WorldWideScience

Sample records for energy correlation experiments

  1. Experiments tests of Bell's inequalities with pairs of low energy correlated photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aspect, A.

    1986-01-01

    This paper reviews the essence of Bell's reasoning, the purpose of which is to convince the reader that a very natural way of understanding the EPR correlations is to complete quantum mechanics in the way considered by Bell. It is noted that Bell's theorem states a conflict between local supplementary parameters theories and certain quantum mechanical predictions. It yields a quantitative criterion for this conflict, that allows one to design sensitive experiments. These experiments are presented in the paper. It is concluded that the predictions of quantum mechanics in EPR-type situations are vindicated by the experiments

  2. The isotope correlation experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, L.; Schoof, S.

    1983-01-01

    The ESARDA working group on Isotopic Correlation Techniques, ICT and Reprocessing Input Analysis performed an Isotope Correlation Experiment, ICE with the aim to check the feasibility of the new technique. Ten input batches of the reprocessing of the KWO fuel at the WAK plant were analysed by 4 laboratories. All information to compare ICT with the gravimetric and volumetric methods was available. ICT combined with simplified reactor physics calculation was included. The main objectives of the statistical data evaluation were detection of outliers, the estimation of random errors and of systematic errors of the measurements performed by the 4 laboratories. Different methods for outlier detection, analysis of variances, Grubbs' analysis for the constant-bias model and Jaech's non-constant-bias model were applied. Some of the results of the statistical analysis may seem inconsistent which is due to the following reasons. For the statistical evaluations isotope abundance data (weight percent) as well as nuclear concentration data (atoms/initial metal atoms) were subjected to different outlier criteria before being used for further statistical evaluations. None of the four data evaluation groups performed a complete statistical data analysis which would render possible a comparison of the different methods applied since no commonly agreed statistical evaluation procedure existed. The results prove that ICT is as accurate as conventional techniques which have to rely on costly mass spectrometric isotope dilution analysis. The potential of outlier detection by ICT on the basis of the results from a single laboratory is as good as outlier detection by costly interlaboratory comparison. The application of fission product or Cm-244 correlations would be more timely than remeasurements at safeguards laboratories

  3. CORRELATIONS OF THE ARRIVAL DIRECTIONS OF ULTRA-HIGH ENERGY COSMIC RAYS WITH EXTRAGALACTIC OBJECTS AS OBSERVED BY THE TELESCOPE ARRAY EXPERIMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abu-Zayyad, T.; Allen, M.; Anderson, R.; Barcikowski, E.; Belz, J. W.; Bergman, D. R.; Blake, S. A.; Cady, R.; Hanlon, W. [High Energy Astrophysics Institute and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Aida, R. [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Medicine and Engineering, University of Yamanashi, Kofu, Yamanashi (Japan); Azuma, R.; Fukuda, T. [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo (Japan); Cheon, B. G.; Cho, E. J. [Department of Physics and The Research Institute of Natural Science, Hanyang University, Seongdong-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chiba, J. [Department of Physics, Tokyo University of Science, Noda, Chiba (Japan); Chikawa, M. [Department of Physics, Kinki University, Higashi Osaka, Osaka (Japan); Cho, W. R. [Department of Physics, Yonsei University, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Fujii, H. [Institute of Particle and Nuclear Studies, KEK, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Fujii, T. [Graduate School of Science, Osaka City University, Osaka (Japan); Fukushima, M. [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba (Japan); and others

    2013-11-10

    We search for correlations between the positions of extragalactic objects and the arrival directions of ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) with primary energy E ≥ 40 EeV as observed by the surface detector array of the Telescope Array (TA) experiment during the first 40 months of operation. We examine several public astronomical object catalogs, including the Veron-Cetty and Veron catalog of active galactic nuclei. We count the number of TA events correlated with objects in each catalog as a function of three parameters: the maximum angular separation between a TA event and an object, the minimum energy of the events, and the maximum redshift of the objects. We determine the combination of these parameters that maximizes the correlations, and we calculate the probability of having the same levels of correlations from an isotropic distribution of UHECR arrival directions. No statistically significant correlations are found when penalties for scanning over the above parameters and for searching in several catalogs are taken into account.

  4. Some techniques of correlation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allas, R.G.

    1976-01-01

    Some general remarks concerning correlation techniques are made. Most of the remarks are limited to correlated pairs of charged particles. The relatively simple system 3 He + 3 H → A + B + C, where all possible charged particle pairs A,B are detected and particle C is left undetected either charged or neutral, is considered. (G.T.H.)

  5. Noise correlations in cosmic microwave background experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodelson, Scott; Kosowsky, Arthur; Myers, Steven T.

    1995-01-01

    Many analysis of microwave background experiments neglect the correlation of noise in different frequency of polarization channels. We show that these correlations, should they be present, can lead to serve misinterpretation of an experiment. In particular, correlated noise arising from either electronics or atmosphere may mimic a cosmic signal. We quantify how the likelihood function for a given experiment varies with noise correlation, using both simple analytic models and actual data. For a typical microwave background anisotropy experiment, noise correlations at the level of 1% of the overall noise can seriously reduce the significance of a given detection.

  6. Inequalities for nonideal correlation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fine, A.

    1991-01-01

    This paper addresses the inefficiency loophole in the Bell theorem. The author examines factorizable stochastic models for the Bell inequalities, where they allow the detection efficiency to depend both on the hidden state of the measured system and also its passage through an analyzer. They show that, nevertheless, if the efficiency functions are symmetric between the two wings of the experiment, one can dispense with supplementary assumptions and derive new inequalities that enable the models to be tested even for highly inefficient experiments

  7. Quantum correlations in connected multipartite Bell experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavakoli, Armin

    2016-01-01

    Bell experiments measure correlations between outcomes of a number of observers measuring on a shared physical state emitted from a single source. Quantum correlations arising in such Bell experiments have been intensively studied over the last decades. Much less is known about the nature of quantum correlations arising in network structures beyond Bell experiments. Such networks can involve many independent sources emitting states to observers in accordance with the network configuration. Here, we will study classical and quantum correlations in a family of networks which can be regarded as compositions of several independent multipartite Bell experiments connected together through a central node. For such networks we present tight Bell-type inequalities which are satisfied by all classical correlations. We study properties of the violations of our inequalities by probability distributions arising in quantum theory. (paper)

  8. Rapidity and multiplicity correlations in high energy hadronic collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heiselberg, H.

    1993-01-01

    Rapidity and multiplicity correlations of particle production in high energy hadronic collisions are studied. A simple model including short range correlations in rapidity due to clustering and long range correlations due to energy conservation is able to describe the two-body correlation functions well hadron-nucleon collisions around lab energies of 250 GeV. In this model fractional moments are calculated and compared to data. The strong rise of the factorial moments in rapidity intervals by size δy∝1 can be explained by long and short range correlation alone whereas the factorial moments approach a constant value at very small δy due to lack of correlations also in agreement with experiment. There is therefore no need for introducing intermittency in the particle production in hadronic collisions at these energies. (orig.)

  9. Energy flux correlations and moving mirrors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, L.H.; Roman, Thomas A.

    2004-01-01

    We study the quantum stress tensor correlation function for a massless scalar field in a flat two-dimensional spacetime containing a moving mirror. We construct the correlation functions for right-moving and left-moving fluxes for an arbitrary trajectory, and then specialize them to the case of a mirror trajectory for which the expectation value of the stress tensor describes a pair of delta-function pulses, one of negative energy and one of positive energy. The flux correlation function describes the fluctuations around this mean stress tensor, and reveals subtle changes in the correlations between regions where the mean flux vanishes

  10. Correlation energy generating potentials for molecular hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, B.S.; Thakkar, A.J.

    1985-01-01

    A variety of local correlation energy functionals are currently in use. All of them depend, to some extent, on modeling the correlation energy of a homogeneous electron fluid. Since atomic and molecular charge densities are neither uniform nor slowly varying, it is important to attempt to use known high accuracy wave functions to learn about correlation energy functionals appropriate to such systems. We have extended the definition of the correlation energy generating potentials V/sub c/ introduced by Ros. A charge density response to correlation has been allowed for by inclusion of an electron--nuclear component V/sup e/n/sub c/ in addition to the electron--electron component V/sup e/e/sub c/. Two different definitions of V/sup e/n/sub c/ are given. We present the first calculations of V/sub c/ for a molecular system: H 2 . The results show that V/sup e/n/sub c/, in either definition, is by no means negligible. Moreover, V/sup e/e/sub c/ and both forms of V/sup e/n/sub c/ show significant nonlocal dependence on the charge density. Calculations with ten different model correlation energy functionals show that none of them is particularly sensitive to the charge density. However, they are quite sensitive to the parametrization of the electron fluid correlation energy. The schemes which include self-interaction corrections (SIC) are found to be superior to those of Kohn--Sham type. The correlation energy generating potentials implied by the SIC type and empirical correlation energy functionals are found to correspond roughly to averages of one of the accurate potentials

  11. The energy-time uncertainty principle and the EPR paradox: Experiments involving correlated two-photon emission in parametric down-conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiao, Raymond Y.; Kwiat, Paul G.; Steinberg, Aephraim M.

    1992-01-01

    The energy-time uncertainty principle is on a different footing than the momentum position uncertainty principle: in contrast to position, time is a c-number parameter, and not an operator. As Aharonov and Bohm have pointed out, this leads to different interpretations of the two uncertainty principles. In particular, one must distinguish between an inner and an outer time in the definition of the spread in time, delta t. It is the inner time which enters the energy-time uncertainty principle. We have checked this by means of a correlated two-photon light source in which the individual energies of the two photons are broad in spectra, but in which their sum is sharp. In other words, the pair of photons is in an entangled state of energy. By passing one member of the photon pair through a filter with width delta E, it is observed that the other member's wave packet collapses upon coincidence detection to a duration delta t, such that delta E(delta t) is approximately equal to planks constant/2 pi, where this duration delta t is an inner time, in the sense of Aharonov and Bohm. We have measured delta t by means of a Michelson interferometer by monitoring the visibility of the fringes seen in coincidence detection. This is a nonlocal effect, in the sense that the two photons are far away from each other when the collapse occurs. We have excluded classical-wave explanations of this effect by means of triple coincidence measurements in conjunction with a beam splitter which follows the Michelson interferometer. Since Bell's inequalities are known to be violated, we believe that it is also incorrect to interpret this experimental outcome as if energy were a local hidden variable, i.e., as if each photon, viewed as a particle, possessed some definite but unknown energy before its detection.

  12. Angular correlations and high energy evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovner, Alex; Lublinsky, Michael

    2011-01-01

    We address the question of to what extent JIMWLK evolution is capable of taking into account angular correlations in a high energy hadronic wave function. Our conclusion is that angular (and indeed other) correlations in the wave function cannot be reliably calculated without taking into account Pomeron loops in the evolution. As an example we study numerically the energy evolution of angular correlations between dipole scattering amplitudes in the framework of the large N c approximation to JIMWLK evolution (the 'projectile dipole model'). Target correlations are introduced via averaging over an (isotropic) ensemble of anisotropic initial conditions. We find that correlations disappear very quickly with rapidity even inside the saturation radius. This is in accordance with our physical picture of JIMWLK evolution. The actual correlations inside the saturation radius in the target QCD wave function, on the other hand, should remain sizable at any rapidity.

  13. Two-particle correlations at FNAL and ISR energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darriulat, P.

    1975-01-01

    Some recent experimental results concerning the cluster structure of hadronic final states at high incident energies are reviewed. Results of experiments on angular correlations, both rapidity correlations and joint azimuth-rapidity correlations, in the central region, are discussed. Recent evidence for local compensation of charges and new data on resonance production are reviewed. Leading and high transverse momentum clusters, in as much as they may somehow be related to central clusters, are dealt with briefly. (U.K.)

  14. An Experiment on Wind Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardo, Vincenzo; Fiordilino, Emilio; Gallitto, Aurelio Agliolo; Aglieco, Pasquale

    2012-01-01

    We discuss an experiment on wind energy performed with home-made apparatus. The experiment reproduces a laboratory windmill, which can pump water from a lower level to a higher one. By measuring the gain of the gravitational potential energy of the pumped water, one can determine the power extracted from the wind. The activity was carried out with…

  15. Energy Experiments for STEM Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanchi, John

    2011-03-01

    Texas Christian University (TCU) is developing an undergraduate program that prepares students to become engineers with an emphasis in energy systems. One of the courses in the program is a technical overview of traditional energy (coal, oil and gas), nuclear energy, and renewable energy that requires as a pre-requisite two semesters of calculus-based physics. Energy experiments are being developed that will facilitate student involvement and provide hands-on learning opportunities. Students participating in the course will improve their understanding of energy systems; be introduced to outstanding scientific and engineering problems; learn about the role of energy in a global and societal context; and evaluate contemporary issues associated with energy. This talk will present the status of experiments being developed for the technical energy survey course.

  16. 4π detector for correlation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorndike, A.M.

    1975-01-01

    A conceptual design of a 4π detector for ISA-BELLE involves a counter hodoscope with 302 elements and an array of proportional wire chambers with 8950 wires. Such a detector could be used for correlation experiments and measurements of total cross section, as has been done by the Pisa-Stony Brook group at the ISR. (U.S.)

  17. Angular correlations near the Fermi energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, D.; Cebra, D.A.; Karn, J.

    1988-01-01

    Angular correlations between light particles have been studied to probe the extent to which a thermally equilibrated system is formed in heavy ion collisions near the Fermi energy. Single-light-particle inclusive energy spectra and two-particle large-angle correlations were measured for 40 and 50 MeV/nucleon C+C, Ag, and Au. The single-particle inclusive energy spectra are well fit by a three moving source parametrization. Two-particle large-angle correlations are shown to be consistent with emission from a thermally equilibrated source when the effects of momentum conservation are considered. Single-particle inclusive spectra and light-particle correlations at small relative momentum were measured for 35 MeV/nucleon N+Ag. Source radii were extracted from the two-particle correlation functions and were found to be consistent with previous measurements using two-particle correlations and the coalescence model. The temperature of the emitting source was extracted from the relative populations of states using the quantum statistical model and was found to be 4.8/sub -2.4//sup +2.8/ MeV, compared to the 14 MeV temperature extracted from the slopes of the kinetic energy spectra

  18. Incident energy dependence of pt correlations at relativistic energies

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, J; Ahammed, Z; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Badyal, S K; Bai, Y; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A; Bellwied, R; Berger, J; Bezverkhny, B I; Bharadwaj, S; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhatia, V S; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Billmeier, A; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Boucham, A; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Bravar, A; Bystersky, M; Cadman, R V; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca-Sanchez, M; Castillo, J; Catu, O; Cebra, D; Chajecki, Z; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, Y; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Das, S; Daugherity, M; De Moura, M M; Dedovich, T G; Derevshchikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Dogra, S M; Dong, W J; Dong, X; Draper, J E; Du, F; Dubey, A K; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Dutta, M R; Mazumdar; Eckardt, V; Edwards, W R; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Estienne, M; Fachini, P; Faivre, J; Fatemi, R; Fedorisin, J; Filimonov, K; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fine, V; Fisyak, Yu; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Gaillard, L; Gans, J; Ganti, M S; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; González, J E; Gos, H; Grachov, O; Grebenyuk, O; Grosnick, D P; Guertin, S M; Guo, Y; Sen-Gupta, A; Gutíerrez, T D; Hallman, T J; Hamed, A; Hardtke, D; Harris, J W; Heinz, M; Henry, T W; Hepplemann, S; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Huang, H Z; Huang, S L; Hughes, E W; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Jedynak, M; Jiang, H; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kang, K; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Khodyrev, V Yu; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Kislov, E M; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kowalik, K L; Krämer, M; Kravtsov, P; Kravtsov, V I; Krüger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kumar, A; Kutuev, R K; Kuznetsov, A A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lehocka, S; Le Vine, M J; Li, C; Li, Q; Li, Y; Lin, G; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, H; Liu, L; Liu, Q J; Liu, Z; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Long, H; Longacre, R S; López-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Lu, Y; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, G L; Ma, J G; Ma, Y G; Magestro, D; Mahajan, S; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Mangotra, L K; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Marx, J N; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McClain, C J; McShane, T S; Meissner, F; Melnik, Yu M; Meschanin, A; Miller, M L; Minaev, N G; Mironov, C; Mischke, A; Mishra, D K; Mitchell, J; Mohanty, B; Molnár, L; Moore, C F; Morozov, D A; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nayak, S K; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Netrakanti, P K; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, Grazyna Janina; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Pal, S K; Panebratsev, Yu A; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Peitzmann, T; Perevozchikov, V; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Phatak, S C; Picha, R; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potekhin, M V; Potrebenikova, E V; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C A; Putschke, J; Rakness, G; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D M; Reid, J G; Reinnarth, J; Renault, G; Retière, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L; Russcher, M; Sahoo, R; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sarsour, M; Savin, I; Sazhin, P S; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schweda, K; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Shao, W; Sharma, M; Shen, W Q; Shestermanov, K E; Shimansky, S S; Sichtermann, E P; Simon, F; Singaraju, R N; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sood, G; Sørensen, P; Sowinski, J; Speltz, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stadnik, A; Stanislaus, T D S; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M N; Stringfellow, B C; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E R; Suire, C; Sumbera, M; Surrow, B; Swanger, M; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tarnowsky, T J; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Timoshenko, S; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tsai, O D; Ulery, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; Van Leeuwen, M; Van der Molen, A M; Varma, R; Vasilevski, I M; Vasilev, A N; Vernet, R; Vigdor, S E; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Waggoner, W T; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Wang, Z M; Ward, H; Watson, J W; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wetzler, A; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Wu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Xu, Z Z; Yamamoto, E; Yepes, P; Yurevich, V I; Zborovský, I; Zhang, H; Zhang, W M; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zubarev, A N

    2005-01-01

    We present results for two-particle transverse momentum correlations, , as a function of event centrality for Au+Au collisions at sqrt(sNN) = 20, 62, 130, and 200 GeV at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. We observe correlations decreasing with centrality that are similar at all four incident energies. The correlations multiplied by the multiplicity density increase with incident energy and the centrality dependence may show evidence of processes such as thermalization, minijet production, or the saturation of transverse flow. The square root of the correlations divided by the event-wise average transverse momentum per event shows little or no beam energy dependence and generally agrees with previous measurements at the Super Proton Synchrotron.

  19. Energy correlations for mixed rotational bands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doessing, T.

    1985-01-01

    A schematic model for the mixing of rotational bands above the yrast line in well deformed nuclei is considered. Many-particle configurations of a rotating mean field form basis bands, and these are subsequently mixed due to a two body residual interaction. The energy interval over which a basis band is spread out increases with increasing excitation energy above the yrast line. Conversely, the B(E2) matrix element for rotational decay out of one of the mixed band states is spread over an interval which is predicted to become more narrow with increasing excitation energy. Finally, the implication of band mixing for γ-ray energy correlations is briefly discussed. (orig.)

  20. Correlation between renew able energy source's energy output and load

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, G.H.M.; El-Zeftawy, A.A.

    1996-01-01

    The common problem to all renew energy sources (RESs) is the mismatch between their energy output and load demand. In remote areas, the solution of this problem is in general employing a small diesel-generator or a storage battery. But, the storage battery is a major cost element of RESs and small diesel-generator is unreliable and costly. Therefore, a proposed technique has been introduced in this work to determine correlation between the energy output of wind energy systems (WES) and isolated loads. solar photovoltaic power system (PVS) and two of energy storage facilities are used here for this correlation. The proposed technique includes also two models for optimizing the generation and costs of WES accompanied with PVS, storage battery and water storage (reservoir) to accommodate an isolated load. The proposed technique is applied with the dynamic programming to coordinate the energy output of a WES with residential and pumping load in remote area of egypt. The results of this application reveal that minimization of both capacity of the storage battery and the whole power system cost are obtained. 4 figs

  1. New angles on energy correlation functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moult, Ian; Necib, Lina; Thaler, Jesse

    2016-12-01

    Jet substructure observables, designed to identify specific features within jets, play an essential role at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), both for searching for signals beyond the Standard Model and for testing QCD in extreme phase space regions. In this paper, we systematically study the structure of infrared and collinear safe substructure observables, defining a generalization of the energy correlation functions to probe n-particle correlations within a jet. These generalized correlators provide a flexible basis for constructing new substructure observables optimized for specific purposes. Focusing on three major targets of the jet substructure community — boosted top tagging, boosted W/Z/H tagging, and quark/gluon discrimination — we use power-counting techniques to identify three new series of powerful discriminants: M i , N i , and U i . The M i series is designed for use on groomed jets, providing a novel example of observables with improved discrimination power after the removal of soft radiation. The N i series behave parametrically like the N -subjettiness ratio observables, but are defined without respect to subjet axes, exhibiting improved behavior in the unresolved limit. Finally, the U i series improves quark/gluon discrimination by using higher-point correlators to simultaneously probe multiple emissions within a jet. Taken together, these observables broaden the scope for jet substructure studies at the LHC.

  2. New angles on energy correlation functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moult, Ian [Berkeley Center for Theoretical Physics, University of California,Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Theoretical Physics Group, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory,Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Center for Theoretical Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology,Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Necib, Lina; Thaler, Jesse [Center for Theoretical Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology,Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2016-12-29

    Jet substructure observables, designed to identify specific features within jets, play an essential role at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), both for searching for signals beyond the Standard Model and for testing QCD in extreme phase space regions. In this paper, we systematically study the structure of infrared and collinear safe substructure observables, defining a generalization of the energy correlation functions to probe n-particle correlations within a jet. These generalized correlators provide a flexible basis for constructing new substructure observables optimized for specific purposes. Focusing on three major targets of the jet substructure community — boosted top tagging, boosted W/Z/H tagging, and quark/gluon discrimination — we use power-counting techniques to identify three new series of powerful discriminants: M{sub i}, N{sub i}, and U{sub i}. The M{sub i} series is designed for use on groomed jets, providing a novel example of observables with improved discrimination power after the removal of soft radiation. The N{sub i} series behave parametrically like the N-subjettiness ratio observables, but are defined without respect to subjet axes, exhibiting improved behavior in the unresolved limit. Finally, the U{sub i} series improves quark/gluon discrimination by using higher-point correlators to simultaneously probe multiple emissions within a jet. Taken together, these observables broaden the scope for jet substructure studies at the LHC.

  3. Correlations in hadron-hadron interactions at high energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Huu Khanh

    1978-01-01

    Some main features of the experimental results on the correlations in hadron-hadron interactions at high energy are considered. Particular attention is paid to the long-range correlation, short-range correlation and Bose-Einstein effect. Long-range correlations are confirmed by the variation of the number of charged particles produced in the final state depending on energy, violation of Koba-Nielsen- Olesen scaling and the analysis of correlation betWeen the numbers of charged particles emitted in the forward and backward hemispheres. Short-range correlations are discussed from the point of view of ISR pp, 195 GeV/c pN and 32 GeV/c k + p experiments. Bose-Einstein effects are studied up to now only between pions. Pions are not produced directly but from the decay of heavier objects. Some experimental results seem to support the evidence for dynamical long-range correlations. Most of the data are compatible with the independent cluster model

  4. Thermal energy management process experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollendorf, S.

    1984-01-01

    The thermal energy management processes experiment (TEMP) will demonstrate that through the use of two-phase flow technology, thermal systems can be significantly enhanced by increasing heat transport capabilities at reduced power consumption while operating within narrow temperature limits. It has been noted that such phenomena as excess fluid puddling, priming, stratification, and surface tension effects all tend to mask the performance of two-phase flow systems in a 1-g field. The flight experiment approach would be to attack the experiment to an appropriate mounting surface with a 15 to 20 meter effective length and provide a heat input and output station in the form of heaters and a radiator. Using environmental data, the size, location, and orientation of the experiment can be optimized. The approach would be to provide a self-contained panel and mount it to the STEP through a frame. A small electronics package would be developed to interface with the STEP avionics for command and data handling. During the flight, heaters on the evaporator will be exercised to determine performance. Flight data will be evaluated against the ground tests to determine any anomalous behavior.

  5. Electron correlation energy in confined two-electron systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, C.L. [Chemistry Program, Centre College, 600 West Walnut Street, Danville, KY 40422 (United States); Montgomery, H.E., E-mail: ed.montgomery@centre.ed [Chemistry Program, Centre College, 600 West Walnut Street, Danville, KY 40422 (United States); Sen, K.D. [School of Chemistry, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500 046 (India); Thompson, D.C. [Chemistry Systems and High Performance Computing, Boehringer Ingelheim Pharamaceuticals Inc., 900 Ridgebury Road, Ridgefield, CT 06877 (United States)

    2010-09-27

    Radial, angular and total correlation energies are calculated for four two-electron systems with atomic numbers Z=0-3 confined within an impenetrable sphere of radius R. We report accurate results for the non-relativistic, restricted Hartree-Fock and radial limit energies over a range of confinement radii from 0.05-10a{sub 0}. At small R, the correlation energies approach limiting values that are independent of Z while at intermediate R, systems with Z{>=}1 exhibit a characteristic maximum in the correlation energy resulting from an increase in the angular correlation energy which is offset by a decrease in the radial correlation energy.

  6. Phoenix I energy extraction experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, J.M.; Patterson, E.L.; Tisone, G.C.; Moreno, J.B.

    1980-07-01

    Energy extraction experiments are reported for the Phoenix I amplifier driven by a discharge-initiated oscillator-preamplifier system operating on mixtures of either SF 6 -HI or SF 6 -C 2 H 6 and an electron-beam-initiated intermediate amplifer (lambda-3) fueled with H 2 and F 2 mixtures. When the oscillator-preamplifier system operated with mixtures of SF 6 -HI the input spectrum to the Phoenix I amplifier contained approx. 28 P-branch vibrational-rotational lines which were almost identical to the input spectrum from the H 2 -F 2 fueled oscillator. In this case the energy extraction measurements were essentially the same as the results obtained with the spectrum produced using H 2 and F 2 mixtures. For an input intensity of 10 7 W/cm 2 , 170 J were extracted from the amplifier. With the SF 6 -C 2 H 6 spectrum, extraction was only obtained from the first three excited vibrational levels. This result indicates that most of the energy in the amplifier could be extracted on the first three excited vibrational levels. It is shown that the extraction results can be fit with a simple two level model. The radius of curvature of the beam was estimated using a lateral shearing interferometer. It was found that the Phoenix I amplifier altered the radius of curvature

  7. Energy deregulation: the Vattenfall experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyquist, C.E.

    1999-01-01

    In 1992, Sweden prepared itself for deregulation by transforming Vattenfall, the country's main supplier of energy, from a public utility into a limited liability company. Vattenfall was still 100% owned by the state, but began to operate as a commercial entity with a separate board of directors. On January 1, 1996, Sweden and Finland deregulated, and the three Nordic countries - Norway, Sweden and Denmark - became a completely open market. Beginning November 1, 1999, Sweden will introduce simplified metering, bringing competition directly to consumers, which represents the purest and most advanced form of electricity competition, forcing Vattenfall and its peers to fight for the loyalty of customers from the smallest retail household upwards. As a central participant in deregulation, Vattenfall was faced with some major challenges. In essence, Vattenfall had to evolve from a parochial Swedish public utility into a pan-European energy services company. The transition was successful and Vattenfall today represents about 20% of Scandinavia's generation capacity, with operations that are about 1/2 the size of those of Ontario Hydro. Vattenfall had to take a number of steps to get ready for a fully competitive retail market. First it established a market oriented group organization based on three units: Vattenfall Electricity Generation, Vattenfall Energy Market, and Vattenfall Electricity Networks and Services. Second it expanded its relationship with its customers. Third it adjusted to the fact that electricity deregulation led to an immediate generation surplus. The main lessons learned from the experience are summarized

  8. Convergence of third order correlation energy in atoms and molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Kalju; Granovsky, Alex A; Noga, Jozef

    2007-01-30

    We have investigated the convergence of third order correlation energy within the hierarchies of correlation consistent basis sets for helium, neon, and water, and for three stationary points of hydrogen peroxide. This analysis confirms that singlet pair energies converge much slower than triplet pair energies. In addition, singlet pair energies with (aug)-cc-pVDZ and (aug)-cc-pVTZ basis sets do not follow a converging trend and energies with three basis sets larger than aug-cc-pVTZ are generally required for reliable extrapolations of third order correlation energies, making so the explicitly correlated R12 calculations preferable.

  9. Alleviating energy poverty: Indian experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Garima

    2010-09-15

    Energy services play an important role in human welfare. India faces acute energy poverty indicating lack of access of clean energy fuels. Access to electricity is limited to 56% households in India and about 89% of rural households depend on polluting energy sources. Energy poverty impacts income poverty as poor find it difficult to acquire high priced cleaner fuels. It also adversely impacts the socio economic conditions of women. The paper highlights the linkage of energy poverty with income poverty and gender inequality. It analyses measures taken to alleviate energy poverty and recommends regulatory and policy measures as way forward.

  10. Symmetry energy of nucleonic matter with tensor correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hen, Or; Li, Bao-An; Guo, Wen-Jun; Weinstein, L. B.; Piasetzky, Eli

    2015-02-01

    The nuclear symmetry energy (Esym(ρ ) ) is a vital ingredient of our understanding of many processes, from heavy-ion collisions to neutron stars structure. While the total nuclear symmetry energy at nuclear saturation density (ρ0) is relatively well determined, its value at supranuclear densities is not. The latter can be better constrained by separately examining its kinetic and potential terms and their density dependencies. The kinetic term of the symmetry energy, Esymkin(ρ0) , equals the difference in the per-nucleon kinetic energy between pure neutron matter (PNM) and symmetric nuclear matter (SNM), often calculated using a simple Fermi gas model. However, experiments show that tensor force induced short-range correlations (SRC) between proton-neutron pairs shift nucleons to high momentum in SNM, where there are equal numbers of neutrons and protons, but have almost no effect in PNM. We present an approximate analytical expression for Esymkin(ρ0) of correlated nucleonic matter. In our model, Esymkin(ρ0) =-10 MeV, which differs significantly from +12.5 MeV for the widely-used free Fermi gas model. This result is consistent with our analysis of recent data on the free proton-to-neutron ratios measured in intermediate energy nucleus-nucleus collisions as well as with microscopic many-body calculations, and previous phenomenological extractions. We then use our calculated Esymkin(ρ ) in combination with the known total symmetry energy and its density dependence at saturation density to constrain the value and density dependence of the potential part and to extrapolate the total symmetry energy to supranuclear densities.

  11. Multiparticle correlations and intermittency in high energy collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozek, P.

    1992-01-01

    The analysis of the intermittency signal observed in high energy experiments is presented using multiparticle distributions and correlation functions. The effect of the dimensional projection of the multiparticle distributions on one or two-dimensional subspace is discussed. The structure of the multiparticle cumulants is analyzed for the DELPHI e + e - annihilation data. The model of spatiotemporal intermittency is discussed in details and is shown to reproduce qualitatively the dependence of the intermittency strength on the target and projectile nuclei. A 1-dimensional (1D) cellular-automaton and a 1D forest-fire model is studied. On the example of the noncritical 1D Ising model the difficulties of the scaled factorial moment (SFM) method in extracting genuine scaling behaviour is illustrated. All these studies could serve as tools to test the sensibility of the SFM method as used in the analysis of the high energy production. (K.A.) 122 refs.; 38 figs.; 3 tabs

  12. Experiences in mainstreaming alternative energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabraal, A.

    1997-12-01

    The author discusses efforts by the Asia Alternative Energy Unit (ASTAE) of the World Bank in supporting alternative energy source projects in Asia. Energy growth rates have been as high as 18% per year, with power capacity doubling each decade in the 1960`s, 70`s and 80`s. Much of this has come from fossil fuel projects coupled with major hydroelectric projects. One consequence is developing air pollution loads originating in Asia. ASTAE has been supporting pilot programs in applying alternative energy sources. The goal has been to mainstream renewable energy sources in World Bank operations, by working with managers from different countries to: include renewable energy in country assistance strategies and sectorial development plans; provide assistance to renewable energy initiatives; expand initiatives to new countries, sectors and technologies.

  13. Energy efficiency initiatives: Indian experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dey, Dipankar [ICFAI Business School, Kolkata, (IBS-K) (India)

    2007-07-01

    India, with a population of over 1.10 billion is one of the fastest growing economies of the world. As domestic sources of different conventional commercial energy are drying up, dependence on foreign energy sources is increasing. There exists a huge potential for saving energy in India. After the first 'oil shock' (1973), the government of India realized the need for conservation of energy and a 'Petroleum Conservation Action Group' was formed in 1976. Since then many initiatives aiming at energy conservation and improving energy efficiency, have been undertaken (the establishment of Petroleum Conservation Research Association in 1978; the notification of Eco labelling scheme in 1991; the formation of Bureau of Energy Efficiency in 2002). But no such initiative was successful. In this paper an attempt has been made to analyze the changing importance of energy conservation/efficiency measures which have been initiated in India between 1970 and 2005.The present study tries to analyze the limitations and the reasons of failure of those initiatives. The probable reasons are: fuel pricing mechanism (including subsidies), political factors, corruption and unethical practices, influence of oil and related industry lobbies - both internal and external, the economic situation and the prolonged protection of domestic industries. Further, as India is opening its economy, the study explores the opportunities that the globally competitive market would offer to improve the overall energy efficiency of the economy. The study suggests that the Bureau of Energy Efficiency (BEE) - the newly formed nodal agency for improving energy efficiency of the economy may be made an autonomous institution where intervention from the politicians would be very low. For proper implementation of different initiatives to improve energy efficiency, BEE should involve more the civil societies (NGO) from the inception to the implementation stage of the programs. The paper also

  14. Energy deregulation: lessons from the American experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiam, L.

    1997-01-01

    This article presents a brief history of US energy regulation, considers some of the important issues arising from the US experience and finally, suggests some lessons which Australia might draw from the US deregulation of energy industries. 5 refs

  15. Energy Inputs Uncertainty: Total Amount, Distribution and Correlation Between Different Forms of Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yue

    2014-01-01

    Describes solar energy inputs contributing to ionospheric and thermospheric weather processes, including total energy amounts, distributions and the correlation between particle precipitation and Poynting flux.

  16. The experience of energy risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Midden, C.J.H.; Daamen, D.D.L.; Verplanken, B.

    1983-09-01

    In this study attention has been paid to the following questions: What is the distribution of attitudes towards the widespread application of coal, uranium and wind; How can these attitudes be explained with (clusters of) beliefs about the energy systems; How are behavioral intentions determined by attitudes and normative influences; What is the relevance of factors like involvement with the subject, the perceived personal effectivity to influence collective decisions to use coal, uranium or wind on a large scale, the level of information about these energy systems, the different ways to obtain this information, the degree to which one has a vivid and detailed image of the possible negative consequences of the use of these energy systems; Are there people who feel threatened by the use of these energy systems. Which ways of coping with this threat can be identified; What are the preferences and expectations with respect to the use of energy options in the future; Are there differences in risk perception between various population-categories which differ with respect to sex, age, education, income, religion, political conviction, distance between dwelling place and the nearest electrical power station. The report concludes with an elaborate discussion of the results and suggestions for energy policy and research. (Auth.)

  17. Spectroscopic Needs for Imaging Dark Energy Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, Jeffrey A.; Abate, Alexandra; Abdalla, Filipe B.; Allam, Sahar; Allen, Steven W.; Ansari, Reza; Bailey, Stephen; Barkhouse, Wayne A.; Beers, Timothy C.; Blanton, Michael R.; Brodwin, Mark; Brownstein, Joel R.; Brunner, Robert J.; Carrasco-Kind, Matias; Cervantes-Cota, Jorge; Chisari, Nora Elisa; Colless, Matthew; Coupon, Jean; Cunha, Carlos E.; Frye, Brenda L.; Gawiser, Eric J.; Gehrels, Neil; Grady, Kevin; Hagen, Alex; Hall, Patrick B.; Hearin, Andrew P.; Hildebrandt, Hendrik; Hirata, Christopher M.; Ho, Shirley; Huterer, Dragan; Ivezic, Zeljko; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Kruk, Jeffrey W.; Lahav, Ofer; Mandelbaum, Rachel; Matthews, Daniel J.; Miquel, Ramon; Moniez, Marc; Moos, H. W.; Moustakas, John; Papovich, Casey; Peacock, John A.; Rhodes, Jason; Ricol, Jean-Stepane; Sadeh, Iftach; Schmidt, Samuel J.; Stern, Daniel K.; Tyson, J. Anthony; Von der Linden, Anja; Wechsler, Risa H.; Wood-Vasey, W. M.; Zentner, A.

    2015-01-01

    .e., to minimize the uncertainty in their mean redshift, RMS dispersion, etc. - rather than to make the moments themselves small. Calibration may be done with the same spectroscopic dataset used for training if that dataset is extremely high in redshift completeness (i.e., no populations of galaxies to be used in analyses are systematically missed). Accurate photo-z calibration is necessary for all imaging experiments; Requirements: If extremely low levels of systematic incompleteness (<∼0.1%) are attained in training samples, the same datasets described above should be sufficient for calibration. However, existing deep spectroscopic surveys have failed to yield secure redshifts for 30-60% of targets, so that would require very large improvements over past experience. This incompleteness would be a limiting factor for training, but catastrophic for calibration. If <∼0.1% incompleteness is not attainable, the best known option for calibration of photometric redshifts is to utilize cross-correlation statistics in some form. The most direct method for this uses cross-correlations between positions on the sky of bright objects of known spectroscopic redshift with the sample of objects that we wish to calibrate the redshift distribution for, measured as a function of spectroscopic z. For such a calibration, redshifts of ∼100,000 objects over at least several hundred square degrees, spanning the full redshift range of the samples used for dark energy, would be necessary; and Options: The proposed BAO experiment eBOSS would provide sufficient spectroscopy for basic calibrations, particularly for ongoing and near-future imaging experiments. The planned DESI experiment would provide excellent calibration with redundant cross-checks, but will start after the conclusion of some imaging projects. An extension of DESI to the Southern hemisphere would provide the best possible calibration from cross-correlation methods for DES and LSST. We thus anticipate that our two primary

  18. Multiparticle correlations and intermittency in high energy collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Bozek, P

    1992-01-01

    In this work the analysis of the intermittency signal observed in high energy experi- ments is done using multiparticle distributions and correlation functions. The effect of the dimensional projection of the multiparticle distributions on one or two-dimensional subspace is discussed. The structure of the multiparticle cumulants is analyzed for the DELPHI e + e~ annihilation data. The language of the self-similar distribution func- tions, which is used in this work, is shown to be largely equivalent to the well known a-model. In the case of the ultrarelativistic nuclear collisions, where the Monte-Carlo simulations fail to reproduce the data, we argue that the observed intermittency pattern is a signal of some nonlinear effect beyond the simple superposition of nucleon-nucleon collisions. The model of spatiotemporal intermittency is discussed in details and is shown to reproduce qualitatively the dependence of t...

  19. Parity violation experiments at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Oers, W.T.H.

    1996-06-01

    The status of the TRIUMF 221 MeV proton-proton violation experiment is reviewed. Several other proton-proton parity violation experiments in the in the intermediate energy range, currently in various stages of preparation, are discussed. A new experiment at an energy of 5.13 GeV (and if confirmed also at an energy of tens of GeV) is needed to follow on the earlier unexpected large result obtained at 5.13 GeV. (author)

  20. Electronic configurations and energies in some thermodynamically correlated laves compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, G.M.

    1979-04-01

    The known electronic configurations of simple elements in Laves compounds are correlated with those of the more complex systems to determine their electronic configurations and gaseous state promotion energies

  1. A semiclassical treatment of correlation energy for nuclear systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, M.

    1988-01-01

    Starting with the separation of the many-body density operator in two parts, one describing the one-body aspects of the full density and the other containing all dynamic correlations information, the semiclassical approximation for the system correlation energy, was calculated. It is showm that, in this case, the Gaussian Wave Packets Phase Space Representation is more convenient than the Wely-Wigner Rrepresentation for the analysis of the semiclassical correlation energy. Using a phenomenological interaction, the correlation energy to the nuclear matter and some simmetric finite nucleus was calculated. The Fermi Surface Diffusivity, was also calculated. Finally, from the relation between this theory and the pertubation theory, we have done some considerations about the viability on the local densities expansion for energy functionals. (author) [pt

  2. Experiments in intermediate energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dehnhard, D.

    2003-01-01

    Research in experimental nuclear physics was done from 1979 to 2002 primarily at intermediate energy facilities that provide pion, proton, and kaon beams. Particularly successful has been the work at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) on unraveling the neutron and proton contributions to nuclear ground state and transition densities. This work was done on a wide variety of nuclei and with great detail on the carbon, oxygen, and helium isotopes. Some of the investigations involved the use of polarized targets which allowed the extraction of information on the spin-dependent part of the triangle-nucleon interaction. At the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility (IUCF) we studied proton-induced charge exchange reactions with results of importance to astrophysics and the nuclear few-body problem. During the first few years, the analysis of heavy-ion nucleus scattering data that had been taken prior to 1979 was completed. During the last few years we created hypernuclei by use of a kaon beam at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and an electron beam at Jefferson Laboratory (JLab). The data taken at BNL for a study of the non-mesonic weak decay of the A particle in a nucleus are still under analysis by our collaborators. The work at JLab resulted in the best resolution hypernuclear spectra measured thus far with magnetic spectrometers

  3. Experiments in intermediate energy physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dehnhard, D.

    2003-02-28

    Research in experimental nuclear physics was done from 1979 to 2002 primarily at intermediate energy facilities that provide pion, proton, and kaon beams. Particularly successful has been the work at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) on unraveling the neutron and proton contributions to nuclear ground state and transition densities. This work was done on a wide variety of nuclei and with great detail on the carbon, oxygen, and helium isotopes. Some of the investigations involved the use of polarized targets which allowed the extraction of information on the spin-dependent part of the triangle-nucleon interaction. At the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility (IUCF) we studied proton-induced charge exchange reactions with results of importance to astrophysics and the nuclear few-body problem. During the first few years, the analysis of heavy-ion nucleus scattering data that had been taken prior to 1979 was completed. During the last few years we created hypernuclei by use of a kaon beam at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and an electron beam at Jefferson Laboratory (JLab). The data taken at BNL for a study of the non-mesonic weak decay of the A particle in a nucleus are still under analysis by our collaborators. The work at JLab resulted in the best resolution hypernuclear spectra measured thus far with magnetic spectrometers.

  4. Evaluation of correlative nuclear data at certain energy point

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jianhua; Liu Tingjin.

    1993-01-01

    A method to process correlative nuclear data at certain energy point is presented. The corresponding processing code has also been developed. Using the code, the effects of the correlation have been discussed in detail for the cases of the two and three data. (3 figs.)

  5. Angular correlations and fragmentation in intermediate energy heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kristiansson, Anders.

    1990-05-01

    Intermediate energy heavy-ion collisions have been studied from 35 A MeV up to 94 A MeV at various accelerators. Angular correlations between light particles and detection of projectile- and target-fragments have been used to investigate the reaction mechanisms in this transition region between low- and high energy. An excess of correlations is observed in the particle-particle elastic scattering plane. This excess increases with particle mass and can be understood in terms of momentum conservation. The fragmentation measurements gives an indication that both energy and momentum transfer to the spectator volumes does occur. (author)

  6. Correlation of energy balance method to dynamic pipe rupture analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuo, H.H.; Durkee, M.

    1983-01-01

    When using an energy balance approach in the design of pipe rupture restraints for nuclear power plants, the NRC specifies in its Standard Review Plan 3.6.2 that the input energy to the system must be multiplied by a factor of 1.1 unless a lower value can be justified. Since the energy balance method is already quite conservative, an across-the-board use of 1.1 to amplify the energy input appears unneccessary. The paper's purpose is to show that this 'correlation factor' could be substantially less than unity if certain design parameters are met. In this paper, result of nonlinear dynamic analyses were compared to the results of the corresponding analyses based on the energy balance method which assumes constant blowdown forces and rigid plastic material properties. The appropriate correlation factors required to match the energy balance results with the dynamic analyses results were correlated to design parameters such as restraint location from the break, yield strength of the energy absorbing component, and the restraint gap. It is shown that the correlation factor is related to a single nondimensional design parameter and can be limited to a value below unity if appropriate design parameters are chosen. It is also shown that the deformation of the restraints can be related to dimensionless system parameters. This, therefore, allows the maximum restraint deformation to be evaluated directly for design purposes. (orig.)

  7. Stuart Energy's experiences in developing 'Hydrogen Energy Station' infrastructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crilly, B.

    2004-01-01

    'Full text:' With over 50 years experience, Stuart Energy is the global leader in the development, manufacture and integration of multi-use hydrogen infrastructure products that use the Company's proprietary IMET hydrogen generation water electrolysis technology. Stuart Energy offers its customers the power of hydrogen through its integrated Hydrogen Energy Station (HES) that provides clean, secure and distributed hydrogen. The HES can be comprised of five modules: hydrogen generation, compression, storage, fuel dispensing and / or power generation. This paper discusses Stuart Energy's involvement with over 10 stations installed in recent years throughout North America, Asia and Europe while examining the economic and environmental benefits of these systems. (author)

  8. Moderate energy ions for high energy density physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grisham, L.R.

    2004-01-01

    This paper gives the results of a preliminary exploration of whether moderate energy ions (≅0.3-3 MeV/amu) could be useful as modest-cost drivers for high energy density physics experiments. It is found that if the target thickness is chosen so that the ion beam enters and then leaves the target in the vicinity of the peak of the dE/dX (stopping power) curve, high uniformity of energy deposition may be achievable while also maximizing the amount of energy per beam particle deposited within the target

  9. The experience of mathematical beauty and its neural correlates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeki, Semir; Romaya, John Paul; Benincasa, Dionigi M. T.; Atiyah, Michael F.

    2014-01-01

    Many have written of the experience of mathematical beauty as being comparable to that derived from the greatest art. This makes it interesting to learn whether the experience of beauty derived from such a highly intellectual and abstract source as mathematics correlates with activity in the same part of the emotional brain as that derived from more sensory, perceptually based, sources. To determine this, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to image the activity in the brains of 15 mathematicians when they viewed mathematical formulae which they had individually rated as beautiful, indifferent or ugly. Results showed that the experience of mathematical beauty correlates parametrically with activity in the same part of the emotional brain, namely field A1 of the medial orbito-frontal cortex (mOFC), as the experience of beauty derived from other sources. PMID:24592230

  10. Correlation energy for elementary bosons: Physics of the singularity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiau, Shiue-Yuan; Combescot, Monique; Chang, Yia-Chung

    2016-01-01

    We propose a compact perturbative approach that reveals the physical origin of the singularity occurring in the density dependence of correlation energy: like fermions, elementary bosons have a singular correlation energy which comes from the accumulation, through Feynman “bubble” diagrams, of the same non-zero momentum transfer excitations from the free particle ground state, that is, the Fermi sea for fermions and the Bose–Einstein condensate for bosons. This understanding paves the way toward deriving the correlation energy of composite bosons like atomic dimers and semiconductor excitons, by suggesting Shiva diagrams that have similarity with Feynman “bubble” diagrams, the previous elementary boson approaches, which hide this physics, being inappropriate to do so.

  11. Correlation energy for elementary bosons: Physics of the singularity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiau, Shiue-Yuan, E-mail: syshiau@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Department of Physics, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, 701, Taiwan (China); Combescot, Monique [Institut des NanoSciences de Paris, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, CNRS, 4 place Jussieu, 75005 Paris (France); Chang, Yia-Chung, E-mail: yiachang@gate.sinica.edu.tw [Research Center for Applied Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei, 115, Taiwan (China); Department of Physics, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, 701, Taiwan (China)

    2016-04-15

    We propose a compact perturbative approach that reveals the physical origin of the singularity occurring in the density dependence of correlation energy: like fermions, elementary bosons have a singular correlation energy which comes from the accumulation, through Feynman “bubble” diagrams, of the same non-zero momentum transfer excitations from the free particle ground state, that is, the Fermi sea for fermions and the Bose–Einstein condensate for bosons. This understanding paves the way toward deriving the correlation energy of composite bosons like atomic dimers and semiconductor excitons, by suggesting Shiva diagrams that have similarity with Feynman “bubble” diagrams, the previous elementary boson approaches, which hide this physics, being inappropriate to do so.

  12. High energy collisions of nuclei: experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heckman, H.H.

    1977-09-01

    Heavy-ion nuclear reactions with projectile energies up to 2.1 GeV/A are reviewed. The concept of ''rapidity'' is elucidated, and the reactions discussed are divided into sections dealing with target fragmentation, projectile fragmentation, and the intermediate region, with emphasis on the production of light nuclei in high-energy heavy-ion collisions. Target fragmentation experiments using nuclear emulsion and AgCl visual track detectors are also summarized. 18 figures

  13. Correlates of New Graduate Nurses' Experiences of Workplace Mistreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, Emily; Laschinger, Heather K

    2015-10-01

    This study explores correlates of new graduate nurses’ experiences of workplace mistreatment. New graduate nurses’ experiences of workplace mistreatment, such as bullying, coworker incivility, and supervisor incivility, negatively influence nurses’ work and health. It is unclear whether these forms of workplace mistreatment have similar precipitating factors and outcomes. We surveyed 342 new graduate nurses in Ontario to explore correlates of 3 forms of workplace mistreatment. Workplace incivility and bullying were significantly related to authentic leadership, structural empowerment, worklife fit, and psychological capital. Bullying was more strongly related to job satisfaction, emotional exhaustion, and mental and physical health outcomes than supervisor and coworker incivility. New graduate nurses’ experiences of 3 types of workplace mistreatment are related to organizational and health factors, although bullying appears to have stronger negative effects.

  14. Multiparticle correlations and intermittency in high energy collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozek, P.

    1992-01-01

    An analysis of the intermittency signal observed in high energy experiments is presented using multiparticle distributions and correlation functions. The effect of the dimensional projection of the multiparticle distributions on one or two-dimensional subspace is discussed. The structure of the multiparticle cumulants is analyzed for the DELPHI e + e - annihilation data. The model of spatiotemporal intermittency is discussed in details and is shown to reproduce qualitatively the dependence of the intermittency strength on the target and projectile nuclei. A 1-dimensional (lD) cellular-automaton (CA) and a lD forest-fire model is studied. On the example of the noncritical lD Ising model the difficulties of the scaled factorial moment (SFM) method in extracting genuine scaling behaviour are illustrated. The problem of the finite-size effect in connection to the dimensional projection can be easily exemplified in the case of the 2D critical system with conformal symmetry. (R.P.) 122 refs., 38 figs., 3 tabs

  15. Phenomenology of the squeezed hadronic correlations at RHIC energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padula, Sandra S.; Dudek, Danuce M.; Socolowski, Otavio Jr.

    2012-01-01

    We briefly review the basic theoretical results on bosonic back-to-back correlations (bBBC) and compare our predictions with the first experimental search for squeezed correlations of K + K - pairs, performed by PHENIX. The hadronic squeezed correlations are very sensitive to the functional form of the time emission distribution. The comparison is made for three different kaon time distributions. From such comparison we show that the outcome of the experimental search may still be inconclusive but it does not exclude the existence of squeezing effects on hadrons with in-medium modified masses already at RHIC energies. (author)

  16. Color transparency experiments at higher energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filippone, B.W. [Caifornia Inst. of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States)

    1994-04-01

    The phenomena of Color Transparency has recently attracted a significant amount of theoretical (and experimental) interest. With an increase in the CEBAF beam energy to 8 - 10 GeV, important new data on the process could become available. The present status of the experiments and future prospects at CEBAF are discussed.

  17. Low energy antiproton experiments - A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jungmann, KP; Yamazaki, Y; Wada, M

    2005-01-01

    Low energy antiprotons offer excellent opportunities to study properties of fundamental forces and symmetries in nature. Experiments with them can contribute substantially to deepen our fundamental knowledge in atomic, nuclear and particle physics. Searches for new interactions can be carried out by

  18. Plasma thermal energy transport: theory and experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coppi, B.

    Experiments on the transport across the magnetic field of electron thermal energy are reviewed (Alcator, Frascati Torus). In order to explain the experimental results, a transport model is described that reconfirmed the need to have an expression for the local diffusion coefficient with a negative exponent of the electron temperature

  19. Symmetron dark energy in laboratory experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhye, Amol

    2013-01-18

    The symmetron scalar field is a matter-coupled dark energy candidate which effectively decouples from matter in high-density regions through a symmetry restoration. We consider a previously unexplored regime, in which the vacuum mass μ~2.4×10(-3) eV of the symmetron is near the dark energy scale, and the matter coupling parameter M~1 TeV is just beyond standard model energies. Such a field will give rise to a fifth force at submillimeter distances which can be probed by short-range gravity experiments. We show that a torsion pendulum experiment such as Eöt-Wash can exclude symmetrons in this regime for all self-couplings λ is < or approximately equal to 7.5.

  20. Density-scaling exponents and virial potential-energy correlation ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This paper investigates the relation between the density-scaling exponent γ and the virial potential energy correlation coefficient R at several thermodynamic state points in three dimensions for the generalized (2n, n) Lennard-Jones (LJ) system for n = 4, 9, 12, 18, as well as for the standard n = 6 LJ system in two,three, and ...

  1. Jet energy scale uncertainty correlations between ATLAS and CMS at 8 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    CMS and ATLAS Collaborations

    2015-01-01

    An evaluation of the correlations between ATLAS and CMS jet energy scale uncertainties is presented for $\\sqrt{s}=8$ TeV $pp$ collisions recorded in 2012. Uncertainties within each experiment are grouped based on the general type of systematic effect they are intended to cover and the means by which they are derived. Inter-experimental correlation value ranges are established for each corresponding group of uncertainty components. This correlation range is intended to cover the possible correlation values when performing combinations between the two experiments, where the most conservative value obtained from scanning over the correlation range should be used for the final combined measurement. The procedure described here is primarily aimed at single-observable analyses, and has limitations when applied to multi-observable measurements.

  2. Relativistic configuration-interaction calculation of the correlation energies of heliumlike ions. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, K.T.; Chen, M.H.; Johnson, W.R.

    1994-04-01

    A new relativistic configuration-interaction (CI) method using B-spline basis functions has been developed to study the correlation energies of two-electron heliumlike ions. Based on the relativistic no-pair Hamiltonian, the CI equation leads to a symmetric eigenvalue problem involving large, dense matrices. Davidson's method is used to obtain the lowest few eigenenergies and eigenfunctions. Results on transition energies and finite structure splittings for heliumlike ions are in very good agreement with experiment throughout the periodic table

  3. Selection effects on GRB spectral-energy correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nava, Lara; Ghirlanda, Giancarlo; Ghisellini, Gabriele

    2009-01-01

    Instrumental selection effects can act upon the estimates of the peak energy E peak obs , the fluence F and the peak flux P of GRBs. If this were the case, then the correlations involving the corresponding rest frame quantities (i.e. E peak , E obs and the peak luminosity L iso ) would be questioned. We estimated, as a function of E peak obs , the minimum peak flux necessary to trigger a GRB and the minimum fluence a burst must have to determine the value of E peak obs by considering different instruments (BATSE, Swift, BeppoSAX). We find that the latter dominates over the former. We then study the E peak obs -fluence (and flux) correlation in the observer plane. GRBs with redshift show well defined E peak obs -F and E peak obs -P correlations: in this planes the selection effects are present, but do not determine the found correlations. This is not true for Swift GRBs with redshift, for which the spectral analysis threshold does affect their distribution in the observer planes. Extending the sample to GRBs without z, we still find a significant E peak obs -F correlation, although with a larger scatter than that defined by GRBs with redshift. We find that 6% are outliers of the Amati correlation. The E peak obs -P correlation of GRBs with or without redshift is the same and no outlier is found among bursts without redshift.

  4. GRB physics and cosmology with peak energy-intensity correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawant, Disha, E-mail: sawant@fe.infn.it [University of Ferrara, Via Saragat-1, Block C, Ferrara 44122 (Italy); University of Nice, 28 Avenue Valrose, Nice 06103 (France); IRAP Erasmus PhD Program, European Union and INAF - IASF Bologna, Via P. Gobetti 101, Bologna 41125 (Italy); Amati, Lorenzo, E-mail: amati@iasfbo.inaf.it [INAF - IASF Bologna, Via P. Gobetti 101, Bologna 41125 (Italy); ICRANet, Piazzale Aldo Moro-5, Rome 00185 (Italy)

    2015-12-17

    Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) are immensely energetic explosions radiating up to 10{sup 54} erg of energy isotropically (E{sub iso}) and they are observed within a wide range of redshift (from ∼ 0.01 up to ∼ 9). Such enormous power and high redshift point at these phenomena being highly favorable to investigate the history and evolution of our universe. The major obstacle in their application as cosmological study-tools is to find a way to standardize the GRBs, for instance similar to SNe Ia. With respect to this goal, the correlation between spectral peak energy (E{sub p,i}) and the “intensity” is a positively useful and investigated criterion. Moreover, it has been demonstrated that, through the E{sub p,i} – E{sub iso} correlation, the current data set of GRBs can already contribute to the independent evidence of the matter density Ω{sub M} being ∼ 0.3 for a flat universe scenario. We try to inspect and compare the correlations of E{sub p,i} with different intensity indicators (e.g., radiated energy, average and peak luminosity, bolometric vs. monochromatic quantities, etc.) both in terms of intrinsic dispersion and precise estimation of Ω{sub M}. The outcome of such studies are further analyzed in verifying the reliability of the correlations for both GRB physics and their standardization for cosmology.

  5. Determination of αs from jet production rates and energy-energy correlations on the Z0 resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pain, R.

    1990-10-01

    This presentation uses data obtained from the DELPHI experiment at LEP. The strong coupling constant α s is determined in two different analyses of the Z 0 decay into multi-hadronic final states. The first uses the jet production rates and the second the asymmetry of energy-energy correlations. Both methods compare experimental data with second order of perturbative QCD predictions. The results are α s (M z ) = 0.114 ± 0.003 ± 0.004 ± 0.012 using the jet rates method and α s (M z ) = 0.106 ± 0.003 ± 0.003 ± 0.003 from the energy-energy correlations method

  6. Electron correlations in narrow energy bands: modified polar model approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Didukh

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The electron correlations in narrow energy bands are examined within the framework of the modified form of polar model. This model permits to analyze the effect of strong Coulomb correlation, inter-atomic exchange and correlated hopping of electrons and explain some peculiarities of the properties of narrow-band materials, namely the metal-insulator transition with an increase of temperature, nonlinear concentration dependence of Curie temperature and peculiarities of transport properties of electronic subsystem. Using a variant of generalized Hartree-Fock approximation, the single-electron Green's function and quasi-particle energy spectrum of the model are calculated. Metal-insulator transition with the change of temperature is investigated in a system with correlated hopping. Processes of ferromagnetic ordering stabilization in the system with various forms of electronic DOS are studied. The static conductivity and effective spin-dependent masses of current carriers are calculated as a function of electron concentration at various DOS forms. The correlated hopping is shown to cause the electron-hole asymmetry of transport and ferromagnetic properties of narrow band materials.

  7. A medium energy neutron deep penetration experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amian, W.; Cloth, P.; Druecke, V.; Filges, D.; Paul, N.; Schaal, H.

    1986-11-01

    A deep penetration experiment conducted at the Los Alamos WNR facility's Spallation Neutron Target is compared with calculations using intra-nuclear-cascade and S N -transport codes installed at KFA-IRE. In the experiment medium energy reactions induced by neutrons between 15 MeV and about 150 MeV inside a quasi infinite slab of iron have been measured using copper foil monitors. Details of the experimental procedure and the theoretical methods are described. A comparison of absolute reaction rates for both experimentally and theoretically derived reactions is given. The present knowledge of the corresponding monitor reaction cross sections is discussed. (orig.)

  8. Diamond Sensors for Energy Frontier Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Schnetzer, Steve

    2014-01-01

    We discuss the use of diamond sensors in high-energy, high-i ntensity collider experiments. Re- sults from diamond sensor based beam conditions monitors in the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) are presented and pla ns for diamond based luminosity monitors for the upcoming LHC run are described. We describe recent measurements on single crystal diamond sensors that indicate a polarization effec t that causes a reduction of charge col- lection efficiency as a function of particle flux. We conclude by describing new developments on the promising technology of 3D diamond sensors.

  9. Compilation of current high energy physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-09-01

    This compilation of current high-energy physics experiments is a collaborative effort of the Berkeley Particle Data Group, the SLAC library, and the nine participating laboratories: Argonne (ANL), Brookhaven (BNL), CERN, DESY, Fermilab (FNAL), KEK, Rutherford (RHEL), Serpukhov (SERP), and SLAC. Nominally, the compilation includes summaries of all high-energy physics experiments at the above laboratories that were approved (and not subsequently withdrawn) before about June 1978, and had not completed taking of data by 1 January 1975. The experimental summaries are supplemented with three indexes to the compilation, several vocabulary lists giving names or abbreviations used, and a short summary of the beams at each of the laboratories (except Rutherford). The summaries themselves are included on microfiche

  10. Particle physics experiments at high energy colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauptman, John

    2011-01-01

    Written by one of the detector developers for the International Linear Collider, this is the first textbook for graduate students dedicated to the complexities and the simplicities of high energy collider detectors. It is intended as a specialized reference for a standard course in particle physics, and as a principal text for a special topics course focused on large collider experiments. Equally useful as a general guide for physicists designing big detectors. (orig.)

  11. The low-energy experiment on EXOSAT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bleeker, J.A.M.

    1975-01-01

    The present concept of the Low-Energy-Experiment (LEE) for EXOSAT was proposed by a collaboration of the X-ray astronomy groups at Mullard Space Science Laboratories at University College London, the Space Research Laboratory at Utrecht and the Cosmic Ray Working Group at Leiden. In the following paragraphs the major characteristics of the instrumentation and the expected scientific return will be discussed. The summary comprises both the approved baseline configuration and the proposed option of a small imaging telescope

  12. Energy-energy correlation in electron-positron annihilation at NNLL + NNLO accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tulipant, Zoltan; Kardos, Adam; Somogyi, Gabor [University of Debrecen, MTA-DE Particle Physics Research Group, Debrecen (Hungary)

    2017-11-15

    We present the computation of energy-energy correlation in e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions in the back-to-back region at next-to-next-to-leading logarithmic accuracy matched with the next-to-next-to-leading order perturbative prediction. We study the effect of the fixed higher-order corrections in a comparison of our results to LEP and SLC data. The next-to-next-to-leading order correction has a sizable impact on the extracted value of α{sub S}(M{sub Z}), hence its inclusion is mandatory for a precise measurement of the strong coupling using energy-energy correlation. (orig.)

  13. Energy-energy correlation in electron-positron annihilation at NNLL + NNLO accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulipánt, Zoltán; Kardos, Adam; Somogyi, Gábor

    2017-11-01

    We present the computation of energy-energy correlation in e^+e^- collisions in the back-to-back region at next-to-next-to-leading logarithmic accuracy matched with the next-to-next-to-leading order perturbative prediction. We study the effect of the fixed higher-order corrections in a comparison of our results to LEP and SLC data. The next-to-next-to-leading order correction has a sizable impact on the extracted value of α S(M_Z), hence its inclusion is mandatory for a precise measurement of the strong coupling using energy-energy correlation.

  14. Distributed energy store railguns experiment and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, L. D.

    1984-02-01

    Electromagnetic acceleration of projectiles holds the potential for achieving higher velocities than yet achieved by any other means. A railgun is the simplest form of electromagnetic macroparticle accelerator and can generate the highest sustained accelerating force. The practical length of conventional railguns is limited by the impedance of the rails because current must be carried along the entire length of the rails. A railgun and power supply system called the distributed energy store railgun was proposed as a solution to this limitation. A distributed energy storage railgun was constructed and successfully operated. In addition to this demonstration of the distributed energy store railgun principle, a theoretical model of the system was also constructed. A simple simulation of the railgun system based on this model, but ignoring frictional drag, was compared with the experimental results. During the process of comparing results from the simulation and the experiment, the effect of significant frictional drag of the projectile on the sidewalls of the bore was observed.

  15. Fire hazard analysis for fusion energy experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvares, N.J.; Hasegawa, H.K.

    1979-01-01

    The 2XIIB mirror fusion facility at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL) was used to evaluate the fire safety of state-of-the-art fusion energy experiments. The primary objective of this evaluation was to ensure the parallel development of fire safety and fusion energy technology. Through fault-tree analysis, we obtained a detailed engineering description of the 2XIIB fire protection system. This information helped us establish an optimum level of fire protection for experimental fusion energy facilities as well as evaluate the level of protection provided by various systems. Concurrently, we analyzed the fire hazard inherent to the facility using techniques that relate the probability of ignition to the flame spread and heat-release potential of construction materials, electrical and thermal insulations, and dielectric fluids. A comparison of the results of both analyses revealed that the existing fire protection system should be modified to accommodate the range of fire hazards inherent to the 2XIIB facility

  16. Methods for converging correlation energies within the dielectric matrix formalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Anant; Claudot, Julien; Gould, Tim; Lebègue, Sébastien; Rocca, Dario

    2018-03-01

    Within the dielectric matrix formalism, the random-phase approximation (RPA) and analogous methods that include exchange effects are promising approaches to overcome some of the limitations of traditional density functional theory approximations. The RPA-type methods however have a significantly higher computational cost, and, similarly to correlated quantum-chemical methods, are characterized by a slow basis set convergence. In this work we analyzed two different schemes to converge the correlation energy, one based on a more traditional complete basis set extrapolation and one that converges energy differences by accounting for the size-consistency property. These two approaches have been systematically tested on the A24 test set, for six points on the potential-energy surface of the methane-formaldehyde complex, and for reaction energies involving the breaking and formation of covalent bonds. While both methods converge to similar results at similar rates, the computation of size-consistent energy differences has the advantage of not relying on the choice of a specific extrapolation model.

  17. The correlation of energy with entropy and exergy; Die Vernetzung der Energie mit Entropie und Exergie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Gernot (Dr. Gernot Weber, Energie-Gebaeudetechnik, Kleinostheim)

    2011-07-01

    Thermodynamics generally is regarded as one of the most difficult fields of knowledge. This may be particularly due to the difficulties and due to the often very complicated described correlations between the terms energy, entropy and exergy in the technical literature. The contribution under consideration tries to explain these correlations to the (scientifically trained) technically interested readers understandable.

  18. Earth to Orbit Beamed Energy Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Les; Montgomery, Edward E.

    2017-01-01

    As a means of primary propulsion, beamed energy propulsion offers the benefit of offloading much of the propulsion system mass from the vehicle, increasing its potential performance and freeing it from the constraints of the rocket equation. For interstellar missions, beamed energy propulsion is arguably the most viable in the near- to mid-term. A near-term demonstration showing the feasibility of beamed energy propulsion is necessary and, fortunately, feasible using existing technologies. Key enabling technologies are large area, low mass spacecraft and efficient and safe high power laser systems capable of long distance propagation. NASA is currently developing the spacecraft technology through the Near Earth Asteroid Scout solar sail mission and has signed agreements with the Planetary Society to study the feasibility of precursor laser propulsion experiments using their LightSail-2 solar sail spacecraft. The capabilities of Space Situational Awareness assets and the advanced analytical tools available for fine resolution orbit determination now make it possible to investigate the practicalities of an Earth-to-orbit Beamed Energy eXperiment (EBEX) - a demonstration at delivered power levels that only illuminate a spacecraft without causing damage to it. The degree to which this can be expected to produce a measurable change in the orbit of a low ballistic coefficient spacecraft is investigated. Key system characteristics and estimated performance are derived for a near term mission opportunity involving the LightSail-2 spacecraft and laser power levels modest in comparison to those proposed previously. While the technology demonstrated by such an experiment is not sufficient to enable an interstellar precursor mission, if approved, then it would be the next step toward that goal.

  19. Measurement of αs from energy-energy correlations at the Z0 resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, K.; Abt, I.; Ash, W.W.; Aston, D.; Bacchetta, N.; Baird, K.G.; Baltay, C.; Band, H.R.; Barakat, M.B.; Baranko, G.; Bardon, O.; Barklow, T.; Bazarko, A.O.; Ben-David, R.; Benvenuti, A.C.; Bienz, T.; Bilei, G.M.; Bisello, D.; Blaylock, G.; Bogart, J.R.; Bolton, T.; Bower, G.R.; Brau, J.E.; Breidenbach, M.; Bugg, W.M.; Burke, D.; Burnett, T.H.; Burrows, P.N.; Busza, W.; Calcaterra, A.; Caldwell, D.O.; Calloway, D.; Camanzi, B.; Carpinelli, M.; Cassell, R.; Castaldi, R.; Castro, A.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Church, E.; Cohn, H.O.; Coller, J.A.; Cook, V.; Cotton, R.; Cowan, R.F.; Coyne, D.G.; D'Oliveira, A.; Damerell, C.J.S.; Dasu, S.; De Sangro, R.; De Simone, P.; Dell'Orso, R.; Du, Y.C.; Dubois, R.; Eisenstein, B.I.; Elia, R.; Fan, C.; Fero, M.J.; Frey, R.; Furuno, K.; Gillman, T.; Gladding, G.; Gonzalez, S.; Hallewell, G.D.; Hart, E.L.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hedges, S.; Hertzbach, S.S.; Hildreth, M.D.; Huber, J.; Huffer, M.E.; Hughes, E.W.; Hwang, H.; Iwasaki, Y.; Jacques, P.; Jaros, J.; Johnson, A.S.; Johnson, J.R.; Johnson, R.A.; Junk, T.; Kajikawa, R.; Kalelkar, M.; Karliner, I.; Kawahara, H.; Kendall, H.W.; King, M.E.; King, R.; Kofler, R.R.; Krishna, N.M.; Kroeger, R.S.; Kwon, Y.; Labs, J.F.; Langston, M.; Lath, A.; Lauber, J.A.; Leith, D.W.G.; Liu, X.; Loreti, M.; Lu, A.; Lynch, H.L.; Ma, J.; Mancinelli, G.; Manly, S.; Mantovani, G.; Markiewicz, T.W.; Maruyama, T.; Masuda, H.; Mazzucato, E.; McKemey, A.K.; Meadows, B.T.; Messner, R.; Mockett, P.M.; Moffeit, K.C.; Mours, B.; Mueller, G.; Muller, D.; Nagamine, T.; Nauenberg, U.; Neal, H.; Nussbaum, M.; Osborne, L.S.; Panvini, R.S.; Park, H.; Pavel, T.J.; Peruzzi, I.; Pescara, L.; Piccolo, M.; Piemontese, L.; Pieroni, E.; Pitts, K.T.; Plano, R.J.; Prepost, R.; Prescott, C.Y.; Punkar, G.D.; Quigley, J.; Ratcliff, B.N.; Reeves, T.W.; Rensing, P.E.; Rochester, L.S.; Rothberg, J.E.; Rowson, P.C.; Russell, J.J.; Saxton, O.H.; Schalk, T.; Schindler, R.H.; Schneekloth, U.; Schumm, B.A.; Seiden, A.; Sen, S.

    1994-01-01

    We determine the strong coupling α s from a comprehensive study of energy-energy correlations (EEC's) and their asymmetry (AEEC's) in hadronic decays of Z 0 bosons collected by the SLD experiment at SLAC. The data are compared with all four available predictions of QCD calculated up to O(α s 2 ) in perturbation theory, and also with a resummed calculation matched to all four of these calculations. We find large discrepancies between α s values extracted from the different O(α s 2 ) calculations. We also find a large renormalization scale ambiguity in α s determined from the EEC's using the O(α s 2 ) calculations; this ambiguity is reduced in the case of the AEEC's and is very small when the matched calculations are used. Averaging over all calculations, and over the EEC and AEEC results, we obtain α s (M Z 2 )=0.124 -0.004 +0.003 (expt.) ±0.009 (theory)

  20. The Bose-Einstein correlations in CDFII experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lovás, Lubomír [Comenius Univ., Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2008-01-01

    We present the results of a study of p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV collected by the CDF-II experiment at Tevatron collider. The Bose-Einstein correlations of the π±π± two boson system have been studied in the minimum-bias high-multiplicity events. The research was carried out on the sample at the size of 173761 events. The two pion correlations have been retrieved. The final results were corrected to the coulomb interactions. Two different reference samples were compared and discussed. A significant two-pion correlation enhancement near origin is observed. This enhancement effect has been used to evaluate the radius of the two-pion emitter source. We have used the TOF detector to distinguish between π and K mesons. The C2(Q) function parameters have also been retrieved for the sample containing only tagged π mesons. A comparison between four different parametrizations based on two diff t theoretical approaches of the C2(Q) function is given.

  1. Particle Discrimination Experiment for Direct Energy Conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasaka, Y.; Kiriyama, Y.; Yamamoto, S.; Takeno, H.; Ishikawa, M.

    2005-01-01

    A direct energy conversion system designed for D- 3 He fusion reactor based on a field reversed configuration employs a venetian-blind type converter for thermal ions to produce DC power and a traveling wave type converter for fusion protons to produce RF power. It is therefore necessary to separate, discriminate, and guide the particle species. For this purpose, a cusp magnetic field is proposed, in which the electrons are deflected and guided along the field line to the line cusp, while the ions pass through the point cusp. A small-scale experimental device was used to study the basic characteristics of discrimination of electrons and ions in the cusp magnetic field. Ions separated from electrons are guided to an ion collector, which is operated as a one-stage direct energy converter. The conversion efficiency was measured for cases with different values of mean and spread of ion energy. These experiments successfully demonstrate direct energy conversion from plasma beams using particle discrimination by a cusp magnetic field

  2. openBEB: open biological experiment browser for correlative measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Chandrasekhar; Bieri, Andrej; Sauter, Nora; Roizard, Sophie; Ringler, Philippe; Müller, Shirley A; Goldie, Kenneth N; Enimanev, Kaloyan; Stahlberg, Henning; Rinn, Bernd; Braun, Thomas

    2014-03-26

    New experimental methods must be developed to study interaction networks in systems biology. To reduce biological noise, individual subjects, such as single cells, should be analyzed using high throughput approaches. The measurement of several correlative physical properties would further improve data consistency. Accordingly, a considerable quantity of data must be acquired, correlated, catalogued and stored in a database for subsequent analysis. We have developed openBEB (open Biological Experiment Browser), a software framework for data acquisition, coordination, annotation and synchronization with database solutions such as openBIS. OpenBEB consists of two main parts: A core program and a plug-in manager. Whereas the data-type independent core of openBEB maintains a local container of raw-data and metadata and provides annotation and data management tools, all data-specific tasks are performed by plug-ins. The open architecture of openBEB enables the fast integration of plug-ins, e.g., for data acquisition or visualization. A macro-interpreter allows the automation and coordination of the different modules. An update and deployment mechanism keeps the core program, the plug-ins and the metadata definition files in sync with a central repository. The versatility, the simple deployment and update mechanism, and the scalability in terms of module integration offered by openBEB make this software interesting for a large scientific community. OpenBEB targets three types of researcher, ideally working closely together: (i) Engineers and scientists developing new methods and instruments, e.g., for systems-biology, (ii) scientists performing biological experiments, (iii) theoreticians and mathematicians analyzing data. The design of openBEB enables the rapid development of plug-ins, which will inherently benefit from the "house keeping" abilities of the core program. We report the use of openBEB to combine live cell microscopy, microfluidic control and visual

  3. Operational Experience from Solar Thermal Energy Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, C. P.

    1984-01-01

    Over the past few years, Sandia National Laboratories were involved in the design, construction, and operation of a number of DOE-sponsored solar thermal energy systems. Among the systems currently in operation are several industrial process heat projects and the Modular Industrial Solar Retrofit qualification test systems, all of which use parabolic troughs, and the Shenandoah Total Energy Project, which uses parabolic dishes. Operational experience has provided insight to both desirable and undesirable features of the designs of these systems. Features of these systems which are also relevant to the design of parabolic concentrator thermal electric systems are discussed. Other design features discussed are system control functions which were found to be especially convenient or effective, such as local concentrator controls, rainwash controls, and system response to changing isolation. Drive systems are also discussed with particular emphasis of the need for reliability and the usefulness of a manual drive capability.

  4. Europe's experience with carbon-energy taxation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mikael Skou

    2010-01-01

    The COMETR project is a comprehensive attempt to account ex-post for the implications of carbon-energy taxation, taking into account differences in sectoral tax burdens and within a suitable macro-economic framework capable of providing an overall assessment, the E3ME model of Cambridge...... Econometrics. The results indicate reductions in greenhouse gas emissions for six member states as a result of carbon-energy taxation under revenue-neutral environmental tax reform (ETR). These effects are mirrored by reductions in total fuel consumption, with the largest reductions occurring in countries...... with the highest tax rates. Accordingly, the European environmental tax reforms had by 2004 caused reductions in greenhouse gas emissions of 3.1% on average for the six member countries examined, with the largest fall recorded for Finland (5.9%). E3ME-results also suggest that ETR-countries did not experience...

  5. High energy diffraction processes - TOTEM experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Kaspar, Jan

    2005-01-01

    We study two problems in this thesis. First, we analyse a model for pp and anti-pp elastic scattering. The model was developed by M.M.Islam and coworkers in the past 25 years. Our aim was to make a prediction for differential cross section of pp scattering at energy of 14 TeV which will be measured by the TOTEM experiment at the LHC at CERN. Since protons carry electromagnetic charge, we had to take into account an electromagnetic interaction and effects of the interference between electromagnetic and hadronic forces. We also analysed the model in the impact parameter representation. It enabled us to gain information about range of hadronic forces responsible for elastic, inelastic and total pp and anti-pp scattering. In the second part we present our alignment method for detectors inside the Roman pots of the TOTEM experiment. The method was used during Roman Pot tests on the SPS beam last year.

  6. High Energy Antimatter Telescope (HEAT) Balloon Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beatty, J. J.

    1995-01-01

    This grant supported our work on the High Energy Antimatter Telescope(HEAT) balloon experiment. The HEAT payload is designed to perform a series of experiments focusing on the cosmic ray positron, electron, and antiprotons. Thus far two flights of the HEAT -e+/- configuration have taken place. During the period of this grant major accomplishments included the following: (1) Publication of the first results of the 1994 HEAT-e+/- flight in Physical Review Letters; (2) Successful reflight of the HEAT-e+/- payload from Lynn Lake in August 1995; (3) Repair and refurbishment of the elements of the HEAT payload damaged during the landing following the 1995 flight; and (4) Upgrade of the ground support equipment for future flights of the HEAT payload.

  7. Study of Isospin Correlation in High Energy Heavy Ion Interactions with the RHIC PHENIX. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Y.

    2003-01-01

    This report describes the research work performed under the support of the DOE research grant E-FG02-97ER4108. The work is composed of three parts: (1) Visual analysis and quality control of the Micro Vertex Detector (MVD) of the PHENIX experiments carried out of Brookhaven National Laboratory. (2) Continuation of the data analysis of the EMU05/09/16 experiments for the study of the inclusive particle production spectra and multi-particle correlation. (3) Exploration of a new statistical means to study very high-multiplicity of nuclear-particle ensembles and its perspectives to apply to the higher energy experiments

  8. Correlation-induced spectral changes and energy conservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwal, G.S.; Wolf, E.

    1996-01-01

    An energy conservation law is derived for fields generated by random, statistically stationary, scalar sources of any state of coherence. It is shown that correlation-induced spectral changes are in strict agreement with this law and that, basic to the understanding of such changes, is a distinction that must be made between the spectrum of a source and the spectrum of the field that the source generates. This distinction, which is obviously relevant for spectroscopy, does not appear to have been previously recognized. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  9. Nucleon-nucleon correlations and the Coulomb Displacement Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Neck, D.; Waroquier, M.; Heyde, K.

    1997-01-01

    Coulomb Displacement Energies (CDE) are accurately known for a wide range of nuclear masses. Assuming isospin independence in the nuclear Hamiltonian, the CDE can in first instance be interpreted as the Coulomb interaction energy between the density of the excess neutrons and the proton charge density in the parent nucleus. However, when using reasonable mean-field models for the proton and neutron density one underestimates the CDE by about 8% on average. This discrepancy is known as the Nolen-Schiffer anomaly, and various explanations have been put forward in the past. In this work the role of nucleon-nucleon correlations are re-examined. Calculations for the pair density functions in various nuclei are presented. Preliminary results suggest that the modifications to the mean-field pair density functions cause an enhancement of the CDE in the order of 4%, which is rather A-independent. (author)

  10. Developments for the 6He beta - nu angular correlation experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zumwalt, David W.

    This thesis describes developments toward the measurement of the angular correlation between the beta and the antineutrino in the beta decay of 6He. This decay is a pure Gamow-Teller decay which is described in the Standard Model as a purely axial vector weak interaction. The angular correlation is characterized by the parameter abetanu = -1/3 in the Standard Model. Any deviation from this value would be evidence for tensor components in the weak interaction and would constitute new physics. A new method will be used to measure the parameter a betanu from 6He decays, featuring a magneto-optical trap that will measure the beta particle in coincidence with the recoiling 6Li daughter ion. This neutral atom trapping scheme provides cold, tightly confined atoms which will reduce systematic uncertainties related to the initial position of the decay. By knowing the initial position of the decay and measuring the time of flight of the recoiling 6Li daughter ion in coincidence with the beta, the angular correlation between the beta and the antineutrino can be deduced. We aim to measure a betanu first to the level of 1%, and eventually to the 0.1% level, which would represent an order of magnitude improvement in precision over past experiments. Towards this goal, we have designed, built, and successfully tested a liquid lithium target to provide >2×10. {10} 6He atoms/sto a low-background environment, which is the most intense source of 6He presently available. This allowed for an additional measurement of the 6He half-life (806.89 +/- 0.11stat +0.23-0.19syst ms) to be made with unprecedented precision, resolving discrepancies in past measurements. We have also tested our trapping and detection apparatus and have begun to record preliminary coincidence events.

  11. Spatial correlation of energy deposition events in irradiated liquid water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamm, R.N.; Wright, H.A.; Turner, J.E.; Ritchie, R.H.

    1978-01-01

    Monte Carlo electron transport computer code is used to study in detail the slowing down of electrons and all of their secondaries with initial energies up to 1.5 MeV in liquid water. The probability distributions for the number of ionizations and for the energy deposited in cubical volume elements from electron tracks in the water are analyzed. Both the electron energies and the sizes of the cubical cells are varied. Results are shown for electron energies between 100 eV and 10 keV and for cell sizes between 40 A and 1500 A. Good general agreement is found with results presented by Paretzke at the last symposium. The code can be used to obtain other basic distributions of importance in microdosimetry. As an example, microdosimetric single-event spectra for 500-eV electrons are computed in cubes with edges that range in size from 40 A to 200 A. The importance of correlations is shown explicitly in a comparison of secondary electrons produced by 60 Co and 50-keV photons

  12. Diamond detectors for high energy physics experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bäni, L.; Alexopoulos, A.; Artuso, M.; Bachmair, F.; Bartosik, M.; Beacham, J.; Beck, H.; Bellini, V.; Belyaev, V.; Bentele, B.; Berdermann, E.; Bergonzo, P.; Bes, A.; Brom, J.-M.; Bruzzi, M.; Cerv, M.; Chiodini, G.; Chren, D.; Cindro, V.; Claus, G.; Collot, J.; Cumalat, J.; Dabrowski, A.; D'Alessandro, R.; Dauvergne, D.; de Boer, W.; Dorfer, C.; Dünser, M.; Eremin, V.; Eusebi, R.; Forcolin, G.; Forneris, J.; Frais-Kölbl, H.; Gallin-Martel, L.; Gallin-Martel, M. L.; Gan, K. K.; Gastal, M.; Giroletti, C.; Goffe, M.; Goldstein, J.; Golubev, A.; Gorišek, A.; Grigoriev, E.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Grummer, A.; Gui, B.; Guthoff, M.; Haughton, I.; Hiti, B.; Hits, D.; Hoeferkamp, M.; Hofmann, T.; Hosslet, J.; Hostachy, J.-Y.; Hügging, F.; Hutton, C.; Jansen, H.; Janssen, J.; Kagan, H.; Kanxheri, K.; Kasieczka, G.; Kass, R.; Kassel, F.; Kis, M.; Konovalov, V.; Kramberger, G.; Kuleshov, S.; Lacoste, A.; Lagomarsino, S.; Lo Giudice, A.; Lukosi, E.; Maazouzi, C.; Mandic, I.; Mathieu, C.; Menichelli, M.; Mikuž, M.; Morozzi, A.; Moss, J.; Mountain, R.; Murphy, S.; Muškinja, M.; Oh, A.; Oliviero, P.; Passeri, D.; Pernegger, H.; Perrino, R.; Picollo, F.; Pomorski, M.; Potenza, R.; Quadt, A.; Re, A.; Reichmann, M.; Riley, G.; Roe, S.; Sanz, D.; Scaringella, M.; Schaefer, D.; Schmidt, C. J.; Schnetzer, S.; Sciortino, S.; Scorzoni, A.; Seidel, S.; Servoli, L.; Smith, S.; Sopko, B.; Sopko, V.; Spagnolo, S.; Spanier, S.; Stenson, K.; Stone, R.; Sutera, C.; Tannenwald, B.; Taylor, A.; Traeger, M.; Tromson, D.; Trischuk, W.; Tuve, C.; Uplegger, L.; Velthuis, J.; Venturi, N.; Vittone, E.; Wagner, S.; Wallny, R.; Wang, J. C.; Weingarten, J.; Weiss, C.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Yamouni, M.; Zavrtanik, M.

    2018-01-01

    Beam test results of the radiation tolerance study of chemical vapour deposition (CVD) diamond against different particle species and energies is presented. We also present beam test results on the independence of signal size on incident particle rate in charged particle detectors based on un-irradiated and irradiated poly-crystalline CVD diamond over a range of particle fluxes from 2 kHz/cm2 to 10 MHz/cm2. The pulse height of the sensors was measured with readout electronics with a peaking time of 6 ns. In addition functionality of poly-crystalline CVD diamond 3D devices was demonstrated in beam tests and 3D diamond detectors are shown to be a promising technology for applications in future high luminosity experiments.

  13. Plasma heating by relativistic electron beams: correlations between experiment and theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thode, L.E.; Godfrey, B.B.

    1975-01-01

    The streaming instability is the primary heating mechanism in most, if not all, experiments in which the beam is injected into partially or fully ionized gas. In plasma heating experiments, the relativistic beam must traverse an anode foil before interacting with the plasma. The linear theory for such a scattered beam is discussed, including a criterion for the onset of the kinetic interaction. A nonlinear model of the two-stream instability for a scattered beam is developed. Using this model, data from ten experiments are unfolded to obtain the following correlations: (i) for a fixed anode foil, the dependence of the plasma heating on the beam-to-plasma density ratio is due to anode foil scattering, (ii) for a fixed beam-to-plasma density ratio, the predicted change in the magnitude of plasma heating as a function of the anode foil is in agreement with experiment, and (iii) the plasma heating tentatively appears to be proportional to the beam kinetic energy density and beam pulse length. For a fixed anode foil, theory also predicts that the energy deposition is improved by increasing the beam electron energy γmc 2 . Presently, no experiment has been performed to confirm this aspect of the theory

  14. Angular correlation of cosmic neutrinos with ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays and implications for their sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moharana, Reetanjali; Razzaque, Soebur, E-mail: reetanjalim@uj.ac.za, E-mail: srazzaque@uj.ac.za [Department of Physics, University of Johannesburg, P.O. Box 524, Auckland Park 2006 (South Africa)

    2015-08-01

    Cosmic neutrino events detected by the IceCube Neutrino Observatory with energy 0∼> 3 TeV have poor angular resolutions to reveal their origin. Ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays (UHECRs), with better angular resolutions at 0>6 EeV energies, can be used to check if the same astrophysical sources are responsible for producing both neutrinos and UHECRs. We test this hypothesis, with statistical methods which emphasize invariant quantities, by using data from the Pierre Auger Observatory, Telescope Array and past cosmic-ray experiments. We find that the arrival directions of the cosmic neutrinos are correlated with 0≥ 10 EeV UHECR arrival directions at confidence level ≈ 90%. The strength of the correlation decreases with decreasing UHECR energy and no correlation exists at energy 0∼ 6 EeV . A search in astrophysical databases within 3{sup o} of the arrival directions of UHECRs with energy 0≥ 10 EeV, that are correlated with the IceCube cosmic neutrinos, resulted in 18 sources from the Swift-BAT X-ray catalog with redshift z≤ 0.06. We also found 3 objects in the Kühr catalog of radio sources using the same criteria. The sources are dominantly Seyfert galaxies with Cygnus A being the most prominent member. We calculate the required neutrino and UHECR fluxes to produce the observed correlated events, and estimate the corresponding neutrino luminosity (25 TeV–2.2 PeV) and cosmic-ray luminosity (500 TeV–180 EeV), assuming the sources are the ones we found in the Swift-BAT and Kühr catalogs. We compare these luminosities with the X-ray luminosity of the corresponding sources and discuss possibilities of accelerating protons to 0∼> 10 EeV and produce neutrinos in these sources.

  15. Search for correlated high energy cosmic ray events with CHICOS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, B E; Brobeck, E; Jillings, C J; Larson, M B; Lynn, T W; McKeown, R D; Hill, James E; Falkowski, B J; Seki, R; Sepikas, J; Yodh, G B

    2005-01-01

    We present the results of a search for time correlations in high energy cosmic ray data (primary E > 10 14 eV) collected by the California HIgh school Cosmic ray ObServatory (CHICOS) array. Data from 60 detector sites spread over an area of 400 km 2 were studied for evidence of isolated events separated by more than 1 km with coincidence times ranging from 1 μs up to 1 s. The results are consistent with the absence of excess coincidences except for a 2.9σ excess observed for coincidence times less than 10 μs. We report upper limits for the coincidence probability as a function of coincidence time

  16. Holographic dark energy: Quantum correlations against thermodynamical description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horvat, R.

    2008-01-01

    Classical and quantum entropic properties of holographic dark energy (HDE) are considered in view of the fact that its entropy is far more restrictive than the entropy of a black hole of the same size. In cosmological settings (in which HDE is promoted to a plausible candidate for being the dark energy of the universe), HDE should be viewed as a combined state composed of the event horizon and the stuff inside the horizon. By any interaction of the subsystems, the horizon and the interior become entangled, raising thereby a possibility that their quantum correlations be responsible for the almost purity of the combined state. Under this circumstances, the entanglement entropy is almost the same for both subsystems, being also of the same order as the thermal (coarse grained) entropy of the interior or the horizon. In the context of thermodynamics, however, only additive coarse grained entropies matter, so we use these entropies to test the generalized second law (GSL) of gravitational thermodynamics in this framework. While we find that the original Li's model passes the GSL test for a special choice of parameters, in a saturated model with the choice for the IR cutoff in the form of the Hubble parameter, the GSL always breaks down

  17. Competition Experiments as a Means of Evaluating Linear Free Energy Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullins, Richard J.; Vedernikov, Andrei; Viswanathan, Rajesh

    2004-01-01

    The use of competition experiments as a means of evaluating linear free energy relationship in the undergraduate teaching laboratory is reported. The use of competition experiments proved to be a reliable method for the construction of Hammett plots with good correlation providing great flexibility with regard to the compounds and reactions that…

  18. Turning energy around: an interactive exhibition experience

    OpenAIRE

    Sarah Kellberg; Christina Newinger

    2018-01-01

    A transition from the fossil-fuel driven to a sustainable energy system is an enormous global challenge: climate change and finite resources require countries all over the world to change their way of producing, transporting and using energy. The Energiewende (energy transition) will require major changes in the current energy supply system in Germany – but also worldwide. These changes will not only affect the technical sector but will also include ecological questions, social issues and pol...

  19. Analytical Computation of Energy-Energy Correlation at Next-to-Leading Order in QCD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Lance J; Luo, Ming-Xing; Shtabovenko, Vladyslav; Yang, Tong-Zhi; Zhu, Hua Xing

    2018-03-09

    The energy-energy correlation (EEC) between two detectors in e^{+}e^{-} annihilation was computed analytically at leading order in QCD almost 40 years ago, and numerically at next-to-leading order (NLO) starting in the 1980s. We present the first analytical result for the EEC at NLO, which is remarkably simple, and facilitates analytical study of the perturbative structure of the EEC. We provide the expansion of the EEC in the collinear and back-to-back regions through next-to-leading power, information which should aid resummation in these regions.

  20. Non-Constant Learning Rates in Retrospective Experience Curve Analyses and their Correlation to Deployment Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Max [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Smith, Sarah J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sohn, Michael D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-07-16

    A key challenge for policy-makers and technology market forecasters is to estimate future technology costs and in particular the rate of cost reduction versus production volume. A related, critical question is what role should state and federal governments have in advancing energy efficient and renewable energy technologies? This work provides retrospective experience curves and learning rates for several energy-related technologies, each of which have a known history of federal and state deployment programs. We derive learning rates for eight technologies including energy efficient lighting technologies, stationary fuel cell systems, and residential solar photovoltaics, and provide an overview and timeline of historical deployment programs such as state and federal standards and state and national incentive programs for each technology. Piecewise linear regimes are observed in a range of technology experience curves, and public investments or deployment programs are found to be strongly correlated to an increase in learning rate across multiple technologies. A downward bend in the experience curve is found in 5 out of the 8 energy-related technologies presented here (electronic ballasts, magnetic ballasts, compact fluorescent lighting, general service fluorescent lighting, and the installed cost of solar PV). In each of the five downward-bending experience curves, we believe that an increase in the learning rate can be linked to deployment programs to some degree. This work sheds light on the endogenous versus exogenous contributions to technological innovation and highlights the impact of exogenous government sponsored deployment programs. This work can inform future policy investment direction and can shed light on market transformation and technology learning behavior.

  1. Testing bell inequality at experiments of high energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao Xiqing; Li Xueqian; Ke Hongwei; Ding Yibing; Shen Pengnian

    2010-01-01

    Besides using the laser beam, it is very tempting to directly testify the Bell inequality at high energy experiments where the spin correlation is exactly what the original Bell inequality investigations. In this work, we follow the proposal raised in literature and use the successive decays J/ψ →γηc →Λ(Λ-bar)→pπ - (p-bar)π + to testify the Bell inequality. Our goal is twofold, namely, we first make a Monte-Carlo simulation of the processes based on the quantum field theory (QFT). Since the underlying theory is QFT, it implies that we pre-admit the validity of quantum picture. Even though the QFT is true, we need to find how big the database should be, so that we can clearly show deviations of the correlation from the Bell inequality determined by the local hidden variable theory. There have been some critiques on the proposed method, so in the second part, we suggest some improvements which may help to remedy the ambiguities indicated by the critiques. It may be realized at an updated facility of high energy physics, such as BES III. (authors)

  2. Charge-dependent azimuthal correlations in pPb collisions with CMS experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Zhoudunming; CMS Collaboration

    2017-11-01

    Charge-dependent azimuthal correlations relative to the event plane in AA collisions have been suggested as providing evidence for the chiral magnetic effect (CME) caused by local strong parity violation. However, the observation of the CME remains inconclusive because of several possible sources of background correlations that may account for part or all of the observed signals. This talk will present the first application of three-particle, charge-dependent azimuthal correlation analysis in proton-nucleus collisions, using pPb data collected with the CMS experiment at the LHC at √{sNN} = 5.02 TeV. The differences found in comparing same and opposite sign correlations are studied as a function of event multiplicity and the pseudorapidity gap between two of the particles detected in the CMS tracker detector. After selecting events with comparable charge-particle multiplicities, the results for pPb collisions are found to be similar to those for PbPb collisions collected at the same collision energy. With a reduced magnetic field strength and a random field orientation in high multiplicity pPb events, the CME contribution to any charge separation signal is expected to be much smaller than found in peripheral PbPb events. These results pose a challenge for the interpretation of charge-dependent azimuthal correlations in heavy ion collisions in terms of the chiral magnetic effect.

  3. A study of parton fragmentation using photon-hadron correlation with the ALICE experiment at LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arbor, N.

    2013-01-01

    The strong interaction theory, Quantum Chromodynamic (QCD), predicts a new phase of nuclear matter at very high temperature and/or very high density. This state is composed of deconfined quarks and gluons known as the quark-gluon plasma (QGP). The measurement of its composition and properties is a challenge for the nuclear physics of the 21. century and should lead to a better understanding of the fundamental symmetries and mechanisms related to the quarks confinement inside hadrons and the strong interaction generally.The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) accelerator at CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research) allows to reach the thermodynamic conditions required to create the quark-gluon plasma using ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions (Pb). The ALICE experiment (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) allows to access several probes to characterize the QGP through particles reconstruction and. Among these probes, high energy parton energy loss is used to access medium characteristics such as density or temperature. Parton energy loss is estimated from the modification of the energy distribution of hadrons produced by fragmentation.This thesis is dedicated to the photon-hadron correlations analysis in order to study the modification of the parton fragmentation due to the quark-gluon plasma. First part of this thesis is devoted to the characterization of the electromagnetic calorimeter (EMCal), the central detector for energy measurement and photon identification. The second part is dedicated to the photon-hadron correlation measurement, for the 7 TeV proton-proton collisions and 2.76 TeV Lead-Lead collisions. An important work has been done to improve the prompt photon identification, one of the key point of this analysis. (author) [fr

  4. A study of parton fragmentation using photon-hadron correlation with the ALICE experiment at LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arbor, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    The strong interaction theory, Quantum Chromodynamic (QCD), predicts a new phase of nuclear matter at very high temperature and/or very high density. This state is composed of deconfined quarks and gluons known as the quark-gluon plasma (QGP). The measurement of its composition and properties is a challenge for the nuclear physics of the 21. century and should lead to a better understanding of the fundamental symmetries and mechanisms related to the quarks confinement inside hadrons and the strong interaction generally. The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) accelerator at CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research) allows to reach the thermodynamic conditions required to create the quark-gluon plasma using ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions (Pb). The ALICE experiment (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) allows to access several probes to characterize the QGP through particles reconstruction and. Among these probes, high energy parton energy loss is used to access medium characteristics such as density or temperature. Parton energy loss is estimated from the modification of the energy distribution of hadrons produced by fragmentation. This thesis is dedicated to the photon-hadron correlations analysis in order to study the modification of the parton fragmentation due to the quark-gluon plasma. First part of this thesis is devoted to the characterization of the electromagnetic calorimeter (EMCal), the central detector for energy measurement and photon identification. The second part is dedicated to the photon-hadron correlation measurement, for the 7 TeV proton-proton collisions and 2.76 TeV Lead-Lead collisions. An important work has been done to improve the prompt photon identification, one of the key point of this analysis. (author) [fr

  5. Modification Of The Electron Energy Distribution Function During Lithium Experiments On The National Spherical Torus Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaworski, M A; Gray, T K; Kaita, R; Kallman, J; Kugel, H; LeBlanc, B; McLean, A; Sabbagh, S A; Soukanovskii, V; Stotler, D P

    2011-06-03

    The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) has recently studied the use of a liquid lithium divertor (LLD). Divertor Langmuir probes have also been installed for making measurements of the local plasma conditions. A non-local probe interpretation method is used to supplement the classical probe interpretation and obtain measurements of the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) which show the occurrence of a hot-electron component. Analysis is made of two discharges within a sequence that exhibited changes in plasma fueling efficiency. It is found that the local electron temperature increases and that this increase is most strongly correlated with the energy contained within the hot-electron population. Preliminary interpretative modeling indicates that kinetic effects are likely in the NSTX.

  6. Correlates of Bulimia Nervosa: Early Family Mealtime Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Debra A. F.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Examined relationship of early mealtime experiences to later bulimia in 128 female college students. Found significant group differences among bulimics, nonbulimics, and repeat dieters on early meal experience questionnaire, with bulimic group reporting most negative and unusual experiences. Found significant differences among groups on depression…

  7. Energy conservation and energy prices: the Hungarian experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molnar, L.

    1997-01-01

    The main sources of emissions into the outdoor air are from the energy sector (e.g. power plants), industry, the transport sector and the residential sector (buildings). The danger from most of these emissions is the fact that heat plants and boilers of residential buildings in particular, are usually in the areas where people live and work and therefore their emissions may have a direct effect on health. The best way to improve this situation - to diminish emissions and to improve air quality - is to increase the efficiency of both energy production and use. This also has important consequences for the economic use of the national energy carrier stock and diminishes the need to import energy which increases the competitiveness of goods produced. The Hungarian government has set out an Energy Saving Programme to address, among other things the fact that the Hungarian average energy consumption per capita is less than the EU average but the energy intensity (the necessary energy to produce 1 USD GDP) is 3.5-4.0 times higher than the EU average. It has been shown that the best way to save energy is to invest in energy-conscious behaviour and training. Recent studies in public and residential buildings have shown that there is a potential for high energy saving in Hungarian buildings which is independent from the building technology used. Also, the pay-back times of investment in the building envelope are significantly higher than the pay-back times of investment in heating-ventilating or control systems, while the energy saved was of the same magnitude. (author) 5 figs., 5 tabs., 6 refs

  8. Photovoltaic energy in Germany: experience feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persem, Melanie

    2011-01-01

    This document presents some key information and figures about the development of photovoltaic energy in Germany: resource potential, 2000-2010 development, share in the energy mix, market, legal framework and incentives, market evolution and electricity feed-in tariffs, 2006-2011 evolution of photovoltaic power plant costs, households' contribution, R and D investments, industry development and employment, the German national energy plan after Fukushima, the expectations of the German photovoltaic industry

  9. Beyond the Random Phase Approximation for the Electron Correlation Energy: The Importance of Single Excitations

    OpenAIRE

    Ren, Xinguo; Rinke, Patrick; Tkatchenko, Alexandre; Scheffler, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    The random-phase approximation (RPA) for the electron correlation energy, combined with the exact-exchange (EX) energy, represents the state-of-the-art exchange-correlation functional within density-functional theory. However, the standard RPA practice-evaluating both the EX and the RPA correlation energies using Kohn-Sham (KS) orbitals from local or semilocal exchange-correlation functionals-leads to a systematic underbinding of molecules and solids. Here we demonstrate that this behavior ca...

  10. Local investment in renewable energies - European experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quantin, J.; Grepmeier, K.; Larsen, J.; Manolakaki, E.; Smith, M.

    2004-01-01

    This booklet is realized within the framework of the european commission called PREDAC. This document have been conceived by a working group specialized on the local investment into renewable energies thematic. The objectives of this project are: to promote citizen participation in the financing of renewable energies projects in Europe; to make organizations, investor clubs and local government to be aware of this way of implication into renewable energies development; to examine more especially three renewable energy sources: biomass, photovoltaic and wind in Denmark, France, Germany, Greece and United Kingdom. (author)

  11. Wind energy: Past experience and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldi, G.

    1993-01-01

    Reductions in the cost of producing wind energy are helping to make this renewable energy source competitive with conventional energy sources. The market for this type of energy in Italy, however, hasn't yet gained a foothold even though close examination of Italy's geomorphology reveals that this country is in fact endowed with many areas having good potential for wind power production. This paper discusses the measures to be taken to bolster wind energy commercialization efforts in Italy. It provides a brief assessment of the current state of wind power technology, national and international market trends, and the directions being taken by other national governments to promote wind turbine manufacturing industries and applications. The comparative analysis indicates that in order to have this energy source alternative taken seriously as an economically viable energy option in Italy, greater financial assistance should be given to local manufacturers involved in commercialization efforts. In addition, a suitable rate structure should be created favouring wind power by taking into account cost benefits afforded by this renewable energy source in terms of reduced air pollution, as well as, reduced national dependency on foreign energy imports

  12. openBEB: open biological experiment browser for correlative measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Ramakrishnan, Chandrasekhar; Bieri, Andrej; Sauter, Nora; Roizard, Sophie; Ringler, Philippe; Müller, Shirley A; Goldie, Kenneth N; Enimanev, Kaloyan; Stahlberg, Henning; Rinn, Bernd; Braun, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Background: New experimental methods must be developed to study interaction networks in systems biology. To reduce biological noise, individual subjects, such as single cells, should be analyzed using high throughput approaches. The measurement of several correlative physical properties would further improve data consistency. Accordingly, a considerable quantity of data must be acquired, correlated, catalogued and stored in a database for subsequent analysis. Results: We have developed openBE...

  13. Lecture note on circuit technology for high energy physics experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Hirokazu.

    1992-07-01

    This lecture gives basic ideas and practice of the circuit technology for high energy physics experiment. The program of this lecture gives access to the integrated circuit technology to be applied for a high luminosity hadron collider experiment. (author)

  14. Turning energy around: an interactive exhibition experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Kellberg

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available A transition from the fossil-fuel driven to a sustainable energy system is an enormous global challenge: climate change and finite resources require countries all over the world to change their way of producing, transporting and using energy. The Energiewende (energy transition will require major changes in the current energy supply system in Germany – but also worldwide. These changes will not only affect the technical sector but will also include ecological questions, social issues and political matters. Whether any transition is going to favour large scale solutions or decentralised technologies depends on local situations and global interconnections, and above all on a democratic process. Hence energy transition succeeds or fails with the acceptance and participation of society. To deal with this overwhelmingly complex topic and its multi-layered dependencies, the Deutsches Museum has designed an exhibition providing visitors with background knowledge about the necessities and challenges of energy transition, unpicking the links between the different technical, economic and social challenges. The exhibition accomplishes the task with an engaging and facilitating approach while taking into account the highly emotive aspects of energy transition as a societal issue. This paper presents the concept of the travelling exhibition energie.wenden, relating it to the Deutsches Museum´s tradition of exhibitions as well as to the challenge of how to deal with socio-scientific topics in scientific exhibitions.

  15. Experiments on very high energy heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willis, W.J.

    1981-01-01

    In this paper I describe experimental techniques which could be used to investigate central collision of very high energy heavy ions. For my purposes, the energy range is defined by the number of pions produced, Nsub(π) >> 100, and consequently Nsub(π) >> Nsub(nucleon). In this regime we may expect that new phenomena will appear. (orig.)

  16. Danish Experience in Local Energy Planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Henrik; Sørensen, Per Alex

    2003-01-01

    The paper describes the influence from public participation brings examples of local energy planning from Ærø and Samsø islands in Denmark.......The paper describes the influence from public participation brings examples of local energy planning from Ærø and Samsø islands in Denmark....

  17. Detection system for neutron β decay correlations in the UCNB and Nab experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broussard, L.J., E-mail: broussardlj@ornl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Zeck, B.A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Adamek, E.R. [Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States); Baeßler, S. [University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Birge, N. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Blatnik, M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Cleveland State University, Cleveland, OH 44115 (United States); Bowman, J.D. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Brandt, A.E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Brown, M. [University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States); Burkhart, J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Callahan, N.B. [Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States); Clayton, S.M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Crawford, C. [University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States); Cude-Woods, C. [North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Currie, S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Dees, E.B. [North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Ding, X. [Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Fomin, N. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Frlez, E.; Fry, J. [University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); and others

    2017-03-21

    We describe a detection system designed for precise measurements of angular correlations in neutron β decay. The system is based on thick, large area, highly segmented silicon detectors developed in collaboration with Micron Semiconductor, Ltd. The prototype system meets specifications for β electron detection with energy thresholds below 10 keV, energy resolution of ∼3 keV FWHM, and rise time of ∼50 ns with 19 of the 127 detector pixels instrumented. Using ultracold neutrons at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, we have demonstrated the coincident detection of β particles and recoil protons from neutron β decay. The fully instrumented detection system will be implemented in the UCNB and Nab experiments to determine the neutron β decay parameters B, a, and b.

  18. High Energy Physics Research with the CMS Experiment at CERN - Energy Frontier Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, Gail G. [Univ. of California, Riverside, CA (United States)

    2017-06-30

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) near Geneva, Switzerland, is now the highest energy accelerator in the world, colliding protons with protons. On July 4, 2012, the two general-purpose experiments, ATLAS and the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment, announced the observation of a particle consistent with the world’s most sought-after particle, the Higgs boson, at a mass of about 125 GeV (approximately 125 times the mass of the proton). The Higgs boson is the final missing ingredient of the standard model, in which it is needed to allow most other particles to acquire mass through the mechanism of electroweak symmetry breaking. We are members of the team in the CMS experiment that found evidence for the Higgs boson through its decay to two photons, the most sensitive channel at the LHC. We are proposing to carry out studies to determine whether the new particle has the properties expected for the standard model Higgs boson or whether it is something else. The new particle can still carry out its role in electroweak symmetry breaking but have other properties as well. Most theorists think that a single standard model Higgs boson cannot be the complete solution – there are other particles needed to answer some of the remaining questions, such as the hierarchy problem. The particle that has been observed could be one of several Higgs bosons, for example, or it could be composite. One model of physics beyond the standard model is supersymmetry, in which every ordinary particle has a superpartner with opposite spin properties. In supersymmetric models, there must be at least five Higgs bosons. In the most popular versions of supersymmetry, the lightest supersymmetric particle does not decay and is a candidate for dark matter. This proposal covers the period from June 1, 2013, to March 31, 2016. During this period the LHC will finally reach its design energy, almost twice the energy at which it now runs. We will

  19. Short range correlations in high energy heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franco, V.; Nutt, W.T.

    1978-01-01

    We present a technique for including the effects of nucleon-nucleon correlations in the optical phase shift (chi) expansion of the nucleus-nucleus scattering amplitude and present the results for chi to second order. The total and inelastic cross sections are consistently higher than those obtained ignoring correlations, and are in better agreement with the data. Furthermore, the inclusion of correlations leads to second order phase shift functions which do not violate unitarity, in constrast to the case when correlations are ignored in very heavy nuclei (A 1 , A 2 > or approx. = 200). In elastic scattering differential cross sections, the effects of correlations can be quite large

  20. Distributed energy store railguns experiment and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holland, L.D.

    1984-01-01

    Electromagnetic acceleration of projectiles holds the potential for achieving higher velocities than yet achieved by any other means. A railgun is the simplest form of electromagnetic macroparticle accelerator and can generate the highest sustained accelerating force. The practical length of conventional railguns is limited by the impedance of the rails because current must be carried along the entire length of the rails. A railgun and power supply system called the distributed energy store railgun was proposed as a solution to this limitation. The distributed energy store railgun used multiple current sources connected to the rails of a railgun at points distributed along the bore. These current sources (energy stores) are turned on in sequence as the projectile moves down the bore so that current is fed to the railgun from behind the armature. In this system the length of the rails that carry the full armature current is less than the total length of the railgun. If a sufficient number of energy stores is used, this removes the limitation on the length of a railgun. An additional feature of distributed energy store type railguns is that they can be designed to maintain a constant pressure on the projectile being accelerated. A distributed energy store railgun was constructed and successfully operated. In addition to this first demonstration of the distributed energy store railgun principle, a theoretical model of the system was also constructed

  1. Experience on Wind Energy and other renewable energies in Guatemala

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azurdia, Ivan; Arriaza, Hugo

    2000-01-01

    In this paper a description of the eco-regions in Central America with high potential for development of renewable energies is described. Also the applications more usual and/or in terms of effective-cost. Aspects on energy demand and supply are presented in Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua Costa Rica y Panama. Also options in terms of cost-effective for each renewable source like geothermal, solar, hydroelectric and wind power are discussed

  2. Term value/band-gap energy correlations for solid rare gas excitons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    Term value/ionization energy correlation algorithms have proven to be of considerable utility in the assignment of atomic and molecular Rydberg states. Many examples of empirical term value/ionization energy correlations are known for diverse classes of atoms and molecules. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate that similar correlations are also obtained for excitons in rare gas solids

  3. Charge-dependent azimuthal correlations in pPb collisions with CMS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Tu, Zhoudunming

    2017-01-01

    Charge-dependent azimuthal correlations relative to the event plane in AA collisions have been suggested as providing evidence for the chiral magnetic effect (CME) caused by local strong parity violation. However, the observation of the CME remains inconclusive because of several possible sources of background correlations that may account for part or all of the observed signals. This talk will present the first application of three-particle, charge-dependent azimuthal correlation analysis in proton-nucleus collisions, using pPb data collected with the CMS experiment at the LHC at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 5.02 TeV. The differences found in comparing same and opposite sign correlations are studied as a function of event multiplicity and the pseudorapidity gap between two of the particles detected in the CMS tracker detector. After selecting events with comparable charge-particle multiplicities, the results for pPb collisions are found to be similar to those for PbPb collisions collected at the same collision energy. ...

  4. Nuclear emulsion experiments on particle production at high energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otterlund, I.

    1976-08-01

    Various experimental results, including multiplicities of shower-particles and heavy prong particles, correlations between them and single particle distributions, from proton-emulsion nucleus reactions in the energy range 200-400 GeV are presented. (Auth.)

  5. Agricultural experiences as correlates of secondary school students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Research Review ... Instruments used were Career Decision Questionnaire, Agricultural Experience Questionnaire and ... in agriculture while poultry (β = -0.333) mostly predicted students career decision in Agricultural Science.

  6. Bell inequalities and experiments on quantum correlations for macroscopic distances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grib, A.A.

    1984-01-01

    Recently in different laboratories experiments checking the validity of Bell's inequalities were made. These inequalities give the answer to the qUestion which interpretation of quantum mechanics is correct: either Einstein's interpretation according to which properties of quantum system exist as elements of physical reality independently from their observation or Copenhagen's interpretation due to Bohr and Fock according to which quantUm properties described by noncommuting operators don't exist independently from measurement. Experiments are classified on three groups: Those with optical photons with γ-quanta and with nucleons. The experiments undoubtedly show that Bell's inequalities are not satisfied, so the Copenhagen's interpretation of quantum mehanics and the principle of relativity to the means of measurement of properties of the microsystem give the only non-contradicting-to-experiment description of quantum phenomena

  7. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Resarch Center Workshop: Fluctuations, Correlations and RHIC Low Energy Runs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karsch, F.; Kojo, T.; Mukherjee, S.; Stephanov, M.; Xu, N.

    2011-10-27

    Most of our visible universe is made up of hadronic matter. Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) is the theory of strong interaction that describes the hadronic matter. However, QCD predicts that at high enough temperatures and/or densities ordinary hadronic matter ceases to exist and a new form of matter is created, the so-called Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP). Non-perturbative lattice QCD simulations shows that for high temperature and small densities the transition from the hadronic to the QCD matter is not an actual phase transition, rather it takes place via a rapid crossover. On the other hand, it is generally believed that at zero temperature and high densities such a transition is an actual first order phase transition. Thus, in the temperature-density phase diagram of QCD, the first order phase transition line emanating from the zero temperature high density region ends at some higher temperature where the transition becomes a crossover. The point at which the first order transition line turns into a crossover is a second order phase transition point belonging to three dimensional Ising universality class. This point is known as the QCD Critical End Point (CEP). For the last couple of years the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory has been performing experiments at lower energies in search of the elusive QCD CEP. In general critical behaviors are manifested through appearance of long range correlations and increasing fluctuations associated with the presence of mass-less modes in the vicinity of a second order phase transition. Experimental signatures of the CEP are likely to be found in observables related to fluctuations and correlations. Thus, one of the major focuses of the RHIC low energy scan program is to measure various experimental observables connected to fluctuations and correlations. On the other hand, with the start of the RHIC low energy scan program, a flurry of activities are taking place to provide solid theoretical

  8. Jet energy scale uncertainty correlations between ATLAS and CMS at $\\sqrt{s}=8$ TeV

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    An evaluation of the correlations between ATLAS and CMS jet energy scale uncertainties is presented for $\\sqrt{s}=8\\,\\mathrm{TeV}$ $pp$ collisions recorded in 2012. Uncertainties within each experiment are grouped based on the general type of systematic effect they are intended to cover and the means by which they are derived. Inter-experimental correlation value ranges are established for each corresponding group of uncertainty components. This correlation range is intended to cover the possible correlation values when performing combinations between the two experiments, where the most conservative value obtained from scanning over the correlation range should be used for the final combined measurement. The procedure described here is primarily aimed at single-observable analyses, and has limitations when applied to multi-observable measurements.

  9. Neural correlates of the LSD experience revealed by multimodal neuroimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carhart-Harris, Robin L; Muthukumaraswamy, Suresh; Roseman, Leor; Kaelen, Mendel; Droog, Wouter; Murphy, Kevin; Tagliazucchi, Enzo; Schenberg, Eduardo E; Nest, Timothy; Orban, Csaba; Leech, Robert; Williams, Luke T; Williams, Tim M; Bolstridge, Mark; Sessa, Ben; McGonigle, John; Sereno, Martin I; Nichols, David; Hellyer, Peter J; Hobden, Peter; Evans, John; Singh, Krish D; Wise, Richard G; Curran, H Valerie; Feilding, Amanda; Nutt, David J

    2016-04-26

    Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) is the prototypical psychedelic drug, but its effects on the human brain have never been studied before with modern neuroimaging. Here, three complementary neuroimaging techniques: arterial spin labeling (ASL), blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) measures, and magnetoencephalography (MEG), implemented during resting state conditions, revealed marked changes in brain activity after LSD that correlated strongly with its characteristic psychological effects. Increased visual cortex cerebral blood flow (CBF), decreased visual cortex alpha power, and a greatly expanded primary visual cortex (V1) functional connectivity profile correlated strongly with ratings of visual hallucinations, implying that intrinsic brain activity exerts greater influence on visual processing in the psychedelic state, thereby defining its hallucinatory quality. LSD's marked effects on the visual cortex did not significantly correlate with the drug's other characteristic effects on consciousness, however. Rather, decreased connectivity between the parahippocampus and retrosplenial cortex (RSC) correlated strongly with ratings of "ego-dissolution" and "altered meaning," implying the importance of this particular circuit for the maintenance of "self" or "ego" and its processing of "meaning." Strong relationships were also found between the different imaging metrics, enabling firmer inferences to be made about their functional significance. This uniquely comprehensive examination of the LSD state represents an important advance in scientific research with psychedelic drugs at a time of growing interest in their scientific and therapeutic value. The present results contribute important new insights into the characteristic hallucinatory and consciousness-altering properties of psychedelics that inform on how they can model certain pathological states and potentially treat others.

  10. Experiences with auctions for renewable energy support

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mora Alvarez, David Fernando; Islam, Marco; Soysal, Emilie Rosenlund

    2017-01-01

    Auctions is an increasingly popular instrument for introducing competitiveness in the support schemes for renewable energy, however, designing successful auctions appears to be a challenge. Policy makers seeking to introduce auctions are faced with a range of design choices, which may affect...

  11. Experiments with low-energy antimatter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Consolati G.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigations on antimatter allow us to shed light on fundamental issues of contemporary physics. The only antiatom presently available, antihydrogen, is produced making use of the Antiproton Decelerator (AD facility at CERN. International collaborations currently on the floor (ALPHA, ASACUSA and ATRAP have succeeded in producing antihydrogen and are now involved in its confinement and manipulation. The AEGIS experiment is currently completing the commissioning of the apparatus which will generate and manipulate antiatoms. The present paper, after a report on the main results achieved with antihydrogen physics, gives an overview of the AEGIS experiment, describes its current status and discusses its first target.

  12. Two-detector cross correlation experiments in the heavy water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jovanovic, S [Boris Kidric Institute of nuclear sciences Vinca, Belgrade (Yugoslavia)

    1969-12-15

    The objective of the task presented in this paper was to develop the instrumentation for Cross Spectral Density method (CPSD) as well as to perform Autopower Spectral Density (APSD) and CPSD experiments with different efficiencies of ionization chambers to compare them. Two ionization chambers with the same sensitivity were were used at different axial positions of the reactor. The experiment was done at the RB reactor in Vinca at the delayed critical state only. The lattice pitch was 16 cm, and 2% enriched fuel fuel was used.

  13. Application of radix sorting in high energy physics experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xuan; Gu Minhao; Zhu Kejun

    2012-01-01

    In the high energy physics experiments, there are always requirements to sort the large scale of experiment data. To meet the demand, this paper introduces one radix sorting algorithms, whose sub-sort is counting sorting and time complex is O (n), based on the characteristic of high energy physics experiment data that is marked by time stamp. This paper gives the description, analysis, implementation and experimental result of the sorting algorithms. (authors)

  14. The spin correlation parameter and analyzing power in n-p elastic scattering at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abegg, R.; Davis, C.A.; Delheij, P.P.J.; Greeniaus, L.G.; Healey, D.C.; Miller, C.A.; Wait, G.D.; Ahmad, M.; Green, P.W.; Lapointe, C.; McDonald, W.J.; Moss, G.A.; Rodning, N.L.; Roy, G.; Ye, Y.

    1989-06-01

    In order to improve existing I=0 phase shift solutions, the spin correlation parameter, A NN , and the analyzing powers, A 0N and A N0 , have been measured in n-p elastic scattering over an angular range of 50 degrees -150 degrees (c.m.) at three neutron energies, 220, 325 and 425 MeV to an absolute accuracy of ±0.03. The data have a profound effect on various phase parameters, particularly the 1 P 1 , 3 D 2 and ε 1 phase parameters which in some cases change by almost a degree. With exception of the highest energy, the data support the predictions of the latest version of the Bonn potential. Also the analyzing power data (A 0N and A N0 ) measured at 477 MeV in a different experiment over a limited angular range (60 degrees - 80 degrees (c.m.)) are reported here. (Author) 30 refs., 10 figs., 5 tabs

  15. A high energy gamma ray astronomy experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofstadter, R.

    1988-01-01

    The author describes work involving NASA's Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO). GRO exemplifies the near zero principle because it investigates new gamma ray phenomena by relying on the space program to take us into the region of zero interference above the earth's atmosphere. In its present form GRO has four experiments

  16. Chemical energy in electro arc furnace - examples from experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shushlevski, Ljupcho; Georgievski, Panche; Hadzhidaovski, Ilija

    2004-01-01

    Great competition on the market in steel-producing and chemical lack of electrical energy leads to realization of new project in section Steelworks AD 'Makstil' - Skopje named: 'Substitution of electrical energy i.e. entering of additional chemical energy in Electrical arc furnace for steel melting using fuels-naturual gas (CH 4 ), oxygen (O 2 ) and carbon (C)'. It is accumulate experience from two and one half year of intensive use of chemical energy with its accompanying problems, appropriate efficiency and economy in process for steel producing. In 2001 year we announced and described project for using of an additional alternative chemical energy in aggregate Electrical are furnace. In this work we will present realization, working experience and efficiency of the system for generating chemical energy. Practical realization needs serious approach in chemical energy usage The usage of chemical energy brings restrictions and needs many innovation for protection of equipment from shown aggressiveness during the combustion of fuel gasses. (Author)

  17. Peritransplant energy changes and their correlation to outcome after human liver transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruinsma, Bote G; Avruch, James H; Sridharan, Gautham V; Weeder, Pepijn D; Jacobs, Marie Louise; Crisalli, Kerry; Amundsen, Beth; Porte, Robert J; Markmann, James F; Uygun, Korkut; Yeh, Heidi

    BACKGROUND: The ongoing shortage of donor livers for transplantation and the increased use of marginal livers necessitate the development of accurate pretransplant tests of viability. Considering the importance energy status during transplantation, we aimed to correlate peritransplant energy

  18. Granular filtration for airborne particles : correlation between experiments and models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golshahi, L.; Tan, Z. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada). Schulich School of Engineering, Mechanical and Manufacturing Dept.; Abedi, J. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada). Schulich School of Engineering, Chemical and Petroleum Engineering Dept.

    2009-10-15

    A new design for a packed bed granular filter was presented. The cylindrical packed bed was designed to filter particles in the range of approximately 10 nm to 15 {mu}m in diameter in different kinetic conditions and configurations. The aim of the study was to develop a precise empirical model to predict the filtration efficiency of the packed beds. A collision-type atomizer was used to generate polydisperse sodium chloride aerosol particles. The effect of flow rates was studied using a thermal mass flow meter. A regression analysis technique was used to determine the correlation between single granule and total packed bed efficiency for the entire granular filter. The experimental data were then compared with results obtained from the theoretical analysis. The least square method was used to correlate experimental data and to develop generalized equations for single granule efficiency. The study showed that the granular filter media has a high filtration efficiency for both micron and submicron particles. It was concluded that the effect of media thickness was more significant at higher flow rates than at lower flow rates. 10 refs., 3 figs.

  19. Diamond sensors for future high energy experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachmair, Felix, E-mail: bachmair@phys.ethz.ch

    2016-09-21

    With the planned upgrade of the LHC to High-Luminosity-LHC [1], the general purpose experiments ATLAS and CMS are planning to upgrade their innermost tracking layers with more radiation tolerant technologies. Chemical Vapor Deposition CVD diamond is one such technology. CVD diamond sensors are an established technology as beam condition monitors in the highest radiation areas of all LHC experiments. The RD42-collaboration at CERN is leading the effort to use CVD diamond as a material for tracking detectors operating in extreme radiation environments. An overview of the latest developments from RD42 is presented including the present status of diamond sensor production, a study of pulse height dependencies on incident particle flux and the development of 3D diamond sensors.

  20. On Storks and Babies: Correlation, Causality and Field Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lambrecht Anja

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The explosion of available data has created much excitement among marketing practitioners about their ability to better understand the impact of marketing investments. Big data allows for detecting patterns and often it seems plausible to interpret them as causal. While it is quite obvious that storks do not bring babies, marketing relationships are usually less clear. Apparent “causalities” often fail to hold up under examination. If marketers want to be sure not to walk into a causality trap, they need to conduct field experiments to detect true causal relationships. In the present digital environment, experiments are easier than ever to execute. However, they need to be prepared and interpreted with great care in order to deliver meaningful and genuinely causal results that help improve marketing decisions.

  1. Preliminary experiments on energy recovery on a neutral beam injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fumelli, M.

    1977-06-01

    Energy recovery tests performed on an injector of energetic neutral atoms in which the ion source is operated at the ground potential and the neutralizer is biased at the high energy potential corresponding to the desired neutral beam energy, are presented. The operation of the suppressor grid is studied in two different experiments. These tests underline the problems to be solved for an efficient recovery of the energy of the unneutralized beam fraction

  2. Pioneering in wind energy: the California experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Righter, R.W.

    1996-01-01

    In California today nearly 16,000 wind generators are spinning, providing for the electrical needs of roughly one million residents. Yet in 1980, just sixteen years ago, the state was without wind generators, save for a few experimental models. It is time to reflect on this remarkable growth. What caused it? What transformed a ''soft energy path'' dream into reality? This paper will focus on four central factors: (1) political climate, (2) tax incentives, (3) the PURPA Act of 1978, and (4) a sympathetic public utility commission. (author)

  3. Inclusion of electron correlation for the target wave function in low- to intermediate-energy e-N2 scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weatherford, C. A.; Brown, F. B.; Temkin, A.

    1987-01-01

    In a recent calculation, an exact exchange method was developed for use in the partial-differential-equation approach to electron-molecule scattering and was applied to e-N2 scattering in the fixed-nuclei approximation with an adiabatic polarization potential at low energies (0-10 eV). Integrated elastic cross sections were calculated and found to be lower than experiment at energies both below and above the Pi(g) resonance. It was speculated at that time that improved experimental agreement could be obtained if a correlated target representation were used in place of the uncorrelated one. The present paper implements this suggestion and demonstrates the improved agreement. These calculations are also extended to higher energies (0-30 eV) so asd to include the Sigma(u) resonance. Some discrepancies among the experiments and between experiment and the various calculations at very low energy are noted.

  4. Beyond the random-phase approximation for the electron correlation energy: the importance of single excitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xinguo; Tkatchenko, Alexandre; Rinke, Patrick; Scheffler, Matthias

    2011-04-15

    The random-phase approximation (RPA) for the electron correlation energy, combined with the exact-exchange (EX) energy, represents the state-of-the-art exchange-correlation functional within density-functional theory. However, the standard RPA practice--evaluating both the EX and the RPA correlation energies using Kohn-Sham (KS) orbitals from local or semilocal exchange-correlation functionals--leads to a systematic underbinding of molecules and solids. Here we demonstrate that this behavior can be corrected by adding a "single excitation" contribution, so far not included in the standard RPA scheme. A similar improvement can also be achieved by replacing the non-self-consistent EX total energy by the corresponding self-consistent Hartree-Fock total energy, while retaining the RPA correlation energy evaluated using KS orbitals. Both schemes achieve chemical accuracy for a standard benchmark set of noncovalent intermolecular interactions.

  5. Two- and three-point energy correlations in hadronic e+e- annihilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, G.C.; Wolfram, S.

    1980-01-01

    Correlations between the energies incident on two or three detectors around e + e - annihilation events are considered as a probe of the QCD structure of the events. Practical methods for deducing two-detector energy correlations (which give the mean product of energies incident on two detectors as a function of their angular separation) from measured events are devised. Analytical formulae for energy correlations from QCD perturbation theory are given, but it is found that large corrections from hadron formation obscure these asymptotic predictions at available energies. Correlations between the final state and the incoming e + - beam direction are discussed, and observables are presented which measure the angular distributions of planes of final particles with respect to the beam axis (but do not require explicit determination of the planes). Finally, three-detector energy correlations and their moments are treated, and methods for investigating planar structures in e + e - annihilation events are devised. (orig.) 891 HSI/orig. 892 MKO

  6. Industrial aspects of nuclear energy: French experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebreton, G.

    1986-11-01

    France decides to develop nuclear energy on a wide scale about 12 years ago. To cope with this ambitious program, the roles have been distributed within a very cohesive organization, as follows: EDF, the french national electricity utility is owner, prime contractor, and plant operator. The Atomic Energy Commission, CEA performs part of the research and development work, and supplies the necessary technical support to the safety authorities. A few leading industrial firms design and build the major parts of the nuclear power plants. Among them is Framatome, which is responsible for the design, manufacture, erection, and startup of nuclear steam supply systems (the NSSSs), and related auxiliaries. Alsthom is responsible for the supply of the turbine and its auxiliaries. It would not be proper to describe the French nuclear industry without focussing our attention on the care given to transfer of technology. Technology transfer agreements can take several forms, but local factors have to be taken into account. These forms are discussed in this paper. A typical and highly significant example (KNU 9-10 project) is given

  7. Zero-point energy and the Eoetvoes experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, D.K.

    1999-01-01

    The paper shows that the modification of the electromagnetic zero-point energy inside a solid aluminum ball ia large enough to be detected by a feasible Eoetvoes-type experiment improved only a factor of 100 over earlier experiments. Because of the uncertainties surrounding the relationship of the zero-point energy to the cosmological constant and to renormalization effects in general relativity that such an experiment might give a non-null result. This would be a test of the weak equivalence principle and of general relativity itself in regard to a very special purely quantum-mechanical form of energy

  8. Experience Curves: A Tool for Energy Policy Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neij, Lena; Helby, Peter [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Environmental and Energy Systems Studies; Dannemand Andersen, Per; Morthorst, Poul Erik [Riso National Laboratory, Roskilde (Denmark); Durstewitz, Michael; Hoppe-Kilpper, Martin [Inst. fuer Solare Energieversorgungstechnik e.V., Kassel (DE); and others

    2003-07-01

    The objective of the project, Experience curves: a tool for energy policy assessment (EXTOOL), was to analyse the experience curve as a tool for the assessment of energy policy measures. This is of special interest, since the use of experience curves for the assessment of energy policy measures requires the development of the established experience curve methodology. This development raises several questions which have been addressed and analysed in this project. The analysis is based on case studies of wind power, an area with considerable experience in technology development, deployment and policy measures. Therefore, a case study based on wind power provides a good opportunity to study the usefulness of experience curves as a tool for the assessment of energy policy measures. However, the results are discussed in terms of using experience curves for the assessment of any energy technology. The project shows that experience curves can be used to assess the effect of combined policy measures in terms of cost reductions. Moreover, the result of the project show that experience curves could be used to analyse international 'learning systems', i.e. cost reductions brought about by the development of wind power and policy measures used in other countries. Nevertheless, the use of experience curves for the assessment of policy programmes has several limitations. First, the analysis and assessment of policy programmes cannot be achieved unless relevant experience curves based on good data can be developed. The authors are of the opinion that only studies that provide evidence of the validity, reliability and relevance of experience curves should be taken into account in policy making. Second, experience curves provide an aggregated picture of the situation and more detailed analysis of various sources of cost reduction, and cost reductions resulting from individual policy measures, requires additional data and analysis tools. Third, we do not recommend the use of

  9. Pauli correlations in heavy-ion collisions at high energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franco, V.; Nutt, W.T.

    1977-01-01

    The effects of short-range correlations on the Glauber expansion for nucleus-nucleus collisions are calculated using the Fermi gas model for nuclei. When the Pauli principle is neglected for collisions between heavy nuclei, calculation of the optical phase-shift function leads to non-unitary results and cross sections cannot be obtained. When Pauli correlations are included important cancellations in the optical phase-shift function are found which make possible the calculation of total and differential cross sections for heavy nuclei. (Auth.)

  10. Correlation between diffusion barriers and alloying energy in binary alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vej-Hansen, Ulrik Grønbjerg; Rossmeisl, Jan; Stephens, Ifan

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we explore the notion that a negative alloying energy may act as a descriptor for long term stability of Pt-alloys as cathode catalysts in low temperature fuel cells.......In this paper, we explore the notion that a negative alloying energy may act as a descriptor for long term stability of Pt-alloys as cathode catalysts in low temperature fuel cells....

  11. Occupant Experiences and Satisfaction with New Low-Energy Houses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Henrik Nellemose; Thomsen, Kirsten Engelund; Mørck, Ove

    2013-01-01

    -energy houses that meet the future lower energy requirements of the planned Danish Building Regulations 2015. The purpose was to study experiences and satisfaction among occupants living in new low-energy houses. It included i.a. overall satisfaction, perceived indoor climate and experiences and satisfaction...... be addressed in order to make low-energy houses attractive to ordinary people. Occupants experienced among other things noise from the technical installations and that it was too hot in summer and too cold in winter, that there were a series of problems with the technical installations and that their use...

  12. Review of high energy heavy ion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miake, Yasuo

    2000-01-01

    It has been proposed that in high energy heavy ion collisions a physical conditions similar to the early stage of the Universe can be established in the laboratory. New phase of matter expected to be created is called the quark gluon plasma (QGP). Based on the motivation to create the QGP in the laboratory, heavy ion beams have been accelerated at AGS of Brookhaven National Laboratory and also at CERN-SPS. Several interesting features of the data have been reported, among which are: the suppression of J/ψ production in Pb+Pb collisions, the enhancement of low mass lepton pairs, and the collective behavior of hadron production. These features are reviewed under the key words of Deconfinement, Chiral Restoration and Collectivity in the lecture. (author)

  13. aCORN: An experiment to measure the electron-antineutrino correlation in neutron decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wietfeldt, F.E., E-mail: few@tulane.ed [Department of Physics, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA 70118 (United States); Byrne, J. [University of Sussex (United Kingdom); Collett, B. [Physics Department, Hamilton College, Clinton, NY 13323 (United States); Dewey, M.S. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Jones, G.L. [Physics Department, Hamilton College, Clinton, NY 13323 (United States); Komives, A. [Physics Department, DePauw University, Greencastle, IN 46135 (United States); Laptev, A. [Department of Physics, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA 70118 (United States); Nico, J.S. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Noid, G.; Stephenson, E.J. [Indiana University Cyclotron Facility, Bloomington, IN 47408 (United States); Stern, I.; Trull, C. [Department of Physics, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA 70118 (United States); Yerozolimsky, B.G. [Physics Department, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2009-12-11

    The aCORN experiment is designed to make a precision (<1%) measurement of the electron-antineutrino angular correlation (a-coefficient) in neutron beta decay. It uses a new method proposed in 1996 by Yerozolimsky and Mostovoy. Electrons and recoil protons from neutron decay in a cold beam are detected in coincidence. The momenta of the particles are selected so that the protons form two kinematically distinct time-of-flight groups as a function of electron energy. The count rate asymmetry in these two groups is proportional to the a-coefficient. Precision spectroscopy of the protons is not required. The apparatus is currently under construction. It will be integrated and tested at the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility (IUCF) and then moved to the NIST Center for Neutron Research for the initial physics run.

  14. Study of energy-energy correlations between 12 and 46. 8 GeV c. m. energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braunschweig, W; Gerhards, R; Kirschfink, F J; Martyn, H U; Rosskamp, P; Bock, B; Eisenmann, J; Fischer, H M; Hartmann, H; Hilger, E

    1987-10-01

    We present data on energy-energy correlations (EEC) and their related asymmetry (AEEC) in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation in the centre of mass energy range 12energy and angular dependence of the EEC in the central region is well described by O(..cap alpha../sub s//sup 2/) QCD plus a fragmentation term proportional to 1/..sqrt..s. Bare O(..cap alpha../sub s//sup 2/) QCD reproduces our data for the large angle region of the AEEC. Nonperturbative effects for the latter are estimated with the help of fragmentation models. From various analyses using different approximations, we find that values for ..lambda.. sub(anti Manti S) in the range 0.1-0.3 GeV give a good description of the data. We also compare analytical calculations in QCD for the EEC in the back-to-back region to our data. The theoretical predictions describe well both the angular and energy dependence of the data in the back-to-back region.

  15. Rapidity correlations in the RHIC Beam Energy Scan Data

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jowzaee, S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, Jana; Chaloupka, P.; Federič, Pavol; Rusňák, Jan; Rusňáková, O.; Šimko, Miroslav; Šumbera, Michal; Vértési, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 967, č. 11 (2017), s. 792-795 ISSN 0375-9474 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LG15001; GA MŠk LM2015054 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : STAR collaboration * rapidity correlations * forward-backward asymmetry Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders OBOR OECD: Nuclear physics Impact factor: 1.916, year: 2016

  16. An investigation of energy balances in palladium cathode electrolysis experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhurst, G. R.; Dolan, T. J.; Henriksen, G. L.

    1990-09-01

    A series of experiments was performed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to investigate mechanisms that may contribute to energy flows in electrolysis cells like those of Fleischmann and Pons. Ordinary water (H2O), heavy water (D2O), and a mixture of the two were used in the INEL experiments. Cathodes used include a 51-μm Pd foil and 1-mm diameter extruded wire Pd rods in straight and coiled configurations. Energy balances in these experiments revealed no significant net gain or net loss of energy. Cell overpotential curves were fit well with a Tafel equation, with parameters dependent on electrode configuration, electrolyte composition, and temperature. Water evaporation and interactions of hydrogen isotopes with the Pd cathode were evaluated and found not to be significant to energy balances. No ionizing radiation, tritium production, or other evidence of fusion reactions was observed in the INEL experiments.

  17. Rocket experiment METS - Microwave Energy Transmission in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, N.; Matsumoto, H.; Akiba, R.

    A Microwave Energy Transmission in Space (METS) rocket experiment is being planned by the Solar Power Satellite Working Group at the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science in Japan for the forthcoming International Space Year, 1992. The METS experiment is an advanced version of the previous MINIX rocket experiment (Matsumoto et al., 1990). This paper describes a conceptual design of the METS rocket experiment. It aims at verifying a newly developed microwave energy transmission system for space use and to study nonlinear effects of the microwave energy beam in the space plasma environment. A high power microwave of 936 W will be transmitted by the new phased-array antenna from a mother rocket to a separated target (daughter rocket) through the ionospheric plasma. The active phased-array system has a capability of focusing the microwave energy around any spatial point by controlling the digital phase shifters individually.

  18. Rocket experiment METS Microwave Energy Transmission in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, N.; Matsumoto, H.; Akiba, R.

    A METS (Microwave Energy Transmission in Space) rocket experiment is being planned by the SPS (Solar Power Satellite) Working Group at the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS) in Japan for the forthcoming International Space Year (ISY), 1992. The METS experiment is an advanced version of our MINIX rocket experiment. This paper describes the conceptual design for the METS rocket experiment. Aims are to verify the feasibility of a newly developed microwave energy transmission system designed for use in space and to study nonlinear effects of the microwave energy beam on space plasma. A high power microwave (936 W) will be transmitted by a new phase-array antenna from a mother rocket to a separate target (daughter rocket) through the Earth's ionospheric plasma. The active phased-array system has the capability of being able to focus the microwave energy at any spatial point by individually controlling the digital phase shifters.

  19. Energy deposition via magnetoplasmadynamic acceleration: I. Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilland, James; Mikellides, Pavlos; Marriott, Darin

    2009-01-01

    The expansion of a high-temperature fusion plasma through an expanding magnetic field is a process common to most fusion propulsion concepts. The propulsive efficiency of this process has a strong bearing on the overall performance of fusion propulsion. In order to simulate the expansion of a fusion plasma, a concept has been developed in which a high velocity plasma is first stagnated in a converging magnetic field to high (100s of eV) temperatures, then expanded though a converging/diverging magnetic nozzle. As a first step in constructing this experiment, a gigawatt magnetoplasmadynamic plasma accelerator was constructed to generate the initial high velocity plasma and has been characterized. The source is powered by a 1.6 MJ, 1.6 ms pulse forming network. The device has been operated with currents up to 300 kA and power levels up to 200 MWe. These values are among the highest levels reached in an magnetoplasmadynamic thruster. The device operation has been characterized by quasi-steady voltage and current measurements for helium mass flow rates from 0.5 to 27 g s -1 . Probe results for downstream plasma density and electron temperature are also presented. The source behavior is examined in terms of current theories for magnetoplasmadynamic thrusters.

  20. Slow or swift, your patients' experience won't drift: absence of correlation between physician productivity and the patient experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, Kasia; McRae, Andrew; Wang, Dongmei; Higgins, Benjamin; Innes, Grant; Cook, Timothy; Lang, Eddy

    2017-09-01

    Absract OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the relationship between Emergency Physician (EP) productivity and patient satisfaction with Emergency Department (ED) care. This retrospective observational study linked administrative and patient experience databases to measure correlations between the patient experience and EP productivity. The study was performed across three Calgary EDs (from June 2010 to July 2013). Patients>16 years old with completed Health Quality Council of Alberta (HQCA) ED Patient Experience Surveys were included. EP productivity was measured at the individual physician level and defined as the average number of patients seen per hour. The association between physician productivity and patient experience scores from six composite domains of the HQCA ED Patient Experience Survey were examined using Pearson correlation coefficients, linear regression modelling, and a path analysis. We correlated 3,794 patient experience surveys with productivity data for 130 EPs. Very weak non-significant negative correlations existed between productivity and survey composites: "Staff Care and Communication" (r=-0.057, p=0.521), "Discharge Communication" (r=-0.144, p=0.102), and "Respect" (r=-0.027, p=0.760). Very weak, non-significant positive correlations existed between productivity and the composite domains: "Medication Communication" (r=0.003, p=0.974) and "Pain management" (r=0.020, p=0.824). A univariate general linear model yielded no statistically significant correlations between EP productivity and patient experience, and the path analysis failed to show a relationship between the variables. We found no correlation between EP productivity and the patient experience.

  1. Unfolding methods in high-energy physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blobel, V.

    1985-01-01

    Distributions measured in high-energy physics experiments are often distorted or transformed by limited acceptance and finite resolution of the detectors. The unfolding of measured distributions is an important, but due to inherent instabilities a very difficult problem. Methods for unfolding, applicable for the analysis of high-energy physics experiments, and their properties are discussed. An introduction is given to the method of regularization. (orig.)

  2. Unfolding methods in high-energy physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blobel, V.

    1984-12-01

    Distributions measured in high-energy physics experiments are often distorted or transformed by limited acceptance and finite resolution of the detectors. The unfolding of measured distributions is an important, but due to inherent instabilities a very difficult problem. Methods for unfolding, applicable for the analysis of high-energy physics experiments, and their properties are discussed. An introduction is given to the method of regularization. (orig.)

  3. An adapted blockage factor correlation approach in wind tunnel experiments of a Savonius-style wind turbine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, Sukanta; Saha, Ujjwal K.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Significance of the blockage correction in wind tunnel experiments of Savonius-style wind turbine. • Adaptation of blockage factor correlations under open type test sections for blockage ratio of 21.16%. • Effectiveness of adapted correlations for smaller blockage ratios (BRs) of 16% and 12.25%. • Estimate the magnitude of the blockage correction under various loading conditions for each BR. • Variation of blockage correction factor with respect to tip speed ratio and BR. - Abstract: An investigation into the blockage correction effects in wind tunnel experiments of a small-scale wind energy conversion system in an open type test section is carried out. The energy conversion system includes a Savonius-style wind turbine (SSWT) and a power measurement assembly. As the available correlations for the closed type test sections may not be appropriate for the open test section under dynamic loading conditions, new correlations are adapted for the blockage correction factors with free stream wind speed, turbine rotational speed and variable load applied to the turbine to quantify the energy conversion coefficients more precisely. These are obtained for a blockage ratio of 21.16% through a comparison of present experimental data with those of established experimental data under dynamic loading conditions. Further, the accuracy of the adapted correlations is substantiated into the experiments with smaller blockage ratios of 16% and 12.25%. The relationships of the tip speed ratios and blockage ratios with the blockage correction factor are also discussed. Using these correlations, this study provides evidence of increase of blockage correction in the range 1–10% with the increase of both tip speed ratio and blockage ratio. The results also indicate that for blockage ratios approaching 10 and tip speed ratios below 0.5, the blockage effects are almost negligible in the open type test sections

  4. Correlation between the Open-Circuit Voltage and Charge Transfer State Energy in Organic Photovoltaic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Yunlong; Holmes, Russell J

    2015-08-26

    In order to further improve the performance of organic photovoltaic cells (OPVs), it is essential to better understand the factors that limit the open-circuit voltage (VOC). Previous work has sought to correlate the value of VOC in donor-acceptor (D-A) OPVs to the interface energy level offset (EDA). In this work, measurements of electroluminescence are used to extract the charge transfer (CT) state energy for multiple small molecule D-A pairings. The CT state as measured from electroluminescence is found to show better correlation to the maximum VOC than EDA. The difference between EDA and the CT state energy is attributed to the Coulombic binding energy of the CT state. This correlation is demonstrated explicitly by inserting an insulating spacer layer between the donor and acceptor materials, reducing the binding energy of the CT state and increasing the measured VOC. These results demonstrate a direct correlation between maximum VOC and CT state energy.

  5. Z-1 perturbation theory applied to the correlation energy problem of atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, B.H.

    1975-01-01

    Rayleigh--Schroedinger Perturbation Theory is applied to obtain directly exact and explicit analytic formulas for the electron correlation energies of N electron systems in terms of their pairwise interactions through second order in Z -1 , where Z is the nucleus of the atom. It is demonstrated that the second order correlation energy may be expressed as exactly the sum of pairwise correlation energies. In the case of no zeroth order degeneracy, the zeroth and first order terms vanish. The expression for the pairwise energies is an infinite sum, all terms of which are of the same sign. There is no numerical differencing. In the case of zeroth order degeneracy it is shown that the above statement concerning the second order energy still holds, but the expressions are a bit more complicated. It is shown that they ''almost'' reduce to a much simpler form. Also, the computation of the first order correlation energy is considered

  6. A Better 2-D Mechanical Energy Conservation Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paesler, Michael

    2012-01-01

    A variety of simple classical mechanics energy conservation experiments are used in teaching laboratories. Typical one-dimensional (1-D) setups may involve falling balls or oscillating springs. Many of these can be quite satisfying in that students can confirm--within a few percent--that mechanical energy is conserved. Students generally have…

  7. Data acquisition systems for high energy physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duran, I.; Olmos, P.

    1986-01-01

    The Data Acquisition Systems most frequently used in High Energy Physics experiments is described. This report begins with a brief description of the main elements of a typical signal processing chain, following with a detailed exposition of the four most popular instrumentation standards used in this kind of experiments: NIM, CAMAC, and VMI. (author). 20 figs., 9 ref

  8. High Power Microwave Diagnostic for the Fusion Energy Experiment ITER

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsholm, Søren Bang; Leipold, Frank; Gonçalves, B.

    2016-01-01

    Microwave diagnostics will play an increasingly important role in burning plasma fusion energy experiments like ITER and beyond. The Collective Thomson Scattering (CTS) diagnostic to be installed at ITER is an example of such a diagnostic with great potential in present and future experiments...

  9. Experience gained with energy taxes in Europe - Lessons for Switzerland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peter, M.; Lueckge, H.; Iten, R.; Trageser, J.; Goerlach, B.; Blobel, D.; Kraemer, A.

    2007-12-01

    This comprehensive final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) takes a look at experience gained with energy taxes in Europe and the lessons that can be learned for Switzerland. The variety of energy and CO 2 taxes that have been introduced in Europe since the early 1990s is reviewed. These are intended to reduce energy consumption and CO 2 emissions and complement conventional mineral oil taxes. Some of these non-fiscal energy and CO 2 taxes that have been created within the scope of the EU directive on energy taxation are examined and commented on, as is their impact on energy consumption. The situation in EU member states is described and commented on. Success-factors and general conditions are examined and conclusions that can be drawn for Switzerland are examined.

  10. Free energy profiles from single-molecule pulling experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummer, Gerhard; Szabo, Attila

    2010-12-14

    Nonequilibrium pulling experiments provide detailed information about the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of molecules. We show that unperturbed free energy profiles as a function of molecular extension can be obtained rigorously from such experiments without using work-weighted position histograms. An inverse Weierstrass transform is used to relate the system free energy obtained from the Jarzynski equality directly to the underlying molecular free energy surface. An accurate approximation for the free energy surface is obtained by using the method of steepest descent to evaluate the inverse transform. The formalism is applied to simulated data obtained from a kinetic model of RNA folding, in which the dynamics consists of jumping between linker-dominated folded and unfolded free energy surfaces.

  11. Four-point correlation function of stress-energy tensors in N=4 superconformal theories

    CERN Document Server

    Korchemsky, G P

    2015-01-01

    We derive the explicit expression for the four-point correlation function of stress-energy tensors in four-dimensional N=4 superconformal theory. We show that it has a remarkably simple and suggestive form allowing us to predict a large class of four-point correlation functions involving the stress-energy tensor and other conserved currents. We then apply the obtained results on the correlation functions to computing the energy-energy correlations, which measure the flow of energy in the final states created from the vacuum by a source. We demonstrate that they are given by a universal function independent of the choice of the source. Our analysis relies only on N=4 superconformal symmetry and does not use the dynamics of the theory.

  12. Review and proposal for heat transfer predictions at supercritical water conditions using existing correlations and experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaeger, Wadim, E-mail: wadim.jaeger@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology, DE-76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Sanchez Espinoza, Victor Hugo [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology, DE-76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Hurtado, Antonio [Technical University of Dresden, Institute of Power Engineering, DE-01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2011-06-15

    Highlights: > Implementation of heat transfer correlations for supercritical water into TRACE. > Simulation of several heat transfer experiments with modified TRACE version. > Most correlations are not able to reproduce the experimental results. > Bishop, Sandberg and Tong correlation is most suitable for TRACE applications. - Abstract: This paper summarizes the activities of the TRACE code validation at the Institute for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology related to supercritical water conditions. In particular, the providing of the thermo physical properties and its appropriate use in the wall-to-fluid heat transfer models in the frame of the TRACE code is the object of this investigation. In a first step, the thermo physical properties of the original TRACE code were modified in order to account for supercritical conditions. In a second step, existing Nusselt correlations were reviewed and implemented into TRACE and available experiments were simulated to identify the most suitable Nusselt correlation(s).

  13. Review and proposal for heat transfer predictions at supercritical water conditions using existing correlations and experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaeger, Wadim; Sanchez Espinoza, Victor Hugo; Hurtado, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Implementation of heat transfer correlations for supercritical water into TRACE. → Simulation of several heat transfer experiments with modified TRACE version. → Most correlations are not able to reproduce the experimental results. → Bishop, Sandberg and Tong correlation is most suitable for TRACE applications. - Abstract: This paper summarizes the activities of the TRACE code validation at the Institute for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology related to supercritical water conditions. In particular, the providing of the thermo physical properties and its appropriate use in the wall-to-fluid heat transfer models in the frame of the TRACE code is the object of this investigation. In a first step, the thermo physical properties of the original TRACE code were modified in order to account for supercritical conditions. In a second step, existing Nusselt correlations were reviewed and implemented into TRACE and available experiments were simulated to identify the most suitable Nusselt correlation(s).

  14. Subcriticality determination by a new time-domain correlation experiment with a 252Cf neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishina, K.; Yamane, Y.; Ishiguro, S.; Miyoshi, Y.; Suzaki, T.; Kobayahi, I.

    1985-01-01

    As a candidate for the on-site subcriticality-monitoring method, a new time-domain correlation experiment is proposed. Hinted by the Cf-252 detector method of Mihalczo, three covariances are taken between the count of three detectors; namely an ionization chamber with Cf-252 coating, and two He-3 proportional counters. A ratio Q is formed from the three quantities such that it does not depend either on detector efficiencies or counting gate duration T, and then related to reactivity. A formulation is given deriving a theoretical expression for this Q, with the effect of higher spatial modes included. Experiments were carried out with a loading at Tank-type Critical Assembly of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, which is a slightly-enriched, and light-water moderated system. With fundamental mode approximation adopted in the data processing, reasonable agreements are observed between the present method and the reactivity scale that has been calibrated by water-level variety. The possibility of the present method is to be investigated further beyond the range of 7$ reported

  15. Correlations between high momentum particles in proton-proton collisions at high energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bobbink, G.J.

    1981-01-01

    This thesis describes an experiment performed at the CERN Intersecting Storage Rings. The experiment studies the reaction p+p→h 1 +h 2 +X at two centre-of-mass energies, √s=44.7 GeV and √s=62.3 GeV. Two of the outgoing particles (h 1 and h 2 ) are detected in opposite c.m.s. hemispheres at small polar angles with respect to the direction of two incident protons. The remaining particles produced (X) are not detected. The hadrons hsub(i) are identified mesons (π + , π - , K + , K - ) or baryons (p, Λ) with relatively large longitudinal psub(L) and small transverse momentum psub(T). The aim of the experiment is twofold. The first aim is to study whether the momentum distributions of the fast particles hsub(i) are correlated and thereby to constrain the possible interaction mechanisms responsible for the production of high psub(L), low psub(T) particles. The second aim is to establish to what extent the production of pions and kaons in inclusive proton-proton collisions (e.g. p+p→π+X, X=all other particles) resembles the production of pions and kaons in diffractive proton-proton collisions (e.g. p+p→p+π+X, in which the final-state proton has a momentum close to its maximum possible value). (Auth.)

  16. Spectrum-energy Correlations in GRBs: Update, Reliability, and the Long/Short Dichotomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z. B.; Zhang, C. T.; Zhao, Y. X.; Luo, J. J.; Jiang, L. Y.; Wang, X. L.; Han, X. L.; Terheide, R. K.

    2018-05-01

    Spectrum-energy correlations of peak energy with total prompt γ-ray emission energies, namely {E}p,i-{E}{iso}, {E}p,i-{E}γ , and {E}p,i-{L}p, had been studied for long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) previously by many authors. These energy correlations were proposed to measure the universe and classify GRBs as useful probes. However, most of these relations were built by non-Swift bursts. The spectrum-energy correlations of short bursts have not been systematically established yet; in particular, how the newly found GRB170817A matches these energy relations is unknown to date. We will first refresh the three spectrum-energy relations of Swift/BAT and Fermi/GBM long bursts and build the corresponding relations of short bursts. Then, we confirm whether they are commonly available as a discriminator of short and long GRBs. Some potential violators to these relations will be investigated. Combining with the plane of peak energy versus fluence, we select 31 short and 252 long GRBs with well-measured peak energy and redshift to study the issue of GRB classifications connected with the above energy relations statistically. We find that the three energy relations do exist in our new GRB samples and they are marginally consistent with some previous results. We report for the first time that short GRBs hold the three corresponding energy relations having the consistent power-law indices with long GRBs. It is found that these energy relations can be adopted to discriminate GRBs successfully if they are put in the peak energy versus fluence plane. Excitingly, we point out that GRB090510 matches the energy relations of {E}p,i-{E}{iso} and {E}p,i-{L}p, but violates the {E}p,i-{E}γ relation. More excitingly, we find that GRB170817A is an outlier to all the three energy correlations.

  17. A comparison of various Gibbs energy dissipation correlations for predicting microbial growth yields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, J.-S. [Laboratory of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, EPFL, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Vojinovic, V. [Laboratory of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, EPFL, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Patino, R. [Cinvestav-Merida, Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Km. 6 carretera antigua a Progreso, AP 73 Cordemex, 97310 Merida, Yucatan (Mexico); Maskow, Th. [UFZ Centre for Environmental Research, Department of Environmental Microbiology, Permoserstrasse 15, D-04318 Leipzig (Germany); Stockar, U. von [Laboratory of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, EPFL, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)]. E-mail: urs.vonStockar@epfl.ch

    2007-06-25

    Thermodynamic analysis may be applied in order to predict microbial growth yields roughly, based on an empirical correlation of the Gibbs energy of the overall growth reaction or Gibbs energy dissipation. Due to the well-known trade-off between high biomass yield and high Gibbs energy dissipation necessary for fast growth, an optimal range of Gibbs energy dissipation exists and it can be correlated to physical characteristics of the growth substrates. A database previously available in the literature has been extended significantly in order to test such correlations. An analysis of the relationship between biomass yield and Gibbs energy dissipation reveals that one does not need a very precise estimation of the latter to predict the former roughly. Approximating the Gibbs energy dissipation with a constant universal value of -500 kJ C-mol{sup -1} of dry biomass grown predicts many experimental growth yields nearly as well as a carefully designed, complex correlation available from the literature, even though a number of predictions are grossly out of range. A new correlation for Gibbs energy dissipation is proposed which is just as accurate as the complex literature correlation despite its dramatically simpler structure.

  18. A comparison of various Gibbs energy dissipation correlations for predicting microbial growth yields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, J.-S.; Vojinovic, V.; Patino, R.; Maskow, Th.; Stockar, U. von

    2007-01-01

    Thermodynamic analysis may be applied in order to predict microbial growth yields roughly, based on an empirical correlation of the Gibbs energy of the overall growth reaction or Gibbs energy dissipation. Due to the well-known trade-off between high biomass yield and high Gibbs energy dissipation necessary for fast growth, an optimal range of Gibbs energy dissipation exists and it can be correlated to physical characteristics of the growth substrates. A database previously available in the literature has been extended significantly in order to test such correlations. An analysis of the relationship between biomass yield and Gibbs energy dissipation reveals that one does not need a very precise estimation of the latter to predict the former roughly. Approximating the Gibbs energy dissipation with a constant universal value of -500 kJ C-mol -1 of dry biomass grown predicts many experimental growth yields nearly as well as a carefully designed, complex correlation available from the literature, even though a number of predictions are grossly out of range. A new correlation for Gibbs energy dissipation is proposed which is just as accurate as the complex literature correlation despite its dramatically simpler structure

  19. Correlation between blister skin thickness, the maximum in the damage-energy distribution, and projected ranges of He+ ions in metals: V

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaminsky, M.; Das, S.K.; Fenske, G.

    1976-01-01

    In these experiments a systematic study of the correlation of the skin thickness measured directly by scanning electron microscopy with both the calculated projected-range values and the maximum in the damage-energy distribution has been conducted for a broad helium-ion energy range (100 keV-1000 keV in polycrystalline vanadium. (Auth.)

  20. The experience curve, option value, and the energy paradox

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ansar, Jasmin; Sparks, Roger

    2009-01-01

    This paper develops a model to explain the 'energy paradox,' the inclination of households and firms to require very high internal rates of return in order to make energy-saving investments. The model abstracts from many features of such investments to focus on their irreversibility, the uncertainty of their future payoff streams, and the investor's anticipation of future technological advance. In this setting, the decision to invest in energy-saving technology can be delayed, providing option value. In addition, delay allows the potential investor to cash in on future experience-curve effects: With the passage of time, firms gain practical knowledge in producing and installing the energy-saving technology, enabling them to reduce the technology's up-front cost per unit of energy saved. We incorporate these fundamentals into a stochastic model where the investment's discounted benefits follow geometric Brownian motion. To demonstrate the model's capabilities, we generate simulation results for photovoltaic systems that highlight the experience-curve effect as a fundamental reason why households and firms delay making energy-saving investments until internal rates of return exceed values of 50% and higher, consistent with observations in the economics literature. We also explore altruistic motivations for energy conservation and the model's implications for both 'additionality' and the design of energy-conservation policy

  1. Energy-development correlation and the nuclear strategy in Brazil. Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amarante, J.A.A. do

    1981-01-01

    The existence of clear correlation between the economic growth of a nation and its energy requirements, in particular of electricity, is demonstrated through the statistical analysis of the behaviour of 47 countries. (Author) [pt

  2. Extending the random-phase approximation for electronic correlation energies: the renormalized adiabatic local density approximation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Thomas; Thygesen, Kristian S.

    2012-01-01

    The adiabatic connection fluctuation-dissipation theorem with the random phase approximation (RPA) has recently been applied with success to obtain correlation energies of a variety of chemical and solid state systems. The main merit of this approach is the improved description of dispersive forces...... while chemical bond strengths and absolute correlation energies are systematically underestimated. In this work we extend the RPA by including a parameter-free renormalized version of the adiabatic local-density (ALDA) exchange-correlation kernel. The renormalization consists of a (local) truncation...... of the ALDA kernel for wave vectors q > 2kF, which is found to yield excellent results for the homogeneous electron gas. In addition, the kernel significantly improves both the absolute correlation energies and atomization energies of small molecules over RPA and ALDA. The renormalization can...

  3. Differential Susceptibility Experiments: Going beyond Correlational Evidence--Comment on beyond Mental Health, Differential Susceptibility Articles

    Science.gov (United States)

    van IJzendoorn, Marinus H.; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J.

    2012-01-01

    Reviewing the studies on differential susceptibility presented in this section, we argue that the time is ripe to go beyond correlational designs to differential susceptibility experiments. In such experiments, randomization prevents hidden moderator effects on the environment and guarantees the independence of moderator and outcome, while the…

  4. Closing the Gap GEF Experiences in Global Energy Efficiency

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Ming

    2013-01-01

    Energy efficiency plays and will continue to play an important role in the world to save energy and mitigate greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. However, little is known on how much additional capital should be invested to ensure using energy efficiently as it should be, and very little is known which sub-areas, technologies, and countries shall achieve maximum greenhouse gas emissions mitigation per dollar of investment in energy efficiency worldwide. Analyzing completed and slowly moving energy efficiency projects by the Global Environment Facility during 1991-2010, Closing the Gap: GEF Experiences in Global Energy Efficiency evaluates impacts of multi-billion-dollar investments in the world energy efficiency. It covers the following areas: 1.       Reviewing the world energy efficiency investment and disclosing the global energy efficiency gap and market barriers that cause the gap; 2.       Leveraging private funds with public funds and other resources in energy efficiency investments; using...

  5. The regional energy integration: the latin-american experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The ways of the regional economic integrations are not identical and generate different repercussions on the markets and the energy industries evolution. The example of the Latin America proposes many various experiences to evaluate the stakes and the limits of each regional integrations. These limits lead to solution researches including indisputable convergencies. The first part of this document presents the genesis of these regional economic integrations experiences in Latina America, to study in the second part the energy consequences of the liberal ALENA and of the more political MERCOSUR. (A.L.B.)

  6. Experiences with commercial wind energy development in Hawaii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conover, K.

    1993-04-01

    This project, open-quotes Experiences with Commercial Wind Energy Development in Hawaii,close quotes was undertaken in order to examine the wind energy experience in Hawaii and to determine what has and has not worked in developing Hawaii's wind resource. Specific objectives include: establishing the background and environment in Hawaii in terms of the policies and attitudes that impact both the existing and future wind power developments; documenting the formation and development aspects of existing and planned wind power stations; and summarizing the operational problems encountered by these projects

  7. Review of recent experiments in intermediate energy nuclear physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, P D [Carnegie-Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (USA)

    1978-01-01

    The data generated at intermediate-energy accelerator facilities has expanded rapidly over the past few years. A number of recent experiments chosen for their impact on nuclear structure questions are reviewed. Proton scattering together with pionic and muonic atom X-ray measurements are shown to be giving very precise determinations of gross nuclear properties. Pion scattering and reaction data although less precise, are starting to generate a new understanding of wave functions of specific nuclear states. Specific examples where new unpublished data are now available are emphasized. In addition, other medium-energy experiments that are starting to contribute to nuclear structure physics are summarized.

  8. Experiences with waste incineration for energy production in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkeby, Janus; Grohnheit, Poul Erik; Møller Andersen, Frits

    The Bioenergy Department in SENER have requested assistance with planning for the deployment of bioenergy (Biomass, biogas and waste incineration) in Mexico and information on Danish experiences with developing policy initiatives promoting bioenergy. This introduction to the Danish experiences...... with waste incineration for energy production use is compiled as preparation for SENER’s potential visit to Denmark in 2014. This report was prepared 19 June, 2014 by COWI DTU System Analysis to Danish Energy Agency (DEA) as part of a frame contract agreement....

  9. Compilation of current high-energy-physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wohl, C.G.; Kelly, R.L.; Armstrong, F.E.

    1980-04-01

    This is the third edition of a compilation of current high energy physics experiments. It is a collaborative effort of the Berkeley Particle Data Group, the SLAC library, and ten participating laboratories: Argonne (ANL), Brookhaven (BNL), CERN, DESY, Fermilab (FNAL), the Institute for Nuclear Study, Tokyo (INS), KEK, Rutherford (RHEL), Serpukhov (SERP), and SLAC. The compilation includes summaries of all high energy physics experiments at the above laboratories that (1) were approved (and not subsequently withdrawn) before about January 1980, and (2) had not completed taking of data by 1 January 1976

  10. Energy correlations in perturbative quantum chromodynamics: a conjecture for all orders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basham, C.L.; Brown, L.S.; Ellis, S.D.; Love, S.T.

    1979-01-01

    The hadronic energy produced in high-energy electron-positron annihilation has an angular correlation which can be computed by the asymptotically free perturbation theory of quantum chromodynamics. In finite orders, the correlation is not well behaved as the detectors become anti-collinear. The leading behaviour has been calculated to fourth order and an exponential expression for the sum of all orders is discussed. This expression obeys a non-trivial sum rule which lends support for its validity. (Auth.)

  11. The reactor antineutrino anomaly and low energy threshold neutrino experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cañas, B. C.; Garcés, E. A.; Miranda, O. G.; Parada, A.

    2018-01-01

    Short distance reactor antineutrino experiments measure an antineutrino spectrum a few percent lower than expected from theoretical predictions. In this work we study the potential of low energy threshold reactor experiments in the context of a light sterile neutrino signal. We discuss the perspectives of the recently detected coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering in future reactor antineutrino experiments. We find that the expectations to improve the current constraints on the mixing with sterile neutrinos are promising. We also analyze the measurements of antineutrino scattering off electrons from short distance reactor experiments. In this case, the statistics is not competitive with inverse beta decay experiments, although future experiments might play a role when compare it with the Gallium anomaly.

  12. Energy prices and agricultural commodity prices: Testing correlation using copulas method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koirala, Krishna H.; Mishra, Ashok K.; D'Antoni, Jeremy M.; Mehlhorn, Joey E.

    2015-01-01

    The linear relationships between energy prices and prices for agricultural commodities such as corn and soybeans may have been affected, over the last several years, by policy legislations in the farm sector, the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007, and the Renewable Fuel Standard Program for 2014. Using high-frequency data and newer methodology, this study investigates dependence between agricultural commodity futures prices and energy futures prices. Results reveal that agricultural commodity and energy future prices are highly correlated and exhibit positive and significant relationship. Findings from this study highlight that an increase in energy price increases the price of agricultural commodities. - Highlights: • Energy policy mandates production of 15 billion gallons of corn ethanol by 2015. • Energy-intensive agriculture has a link between energy sector and crop production costs. • We investigate correlation between energy prices and agricultural commodity prices. • Agricultural commodity and energy future prices are highly correlated. • Increase in energy price increases the price of agricultural commodity

  13. Simultaneous acquisition for T2 -T2 Exchange and T1 -T2 correlation NMR experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montrazi, Elton T.; Lucas-Oliveira, Everton; Araujo-Ferreira, Arthur G.; Barsi-Andreeta, Mariane; Bonagamba, Tito J.

    2018-04-01

    The NMR measurements of longitudinal and transverse relaxation times and its multidimensional correlations provide useful information about molecular dynamics. However, these experiments are very time-consuming, and many researchers proposed faster experiments to reduce this issue. This paper presents a new way to simultaneously perform T2 -T2 Exchange and T1 -T2 correlation experiments by taking the advantage of the storage time and the two steps phase cycling used for running the relaxation exchange experiment. The data corresponding to each step is either summed or subtracted to produce the T2 -T2 and T1 -T2 data, enhancing the information obtained while maintaining the experiment duration. Comparing the results from this technique with traditional NMR experiments it was possible to validate the method.

  14. Modular safety interlock system for high energy physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kieffer, J.; Golceff, B.V.

    1980-10-01

    A frequent problem in electronics systems for high energy physics experiments is to provide protection for personnel and equipment. Interlock systems are typically designed as an afterthought and as a result, the working environment around complex experiments with many independent high voltages or hazardous gas subsystems, and many different kinds of people involved, can be particularly dangerous. A set of modular hardware has been designed which makes possible a standardized, intergrated, hierarchical system's approach and which can be easily tailored to custom requirements

  15. Free electron laser small signal dynamics and inclusion of electron-beam energy phase correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dattoli, G.; Giannessi, L.; Ottaviani, P. L.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper are analyzed the problems associated with the generation of coherent radiation by an e-beam, traversing an undulator magnet, with an initial energy-phase correlation. The mechanism of the process are explained and the role played by the bunching is clarified. The effect of the correlation on the stimulated part of the emission is also discussed [it

  16. Effects of pairing correlation on nuclear level density parameter and nucleon separation energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajesekaran, T.R.; Selvaraj, S.

    2002-01-01

    A systematic study of effects of pairing correlations on nuclear level density parameter 'a' and neutron separation energy S N is presented for 152 Gd using statistical theory of nuclei with deformation, collective and noncollective rotational degrees of freedom, shell effects, and pairing correlations

  17. Financing energy efficiency: lessons from experiences in India and China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Painuly, J.P.

    2009-01-01

    in China and India. This paper aims to report the experience of a three-country United Nations Environment Programme/World Bank Energy Efficiency Project (involving China, India and Brazil) that is set up to address the financial barrier and identifies the lessons that can be learnt from the project...... on potential of energy efficiency and need to make financing available for this. The banks in India in created specialized schemes for energy efficiency financing, and in China, the project has a positive impact on the new initiatives with the on-lending facility and the guarantee fund for energy management....... Design/methodology/approach – The paper follows the post-completion review approach of a project and presents the activities undertaken and results obtained from the project. Findings – The project seeks to remove the financial barrier through the development of a commercial banking window for energy...

  18. CGC/saturation approach for soft interactions at high energy: long range rapidity correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gotsman, E.; Maor, U.; Levin, E.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we continue our program to construct a model for high energy soft interactions that is based on the CGC/saturation approach. The main result of this paper is that we have discovered a mechanism that leads to large long range rapidity correlations and results in large values of the correlation function R(y 1 , y 2 ) ≥ 1, which is independent of y 1 and y 2 . Such a behavior of the correlation function provides strong support for the idea that at high energies the system of partons that is produced is not only dense but also has strong attractive forces acting between the partons. (orig.)

  19. Correlation between the pionization region and the fragmentation region in high energy proton-proton collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Albrow, M G; Barber, D P; Bogaerts, A; Bosnjakovic, B; Brooks, J R; Clegg, A B; Erné, F C; Gee, C N P; Locke, D H; Loebinger, F K; Murphy, P G; Rudge, A; Sens, Johannes C

    1973-01-01

    Measurements are reported of two-particle correlations in high energy proton-proton collisions with one particle in the pionization region and the other a proton in the fragmentation region. The correlation function is independent of x of the fragmentation proton for 0.55correlation is an energy-independent function of x. The measurements for two values of the rapidity of the pionization particle give similar results. (11 refs).

  20. Correlation functions of the energy-momentum tensor in SU(2) gauge theory at finite temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huebner, K.; Karsch, F.; Pica, Claudio

    2008-01-01

    We calculate correlation functions of the energy-momentum tensor in the vicinity of the deconfinement phase transition of (3+1)-dimensional SU(2) gauge theory and discuss their critical behavior in the vicinity of the second order deconfinement transition. We show that correlation functions...... of the trace of the energy momentum tensor diverge uniformly at the critical point in proportion to the specific heat singularity. Correlation functions of the pressure, on the other hand, stay finite at the critical point. We discuss the consequences of these findings for the analysis of transport...... coefficients, in particular the bulk viscosity, in the vicinity of a second order phase transition point....

  1. ASIC design used in high energy physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Hongyu; Lin Tao; Wu Ling; Zhao jingwei; Gu Shudi

    1997-01-01

    The author introduces an ASIC (Application Specific Integrated Circuit) design environment based on PC. Some design tools used in such environment are also introduced. A kind of ASIC chip used in high energy physics experiment, weighting mean timer, is being developed now

  2. Qweak experiment update and applications/opportunities at lower energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitt, Mark L.

    2013-01-01

    The Q weak experiment has recently completed data-taking at Jefferson Lab. The primary focus of the experiment is to perform a precision measurement of the proton's neutral weak charge. The Standard Model gives a definite prediction for the weak charge. Any deviation from that can be interpreted as evidence for new physics beyond the Standard Model. This precision, low energy measurement is sensitive to new physics signatures at energy scales up to 2 TeV. The experiment measures the parity-violating asymmetry in the scattering of 1.165 GeV longitudinally polarized electrons on the proton at low momentum transfer (Q 2 ∼ 0.025 (GeV/c) 2 ). This paper provides a brief status report on the experiment with a focus on instrumentation and techniques that are applicable to lower beam energy realizations of parity-violating electron scattering measurements. Estimates of anticipated errors on the proton's weak charge expected if the Q weak apparatus were used at a lower beam energy are also discussed

  3. Data acquisition systems for high energy Physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duran, I.; Olmos, P.

    1986-01-01

    We describe here the Data Acquisition Systems most frequently used in High Energy Physics experiments. This report begins with a brief description of the main elements of a typical signal processing chain, following with a detailed exposition of the four most popular instrumentation standards used in this kind of experimental: NIM, CAMAC, FASTBUS and VME. (Author) 9 refs

  4. Short-range second order screened exchange correction to RPA correlation energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuerle, Matthias; Ochsenfeld, Christian

    2017-11-01

    Direct random phase approximation (RPA) correlation energies have become increasingly popular as a post-Kohn-Sham correction, due to significant improvements over DFT calculations for properties such as long-range dispersion effects, which are problematic in conventional density functional theory. On the other hand, RPA still has various weaknesses, such as unsatisfactory results for non-isogyric processes. This can in parts be attributed to the self-correlation present in RPA correlation energies, leading to significant self-interaction errors. Therefore a variety of schemes have been devised to include exchange in the calculation of RPA correlation energies in order to correct this shortcoming. One of the most popular RPA plus exchange schemes is the second order screened exchange (SOSEX) correction. RPA + SOSEX delivers more accurate absolute correlation energies and also improves upon RPA for non-isogyric processes. On the other hand, RPA + SOSEX barrier heights are worse than those obtained from plain RPA calculations. To combine the benefits of RPA correlation energies and the SOSEX correction, we introduce a short-range RPA + SOSEX correction. Proof of concept calculations and benchmarks showing the advantages of our method are presented.

  5. Nuclear controls and its correlation with the energy policy in two Koreas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, G. G.; Choi, Y. M.; Ahn, J. S.; Kim, J. S.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to analyse how the nuclear controls, main tools of implementation for the international NPT regime, have been understood and taken by two Koreas, and also what kind of influence it has on the energy policies of two Koreas as a national energy resources. Even though two Koreas have shown different position in their understanding and their reactions for the nuclear controls, there exist a close correlation between the nuclear controls and energy policies in the sense that they approach nuclear energy question as an essential way to make sure energy resources for industrial and social development

  6. A layer correlation technique for pion energy calibration at the 2004 ATLAS Combined Beam Test

    OpenAIRE

    Kovalenko, S.; Khoriauli, G.; C. Driouchi; J. D. Peso; L. Santi; Soloviev, I.; Arik, E.; Bernabeu, J; M. V. Castillo; Atkinson, T; Tegenfeldt, F.; Weidberg, A.R.; Røhne, O.; F. Anghinolfi; S. Chouridou

    2016-01-01

    A new method for calibrating the hadron response of a segmented calorimeter is developed and successfully applied to beam test data. It is based on a principal component analysis of energy deposits in the calorimeter layers, exploiting longitudinal shower development information to improve the measured energy resolution. Corrections for invisible hadronic energy and energy lost in dead material in front of and between the calorimeters of the ATLAS experiment were calculated with simulated Gea...

  7. Dielectric Matrix Formulation of Correlation Energies in the Random Phase Approximation: Inclusion of Exchange Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mussard, Bastien; Rocca, Dario; Jansen, Georg; Ángyán, János G

    2016-05-10

    Starting from the general expression for the ground state correlation energy in the adiabatic-connection fluctuation-dissipation theorem (ACFDT) framework, it is shown that the dielectric matrix formulation, which is usually applied to calculate the direct random phase approximation (dRPA) correlation energy, can be used for alternative RPA expressions including exchange effects. Within this famework, the ACFDT analog of the second order screened exchange (SOSEX) approximation leads to a logarithmic formula for the correlation energy similar to the direct RPA expression. Alternatively, the contribution of the exchange can be included in the kernel used to evaluate the response functions. In this case, the use of an approximate kernel is crucial to simplify the formalism and to obtain a correlation energy in logarithmic form. Technical details of the implementation of these methods are discussed, and it is shown that one can take advantage of density fitting or Cholesky decomposition techniques to improve the computational efficiency; a discussion on the numerical quadrature made on the frequency variable is also provided. A series of test calculations on atomic correlation energies and molecular reaction energies shows that exchange effects are instrumental for improvement over direct RPA results.

  8. A serach for moderate- and high-energy neturino emission correlated with gamma-ray bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker-Szendy, R.; Bratton, C. B.; Breault, J.; Casper, D.; Dye, S. T.; Gajewski, W.; Goldhaber, M.; Haines, T. J.; Halverson, P. G.; Kielczewska, D.

    1995-01-01

    A temporal correlation analysis between moderate- (60 Mev less than or equal to E(sub nu)greater than or equal to 2500 MeV) and high-energy (E(sub nu) greater than or equal to 2000 MeV) neutrino interactions consist of two types: the moderate-energy interactions that are contained within the volume of IMB-3 and the upward-going muons produced by high-energy nu(sub mu) interactions in the rock around the detector. No evidence is found for moderate- or high-energy neutrino emission from GRBs nor for any neutrino/neutrino correlation. The nonobservation of nu/GRB correlations allows upper limits to be placed on the neutrino flux associated with GRBs.

  9. [Analysis of grey correlation between energy consumption and economic growth in Liaoning Province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Xi, Feng Ming; Wang, Jiao Yue

    2016-03-01

    The contradiction between energy consumption and economic growth is increasingly prominent in China. Liaoning Province as one of Chinese heavy industrial bases, consumes a large amount of energy. Its economic development has a strong dependence on energy consumption, but the energy in short supply become more apparent. In order to further understand the relationship between energy consumption and economic growth and put forward scientific suggestions on low carbon development, we used the grey correlation analysis method to separately examine the relevance of economic growth with energy consumption industries and energy consumption varieties through analy sis of energy consumption and economic growth data in Liaoning Province from 2000 to 2012. The results showed that the wholesale and retail sector and hotel and restaurant sector were in the minimum energy consumption in all kinds of sectors, but they presented the closest connection with the economic growth. Although industry energy consumption was the maximum, the degree of connection between industry energy consumption and economic growth was weak. In all types of energy consumption, oil and hydro-power consumption had a significant connection with economic growth. However, the degree of connection of coal consumption with economic growth was not significant, which meant that coal utilization efficiency was low. In order to achieve low carbon and sustainable development, Liaoning Province should transform the economic growth mode, adjust industry structure, optimize energy structure, and improve energy utilization efficiency, especially promote producer services and develop clean and renewable energy.

  10. Behavioral and body size correlates of energy intake underreporting by obese and normal-weight women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kretsch, M J; Fong, A K; Green, M W

    1999-03-01

    To examine behavioral and body size influences on the underreporting of energy intake by obese and normal-weight women. Seven-day estimated food records were kept by subjects before they participated in a 49-day residential study. Self-reported energy intake was compared with energy intake required to maintain a stable body weight during the residential study (reference standard). Energy intake bias and its relationship to various body size and behavioral measures were examined. Twenty-two, healthy, normal-weight (mean body mass index [BMI] = 21.3) and obese (mean BMI = 34.2) women aged 22 to 42 years were studied. Analysis of variance, paired t test, simple linear regression, and Pearson correlation analyses were conducted. Mean energy intake from self-reported food records was underreported by normal-weight (-9.7%) and obese (-19.4%) women. BMI correlated inversely with the energy intake difference for normal-weight women (r = -.67, P = .02), whereas the Beck Depression Inventory correlated positively with the energy intake difference for obese women (r = .73, P behavioral traits play a role in the ability of women to accurately self-report energy intake. BMI appears to be predictive of underreporting of energy intake by normal-weight women, whereas emotional factors related to depression appear to be more determinant of underreporting for obese women. Understanding causative factors of the underreporting phenomenon will help practicing dietitians to devise appropriate and realistic diet intervention plans that clients can follow to achieve meaningful change.

  11. Assessment of correlation energies based on the random-phase approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paier, Joachim; Ren, Xinguo; Rinke, Patrick; Scheffler, Matthias; Scuseria, Gustavo E; Grüneis, Andreas; Kresse, Georg

    2012-01-01

    The random-phase approximation to the ground state correlation energy (RPA) in combination with exact exchange (EX) has brought the Kohn-Sham (KS) density functional theory one step closer towards a universal, ‘general purpose first-principles method’. In an effort to systematically assess the influence of several correlation energy contributions beyond RPA, this paper presents dissociation energies of small molecules and solids, activation energies for hydrogen transfer and non-hydrogen transfer reactions, as well as reaction energies for a number of common test sets. We benchmark EX + RPA and several flavors of energy functionals going beyond it: second-order screened exchange (SOSEX), single-excitation (SE) corrections, renormalized single-excitation (rSE) corrections and their combinations. Both the SE correction and the SOSEX contribution to the correlation energy significantly improve on the notorious tendency of EX + RPA to underbind. Surprisingly, activation energies obtained using EX + RPA based on a KS reference alone are remarkably accurate. RPA + SOSEX + rSE provides an equal level of accuracy for reaction as well as activation energies and overall gives the most balanced performance, because of which it can be applied to a wide range of systems and chemical reactions. (paper)

  12. Energy reconstruction in the long-baseline neutrino experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosel, U; Lalakulich, O; Gallmeister, K

    2014-04-18

    The Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment aims at measuring fundamental physical parameters to high precision and exploring physics beyond the standard model. Nuclear targets introduce complications towards that aim. We investigate the uncertainties in the energy reconstruction, based on quasielastic scattering relations, due to nuclear effects. The reconstructed event distributions as a function of energy tend to be smeared out and shifted by several 100 MeV in their oscillatory structure if standard event selection is used. We show that a more restrictive experimental event selection offers the possibility to reach the accuracy needed for a determination of the mass ordering and the CP-violating phase. Quasielastic-based energy reconstruction could thus be a viable alternative to the calorimetric reconstruction also at higher energies.

  13. High Energy Galactic Cosmic Rays Observed by RUNJOB Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hareyama, Makoto [Advanced Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan)

    2006-03-21

    Galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) from proton to iron with the energy of 10{sup 13} - 10{sup 15} eV were observed by RUssia-Nippon JOint Balloon (RUNJOB) experiments. Each energy spectrum of the primary nuclear components except for helium is in agreement with the results obtained by other observations in the same energy region as the RUNJOB observation within statistical errors, while the intensity of the helium component is nearly half that obtained by the JACEE and the SOKOL observations. The spectrum slopes seem to be almost parallel or become gradually harder as mass becomes heavier. The power indices of the spectra are nearly -2.75 in the energy range of 20-500 TeV/nucleous. These our results support the acceleration mechanism and the propagation process in Galaxy of GCRs depend on its rigidity.

  14. The Phobos low energy telescope charged particle experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsden, R.G.; Henrion, J.P.G.; Wenzel, K.P. (European Space Agency, Noordwijk (Netherlands). Space Science Dept.); Afonin, V.V. (AN SSSR, Moscow (USSR). Inst. Kosmicheskikh Issledovanij); Balazs, A.; Erdoes, G.; Rusznyak, P.; Somogyi, A.; Szalai, S.; Varga, A.; Varhalmi, L. (Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest (Hungary). Central Research Inst. for Physics); Richter, A.K.; Witte, M. (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Aeronomie, Katlenburg-Lindau (Germany, F.R.))

    1990-05-01

    The Low Energy Telescope (LET) experiment on board the Phobos 1 and 2 spacecraft measures the flux, energy spectra and elemental composition of solar energetic particles and cosmic ray nuclei from hydrogen up to iron in the energy range {proportional to}1 to {proportional to}75 MeV/n. The LET sensor system comprises a double dE/dX vs E solid-state detector telescope surrounded by a cylindrical plastic scintillator anticoincidence shield, and the instrument is equipped with a comprehensive particle identifier and event priority system that enables rare nuclei to be analysed in preference to the more common species. Isotope separation for light nuclei such as He is also achieved. The sensor is mounted on a rotating platform to enable coarse anisotropy measurements of low energy protons to be made. (orig.).

  15. Correlation of adverse childhood experiences with psychiatric disorders and aggressiveness in adulthood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samardžić Ljiljana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Consequences of individual adverse childhood experiences for adult mental health have been precisely studied during past decades. The focus of past research was mainly on childhood maltreatment and neglect. The aim of this paper was to determine association between multiple adverse childhood experiences and psychiatric disorders, as well as their correlation to the degree and type of aggressiveness in adult psychiatric patients. Methods. One hundred and thirteen psychiatric outpatients were divided into three diagnostic groups: psychotics, non-psychotics and alcoholics and compared with fourty healthy individuals. Adverse childhood experiences data were gathered retrospectively, using the Adverse childhood experiences questionnaire and explanatory interview. Aggressiveness was assessed using Buss-Perry Aggression Questionnaire. The Student's t test, ANOVA and correlational analysis were used for evaluation of statistical significance of differences among the groups. A value p < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results. Our results showed that the mean number of adverse childhood experiences in each group of psychiatric patients, as well as in the whole group of patients, was statistically significantly higher than in the group of healthy individuals (p < 0.001; there was a statistically significant difference in score of physical aggressiveness between the patients exposed to adverse childhood experiences and those who were not exposed to them (p < 0.05; scores of physical aggressiveness were in positive correlation with the number of adverse childhood experiences (p < 0.05. The highest mean score of adverse childhood experiences was evidenced in the group of patients with psychotic disorders. Conclusion. Multiple adverse childhood experiences are significantly associated with psychotic disorders, nonpsychotic disorders and alcohol dependence in adulthood and their presence is important morbidity risk factor for

  16. Dynamic energy conservation model REDUCE. Extension with experience curves, energy efficiency indicators and user's guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uyterlinde, M.A.; Rijkers, F.A.M.

    1999-12-01

    The main objective of the energy conservation model REDUCE (Reduction of Energy Demand by Utilization of Conservation of Energy) is the evaluation of the effectiveness of economical, financial, institutional, and regulatory measures for improving the rational use of energy in end-use sectors. This report presents the results of additional model development activities, partly based on the first experiences in a previous project. Energy efficiency indicators have been added as an extra tool for output analysis in REDUCE. The methodology is described and some examples are given. The model has been extended with a method for modelling the effects of technical development on production costs, by means of an experience curve. Finally, the report provides a 'users guide', by describing in more detail the input data specification as well as all menus and buttons. 19 refs

  17. Wind energy development in the light of Danish experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frandsen, S.

    1991-01-01

    Wind energy will undoubtedly play a significant role in the future energy supply being a nonpolluting energy source, which on a technical basis has proved to be an economically feasible and thus a realistic alternative to traditional power production. This conclusion may be drawn from Danish experiences where energy planning comprises a visible contribution from wind energy. Since 1976 more than 3200 wind turbine units have been installed in Denmark, representing a capacity of roughly 340 MW out of a grid capacity of 8,000 MW. These units are all grid-connected and the unit sizes range from 55 kW to 450 kW. The installed wind energy capacity represents a substantial development of technologies for wind energy utilization during the last 15 years, involving participation from many sides: research institutes, electric utilities, the national energy administration, and private industry. The development has implied a considerable improvement of the technical and economic performance of wind turbines along with increased reliability and durability. The successful development has been strongly supported by comprehensive government programmes, i.e. establishment of a national wind energy research programme, establishment of the Riso Test Station for Windmills and a subsidy scheme for private turbine owners. The improved economic performance is partly the result of a development in rotor size of commercially available wind turbines. In 1981 the largest commercial wind turbine size in Denmark was 55 kW, while today it is close to 500 kW. In the same period the average energy production per installed unit capacity almost doubled, due to enhanced aerodynamic rotor design, increased tower height and improved overall design and production methods. (author) 7 figs., 3 tabs., 13 refs

  18. Correlation energy functional within the GW -RPA: Exact forms, approximate forms, and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail-Beigi, Sohrab

    2010-05-01

    In principle, the Luttinger-Ward Green’s-function formalism allows one to compute simultaneously the total energy and the quasiparticle band structure of a many-body electronic system from first principles. We present approximate and exact expressions for the correlation energy within the GW -random-phase approximation that are more amenable to computation and allow for developing efficient approximations to the self-energy operator and correlation energy. The exact form is a sum over differences between plasmon and interband energies. The approximate forms are based on summing over screened interband transitions. We also demonstrate that blind extremization of such functionals leads to unphysical results: imposing physical constraints on the allowed solutions (Green’s functions) is necessary. Finally, we present some relevant numerical results for atomic systems.

  19. The first interdisciplinary experiments at the IMP high energy microbeam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Guanghua; Guo, Jinlong; Wu, Ruqun; Guo, Na; Liu, Wenjing; Ye, Fei; Sheng, Lina; Li, Qiang [Institute of Modern Physics (IMP), Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou (China); Li, Huiyun [Shenzhen Institute of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenzhen (China)

    2015-04-01

    The high energy beam of tens to hundred MeV/u ions possesses mm-to-cm penetration depth in materials and can be easily extracted into air without significant energy loss and beam scattering. Combination of high energy ions and microbeam technology facilitates the microprobe application to many practical studies in large scale samples. The IMP heavy ion microbeam facility has recently been integrated with microscopic positioning and targeting irradiation system. This paper introduced the first interdisciplinary experiments performed at the IMP microbeam facility using the beam of 80.5 MeV/u carbon ions. Bystander effect induction via medium transferring was not found in the micro-irradiation study using HeLa cells. The mouse irradiation experiment demonstrated that carbon irradiation of 10 Gy dose to its tuberomammillary nucleus did not impair the sleep nerve system. The fault injection attack on RSA (Rivest–Shamir–Adleman) decryption proved that the commercial field-programmable gate array chip is vulnerable in single event effect to low linear-energy-transfer carbon irradiation, and the attack can cause the leakage of RSA private key. This work demonstrates the potential of high energy microbeam in its application to biology, biomedical, radiation hardness, and information security studies.

  20. The low energy tagger for the KLOE-2 experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babusci, D. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati dell' INFN, Frascati (Italy); Bini, C. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' universita Sapienza di Roma, p.le Aldo Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy); INFN sezione di Roma, Roma (Italy); Ciambrone, P.; Corradi, G. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati dell' INFN, Frascati (Italy); De Santis, A.; De Zorzi, G.; Di Domenico, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' universita Sapienza di Roma, p.le Aldo Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy); INFN sezione di Roma, Roma (Italy); Fiore, S., E-mail: salvatore.fiore@roma1.infn.i [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' universita Sapienza di Roma, p.le Aldo Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy); INFN sezione di Roma, Roma (Italy); Gauzzi, P. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' universita Sapienza di Roma, p.le Aldo Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy); INFN sezione di Roma, Roma (Italy); Iannarelli, M.; Miscetti, S.; Paglia, C.; Tagnani, D.; Turri, E. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati dell' INFN, Frascati (Italy)

    2010-05-21

    The KLOE experiment at the upgraded DAFNE e{sup +}e{sup -} collider in Frascati (KLOE-2) is going to start a new data taking at the beginning of 2010 with its detector upgraded with a tagging system for the identification of gamma-gamma interactions. The tagging stations for low-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} will consist in two calorimeters placed between the beam-pipe outer support structure and the inner wall of the KLOE drift chamber. This calorimeter will be made of LYSO crystals readout by Silicon Photomultipliers, to achieve an energy resolution better than 8% at 200 MeV.

  1. SPARC experiments at the high-energy storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stöhlker, Thomas; Litvinov, Yuri A; Bagnoud, Vincent; Dimopoulou, Christina; Dolinskii, Alexei; Geppert, Christopher; Hagmann, Siegbert; Katayama, Takeshi; Kühl, Thomas; Nörtershäuser, Wilfried; Steck, Markus; Bechstedt, Ulf; Maier, Rudolf; Prasuhn, Dieter; Stockhorst, Hans; Schuch, Reinhold

    2013-01-01

    The physics program of the SPARC collaboration at the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) focuses on the study of collision phenomena in strong and even extreme electromagnetic fields and on the fundamental interactions between electrons and heavy nuclei up to bare uranium. Here we give a short overview on the challenging physics opportunities of the high-energy storage ring at FAIR for future experiments with heavy-ion beams at relativistic energies with particular emphasis on the basic beam properties to be expected. (paper)

  2. The low energy tagger for the KLOE-2 experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babusci, D.; Bini, C.; Ciambrone, P.; Corradi, G.; De Santis, A.; De Zorzi, G.; Di Domenico, A.; Fiore, S.; Gauzzi, P.; Iannarelli, M.; Miscetti, S.; Paglia, C.; Tagnani, D.; Turri, E.

    2010-01-01

    The KLOE experiment at the upgraded DAFNE e + e - collider in Frascati (KLOE-2) is going to start a new data taking at the beginning of 2010 with its detector upgraded with a tagging system for the identification of gamma-gamma interactions. The tagging stations for low-energy e + e - will consist in two calorimeters placed between the beam-pipe outer support structure and the inner wall of the KLOE drift chamber. This calorimeter will be made of LYSO crystals readout by Silicon Photomultipliers, to achieve an energy resolution better than 8% at 200 MeV.

  3. Correlation between Chinese and international energy prices based on a HP filter and time difference analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Yongxiu; Wang, Bing; Wang, Jianhui; Xiong, Wei; Xia, Tian

    2013-01-01

    To establish a reasonable system and mechanism for Chinese energy prices, we use the Granger causality test, Hodrick–Prescott (HP) filter and time difference analysis to research the pricing relationship between Chinese and international energy prices. We find that Chinese and international crude oil prices changed synchronously while Chinese refined oil prices follow the changes of international oil prices with the time difference being about 1 month to 2 months. Further, Australian coal prices Granger causes Chinese coal prices, and there is a high correlation between them. The U.S. electricity price is influenced by the WTI crude oil price, the U.S. gasoline price and the HenryHub gas price. Due to the unreasonable price-setting mechanism and regulation from the central government, China′s terminal market prices for both electricity and natural gas do not reflect the real supply–demand situation. This paper provides quantitative results on the correlation between Chinese and international energy prices to better predict the impact of international energy price fluctuations on China′s domestic energy supply and guide the design of more efficient energy pricing policies. Moreover, it provides references for developing countries to improve their energy market systems and trading, and to coordinate domestic and international energy markets. -- Highlights: •The Hodrick-Prescott filter and time difference analysis are used to research the correlation among energy prices. •Our study finds that the U.S. and British refined oil prices Granger cause the Chinese refined oil price. •Both Chinese and the Australian coal prices play an important role in the international coal market. •The Chinese terminal electric power and terminal natural gas prices are not highly correlated. •The results are useful for guiding the design of more efficient energy pricing policies in China

  4. Ground-Laboratory to In-Space Atomic Oxygen Correlation for the Polymer Erosion and Contamination Experiment (PEACE) Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stambler, Arielle H.; Inoshita, Karen E.; Roberts, Lily M.; Barbagallo, Claire E.; deGroh, Kim K.; Banks, Bruce A.

    2011-01-01

    The Materials International Space Station Experiment 2 (MISSE 2) Polymer Erosion and Contamination Experiment (PEACE) polymers were exposed to the environment of low Earth orbit (LEO) for 3.95 years from 2001 to 2005. There were 41 different PEACE polymers, which were flown on the exterior of the International Space Station (ISS) in order to determine their atomic oxygen erosion yields. In LEO, atomic oxygen is an environmental durability threat, particularly for long duration mission exposures. Although spaceflight experiments, such as the MISSE 2 PEACE experiment, are ideal for determining LEO environmental durability of spacecraft materials, ground-laboratory testing is often relied upon for durability evaluation and prediction. Unfortunately, significant differences exist between LEO atomic oxygen exposure and atomic oxygen exposure in ground-laboratory facilities. These differences include variations in species, energies, thermal exposures and radiation exposures, all of which may result in different reactions and erosion rates. In an effort to improve the accuracy of ground-based durability testing, ground-laboratory to in-space atomic oxygen correlation experiments have been conducted. In these tests, the atomic oxygen erosion yields of the PEACE polymers were determined relative to Kapton H using a radio-frequency (RF) plasma asher (operated on air). The asher erosion yields were compared to the MISSE 2 PEACE erosion yields to determine the correlation between erosion rates in the two environments. This paper provides a summary of the MISSE 2 PEACE experiment; it reviews the specific polymers tested as well as the techniques used to determine erosion yield in the asher, and it provides a correlation between the space and ground laboratory erosion yield values. Using the PEACE polymers asher to in-space erosion yield ratios will allow more accurate in-space materials performance predictions to be made based on plasma asher durability evaluation.

  5. Investigation of the energy correlations of spallation neutrons by the MCNPX code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szieberth, Mate; Radocz, Gabor

    2011-01-01

    Earlier works have suggested that the energy correlations in a spallation source may influence the neutron noise measurements in an ADS. For the calculation of this effect not only the generally known and used one-particle spectrum is needed but also the so-called two particle spectrum, which describes also the energy correlations. Since measured data are not available for the energy distribution of the neutrons from a single spallation event the physical models of the MCNPX code have been used to investigate the effect. The calculational model has been successfully validated with measurements of the number distribution of spallation neutrons. The simulated one- and two-particle energy distributions and spectra proved that the energy correlations exist and have an important effect in low multiplicity spallation events and in thin targets. On the other hand for thick targets this effect appears negligible and the factorization of the two-particle spectrum seems an acceptable approximation. Further investigations are in hand to quantify the actual effect of the energy correlations on the neutron noise measurements. (author)

  6. FASTBUS system used in a high energy experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leipuner, L.B.; Fuhrmann, J.; Larsen, R.

    1980-01-01

    Experiment No. 735, now being executed at the A.G.S. is implemented in FASTBUS. Briefly, this data acquisition system is designed to operate and gather data from high energy physics experiments at sub-microsecond speeds. It is a 32 bit bus system capable of operating at near-gigabit rates. The bus can be segmented with each segment operating independently when not communicating with each other. The system is based upon a very fast integrated circuit family, emitter coupled logic or ECL

  7. High power microwave diagnostic for the fusion energy experiment ITER

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsholm, Søren Bang; Leipold, Frank; Goncalves, B.

    2016-01-01

    Microwave diagnostics will play an increasingly important role in burning plasma fusion energy experiments like ITER and beyond. The Collective Thomson Scattering (CTS) diagnostic to be installed at ITER is an example of such a diagnostic with great potential in present and future experiments....... The ITER CTS diagnostic will inject a 1 MW 60 GHz gyrotron beam into the ITER plasma and observe the scattering off fluctuations in the plasma — to monitor the dynamics of the fast ions generated in the fusion reactions....

  8. Correlated volume-energy fluctuations of phospholipid membranes: A simulation study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ulf. R.; Peters, Günther H.J.; Schröder, Thomas B.

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports all-atom computer simulations of five phospholipid membranes (DMPC, DPPC, DMPG, DMPS, and DMPSH) with focus on the thermal equilibrium fluctuations of volume, energy, area, thickness, and chain order. At constant temperature and pressure, volume and energy exhibit strong...... membranes, showing a similar picture. The cause of the observed strong correlations is identified by splitting volume and energy into contributions from tails, heads, and water, and showing that the slow volume−energy fluctuations derive from van der Waals interactions of the tail region; they are thus...

  9. Characterization of the energy-dependent uncertainty and correlation in silicon neutron displacement damage metrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Griffin Patrick

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A rigorous treatment of the uncertainty in the underlying nuclear data on silicon displacement damage metrics is presented. The uncertainty in the cross sections and recoil atom spectra are propagated into the energy-dependent uncertainty contribution in the silicon displacement kerma and damage energy using a Total Monte Carlo treatment. An energy-dependent covariance matrix is used to characterize the resulting uncertainty. A strong correlation between different reaction channels is observed in the high energy neutron contributions to the displacement damage metrics which supports the necessity of using a Monte Carlo based method to address the nonlinear nature of the uncertainty propagation.

  10. Cross correlation analysis of medium energy gamma rays for the northern hemisphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, J.; Zanrosso, E.; Zych, A.D.; White, R.S.

    1982-01-01

    Data obtained with the UCR gamma telescope have been analyzed using the cross-correlation method. The observations extended over 37.5 hr from 0930 UT, 30 Sept. to 2300 UT, 1 oct. 1978 at 32deg N. Lat. (Palestine, Texas). The Crab Nebula- Anticenter region was observed on consecutive days. The telescope's wide field-of-view permitted the search for a number of other medium energy (1-30 MeV) source candidates. As the telescope swept the sky, the count rates for fixed celestial directions were correlated with the expected response as a function of time and telescope geometry. Similar correlations were carried out for sources measured in the laboratory and computer-simulated sources. In the correlation method the time independence and azimuthal symmetry of the atmospheric and cosmic diffuse backgrounds provide zero correlation. In contrast, a celestial source produces an asymmetric response with respect to the azimuthal direction which varies predictably in time to give a positive correlation. Preliminary correlation skymaps of the Anticenter region are presented and their statistical significance discussed. An energy spectrum obtained from the ''correlated counts'' is compared with measurements by other methods

  11. Assessments of CHF correlations based on full-scale rod bundle experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sardh, K.; Becker, K.M.

    1986-02-01

    In the present study the Barnett, the Becker, the Biasi, the CISE-4, the XN-1, the EPRI and the Bezrukov burnout correlations have been compared with burnout measurements obtained with full scale 81, 64, 36 and 37-rod bundles. The total power as well as the local power hypothesis was employed for the comparisons. The results clearly indicated that the Biasi and the CISE-4 correlations do not predict the burnout conditions in full-scale rod bundles. Since, these correlations yield non-conservative results their use in computer programs as for instance RELAP, TRAC or NORA should be avoided. Considering that the effects of spacers were not included in the predictions, the Becker and the Bezrukov correlations were in excellent agreement with the experimental data. However, it should be pointed out that the Bezrukov correlation only covered the 70 and 90 bar data, while the Becker correlation agreed with the experimental data in the whole pressure range between 30 and 90 bar. The Barnett, the XN-1 and the EPRI correlations were also in satisfactory agreement with the experiments. We therefore conclude that for predictions of the burnout conditions in full-scale BWR rod bundles the Becker correlation should be employed. (author)

  12. Compilation of current high energy physics experiments - Sept. 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Addis, L.; Odian, A.; Row, G. M.; Ward, C. E. W.; Wanderer, P.; Armenteros, R.; Joos, P.; Groves, T. H.; Oyanagi, Y.; Arnison, G. T. J.; Antipov, Yu; Barinov, N.

    1978-09-01

    This compilation of current high-energy physics experiments is a collaborative effort of the Berkeley Particle Data Group, the SLAC library, and the nine participating laboratories: Argonne (ANL), Brookhaven (BNL), CERN, DESY, Fermilab (FNAL), KEK, Rutherford (RHEL), Serpukhov (SERP), and SLAC. Nominally, the compilation includes summaries of all high-energy physics experiments at the above laboratories that were approved (and not subsequently withdrawn) before about June 1978, and had not completed taking of data by 1 January 1975. The experimental summaries are supplemented with three indexes to the compilation, several vocabulary lists giving names or abbreviations used, and a short summary of the beams at each of the laboratories (except Rutherford). The summaries themselves are included on microfiche. (RWR)

  13. MINT Incineration and Renewable Energy Centre - experience and challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamad Puad Abu

    2005-01-01

    MIREC is the acronym for MINT Incineration and Renewable Energy Centre which was established in the year 2000 to carry out research and provide services on matters related to incineration technology and renewable energy. Throughout this period, many challenges and experiences has been faced by MIREC. Three research contracts with the value of nearly RM 1 million have been signed. Four laboratory scale burners have been designed and fabricated. Three mathematical models have been developed. Three programs on enhancement image have been published. Three papers have been published in the international journal. In order to achieve all these, many obstacles were faced by MIREC. This paper will discuss on the experiences and challenges that could be shared together with MINT staff. (Author)

  14. Current Solutions: Recent Experience in Interconnecting Distributed Energy Resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, M.

    2003-09-01

    This report catalogues selected real-world technical experiences of utilities and customers that have interconnected distributed energy assets with the electric grid. This study was initiated to assess the actual technical practices for interconnecting distributed generation and had a particular focus on the technical issues covered under the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) 1547(TM) Standard for Interconnecting Distributed Resources With Electric Power Systems.

  15. VLAD for epithermal neutron scattering experiments at large energy transfers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tardocchi, M; Gorini, G; Perelli-Cippo, E; Andreani, C; Imberti, S; Pietropaolo, A; Senesi, R; Rhodes, N R; Schooneveld, E M

    2006-01-01

    The Very Low Angle Detector (VLAD) bank will extend the kinematical region covered by today's epithermal neutron scattering experiments to low momentum transfer ( -1 ) together with large energy transfer 0 -4 0 . In this paper the design of VLAD is presented together with Montecarlo simulations of the detector performances. The results of tests made with prototype VLAD detectors are also presented, confirming the usefulness of the Resonance Detector for measurements at very low scattering angles

  16. A layer correlation technique for pion energy calibration at the 2004 ATLAS Combined Beam Test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abat, E; Arik, E; Abdallah, J M; Addy, T N; Adragna, P; Aharrouche, M; Ahmad, A; Akesson, T P A; Aleksa, M; Anghinolfi, F; Baron, S; Alexa, C; Anderson, K; Andreazza, A; Banfi, D; Antonaki, A; Arabidze, G; Atkinson, T; Baines, J; Baker, O K

    2011-01-01

    A new method for calibrating the hadron response of a segmented calorimeter is developed and successfully applied to beam test data. It is based on a principal component analysis of energy deposits in the calorimeter layers, exploiting longitudinal shower development information to improve the measured energy resolution. Corrections for invisible hadronic energy and energy lost in dead material in front of and between the calorimeters of the ATLAS experiment were calculated with simulated Geant4 Monte Carlo events and used to reconstruct the energy of pions impinging on the calorimeters during the 2004 Barrel Combined Beam Test at the CERN H8 area. For pion beams with energies between 20GeV and 180GeV, the particle energy is reconstructed within 3% and the energy resolution is improved by between 11% and 25% compared to the resolution at the electromagnetic scale.

  17. A layer correlation technique for pion energy calibration at the 2004 ATLAS Combined Beam Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abat, E; Arik, E [Bogazici University, Faculty of Sciences, Department of Physics, TR - 80815 Bebek-Istanbul (Turkey); Abdallah, J M [Institut de Fisica d' Altes Energies, IFAE, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Edifici Cn, ES - 08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) Spain (Spain); Addy, T N [Hampton University, Department of Physics, Hampton, VA 23668 (United States); Adragna, P [Queen Mary, University of London, Mile End Road, E1 4NS, London (United Kingdom); Aharrouche, M [Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Physik, Staudinger Weg 7, DE 55099 (Germany); Ahmad, A [Insitute of Physics, Academia Sinica, TW - Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Akesson, T P A [Lunds universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Fysiska institutionen, Box 118, SE - 221 00, Lund (Sweden); Aleksa, M; Anghinolfi, F; Baron, S [European Laboratory for Particle Physics CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Alexa, C [National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering (Bucharest -IFIN-HH), P.O. Box MG-6, R-077125 Bucharest (Romania); Anderson, K [University of Chicago, Enrico Fermi Institute, 5640 S. Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Andreazza, A; Banfi, D [INFN Sezione di Milano, via Celoria 16, IT - 20133 Milano (Italy); Antonaki, A; Arabidze, G [University of Athens, Nuclear and Particle Physics Department of Physics, Panepistimiopouli Zografou, GR 15771 Athens (Greece); Atkinson, T [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, AU - Parkvill, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Baines, J [Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Science and Technology Facilities Council, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Baker, O K, E-mail: kjg@particle.kth.se [Yale University, Department of Physics , PO Box 208121, New Haven, CT06520-8121 (United States)

    2011-06-15

    A new method for calibrating the hadron response of a segmented calorimeter is developed and successfully applied to beam test data. It is based on a principal component analysis of energy deposits in the calorimeter layers, exploiting longitudinal shower development information to improve the measured energy resolution. Corrections for invisible hadronic energy and energy lost in dead material in front of and between the calorimeters of the ATLAS experiment were calculated with simulated Geant4 Monte Carlo events and used to reconstruct the energy of pions impinging on the calorimeters during the 2004 Barrel Combined Beam Test at the CERN H8 area. For pion beams with energies between 20GeV and 180GeV, the particle energy is reconstructed within 3% and the energy resolution is improved by between 11% and 25% compared to the resolution at the electromagnetic scale.

  18. Correlations in simple multi-string models of pp collisions at ISR energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lugovoj, V.V.; Chudakov, V.M.

    1989-01-01

    Simple statistical simulation algorithms are suggested for formation and breaking of a few quark-gluon strings in inelastic pp collisions. Theoretical multiplicity distributions, semi-inclusive quasirapidity spectra, forward-backward correlations of charged secondaries and seagull effect agree well with the experimental data at ISR energies. In the framework of the model, the semi-inclusive two-particle correlations of quasirapidities depend upon the fraction of the spherical chains. The seagull effect is qualitatively interpretated

  19. Constraining the geometry to study jet energy loss with 2-particle correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pei, H.; Awes, Terry C.; Cianciolo, Vince; Efremenko, Yuri V.; Enokizono, Akitomo; Read, Kenneth F. Jr.; Silvermyr, David O.; Sorensen, Soren P.; Stankus, Paul W.; Young, Glenn R.

    2008-01-01

    Correlations between two high-p T hadrons provide information on how partons lose energy as they travel through the dense plasma formed at RHIC. To vary the path length partons travel, we measure the back-to-back jets in the AA collision of centrality and reaction-plane dependence, in addition to '2+1' particle correlations, and compare with p+p results

  20. A Correlated Model for Evaluating Performance and Energy of Cloud System Given System Reliability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongli Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The serious issue of energy consumption for high performance computing systems has attracted much attention. Performance and energy-saving have become important measures of a computing system. In the cloud computing environment, the systems usually allocate various resources (such as CPU, Memory, Storage, etc. on multiple virtual machines (VMs for executing tasks. Therefore, the problem of resource allocation for running VMs should have significant influence on both system performance and energy consumption. For different processor utilizations assigned to the VM, there exists the tradeoff between energy consumption and task completion time when a given task is executed by the VMs. Moreover, the hardware failure, software failure and restoration characteristics also have obvious influences on overall performance and energy. In this paper, a correlated model is built to analyze both performance and energy in the VM execution environment given the reliability restriction, and an optimization model is presented to derive the most effective solution of processor utilization for the VM. Then, the tradeoff between energy-saving and task completion time is studied and balanced when the VMs execute given tasks. Numerical examples are illustrated to build the performance-energy correlated model and evaluate the expected values of task completion time and consumed energy.

  1. Estimating adhesive seed-dispersal distances : field experiments and correlated random walks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mouissie, AM; Lengkeek, W; van Diggelen, R

    1. In this study we aimed to estimate distance distributions of adhesively dispersed seeds and the factors that determine them. 2. Seed attachment and detachment were studied using field experiments with a real sheep, a sheep dummy and a cattle dummy. Seed-retention data were used in correlated

  2. Nuclear energy. First experiences with decommissioning in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokoll, Joerg

    2015-01-01

    After the Fukushima disaster in 2011 the German parliament changed the national atomic energy law by way of its thirteenth amendment. In contrast to the initial ''nuclear phaseout'' the new phaseout of nuclear energy foresees a large number of decommissionings which will occur in part successively and in part simultaneously and will extend over a period of eleven years. Eight generating units were already decommissioned in 2011 or have not been ramped up again since then. By 2020 the last units will have been decommissioned and the phaseout of nuclear energy will have been completed, at least in terms of power plant operation. However the subsequent dismantling operations will keep German operators busy for decades to come. This article reports on first practical experiences in decommissioning.

  3. Experiments and detectors for high energy heavy ion colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludlam, T.

    1984-01-01

    Problems and possibilities are discussed for experiments at the highest collision energies achievable in man-made accelerators; i.e., colliding beams of heavy nuclei at cm energies greater than or equal to 100 GeV/amu, well beyond the threshold of nuclear transparency. Here the final state consists of two hot, dense, baryon-rich fireballs flying away from each other at large rapidity (the fragmentation regions), and thermally-produced particles with near-zero net baryon number populating the central rapidity range. The matter produced at central rapidity (the lab frame for a collider) may reach extremely high temperatures and energy densities, and it is here that one expects to produce thermodynamic conditions similar to those which existed when the early universe condensed from a plasma of quarks and gluons to a gas of hadrons. The problem of tracking, lepton measurements, and calorimeters are discussed. (WHK)

  4. Community energy auditing: experience with the comprehensive community energy management program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, J.L.; Berger, D.A.; Rubin, C.B.; Hutchinson, P.A. Sr.; Griggs, H.M.

    1980-09-01

    The report provides local officials and staff with information on lessons from the audit, projection, and general planning experiences of the Comprehensive Community Energy Management Program (CCEMP) communities and provides ANL and US DOE with information useful to the further development of local energy management planning methods. In keeping with the objectives, the report is organized into the following sections: Section II presents the evaluation issues and key findings based on the communities' experiences from Spring of 1979 to approximately March of 1980; Section III gives an organized review of experience of communities in applying the detailed audit methodology for estimating current community energy consumption and projecting future consumption and supply; Section IV provides a preliminary assessment of how audit information is being used in other CCEMP tasks; Section V presents an organized review of preliminary lessons from development of the community planning processes; and Section VI provides preliminary conclusions on the audit and planning methodology. (MCW)

  5. Automation of variable low-energy positron beam experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Jayapandian, J; Amarendra, G; Venugopal-Rao, G; Purniah, B; Viswanathan, B

    2000-01-01

    By exploiting the special BIOS interrupt (INT 1CH) of PC in conjunction with a compatible high-voltage controller card and menu-driven control program, we report here the automation of variable low-energy positron beam experiments. The beam experiment consists of monitoring the Doppler broadening lineshape parameters corresponding to the annihilation 511 keV gamma-ray at various positron beam implantation energies. The variation and monitoring of the sample high voltage, which determines positron beam energy, is carried out using a controller add-on card coupled to a 0-30 kV high-voltage unit. The design features of this controller card are discussed. This controller card is housed in a PC, which also houses a multichannel analyser (MCA) card. The MCA stores the Doppler energy spectrum of the annihilation gamma-ray. The interactive control program, written in Turbo C, carries out the assigned tasks. The design features of the automation and results are presented.

  6. Searching for squeezed particle-antiparticle correlations in high-energy heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padula, Sandra S.; Socolowski, O. Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Squeezed correlations of particle-antiparticle pairs were predicted to exist if the hadron masses were modified in the hot and dense medium formed in high-energy heavy-ion collisions. Although well-established theoretically, they have not yet been observed experimentally. We suggest here a clear method to search for such a signal by analyzing the squeezed correlation functions in terms of measurable quantities. We illustrate this suggestion for simulated φφ pairs at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) energies.

  7. PERLE. Powerful energy recovery linac for experiments. Conceptual design report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angal-Kalinin, D.; Arduini, G.; Auchmann, B.; Bernauer, J.; Bogacz, A.; Bordry, F.; Bousson, S.; Bracco, C.; Brüning, O.; Calaga, R.; Cassou, K.; Chetvertkova, V.; Cormier, E.; Daly, E.; Douglas, D.; Dupraz, K.; Goddard, B.; Henry, J.; Hutton, A.; Jensen, E.; Kaabi, W.; Klein, M.; Kostka, P.; Lasheras, N.; Levichev, E.; Marhauser, F.; Martens, A.; Milanese, A.; Militsyn, B.; Peinaud, Y.; Pellegrini, D.; Pietralla, N.; Pupkov, Y.; Rimmer, R.; Schirm, K.; Schulte, D.; Smith, S.; Stocchi, A.; Valloni, A.; Welsch, C.; Willering, G.; Wollmann, D.; Zimmermann, F.; Zomer, F.

    2018-06-01

    A conceptual design is presented of a novel energy-recovering linac (ERL) facility for the development and application of the energy recovery technique to linear electron accelerators in the multi-turn, large current and large energy regime. The main characteristics of the powerful energy recovery linac experiment facility (PERLE) are derived from the design of the Large Hadron electron Collider, an electron beam upgrade under study for the LHC, for which it would be the key demonstrator. PERLE is thus projected as a facility to investigate efficient, high current (HC) (>10 mA) ERL operation with three re-circulation passages through newly designed SCRF cavities, at 801.58 MHz frequency, and following deceleration over another three re-circulations. In its fully equipped configuration, PERLE provides an electron beam of approximately 1 GeV energy. A physics programme possibly associated with PERLE is sketched, consisting of high precision elastic electron–proton scattering experiments, as well as photo-nuclear reactions of unprecedented intensities with up to 30 MeV photon beam energy as may be obtained using Fabry–Perot cavities. The facility has further applications as a general technology test bed that can investigate and validate novel superconducting magnets (beam induced quench tests) and superconducting RF structures (structure tests with HC beams, beam loading and transients). Besides a chapter on operation aspects, the report contains detailed considerations on the choices for the SCRF structure, optics and lattice design, solutions for arc magnets, source and injector and on further essential components. A suitable configuration derived from the here presented design concept may next be moved forward to a technical design and possibly be built by an international collaboration which is being established.

  8. Systematic studies of binding energy dependence of neutron-proton momentum correlation function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Y B; Ma, Y G; Shen, W Q; Ma, G L; Wang, K; Cai, X Z; Zhong, C; Guo, W; Chen, J G; Fang, D Q; Tian, W D; Zhou, X F

    2004-01-01

    Hanbury Brown-Twiss (HBT) results of the neutron-proton correlation function have been systematically investigated for a series of nuclear reactions with light projectiles with the help of the isospin-dependent quantum molecular dynamics model. The relationship between the binding energy per nucleon of the projectiles and the strength of the neutron-proton HBT at small relative momentum has been obtained. Results show that neutron-proton HBT results are sensitive to the binding energy per nucleon

  9. HIGH ENERGY DENSITY PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS WITH INTENSE HEAVY ION BEAMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bieniosek, F.M.; Henestroza, E.; Leitner, M.; Logan, B.G.; More, R.M.; Roy, P.K.; Ni, P.; Seidl, P.A.; Waldron, W.L.; Barnard, J.J.

    2008-01-01

    The US heavy ion fusion science program has developed techniques for heating ion-beam-driven warm dense matter (WDM) targets. The WDM conditions are to be achieved by combined longitudinal and transverse space-charge neutralized drift compression of the ion beam to provide a hot spot on the target with a beam spot size of about 1 mm, and pulse length about 1-2 ns. As a technique for heating volumetric samples of matter to high energy density, intense beams of heavy ions are capable of delivering precise and uniform beam energy deposition dE/dx, in a relatively large sample size, and the ability to heat any solid-phase target material. Initial experiments use a 0.3 MeV K+ beam (below the Bragg peak) from the NDCX-I accelerator. Future plans include target experiments using the NDCX-II accelerator, which is designed to heat targets at the Bragg peak using a 3-6 MeV lithium ion beam. The range of the beams in solid matter targets is about 1 micron, which can be lengthened by using porous targets at reduced density. We have completed the fabrication of a new experimental target chamber facility for WDM experiments, and implemented initial target diagnostics to be used for the first target experiments in NDCX-1. The target chamber has been installed on the NDCX-I beamline. The target diagnostics include a fast multi-channel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, VISAR, and high-speed gated cameras. Initial WDM experiments will heat targets by compressed NDCX-I beams and will explore measurement of temperature and other target parameters. Experiments are planned in areas such as dense electronegative targets, porous target homogenization and two-phase equation of state

  10. Correlations between D and D-bar mesons in high energy photoproduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gottschalk, Erik E.; Link, J.; Reyes, M.; Yager, P.M.; Anjos, J.; Bediaga, I.; Gobel, C.; Magnin, J.; Massafferri, A.; Miranda, J.M. de; Pepe, I.M.; Reis, A.C. dos; Carrillo, S.; Casimiro, E.; Cuautle, E.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Uribe, C.; Vasquez, F.; Agostino, L.; Cinquini, L.; Cumalat, J.P.; O'Reilly, B.; Ramirez, J.E.; Segoni, I.; Butler, J.N.; Cheung, H.W.K.; Chiodini, G.; Gaines, I.; Garbincius, P.H.; Garren, L.A.; Gottschalk, E.E.; Kasper, P.H.; Kreymer, A.E.; Kutschke, R.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Fabbri, F.L.; Zallo, A.; Cawlfield, C.; Kim, D.Y.; Park, K.S.; Rahimi, A.; Wiss, J.; Gardner, R.; Kryemadhi, A.; Chang, K.H.; Chung, Y.S.; Kang, J.S.; Ko, B.R.; Kwak, J.W.; Lee, K.B.; Cho, K.; Park, H.; Alimonti, G.; Barberis, S.; Cerutti, A.; Boschini, M.; D'Angelo, P.; DiCorato, M.; Dini, P.; Edera, L.; Erba, S.; Giammarchi, M.; Inzani, P.; Leveraro, F.; Malvezzi, S.; Menasce, D.; Mezzadri, M.; Moroni, L.; Pedrini, D.; Pontoglio, C.; Prelz, F.; Rovere, M.; Sala, S.; Davenport, T.F.; Arena, V.; Boca, G.; Bonomi, G.; Gianini, G.; Liguori, G.; Merlo, M.M.; Pantea, D.; Ratti, S.P.; Vitulo, P.; Hernandez, H.; Lopez, A.M.; Mendez, H.; Mendez, L.; Montiel, E.; Olaya, D.; Paris, A.; Quinones, J.; Rivera, C.; Xiong, W.; Zhang, Y.; Wilson, J.R.; Handler, T.; Mitchell, R.; Engh, D.; Hosack, M.; Johns, W.E.; Nehring, M.; Sheldon, P.D.; Stenson, K.; Vaadering, E.W.; Webster, M.; Sheaff, M.

    2003-01-01

    Over 7000 events containing a fully reconstructed D D-bar pair have been extracted from data recorded by the FOCUS photoproduction experiment at Fermilab. Preliminary results from a study of correlations between D and D-bar mesons are presented. Correlations are used to study perturbative QCD predictions and investigate non-perturbative effects. We also present a preliminary result on the production of Ψ(3770)

  11. Cross-Correlations between Energy and Emissions Markets: New Evidence from Fractal and Multifractal Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang-Jin Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We supply a new perspective to describe and understand the behavior of cross-correlations between energy and emissions markets. Namely, we investigate cross-correlations between oil and gas (Oil-Gas, oil and CO2 (Oil-CO2, and gas and CO2 (Gas-CO2 based on fractal and multifractal analysis. We focus our study on returns of the oil, gas, and CO2 during the period of April 22, 2005–April 30, 2013. In the empirical analysis, by using the detrended cross-correlation analysis (DCCA method, we find that cross-correlations for Oil-Gas, Oil-CO2, and Gas-CO2 obey a power-law and are weakly persistent. Then, we adopt the method of DCCA cross-correlation coefficient to quantify cross-correlations between energy and emissions markets. The results show that their cross-correlations are diverse at different time scales. Next, based on the multifractal DCCA method, we find that cross-correlated markets have the nonlinear and multifractal nature and that the multifractality strength for three cross-correlated markets is arranged in the order of Gas-CO2 > Oil-Gas > Oil-CO2. Finally, by employing the rolling windows method, which can be used to investigate time-varying cross-correlation scaling exponents, we analyze short-term and long-term market dynamics and find that the recent global financial crisis has a notable influence on short-term and long-term market dynamics.

  12. Beam energy and centrality dependence of two-pion Bose-Einstein correlations at SPS energies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Adamová, Dagmar; Agakichiev, G.; Appelshäuser, H.; Belaga, V.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Campagnolo, R.; Castillo, A.; Cherlin, A.; Damjanović, S.; Dietel, T.; Dietrich, L.; Drees, A.; Esumi, S. I.; Filimonov, K.; Fomenko, K.; Fraenkel, Z.; Garabatos, C.; Glässel, P.; Hering, G.; Holeczek, J.; Kushpil, Vasilij; Lenkeit, B.; Ludolphs, W.; Maas, A.; Marín, A.; Milošević, J.; Milov, A.; Miśkowiec, D.; Musa, L.; Panebrattsev, Yu.; Petchenova, O.; Petráček, Vojtěch; Pfeiffer, A.; Rak, J.; Ravinovich, I.; Rehak, P.; Richter, M.; Sako, H.; Schmitz, W.; Schukraft, J.; Sedykh, S.; Seipp, W.; Sharma, A.; Shimansky, S.; Slívová, J.; Specht, H. J.; Stachel, J.; Šumbera, Michal; Tilsner, H.; Tserruya, I.; Wessels, J. P.; Wienold, T.; Windelband, B.; Wurm, J. P.; Xie, W.; Yurevich, S.; Yurevich, V. V.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 714, 1/2 (2003), s. 124-144 ISSN 0375-9474 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/03/0879; GA AV ČR KSK1048102 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1048901 Keywords : two-pion correlation function * heavy-ion collisions Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 1.761, year: 2003

  13. Comparison of condensation correlations in CATHARE for modelling isolation condenser experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorjonen, J.; Kalli, H.

    1996-01-01

    CATHARE is a thermal-hydraulic computer code developed at the Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Grenoble (CENG) for nuclear power plant safety analysis. Behaviour of a new Cathare condensation correlation have been studied. The code has been applied to Isolation Condenser (IC) experiment conducted in PIPER-ONE facility. PIPER-ONE simulates a General Electric BWR-6 with volume and height scaling ratios 1/2200 and 1/1, respectively. The facility is installed at Dipartimento di Costruzioni Meccaniche e Nucleari of Pisa University. The facility was equipped with an once-through heat exchanger immersed in a pool of ambient temperature water, installed roughly 10 m above the core, in the aim to reproduce qualitatively the phenomenologies expected for Isolation Condenser in the Simplified BWR (SBWR). Experiment PO-IC-02 included two subsequent power levels with initial pressure of 5.1 MPa. The IC was active during the whole experiment except in the time period between the two different power levels. A previous calculation of above mentioned experiment by Cathare2 V1.3E showed some lacks in the condensation correlation of the code. A new correlation has been developed in Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Grenoble (CENG). The new calculation of the PO-IC-02 experiment by Cathare2 Vl.3U 1 with the new correlation gave results consistent with the experiment in the condensing zone of the IC. Also the overall pressure trend was reproduced with estimated heat losses to the environment. A comparison with previously obtained Relap5/Mod3. 1 results is also shown in the present document. (author) (18 refs.)

  14. High energy particle experiment for the GEOTAIL mission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-09-01

    The high energy particle experiment for GEOTAIL mission was designed to understand the particle acceleration mechanism, energy flow, boundary dynamics and magnetic reconnection mechanism in the geotail region, solar flare particle acceleration mechanism, the propagation mechanism through interplanetary space, and the origin, lifetime and propagation mechanism of cosmic ray heavy ions. In order to achieve these objectives, particle detectors, burst detectors, medium energy isotope telescopes and a high energy isotope telescope will be placed in the spacecraft which will be launched in 1992 as one of the spacecraft missions in the International Solar Terrestrial Physics program. With these detectors, electrons, protons and helium, carbon, silicon and iron particles will be detected. The characteristics and the main technique used for each instrument to observe high energy particles are summarized. The details of the scientific objectives, the basic principle of particle identification, the electronic system and data processing system, key parameter information, telemetry data formats, preflight and in-flight calibration method and data an analysis plan are described in this report. (K.I.)

  15. Exchange-correlation energy from pairing matrix fluctuation and the particle-particle random phase approximation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Aggelen, Helen; Yang, Yang; Yang, Weitao

    2014-05-14

    Despite their unmatched success for many applications, commonly used local, semi-local, and hybrid density functionals still face challenges when it comes to describing long-range interactions, static correlation, and electron delocalization. Density functionals of both the occupied and virtual orbitals are able to address these problems. The particle-hole (ph-) Random Phase Approximation (RPA), a functional of occupied and virtual orbitals, has recently known a revival within the density functional theory community. Following up on an idea introduced in our recent communication [H. van Aggelen, Y. Yang, and W. Yang, Phys. Rev. A 88, 030501 (2013)], we formulate more general adiabatic connections for the correlation energy in terms of pairing matrix fluctuations described by the particle-particle (pp-) propagator. With numerical examples of the pp-RPA, the lowest-order approximation to the pp-propagator, we illustrate the potential of density functional approximations based on pairing matrix fluctuations. The pp-RPA is size-extensive, self-interaction free, fully anti-symmetric, describes the strong static correlation limit in H2, and eliminates delocalization errors in H2(+) and other single-bond systems. It gives surprisingly good non-bonded interaction energies--competitive with the ph-RPA--with the correct R(-6) asymptotic decay as a function of the separation R, which we argue is mainly attributable to its correct second-order energy term. While the pp-RPA tends to underestimate absolute correlation energies, it gives good relative energies: much better atomization energies than the ph-RPA, as it has no tendency to underbind, and reaction energies of similar quality. The adiabatic connection in terms of pairing matrix fluctuation paves the way for promising new density functional approximations.

  16. Exchange-correlation energy from pairing matrix fluctuation and the particle-particle random phase approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggelen, Helen van; Yang, Yang; Yang, Weitao

    2014-01-01

    Despite their unmatched success for many applications, commonly used local, semi-local, and hybrid density functionals still face challenges when it comes to describing long-range interactions, static correlation, and electron delocalization. Density functionals of both the occupied and virtual orbitals are able to address these problems. The particle-hole (ph-) Random Phase Approximation (RPA), a functional of occupied and virtual orbitals, has recently known a revival within the density functional theory community. Following up on an idea introduced in our recent communication [H. van Aggelen, Y. Yang, and W. Yang, Phys. Rev. A 88, 030501 (2013)], we formulate more general adiabatic connections for the correlation energy in terms of pairing matrix fluctuations described by the particle-particle (pp-) propagator. With numerical examples of the pp-RPA, the lowest-order approximation to the pp-propagator, we illustrate the potential of density functional approximations based on pairing matrix fluctuations. The pp-RPA is size-extensive, self-interaction free, fully anti-symmetric, describes the strong static correlation limit in H 2 , and eliminates delocalization errors in H 2 + and other single-bond systems. It gives surprisingly good non-bonded interaction energies – competitive with the ph-RPA – with the correct R −6 asymptotic decay as a function of the separation R, which we argue is mainly attributable to its correct second-order energy term. While the pp-RPA tends to underestimate absolute correlation energies, it gives good relative energies: much better atomization energies than the ph-RPA, as it has no tendency to underbind, and reaction energies of similar quality. The adiabatic connection in terms of pairing matrix fluctuation paves the way for promising new density functional approximations

  17. Low-energy moments of non-diagonal quark current correlators at four loops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maier, A.

    2015-06-01

    We complete the leading four physical terms in the low-energy expansions of heavy-light quark current correlators at four-loop order. As a by-product we reproduce the corresponding top-induced non-singlet correction to the electroweak ρ parameter.

  18. Correlation between X-ray and high energy gamma-ray emission form Cygnus X-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weekes, T.C.; Danaher, S.; Fegan, D.J.; Porter, N.A.

    1981-01-01

    In May-June 1980, the 4.8 hour modulated X-ray flux from Cygnus X-3 underwent a significant change in the shape of the light curve; this change correlates with the peak in the high-energy (E > 2 x 10 12 eV) gamma ray emission at the same epoch. (orig.)

  19. Communication: Thermodynamics of condensed matter with strong pressure-energy correlations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingebrigtsen, Trond; Bøhling, Lasse; Schrøder, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    We show that for any liquid or solid with strong correlation between its NVT virial and potential-energy equilibrium fluctuations, the temperature is a product of a function of excess entropy per particle and a function of density, T = f(s)h(ρ). This implies that (1) the system's isomorphs (curve...

  20. Correlation of the highest-energy cosmic rays with nearby extragalactic objects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pierre Auger Collaboration, [No Value; Abraham, J.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Aguirre, C.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Alvarez, C.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Anzalone, A.; Aramo, C.; Argirò, S.; Arisaka, K.; Armengaud, E.; Arneodo, F.; Arqueros, F.; Asch, T.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Atulugama, B. S.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avila, G.; Bäcker, T.; Badagnani, D.; Barbosa, A. F.; Barnhill, D.; Barroso, S. L. C.; Bauleo, P.; Beatty, J.; Beau, T.; Becker, B. R.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; BenZvi, S.; Berat, C.; Bergmann, T.; Bernardini, P.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanch-Bigas, O.; Blanco, F.; Blasi, P.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Bohácová, M.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Boratav, M.; Brack, J.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Busca, N. G.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Cai, B.; Camin, D. V.; Caruso, R.; Carvalho, W.; Castellina, A.; Catalano, O.; Cataldi, G.; Cazón-Boado, L.; Cester, R.; Chauvin, J.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chou, A.; Chye, J.; Clark, P. D. J.; Clay, R. W.; Colombo, E.; Conceição, R.; Connolly, B.; Contreras, F.; Coppens, J.; Cordier, A.; Cotti, U.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Creusot, A.; Cronin, J.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Donato, C.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Vega, G.; de Mello Junior, W. J. M.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Souza, V.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Della Selva, A.; Delle Fratte, C.; Dembinski, H.; Di Giulio, C.; Diaz, J. C.; Dobrigkeit, C.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dornic, D.; Dorofeev, A.; dos Anjos, J. C.; Dova, M. T.; D'Urso, D.; DuVernois, M. A.; Engel, R.; Epele, L.; Erdmann, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Falcke, H.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Fernández, A.; Ferrer, F.; Ferry, S.; Fick, B.; Filevich, A.; Filipcic, A.; Fleck, I.; Fonte, R.; Fracchiolla, C. E.; Fulgione, W.; García, B.; García Gámez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garrido, X.; Geenen, H.; Gelmini, G.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giller, M.; Glass, H.; Gold, M. S.; Golup, G.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gómez Herrero, R.; Gonçalves, P.; Gonçalves do Amaral, M.; Gonzalez, D.; Gonzalez, J. G.; González, M.; Góra, D.; Gorgi, A.; Gouffon, P.; Grassi, V.; Grillo, A.; Grunfeld, C.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Gutiérrez, J.; Hague, J. D.; Hamilton, J. C.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harmsma, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hauschildt, T.; Healy, M. D.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Hojvat, C.; Holmes, V. C.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J.; Horneffer, A.; Horvat, M.; Hrabovsky, M.; Huege, T.; Iarlori, M.; Insolia, A.; Ionita, F.; Italiano, A.; Kaducak, M.; Kampert, K. H.; Keilhauer, B.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Knapik, R.; Knapp, J.; Koang, D.-H.; Kopmann, A.; Krieger, A.; Krömer, O.; Kümpel, D.; Kunka, N.; Kusenko, A.; La Rosa, G.; Lachaud, C.; Lago, B. L.; Lebrun, D.; Le Brun, P.; Lee, J.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Leuthold, M.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; López, R.; Lopez Agüera, A.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Maccarone, M. C.; Macolino, C.; Maldera, S.; Malek, M.; Mancarella, G.; Manceñido, M. E.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Maris, I. C.; Martello, D.; Martínez, J.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Mathes, H. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurizio, D.; Mazur, P. O.; McCauley, T.; McEwen, M.; McNeil, R. R.; Medina, M. C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Meli, A.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menschikov, A.; Meurer, Chr.; Meyhandan, R.; Micheletti, M. I.; Miele, G.; Miller, W.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morales, B.; Morello, C.; Moreno, E.; Moreno, J. C.; Morris, C.; Mostafá, M.; Muller, M. A.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navarro, J. L.; Navas, S.; Nellen, L.; Newman-Holmes, C.; Newton, D.; Nguyen Thi, T.; Nierstenhöfer, N.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Nozka, L.; Oehlschläger, J.; Ohnuki, T.; Olinto, A.; Olmos-Gilbaja, V. M.; Ortiz, M.; Ostapchenko, S.; Otero, L.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Parente, G.; Parizot, E.; Parlati, S.; Pastor, S.; Patel, M.; Paul, T.; Pavlidou, V.; Payet, K.; Pech, M.; Pçkala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Petrera, S.; Petrinca, P.; Petrov, Y.; Ngoc, DiepPham; Ngoc, DongPham; Pham Thi, T. N.; Pichel, A.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pimenta, M.; Pinto, T.; Pirronello, V.; Pisanti, O.; Platino, M.; Pochon, J.; Porter, T. A.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Rautenberg, J.; Reucroft, S.; Revenu, B.; Rezende, F. A. S.; Rídky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Rivière, C.; Rizi, V.; Roberts, M.; Robledo, C.; Rodriguez, G.; Rodríguez Frías, D.; Rodriguez Martino, J.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodriguez-Cabo, I.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Roth, M.; Rouillé-d'Orfeuil, B.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Santander, M.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, S.; Sato, R.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schmidt, F.; Schmidt, T.; Scholten, O.; Schovánek, P.; Schüssler, F.; Sciutto, S. J.; Scuderi, M.; Segreto, A.; Semikoz, D.; Settimo, M.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Siffert, B. B.; Sigl, G.; Smetniansky De Grande, N.; Smialkowski, A.; Smída, R.; Smith, A. G. K.; Smith, B. E.; Snow, G. R.; Sokolsky, P.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Spinka, H.; Squartini, R.; Strazzeri, E.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Takahashi, J.; Tamashiro, A.; Tamburro, A.; Tascau, O.; Tcaciuc, R.; Thomas, D.; Ticona, R.; Tiffenberg, J.; Timmermans, C.; Tkaczyk, W.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Tomé, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torresi, D.; Travnicek, P.; Tripathi, A.; Tristram, G.; Tscherniakhovski, D.; Tueros, M.; Tunnicliffe, V.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Elewyck, V.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberic, D.; Veiga, A.; Velarde, A.; Venters, T.; Verzi, V.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Vorobiov, S.; Voyvodic, L.; Wahlberg, H.; Wainberg, O.; Waldenmaier, T.; Walker, P.; Warner, D.; Watson, A. A.; Westerhoff, S.; Wieczorek, G.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczynska, B.; Wilczynski, H.; Wileman, C.; Winnick, M. G.; Wu, H.; Wundheiler, B.; Xu, J.; Yamamoto, T.; Younk, P.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zech, A.; Zepeda, A.; Ziolkowski, M.

    2007-01-01

    Using data collected at the Pierre Auger Observatory during the past 3.7 years, we demonstrated a correlation between the arrival directions of cosmic rays with energy above 6 × 1019 electron volts and the positions of active galactic nuclei (AGN) lying within ~75 megaparsecs. We rejected the

  1. Correlation of the highest-energy cosmic rays with the positions of nearby active galactic nuclei

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abraham, J.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Aguirre, C.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Anzalone, A.; Aramo, C.; Argiro, S.; Arisaka, K.; Armengaud, E.; Arneodo, F.; Arqueros, F.; Asch, T.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Atulugama, B. S.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avila, G.; Baecker, T.; Badagnani, D.; Barbosa, A. F.; Barnhill, D.; Barroso, S. L. C.; Bauleo, P.; Beatty, J. J.; Beau, T.; Becker, B. R.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; BenZvi, S.; Berat, C.; Bergmann, T.; Bernardini, P.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanch-Bigas, O.; Blanco, F.; Blasi, P.; Bleve, C.; Bluemer, H.; Bohacova, M.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Brack, J.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Burton, R. E.; Busca, N. G.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Cai, B.; Camin, D. V.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Carvalho, W.; Castellina, A.; Catalano, O.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chauvin, J.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chou, A.; Chye, J.; Clay, R. W.; Colombo, E.; Conceicao, R.; Connolly, B.; Contreras, F.; Coppens, J.; Cordier, A.; Cotti, U.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Creusot, A.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Donato, C.; Bg, S. J. de Jong; De La Vega, G.; de Mello, W. J. M.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Souza, V.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Della Selva, A.; Delle Fratte, C.; Dembinski, H.; Di Giulio, C.; Diaz, J. C.; Diep, P. N.; Dobrigkeit, C.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dong, P. N.; Dornic, D.; Dorofeev, A.; dos Anjos, J. C.; Dova, M. T.; D'Urso, D.; Dutan, I.; DuVernois, M. A.; Engel, R.; Epele, L.; Escobar, C. O.; Etchegoyen, A.; Luis, P. Facal San; Falcke, H.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferrer, F.; Ferry, S.; Fick, B.; Filevich, A.; Filipcic, A.; Fleck, I.; Fracchiolla, C. E.; Fulgione, W.; Garcia, B.; Gaimez, D. Garcia; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garrido, X.; Geenen, H.; Gelmini, G.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giller, M.; Glass, H.; Gold, M. S.; Golup, G.; Albarracin, F. Gomez; Berisso, M. Gomez; Herrero, R. Gomez; Goncalves, P.; do Amaral, M. Goncalves; Gonzalez, D.; Gonzalezc, J. G.; Gonzalez, M.; Gora, D.; Gorgi, A.; Gouffon, P.; Grassi, V.; Grillo, A. F.; Grunfeld, C.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Gutierrez, J.; Hague, J. D.; Hamilton, J. C.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harmsma, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hauschildt, T.; Healy, M. D.; Hebbeker, T.; Hebrero, G.; Heck, D.; Hojvat, C.; Holmes, V. C.; Homola, P.; Hoerandel, J.; Horneffer, A.; Horvat, M.; Hrabovsky, M.; Huege, T.; Hussain, M.; Larlori, M.; Insolia, A.; Ionita, F.; Italiano, A.; Kaducak, M.; Kampert, K. H.; Karova, T.; Kegl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Knapik, R.; Knapp, J.; Koanga, V. -H.; Krieger, A.; Kroemer, O.; Kuempel, D.; Kunka, N.; Kusenko, A.; La Rosa, G.; Lachaud, C.; Lago, B. L.; Lebrun, D.; LeBrun, P.; Lee, J.; de Oliveira, M. A. Leigui; Lopez, R.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Leuthold, M.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Aguera, A. Lopez; Bahilo, J. Lozano; Garcia, R. Luna; Maccarone, M. C.; Macolino, C.; Maldera, S.; Mancarella, G.; Mancenido, M. E.; Mandatat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Maris, I. C.; Falcon, H. R. Marquez; Martello, D.; Martinez, J.; Bravo, O. Martinez; Mathes, H. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurizio, D.; Mazur, P. O.; McCauley, T.; McEwen, M.; McNeil, R. R.; Medina, M. C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Meli, A.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menschikov, A.; Meurer, Chr.; Meyhandan, R.; Micheletti, M. I.; Miele, G.; Miller, W.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Ragaigne, D. Monnier; Montanet, F.; Morales, B.; Morello, C.; Moreno, J. C.; Morris, C.; Mostafa, M.; Muller, M. A.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navarro, J. L.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Newman-Holmes, C.; Newton, D.; Nhung, P. T.; Nierstenhoefer, N.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Nozka, L.; Oehlschlaeger, J.; Ohnuki, T.; Olinto, A.; Olmos-Gilbaja, V. M.; Ortiz, M.; Ortolani, F.; Ostapchenko, S.; Otero, L.; Pacheco, N.; Selmi-Dei, D. Pakk; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Parente, G.; Parizot, E.; Parlati, S.; Pastor, S.; Patel, M.; Paul, T.; Pavlidou, V.; Payet, K.; Pech, M.; Pekala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Petrera, S.; Petrinca, P.; Petrov, Y.; Pichel, A.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pimenta, M.; Pinto, T.; Pirronello, V.; Pisanti, O.; Platino, M.; Pochon, J.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Rautenberg, J.; Redondo, A.; Reucroft, S.; Revenu, B.; Rezende, F. A. S.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Riviere, C.; Rizi, V.; Roberts, M.; Robledo, C.; Rodriguez, G.; Martino, J. Rodriguez; Rojo, J. Rodriguez; Rodriguez-Cabo, I.; Rodriguez-Frias, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Roth, M.; Rouille-d'Orfeuil, B.; Roulet, E.; Roverok, A. C.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Salina, G.; Sanchez, F.; Santander, M.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, S.; Sato, R.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, F.; Schmidt, T.; Scholten, O.; Schovanek, P.; Schuessler, F.; Sciutto, S. J.; Scuderi, M.; Segreto, A.; Semikoz, D.; Settimo, M.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Siffert, B. B.; Sigl, G.; De Grande, N. Smetniansky; Smialkowski, A.; Smida, R.; Smith, A. G. K.; Smith, B. E.; Snow, G. R.; Sokolsky, P.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Spinka, H.; Squartini, R.; Strazzeri, E.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijarvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Takahashi, J.; Tamashiro, A.; Tamburro, A.; Tascau, O.; Tcaciuc, R.; Thao, N. T.; Thomas, D.; Ticona, R.; Tiffenberg, J.; Timmermans, C.; Tkaczyk, W.; Peixoto, C. J. Todero; Tome, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torres, I.; Travnicek, P.; Tripathi, A.; Tristram, G.; Tscherniakhovski, D.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Galicia, J. F. Valdes; Valino, I.; Valore, L.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Elewyck, V.; Vazquez, R. A.; Veberic, D.; Veiga, A.; Velarde, A.; Venters, T.; Verzi, V.; Videla, M.; Villasenor, L.; Vorobiov, S.; Voyvodic, L.; Wahlberg, H.; Wainberg, O.; Warner, D.; Watson, A. A.; Westerhoff, S.; Wieczorek, G.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczynska, B.; Wilczynski, H.; Wileman, C.; Winnick, M. G.; Wu, H.; Wundheiler, B.; Yamamoto, T.; Younk, P.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zech, A.; Zepeda, A.; Ziolkowski, M.

    Data collected by the Pierre Auger Observatory provide evidence for anisotropy in the arrival directions of the cosmic rays with the highest-energies, which are correlated with the positions of relatively nearby active galactic nuclei (AGN) [Pierre Auger Collaboration, Science 318 (2007) 938]. The

  2. Exchange-correlation energies of atoms from efficient density functionals: influence of the electron density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Jianmin; Ye, Lin-Hui; Duan, Yuhua

    2017-12-01

    The primary goal of Kohn-Sham density functional theory is to evaluate the exchange-correlation contribution to electronic properties. However, the accuracy of a density functional can be affected by the electron density. Here we apply the nonempirical Tao-Mo (TM) semilocal functional to study the influence of the electron density on the exchange and correlation energies of atoms and ions, and compare the results with the commonly used nonempirical semilocal functionals local spin-density approximation (LSDA), Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE), Tao-Perdew-Staroverov-Scuseria (TPSS), and hybrid functional PBE0. We find that the spin-restricted Hartree-Fock density yields the exchange and correlation energies in good agreement with the Optimized Effective Potential method, particularly for spherical atoms and ions. However, the errors of these semilocal and hybrid functionals become larger for self-consistent densities. We further find that the quality of the electron density have greater effect on the exchange-correlation energies of kinetic energy density-dependent meta-GGA functionals TPSS and TM than on those of the LSDA and GGA, and therefore, should have greater influence on the performance of meta-GGA functionals. Finally, we show that the influence of the density quality on PBE0 is slightly reduced, compared to that of PBE, due to the exact mixing.

  3. Investigation on the correlation between energy deposition and clustered DNA damage induced by low-energy electrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Tan, Zhenyu; Zhang, Liming; Champion, Christophe

    2018-05-01

    This study presents the correlation between energy deposition and clustered DNA damage, based on a Monte Carlo simulation of the spectrum of direct DNA damage induced by low-energy electrons including the dissociative electron attachment. Clustered DNA damage is classified as simple and complex in terms of the combination of single-strand breaks (SSBs) or double-strand breaks (DSBs) and adjacent base damage (BD). The results show that the energy depositions associated with about 90% of total clustered DNA damage are below 150 eV. The simple clustered DNA damage, which is constituted of the combination of SSBs and adjacent BD, is dominant, accounting for 90% of all clustered DNA damage, and the spectra of the energy depositions correlating with them are similar for different primary energies. One type of simple clustered DNA damage is the combination of a SSB and 1-5 BD, which is denoted as SSB + BD. The average contribution of SSB + BD to total simple clustered DNA damage reaches up to about 84% for the considered primary energies. In all forms of SSB + BD, the SSB + BD including only one base damage is dominant (above 80%). In addition, for the considered primary energies, there is no obvious difference between the average energy depositions for a fixed complexity of SSB + BD determined by the number of base damage, but average energy depositions increase with the complexity of SSB + BD. In the complex clustered DNA damage constituted by the combination of DSBs and BD around them, a relatively simple type is a DSB combining adjacent BD, marked as DSB + BD, and it is of substantial contribution (on average up to about 82%). The spectrum of DSB + BD is given mainly by the DSB in combination with different numbers of base damage, from 1 to 5. For the considered primary energies, the DSB combined with only one base damage contributes about 83% of total DSB + BD, and the average energy deposition is about 106 eV. However, the

  4. First experience from in-core sensor validation based on correlation and neuro-fuzzy techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figedy, S.

    2011-01-01

    In this work new types of nuclear reactor in-core sensor validation methods are outlined. The first one is based on combination of correlation coefficients and mutual information indices, which reflect the correlation of signals in linear and nonlinear regions. The method may be supplemented by wavelet transform based signal features extraction and pattern recognition by artificial neural networks and also fuzzy logic based decision making. The second one is based on neuro-fuzzy modeling of residuals between experimental values and their theoretical counterparts obtained from the reactor core simulator calculations. The first experience with this approach is described and further improvements to enhance the outcome reliability are proposed (Author)

  5. Correlations between energy economy and housing market prices in the EU-impacts on future sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maassen Maria Alexandra

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The global economic system is facing multiple challenges in terms of social development, technology and innovation, as well as sustainability needs. As a result, the value of existing assets is changing globally depending on the scarcity, necessity and effects on the business field leading to increased prices of traditional sources of energy and increased competition in the economic field. Thus, the EU energy market has progressed in reducing its dependence on external energy sourcing, by increasing production of renewable energy, such as wind or solar, as well as by further integration of the electric grid. Based on the Pearson coefficient this article intends to research the correlations between the economic, energy and house prices in recent years and the future possible impacts depending on their evolution. For example, gas prices in the past decade increasing household costs in most countries due to the dependence on third parties for energy, lead to the need of increasing the share of renewable energy in total energy consumption, which have consequently decreased electricity prices since 2008. However, this development has still not solved the additional costs issue of households due to the new technologies implemented although wind and solar energy receive in general low margins. Such energy issues, as well as the increased housing prices after the financial crisis in 2008 have caused on their own an additional burden on the economy and households spending income in the next years following.

  6. CGC/saturation approach for soft interactions at high energy: long range rapidity correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gotsman, E.; Maor, U. [Tel Aviv University, Department of Particle Physics, School of Physics and Astronomy, Raymond and Beverly Sackler Faculty of Exact Science, Tel Aviv (Israel); Levin, E. [Tel Aviv University, Department of Particle Physics, School of Physics and Astronomy, Raymond and Beverly Sackler Faculty of Exact Science, Tel Aviv (Israel); Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria and Centro Cientifico- Tecnologico de Valparaiso, Departemento de Fisica, Valparaiso (Chile)

    2015-11-15

    In this paper we continue our program to construct a model for high energy soft interactions that is based on the CGC/saturation approach. The main result of this paper is that we have discovered a mechanism that leads to large long range rapidity correlations and results in large values of the correlation function R(y{sub 1}, y{sub 2}) ≥ 1, which is independent of y{sub 1} and y{sub 2}. Such a behavior of the correlation function provides strong support for the idea that at high energies the system of partons that is produced is not only dense but also has strong attractive forces acting between the partons. (orig.)

  7. Cutoff effects on energy-momentum tensor correlators in lattice gauge theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, Harvey B.

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the discretization errors affecting correlators of the energy-momentum tensor T μν at finite temperature in SU(N c ) gauge theory with the Wilson action and two different discretizations of T μν . We do so by using lattice perturbation theory and non-perturbative Monte-Carlo simulations. These correlators, which are functions of Euclidean time x 0 and spatial momentum p, are the starting point for a lattice study of the transport properties of the gluon plasma. We find that the correlator of the energy ∫d 3 x T 00 has much larger discretization errors than the correlator of momentum ∫d 3 x T 0k . Secondly, the shear and diagonal stress correlators (T 12 and T kk ) require N τ ≥ 8 for the Tx 0 = 1/2 point to be in the scaling region and the cutoff effect to be less than 10%. We then show that their discretization errors on an anisotropic lattice with a σ /a τ = 2 are comparable to those on the isotropic lattice with the same temporal lattice spacing. Finally, we also study finite p correlators.

  8. Selected results on strong and coulomb-induced correlations from the STAR experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumbera, M.

    2007-01-01

    Using recent high-statistics STAR data from Au + Au and Cu + Cu collisions at full RHIC energy I discuss strong and Coulomb-induced final state interaction effects on identical (pi-pi) and non-identical (pi-XI) particle correlations. Analysis of pi-XI correlations reveals the strong and Coulomb-induced FSI effects, allowing for the first time to estimate spatial extension of pi and XI sources and the average shift between them. Source imaging techniques provide clean separation of details of the source function and are applied to the one-dimensional relative momentum correlation function of identical pions. For low momentum pions, and/or non-central collisions, a large departure from a single-Gaussian shape is observed. (author)

  9. Angular correlation between IceCube high-energy starting events and starburst sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moharana, Reetanjali; Razzaque, Soebur, E-mail: moharana.reetanjali@mail.huji.ac.il, E-mail: srazzaque@uj.ac.za [Department of Physics, University of Johannesburg, P.O. Box 524, Auckland Park 2006 (South Africa)

    2016-12-01

    Starburst galaxies and star-forming regions in the Milkyway, with high rate of supernova activities, are candidate sources of high-energy neutrinos. Using a gamma-ray selected sample of these sources we perform statistical analysis of their angular correlation with the four-year sample of high-energy starting events (HESE), detected by the IceCube Neutrino Observatory. We find that the two samples (starburst galaxies and local star-forming regions) are correlated with cosmic neutrinos at ∼ (2–3)σ (pre-trial) significance level, when the full HESE sample with deposited energy ∼> 20 TeV is considered. However when we consider the HESE sample with deposited energy ∼> 60 TeV, which is almost free of atmospheric neutrino and muon backgrounds, the significance of correlation decreased drastically. We perform a similar study for Galactic sources in the 2nd Catalog of Hard Fermi -LAT Sources (2FHL, >50 GeV) catalog as well, obtaining ∼ (2–3)σ (pre-trial) correlation, however the significance of correlation increases with higher cutoff energy in the HESE sample for this case. We also fit available gamma-ray data from these sources using a pp interaction model and calculate expected neutrino fluxes. We find that the expected neutrino fluxes for most of the sources are at least an order of magnitude lower than the fluxes required to produce the HESE neutrinos from these sources. This puts the starburst sources being the origin of the IceCube HESE neutrinos in question.

  10. Homestake result, sterile neutrinos, and low energy solar neutrino experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Holanda, P. C.; Smirnov, A. Yu.

    2004-06-01

    The Homestake result is about ˜2σ lower than the Ar-production rate, QAr, predicted by the large mixing angle (LMA) Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein solution of the solar neutrino problem. Also there is no apparent upturn of the energy spectrum (R≡Nobs/NSSM) at low energies in SNO and Super-Kamiokande. Both these facts can be explained if a light, Δm201˜(0.2 2)×10-5 eV2, sterile neutrino exists which mixes very weakly with active neutrinos: sin2 2α˜(10-5 10-3). We perform both the analytical and numerical study of the conversion effects in the system of two active neutrinos with the LMA parameters and one weakly mixed sterile neutrino. The presence of sterile neutrino leads to a dip in the survival probability in the intermediate energy range E=(0.5 5) MeV thus suppressing the Be, or/and pep, CNO, as well as B electron neutrino fluxes. Apart from diminishing QAr it leads to decrease of the Ge-production rate and may lead to the decrease of the BOREXINO signal as well as the CC/NC ratio at SNO. Future studies of the solar neutrinos by SNO, SK, BOREXINO, and KamLAND as well as by the new low energy experiments will allow us to check this possibility.

  11. Experience in the use of wind energy for greenhouse heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Flaherty, T; Kocsis, K; Petersen, H [eds.

    1987-05-01

    Study of the appliction of wind energy for greenhouse heating began at Kinsealy Research Centre in 1980 with the installation of a multi-blade 6m diamter wind turbine. This produced electricity which was used to provide root zone warming for a glasshouse tomato crop. The application worked well and the wind turbine is still in operation, although it has been out of service for substantial periods and has required major refurbishment. In July 1985 a new wind turbine was commissioned as an EEC Wind Energy Demonstration Project. This is an 11m diameter grid-connected unit, and the project involves using its output to power a heat pump which in turn supplies heat to a greenhouse. The system is operating well and initial performance results have been obtained during the 1985-'86 heating season. The paper summarises the experience to data with both of these projects.

  12. Ion energy recovery experiment based on magnetic electro suppression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.; Stirling, W.L.; Dagenhart, W.K.; Barber, G.C.; Ponte, N.S.

    1980-05-01

    A proof-of-principle experiment on direct recovery of residual hydrogen ions based on a magnetic electron suppression scheme is described. Ions extracted from a source plasma a few kilovolts above the ground potential (approx. 20 A) are accelerated to 40 keV by a negative potential maintained on a neutralizer gas cell. As the residual ions exit the gas cell, they are deflected from the neutral beam by a magnetic field that also suppresses gas cell electrons and then recovered on a ground-potential surface. Under optimum conditions, a recovery efficiency (the ratio of the net recovered current to the available full-energy ion current) of 80% +- 20% has been obtained. Magnetic suppression of the beam plasma electrons was rather easily achieved; however, handling the fractional-energy ions originating from molecular species (H 2 + and H 3 + ) proved to be extremely important to recovery efficiency

  13. White Dwarfs in the HET Dark Energy Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castanheira, B. G.; Winget, D. E.; Williams, K.; Montgomery, M. H.; Falcon, R. E.; Hermes, J. J.

    2010-11-01

    In the past decades, large scale surveys have discovered a large number of white dwarfs. For example, the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7 [5] lists about 20 000 spectroscopically confirmed new white dwarfs. More than just a number, the new discoveries revealed different flavors of white dwarfs, including a new class of pulsators [7] and a larger percentage of stars with a magnetic field [4]. The HET Dark Energy Experiment (HETDEX) will use the 9.2 m Hobby-Eberly Telescope at McDonald Observatory and a set of 150 spectrographs to map the three-dimensional positions of one million galaxies. The main goal of the survey is to probe dark energy by observing the recent universe (2products. We expect to obtain spectra for about 10 000 white dwarfs in the next 3 to 4 years.

  14. Energy-Efficient Optimization for HARQ Schemes over Time-Correlated Fading Channels

    KAUST Repository

    Shi, Zheng

    2018-03-19

    Energy efficiency of three common hybrid automatic repeat request (HARQ) schemes including Type I HARQ, HARQ with chase combining (HARQ-CC) and HARQ with incremental redundancy (HARQ-IR), is analyzed and joint power allocation and rate selection to maximize the energy efficiency is investigated in this paper. Unlike prior literature, time-correlated fading channels is considered and two widely concerned quality of service (QoS) constraints, i.e., outage and goodput constraints, are also considered in the optimization, which further differentiates this work from prior ones. Using a unified expression of asymptotic outage probabilities, optimal transmission powers and optimal rate are derived in closed-forms to maximize the energy efficiency while satisfying the QoS constraints. These closed-form solutions then enable a thorough analysis of the maximal energy efficiencies of various HARQ schemes. It is revealed that with low outage constraint, the maximal energy efficiency achieved by Type I HARQ is $\\\\frac{1}{4\\\\ln2}$ bits/J, while HARQ-CC and HARQ-IR can achieve the same maximal energy efficiency as $\\\\frac{\\\\kappa_\\\\infty}{4\\\\ln2}$ bits/J where $\\\\kappa_\\\\infty = 1.6617$. Moreover, time correlation in the fading channels has a negative impact on the energy efficiency, while large maximal allowable number of transmissions is favorable for the improvement of energy efficiency. The effectiveness of the energy-efficient optimization is verified by extensive simulations and the results also show that HARQ-CC can achieve the best tradeoff between energy efficiency and spectral efficiency among the three HARQ schemes.

  15. Clinical experience does not correlate with the perceived need for cardiopulmonary resuscitation training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunz, Dirk; Brandl, Anita; Lang, Klaus; Weiss, Berthold; Haneya, Assad; Pühler, Thomas; Graf, Bernhard M; Zausig, York A

    2013-02-01

    The efficiency of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training is dependent upon different influencing factors, such as the presented concepts, the participants' willingness to learn, and the interval between training sessions. However, the optimal interval for refreshing CPR training is less clear. We evaluated the perceived need of simulator-based CPR training for nurses and correlated it with their clinical experience. The 60 invited nurses were trained in simulator-based CPR. Knowledge about adult advanced life support was evaluated using a questionnaire after training, and participants rated their desired individual frequency of simulator-based training as well as the value of the presented training using a six-point Likert scale. The same questions were asked again after 1 year. All participants agreed about the usefulness of this type of simulator-based training. The average number of correct answers about typical facts in adult advanced life support showed an almost bell-shaped distribution, with the highest point at 6-15 years of clinical experience and the lowest points at≤5 and≥21 years. The desired training-frequency need was inversely correlated with clinical experience. There is a high interest in CPR training among nursing staff. Self-assessment about the training-frequency need was inversely correlated with clinical experience. However, the average number of correct answers on resuscitation questions decreased with clinical experience. Therefore, the training effectiveness seems to be extremely dependent on clinical experience, and therefore, training experienced senior nurses might be more challenging than training novice nurses. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Tensor polarized deuteron targets for intermediate energy physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, W.; Schilling, E.

    1985-03-01

    At intermediate energies measurements from a tensor polarized deuteron target are being prepared for the following reactions: the photodisintegration of the deuteron, the elastic pion-deuteron scattering and the elastic electron-deuteron scattering. The experimental situation of the polarization experiments for these reactions is briefly discussed in section 2. In section 3 the definitions of the deuteron polarization and the possibilities to determine the vector and tensor polarization are given. Present tensor polarization values and further improvements in this field are reported in section 4. (orig.)

  17. Experiments with monoenergetic high-energy gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreh, R.

    1982-01-01

    Some new studies using photon beams with energies below 12 MeV are reviewed. These experiments involve three main topics: (1) Elastic and nuclear Raman scattering of photons. (2) Use of the (#betta#,n) reaction for studying E1-E2 and E1-M1 interference effects in A of the order of 208 nuclei. Some spectroscopic studies using the (#betta#,n) reaction are also mentioned. (3) Study of the spatial orientation of molecular groups using nuclear resonance photon scattering. (author)

  18. Assessment of fire hazards in buildings housing fusion energy experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvares, N.; Lipska, A.

    1978-01-01

    A number of materials in and within the proximity of buildings housing fusion energy experiments (FEE) were analyzed for their potential fire hazard. The materials used in this study were mostly: electrical and thermal insulations. The fire hazard of these materials was assessed in terms of their ease of ignition, heat release rate, generation of smoke, and the effect of thermal environment on the combustion behavior. Several fire protection measures for buildings housing the (FEE) projects are analyzed and as a result of this study are found to be adequate for the near term

  19. Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) dismantling experience review and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barre, J.Y.

    1992-01-01

    Reorganization and dismantling have been part of the CEA's facility renewal process for more than twenty years now. Many facilities have already been downrated or will be in the near future. The strategy developed so far is founded on acquired experience, on the basis of which it may be said that: nuclear facilities are reversible in full and strict compliance with safety and security rules; a field of competence has been developed that will help French industries to land on their feet when the time comes on the dismantling market; public opinion has been informed as to the soundness of the energy alternatives chosen

  20. An unfolding method for high energy physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blobel, V.

    2002-06-01

    Finite detector resolution and limited acceptance require one to apply unfolding methods in high energy physics experiments. Information on the detector resolution is usually given by a set of Monte Carlo events. Based on the experience with a widely used unfolding program (RUN) a modified method has been developed. The first step of the method is a maximum likelihood fit of the Monte Carlo distributions to the measured distribution in one, two or three dimensions; the finite statistics of the Monte Carlo events is taken into account by the use of Barlow's method with a new method of solution. A clustering method is used before combining bins in sparsely populated areas. In the second step a regularization is applied to the solution, which introduces only a small bias. The regularization parameter is determined from the data after a diagonalization and rotation procedure. (orig.)

  1. Utilizing HPC Network Technologies in High Energy Physics Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2088631; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Because of their performance characteristics high-performance fabrics like Infiniband or OmniPath are interesting technologies for many local area network applications, including data acquisition systems for high-energy physics experiments like the ATLAS experiment at CERN. This paper analyzes existing APIs for high-performance fabrics and evaluates their suitability for data acquisition systems in terms of performance and domain applicability. The study finds that existing software APIs for high-performance interconnects are focused on applications in high-performance computing with specific workloads and are not compatible with the requirements of data acquisition systems. To evaluate the use of high-performance interconnects in data acquisition systems a custom library, NetIO, is presented and compared against existing technologies. NetIO has a message queue-like interface which matches the ATLAS use case better than traditional HPC APIs like MPI. The architecture of NetIO is based on a interchangeable bac...

  2. DIAGNOSTICS FOR ION BEAM DRIVEN HIGH ENERGY DENSITY PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bieniosek, F.M.; Henestroza, E.; Lidia, S.; Ni, P.A.

    2010-01-01

    Intense beams of heavy ions are capable of heating volumetric samples of matter to high energy density. Experiments are performed on the resulting warm dense matter (WDM) at the NDCX-I ion beam accelerator. The 0.3 MeV, 30-mA K + beam from NDCX-I heats foil targets by combined longitudinal and transverse neutralized drift compression of the ion beam. Both the compressed and uncompressed parts of the NDCX-I beam heat targets. The exotic state of matter (WDM) in these experiments requires specialized diagnostic techniques. We have developed a target chamber and fielded target diagnostics including a fast multi-channel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, laser Doppler-shift interferometer (VISAR), beam transmission diagnostics, and high-speed gated cameras. We also present plans and opportunities for diagnostic development and a new target chamber for NDCX-II.

  3. Recent improvements in size effects correlations for DBTT and upper shelf energy of ferritic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, A.S.; Louden, B.S.; Garner, F.A.; Hamilton, M.L.

    1992-01-01

    Currently available correlations for the effects of specimen size on the USE were developed for relatively ductile steels and will not serve as well when the steels become embrittled. Size effects correlations were developed recently for the impact properties of less ductile HT9 to be applied to other initially more ductile steels as they lose their ductility during irradiation. These new correlations successfully predict the ductile brittle transition temperature (DBTT) and the upper shelf energy (USE) of full size Charpy specimens based on subsize specimen data. The new DBTT and the USE correlations were tested against published experimental data on other ferritic steels and shown to perform successfully at lower USE particularly when both precracked and notched only specimens were employed

  4. Rapidity correlations in inclusive two-particle production at storage ring energies

    CERN Document Server

    Dibon, Heinz; Gottfried, Christian; Nefkens, B M K; Neuhofer, G; Niebergall, F; Regler, Meinhard; Schmidt-Parzefall, W; Schubert, K R; Schumacher, P E; Winter, Klaus

    1973-01-01

    Inclusive two-particle production in the reaction pp to gamma +ch+ (anything) has been measured at the CERN ISR for four energies ( square root s=23, 30.5, 45, and 53 GeV) at two production angles of the charged particles (ch) and at eight production angles of the gamma -rays. The rapidity correlation of the two particles is weak and of short range. The peak correlation is sigma /sub inel/(d/sup 2/ sigma /sub gamma ch//d sigma /sub gamma /d sigma /sub ch/)-1=0.62+or-0.08, the correlation range (y/sub gamma /-y/sub ch/)=1.17+or-0.05, independently of s. The phi correlation extends over a wide gap in rapidity; its strength is increasing with increasing transverse momentum. (7 refs).

  5. Correlation, necessity, and sufficiency: Common errors in the scientific reasoning of undergraduate students for interpreting experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Aaron B; Lam, Diane P; Soowal, Lara N

    2015-01-01

    Gaining an understanding of how science works is central to an undergraduate education in biology and biochemistry. The reasoning required to design or interpret experiments that ask specific questions does not come naturally, and is an essential part of the science process skills that must be learned for an understanding of how scientists conduct research. Gaps in these reasoning skills make it difficult for students to become proficient in reading primary scientific literature. In this study, we assessed the ability of students in an upper-division biochemistry laboratory class to use the concepts of correlation, necessity, and sufficiency in interpreting experiments presented in a format and context that is similar to what they would encounter when reading a journal article. The students were assessed before and after completion of a laboratory module where necessary vs. sufficient reasoning was used to design and interpret experiments. The assessment identified two types of errors that were commonly committed by students when interpreting experimental data. When presented with an experiment that only establishes a correlation between a potential intermediate and a known effect, students frequently interpreted the intermediate as being sufficient (causative) for the effect. Also, when presented with an experiment that tests only necessity for an intermediate, they frequently made unsupported conclusions about sufficiency, and vice versa. Completion of the laboratory module and instruction in necessary vs. sufficient reasoning showed some promise for addressing these common errors. © 2015 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  6. Theoretical investigations of quantum correlations in NMR multiple-pulse spin-locking experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerasev, S. A.; Fedorova, A. V.; Fel'dman, E. B.; Kuznetsova, E. I.

    2018-04-01

    Quantum correlations are investigated theoretically in a two-spin system with the dipole-dipole interactions in the NMR multiple-pulse spin-locking experiments. We consider two schemes of the multiple-pulse spin-locking. The first scheme consists of π /2-pulses only and the delays between the pulses can differ. The second scheme contains φ-pulses (0Quantum discord is obtained for the first scheme of the multiple-pulse spin-locking experiment at different temperatures.

  7. Comment on ''a classical model of EPR experiment with quantum mechanical correlations and Bell inequalities''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aspect, A.

    1986-01-01

    The author states that ''It is impossible to mimick the quantum mechanical predictions for the EPR correlations, with a reasonable classical-looking model, in the spirit of Einstein's ideas''. The author feels that if he is wrong somebody could make a classical model (i.e. following the laws of classical physics) mimicking all the quantum mechanical predictions for the EPR correlations. He attempts to show that it is not the case for Barut's model for the following reasons: the first version of his model is classical, but doesn't mimick at all an EPR type experiment; and by reinterpretation one can get a model that does mimick the experiment, but this model is no longer ''reasonably classical looking'' since it involves negative probabilities. The claim is put in the form of a challenge. It is shown that the model under discussion can be reinterpreted by adding a chip converting the continuous outputs into two-valved outputs

  8. Homonuclear long-range correlation spectra from HMBC experiments by covariance processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoefberger, Wolfgang; Smrecki, Vilko; Vikić-Topić, Drazen; Müller, Norbert

    2007-07-01

    We present a new application of covariance nuclear magnetic resonance processing based on 1H--13C-HMBC experiments which provides an effective way for establishing indirect 1H--1H and 13C--13C nuclear spin connectivity at natural isotope abundance. The method, which identifies correlated spin networks in terms of covariance between one-dimensional traces from a single decoupled HMBC experiment, derives 13C--13C as well as 1H--1H spin connectivity maps from the two-dimensional frequency domain heteronuclear long-range correlation data matrix. The potential and limitations of this novel covariance NMR application are demonstrated on two compounds: eugenyl-beta-D-glucopyranoside and an emodin-derivative. Copyright (c) 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Interplay of short-range correlations and nuclear symmetry energy in hard-photon production from heavy-ion reactions at Fermi energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Gao-Chan; Li, Bao-An

    2017-12-01

    Within an isospin- and momentum-dependent transport model for nuclear reactions at intermediate energies, we investigate the interplay of the nucleon-nucleon short-range correlations (SRCs) and nuclear symmetry energy Esym(ρ ) on hard-photon spectra in collisions of several Ca isotopes on 112Sn and 124Sn targets at a beam energy of 45 MeV/nucleon. It is found that over the whole spectra of hard photons studied, effects of the SRCs overwhelm those owing to the Esym(ρ ) . The energetic photons come mostly from the high-momentum tails (HMTs) of single-nucleon momentum distributions in the target and projectile. Within the neutron-proton dominance model of SRCs based on the consideration that the tensor force acts mostly in the isosinglet and spin-triplet nucleon-nucleon interaction channel, there are equal numbers of neutrons and protons, thus a zero isospin asymmetry in the HMTs. Therefore, experimental measurements of the energetic photons from heavy-ion collisions at Fermi energies have the great potential to help us better understand the nature of SRCs without any appreciable influence by the uncertain Esym(ρ ) . These measurements will be complementary to but also have some advantages over the ongoing and planned experiments using hadronic messengers from reactions induced by high-energy electrons or protons. Because the underlying physics of SRCs and Esym(ρ ) are closely correlated, a better understanding of the SRCs will, in turn, help constrain the nuclear symmetry energy more precisely in a broad density range.

  10. Willingness to pay for renewable energy investment in Korea: A choice experiment study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ku, Se-Ju; Yoo, Seung-Hoon

    2010-01-01

    Renewable energy sources are considered as alternatives for coping with the high price of oil and global warming. The Korean government has set a target that 11% of the total primary energy supply should be obtained through renewable energy sources until 2030. In order to develop proper policies for renewable energy investment, it is necessary to analyze the benefits of renewable energy investment based on households' willingness to pay. This study attempts to apply a choice experiment (CE) for assessing renewable energy investment in Korea. Moreover, we employ a multinomial probit (MNP) model to relax the assumption that all respondents have the same preferences for the attributes being valued, which is usually required in empirical CE studies. An MNP model allows the most flexible pattern of error correlation structure. The results reveal that the Korean public puts a value on the protection of wildlife, reduction of pollution, and increased employment opportunities. On the other hand, respondents do not derive significant values from the improvement of landscapes. This study is expected to provide policy-makers with useful information for evaluating and planning policies related to renewable energy investment. (author)

  11. Measurements of high energy photons in Z-pinch experiments on primary test stand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Si, Fenni; Zhang, Chuanfei; Xu, Rongkun; Yuan, Xi; Huang, Zhanchang; Xu, Zeping; Ye, Fan; Yang, Jianlun; Ning, Jiamin; Hu, Qingyuan; Zhu, Xuebin

    2015-01-01

    High energy photons are measured for the first time in wire-array Z-pinch experiments on the Primary Test Stand (PTS) which delivers a current up to 8 MA with a rise time of 70 ns. A special designed detecting system composed of three types of detectors is used to measure the average energy, intensity, and pulse waveform of high energy photons. Results from Pb-TLD (thermoluminescence dosimeter) detector indicate that the average energy is 480 keV (±15%). Pulse shape of high energy photons is measured by the photodiode detector consisted of scintillator coupled with a photodiode, and it is correlated with soft x-ray power by the same timing signal. Intensity is measured by both TLD and the photodiode detector, showing good accordance with each other, and it is 10 10 cm −2 (±20%) at 2 m in the horizontal direction. Measurement results show that high energy photons are mainly produced in pinch regions due to accelerated electrons. PTS itself also produces high energy photons due to power flow electrons, which is one order smaller in amplitude than those from pinch region

  12. Energy and energy gradient matrix elements with N-particle explicitly correlated complex Gaussian basis functions with L =1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubin, Sergiy; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2008-03-01

    In this work we consider explicitly correlated complex Gaussian basis functions for expanding the wave function of an N-particle system with the L =1 total orbital angular momentum. We derive analytical expressions for various matrix elements with these basis functions including the overlap, kinetic energy, and potential energy (Coulomb interaction) matrix elements, as well as matrix elements of other quantities. The derivatives of the overlap, kinetic, and potential energy integrals with respect to the Gaussian exponential parameters are also derived and used to calculate the energy gradient. All the derivations are performed using the formalism of the matrix differential calculus that facilitates a way of expressing the integrals in an elegant matrix form, which is convenient for the theoretical analysis and the computer implementation. The new method is tested in calculations of two systems: the lowest P state of the beryllium atom and the bound P state of the positronium molecule (with the negative parity). Both calculations yielded new, lowest-to-date, variational upper bounds, while the number of basis functions used was significantly smaller than in previous studies. It was possible to accomplish this due to the use of the analytic energy gradient in the minimization of the variational energy.

  13. Energy and energy gradient matrix elements with N-particle explicitly correlated complex Gaussian basis functions with L=1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubin, Sergiy; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2008-03-21

    In this work we consider explicitly correlated complex Gaussian basis functions for expanding the wave function of an N-particle system with the L=1 total orbital angular momentum. We derive analytical expressions for various matrix elements with these basis functions including the overlap, kinetic energy, and potential energy (Coulomb interaction) matrix elements, as well as matrix elements of other quantities. The derivatives of the overlap, kinetic, and potential energy integrals with respect to the Gaussian exponential parameters are also derived and used to calculate the energy gradient. All the derivations are performed using the formalism of the matrix differential calculus that facilitates a way of expressing the integrals in an elegant matrix form, which is convenient for the theoretical analysis and the computer implementation. The new method is tested in calculations of two systems: the lowest P state of the beryllium atom and the bound P state of the positronium molecule (with the negative parity). Both calculations yielded new, lowest-to-date, variational upper bounds, while the number of basis functions used was significantly smaller than in previous studies. It was possible to accomplish this due to the use of the analytic energy gradient in the minimization of the variational energy.

  14. Comparison of a new calculation of energy-energy correlations with e+e-→ hadrons data at the Z0 resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, K.; Abt, I.; Ahn, C.J.; Akagi, T.; Allen, N.J.; Ash, W.W.; Aston, D.; Baird, K.G.; Baltay, C.; Band, H.R.; Barakat, M.B.; Baranko, G.; Bardon, O.; Barklow, T.; Bazarko, A.O.; Ben-David, R.; Benvenuti, A.C.; Bienz, T.; Bilei, G.M.; Bisello, D.; Blaylock, G.; Bogart, J.R.; Bolton, T.; Bower, G.R.; Brau, J.E.; Breidenbach, M.; Bugg, W.M.; Burke, D.; Burnett, T.H.; Burrows, P.N.; Busza, W.; Calcaterra, A.; Caldwell, D.O.; Calloway, D.; Camanzi, B.; Carpinelli, M.; Cassell, R.; Castaldi, R.; Castro, A.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Church, E.; Cohn, H.O.; Coller, J.A.; Cook, V.; Cotton, R.; Cowan, R.F.; Coyne, D.G.; D'Oliveira, A.; Damerell, C.J.S.; Daoudi, M.; De Sangro, R.; De Simone, P.; Dell'Orso, R.; Dima, M.; Du, P.Y.C.; Dubois, R.; Eisenstein, B.I.; Elia, R.; Falciai, D.; Fan, C.; Fero, M.J.; Frey, R.; Furuno, K.; Gillman, T.; Gladding, G.; Gonzalez, S.; Hallewell, G.D.; Hart, E.L.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hedges, S.; Hertzbach, S.S.; Hildreth, M.D.; Huber, J.; Huffer, M.E.; Hughes, E.W.; Hwang, H.; Iwasaki, Y.; Jackson, D.J.; Jacques, P.; Jaros, J.; Johnson, A.S.; Johnson, J.R.; Johnson, R.A.; Junk, T.; Kajikawa, R.; Kalelkar, M.; Karliner, I.; Kawahara, H.; Kendall, H.W.; Kim, Y.; King, M.E.; King, R.; Kofler, R.R.; Krishna, N.M.; Kroeger, R.S.; Labs, J.F.; Langston, M.; Lath, A.; Lauber, J.A.; Leith, D.W.G.; Liu, X.; Loreti, M.; Lu, A.; Lynch, H.L.; Ma, J.; Mancinelli, G.; Manly, S.; Mantovani, G.; Markiewicz, T.W.; Maruyama, T.; Massetti, R.; Masuda, H.; Mazzucato, E.; McKemey, A.K.; Meadows, B.T.; Messner, R.; Mockett, P.M.; Moffeit, K.C.; Mours, B.; Mueller, G.; Muller, D.; Nagamine, T.; Nauenberg, U.; Neal, H.; Nussbaum, M.; Ohnishi, Y.; Osborne, L.S.; Panvini, R.S.; Park, H.; Pavel, T.J.; Peruzzi, I.; Piccolo, M.; Piemontese, L.; Pieroni, E.; Pitts, K.T.; Plano, R.J.; Prepost, R.; Prescott, C.Y.; Punkar, G.D.; Quigley, J.; Ratcliff, B.N.; Reeves, T.W.; Rensing, P.E.; Rochester, L.S.; Rothberg, J.E.; Rowson, P.C.; Russell, J.J.; Saxton, O.H.; Schalk, T.

    1995-01-01

    We have compared a new QCD calculation by Clay and Ellis of energy-energy correlations (EEC's) and their asymmetry (AEEC's) in e + e - annihilation into hadrons with data collected by the SLD experiment at SLAC. From fits of the new calculation, complete at O(α s 2 ), we obtained α s (M Z 2 )=0.1184±0.0031(expt)±0.0129(theory) (EEC) and α s (M Z 2 )=0.1120±0.0034(expt)±0.0036(theory) (AEEC). The EEC result is significantly lower than that obtained from comparable fits using the O(α s 2 ) calculation of Kunszt and Nason

  15. The difficulty with correlations: Energy expenditure and brain mass in bats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNab, Brian K; Köhler, Meike

    2017-10-01

    Brain mass has been suggested to determine a mammal's energy expenditure. This potential dependence is examined in 48 species of bats. A correlation between characters may be direct or derived from shared correlations with intervening factors without a direct interaction. Basal rate of metabolism in these bats increases with brain mass: large brains are more expensive than small brains, and both brain mass and basal rate increase with body mass. Basal rate and brain mass also correlate with food habits in bats. Mass-independent basal rate weakly correlates with mass-independent brain mass, the correlation only accounting for 12% of the variation in basal rate, which disappears when the combined effects of body mass and food habits are deleted. The correlation between basal rate and brain mass seen in this and other studies usually accounts for bats. Most biological correlations are complicated and must be examined in detail before assurance can be given as to their bases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Energy diffusion in strongly driven quantum chaotic systems: the role of correlations of the matrix elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elyutin, P V; Rubtsov, A N

    2008-01-01

    The energy evolution of a quantum chaotic system under the perturbation that harmonically depends on time is studied for the case of large perturbation, in which the rate of transition calculated from the Fermi golden rule (FGR) is about or exceeds the frequency of perturbation. For this case, the models of the Hamiltonian with random non-correlated matrix elements demonstrate that the energy evolution retains its diffusive character, but the rate of diffusion increases slower than the square of the magnitude of perturbation, thus destroying the quantum-classical correspondence for the energy diffusion and the energy absorption in the classical limit ℎ → 0. The numerical calculation carried out for a model built from the first principles (the quantum analog of the Pullen-Edmonds oscillator) demonstrates that the evolving energy distribution, apart from the diffusive component, contains a ballistic one with the energy dispersion that is proportional to the square of time. This component originates from the chains of matrix elements with correlated signs and vanishes if the signs of matrix elements are randomized. The presence of the ballistic component formally extends the applicability of the FGR to the non-perturbative domain and restores the quantum-classical correspondence

  17. Correlates of University Students’ Soft and Energy Drink Consumption According to Gender and Residency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deliens, Tom; Clarys, Peter; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse; Deforche, Benedicte

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed personal and environmental correlates of Belgian university students’ soft and energy drink consumption and investigated whether these associations were moderated by gender or residency. Four hundred twenty-five university students completed a self-reported on-line questionnaire assessing socio-demographics, health status, soft and energy drink consumption, as well as personal and environmental factors related to soft and energy drink consumption. Multiple linear regression analyses were conducted. Students believing soft drink intake should be minimized (individual subjective norm), finding it less difficult to avoid soft drinks (perceived behavioral control), being convinced they could avoid soft drinks in different situations (self-efficacy), having family and friends who rarely consume soft drinks (modelling), and having stricter family rules about soft drink intake were less likely to consume soft drinks. Students showing stronger behavioral control, having stricter family rules about energy drink intake, and reporting lower energy drink availability were less likely to consume energy drinks. Gender and residency moderated several associations between psychosocial constructs and consumption. Future research should investigate whether interventions focusing on the above personal and environmental correlates can indeed improve university students’ beverage choices. PMID:26258790

  18. Correlates of domestic violence experience among recently-married women residing in slums in Pune, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalokhe, Ameeta S; Iyer, Sandhya R; Kolhe, Ambika R; Dhayarkar, Sampada; Paranjape, Anuradha; Del Rio, Carlos; Stephenson, Rob; Sahay, Seema

    2018-01-01

    The high risk of experiencing domestic violence (DV) among married women in India who reside in slum communities underscores the need for effective, evidence-based, and culturally-tailored primary prevention. To inform such DV primary prevention strategies for this population, we herein aimed to identify correlates of DV experience in early marriage. Utilizing a cross-sectional design, potential correlates of DV experience were explored among a geographically-clustered random sample of 100 recently-married women residing in slums in Pune, India. In multivariable regression, DV experience was associated with less educational attainment by the participant's spouse (standardized β = -0.281, p = 0.004), less satisfaction of the spouse's family with the maanpaan (wedding-related gifts provided by the bride's family) they received at the time of marriage (standardized β = -0.298, p<0.001), poorer conflict negotiation skills (standardized β = -0.308, p<0.001), and greater acknowledgement of DV occurrence in family and friends (standardized β = 0.436, p<0.001). These correlates suggest strategies that could be incorporated into future DV primary prevention interventions for this vulnerable population (i.e. promoting completion of formal education of boys alongside girls, mitigating causes of familial dowry harassment, improving conflict negotiation skills, and challenging norms surrounding DV).

  19. The Multiscale Fluctuations of the Correlation between Oil Price and Wind Energy Stock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shupei Huang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Wind energy is considered a clear and sustainable substitution for fossil fuel, and the stock index of the wind energy industry is closely related to the oil price fluctuation. Their relationship is characterized by multiscale and time-varying features based on a variety of stakeholders who have different objectives within various time horizons, which makes it difficult to identify the factor in which time scale could be the most influential one in the market. Aiming to explore the correlation between oil price and the wind energy stock index from the time–frequency domain in a dynamic perspective, we propose an algorithm combining the wavelet transform, complex network, and gray correlation analyses and choose the Brent oil price and the international securities exchange (ISE global wind energy index from January 2006 to October 2015 in daily frequency as data sample. First, we define the multiscale conformation by a set of fluctuation information with different time horizons to represent the fluctuation status of the correlation of the oil–wind nexus rather than by a single original correlation value. Then, we transform the multiscale conformation evolution into a network model, and only 270 multiscale conformations and 710 transmissions could characterize 2451 data points. We find that only 30% of conformations and transmissions work as a backbone of the entire correlation series; through these major conformations, we identify that the main factor that could influence the oil–wind nexus are long-term components, such as policies, the status of the global economy and demand–supply issues. In addition, there is a clustering effect and transmissions among conformations that mainly happen inside clusters and rarely among clusters, which means the interaction of the oil–wind nexus is stable over a short period of time.

  20. Determining the static electronic and vibrational energy correlations via two-dimensional electronic-vibrational spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Hui; Lewis, Nicholas H. C.; Oliver, Thomas A. A.; Fleming, Graham R., E-mail: grfleming@lbl.gov [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Physical Biosciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, Californial 94720 (United States); Kavli Energy NanoSciences Institute at Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2015-05-07

    Changes in the electronic structure of pigments in protein environments and of polar molecules in solution inevitably induce a re-adaption of molecular nuclear structure. Both changes of electronic and vibrational energies can be probed with visible or infrared lasers, such as two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy or vibrational spectroscopy. The extent to which the two changes are correlated remains elusive. The recent demonstration of two-dimensional electronic-vibrational (2DEV) spectroscopy potentially enables a direct measurement of this correlation experimentally. However, it has hitherto been unclear how to characterize the correlation from the spectra. In this paper, we present a theoretical formalism to demonstrate the slope of the nodal line between the excited state absorption and ground state bleach peaks in the spectra as a characterization of the correlation between electronic and vibrational transition energies. We also show the dynamics of the nodal line slope is correlated to the vibrational spectral dynamics. Additionally, we demonstrate the fundamental 2DEV spectral line-shape of a monomer with newly developed response functions.

  1. Evolution of pressures and correlations in the glasma produced in high energy nuclear collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggieri, M.; Liu, J. H.; Oliva, L.; Peng, G. X.; Greco, V.

    2018-04-01

    We consider the SU(2) glasma with Gaussian fluctuations and study its evolution by means of classical Yang-Mills equations solved numerically on a lattice. Neglecting in this first study the longitudinal expansion, we follow the evolution of the pressures of the system and compute the effect of the fluctuations in the early stage up to t ≈2 fm /c , that is the time range in which the glasma is relevant for high energy collisions. We measure the ratio of the longitudinal over the transverse pressure, PL/PT, and we find that unless the fluctuations carry a substantial amount of the energy density at the initial time, they do not change significantly the evolution of PL/PT in the early stage and that the system remains quite anisotropic. We also measure the longitudinal fields correlators both in the transverse plane and along the longitudinal direction: while at initial time fields appear to be anticorrelated in the transverse plane, this anticorrelation disappears in the very early stage, and the correlation length in the transverse plane increases. On the other hand, we find a dependence of the gauge invariant correlator on the longitudinal coordinate, which we interpret as a partial loss of correlation induced by the dynamics that we dub the gauge invariant string breaking. We finally study the effect of fluctuations on the longitudinal correlations: we find that string breaking is accelerated by the fluctuations and waiting for a sufficiently long time fluctuations lead to the complete breaking of the color strings.

  2. Multiparticle Collectivity from Initial State Correlations in High Energy Proton-Nucleus Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusling, Kevin; Mace, Mark; Venugopalan, Raju

    2018-01-01

    Qualitative features of multiparticle correlations in light-heavy ion (p +A ) collisions at RHIC and LHC are reproduced in a simple initial state model of partons in the projectile coherently scattering off localized domains of color charge in the heavy nuclear target. These include (i) the ordering of the magnitudes of the azimuthal angle n th Fourier harmonics of two-particle correlations vn{2 }, (ii) the energy and transverse momentum dependence of the four-particle Fourier harmonic v2{4 }, and (iii) the energy dependence of four-particle symmetric cumulants measuring correlations between different Fourier harmonics. Similar patterns are seen in an Abelian version of the model, where we observe v2{2 }>v2{4 }≈v2{6 }≈v2{8 } of two, four, six, and eight particle correlations. While such patterns are often interpreted as signatures of collectivity arising from hydrodynamic flow, our results provide an alternative description of the multiparticle correlations seen in p +A collisions.

  3. Thyroid hormones correlate with resting metabolic rate, not daily energy expenditure, in two charadriiform seabirds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle H. Elliott

    2013-04-01

    Thyroid hormones affect in vitro metabolic intensity, increase basal metabolic rate (BMR in the lab, and are sometimes correlated with basal and/or resting metabolic rate (RMR in a field environment. Given the difficulty of measuring metabolic rate in the field—and the likelihood that capture and long-term restraint necessary to measure metabolic rate in the field jeopardizes other measurements—we examined the possibility that circulating thyroid hormone levels were correlated with RMR in two free-ranging bird species with high levels of energy expenditure (the black-legged kittiwake, Rissa tridactyla, and thick-billed murre, Uria lomvia. Because BMR and daily energy expenditure (DEE are purported to be linked, we also tested for a correlation between thyroid hormones and DEE. We examined the relationships between free and bound levels of the thyroid hormones thyroxine (T4 and triiodothyronine (T3 with DEE and with 4-hour long measurements of post-absorptive and thermoneutral resting metabolism (resting metabolic rate; RMR. RMR but not DEE increased with T3 in both species; both metabolic rates were independent of T4. T3 and T4 were not correlated with one another. DEE correlated with body mass in kittiwakes but not in murres, presumably owing to the larger coefficient of variation in body mass during chick rearing for the more sexually dimorphic kittiwakes. We suggest T3 provides a good proxy for resting metabolism but not DEE in these seabird species.

  4. First β-ν correlation measurement from the recoil-energy spectrum of Penning trapped Ar35 ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Gorp, S.; Breitenfeldt, M.; Tandecki, M.; Beck, M.; Finlay, P.; Friedag, P.; Glück, F.; Herlert, A.; Kozlov, V.; Porobic, T.; Soti, G.; Traykov, E.; Wauters, F.; Weinheimer, Ch.; Zákoucký, D.; Severijns, N.

    2014-08-01

    We demonstrate a novel method to search for physics beyond the standard model by determining the β-ν angular correlation from the recoil-ion energy distribution after β decay of ions stored in a Penning trap. This recoil-ion energy distribution is measured with a retardation spectrometer. The unique combination of the spectrometer with a Penning trap provides a number of advantages, e.g., a high recoil-ion count rate and low sensitivity to the initial position and velocity distribution of the ions and completely different sources of systematic errors compared to other state-of-the-art experiments. Results of a first measurement with the isotope Ar35 are presented. Although currently at limited precision, we show that a statistical precision of about 0.5% is achievable with this unique method, thereby opening up the possibility of contributing to state-of-the-art searches for exotic currents in weak interactions.

  5. Monitoring of the energy scale in the KATRIN neutrino experiment

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2083282

    The question of the absolute mass scale of neutrinos is of particular interest for particle physics, astrophysics, and cosmology. The KATRIN experiment (KArlsruhe TRItium Neutrino experiment) aims to address the effective electron antineutrino mass from the shape of the tritium $\\beta$-spectrum with an unprecedented sensitivity of 0.2 eV/c$^2$. One of the major systematic effects concerns the experimental energy scale, which has to be stable at the level of only a few parts in a million. For its calibration and monitoring the monoenergetic electrons emitted in the internal conversion of $\\gamma$-transition of the metastable isotope $^{83\\mathrm{m}}$Kr will be extensively applied. The aim of this thesis is to address the problem of KATRIN energy scale distortions and its monitoring in detail. The source of electrons based on $^{83\\mathrm{m}}$Kr embedded in a solid as well as the source based on gaseous $^{83\\mathrm{m}}$Kr are studied. Based on the experimental results an approach for the continuous stability m...

  6. Investigating the correlation between paediatric stride interval persistence and gross energy expenditure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sejdić Ervin

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stride interval persistence, a term used to describe the correlation structure of stride interval time series, is thought to provide insight into neuromotor control, though its exact clinical meaning has not yet been realized. Since human locomotion is shaped by energy efficient movements, it has been hypothesized that stride interval dynamics and energy expenditure may be inherently tied, both having demonstrated similar sensitivities to age, disease, and pace-constrained walking. Findings This study tested for correlations between stride interval persistence and measures of energy expenditure including mass-specific gross oxygen consumption per minute (, mass-specific gross oxygen cost per meter (VO2 and heart rate (HR. Metabolic and stride interval data were collected from 30 asymptomatic children who completed one 10-minute walking trial under each of the following conditions: (i overground walking, (ii hands-free treadmill walking, and (iii handrail-supported treadmill walking. Stride interval persistence was not significantly correlated with (p > 0.32, VO2 (p > 0.18 or HR (p > 0.56. Conclusions No simple linear dependence exists between stride interval persistence and measures of gross energy expenditure in asymptomatic children when walking overground and on a treadmill.

  7. Socioecological correlates of energy balance using urinary C-peptide measurements in wild female mountain gorillas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grueter, Cyril C; Deschner, Tobias; Behringer, Verena; Fawcett, Katie; Robbins, Martha M

    2014-03-29

    Maintaining a balanced energy budget is important for survival and reproduction, but measuring energy balance in wild animals has been fraught with difficulties. Female mountain gorillas are interesting subjects to examine environmental correlates of energy balance because their diet is primarily herbaceous vegetation, their food supply shows little seasonal variation and is abundant, yet they live in cooler, high-altitude habitats that may bring about energetic challenges. Social and reproductive parameters may also influence energy balance. Urinary C-peptide (UCP) has emerged as a valuable non-invasive biomarker of energy balance in primates. Here we use this method to investigate factors influencing energy balance in mountain gorillas of the Virunga Volcanoes, Rwanda. We examined a range of socioecological variables on energy balance in adult females in three groups monitored by the Karisoke Research Center over nine months. Three variables had significant effects on UCP levels: habitat (highest levels in the bamboo zone), season (highest levels in November during peak of the bamboo shoot availability) and day time (gradually increasing from early morning to early afternoon). There was no significant effect of reproductive state and dominance rank. Our study indicates that even in species that inhabit an area with a seemingly steady food supply, ecological variability can have pronounced effects on female energy balance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Wave energy level and geographic setting correlate with Florida beach water quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zhixuan; Reniers, Ad; Haus, Brian K; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M; Kelly, Elizabeth A

    2016-03-15

    Many recreational beaches suffer from elevated levels of microorganisms, resulting in beach advisories and closures due to lack of compliance with Environmental Protection Agency guidelines. We conducted the first statewide beach water quality assessment by analyzing decadal records of fecal indicator bacteria (enterococci and fecal coliform) levels at 262 Florida beaches. The objectives were to depict synoptic patterns of beach water quality exceedance along the entire Florida shoreline and to evaluate their relationships with wave condition and geographic location. Percent exceedances based on enterococci and fecal coliform were negatively correlated with both long-term mean wave energy and beach slope. Also, Gulf of Mexico beaches exceeded the thresholds significantly more than Atlantic Ocean ones, perhaps partially due to the lower wave energy. A possible linkage between wave energy level and water quality is beach sand, a pervasive nonpoint source that tends to harbor more bacteria in the low-wave-energy environment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Correlation Functions of the Energy Momentum Tensor on Spaces of Constant Curvature

    CERN Document Server

    Osborn, H

    2000-01-01

    An analysis of one and two point functions of the energy momentum tensor on homogeneous spaces of constant curvature is undertaken. The possibility of proving a c-theorem in this framework is discussed, in particular in relation to the coefficients c,a, which appear in the energy momentum tensor trace on general curved backgrounds in four dimensions. Ward identities relating the correlation functions are derived and explicit expressions are obtained for free scalar, spinor field theories in general dimensions and also free vector fields in dimension four. A natural geometric formalism which is independent of any choice of coordinates is used and the role of conformal symmetries on such constant curvature spaces is analysed. The results are shown to be constrained by the operator product expansion. For negative curvature the spectral representation, involving unitary positive energy representations of $O(d-1,2)$, for two point functions of vector currents is derived in detail and extended to the energy momentu...

  10. Progress in heavy ion driven inertial fusion energy: From scaled experiments to the integrated research experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnard, J.J.; Ahle, L.E.; Baca, D.; Bangerter, R.O.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Celata, C.M.; Chacon-Golcher, E.; Davidson, R.C.; Faltens, A.; Friedman, A.; Franks, R.M.; Grote, D.P.; Haber, I.; Henestroza, E.; Hoon, M.J.L. de; Kaganovich, I.; Karpenko, V.P.; Kishek, R.A.; Kwan, J.W.; Lee, E.P.; Logan, B.G.; Lund, S.M.; Meier, W.R.; Molvik, A.W.; Olson, C.; Prost, L.R.; Qin, H.; Rose, D.; Sabbi, G.-L.; Sangster, T.C.; Seidl, P.A.; Sharp, W.M.; Shuman, D.; Vay, J.-L.; Waldron, W.L.; Welch, D.; Yu, S.S.

    2001-01-01

    The promise of inertial fusion energy driven by heavy ion beams requires the development of accelerators that produce ion currents (∼100's Amperes/beam) and ion energies (∼1-10 GeV) that have not been achieved simultaneously in any existing accelerator. The high currents imply high generalized perveances, large tune depressions, and high space charge potentials of the beam center relative to the beam pipe. Many of the scientific issues associated with ion beams of high perveance and large tune depression have been addressed over the last two decades on scaled experiments at Lawrence Berkeley and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories, the University of Maryland, and elsewhere. The additional requirement of high space charge potential (or equivalently high line charge density) gives rise to effects (particularly the role of electrons in beam transport) which must be understood before proceeding to a large scale accelerator. The first phase of a new series of experiments in Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory (HIF VNL), the High Current Experiments (HCX), is now being constructed at LBNL. The mission of the HCX will be to transport beams with driver line charge density so as to investigate the physics of this regime, including constraints on the maximum radial filling factor of the beam through the pipe. This factor is important for determining both cost and reliability of a driver scale accelerator. The HCX will provide data for design of the next steps in the sequence of experiments leading to an inertial fusion energy power plant. The focus of the program after the HCX will be on integration of all of the manipulations required for a driver. In the near term following HCX, an Integrated Beam Experiment (IBX) of the same general scale as the HCX is envisioned. The step which bridges the gap between the IBX and an engineering test facility for fusion has been designated the Integrated Research Experiment (IRE). The IRE (like the IBX) will provide an

  11. Analytical energy gradients for explicitly correlated wave functions. I. Explicitly correlated second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Győrffy, Werner; Knizia, Gerald; Werner, Hans-Joachim

    2017-12-01

    We present the theory and algorithms for computing analytical energy gradients for explicitly correlated second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2-F12). The main difficulty in F12 gradient theory arises from the large number of two-electron integrals for which effective two-body density matrices and integral derivatives need to be calculated. For efficiency, the density fitting approximation is used for evaluating all two-electron integrals and their derivatives. The accuracies of various previously proposed MP2-F12 approximations [3C, 3C(HY1), 3*C(HY1), and 3*A] are demonstrated by computing equilibrium geometries for a set of molecules containing first- and second-row elements, using double-ζ to quintuple-ζ basis sets. Generally, the convergence of the bond lengths and angles with respect to the basis set size is strongly improved by the F12 treatment, and augmented triple-ζ basis sets are sufficient to closely approach the basis set limit. The results obtained with the different approximations differ only very slightly. This paper is the first step towards analytical gradients for coupled-cluster singles and doubles with perturbative treatment of triple excitations, which will be presented in the second part of this series.

  12. Water-Energy Correlations: Analysis of Water Technologies, Processes and Systems in Rural and Urban India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murumkar, A. R.; Gupta, S.; Kaurwar, A.; Satankar, R. K.; Mounish, N. K.; Pitta, D. S.; Virat, J.; Kumar, G.; Hatte, S.; Tripathi, R. S.; Shedekar, V.; George, K. J.; Plappally, A. K.

    2015-12-01

    In India, the present value of water, both potable and not potable, bears no relation to the energy of water production. However, electrical energy spent on ground water extraction alone is equivalent to the nation's hydroelectric capacity of 40.1 GWh. Likewise, desalinating 1m3 water of the Bay of Bengal would save three times the energy for potable ground water extraction along the coast of the Bay. It is estimated that every second woman in rural India expends 0.98 kWhe/m3/d for bringing water for household needs. Yet, the water-energy nexus remains to be a topic which is gravely ignored. This is largely caused by factors such as lack of awareness, defective public policies, and intrusive cultural practices. Furthermore, there are instances of unceasing dereliction towards water management and maintenance of the sparsely distributed water and waste water treatment plants across the country. This pollutes the local water across India apart from other geogenic impurities. Additionally, product aesthetics and deceptive advertisements take advantage of the abulia generated by users' ignorance of technical specifications of water technologies and processes in mismanagement of water use. Accordingly, urban residents are tempted to expend on energy intensive water technologies at end use. This worsens the water-energy equation at urban households. Cooking procedures play a significant role in determining the energy expended on water at households. The paper also evaluates total energy expense involved in cultivating some major Kharif and Rabi crops. Manual and traditional agricultural practices are more prominent than mechanized and novel agricultural techniques. The specific energy consumption estimate for different water technologies will help optimize energy expended on water in its life cycles. The implication of the present study of water-energy correlation will help plan and extend water management infrastructure at different locations across India.

  13. Correlation experiments and the nonvalidity of ordinary ideas about the physical world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stapp, H.P.

    1976-01-01

    It is shown that the predictions of quantum theory in certain correlations experiments are incompatible with ordinary ideas about the physical world. In particular the following theorem is proved: Consider situations involving two experimenters, one working in each of two space-like separated regions. Suppose each is apparently free to choose to perform in his region one of two alternative experiments. Assume that the results that would be obtained in each of the alternative cases conform to the statistical predictions of quantum theory. Then the experimental results in one region must, in some cases, depend on which experiment is performed in the space-like separated region. This theorem is akin to a theorem of J. S. Bell. However, Bell's theorem refers to hidden-variables, which may not exist in nature, whereas the present theorem deals directly with connections between the (macroscopic) results of possible measurements and physical variables subject to the control of experimenters

  14. High energy physics experiment triggers and the trustworthiness of software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nash, T.

    1991-10-01

    For all the time and frustration that high energy physicists expend interacting with computers, it is surprising that more attention is not paid to the critical role computers play in the science. With large, expensive colliding beam experiments now dependent on complex programs working at startup, questions of reliability -- the trustworthiness of software -- need to be addressed. This issue is most acute in triggers, used to select data to record -- and data to discard -- in the real time environment of an experiment. High level triggers are built on codes that now exceed 2 million source lines -- and for the first time experiments are truly dependent on them. This dependency will increase at the accelerators planned for the new millennium (SSC and LHC), where cost and other pressures will reduce tolerance for first run problems, and the high luminosities will make this on-line data selection essential. A sense of this incipient crisis motivated the unusual juxtaposition to topics in these lectures. 37 refs., 1 fig

  15. Dynamic Electron Correlation Effects on the Ground State Potential Energy Surface of a Retinal Chromophore Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gozem, Samer; Huntress, Mark; Schapiro, Igor; Lindh, Roland; Granovsky, Alexander A; Angeli, Celestino; Olivucci, Massimo

    2012-11-13

    The ground state potential energy surface of the retinal chromophore of visual pigments (e.g., bovine rhodopsin) features a low-lying conical intersection surrounded by regions with variable charge-transfer and diradical electronic structures. This implies that dynamic electron correlation may have a large effect on the shape of the force fields driving its reactivity. To investigate this effect, we focus on mapping the potential energy for three paths located along the ground state CASSCF potential energy surface of the penta-2,4-dieniminium cation taken as a minimal model of the retinal chromophore. The first path spans the bond length alternation coordinate and intercepts a conical intersection point. The other two are minimum energy paths along two distinct but kinetically competitive thermal isomerization coordinates. We show that the effect of introducing the missing dynamic electron correlation variationally (with MRCISD) and perturbatively (with the CASPT2, NEVPT2, and XMCQDPT2 methods) leads, invariably, to a stabilization of the regions with charge transfer character and to a significant reshaping of the reference CASSCF potential energy surface and suggesting a change in the dominating isomerization mechanism. The possible impact of such a correction on the photoisomerization of the retinal chromophore is discussed.

  16. Energy deposition of heavy ions in the regime of strong beam-plasma correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gericke, D O; Schlanges, M

    2003-03-01

    The energy loss of highly charged ions in dense plasmas is investigated. The applied model includes strong beam-plasma correlation via a quantum T-matrix treatment of the cross sections. Dynamic screening effects are modeled by using a Debye-like potential with a velocity dependent screening length that guarantees the known low and high beam velocity limits. It is shown that this phenomenological model is in good agreement with simulation data up to very high beam-plasma coupling. An analysis of the stopping process shows considerably longer ranges and a less localized energy deposition if strong coupling is treated properly.

  17. Correlations between the nuclear matter symmetry energy, its slope, and curvature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, B M; Delfino, A; Dutra, M; Lourenço, O

    2015-01-01

    By using point-coupling versions of finite range nuclear relativistic mean field models containing cubic and quartic self interactionsin the scalar field σ, a nonrelativistic limit is achieved. This approach allows for an analytical expression for the symmetry energy (J) as a function of its slope (L) in a unified form, namely, L = 3J + f(m*, ρ o , B o , K o ), where the quantities m*, p o , B o and K o are bulk parameters at the nuclear matter saturation density ρ o . This result establishes a linear correlation between L and J which is reinforced by exact relativistic calculations we have performed. An analogous analytical correlation can also be found for J, L and the symmetry energy curvature (K sym ). Based on these results, we propose a graphic constraint in L × J plane which finite range models should satisfy. (paper)

  18. GW correlation effects on plutonium quasiparticle energies: Changes in crystal-field splitting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chantis, A.N.; Albers, R.C.; Svane, Axel

    2009-01-01

    We present results for the electronic structure of plutonium by using a recently developed quasiparticle self-consistent GW method (QSGW). We consider a paramagnetic solution without spin-orbit interaction as a function of volume for the face-centred cubic (fcc) unit cell. We span unit-cell volumes...... ranging from 10% greater than the equilibrium volume of the δ phase to 90% of the equivalent for the α phase of Pu. The selfconsistent GW quasiparticle energies are compared to those obtained within the Local Density Approximation (LDA). The goal of the calculations is to understand systematic trends...... in the effects of electronic correlations on the quasiparticle energy bands of Pu as a function of the localisation of the f orbitals. We show that correlation effects narrow the f bands in two significantly different ways. Besides the expected narrowing of individual f bands (flatter dispersion), we find...

  19. Free energy correlation of rate constants for electron transfer between organic systems in aqueous solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meisel, D

    1975-07-15

    Recent experimental data concerning the rate constants for electron transfer reactions of organic systems in aqueous solutions and their equilibrium constants is examined for possible correlation. The data is correlated quite well by the Marcus theory, if a reorganization parameter, lambda, of 18 kcal/mole is used. Assuming that the only contribution to lambda is the free energy of rearrangement of the water molecules, an effective radius of 5 A for the reacting entities is estimated. For the zero free energy change reaction, i.e., electron exchange between a radical ion and its parent molecule, a rate constant of about 5 X 10/sup 7/ M/sup -1/ s/sup -1/ is predicted. (auth)

  20. Energy-momentum tensor correlation function in Nf = 2 + 1 full QCD at finite temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Yusuke; Ejiri, Shinji; Kanaya, Kazuyuki; Kitazawa, Masakiyo; Suzuki, Asobu; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Umeda, Takashi

    2018-03-01

    We measure correlation functions of the nonperturbatively renormalized energy-momentum tensor in Nf = 2 + 1 full QCD at finite temperature by applying the gradient flow method both to the gauge and quark fields. Our main interest is to study the conservation law of the energy-momentum tensor and to test whether the linear response relation is properly realized for the entropy density. By using the linear response relation we calculate the specific heat from the correlation function. We adopt the nonperturba-tively improved Wilson fermion and Iwasaki gauge action at a fine lattice spacing = 0:07 fm. In this paper the temperature is limited to a single value T ≃ 232 MeV. The u, d quark mass is rather heavy with mπ=mρ ≃ 0:63 while the s quark mass is set to approximately its physical value.

  1. Energy-momentum tensor correlation function in Nf = 2 + 1 full QCD at finite temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taniguchi Yusuke

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We measure correlation functions of the nonperturbatively renormalized energy-momentum tensor in Nf = 2 + 1 full QCD at finite temperature by applying the gradient flow method both to the gauge and quark fields. Our main interest is to study the conservation law of the energy-momentum tensor and to test whether the linear response relation is properly realized for the entropy density. By using the linear response relation we calculate the specific heat from the correlation function. We adopt the nonperturba-tively improved Wilson fermion and Iwasaki gauge action at a fine lattice spacing = 0:07 fm. In this paper the temperature is limited to a single value T ≃ 232 MeV. The u, d quark mass is rather heavy with mπ=mρ ≃ 0:63 while the s quark mass is set to approximately its physical value.

  2. Low-energy pion double charge exchange and nucleon-nucleon correlations in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leitch, M.J.

    1989-01-01

    Recent measurements of pion double-charge exchange (DCX) at energies 20 to 70 MeV are providing a new means for studying nucleon-nucleon correlations in nuclei. At these energies the nucleus is relatively transparent, allowing simpler theoretical models to be used in interpreting the data and leading to a clearer picture. Also the contribution to DCX of sequential charge-exchange scattering through the intermediate analog state is suppressed near 50 MeV and transitions through non-analog intermediate states become very important. Recent theoretical studies by several groups have shown that while transitions through the analog route involve relatively long nucleon-nucleon distances, those through non-analog intermediate states obtain nearly half their strength from nucleon pairs with less than 1 fermi separation. Thus DCX near 50 MeV is an excellent way to study short-range nucleon-nucleon correlations. 31 refs., 29 figs., 4 tabs

  3. Freezing and extreme-value statistics in a random energy model with logarithmically correlated potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fyodorov, Yan V; Bouchaud, Jean-Philippe

    2008-01-01

    We investigate some implications of the freezing scenario proposed by Carpentier and Le Doussal (CLD) for a random energy model (REM) with logarithmically correlated random potential. We introduce a particular (circular) variant of the model, and show that the integer moments of the partition function in the high-temperature phase are given by the well-known Dyson Coulomb gas integrals. The CLD freezing scenario allows one to use those moments for extracting the distribution of the free energy in both high- and low-temperature phases. In particular, it yields the full distribution of the minimal value in the potential sequence. This provides an explicit new class of extreme-value statistics for strongly correlated variables, manifestly different from the standard Gumbel class. (fast track communication)

  4. Freezing and extreme-value statistics in a random energy model with logarithmically correlated potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fyodorov, Yan V [School of Mathematical Sciences, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG72RD (United Kingdom); Bouchaud, Jean-Philippe [Science and Finance, Capital Fund Management 6-8 Bd Haussmann, 75009 Paris (France)

    2008-09-19

    We investigate some implications of the freezing scenario proposed by Carpentier and Le Doussal (CLD) for a random energy model (REM) with logarithmically correlated random potential. We introduce a particular (circular) variant of the model, and show that the integer moments of the partition function in the high-temperature phase are given by the well-known Dyson Coulomb gas integrals. The CLD freezing scenario allows one to use those moments for extracting the distribution of the free energy in both high- and low-temperature phases. In particular, it yields the full distribution of the minimal value in the potential sequence. This provides an explicit new class of extreme-value statistics for strongly correlated variables, manifestly different from the standard Gumbel class. (fast track communication)

  5. Charged multiplicity distributions and correlations in e+e- annihilation at PETRA energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braunschweig, W.; Gerhards, R.; Kirschfink, F.J.; Martyn, H.U.; Kolanoski, H.; Bowler, M.G.; Burrows, P.N.; Veitch, M.E.; Brandt, S.; Holder, M.; Caldwell, A.; Muller, D.; Ritz, S.; Strom, D.; Takashima, M.; Wu Saulan; Zobernig, G.

    1989-01-01

    We report on an analysis of the multiplicity distributions of charged particles produced in e + e - annihilation into hadrons at c.m. energies between 14 and 46.8 GeV. The charged multiplicity distributions of the whole event and single hemisphere deviate significantly from the Poisson distribution but follow approximate KNO scaling. We have also studied the multiplicity distributions in various rapidity intervals and found that they can be well described by the negative binomial distribution only for small central intervals. We have also analysed forward-backward multiplicity correlations for different energies and selections of particle charge and shown that they can be understood in terms of the fragmentation properties of the different quark flavours and by the production and decay of resonances. These correlations are well reproduced by the Lund string model. (orig.)

  6. Diagnosing collisionless energy transfer using field-particle correlations: Vlasov-Poisson plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howes, Gregory G.; Klein, Kristopher G.; Li, Tak Chu

    2017-02-01

    Turbulence plays a key role in the conversion of the energy of large-scale fields and flows to plasma heat, impacting the macroscopic evolution of the heliosphere and other astrophysical plasma systems. Although we have long been able to make direct spacecraft measurements of all aspects of the electromagnetic field and plasma fluctuations in near-Earth space, our understanding of the physical mechanisms responsible for the damping of the turbulent fluctuations in heliospheric plasmas remains incomplete. Here we propose an innovative field-particle correlation technique that can be used to measure directly the secular energy transfer from fields to particles associated with collisionless damping of the turbulent fluctuations. Furthermore, this novel procedure yields information about the collisionless energy transfer as a function of particle velocity, providing vital new information that can help to identify the dominant collisionless mechanism governing the damping of the turbulent fluctuations. Kinetic plasma theory is used to devise the appropriate correlation to diagnose Landau damping, and the field-particle correlation technique is thoroughly illustrated using the simplified case of the Landau damping of Langmuir waves in a 1D-1V (one dimension in physical space and one dimension in velocity space) Vlasov-Poisson plasma. Generalizations necessary to apply the field-particle correlation technique to diagnose the collisionless damping of turbulent fluctuations in the solar wind are discussed, highlighting several caveats. This novel field-particle correlation technique is intended to be used as a primary analysis tool for measurements from current, upcoming and proposed spacecraft missions that are focused on the kinetic microphysics of weakly collisional heliospheric plasmas, including the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS), Solar Probe Plus, Solar Orbiter and Turbulence Heating ObserveR (THOR) missions.

  7. Correlations between nuclear data and integral slab experiments: the case of hafnium; Correlations entre donnees nucleaires et experiences integrales a plaques: le cas du hafnium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palau, J.M

    1999-07-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate how much integral slab experiments can both reduce discrepancies between experimental results and calculations, and improve the knowledge of hafnium isotopes neutronic parameters by an adapted sensitivity and uncertainty method. A statistical approach, based on the generalized least squares method and perturbation theory, has been incorporated into our calculation system in order to deduce microscopic cross-section adjustments from observed integral measurements on this particular 'mock-up' reactor.In this study it has been established that the correlations between integral parameters and hafnium capture cross-sections enable specific variations in the region of resolved resonances at the level of multigroup and punctual cross-sections recommended data (JEF-2.2 evaluation) to be highlighted. The use of determinist methods together with Monte Carlo- type simulations enabled a depth analysis of the modelling approximations to be carried out. Furthermore, the sensitivity coefficient validation technique employed leads to a reliable assessment of the quality of the new basic nuclear data. In this instance, the adjustments proposed for certain isotope {sup 177}Hf resonance parameters reduce, after error propagation, by 3 to 5 per cent the difference between experimental results and calculations related to this absorbent's efficiency. Beyond this particular application, the qualification methodology integrated in our calculation system should enable other basic sizing parameters to be treated (chemical / geometric data or other unexplored nuclear data) to make technological requirements less stringent. (author)

  8. Correlations between nuclear data and integral slab experiments: the case of hafnium; Correlations entre donnees nucleaires et experiences integrales a plaques: le cas du hafnium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palau, J M

    1999-07-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate how much integral slab experiments can both reduce discrepancies between experimental results and calculations, and improve the knowledge of hafnium isotopes neutronic parameters by an adapted sensitivity and uncertainty method. A statistical approach, based on the generalized least squares method and perturbation theory, has been incorporated into our calculation system in order to deduce microscopic cross-section adjustments from observed integral measurements on this particular 'mock-up' reactor.In this study it has been established that the correlations between integral parameters and hafnium capture cross-sections enable specific variations in the region of resolved resonances at the level of multigroup and punctual cross-sections recommended data (JEF-2.2 evaluation) to be highlighted. The use of determinist methods together with Monte Carlo- type simulations enabled a depth analysis of the modelling approximations to be carried out. Furthermore, the sensitivity coefficient validation technique employed leads to a reliable assessment of the quality of the new basic nuclear data. In this instance, the adjustments proposed for certain isotope {sup 177}Hf resonance parameters reduce, after error propagation, by 3 to 5 per cent the difference between experimental results and calculations related to this absorbent's efficiency. Beyond this particular application, the qualification methodology integrated in our calculation system should enable other basic sizing parameters to be treated (chemical / geometric data or other unexplored nuclear data) to make technological requirements less stringent. (author)

  9. Correlations between nuclear data and results of integral slab experiments. Case of hafnium; Correlations entre donnees nucleaires et experiences integrales a plaques: le cas du hafnium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palau, J M

    1997-10-22

    The aim of this thesis was to evaluate how much integral slab experiments can both reduce discrepancies between experimental results and calculations, and improve the knowledge of hafnium isotopes neutronic parameters by an adapted sensitivity and uncertainty method. A statistical approach, based on the generalized least squares method and perturbation theory, has been incorporated into our calculation system in order to deduce microscopic cross-section adjustments from observed integral measurements on this particular `mock-up` reactor. In this study it has been established that the correlations between integral parameters and hafnium capture cross-sections enable specific variations in the region of resolved resonances at the level of multigroup and punctual cross-sections recommended data (JEF-2.2 evaluation) to be highlighted. The use of determinist methods (APOLLO2 code) together with Monte Carlo- type simulations (TRIPOLI4 code) enabled a depth analysis of the modelling approximations to be carried out. Furthermore, the sensitivity coefficient validation technique employed leads to a reliable assessment of the quality of the new basic nuclear data. In this instance, the adjustments proposed for certain isotope {sup 177}Hf resonance parameters reduce, after error propagation, by 3 to 5 per cent the difference between experimental results and calculations related to this absorbent`s efficiency. Beyond this particular application, the qualification methodology integrated in our calculation system should enable other basic sizing parameters to be treated (chemical / geometric data or other unexplored nuclear data) to make technological requirements less stringent. (author) 128 refs.

  10. Inhomogeneity induced and appropriately parameterized semilocal exchange and correlation energy functionals in two-dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Abhilash; Jana, Subrata; Samal, Prasanjit

    2018-04-01

    The construction of meta generalized gradient approximations based on the density matrix expansion (DME) is considered as one of the most accurate techniques to design semilocal exchange energy functionals in two-dimensional density functional formalism. The exchange holes modeled using DME possess unique features that make it a superior entity. Parameterized semilocal exchange energy functionals based on the DME are proposed. The use of different forms of the momentum and flexible parameters is to subsume the non-uniform effects of the density in the newly constructed semilocal functionals. In addition to the exchange functionals, a suitable correlation functional is also constructed by working upon the local correlation functional developed for 2D homogeneous electron gas. The non-local effects are induced into the correlation functional by a parametric form of one of the newly constructed exchange energy functionals. The proposed functionals are applied to the parabolic quantum dots with a varying number of confined electrons and the confinement strength. The results obtained with the aforementioned functionals are quite satisfactory, which indicates why these are suitable for two-dimensional quantum systems.

  11. Low-energy positron-argon collisions by using parameter-free positron correlation polarization potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, A.

    1990-01-01

    We report differential, integral, and momentum-transfer cross sections and the scattering length (A 0 ) for positron (e + )-argon scattering at low energies below the positronium formation threshold. An optical-potential approach is employed in which the repulsive Coulombic interaction is calculated exactly at the Hartree-Fock level and the attractive polarization and correlation effects are included approximately via a parameter-free positron correlation polarization (PCP) potential recently proposed by us. The PCP model is based on the correlation energy var-epsilon corr of one positron in a homogeneous electron gas; in the outside region, the var-epsilon corr is joined smoothly with the correct asymptotic form of the polarization interaction (-α 0 /2r 4 , where α 0 is the target polarizability) where they cross each other for the first time. The total optical potential of the e + -argon system is treated exactly in a partial-wave analysis to extract the scattering parameters. It is found that the PCP potential gives much better qualitative results, particularly for the differential cross sections and the scattering length, than the corresponding results obtained from an electron polarization potential used as such for the positron case. We also discuss the ''critical'' points (representing the minima in the differential scattering) in the low-energy e + -Ar scattering. The present results involve no fitting procedure

  12. Reaction mechanism and nuclear correlations study by low energy pion double charge exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinfeld, Z.

    1993-06-01

    In pion double-charge-exchange (DCX) reactions, a positive (negative) pion is incident on a nucleus and a negative (positive) pion emerges. These reactions are of fundamental interest since the process must involve at least two nucleons in order to conserve charge. Although two nucleon processes are present in many reactions they are usually masked by the dominant single nucleon processes. DCX is unique in that respect since it is a two nucleon process in lowest order and thus may be sensitive to two-nucleon correlations. Measurements of low energy pion double-charge-exchange reactions to the double-isobaric-analog-state (DIAS) and ground-state (GS) of the residual nucleus provide new means for studying nucleon-nucleon correlations in nuclei. At low energies (T π 7/2 shell at energies ranging from 25 to 65 MeV. Cross sections were measured on 42,44,48 Ca, 46,50 Ti and 54 Fe. The calcium isotopes make a good set of nuclei on which to study the effects of correlations in DCX reactions

  13. Fisher matrix forecast on cosmological parameters from the dark energy survey 2-point angular correlation function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobreira, F.; Rosenfeld, R. [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (IFT/UNESP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Inst. Fisica Teorica; Simoni, F. de; Costa, L.A.N. da; Gaia, M.A.G.; Ramos, B.; Ogando, R.; Makler, M. [Laboratorio Interinstitucional de e-Astronomia (LIneA), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Full text: We study the cosmological constraints expected for the upcoming project Dark Energy Survey (DES) with the full functional form of the 2-point angular correlation function. The angular correlation function model applied in this work includes the effects of linear redshift-space distortion, photometric redshift errors (assumed to be Gaussian) and non-linearities prevenient from gravitational infall. The Fisher information matrix is constructed with the full covariance matrix, which takes the correlation between nearby redshift shells in a proper manner. The survey was sliced into 20 redshift shells in the range 0:4 {<=} z {<=} 1:40 with a variable angular scale in order to search only the scale around the signal from the baryon acoustic oscillation, therefore well within the validity of the non-linear model employed. We found that under those assumptions and with a flat {Lambda}CDM WMAP7 fiducial model, the DES will be able to constrain the dark energy equation of state parameter w with a precision of {approx} 20% and the cold dark matter with {approx} 11% when marginalizing over the other 25 parameters (bias is treated as a free parameter for each shell). When applying WMAP7 priors on {Omega}{sub baryon}, {Omega} c{sub dm}, n{sub s}, and HST priors on the Hubble parameter, w is constrained with {approx} 9% precision. This shows that the full shape of the angular correlation function with DES data will be a powerful probe to constrain cosmological parameters. (author)

  14. Energy and polarization of the telluric field in correlation with seismic activity in Greece

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargemezis, G.; Tsokas, G. N. [Geophysical Laboratory of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki (Greece); Zlotnicki, J. [Observatoire de Physique du Globe de Clermont-Ferrand, Clermont-Ferrand (France)

    2001-04-01

    Many attempts have been made to disclose anomalous changes of the electromagnetic field in relation with tectonic earthquakes. It was tentatively developed a new approach based on the energy and polarity of the electric field, and apply this method to the seismicity in Greece. The study of the parameters of the horizontal electric field is realized in a time interval of five years. The data allows the study of long-term variations of the field. Further, it was examined the possible relation of the geoelectric activity with long distance seismicity (up to 500 km). The energy of the electric signal was estimated and correlated with the logarithm of the seismic moment (M{sub 0}). The values of the seismic moment estimated for each earthquake were summed for daily intervals, and the logarithm of the sum was computed. The same process was applied to the energy of the geoelectric field. Then, a correlation was attempted between the energy of the geoelectric field and the seismic moment referring to daily intervals. In two cases, changes in the energy of the horizontal geoelectric field were observed before the burst of the seismic activity. The energy of the telluric field increased several months before the burst of seismic activity and recovered right after the occurrence of the mainshocks. The hodograms of the horizontal geoelectric field show polarization changes regardless of the magnetic field. This is possibly attributed to the process of generation of electric currents before major earthquakes. Due to high and continuous regional seismicity in Greece, it was impossible to attribute the response of the polarization to the activation of specific seismic areas. It seems that the long-term energy variations of the horizontal geoelectric field as well as the polarization could be used in tandem with other possible precursors in order to contribute to earthquake prediction studies.

  15. Benchmark calculations with correlated molecular wave functions. VII. Binding energy and structure of the HF dimer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, K.A.; Dunning, T.H. Jr.

    1995-01-01

    The hydrogen bond energy and geometry of the HF dimer have been investigated using the series of correlation consistent basis sets from aug-cc-pVDZ to aug-cc-pVQZ and several theoretical methods including Moller--Plesset perturbation and coupled cluster theories. Estimates of the complete basis set (CBS) limit have been derived for the binding energy of (HF) 2 at each level of theory by utilizing the regular convergence characteristics of the correlation consistent basis sets. CBS limit hydrogen bond energies of 3.72, 4.53, 4.55, and 4.60 kcal/mol are estimated at the SCF, MP2, MP4, and CCSD(T) levels of theory, respectively. CBS limits for the intermolecular F--F distance are estimated to be 2.82, 2.74, 2.73, and 2.73 A, respectively, for the same correlation methods. The effects of basis set superposition error (BSSE) on both the binding energies and structures have also been investigated for each basis set using the standard function counterpoise (CP) method. While BSSE has a negligible effect on the intramolecular geometries, the CP-corrected F--F distance and binding energy differ significantly from the uncorrected values for the aug-cc-pVDZ basis set; these differences decrease regularly with increasing basis set size, yielding the same limits in the CBS limit. Best estimates for the equilibrium properties of the HF dimer from CCSD(T) calculations are D e =4.60 kcal/mol, R FF =2.73 A, r 1 =0.922 A, r 2 =0.920 A, Θ 1 =7 degree, and Θ 2 =111 degree

  16. Vacancy formation energies in close-packed crystals correlated with melting temperature via thermodynamics and liquid structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rashid, R.I.M.A.; March, N.H.

    1988-08-01

    In earlier work, the vacancy formation energy E v in close-packed crystals, in units of the thermal energy k B T m at the melting temperature T m , has been connected with compressibility and specific heats, plus terms dependent on the liquid structure at T m . Here, this connection has been examined quantitatively for (a) the insulating condensed rare gases Ne, Ar and Kr, and (b) a variety of close-packed metals. For case (a), E v /k B T m can be calculated directly from thermodynamic data to obtain agreement with experiment for Ar and Kr, though not for Ne. A 'residual' contribution is estimated for Ar and Kr from diffraction and computer experiments on the density dependence of the liquid pair correlation function and is shown to be very small. Agreement is less impressive for case (b) for the eight close-packed metals for which all data required is known, the thermodynamic formula giving an average value E v /k B T m =7.8+-1.1 whereas experiment yields 9.4+-1.8. However, for the body-centred cubic alkalis the thermodynamic average value of 4.5+-0.5 is much lower than the experimental value 11.5+-2.0 consistent with the known role of ionic relaxation round the vacancy in such open structures. (author). 16 refs, 2 tabs

  17. Multimicroprocessor system for high-energy physics experiment applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piska, K.; Falkenberg, W.; Glasneck, C.P.; Pflugbeil, W.

    1982-01-01

    An autonomous modular multicomputer system based on the INTEL 8080 for program development and for application to the high-energy physics experiment 'RISK' is presented. The associated microcomputers (a three-processor configuration is realized) with uniform software systems can perform, in parallel, the interactively-controlled processing and monitoring of data accessible in the common memory block coupled to the processors via the direct shared bus. Data are acquired into the common memory buffer by the main processor, which is linked by the CAMAC interface with the experimental apparatus and optionally with a large-size computer. One microcomputer can be connected with the magnetic tape unit used for data recording. (orig.)

  18. Deep geothermal energy: the Soultz-sous-Forets experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genter, A.; Guenot, N.; Graff, J.J.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the mining exploitation project of the geothermal heat at Soultz-sous-Forets, located 50 km NE of Strasbourg (Bas Rhin, France). A geothermal power plant, inaugurated mid-2008, will commercialize its own power generation soon. This power plant is owned by a consortium of French-German industrialists through the European economical interest group for the mining exploitation of heat. The paper presents the geological characteristics of the hot dry rock geothermal reservoir, the deep geothermal wells, the hydraulic stimulation of the reservoir rock, the surface equipments of the power plants and the production pumps, the activities of the site in 2008 and 2009 and the perspectives of development of this energy source in France in the light of the Soultz-sous-Forets site experience. (J.S.)

  19. Atlas Pulsed Power Facility for High Energy Density Physics Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, R.B.; Ballard, E.O.; Barr, G.W.; Bowman, D.W.; Chochrane, J.C.; Davis, H.A.; Elizondo, J.M.; Gribble, R.F.; Griego, J.R.; Hicks, R.D.; Hinckley, W.B.; Hosack, K.W.; Nielsen, K.E.; Parker, J.V.; Parsons, M.O.; Rickets, R.L.; Salazar, H.R.; Sanchez, P.G.; Scudder, D.W.; Shapiro, C.; Thompson, M.C.; Trainor, R.J.; Valdez, G.A.; Vigil, B.N.; Watt, R.G.; Wysock, F.J.

    1999-01-01

    The Atlas facility, now under construction at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), will provide a unique capability for performing high-energy-density experiments in support of weapon-physics and basic-research programs. It is intended to be an international user facility, providing opportunities for researchers from national laboratories and academic institutions around the world. Emphasizing institutions around the world. Emphasizing hydrodynamic experiments, Atlas will provide the capability for achieving steady shock pressures exceeding 10-Mbar in a volume of several cubic centimeters. In addition, the kinetic energy associated with solid liner implosion velocities exceeding 12 km/s is sufficient to drive dense, hydrodynamic targets into the ionized regime, permitting the study of complex issues associated with strongly-coupled plasmas. The primary element of Atlas is a 23-MJ capacitor bank, comprised of 96 separate Marx generators housed in 12 separate oil-filled tanks, surrounding a central target chamber. Each tank will house two, independently-removable maintenance units, with each maintenance unit consisting of four Marx modules. Each Marx module has four capacitors that can each be charged to a maximum of 60 kilovolts. When railgap switches are triggered, the marx modules erect to a maximum of 240 kV. The parallel discharge of these 96 Marx modules will deliver a 30-MA current pulse with a 4-5-micros risetime to a cylindrical, imploding liner via 24 vertical, tri-plate, oil-insulated transmission lines. An experimental program for testing and certifying all Marx and transmission line components has been completed. A complete maintenance module and its associated transmission line (the First Article) are now under construction and testing. The current Atlas schedule calls for construction of the machine to be complete by August, 2000. Acceptance testing is scheduled to begin in November, 2000, leading to initial operations in January, 2001

  20. Retrospective North American CFL Experience Curve Analysis and Correlation to Deployment Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Sarah J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Wei, Max [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sohn, Michael D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Retrospective experience curves are a useful tool for understanding historic technology development, and can contribute to investment program analysis and future cost estimation efforts. This work documents our development of an analysis approach for deriving retrospective experience curves with a variable learning rate, and its application to develop an experience curve for compact fluorescent lamps for the global and North American markets over the years 1990-2007. Uncertainties and assumptions involved in interpreting data for our experience curve development are discussed, including the processing and transformation of empirical data, the selection of system boundaries, and the identification of historical changes in the learning rate over the course of 15 years. In the results that follow, we find that that the learning rate has changed at least once from 1990-2007. We also explore if, and to what degree, public deployment programs may have contributed to an increased technology learning rate in North America. We observe correlations between the changes in the learning rate and the initiation of new policies, abrupt technological advances, including improvements to ballast technology, and economic and political events such as trade tariffs and electricity prices. Finally, we discuss how the findings of this work (1) support the use of segmented experience curves for retrospective and prospective analysis and (2) may imply that investments in technological research and development have contributed to a change in market adoption and penetration.

  1. Nuclear energy and public opinion: an analysis of international experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Jair A. Marques de; Spitalnik, Jorge

    1996-01-01

    Nuclear power occupies nowadays the third place among the different sources of energy in the world (17%), after coal (40%) and hydropower (18%). In the more developed countries of OECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development), nuclear power already represents the second most utilized source of energy (coal; 40%, nuclear: 24%, hydro: 17%). It has been frequently stated that inadequate public information constitutes one of the main hindrances for broad use worldwide of nuclear power. However, in those countries where nuclear power has been more successful their well informed populations are generally in favor of its utilization. In countries like France, Japan, Republic of Korea and the U.S., big users of nuclear power, public opinion has been either in favor or has evolved favorably to the nuclear option. The experience in this field varies from country to country, depending mainly on their cultural and socio-political traditions. This report summarizes the situation in various countries as background information for possible adaptation to the conditions in Brazil. (author)

  2. Signature for g bosons from medium energy proton scattering experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuyucak, S.

    1993-01-01

    We apply the recently developed algebraic (1/N expansion) scattering formalism to medium energy proton scattering from 154 Sm and 176 Yb. The nuclear structure effects in this formalism are described by the interacting boson model generalized to arbitrary interactions and types of bosons i.e. s,d,g, etc. We find that, in the sd boson model, a consistent description of cross sections is possible only for the 0 + and 2 + states. The failure of the model with regard to the 4 + states indicates that the effective hexadecapole operator used in the sd model is inadequate. In contrast, the data for scattering to the 0 + , 2 + and 4 + states could be consistently described in the sdg boson model. The spectroscopic data for the low-lying levels usually can not distinguish between the sd and sdg models due to renormalization of parameters, and one has to look at high spin or energy data for evidence of g bosons. The inelastic proton scattering experiments, on the other hand, directly probe the wave functions, and hence could provide a signature for g bosons even in the ground band states

  3. Beam Energy Dependence of the Third Harmonic of Azimuthal Correlations in Au +Au Collisions at RHIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Attri, A.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, X.; Bairathi, V.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Bouchet, J.; Brandenburg, J. D.; Brandin, A. V.; Bunzarov, I.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Chakaberia, I.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chatterjee, A.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, X.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Christie, W.; Contin, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, S.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Esha, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Federic, P.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, Z.; Filip, P.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Fulek, L.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, S.; Gupta, A.; Guryn, W.; Hamad, A. I.; Hamed, A.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; He, L.; Heppelmann, S.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Horvat, S.; Huang, T.; Huang, X.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Jentsch, A.; Jia, J.; Jiang, K.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikoła, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Kochenda, L.; Koetke, D. D.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kumar, L.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Li, X.; Li, C.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, W.; Lin, T.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, R.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Ma, L.; Magdy, N.; Majka, R.; Manion, A.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; McKinzie, S.; Meehan, K.; Mei, J. C.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mishra, D.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Niida, T.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Okorokov, V. A.; Olvitt, D.; Page, B. S.; Pak, R.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Pile, P.; Pluta, J.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Posik, M.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, S.; Raniwala, R.; Ray, R. L.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, A.; Sharma, B.; Sharma, M. K.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, Z.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Sikora, R.; Simko, M.; Singha, S.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Smirnov, D.; Solyst, W.; Song, L.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stepanov, M.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Summa, B.; Sun, Z.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Tang, Z.; Tang, A. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Tawfik, A.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Todoroki, T.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Tripathy, S. K.; Tsai, O. D.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Upsal, I.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Varma, R.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, H.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Wen, L.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y.; Xiao, Z. G.; Xie, W.; Xie, G.; Xin, K.; Xu, Y. F.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, N.; Xu, H.; Xu, Z.; Xu, J.; Yang, S.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Yang, C.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Q.; Ye, Z.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhu, X.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.; STAR Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    We present results from a harmonic decomposition of two-particle azimuthal correlations measured with the STAR detector in Au +Au collisions for energies ranging from √{sN N }=7.7 to 200 GeV. The third harmonic v32{2 }=⟨cos 3 (ϕ1-ϕ2)⟩ , where ϕ1-ϕ2 is the angular difference in azimuth, is studied as a function of the pseudorapidity difference between particle pairs Δ η =η1-η2 . Nonzero v32{2 } is directly related to the previously observed large-Δ η narrow-Δ ϕ ridge correlations and has been shown in models to be sensitive to the existence of a low viscosity quark gluon plasma phase. For sufficiently central collisions, v32{2 } persist down to an energy of 7.7 GeV, suggesting that quark gluon plasma may be created even in these low energy collisions. In peripheral collisions at these low energies, however, v32{2 } is consistent with zero. When scaled by the pseudorapidity density of charged-particle multiplicity per participating nucleon pair, v32{2 } for central collisions shows a minimum near √{sN N }=20 GeV .

  4. Foreign Direct Investment and Energy Supply in the Middle East and North Africa: A Correlational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elghali, Siddig

    Middle East and North Africa countries have been criticized for failing to utilize foreign direct investment energy resources efficiently. The changing of energy resources environment of the past decades with its growing emphasis on the importance of imminent energy supply challenges require strategists to consider different types of energy resources investment to improve energy supply. One type of energy investment will show effectiveness and efficiency in utilizing foreign direct investment in exposing RE, fossil fuels, natural gas, and reducing CO2 emissions. The purpose of this quantitative correlational study was to utilize foreign direct investment to predict total primary energy supply in the Middle East and North Africa region between 1971 and 2013. The study was conducted using a sample size of 43 years of energy supply resources and foreign direct investment from 1971 to 2013, which includes all of the years for which FDI is available. RE potential may equip Middle East and North Africa countries with sustainable and clean electricity for centuries to come, as non-renewable energy resources may not meet the demands globally and domestically or environmentally. As demands for fossil fuels grow, carbon emissions will increase. RE may be a better option of CO 2 emissions sequestration and will increase electricity to rural areas without government subsidies and complex decision-making policies. RE infrastructure will reduce water desalinization costs, cooling systems, and be useful in heating. Establishing concentrated solar power may be useful for the region cooperation, negotiations, and integration to share this energy. The alternative sought to fossil fuels was nuclear power. However, nuclear power depends on depleting, non-renewable uranium resources. The cost of uranium will increase if widely used and the presence of a nuclear plant in an unstable region is unsafe. Thus, renewable energy as a long-term option is efficient. A nonlinear regression

  5. Task A, High energy physics program experiment and theory: Task B, High energy physics program numerical simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses progress in experimental and theoretical High Energy Physics at Florida State University. Fixed target experiments, collider experiments, computing, networking, VAX upgrade, SSC preparation, detector development, and particle theory are some of the areas covered

  6. Minijet thermalization and diffusion of transverse momentum correlation in high-energy heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pang Longgang; Wang Qun; Wang Xinnian; Xu Rong

    2010-01-01

    Transverse momentum correlations in the azimuthal angle of hadrons produced owing to minijets are first studied within the HIJING Monte Carlo model in high-energy heavy-ion collisions. Quenching of minijets during thermalization is shown to lead to significant diffusion (broadening) of the correlation. Evolution of the transverse momentum density fluctuation that gives rise to this correlation in azimuthal angle in the later stage of heavy-ion collisions is further investigated within a linearized diffusion-like equation and is shown to be determined by the shear viscosity of the evolving dense matter. This diffusion equation for the transverse momentum fluctuation is solved with initial values given by HIJING and together with the hydrodynamic equation for the bulk medium. The final transverse momentum correlation in azimuthal angle is calculated along the freeze-out hypersurface and is found to be further diffused for higher values of the shear viscosity to entropy density ratio, η/s∼0.2-0.4. Therefore the final transverse momentum correlation in azimuthal angle can be used to study the thermalization of minijets in the early stage of heavy-ion collisions and the viscous effect in the hydrodynamic evolution of strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma.

  7. Minimum Energy Decentralized Estimation in a Wireless Sensor Network with Correlated Sensor Noises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krasnopeev Alexey

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Consider the problem of estimating an unknown parameter by a sensor network with a fusion center (FC. Sensor observations are corrupted by additive noises with an arbitrary spatial correlation. Due to bandwidth and energy limitation, each sensor is only able to transmit a finite number of bits to the FC, while the latter must combine the received bits to estimate the unknown parameter. We require the decentralized estimator to have a mean-squared error ( that is within a constant factor to that of the best linear unbiased estimator (BLUE. We minimize the total sensor transmitted energy by selecting sensor quantization levels using the knowledge of noise covariance matrix while meeting the target requirement. Computer simulations show that our designs can achieve energy savings up to when compared to the uniform quantization strategy whereby each sensor generates the same number of bits, irrespective of the quality of its observation and the condition of its channel to the FC.

  8. PHELIX - Petawatt high-energy laser for heavy ion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Backe, H.; Bock, R.; Caird, J.

    1998-12-01

    A high-power laser facility will be installed at the GSI heavy-ion accelerator. It will deliver laser pulses up to one kilojoule (with an option of a later upgrade to several kJ) at a pulse length of 1 - 10 nanoseconds (high-energy mode). In a high-intensity mode, laser pulses with a power of one petawatt (10 15 Watt) will be generated by chirped pulse amplification at a pulse length of typically 500 femtoseconds. Details of the laser system as well as time schedule and costs are given in Section B. In combination with the heavy-ion beams available at GSI - which will be further improved in intensity by the presently on-going upgrade program - a large number of unique experiments will become possible by the high-power laser facility described in this report. As outlined in Section A, novel research opportunities are expected in a wide range of basic-research topics spanning from the study of ion-matter interaction, through challenging new experiments in atomic, nuclear, and astrophysics, into the virgin field of relativistic plasma physics. Foreseeable topics in applied science are the development of new sources for highly charged ions and of X-ray lasers, new concepts for laser-based particle acceleration and the research in the field of inertial confinement fusion. (orig.)

  9. Gaussian-2 theory: Use of higher level correlation methods, quadratic configuration interaction geometries, and second-order Moller--Plesset zero-point energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtiss, L.A.; Raghavachari, K.; Pople, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    The performance of Gaussian-2 theory is investigated when higher level theoretical methods are included for correlation effects, geometries, and zero-point energies. A higher level of correlation treatment is examined using Brueckner doubles [BD(T)] and coupled cluster [CCSD(T)] methods rather than quadratic configuration interaction [QCISD(T)]. The use of geometries optimized at the QCISD level rather than the second-order Moller--Plesset level (MP2) and the use of scaled MP2 zero-point energies rather than scaled Hartree--Fock (HF) zero-point energies have also been examined. The set of 125 energies used for validation of G2 theory [J. Chem. Phys. 94, 7221 (1991)] is used to test out these variations of G2 theory. Inclusion of higher levels of correlation treatment has little effect except in the cases of multiply-bonded systems. In these cases better agreement is obtained in some cases and poorer agreement in others so that there is no improvement in overall performance. The use of QCISD geometries yields significantly better agreement with experiment for several cases including the ionization potentials of CS and O 2 , electron affinity of CN, and dissociation energies of N 2 , O 2 , CN, and SO 2 . This leads to a slightly better agreement with experiment overall. The MP2 zero-point energies gives no overall improvement. These methods may be useful for specific systems

  10. The experiences of mastery of stand-by energy demand; Les experiences de MDE stand by

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schilken, P

    2001-07-01

    In the residential sector of the OECD countries, the electricity losses of domestic appliances in stand-by position represent 1.5% of the total electricity consumption. This study belongs to the SAVE project (pilot campaign of municipal utilities for an improved rational use of energy). Its aim is to observe the policies and experiments implemented by municipalities and municipal energy companies for the abatement of the electricity consumptions of stand-by origin. A working group consisting of the German Stadtwerke and some international partners have debated the possible actions and documents for an efficient information of the public. This document presents the brochures and local actions of this program. (J.S.)

  11. High-Energy Neutron Backgrounds for Underground Dark Matter Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yu [Syracuse Univ., NY (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Direct dark matter detection experiments usually have excellent capability to distinguish nuclear recoils, expected interactions with Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) dark matter, and electronic recoils, so that they can efficiently reject background events such as gamma-rays and charged particles. However, both WIMPs and neutrons can induce nuclear recoils. Neutrons are then the most crucial background for direct dark matter detection. It is important to understand and account for all sources of neutron backgrounds when claiming a discovery of dark matter detection or reporting limits on the WIMP-nucleon cross section. One type of neutron background that is not well understood is the cosmogenic neutrons from muons interacting with the underground cavern rock and materials surrounding a dark matter detector. The Neutron Multiplicity Meter (NMM) is a water Cherenkov detector capable of measuring the cosmogenic neutron flux at the Soudan Underground Laboratory, which has an overburden of 2090 meters water equivalent. The NMM consists of two 2.2-tonne gadolinium-doped water tanks situated atop a 20-tonne lead target. It detects a high-energy (>~ 50 MeV) neutron via moderation and capture of the multiple secondary neutrons released when the former interacts in the lead target. The multiplicity of secondary neutrons for the high-energy neutron provides a benchmark for comparison to the current Monte Carlo predictions. Combining with the Monte Carlo simulation, the muon-induced high-energy neutron flux above 50 MeV is measured to be (1.3 ± 0.2) ~ 10-9 cm-2s-1, in reasonable agreement with the model prediction. The measured multiplicity spectrum agrees well with that of Monte Carlo simulation for multiplicity below 10, but shows an excess of approximately a factor of three over Monte Carlo prediction for multiplicities ~ 10 - 20. In an effort to reduce neutron backgrounds for the dark matter experiment SuperCDMS SNO- LAB, an active neutron veto was developed

  12. Review of International Experience with Renewable Energy Obligation Support Mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiser, R.

    2005-06-01

    The main policy instruments currently used in the EU Member States to achieve the targets set for electricity produced from renewable energy sources are: (1) the quota obligation system; (2) the feed-in tariff system; and (3) the tendering system. The current study aims to review the experience gained with the quota obligation system. The report provides an overview of the regions where obligation systems have been implemented and contains a detailed evaluation of the performance of the obligation systems in the USA, the UK and in Sweden. The obligation systems in these countries have been evaluated based on the following criteria: Effectiveness; Market efficiency; Certainty for the renewable energy industry; Cost effectiveness; Stakeholder support for the obligation system; and Equity. The evaluation of international experiences with the obligation system gives rise to a mixed picture. Although an obligation in theory is effective and cost effective, it seems too early to conclude that the system delivers these promises in practice. On the one hand this is due to the limited period of implementation that makes it hard to distinguish between the direct effect of the system and some teething problems that will be solved in due time. On the other hand, the conclusion can be drawn that the obligation is a complex system, which will only function well if designed carefully. It does seem worthwhile, however, to continue monitoring the experiences with the obligation system abroad, because this will further reveal whether the system is indeed effective and cost effective in practice. In the longer term, e.g. beyond 2010, the introduction of an obligation system in the Netherlands could be considered. Finally, as the design of support schemes is being improved, it appears that the basic concepts of both the obligation system and the feed in system have been refined in such a way that the two systems are gradually converging. An important difference between the two systems

  13. Sequential backbone assignment based on dipolar amide-to-amide correlation experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang, ShengQi; Grohe, Kristof; Rovó, Petra; Vasa, Suresh Kumar; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Linser, Rasmus, E-mail: rali@nmr.mpibpc.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Department for NMR-Based Structural Biology (Germany)

    2015-07-15

    Proton detection in solid-state NMR has seen a tremendous increase in popularity in the last years. New experimental techniques allow to exploit protons as an additional source of information on structure, dynamics, and protein interactions with their surroundings. In addition, sensitivity is mostly improved and ambiguity in assignment experiments reduced. We show here that, in the solid state, sequential amide-to-amide correlations turn out to be an excellent, complementary way to exploit amide shifts for unambiguous backbone assignment. For a general assessment, we compare amide-to-amide experiments with the more common {sup 13}C-shift-based methods. Exploiting efficient CP magnetization transfers rather than less efficient INEPT periods, our results suggest that the approach is very feasible for solid-state NMR.

  14. Sequential backbone assignment based on dipolar amide-to-amide correlation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiang, ShengQi; Grohe, Kristof; Rovó, Petra; Vasa, Suresh Kumar; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Linser, Rasmus

    2015-01-01

    Proton detection in solid-state NMR has seen a tremendous increase in popularity in the last years. New experimental techniques allow to exploit protons as an additional source of information on structure, dynamics, and protein interactions with their surroundings. In addition, sensitivity is mostly improved and ambiguity in assignment experiments reduced. We show here that, in the solid state, sequential amide-to-amide correlations turn out to be an excellent, complementary way to exploit amide shifts for unambiguous backbone assignment. For a general assessment, we compare amide-to-amide experiments with the more common 13 C-shift-based methods. Exploiting efficient CP magnetization transfers rather than less efficient INEPT periods, our results suggest that the approach is very feasible for solid-state NMR

  15. THE PEAK ENERGY-DURATION CORRELATION AND POSSIBLE IMPLICATIONS ON GAMMA RAY BURST PROGENITOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heon-Young Chang

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the correlation between the peak energy and the burst duration using available long GRB data with known redshift, whose circumburst medium type has been suggested via afterglow light curve modeling. We find that the peak energy and the burst duration of the observed GRBs are correlated both in the observer frame and in the GRB rest frame. For our total sample we obtain, for instance, the Spearman rank-order correlation values sim 0.75 and sim 0.65 with the chance probabilities P=1.0 times 10^{-3} and P=6.0 times 10^{-3} in the observer frame and in the GRB rest frame, respectively. We note that taking the effects of the expanding universe into account reduces the value a bit. We further attempt to separate our GRB sample into the ``ISM'' GRBs and the ``WIND'' GRBs according to environment models inferred from the afterglow light curves and apply statistical tests, as one may expect that clues on the progenitor of GRBs can be deduced directly from prompt emission properties other than from the ambient environment surrounding GRBs. We find that two subsamples of GRBs show different correlation coefficients. That is, the Spearman rank-order correlation are sim 0.65 and sim 0.57 for the ``ISM'' GRBs and ``WIND'' GRBs, respectively, after taking the effects of the expanding universe into account. It is not yet, however, statistically very much significant that the GRBS in two types of circumburst media show statistically characteristic behaviors, from which one may conclude that all the long bursts are not originated from a single progenitor population. A larger size of data is required to increase the statistical significance.

  16. A retrospective analysis of compact fluorescent lamp experience curves and their correlations to deployment programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Sarah Josephine; Wei, Max; Sohn, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Experience curves are useful for understanding technology development and can aid in the design and analysis of market transformation programs. Here, we employ a novel approach to create experience curves, to examine both global and North American compact fluorescent lamp (CFL) data for the years 1990–2007. We move away from the prevailing method of fitting a single, constant, exponential curve to data and instead search for break points where changes in the learning rate may have occurred. Our analysis suggests a learning rate of approximately 21% for the period of 1990–1997, and 51% and 79% in global and North American datasets, respectively, after 1998. We use price data for this analysis; therefore our learning rates encompass developments beyond typical “learning by doing”, including supply chain impacts such as market competition. We examine correlations between North American learning rates and the initiation of new programs, abrupt technological advances, and economic and political events, and find an increased learning rate associated with design advancements and federal standards programs. Our findings support the use of segmented experience curves for retrospective and prospective technology analysis, and may imply that investments in technology programs have contributed to an increase of the CFL learning rate. - Highlights: • We develop a segmented regression technique to estimate historical CFL learning curves. • CFL experience curves do not have a constant learning rate. • CFLs exhibited a learning rate of approximately 21% from 1990 to 1997. • The CFL learning rate significantly increased after 1998. • Increased CFL learning rate is correlated to technology deployment programs.

  17. Correlation analysis of energy indicators for sustainable development using multivariate statistical techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carneiro, Alvaro Luiz Guimaraes; Santos, Francisco Carlos Barbosa dos

    2007-01-01

    Energy is an essential input for social development and economic growth. The production and use of energy cause environmental degradation at all levels, being local, regional and global such as, combustion of fossil fuels causing air pollution; hydropower often causes environmental damage due to the submergence of large areas of land; and global climate change associated with the increasing concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. As mentioned in chapter 9 of Agenda 21, the Energy is essential to economic and social development and improved quality of life. Much of the world's energy, however, is currently produced and consumed in ways that could not be sustained if technologies were remain constant and if overall quantities were to increase substantially. All energy sources will need to be used in ways that respect the atmosphere, human health, and the environment as a whole. The energy in the context of sustainable development needs a set of quantifiable parameters, called indicators, to measure and monitor important changes and significant progress towards the achievement of the objectives of sustainable development policies. The indicators are divided into four dimensions: social, economic, environmental and institutional. This paper shows a methodology of analysis using Multivariate Statistical Technique that provide the ability to analyse complex sets of data. The main goal of this study is to explore the correlation analysis among the indicators. The data used on this research work, is an excerpt of IBGE (Instituto Brasileiro de Geografia e Estatistica) data census. The core indicators used in this study follows The IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency) framework: Energy Indicators for Sustainable Development. (author)

  18. Energy production forecasting, experiences from Lillgrund. Lillgrund Pilot Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansson, Lasse; Schelander, Peter; Haakansson, Maans; Hansson, Johan (Vattenfall Vindkraft AB, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2010-01-15

    assumptions. Production forecasts are not used as a tool in the planning of the operation and maintenance within the wind farm. Maintenance planning is done with a much longer time horizon than the current production forecasts offer. For example, Vattenfall has to inform and coordinate with the owner of the local power network typically three weeks in advance before any maintenance that can cause significant loss of production. It's an inevitable fact that wind turbines must be stopped for maintenance with regular intervals in order to maintain secure and stable operations. However, it is in the power producers' interest to minimize these stops for maintenance work. And of even higher importance, minimize the loss of production by making sure the stops coincide with periods of expected low production. At the end it's always the current weather that determines if the maintenance can be carried out as planned. Maintenance involving boats is dependent on calm weather and thus is correlated with periods of low wind speed and low energy production. Due to the seasonal variations in the wind climate, the summer season offers the best opportunities for planned maintenance work in the wind park. A production stop of larger dignity where sometimes the complete park is set out of operations is always done during the summer season. An analysis of production data from the first year of operation shows that the loss of production due to scheduled stops was almost negligible. However, a six week, unplanned stop of a few turbines caused a loss in production of almost 1.5 GWh

  19. Correlation of microdosimetric measurements with relative biological effectiveness from clinical experience for two neutron therapy beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stinchcomb, T.G.; Kuchnir, F.T.; Myrianthopoulos, L.C.; Horton, J.L. Jr.; Roberts, W.K.

    1986-01-01

    Microdosimetric measurements were made for the neutron therapy beams at the University of Chicago and at the Cleveland Clinic with the same geometry and phantom material using the same tissue-equivalent spherical proportional counter and standard techniques. The energy deposition spectra (dose distributions in lineal energy) are compared for these beams and for their scattered components (direct beam blocked). The model of dual radiation action (DRA) of Kellerer and Rossi is employed to interpret these data in terms of biological effectiveness over this limited range of radiation qualities. The site-diameter parameter of the DRA theory is determined for the Cleveland beam by setting the biological effectiveness (relative to 60 Co gamma radiation) equal to the relative biological effectiveness value deduced from radiobiology experiments and clinical experience. The resulting value of this site-diameter parameter is then used to predict the biological effectiveness of the Chicago beam. The prediction agrees with the value deduced from radiobiology and clinical experience. The biological effectiveness of the scattered components of both beams is also estimated using the model

  20. Correlation, Breit and quantum electrodynamics effects on energy level and transition properties of W54+ ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, X.; Sun, R.; Dong, C.; Koike, F.; Kato, D.; Murakami, I.; Sakaue, H.A.

    2017-01-01

    The electron correlation effects and Breit interaction as well as Quantum Electro-Dynamics (QED) effects were expected to have important contribution to the energy level and transition properties of heavy highly charged ions. The study of W 54+ ion provide necessary reference data for the fusion plasma physics as tungsten was chosen to be used as the armour material of the divertor of the ITER project. The ground states [Ne]3s 2 3p 6 3d 2 and first excited states [Ne]3s 2 3p 5 3d 3 of W 54+ ion have been studied by using Multi-Configuration Dirac-Fock method with the implementation of Grasp2K package. A restricted active space method was employed to investigate the correlation contribution from different models. The Breit interaction and QED effects were taken into account in the relativistic configuration interaction calculation with the converged wavefunction. It is found that the correlation contribution from 3s and 3p orbital have important contribution to the energy level, transition wavelength and probability of the ground and the first excited state of W 54+ ion. (authors)

  1. Two-scale correlation and energy cascade in three-dimensional turbulent flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Y X; Schmitt, F G; Gagne, Y

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a high-order harmonic-free methodology, namely arbitrary-order Hilbert spectral analysis, to estimate the two-scale correlation (TSC). When applied to fully developed turbulent velocity, we find that the scale-dependent Hilbert energy satisfies a lognormal distribution on both the inertial and dissipation ranges. The maximum probability density function of the logarithm of the Hilbert energy obeys a power law with a scaling exponent γ ≃ 0.33 in the inertial range. For the measured TSC, we observe a logarithmic correlation law with an experimental exponent α ≃ 0.37 on both the inertial and dissipation ranges. The correlation itself is found to be self-similar with respect to the distance between the two considered scales and a central frequency ω c in the logarithm space. An empirical nonlinear and nonlocal triad-scale interaction formula is proposed to describe the observed TSC. This triadic interaction can be interpreted as experimental evidence of a small-scale nonlinear and nonlocal coupling inside the self-similarity of the Richardson–Kolmogorov phenomenological cascade picture. (paper)

  2. Experience of Early Childhood Caries May Positively Correlate with Psychomotor Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Chen-Yi; Liu, Yen-Chun; Shieh, Tien-Yu; Lin, Jia-Rong; Tseng, Yi-Chun; Teng, Andy Yen-Tung

    2015-01-01

    To examine the as yet unknown relationship between dental caries and the child's psychomotor development. A cross-sectional study was designed by screening the kindergartens from urban areas of two cities in southern Taiwan. Besides the personal, demographic and dietary information, the common measures for caries (dmft) and the amended comprehensive scales (CCDI) for psychomotor development were used to assess their relationship(s). A power analysis showed that 334 subjects would be required. One-way ANOVA vs multiple linear regression analysis were used to compare the differences of variables between gender, age and dmft scales, vs the relationship among all variables tested, respectively. A total of 433 children completed the study. The results demonstrated that there was a positive relationship between higher (i.e. dmft≥4 and 5) but not lower or extremely high caries experience and aspects of psychomotor development (i.e. personal-social and expressive language) in children aged 4 to 6 years. The present results are important for paediatric dentists, as they suggest a positive correlation between caries experience (dmft 3 to 6) and psychomotor development in pre-school children and that such a correlation may occur more significantly as an attribute of the most affected teeth (incisors and molars) during the critical stage of personal-social and expressive language development (speech-communication).

  3. On the relationship between convex bodies related to correlation experiments with dichotomic observables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avis, David [School of Computer Science, McGill University, 3480 University, Montreal, Quebec, H3A 2A7 (Canada); Imai, Hiroshi [Department of Computer Science, Graduate School of Information Science and Technology, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Ito, Tsuyoshi [Department of Computer Science, Graduate School of Information Science and Technology, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2006-09-08

    In this paper we explore further the connections between convex bodies related to quantum correlation experiments with dichotomic variables and related bodies studied in combinatorial optimization, especially cut polyhedra. Such a relationship was established in Avis et al (2005 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 38 10971-87) with respect to Bell inequalities. We show that several well-known bodies related to cut polyhedra are equivalent to bodies such as those defined by Tsirelson (1993 Hadronic J. Suppl. 8 329-45) to represent hidden deterministic behaviours, quantum behaviours and no-signalling behaviours. Among other things, our results allow a unique representation of these bodies, give a necessary condition for vertices of the no-signalling polytope, and give a method for bounding the quantum violation of Bell inequalities by means of a body that contains the set of quantum behaviours. Optimization over this latter body may be performed efficiently by semidefinite programming. In the second part of the paper we apply these results to the study of classical correlation functions. We provide a complete list of tight inequalities for the two party case with (m, n) dichotomic observables when m = 4, n = 4 and when min{l_brace}m, n{r_brace} {<=} 3, and give a new general family of correlation inequalities.

  4. The Depressive Experiences Questionnaire: validity and psychological correlates in a clinical sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, W T; McCranie, E W

    1990-01-01

    This study sought to compare the original and revised scoring systems of the Depressive Experiences Questionnaire (DEQ) and to assess the construct validity of the Dependent and Self-Critical subscales of the DEQ in a clinically depressed sample. Subjects were 103 depressed inpatients who completed the DEQ, the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), the Hopelessness Scale, the Automatic Thoughts Questionnaire (ATQ), the Rathus Assertiveness Schedule (RAS), and the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI). The original and revised scoring systems of the DEQ evidenced good concurrent validity for each factor scale, but the revised system did not sufficiently discriminate dependent and self-critical dimensions. Using the original scoring system, self-criticism was significantly and positively related to severity of depression, whereas dependency was not, particularly for males. Factor analysis of the DEQ scales and the other scales used in this study supported the dependent and self-critical dimensions. For men, the correlation of the DEQ with the MMPI scales indicated that self-criticism was associated with psychotic symptoms, hostility/conflict, and a distress/exaggerated response set, whereas dependency did not correlate significantly with any MMPI scales. Females, however, did not exhibit a differential pattern of correlations between either the Dependency or the Self-Criticism scales and the MMPI. These findings suggest possible gender differences in the clinical characteristics of male and female dependent and self-critical depressive subtypes.

  5. Transverse energy-energy correlations in next-to-leading order in {alpha}{sub s} at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Ahmed; Wang, Wei [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Barreiro, Fernando; Llorente, Javier [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid (Spain). Dept. de Fisica

    2012-05-15

    We compute the transverse energy-energy correlation (EEC) and its asymmetry (AEEC) in next-to-leading order (NLO) in {alpha}{sub s} in proton-proton collisions at the LHC with the center-of-mass energy E{sub c.m.}=7 TeV. We show that the transverse EEC and the AEEC distributions are insensitive to the QCD factorization- and the renormalization-scales, structure functions of the proton, and for a judicious choice of the jet-size, also the underlying minimum bias events. Hence they can be used to precisely test QCD in hadron colliders and determine the strong coupling {alpha}{sub s}. We illustrate these features by defining the hadron jets using the anti-k{sub T} jet algorithm and an event selection procedure employed in the analysis of jets at the LHC and show the {alpha}{sub s}(M{sub Z})-dependence of the transverse EEC and the AEEC in the anticipated range 0.11{<=} {alpha}{sub s}(M{sub Z}){<=}0.13.

  6. Enzymatic correlates of energy status in wild yellow perch inhabiting clean and contaminated environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, Charles; Campbell, Peter G C; Couture, Patrice

    2011-09-01

    Enzymes representing a variety of metabolic pathways were examined in yellow perch (Perca flavescens) collected from a metal-contaminated region (Rouyn-Noranda, Québec, Canada) to determine which were most closely related to fish condition factor, pyloric caeca weight, and visceral lipid accumulation, as well to seek a better understanding of the influence of metal contamination on the physiology and biometrics of perch. Compared to laboratory fish, wild perch were under important energy restrictions. The condition factor of wild fish was correlated with indicators of aerobic metabolism (citrate synthase, cytochrome C oxidase), protein anabolism (nucleoside diphosphokinase), and indicators of lipid accumulation (glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, visceral lipid index). Pyloric caeca weights were well correlated with indicators of protein anabolism, but only when both seasons were examined together, possibly indicating a lag in the response of enzymes to changes in diet. The addition of contaminant stress to existing energy restrictions led to changes in the relationships between enzymes and biometrics, reducing the predictive power of the models for perch in contaminated lakes. The present study broadens our knowledge of the impact of metal contamination on energy accumulation and tissue metabolic capacities in wild perch. Copyright © 2011 SETAC.

  7. Approximating the Shifted Hartree-Exchange-Correlation Potential in Direct Energy Kohn-Sham Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpe, Daniel J; Levy, Mel; Tozer, David J

    2018-02-13

    Levy and Zahariev [Phys. Rev. Lett. 113 113002 (2014)] have proposed a new approach for performing density functional theory calculations, termed direct energy Kohn-Sham (DEKS) theory. In this approach, the electronic energy equals the sum of orbital energies, obtained from Kohn-Sham-like orbital equations involving a shifted Hartree-exchange-correlation potential, which must be approximated. In the present study, density scaling homogeneity considerations are used to facilitate DEKS calculations on a series of atoms and molecules, leading to three nonlocal approximations to the shifted potential. The first two rely on preliminary Kohn-Sham calculations using a standard generalized gradient approximation (GGA) exchange-correlation functional and the results illustrate the benefit of describing the dominant Hartree component of the shift exactly. A uniform electron gas analysis is used to eliminate the need for these preliminary Kohn-Sham calculations, leading to a potential with an unconventional form that yields encouraging results, providing strong motivation for further research in DEKS theory.

  8. Large-Scale Cubic-Scaling Random Phase Approximation Correlation Energy Calculations Using a Gaussian Basis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Jan; Seewald, Patrick; Del Ben, Mauro; Hutter, Jürg

    2016-12-13

    We present an algorithm for computing the correlation energy in the random phase approximation (RPA) in a Gaussian basis requiring [Formula: see text] operations and [Formula: see text] memory. The method is based on the resolution of the identity (RI) with the overlap metric, a reformulation of RI-RPA in the Gaussian basis, imaginary time, and imaginary frequency integration techniques, and the use of sparse linear algebra. Additional memory reduction without extra computations can be achieved by an iterative scheme that overcomes the memory bottleneck of canonical RPA implementations. We report a massively parallel implementation that is the key for the application to large systems. Finally, cubic-scaling RPA is applied to a thousand water molecules using a correlation-consistent triple-ζ quality basis.

  9. Correlations among observables in the neutron-deuteron elastic scattering at low energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frederico, T.; Goldman, I.D.

    1984-01-01

    The 2 S amplitude of the n-d elastic scattering appears like function of the dublet ( 2 a) scattering length in the three nucleons calculations. The correlation of Kcotg 2 δ o with 2 a, with separable N-N potential calculations, is obtained and the result is independent of the N-N potential. The 2 δ o (n-d) values obtained with these lines, using 2 a=.65F (experimental value), agree with p-d data. 2 S and 4 S scattering amplitude and tritium energy (E T ) calculations are performed with the zero-range model and an alternative deduction is proposed. These results for the E T and Kcotg 2 δ o correlation with 2 a show the limitations of this model. (L.C.) [pt

  10. Mirroring the self: testing neurophysiological correlates of disturbed self-experience in schizophrenia spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sestito, Mariateresa; Raballo, Andrea; Umiltà, Maria Alessandra; Leuci, Emanuela; Tonna, Matteo; Fortunati, Renata; De Paola, Giancarlo; Amore, Mario; Maggini, Carlo; Gallese, Vittorio

    2015-01-01

    Self-disorders (SDs) have been described as a core schizophrenia spectrum vulnerability phenotype, both in classic and contemporary psychopathological literature. However, such a core phenotype has not yet been investigated adopting a trans-domain approach that combines the phenomenological and the neurophysiological levels of analysis. The aim of this study is to investigate the relation between SDs and subtle, schizophrenia-specific impairments of emotional resonance that are supposed to reflect abnormalities in the mirror neurons mechanism. Specifically, we tested whether electromyographic response to emotional stimuli (i.e. a proxy for subtle changes in facial mimicry and related motor resonance mechanisms) would predict the occurrence of anomalous subjective experiences (i.e. SDs). Eighteen schizophrenia spectrum (SzSp) patients underwent a comprehensive psychopathological examination and were contextually tested with a multimodal paradigm, recording facial electromyographic activity of muscles in response to positive and negative emotional stimuli. Experiential anomalies were explored with the Bonn Scale for the Assessment of Basic Symptoms (BSABS) and then condensed into rational subscales mapping SzSp anomalous self-experiences. SzSp patients showed an imbalance in emotional motor resonance with a selective bias toward negative stimuli, as well as a multisensory integration impairment. Multiple regression analysis showed that electromyographic facial reactions in response to negative stimuli presented in auditory modality specifically and strongly correlated with SD subscore. The study confirms the potential of SDs as target phenotype for neurobiological research and encourages research into disturbed motor/emotional resonance as possible body-level correlate of disturbed subjective experiences in SzSp.

  11. Studying multifragmentation dynamics at intermediate energies using two-fragment correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sangster, T.C.; Britt, H.C.; Namboodiri, M.N.

    1993-01-01

    One of the most challenging topics in Nuclear Physics is the multifragmentation at moderate excitation energies in large nuclear systems. Although the idea that multifragmentation is analogous to a liquid-gas like phase transition is not new, it has only been recently that highly exclusive experimental measurements have been coupled with sophisticated theoretical models like QMD and BUU/VUU to explore reaction dynamics and the process of fragment formation. Indeed, much of what is known about multifragmentation has resulted from the study of complex correlations present in both the experimental data and theoretical calculations. One of the most crucial questions in the ongoing debate concerning the liquid-gas analogy is the differentiation between simultaneous and sequential fragment emission. Clearly, the phase transition analogy breaks down if fragments are emitted sequentially as in an evaporative process. There have been a number of two-fragment correlation results published recently (including those presented in this paper) which attempt to put limits on the emission timescale using three-body Coulomb trajectory calculations with explicit emission times for sequential decays from a fixed source density. These results have been generally consistent and indicate that intermediate mass fragment (IMF) emission is nearly simultaneous in medium energy heavy ion collisions. Only very recently have calculations been performed which approach this question from the other extreme: simultaneous emission from a variable density source. When considered together, these results argue favorably for a simultaneous multifragmentation. In this paper the authors present comprehensive results on two-fragment correlations for heavy systems at intermediate energies

  12. The LPCTrap experiment: measurement of the {beta}-{nu} angular correlation in {sup 6}He{sup +} decay using a transparent Paul trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velten, Ph., E-mail: velten@lpccaen.in2p3.fr; Ban, G.; Durand, D.; Flechard, X.; Lienard, E.; Mauger, F.; Mery, A.; Naviliat-Cuncic, O.; Rodriguez, D.; Thomas, J. C. [Universite de Caen, LPC Caen, ENSICAEN (France)

    2011-07-15

    The LPCTrap experiment is devoted to the precise measurement of the {beta}-{nu} angular correlation parameter, a{sub {beta}{nu}}, in the pure Gamow-Teller decay of {sup 6}He{sup +}. This experiment is motivated by the search of the presence of tensor type contributions in the weak interaction. The radioactive source is confined in a transparent Paul trap installed at LIRAT, the low energy beam line of the SPIRAL facility. The {beta}-{nu} correlation is studied by measuring the time of flight of the recoil ions detected in coincidence with the {beta} particles. During the last experiment, a total of 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} coincidence events have been recorded which would enable to determine the coefficient with a statistical uncertainty of 0.5%. The status of the analysis is presented in this contribution.

  13. Coulomb correlations in electron and positron impact ionization of hydrogen at intermediate and higher energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jetzke, S.; Faisal, F.H.M.

    1992-01-01

    Investigating the relation between the asymptotic condition and the dynamic Coulomb correlation for single and multiple ionization we discuss a complete set of spatially separable N-electrons final-state wavefunctions, satisfying multiple ionization boundary conditions. We apply these results to electron and positron impact ionization of atomic hydrogen in the energy range 54.4 and 250 eV on the basis of a parameter-free model formulated within the scope of the multiple scattering approach. A comparison between our results and available experimental data and alternative theoretical calculations are made and discussed. (Author)

  14. Accurate correlation energies in one-dimensional systems from small system-adapted basis functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Thomas E.; Burke, Kieron; White, Steven R.

    2018-02-01

    We propose a general method for constructing system-dependent basis functions for correlated quantum calculations. Our construction combines features from several traditional approaches: plane waves, localized basis functions, and wavelets. In a one-dimensional mimic of Coulomb systems, it requires only 2-3 basis functions per electron to achieve high accuracy, and reproduces the natural orbitals. We illustrate its effectiveness for molecular energy curves and chains of many one-dimensional atoms. We discuss the promise and challenges for realistic quantum chemical calculations.

  15. Transverse momentum at work in high-energy scattering experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signori, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    I will review some aspects of the definition and the phenomenology of Transverse-Momentum-Dependent distributions (TMDs) which are potentially interesting for the physics program at several current and future experimental facilities. First of all, I will review the definition of quark, gluon and Wilson loop TMDs based on gauge invariant hadronic matrix elements. Looking at the phenomenology of quarks, I will address the flavor dependence of the intrinsic transverse momentum in unpolarized TMDs, focusing on its extraction from Semi-Inclusive Deep-Inelastic Scattering. I will also present an estimate of its impact on the transverse momentum spectrum of W and Z bosons produced in unpolarized hadronic collisions and on the determination of the W boson mass. Moreover, the combined effect of the flavor dependence and the evolution of TMDs with the energy scale will be discussed for electron-positron annihilation. Concerning gluons, I will present from an effective theory point of view the TMD factorization theorem for the transverse momentum spectrum of pseudoscalar quarkonium produced in hadronic collisions. Relying on this, I will discuss the possibility of extracting precise information on (un)polarized gluon TMDs at a future Fixed Target Experiment at the LHC (AFTER@LHC).

  16. Optimal trade-offs between energy efficiency improvements and additional renewable energy supply: A review of international experiences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baldini, Mattia; Klinge Jacobsen, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    the improvements made in the energy saving field. Indeed, little attention has been paid to implement energy efficiency measures, which has resulted in scenarios where expedients for a wise use of energy (e.g. energy savings and renewables share) are unbalanced. The aim of this paper is to review and evaluate...... international experiences on finding the optimal trade-off between efficiency improvements and additional renewable energy supply. A critical review of each technique, focusing on purposes, methodology and outcomes, is provided along with a review of tools adopted for the analyses. The models are categorized...... trade-off between renewables and energy efficiency measures in energy-systems under different objectives....

  17. Correlations between Energy and Displacement Demands for Performance-Based Seismic Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollaioli, Fabrizio; Bruno, Silvia; Decanini, Luis; Saragoni, Rodolfo

    2011-01-01

    The development of a scientific framework for performance-based seismic engineering requires, among other steps, the evaluation of ground motion intensity measures at a site and the characterization of their relationship with suitable engineering demand parameters (EDPs) which describe the performance of a structure. In order to be able to predict the damage resulting from earthquake ground motions in a structural system, it is first necessary to properly identify ground motion parameters that are well correlated with structural response and, in turn, with damage. Since structural damage during an earthquake ground motion may be due to excessive deformation or to cumulative cyclic damage, reliable methods for estimating displacement demands on structures are needed. Even though the seismic performance is directly related to the global and local deformations of the structure, energy-based methodologies appear more helpful in concept, as they permit a rational assessment of the energy absorption and dissipation mechanisms that can be effectively accomplished to balance the energy imparted to the structure. Moreover, energy-based parameters are directly related to cycles of response of the structure and, therefore, they can implicitly capture the effect of ground motion duration, which is ignored by conventional spectral parameters. Therefore, the identification of reliable relationships between energy and displacement demands represents a fundamental issue in both the development of more reliable seismic code provisions and the evaluation of seismic vulnerability aimed at the upgrading of existing hazardous facilities. As these two aspects could become consistently integrated within a performance-based seismic design methodology, understanding how input and dissipated energy are correlated with displacement demands emerges as a decisive prerequisite. The aim of the present study is the establishment of functional relationships between input and dissipated energy

  18. Improving scaling methods to estimate eruption energies from volcanic crater structures using blast experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonder, I.; Graettinger, A. H.; Valentine, G.; Schmid, A.; Zimanowski, B.; Majji, M.; Ross, P.; White, J. D.; Taddeucci, J.; Lube, G.; Kueppers, U.; Bowman, D. C.

    2013-12-01

    In an ongoing effort to understand the relevant processes behind the formation of volcanic crater-, maar-, and diatreme structures, experiments producing craters with radii exceeding one meter were conducted at University at Buffalos Geohazards Field Station. A chemical explosive was used as energy source for the tests, and detonated in prepared test beds made from several stratified, compacted aggregates. The amount of explosive, as well as its depth of burial were varied in the twelve experiments. The detonations were recorded by a diverse set of sensors including high-speed/high-definition cameras, seismic and electric field sensors, normal- and infrasound microphones. Morphology and structures were documented after each blast by manual measurements and semi-automated photogrammetry. After all blasts were complete the structures excavated and analyzed. The measured sensor signals were evaluated and related to blast energies, depths of burial and crater morphologies. Former experiments e.g. performed by Goto et al. (2001; Geophys. Res. Lett. 28, 4287-4290) considered craters of single blasts at a given lateral position and found empirical relationships emphasizing the importance of length scaling with the cube root of the blasts energy E. For example the depth of burial producing the largest crater radius--the ';optimal' depth--is proportional to E1/3, as is the corresponding radius. Resembling natural processes creating crater and diatreme structures the experiments performed here feature several blasts at one lateral position. The dependencies on E1/3 could be roughly confirmed. Also the scaled depth correlated with the sensor signals capturing the blasts dynamics. However, significant scatter was introduced by the pre-existing morphologies. Using a suitable re-definition for the charges depth of burial (';eruption depth'), accounting for a pre-existing (crater) morphology, the measured dependencies of morphology and blast dynamics on E can be improved

  19. On the distribution of energy versus Alfvénic correlation for polar wind fluctuations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Bavassano

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Previous analyses have shown that polar wind fluctuations at MHD scales appear as a mixture of Alfvénic fluctuations and variations with an energy imbalance in favour of the magnetic term. In the present study, by separately examining the behaviour of kinetic and magnetic energies versus the Alfvénic correlation level, we unambiguously confirm that the second population is essentially related to a large increase of the magnetic energy with respect to that of the Alfvénic population. The relevant new result is that this magnetic population, though of secondary importance in terms of occurrence frequency, corresponds to a primary peak in the distribution of total energy. The fact that this holds in the case of polar wind, which is the least structured type of interplanetary plasma flow and with the slowest evolving Alfvénic turbulence, strongly suggests the general conclusion that magnetic structures cannot be neglected when modeling fluctuations for all kinds of wind regime.

  20. Correlation functions of the energy-momentum tensor on spaces of constant curvature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osborn, H.; Shore, G.M.

    2000-01-01

    An analysis of one- and two-point functions of the energy-momentum tensor on homogeneous spaces of constant curvature is undertaken. The possibility of proving a c-theorem in this framework is discussed, in particular in relation to the coefficients c,a, which appear in the energy-momentum tensor trace on general curved backgrounds in four dimensions. Ward identities relating the correlation functions are derived and explicit expressions are obtained for free scalar, spinor field theories in general dimensions and also free vector fields in dimension four. A natural geometric formalism which is independent of any choice of coordinates is used and the role of conformal symmetries on such constant curvature spaces is analysed. The results are shown to be constrained by the operator product expansion. For negative curvature the spectral representation, involving unitary positive energy representations of O(d-1,2), for two-point functions of vector currents is derived in detail and extended to the energy-momentum tensor by analogy. It is demonstrated that, at non-coincident points, the two-point functions are not related to a in any direct fashion and there is no straightforward demonstration obtainable in this framework of irreversibility under renormalisation group flow of any function of the couplings for four-dimensional field theories which reduces to a at fixed points

  1. AGS experiments in nuclear/QCD physics at medium energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo Presti, P.

    1998-07-01

    This report contains a diagram of the experimental setup for each experiment as well as giving a brief discussion of its purpose and list of collaborators for the experiment. Thirty-one experiments in the areas of nuclear physics and particle physics are covered. It concludes with a list of publications of the AGS experiments.

  2. AGS experiments in nuclear/QCD physics at medium energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lo Presti, P.

    1998-07-01

    This report contains a diagram of the experimental setup for each experiment as well as giving a brief discussion of its purpose and list of collaborators for the experiment. Thirty-one experiments in the areas of nuclear physics and particle physics are covered. It concludes with a list of publications of the AGS experiments

  3. The Utilization of Classifications in High-Energy Astrophysics Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwood, Bill

    2012-03-01

    The history of high-energy gamma observations stretches back several decades. But it was with the launch of the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) in 1991 onboard the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) [1], that the field entered a new era of discovery. At the high-energy end of the electromagnetic spectrum, incoming particles of light, photons, interact with matter mainly by producing electron-positron pairs and this process dominates above an energy of 10-30MeV depending on the material. To a high degree the directionality of the incoming gamma ray is reflected in the e+ and e-, and hence the detection of the trajectories of the e+e- pair can be used to infer the direction of the originating photon. Measuring these high-energy charged particles is the domain of high-energy particle physics and so it should be of little surprise that particle physicists played a significant role in the design and construction of EGRET, as well as the design and implementation of analysis methods for the resulting data. Prior to EGRET, only a handful of sources in the sky were known as high-energy gamma-ray emitters. During EGRET's 9-years mission the final catalog included over 270 sources including new types such as Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs). This set the stage for the next-generation mission, the Gamma ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) [2]. Very early in the EGRET mission, the realization that the high-energy gamma-ray sky was extremely interesting led to a competition to develop the next-generation instruments. The technology used in EGRET was frozen in the late 1970s and by 1992, enormous advances had been made in experimental particle physics. In particular the effort to develop solid state detectors, targeted for use at the Super Conducting Super Collider (SSC), had made the technology of silicon strip detectors (SSDs) commercially viable for use in large area arrays. Given the limitations imposed by the space environment (e.g., operate in a vacuum, scarce

  4. Plan of measurement experiment of correlation between ion beam and plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oguri, Yoshiyuki; Abe, Satoru; Sakumi, Akira; Okazaki, Hisashi; Watanabe, Takeshi [Tokyo Inst. of Tech. (Japan). Research Lab. for Nuclear Reactors

    1996-12-01

    The Research Laboratory, for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology has conducted experimental study on accelerating structure and beam behavior of high intensity heavy ion accelerator for a beam driver and its computer simulation study as a circle of fundamental study of the heavy ion inertial nuclear fusion. From last fiscal year, a preliminary study for measuring the correlation between beam and plasma using low speed heavy ion beam from 1.7 MV tandem accelerator was begun. As a result, a possibility of forming a plasma target with above 10 (exp 17)/cu cm in free electron density and about 100 ns in life possible to supply to measurement of the correlation between beam and plasma was obtained by formation of laser plasma target and development of diagnostic measurement system. According to the preliminary calculation, it is expected to be larger charging state of ion passing through plasma than that in normal temperature target, and stoppability is presumed to increase largely and to apply to electron stopper for accelerator. And, a plan of time resolution measurement of energy loss of beam passed through plasma target using magnetic field type spectrometer and high speed plastic scintillator is also preceeding. (G.K.)

  5. Angular correlation experiments for the study of giant multipole resonances and currents of the second kind in atomic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-03-01

    The project dealt with angular correlation experiments for the study of giant multipole resonances and currents of the second kind in atomic nuclei. Both partial projects were worked in the period of the report. (orig.) [de

  6. Study of correlations between photoproduced pairs of charmed particles at Experiment E831/FOCUS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castromonte Flores, Cesar Manuel [Brazilian Center for Physics Research, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2008-08-01

    The authors present the study of the charm-pair correlations produced in photon-nucleon interactions at $\\langle$Eγ$\\rangle$ = 175 GeV/c, by the Fermilab fixed target experiment E831/FOCUS. The E831/FOCUS experiment produced and reconstructed over one million charm particles. This high statistics allows the reconstruction of more than 7000 charm-pair mesons D$\\bar{D}$, 10 times the statistic of former experiments, and also allows to get, for the first time, about 600 totally reconstructed charm-pairs in the DDs and DΛc channels. They were able to study, with some detail, the kinematical correlations between the charm and anticharm particle forming a pair, in the square transverse momentum (pT2), azimuthal angle difference (ΔΦ), rapidity difference (Δy) and the charm-pair mass variables. They observe some correlation for the longitudinal momenta, and a significant correlation for the transverse momenta of the charm and anticharm particles. They compare the experimental distributions with theoretical predictions based on the photon-gluon fusion model (PGF), for the production of c$\\bar{c}$ quarks, and the standard Lund hadronization model. These models are implemented by the PYTHIA Monte Carlo event generator. The PYTHIA program allows the inclusion, in the simulation, of non-perturbative effects that have been shown to be important for charm production. In order to compare data and simulation, they have generated two Monte Carlo samples, the first one set to favor the production of D$\\bar{D}$ pairs (MCDD2), and the second one set to favor the production of DDsand DΛc pairs, where each one uses different functions and parameters values for the theoretical models in the simulation. They observe, for the correlation distributions, that the set of parameters used by the MCDD2 model together with the intrinsic transverse momentum (k$\\perp$) of the partons inside the

  7. Fantasy Proneness Correlates With the Intensity of Near-Death Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Martial

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the personality characteristics of those who have experienced a “Near-Death Experience” (NDE. One interesting candidate is fantasy proneness. We studied this trait in individuals who developed NDEs in the presence (i.e., classical NDEs or absence (i.e., NDEs-like of a life-threatening situation. We surveyed a total of 228 individuals. From those, 108 qualified as NDE experiencers (i.e., Greyson NDE scale total score ≥7: 51 had their NDEs in the context of a life-threatening situation; 57 had their NDEs not related to a life-threatening situation. From those who did not meet the criteria to be considered “experiencers,” 20 had their NDE in the absence of a life-threatening situation; 50 had faced death but did not recall a NDE and finally, 50 were healthy people without a history of life threat and/or NDE. All participants completed a measure of NDE intensity (the Greyson NDE scale and a measure of fantasy proneness (the Creative Experiences Questionnaire. People reporting NDEs-like scored higher on fantasy proneness than those reporting classical NDEs, individuals whose experiences did not meet the NDE criteria and matched controls. By contrast, individuals reporting classical NDEs did not show different engagement in fantasy as matched controls. The reported intensity of the experiences was positively correlated with engagement in fantasy. Our findings support the view that strong engagement in fantasy by individuals recalling NDEs-like might make these persons more likely to report such subjective experiences when exposed to suitable physiological and/or psychological conditions (e.g., meditation, syncope.

  8. World Bank support for renewable energy - the ASTAE experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaeffer, L.

    1999-01-01

    Historically, the World Bank has helped finance the generation, transmission and distribution of electricity as well as improvements in supply-side energy efficiency. The World Bank's ability to mainstream renewable energy technologies in developing countries is enhanced by the Global Energy Facility (GEF), the World Bank Solar Initiative (and the nascent Solar Development Corporation), the International Finance Corporation and the Asia Alternative Energy Unit (ASTAE). (orig./RHM)

  9. World Bank support for renewable energy - the ASTAE experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaeffer, L. [World Bank, Washington, DC (United States). Asia Alternative Energy Unit

    1999-07-01

    Historically, the World Bank has helped finance the generation, transmission and distribution of electricity as well as improvements in supply-side energy efficiency. The World Bank's ability to mainstream renewable energy technologies in developing countries is enhanced by the Global Energy Facility (GEF), the World Bank Solar Initiative (and the nascent Solar Development Corporation), the International Finance Corporation and the Asia Alternative Energy Unit (ASTAE). (orig./RHM)

  10. Correlation of weight-based objectifying experiences with depression and eating disorder in overweight women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Khabir

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study was carried out to investigate the correlation of self-objectification, internalized weight bias and body image concern with depression and eating disorder Methods: A total of 200 female students with overweight and obesity were selected using convenience random sampling among female students with overweight and obesity referring to Shiraz sport clubs in 2013. They responded to Stigmatizing Situations Inventory (SSI, Trait Self- Objectification Questionnaire (TSOQ, Weight Bias Internalization Scale (WBIS, Body Image Concern Inventory (BICI, Center for Epidemiological Studies- Depression Scale (CES-D and Eating Disorder Diagnostic Scale (EDDS. Data were analyzed by structural equation modeling (SEM. Results: Result showed that self-objectification, internalized weight bias and body image concern can mediate the relationship of weight-based objectifying experiences with depression and eating disorder. Conclusion: The findings of this study showed that fitness index of the proposed model can acceptably fit the data.

  11. High energy x-ray scattering studies of strongly correlated oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatton, Peter D; Wilkins, S B; Spencer, P D; Zimmermann, M v; D'Almeida, T

    2003-01-01

    Many transition metal oxides display strongly correlated charge, spin, or orbital ordering resulting in varied phenomena such as colossal magnetoresistance, high temperature superconductivity, metal-insulator transitions etc. X-ray scattering is one of the principle techniques for probing the structural response to such effects. In this paper, we discuss and review the use of synchrotron radiation high energy x-rays (50-200 keV) for the study of transition metal oxides such as nickelates (La 2-x Sr x NiO 4 ) and manganites (La 2-2x Sr 1+2x Mn 2 O 7 ). High energy x-rays have sufficient penetration to allow us to study large flux-grown single crystals. The huge increase in sample scattering volume means that extremely weak peaks can be observed. This allows us to study very weak charge ordering. Measurements of the intensity, width and position of the charge ordering satellites as a function of temperature provide us with quantitative measures of the charge amplitude, inverse correlation length and wavevector of the charge ordering

  12. Disentangling interacting dark energy cosmologies with the three-point correlation function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moresco, Michele; Marulli, Federico; Baldi, Marco; Moscardini, Lauro; Cimatti, Andrea

    2014-10-01

    We investigate the possibility of constraining coupled dark energy (cDE) cosmologies using the three-point correlation function (3PCF). Making use of the CODECS N-body simulations, we study the statistical properties of cold dark matter (CDM) haloes for a variety of models, including a fiducial ΛCDM scenario and five models in which dark energy (DE) and CDM mutually interact. We measure both the halo 3PCF, ζ(θ), and the reduced 3PCF, Q(θ), at different scales (2 values of the halo 3PCF for perpendicular (elongated) configurations. The effect is also scale-dependent, with differences between ΛCDM and cDE models that increase at large scales. We made use of these measurements to estimate the halo bias, that results in fair agreement with the one computed from the two-point correlation function (2PCF). The main advantage of using both the 2PCF and 3PCF is to break the bias-σ8 degeneracy. Moreover, we find that our bias estimates are approximately independent of the assumed strength of DE coupling. This study demonstrates the power of a higher order clustering analysis in discriminating between alternative cosmological scenarios, for both present and forthcoming galaxy surveys, such as e.g. Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey and Euclid.

  13. Explicit correlation treatment of the potential energy surface of CO{sub 2} dimer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalugina, Yulia N., E-mail: kalugina@phys.tsu.ru [Tomsk State University, 36 Lenin Ave., Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Buryak, Ilya A. [Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Chemistry Department, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation); Ajili, Yosra [Université Paris-Est, Laboratoire Modélisation et Simulation Multi Echelle, MSME UMR 8208 CNRS, 5 Bd Descartes, 77454 Marne-La-Vallée (France); Laboratoire de Spectroscopie Atomique, Moléculaire et Applications - LSAMA Université de Tunis El Manar (Tunisia); Vigasin, Andrei A. [Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Jaidane, Nejm Eddine [Laboratoire de Spectroscopie Atomique, Moléculaire et Applications - LSAMA Université de Tunis El Manar (Tunisia); Hochlaf, Majdi [Université Paris-Est, Laboratoire Modélisation et Simulation Multi Echelle, MSME UMR 8208 CNRS, 5 Bd Descartes, 77454 Marne-La-Vallée (France)

    2014-06-21

    We present an extensive study of the four-dimensional potential energy surface (4D-PES) of the carbon dioxide dimer, (CO{sub 2}){sub 2}. This PES is developed over the set of intermolecular coordinates. The electronic computations are carried out at the explicitly correlated coupled cluster method with single, double, and perturbative triple excitations [CCSD(T)-F12] level of theory in connection with the augmented correlation-consistent aug-cc-pVTZ basis set. An analytic representation of the 4D-PES is derived. Our extensive calculations confirm that “Slipped Parallel” is the most stable form and that the T-shaped structure corresponds to a transition state. Later on, this PES is employed for the calculations of the vibrational energy levels of the dimer. Moreover, the temperature dependence of the dimer second virial coefficient and of the first spectral moment of rototranslational collision-induced absorption spectrum is derived. For both quantities, a good agreement is found between our values and the experimental data for a wide range of temperatures. This attests to the high quality of our PES. Generally, our PES and results can be used for modeling CO{sub 2} supercritical fluidity and examination of its role in planetary atmospheres. It can be also incorporated into dynamical computations of CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration. This allows deep understanding, at the microscopic level, of these processes.

  14. Towards fully renewable energy systems - Experience and trends in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinson, Pierre; Mitridati, Lesia Marie-Jeanne Mariane; Ordoudis, Christos

    2017-01-01

    .g., wind and solar. Denmark is a country that invested early in wind energy, rapidly proposing very ambitious goals for the future of its energy system and global energy usage. While the case of Denmark is specific due to its limited size and good interconnections, there may still be a lot to learn from...

  15. Assessing wave energy effects on biodiversity: the wave hub experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, M J; Sheehan, E V; Bearhop, S; Broderick, A C; Conley, D C; Cotterell, S P; Crow, E; Grecian, W J; Halsband, C; Hodgson, D J; Hosegood, P; Inger, R; Miller, P I; Sims, D W; Thompson, R C; Vanstaen, K; Votier, S C; Attrill, M J; Godley, B J

    2012-01-28

    Marine renewable energy installations harnessing energy from wind, wave and tidal resources are likely to become a large part of the future energy mix worldwide. The potential to gather energy from waves has recently seen increasing interest, with pilot developments in several nations. Although technology to harness wave energy lags behind that of wind and tidal generation, it has the potential to contribute significantly to energy production. As wave energy technology matures and becomes more widespread, it is likely to result in further transformation of our coastal seas. Such changes are accompanied by uncertainty regarding their impacts on biodiversity. To date, impacts have not been assessed, as wave energy converters have yet to be fully developed. Therefore, there is a pressing need to build a framework of understanding regarding the potential impacts of these technologies, underpinned by methodologies that are transferable and scalable across sites to facilitate formal meta-analysis. We first review the potential positive and negative effects of wave energy generation, and then, with specific reference to our work at the Wave Hub (a wave energy test site in southwest England, UK), we set out the methodological approaches needed to assess possible effects of wave energy on biodiversity. We highlight the need for national and international research clusters to accelerate the implementation of wave energy, within a coherent understanding of potential effects-both positive and negative.

  16. The French experience in nuclear energy: Reasons for success

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plante, J.

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear energy for France represents a viable option in meeting energy demands in the near and medium terms due to few energy resources and dependency on imported oil. Basic decisions to launch the French nuclear program, successive series of PWRs installed and standardization due to technical progress are highlighted in this paper. (author)

  17. Update on the status of hadronic squeezed correlations at RHIC energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padula, S.S.; Dudek, D.M.; Socolowski, O. Jr.

    2011-01-01

    In high-energy heavy-ion collisions, a hot and dense medium is formed, where the hadronic masses may be shifted from their asymptotic values. If this mass modification occurs, squeezed back-to-back correlations (BBC) of particle-antiparticle pairs are predicted to appear, both in the fermionic (fBBC) and in the bosonic (bBBC) sectors. Although they have unlimited intensity even for finite-size expanding systems, these hadronic squeezed correlations are very sensitive to their time emission distribution. Here we discuss results in case this time emission is parameterized by a Levy-type distribution, showing that it reduces the signal even more dramatically than a Lorentzian distribution, which already reduces the intensity of the effect by orders of magnitude, as compared to the sudden emission. However, we show that the signal could still survive if the duration of the process is short, and if the effect is searched for lighter mesons, such as kaons. We compare some of our results to recent PHENIX preliminary data on squeezed correlations of K + K - pairs

  18. Photodissociation of OCS: deviations between theory and experiment, and the importance of higher order correlation effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, J A; Olsen, J M H

    2014-11-14

    The photodissociation of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) was investigated theoretically in a series of studies by Schmidt and co-workers. Initial studies [J. A. Schmidt, M. S. Johnson, G. C. McBane, and R. Schinke, J. Chem. Phys. 136, 131101 (2012); J. A. Schmidt, M. S. Johnson, G. C. McBane, and R. Schinke, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 054313 (2012)] found photodissociation in the first UV-band to occur mainly by excitation of the 2(1)A' (A) excited state. However, in a later study [G. C. McBane, J. A. Schmidt, M. S. Johnson, and R. Schinke, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 094314 (2013)] it was found that a significant fraction of photodissociation must occur by excitation of 1(1)A″ (B) excited state to explain the product angular distribution. The branching between excitation of the A and B excited states is determined by the magnitude of the transition dipole moment vectors in the Franck-Condon region. This study examines the sensitivity of these quantities to changes in the employed electronic structure methodology. This study benchmarks the methodology employed in previous studies against highly correlated electronic structure methods (CC3 and MRAQCC) and provide evidence in support of the picture of the OCS photodissociation process presented in [G. C. McBane, J. A. Schmidt, M. S. Johnson, and R. Schinke, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 094314 (2013)] showing that excitation of A and B electronic states both contribute significantly to the first UV absorption band of OCS. In addition, this study presents evidence in support of the assertion that the A state potential energy surface employed in previous studies underestimates the energy at highly bent geometries (γ ∼ 70°) leading to overestimated rotational energy in the product CO.

  19. Photodissociation of OCS: Deviations between theory and experiment, and the importance of higher order correlation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, J. A.; Olsen, J. M. H.

    2014-01-01

    The photodissociation of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) was investigated theoretically in a series of studies by Schmidt and co-workers. Initial studies [J. A. Schmidt, M. S. Johnson, G. C. McBane, and R. Schinke, J. Chem. Phys. 136, 131101 (2012); J. A. Schmidt, M. S. Johnson, G. C. McBane, and R. Schinke, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 054313 (2012)] found photodissociation in the first UV-band to occur mainly by excitation of the 2 1 A ′ (A) excited state. However, in a later study [G. C. McBane, J. A. Schmidt, M. S. Johnson, and R. Schinke, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 094314 (2013)] it was found that a significant fraction of photodissociation must occur by excitation of 1 1 A ″ (B) excited state to explain the product angular distribution. The branching between excitation of the A and B excited states is determined by the magnitude of the transition dipole moment vectors in the Franck-Condon region. This study examines the sensitivity of these quantities to changes in the employed electronic structure methodology. This study benchmarks the methodology employed in previous studies against highly correlated electronic structure methods (CC3 and MRAQCC) and provide evidence in support of the picture of the OCS photodissociation process presented in [G. C. McBane, J. A. Schmidt, M. S. Johnson, and R. Schinke, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 094314 (2013)] showing that excitation of A and B electronic states both contribute significantly to the first UV absorption band of OCS. In addition, this study presents evidence in support of the assertion that the A state potential energy surface employed in previous studies underestimates the energy at highly bent geometries (γ ∼ 70°) leading to overestimated rotational energy in the product CO

  20. Hybrid Correlation Energy (HyCE): An Approach Based on Separate Evaluations of Internal and External Components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanic, Joseph; Schmidt, Michael W

    2018-06-04

    A novel hybrid correlation energy (HyCE) approach is proposed that determines the total correlation energy via distinct computation of its internal and external components. This approach evolved from two related studies. First, rigorous assessment of the accuracies and size extensivities of a number of electron correlation methods, that include perturbation theory (PT2), coupled-cluster (CC), configuration interaction (CI), and coupled electron pair approximation (CEPA), shows that the CEPA(0) variant of the latter and triples-corrected CC methods consistently perform very similarly. These findings were obtained by comparison to near full CI results for four small molecules and by charting recovered correlation energies for six steadily growing chain systems. Second, by generating valence virtual orbitals (VVOs) and utilizing the CEPA(0) method, we were able to partition total correlation energies into internal (or nondynamic) and external (or dynamic) parts for the aforementioned six chain systems and a benchmark test bed of 36 molecules. When using triple-ζ basis sets it was found that per orbital internal correlation energies were appreciably larger than per orbital external energies and that the former showed far more chemical variation than the latter. Additionally, accumulations of external correlation energies were seen to proceed smoothly, and somewhat linearly, as the virtual space is gradually increased. Combination of these two studies led to development of the HyCE approach, whereby the internal and external correlation energies are determined separately by CEPA(0)/VVO and PT2/external calculations, respectively. When applied to the six chain systems and the 36-molecule benchmark test set it was found that HyCE energies followed closely those of triples-corrected CC and CEPA(0) while easily outperforming MP2 and CCSD. The success of the HyCE approach is more notable when considering that its cost is only slightly more than MP2 and significantly cheaper

  1. Correlations between energy and mass partition in the damped reaction 165Ho+74Ge at Elab=8.5 MeV/nucleon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toke, J.; Planeta, R.; Schroeder, W.U.; Huizenga, J.R.

    1991-01-01

    Data from a kinematical coincidence experiment on the damped reaction 165 Ho+ 74 Ge at 8.5 MeV/nucleon have been reanalyzed. Although the new analysis confirms the presence of some correlations between the excitation-energy division and the mass asymmetry, the magnitude of these correlations is found to be significantly smaller than that previously reported. Proton-neutron symmetry of the mechanism of heat generation through nucleon exchange is revealed and a possible acceptor-donor asymmetry of this mechanism is discussed

  2. Triple energy correlations: A new method of α/sub S//sub x/ determination in high energy e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csikor, F.; Eszes, G.; Garrido, L.; Pocsik, G.

    1987-01-01

    Reasons why planar triple energy correlation measurement may serve as an appropriate method of α/sub S/ determination are reviewed. The new MARKJ results on α/sub S/ determination are briefly summarized

  3. The Conceptualization of Energy Security: the International Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muzychenko Mykola V.

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The article reviews and analyzes existing interpretations of the term of «energy security», which are used by international organizations, individual countries, and foreign scientists. As result of a generalization of the numerous existing conceptual-methodical and substantive approaches to the definition of energy security, its main components and possible ways of its ensuring, it has been found that the concept of energy security includes many multifactor components that are interconnected by numerous functional linkages, including economic, political, social, and ecological aspects. The issues related to geology, geography, and time factor have impact on interpretation of energy security. But in general, energy security can be seen in a one-aspect dimension that is largely based on the security of energy supplies (availability of energy resources and in a multi-aspect dimension which, in addition to the security of energy supplies, also takes into consideration a number of other important interrelated aspects of energy security, particularly in the areas of accessibility of energy resources, energy efficiency, and environmental safety.

  4. Grameen Bank`s experience with energy related microenterprise development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barua, D.C.

    1997-12-01

    Increased population and growth of industry have resulted in greater demand for energy worldwide. Most of this energy is derived from fossil fuel (coal, gas, oil and nuclear) which will soon be depleted. In this context the need for developing renewable sources of energy has taken on a greater sense of importance and urgency. Over the years significant technological advances have been made in the area of renewable energies especially in the field of solar photovoltaics (PV), wind energy and bio-gas technology. In addition, for remote rural areas where there exists no infrastructure for conventional energy supply, these forms of decentralized alternative energy systems will be far more adaptable and well suited. Grameen Shakti (Energy) is an addition to the family of companies of Grameen Bank, to promote and supply renewable energy sources to rural households. GS, a not-for-profit company, expects not only to supply renewable energy services, but also to create employment and income generation opportunities in rural Bangladesh. GS will focus on supply, marketing, sales, testing and development of renewable energy systems of solar pv, biogas, wind turbines and windpumps.

  5. Two-particle correlations in p+p and Pb+Pb collisions at SPS energies

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2081214

    In this thesis two-particle correlations in pseudorapidity and azimuthal angle in p+p collisions at beam momenta: 20, 31, 40, 80, and 158 GeV/c are presented. Data were recorded in the NA61/SHINE experiment at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS). The results are compared to the EPOS and the UrQMD models as well as to the results from various experiments at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Dedicated comparison analysis was done also on NA49 data of Pb+Pb collisions. The inclusive results in p+p show correlation structures connected with resonance decays, Bose-Einstein statistics, momentum conservation, and strings fragmentation. No structures connected with hard processes were observed even at 158 GeV/c beam momentum. The EPOS model reproduces data fine except of Bose-Einstein enhancement; the UrQMD model shows many disagreements with data. The results provide an insight into forgotten realm of soft physics where jet peaks do not cast shadows onto two-particle...

  6. Experiments at the Frankfurt low energy storage ring (FLSR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, F; Stiebing, K E; Dörner, R; Müller, J; Schmidt, L Ph; Schmidt Böking, H

    2015-01-01

    FLSR has been designed for experiments on the dynamics of atomic and molecular collisions. After successful commissioning, an experiment on the dissociative recombination of 4 HeH + has been started. (paper)

  7. Influence of transmutation and high neutron exposure on materials used in fission-fusion correlation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garner, F.A.

    1990-07-01

    This paper explores the response of three different materials to high fluence irradiation as observed in recent fusion-related experiments. While helium at fusion-relevant levels influences the details of the microstructure of Fe--Cr--Ni alloys somewhat, the resultant changes in swelling and tensile behavior are relatively small. Under conditions where substantially greater-than-fusion levels of helium are generated, however, an extensive refinement of microstructure can occur, leading to depression of swelling at lower temperatures and increased strengthening at all temperatures studied. The behavior of these alloys is dominated by their tendency to converge to saturation microstructures which encourage swelling. Irradiations of nickel are dominated by its tendency to develop a different type of saturation microstructure that discourages further void growth. Swelling approaches saturation levels that are remarkably insensitive to starting microstructure and irradiation temperature. The rate of approach to saturation is very sensitive to variables such as helium, impurities, dislocation density and displacement rate, however. Copper exhibits a rather divergent response depending on the property measured. Transmutation of copper to nickel and zinc plays a large role in determining electrical conductivity but almost no role in void swelling. Each of these three materials offers different challenges in the interpretation of fission-fusion correlation experiments

  8. Achieving energy efficiency through product policy: the UK experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boardman, Brenda

    2004-01-01

    The focus of this paper is on energy efficiency of domestic equipment. It is contended that, in the UK and--by extension--elsewhere. Government has to take the lead in defining low-energy standards for products. In the absence of policy, manufacturers do not recognize the need for carbon reductions in the equipment they design and consumers are unaware of the variation in energy performance in the product range. At present, neither market pull nor technology push can be relied upon to deliver energy savings. The imposition of a weak minimum standard on domestic fridges and freezers in 1999 will, over the lifetime of the appliances already sold by December 2002, save 1 Mt C of carbon dioxide at nil cost to government or to the manufacturers, and a net benefit to consumers of pound 855 m: a highly cost-effective policy. The difference between energy efficiency and energy conservation is that it takes time for the cumulative benefits of an energy efficiency improvement to result in the maximum effect on energy demand reduction: the benefits of the 1999 energy efficiency standard will accumulate until at least 2020. This period is equivalent to the cycle of stock replacement for that particular object. The final level of energy conservation depends upon the offsetting effects of growth in ownership levels and the size of new equipment purchases

  9. Exchange-correlation energy in the orbital occupancy method: electronic structure of organic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oszwaldowski, R; Vazquez, H; Pou, P; Ortega, J; Perez, R; Flores, F

    2003-01-01

    A new DF-LCAO (density functional with local combination of atomic orbitals) method is used to calculate the electronic properties of 3,4,9,10 perylenetetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA), C 6 H 6 , CH 4 , and CO. The method, called the OO (orbital occupancy) method, is a DF-based theory, which uses the OOs instead of ρ(r) to calculate the exchange and correlation energies. In our calculations, we compare the OO method with the conventional local density approximation approach. Our results show that, using a minimal basis set, we obtain equilibrium bond lengths and binding energies for PTCDA, C 6 H 6 , and CH 4 which are respectively within 6, and 10-15% of the experimental values. We have also calculated the affinity and ionization levels, as well as the optical gap, for benzene and PTCDA and have found that a variant of Koopmans' theorem works well for these molecules. Using this theorem we calculate the Koopmans relaxation energies of the σ- and π-orbitals for PTCDA and have obtained this molecule's density of states which compares well with experimental evidence

  10. Minimum Energy Decentralized Estimation in a Wireless Sensor Network with Correlated Sensor Noises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krasnopeev Alexey

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Consider the problem of estimating an unknown parameter by a sensor network with a fusion center (FC. Sensor observations are corrupted by additive noises with an arbitrary spatial correlation. Due to bandwidth and energy limitation, each sensor is only able to transmit a finite number of bits to the FC, while the latter must combine the received bits to estimate the unknown parameter. We require the decentralized estimator to have a mean-squared error (MSE that is within a constant factor to that of the best linear unbiased estimator (BLUE. We minimize the total sensor transmitted energy by selecting sensor quantization levels using the knowledge of noise covariance matrix while meeting the target MSE requirement. Computer simulations show that our designs can achieve energy savings up to 70 % when compared to the uniform quantization strategy whereby each sensor generates the same number of bits, irrespective of the quality of its observation and the condition of its channel to the FC.

  11. Multiplicity and correlated energy of gamma rays emitted in the spontaneous fission of Californium-252

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunson, G.S. Jr.

    1982-06-01

    An array of eight high-speed plastic scintillation detectors has been used to infer a mathematical model for the emission multipliciy of prompt gammas in the spontaneous fission of 252 Cf. Exceptional time resolution and coincidence capability permitted the separation of gammas from fast neutrons over a flight path of approximately 10 cm. About 20 different distribution models were tested. The average energy of the prompt gammas is inversely related to the number emitted; however, this inverse relationship is not strong and the total gamma energy does increase with increasing gamma number. An extension of the experiment incorporated a lithium-drifted germanium gamma spectrometer that resolved nearly 100 discrete gammas associated with fission. Of these gammas, some were preferentially associated with fission in which few gammas were emitted. Certain others were more frequent when many gammas were emitted. Results are presented

  12. Nuclear Energy: A Competitive and Safe Option, The EDF Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colas, F.

    1998-01-01

    Today, nuclear energy seems challenged by fossil energies, especially gas. However, the 1997's French government survey over energy options still places nuclear energy at the top of the list. The reasons why and how safe nuclear energy is still competitive are detailed in this paper. Most recent data from EDF's reactor will be discussed in terms of environmental and electricity production issues. The methods and management used to attain these results are explained for the different phases: design, construction, operation, and maintenance. The beneficial aspects over industrial development and local employment will be underlined. The influence of nuclear energy on EDF's financial results are shown, from past programme to today's operation. As most of french reactors are designed to adapt their output to the changes of load in the national grid, results are, as a conclusion, discussed in a small and medium electrical grid perspective. (author)

  13. Relativistic coupled-cluster calculations of 20Ne, 40Ar, 84Kr, and 129Xe: Correlation energies and dipole polarizabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mani, B. K.; Angom, D.; Latha, K. V. P.

    2009-01-01

    We have carried out a detailed and systematic study of the correlation energies of inert gas atoms Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe using relativistic many-body perturbation theory and relativistic coupled-cluster theory. In the relativistic coupled-cluster calculations, we implement perturbative triples and include these in the correlation energy calculations. We then calculate the dipole polarizability of the ground states using perturbed coupled-cluster theory.

  14. Use, operation and maintenance of renewable energy systems experiences and future approaches

    CERN Document Server

    Sanz Bobi, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Fully accounting for their integration with the current electricity market, and dealing too with emerging uses of energy, this book is fully informed by real-life experiences that provide varying perspectives on the efficiency of renewable energy production.

  15. The BFMNU method as an alternative to the methods in use based on energy: study of the correlation between food energy and body mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rondini, Greta; Olearo, Beatrice; Soriano Del Castillo, José Miguel; Boselli, Pietro Marco

    2018-03-01

    to establish slimming guidelines and any other changing treatments is useful to know the individual's energy expenditure due to the fact that, nowadays, the incidence of many diseases related to the loss of lean mass and the accumulation of adipose tissue has increased. The dietary treatments are carried out on calculating the energy contained in food, and then put in relation to the total energy expended by the body in order to produce changes in body mass. the aim of this study was to evaluate the correlation between the food energy and body mass of different subjects in various pathophysiological conditions. one hundred and twenty subjects (male and female, aged 7-78 years old) were studied in various pathophysiological conditions and previously treated with the BFMNU (Biologia e Fisiologia Modellistica della Nutrizione Umana)method. a correlation coefficient R2 of 0.1256 was found between food energy of the diet usually followed by the subjects and their body mass. The correlation between food energy and food mass was with R2 of 0.211. The correlation between Δ% of food energy and Δ% of body mass of the subjects, obtained through dietary treatment with the BFMNU method, was 95.77 percent. the correlation between food energy and body mass is not significant, being a critical point about the diets designed on an energy basis. However, the body mass of an individual is determined by mass balance, regulated by corresponding metabolic rate, calculated by the BFMNU method, thanks to which the macronutrients in the diet are absorbed, redistributed and eliminated. A significant correlation, although not straight, is demonstrated between Δ% of food energy, supplied after processing through the dietary BFMNU method, and the Δ% of body mass, obtained following the dietetic path.

  16. Dual-energy computed tomographic virtual noncalcium algorithm for detection of bone marrow edema in acute fractures: early experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reagan, Adrian C; Mallinson, Paul I; O'Connell, Timothy; McLaughlin, Patrick D; Krauss, Bernhard; Munk, Peter L; Nicolaou, Savvas; Ouellette, Hugue A

    2014-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is often used to assess the presence of occult fractures when plain radiographs are equivocal in the acute traumatic setting. While providing increased spatial resolution, conventional computed tomography is limited in the assessment of bone marrow edema, a finding that is readily detectable on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).Dual-energy CT has recently been shown to demonstrate patterns of bone marrow edema similar to corresponding MRI studies. Dual-energy CT may therefore provide a convenient modality for further characterizing acute bony injury when MRI is not readily available. We report our initial experiences of 4 cases with imaging and clinical correlation.

  17. Wind and solar energy curtailment: A review of international experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bird, Lori; Lew, Debra; Milligan, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Greater penetrations of variable renewable generation on some electric grids have resulted in increased levels of curtailment in recent years. Studies of renewable energy grid integration have found that curtailment levels may grow as the penetration of wind and solar energy generation increases....

  18. Communicating Wave Energy: An Active Learning Experience for Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Trongnghia; Hou, Gene; Wang, Jin

    2016-01-01

    We have conducted an education project to communicate the wave energy concept to high school students. A virtual reality system that combines both hardware and software is developed in this project to simulate the buoy-wave interaction. This first-of-its-kind wave energy unit is portable and physics-based, allowing students to conduct a number of…

  19. Renewable Energy Permitting Barriers in Hawaii: Experience from the Field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busche, S.; Donnelly, C.; Atkins, D.; Fields, R.; Black, C.

    2013-03-01

    This white paper presents a summary of the solicited input from permitting agencies and renewable energy developers on the permitting process in Hawaii to provide stakeholders in Hawaii, particularly those involved in permitting, with information on current permitting barriers that renewable energy developers are experiencing.

  20. The information in Nuclear Energy: The Experience in Goiania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, W.M.; Campos, E.P.

    1998-01-01

    After the accident in Goiania the Nuclear Energy National Commission implant in this city a information system for the human population. The objective consisted on giving a technical knowledge about the nuclear energy utilization. This work represents the utilized strategy and the results reached in this program during the period 1991-1996

  1. Global Indicators Analysis and Consultancy Experience Insights into Correlation between Entrepreneurial Activities and Business Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovan Krivokapić

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Many researches and practical experiences clearly indicate the existence of a strong relationship between entrepreneurial activities and the business environment in which these activities are initiated. Although this topic has been quite ignored until the late twentieth century, a lot of studies and consulting practice have contributed to the fact that there are now a number of theories concerning mentioned correlation. These theories aim to offer a model that would provide better utilization of the possibilities from the business environment which could be very important for the development from both macroeconomic and microeconomic aspects. An increasing number of articles on this topic says enough about its importance, and numerous researches by many reputable globally recognized institutions go in favor of this claim. There are many indicators that observe the economic situation in a country or a region from different aspects, so the analyses of these indicators make it possible to determine the specific relationships between entrepreneurial activities and the local and the global business environment. Given the complexity of these relations, the impact cannot be observed partially, without taking into consideration other important factors, but more detailed analyses, however, result in some useful conclusions, which in the proper context can have a positive impact on many economic factors. It is very important to emphasize the fact that the correlation between the business environment and entrepreneurial activities is bidirectional, since this influence is mutual, so that changes in one of these factors can and usually cause some modifications in the other. Frequent series of such iterations actually lead to changes in the business environment, while entrepreneurial activity changes its shape and affects the economy of a country or a region, which is of particular importance for its competitiveness in the era of globalization.

  2. Void analysis of target residues at SPS energy -evidence of correlation with fractal behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Dipak; Deb, Argha; Das, Rupa . E-mail : dipakghosh_in@yahoo.com

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the target residues in 32 S -AgBr and 16 0 -AgBr interactions at 200 AGeV and 60AGeV respectively in terms of fractal moment by Takagi method and void probability scaling. The study reveals an interesting feature of the production process. In 16 O- AgBr interactions multifractal behaviour is present in both hemispheres and void probability does not show a scaling behaviour, but at high energy the situation changes. In 32 S -AgBr interactions for both hemisphere monofractal behaviour is indicated by that data and void probability also shows good scaling behaviour. This suggests that a possible correlation of void probability with fractal behaviour of target residues. (author)

  3. Linear free energy correlations for fission product release from the Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrecht, David G; Schwantes, Jon M

    2015-03-03

    This paper extends the preliminary linear free energy correlations for radionuclide release performed by Schwantes et al., following the Fukushima-Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. Through evaluations of the molar fractionations of radionuclides deposited in the soil relative to modeled radionuclide inventories, we confirm the initial source of the radionuclides to the environment to be from active reactors rather than the spent fuel pool. Linear correlations of the form In χ = −α ((ΔGrxn°(TC))/(RTC)) + β were obtained between the deposited concentrations, and the reduction potentials of the fission product oxide species using multiple reduction schemes to calculate ΔG°rxn (TC). These models allowed an estimate of the upper bound for the reactor temperatures of TC between 2015 and 2060 K, providing insight into the limiting factors to vaporization and release of fission products during the reactor accident. Estimates of the release of medium-lived fission products 90Sr, 121mSn, 147Pm, 144Ce, 152Eu, 154Eu, 155Eu, and 151Sm through atmospheric venting during the first month following the accident were obtained, indicating that large quantities of 90Sr and radioactive lanthanides were likely to remain in the damaged reactor cores.

  4. Urban form and energy use for transport. A Nordic experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naess, P

    1995-02-10

    The main research problem addressed in this thesis is the possible influence of several urban form variables on the amount of transportation, on the modal split between different means of transport, and on energy use for transportation. This problem is elucidated through five empirical investigations covering different geographic levels in a Nordic context, from individual employees and households to commuting regions. A main feature of the study is the combination of socioeconomic and urban form variables in empirical investigations, employing techniques of multivariate analysis. The investigations of residential areas and job sites have been based on travel surveys, while the investigations where the units of analysis are towns or regions have been based on fuel sales. The socioeconomic data have been collected from official statistics and from questionnaires. It is found that urban form variables exert important influences on transportation energy use. Urban density affects energy use for transportation. A central location of residences as well as workplaces is favourable with respect to energy conservation on an intra-urban scale, but not in a wider geographical context, where decentralization into several dense, relatively self-contained local communities distributed over the region is the most energy-saving pattern of regional development. Urban form characteristics favourable for minimizing transport energy requirements also seem favourable for energy conservation in buildings. 160 refs., 39 figs., 46 tabs.

  5. Experience 2030. Four scenarios for the energy sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aarts, P.; Breunesse, L.; Duijm, K.; Van Empel, F.; Van Erp, J.; Van Huffelen, A.; Veenstra, J.; Visser, H.; Sicking, C.; Bloemendaal, R.

    2003-01-01

    In four days several experts in the field of energy participated in a brainstorm session to discuss the future and the consequences for our energy supply and demand, energy sources and technology. In this book four scenarios are presented: (1) Voluntary Simplicity, characterized by austerity and solidarity; (2) Hyper Individualism, characterized by competitive activities for as much prosperity as possible; (3) Haves and Have-nots, based on geopolitical instability and a strong technological development, resulting even beyond a wider gap between rich and poor; and (4) Tribal Society, dominated by fear, distrust and less prosperity [nl

  6. Experiences of a grid connected solar array energy production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagymássy, Zoltán; Vántus, András

    2015-04-01

    Solar energy possibilities of Hungary are higher than in Central Europe generally. The Institute for Land Utilisation, Technology and Regional Development of the University of Debrecen installed a photovoltaic (PV) system. The PV system is structured into 3 subsystems (fields). The first subsystem has 24 pieces of Kyocera KC 120 W type modules, the second subsystem has 72 pieces of Siemens ST 40W, and the remaining has 72 pieces of Dunasolar DS 40W In order to be operable independently of each other three inverter modules (SB 2500) had been installed. The recorder can be connected directly to a desktop PC. Operating and meteorological dates are recorded by MS Excel every 15 minutes. The power plant is connected to a weather station, which contents a PT 100 type temperature and humidity combined measuring instrument, a CM 11 pyranometer, and a wind speed measuring instrument. The produced DC, and AC power, together with the produced energy are as well, and the efficiency can be determined for each used PV technology. The measured operating and meteorological dates are collected by Sunny Boy Control, produced by the SMA. The energy productions of the subsystems are measured continually and the subsystems are measured separately. As an expected, the produced energy of polycrystalline -Si PV module and monocrystalline -Si PV was higher than amorphous-Si PV module. It is well known that energy analysis is more suitable for energy balance when we design a system. The air temperature and the temperature of the panels and the global irradiation conditions were measured. In summertime the panel temperature reaches 60-80 degrees in a sunny day. The panel temperatures are in a spring sunny day approximately 30-40 degrees. It can be concluded that the global irradiation is a major impact feature to influence the amount of energy produced. The efficiency depends on several parameters (spectral distribution of the incoming light, temperature values, etc.). The energy efficiency

  7. CORRELATION BETWEEN PREEXPONENTIAL FACTOR AND ACTIVATION ENERGY OF ISOAMYLALCOHOL HYDROGENOLYSIS ON PLATINUM CATALYSTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Triyono Triyono

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Arrhenius equation stated that reaction will proceed faster at higher temperature and with lower activation energy (Ea. Many literatures reported that preexponential factor (A is constant for certain reaction and there is no relation between A and Ea. Experiment on the reaction of isoamylalcohol hydrogenolysis showed that logarithm of A increased linearly with Ea. The result of this investigation suggests that the rate of a process is affected by the number of active centers on the surface of a catalysts, which influences the value of the pre-exponential term in the expression for the rate constant of a reaction. An increase in the number of active centers corresponds to a higher value of A, the active centers would be less effective and is attended by a growth in the value of Ea. Therefore, reaction with lower activation energy will not always has higher reaction rate due to decreasing of Ea.   Keywords: isoamylalcohol hydrogenolysis, preexponential factor, activation  energy.

  8. Exploring Sub-Femtosecond Correlated Dynamics with an Ultra-low Energy Electrostatic Storage Ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welsch, C.P.; Grieser, M.; Dorn, A.; Moshammer, R.; Ullrich, J.

    2005-01-01

    Whereas the three-body Coulomb problem for single excitation and ionization was claimed to be solved in a mathematically correct way during 1999 until 2004 for electron impact on hydrogen and helium, ion-impact ionization still represents a major challenge for theory. Troubling discrepancies have been observed recently in fully differential cross sections (FDCS) for helium single ionization by fast ion impact and even experimental total cross sections are in striking disagreement with the predictions of all state-of-the-art theories for low-energy antiproton collisions. Therefore, within the future Facility for Low-energy Antiproton and Ion Research (FLAIR), it has been proposed to combine state-of-the-art many-particle imaging methods with a novel electrostatic storage ring for slow antiprotons in order to realize single and multiple ionization cross section measurements for antiprotons colliding with atoms, molecules and clusters. Total, as well as any differential cross sections up to FDCS including ionization-excitation reactions are envisaged to become available, serving as benchmark data for theory. Here, the present status of experiments in comparison with theory is presented and the layout of an Ultra-low energy Storage Ring (USR) with its integrated reaction microscope at FLAIR is described

  9. NBME subject examination in surgery scores correlate with surgery clerkship clinical experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Jonathan A; Vigneswaran, Yalini; Gabryszak, Beth; Fogg, Louis F; Francescatti, Amanda B; Golner, Christine; Bines, Steven D

    2014-01-01

    Most medical schools in the United States use the National Board of Medical Examiners Subject Examinations as a method of at least partial assessment of student performance, yet there is still uncertainty of how well these examination scores correlate with clinical proficiency. Thus, we investigated which factors in a surgery clerkship curriculum have a positive effect on academic achievement on the National Board of Medical Examiners Subject Examination in Surgery. A retrospective analysis of 83 third-year medical students at our institution with 4 unique clinical experiences on the general surgery clerkship for the 2007-2008 academic year was conducted. Records of the United States Medical Licensing Examination Step 1 scores, National Board of Medical Examiners Subject Examination in Surgery scores, and essay examination scores for the groups were compared using 1-way analysis of variance testing. Rush University Medical Center, Chicago IL, an academic institution and tertiary care center. Our data demonstrated National Board of Medical Examiners Subject Examination in Surgery scores from the group with the heavier clinical loads and least time for self-study were statistically higher than the group with lighter clinical services and higher rated self-study time (p = 0.036). However, there was no statistical difference of National Board of Medical Examiners Subject Examination in Surgery scores between the groups with equal clinical loads (p = 0.751). Students experiencing higher clinical volumes on surgical services, but less self-study time demonstrated statistically higher academic performance on objective evaluation, suggesting clinical experience may be of higher value than self-study and reading. Copyright © 2014 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Development of an X-ray delay unit for correlation spectroscopy and pump-probe experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roseker, Wojciech

    2008-07-15

    Probing condensed matter on time scales ranging from femtoseconds to nanoseconds will be one of the key topics for future X-ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL) sources. The accessible time windows are, however, compromised by the intrinsic time structure of the sources. One way to overcome this limitation is the usage of a time delay unit. A prototype device capable of splitting an X-ray pulse into two adjustable fractions, delaying one of them with the aim to perform X-ray Photon Correlation Spectroscopy and pump-probe type studies was designed and manufactured. The device utilizes eight perfect crystals in vertical 90 scattering geometry. Its performance has been verified with 8.39 keV and 12.4 keV Xrays at various synchrotron sources. The measured throughput of the device with a Si(333) monochromator at 8.39 keV under ambient conditions is 0.6%. The stability was verified at 12.4 keV and operation without realignment and feedback was possible for more than 30 minutes. Time delays up to 2.95 ns have been achieved. The highest resolution achieved in an experiment was 15.4 ps, a value entirely determined by the diagnostics system. The influence of the delay unit optics on the coherence properties of the beam was investigated by means of Fraunhofer diffraction and static speckle analysis. The obtained high fringe visibility and contrast values larger than 23% indicate the feasibility of performing coherence based experiments with the delay line. (orig.)

  11. Experiments and Data for Building Energy Performance Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bacher, Peder; Madsen, Henrik

    are during the experiments, from conditions optimized for modelling toward more common living conditions, i.e. from high variation of the indoor temperature, toward thermostatic temperature control and human activities in the building. In total five experiments have been successfully carried out, two...

  12. Final Report on Developing Microstructure-Property Correlation in Reactor Materials using in situ High-Energy X-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Meimei [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Almer, Jonathan D. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Yang, Yong [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Tan, Lizhen [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-01-01

    This report provides a summary of research activities on understanding microstructure – property correlation in reactor materials using in situ high-energy X-rays. The report is a Level 2 deliverable in FY16 (M2CA-13-IL-AN_-0403-0111), under the Work Package CA-13-IL-AN_- 0403-01, “Microstructure-Property Correlation in Reactor Materials using in situ High Energy Xrays”, as part of the DOE-NE NEET Program. The objective of this project is to demonstrate the application of in situ high energy X-ray measurements of nuclear reactor materials under thermal-mechanical loading, to understand their microstructure-property relationships. The gained knowledge is expected to enable accurate predictions of mechanical performance of these materials subjected to extreme environments, and to further facilitate development of advanced reactor materials. The report provides detailed description of the in situ X-ray Radiated Materials (iRadMat) apparatus designed to interface with a servo-hydraulic load frame at beamline 1-ID at the Advanced Photon Source. This new capability allows in situ studies of radioactive specimens subject to thermal-mechanical loading using a suite of high-energy X-ray scattering and imaging techniques. We conducted several case studies using the iRadMat to obtain a better understanding of deformation and fracture mechanisms of irradiated materials. In situ X-ray measurements on neutron-irradiated pure metal and model alloy and several representative reactor materials, e.g. pure Fe, Fe-9Cr model alloy, 316 SS, HT-UPS, and duplex cast austenitic stainless steels (CASS) CF-8 were performed under tensile loading at temperatures of 20-400°C in vacuum. A combination of wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS), small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), and imaging techniques were utilized to interrogate microstructure at different length scales in real time while the specimen was subject to thermal-mechanical loading. In addition, in situ X-ray studies were

  13. Local investment in renewable energies - European experiences; Investissement local dans les energies renouvelables - recueil d'experiences europeennes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quantin, J; Grepmeier, K; Larsen, J; Manolakaki, E; Smith, M

    2004-01-01

    This booklet is realized within the framework of the european commission called PREDAC. This document have been conceived by a working group specialized on the local investment into renewable energies thematic. The objectives of this project are: to promote citizen participation in the financing of renewable energies projects in Europe; to make organizations, investor clubs and local government to be aware of this way of implication into renewable energies development; to examine more especially three renewable energy sources: biomass, photovoltaic and wind in Denmark, France, Germany, Greece and United Kingdom. (author)

  14. Local investment in renewable energies - European experiences; Investissement local dans les energies renouvelables - recueil d'experiences europeennes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quantin, J.; Grepmeier, K.; Larsen, J.; Manolakaki, E.; Smith, M

    2004-01-01

    This booklet is realized within the framework of the european commission called PREDAC. This document have been conceived by a working group specialized on the local investment into renewable energies thematic. The objectives of this project are: to promote citizen participation in the financing of renewable energies projects in Europe; to make organizations, investor clubs and local government to be aware of this way of implication into renewable energies development; to examine more especially three renewable energy sources: biomass, photovoltaic and wind in Denmark, France, Germany, Greece and United Kingdom. (author)

  15. Measuring decision weights in recognition experiments with multiple response alternatives: comparing the correlation and multinomial-logistic-regression methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Huanping; Micheyl, Christophe

    2012-11-01

    Psychophysical "reverse-correlation" methods allow researchers to gain insight into the perceptual representations and decision weighting strategies of individual subjects in perceptual tasks. Although these methods have gained momentum, until recently their development was limited to experiments involving only two response categories. Recently, two approaches for estimating decision weights in m-alternative experiments have been put forward. One approach extends the two-category correlation method to m > 2 alternatives; the second uses multinomial logistic regression (MLR). In this article, the relative merits of the two methods are discussed, and the issues of convergence and statistical efficiency of the methods are evaluated quantitatively using Monte Carlo simulations. The results indicate that, for a range of values of the number of trials, the estimated weighting patterns are closer to their asymptotic values for the correlation method than for the MLR method. Moreover, for the MLR method, weight estimates for different stimulus components can exhibit strong correlations, making the analysis and interpretation of measured weighting patterns less straightforward than for the correlation method. These and other advantages of the correlation method, which include computational simplicity and a close relationship to other well-established psychophysical reverse-correlation methods, make it an attractive tool to uncover decision strategies in m-alternative experiments.

  16. Correlation between viscous-flow activation energy and phase diagram in four systems of Cu-based alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ning Shuang [Key Laboratory of Liquid Structure and Heredity of Materials, Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Bian Xiufang, E-mail: xfbian@sdu.edu.c [Key Laboratory of Liquid Structure and Heredity of Materials, Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Ren Zhenfeng [Key Laboratory of Liquid Structure and Heredity of Materials, Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China)

    2010-09-01

    Activation energy is obtained from temperature dependence of viscosities by means of a fitting to the Arrhenius equation for liquid alloys of Cu-Sb, Cu-Te, Cu-Sn and Cu-Ag systems. We found that the changing trend of activation energy curves with concentration is similar to that of liquidus in the phase diagrams. Moreover, a maximum value of activation energy is in the composition range of the intermetallic phases and a minimum value of activation energy is located at the eutectic point. The correlation between the activation energy and the phase diagrams has been further discussed.

  17. Experience with Energy Efficiency Requirements for Electrical Equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    This publication has been produced as part of the work programme in support of the Gleneagles Plan of Action (GPOA), where the IEA was requested to 'undertake a study to review existing global appliance standards and codes'. In accordance with the G8 request, this study investigates the coverage and impact of forms of minimum energy performance standards (MEPS) and comparative energy labelling programmes; which comprise the cornerstone of most IEA countries national energy efficiency strategy. This scope also reflects governments' aspirations to achieve ambitious targets for reducing greenhouse gas emissions. As a result, this study does not address endorsement labelling and associated voluntary programmes, although these are also important policy tools for national energy efficiency strategies.

  18. GEWEX: The Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahine, M.; Vane, D.

    1994-01-01

    GEWEX is one of the world's largest global change research programs. Its purpose is to observe and understand the hydrological cycle and energy fluxes in the atmosphere, at land surfaces and in the upper oceans.

  19. Trade-offs between Energy Efficiency improvements and additional Renewable Energy supply: A review of international experiences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baldini, Mattia; Klinge Jacobsen, Henrik

    improvements made in the energy saving field. Indeed, less attention has been paid to implement energy efficiency measures in energy systems modeling, which has resulted in scenarios where expedients for a wise use of energy (e.g. energy savings and renewables’ share) are unbalanced and cost......-savings opportunities are missed. The aim of this paper is to review and evaluate international experiences on finding the optimal trade-off between efficiency improvements and additional renewable energy supply. A critical review of each technique, focusing on purposes, methodology and outcomes, is provided along......-makers, informations useful for identify a suitable analysis for investigate on the optimal trade-off between renewables and energy efficiency measures in energy-systems under different objectives....

  20. Climatic correlates of tree mortality in water- and energy-limited forests.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian J Das

    Full Text Available Recent increases in tree mortality rates across the western USA are correlated with increasing temperatures, but mechanisms remain unresolved. Specifically, increasing mortality could predominantly be a consequence of temperature-induced increases in either (1 drought stress, or (2 the effectiveness of tree-killing insects and pathogens. Using long-term data from California's Sierra Nevada mountain range, we found that in water-limited (low-elevation forests mortality was unambiguously best modeled by climatic water deficit, consistent with the first mechanism. In energy-limited (high-elevation forests deficit models were only equivocally better than temperature models, suggesting that the second mechanism is increasingly important in these forests. We could not distinguish between models predicting mortality using absolute versus relative changes in water deficit, and these two model types led to different forecasts of mortality vulnerability under future climate scenarios. Our results provide evidence for differing climatic controls of tree mortality in water- and energy-limited forests, while highlighting the need for an improved understanding of tree mortality processes.

  1. Two-electron germanium centers with a negative correlation energy in lead chalcogenides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terukov, E. I.; Marchenko, A. V.; Zaitseva, A. V.; Seregin, P. P.

    2007-01-01

    It is shown that the charge state of the 73 Ge antisite defect that arises in anionic sublattices of PbS, PbSe, and PbTe after radioactive transformation of 73 As does not depend on the position of the Fermi level, whereas the 73 Ge center in cationic sublattices of PbS and PbSe represents a two-electron donor with the negative correlation energy: the Moessbauer spectrum for the n-type samples corresponds to the neutral state of the donor center (Ge 2+ ), while this spectrum corresponds to the doubly ionized state (Ge 4+ ) of the center in the p-type samples. In partially compensated PbSe samples, a fast electron exchange between the neutral and ionized donor centers is realized. It is shown by the method of Moessbauer spectroscopy for the 119 Sn isotope that the germanium-related energy levels are located higher than the levels formed in the band gap of these semiconductors by the impurity tin atoms

  2. Forecasting model for energy consumption in South Africa correlated with the income

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siti, M.W.; Nicolae, D.V.; Jimoh, A.A. [Tshwane Univ. of Technology, Pretoria (South Africa). Dept. of Electrical Engineers

    2008-07-01

    Demand-side-management (DSM) programs are used to influence customer electricity usage and reduce capital and operating costs for electric utilities. Escalating fuel costs and regulatory pressure are now causing some municipalities to consider demand-side options as alternatives to traditional resource planning. A mathematical model for forecasting energy consumption in South Africa was presented in this paper. The model used data from an energy consumption audit conducted in South Africa, and was correlated to the income of consumers. The model was used to study the impact of society, personality, and fixed contribution indexes on electricity consumption. Results of the modelling study showed that a higher fixed contribution factor indicates a more developed economic infrastructure and higher electrical expenditure. The personality index influences dynamic expenditures that are likely to be improved by electricity awareness programs. The study also showed that small changes in the society index can have a significant impact on electricity consumption. The model can be extrapolated to predict load profiles for particular localities or communities based on household income data. The model can also be used to validate load shaping, profiling, and prediction approaches. 6 refs., 4 tabs., 6 figs.

  3. Renewable energy and sustainable communities: Alaska's wind generator experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konkel, R Steven

    2013-01-01

    In 1984, the Alaska Department of Commerce and Economic Development (DCED) issued the State's first inventory/economic assessment of wind generators, documenting installed wind generator capacity and the economics of replacing diesel-fuel-generated electricity. Alaska's wind generation capacity had grown from hundreds of installed kilowatts to over 15.3 megawatts (MW) by January 2012. This article reviews data and conclusions presented in "Alaska's Wind Energy Systems; Inventory and Economic Assessment" (1). (Alaska Department of Commerce and Economic Development, S. Konkel, 1984). It provides a foundation and baseline for understanding the development of this renewable energy source. Today's technologies have evolved at an astonishing pace; a typical generator in an Alaska wind farm now is likely rated at 1.5-MW capacity, compared to the single-kilowatt (kW) machines present in 1984. Installed capacity has mushroomed, illustrated by Unalakleet's 600-kW wind farm dwarfing the original three 10-kW machines included in the 1984 inventory. Kodiak Electric had three 1.5-MW turbines installed at Pillar Mountain in 2009, with three additional turbines of 4.5-MW capacity installed in 2012. Utilities now actively plan for wind generation and compete for state funding. State of Alaska energy policy provides the context for energy project decision-making. Substantial renewable energy fund (REF) awards--$202,000,000 to date for 227 REF projects in the first 5 cycles of funding--along with numerous energy conservation programs--are now in place. Increasing investment in wind is driven by multiple factors. Stakeholders have interests both in public policy and meeting private investment objectives. Wind generator investors should consider project economics and potential impacts of energy decisions on human health. Specifically this article considers: changing environmental conditions in remote Alaska villages, impacts associated with climate change on human health, progress in

  4. Wind energy development: Danish experiences and international options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frandsen, S.; Hasted, F.; Josephsen, L.; Nielson, J.H.

    1989-01-01

    In Denmark, wind energy makes a visible contribution to energy planning. Since 1976, over 1,800 wind turbine units have been installed in Denmark, representing a capacity of ca 140 MW out of a grid capacity of 8,000 MW. These units are all grid-connected and the unit sizes range from 55 kW to 400 kW. The installed wind energy capacity represents a substantial development of technologies for wind energy utilization during the last 15 years, involving participation from research institutes, electric utilities, private industry, and the national energy administration. A considerable improvement of the technical and economic performance of wind turbines, along with increased reliability and durability, has been strongly supported by comprehensive government programs. In 1985, another large construction program was initiated which will add 100 MW wind power capacity by the end of 1990. Parallel with commercial development, Danish utilities have developed and constructed a number of megawatt-size wind turbines on a pilot basis. In general terms the wind energy resources in Denmark are rather good, and many suitable sites exist, but installed wind energy capacity is limited by the high population density. Consequently, research is being conducted on the feasibility of offshore wind turbines. In other countries, wind energy developments similar to those in Denmark are taking place. In communities with no connection to the national grid, special attention should be paid to hybrid systems such as wind-diesel and hydro-wind systems. A substantial transfer of technology is required for facilitating significant development of hybrid systems in developing countries. 11 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  5. Correlations between nuclear data and results of integral slab experiments. Case of hafnium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palau, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to evaluate how much integral slab experiments can both reduce discrepancies between experimental results and calculations, and improve the knowledge of hafnium isotopes neutronic parameters by an adapted sensitivity and uncertainty method. A statistical approach, based on the generalized least squares method and perturbation theory, has been incorporated into our calculation system in order to deduce microscopic cross-section adjustments from observed integral measurements on this particular 'mock-up' reactor. In this study it has been established that the correlations between integral parameters and hafnium capture cross-sections enable specific variations in the region of resolved resonances at the level of multigroup and punctual cross-sections recommended data (JEF-2.2 evaluation) to be highlighted. The use of determinist methods (APOLLO2 code) together with Monte Carlo- type simulations (TRIPOLI4 code) enabled a depth analysis of the modelling approximations to be carried out. Furthermore, the sensitivity coefficient validation technique employed leads to a reliable assessment of the quality of the new basic nuclear data. In this instance, the adjustments proposed for certain isotope 177 Hf resonance parameters reduce, after error propagation, by 3 to 5 per cent the difference between experimental results and calculations related to this absorbent's efficiency. Beyond this particular application, the qualification methodology integrated in our calculation system should enable other basic sizing parameters to be treated (chemical / geometric data or other unexplored nuclear data) to make technological requirements less stringent. (author)

  6. Correlations between nuclear data and integral slab experiments: the case of hafnium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palau, J.M.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate how much integral slab experiments can both reduce discrepancies between experimental results and calculations, and improve the knowledge of hafnium isotopes neutronic parameters by an adapted sensitivity and uncertainty method. A statistical approach, based on the generalized least squares method and perturbation theory, has been incorporated into our calculation system in order to deduce microscopic cross-section adjustments from observed integral measurements on this particular 'mock-up' reactor.In this study it has been established that the correlations between integral parameters and hafnium capture cross-sections enable specific variations in the region of resolved resonances at the level of multigroup and punctual cross-sections recommended data (JEF-2.2 evaluation) to be highlighted. The use of determinist methods together with Monte Carlo- type simulations enabled a depth analysis of the modelling approximations to be carried out. Furthermore, the sensitivity coefficient validation technique employed leads to a reliable assessment of the quality of the new basic nuclear data. In this instance, the adjustments proposed for certain isotope 177 Hf resonance parameters reduce, after error propagation, by 3 to 5 per cent the difference between experimental results and calculations related to this absorbent's efficiency. Beyond this particular application, the qualification methodology integrated in our calculation system should enable other basic sizing parameters to be treated (chemical / geometric data or other unexplored nuclear data) to make technological requirements less stringent. (author)

  7. Investigation into magnetic correlations in cuprates by means of neutron scattering experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henggeler, W.

    1996-01-01

    This thesis shows the results of our investigation on cuprate materials containing rare earth ions. The main experimental tools were inelastic and elastic neutron scattering techniques. In some cases we also performed μSR, susceptibility and specific heat measurements. One aim was to learn more about the crystalline environment of the rare earth ions in these substances via the crystalline electric field (CEF) interaction. Furthermore, we investigated the correlations of the magnetic moments of these ions by a determination of the dispersion of the CEF excitations. The theory that is essential for the understanding of this work is outlined. The instruments on which the experiments have been performed are presented in the third chapter. In the fourth chapter we show the measurements of the CEF excitations of Ho 3+ in Y 0.99 Ho 0.01 Ba 2 Cu 3 O 6+x . The Ho ions represent ideal local probes to examine changes of the charge distribution in the copper oxide planes upon doping with oxygen. To prevent any influence of the Ho-Ho exchange interaction on the CEF excitations we performed the experiments on substances containing only one percent of Ho. Our results show that for all the intermediately doped compounds the charge distribution is very inhomogeneous. For all the highly doped samples we observe a line asymmetry for which several possible origins are discussed. In the fifth chapter we examine the Pr 3+ CEF excitations in the Pr 2-x Ce x CuO 4(-δ) (0≤x≤0.2)-substances. Our results show a coexistence of different environments of the Pr ions in all the doped compounds. We try to describe these inhomogeneities with the help of a model. We used the μSR-technique on some of these samples in order to learn more about the oxygen reduction process. Finally, we performed inelastic neutron scattering experiments on Pr 1.86 Ce 0.14 CuO 4 single crystal, which allowed a direct determination of the coupling constants between the magnetic moments of the Pr ions. (author

  8. Correlates of use of alcohol mixed with energy drinks among youth across 10 US metropolitan areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Shivani R; Cottler, Linda B; Striley, Catherine W

    2016-06-01

    Predictors of use of alcohol mixed with energy drinks (AmED) among youth have been understudied. The current analyses investigated the prevalence of and correlates for use of AmED among alcohol users from a national study of stimulant use among youth. The National Monitoring of Adolescent Prescription Stimulants Study (N-MAPSS) assessed behaviors and risk factors for stimulant use from 11,048 youth, 10-18 years of age recruited from entertainment venues across 10 US cities. Of the four cross sections, two had questions on having alcohol mixed with energy drinks (AmED) in the past 30 days along with sociodemographic characteristics, current tobacco and marijuana use and current nonmedical use of prescription opioids, anxiolytics, and stimulants. Only 13 to18 year olds and those who reported alcohol use were included in the analyses. Overall, 28.4% (1392 out of 4905) of the 13 to18 year olds reported past 30-day alcohol use. Among alcohol users, 27% reported having alcohol mixed with energy drinks in the past 30 days. Multivariate logistic regression indicated that use of AmED was significantly associated with tobacco and marijuana use and nonmedical use of prescription stimulants. Underage drinking is common among youth and more than a quarter of these drinkers use AmED. Use of AmED is significantly associated with tobacco and marijuana use and nonmedical use of prescription stimulants. Drug and alcohol intervention programs should educate on the risks of AmED, as the same population is at high-risk for use of AmED and alcohol/drug use. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. SLAC's Polarized Electron Source LaserSystem and Minimization of Helicity Correlations for the E-158 Parity Violation Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Humensky, T

    2002-01-01

    SLAC E-158 is an experiment designed to make the first measurement of parity violation in Moeller scattering. E-158 will measure the right-left cross-section asymmetry, A sub L sub R sup M sup o sup e sup l sup l sup e sup r , in the elastic scattering of a 45-GeV polarized electron beam off unpolarized electrons in a liquid hydrogen target. E-158 plans to measure the expected Standard Model asymmetry of approx 10 sup - sup 7 to an accuracy of better than 10 sup - sup 8. To make this measurement, the polarized electron source requires for operation an intense circularly polarized laser beam and the ability to quickly switch between right- and left-helicity polarization states with minimal right-left helicity-correlated asymmetries in the resulting beam parameters (intensity, position, angle, spot size, and energy), sup b sup e sup a sup m A sub L sub R 's. This laser beam is produced by a unique SLAC-designed flashlamp-pumped Ti:Sapphire laser and is propagated through a carefully designed set of polarization...

  10. On the determination of neutrino masses and dark energy evolution from the cross-correlation of CMB and LSS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichikawa, Kazuhide; Takahashi, Tomo

    2008-01-01

    We discuss the possibilities of the simultaneous determination of the neutrino masses and the evolution of dark energy from future cosmological observations such as cosmic microwave background (CMB), large scale structure (LSS) and the cross-correlation between them. Recently it has been discussed that there is a degeneracy between the neutrino masses and the equation of state for dark energy. It is also known that there are some degeneracies among the parameters describing the dark energy evolution. We discuss the implications of these for the cross-correlation of CMB with LSS in some detail. Then we consider to what extent we can determine the neutrino masses and the dark energy evolution using the expected data from CMB, LSS and their cross-correlation

  11. Pion correlations and calorimeter design for high energy heavy ion collisions. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, K.L.

    1997-01-01

    Data analysis is in progress for recent experiments performed by the NA44 collaboration with the first running of 160 A GeV 208 Pb-induced reactions at the CERN SPS. Identified singles spectra were taken for pions, kaons, protons, deuterons, antiprotons and antideuterons. Two-pion interferometry measurements were made for semi-central-triggered 208 Pb + Pb collisions. An updated multi-particle spectrometer allows high statistics data sets of identified particles to be collected near mid-rapidity. A second series of experiments will be performed in the fall of 1995 with more emphasis on identical kaon interferometry and on the measurement of rare particle spectra and correlations. Modest instrumentation upgrades by TAMU are designed to increase the trigger function for better impact parameter selection and improved collection efficiency of valid events. An effort to achieve the highest degree of projectile-target stopping is outlined and it is argued that an excitation function on the SPS is needed to better understand reaction mechanisms. Analysis of experimental results is in the final stages at LBL in the EOS collaboration for two-pion interferometry in the 1.2 A GeV Au + Au reaction, taken with full event characterization

  12. Pion and kaon correlations in high energy heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, K.L.

    1996-01-01

    Data analysis is in progress for recent experiments performed by the NA44 collaboration with the first running of 160 A GeV 208 Pb-induced reactions at the CERN SPS. Identified singles spectra were taken for pions, kaons, protons, deuterons, antiprotons and antideuterons. Two-pion interferometry measurements were made for semi-central-triggered 208 Pb + Pb collisions. An upgraded multi-particle spectrometer allows high statistics data sets of identified particles to be collected near mid-rapidity. A second series of experiments will be performed in the fall of 1995 with more emphasis on identical kaon interferometry and on the measurement of rare particle spectra and correlations. Modest instrumentation upgrades by TAMU are designed to increase the trigger function for better impact parameter selection and improved collection efficiency of valid events. An effort to achieve the highest degree of projectile-target stopping is outlined and it is argued that an excitation function on the SPS is needed to better understand reaction mechanisms. Analysis of experimental results is in the final stages at LBL in the EOS collaboration for two-pion interferometry in the 1.2 A GeV Au+Au reaction, taken with full event characterization. 35 refs., 15 figs., 5 tabs

  13. Phoenix II energy extraction and angular multiplexing experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, J.M.; Hays, G.N.

    1981-08-01

    The energy extraction efficiency as a function of input intensity has been determined from a large-volume HF amplifier. For an input intensity of 4 x 10 6 W/cm 2 , 1080 Joules was extracted from the amplifier. This corresponded to an energy extraction efficiency of 0.90. At the highest H 2 /F 2 /O 2 pressures used, 1700 Joules was obtained from this system when used in an oscillator configuration. These results also show evidence that energy extraction at low input intensities in large-volume HF amplifiers is strongly influenced by parasitic oscillations. The results also indicate that, for a long-pulse HF amplifier (60-nsec electron beam), the timing between the amplifier and oscillator to achieve optimum operating conditions is not very critical. This same amplifier, used in conjunction with a short-pulse, good-beam-quality oscillator-preamplifier chain, has also been used to evaluate pulse compression using angular multiplexing. Using two sequential 24-nsec pulses, the essential elements of angular multiplexing have been evaluated as a function of interpulse separation time. Included are energy extraction efficiency, overall temporal pulse distortion, leading-edge contrast-ratio distortion, and suppression of amplified spontaneous emission relative to a single, long-duration input pulse. For appropriate interpulse delay time, we show that distortionless amplification is possible with energy-extraction efficiency the same as is obtained using a single input beam having a pulse width equal to the duration of the amplifier gain

  14. Energy efficiency in urban management: Russian and world experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryadko, Igor

    2017-10-01

    The article discusses the role of energetics in creating a comfortable and safe environment of modern megacities, and the problem is considered in the socio-economic aspect. The object is the energy security of the city, and the subject is the influence of urban society on the formation of energy security. In particular, the problems are raised: ecological problems of urban energy supply, the condition of surface layer of the atmosphere near electric power lines. The author assesses the actions, implemented by the urban authorities in Mytischi, in the southwestern areas of New Moscow. The author assesses these sample areas on the basis of Ch. Landry’s concept of self-training, designated for municipal authorities and urban communities, and offers several successfully implemented self-study cases and in the light of modern methods of ensuring energy security. The forecasts of creation of energy-safe space, made by modern sociologist-urbanist Leo Hollis, are taken into account. The author also considers some of the economic aspects of biosphere safety. In particular, he insists that biosphere safety, convenience, and comfort have developed into competitive advantages in the housing market.

  15. Analysis of NIF experiments with the minimal energy implosion model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, B., E-mail: bcheng@lanl.gov; Kwan, T. J. T.; Wang, Y. M.; Merrill, F. E.; Batha, S. H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Cerjan, C. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    We apply a recently developed analytical model of implosion and thermonuclear burn to fusion capsule experiments performed at the National Ignition Facility that used low-foot and high-foot laser pulse formats. Our theoretical predictions are consistent with the experimental data. Our studies, together with neutron image analysis, reveal that the adiabats of the cold fuel in both low-foot and high-foot experiments are similar. That is, the cold deuterium-tritium shells in those experiments are all in a high adiabat state at the time of peak implosion velocity. The major difference between low-foot and high-foot capsule experiments is the growth of the shock-induced instabilities developed at the material interfaces which lead to fuel mixing with ablator material. Furthermore, we have compared the NIF capsules performance with the ignition criteria and analyzed the alpha particle heating in the NIF experiments. Our analysis shows that alpha heating was appreciable only in the high-foot experiments.

  16. Analysis of NIF experiments with the minimal energy implosion model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, B.; Kwan, T. J. T.; Wang, Y. M.; Merrill, F. E.; Batha, S. H.; Cerjan, C. J.

    2015-01-01

    We apply a recently developed analytical model of implosion and thermonuclear burn to fusion capsule experiments performed at the National Ignition Facility that used low-foot and high-foot laser pulse formats. Our theoretical predictions are consistent with the experimental data. Our studies, together with neutron image analysis, reveal that the adiabats of the cold fuel in both low-foot and high-foot experiments are similar. That is, the cold deuterium-tritium shells in those experiments are all in a high adiabat state at the time of peak implosion velocity. The major difference between low-foot and high-foot capsule experiments is the growth of the shock-induced instabilities developed at the material interfaces which lead to fuel mixing with ablator material. Furthermore, we have compared the NIF capsules performance with the ignition criteria and analyzed the alpha particle heating in the NIF experiments. Our analysis shows that alpha heating was appreciable only in the high-foot experiments

  17. Overcoming correlation fluctuations in two-photon interference experiments with differently bright and independently blinking remote quantum emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Jonas H.; Kettler, Jan; Vural, Hüseyin; Müller, Markus; Maisch, Julian; Jetter, Michael; Portalupi, Simone L.; Michler, Peter

    2018-05-01

    As a fundamental building block for quantum computation and communication protocols, the correct verification of the two-photon interference (TPI) contrast between two independent quantum light sources is of utmost importance. Here, we experimentally demonstrate how frequently present blinking dynamics and changes in emitter brightness critically affect the Hong-Ou-Mandel-type (HOM) correlation histograms of remote TPI experiments measured via the commonly utilized setup configuration. We further exploit this qualitative and quantitative explanation of the observed correlation dynamics to establish an alternative interferometer configuration, which is overcoming the discussed temporal fluctuations, giving rise to an error-free determination of the remote TPI visibility. We prove full knowledge of the obtained correlation by reproducing the measured correlation statistics via Monte Carlo simulations. As an exemplary system, we make use of two pairs of remote semiconductor quantum dots; however, the same conclusions apply for TPI experiments with flying qubits from any kind of remote solid-state quantum emitters.

  18. Discovering Inexpensive, Effective Catalysts for Solar Energy Conversion: An Authentic Research Laboratory Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaner, Sarah E.; Hooker, Paul D.; Nickel, Anne-Marie; Leichtfuss, Amanda R.; Adams, Carissa S.; de la Cerda, Dionisia; She, Yuqi; Gerken, James B.; Pokhrel, Ravi; Ambrose, Nicholas J.; Khaliqi, David; Stahl, Shannon S.; Schuttlefield Christus, Jennifer D.

    2016-01-01

    Electrochemical water oxidation is a major focus of solar energy conversion efforts. A new laboratory experiment has been developed that utilizes real-time, hands-on research to discover catalysts for solar energy conversion. The HARPOON, or Heterogeneous Anodes Rapidly Perused for Oxygen Overpotential Neutralization, experiment allows an array of…

  19. Review of recent benchmark experiments on integral test for high energy nuclear data evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakashima, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Susumu; Konno, Chikara; Fukahori, Tokio; Hayashi, Katsumi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-11-01

    A survey work of recent benchmark experiments on an integral test for high energy nuclear data evaluation was carried out as one of the work of the Task Force on JENDL High Energy File Integral Evaluation (JHEFIE). In this paper the results are compiled and the status of recent benchmark experiments is described. (author)

  20. Alexandria electricity distribution company (AEDC) experience in energy conservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youssef, K.; Soliman, O.; Nabil, A.

    2005-01-01

    Alexandria is the second capital of Egypt and represents forty percent of Egypt's industrial activities. There are about 350 big industrial firms and more than 2 thousands small and medium enterprises. This industries produces significant greenhouse gas emission. Good efforts are exerted in the field of energy saving and environment conservation by AEDC in order to reduce and limit greenhouse gas emission. AEDC participated in many projects sponsored by different foreign counterparts. These projects are: 1 - Energy and urban environment in Mediterranean countries: Phases 1, 2(1995-1996). 2 - Demand side management (DSM) 1996 - 1997. 3 - Energy and urban environment in Mediterranean countries: Phases 3 (2002-2003). 4 - Global environment facility ( GEF ) 1999 - 2003. The results of these pilot projects are presented in details in this paper

  1. HISTORICAL EXPERIENCE OF RUSSIA-KAZAKHSTAN GEO-ENERGY COMPLEX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Владимир Ильич Цай

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the perspective directions of the Russian Federation and the Republic of Kazakhstan in the sphere of fuel and energy complex. The authors give particular examples of the joint implementation of the adopted documents aimed at strengthening the two countries’ cooperation in the exploration and production of oil and gas in the past decade. Particular attention is paid to the Russia-Kazakhstan cooperation in the spheres of nuclear power, oil and oil products. These areas are considered by the example of the largest enterprises of fuel and energy complexes of Russia and Kazakhstan. One of the main components of the fuel and energy complex is the Petroleum Industry.

  2. Early experience in centralized real time energy market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alaywan, Z.; Hernandez, L.; Martin, M.

    2005-01-01

    The current structure of the California Independent System Operator (ISO) was described. The study provided an outline of California's transition from a decentralized pool operation to a forward bilateral market through the implementation of a centralized real time market. Details of the institutional, economic and technological history of the power system were provided. Although the California real time market was implemented in order to simplify the power system, a number of operational challenges were observed. Discontinuities in the energy curve resulted in the implementation of a target price process, which aimed to resolve the overlap in energy bids. The design of the ISO's real time market did not provide a mechanism for bidders to execute real time energy trades. Regulation bidders also internalized energy in their regulation capacity bids. The real time market application (RTMA) provided the ISO with a substantial computer program to determine and account for nearly all aspects of generation unit scheduling and physical characteristics with a multiple ramp rate. The program combined optimal power flow (OPF) logic for energy flows in addition to mixed-integer nonlinear optimization of trading schedules, and system and security constraints. The RTMA used a multi-period security constrained economic dispatch (SCED) function to optimize energy dispatch schedules. Other features of the RTMA included security constrained unit commitment, security constrained economic dispatch, and dispatch schedule post processes. It was concluded that implementation of the RTMA has increased the efficiency of the ISO. A case study of the RTMA during an outage in November 2004 was provided. 5 refs., 1 tab., 2 figs

  3. Needs for experiment and theory in intermediate energy reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blann, M.

    1991-01-01

    We summarize several reasons intermediate energy data are needed in both basic and applied science. The status of the data base at energies up to 2 GeV is cursorily reviewed. Experimental excitation functions, single and double differential cross sections are compared with predictions of the nuclear model code ALICE. The strengths and weaknesses of the code to reproduce data are summarized. Opinions are given as to areas where data are too few or totally lacking, yet are needed for the verification of models and theories. (author). 25 refs, 22 figs

  4. Renewable energy and rural development activities experience in Bangladesh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barua, D.C.

    1997-12-01

    The per capita per year fuel consumption in Bangladesh is only 56 kg oil equivalent. The supply of electricity by Bangladesh power development board (BPDB) and Dhaka electricity supply authority (DESA) is mainly confined to cities and towns. Rural Electrification Board (REB) distributes electricity to the rural people through cooperatives. The rural cooperatives cover only 10% of the total population. Only about 15% of the total population is directly connected to the electricity. In order to meet the increasing energy demand for development of agriculture and industry and for the generation of better employment opportunities, it will be necessary to harness all the available alternative sources of energy immediately.

  5. Quark model and high-energy nuclear experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bialas, A.

    1979-05-01

    Theoretical aspects of the measurements of production of low transverse momentum secondaries in high-energy hadron-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions are discussed. Applications of the quark model to those processes are discussed in some detail. 58 references

  6. Jet energy scale determination in the D0 experiment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B.S.; Kupčo, Alexander; Lokajíček, Miloš

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 763, Nov (2014), s. 442-475 ISSN 0168-9002 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LG12006 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : Batavia TEVATRON Coll * liquid argon * uranium * jet * flavor * dijet * gluon * jet * DZERO * anti-p p * interaction Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 1.216, year: 2014

  7. Quark model and high-energy nuclear experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bialas, A.

    1979-05-01

    Theoretical aspects of the measurements of production of low transverse momentum secondaries in high-energy hadron-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions are discussed. Applications of the quark model to those processes are discussed in some detail. 58 references.

  8. The LPCTrap experiment: measurement of the β-ν angular correlation in 6He using a transparent Paul trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lienard, E.; Ban, G.; Blieck, J.; Durand, D.; Duval, F.; Flechard, X.; Herbane, M.; Labalme, M.; Lemiere, Y.; Mauger, F.; Mery, A.; Naviliat-Cuncic, O.; Rodriguez, D.; Thomas, J. C.

    2006-01-01

    We report on the status of the LPCTrap experiment, devoted to measure the β-ν angular correlation in the pure Gamow-Teller decay of 6 He. This measurement is motivated by the search for the presence of tensor type contributions to the weak interaction. The 6 He ions are confined in a novel transparent Paul trap. The β particles and the recoil ions are detected in coincidence to deduce the angular correlation parameter. The commissioning run performed in 2005 has given the proof of principle of this experiment. Up to 10 5 coincidences were recorded during a second run in 2006.

  9. Spin-density correlations in the dynamic spin-fluctuation theory: Comparison with polarized neutron scattering experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melnikov, N.B., E-mail: melnikov@cs.msu.su [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Reser, B.I., E-mail: reser@imp.uran.ru [Miheev Institute of Metal Physics, Ural Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, Ekaterinburg 620990 (Russian Federation); Paradezhenko, G.V., E-mail: gparadezhenko@cs.msu.su [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation)

    2016-08-01

    To study the spin-density correlations in the ferromagnetic metals above the Curie temperature, we relate the spin correlator and neutron scattering cross-section. In the dynamic spin-fluctuation theory, we obtain explicit expressions for the effective and local magnetic moments and spatial spin-density correlator. Our theoretical results are demonstrated by the example of bcc Fe. The effective and local moments are found in good agreement with results of polarized neutron scattering experiment over a wide temperature range. The calculated short-range order is small (up to 4 Å) and slowly decreases with temperature.

  10. A study of energy-energy correlations in e+e- annihilations at √s = 34.6 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, C.; Genzel, H.; Lackas, W.; Pielorz, J.; Raupach, F.; Wagner, W.; Ferrarotto, F.; Gaspero, M.; Stella, B.; Zachara, M.; Bussey, P.J.; Cartwright, S.L.; Dainton, J.B.; King, B.T.; Raine, C.; Scarr, J.M.; Skillicorn, I.O.; Smith, K.M.; Thomson, J.C.; Achterberg, O.; Blobel, V.; Burkart, D.; Diehlmann, K.; Feindt, M.; Kapitza, H.; Koppitz, B.; Krueger, M.; Poppe, M.; Spitzer, H.; Staa, R. van; Almeida, F.; Baecker, A.; Barreiro, F.; Brandt, S.; Derikum, K.; Grupen, C.; Meyer, H.J.; Mueller, H.; Neumann, B.; Rost, M.; Stupperich, K.; Zech, G.; Alexander, G.; Bella, G.; Gnat, Y.; Grunhaus, J.; Junge, H.; Kraski, K.; Maxeiner, C.; Maxeiner, H.; Meyer, H.; Schmidt, D.; Buerger, J.; Criegee, L.; Deuter, A.; Franke, G.; Gerke, C.; Knies, G.; Lewendel, B.; Meyer, J.; Michelsen, U.; Pape, K.H.; Timm, U.; Winter, G.G.; Zimmermann, W.

    1985-05-01

    We present high statistics measurements of the energy-energy correlation (EEC) and its related asymmetry (AEEC) in e + e - annihilation at a c.m. energy of 34.6 GeV. We find that the energy dependence as well as the large angle behaviour of the latter are well described by perturbative QCD calculations to O(αsub(s) 2 ). Non-pertubative effects are estimated with the help of fragmentation models in which different jet topologies are separated using (epsilon,delta) cuts, and found to be small. The extracted values of Δsub(MS) lie between 100 and 300 MeV. (orig.)

  11. Event-related potential correlates of paranormal ideation and unusual experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumich, Alex; Kumari, Veena; Gordon, Evian; Tunstall, Nigel; Brammer, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Separate dimensions of schizotypy have been differentially associated with electrophysiological measures of brain function, and further shown to be modified by sex/gender. We investigated event-related potential (ERP) correlates of two subdimensions of positive schizotypy, paranormal ideation (PI) and unusual experiences (UEs). Seventy-two individuals with no psychiatric diagnosis (men=36) completed self-report measures of UE and PI and performed an auditory oddball task. Average scores for N100, N200 and P300 amplitudes were calculated for left and right anterior, central and posterior electrode sites. Multiple linear regression was used to examine the relationships between the measures of schizotypy and ERPs across the entire sample, as well as separately according to sex. PI was inversely associated with P300 amplitude at left-central sites across the entire sample, and at right-anterior electrodes in women only. Right-anterior P300 and right-posterior N100 amplitudes were negatively associated with UE in women only. Across the entire sample, UE was negatively associated with left-central N100 amplitude, and positively associated with left-anterior N200 amplitude. These results provide support from electrophysiological measures for the fractionation of the positive dimension of schizotypy into subdimensions of PI and UE, and lend indirect support to dimensional or quasidimensional conceptions of psychosis. More specifically, they suggest that PI may be associated with alteration in contextual updating processes, and that UE may reflect altered sensory/early-attention (N100) mechanisms. The sex differences observed are consistent with those previously observed in individuals with schizophrenia.

  12. Correlation between peak energy and Fourier power density spectrum slope in gamma-ray bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dichiara, S.; Guidorzi, C.; Amati, L.; Frontera, F.; Margutti, R.

    2016-05-01

    Context. The origin of the gamma-ray burst (GRB) prompt emission still defies explanation, in spite of recent progress made, for example, on the occasional presence of a thermal component in the spectrum along with the ubiquitous non-thermal component that is modelled with a Band function. The combination of finite duration and aperiodic modulations make GRBs hard to characterise temporally. Although correlations between GRB luminosity and spectral hardness on one side and time variability on the other side have long been known, the loose and often arbitrary definition of the latter makes the interpretation uncertain. Aims: We characterise the temporal variability in an objective way and search for a connection with rest-frame spectral properties for a number of well-observed GRBs. Methods: We studied the individual power density spectra (PDS) of 123 long GRBs with measured redshift, rest-frame peak energy Ep,I of the time-averaged ν Fν spectrum, and well-constrained PDS slope α detected with Swift, Fermi and past spacecraft. The PDS were modelled with a power law either with or without a break adopting a Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo technique. Results: We find a highly significant Ep,I-α anti-correlation. The null hypothesis probability is ~10-9. Conclusions: In the framework of the internal shock synchrotron model, the Ep,I-α anti-correlation can hardly be reconciled with the predicted Ep,I ∝ Γ-2, unless either variable microphysical parameters of the shocks or continual electron acceleration are assumed. Alternatively, in the context of models based on magnetic reconnection, the PDS slope and Ep,I are linked to the ejecta magnetisation at the dissipation site, so that more magnetised outflows would produce more variable GRB light curves at short timescales (≲1 s), shallower PDS, and higher values of Ep,I. Full Table 1 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc

  13. Pairwise NMR experiments for the determination of protein backbone dihedral angle Φ based on cross-correlated spin relaxation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Hideo; Shimada, Ichio

    2007-01-01

    Novel cross-correlated spin relaxation (CCR) experiments are described, which measure pairwise CCR rates for obtaining peptide dihedral angles Φ. The experiments utilize intra-HNCA type coherence transfer to refocus 2-bond J NCα coupling evolution and generate the N (i)-C α (i) or C'(i-1)-C α (i) multiple quantum coherences which are required for measuring the desired CCR rates. The contribution from other coherences is also discussed and an appropriate setting of the evolution delays is presented. These CCR experiments were applied to 15 N- and 13 C-labeled human ubiquitin. The relevant CCR rates showed a high degree of correlation with the Φ angles observed in the X-ray structure. By utilizing these CCR experiments in combination with those previously established for obtaining dihedral angle Ψ, we can determine high resolution structures of peptides that bind weakly to large target molecules

  14. Experiments on the WavePiston, Wave Energy Converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angelelli, E.; Zanuttigh, B.; Kofoed, Jens Peter

    2011-01-01

    This paper analyses the performance of a new Wave Energy Converter (WEC) of the Oscillating Water Column type (OWC), named WavePiston. This near-shore floating device is composed of plates (i.e. energy collectors) sliding around a cylinder, that is placed perpendicular to the shore. Tests...... in the wave basin at Aalborg University allowed to investigate power production in the North Sea typical wave climate, with varying design parameters such as plate dimensions and their mutual distance. The power produced per meter by each collector is about the 5% of the available wave power. Experimental...... results and survivability considerations suggest that the WavePiston would be particularly suited for installations in milder seas. An example application is therefore presented in the Mediterranean Sea, off-shore the island of Sicily. In this case, each collector harvests the 10% of the available wave...

  15. Extended MHD Effects in High Energy Density Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyler, Charles

    2016-10-01

    The MHD model is the workhorse for computational modeling of HEDP experiments. Plasma models are inheritably limited in scope, but MHD is expected to be a very good model for studying plasmas at the high densities attained in HEDP experiments. There are, however, important ways in which MHD fails to adequately describe the results, most notably due to the omission of the Hall term in the Ohm's law (a form of extended MHD or XMHD). This talk will discuss these failings by directly comparing simulations of MHD and XMHD for particularly relevant cases. The methodology is to simulate HEDP experiments using a Hall-MHD (HMHD) code based on a highly accurate and robust Discontinuous Galerkin method, and by comparison of HMHD to MHD draw conclusions about the impact of the Hall term. We focus on simulating two experimental pulsed power machines under various scenarios. We examine the MagLIF experiment on the Z-machine at Sandia National Laboratories and liner experiments on the COBRA machine at Cornell. For the MagLIF experiment we find that power flow in the feed leads to low density plasma ablation into the region surrounding the liner. The inflow of this plasma compresses axial magnetic flux onto the liner. In MHD this axial flux tends to resistively decay, whereas in HMHD a force-free current layer sustains the axial flux on the liner leading to a larger ratio of axial to azimuthal flux. During the liner compression the magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability leads to helical perturbations due to minimization of field line bending. Simulations of a cylindrical liner using the COBRA machine parameters can under certain conditions exhibit amplification of an axial field due to a force-free low-density current layer separated by some distance from the liner. This results in a configuration in which there is predominately axial field on the liner inside the current layer and azimuthal field outside the layer. We are currently attempting to experimentally verify the simulation

  16. Dark Energy Survey Year 1 results: cross-correlation redshifts - methods and systematics characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatti, M.; Vielzeuf, P.; Davis, C.; Cawthon, R.; Rau, M. M.; DeRose, J.; De Vicente, J.; Alarcon, A.; Rozo, E.; Gaztanaga, E.; Hoyle, B.; Miquel, R.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bonnett, C.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Castander, F. J.; Chang, C.; da Costa, L. N.; Gruen, D.; Gschwend, J.; Hartley, W. G.; Lin, H.; MacCrann, N.; Maia, M. A. G.; Ogando, R. L. C.; Roodman, A.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Troxel, M. A.; Wechsler, R. H.; Asorey, J.; Davis, T. M.; Glazebrook, K.; Hinton, S. R.; Lewis, G.; Lidman, C.; Macaulay, E.; Möller, A.; O'Neill, C. R.; Sommer, N. E.; Uddin, S. A.; Yuan, F.; Zhang, B.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Allam, S.; Annis, J.; Bechtol, K.; Brooks, D.; Burke, D. L.; Carollo, D.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Carretero, J.; Cunha, C. E.; D'Andrea, C. B.; DePoy, D. L.; Desai, S.; Eifler, T. F.; Evrard, A. E.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; García-Bellido, J.; Gerdes, D. W.; Goldstein, D. A.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; Hoormann, J. K.; Jain, B.; James, D. J.; Jarvis, M.; Jeltema, T.; Johnson, M. W. G.; Johnson, M. D.; Krause, E.; Kuehn, K.; Kuhlmann, S.; Kuropatkin, N.; Li, T. S.; Lima, M.; Marshall, J. L.; Melchior, P.; Menanteau, F.; Nichol, R. C.; Nord, B.; Plazas, A. A.; Reil, K.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sako, M.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Schubnell, M.; Sheldon, E.; Smith, M.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Tucker, B. E.; Tucker, D. L.; Vikram, V.; Walker, A. R.; Weller, J.; Wester, W.; Wolf, R. C.

    2018-06-01

    We use numerical simulations to characterize the performance of a clustering-based method to calibrate photometric redshift biases. In particular, we cross-correlate the weak lensing source galaxies from the Dark Energy Survey Year 1 sample with redMaGiC galaxies (luminous red galaxies with secure photometric redshifts) to estimate the redshift distribution of the former sample. The recovered redshift distributions are used to calibrate the photometric redshift bias of standard photo-z methods applied to the same source galaxy sample. We apply the method to two photo-z codes run in our simulated data: Bayesian Photometric Redshift and Directional Neighbourhood Fitting. We characterize the systematic uncertainties of our calibration procedure, and find that these systematic uncertainties dominate our error budget. The dominant systematics are due to our assumption of unevolving bias and clustering across each redshift bin, and to differences between the shapes of the redshift distributions derived by clustering versus photo-zs. The systematic uncertainty in the mean redshift bias of the source galaxy sample is Δz ≲ 0.02, though the precise value depends on the redshift bin under consideration. We discuss possible ways to mitigate the impact of our dominant systematics in future analyses.

  17. Toxicity of metal oxide nanoparticles in Escherichia coli correlates with conduction band and hydration energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaweeteerawat, Chitrada; Ivask, Angela; Liu, Rong; Zhang, Haiyuan; Chang, Chong Hyun; Low-Kam, Cecile; Fischer, Heidi; Ji, Zhaoxia; Pokhrel, Suman; Cohen, Yoram; Telesca, Donatello; Zink, Jeffrey; Mädler, Lutz; Holden, Patricia A; Nel, Andre; Godwin, Hilary

    2015-01-20

    Metal oxide nanoparticles (MOx NPs) are used for a host of applications, such as electronics, cosmetics, construction, and medicine, and as a result, the safety of these materials to humans and the environment is of considerable interest. A prior study of 24 MOx NPs in mammalian cells revealed that some of these materials show hazard potential. Here, we report the growth inhibitory effects of the same series of MOx NPs in the bacterium Escherichia coli and show that toxicity trends observed in E. coli parallel those seen previously in mammalian cells. Of the 24 materials studied, only ZnO, CuO, CoO, Mn2O3, Co3O4, Ni2O3, and Cr2O3 were found to exert significant growth inhibitory effects; these effects were found to relate to membrane damage and oxidative stress responses in minimal trophic media. A correlation of the toxicological data with physicochemical parameters of MOx NPs revealed that the probability of a MOx NP being toxic increases as the hydration enthalpy becomes less negative and as the conduction band energy approaches those of biological molecules. These observations are consistent with prior results observed in mammalian cells, revealing that mechanisms of toxicity of MOx NPs are consistent across two very different taxa. These results suggest that studying nanotoxicity in E. coli may help to predict toxicity patterns in higher organisms.

  18. Main real time software for high-energy physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tikhonov, A.N.

    1985-01-01

    The general problems of organization of software complexes, as well as development of typical algorithms and packages of applied programs for real time systems used in experiments with charged particle accelerators are discussed. It is noted that numerous qualitatively different real time tasks are solved by parallel programming of the processes of data acquisition, equipment control, data exchange with remote terminals, data express processing and accumulation, operator's instruction interpretation, generation and buffering of resulting files for data output and information processing which is realized on the basis of multicomputer system utilization. Further development of software for experiments is associated with improving the algorithms for automatic recognition and analysis of events with complex topology and standardization of applied program packages

  19. The regional energy integration: the latin-american experiences; L'integration energetique regionale: les experiences latino-americaines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    The ways of the regional economic integrations are not identical and generate different repercussions on the markets and the energy industries evolution. The example of the Latin America proposes many various experiences to evaluate the stakes and the limits of each regional integrations. These limits lead to solution researches including indisputable convergencies. The first part of this document presents the genesis of these regional economic integrations experiences in Latina America, to study in the second part the energy consequences of the liberal ALENA and of the more political MERCOSUR. (A.L.B.)

  20. The regional energy integration: the latin-american experiences; L'integration energetique regionale: les experiences latino-americaines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    The ways of the regional economic integrations are not identical and generate different repercussions on the markets and the energy industries evolution. The example of the Latin America proposes many various experiences to evaluate the stakes and the limits of each regional integrations. These limits lead to solution researches including indisputable convergencies. The first part of this document presents the genesis of these regional economic integrations experiences in Latina America, to study in the second part the energy consequences of the liberal ALENA and of the more political MERCOSUR. (A.L.B.)

  1. Energy calibration of the jets in the experiment D0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coss, J.

    2003-12-01

    This thesis have been performed in the D0 group of the Nuclear Physics Institute at Lyon. This work is about the calibration of the jets in the D0 experiment located on the proton-antiproton collider Tevatron. I studied the Jet Offset Correction and we have proposed a new method to calibrate the b-jets. We have calculated the response of the calorimeter for these jets in the 'photon + b - jets' events. (author)

  2. Quality of Experience on Smartphones : Network, Application, and Energy Perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Ickin, Selim

    2015-01-01

    Smartphones have become crucial enablers for users to exploit online services such as learning, leisure, communicating, and socializing. The user-perceived quality of applications and services is an important factor to consider, in order to achieve lean resource management, to prevent user churn and revenue depletion of service or network providers. This is often studied within the scope of Quality of Experience (QoE), which has attracted researchers both in academia and industry. The objecti...

  3. Study on a drift chamber for high energy experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puget, Maria Augusta Constante

    1993-01-01

    This work deals with the studies of a multiwire gaseous detector operating as a drift chamber, which will be part of the SELEX spectrometer of the experiment Fermilab E781. A prototype was designed to be built and tested at IFUSP. Results are shown of the analysis of data taken with another similar detector whose construction and test were done at Fermilab, with the aim of studying its characterization and performance. (author)

  4. The regulated energy economy versus the free energy market - The West German experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liesen, K.; Schwarz, H.O.

    1989-09-01

    The overall good performance of the West German energy industry in terms of energy policy objectives such as security of supplies, competitiveness, efficient use of energy and environmental protection, is attributable to an energy policy based on the principles of the market economy and steady application of these same principles. Today, though, a debate, at times controversial, on whether more market influence or more government intervention is required is underway in West Germany; in view of the successes of energy policy and the balance struck between free enterprise and the government in the past, this debate has met with little understanding in some quarters. It is generally agreed, though, that the quality of the challenges energy policy and the energy industry in West Germany will confront in the future will remain essentially unchanged. West German energy policy will have to deal with: reestablishing a consensus on coal and nuclear power policy; achieving a high standard of environmental protection in the European Communities, and strengthening the position of the energy industry as efforts are made to get moves underway to create a single European market for energy underway. No fundamental change in the course of energy policy in the Federal Republic of Germany is needed to solve current energy policy issues or to preserve the underlying goals of this policy. An energy policy which continues to give priority where possible to market mechanisms as a means of adjustment and provides energy suppliers and users with a stable and reliable framework in which to operate, offers the best promise for meeting the challenges of the future. (author). 2 figs

  5. MANAGEMENT OF RENEWABLE ENERGY AND REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT: EUROPEAN EXPERIENCES AND STEPS FORWARD

    OpenAIRE

    Andreea Ileana Zamfir

    2011-01-01

    The issues of the renewable energy and regional development have become major priorities for public policymakers across the globe. Therefore, this study explores some European experiences and steps forward in the field of the management of renewable energy and regional development. Firstly, an overview of renewable energy issues in European regions is revealed, and secondly, some measures and actions for managing regional development of renewable energy in Romania taking into account the fina...

  6. Correlations between isospin dynamics and Intermediate Mass Fragments emission time scales: a probe for the symmetry energy in asymmetric nuclear matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Filippo, E; Cardella, G; Guidara, E La; Pagano, A; Papa, M; Amorini, F; Colonna, M; Gianì, S; Grassi, L; Han, J; Maiolino, C; Auditore, L; Minniti, T; Baran, V; Berceanu, I; Geraci, E; Grzeszczuk, A; Guazzoni, P; Lanzalone, G; Lombardo, I

    2013-01-01

    We show new data from the 64 Ni+ 124 Sn and 58 Ni+ 112 Sn reactions studied in direct kinematics with the CHIMERA detector at INFN-LNS and compared with the reverse kinematics reactions at the same incident beam energy (35 A MeV). Analyzing the data with the method of relative velocity correlations, fragments coming from statistical decay of an excited projectile-like (PLF) or target-like (TLF) fragments are discriminated from the ones coming from dynamical emission in the early stages of the reaction. By comparing data of the reverse kinematics experiment with a stochastic mean field (SMF) + GEMINI calculations our results show that observables from neck fragmentation mechanism add valuable constraints on the density dependence of symmetry energy. An indication is found for a moderately stiff symmetry energy potential term of EOS.

  7. Active Noise Control Experiments using Sound Energy Flu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Uli

    2015-03-01

    This paper reports on the latest results concerning the active noise control approach using net flow of acoustic energy. The test set-up consists of two loudspeakers simulating the engine noise and two smaller loudspeakers which belong to the active noise system. The system is completed by two acceleration sensors and one microphone per loudspeaker. The microphones are located in the near sound field of the loudspeakers. The control algorithm including the update equation of the feed-forward controller is introduced. Numerical simulations are performed with a comparison to a state of the art method minimising the radiated sound power. The proposed approach is experimentally validated.

  8. Promotion of solar thermal energy - guide and comparison of experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballot, E [ALTER Alsace (France)

    2004-01-01

    One of the objectives of the guide is to analyse the methods of the various partners of the project (Germany, Cyprus, Town of Barcelona and France) and to make a list with the most important ones, which could eventually be reproduced and adapted in other regions. Also, try to find out the problems that the various partners encounter (lack of information, technical and financial tools...), look for the best ways for developing the solar thermal energy and try to find out some answers from the stake holders of this domain and from our partners. (author)

  9. Data management in a fusion energy research experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glad, A.; Drobnis, D.; McHarg, B.

    1981-07-01

    Present-day fusion research requires extensive support for the large amount of scientific data generated, bringing about three distinct problems computer systems must solve: (1) the processing of large amounts of data in very small time frames; (2) the archiving, analyzing and managing of the entire data output for the project's lifetime; (3) the standardization of data for the exchange of information between laboratories. The computer system supporting General Atomic's Doublet III tokamak, a project funded by the United States Department of Energy, is the first to encounter and address these problems through a system-wide data base structure

  10. O(. cap alpha. sub(S))/sup 2/ calculation of energy-energy correlation in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation and comparison with experimental data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, A [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany, F.R.); Barreiro, F [Gesamthochschule Siegen (Germany, F.R.)

    1982-12-02

    We report, in the framework of quantum chromodynamics, an order ..cap alpha..sub(s)/sup 2/ calculation for the energy-energy correlation and the related asymmetry distribution in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation. The normalized distributions are found to be stable and the correction to normalization moderate. The data from PETRA and PEP are analyzed and the QCD scale parameter ..lambda.. is determined. Effects due to the quark and gluon fragmentation are also discussed.

  11. Soft computing analysis of the possible correlation between temporal and energy release patterns in seismic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantaras, Anthony; Katsifarakis, Emmanouil; Artzouxaltzis, Xristos; Makris, John; Vallianatos, Filippos; Varley, Martin

    2010-05-01

    This paper is a preliminary investigation of the possible correlation of temporal and energy release patterns of seismic activity involving the preparation processes of consecutive sizeable seismic events [1,2]. The background idea is that during periods of low-level seismic activity, stress processes in the crust accumulate energy at the seismogenic area whilst larger seismic events act as a decongesting mechanism releasing considerable energy [3,4]. A dynamic algorithm is being developed aiming to identify and cluster pre- and post- seismic events to the main earthquake following on research carried out by Zubkov [5] and Dobrovolsky [6,7]. This clustering technique along with energy release equations dependent on Richter's scale [8,9] allow for an estimate to be drawn regarding the amount of the energy being released by the seismic sequence. The above approach is being implemented as a monitoring tool to investigate the behaviour of the underlying energy management system by introducing this information to various neural [10,11] and soft computing models [1,12,13,14]. The incorporation of intelligent systems aims towards the detection and simulation of the possible relationship between energy release patterns and time-intervals among consecutive sizeable earthquakes [1,15]. Anticipated successful training of the imported intelligent systems may result in a real-time, on-line processing methodology [1,16] capable to dynamically approximate the time-interval between the latest and the next forthcoming sizeable seismic event by monitoring the energy release process in a specific seismogenic area. Indexing terms: pattern recognition, long-term earthquake precursors, neural networks, soft computing, earthquake occurrence intervals References [1] Konstantaras A., Vallianatos F., Varley M.R. and Makris J. P.: ‘Soft computing modelling of seismicity in the southern Hellenic arc', IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Letters, vol. 5 (3), pp. 323-327, 2008 [2] Eneva M. and

  12. Multi-particle correlation observables in high energy nucleus-nucleus collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stock, R.

    1981-01-01

    Global features of exclusively measured events, including number correlations and vector correlations, and hybrid analysis of measurements of one or two specific fragments like spectator nuclei, high transverse momentum particles, polarization of one particle, etc., are considered

  13. Chapter 5: Exponential experiments on natural uranium graphite moderated systems. II: Correlation of results with the method of Syrett (1961)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, G.; Moore, P.G.F.; Richmond, R.

    1963-01-01

    The results are given of exponential experiments on graphite moderated systems with fuel elements consisting of single rods and tubes of natural uranium metal. A correlation is given with the method of calculation proposed by Syrett (1961) and new consistent values of neutron yield and effective resonance integral are derived. (author)

  14. Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response. International Experiences and Practices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Bo [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Ghatikar, Girish [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Ni, Chun Chun [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Dudley, Junqiao [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Martin, Phil [Enernoc, Inc., Boston, MA (United States); Wikler, Greg

    2012-06-01

    Demand response (DR) is a load management tool which provides a cost-effective alternative to traditional supply-side solutions to address the growing demand during times of peak electrical load. According to the US Department of Energy (DOE), demand response reflects “changes in electric usage by end-use customers from their normal consumption patterns in response to changes in the price of electricity over time, or to incentive payments designed to induce lower electricity use at times of high wholesale market prices or when system reliability is jeopardized.” 1 The California Energy Commission (CEC) defines DR as “a reduction in customers’ electricity consumption over a given time interval relative to what would otherwise occur in response to a price signal, other financial incentives, or a reliability signal.” 2 This latter definition is perhaps most reflective of how DR is understood and implemented today in countries such as the US, Canada, and Australia where DR is primarily a dispatchable resource responding to signals from utilities, grid operators, and/or load aggregators (or DR providers).

  15. Preliminary experiments on energy recovery on a neutral beam injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fumelli, M.

    1977-06-01

    Experimental tests of energy recovery are made on an injector of energetic neutral atoms in which the ion source (the circular periplasmatron) is operated at the ground potential and the neutralizer is biased at the high negative potential corresponding to the desired neutral beam energy. To prevent the acceleration of the neutralizer plasma electrons toward the collector of the decelerated ions (the recovery electrode), a potential barrier is created by means of a negatively biased long cylindrical grid (called the suppressor grid) surrounding the beam. For a given negative potential (relative to the neutralizer) applied to this grid a plasma sheath develops at the periphery of the beam. At the entry of the grid the width of this sheath is generally much smaller than the beam radius. However, the ions are deflected by the electric field of the sheath outward through the grid. The ion density in the sheath is thus decreasing as the beam propagates and the result is a sheath-widening process which in turn causes more ions to be deflected. If the suppressor grid is sufficiently long the sheath will eventually fill the whole section of the beam, the potential on the axis will fall below the neutralizer potential and stop the electrons. Concurrently, most of the ions are deflected out of the suppressor. These ions can be decelerated and collected outside the region where the neutral beam propagates. A drawing of such a system is shown

  16. Energy efficiency and energy service companies in restructured markets: international experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limaye, Dilip R.

    1999-01-01

    There has been considerable recent activity related to restructuring of the energy supply industries. Restructuring usually involves introducing competition into some elements of the ESI (energy supply industries). In some countries the privatization of the government-owned utility businesses is another key element of industry restructuring. The introduction of competition and privatization in the energy market is likely to realign the roles of the industry players (generators, transmission businesses) distribution 'wires' businesses, and retail suppliers) relative to customers. A key challenge faced by policy-makers is to define the appropriate roles and activities of the public and private sector to assure that economically justifiable levels of sustainable energy services are offered in the marketplace. This paper reviews the mechanisms adopted to implement energy efficiency services in a number of countries that have restructured their energy markets, and develops a framework for assessing, comparing and discussing potential new mechanisms. The paper identifies two types of EE mechanisms. (The author)

  17. SU-E-T-781: Using An Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID) for Correlating Linac Photon Beam Energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaddanapudi, S; Cai, B; Sun, B; Noel, C; Goddu, S; Mutic, S [Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) have proven to be useful for measuring several parameters of interest in linear accelerator (linac) quality assurance (QA). The purpose of this project was to evaluate the feasibility of using EPIDs for determining linac photon beam energies. Methods: Two non-clinical Varian TrueBeam linacs (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) with 6MV and 10MV photon beams were used to perform the measurements. The linacs were equipped with an amorphous silicon based EPIDs (aSi1000) that were used for the measurements. We compared the use of flatness versus percent depth dose (PDD) for predicting changes in linac photon beam energy. PDD was measured in 1D water tank (Sun Nuclear Corporation, Melbourne FL) and the profiles were measured using 2D ion-chamber array (IC-Profiler, Sun Nuclear) and the EPID. Energy changes were accomplished by varying the bending magnet current (BMC). The evaluated energies conformed with the AAPM TG142 tolerance of ±1% change in PDD. Results: BMC changes correlating with a ±1% change in PDD corresponded with a change in flatness of ∼1% to 2% from baseline values on the EPID. IC Profiler flatness values had the same correlation. We observed a similar trend for the 10MV beam energy changes. Our measurements indicated a strong correlation between changes in linac photon beam energy and changes in flatness. For all machines and energies, beam energy changes produced change in the uniformity (AAPM TG-142), varying from ∼1% to 2.5%. Conclusions: EPID image analysis of beam profiles can be used to determine linac photon beam energy changes. Flatness-based metrics or uniformity as defined by AAPM TG-142 were found to be more sensitive to linac photon beam energy changes than PDD. Research funding provided by Varian Medical Systems. Dr. Sasa Mutic receives compensation for providing patient safety training services from Varian Medical Systems, the sponsor of this study.

  18. A Gas Calorimeter for High-Energy Experiment and Study of High-Energy Cascade Shower

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyata, Hitoshi [Univ. of Tsukuba (Japan)

    1984-09-01

    High energy behavior of the electromagnetic cascade shower has been studied. high energy showers were created by electron and hadron beams with energies between 25 GeV and 150 GeV at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. The showers were observed by a shower detector consisting of multi-layer of lead plates and proportional chambers. The experimental results were analyzed with special emphasis on the fluctuation problem of the electromagnetic cascade shower.

  19. Experiences with Implementing a Distributed and Self-Organizing Scheduling Algorithm for Energy-Efficient Data Gathering on a Real-Life Sensor Network Platform

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Y.; Chatterjea, Supriyo; Havinga, Paul J.M.

    2007-01-01

    We report our experiences with implementing a distributed and self-organizing scheduling algorithm designed for energy-efficient data gathering on a 25-node multihop wireless sensor network (WSN). The algorithm takes advantage of spatial correlations that exist in readings of adjacent sensor nodes

  20. 'Experience the future of building technologies'. High tech, low energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    These proceedings cover the contributions presented at the CLIMA 2005 conference held in Lausanne, Switzerland. This four-day conference was sponsored by a large number of companies and organisations active in the Swiss building technologies area. Several keynote lectures were presented as were awards to students active in the building technical services area. The proceedings document the papers presented at the conference. These covered nine main topics. The first, 'Air-conditioning and ventilation' comprised 43 papers on the indoor environment, 15 on room air distribution, 4 on hygiene, 11 on alternative cooling methods, 8 on air-flow, 2 on air-cleaning and filters, 6 on refurbishment and even one concerning air-flow predictions in Egyptian tombs. The second topic, 'Heating', comprised 13 contributions on low-temperature heating and heat pumps, 7 on distributed energy systems, 4 on district heating, 7 on solar heating systems and 3 miscellaneous items. 'Design methods' were examined as a third topic with 11 contributions on building-simulation tools and 26 on computer-based methods for design, construction and operation. In the fourth section, 'Refrigeration', papers were presented on new working fluids (3 contributions), modernisation (5) along with 4 miscellaneous papers. 'Policies, standards and building-codes' were examined in four categories: Implementation of the European Energy Performance Directive with 8 contributions, life-cycle costs with 2 papers, energy conservation with 15 contributions and 2 contributions in the miscellaneous category. 'Domestic water systems and sanitary technology', the sixth section, includes 3 contributions on water conservation. Section 7, 'Building automation, security and control' includes a section on information and communication systems (3 contributions) and 6 various papers. Section 8, 'Building physics and HVAC' includes 8 contributions on double-skin and high-tech building envelopes, 7 on moisture control, and one on