aureliano, D R; Rimbau, S; Calvo, J

    2009-03-01

    The energy density (ED) of nine species of sub-Antarctic fishes was estimated by calorimetry. The fish, seven notothenioids, one atherinopsid and one galaxiid, represents some of the more abundant species in the ichthyofauna of the Beagle Channel. Principal-components analysis (PCA) of the ED of the different organs/tissues indicated that PC(1) and PC(2) accounted for 87% of the variability. Separation along PC(1) corresponded to differences in muscle and liver energy densities whereas separation along PC(2) corresponded to differences in the ED of the gonads. Differences between species were significant except for P. sima. Inclusion of the gonadosomatic index (GSI) as an explanatory variable enabled us to establish the existence of energy transfer from muscle and liver to the gonads in ripe P. tessellata females. Total ED values varied between 4.21 and 6.26 kJ g(-1), the pelagic Odontesthes sp. being the species with the highest ED. A significant relationship between ED and muscle dry weight (DW(M)) was found for all the species except P. tessellata. These data are the first direct estimates of ED of fishes from the Beagle Channel.

  9. Impact of olfactory and auditory priming on the attraction to foods with high energy density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambaron, S; Chisin, Q; Chabanet, C; Issanchou, S; Brand, G

    2015-12-01

    \\]\\Recent research suggests that non-attentively perceived stimuli may significantly influence consumers' food choices. The main objective of the present study was to determine whether an olfactory prime (a sweet-fatty odour) and a semantic auditory prime (a nutritional prevention message), both presented incidentally, either alone or in combination can influence subsequent food choices. The experiment included 147 participants who were assigned to four different conditions: a control condition, a scented condition, an auditory condition or an auditory-scented condition. All participants remained in the waiting room during15 min while they performed a 'lure' task. For the scented condition, the participants were unobtrusively exposed to a 'pain au chocolat' odour. Those in the auditory condition were exposed to an audiotape including radio podcasts and a nutritional message. A third group of participants was exposed to both olfactory and auditory stimuli simultaneously. In the control condition, no stimulation was given. Following this waiting period, all participants moved into a non-odorised test room where they were asked to choose, from dishes served buffet-style, the starter, main course and dessert that they would actually eat for lunch. The results showed that the participants primed with the odour of 'pain au chocolat' tended to choose more desserts with high energy density (i.e., a waffle) than the participants in the control condition (p = 0.06). Unexpectedly, the participants primed with the nutritional auditory message chose to consume more desserts with high energy density than the participants in the control condition (p = 0.03). In the last condition (odour and nutritional message), they chose to consume more desserts with high energy density than the participants in the control condition (p = 0.01), and the data reveal an additive effect of the two primes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Beamed-Energy Propulsion (BEP): Considerations for Beaming High Energy-Density Electromagnetic Waves Through the Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    A study to determine the feasibility of employing beamed electromagnetic energy for vehicle propulsion within and outside the Earth's atmosphere was co-funded by NASA and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency that began in June 2010 and culminated in a Summary Presentation in April 2011. A detailed report entitled "Beamed-Energy Propulsion (BEP) Study" appeared in February 2012 as NASA/TM-2012-217014. Of the very many nuances of this subject that were addressed in this report, the effects of transferring the required high energy-density electromagnetic fields through the atmosphere were discussed. However, due to the limitations of the length of the report, only a summary of the results of the detailed analyses were able to be included. It is the intent of the present work to make available the complete analytical modeling work that was done for the BEP project with regard to electromagnetic wave propagation issues. In particular, the present technical memorandum contains two documents that were prepared in 2011. The first one, entitled "Effects of Beaming Energy Through the Atmosphere" contains an overview of the analysis of the nonlinear problem inherent with the transfer of large amounts of energy through the atmosphere that gives rise to thermally-induced changes in the refractive index; application is then made to specific beamed propulsion scenarios. A brief portion of this report appeared as Appendix G of the 2012 Technical Memorandum. The second report, entitled "An Analytical Assessment of the Thermal Blooming Effects on the Propagation of Optical and Millimeter- Wave Focused Beam Waves For Power Beaming Applications" was written in October 2010 (not previously published), provides a more detailed treatment of the propagation problem and its effect on the overall characteristics of the beam such as its deflection as well as its radius. Comparisons are then made for power beaming using the disparate electromagnetic wavelengths of 1.06 microns and 2

  11. Extended Thomas-Fermi kinetic energy density functional with spatially varying effective mass in d=1,2,3 dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkane, K.; Bencheikh, K.

    2005-08-01

    For first-principles density functional theory of a many fermion system, the determination of the kinetic energy functional is important. We consider N independent fermions with spatially varying effective mass in two dimensions, we derive the corresponding kinetic energy density using the ℏ semiclassical approach. Our result reduces, as expected, to the one obtained in the literature for a constant effective mass. We examine the analytical expressions of the position dependent effective mass terms in the kinetic energy density functional with respect to the dimensionality d=1,2,3 of the space.

  12. Basic Phenomena In High Energy-Density Beam Welding And Cutting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arata, Yoshiaki

    1983-08-01

    Essential features in the dynamic behaviours of welding and cutting processes with high energy density beams are reviewed and clarified by the efficient usage of various cineradiographic diagnosises. Formation of a deep beam hole in the weld pool are described and the important effect of the front wall characters in the beam hole is demonstrated on the natures of deep penetration and defect formations such as spiking and porosity. The cutting process is also interpreted in the frame of the same physical viewpoint with the welding. A new and efficient suppression method of spiking, porosity and humping are examined and confirmed using Tandem Electron Beam developed by the author.

  13. Pragmatics for formal semantics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danvy, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    This tech talk describes how to write and how to inter-derive formal semantics for sequential programming languages. The progress reported here is (1) concrete guidelines to write each formal semantics to alleviate their proof obligations, and (2) simple calculational tools to obtain a formal...

  14. Differential and total excitation cross sections in the collision of protons with He atoms at intermediate and high energies under a three body formalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Fathi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available  A three-body model is devised to study differential and total cross sections for the excitation of helium atom under impact of energetic protons. The actual process is a four body one but in the present model the process is simplified into a three-body one. In this model, an electron of helium atom is assumed to be inactive and only one electron of the atom is active. Therefore, the active electron is assumed to be in an atomic state with a potential of the nucleus, T, being screened by the inactive electron, e, and, thus, an effective charge of Ze. As a result, the ground state, 11S, or the excited states, 21S and 21P, wave function of the active electron is deduced from similar hydrogenic wave functions assuming effective charge, Ze for the combined nucleus (T+e. In this three-body model, the Faddeev-Watson-Lovelace formalism for excitation channel is used to calculate the transition amplitude. In the first order approximation, electronic and nuclear interaction is assumed in the collision to be A(1e= and A(1n=, respectively. Here, A(1, Txy, |i> and |f> are the first order transition amplitude, the transition matrix for the interaction between particles x and y, the initial state and the final state, respectively. The transition matrix for the first order electronic interaction implemented into A(1e is approximated as the corresponding two-body interaction, Vxy. In order to calculate first order nuclear amplitude A(1n, the near-the-shell form of transition matrix TPT is used. Calculations are performed in the energy range of 50 keV up to 1MeV. The results are then compared with those of theoretical and experimental works in the literature.

  15. The Cross-Sectional Association of Energy Intake and Dietary Energy Density with Body Composition of Children in Southwest China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Zhou

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We examined whether dietary energy intake (EI and dietary energy density (ED were cross-sectionally associated with body composition of children living in Southwest China. Design and Methods: Multivariate regression analyses were performed on three day, 24 h dietary recall data and information on potential confounders from 1207 participants aged 8–14 years. EI was calculated from all foods and drinks and ED was classified into five categories. Body mass index (BMI z-scores, percentage of body fat (%BF, fat mass index (FMI, fat-free mass index (FFMI and ratio of waist to hip circumference (WHR were used to describe body composition. Results: Boys with higher total EI had higher BMI z-scores, %BF, and FMI than boys with lower total EI both before and after measurements were adjusted for confounders (age, fiber intake, physical activity, the timing of adding complementary foods, paternal education level and maternal BMI (p ≤ 0.04. However, EI was not associated with body composition in girls. Dietary ED, in any category, was not associated with body composition in either gender. Conclusions: Dietary ED was not associated with body composition of children in Southwest China, while dietary EI in boys, not girls, was positively associated with body composition. Reducing dietary energy intake may help to prevent obesity and related diseases in later life among boys living in Southwest China.

  16. Electrostatic solvation free energies of charged hard spheres using molecular dynamics with density functional theory interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duignan, Timothy T. [Physical Science Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352, USA; Baer, Marcel D. [Physical Science Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352, USA; Schenter, Gregory K. [Physical Science Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352, USA; Mundy, Chistopher J. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98185, USA

    2017-10-28

    Determining the solvation free energies of single ions in water is one of the most fundamental problems in physical chemistry and yet many unresolved questions remain. In particular, the ability to decompose the solvation free energy into simple and intuitive contributions will have important implications for coarse grained models of electrolyte solution. Here, we provide rigorous definitions of the various types of single ion solvation free energies based on different simulation protocols. We calculate solvation free energies of charged hard spheres using density functional theory interaction potentials with molecular dynamics simulation (DFT-MD) and isolate the effects of charge and cavitation, comparing to the Born (linear response) model. We show that using uncorrected Ewald summation leads to highly unphysical values for the solvation free energy and that charging free energies for cations are approximately linear as a function of charge but that there is a small non-linearity for small anions. The charge hydration asymmetry (CHA) for hard spheres, determined with quantum mechanics, is much larger than for the analogous real ions. This suggests that real ions, particularly anions, are significantly more complex than simple charged hard spheres, a commonly employed representation. We would like to thank Thomas Beck, Shawn Kathmann, Richard Remsing and John Weeks for helpful discussions. Computing resources were generously allocated by PNNL's Institutional Computing program. This research also used resources of the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center, a DOE Office of Science User Facility supported by the Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. TTD, GKS, and CJM were supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences. MDB was supported by MS3 (Materials Synthesis and Simulation Across

  17. High-power density miniscale power generation and energy harvesting systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyshevski, Sergey Edward [Department of Electrical and Microelectronics Engineering, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, NY 14623-5603 (United States)

    2011-01-15

    This paper reports design, analysis, evaluations and characterization of miniscale self-sustained power generation systems. Our ultimate objective is to guarantee highly-efficient mechanical-to-electrical energy conversion, ensure premier wind- or hydro-energy harvesting capabilities, enable electric machinery and power electronics solutions, stabilize output voltage, etc. By performing the advanced scalable power generation system design, we enable miniscale energy sources and energy harvesting technologies. The proposed systems integrate: (1) turbine which rotates a radial- or axial-topology permanent-magnet synchronous generator at variable angular velocity depending on flow rate, speed and load, and, (2) power electronic module with controllable rectifier, soft-switching converter and energy storage stages. These scalable energy systems can be utilized as miniscale auxiliary and self-sustained power units in various applications, such as, aerospace, automotive, biotechnology, biomedical, and marine. The proposed systems uniquely suit various submersible and harsh environment applications. Due to operation in dynamic rapidly-changing envelopes (variable speed, load changes, etc.), sound solutions are researched, proposed and verified. We focus on enabling system organizations utilizing advanced developments for various components, such as generators, converters, and energy storage. Basic, applied and experimental findings are reported. The prototypes of integrated power generation systems were tested, characterized and evaluated. It is documented that high-power density, high efficiency, robustness and other enabling capabilities are achieved. The results and solutions are scalable from micro ({proportional_to}100 {mu}W) to medium ({proportional_to}100 kW) and heavy-duty (sub-megawatt) auxiliary and power systems. (author)

  18. On the accuracy of density functional theory and wave function methods for calculating vertical ionization energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKechnie, Scott [Cavendish Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Cambridge, J J Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Booth, George H. [Theory and Simulation of Condensed Matter, King’s College London, The Strand, London WC2R 2LS (United Kingdom); Cohen, Aron J. [Department of Chemistry, University of Cambridge, Lensfield Road, Cambridge CB2 1EW (United Kingdom); Cole, Jacqueline M., E-mail: jmc61@cam.ac.uk [Cavendish Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Cambridge, J J Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2015-05-21

    The best practice in computational methods for determining vertical ionization energies (VIEs) is assessed, via reference to experimentally determined VIEs that are corroborated by highly accurate coupled-cluster calculations. These reference values are used to benchmark the performance of density functional theory (DFT) and wave function methods: Hartree-Fock theory, second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory, and Electron Propagator Theory (EPT). The core test set consists of 147 small molecules. An extended set of six larger molecules, from benzene to hexacene, is also considered to investigate the dependence of the results on molecule size. The closest agreement with experiment is found for ionization energies obtained from total energy difference calculations. In particular, DFT calculations using exchange-correlation functionals with either a large amount of exact exchange or long-range correction perform best. The results from these functionals are also the least sensitive to an increase in molecule size. In general, ionization energies calculated directly from the orbital energies of the neutral species are less accurate and more sensitive to an increase in molecule size. For the single-calculation approach, the EPT calculations are in closest agreement for both sets of molecules. For the orbital energies from DFT functionals, only those with long-range correction give quantitative agreement with dramatic failing for all other functionals considered. The results offer a practical hierarchy of approximations for the calculation of vertical ionization energies. In addition, the experimental and computational reference values can be used as a standardized set of benchmarks, against which other approximate methods can be compared.

  19. Low-energy density and high fiber intake are dietary concerns in female endurance athletes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melin, Anna Katarina; Tornberg, Å B; Skouby, Sven O.

    2016-01-01

    Low or reduced energy availability (LEA) is linked to functional hypothalamic oligomenorrhea/amenorrhea (FHA), which is frequently reported in weight-sensitive sports. This makes LEA a major nutritional concern for female athletes. The aim of this study was to describe dietary characteristics...... function [eumenorrhea (EUM; n = 10), FHA (n = 15)]. There was no difference in EA between FHA and EUM subjects. However, FHA and LEA subjects shared the same dietary characteristics of lower energy density (ED) [(P = 0.012; P = 0.020), respectively], and fat content [(P = 0.047; P = 0.027), respectively......]. Furthermore, FHA subjects had a lower intake of carbohydrate-rich foods (P = 0.019), higher fiber content (P 

  20. Dietary energy density is positively associated with body composition of adults in Southwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jun; Xue, Hong-Mei; Chen, Yuan-Yuan; Zhang, Xiao; Quan, Li-Ming; Gong, Yun-Hui; Cheng, Guo

    2018-02-20

    Dietary energy density (ED) might have influences on body composition. We therefore examined whether ED is associated with body composition among Chinese adults. We collected dietary data through validated two-day 24 h recalls. ED, defined as the amount of energy per unit weight of food consumed, was calculated based on five methods. Multiple linear regression analyses were performed to explore the associations between ED and body composition parameters, including BMI, fat mass index (FMI), fat-free mass index (FFMI), percentage body fat (%BF) and waist circumference (WC). Southwest China. Chinese adults (n 1933) in 2013. After adjusting the covariates, all ED definitions were positively associated with BMI, FMI, FFMI, %BF and WC among women (Pcomposition among men. Additionally, ED contributed to higher increases of body composition in women than in men (Pcomposition among adults in Southwest China, in which beverages may play an important role.

  1. Energy decomposition analysis of single bonds within Kohn-Sham density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Daniel S; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2017-11-28

    An energy decomposition analysis (EDA) for single chemical bonds is presented within the framework of Kohn-Sham density functional theory based on spin projection equations that are exact within wave function theory. Chemical bond energies can then be understood in terms of stabilization caused by spin-coupling augmented by dispersion, polarization, and charge transfer in competition with destabilizing Pauli repulsions. The EDA reveals distinguishing features of chemical bonds ranging across nonpolar, polar, ionic, and charge-shift bonds. The effect of electron correlation is assessed by comparison with Hartree-Fock results. Substituent effects are illustrated by comparing the C-C bond in ethane against that in bis(diamantane), and dispersion stabilization in the latter is quantified. Finally, three metal-metal bonds in experimentally characterized compounds are examined: a [Formula: see text]-[Formula: see text] dimer, the [Formula: see text]-[Formula: see text] bond in dizincocene, and the Mn-Mn bond in dimanganese decacarbonyl.

  2. Causes of Irregular Energy Density in $f(R,T)$ Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Yousaf, Z; Bhatti, M Zaeem ul Haq

    2016-01-01

    We investigate irregularity factors for a self-gravitating spherical star evolving in the presence of imperfect fluid. We explore the gravitational field equations and the dynamical equations with the systematic construction in $f(R,T)$ gravity, where $T$ is the trace of the energy-momentum tensor. Furthermore, we analyze two well-known differential equations (which occupy principal importance in the exploration of causes of energy density inhomogeneities) with the help of the Weyl tensor and the conservation laws. The irregularity factors for a spherical star are examined for particular cases of dust, isotropic and anisotropic fluids in dissipative and non-dissipative regimes in the framework of $f(R,T)$ gravity. It is found that as the complexity in the matter with the anisotropic stresses increases, the inhomogeneity factor has more correspondences to one of the structure scalars.

  3. Growth of Low-Density Vertical Quantum Dot Molecules with Control in Energy Emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuster D

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this work, we present results on the formation of vertical molecule structures formed by two vertically aligned InAs quantum dots (QD in which a deliberate control of energy emission is achieved. The emission energy of the first layer of QD forming the molecule can be tuned by the deposition of controlled amounts of InAs at a nanohole template formed by GaAs droplet epitaxy. The QD of the second layer are formed directly on top of the buried ones by a strain-driven process. In this way, either symmetric or asymmetric vertically coupled structures can be obtained. As a characteristic when using a droplet epitaxy patterning process, the density of quantum dot molecules finally obtained is low enough (2 × 108 cm−2 to permit their integration as active elements in advanced photonic devices where spectroscopic studies at the single nanostructure level are required.

  4. Spin gaps and spin-flip energies in density-functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capelle, K.; Vignale, G.; Ullrich, C. A.

    2010-03-01

    Energy gaps are crucial aspects of the electronic structure of finite and extended systems. Whereas much is known about how to define and calculate charge gaps in density-functional theory (DFT), and about the relation between these gaps and derivative discontinuities of the exchange-correlation functional, much less is known about spin gaps. In this paper we give density-functional definitions of spin-conserving gaps, spin-flip gaps and the spin stiffness in terms of many-body energies and in terms of single-particle (Kohn-Sham) energies. Our definitions are as analogous as possible to those commonly made in the charge case, but important differences between spin and charge gaps emerge already on the single-particle level because unlike the fundamental charge gap spin gaps involve excited-state energies. Kohn-Sham and many-body spin gaps are predicted to differ, and the difference is related to derivative discontinuities that are similar to, but distinct from, those usually considered in the case of charge gaps. Both ensemble DFT and time-dependent DFT (TDDFT) can be used to calculate these spin discontinuities from a suitable functional. We illustrate our findings by evaluating our definitions for the Lithium atom, for which we calculate spin gaps and spin discontinuities by making use of near-exact Kohn-Sham eigenvalues and, independently, from the single-pole approximation to TDDFT. The many-body corrections to the Kohn-Sham spin gaps are found to be negative, i.e., single-particle calculations tend to overestimate spin gaps while they underestimate charge gaps.

  5. Vacuum energy density fluctuations in Minkowski and Casimir states via smeared quantum fields and point separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Nicholas G.; Hu, B. L.

    2000-10-01

    We present calculations of the variance of fluctuations and of the mean of the energy momentum tensor of a massless scalar field for the Minkowski and Casimir vacua as a function of an intrinsic scale defined by a smeared field or by point separation. We point out that, contrary to prior claims, the ratio of variance to mean-squared being of the order unity is not necessarily a good criterion for measuring the invalidity of semiclassical gravity. For the Casimir topology we obtain expressions for the variance to mean-squared ratio as a function of the intrinsic scale (defined by a smeared field) compared to the extrinsic scale (defined by the separation of the plates, or the periodicity of space). Our results make it possible to identify the spatial extent where negative energy density prevails which could be useful for studying quantum field effects in worm holes and baby universes, and for examining the design feasibility of real-life ``time machines.'' For the Minkowski vacuum we find that the ratio of the variance to the mean-squared, calculated from the coincidence limit, is identical to the value of the Casimir case at the same limit for spatial point separation while identical to the value of a hot flat space result with a temporal point separation. We analyze the origin of divergences in the fluctuations of the energy density and discuss choices in formulating a procedure for their removal, thus raising new questions about the uniqueness and even the very meaning of regularization of the energy momentum tensor for quantum fields in curved or even flat spacetimes when spacetime is viewed as having an extended structure.

  6. Choosing the best method to estimate the energy density of a population using food purchase data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrieden, W L; Armstrong, J; Anderson, A S; Sherriff, A; Barton, K L

    2015-04-01

    Energy density (ED) is a measure of the energy content of a food component or diet relative to a standard unit of weight. Widespread variation in ED assessment methodologies exist. The present study aimed to explore the feasibility of calculating the ED of the Scottish diet using UK food purchase survey data and to identify the most appropriate method for calculating ED for use in the development of a Scottish Dietary Goal that captures any socioeconomic differences. Energy density was calculated using five different methods [food; food and milk; food, milk and energy containing (non-alcoholic) beverages; food, milk and all non-alcoholic beverages; and all food and beverages]. ED of the Scottish diet was estimated for each of the ED methods and data were examined by deprivation category. Mean ED varied from 409 to 847 kJ 100 g(-1) depending on the method used. ED values calculated from food (847 kJ 100 g(-1) ) and food and milk (718 kJ 100 g(-1) ) were most comparable to other published data, with the latter being a more accurate reflection of all food consumed. For these two methods, there was a significant gradient between the most and least deprived quintiles (892-807 and 737-696 kJ 100 g(-1) for food and food and milk, respectively). Because the World Cancer Research Fund recommendations are based on ED from food and milk, it was considered prudent to use this method for policy purposes and for future monitoring work of the Scottish Diet to ensure consistency of reporting and comparability with other published studies. © 2014 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  7. Assessment of the performance of common density functional methods for describing the interaction energies of (H2O)6 clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, F.-F.; Jenness, G.; Al-Saidi, W. A.; Jordan, K. D.

    2010-04-01

    Localized molecular orbital energy decomposition analysis and symmetry-adapted perturbation theory (SAPT) calculations are used to analyze the two- and three-body interaction energies of four low-energy isomers of (H2O)6 in order to gain insight into the performance of several popular density functionals for describing the electrostatic, exchange-repulsion, induction, and short-range dispersion interactions between water molecules. The energy decomposition analyses indicate that all density functionals considered significantly overestimate the contributions of charge transfer to the interaction energies. Moreover, in contrast to some studies that state that density functional theory (DFT) does not include dispersion interactions, we adopt a broader definition and conclude that for (H2O)6 the short-range dispersion interactions recovered in the DFT calculations account about 75% or more of the net (short-range plus long-range) dispersion energies obtained from the SAPT calculations.

  8. Significantly Enhanced Energy Storage Density by Modulating the Aspect Ratio of BaTiO3 Nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dou; Zhou, Xuefan; Roscow, James; Zhou, Kechao; Wang, Lu; Luo, Hang; Bowen, Chris R

    2017-03-23

    There is a growing need for high energy density capacitors in modern electric power supplies. The creation of nanocomposite systems based on one-dimensional nanofibers has shown great potential in achieving a high energy density since they can optimize the energy density by exploiting both the high permittivity of ceramic fillers and the high breakdown strength of the polymer matrix. In this paper, BaTiO3 nanofibers (NFs) with different aspect ratio were synthesized by a two-step hydrothermal method and the permittivity and energy storage of the P(VDF-HFP) nanocomposites were investigated. It is found that as the BaTiO3 NF aspect ratio and volume fraction increased the permittivity and maximum electric displacement of the nanocomposites increased, while the breakdown strength decreased. The nanocomposites with the highest aspect ratio BaTiO3 NFs exhibited the highest energy storage density at the same electric field. However, the nanocomposites with the lowest aspect ratio BaTiO3 NFs achieved the maximal energy storage density of 15.48 J/cm(3) due to its higher breakdown strength. This contribution provides a potential route to prepare and tailor the properties of high energy density capacitor nanocomposites.

  9. Development on the National Ignition Facility of a High Energy Density Opacity Platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perry, Theodore Sonne [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dodd, Evan S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); DeVolder, Barbara Gloria [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Johns, Heather Marie [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Cardenas, Tana [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Archuleta, Thomas Nick [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kline, John L. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Flippo, Kirk Adler [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Vinyard, Natalia Sergeevna [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Sherrill, Manolo Edgar [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Wilde, Bernhard Heinz [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Tregillis, Ian Lee [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Urbatsch, Todd James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Douglas, Melissa Rae [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Heeter, R. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Liedahl, D. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wilson, B. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Iglesias, C. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Schneider, M. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Martin, M. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); London, R. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ahmed, M. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Thompson, N. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Emig, J. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Zika, M. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Opachich, Y. P. [Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), NV (United States); King, J. A. [Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), NV (United States); Ross, P. W. [Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), NV (United States); Huffman, E. J. [Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), NV (United States); Knight, R. A. [Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), NV (United States); Koch, J. A. [Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), NV (United States); Pond, T. D. [Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), NV (United States); Craxton, R. S. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Zhang, R. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; McKenty, P. W. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Garcia, E. M. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Bailey, J. E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Rochau, G. A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hansen, S. B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-10-02

    X-ray opacity is a crucial factor in all radiation-hydrodynamics calculations, yet it is one of the least validated of the material properties in simulation codes for high-energy-density plasmas. Recent opacity experiments at the Sandia Z-machine have shown up to factors of two discrepancies between theory and experiment for various mid-Z elements (Fe, Cr, Ni). These discrepancies raise doubts regarding the accuracy of the opacity models which are used in ICF and stewardship as well as in astrophysics. Therefore, a new experimental opacity platform has been developed on the National Ignition Facility (NIF), not only to verify the Z-machine experimental results, but also to extend the experiments to other temperatures and densities. Within the context of the national opacity strategy, the first NIF experiments were directed towards measuring the opacity of iron at a temperature of ~160 eV and an electron density of ~7xl021 cm-3(Anchor 1). The Z data agree with theory at these conditions, providing a reference point for validation of the NIF platform. Development shots on NIF have demonstrated the ability to create a sufficiently bright point backlighter using an imploding plastic capsule, and also a combined hohlraum, sample and laser drive able to produce iron plasmas at the desired conditions. Spectrometer qualification has been completed, albeit with additional improvements planned, and the first iron absorption spectra have now been obtained.

  10. A predictive model of rats' calorie intake as a function of diet energy density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beheshti, Rahmatollah; Treesukosol, Yada; Igusa, Takeru; Moran, Timothy H

    2018-01-17

    Easy access to high-energy food has been linked to high rates of obesity in the world. Understanding the way that access to palatable (high fat or high calorie) food can lead to overconsumption is essential for both preventing and treating obesity. Although the body of studies focused on the effects of high energy diets is growing, our understanding of how different factors contribute to food choices is not complete. In this study, we present a mathematical model that can predict rats' calorie intake to a high-energy diet based on their ingestive behavior to a standard chow diet. Specifically, we propose an equation that describes the relation between the body weight (W), energy density ( E), time elapsed from the start of diet ( T), and daily calorie intake ( C). We tested our model on two independent data sets. Our results show that the suggested model can predict the calorie intake patterns with high accuracy. Additionally, the only free parameter of our proposed equation ( ρ), which is unique to each animal, has a strong association with their calorie intake.

  11. Determining excitation-energy transfer times and mechanisms from stochastic time-dependent density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann-Mees, D; Appel, H; Di Ventra, M; Kümmel, S

    2013-11-21

    We developed an approach for calculating excitation-energy transfer times in supermolecular arrangements based on stochastic time-dependent density functional theory (STDDFT). The combination of real-time propagation and the stochastic Schrödinger equation with a Kohn-Sham Hamiltonian allows for simulating how an excitation spreads through an assembly of molecular systems. The influence that approximations, such as the dipole-dipole coupling approximation of Förster theory, have on energy-transfer times can be checked explicitly. As a first application of our approach we investigate a light-harvesting-inspired model ring system, calculating the time it takes for an excitation to travel from one side of the ring to the opposite side under ideal and perturbed conditions. Among other things we find that completely removing a molecule from the ring may inhibit energy transfer less than having an energetically detuned molecule in the ring. In addition, Förster's dipole coupling approximation may noticeably overestimate excitation-energy transfer efficiency.

  12. Molecularly Engineered Azobenzene Derivatives for High Energy Density Solid-State Solar Thermal Fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Eugene N; Zhitomirsky, David; Han, Grace G D; Liu, Yun; Grossman, Jeffrey C

    2017-03-15

    Solar thermal fuels (STFs) harvest and store solar energy in a closed cycle system through conformational change of molecules and can release the energy in the form of heat on demand. With the aim of developing tunable and optimized STFs for solid-state applications, we designed three azobenzene derivatives functionalized with bulky aromatic groups (phenyl, biphenyl, and tert-butyl phenyl groups). In contrast to pristine azobenzene, which crystallizes and makes nonuniform films, the bulky azobenzene derivatives formed uniform amorphous films that can be charged and discharged with light and heat for many cycles. Thermal stability of the films, a critical metric for thermally triggerable STFs, was greatly increased by the bulky functionalization (up to 180 °C), and we were able to achieve record high energy density of 135 J/g for solid-state STFs, over a 30% improvement compared to previous solid-state reports. Furthermore, the chargeability in the solid state was improved, up to 80% charged from 40% charged in previous solid-state reports. Our results point toward molecular engineering as an effective method to increase energy storage in STFs, improve chargeability, and improve the thermal stability of the thin film.

  13. Microfabricated pseudocapacitors using Ni(OH)2 electrodes exhibit remarkable volumetric capacitance and energy density

    KAUST Repository

    Kurra, Narendra

    2014-09-10

    Metal hydroxide based microfabricated pseudocapacitors with impressive volumetric stack capacitance and energy density are demonstrated. A combination of top-down photolithographic process and bottom-up chemical synthesis is employed to fabricate the micro-pseudocapacitors (μ-pseudocapacitors). The resulting Ni(OH)2-based devices show several excellent characteristics including high-rate redox activity up to 500 V s-1 and an areal cell capacitance of 16 mF cm-2 corresponding to a volumetric stack capacitance of 325 F cm-3. This volumetric capacitance is two-fold higher than carbon and metal oxide based μ-supercapacitors with interdigitated electrode architecture. Furthermore, these μ-pseudocapacitors show a maximum energy density of 21 mWh cm-3, which is superior to the Li-based thin film batteries. The heterogeneous growth of Ni(OH)2 over the Ni surface during the chemical bath deposition is found to be the key parameter in the formation of uniform monolithic Ni(OH)2 mesoporous nanosheets with vertical orientation, responsible for the remarkable properties of the fabricated devices. Additionally, functional tandem configurations of the μ-pseudocapacitors are shown to be capable of powering a light-emitting diode.

  14. High Energy Density and High Temperature Multilayer Capacitor Films for Electric Vehicle Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treufeld, Imre; Song, Michelle; Zhu, Lei; Baer, Eric; Snyder, Joe; Langhe, Deepak

    2015-03-01

    Multilayer films (MLFs) with high energy density and high temperature capability (>120 °C) have been developed at Case Western Reserve University. Such films offer a potential solution for electric car DC-link capacitors, where high ripple currents and high temperature tolerance are required. The current state-of-the-art capacitors used in electric cars for converting DC to AC use biaxially oriented polypropylene (BOPP), which can only operate at temperatures up to 85 °C requiring an external cooling system. The polycarbonate (PC)/poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) MLFs have a higher permittivity compared to that of BOPP (2.3), leading to higher energy density. They have good mechanical stability and reasonably low dielectric losses at 120 °C. Nonetheless, our preliminary dielectric measurements show that the MLFs exhibit appreciable dielectric losses (20%) at 120 °C, which would, despite all the other advantages, make them not suitable for practical applications. Our preliminary data showed that dielectric losses of the MLFs at 120 °C up to 400 MV/m and 1000 Hz originate mostly from impurity ionic conduction. This work is supported by the NSF PFI/BIC Program (IIP-1237708).

  15. Hierarchical columnar silicon anode structures for high energy density lithium sulfur batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piwko, Markus; Kuntze, Thomas; Winkler, Sebastian; Straach, Steffen; Härtel, Paul; Althues, Holger; Kaskel, Stefan

    2017-05-01

    Silicon is a promising anode material for next generation lithium secondary batteries. To significantly increase the energy density of state of the art batteries with silicon, new concepts have to be developed and electrode structuring will become a key technology. Structuring is essential to reduce the macroscopic and microscopic electrode deformation, caused by the volume change during cycling. We report pulsed laser structuring for the generation of hierarchical columnar silicon films with outstanding high areal capacities up to 7.5 mAh cm-2 and good capacity retention. Unstructured columnar electrodes form a micron-sized block structure during the first cycle to compensate the volume expansion leading to macroscopic electrode deformation. At increased silicon loading, without additional structuring, pronounced distortion and the formation of cracks through the current collector causes cell failure. Pulsed laser ablation instead is demonstrated to avoid macroscopic electrode deformation by initial formation of the block structure. A full cell with lithiated silicon versus a carbon-sulfur cathode is assembled with only 15% overbalanced anode and low electrolyte amount (8 μl mgsulfur-1). While the capacity retention over 50 cycles is identical to a cell with high excess lithium anode, the volumetric energy density could be increased by 30%.

  16. High-Throughput Phase-Field Design of High-Energy-Density Polymer Nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Zhong-Hui; Wang, Jian-Jun; Lin, Yuanhua; Nan, Ce-Wen; Chen, Long-Qing; Shen, Yang

    2017-11-22

    Understanding the dielectric breakdown behavior of polymer nanocomposites is crucial to the design of high-energy-density dielectric materials with reliable performances. It is however challenging to predict the breakdown behavior due to the complicated factors involved in this highly nonequilibrium process. In this work, a comprehensive phase-field model is developed to investigate the breakdown behavior of polymer nanocomposites under electrostatic stimuli. It is found that the breakdown strength and path significantly depend on the microstructure of the nanocomposite. The predicted breakdown strengths for polymer nanocomposites with specific microstructures agree with existing experimental measurements. Using this phase-field model, a high throughput calculation is performed to seek the optimal microstructure. Based on the high-throughput calculation, a sandwich microstructure for PVDF-BaTiO3 nanocomposite is designed, where the upper and lower layers are filled with parallel nanosheets and the middle layer is filled with vertical nanofibers. It has an enhanced energy density of 2.44 times that of the pure PVDF polymer. The present work provides a computational approach for understanding the electrostatic breakdown, and it is expected to stimulate future experimental efforts on synthesizing polymer nanocomposites with novel microstructures to achieve high performances. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Covariant energy density functionals: parametric correlations and the propagation of statistical errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agbemava, Sylvester; Afanasjev, Anatoli

    2017-09-01

    Because of the complexity of nuclear many-body problem modern theoretical tools rely on some approximations in its solution. As a result, it becomes necessary to estimate theoretical uncertainties in the description of physical observables. This is especially important when one deals with the extrapolations beyond the known regions. There are two types of such uncertainties: systematic and statistical. Systematic theoretical uncertainties in the description of physical observables within the covariant density functional theory have been evaluated in. Present work is focused on the evaluation of statistical uncertainties for major classes of covariant energy density functionals (CEDFs) and their propagation with particle number (towards extremes of nuclear landscape) and deformation. These uncertainties are evaluated for different classes of physical observables (ground state and single-particle properties, fission barriers) and compared with systematic ones. Moreover, the correlations between the parameters of the CEDFs are evaluated with the goal to see to which degree they are independent. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics under Award No. DE-SC0013037.

  18. Energy decomposition analysis based on a block-localized wavefunction and multistate density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Yirong; Bao, Peng; Gao, Jiali

    2011-04-21

    An interaction energy decomposition analysis method based on the block-localized wavefunction (BLW-ED) approach is described. The first main feature of the BLW-ED method is that it combines concepts of valence bond and molecular orbital theories such that the intermediate and physically intuitive electron-localized states are variationally optimized by self-consistent field calculations. Furthermore, the block-localization scheme can be used both in wave function theory and in density functional theory, providing a useful tool to gain insights on intermolecular interactions that would otherwise be difficult to obtain using the delocalized Kohn-Sham DFT. These features allow broad applications of the BLW method to energy decomposition (BLW-ED) analysis for intermolecular interactions. In this perspective, we outline theoretical aspects of the BLW-ED method, and illustrate its applications in hydrogen-bonding and π-cation intermolecular interactions as well as metal-carbonyl complexes. Future prospects on the development of a multistate density functional theory (MSDFT) are presented, making use of block-localized electronic states as the basis configurations.

  19. Unique aqueous Li-ion/sulfur chemistry with high energy density and reversibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chongyin; Suo, Liumin; Borodin, Oleg; Wang, Fei; Sun, Wei; Gao, Tao; Fan, Xiulin; Hou, Singyuk; Ma, Zhaohui; Amine, Khalil; Xu, Kang; Wang, Chunsheng

    2017-06-13

    Leveraging the most recent success in expanding the electrochemical stability window of aqueous electrolytes, in this work we create a unique Li-ion/sulfur chemistry of both high energy density and safety. We show that in the superconcentrated aqueous electrolyte, lithiation of sulfur experiences phase change from a high-order polysulfide to low-order polysulfides through solid-liquid two-phase reaction pathway, where the liquid polysulfide phase in the sulfide electrode is thermodynamically phase-separated from the superconcentrated aqueous electrolyte. The sulfur with solid-liquid two-phase exhibits a reversible capacity of 1,327 mAh/(g of S), along with fast reaction kinetics and negligible polysulfide dissolution. By coupling a sulfur anode with different Li-ion cathode materials, the aqueous Li-ion/sulfur full cell delivers record-high energy densities up to 200 Wh/(kg of total electrode mass) for >1,000 cycles at ∼100% coulombic efficiency. These performances already approach that of commercial lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) using a nonaqueous electrolyte, along with intrinsic safety not possessed by the latter. The excellent performance of this aqueous battery chemistry significantly promotes the practical possibility of aqueous LIBs in large-format applications.

  20. Diet density during the first week of life: Effects on energy and nitrogen balance characteristics of broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamot, D M; Sapkota, D; Wijtten, P J A; van den Anker, I; Heetkamp, M J W; Kemp, B; van den Brand, H

    2017-07-01

    This study aimed to determine effects of diet density on growth performance, energy balance, and nitrogen (N) balance characteristics of broiler chickens during the first wk of life. Effects of diet density were studied using a dose-response design consisting of 5 dietary fat levels (3.5, 7.0, 10.5, 14.0, and 17.5%). The relative difference in dietary energy level was used to increase amino acid levels, mineral levels, and the premix inclusion level at the same ratio. Chickens were housed in open-circuit climate respiration chambers from d 0 to 7 after hatch. Body weight was measured on d 0 and 7, whereas feed intake was determined daily. For calculation of energy balances, O2 and CO2 exchange were measured continuously and all excreta from d 0 to 7 was collected and analyzed at d 7. Average daily gain (ADG) and average daily feed intake (ADFI) decreased linearly (P = 0.047 and P density. Gross energy (GE) intake and metabolizable energy (ME) intake were not affected by diet density, but the ratio between ME and GE intake decreased linearly with increasing diet density (P = 0.006). Fat, N, and GE efficiencies (expressed as gain per unit of nutrient intake), heat production, and respiratory exchange ratio (CO2 to O2 ratio) decreased linearly (P density increased. Energy retention, N intake, and N retention were not affected by diet density. We conclude that a higher diet density in the first wk of life of broiler chickens did not affect protein and fat retention, whereas the ME to GE ratio decreased linearly with increased diet density. This suggests that diet density appears to affect digestibility rather than utilization of nutrients. © 2017 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  1. Determination of spectral, structural and energetic properties of small lithium clusters, within the density functional theory formalism.; Application et developpement de calculs type fonctionnelle de la densite pour la determination de proprietes spectrales structurales et energetiques d`agregats de lithium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardet, G.

    1995-06-14

    A systematic study of small lithium clusters (with size less than 19), within the Density Functional Theory (DFT) formalism is presented. We examine structural properties of the so called local level of approximation. For clusters with size smaller than 8, the conformations are well known from ab initio calculations and are found here at much lower computational cost, with only small differences. For bigger clusters, two growth pattern have been used, based upon the increase of the number of pentagonal subunits in the clusters by absorption of one or two Li atoms. Several new stable structures are proposed. Then DFT gradient-corrected functionals have been used for relative stability determination of these clusters. Ionisation potentials and binding energies are also investigated in regard to clusters size and geometry. Calculations of excited states of lithium clusters (with size less than 9) have been performed within two different approaches. Using a set of Kohn-Sham orbitals to construct wave functions, oscillator strengths calculation of the electric dipole transitions is performed. Transition energies, oscillator strengths and optical absorption presented here are generally in reasonable agreement with the experimental data and the Configuration Interaction calculations. (author).

  2. Dietary energy density and obesity: how consumption patterns differ by body weight status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernarelli, Jacqueline A; Mitchell, Diane C; Rolls, Barbara J; Hartman, Terryl J

    2018-02-01

    Recent public health messages have advised consumers to lower dietary energy density (ED) for weight management, but it is not known whether the proportion of the diet from low-ED foods is related to weight status. In a nationally representative sample of US adults, we evaluated whether the proportions of dietary energy intake contributed by low- and high-ED foods are associated with body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC). Data were from a cross-sectional sample of 9551 adults ≥18 years in the 2005-2008 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). ED (kcal/g) was calculated for each food item reported during a 24-h dietary recall; individual foods were divided into five ED categories: very low ED (4.0 kcal/g). The percentages of total energy and the food weight from each category were evaluated by BMI and WC after controlling for total energy intake and other covariates. Men classified as lean (BMI energy from very low- and low-ED foods (7.2 % very low and 23.3 % low ), compared to men considered obese ((BMI > 30 kg/m 2 ); 5.2 % very low and 20.1 low  %; p-trends energy and low-ED foods of 24.7 % (vs. 21.5 % for women with obesity) of total energy (p-trends 0.007 very low , 0.004 low ). Men and women with obesity reported greater proportions of energy from high-ED foods (45.9 % men with obesity vs. 42.4 % lean men , 44.2 % women with obesity vs. 39.9 % lean women ) with significant statistical trends (men = 0.008, women = 0.0005). Similar patterns were observed for intakes of proportions of very low-, low-, and high-ED foods and WC. Higher proportions of energy intake and food weight contributed by very low- and low-ED foods are associated with lower BMI (and WC).

  3. Inhibitory effects of a super pulsed carbon dioxide laser at low energy density on periodontopathic bacteria and lipopolysaccharide in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Taro; Shimada, Koichi; Iwasaki, Hiroyasu; Ito, Koichi

    2005-12-01

    Previous studies have described the effect of irradiation by a carbon dioxide (CO2) laser at high energy density on oral bacteria, and various side-effects have also been observed. However, no published studies have examined the effect of irradiation by a CO2 laser at low energy density on oral bacteria. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of super pulsed CO2 laser irradiation on periodontopathic bacteria and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Bacterial suspensions of two species of periodontopathic bacteria received laser irradiation at energy densities of 0-12.5 J/cm2. The suspensions were then spread over agar plates and incubated anaerobically. The bactericidal effects were evaluated based on colony formation. Samples of LPS were laser-irradiated at energy densities of 0-12.5 J/cm2. The biological activity was measured, and LPS was analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The irradiation at low energy densities of 7.5 and 12.5 J/cm2 killed more than 99.9 and 99.999% of Porphyromonas gingivalis and more than 99% of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans was sterilized by the irradiation at 7.5 J/cm2. LPS biological activity was significantly decreased by laser irradiation at energy densities of more than 7.5 J/cm2 (p CO2 laser irradiation at low power is capable of bactericidal effect on periodontopathic bacteria and decreasing LPS activity.

  4. Dairy product consumption, dietary nutrient and energy density and associations with obesity in Australian adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, T A; Bremner, A P; Bremer, H K; Seares, M E; Beilin, L J; Mori, T A; Lyons-Wall, P; Devine, A; Oddy, W H

    2015-10-01

    Dairy intake is likely to influence dietary energy density (ED) and nutrient density (ND), which are factors representing aspects of dietary quality. Although evidence suggests dairy intake is unlikely to contribute to obesity, intake tends to decrease over adolescence, potentially as a result of concerns around weight gain. We examined associations between dairy intake, ED and ND, and investigated relationships with obesity in adolescents. The present study comprised a cross-sectional study of 1613 14-year-olds in the Western Australian Pregnancy Cohort (Raine) Study. Adolescents completed a 212-item food frequency questionnaire. Nutrient Rich Food index 9.3 (NRF9.3) was used to estimate ND. Age-specific body mass index (BMI) and waist-height cut-offs were used to categorise obesity risk. Mean (SD) dairy intake was: 2.62 (1.51) servings daily; ED was 4.53 (0.83) (food and beverage) and 6.28 (1.33) (food only); ND was 373 (109). Dairy intake was inversely associated with ED and positively associated with ND. The odds of being overweight (as assessed by BMI) increased by 1.24 (95% confidence interval = 1.09-1.42) with each 100-point increase in ND, after adjustment for potential confounders and energy intake. ED measures and dairy intake were inversely associated with obesity after adjustment for confounders; associations became nonsignificant after energy adjustment. The NRF9.3 was originally designed to assess foods, not diets. Further research in other cohorts to determine whether similar findings exist, or investigations into alternate measures of dietary ND, may prove useful. Our findings may be the result of factors such as an excess consumption of refined but fortified foods. Although higher dairy intakes were associated with higher ND, intakes were not associated with higher obesity risk. © 2014 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  5. Directing the Lithium–Sulfur Reaction Pathway via Sparingly Solvating Electrolytes for High Energy Density Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The lithium–sulfur battery has long been seen as a potential next generation battery chemistry for electric vehicles owing to the high theoretical specific energy and low cost of sulfur. However, even state-of-the-art lithium–sulfur batteries suffer from short lifetimes due to the migration of highly soluble polysulfide intermediates and exhibit less than desired energy density due to the required excess electrolyte. The use of sparingly solvating electrolytes in lithium–sulfur batteries is a promising approach to decouple electrolyte quantity from reaction mechanism, thus creating a pathway toward high energy density that deviates from the current catholyte approach. Herein, we demonstrate that sparingly solvating electrolytes based on compact, polar molecules with a 2:1 ratio of a functional group to lithium salt can fundamentally redirect the lithium–sulfur reaction pathway by inhibiting the traditional mechanism that is based on fully solvated intermediates. In contrast to the standard catholyte sulfur electrochemistry, sparingly solvating electrolytes promote intermediate- and short-chain polysulfide formation during the first third of discharge, before disproportionation results in crystalline lithium sulfide and a restricted fraction of soluble polysulfides which are further reduced during the remaining discharge. Moreover, operation at intermediate temperatures ca. 50 °C allows for minimal overpotentials and high utilization of sulfur at practical rates. This discovery opens the door to a new wave of scientific inquiry based on modifying the electrolyte local structure to tune and control the reaction pathway of many precipitation–dissolution chemistries, lithium–sulfur and beyond. PMID:28691072

  6. Directing the Lithium-Sulfur Reaction Pathway via Sparingly Solvating Electrolytes for High Energy Density Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chang-Wook; Pang, Quan; Ha, Seungbum; Cheng, Lei; Han, Sang-Don; Zavadil, Kevin R; Gallagher, Kevin G; Nazar, Linda F; Balasubramanian, Mahalingam

    2017-06-28

    The lithium-sulfur battery has long been seen as a potential next generation battery chemistry for electric vehicles owing to the high theoretical specific energy and low cost of sulfur. However, even state-of-the-art lithium-sulfur batteries suffer from short lifetimes due to the migration of highly soluble polysulfide intermediates and exhibit less than desired energy density due to the required excess electrolyte. The use of sparingly solvating electrolytes in lithium-sulfur batteries is a promising approach to decouple electrolyte quantity from reaction mechanism, thus creating a pathway toward high energy density that deviates from the current catholyte approach. Herein, we demonstrate that sparingly solvating electrolytes based on compact, polar molecules with a 2:1 ratio of a functional group to lithium salt can fundamentally redirect the lithium-sulfur reaction pathway by inhibiting the traditional mechanism that is based on fully solvated intermediates. In contrast to the standard catholyte sulfur electrochemistry, sparingly solvating electrolytes promote intermediate- and short-chain polysulfide formation during the first third of discharge, before disproportionation results in crystalline lithium sulfide and a restricted fraction of soluble polysulfides which are further reduced during the remaining discharge. Moreover, operation at intermediate temperatures ca. 50 °C allows for minimal overpotentials and high utilization of sulfur at practical rates. This discovery opens the door to a new wave of scientific inquiry based on modifying the electrolyte local structure to tune and control the reaction pathway of many precipitation-dissolution chemistries, lithium-sulfur and beyond.

  7. The NIF: An international high energy density science and inertial fusion user facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moses E.I.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The National Ignition Facility (NIF, a 1.8-MJ/500-TW Nd:Glass laser facility designed to study inertial confinement fusion (ICF and high-energy-density science (HEDS, is operational at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL. A primary goal of NIF is to create the conditions necessary to demonstrate laboratory-scale thermonuclear ignition and burn. NIF experiments in support of indirect-drive ignition began late in FY2009 as part of the National Ignition Campaign (NIC, an international effort to achieve fusion ignition in the laboratory. To date, all of the capabilities to conduct implosion experiments are in place with the goal of demonstrating ignition and developing a predictable fusion experimental platform in 2012. The results from experiments completed are encouraging for the near-term achievement of ignition. Capsule implosion experiments at energies up to 1.6 MJ have demonstrated laser energetics, radiation temperatures, and symmetry control that scale to ignition conditions. Of particular importance is the demonstration of peak hohlraum temperatures near 300 eV with overall backscatter less than 15%. Important national security and basic science experiments have also been conducted on NIF. Successful demonstration of ignition and net energy gain on NIF will be a major step towards demonstrating the feasibility of laser-driven Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE. This paper will describe the results achieved so far on the path toward ignition, the beginning of fundamental science experiments and the plans to transition NIF to an international user facility providing access to HEDS and fusion energy researchers around the world.

  8. Advanced Materials Enabled by Atomic Layer Deposition for High Energy Density Rechargeable Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin

    In order to meet the ever increasing energy needs of society and realize the US Department of Energy (DOE)'s target for energy storage, acquiring a fundamental understanding of the chemical mechanisms in batteries for direct guidance and searching novel advanced materials with high energy density are critical. To realize rechargeable batteries with superior energy density, great cathodes and excellent anodes are required. LiMn2O4 (LMO) has been considered as a simpler surrogate for high energy cathode materials like NMC. Previous studies demonstrated that Al2O3 coatings prepared by atomic layer deposition (ALD) improved the capacity of LMO cathodes. This improvement was attributed to a reduction in surface area and diminished Mn dissolution. However, here we propose a different mechanism for ALD Al 2O3 on LMO based on in-situ and ex-situ investigations coupled with density functional theory calculations. We discovered that Al2O 3 not only coats the LMO, but also dopes the LMO surface with Al leading to changes in the Mn oxidation state. Different thicknesses of Al2O 3 were deposited on nonstoichiometric LiMn2O4 for electrochemical measurements. The LMO treated with one cycle of ALD Al2O3 (1xAl 2O3 LMO) to produce a sub-monolayer coating yielded a remarkable initial capacity, 16.4% higher than its uncoated LMO counterpart in full cells. The stability of 1xAl2O3 LMO is also much better as a result of stabilized defects with Al species. Furthermore, 4xAl 2O3 LMO demonstrates remarkable capacity retention. Stoichiometric LiMn2O4 was also evaluated with similar improved performance achieved. All superior results, accomplished by great stability and reduced Mn dissolution, is thanks to the synergetic effects of Al-doping and ALD Al2O 3 coating. Turning our attention to the anode, we again utilized aluminum oxide ALD to form conformal films on lithium. We elaborately designed and studied, for the first time, the growth mechanism during Al2O3 ALD on lithium metal in

  9. Industrial use of formal methods formal verification

    CERN Document Server

    Boulanger, Jean-Louis

    2012-01-01

    At present the literature gives students and researchers of the very general books on the formal technics. The purpose of this book is to present in a single book, a return of experience on the used of the "formal technics" (such proof and model-checking) on industrial examples for the transportation domain. This book is based on the experience of people which are completely involved in the realization and the evaluation of safety critical system software based.  The implication of the industrialists allows to raise the problems of confidentiality which could appear and so allow

  10. High-energy-density hydrogen-halogen fuel cells for advanced military applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balko, E. N.; McElroy, J. F.

    It is pointed out that hydrogen-halogen fuel cell systems are particularly suited for an employment as ground power sources for military applications. The large cell potential and reversible characteristics of the H2/Cl2 and H2/Br2 couples permit high energy storage density and efficient energy conversion. When used as flow batteries, the fluid nature of the reactants in the hydrogen-halogen systems has several advantages over power sources which involve solid phases. Very deep discharge is possible without degradation of subsequent performance, and energy storage capacity is limited only by the external reactant storage volume. Very rapid chemical recharging is possible through replenishment of the reactant supply. A number of H2/Cl2 and H2/Br2 fuel cell systems have been studied. These systems use the same solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) cell technology originally developed for H2/O2 fuel cells. The results of the investigation are illustrated with the aid of a number of graphs.

  11. Tunable porous structure of carbon nanosheets derived from puffed rice for high energy density supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jianhua; Jiang, Kun; Tahir, Muhammad; Wu, Xiaoge; Idrees, Faryal; Shen, Ming; Cao, Chuanbao

    2017-12-01

    The development of green and clean synthetic techniques to overcome energy requirements have motivated the researchers for the utilization of sustainable biomass. Driven by this desire we choose rice as starting materials source. After the explosion effect, the precursor is converted into puffed rice with a honeycomb-like structures composed of thin sheets. These honeycomb-like macrostructures, effectively prevent the cross-linking tendency towards the adjacent nanosheets during activation process. Furthermore, tuneable micro/mesoporous structures with ultrahigh specific surface areas (SBET) are successfully designed by KOH activation. The highest SBET of 3326 m2 g-1 with optimized proportion of small-mesopores is achieved at 850 °C. The rice-derived porous N-doped carbon nanosheets (NCS-850) are used as the active electrode materials for supercapacitors. It exhibites high specific capacitance specifically of 218 F g-1 at 80 A g-1 in 6 M KOH and a high-energy density of 104 Wh kg-1 (53 Wh L-1) in the ionic liquid electrolytes. These are the highest values among the reported biomass-derived carbon materials for the best of our knowledge. The present work demonstrates that the combination of ;puffing effect; and common chemical activation can turn natural products such as rice into functional products with prospective applications in high-performance energy storage devices.

  12. The CERN Large Hadron Collider as a tool to study high-energy density matter

    CERN Document Server

    Tahir, N A; Gryaznov, V; Hoffmann, Dieter H H; Kain, V; Lomonosov, I V; Piriz, A R; Schmidt, R; Shutov, A; Temporal, M

    2005-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN will generate two extremely powerful 7 TeV proton beams. Each beam will consist of 2808 bunches with an intensity per bunch of 1.15*10/sup 11/ protons so that the total number of protons in one beam will be about 3*10/sup 14/ and the total energy will be 362 MJ. Each bunch will have a duration of 0.5 ns and two successive bunches will be separated by 25 ns, while the power distribution in the radial direction will be Gaussian with a standard deviation, sigma =0.2 mm. The total duration of the beam will be about 89 mu s. Using a 2D hydrodynamic code, we have carried out numerical simulations of the thermodynamic and hydrodynamic response of a solid copper target that is irradiated with one of the LHC beams. These calculations show that only the first few hundred proton bunches will deposit a high specific energy of 400 kJ/g that will induce exotic states of high energy density in matter.

  13. High energy density supercapacitors from lignin derived submicron activated carbon fibers in aqueous electrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Sixiao; Zhang, Sanliang; Pan, Ning; Hsieh, You-Lo

    2014-12-01

    Highly porous submicron activated carbon fibers (ACFs) were robustly generated from low sulfonated alkali lignin and fabricated into supercapacitors for capacitive energy storage. The hydrophilic and high specific surface ACFs exhibited large-size nanographites and good electrical conductivity to demonstrate outstanding electrochemical performance. ACFs from KOH activation, in particular, showed very high 344 F g-1 specific capacitance at low 1.8 mg cm-2 mass loading and 10 mV s-1 scan rate in aqueous electrolytes. Even at relatively high scan rate of 50 mV s-1 and mass loading of 10 mg cm-2, a decent specific capacitance of 196 F g-1 and a remarkable areal capacitance of 0.55 F cm-2 was obtained, leading to high energy density of 8.1 Wh kg-1 based on averaged electrodes mass. Furthermore, over 96% capacitance retention rates were achieved after 5000 charge/discharge cycles. Such excellent performance demonstrated great potential of lignin derived carbons for electrical energy storage.

  14. Microscopic description of fission in neutron-rich radium isotopes with the Gogny energy density functional

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez-Guzman, R. [Kuwait University, Physics Department, Kuwait (Kuwait); Robledo, L.M. [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Madrid (Spain)

    2016-01-15

    Mean-field calculations, based on the D1S, D1N and D1M parametrizations of the Gogny energy density functional, have been carried out to obtain the potential energy surfaces relevant to fission in several Ra isotopes with the neutron number 144 ≤ N ≤ 176. Inner and outer barrier heights as well as first and second isomer excitation energies are given. The existence of a well-developed third minimum along the fission paths of Ra nuclei is analyzed in terms of the energetics of the ''fragments'' defining such elongated configuration. The masses and charges of the fission fragments are studied as functions of the neutron number in the parent Ra isotope. The comparison between fission and α-decay half-lives, reveals that the former becomes faster for increasing neutron numbers. Though there exists a strong variance of the results with respect to the parameters used in the computation of the spontaneous fission rate, a change in tendency is observed at N = 164 with a steady increase that makes heavier neutron-rich Ra isotopes stable against fission, diminishing the importance of fission recycling in the r-process. (orig.)

  15. Freestanding Gold/Graphene-Oxide/Manganese Oxide Microsupercapacitor Displaying High Areal Energy Density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morag, Ahiud; Becker, James Y; Jelinek, Raz

    2017-07-10

    Microsupercapacitors are touted as one of the promising "next frontiers" in energy-storage research and applications. Despite their potential, significant challenges still exist in terms of physical properties and electrochemical performance, particularly attaining high energy density, stability, ease of synthesis, and feasibility of large-scale production. We present new freestanding microporous electrodes comprising self-assembled scaffold of gold and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) nanowires coated with MnO2 . The electrodes exhibited excellent electrochemical characteristics, particularly superior high areal capacitance. Moreover, the freestanding Au/rGO scaffold also served as the current collector, obviating the need for an additional electrode support required in most reported supercapacitors, thus enabling low volume and weight devices with a high overall device specific energy. Stacked symmetrical solid-state supercapacitors were fabricated using the Au/rGO/MnO2 electrodes in parallel configurations showing the advantage of using freestanding electrodes in the fabrication of low-volume devices. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Graphene-based lithium ion capacitor with high gravimetric energy and power densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajuria, Jon; Arnaiz, Maria; Botas, Cristina; Carriazo, Daniel; Mysyk, Roman; Rojo, Teofilo; Talyzin, Alexandr V.; Goikolea, Eider

    2017-09-01

    Hybrid capacitor configurations are now of increasing interest to overcome the current energy limitations of supercapacitors. In this work, we report a lithium ion capacitor (LIC) entirely based on graphene. On the one hand, the negative -battery-type- electrode consists of a self-standing, binder-free 3D macroporous foam formed by reduced graphene oxide and decorated with tin oxide nanoparticles (SnO2-rGO). On the other hand, the positive -capacitor-type- electrode is based on a thermally expanded and physically activated reduced graphene oxide (a-TEGO). For comparison purposes, a symmetric electrical double layer capacitor (EDLC) using the same activated graphene in 1.5 M Et4NBF4/ACN electrolyte is also assembled. Built in 1 M LiPF6 EC:DMC, the graphene-based LIC shows an outstanding, 10-fold increase in energy density with respect to its EDLC counterpart at low discharge rates (up to 200 Wh kg-1). Furthermore, it is still capable to deliver double the energy in the high power region, within a discharge time of few seconds.

  17. The effect of preload/meal energy density on energy intake in a subsequent meal: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouhani, Mohammad Hossein; Surkan, Pamela J; Azadbakht, Leila

    2017-08-01

    To conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of the effects of preload/meal energy density on energy intake in a subsequent meal(s). Multiple databases were searched for studies published through December 2016 on the effects of preload/meal energy density on energy intake in a subsequent meal(s). We extracted information on mean energy intake in a subsequent meal(s) and on variables that could contribute to between-subject heterogeneity. Forty and Thirty nine eligible studies were identified for our systematic review and meta-analysis, respectively. The meta-analysis showed that preload/meal energy density did not affect energy intake in a subsequent meal(s) (95% CI:-21.21, 21.29). As heterogeneity was remarkable among studies, we stratified the studies by intervention type into "meal" or "preload" classifications. In the "preload" subgroup, studies used either fixed energy or fixed weight preloads. The results reveal that in comparison to a high energy-dense (HED) preload, consuming a low energy-dense (LED) preload with same weight resulted in higher energy intake in a subsequent meal (95% CI: 9.72, 56.19). On the other hand, decreased energy intake was observed after consuming an LED preload compared to after consumption of an HED preload with same energy content (95% CI: -138.71, -57.33). In the "meal" subgroup, studies were categorized by different subsequent meal (i.e., "afternoon or evening", "lunch" and "dinner or post-dinner"). Meta-analysis showed that an LED meal resulted in more energy intake only in afternoon or evening meals (95% CI: 14.82, 31.22). In summary, the current analysis revealed that we can restrict the energy intake by consuming an LED preload. Moreover, consuming an LED preload could favorably affect preload+meal energy intake. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Monochromatic radiography of high energy density physics experiments on the MAGPIE generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, G N; Burdiak, G C; Suttle, L; Stuart, N H; Swadling, G F; Lebedev, S V; Smith, R A; Patankar, S; Suzuki-Vidal, F; de Grouchy, P; Harvey-Thompson, A J; Bennett, M; Bland, S N; Pickworth, L; Skidmore, J

    2014-11-01

    A monochromatic X-ray backlighter based on Bragg reflection from a spherically bent quartz crystal has been developed for the MAGPIE pulsed power generator at Imperial College (1.4 MA, 240 ns) [I. H. Mitchell et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 67, 1533 (2005)]. This instrument has been used to diagnose high energy density physics experiments with 1.865 keV radiation (Silicon He-α) from a laser plasma source driven by a ∼7 J, 1 ns pulse from the Cerberus laser. The design of the diagnostic, its characterisation and performance, and initial results in which the instrument was used to radiograph a shock physics experiment on MAGPIE are discussed.

  19. Statistical frameworking of deforestation models based on human population density and relief energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishii, Ryuei; Miyata, Daiki; Tanaka, Shojiro

    2012-10-01

    This paper establishes a statistical framework of forest coverage models for spatio-temporal data. The forest coverage ratio of grid-cell data is modeled by taking human population density and relief energy as explanatory variables. The likelihood of the forest ratios is decomposed by the product of two likelihoods. The first likelihood discussed by Nishii and Tanaka (2010) is due to trinomial logistic distributions on three categories: the ratios take zero, one, or values between zero and one. We consider a precise modeling to the second likelihood for partlydeforested ratios by considering a) spline functions to the additive mean structure, b) wide spatial dependency of normal error terms, and c) an extended logistic type transform to the forest ratio. For spatio-temporal data, we implement auto-regressive terms based on the ratios observed in past. The proposed model was applied to real grid-cell data and resulted significant improvement compared to our previous model.

  20. The ASY-EOS experiment at GSI: investigating the symmetry energy at supra-saturation densities

    CERN Document Server

    Russotto, P; De Filippo, E; Févre, A Le; Gannon, S; Gašparić, I; Kiš, M; Kupny, S; Leifels, Y; Lemmon, R C; Łukasik, J; Marini, P; Pagano, A; Pawłowski, P; Santoro, S; Trautmann, W; Veselsky, M; Acosta, L; Adamczyk, M; Al-Ajlan, A; Al-Garawi, M; Al-Homaidhi, S; Amorini, F; Auditore, L; Aumann, T; Ayyad, Y; Baran, V; Basrak, Z; Benlliure, J; Boiano, C; Boisjoli, M; Boretzky, K; Brzychczyk, J; Budzanowski, A; Cardella, G; Cammarata, P; Chajecki, Z; Chbihi, A; Colonna, M; Cozma, D; Czech, B; Di Toro, M; Famiano, M; Geraci, E; Greco, V; Grassi, L; Guazzoni, C; Guazzoni, P; Heil, M; Heilborn, L; Introzzi, R; Isobe, T; Kezzar, K; Krasznahorkay, A; Kurz, N; La Guidara, E; Lanzalone, G; Lasko, P; Li, Q; Lombardo, I; Lynch, W G; Matthews, Z; May, L; Minniti, T; Mostazo, M; Papa, M; Pirrone, S; Politi, G; Porto, F; Reifarth, R; Reisdorf, W; Riccio, F; Rizzo, F; Rosato, E; Rossi, D; Simon, H; Skwirczynska, I; Sosin, Z; Stuhl, L; Trifiró, A; Trimarchi, M; Tsang, M B; Verde, G; Vigilante, M; Wieloch, A; Wigg, P; Wolter, H H; Wu, P; Yennello, S; Zambon, P; Zetta, L; Zoric, M

    2012-01-01

    The elliptic-flow ratio of neutrons with respect to protons in reactions of neutron rich heavy-ions systems at intermediate energies has been proposed as an observable sensitive to the strength of the symmetry term in the nuclear Equation Of State (EOS) at supra-saturation densities. The recent results obtained from the existing FOPI/LAND data for $^{197}$Au+$^{197}$Au collisions at 400 MeV/nucleon in comparison with the UrQMD model allowed a first estimate of the symmetry term of the EOS but suffer from a considerable statistical uncertainty. In order to obtain an improved data set for Au+Au collisions and to extend the study to other systems, a new experiment was carried out at the GSI laboratory by the ASY-EOS collaboration in May 2011.

  1. Crustal Stress and Strain Energy Density Rates in South Korea Deduced from GPS Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuanggen Jin Pil-Ho Park

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available An accurate measurement and understanding of horizontal stress rates within the earth¡¦s crust is important for providing fundamental insights into the mechanisms driving plate motion and intraplate tectonic activity. In this paper, the stress field within the crust of the South Korean peninsula is obtained from observed displacement rates based on 4-year continuous GPS observations (2000 - 2004. Results show that the South Korean peninsula is under both compression and extensional stress regimes with maximum shear stress rate being in the mid part of the study area coinciding with the geologically defined Honam Shear Zone (HSZ and relatively highly seismically active zone. In addition, the variation rate of strain energy density, an important index reflecting the intensity of crustal activity, is further derived, and its distribution indicates high earthquake potential in the mid-part as well as the north and northeast edges of the crust of the South Korean peninsula.

  2. Asymmetric battery having a semi-solid cathode and high energy density anode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Taison; Chiang, Yet-Ming; Ota, Naoki; Wilder, Throop; Duduta, Mihai

    2017-11-28

    Embodiments described herein relate generally to devices, systems and methods of producing high energy density batteries having a semi-solid cathode that is thicker than the anode. An electrochemical cell can include a positive electrode current collector, a negative electrode current collector and an ion-permeable membrane disposed between the positive electrode current collector and the negative electrode current collector. The ion-permeable membrane is spaced a first distance from the positive electrode current collector and at least partially defines a positive electroactive zone. The ion-permeable membrane is spaced a second distance from the negative electrode current collector and at least partially defines a negative electroactive zone. The second distance is less than the first distance. A semi-solid cathode that includes a suspension of an active material and a conductive material in a non-aqueous liquid electrolyte is disposed in the positive electroactive zone, and an anode is disposed in the negative electroactive zone.

  3. Guaiacol hydrodeoxygenation mechanism on Pt(111): insights from density functional theory and linear free energy relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyungtae; Gu, Geun Ho; Mullen, Charles A; Boateng, Akwasi A; Vlachos, Dionisios G

    2015-01-01

    Density functional theory is used to study the adsorption of guaiacol and its initial hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) reactions on Pt(111). Previous Brønsted-Evans-Polanyi (BEP) correlations for small open-chain molecules are inadequate in estimating the reaction barriers of phenolic compounds except for the side group (methoxy) carbon-dehydrogenation. New BEP relations are established using a select group of phenolic compounds. These relations are applied to construct a potential-energy surface of guaiacol-HDO to catechol. Analysis shows that catechol is mainly produced via dehydrogenation of the methoxy functional group followed by the CHx (xhypothesis of a direct demethylation path. Dehydroxylation and demethoxylation are slow, implying that phenol is likely produced from catechol but not through its direct dehydroxylation followed by aromatic carbon-ring hydrogenation. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. A 100 J-level nanosecond DPSSL for high energy density experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butcher, Thomas; Mason, Paul; Banerjee, Saumyabrata; Ertel, Klaus; Phillips, P. Jonathan; Smith, Jodie; De Vido, Mariastefania; Chekhlov, Oleg; Divoky, Martin; Pilat, Jan; Priebe, Gerd; Toncian, Toma; Shaikh, Waseem; Hooker, Chris; Lucianetti, Antonio; Hernandez-Gomez, Cristina; Mocek, Tomas; Edwards, Chris; Collier, John

    2017-05-01

    We present an overview of the cryo-amplifier concept and design utilized in the DiPOLE100 laser system built for use at the HiLASE Center, which has been successfully tested operating at an average power of 1kW. Following this we describe the alterations made to the design in the second generation system being constructed for high energy density (HED) experiments in the HED beamline at the European XFEL. These changes are predominantly geometric in nature, however also include improved mount design and improved control over the temporal shape of the output pulse. Finally, we comment on future plans for development of the DiPOLE laser amplifier architecture.

  5. Promise and reality of post-lithium-ion batteries with high energy densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jang Wook; Aurbach, Doron

    2016-04-01

    Energy density is the main property of rechargeable batteries that has driven the entire technology forward in past decades. Lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) now surpass other, previously competitive battery types (for example, lead-acid and nickel metal hydride) but still require extensive further improvement to, in particular, extend the operation hours of mobile IT devices and the driving mileages of all-electric vehicles. In this Review, we present a critical overview of a wide range of post-LIB materials and systems that could have a pivotal role in meeting such demands. We divide battery systems into two categories: near-term and long-term technologies. To provide a realistic and balanced perspective, we describe the operating principles and remaining issues of each post-LIB technology, and also evaluate these materials under commercial cell configurations.

  6. Monochromatic radiography of high energy density physics experiments on the MAGPIE generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, G. N., E-mail: gareth.hall@imperial.ac.uk; Burdiak, G. C.; Suttle, L.; Stuart, N. H.; Swadling, G. F.; Lebedev, S. V.; Smith, R. A.; Patankar, S.; Suzuki-Vidal, F.; Grouchy, P. de; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Bennett, M.; Bland, S. N.; Pickworth, L.; Skidmore, J. [The Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London SW7 2BW (United Kingdom)

    2014-11-15

    A monochromatic X-ray backlighter based on Bragg reflection from a spherically bent quartz crystal has been developed for the MAGPIE pulsed power generator at Imperial College (1.4 MA, 240 ns) [I. H. Mitchell et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 67, 1533 (2005)]. This instrument has been used to diagnose high energy density physics experiments with 1.865 keV radiation (Silicon He-α) from a laser plasma source driven by a ∼7 J, 1 ns pulse from the Cerberus laser. The design of the diagnostic, its characterisation and performance, and initial results in which the instrument was used to radiograph a shock physics experiment on MAGPIE are discussed.

  7. The diene isomerization energies dataset: A difficult test for double-hybrid density functionals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wykes, M.; Pérez-Jiménez, A. J.; Adamo, C.; Sancho-García, J. C.

    2015-06-01

    We have systematically analyzed the performance of some representative double-hybrid density functionals (including PBE0-DH, PBE-QIDH, PBE0-2, XYG3, XYGJ-OS, and xDH-PBE0) for a recently introduced database of diene isomerization energies. Double-hybrid models outperform their corresponding hybrid forms (for example, PBE0-DH, PBE0-2, and PBE-QIDH are more accurate than PBE0) and the XYG3, XYGJ-OS, and xDH-PBE0 functionals perform excellently, providing root mean square deviation values within "calibration accuracy." XYGJ-OS and xDH-PBE0 also rival the best performing post-Hartree-Fock methods at a substantially lower cost.

  8. Dietary energy density affects fat mass in early adolescence and is not modified by FTO variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Laura; van Jaarsveld, Cornelia H M; Emmett, Pauline M; Rogers, Imogen S; Ness, Andy R; Hattersley, Andrew T; Timpson, Nicholas J; Smith, George Davey; Jebb, Susan A

    2009-01-01

    Dietary energy density (DED) does not have a simple linear relationship to fat mass in children, which suggests that some children are more susceptible than others to the effects of DED. Children with the FTO (rs9939609) variant that increases the risk of obesity may have a higher susceptibility to the effects of DED because their internal appetite control system is compromised. We tested the relationship between DED and fat mass in early adolescence and its interaction with FTO variants. We carried out a prospective analysis on 2,275 children enrolled in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC). Diet was assessed at age 10 y using 3-day diet diaries. DED (kJ/g) was calculated excluding drinks. Children were genotyped for the FTO (rs9939609) variant. Fat mass was estimated at age 13 y using the Lunar Prodigy Dual-energy X-ray Absorptiometry scanner. There was no evidence of interaction between DED at age 10 y and the high risk A allele of the FTO gene in relation to fat mass at age 13 y (beta = 0.005, p = 0.51), suggesting that the FTO gene has no effect on the relation between DED at 10 y and fat mass at 13 y. When DED at 10 y and the A allele of FTO were in the same model they were independently related to fat mass at 13 y. Each A allele of FTO was associated with 0.35+/-0.13 kg more fat mass at 13 y and each 1 kJ/g DED at 10 y was associated with 0.16+/-0.06 kg more fat mass at age 13 y, after controlling for misreporting of energy intake, gender, puberty, overweight status at 10 y, maternal education, TV watching, and physical activity. This study reveals the multi-factorial origin of obesity and indicates that although FTO may put some children at greater risk of obesity, encouraging a low dietary energy density may be an effective strategy to help all children avoid excessive fat gain.

  9. Dietary energy density affects fat mass in early adolescence and is not modified by FTO variants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Johnson

    Full Text Available Dietary energy density (DED does not have a simple linear relationship to fat mass in children, which suggests that some children are more susceptible than others to the effects of DED. Children with the FTO (rs9939609 variant that increases the risk of obesity may have a higher susceptibility to the effects of DED because their internal appetite control system is compromised. We tested the relationship between DED and fat mass in early adolescence and its interaction with FTO variants.We carried out a prospective analysis on 2,275 children enrolled in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC. Diet was assessed at age 10 y using 3-day diet diaries. DED (kJ/g was calculated excluding drinks. Children were genotyped for the FTO (rs9939609 variant. Fat mass was estimated at age 13 y using the Lunar Prodigy Dual-energy X-ray Absorptiometry scanner. There was no evidence of interaction between DED at age 10 y and the high risk A allele of the FTO gene in relation to fat mass at age 13 y (beta = 0.005, p = 0.51, suggesting that the FTO gene has no effect on the relation between DED at 10 y and fat mass at 13 y. When DED at 10 y and the A allele of FTO were in the same model they were independently related to fat mass at 13 y. Each A allele of FTO was associated with 0.35+/-0.13 kg more fat mass at 13 y and each 1 kJ/g DED at 10 y was associated with 0.16+/-0.06 kg more fat mass at age 13 y, after controlling for misreporting of energy intake, gender, puberty, overweight status at 10 y, maternal education, TV watching, and physical activity.This study reveals the multi-factorial origin of obesity and indicates that although FTO may put some children at greater risk of obesity, encouraging a low dietary energy density may be an effective strategy to help all children avoid excessive fat gain.

  10. The impact of Hall physics on magnetized high energy density plasma jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourdain, Pierre-Alexandre

    2013-10-01

    Magnetized high energy density (HED) plasma jets produced by radial foil explosions on pulsed power machines have improved our understanding of the fundamental mechanisms driving flowing matter under extreme conditions. Experiments and simulations indicate that magnetic fields are crucial in the formation and stability of strongly collimated plasma jets, a property also shared by astrophysical jets originating from black holes and protostars. It is understood that these magnetic fields also generate electric fields, often associated with the dynamo effect. In fact, when the Lundquist number is large enough, the dynamo effect is frequently seen as the dominant electric field driver of flowing plasmas. This is true inside the collimated jet where the density (> 1019 cm-3) , velocity ( 50 eV) are high enough to preclude the dominance of any other type of electric fields. However, the ion flow speed is much lower than the speed of light. As a result, dynamo electric fields do not impact noticeably fluid motion since electric stresses are negligible compared to magnetic stresses. On the other hand, Hall physics dominates the low density plasma surrounding the jet (< 1018 cm-3) . In this region, electron speeds can be orders of magnitude higher than the bulk flow velocity as ion and electron fluids are decoupled. As a result, electric stresses can rival with magnetic stresses and Hall physics does impact the overall plasma dynamics. This talk will discuss how HED plasmas are subjected to Hall physics and how it impacts the particle confinement as well as the MHD stability of plasma jets. After focusing on experimental results and numerical simulations from the PERSEUS code, the talk will extend its conclusions to inertial fusion regimes where Hall physics could also alter plasma confinement and stability. Research supported by NNSA/DOE Grant Cooperative Agreements DE-FC52-06NA 00057, DE-NA 0001836 and NSF Grant PHY-1102471.

  11. Energy density of zooplankton and fish larvae in the southern Catalan Sea (NW Mediterranean)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barroeta, Ziortza; Olivar, M. Pilar; Palomera, Isabel

    2017-06-01

    In marine communities, energy of small planktonic organisms is transferred to their predators through feeding. The energy accumulated as organic substances by the different plankton organisms (Energetic Density content, ED) has been analysed in high latitudes and tropical areas, but not in the Mediterranean Sea. In this study, we approach this type of investigation for Mediterranean plankton through measures of total calorimetric content using an oxygen bomb calorimeter. We examined the spatiotemporal variation in the ED of microplankton (50-200 μm) and mesozooplankton (200-2000 μm), and two plankton-consumers, sardine (Sardina pilchardus) and anchovy (Engraulis encrasicolus) larvae. The study was carried out during the winter and summer of 2013 off the Ebro River Delta (NW Mediterranean Sea). Both plankton fractions showed a more coastal distribution and higher biomasses during winter, the period of sardine larvae occurrences, in front of a wider cross-shelf distribution and lower biomasses in summer, when anchovy appeared. ED values increased with the size of each plankton component, i.e., microzooplankton associated to the more productive waters there. Sardine and anchovy larvae showed an increasing trend in the amount of energy during development, with significantly lower ED between early larvae (6-10 mm standard length) and late postflexion stages (16-20 mm standard length). Small larvae of both species departed from a similarly low ED content, but in the next two size classes sardine larvae showed higher ED values than anchovy, being significantly higher in the 16-20 mm size class. Information on larval feeding patterns and larval growth rates for each species were used to discuss differences in energy allocation strategies.

  12. High energy density, thin-film, rechargeable lithium batteries for marine field operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Biying; Cook, Christopher C.; Mui, Simon; Soo, Philip P.; Staelin, David H.; Mayes, Anne M.; Sadoway, Donald R.

    All solid state, thin-film batteries with the cell configuration of VO x/block copolymer electrolyte/Li have been designed, constructed, and tested. The additive-free (no carbon, no binder) cathode consisted of a dense film of vanadium oxide (˜200 nm thick), deposited on aluminum foil and prepared by laser assisted vapor deposition of vanadium metal in an oxygen atmosphere of controlled chemical potential. The electrolyte was a block copolymer of poly[oligo(oxy-ethylene) methacrylate]- b-poly-(methyl methacrylate) [hence forth denoted as POEM- b-PMMA] containing LiCF 3SO 3. The anode was metallic lithium. At room temperature, cathode capacities of ˜395 mAh/g were measured at a current rate of 0.5 C ( C=400 mA/g) over an operating voltage ranging from 1.5 to 4.0 V. The cathode proved to be resistant to capacity fade as evidenced by the small loss of discharge capacity during the extended cycling (over 200 cycles). It was possible to draw substantial currents. Routine testing was conducted at 0.5 C; however, discharge rates as high as 1.6 C were achieved. Based upon these results, cells designed with these materials in optimal dimensions are projected to have energy densities exceeding ˜350 Wh/kg and power densities exceeding 560 W/kg at 1.6 C.

  13. Energy landscape of ZnO clusters and low-density polymorphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasoulkhani, Robabe; Tahmasbi, Hossein; Ghasemi, S. Alireza; Faraji, Somayeh; Rostami, Samare; Amsler, Maximilian

    2017-08-01

    We report on an extensive study of ZnO materials with cagelike motifs in clusters and bulk phases through structural searches using the minima hopping method. A novel putative ground state was discovered for the (ZnO) 32 cluster with a tubelike structure, closely related to the previously reported (ZnO) 24 ground-state cage geometry. Furthermore, the effect of ionization on the geometries and energetic ordering of (ZnO) n clusters with n =3 -10 ,12 was studied by directly sampling the energy landscape of the ionized system. Our results indicate that the transition from ring and planar structures to three-dimensional cages occurs at larger cluster sizes than in the neutral system. Inspired by the bottom-up design philosophy and the predominance of cagelike structures in medium-sized clusters, a search for crystalline ZnO was conducted aimed specifically at low-density polymorphs, resulting in the discovery of 57 novel metastable phases. The voids in these low-density materials closely resemble the hollow cage structures of small (ZnO) n/(ZnO)n + clusters with n <16 . Analogous to clathrate materials, these voids could serve to accommodate guest atoms to tailor the materials properties for various applications.

  14. Influence of different energy densities of laser phototherapy on oral wound healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Vivian Petersen; Meurer, Luise; Martins, Marco Antonio Trevizani; Danilevicz, Chris Krebs; Magnusson, Alessandra Selinger; Marques, Márcia Martins; Filho, Manoel Sant'Ana; Squarize, Cristiane Helena; Martins, Manoela Domingues

    2013-12-01

    The aim of the present prospective study was to evaluate the impact of laser phototherapy (LPT) on the healing of oral ulcers. Different power densities were used on oral wounds in Wistar rats (n=72) randomly divided into three groups: control (0 J/cm2), 4 J/cm2 laser, and 20 J/cm2 laser. Ulcers (3 mm in diameter) were made on the dorsum of the tongue with a punch. Irradiation with an indium-gallium-aluminum-phosphide laser (660 nm output power: 40 mW spot size: 0.04 cm) was performed once a day in close contact with the ulcer for 14 consecutive days. A statistically significant acceleration in healing time was found with wounds treated with 4 J/cm2 LPT. Moreover, striking differences were found in the ulcer area, healing percentage, degree of reepithelialization, and collagen deposition. The most significant changes occurred after 5 days of irradiation. Based on the conditions employed in the present study, LPT is capable of accelerating the oral mucosa wound-healing process. Moreover, faster and more organized reepithelialization and tissue healing of the oral mucosa were achieved with an energy density of 4 J/cm2 in comparison to 20 J/cm2.

  15. Flexible Aqueous Lithium-Ion Battery with High Safety and Large Volumetric Energy Density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiaoli; Chen, Long; Su, Xiuli; Wang, Yonggang; Xia, Yongyao

    2016-06-20

    A flexible and wearable aqueous lithium-ion battery is introduced based on spinel Li1.1 Mn2 O4 cathode and a carbon-coated NASICON-type LiTi2 (PO4 )3 anode (NASICON=sodium-ion super ionic conductor). Energy densities of 63 Wh kg(-1) or 124 mWh cm(-3) and power densities of 3 275 W kg(-1) or 11.1 W cm(-3) can be obtained, which are seven times larger than the largest reported till now. The full cell can keep its capacity without significant loss under different bending states, which shows excellent flexibility. Furthermore, two such flexible cells in series with an operation voltage of 4 V can be compatible with current nonaqueous Li-ion batteries. Therefore, such a flexible cell can potentially be put into practical applications for wearable electronics. In addition, a self-chargeable unit is realized by integrating a single flexible aqueous Li-ion battery with a commercial flexible solar cell, which may facilitate the long-time outdoor operation of flexible and wearable electronic devices. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. High-Energy-Density-Physics Studies for Inertial Confinement Fusion Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, S. X.

    2017-10-01

    Accurate knowledge of the static, transport, and optical properties of high-energy-density (HED) plasmas is essential for reliably designing and understanding inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions. In the warm-dense-matter regime routinely accessed by low-adiabat ICF implosions, many-body strong-coupling and quantum electron degeneracy effects play an important role in determining plasma properties. The past several years have witnessed intense efforts to assess the importance of the microphysics of ICF targets, both theoretically and experimentally. On the theory side, first-principles methods based on quantum mechanics have been applied to investigate the properties of warm, dense plasmas. Specifically, self-consistent investigations have recently been performed on the equation of state, thermal conductivity, and opacity of a variety of ICF ablators such as polystyrene (CH), beryllium, carbon, and silicon over a wide range of densities and temperatures. In this talk, we will focus on the most-recent progress on these ab initio HED physics studies, which generally result in favorable comparisons with experiments. Upon incorporation into hydrocodes for ICF simulations, these first-principles ablator-plasma properties have produced significant differences over traditional models in predicting 1-D target performance of ICF implosions on OMEGA and direct-drive-ignition designs for the National Ignition Facility. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944. *In collaboration with L. A. Collins, T. R. Boehly, G. W. Collins, J. D. Kress, and V. N. Goncharov.

  17. Evaluation of Digestible lysine levels in diets with high energy density for finishing pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janeth Colina R

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective. To evaluate the effects of different levels of digestible lysine in diets with high energy density on productive performance and carcass characteristics of finishing pigs. Materials and Methods. Seventy crossbred barrows (initial body weight of 83.36 kg were used and allotted in a randomized block design with five treatments, seven replications and two pigs per experimental unit. Pigs were fed ad libitum with diets containing 3.5 kcal/kg of ME and five levels of digestible lysine (0.46, 0.52, 0.58, 0.64 and 0.70% during four weeks. Final live weight (FLW, daily feed intake (DFI, daily weight gain (DWG, feed conversion (FC, daily lysine intake (DLI, and the amount of lysine per body weight gain (DLI/DWG, were evaluated. At the end of the experiment, blood samples were taken from each pig to determine urea nitrogen concentration (UN in serum and slaughtered to evaluate quantitative and qualitative carcass characteristics. Results. The FLW increased linearly (p<0.05.There were no differences among treatments for DFI, DWG, FC, carcass characteristics and UN. The DLI and DLI/DWG varied significantly (p<0.001 and increased linearly (p<0.001 with each lysine level. Pigs that consumed the limiting diet in lysine (0.46% showed less DLI and DLI/DWG (p<0.001 than pigs fed the other diets. Conclusions. The amount of DLI/DWG increased with the evaluated levels of digestible lysine in diets with high energy density, without effects on productive performance and carcass characteristics of finishing pigs.

  18. Variation in energy density of Loricariichthys platymetopon (Siluriformes: Loricariidae in the upper Paraná River basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Aparecida Garcia

    Full Text Available The present study described the variations in energy density from skeletal muscles of Loricariichthys platymetopon in relation to body size, sex, gonadal development stages, sampling site and habitat type (lotic, semi-lotic and lotic. Samplings were performed between June 2002 and August 2006 in points located in the upper Paraná River floodplain, Rosana Reservoir and Diamante Stream. The energy density from each muscle sample of 212 specimens was determined using an adiabatic calorimeter. The correlations between the variables 'muscle energy density' and 'specimen standard length' were not significant. Only in the Rosana Reservoir there was a significant difference in energetic means between 'sex'. Otherwise, due to the gonadal development stage, a significant difference between energetic means was recorded only for males from the upper Paraná River floodplain and for both sexes in Rosana Reservoir. The density of muscle energy ranged from 4,170 to 5,540 cal/g DW (dry weight, with the means (± standard deviation of 5,140± 0.06 cal/g DW in the Reservoir, 4,950±0.25 cal/g DW in the stream and 4,920 ±0.18 cal/g DW in the floodplain. Furthermore, we also detected a significant difference between the energy means from the different sampled sites, but the same was not registered among the analyzed habitats. In conclusion, the variation in muscle energy density from L. platymetopon may occur. The occurrence of variation between the sexes depends on the site, and the density variation among the stages depends on both the site and 'sex'. In summary, the spatial variation in muscle energy density from this species strengthens the idea that this factor is not a constant parameter, so it should not be applied in bioenergetics modeling and in the quantification of energetic balance as an unique value.

  19. Energy density of foods and diets in Mexico and their monetary cost by socioeconomic strata: analyses of ENSANUT data 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Alfonso; Pérez, Ana E; Aggarwal, Anju; Drewnowski, Adam

    2017-07-01

    In January 2014, Mexico implemented an 8% tax on non-essential foods with energy density ≥275 kcal/100 g, with a view to prevent obesity. This study explored energy density of foods and diets in Mexico and their monetary cost across population subgroups. Dietary intakes for 3057 adults (ages ≥19 years) were obtained from the nationally representative Encuesta Nacional de Salud y Nutrición (ENSANUT 2012). Energy density (kcal/g) was calculated for foods, food groups and total diets. The mean national retail prices for 153 foods were obtained from the National Institute for Geography and Statistics (INEGI). The monetary cost of total diets (MXN/day) was estimated by attaching food prices to dietary intakes from the ENSANUT food frequency questionnaire. A series of descriptive analyses and regression models examined associations among dietary energy density and diet cost by age, gender, rural or urban residence and socioeconomic status (SES). Energy-dense grains, fats and sweets cost less per calorie than did milk and dairy, meat, vegetables and fruit. Lower cost diets derived more calories from tortillas, tamales, beans and sugar, whereas higher cost diets contained more non-essential energy-dense processed foods and more sugar sweetened beverages, and fruits and vegetables. At each quintile of energy intake, higher dietary energy density was associated with lower energy-adjusted diet costs. Traditional energy-dense tortillas and tamales, also characterised by lower cost, were consumed more by the rural poor. Urban dwellers had more 'western-style' diets. Food patterns in Mexico appear to be driven by monetary cost and SES. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  20. A new Skyrme energy density functional for a better description of spin-isospin resonances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roca-Maza, X., E-mail: xavier.roca.maza@mi.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Milano, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Sez. di Milano, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Colò, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Milano, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Sez. di Milano, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics China, CAS, Beijing 100190 (China); Cao, Li-Gang [Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics China, CAS, Beijing 100190 (China); School of Mathematics and Physics, North China Electric Power University, Beijing 102206 (China); State Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, ITP, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); National Laboratory of Heavy Ion Accelerator of Lanzhou, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Sagawa, H. [Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics China, CAS, Beijing 100190 (China); Center for Mathematics and Physics, University of Aizu, Aizu-Wakamatsu, Fukushima 965-8580 (Japan); RIKEN, Nishina Center, Wako, 351-0198 (Japan)

    2015-10-15

    A correct determination of the isospin and spin-isospin properties of the nuclear effective interaction should lead to an accurate description of the Gamow-Teller resonance (GT), the Spin Dipole Resonance (SDR), the Giant Dipole Resonance (GDR) or the Antianalog Giant Dipole Resonance (AGDR), among others. A new Skyrme energy density functional named SAMi is introduced with the aim of going a step forward in setting the bases for a more precise description of spin-isospin resonances [1, 2]. In addition, we will discuss some new features of our analysis on the AGDR in {sup 208}Pb [3] as compared with available experimental data on this resonance [4, 5, 6], and on the GDR [7]. Such study, guided by a simple yet physical pocket formula, has been developed by employing the so called SAMi-J family of systematically varied interactions. This set of interactions is compatible with experimental data for values of the symmetry energy at saturation J and slope parameter L falling in the ranges 31−33 MeV and 75−95 MeV, respectively.

  1. Making FLASH an Open Code for the Academic High-Energy Density Physics Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, D. Q.; Couch, S. M.; Dubey, A.; Gopal, S.; Graziani, C.; Lee, D.; Weide, K.; Xia, G.

    2010-11-01

    High-energy density physics (HEDP) is an active and growing field of research. DOE has recently decided to make FLASH a code for the academic HEDP community. FLASH is a modular and extensible compressible spatially adaptive hydrodynamics code that incorporates capabilities for a broad range of physical processes, performs well on a wide range of existing advanced computer architectures, and has a broad user base. A rigorous software maintenance process allows the code to operate simultaneously in production and development modes. We summarize the work we are doing to add HEDP capabilities to FLASH. We are adding (1) Spitzer conductivity, (2) super time-stepping to handle the disparity between diffusion and advection time scales, and (3) a description of electrons, ions, and radiation (in the diffusion approximation) by 3 temperatures (3T) to both the hydrodynamics and the MHD solvers. We are also adding (4) ray tracing, (5) laser energy deposition, and (6) a multi-species equation of state incorporating ionization to the hydrodynamics solver; and (7) Hall MHD, and (8) the Biermann battery term to the MHD solver.

  2. Wearable woven supercapacitor fabrics with high energy density and load-bearing capability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Caiwei; Xie, Yingxi; Zhu, Bingquan; Sanghadasa, Mohan; Tang, Yong; Lin, Liwei

    2017-10-30

    Flexible power sources with load bearing capability are attractive for modern wearable electronics. Here, free-standing supercapacitor fabrics that can store high electrical energy and sustain large mechanical loads are directly woven to be compatible with flexible systems. The prototype with reduced package weight/volume provides an impressive energy density of 2.58 mWh g-1 or 3.6 mWh cm-3, high tensile strength of over 1000 MPa, and bearable pressure of over 100 MPa. The nanoporous thread electrodes are prepared by the activation of commercial carbon fibers to have three-orders of magnitude increase in the specific surface area and 86% retention of the original strength. The novel device configuration woven by solid electrolyte-coated threads shows excellent flexibility and stability during repeated mechanical bending tests. A supercapacitor watchstrap is used to power a liquid crystal display as an example of load-bearing power sources with various form-factor designs for wearable electronics.

  3. Building a Universal Nuclear Energy Density Functional (UNEDF): SciDAC-2 Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, Joe; Furnstahl, Dick; Lusk, Rusty; Nazarewicz, Witek; Ng, Esmond; Thompson, Ian; Vary, James

    2012-06-30

    An understanding of the properties of atomic nuclei is crucial for a complete nuclear theory, for element formation, for properties of stars, and for present and future energy and defense applications. During the period of Dec. 1, 2006 - Jun. 30, 2012, the UNEDF collaboration carried out a comprehensive study of all nuclei based on the most accurate knowledge of the strong nuclear interaction, the most reliable theoretical approaches, the most advanced algorithms, and extensive computational resources, with a view towards scaling to the petaflop platforms and beyond. The long-term vision initiated with UNEDF is to arrive at a comprehensive, quantitative, and unified description of nuclei and their reactions, grounded in the fundamental interactions between the constituent nucleons. We seek to replace current phenomenological models of nuclear structure and reactions with a well-founded microscopic theory that delivers maximum predictive power with well-quantified uncertainties. Specifically, the mission of this project has been three-fold: first, to find an optimal energy density functional (EDF) using all our knowledge of the nucleonic Hamiltonian and basic nuclear properties; second, to apply the EDF theory and its extensions to validate the functional using all the available relevant nuclear structure and reaction data; and third, to apply the validated theory to properties of interest that cannot be measured, in particular the properties needed for reaction theory.

  4. The potential energy density in transverse string waves depends critically on longitudinal motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowland, David R, E-mail: d.rowland@uq.edu.au [Student Services, University of Queensland, Brisbane QLD 4072 (Australia)

    2011-11-15

    The question of the correct formula for the potential energy density in transverse waves on a taut string continues to attract attention (e.g. Burko 2010 Eur. J. Phys. 31 L71), and at least three different formulae can be found in the literature, with the classic text by Morse and Feshbach (Methods of Theoretical Physics pp 126-127) stating that the formula is inherently ambiguous. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate that neither the standard expression nor the alternative proposed by Burko can be considered to be physically consistent, and that to obtain a formula free of physical inconsistencies and which also removes the ambiguity of Morse and Feshbach, the longitudinal motion of elements of the string needs to be taken into account, even though such motion can be neglected when deriving the linear transverse wave equation. Two derivations of the correct formula are sketched, one proceeding from a consideration of the amount of energy required to stretch a small segment of string when longitudinal displacements are considered, and the other from the full wave equation. The limits of the validity of the derived formulae are also discussed in detail.

  5. Geometry and Formal Linguistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, George A.

    This paper presents a method of encoding geometric line-drawings in a way which allows sets of such drawings to be interpreted as formal languages. A characterization of certain geometric predicates in terms of their properties as languages is obtained, and techniques usually associated with generative grammars and formal automata are then applied…

  6. Fear of the Formal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    du Gay, Paul; Lopdrup-Hjorth, Thomas

    Over recent decades, institutions exhibiting high degrees of formality have come in for severe criticism. From the private to the public sector, and across a whole spectrum of actors spanning from practitioners to academics, formal organization is viewed with increasing doubt and skepticism. In a...

  7. Small molecule-mediated control of hydroxyapatite growth: free energy calculations benchmarked to density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhijun; Yang, Yang; Wang, Ziqiu; Mkhonto, Donald; Shang, Cheng; Liu, Zhi-Pan; Cui, Qiang; Sahai, Nita

    2014-01-05

    The unique, plate-like morphology of hydroxyapatite (HAP) nanocrystals in bone lends to the hierarchical structure and functions of bone. Proteins enriched in phosphoserine (Ser-OPO3) and glutamic acid (Glu) residues have been proposed to regulate crystal morphology; however, the atomic-level mechanisms remain unclear. Previous molecular dynamics studies addressing biomineralization have used force fields with limited benchmarking, especially at the water/mineral interface, and often limited sampling for the binding free energy profile. Here, we use the umbrella sampling/weighted histogram analysis method to obtain the adsorption free energy of Ser-OPO3 and Glu on HAP (100) and (001) surfaces to understand organic-mediated crystal growth. The calculated organic-water-mineral interfacial energies are carefully benchmarked to density functional theory calculations, with explicit inclusion of solvating water molecules around the adsorbate plus the Poisson-Boltzmann continuum model for long-range solvation effects. Both amino acids adsorb more strongly on the HAP (100) face than the (001) face. Growth rate along the [100] direction should then be slower than in the [001] direction, resulting in plate-like crystal morphology with greater surface area for the (100) than the (001) face, consistent with bone HAP crystal morphology. Thus, even small molecules are capable of regulating bone crystal growth by preferential adsorption in specific directions. Furthermore, Ser-OPO3 is a more effective growth modifier by adsorbing more strongly than Glu on the (100) face, providing one possible explanation for the energetically expensive process of phosphorylation of some proteins involved in bone biomineralization. The current results have broader implications for designing routes for biomimetic crystal synthesis. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Counter-Based Broadcast Scheme Considering Reachability, Network Density, and Energy Efficiency for Wireless Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Ji-Young; Seo, Dong-Yoon; Lee, Jung-Ryun

    2018-01-04

    A wireless sensor network (WSN) is emerging as an innovative method for gathering information that will significantly improve the reliability and efficiency of infrastructure systems. Broadcast is a common method to disseminate information in WSNs. A variety of counter-based broadcast schemes have been proposed to mitigate the broadcast-storm problems, using the count threshold value and a random access delay. However, because of the limited propagation of the broadcast-message, there exists a trade-off in a sense that redundant retransmissions of the broadcast-message become low and energy efficiency of a node is enhanced, but reachability become low. Therefore, it is necessary to study an efficient counter-based broadcast scheme that can dynamically adjust the random access delay and count threshold value to ensure high reachability, low redundant of broadcast-messages, and low energy consumption of nodes. Thus, in this paper, we first measure the additional coverage provided by a node that receives the same broadcast-message from two neighbor nodes, in order to achieve high reachability with low redundant retransmissions of broadcast-messages. Second, we propose a new counter-based broadcast scheme considering the size of the additional coverage area, distance between the node and the broadcasting node, remaining battery of the node, and variations of the node density. Finally, we evaluate performance of the proposed scheme compared with the existing counter-based broadcast schemes. Simulation results show that the proposed scheme outperforms the existing schemes in terms of saved rebroadcasts, reachability, and total energy consumption.

  9. Dietary Energy Density and Postmenopausal Breast Cancer Incidence in the Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Terryl J; Gapstur, Susan M; Gaudet, Mia M; Shah, Roma; Flanders, W Dana; Wang, Ying; McCullough, Marjorie L

    2016-10-01

    Dietary energy density (ED) is a measure of diet quality that estimates the amount of energy per unit of food (kilocalories per gram) consumed. Low-ED diets are generally high in fiber and fruits and vegetables and low in fat. Dietary ED has been positively associated with body mass index (BMI) and other risk factors for postmenopausal breast cancer. We evaluated the associations of total dietary ED and energy-dense (high-ED) foods with postmenopausal breast cancer incidence. Analyses included 56,795 postmenopausal women from the Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort with no previous history of breast or other cancers and who provided information on diet, lifestyle, and medical history in 1999. Multivariable-adjusted breast cancer incidence rate ratios (RRs and 95% CIs) were estimated for quintiles of total dietary ED and for the consumption of high-ED foods in Cox proportional hazards regression models. During a median follow-up of 11.7 y, 2509 invasive breast cancer cases were identified, including 1857 estrogen receptor-positive and 277 estrogen receptor-negative tumors. Median dietary ED was 1.5 kcal/g (IQR: 1.3-1.7 kcal/g). After adjusting for age, race, education, reproductive characteristics, and family history, high compared with low dietary ED was associated with a statistically significantly higher risk of breast cancer (RR for fifth quintile compared with first quintile: 1.20; 95% CI: 1.05, 1.36; P-trend = 0.03). The association between the amount of high-ED foods consumed and breast cancer risk was not statistically significant. We observed no differences by estrogen receptor status or effect modification by BMI, age, or physical activity. These results suggest a modest positive association between total dietary ED and risk of postmenopausal breast cancer. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  10. Formality in Brackets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garsten, Christina; Nyqvist, Anette

    Ethnographic work in formal organizations involves learning to recognize the many layers of front stage and back stage of organized life, and to bracket formality. It means to be alert to the fact that what is formal and front stage for one some actors, and in some situations, may in fact be back...... stage and informal for others. Walking the talk, donning the appropriate attire, wearing the proper suit, may be part of what is takes to figure out the code of formal organizational settings – an entrance ticket to the backstage, as it were. Oftentimes, it involves a degree of mimicry, of ‘following...... suits’ (Nyqvist 2013), and of doing ‘ethnography by failure’ (Garsten 2013). In this paper, we explore the layers of informality and formality in our fieldwork experiences among financial investors and policy experts, and discuss how to ethnographically represent embodied fieldwork practices. How do we...

  11. Effect of reduced energy density of close-up diets on dry matter intake, lactation performance and energy balance in multiparous Holstein cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wenming; Tian, Yujia; Wang, Yajing; Simayi, Aminamu; Yasheng, Amingguli; Wu, Zhaohai; Li, Shengli; Cao, Zhijun

    2014-01-01

    Energy intake prepartum is critically important to health, milk performance, and profitability of dairy cows. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of reduced energy density of close-up diets on dry matter intake (DMI), lactation performance and energy balance (EB) in multiparous Holstein cows which were housed in a free-stall barn and fed for ad libitum intake. Thirty-nine dry cows were blocked and assigned randomly to three groups fed a high energy density diet [HD, n = 13; 6.8 MJ of net energy for lactation (NEL)/kg; 14.0% crude protein (CP) ], or a middle energy density diet (MD, n = 13; 6.2 MJ NEL/kg; 14.0% CP), or a low energy density diet (LD, n = 13; 5.4 MJ NEL/kg; 14.0% CP) from d 21 before expected day of calving. After parturition, all cows were fed the same lactation diet to d 70 in milk (DIM). The DMI and NEL intake prepartum were decreased by the reduced energy density diets (P < 0.05). The LD group consumed 1.3 kg/d (DM) more diet compared with HD group in the last 24 h before calving. The milk yield and the postpartum DMI were increased by the reduced energy density diet prepartum (P < 0.05). The changes in BCS and BW prepartum and postpartum were not affected by prepartum diets. HD group had higher milk fat content and lower lactose content compared with LD group during the first 3 wk of lactation (P < 0.05). The energy consumption for HD, MD and LD groups were 149.8%, 126.2% and 101.1% of their calculated energy requirements prepartum (P < 0.05), and 72.7%, 73.1% and 75.2% during the first 4 wk postpartum, respectively. In conclusion, the low energy density prepartum diet was effective in controlling NEL intake prepartum, and was beneficial in increasing DMI and milk yield, and alleviating negative EB postpartum.

  12. Augmented potential, energy densities, and virial relations in the weak- and strong-interaction limits of DFT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuckovic, Stefan; Levy, Mel; Gori-Giorgi, Paola

    2017-12-01

    The augmented potential introduced by Levy and Zahariev [Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 113002 (2014)] is shifted with respect to the standard exchange-correlation potential of the Kohn-Sham density functional theory by a density-dependent constant that makes the total energy become equal to the sum of the occupied orbital energies. In this work, we analyze several features of this approach, focusing on the limit of infinite coupling strength and studying the shift and the corresponding energy density at different correlation regimes. We present and discuss coordinate scaling properties of the augmented potential, study its connection to the response potential, and use the shift to analyze the classical jellium and uniform gas models. We also study other definitions of the energy densities in relation to the functional construction by local interpolations along the adiabatic connection. Our findings indicate that the energy density that is defined in terms of the electrostatic potential of the exchange-correlation hole is particularly well suited for this purpose.

  13. Strain-tolerant High Capacity Silicon Anodes via Directed Lithium Ion Transport for High Energy Density Lithium-ion Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Jason

    2012-02-01

    Energy storage is an essential component of modern technology, with applications including public infrastructure, transportation systems, and consumer electronics. Lithium-ion batteries are the preeminent form of energy storage when high energy / moderate power densities are required. Improvements to lithium-ion battery energy / power density through the adoption of silicon anodes—with approximately an order of magnitude greater gravimetric capacity than traditional carbon-based anodes--have been limited by ˜300% strains during electrochemical lithium insertion which result in short operational lifetimes. In two different systems we demonstrated improvements to silicon-based anode performance via directed lithium ion transport. The first system demonstrated a crystallographic-dependent anisotropic electrochemical lithium insertion in single-crystalline silicon anode microstructures. Exploiting this anisotropy, we highlight model silicon anode architectures that limit the maximum strain during electrochemical lithium insertion. This self-strain-limiting is a result of selecting a specific microstructure design such that during lithiation the anisotropic evolution of strain, above a given threshold, blocks further lithium intercalation. Exemplary design rules have achieved self-strain-limited charging capacities ranging from 677 mAhg-1 to 2833 mAhg-1. A second system with variably encapsulated silicon-based anodes demonstrated greater than 98% of their initial capacity after 130+ cycles. This anode also can operate stably at high energy/power densities. A lithium-ion battery with this anode was able to continuously (dis)charge in 10 minutes, corresponding to a power / energy density of ˜1460 W/kg and ˜243 Wh/kg--up to 780% greater power density and 220% higher energy density than conventional lithium-ion batteries. Anodes were also demonstrated with areal capacities of 12.7 mAh/cm^2, two orders of magnitude greater than traditional thin-film silicon anodes.[4pt

  14. Energy density of standing sound waves at the radiation-dominated phase of the universe expansion (hydrodynamic derivation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inogamov, N. A.; Sunyaev, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    In the early Universe up to hydrogen recombination in the Universe, the radiation pressure was much greater than the pressure of baryons and electrons. Moreover, the energy density of cosmic microwave background (CMB) photons was greater than or close to the energy density contained in the rest mass of baryonic matter, i.e., the primordial plasma was a radiated-dominated one and the adiabatic index was close to 4/3. The small density perturbations from which the observed galaxies have grown grew as long as the characteristic perturbation scales exceeded the horizon of the Universe сt at that time. On smaller scales, the density perturbations were standing sound waves. Radiative viscosity and heat conduction must have led to the damping of sound waves on very small scales. After the discovery of the cosmic microwave background, J. Silk calculated the scales of this damping, which is now called Silk damping, knowing the CMBtemperature and assuming the density of baryons and electrons. Observations with the South Pole Telescope, the Atacama Cosmology Telescope, and the Planck satellite have revealed the predicted damping of acoustic peaks in the CMB power spectrum and confirmed one important prediction of the theory. In 1970, R.A. Sunyaev and Ya.B. Zeldovich showed that such energy release in the early Universe should lead to characteristic deviations of the CMB spectrum from the Planck one. The development of the technology of cryogenic detectors of submillimeter and millimeter wavelength radiation has made it possible to measure the CMB spectral distortions at 10-8 of its total intensity (PIXIE). This has sharply increased the interest of theoretical cosmologists in the problem of energy release when smallscale sound waves are damped. We have derived a relativistic formula for the energy of a standing sound wave in a photon-baryon-electron plasma from simple hydrodynamic and thermodynamic relations. This formula is applicable for an arbitrary relation between the

  15. High-Energy-Density Metal-Oxygen Batteries: Lithium-Oxygen Batteries vs Sodium-Oxygen Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kyeongse; Agyeman, Daniel Adjei; Park, Mihui; Yang, Junghoon; Kang, Yong-Mook

    2017-12-01

    The development of next-generation energy-storage devices with high power, high energy density, and safety is critical for the success of large-scale energy-storage systems (ESSs), such as electric vehicles. Rechargeable sodium-oxygen (Na-O2 ) batteries offer a new and promising opportunity for low-cost, high-energy-density, and relatively efficient electrochemical systems. Although the specific energy density of the Na-O2 battery is lower than that of the lithium-oxygen (Li-O2 ) battery, the abundance and low cost of sodium resources offer major advantages for its practical application in the near future. However, little has so far been reported regarding the cell chemistry, to explain the rate-limiting parameters and the corresponding low round-trip efficiency and cycle degradation. Consequently, an elucidation of the reaction mechanism is needed for both lithium-oxygen and sodium-oxygen cells. An in-depth understanding of the differences and similarities between Li-O2 and Na-O2 battery systems, in terms of thermodynamics and a structural viewpoint, will be meaningful to promote the development of advanced metal-oxygen batteries. State-of-the-art battery design principles for high-energy-density lithium-oxygen and sodium-oxygen batteries are thus reviewed in depth here. Major drawbacks, reaction mechanisms, and recent strategies to improve performance are also summarized. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus) optimize foraging efficiency by balancing oxygen use and energy gain as a function of prey density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazen, Elliott Lee; Friedlaender, Ari Seth; Goldbogen, Jeremy Arthur

    2015-10-01

    Terrestrial predators can modulate the energy used for prey capture to maximize efficiency, but diving animals face the conflicting metabolic demands of energy intake and the minimization of oxygen depletion during a breath hold. It is thought that diving predators optimize their foraging success when oxygen use and energy gain act as competing currencies, but this hypothesis has not been rigorously tested because it has been difficult to measure the quality of prey that is targeted by free-ranging animals. We used high-resolution multisensor digital tags attached to foraging blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus) with concurrent acoustic prey measurements to quantify foraging performance across depth and prey density gradients. We parameterized two competing physiological models to estimate energy gain and expenditure based on foraging decisions. Our analyses show that at low prey densities, blue whale feeding rates and energy intake were low to minimize oxygen use, but at higher prey densities feeding frequency increased to maximize energy intake. Contrary to previous paradigms, we demonstrate that blue whales are not indiscriminate grazers but instead switch foraging strategies in response to variation in prey density and depth to maximize energetic efficiency.

  17. The science applications of the high-energy density plasmas created on the Nova laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosen, M.D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    1996-05-01

    Since the late 1970s it has been realized that the laser-heated hohlraums envisioned for indirect drive Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) could also serve as {open_quote}{open_quote}physics factories{close_quote}{close_quote} by providing a high-energy density environment for the study of a wide variety of physics with important applications. In this review we will describe some of these studies, accomplished in the early 1990s using the Nova laser [J. T. Hunt and D. R. Speck, Opt. Eng. {bold 28}, 461 (1989)] at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. They include measuring the opacity of Fe, thus confirming that the OPAL low {ital Z} opacity code [C. A. Iglesias and F. J. Rogers, Astrophys. J. {bold 443}, 460 (1995)] is quantitatively more accurate than {open_quote}{open_quote}standard{close_quote}{close_quote} models, with important astrophysical implications such as modeling the Cepheid variables [F. J. Rogers and C. A. Iglesias, Science {bold 263}, 50 (1994)]; measuring the Rosseland mean opacity of Au, confirming the correctness of the {open_quote}{open_quote}Super Transition Array{close_quote}{close_quote} (STA) high-{ital Z} code [Bar Shalom {ital et} {ital al}., Phys. Rev. A {bold 40}, 3183 (1989)] with important implications for ignition targets designed for the National Ignition Facility (NIF); sophisticated Rayleigh{endash}Taylor and other hydrodynamic turbulence experiments and analysis that serve as a test bed for understanding astrophysical observations such as supernova explosions; using laboratory x-ray lasers for probing high-density ICF plasmas as well as biology; and creating near Gbar pressures [Cauble {ital et} {ital al}. Phys. Rev. Lett. {bold 70}, 2102 (1993)]. Expanded opportunities for such research on the NIF will also be described. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  18. Mechanical confinement for improved energy storage density in BNT-BT-KNN lead-free ceramic capacitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditya Chauhan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available With the advent of modern power electronics, embedded circuits and non-conventional energy harvesting, the need for high performance capacitors is bound to become indispensible. The current state-of-art employs ferroelectric ceramics and linear dielectrics for solid state capacitance. However, lead-free ferroelectric ceramics propose to offer significant improvement in the field of electrical energy storage owing to their high discharge efficiency and energy storage density. In this regards, the authors have investigated the effects of compressive stress as a means of improving the energy storage density of lead-free ferroelectric ceramics. The energy storage density of 0.91(Bi0.5Na0.5TiO3-0.07BaTiO3-0.02(K0.5Na0.5NbO3 ferroelectric bulk ceramic was analyzed as a function of varying levels of compressive stress and operational temperature .It was observed that a peak energy density of 387 mJ.cm-3 was obtained at 100 MPa applied stress (25oC. While a maximum energy density of 568 mJ.cm-3 was obtained for the same stress at 80oC. These values are indicative of a significant, 25% and 84%, improvement in the value of stored energy compared to an unloaded material. Additionally, material's discharge efficiency has also been discussed as a function of operational parameters. The observed phenomenon has been explained on the basis of field induced structural transition and competitive domain switching theory.

  19. Co(OH2 nanosheet-decorated graphene–CNT composite for supercapacitors of high energy density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A composite of graphene and carbon nanotubes has been synthesized and characterized for application as supercapacitor electrodes. By coating the nanostructured active material of Co(OH2 onto one electrode, the asymmetric supercapacitor has exhibited a high specific capacitance of 310 F g−1, energy density of 172 Wh kg−1 and maximum power density of 198 kW kg−1 in ionic liquid electrolyte EMI-TFSI.

  20. A stencil printed, high energy density silver oxide battery using a novel photopolymerizable poly(acrylic acid) separator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braam, Kyle; Subramanian, Vivek

    2015-01-27

    A novel photopolymerized poly(acrylic acid) separator is demonstrated in a printed, high-energy-density silver oxide battery. The printed battery demonstrates a high capacity of 5.4 mA h cm(-2) at a discharge current density of 2.75 mA cm(-2) (C/2 rate) while delivering good mechanical flexibility and robustness. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Effect of Porosity on the Thick Electrodes for High Energy Density Lithium Ion Batteries for Stationary Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhav Singh

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A series of 250–350 μ m-thick single-sided lithium ion cell graphite anodes and lithium nickel manganese cobalt oxide (NMC cathodes with constant area weight, but varying porosity were prepared. Over this wide thickness range, micron-sized carbon fibers were used to stabilize the electrode structure and to improve electrode kinetics. By choosing the proper porosities for the anode and cathode, kinetic limitations and aging losses during cell cycling could be minimized and energy density improved. The cell (C38%-A48% exhibits the highest energy density, 441 Wh/L at the C/10 rate, upon cycling at elevated temperature and different C-rates. The cell (C38%-A48% showed 9% higher gravimetric energy density at C/10 in comparison to the cell with as-coated electrodes.

  2. Improved growth performance in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss reared at high densities is linked to increased energy retention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Danielle Caroline; Larsen, Bodil Katrine; Skov, Peter Vilhelm

    2015-01-01

    that aggression decreases, as the cost and effort required to establish and maintain dominance hierarchies increase. The increased energy expenditure associated with aggressive interactions has been identified as one mechanism causing a reduced efficiency in feed utilisation and therefore decreased growth...... performance. Manipulating aggressive behaviour through density may have advantages from a practical perspective. In the present study the energetic expenditure of rainbow trout held at three densities, 25, 80 and 140 kg m(-3), were related to growth performance parameters. Measurements for growth performance...... and parameters of energetics were investigated at the three densities during a four week growth period. The results showed a significant increase in routine metabolism in fish reared at 25 kg m(-3) compared to groups reared at higher densities. The study concludes that in fish reared at density of 25 kg m(-3...

  3. The Benefits of Formalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rand, John; Torm, Nina Elisabeth

    2012-01-01

    Based on unique panel data consisting of both formal and informal firms, this paper uses a matched double difference approach to examine the relationship between legal status and firm level outcomes in micro, small and medium manufacturing enterprises (SMEs) in Vietnam. Controlling for determining...... factors and observable time-variant factors that may simultaneously influence the decision to formalize and subsequent firm performance, we find evidence that becoming officially registered leads to an increase in profits and investments, and a decrease in the use of casual labor (improved contract...... conditions for workers). Thus, we conclude that formalizing is beneficial both to firms and the workers in these firms....

  4. Weavable, Conductive Yarn-Based NiCo//Zn Textile Battery with High Energy Density and Rate Capability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yan; Ip, Wing Shan; Lau, Yuen Ying; Sun, Jinfeng; Zeng, Jie; Yeung, Nga Sze Sea; Ng, Wing Sum; Li, Hongfei; Pei, Zengxia; Xue, Qi; Wang, Yukun; Yu, Jie; Hu, Hong; Zhi, Chunyi

    2017-09-26

    With intrinsic safety and much higher energy densities than supercapacitors, rechargeable nickel/cobalt-zinc-based textile batteries are promising power sources for next generation personalized wearable electronics. However, high-performance wearable nickel/cobalt-zinc-based batteries are rarely reported because there is a lack of industrially weavable and knittable highly conductive yarns. Here, we use scalably produced highly conductive yarns uniformly covered with zinc (as anode) and nickel cobalt hydroxide nanosheets (as cathode) to fabricate rechargeable yarn batteries. They possess a battery level capacity and energy density, as well as a supercapacitor level power density. They deliver high specific capacity of 5 mAh cm -3 and energy densities of 0.12 mWh cm -2 and 8 mWh cm -3 (based on the whole solid battery). They exhibit ultrahigh rate capabilities of 232 C (liquid electrolyte) and 116 C (solid electrolyte), which endows the batteries excellent power densities of 32.8 mW cm -2 and 2.2 W cm -3 (based on the whole solid battery). These are among the highest values reported so far. A wrist band battery is further constructed by using a large conductive cloth woven from the conductive yarns by a commercial weaving machine. It powers various electronic devices successfully, enabling dual functions of wearability and energy storage.

  5. Prospective study of dietary energy density and weight gain in a Japanese adult population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, K M; Wada, K; Zeredo, J L L; Nagata, C

    2017-03-01

    High dietary energy density (ED) has been associated with weight gain. However, little is known about the long-term effects of ED on weight changes among free-living subjects, particularly in Japanese and other Asian populations. In this study, we assessed dietary habits and weight changes in participants (5778 males and 7440 females, 35-69 years old) of the Takayama study. ED was estimated using a validated FFQ at baseline only. Information on body weight (BW) was obtained by self-administered questionnaires at baseline and follow-up. Mean BW difference in 9·8 years was 17 (se 4221) g for men and -210 (se 3889) g for women. In men, ED was positively associated with BW at follow-up after controlling for age, BW, height, physical activity score, alcohol consumption, energy intake, years of education at the baseline and change of smoking status during the follow-up. On average, men in the highest quartile of ED (>5·322 kJ/g (>1·272 kcal/g)) gained 138 (se 111) g, whereas men in the lowest ED (lost 22 (se 111) g (P for trend=0·01). The association between ED and BW gain was stronger in men with normal weight. In women, the association between ED and weight change was not statistically significant. In conclusion, contrary to some studies that report an association between ED and weight gain in the overweight only, our data suggest that high-ED diets may be associated with weight gain in the lean population as well, at least in male subjects.

  6. Double trouble: Portion size and energy density combine to increase preschool children's lunch intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kling, Samantha M R; Roe, Liane S; Keller, Kathleen L; Rolls, Barbara J

    2016-08-01

    Both portion size and energy density (ED) have substantial effects on intake; however, their combined effects on preschool children's intake have not been examined when multiple foods are varied at a meal. We tested the effects on intake of varying the portion size and ED of lunches served to children in their usual eating environment. In a crossover design, lunch was served in 3 childcare centers once a week for 6weeks to 120 children aged 3-5y. Across the 6 meals, all items were served at 3 levels of portion size (100%, 150%, or 200%) and 2 levels of ED (100% or 142%). The lunch menu had either lower-ED or higher-ED versions of chicken, macaroni and cheese, vegetables, applesauce, ketchup, and milk. Children's ratings of the foods indicated that the lower-ED and higher-ED meals were similarly well liked. The total weight of food and milk consumed at meals was increased by serving larger portions (Peffects combined to increase intake by 175±12kcal or 79% at the higher-ED meal with the largest portions compared to the lower-ED meal with the smallest portions. The foods contributing the most to this increase were chicken, macaroni and cheese, and applesauce. The effects of meal portion size and ED on intake were not influenced by child age or body size, but were significantly affected by parental ratings of child eating behavior. Strategically moderating the portion size and ED of foods typically consumed by children could substantially reduce their energy intake without affecting acceptability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The independent prospective associations of activity intensity and dietary energy density with adiposity in young adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Sluijs, Esther M F; Sharp, Stephen J; Ambrosini, Gina L; Cassidy, Aedin; Griffin, Simon J; Ekelund, Ulf

    2016-03-14

    There is limited evidence on the prospective association of time spent in activity intensity (sedentary (SED), moderate (MPA) or vigorous (VPA) physical activity) and dietary intake with adiposity indicators in young people. This study aimed to assess associations between (1) baseline objectively measured activity intensity, dietary energy density (DED) and 4-year change in adiposity and (2) 4-year change in activity intensity/DED and adiposity at follow-up. We conducted cohort analyses including 367 participants (10 years at baseline, 14 years at follow-up) with valid data for objectively measured activity (Actigraph), DED (4-d food diary), anthropometry (waist circumference (WC), %body fat (%BF), fat mass index (FMI), weight status) and covariates. Linear and logistic regression models were fit, including adjustment for DED and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. Results showed that baseline DED was associated with change in WC (β for 1kJ/g difference: 0·71; 95% CI 0·26, 1·17), particularly in boys (1·26; 95% CI 0·41, 2·16 v. girls: 0·26; 95% CI -0·34, 0·87), but not with %BF, FMI or weight status. In contrast, baseline SED, MPA or VPA were not associated with any of the outcomes. Change in DED was negatively associated with FMI (β for 1kJ/g increase: -0·86; 95% CI -1·59, -0·12) and %BF (-0·86; 95% CI -1·25, -0·11) but not WC (-0·27; 95% CI -1·02, 0·48). Change in SED, MPA and VPA did not predict adiposity at follow-up. In conclusion, activity intensity was not prospectively associated with adiposity, whereas the directions of associations with DED were inconsistent. To inform public health efforts, future studies should continue to analyse longitudinal data to further understand the independent role of different energy-balance behaviours in changes in adiposity in early adolescence.

  8. Pressure-induced stable BeN4 as a high-energy density material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shoutao; Zhao, Ziyuan; Liu, Lulu; Yang, Guochun

    2017-10-01

    Polynitrogens are the ideal rocket fuels or propellants. Due to strong triple N≡N bond in N2, the direct polymerization of nitrogen is rather difficult (i.e. extreme high temperature and high pressure). However, the use of nitrides as precursors or the reaction of N2 with other elements has been proved to be an effective way to obtain polynitrogens. Here, with assistance of the advanced first-principles swarm-intelligence structure searches, we found that P 1 bar -BeN4, containing infinite zigzag-like polymeric nitrogen chains, can be synthesized by compressing the mixture of Be3N2 and N2 at 25.4 GPa, which is greatly lower than 110 GPa for synthesizing cubic gauche nitrogen and other polynitrogen compounds (e.g. bulk CNO at 52 GPa and SN4 at 49 GPa). Its structural stability can be attributed to the coexistence of ionic Be-N and covalent N-N bonds. Intriguingly, this phase has high kinetic stability and remains metastable at ambient pressure. The exceptional properties, including high energy density (3.60 kJ g-1), high nitrogen content (86.1%), high dynamical stability, and low polymerization pressure, make P 1 bar -structured BeN4 a promising high energy material. Infinite nitrogen chains in P 1 bar -BeN4 transform to N10 rings network in P21/c phase at 115.1 GPa. P 1 bar -BeN4 is metallic, while P21/c-BeN4 is an insulator.

  9. Spatial heterogeneity of satellite derived land surface parameters and energy flux densities for LITFASS-area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Tittebrand

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Based on satellite data in different temporal and spatial resolution, the current use of frequency distribution functions (PDF for surface parameters and energy fluxes is one of the most promising ways to describe subgrid heterogeneity of a landscape. Objective of this study is to find typical distribution patterns of parameters (albedo, NDVI for the determination of the actual latent heat flux (L.E determined from highly resolved satellite data within pixel on coarser scale.

    Landsat ETM+, Terra MODIS and NOAA-AVHRR surface temperature and spectral reflectance were used to infer further surface parameters and radiant- and energy flux densities for LITFASS-area, a 20×20 km2 heterogeneous area in Eastern Germany, mainly characterised by the land use types forest, crop, grass and water. Based on the Penman-Monteith-approach L.E, as key quantity of the hydrological cycle, is determined for each sensor in the accordant spatial resolution with an improved parametrisation. However, using three sensors, significant discrepancies between the inferred parameters can cause flux distinctions resultant from differences of the sensor filter response functions or atmospheric correction methods. The approximation of MODIS- and AVHRR- derived surface parameters to the reference parameters of ETM (via regression lines and histogram stretching, respectively, further the use of accurate land use classifications (CORINE and a new Landsat-classification, and a consistent parametrisation for the three sensors were realized to obtain a uniform base for investigations of the spatial variability.

    The analyses for 4 scenes in 2002 and 2003 showed that for forest clear distribution-patterns for NDVI and albedo are found. Grass and crop distributions show higher variability and differ significantly to each other in NDVI but only marginal in albedo. Regarding NDVI-distribution functions NDVI was found to be the key variable for L.E-determination.

  10. Hierarchically porous Ni monolith@branch-structured NiCo2O4 for high energy density supercapacitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengjie Xu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A variety of NiCo2O4 nanostrucutures ranging from nanowire to nanoplate and branched structures were successfully prepared via a simple hydrothermal process. The experimental results show that NiCo2O4 with branched structures possesses the best overall electrochemical performance. The improvement of energy density was explored in terms of hierarchically three-dimensional (3D metal substrates and a high specific area capacitance, and area energy density is obtained with hierarchically porous Ni monolith synthesized through a controlled combustion procedure.

  11. The extended Thomas Fermi kinetic energy density functional with position-dependent effective mass in one dimension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencheikh, K.; Berkane, K.; Bouizane, S.

    2004-11-01

    The point canonical transformations map the Schrödinger equation with constant mass to a wave equation with a position-dependent effective mass. Using such a technique we derive, for a one-dimensional inhomogeneous system of noninteracting fermions with density ρ(x) and spatially dependent effective mass distribution m(x), the semiclassical kinetic energy density functional τ(ρ) in the so-called extended Thomas-Fermi model up to order planck2. For a given position-dependent mass, we compare numerically the total semiclassical kinetic energy with its exact quantum mechanical counterpart. The qualitative agreement is excellent.

  12. Asymmetric supercapacitors based on functional electrospun carbon nanofiber/manganese oxide electrodes with high power density and energy density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Sheng-Chi; Lu, Yi-Ting; Chien, Yu-An; Wang, Jeng-An; You, Ting-Hsuan; Wang, Yu-Sheng; Lin, Chih-Wen; Ma, Chen-Chi M.; Hu, Chi-Chang

    2017-09-01

    Carbon nanofibers modified with carboxyl groups (CNF-COOH) possessing good wettability and high porosity are homogeneously deposited with amorphous manganese dioxide (amorphous MnO2) by potentiodynamic deposition for asymmetric super-capacitors (ASCs). The potential-cycling in 1 M H2SO4 successfully enhances the hydrophilicity of carbonized polymer nanofibers and facilitates the access of electrolytes within the CNF-COOH matrix. This modification favors the deposition of amorphous MnO2 and improves its electrochemical utilization. In this composite, MnO2 homogeneously dispersed onto CNF-COOH provides desirable pseudocapacitance and the CNF-COOH network works as the electron conductor. The composite of CNF-COOH@MnO2-20 shows a high specific capacitance of 415 F g-1 at 5 mV s-1. The capacitance retention of this composite is 94% in a 10,000-cycle test. An ASC cell consisting of this composite and activated carbon as positive and negative electrodes can be reversibly charged/discharged to a cell voltage of 2.0 V in 1 M Na2SO4 and 4 mM NaHCO3 with specific energy and power of 36.7 Wh kg-1 and 354.9 W kg-1, respectively. This ASC also shows excellent cell capacitance retention (8% decay) in the 2V, 10,000-cycle stability test, revealing superior performance.

  13. Additions and improvements to the high energy density physics capabilities in the FLASH code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, D.; Bogale, A.; Feister, S.; Flocke, N.; Graziani, C.; Khiar, B.; Laune, J.; Tzeferacos, P.; Walker, C.; Weide, K.

    2017-10-01

    FLASH is an open-source, finite-volume Eulerian, spatially-adaptive radiation magnetohydrodynamics code that has the capabilities to treat a broad range of physical processes. FLASH performs well on a wide range of computer architectures, and has a broad user base. Extensive high energy density physics (HEDP) capabilities exist in FLASH, which make it a powerful open toolset for the academic HEDP community. We summarize these capabilities, emphasizing recent additions and improvements. We describe several non-ideal MHD capabilities that are being added to FLASH, including the Hall and Nernst effects, implicit resistivity, and a circuit model, which will allow modeling of Z-pinch experiments. We showcase the ability of FLASH to simulate Thomson scattering polarimetry, which measures Faraday due to the presence of magnetic fields, as well as proton radiography, proton self-emission, and Thomson scattering diagnostics. Finally, we describe several collaborations with the academic HEDP community in which FLASH simulations were used to design and interpret HEDP experiments. This work was supported in part at U. Chicago by DOE NNSA ASC through the Argonne Institute for Computing in Science under FWP 57789; DOE NNSA under NLUF Grant DE-NA0002724; DOE SC OFES Grant DE-SC0016566; and NSF Grant PHY-1619573.

  14. A journey from nuclear criticality methods to high energy density radflow experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urbatsch, Todd James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-11-08

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is a nuclear weapons laboratory supporting our nation's defense. In support of this mission is a high energy-density physics program in which we design and execute experiments to study radiationhydrodynamics phenomena and improve the predictive capability of our largescale multi-physics software codes on our big-iron computers. The Radflow project’s main experimental effort now is to understand why we haven't been able to predict opacities on Sandia National Laboratory's Z-machine. We are modeling an increasing fraction of the Z-machine's dynamic hohlraum to find multi-physics explanations for the experimental results. Further, we are building an entirely different opacity platform on Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's National Ignition Facility (NIF), which is set to get results early 2017. Will the results match our predictions, match the Z-machine, or give us something entirely different? The new platform brings new challenges such as designing hohlraums and spectrometers. The speaker will recount his history, starting with one-dimensional Monte Carlo nuclear criticality methods in graduate school, radiative transfer methods research and software development for his first 16 years at LANL, and, now, radflow technology and experiments. Who knew that the real world was more than just radiation transport? Experiments aren't easy and they are as saturated with politics as a presidential election, but they sure are fun.

  15. A journey from nuclear criticality methods to high energy density radflow experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urbatsch, Todd James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-05-30

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is a nuclear weapons laboratory supporting our nation's defense. In support of this mission is a high energy-density physics program in which we design and execute experiments to study radiationhydrodynamics phenomena and improve the predictive capability of our largescale multi-physics software codes on our big-iron computers. The Radflow project’s main experimental effort now is to understand why we haven't been able to predict opacities on Sandia National Laboratory's Z-machine. We are modeling an increasing fraction of the Z-machine's dynamic hohlraum to find multi-physics explanations for the experimental results. Further, we are building an entirely different opacity platform on Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's National Ignition Facility (NIF), which is set to get results early 2017. Will the results match our predictions, match the Z-machine, or give us something entirely different? The new platform brings new challenges such as designing hohlraums and spectrometers. The speaker will recount his history, starting with one-dimensional Monte Carlo nuclear criticality methods in graduate school, radiative transfer methods research and software development for his first 16 years at LANL, and, now, radflow technology and experiments. Who knew that the real world was more than just radiation transport? Experiments aren't easy, but they sure are fun.

  16. A class of polysulfide catholytes for lithium-sulfur batteries: energy density, cyclability, and voltage enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xingwen; Manthiram, Arumugam

    2015-01-21

    Liquid-phase polysulfide catholytes are attracting much attention in lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries as they provide a facile dispersion and homogeneous distribution of the sulfur active material in the conductive matrix. However, the organic solvents used in lithium-polysulfide (Li-PS) batteries play an important role and have an impact on the physico-chemical characteristics of polysulfides. For instance, significantly higher voltages (∼2.7 V) of the S/S(n)(2-) (4 ≤n≤ 8) redox couple are observed in Li-PS batteries with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) solvents. Accordingly, high power Li-PS batteries are presented here with the catholyte prepared with NMP solvent and operated with the highly reversible sulfur/long-chain polysulfide redox couple. On the other hand, a remarkable cyclability enhancement of the Li-PS battery is observed with the long-chain, ether-based tetraglyme (TEGDME) solvent. The voltage enhancement and the cyclability enhancement of the Li-PS batteries are attributed to the solvation effect, viscosity, and volatility of the solvents. Finally, highly concentrated polysulfide catholytes are successfully synthesized, with which high energy density Li-PS batteries are demonstrated by employing a multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) fabric electrode.

  17. A class of polysulfide catholytes for lithium-sulfur batteries: energy density, cyclability, and voltage enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, XW; Manthiram, A

    2015-01-01

    Liquid-phase polysulfide catholytes are attracting much attention in lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries as they provide a facile dispersion and homogeneous distribution of the sulfur active material in the conductive matrix. However, the organic solvents used in lithium-polysulfide (Li-PS) batteries play an important role and have an impact on the physico-chemical characteristics of polysulfides. For instance, significantly higher voltages (similar to 2.7 V) of the S/S-n(2-) (4 <= n <= 8) redox couple are observed in Li-PS batteries with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) solvents. Accordingly, high power Li-PS batteries are presented here with the catholyte prepared with NMP solvent and operated with the highly reversible sulfur/long-chain polysulfide redox couple. On the other hand, a remarkable cyclability enhancement of the Li-PS battery is observed with the long-chain, ether-based tetraglyme (TEGDME) solvent. The voltage enhancement and the cyclability enhancement of the Li-PS batteries are attributed to the solvation effect, viscosity, and volatility of the solvents. Finally, highly concentrated polysulfide catholytes are successfully synthesized, with which high energy density Li-PS batteries are demonstrated by employing a multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) fabric electrode.

  18. Local strain energy density to assess the multiaxial fatigue strength of titanium alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Berto

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The present paper investigates the multiaxial fatigue strength of sharp V-notched components made of titanium grade 5 alloy (Ti-6Al-4V. Axisymmetric notched specimens have been tested under combined tension and torsion fatigue loadings, both proportional and non-proportional, taking into account different nominal load ratios (R = -1 and 0. All tested samples have a notch root radius about equal to 0.1 mm, a notch depth of 6 mm and an opening angle of 90 degrees. The fatigue results obtained by applying multiaxial loadings are discussed together with those related to pure tension and pure torsion experimental fatigue tests, carried out on both smooth and notched specimens at load ratios R ranging between -3 and 0.5. Altogether, more than 250 fatigue results (19 S-N curves are examined, first on the basis of nominal stress amplitudes referred to the net area and secondly by means of the strain energy density averaged over a control volume embracing the V-notch tip. The effect of the loading mode on the control volume size has been analysed, highlighting a wide difference in the notch sensitivity of the considered material under tension and torsion loadings. Accordingly, the control radius of the considered titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V is found to be strongly affected by the loading mode.

  19. Megagauss field generation for high-energy-density plasma science experiments.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rovang, Dean Curtis; Struve, Kenneth William; Porter, John Larry Jr.

    2008-10-01

    There is a need to generate magnetic fields both above and below 1 megagauss (100 T) with compact generators for laser-plasma experiments in the Beamlet and Petawatt test chambers for focused research on fundamental properties of high energy density magnetic plasmas. Some of the important topics that could be addressed with such a capability are magnetic field diffusion, particle confinement, plasma instabilities, spectroscopic diagnostic development, material properties, flux compression, and alternate confinement schemes, all of which could directly support experiments on Z. This report summarizes a two-month study to develop preliminary designs of magnetic field generators for three design regimes. These are, (1) a design for a relatively low-field (10 to 50 T), compact generator for modest volumes (1 to 10 cm3), (2) a high-field (50 to 200 T) design for smaller volumes (10 to 100 mm3), and (3) an extreme field (greater than 600 T) design that uses flux compression. These designs rely on existing Sandia pulsed-power expertise and equipment, and address issues of magnetic field scaling with capacitor bank design and field inductance, vacuum interface, and trade-offs between inductance and coil designs.

  20. High-Energy-Density, Laboratory-Astrophysics Studies of Jets and Bow Shocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foster, J M; Wilde, B H; Rosen, P A; Perry, T S; Khokhlov, A M; Coker, R F; Frank, A; Keiter, P A; Blue, B E; Drake, R P; Knauer, J P; Williams, R R

    2005-01-24

    Large-scale directional outflows of supersonic plasma, also known as ''jets'', are ubiquitous phenomena in astrophysics [1]. The interaction of such jets with surrounding matter often results in spectacular bow shocks, and intense radiation from radio to gamma-ray wavelengths. The traditional approach to understanding such phenomena is through theoretical analysis and numerical simulations. However, such numerical simulations have limited resolution, often assume axial symmetry, do not include all relevant physical processes, and fail to scale correctly in Reynolds number and perhaps other key dimensionless parameters. Additionally, they are frequently not tested by comparison with laboratory experiments. Recent advances in high-energy-density physics using large inertial-confinement-fusion devices now allow controlled laboratory experiments on macroscopic volumes of plasma of direct relevance relevant to astrophysics [2]. In this Letter we report the first results of experiments designed to study the evolution of supersonic plasma jets and the bow shocks they drive into a surrounding medium. Our experiments reveal both regular and highly complex flow patterns in the bow shock, thus opening a new window--complementary to computer simulations--into understanding the nature of three-dimensional astrophysical jets.

  1. Using Magnetic Fields to Create and Control High Energy Density Matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrmann, Mark [Sandia National Laboratory

    2012-05-09

    The recently refurbished Z facility at Sandia National Laboratories is the world’s largest pulsed power driver. Z can efficiently deliver currents as large as 26 Million Amperes to centimeter scale loads. These large currents create large magnetic fields that, in turn, create very large pressures in conducting materials. These very large pressures have been used to create unique conditions for high energy density science experiments for a variety of applications. Recently, we have been exploring the use of very strong magnetic fields to significantly relax the requirements for achieving inertial confinement fusion self heating1. The magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) concept relies on a cylindrically imploding liner, an axial magnetic field, and a laser heated fuel region. We hope to achieve significant fusion yield on the Z facility with this concept. Initial experiments assessing the growth of the Magneto-Rayleigh Taylor instability are promising and recent calculational work has identified an approach to achieving high gain with this concept.

  2. The Atlas pulsed power facility for high energy density physics experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, R B; Barr, G W; Bowman, D W; Cochrane, J C; Davis, H A; Elizondo, J M; Gribble, R F; Griego, J R; Hicks, R D; Hinckley, W B; Hosack, K W; Nielsen, K E; Parker, J V; Parsons, M O; Rickets, R L; Salazar, H R; Sánchez, P G; Scudder, D W; Shapiro, C; Thompson, M C; Trainor, R J; Valdez, G A; Vigil, B N; Watt, R G; Wysocki, F J; Kirbie, H C

    1999-01-01

    The Atlas facility, now under construction at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), will provide a unique capability for performing high-energy-density experiments in support of weapon-physics and basic-research programs. Here, the authors describe how the primary element of Atlas is a 23-MJ capacitor bank, comprised of 96 separate Marx generators housed in 12 separate oil-filled tanks, surrounding a central target chamber. Each tank will house two, independently- removable maintenance units, with each maintenance unit consisting of four Marx modules. Each Marx module has four capacitors that can each be charged to a maximum of 60 kilovolts. When railgap switches are triggered, the Marx modules erect to a maximum of 240 kV. The parallel discharge of these 96 Marx modules will deliver a 30-MA current pulse with a 4-5-ys risetime to a cylindrical, imploding liner via 24 vertical, tri-plate, oil-insulated transmission lines. An experimental program for testing and certifying all Marx and transmission line compo...

  3. Parameter scaling toward high-energy density in a quasi-steady flow Z-pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, M. C.; Shumlak, U.; Nelson, B. A.; Golingo, R. P.; Claveau, E. L.; Doty, S. A.; Forbes, E. G.; Kim, B.; Ross, M. P.

    2016-10-01

    Sheared axial flows are utilized by the ZaP Flow Z-Pinch Experiment to stabilize MHD instabilities. The pinches formed are 50 cm long with radii ranging from 0.3 to 1.0 cm. The plasma is generated in a coaxial acceleration region, similar to a Marshall gun, which provides a steady supply of plasma for approximately 100 us. The power to the plasma is partially decoupled between the acceleration and pinch assembly regions through the use of separate power supplies. Adiabatic scaling of the Bennett relation gives targets for future devices to reach high-energy density conditions or fusion reactors. The applicability of an adiabatic assumption is explored and work is done experimentally to clarify the plasma compression process, which may be more generally polytropic. The device is capable of a much larger parameter space than previous machine iterations, allowing flexibility in the initial conditions of the compression process to preserve stability. This work is supported by DoE FES and NNSA.

  4. Functionalization of Polypyrrole Nanopipes with Redox-Active Polyoxometalates for High Energy Density Supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubal, Deepak P; Ballesteros, Belén; Mohite, Ashwini A; Gómez-Romero, Pedro

    2017-02-22

    Hybrid materials are very attractive for the fabrication of high-performance supercapacitors. Here, we have explored organic-inorganic hybrid materials based on open-end porous 1 D polypyrrole nanopipes (PPy-NPipes) and heteropolyoxometalates (phosphotungstate ([PW12 O40 ](3-) , PW12 ) or phosphomolybdate ([PMo12 O40 ](3-) , PMo12 )) that display excellent areal capacitances. Two different hybrid materials (PMo12 @PPy and PW12 @PPy) were effectively synthesized and used for symmetric supercapacitors. The anchoring of the inorganic nanoclusters onto the conducting polymer nanopipes led to electrodes that stood up to our best expectations exhibiting outstanding areal capacitances that are almost 1.5 to 2 fold higher than that of pristine PPy-NPipes. In addition, symmetric cells based on PMo12 @PPy and PW12 @PPy hybrid electrodes were fabricated and showed significant improvement in cell performance with very high volumetric capacitances in the range of 6.3-6.8 F cm(-3) (considering the volume of whole device). Indeed, they provide extended potential windows in acidic electrolytes (up to 1.5 V) which led to ultrahigh energy densities of 1.5 and 2.2 mWh cm(-3) for PMo12 @PPy and PW12 @PPy cells, respectively. Thus, these unique organic-inorganic hybrid symmetric cells displayed extraordinary electrochemical performances far exceeding those of more complex asymmetric systems. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Fracture Assessment of PEEK under Static Loading by Means of the Local Strain Energy Density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirco Peron

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Polyetheretherketone (PEEK has gained interest in many industrial applications due to its high strength-to-weight ratio, excellent heat tolerance and high corrosion resistance. Stress concentrators such as notches and geometrical discontinuities are present in many such components necessitating the reliable assessment of notch sensitivity of PEEK in monotonic tension. Here we evaluate the applicability of the strain energy density (SED approach for the assessment of the fracture strength of experimentally tested notched geometries subject to corrosion. The fracture behavior of neat, circumferentially razor-grooved dog-bone specimens and circumferentially U-notched specimens with different notch radii can be predicted with a discrepancy lower than ±10%. Reliable predictions are shown on two previously published datasets employing both computed and published mechanical properties as inputs for the SED calculations. This report presents the first successful application of SED for PEEK as well as the successful prediction of tensile behavior in corrosive environments. This opens the road towards future applications of PEEK in fields its compliant use is of growing popularity.

  6. Strong perpendicular magnetic anisotropy energy density at Fe alloy/HfO2 interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Yongxi; Ralph, D. C.; Buhrman, R. A.

    2017-05-01

    We report on the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) behavior of heavy metal (HM)/Fe alloy/MgO thin film heterostructures when an ultrathin HfO2 passivation layer is inserted between the Fe alloy and MgO. This is accomplished by depositing one to two atomic layers of Hf onto the Fe alloy before the subsequent rf sputter deposition of the MgO layer. This Hf layer is fully oxidized during the subsequent deposition of the MgO layer, as confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements. The HfO2 insertion generates a strong interfacial perpendicular anisotropy energy density without any post-fabrication annealing treatment, for example, 1.7 erg / cm 2 for the Ta/Fe60Co20B20/HfO2/MgO heterostructure. We also demonstrate PMA even in Ni80Fe20/HfO2/MgO structures for low-damping, low-magnetostriction Ni80Fe20 thin films. Depending on the choice of the HM, further enhancements of the PMA can be realized by thermal annealing to at least 400 o C . We show that ultra-thin HfO2 layers offer a range of options for enhancing the PMA properties of magnetic heterostructures for spintronics applications.

  7. Machine learning applied to proton radiography of high-energy-density plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Nicholas F. Y.; Kasim, Muhammad Firmansyah; Ceurvorst, Luke; Ratan, Naren; Sadler, James; Levy, Matthew C.; Trines, Raoul; Bingham, Robert; Norreys, Peter

    2017-04-01

    Proton radiography is a technique extensively used to resolve magnetic field structures in high-energy-density plasmas, revealing a whole variety of interesting phenomena such as magnetic reconnection and collisionless shocks found in astrophysical systems. Existing methods of analyzing proton radiographs give mostly qualitative results or specific quantitative parameters, such as magnetic field strength, and recent work showed that the line-integrated transverse magnetic field can be reconstructed in specific regimes where many simplifying assumptions were needed. Using artificial neural networks, we demonstrate for the first time 3D reconstruction of magnetic fields in the nonlinear regime, an improvement over existing methods, which reconstruct only in 2D and in the linear regime. A proof of concept is presented here, with mean reconstruction errors of less than 5% even after introducing noise. We demonstrate that over the long term, this approach is more computationally efficient compared to other techniques. We also highlight the need for proton tomography because (i) certain field structures cannot be reconstructed from a single radiograph and (ii) errors can be further reduced when reconstruction is performed on radiographs generated by proton beams fired in different directions.

  8. Formalizing Arrow's theorem

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. formalization of mathematics; Mizar; social choice theory; Arrow's theorem; Gibbard–Satterthwaite theorem; proof errors. ... Author Affiliations. Freek Wiedijk1. Institute for Computing and Information Sciences, Radboud University Nijmegen, Toernooiveld 1, 6525 ED Nijmegen, The Netherlands ...

  9. Radiation dose in radius bone mineral density measurements using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. Dosimetric method on scan beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, Ichiro; Ogata, Hiromitsu; Izumo, Yoshiro [Institute of Public Health, Tokyo (Japan); Ohkubo, Makoto; Kato, Akira

    2001-12-01

    Effective doses in radius bone mineral density measurements using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) were assessed with entrance beam intensity and X-ray absorption rate in organs. The X-ray entrance beam intensity was calculated from an energy fluence rate, and we demonstrated how to assess beam intensity by using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). The entrance beam energies were calculated from X-ray beam intensity in regard to beam sizes, scan areas, and scan times. The X-ray absorption rates were calculated by using X-ray absorption curves at bone mineral density measurements. The average tissue doses were determined by using reference female and men. Skin entrance intensity was 4 x 10{sup -4} [J/(m{sup 2}{center_dot}s)]. Skin entrance energies were 1-2 x 10{sup -3} [J] in proportion to wrist width. The effective dose was approximately 5 nSv. (author)

  10. Formalized Informal Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levinsen, Karin Tweddell; Sørensen, Birgitte Holm

    2013-01-01

    are examined and the relation between network society competences, learners’ informal learning strategies and ICT in formalized school settings over time is studied. The authors find that aspects of ICT like multimodality, intuitive interaction design and instant feedback invites an informal bricoleur approach....... When integrated into certain designs for teaching and learning, this allows for Formalized Informal Learning and support is found for network society competences building....

  11. Interpretation of monoclinic hafnia valence electron energy-loss spectra by time-dependent density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, L.; Guedj, C.; Bernier, N.; Blaise, P.; Olevano, V.; Sottile, F.

    2016-04-01

    We present the valence electron energy-loss spectrum and the dielectric function of monoclinic hafnia (m -HfO2) obtained from time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) predictions and compared to energy-filtered spectroscopic imaging measurements in a high-resolution transmission-electron microscope. Fermi's golden rule density-functional theory (DFT) calculations can capture the qualitative features of the energy-loss spectrum, but we find that TDDFT, which accounts for local-field effects, provides nearly quantitative agreement with experiment. Using the DFT density of states and TDDFT dielectric functions, we characterize the excitations that result in the m -HfO2 energy-loss spectrum. The sole plasmon occurs between 13 and 16 eV, although the peaks ˜28 and above 40 eV are also due to collective excitations. We furthermore elaborate on the first-principles techniques used, their accuracy, and remaining discrepancies among spectra. More specifically, we assess the influence of Hf semicore electrons (5 p and 4 f ) on the energy-loss spectrum, and find that the inclusion of transitions from the 4 f band damps the energy-loss intensity in the region above 13 eV. We study the impact of many-body effects in a DFT framework using the adiabatic local-density approximation (ALDA) exchange-correlation kernel, as well as from a many-body perspective using "scissors operators" matched to an ab initio G W calculation to account for self-energy corrections. These results demonstrate some cancellation of errors between self-energy and excitonic effects, even for excitations from the Hf 4 f shell. We also simulate the dispersion with increasing momentum transfer for plasmon and collective excitation peaks.

  12. Altered Right Ventricular Kinetic Energy Work Density and Viscous Energy Dissipation in Patients with Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension: A Pilot Study Using 4D Flow MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q Joyce Han

    Full Text Available Right ventricular (RV function has increasingly being recognized as an important predictor for morbidity and mortality in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH. The increased RV after-load increase RV work in PAH. We used time-resolved 3D phase contrast MRI (4D flow MRI to derive RV kinetic energy (KE work density and energy loss in the pulmonary artery (PA to better characterize RV work in PAH patients.4D flow and standard cardiac cine images were obtained in ten functional class I/II patients with PAH and nine healthy subjects. For each individual, we calculated the RV KE work density and the amount of viscous dissipation in the PA.PAH patients had alterations in flow patterns in both the RV and the PA compared to healthy subjects. PAH subjects had significantly higher RV KE work density than healthy subjects (94.7±33.7 mJ/mL vs. 61.7±14.8 mJ/mL, p = 0.007 as well as a much greater percent PA energy loss (21.1±6.4% vs. 2.2±1.3%, p = 0.0001 throughout the cardiac cycle. RV KE work density and percent PA energy loss had mild and moderate correlations with RV ejection fraction.This study has quantified two kinetic energy metrics to assess RV function using 4D flow. RV KE work density and PA viscous energy loss not only distinguished healthy subjects from patients, but also provided distinction amongst PAH patients. These metrics hold promise as imaging markers for RV function.

  13. Influence of stocking density on growth, body composition and energy budget of Atlantic salmon Salmo salar L. in recirculating aquaculture systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Baoliang; Liu, Ying; Liu, Ziyi; Qiu, Denggao; Sun, Guoxiang; Li, Xian

    2014-09-01

    Atlantic salmon Salmo salar were reared at four stocking densities—high density D 1 (final density ˜39 kg/m3), medium densities D 2 (˜29 kg/m3) and D 3 (˜19 kg/m3), and low density D 4 (˜12 kg/m3)—for 40 days to investigate the effect of stocking density on their growth performance, body composition and energy budgets. Stocking density did not significantly affect specific growth rate in terms of weight (SGRw) but did affect specific growth rate in terms of energy (SGRe). Stocking density significantly influenced the ration level (RLw and RLe), feed conversion ratio (FCRw and FCRe) and apparent digestibility rate (ADR). Ration level and FCRw tended to increase with increasing density. Fish at the highest density D 1 and lowest density D 4 showed lower FCRe and higher ADR than at medium densities. Stocking density significantly affected protein and energy contents of the body but did not affect its moisture, lipid, or ash contents. The expenditure of energy for metabolism in the low-density and high-density groups was lower than that in the medium-density groups. Stocking density affected energy utilization from the feces but had no effect on excretion rate. The greater energy allocation to growth at high density and low density may be attributed to reduced metabolic rate and increased apparent digestibility rate. These findings provide information that will assist selection of suitable stocking densities in the Atlantic-salmon-farming industry.

  14. The probability density function of energy loss for an electron by bremsstrahlung radiation in a thickness of a target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kia, Mohammad Reza

    2017-10-01

    The probability density function (PDF) of energy loss for an electron by bremsstrahlung radiation in a thickness of a target is obtained by solving the collision term of the Boltzmann equation for the Bethe-Heitler differential cross section. It is demonstrated that the values of the energy loss for an electron by bremsstrahlung radiation will be important in order to calculate the total energy loss when the amount of screening from the atomic electrons becomes important. In this case, a stochastic equation based on the electron energy and the target properties is derived to calculate the energy loss of an electron by bremsstrahlung radiation in a thickness of a target. The results obtained from this analysis are in good agreement with the experimental data and the folding theory for the PDFs of total energy loss for an electron at a certain depth of a target reported in the literature.

  15. SC-CO2-assisted process for a high energy density aerogel supercapacitor: the effect of GO loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarno, Maria; Baldino, Lucia; Scudieri, Carmela; Cardea, Stefano; Ciambelli, Paolo; Reverchon, Ernesto

    2017-05-19

    Energy density, safety, and simple and environmentally friendly preparation methods are very significant aspects in the realization of a compact supercapacitor. Herein we report the use of a supercritical CO2-assisted gel drying process (SC-CO2) for the preparation of porous electrodes containing dispersed graphene in a poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) (PVDF-HFP) binder membrane to sandwich in a new portable supercapacitor based on graphene oxide (GO). A GO loading of 60 wt.% was found to give the best combination of factors (porosity, wettability, mechanical and electrochemical properties). Cycling voltammetry and charge/discharge studies showed an excellent capacitance behaviour and stability in an ionic liquid electrolyte, suggesting SC-CO2 processing as a promising platform to produce highly bulky and porous films for supercapacitors. The supercapacitor device delivers a very high energy density of 79.2 Wh kg-1 at a power density of 0.23 KW kg-1 (current density 0.5 A g-1, specific capacitance 36.2 F g-1) while that of steel remains at 50.3 Wh kg-1 at a power density of 2.8 KW kg-1 (current density 6 A g-1, specific capacitance 23.5 F g-1).

  16. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry for the simultaneous determination of Density and Moisture Content in Porous Structural Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard; Jensen, Signe Kamp; Gerward, Leif

    1999-01-01

    The paper describes the dual-energy x-ray equipment, which consists of a x-ray source, filters and a detector. The x-ray beam can be moved automatically in two dimensions relative to a fixed specimen. The purpose of the equipment is to measure simultaneously the density and moisture content in po...

  17. CFD based exploration of the dry-low-NOx hydrogen micromix combustion technology at increased energy densities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Haj Ayed

    2017-03-01

    The study reveals great optimization potential of the micromix combustion technology with respect to the DLN characteristics and gives insight into the impact of geometry modifications on flame structure and NOx emission. This allows to further increase the energy density of the micromix burners and to integrate this technology in industrial gas turbines.

  18. New class of two-dimensional bimetallic nanoplatelets for high energy density and electrochemically stable hybrid supercapacitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Zhiting; Ma, Peng; Ulstrup, Jens

    2017-01-01

    Currently, the application of supercapacitors (SCs) in portable electronic devices and vehicles is limited by their low energy density. Developing high-energy density SCs without sacrificing their advantages, such as their long-term stability and high power density, has thus become an increasing...... demand but a major challenge. This demand has motivated tremendous efforts, especially towards discovering and optimizing the architecture of novel electrode materials. To this end, we herein report the design, synthesis, and SC application of a new family of two-dimensional (2D) nanoplatelets, i.......0). Tuning the molar ratio of Ni/Co allowed us to optimize the structures and physicochemical properties of the nanoplatelets for SC applications. When tested in a half cell, SC electrodes using the nanoplatelets exhibited high electrochemical performance with a specific capacitance as high as 1,415 F⋅g-1...

  19. Inductively Driven, 3D Liner Compression of a Magnetized Plasma to Megabar Energy Densities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slough, John [MSNW LLC, Redmond, WA (United States)

    2015-02-01

    To take advantage of the smaller scale, higher density regime of fusion an efficient method for achieving the compressional heating required to reach fusion gain conditions must be found. What is proposed is a more flexible metallic liner compression scheme that minimizes the kinetic energy required to reach fusion. It is believed that it is possible to accomplish this at sub-megajoule energies. This however will require operation at very small scale. To have a realistic hope of inexpensive, repetitive operation, it is essential to have the liner kinetic energy under a megajoule which allows for the survivability of the vacuum and power systems. At small scale the implosion speed must be reasonably fast to maintain the magnetized plasma (FRC) equilibrium during compression. For limited liner kinetic energy, it becomes clear that the thinnest liner imploded to the smallest radius consistent with the requirements for FRC equilibrium lifetime is desired. The proposed work is directed toward accomplishing this goal. Typically an axial (Z) current is employed for liner compression. There are however several advantages to using a θ-pinch coil. With the θ-pinch the liner currents are inductively driven which greatly simplifies the apparatus and vacuum system, and avoids difficulties with the post implosion vacuum integrity. With fractional flux leakage, the foil liner automatically provides for the seed axial compression field. To achieve it with optimal switching techniques, and at an accelerated pace however will require additional funding. This extra expense is well justified as the compression technique that will be enabled by this funding is unique in the ability to implode individual segments of the liner at different times. This is highly advantageous as the liner can be imploded in a manner that maximizes the energy transfer to the FRC. Production of shaped liner implosions for additional axial compression can thus be readily accomplished with the modified power

  20. Addition energies and density dipole response of quantum rings under the influence of in-plane electric fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malet, Francesc; Pi, Martí; Barranco, Manuel; Serra, Llorenç; Lipparini, Enrico

    2007-12-01

    Within density functional theory, we address the effect of an in-plane electric field E on the ground state and the density dipole response of a many-electron quantum ring, which is also submitted to a perpendicular magnetic field B . Addition energies and density dipole spectra are discussed as a function of E . For the two-electron case, an exact numerical calculation is performed, obtaining the spin-phase diagram in the E-B plane and showing that transitions between singlet and triplet spin states can be induced by varying the fields. We also find that, in spite of the deformation that E causes in the electronic density, the spin of the ground state of a given electron number ring is very robust, changing little as the strength of the electric field is reasonably increased.

  1. Food portion size and energy density evoke different patterns of brain activation in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Laural K; Fearnbach, S Nicole; Wilson, Stephen J; Fisher, Jennifer O; Savage, Jennifer S; Rolls, Barbara J; Keller, Kathleen L

    2017-02-01

    Large portions of food promote intake, but the mechanisms that drive this effect are unclear. Previous neuroimaging studies have identified the brain-reward and decision-making systems that are involved in the response to the energy density (ED) (kilocalories per gram) of foods, but few studies have examined the brain response to the food portion size (PS). We used functional MRI (fMRI) to determine the brain response to food images that differed in PSs (large and small) and ED (high and low). Block-design fMRI was used to assess the blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) response to images in 36 children (7-10 y old; girls: 50%), which was tested after a 2-h fast. Pre-fMRI fullness and liking were rated on visual analog scales. A whole-brain cluster-corrected analysis was used to compare BOLD activation for main effects of the PS, ED, and their interaction. Secondary analyses were used to associate BOLD contrast values with appetitive traits and laboratory intake from meals for which the portions of all foods were increased. Compared with small-PS cues, large-PS cues were associated with decreased activation in the inferior frontal gyrus (P food PS may be processed in the lateral prefrontal cortex, which is a region that is implicated in cognitive control, whereas ED activates multiple areas involved in sensory and reward processing. Possible implications include the development of interventions that target decision-making and reward systems differently to moderate overeating. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  2. Supermarket discounts of low-energy density foods: effects on purchasing, food intake, and body weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geliebter, Allan; Ang, Ian Yi Han; Bernales-Korins, Maria; Hernandez, Dominica; Ochner, Christopher N; Ungredda, Tatiana; Miller, Rachel; Kolbe, Laura

    2013-12-01

    To assess the effects of a 50% discount on low-energy density (ED) fruits and vegetables (F&V), bottled water, and diet sodas on shoppers' purchasing, food intake, and body weight. A randomized, controlled trial was conducted at two Manhattan supermarkets, in which a 4-week baseline period (no discounts) preceded an 8-week intervention period (50% discount), and a 4-week follow-up period (no discounts). Twenty-four hour dietary recall, as well as body weight and body composition measures were obtained every 4 weeks. Participants (n = 47, 33f; 14m) were overweight and obese (BMI ≥ 25) shoppers. Purchasing of F&V during intervention was greater in the discount group than in the control group (P discount group relative to the control group during follow-up was reduced from intervention (P = 0.002), but still remained higher than during baseline (P = 0.01), indicating a partially sustained effect. Intake of F&V increased from baseline to intervention in the discount group relative to the control group (P = 0.037) and was sustained during follow-up. Body weight change did not differ significantly between groups, although post hoc analysis indicated a change within the discount group (-1.1 kg, P = 0.006) but not within the control group. Discounts of low-ED F&V led to increased purchasing and intake of those foods. Copyright © 2013 The Obesity Society.

  3. Regenerative Polysulfide-Scavenging Layers Enabling Lithium-Sulfur Batteries with High Energy Density and Prolonged Cycling Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fang; Xiao, Qiangfeng; Wu, Hao Bin; Sun, Fei; Liu, Xiaoyan; Li, Fan; Le, Zaiyuan; Shen, Li; Wang, Ge; Cai, Mei; Lu, Yunfeng

    2017-03-28

    Lithium-sulfur batteries, notable for high theoretical energy density, environmental benignity, and low cost, hold great potential for next-generation energy storage. Polysulfides, the intermediates generated during cycling, may shuttle between electrodes, compromising the energy density and cycling life. We report herein a class of regenerative polysulfide-scavenging layers (RSL), which effectively immobilize and regenerate polysulfides, especially for electrodes with high sulfur loadings (e.g., 6 mg cm-2). The resulting cells exhibit high gravimetric energy density of 365 Wh kg-1, initial areal capacity of 7.94 mAh cm-2, low self-discharge rate of 2.45% after resting for 3 days, and dramatically prolonged cycling life. Such blocking effects have been thoroughly investigated and correlated with the work functions of the oxides as well as their bond energies with polysulfides. This work offers not only a class of RSL to mitigate shuttling effect but also a quantified design framework for advanced lithium-sulfur batteries.

  4. Graphene-wrapped sulfur nanospheres with ultra-high sulfur loading for high energy density lithium-sulfur batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ya; Guo, Jinxin; Zhang, Jun; Su, Qingmei; Du, Gaohui

    2015-01-01

    Lithium-sulfur (Li-S) battery with high theoretical energy density is one of the most promising energy storage systems for electric vehicles and intermittent renewable energy. However, due to the poor conductivity of the active material, considerable weight of the electrode is occupied by the conductive additives. Here we report a graphene-wrapped sulfur nanospheres composite (S-nanosphere@G) with sulfur content up to 91 wt% as the high energy density cathode material for Li-S battery. The sulfur nanospheres with diameter of 400-500 nm are synthesized through a solution-based approach with the existence of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). Then the sulfur nanospheres are uniformly wrapped by conductive graphene sheets through the electrostatic interaction between graphene oxide and PVP, followed by reducing of graphene oxide with hydrazine. The design of graphene wrapped sulfur nanoarchitecture provides flexible conductive graphene coating with void space to accommodate the volume expansion of sulfur and to minimize polysulfide dissolution. As a result, the S-nanosphere@G nanocomposite with 91 wt% sulfur shows a reversible initial capacity of 970 mA h g-1 and an average columbic efficiency > 96% over 100 cycles at a rate of 0.2 C. Taking the total mass of electrode into account, the S-nanosphere@G composite is a promising cathode material for high energy density Li-S batteries.

  5. The correlation between the laser energy density and the properties of diamond-like carbon films with Nd:YAG (355 nm) excimer laser

    CERN Document Server

    Jung, H S; Pang, S S; Lee, S Y

    1998-01-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films were deposited using pulsed laser ablation of graphite target. The deposition process was performed with the change of laser energy density from 8 to 17 J/cm sup 2. collected from analytical results, laser energy density is seen to play an important role in the formation of sp sup 3 carbon bondings in films. Also, the optimal deposition condition for DLC films was proposed and correlated with the laser energy density.

  6. Concept of effective atomic number and effective mass density in dual-energy X-ray computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonnin, Anne, E-mail: annebonnin@free.fr [ESRF, 6 Jules Horowitz, F-38073 Grenoble Cedex (France); LVA, Vibrations and Acoustic Laboratory, INSA-Lyon, Université de Lyon, F-69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Duvauchelle, Philippe, E-mail: philippe.duvauchelle@insa-lyon.fr [LVA, Vibrations and Acoustic Laboratory, INSA-Lyon, Université de Lyon, F-69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Kaftandjian, Valérie [LVA, Vibrations and Acoustic Laboratory, INSA-Lyon, Université de Lyon, F-69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Ponard, Pascal [Thales Electron Devices SAS, 2 Rue Marcel Dassault, BP23 78141 Vélizy, Villacoublay Cedex (France)

    2014-01-01

    This paper focuses on dual-energy X-ray computed tomography and especially the decomposition of the measured attenuation coefficient in a mass density and atomic number basis. In particular, the concept of effective atomic number is discussed. Although the atomic number is well defined for chemical elements, the definition of an effective atomic number for any compound is not an easy task. After reviewing different definitions available in literature, a definition related to the method of measurement and X-ray energy, is suggested. A new concept of effective mass density is then introduced in order to characterize material from dual-energy computed tomography. Finally, this new concept and definition are applied on a simulated case, focusing on explosives identification in luggage.

  7. Formalizing Restriction Categories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Chapman

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Restriction categories are an abstract axiomatic framework by Cockett and Lack for reasoning about (generalizations of the idea of partiality of functions. In a restriction category, every map defines an endomap on its domain, the corresponding partial identity map. Restriction categories cover a number of examples of different flavors and are sound and complete with respect to the more synthetic and concrete partial map categories. A partial map category is based on a given category (of total maps and a map in it is a map from a subobject of the domain. In this paper, we report on an Agda formalization of the first chapters of the theory of restriction categories, including the challenging completeness result. We explain the mathematics formalized, comment on the design decisions we made for the formalization, and illustrate them at work.

  8. Formalizing Probabilistic Safety Claims

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herencia-Zapana, Heber; Hagen, George E.; Narkawicz, Anthony J.

    2011-01-01

    A safety claim for a system is a statement that the system, which is subject to hazardous conditions, satisfies a given set of properties. Following work by John Rushby and Bev Littlewood, this paper presents a mathematical framework that can be used to state and formally prove probabilistic safety claims. It also enables hazardous conditions, their uncertainties, and their interactions to be integrated into the safety claim. This framework provides a formal description of the probabilistic composition of an arbitrary number of hazardous conditions and their effects on system behavior. An example is given of a probabilistic safety claim for a conflict detection algorithm for aircraft in a 2D airspace. The motivation for developing this mathematical framework is that it can be used in an automated theorem prover to formally verify safety claims.

  9. A chemistry and material perspective on lithium redox flow batteries towards high-density electrical energy storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yu; Ding, Yu; Li, Yutao; Peng, Lele; Byon, Hye Ryung; Goodenough, John B; Yu, Guihua

    2015-11-21

    Electrical energy storage system such as secondary batteries is the principle power source for portable electronics, electric vehicles and stationary energy storage. As an emerging battery technology, Li-redox flow batteries inherit the advantageous features of modular design of conventional redox flow batteries and high voltage and energy efficiency of Li-ion batteries, showing great promise as efficient electrical energy storage system in transportation, commercial, and residential applications. The chemistry of lithium redox flow batteries with aqueous or non-aqueous electrolyte enables widened electrochemical potential window thus may provide much greater energy density and efficiency than conventional redox flow batteries based on proton chemistry. This Review summarizes the design rationale, fundamentals and characterization of Li-redox flow batteries from a chemistry and material perspective, with particular emphasis on the new chemistries and materials. The latest advances and associated challenges/opportunities are comprehensively discussed.

  10. Description of odd-mass nuclei within the interacting boson-fermion model based on the Gogny energy density functional

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, K.; Rodríguez-Guzmán, R.; Robledo, L. M.

    2017-07-01

    Spectroscopic properties of odd-mass nuclei are studied within the framework of the interacting boson-fermion model (IBFM) with parameters based on the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) approximation. The parametrization D1M of the Gogny energy density functional (EDF) was used at the mean-field level to obtain the deformation energy surfaces for the considered nuclei in terms of the quadrupole deformations (β ,γ ). In addition to the energy surfaces, both single-particle energies and occupation probabilities were used as a microscopic input for building the IBFM Hamiltonian. Only three strength parameters for the particle-boson-core coupling are fitted to experimental spectra. The IBFM Hamiltonian is then used to compute the energy spectra and electromagnetic transition rates for selected odd-mass Eu and Sm nuclei as well as for 195Pt and 195Au. A reasonable agreement with the available experimental data is obtained for the considered odd-mass nuclei.

  11. Studies on effective atomic numbers for photon energy absorption and electron density of some narcotic drugs in the energy range 1 keV-20 MeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gounhalli, Shivraj G.; Shantappa, Anil; Hanagodimath, S. M.

    2013-04-01

    Effective atomic numbers for photon energy absorption ZPEA,eff, photon interaction ZPI,eff and for electron density Nel, have been calculated by a direct method in the photon-energy region from 1 keV to 20 MeV for narcotic drugs, such as Heroin (H), Cocaine (CO), Caffeine (CA), Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), Cannabinol (CBD), Tetrahydrocannabivarin (THCV). The ZPEA,eff, ZPI,eff and Nel values have been found to change with energy and composition of the narcotic drugs. The energy dependence ZPEA,eff, ZPI,eff and Nel is shown graphically. The maximum difference between the values of ZPEA,eff, and ZPI,eff occurs at 30 keV and the significant difference of 2 to 33% for the energy region 5-100 keV for all drugs. The reason for these differences is discussed.

  12. Ontology or formal ontology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žáček, Martin

    2017-07-01

    Ontology or formal ontology? Which word is correct? The aim of this article is to introduce correct terms and explain their basis. Ontology describes a particular area of interest (domain) in a formal way - defines the classes of objects that are in that area, and relationships that may exist between them. Meaning of ontology consists mainly in facilitating communication between people, improve collaboration of software systems and in the improvement of systems engineering. Ontology in all these areas offer the possibility of unification of view, maintaining consistency and unambiguity.

  13. Formality theorem for gerbes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bressler, Paul; Gorokhovsky, Alexander; Nest, Ryszard

    2015-01-01

    The main result of the present paper is an analogue of Kontsevich formality theorem in the context of the deformation theory of gerbes. We construct an L∞L∞ deformation of the Schouten algebra of multi-vectors which controls the deformation theory of a gerbe.......The main result of the present paper is an analogue of Kontsevich formality theorem in the context of the deformation theory of gerbes. We construct an L∞L∞ deformation of the Schouten algebra of multi-vectors which controls the deformation theory of a gerbe....

  14. Operating plasma density issues on large-scale laser-plasma accelerators toward high-energy frontier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhisa Nakajima

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Consideration of laser-driven plasma-based electron/positron accelerators with a 2 TeV center-of-mass energy is presented, employing a multistaging scheme consisting of successive multi-GeV laser wakefield accelerators operated at the plasma density range of 10^{15}–10^{18}  cm^{-3} in the quasilinear regime. A total accelerator length is determined by an operating plasma density and a coupling distance allowed for both laser and beam focusing systems. We investigate beam dynamics and synchrotron radiation due to the betatron oscillation of the beam in laser-plasma acceleration, characterizing the beam qualities such as energy spread and transverse emittance. According to the criteria on the beam qualities for applications and available laser sources, the operating plasma density will be optimized. We note that in the low density operation the required wall-plug power for the laser driver will be much reduced in comparison with the high-density options.

  15. A comparison of bone mineral density in osteoporotic fracture of the proximal femur using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Seok; Yoo, Beong Gyu [Wonkwang Health Science College, Iksan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Keung Sik [Yonsei University Yong Dong Severance Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-04-15

    There were some controversies about direct cause of hip fracture. We attempted to look at 40 osteoporotic proximal femur fractures in women over 50 years between March in 1999 and February in 2000. The bone density of the fracture group and the healthy 85 control group was measured by Dual Energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA). The result was compared using age matched paired T test. The results were as follows: The femoral neck fractures were 14 cases and the trochanteric fractures were 26 cases. Mean age at a fracture was 67.1 years in neck fracture group and 76.5 years in trochanteric fracture. In the control group, the bone density of both side of the proximal femur was measured and it showed statistically no difference between both sides in same person. The bone density of neck, Ward's triangle, trochanter (P<0.05) and lumbar spine (P<0.001) was significantly reduced in the proximal femoral fracture group comparing with the control group. The bone density of neck, Ward's triangle, trochanter (P<0.05) was significantly reduced in the proximal femoral neck fracture group comparing with the control group, but there was no statistical difference in lumbar spine comparing with the control group. The bone density of neck, Ward's triangle, trochanter and lumbar spine (P<0.001) was significantly reduced in the proximal femoral neck fracture group comparing with the control group. We concluded that the bone mineral densities (BMD) of proximal femur and lumbar spine had decreased in hip fractures but that the bone mineral density and T-score % of the proximal femur were statistically lower than that of the lumbar spine. We suggest that measuring the bone mineral density of the proximal femur may reflect the weakness of the proximal femur more precisely than measuring the bone mineral density of the lumbar spine.

  16. Gradient corrections to the kinetic energy density functional of a two-dimensional Fermi gas at finite temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zyl, B. P.; Berkane, K.; Bencheikh, K.; Farrell, A.

    2011-05-01

    We examine the leading-order semiclassical gradient corrections to the noninteracting kinetic-energy density functional of a two-dimensional Fermi gas by applying the extended Thomas-Fermi theory at finite temperature. We find a nonzero von Weizsäcker-like gradient correction, which in the high-temperature limit goes over to the functional form (ℏ2/24m)(∇ρ)2/ρ. Our work provides a theoretical justification for the inclusion of gradient corrections in applications of density-functional theory to inhomogeneous two-dimensional Fermi systems at any finite temperature.

  17. Characterization of high density SiPM non-linearity and energy resolution for prompt gamma imaging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regazzoni, V.; Acerbi, F.; Cozzi, G.; Ferri, A.; Fiorini, C.; Paternoster, G.; Piemonte, C.; Rucatti, D.; Zappalà, G.; Zorzi, N.; Gola, A.

    2017-07-01

    Fondazione Bruno Kessler (FBK) (Trento, Italy) has recently introduced High Density (HD) and Ultra High-Density (UHD) SiPMs, featuring very small micro-cell pitch. The high cell density is a very important factor to improve the linearity of the SiPM in high-dynamic-range applications, such as the scintillation light readout in high-energy gamma-ray spectroscopy and in prompt gamma imaging for proton therapy. The energy resolution at high energies is a trade-off between the excess noise factor caused by the non-linearity of the SiPM and the photon detection efficiency of the detector. To study these effects, we developed a new setup that simulates the LYSO light emission in response to gamma photons up to 30 MeV, using a pulsed light source. We measured the non-linearity and energy resolution vs. energy of the FBK RGB-HD e RGB-UHD SiPM technologies. We considered five different cell sizes, ranging from 10 μm up to 25 μm. With the UHD technology we were able to observe a remarkable reduction of the SiPM non-linearity, less than 5% at 5 MeV with 10 μm cells, which should be compared to a non-linearity of 50% with 25 μm-cell HD-SiPMs. With the same setup, we also measured the different components of the energy resolution (intrinsic, statistical, detector and electronic noise) vs. cell size, over-voltage and energy and we separated the different sources of excess noise factor.

  18. High energy storage density over a broad temperature range in sodium bismuth titanate-based lead-free ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haibo; Yan, Fei; Lin, Ying; Wang, Tong; Wang, Fen

    2017-08-18

    A series of (1-x)Bi0.48La0.02Na0.48Li0.02Ti0.98Zr0.02O3-xNa0.73Bi0.09NbO3 ((1-x)LLBNTZ-xNBN) (x = 0-0.14) ceramics were designed and fabricated using the conventional solid-state sintering method. The phase structure, microstructure, dielectric, ferroelectric and energy storage properties of the ceramics were systematically investigated. The results indicate that the addition of Na0.73Bi0.09NbO3 (NBN) could decrease the remnant polarization (P r ) and improve the temperature stability of dielectric constant obviously. The working temperature range satisfying TCC 150 °C ≤±15% of this work spans over 400 °C with the compositions of x ≥ 0.06. The maximum energy storage density can be obtained for the sample with x = 0.10 at room temperature, with an energy storage density of 2.04 J/cm(3) at 178 kV/cm. In addition, the (1-x)LLBNTZ-xNBN ceramics exhibit excellent energy storage properties over a wide temperature range from room temperature to 90 °C. The values of energy storage density and energy storage efficiency is 0.91 J/cm(3) and 79.51%, respectively, for the 0.90LLBNTZ-0.10NBN ceramic at the condition of 100 kV/cm and 90 °C. It can be concluded that the (1-x)LLBNTZ-xNBN ceramics are promising lead-free candidate materials for energy storage devices over a broad temperature range.

  19. Increased energy density of the home-delivered lunch meal improves 24-hour nutrient intakes in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Heidi J; Dietrich, Mary S; Castellanos, Victoria H

    2008-12-01

    As food intake declines with aging, older adults develop energy and nutrient inadequacies. It is important to design practical approaches to combat insufficient dietary intakes to decrease risk for acute and chronic diseases, illness, and injury. Manipulating the energy density of meals has improved energy intakes in institutional settings, but the effects on community-residing older adults who are at nutrition risk have not been investigated. The aim of this study was to determine whether enhancing the energy density of food items regularly served in a home-delivered meals program would increase lunch and 24-hour energy and nutrient intakes. In a randomized crossover counterbalanced design, 45 older adult Older American Act Nutrition Program participants received a regular and enhanced version of a lunch meal on alternate weeks. The types of foods, portion sizes (gram weight), and appearance of the lunch meal was held constant. Consumption of the enhanced meal increased average lunch energy intakes by 86% (Pmenu items is an effective strategy to improve dietary intakes of free-living older adults.

  20. Porosity and density measurements of sodium acetate trihydrate for thermal energy storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dannemand, Mark; Delgado, Monica; Lazaro, Ana

    2018-01-01

    Sodium acetate trihydrate (SAT) can be used as phase change material in latent heat storage with or without utilizing supercooling. The change of density between liquid to solid state leads to formation of cavities inside the bulk SAT during solidification. Samples of SAT which had solidified from...... supercooled state at ambient temperature and samples which had solidified with a minimal degree supercooled were investigated. The temperature dependent densities of liquid and the two types of solid SAT were measured with a density meter and a thermomechanical analyzer. The cavities formed inside samples...

  1. Development of large high current density superconducting solenoid magnets for use in high energy physics experiments. [Thesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, M.A.

    1977-05-01

    The development of a unique type of large superconducting solenoid magnet, characterized by very high current density windings and a two-phase helium tubular cooling system is described. The development of the magnet's conceptual design and the construction of two test solenoids are described. The successful test of the superconducting coil and its tubular cooling refrigeration system is presented. The safety, environmental and economic impacts of the test program on future developments in high energy physics are shown. Large solid angle particle detectors for colliding beam physics will analyze both charged and neutral particles. In many cases, these detectors will require neutral particles, such as gamma rays, to pass through the magnet coil with minimum interaction. The magnet coils must be as thin as possible. The use of superconducting windings allows one to minimize radiation thickness, while at the same time maximizing charged particle momentum resolution and saving substantial quantities of electrical energy. The results of the experimental measurements show that large high current density solenoid magnets can be made to operate at high stored energies. The superconducting magnet development described has a positive safety and environmental impact. The use of large high current density thin superconducting solenoids has been proposed in two high energy physics experiments to be conducted at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center and Cornell University as a result of the successful experiments described.

  2. Formal fault tree semantics

    OpenAIRE

    Schellhorn, Gerhard

    2002-01-01

    Formal fault tree semantics / G. Schellhorn, A. Thums, and W. Reif. - In: IDPT : Proceedings of the Sixth World Conference on Integrated Design and Process Technology : June 23 - 27, 2003, Pasadena, California / SDPS, Society for Design & Process Science. - 2002. - 1CD-ROM

  3. Formalizing physical security procedures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meadows, C.; Pavlovic, Dusko

    Although the problems of physical security emerged more than 10,000 years before the problems of computer security, no formal methods have been developed for them, and the solutions have been evolving slowly, mostly through social procedures. But as the traffic on physical and social networks is now

  4. Fear of the Formal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    du Gay, Paul; Lopdrup-Hjorth, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    term this ‘fear of the formal’, outlining key elements of its genealogy and exploring its contemporary manifestation in relation to recent and ongoing reforms of organisational life in a range of contexts. At the same time, we seek to indicate the continuing constitutive significance of formality...

  5. Formal Methods for Privacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    automated enforcement [52]. Other policy languages such as P3P [15], which has a formal notation, inform website visitors of the site’s privacy practices...Lorrie Faith Cranor. Web Privacy with P3P . O’Reilly, September 2002. [16] Lorrie Faith Cranor, Praveen Guduru, and Manjula Arjula. User interfaces for

  6. Comparing Formal Specification Languages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harmelen, van F.A.H.; Lopez de Mantaras, R.; Malec, J.; Treur, J.

    This paper presents a comparison between eight specification languages discussed during the Workshop on Formal Specification Techniques for Complex Reasoning Systems held in Vienna during the ECAI'92 conference. The languages as discussed here possess many important common characteristics, but also

  7. Full charge-density calculation of the surface energy of metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vitos, Levente; Kollár, J..; Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1994-01-01

    We have calculated the surface energy and the work function of the 4d metals by means of an energy functional based on a self-consistent, spherically symmetric atomic-sphere potential. In this approach the kinetic energy is calculated completely within the atomic-sphere approximation (ASA) by means...

  8. Energy levels and redox properties of aqueous Mn(2+/3+) from photoemission spectroscopy and density functional molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moens, Jan; Seidel, Robert; Geerlings, Paul; Faubel, Manfred; Winter, Bernd; Blumberger, Jochen

    2010-07-22

    Energy-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and density functional molecular dynamics simulations are combined to construct an energy level diagram for the Mn(2+/3+) redox reaction in aqueous solution. Two peaks centered at 8.88 and 10.26 eV electron binding energies can be assigned to the Mn2+ hexa-aquo complex with a peak area ratio of 2:2.83. Using the notation of crystal field theory, the peak at lower energies can be interpreted as arising from ionization from the e(g) levels (highest occupied molecular orbital, HOMO), and the peak at higher energies are from ionization of the t(2g) levels. The difference corresponds to the average crystal field splitting, 1.38 eV. From the position of the HOMO level and the absolute redox potential, an experimental value for the reorganization free energy of the aqueous Mn3+ hexa-aquo complex is estimated to be 2.98 eV. Density functional molecular dynamics simulations can reproduce the experimental vertical ionization energy, redox free energy, and reorganization free energies fairly well, provided that the absolute potential shift in periodic boundary conditions, finite size effects, and inaccuracies of the exchange correlation functional are taken into account. Most strikingly, in the simulations, we observe spontaneous and reversible deprotonation of the aqueous Mn3+ hexa-aquo complex to form MnOH(H2O)5(2+) + H+, in line with the low experimental pKa value of this ion. The interconversion between protonation states leads to interesting redox phenomena for aqueous Mn3+, culminating in a bimodal thermal distribution of the electron affinity.

  9. Porosity and density measurements of sodium acetate trihydrate for thermal energy storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dannemand, Mark; Delgado, Monica; Lazaro, Ana

    2017-01-01

    Sodium acetate trihydrate (SAT) can be used as phase change material in latent heat storage with or without utilizing supercooling. The change of density between liquid to solid state leads to formation of cavities inside the bulk SAT during solidification. Samples of SAT which had solidified from....../cm3. The density of liquid and supercooled SAT with extra water was also determined at different temperatures....... supercooled state at ambient temperature and samples which had solidified with a minimal degree supercooled were investigated. The temperature dependent densities of liquid and the two types of solid SAT were measured with a density meter and a thermomechanical analyzer. The cavities formed inside samples...

  10. H + H2 quantum dynamics using potential energy surfaces based on the XYG3 type of doubly hybrid density functionals: Validation of the density functionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Neil Qiang; Chen, Jun; Sun, Zhigang; Zhang, Dong H.; Xu, Xin

    2015-02-01

    The potential energy surfaces for the H + H2 exchange reaction are determined, using the standard Becke-3_parameter-Lee-Yang-Parr (B3LYP) hybrid exchange-correlation functional and the recently developed XYG3 type (xDH) doubly hybrid functionals. Quantum dynamical results calculated on these density functional theory surfaces revealed that the accuracy for the surfaces from the xDH functionals is quite satisfactory as compared to the benchmark Boothroyd-Keogh-Martin-Peterson-2 surface, whereas B3LYP is wholly inadequate in describing this simplest reaction despite the fact that it has been widely used to study reactions in complex systems. It is shown that further improvements can be achieved if the xDH functional parameters are fine-tuned to be reaction specific.

  11. Restoration of the Derivative Discontinuity in Kohn-Sham Density Functional Theory: An Efficient Scheme for Energy Gap Correction

    CERN Document Server

    Chai, Jeng-Da

    2012-01-01

    Based on a simple and physically motivated approximation to an expression for the derivative discontinuity (DD) of the exchange-correlation (XC) energy functional in Kohn-Sham density functional theory (KS-DFT), we show that the DD can be approximately expressed as an explicit universal functional of the ground-state density and the KS lowest unoccupied molecular orbital density, allowing the direct evaluation of the DD in the standard KS method without extra computational cost. The fundamental gap can be predicted by adding the estimated DD to the KS gap. This scheme is shown to be accurate in the prediction of the fundamental gaps for a wide variety of atoms and molecules. In addition, possible extensions of this scheme for improved accuracy are also discussed.

  12. High performance charge-state resolving ion energy analyzer optimized for intense laser studies on low-density cluster targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komar, D.; Meiwes-Broer, K.-H.; Tiggesbäumker, J.

    2016-10-01

    We report on a versatile ion analyzer which is capable to resolve ion charge states and energies with a resolution of E/ΔE = 100 at 75 keV/nucleon. Charge states are identified by their characteristic deflection in a magnetic field, whereas the ion energies are independently determined by a time-of-flight measurement. To monitor the signals a delay-line detector is used which records ion impact positions and times in each laser shot. Compared to conventional Thomson parabola spectrometers our instrument provides a low background measurement, hence a superior dynamic range. Further features are an improved energy resolution and a significantly increased transmission. We demonstrate the performance by showing charge-state resolved ion energy spectra from the Coulomb explosion of a low-density target, i.e., silver clusters exposed to intense femtosecond laser pulses.

  13. Matrix formalism of synchrobetatron coupling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaobiao Huang

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present a complete linear synchrobetatron coupling formalism by studying the transfer matrix which describes linear horizontal and longitudinal motions. With the technique established in the linear horizontal-vertical coupling study [D. Sagan and D. Rubin, Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 2, 074001 (1999PRABFM1098-440210.1103/PhysRevSTAB.2.074001], we found a transformation to block diagonalize the transfer matrix and decouple the betatron motion and the synchrotron motion. By separating the usual dispersion term from the horizontal coordinate first, we were able to obtain analytic expressions of the transformation under reasonable approximations. We also obtained the perturbations to the betatron tune and the Courant-Snyder functions. The closed-orbit changes due to finite energy gains at rf cavities and radiation energy losses were studied by the 5×5 extended transfer matrix with the fifth column describing kicks in the 4-dimension phase space.

  14. Joint Reconstruction of Absorbed Optical Energy Density and Sound Speed Distribution in Photoacoustic Computed Tomography: A numerical Investigation

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Chao; Schoonover, Robert W; Wang, Lihong V; Anastasio, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    Photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) is a rapidly emerging bioimaging modality that seeks to reconstruct an estimate of the absorbed optical energy density within an object. Conventional PACT image reconstruction methods assume a constant speed-of-sound (SOS), which can result in image artifacts when acoustic aberrations are significant. It has been demonstrated that incorporating knowledge of an object's SOS distribution into a PACT image reconstruction method can improve image quality. However, in many cases, the SOS distribution cannot be accurately and/or conveniently estimated prior to the PACT experiment. Because variations in the SOS distribution induce aberrations in the measured photoacoustic wavefields, certain information regarding an object's SOS distribution is encoded in the PACT measurement data. Based on this observation, a joint reconstruction (JR) problem has been proposed in which the SOS distribution is concurrently estimated along with the sought-after absorbed optical energy density ...

  15. Collision dynamics of H+ + N2 at low energies based on time-dependent density-functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, W.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, F. S.; Hutton, R.; Zou, Y.; Gao, C.-Z.; Wei, B.

    2018-02-01

    Using time-dependent density-functional theory at the level of local density approximation augmented by a self-interaction correction and coupled non-adiabatically to molecular dynamics, we study, from a theoretical perspective, scattering dynamics of the proton in collisions with the N2 molecule at 30 eV. Nine different collision configurations are employed to analyze the proton energy loss spectra, electron depletion, scattering angles and self-interaction effects. Our results agree qualitatively with the experimental data and previous theoretical calculations. The discrepancies are ascribed to the limitation of the theoretical models in use. We find that self-interaction effects can significantly influence the electron capture and the excited diatomic vibrational motion, which is in consistent with other calculations. In addition, it is found that the molecular structure can be readily retrieved from the proton energy loss spectra due to a significant momentum transfer in head-on collisions.

  16. Dual-energy synchrotron X ray measurements of rapid soil density and water content changes in swelling soils during infiltration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnier, Patricia; Angulo-Jaramillo, Rafael; DiCarlo, David A.; Bauters, Tim W. J.; Darnault, Christophe J. G.; Steenhuis, Tammo S.; Parlange, J.-Yves; Baveye, Philippe

    1998-11-01

    Understanding soil swelling is hampered by the difficulty of simultaneously measuring water content and bulk density. A number of studies have used dual-energy gamma rays to investigate soil swelling. The long counting time of this technique makes it impracticable for studying the rapid changes in moisture content and soil swelling shortly after infiltration is initiated. In this paper, we use the dual-energy synchrotron X ray to measure, for the first time, the water content and bulk density changes during the fast, initial phase of the swelling process. Ponded infiltration experiments were performed with two soils: a bentonite-sand mixture and a vertisol. Swelling curves and hydraulic diffusivity were determined. Deformation was very rapid immediately after water application and then became progressively slower. The hydraulic diffusivity decreased with time, which can partially explain the very rapid decrease in infiltration rates observed in the field.

  17. Free-energy analysis of the electron-density fluctuation in the quantum-mechanical/molecular-mechanical simulation combined with the theory of energy representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matubayasi, Nobuyuki; Takahashi, Hideaki

    2012-01-28

    The relationship is investigated for QM/MM (quantum-mechanical/molecular-mechanical) systems between the fluctuations of the electronic state of the QM subsystem and of the solvation effect due to the QM-MM interaction. The free-energy change due to the electron-density fluctuation around its average is highlighted, and is evaluated through an approximate functional formulated in terms of distribution functions of the many-body coupling (pairwise non-additive) part of the QM-MM interaction energy. A set of QM/MM simulations are conducted in MM water solvent for QM water solute in ambient and supercritical conditions and for QM glycine solute in the neutral and zwitterionic forms. The variation of the electronic distortion energy of the QM solute in the course of QM/MM simulation is then shown to be compensated by the corresponding variation of the free energy of solvation. The solvation free energy conditioned by the electronic distortion energy is further analyzed with its components. It is found that the many-body contribution is essentially equal between the free energy and the average sum of solute-solvent interaction energy. © 2012 American Institute of Physics

  18. Spin formalism and applications to new physics searches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haber, H.E. [Univ. of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States)

    1994-12-01

    An introduction to spin techniques in particle physics is given. Among the topics covered are: helicity formalism and its applications to the decay and scattering of spin-1/2 and spin-1 particles, techniques for evaluating helicity amplitudes (including projection operator methods and the spinor helicity method), and density matrix techniques. The utility of polarization and spin correlations for untangling new physics beyond the Standard Model at future colliders such as the LHC and a high energy e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear collider is then considered. A number of detailed examples are explored including the search for low-energy supersymmetry, a non-minimal Higgs boson sector, and new gauge bosons beyond the W{sup {+-}} and Z.

  19. Energy transmission transformer for a wireless capsule endoscope: analysis of specific absorption rate and current density in biological tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiba, Kenji; Nagato, Tomohiro; Tsuji, Toshio; Koshiji, Kohji

    2008-07-01

    This paper reports on the electromagnetic influences on the analysis of biological tissue surrounding a prototype energy transmission system for a wireless capsule endoscope. Specific absorption rate (SAR) and current density were analyzed by electromagnetic simulator in a model consisting of primary coil and a human trunk including the skin, fat, muscle, small intestine, backbone, and blood. First, electric and magnetic strength in the same conditions as the analytical model were measured and compared to the analytical values to confirm the validity of the analysis. Then, SAR and current density as a function of frequency and output power were analyzed. The validity of the analysis was confirmed by comparing the analytical values with the measured ones. The SAR was below the basic restrictions of the International Commission on Nonionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP). At the same time, the results for current density show that the influence on biological tissue was lowest in the 300-400 kHz range, indicating that it was possible to transmit energy safely up to 160 mW. In addition, we confirmed that the current density has decreased by reducing the primary coil's current.

  20. Efficient algorithm for multiconfiguration pair-density functional theory with application to the heterolytic dissociation energy of ferrocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sand, Andrew M.; Truhlar, Donald G.; Gagliardi, Laura

    2017-01-01

    The recently developed multiconfiguration pair-density functional theory (MC-PDFT) combines multiconfiguration wave function theory with a density functional that depends on the on-top pair density of an electronic system. In an MC-PDFT calculation, there are two steps: a conventional multiconfiguration self-consistent-field (MCSCF) calculation and a post-MCSCF evaluation of the energy with an on-top density functional. In this work, we present the details of the MC-PDFT algorithm that avoids steeply scaling steps that are present in other post-self-consistent-field multireference calculations of dynamic correlation energy. We demonstrate the favorable scaling by considering systems of H2 molecules with active spaces of several different sizes. We then apply the MC-PDFT method to calculate the heterolytic dissociation enthalpy of ferrocene. We find that MC-PDFT yields results that are at least as accurate as complete active space second-order perturbation theory and are more stable with respect to basis set, but at a fraction of the cost in both time and memory.

  1. Kinetic modeling of ultrasound-assisted extraction of phenolic compounds from grape marc: influence of acoustic energy density and temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Yang; Zhang, Zhihang; Sun, Da-Wen

    2014-07-01

    The effects of acoustic energy density (6.8-47.4 W/L) and temperature (20-50 °C) on the extraction yields of total phenolics and tartaric esters during ultrasound-assisted extraction from grape marc were investigated in this study. The ultrasound treatment was performed in a 25-kHz ultrasound bath system and the 50% aqueous ethanol was used as the solvent. The initial extraction rate and final extraction yield increased with the increase of acoustic energy density and temperature. The two site kinetic model was used to simulate the kinetics of extraction process and the diffusion model based on the Fick's second law was employed to determine the effective diffusion coefficient of phenolics in grape marc. Both models gave satisfactory quality of data fit. The diffusion process was divided into one fast stage and one slow stage and the diffusion coefficients in both stages were calculated. Within the current experimental range, the diffusion coefficients of total phenolics and tartaric esters for both diffusion stages increased with acoustic energy density. Meanwhile, the rise of temperature also resulted in the increase of diffusion coefficients of phenolics except the diffusion coefficient of total phenolics in the fast stage, the value of which being the highest at 40 °C. Moreover, an empirical equation was suggested to correlate the effective diffusion coefficient of phenolics in grape marc with acoustic energy density and temperature. In addition, the performance comparison of ultrasound-assisted extraction and convention methods demonstrates that ultrasound is an effective and promising technology to extract bioactive substances from grape marc. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Transition metal sulfides grown on graphene fibers for wearable asymmetric supercapacitors with high volumetric capacitance and high energy density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Weihua; Lai, Ting; Lai, Jianwei; Xie, Haoting; Ouyang, Liuzhang; Ye, Jianshan; Yu, Chengzhong

    2016-06-01

    Fiber shaped supercapacitors are promising candidates for wearable electronics because they are flexible and light-weight. However, a critical challenge of the widespread application of these energy storage devices is their low cell voltages and low energy densities, resulting in limited run-time of the electronics. Here, we demonstrate a 1.5 V high cell voltage and high volumetric energy density asymmetric fiber supercapacitor in aqueous electrolyte. The lightweight (0.24 g cm-3), highly conductive (39 S cm-1), and mechanically robust (221 MPa) graphene fibers were firstly fabricated and then coated by NiCo2S4 nanoparticles (GF/NiCo2S4) via the solvothermal deposition method. The GF/NiCo2S4 display high volumetric capacitance up to 388 F cm-3 at 2 mV s-1 in a three-electrode cell and 300 F cm-3 at 175.7 mA cm-3 (568 mF cm-2 at 0.5 mA cm-2) in a two-electrode cell. The electrochemical characterizations show 1000% higher capacitance of the GF/NiCo2S4 as compared to that of neat graphene fibers. The fabricated device achieves high energy density up to 12.3 mWh cm-3 with a maximum power density of 1600 mW cm-3, outperforming the thin-film lithium battery. Therefore, these supercapacitors are promising for the next generation flexible and wearable electronic devices.

  3. Transition metal sulfides grown on graphene fibers for wearable asymmetric supercapacitors with high volumetric capacitance and high energy density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Weihua; Lai, Ting; Lai, Jianwei; Xie, Haoting; Ouyang, Liuzhang; Ye, Jianshan; Yu, Chengzhong

    2016-01-01

    Fiber shaped supercapacitors are promising candidates for wearable electronics because they are flexible and light-weight. However, a critical challenge of the widespread application of these energy storage devices is their low cell voltages and low energy densities, resulting in limited run-time of the electronics. Here, we demonstrate a 1.5 V high cell voltage and high volumetric energy density asymmetric fiber supercapacitor in aqueous electrolyte. The lightweight (0.24 g cm−3), highly conductive (39 S cm−1), and mechanically robust (221 MPa) graphene fibers were firstly fabricated and then coated by NiCo2S4 nanoparticles (GF/NiCo2S4) via the solvothermal deposition method. The GF/NiCo2S4 display high volumetric capacitance up to 388 F cm−3 at 2 mV s−1 in a three-electrode cell and 300 F cm−3 at 175.7 mA cm−3 (568 mF cm−2 at 0.5 mA cm−2) in a two-electrode cell. The electrochemical characterizations show 1000% higher capacitance of the GF/NiCo2S4 as compared to that of neat graphene fibers. The fabricated device achieves high energy density up to 12.3 mWh cm−3 with a maximum power density of 1600 mW cm−3, outperforming the thin-film lithium battery. Therefore, these supercapacitors are promising for the next generation flexible and wearable electronic devices. PMID:27248510

  4. Fiber intake, not dietary energy density, is associated with subsequent change in BMI z-score among sub-groups of children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kring, Sofia I Iqbal; Heitmann, Berit L

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Results from short-term studies demonstrate that energy density influences energy intake, but in children and adolescents the long-term effects of energy density and obesity development are sparse. We examined the longitudinal relationship between dietary energy density, fiber intake...... to collect dietary energy intake. Overweight was defined as 1.05 SD, equivalent to the 85th percentile, of age- and sex-specific BMI z-score reference values. RESULTS: An inverse association between fiber intake and subsequent excess weight gain was observed among the normal weight boys. In overweight boys.......1 to 29.9%. Mean Deltaz-score was +0.1 and +0.4 for boys and girls, respectively. CONCLUSION: Dietary energy density was not associated with 3-year weight gain in boys and girls. Only energy and fiber intakes were related to weight gain, but in different ways for subgroups of normal-weight and overweight...

  5. Full charge-density scheme with a kinetic-energy correction: Application to ground-state properties of the 4d metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vitos, Levente; Kollár, J.; Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1997-01-01

    We present a full charge-density technique to evaluate total energies from the output of self-consistent linear muffin-tin orbitals (LMTO) calculations in the atomic-sphere approximation (ASA). The Coulomb energy is calculated exactly from the complete, nonspherically symmetric charge density...

  6. Biredox ionic liquids with solid-like redox density in the liquid state for high-energy supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourad, Eléonore; Coustan, Laura; Lannelongue, Pierre; Zigah, Dodzi; Mehdi, Ahmad; Vioux, André; Freunberger, Stefan A; Favier, Frédéric; Fontaine, Olivier

    2017-04-01

    Kinetics of electrochemical reactions are several orders of magnitude slower in solids than in liquids as a result of the much lower ion diffusivity. Yet, the solid state maximizes the density of redox species, which is at least two orders of magnitude lower in liquids because of solubility limitations. With regard to electrochemical energy storage devices, this leads to high-energy batteries with limited power and high-power supercapacitors with a well-known energy deficiency. For such devices the ideal system should endow the liquid state with a density of redox species close to the solid state. Here we report an approach based on biredox ionic liquids to achieve bulk-like redox density at liquid-like fast kinetics. The cation and anion of these biredox ionic liquids bear moieties that undergo very fast reversible redox reactions. As a first demonstration of their potential for high-capacity/high-rate charge storage, we used them in redox supercapacitors. These ionic liquids are able to decouple charge storage from an ion-accessible electrode surface, by storing significant charge in the pores of the electrodes, to minimize self-discharge and leakage current as a result of retaining the redox species in the pores, and to raise working voltage due to their wide electrochemical window.

  7. Synthesis of Mesoporous Carbons from Rice Husk for Supercapacitors with High Energy Density in Ionic Liquid Electrolytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaojun; Zhang, Hebao; Xie, Kang; Xia, Youyi; Zhao, Zhigang; Wang, Xiaoting

    2016-03-01

    High-performance mesoporous carbons (MCs) for supercapacitors were made from rice husk by one-step microwave-assisted ZnCl2 activation. The microstructures of MCs as-made were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The pore structure parameters of MCs were obtained by N2 adsorption technique. The electrochemical properties of MC electrodes were studied by constant current charge-discharge, cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in different electrolytes. The results showed that the specific surface area of MC4 made at the ZnCl2/rice husk mass of 4:1 reached 1737 m2 g(-1). The specific capacitance and energy density of the electrodes fabricated from the mixture of MC4 and microporous carbon increased with the mass percentage of MC4, reaching 157 F g(-1) and 84 Wh kg(-1) at 0.05 A g(-1), and showed good cycle stability in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate electrolyte. Compared to the often-used aqueous and organic electrolytes, MC4 capacitor exhibited extremely high energy density in ionic liquid electrolyte, remaining at 28 Wh kg(-1) at 1684 W kg(-1). This work paves a new way to produce cost-effective MCs from biomass for supercapacitors with extremely high energy density in ionic liquid electrolytes.

  8. Tube-Super Dielectric Materials: Electrostatic Capacitors with Energy Density Greater than 200 J·cm−3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes, Francisco Javier Quintero; Phillips, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    The construction and performance of a second generation of super dielectric material based electrostatic capacitors (EC), with energy density greater than 200 J·cm−3, which rival the best reported energy density of electric double layer capacitors (EDLC), also known as supercapacitors, are reported. The first generation super dielectric materials (SDM) are multi-material mixtures with dielectric constants greater than 1.0 × 105, composed of a porous, electrically insulating powder filled with a polarizable, ion-containing liquid. Second-generation SDMs (TSDM), introduced here, are anodic titania nanotube arrays filled with concentrated aqueous salt solutions. Capacitors using TiO2 based TSDM were found to have dielectric constants at ~0 Hz greater than 107 in all cases, a maximum operating voltage of greater than 2 volts and remarkable energy density that surpasses the highest previously reported for EC capacitors by approximately one order of magnitude. A simple model based on the classic ponderable media model was shown to be largely consistent with data from nine EC type capacitors employing TSDM. PMID:28793561

  9. Seasonal and nightly variations of gravity-wave energy density in the middle atmosphere measured by the Purple Crow Lidar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. J. Sica

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The Purple Crow Lidar (PCL is a large power-aperture product monostatic Rayleigh-Raman-Sodium-resonance-fluorescence lidar, which has been in operation at the Delaware Observatory (42.9° N, 81.4° W, 237 m elevation near the campus of The University of Western Ontario since 1992. Kinetic-energy density has been calculated from the Rayleigh-scatter system measurements of density fluctuations at temporal-spatial scales relevant for gravity waves, e.g. soundings at 288 m height resolution and 9 min temporal resolution in the upper stratosphere and mesosphere. The seasonal averages from 10 years of measurements show in all seasons some loss of gravity-wave energy in the upper stratosphere. During the equinox periods and summer the measurements are consistent with gravity waves growing in height with little saturation, in agreement with the classic picture of the variations in the height at which gravity waves break given by Lindzen (1981. The mean values compare favourably to previous measurements when computed as nightly averages, but the high temporal-spatial resolution measurements show considerable day-to-day variability. The variability over a night is often extremely large, with typical RMS fluctuations of 50 to 100% at all heights and seasons common. These measurements imply that using a daily or nightly-averaged gravity-wave energy density in numerical models may be highly unrealistic.

  10. Effect of energy density and delay time on the degree of conversion and Knoop microhardness of a dual resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainardi, Maria do Carmo A J; Giorgi, Maria Cecília C; Lima, Débora A N L; Marchi, Giselle M; Ambrosano, Gláucia M; Paulillo, Luiz A M S; Aguiar, Flávio H B

    2015-02-01

    In the present study, we evaluated the influence of the photo-curing delay time and energy density on the degree of conversion and the Knoop microhardness of a resin cement. Seventy-eight samples were assigned to 13 groups (n = 6), one of which received no light curing (control). The samples were made of a dual-cured resin cement (RelyX ARC) with the aid of a Teflon matrix, submitted to one of the following energy densities (J/cm²): 7, 14, 20, and 28. Delay times were immediate (0), 1 min, or 2 min. After 24 h, the degree of conversion and microhardness were measured at three segments: cervical, medium, and apical. Data were submitted to three-way anova and Tukey's and Dunnett's tests, the latest of which was used to compare the control to the experimental groups. No interaction was observed between delay time and energy density regarding the degree of conversion. The cervical segment showed the highest values, while the apical showed the lowest. Microhardness values concerning the cervical segment in all groups were statistically different from that obtained for the control. A high-irradiance light-curing unit allows for a reduced irradiation exposure time with a short delay time, aimed at tooth restorations using a dual-cured resin cement. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  11. Advanced asymmetric supercapacitors based on Ni(OH){sub 2}/graphene and porous graphene electrodes with high energy density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Jun; Fan, Zhuangjun; Sun, Wei; Wei, Tong [Key Laboratory of Superlight Materials and Surface Technology, Ministry of Education, College of Material Science and Chemical Engineering, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin 150001 (China); Ning, Guoqing [State Key Laboratory of Heavy Oil Processing, China University of Petroleum, Beijing 102249 (China); Zhang, Qiang; Zhang, Rufan; Wei, Fei [Beijing Key Laboratory of Green Chemical Reaction, Engineering and Technology, Department of Chemical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Zhi, Linjie [National Center for Nanoscience and Technology of China, Zhongguancun, Beiyitiao 11, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2012-06-20

    Hierarchical flowerlike nickel hydroxide decorated on graphene sheets has been prepared by a facile and cost-effective microwave-assisted method. In order to achieve high energy and power densities, a high-voltage asymmetric supercapacitor is successfully fabricated using Ni(OH){sub 2}/graphene and porous graphene as the positive and negative electrodes, respectively. Because of their unique structure, both of these materials exhibit excellent electrochemical performances. The optimized asymmetric supercapacitor could be cycled reversibly in the high-voltage region of 0-1.6 V and displays intriguing performances with a maximum specific capacitance of 218.4 F g{sup -1} and high energy density of 77.8 Wh kg{sup -1}. Furthermore, the Ni(OH){sub 2}/graphene//porous graphene supercapacitor device exhibits an excellent long cycle life along with 94.3% specific capacitance retained after 3000 cycles. These fascinating performances can be attributed to the high capacitance and the positive synergistic effects of the two electrodes. The impressive results presented here may pave the way for promising applications in high energy density storage systems. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  12. Tube-Super Dielectric Materials: Electrostatic Capacitors with Energy Density Greater than 200 J·cm−3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Javier Quintero Cortes

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The construction and performance of a second generation of super dielectric material based electrostatic capacitors (EC, with energy density greater than 200 J·cm−3, which rival the best reported energy density of electric double layer capacitors (EDLC, also known as supercapacitors, are reported. The first generation super dielectric materials (SDM are multi-material mixtures with dielectric constants greater than 1.0 × 105, composed of a porous, electrically insulating powder filled with a polarizable, ion-containing liquid. Second-generation SDMs (TSDM, introduced here, are anodic titania nanotube arrays filled with concentrated aqueous salt solutions. Capacitors using TiO2 based TSDM were found to have dielectric constants at ~0 Hz greater than 107 in all cases, a maximum operating voltage of greater than 2 volts and remarkable energy density that surpasses the highest previously reported for EC capacitors by approximately one order of magnitude. A simple model based on the classic ponderable media model was shown to be largely consistent with data from nine EC type capacitors employing TSDM.

  13. A Homogenized Energy Model for Hysteresis in Ferroelectric Materials: General Density Formulation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Smith, Ralph C; Hatch, Andrew; Mukhergee, Binu; Liu, Shifang

    2004-01-01

    ... homogenization techniques to construct macroscopic models. In the first step of the development, previous analysis is used to construct Helmholtz and Gibbs energy relations at the lattice level...

  14. Melting Point and Viscosity Behavior of High Energy Density Missile Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-09-01

    0.996 0.0545 +49.78 0.982 0.03525 20 MOLX HNN & 80 MOL% XTHDCPD TEMP. DENSITY VISCOSITY (DEG C) (G/CMt3) (POISE) -50.25 1.025 0.612 -40.28 1.017 0.3555...80 MOLU HXX & 20 MOLX XTHDCPD TEMP. DENSITY VISCOSITY (DEG C) (G/CMIo) (POISE) -25.00 1.085 1.315 -15.32 1.078 0.675...1.003 0.0411 40 MOLX HXX & 60 MOLX XTHDCPD---------------------------- TEMP. DENSITY VISCOSITY (DEG C) (G/CMI$) (POISE) -55.25 1.056 2.116 -50.30 1.052

  15. {\\delta}M Formalism

    CERN Document Server

    Talebian-Ashkezari, Alireza; Abolhasani, Ali Akbar

    2016-01-01

    We study the evolution of the "non-perturbative" metric perturbations in a Bianchi background in the long-wavelength limit. By applying the gradient expansion to the equations of motion we exhibit a generalized "Separate Universe" approach to the cosmological perturbation theory. Having found this consistent separate universe picture, we introduce the "{\\delta}M formalism" for calculating the evolution of the tensor perturbations in anisotropic inflation models in almost similar way as the so-called {\\delta}N formula for the super-horizon dynamics of the curvature perturbations. Likewise its ancestor, {\\delta}N formalism, this new method can substantially reduce the amount of calculations related to the evolution of the tensor modes.

  16. Readings in Formal Epistemology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Formal epistemology’ is a term coined in the late 1990s for a new constellation of interests in philosophy,the roots of which are found in earlier works of epistemologists, philosophers of science, and logicians. It addresses a growing agenda of problems concerning knowledge, belief, certainty......, rationality, deliberation, decision, strategy, action and agent interaction – and it does so using methods from logic, probability, computability, decision, and game theory. This volume presents 42 classic texts in formal epistemology, and strengthens the ties between research into this area of philosophy...... and its neighbouring intellectual disciplines. The editors provide introductions to five basic subsections: Bayesian Epistemology, Belief Change, Decision Theory, Interactive Epistemology and Logics of Knowledge and Belief. The volume also includes a thorough index and suggestions for further reading...

  17. E1 density transitions from the low-energy deuteron photodisintegration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipparini, E.; Orlandini, G. (Trento Univ. (Italy). Dipartimento di Fisica)

    1982-01-18

    The dynamical dipole polarizability and transition density for the deuteron are studied in the Bethe-Peierls model for deuteron photodisintegration. In two limiting values of the frequency of the oscillating field, the transition density is shown to have simple forms corresponding to pure surface and a mixing of surface and volume deformations respectively. Predictions for the low-sub(q) behaviour of the E1 form factor are given. A unitary transformation for the evaluation of the static polarizability in heavier nuclei is suggested.

  18. High energy density z-pinch plasma conditions with picosecond time resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikuz, S A; Sinars, D B; Shelkovenko, T A; Chandler, K M; Hammer, D A; Ivanenkov, G V; Stepniewski, W; Skobelev, I Yu

    2002-07-15

    Using an X-pinch configuration, we have determined that micropinches produced by exploding-wire z pinches can have densities approaching solid density and temperatures of 0.5-1.8 keV, depending upon the wire material used. These plasma parameters, determined from x-ray spectra recorded using an x-ray streak camera, vary drastically on time scales ranging from <10 to 100 ps. Computer simulations require radiation loss to reproduce the observed plasma implosion, suggesting that a radiative-collapse hypothesis for micropinch plasma formation may be correct.

  19. Graphene-wrapped sulfur nanospheres with ultra-high sulfur loading for high energy density lithium–sulfur batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ya; Guo, Jinxin; Zhang, Jun, E-mail: zhangjun@zjnu.cn; Su, Qingmei; Du, Gaohui, E-mail: gaohuidu@zjnu.edu.cn

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A graphene-wrapped sulfur nanospheres composite with 91 wt% S is prepared. • It shows highly improved electrochemical performance as cathode for Li–S cell. • The PVP coating and conductive graphene minimize polysulfides dissolution. • The flexible coatings with void space accommodate the volume expansion of sulfur. - Abstract: Lithium–sulfur (Li–S) battery with high theoretical energy density is one of the most promising energy storage systems for electric vehicles and intermittent renewable energy. However, due to the poor conductivity of the active material, considerable weight of the electrode is occupied by the conductive additives. Here we report a graphene-wrapped sulfur nanospheres composite (S-nanosphere@G) with sulfur content up to 91 wt% as the high energy density cathode material for Li–S battery. The sulfur nanospheres with diameter of 400–500 nm are synthesized through a solution-based approach with the existence of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). Then the sulfur nanospheres are uniformly wrapped by conductive graphene sheets through the electrostatic interaction between graphene oxide and PVP, followed by reducing of graphene oxide with hydrazine. The design of graphene wrapped sulfur nanoarchitecture provides flexible conductive graphene coating with void space to accommodate the volume expansion of sulfur and to minimize polysulfide dissolution. As a result, the S-nanosphere@G nanocomposite with 91 wt% sulfur shows a reversible initial capacity of 970 mA h g{sup −1} and an average columbic efficiency > 96% over 100 cycles at a rate of 0.2 C. Taking the total mass of electrode into account, the S-nanosphere@G composite is a promising cathode material for high energy density Li–S batteries.

  20. Dense Plasma Focus - From Alternative Fusion Source to Versatile High Energy Density Plasma Source for Plasma Nanotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawat, R. S.

    2015-03-01

    The dense plasma focus (DPF), a coaxial plasma gun, utilizes pulsed high current electrical discharge to heat and compress the plasma to very high density and temperature with energy densities in the range of 1-10 × 1010 J/m3. The DPF device has always been in the company of several alternative magnetic fusion devices as it produces intense fusion neutrons. Several experiments conducted on many different DPF devices ranging over several order of storage energy have demonstrated that at higher storage energy the neutron production does not follow I4 scaling laws and deteriorate significantly raising concern about the device's capability and relevance for fusion energy. On the other hand, the high energy density pinch plasma in DPF device makes it a multiple radiation source of ions, electron, soft and hard x-rays, and neutrons, making it useful for several applications in many different fields such as lithography, radiography, imaging, activation analysis, radioisotopes production etc. Being a source of hot dense plasma, strong shockwave, intense energetic beams and radiation, etc, the DPF device, additionally, shows tremendous potential for applications in plasma nanoscience and plasma nanotechnology. In the present paper, the key features of plasma focus device are critically discussed to understand the novelties and opportunities that this device offers in processing and synthesis of nanophase materials using, both, the top-down and bottom-up approach. The results of recent key experimental investigations performed on (i) the processing and modification of bulk target substrates for phase change, surface reconstruction and nanostructurization, (ii) the nanostructurization of PLD grown magnetic thin films, and (iii) direct synthesis of nanostructured (nanowire, nanosheets and nanoflowers) materials using anode target material ablation, ablated plasma and background reactive gas based synthesis and purely gas phase synthesis of various different types of