WorldWideScience

Sample records for energy benchmarking part

  1. California commercial building energy benchmarking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinney, Satkartar; Piette, Mary Ann

    2003-07-01

    Building energy benchmarking is the comparison of whole-building energy use relative to a set of similar buildings. It provides a useful starting point for individual energy audits and for targeting buildings for energy-saving measures in multiple-site audits. Benchmarking is of interest and practical use to a number of groups. Energy service companies and performance contractors communicate energy savings potential with ''typical'' and ''best-practice'' benchmarks while control companies and utilities can provide direct tracking of energy use and combine data from multiple buildings. Benchmarking is also useful in the design stage of a new building or retrofit to determine if a design is relatively efficient. Energy managers and building owners have an ongoing interest in comparing energy performance to others. Large corporations, schools, and government agencies with numerous facilities also use benchmarking methods to compare their buildings to each other. The primary goal of Task 2.1.1 Web-based Benchmarking was the development of a web-based benchmarking tool, dubbed Cal-Arch, for benchmarking energy use in California commercial buildings. While there were several other benchmarking tools available to California consumers prior to the development of Cal-Arch, there were none that were based solely on California data. Most available benchmarking information, including the Energy Star performance rating, were developed using DOE's Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), which does not provide state-level data. Each database and tool has advantages as well as limitations, such as the number of buildings and the coverage by type, climate regions and end uses. There is considerable commercial interest in benchmarking because it provides an inexpensive method of screening buildings for tune-ups and retrofits. However, private companies who collect and manage consumption data are concerned that the

  2. Atomic Energy Research benchmark activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makai, M.

    1998-01-01

    The test problems utilized in the validation and verification process of computer programs in Atomic Energie Research are collected into one bunch. This is the first step towards issuing a volume in which tests for VVER are collected, along with reference solutions and a number of solutions. The benchmarks do not include the ZR-6 experiments because they have been published along with a number of comparisons in the Final reports of TIC. The present collection focuses on operational and mathematical benchmarks which cover almost the entire range of reaktor calculation. (Author)

  3. Benchmark matrix and guide: Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    In the last issue of the Journal of Quality Assurance (September/October 1991, Volume 13, Number 5, pp. 14-19), the benchmark matrix developed by Headquarters Air Force Logistics Command was published. Five horizontal levels on the matrix delineate progress in TQM: business as usual, initiation, implementation, expansion, and integration. The six vertical categories that are critical to the success of TQM are leadership, structure, training, recognition, process improvement, and customer focus. In this issue, "Benchmark Matrix and Guide: Part II" will show specifically how to apply the categories of leadership, structure, and training to the benchmark matrix progress levels. At the intersection of each category and level, specific behavior objectives are listed with supporting behaviors and guidelines. Some categories will have objectives that are relatively easy to accomplish, allowing quick progress from one level to the next. Other categories will take considerable time and effort to complete. In the next issue, Part III of this series will focus on recognition, process improvement, and customer focus.

  4. Benchmarking the energy efficiency of commercial buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, William; Hui, Y.V.; Lam, Y. Miu

    2006-01-01

    Benchmarking energy-efficiency is an important tool to promote the efficient use of energy in commercial buildings. Benchmarking models are mostly constructed in a simple benchmark table (percentile table) of energy use, which is normalized with floor area and temperature. This paper describes a benchmarking process for energy efficiency by means of multiple regression analysis, where the relationship between energy-use intensities (EUIs) and the explanatory factors (e.g., operating hours) is developed. Using the resulting regression model, these EUIs are then normalized by removing the effect of deviance in the significant explanatory factors. The empirical cumulative distribution of the normalized EUI gives a benchmark table (or percentile table of EUI) for benchmarking an observed EUI. The advantage of this approach is that the benchmark table represents a normalized distribution of EUI, taking into account all the significant explanatory factors that affect energy consumption. An application to supermarkets is presented to illustrate the development and the use of the benchmarking method

  5. High Energy Physics (HEP) benchmark program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasu, Yoshiji; Ichii, Shingo; Yashiro, Shigeo; Hirayama, Hideo; Kokufuda, Akihiro; Suzuki, Eishin.

    1993-01-01

    High Energy Physics (HEP) benchmark programs are indispensable tools to select suitable computer for HEP application system. Industry standard benchmark programs can not be used for this kind of particular selection. The CERN and the SSC benchmark suite are famous HEP benchmark programs for this purpose. The CERN suite includes event reconstruction and event generator programs, while the SSC one includes event generators. In this paper, we found that the results from these two suites are not consistent. And, the result from the industry benchmark does not agree with either of these two. Besides, we describe comparison of benchmark results using EGS4 Monte Carlo simulation program with ones from two HEP benchmark suites. Then, we found that the result from EGS4 in not consistent with the two ones. The industry standard of SPECmark values on various computer systems are not consistent with the EGS4 results either. Because of these inconsistencies, we point out the necessity of a standardization of HEP benchmark suites. Also, EGS4 benchmark suite should be developed for users of applications such as medical science, nuclear power plant, nuclear physics and high energy physics. (author)

  6. Energy benchmarking of South Australian WWTPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krampe, J

    2013-01-01

    Optimising the energy consumption and energy generation of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) is a topic with increasing importance for water utilities in times of rising energy costs and pressures to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Assessing the energy efficiency and energy optimisation of a WWTP are difficult tasks as most plants vary greatly in size, process layout and other influencing factors. To overcome these limits it is necessary to compare energy efficiency with a statistically relevant base to identify shortfalls and optimisation potential. Such energy benchmarks have been successfully developed and used in central Europe over the last two decades. This paper demonstrates how the latest available energy benchmarks from Germany have been applied to 24 WWTPs in South Australia. It shows how energy benchmarking can be used to identify shortfalls in current performance, prioritise detailed energy assessments and help inform decisions on capital investment.

  7. Benchmarks of Global Clean Energy Manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandor, Debra [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Chung, Donald [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Keyser, David [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Mann, Margaret [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Engel-Cox, Jill [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The Clean Energy Manufacturing Analysis Center (CEMAC), sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), provides objective analysis and up-to-date data on global supply chains and manufacturing of clean energy technologies. Benchmarks of Global Clean Energy Manufacturing sheds light on several fundamental questions about the global clean technology manufacturing enterprise: How does clean energy technology manufacturing impact national economies? What are the economic opportunities across the manufacturing supply chain? What are the global dynamics of clean energy technology manufacturing?

  8. Clean Energy Manufacturing Analysis Center Benchmark Report: Framework and Methodologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandor, Debra [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Chung, Donald [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Keyser, David [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Mann, Margaret [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Engel-Cox, Jill [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-05-23

    This report documents the CEMAC methodologies for developing and reporting annual global clean energy manufacturing benchmarks. The report reviews previously published manufacturing benchmark reports and foundational data, establishes a framework for benchmarking clean energy technologies, describes the CEMAC benchmark analysis methodologies, and describes the application of the methodologies to the manufacturing of four specific clean energy technologies.

  9. Model based energy benchmarking for glass furnace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sardeshpande, Vishal; Gaitonde, U.N.; Banerjee, Rangan

    2007-01-01

    Energy benchmarking of processes is important for setting energy efficiency targets and planning energy management strategies. Most approaches used for energy benchmarking are based on statistical methods by comparing with a sample of existing plants. This paper presents a model based approach for benchmarking of energy intensive industrial processes and illustrates this approach for industrial glass furnaces. A simulation model for a glass furnace is developed using mass and energy balances, and heat loss equations for the different zones and empirical equations based on operating practices. The model is checked with field data from end fired industrial glass furnaces in India. The simulation model enables calculation of the energy performance of a given furnace design. The model results show the potential for improvement and the impact of different operating and design preferences on specific energy consumption. A case study for a 100 TPD end fired furnace is presented. An achievable minimum energy consumption of about 3830 kJ/kg is estimated for this furnace. The useful heat carried by glass is about 53% of the heat supplied by the fuel. Actual furnaces operating at these production scales have a potential for reduction in energy consumption of about 20-25%

  10. Benchmarking and energy management schemes in SMEs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huenges Wajer, Boudewijn [SenterNovem (Netherlands); Helgerud, Hans Even [New Energy Performance AS (Norway); Lackner, Petra [Austrian Energy Agency (Austria)

    2007-07-01

    Many companies are reluctant to focus on energy management or to invest in energy efficiency measures. Nevertheless, there are many good examples proving that the right approach to implementing energy efficiency can very well be combined with the business-priorities of most companies. SMEs in particular can benefit from a facilitated European approach because they normally have a lack of resources and time to invest in energy efficiency. In the EU supported pilot project BESS, 60 SMEs from 11 European countries of the food and drink industries successfully tested a package of interactive instruments which offers such a facilitated approach. A number of pilot companies show a profit increase of 3 up to 10 %. The package includes a user-friendly and web based E-learning scheme for implementing energy management as well as a benchmarking module for company specific comparison of energy performance indicators. Moreover, it has several practical and tested tools to support the cycle of continuous improvement of energy efficiency in the company such as checklists, sector specific measure lists, templates for auditing and energy conservation plans. An important feature and also a key trigger for companies is the possibility for SMEs to benchmark anonymously their energy situation against others of the same sector. SMEs can participate in a unique web based benchmarking system to interactively benchmark in a way which fully guarantees confidentiality and safety of company data. Furthermore, the available data can contribute to a bottom-up approach to support the objectives of (national) monitoring and targeting and thereby also contributing to the EU Energy Efficiency and Energy Services Directive. A follow up project to expand the number of participating SMEs of various sectors is currently being developed.

  11. Benchmarking urban energy efficiency in the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keirstead, James

    2013-01-01

    This study asks what is the ‘best’ way to measure urban energy efficiency. There has been recent interest in identifying efficient cities so that best practices can be shared, a process known as benchmarking. Previous studies have used relatively simple metrics that provide limited insight on the complexity of urban energy efficiency and arguably fail to provide a ‘fair’ measure of urban performance. Using a data set of 198 urban UK local administrative units, three methods are compared: ratio measures, regression residuals, and data envelopment analysis. The results show that each method has its own strengths and weaknesses regarding the ease of interpretation, ability to identify outliers and provide consistent rankings. Efficient areas are diverse but are notably found in low income areas of large conurbations such as London, whereas industrial areas are consistently ranked as inefficient. The results highlight the shortcomings of the underlying production-based energy accounts. Ideally urban energy efficiency benchmarks would be built on consumption-based accounts, but interim recommendations are made regarding the use of efficiency measures that improve upon current practice and facilitate wider conversations about what it means for a specific city to be energy-efficient within an interconnected economy. - Highlights: • Benchmarking is a potentially valuable method for improving urban energy performance. • Three different measures of urban energy efficiency are presented for UK cities. • Most efficient areas are diverse but include low-income areas of large conurbations. • Least efficient areas perform industrial activities of national importance. • Improve current practice with grouped per capita metrics or regression residuals

  12. Benchmarking

    OpenAIRE

    Meylianti S., Brigita

    1999-01-01

    Benchmarking has different meaning to different people. There are five types of benchmarking, namely internal benchmarking, competitive benchmarking, industry / functional benchmarking, process / generic benchmarking and collaborative benchmarking. Each type of benchmarking has its own advantages as well as disadvantages. Therefore it is important to know what kind of benchmarking is suitable to a specific application. This paper will discuss those five types of benchmarking in detail, includ...

  13. Energy efficiency benchmarking of energy-intensive industries in Taiwan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, David Yih-Liang; Huang, Chi-Feng; Lin, Wei-Chun; Hong, Gui-Bing

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Analytical tool was applied to estimate the energy efficiency indicator of energy intensive industries in Taiwan. • The carbon dioxide emission intensity in selected energy-intensive industries is also evaluated in this study. • The obtained energy efficiency indicator can serve as a base case for comparison to the other regions in the world. • This analysis results can serve as a benchmark for selected energy-intensive industries. - Abstract: Taiwan imports approximately 97.9% of its primary energy as rapid economic development has significantly increased energy and electricity demands. Increased energy efficiency is necessary for industry to comply with energy-efficiency indicators and benchmarking. Benchmarking is applied in this work as an analytical tool to estimate the energy-efficiency indicators of major energy-intensive industries in Taiwan and then compare them to other regions of the world. In addition, the carbon dioxide emission intensity in the iron and steel, chemical, cement, textile and pulp and paper industries are evaluated in this study. In the iron and steel industry, the energy improvement potential of blast furnace–basic oxygen furnace (BF–BOF) based on BPT (best practice technology) is about 28%. Between 2007 and 2011, the average specific energy consumption (SEC) of styrene monomer (SM), purified terephthalic acid (PTA) and low-density polyethylene (LDPE) was 9.6 GJ/ton, 5.3 GJ/ton and 9.1 GJ/ton, respectively. The energy efficiency of pulping would be improved by 33% if BAT (best available technology) were applied. The analysis results can serve as a benchmark for these industries and as a base case for stimulating changes aimed at more efficient energy utilization

  14. Energy benchmarking for shopping centers in Gulf Coast region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juaidi, Adel; AlFaris, Fadi; Montoya, Francisco G.; Manzano-Agugliaro, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Building sector consumes a significant amount of energy worldwide (up to 40% of the total global energy); moreover, by the year 2030 the consumption is expected to increase by 50%. One of the reasons is that the performance of buildings and its components degrade over the years. In recent years, energy benchmarking for government office buildings, large scale public buildings and large commercial buildings is one of the key energy saving projects for promoting the development of building energy efficiency and sustainable energy savings in Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries. Benchmarking would increase the purchase of energy efficient equipment, reducing energy bills, CO_2 emissions and conventional air pollution. This paper focuses on energy benchmarking for shopping centers in Gulf Coast Region. In addition, this paper will analyze a sample of shopping centers data in Gulf Coast Region (Dubai, Ajman, Sharjah, Oman and Bahrain). It aims to develop a benchmark for these shopping centers by highlighting the status of energy consumption performance. This research will support the sustainability movement in Gulf area through classifying the shopping centers into: Poor, Usual and Best Practices in terms of energy efficiency. According to the benchmarking analysis in this paper, the shopping centers best energy management practices in the Gulf Coast Region are the buildings that consume less than 810 kW h/m"2/yr, whereas the poor building practices are the centers that consume greater than 1439 kW h/m"2/yr. The conclusions of this work can be used as a reference for shopping centres benchmarking with similar climate. - Highlights: •The energy consumption data of shopping centers in Gulf Coast Region were gathered. •A benchmarking of energy consumption for the public areas for the shopping centers in the Gulf Coast Region was developed. •The shopping centers have the usual practice in the region between 810 kW h/m"2/yr and 1439 kW h/m"2/yr.

  15. Systems reliability Benchmark exercise part 1-Description and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amendola, A.

    1986-01-01

    The report describes aims, rules and results of the Systems Reliability Benchmark Exercise, which has been performed in order to assess methods and procedures for reliability analysis of complex systems and involved a large number of European organizations active in NPP safety evaluation. The exercise included both qualitative and quantitative methods and was structured in such a way that separation of the effects of uncertainties in modelling and in data on the overall spread was made possible. Part I describes the way in which RBE has been performed, its main results and conclusions

  16. Systems reliability Benchmark exercise part 2-Contributions by the participants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amendola, A.

    1986-01-01

    The report describes aims, rules and results of the Systems Reliability Benchmark Exercise, which has been performed in order to assess methods and procedures for reliability analysis of complex systems and involved a large number of European organizations active in NPP safety evaluation. The exercise included both qualitative and quantitative methods and was structured in such a way that separation of the effects of uncertainties in modelling and in data on the overall spread was made possible. This second part of the report is devoted to the documentation of the single contributions by the participant teams (Swedish, GRS, ENEA, NIRA and ENEL, EWE, EdF, Risoe, KWU/IA, ECN, KEMA/KUL, and Framatome contributions)

  17. Benchmarking

    OpenAIRE

    Beretta Sergio; Dossi Andrea; Grove Hugh

    2000-01-01

    Due to their particular nature, the benchmarking methodologies tend to exceed the boundaries of management techniques, and to enter the territories of managerial culture. A culture that is also destined to break into the accounting area not only strongly supporting the possibility of fixing targets, and measuring and comparing the performance (an aspect that is already innovative and that is worthy of attention), but also questioning one of the principles (or taboos) of the accounting or...

  18. Benchmarks of Global Clean Energy Manufacturing: Summary of Findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-01-01

    The Benchmarks of Global Clean Energy Manufacturing will help policymakers and industry gain deeper understanding of global manufacturing of clean energy technologies. Increased knowledge of the product supply chains can inform decisions related to manufacturing facilities for extracting and processing raw materials, making the array of required subcomponents, and assembling and shipping the final product. This brochure summarized key findings from the analysis and includes important figures from the report. The report was prepared by the Clean Energy Manufacturing Analysis Center (CEMAC) analysts at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory.

  19. Results of the benchmark for blade structural models, part A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lekou, D.J.; Chortis, D.; Belen Fariñas, A.

    2013-01-01

    A benchmark on structural design methods for blades was performed within the InnWind.Eu project under WP2 “Lightweight Rotor” Task 2.2 “Lightweight structural design”. The present document is describes the results of the comparison simulation runs that were performed by the partners involved within...... Task 2.2 of the InnWind.Eu project. The benchmark is based on the reference wind turbine and the reference blade provided by DTU [1]. "Structural Concept developers/modelers" of WP2 were provided with the necessary input for a comparison numerical simulation run, upon definition of the reference blade...

  20. 2010 energy benchmarking report performance of the Canadian office sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-04-15

    In 2009, REALpac set a target of reducing energy consumption in office buildings to 20 equivalent kilowatt-hours per square foot by 2015. Following this, REALpac launched a national energy benchmarking survey to create a baseline for building energy performance across Canada; this paper provides the results of that survey. The survey was carried out using a tool which can measure energy use in a meaningful way using building characteristics data and energy use data from utility bills. The survey was conducted on 2009 data, 261 office buildings submitted their data which were then analyzed to provide trends and a baseline. Results showed a variety and diversity of performances and a 28.7 ekWh/ft2 annual mean building energy use intensity was found. This survey demonstrated that several office building owners and managers are taking steps to monitor and minimize energy use in their buildings.

  1. Benchmarking Benchmarks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.C. Blitz (David)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBenchmarking benchmarks is a bundle of six studies that are inspired by the prevalence of benchmarking in academic finance research as well as in investment practice. Three studies examine if current benchmark asset pricing models adequately describe the cross-section of stock returns.

  2. Cleanroom energy benchmarking in high-tech and biotech industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tschudi, William; Benschine, Kathleen; Fok, Stephen; Rumsey, Peter

    2001-01-01

    Cleanrooms, critical to a wide range of industries, universities, and government facilities, are extremely energy intensive. Consequently, energy represents a significant operating cost for these facilities. Improving energy efficiency in cleanrooms will yield dramatic productivity improvement. But more importantly to the industries which rely on cleanrooms, base load reduction will also improve reliability. The number of cleanrooms in the US is growing and the cleanroom environmental systems' energy use is increasing due to increases in total square footage and trends toward more energy intensive, higher cleanliness applications. In California, many industries important to the State's economy utilize cleanrooms. In California these industries utilize over 150 cleanrooms with a total of 4.2 million sq. ft. (McIlvaine). Energy intensive high tech buildings offer an attractive incentive for large base load energy reduction. Opportunities for energy efficiency improvement exist in virtually all operating cleanrooms as well as in new designs. To understand the opportunities and their potential impact, Pacific Gas and Electric Company sponsored a project to benchmark energy use in cleanrooms in the electronics (high-tech) and biotechnology industries. Both of these industries are heavily dependent intensive cleanroom environments for research and manufacturing. In California these two industries account for approximately 3.6 million sq. ft. of cleanroom (McIlvaine, 1996) and 4349 GWh/yr. (Sartor et al. 1999). Little comparative energy information on cleanroom environmental systems was previously available. Benchmarking energy use allows direct comparisons leading to identification of best practices, efficiency innovations, and highlighting previously masked design or operational problems

  3. Final results of the fifth three-dimensional dynamic Atomic Energy Research benchmark problem calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadek, J.

    1999-01-01

    The paper gives a brief survey of the fifth three-dimensional dynamic Atomic Energy Research benchmark calculation results received with the code DYN3D/ATHLET at NRI Rez. This benchmark was defined at the seventh Atomic Energy Research Symposium (Hoernitz near Zittau, 1997). Its initiating event is a symmetrical break of the main steam header at the end of the first fuel cycle and hot shutdown conditions with one stuck out control rod group. The calculations were performed with the externally coupled codes ATHLET Mod.1.1 Cycle C and DYN3DH1.1/M3. The standard WWER-440/213 input deck of ATHLET code was adopted for benchmark purposes and for coupling with the code DYN3D. The first part of paper contains a brief characteristics of NPP input deck and reactor core model. The second part shows the time dependencies of important global and local parameters. In comparison with the results published at the eighth Atomic Energy Research Symposium (Bystrice nad Pernstejnem, 1998), the results published in this paper are based on improved ATHLET descriptions of control and safety systems. (Author)

  4. Development of an integrated energy benchmark for a multi-family housing complex using district heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Jaewook; Hong, Taehoon; Ji, Changyoon; Kim, Jimin; Lee, Minhyun; Jeong, Kwangbok

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The energy benchmarks for MFHC using district heating were developed. • We consider heating, hot water, electricity, and water energy consumption. • The benchmarks cover the site EUI, source EUI, and CO_2 emission intensity. • The benchmarks were developed through data mining and statistical methodologies. • The developed benchmarks provide fair criteria to evaluate energy efficiency. - Abstract: The reliable benchmarks are required to evaluate building energy efficiency fairly. This study aims to develop the energy benchmarks and relevant process for a multi-family housing complex (MFHC), which is responsible for huge CO_2 emissions in South Korea. A database, including the information on building attributes and energy consumption of 503 MFHCs, was established. The database was classified into three groups based on average enclosed area per household (AEA) through data mining techniques. The benchmarks of site energy use intensity (EUI), source EUI, and CO_2 emission intensity (CEI) were developed from Groups 1, 2, and 3. Representatively, the developed benchmarks of CEI for Groups 1, 2, and 3 were 28.17, 24.16, and 20.96 kg-CO_2/m"2 y, respectively. A comparative analysis using the operational rating identified that the developed benchmarks could solve the irrationality of the original benchmarks from overall database. In the case of the original benchmarks, 93% of small-AEA-groups and 16% of large-AEA-groups received lower grades. In the case of the developed benchmark, the upper and lower grades in Groups 1–3 were both adjusted to 50%. The proposed process for developing energy benchmark is applicable to evaluate the energy efficiency of other buildings, in other regions.

  5. Benchmark calculations on residue production within the EURISOL DS project. Part 1: thin targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David, J.C.; Blideanu, V.; Boudard, A.; Dore, D.; Leray, S.; Rapp, B.; Ridikas, D.; Thiolliere, N

    2006-12-15

    We have begun this benchmark study using mass distribution data of reaction products obtained at GSI in inverse kinematics. This step has allowed us to make a first selection among 10 spallation models; in this way the first assessment of the quality of the models was obtained. Then, in a second part, experimental mass distributions for some elements, which either are interesting as radioactive ion beams or important due to the safety and radioprotection issues (alpha or gamma emitters), will be also compared to model calculations. These data have been obtained for an equivalent 0.8 or 1.0 GeV proton beam, which is approximately the proposed projectile energy. We note that in realistic thick targets the proton beam will be slowed down and some secondary particles will be produced. Therefore, the residual nuclei production at lower energies is also important. For this reason, we also performed in the third part of this work some excitation function calculations and the associated data obtained with gamma-spectroscopy to test the models in a wide projectile energy range. We conclude that INCL4/Abla and Isabel/Abla are the best model combinations which we recommend. We also note that the agreement between model and data are better with 1 GeV protons than with 100-200 MeV protons.

  6. Dependable Benchmarking for Storage Systems in High-Energy Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Fleri Soler, Edward

    2017-01-01

    In high-energy physics, storage systems play a crucial role to store and secure very valuable data produced by complex experiments. The effectiveness and efficiency of data acquisition systems of such experiments depends directly on those of these storage systems. Coping with present day rates and reliability requirements of such experiments implies operating high-performance hardware under the best possible conditions, with a broad set of hardware and software parameters existing along the hierarchical levels, from networks down to drives. An extensive number of tests are required for the tuning of parameters to achieve optimised I/O operations. Current approaches to I/O optimisation generally consist of manual test execution and result taking. This approach lacks appropriate modularity, durability and reproducibility, attainable through dedicated testing facilities. The aim of this project is to conceive a user-friendly, dedicated storage benchmarking tool for the improved comparison of I/O parameters in re...

  7. Review of recent benchmark experiments on integral test for high energy nuclear data evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakashima, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Susumu; Konno, Chikara; Fukahori, Tokio; Hayashi, Katsumi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-11-01

    A survey work of recent benchmark experiments on an integral test for high energy nuclear data evaluation was carried out as one of the work of the Task Force on JENDL High Energy File Integral Evaluation (JHEFIE). In this paper the results are compiled and the status of recent benchmark experiments is described. (author)

  8. Calculation of the fifth atomic energy research dynamic benchmark with APROS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puska Eija Karita; Kontio Harii

    1998-01-01

    The band-out presents the model used for calculation of the fifth atomic energy research dynamic benchmark with APROS code. In the calculation of the fifth atomic energy research dynamic benchmark the three-dimensional neutronics model of APROS was used. The core was divided axially into 20 nodes according to the specifications of the benchmark and each six identical fuel assemblies were placed into one one-dimensional thermal hydraulic channel. The five-equation thermal hydraulic model was used in the benchmark. The plant process and automation was described with a generic WWER-440 plant model created by IVO Power Engineering Ltd. - Finland. (Author)

  9. Using the fuzzy linear regression method to benchmark the energy efficiency of commercial buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, William

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Fuzzy linear regression method is used for developing benchmarking systems. ► The systems can be used to benchmark energy efficiency of commercial buildings. ► The resulting benchmarking model can be used by public users. ► The resulting benchmarking model can capture the fuzzy nature of input–output data. -- Abstract: Benchmarking systems from a sample of reference buildings need to be developed to conduct benchmarking processes for the energy efficiency of commercial buildings. However, not all benchmarking systems can be adopted by public users (i.e., other non-reference building owners) because of the different methods in developing such systems. An approach for benchmarking the energy efficiency of commercial buildings using statistical regression analysis to normalize other factors, such as management performance, was developed in a previous work. However, the field data given by experts can be regarded as a distribution of possibility. Thus, the previous work may not be adequate to handle such fuzzy input–output data. Consequently, a number of fuzzy structures cannot be fully captured by statistical regression analysis. This present paper proposes the use of fuzzy linear regression analysis to develop a benchmarking process, the resulting model of which can be used by public users. An illustrative example is given as well.

  10. Review of California and National Methods for Energy PerformanceBenchmarking of Commercial Buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matson, Nance E.; Piette, Mary Ann

    2005-09-05

    This benchmarking review has been developed to support benchmarking planning and tool development under discussion by the California Energy Commission (CEC), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and others in response to the Governor's Executive Order S-20-04 (2004). The Executive Order sets a goal of benchmarking and improving the energy efficiency of California's existing commercial building stock. The Executive Order requires the CEC to propose ''a simple building efficiency benchmarking system for all commercial buildings in the state''. This report summarizes and compares two currently available commercial building energy-benchmarking tools. One tool is the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Energy Star National Energy Performance Rating System, which is a national regression-based benchmarking model (referred to in this report as Energy Star). The second is Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's Cal-Arch, which is a California-based distributional model (referred to as Cal-Arch). Prior to the time Cal-Arch was developed in 2002, there were several other benchmarking tools available to California consumers but none that were based solely on California data. The Energy Star and Cal-Arch benchmarking tools both provide California with unique and useful methods to benchmark the energy performance of California's buildings. Rather than determine which model is ''better'', the purpose of this report is to understand and compare the underlying data, information systems, assumptions, and outcomes of each model.

  11. Features of energy efficiency benchmarking implementation as tools of DSTU ISO 50001: 2014 for Ukrainian industrial enterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Анастасія Юріївна Данілкова

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Essence, types and stages of energy efficiency benchmarking in the industrial enterprises are considered. Features, advantages, disadvantages and limitations on the use are defined and underlying problems that could affect the successful conduct of energy efficiency benchmarking to Ukrainian industrial enterprises are specified. Energy efficiency benchmarking as tools to the national standard of DSTU ISO 50001: 2014 is proposed

  12. Building Energy Benchmarking in India: an Action Plan for Advancing the State-of-the-Art

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarraf, Saket [Centre for Environmental Planning and Technology (CEPT) Univ., Ahmedabad (India); Anand, Shilpi [Centre for Environmental Planning and Technology (CEPT) Univ., Ahmedabad (India); Shukla, Yash [Centre for Environmental Planning and Technology (CEPT) Univ., Ahmedabad (India); Mathew, Paul [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Singh, Reshma [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    This document describes an action plan for advancing the state of the art of commercial building energy benchmarking in the Indian context. The document is primarily intended for two audiences: (a) Research and development (R&D) sponsors and researchers can use the action plan to frame, plan, prioritize and scope new energy benchmarking R&D in order to ensure that their research is market relevant; (b) Policy makers and program implementers engaged in the deployment of benchmarking and building efficiency rating programmes can use the action plan for policy formulation and enforcement .

  13. Energy Efficiency Evaluation and Benchmarking of AFRL’s Condor High Performance Computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    PlayStation 3 nodes executing the HPL benchmark. When idle, the two PS3s consume 188.49 W on average. At peak HPL performance, the nodes draw an average of...AUG 2011 2. REPORT TYPE CONFERENCE PAPER (Post Print) 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) JAN 2011 – JUN 2011 4 . TITLE AND SUBTITLE ENERGY EFFICIENCY...the High Performance LINPACK (HPL) benchmark while also measuring the energy consumed to achieve such performance. Supercomputers are ranked by

  14. Communication: energy benchmarking with quantum Monte Carlo for water nano-droplets and bulk liquid water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfè, D; Bartók, A P; Csányi, G; Gillan, M J

    2013-06-14

    We show the feasibility of using quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) to compute benchmark energies for configuration samples of thermal-equilibrium water clusters and the bulk liquid containing up to 64 molecules. Evidence that the accuracy of these benchmarks approaches that of basis-set converged coupled-cluster calculations is noted. We illustrate the usefulness of the benchmarks by using them to analyze the errors of the popular BLYP approximation of density functional theory (DFT). The results indicate the possibility of using QMC as a routine tool for analyzing DFT errors for non-covalent bonding in many types of condensed-phase molecular system.

  15. Regression Tree-Based Methodology for Customizing Building Energy Benchmarks to Individual Commercial Buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaskhedikar, Apoorva Prakash

    According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration, commercial buildings represent about 40% of the United State's energy consumption of which office buildings consume a major portion. Gauging the extent to which an individual building consumes energy in excess of its peers is the first step in initiating energy efficiency improvement. Energy Benchmarking offers initial building energy performance assessment without rigorous evaluation. Energy benchmarking tools based on the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) database are investigated in this thesis. This study proposes a new benchmarking methodology based on decision trees, where a relationship between the energy use intensities (EUI) and building parameters (continuous and categorical) is developed for different building types. This methodology was applied to medium office and school building types contained in the CBECS database. The Random Forest technique was used to find the most influential parameters that impact building energy use intensities. Subsequently, correlations which were significant were identified between EUIs and CBECS variables. Other than floor area, some of the important variables were number of workers, location, number of PCs and main cooling equipment. The coefficient of variation was used to evaluate the effectiveness of the new model. The customization technique proposed in this thesis was compared with another benchmarking model that is widely used by building owners and designers namely, the ENERGY STAR's Portfolio Manager. This tool relies on the standard Linear Regression methods which is only able to handle continuous variables. The model proposed uses data mining technique and was found to perform slightly better than the Portfolio Manager. The broader impacts of the new benchmarking methodology proposed is that it allows for identifying important categorical variables, and then incorporating them in a local, as against a global, model framework for EUI

  16. Magnetic fusion energy. Part VI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1982-01-01

    The first chapter of this part describes briefly the DOE policy for fusion energy. Subsequent chapters include: FY 1980 overview - activities of the Office of Fusion Energy; subactivity descriptions (confinement systems, development and technology, applied plasma physics, and reactor projects); field activities (DOE laboratories, educational institutions, nonprofit organizations, and commercial firms); commercialization; environmental implications; regional activities; and international programs

  17. Yucca Mountain Project thermal and mechanical codes first benchmark exercise: Part 3, Jointed rock mass analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costin, L.S.; Bauer, S.J.

    1991-10-01

    Thermal and mechanical models for intact and jointed rock mass behavior are being developed, verified, and validated at Sandia National Laboratories for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project. Benchmarking is an essential part of this effort and is one of the tools used to demonstrate verification of engineering software used to solve thermomechanical problems. This report presents the results of the third (and final) phase of the first thermomechanical benchmark exercise. In the first phase of this exercise, nonlinear heat conduction code were used to solve the thermal portion of the benchmark problem. The results from the thermal analysis were then used as input to the second and third phases of the exercise, which consisted of solving the structural portion of the benchmark problem. In the second phase of the exercise, a linear elastic rock mass model was used. In the third phase of the exercise, two different nonlinear jointed rock mass models were used to solve the thermostructural problem. Both models, the Sandia compliant joint model and the RE/SPEC joint empirical model, explicitly incorporate the effect of the joints on the response of the continuum. Three different structural codes, JAC, SANCHO, and SPECTROM-31, were used with the above models in the third phase of the study. Each model was implemented in two different codes so that direct comparisons of results from each model could be made. The results submitted by the participants showed that the finite element solutions using each model were in reasonable agreement. Some consistent differences between the solutions using the two different models were noted but are not considered important to verification of the codes. 9 refs., 18 figs., 8 tabs

  18. Energy saving in WWTP: Daily benchmarking under uncertainty and data availability limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torregrossa, D; Schutz, G; Cornelissen, A; Hernández-Sancho, F; Hansen, J

    2016-07-01

    Efficient management of Waste Water Treatment Plants (WWTPs) can produce significant environmental and economic benefits. Energy benchmarking can be used to compare WWTPs, identify targets and use these to improve their performance. Different authors have performed benchmark analysis on monthly or yearly basis but their approaches suffer from a time lag between an event, its detection, interpretation and potential actions. The availability of on-line measurement data on many WWTPs should theoretically enable the decrease of the management response time by daily benchmarking. Unfortunately this approach is often impossible because of limited data availability. This paper proposes a methodology to perform a daily benchmark analysis under database limitations. The methodology has been applied to the Energy Online System (EOS) developed in the framework of the project "INNERS" (INNovative Energy Recovery Strategies in the urban water cycle). EOS calculates a set of Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for the evaluation of energy and process performances. In EOS, the energy KPIs take in consideration the pollutant load in order to enable the comparison between different plants. For example, EOS does not analyse the energy consumption but the energy consumption on pollutant load. This approach enables the comparison of performances for plants with different loads or for a single plant under different load conditions. The energy consumption is measured by on-line sensors, while the pollutant load is measured in the laboratory approximately every 14 days. Consequently, the unavailability of the water quality parameters is the limiting factor in calculating energy KPIs. In this paper, in order to overcome this limitation, the authors have developed a methodology to estimate the required parameters and manage the uncertainty in the estimation. By coupling the parameter estimation with an interval based benchmark approach, the authors propose an effective, fast and reproducible

  19. A liquefied energy chain for transport and utilization of natural gas for power production with CO2 capture and storage - Part 4: Sensitivity analysis of transport pressures and benchmarking with conventional technology for gas transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aspelund, Audun; Gundersen, Truls

    2009-01-01

    A novel energy and cost effective transport chain for stranded natural gas utilized for power production with CO 2 capture and storage is developed. It includes an offshore section, a combined gas carrier and an integrated receiving terminal. In the offshore section, natural gas (NG) is liquefied to LNG by liquid carbon dioxide (LCO 2 ) and liquid inert nitrogen (LIN), which are used as cold carriers. In the onshore process, the cryogenic exergy in the LNG is utilized to cool and liquefy the cold carriers, LCO 2 and LIN. The transport pressures for LNG, LIN and LCO 2 will influence the thermodynamic efficiency as well as the ship utilization; hence sensitivity analyses are performed, showing that the ship utilization for the payload will vary between 58% and 80%, and the transport chain exergy efficiency between 48% and 52%. A thermodynamically optimized process requires 319 kWh/tonne LNG. The NG lost due to power generation needed to operate the LEC processes is roughly one third of the requirement in a conventional transport chain for stranded NG gas with CO 2 capture and sequestration (CCS)

  20. Benchmarking NaI(Tl) Electron Energy Resolution Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mengesha, Wondwosen; Valentine, J D.

    2002-01-01

    A technique for validating electron energy resolution results measured using the modified Compton coincidence technique (MCCT) has been developed. This technique relies on comparing measured gamma-ray energy resolution with calculated values that were determined using the measured electron energy resolution results. These gamma-ray energy resolution calculations were based on Monte Carlo photon transport simulations, the measured NaI(Tl) electron response, a simplified cascade sequence, and the measured electron energy resolution results. To demonstrate this technique, MCCT-measured NaI(Tl) electron energy resolution results were used along with measured gamma-ray energy resolution results from the same NaI(Tl) crystal. Agreement to within 5% was observed for all energies considered between the calculated and measured gamma-ray energy resolution results for the NaI(Tl) crystal characterized. The calculated gamma-ray energy resolution results were also compared with previously published gamma-ray energy resolution measurements with good agreement (<10%). In addition to describing the validation technique that was developed in this study and the results, a brief review of the electron energy resolution measurements made using the MCCT is provided. Based on the results of this study, it is believed that the MCCT-measured electron energy resolution results are reliable. Thus, the MCCT and this validation technique can be used in the future to characterize the electron energy resolution of other scintillators and to determine NaI(Tl) intrinsic energy resolution

  1. Measuring and managing radiologist productivity, part 1: clinical metrics and benchmarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duszak, Richard; Muroff, Lawrence R

    2010-06-01

    Physician productivity disparities are not uncommonly debated within radiology groups, sometimes in a contentious manner. Attempts to measure productivity, identify and motivate outliers, and develop equitable management policies can present challenges to private and academic practices alike but are often necessary for a variety of professional, financial, and personnel reasons. This is the first of a two-part series that will detail metrics for evaluating radiologist productivity and review published benchmarks, focusing primarily on clinical work. Issues and limitations that may prevent successful implementation of measurement systems are explored. Part 2 will expand that discussion to evaluating nonclinical administrative and academic activities, outlining advantages and disadvantages of addressing differential productivity, and introducing potential models for practices seeking to motivate physicians on the basis of both clinical and nonclinical work.

  2. BEST Winery Guidebook: Benchmarking and Energy and Water SavingsTool for the Wine Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst; Radspieler, Anthony; Healy,Patrick; Zechiel, Susanne

    2005-10-15

    Not all industrial facilities have the staff or the opportunity to perform a detailed audit of their operations. The lack of knowledge of energy efficiency opportunities provides an important barrier to improving efficiency. Benchmarking has demonstrated to help energy users understand energy use and the potential for energy efficiency improvement, reducing the information barrier. In California, the wine making industry is not only one of the economic pillars of the economy; it is also a large energy consumer, with a considerable potential for energy-efficiency improvement. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Fetzer Vineyards developed an integrated benchmarking and self-assessment tool for the California wine industry called ''BEST''(Benchmarking and Energy and water Savings Tool) Winery. BEST Winery enables a winery to compare its energy efficiency to a best practice winery, accounting for differences in product mix and other characteristics of the winery. The tool enables the user to evaluate the impact of implementing energy and water efficiency measures. The tool facilitates strategic planning of efficiency measures, based on the estimated impact of the measures, their costs and savings. BEST Winery is available as a software tool in an Excel environment. This report serves as background material, documenting assumptions and information on the included energy and water efficiency measures. It also serves as a user guide for the software package.

  3. International Benchmark Renewable Energy. European Union and Norway. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Beek, A.; Benner, J.H.B.; Brogtrop, A.C.G.M.; Van Alphen, M.

    2001-12-01

    The main aim of the survey was to generate an actual, realistic and accepted overview of potentials and cost prices for all relevant renewable energy options in the different countries of the European Union. The survey covered electrical options, heat options and combined heat and power options for renewable energy. Survey data were obtained directly from the responsible governments and their energy agencies, not from theoretical model studies. The intention was to improve insight for future decisions and create a useful basis (in the form of definitions, guidelines, etc.) for future perfection. Survey results also help to assess the relative ambition of the different national targets, especially in the EU Member States. The survey thus primarily sought answers to the following questions: (1) What renewable energy potential is available, and to what extent can the potential be exploited and what would be the related costs; and (2) What observations can be made, considering the survey results

  4. Energy benchmarking in wastewater treatment plants: the importance of site operation and layout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belloir, C; Stanford, C; Soares, A

    2015-01-01

    Energy benchmarking is a powerful tool in the optimization of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in helping to reduce costs and greenhouse gas emissions. Traditionally, energy benchmarking methods focused solely on reporting electricity consumption, however, recent developments in this area have led to the inclusion of other types of energy, including electrical, manual, chemical and mechanical consumptions that can be expressed in kWh/m3. In this study, two full-scale WWTPs were benchmarked, both incorporated preliminary, secondary (oxidation ditch) and tertiary treatment processes, Site 1 also had an additional primary treatment step. The results indicated that Site 1 required 2.32 kWh/m3 against 0.98 kWh/m3 for Site 2. Aeration presented the highest energy consumption for both sites with 2.08 kWh/m3 required for Site 1 and 0.91 kWh/m3 in Site 2. The mechanical energy represented the second biggest consumption for Site 1 (9%, 0.212 kWh/m3) and chemical input was significant in Site 2 (4.1%, 0.026 kWh/m3). The analysis of the results indicated that Site 2 could be optimized by constructing a primary settling tank that would reduce the biochemical oxygen demand, total suspended solids and NH4 loads to the oxidation ditch by 55%, 75% and 12%, respectively, and at the same time reduce the aeration requirements by 49%. This study demonstrated that the effectiveness of the energy benchmarking exercise in identifying the highest energy-consuming assets, nevertheless it points out the need to develop a holistic overview of the WWTP and the need to include parameters such as effluent quality, site operation and plant layout to allow adequate benchmarking.

  5. Benchmarking the energy situation of Danish municipalities - Rural production and urban efficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fertner, Christian; Groth, Niels Boje

    Energy is a key issue for sustainable urban development, mainly related to the twin challenges of climate change and resource scarcity (Droege 2011). Despite agendas set on national and international level, local authorities are the key actors in this transformation (Lewis et al. 2013). European...... initiatives as the Covenant of Mayors or Energy Cities are closely following this development and supporting local authorities in their actions. Still, a general benchmarking of states and efforts is still missing which could however increase the use of good practice and enforce discussions in lagging cities....... Against this background, a model was developed in the ongoing European FP7 project PLEEC (www.pleecproject.eu) to measure the energy situation in cities, called “Energy-Smart City”, compiling over 50 energy-related indicators. In this paper we adapt the model to the Danish context and benchmark the 98...

  6. Benchmark studies of induced radioactivity produced in LHC materials, Part II: Remanent dose rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugger, M; Khater, H; Mayer, S; Prinz, A; Roesler, S; Ulrici, L; Vincke, H

    2005-01-01

    A new method to estimate remanent dose rates, to be used with the Monte Carlo code FLUKA, was benchmarked against measurements from an experiment that was performed at the CERN-EU high-energy reference field facility. An extensive collection of samples of different materials were placed downstream of, and laterally to, a copper target, intercepting a positively charged mixed hadron beam with a momentum of 120 GeV c(-1). Emphasis was put on the reduction of uncertainties by taking measures such as careful monitoring of the irradiation parameters, using different instruments to measure dose rates, adopting detailed elemental analyses of the irradiated materials and making detailed simulations of the irradiation experiment. The measured and calculated dose rates are in good agreement.

  7. Benchmark of Space Charge Simulations and Comparison with Experimental Results for High Intensity, Low Energy Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Cousineau, Sarah M

    2005-01-01

    Space charge effects are a major contributor to beam halo and emittance growth leading to beam loss in high intensity, low energy accelerators. As future accelerators strive towards unprecedented levels of beam intensity and beam loss control, a more comprehensive understanding of space charge effects is required. A wealth of simulation tools have been developed for modeling beams in linacs and rings, and with the growing availability of high-speed computing systems, computationally expensive problems that were inconceivable a decade ago are now being handled with relative ease. This has opened the field for realistic simulations of space charge effects, including detailed benchmarks with experimental data. A great deal of effort is being focused in this direction, and several recent benchmark studies have produced remarkably successful results. This paper reviews the achievements in space charge benchmarking in the last few years, and discusses the challenges that remain.

  8. Strategies for energy benchmarking in cleanrooms and laboratory-type facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sartor, Dale; Piette, Mary Ann; Tschudi, William; Fok, Stephen

    2000-01-01

    Buildings with cleanrooms and laboratories are growing in terms of total floor area and energy intensity. This building type is common in institutions such as universities and in many industries such as microelectronics and biotechnology. These buildings, with high ventilation rates and special environmental considerations, consume from 4 to 100 times more energy per square foot than conventional commercial buildings. Owners and operators of such facilities know they are expensive to operate, but have little way of knowing if their facilities are efficient or inefficient. A simple comparison of energy consumption per square foot is of little value. A growing interest in benchmarking is also fueled by: A new U.S. Executive Order removing the exemption of federal laboratories from energy efficiency goals, setting a 25% savings target, and calling for baseline guidance to measure progress; A new U.S. EPA and U.S. DOE initiative, Laboratories for the 21st Century, establishing voluntary performance goals and criteria for recognition; and A new PG and E market transformation program to improve energy efficiency in high tech facilities, including a cleanroom energy use benchmarking project. This paper identifies the unique issues associated with benchmarking energy use in high-tech facilities. Specific options discussed include statistical comparisons, point-based rating systems, model-based techniques, and hierarchical end-use and performance-metrics evaluations

  9. Benchmarking the performance of fixed-image receptor digital radiography systems. Part 2: system performance metric.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kam L; Bernardo, Michael; Ireland, Timothy A

    2016-06-01

    This is part two of a two-part study in benchmarking system performance of fixed digital radiographic systems. The study compares the system performance of seven fixed digital radiography systems based on quantitative metrics like modulation transfer function (sMTF), normalised noise power spectrum (sNNPS), detective quantum efficiency (sDQE) and entrance surface air kerma (ESAK). It was found that the most efficient image receptors (greatest sDQE) were not necessarily operating at the lowest ESAK. In part one of this study, sMTF is shown to depend on system configuration while sNNPS is shown to be relatively consistent across systems. Systems are ranked on their signal-to-noise ratio efficiency (sDQE) and their ESAK. Systems using the same equipment configuration do not necessarily have the same system performance. This implies radiographic practice at the site will have an impact on the overall system performance. In general, systems are more dose efficient at low dose settings.

  10. Guidebook for Using the Tool BEST Cement: Benchmarking and Energy Savings Tool for the Cement Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galitsky, Christina; Price, Lynn; Zhou, Nan; Fuqiu , Zhou; Huawen, Xiong; Xuemin, Zeng; Lan, Wang

    2008-07-30

    The Benchmarking and Energy Savings Tool (BEST) Cement is a process-based tool based on commercially available efficiency technologies used anywhere in the world applicable to the cement industry. This version has been designed for use in China. No actual cement facility with every single efficiency measure included in the benchmark will likely exist; however, the benchmark sets a reasonable standard by which to compare for plants striving to be the best. The energy consumption of the benchmark facility differs due to differences in processing at a given cement facility. The tool accounts for most of these variables and allows the user to adapt the model to operational variables specific for his/her cement facility. Figure 1 shows the boundaries included in a plant modeled by BEST Cement. In order to model the benchmark, i.e., the most energy efficient cement facility, so that it represents a facility similar to the user's cement facility, the user is first required to input production variables in the input sheet (see Section 6 for more information on how to input variables). These variables allow the tool to estimate a benchmark facility that is similar to the user's cement plant, giving a better picture of the potential for that particular facility, rather than benchmarking against a generic one. The input variables required include the following: (1) the amount of raw materials used in tonnes per year (limestone, gypsum, clay minerals, iron ore, blast furnace slag, fly ash, slag from other industries, natural pozzolans, limestone powder (used post-clinker stage), municipal wastes and others); the amount of raw materials that are preblended (prehomogenized and proportioned) and crushed (in tonnes per year); (2) the amount of additives that are dried and ground (in tonnes per year); (3) the production of clinker (in tonnes per year) from each kiln by kiln type; (4) the amount of raw materials, coal and clinker that is ground by mill type (in tonnes per

  11. Development of a Computer-based Benchmarking and Analytical Tool. Benchmarking and Energy & Water Savings Tool in Dairy Plants (BEST-Dairy)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Tengfang [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Flapper, Joris [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Ke, Jing [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Kramer, Klaas [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sathaye, Jayant [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2012-02-01

    The overall goal of the project is to develop a computer-based benchmarking and energy and water savings tool (BEST-Dairy) for use in the California dairy industry – including four dairy processes – cheese, fluid milk, butter, and milk powder.

  12. The fifth Atomic Energy Research dynamic benchmark calculation with HEXTRAN-SMABRE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haenaelaeinen, Anitta

    1998-01-01

    The fifth Atomic Energy Research dynamic benchmark is the first Atomic Energy Research benchmark for coupling of the thermohydraulic codes and three-dimensional reactor dynamic core models. In VTT HEXTRAN 2.7 is used for the core dynamics and SMABRE 4.6 as a thermohydraulic model for the primary and secondary loops. The plant model for SMABRE is based mainly on two input models. the Loviisa model and standard WWER-440/213 plant model. The primary circuit includes six separate loops, totally 505 nodes and 652 junctions. The reactor pressure vessel is divided into six parallel channels. In HEXTRAN calculation 176 symmetry is used in the core. In the sequence of main steam header break at the hot standby state, the liquid temperature is decreased symmetrically in the core inlet which leads to return to power. In the benchmark, no isolations of the steam generators are assumed and the maximum core power is about 38 % of the nominal power at four minutes after the break opening in the HEXTRAN-SMABRE calculation. Due to boric acid in the high pressure safety injection water, the power finally starts to decrease. The break flow is pure steam in the HEXTRAN-SMABRE calculation during the whole transient even in the swell levels in the steam generators are very high due to flashing. Because of sudden peaks in the preliminary results of the steam generator heat transfer, the SMABRE drift-flux model was modified. The new model is a simplified version of the EPRI correlation based on test data. The modified correlation behaves smoothly. In the calculations nuclear data is based on the ENDF/B-IV library and it has been evaluated with the CASMO-HEX code. The importance of the nuclear data was illustrated by repeating the benchmark calculation with using three different data sets. Optimal extensive data valid from hot to cold conditions were not available for all types of fuel enrichments needed in this benchmark.(Author)

  13. JENDL-4.0 benchmarking for effective delayed neutron fraction with a continuous-energy Monte Carlo code MVP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagaya, Yasunobu

    2013-01-01

    Benchmark calculations with a continuous-energy Monte Carlo code have been performed for delayed neutron data of JENDL-4.0. JENDL-4.0 gives good prediction for the effective delayed neutron fraction in the present benchmarks but further detailed analysis is required for some cores. (author)

  14. Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program Development of a Computer-based Benchmarking and Analytical Tool. Benchmarking and Energy & Water Savings Tool in Dairy Plants (BEST-Dairy)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Tengfang [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Flapper, Joris [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Ke, Jing [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Kramer, Klaas [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sathaye, Jayant [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2012-02-01

    The overall goal of the project is to develop a computer-based benchmarking and energy and water savings tool (BEST-Dairy) for use in the California dairy industry - including four dairy processes - cheese, fluid milk, butter, and milk powder. BEST-Dairy tool developed in this project provides three options for the user to benchmark each of the dairy product included in the tool, with each option differentiated based on specific detail level of process or plant, i.e., 1) plant level; 2) process-group level, and 3) process-step level. For each detail level, the tool accounts for differences in production and other variables affecting energy use in dairy processes. The dairy products include cheese, fluid milk, butter, milk powder, etc. The BEST-Dairy tool can be applied to a wide range of dairy facilities to provide energy and water savings estimates, which are based upon the comparisons with the best available reference cases that were established through reviewing information from international and national samples. We have performed and completed alpha- and beta-testing (field testing) of the BEST-Dairy tool, through which feedback from voluntary users in the U.S. dairy industry was gathered to validate and improve the tool's functionality. BEST-Dairy v1.2 was formally published in May 2011, and has been made available for free downloads from the internet (i.e., http://best-dairy.lbl.gov). A user's manual has been developed and published as the companion documentation for use with the BEST-Dairy tool. In addition, we also carried out technology transfer activities by engaging the dairy industry in the process of tool development and testing, including field testing, technical presentations, and technical assistance throughout the project. To date, users from more than ten countries in addition to those in the U.S. have downloaded the BEST-Dairy from the LBNL website. It is expected that the use of BEST-Dairy tool will advance understanding of energy and

  15. Indicators System Creation For The Energy Efficiency Benchmarking Of Municipal Power System Facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davydenko L.V.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The issues of the dataware of the comparative analysis procedure (benchmarking for municipal power system facilities energy efficiency level estimation with a view of the hierarchical structure of the heat supply system are considered. The aim of the paper is the system of indicators formation for characterizing the efficiency of energy usage as on objects on lowest so on highest levels of power systems, proceeding from features of their functioning. Benchmarking methodology allows carrying out the estimation of energy efficiency level on the base of a plurality of parameters without their generalization in one indicator, but requires ensuring their comparability. Using the methodology of available statistical information that did not require deep specification and additional inspection structuring objectives and tasks of energy efficiency estimation problem has been proposed for ensuring the opportunity of benchmarking procedure implementation. This makes it possible to form the subset of indicators that ensure enough specification of the object of study, taking into account the degree of abstraction for every hierarchical level or sub problem. For a comparative analysis of energy using efficiency in municipal power systems at the highest levels of the hierarchy a plurality of indicators of the energy efficiency has been formed. Indicators have been determined with consideration of the structural elements of heat supply systems, but allowing taking into account the efficiency of the initial state of the objects, their functioning, and the questions of energy resources accounting organization. Usage of the proposed indicators provides implementation of energy using efficiency monitoring in the municipal power system and allows getting complete overview of the problem.

  16. Benchmarking in the Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    In two articles an overview is given of the activities in the Dutch industry and energy sector with respect to benchmarking. In benchmarking operational processes of different competitive businesses are compared to improve your own performance. Benchmark covenants for energy efficiency between the Dutch government and industrial sectors contribute to a growth of the number of benchmark surveys in the energy intensive industry in the Netherlands. However, some doubt the effectiveness of the benchmark studies

  17. Design and Evaluation of Energy Management using Map-Based ECMS for the PHEV Benchmark

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivertsson Martin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles (PHEV provide a promising way of achieving the benefits of the electric vehicle without being limited by the electric range, but they increase the importance of the supervisory control to fully utilize the potential of the powertrain. The winning contribution in the PHEV Benchmark organized by IFP Energies nouvelles is described and evaluated. The control is an adaptive strategy based on a map-based Equivalent Consumption Minimization Strategy (ECMS approach, developed and implemented in the simulator provided for the PHEV Benchmark. The implemented control strives to be as blended as possible, whilst still ensuring that all electric energy is used in the driving mission. The controller is adaptive to reduce the importance of correct initial values, but since the initial values affect the consumption, a method is developed to estimate the optimal initial value for the controller based on driving cycle information. This works well for most driving cycles with promising consumption results. The controller performs well in the benchmark; however, the driving cycles used show potential for improvement. A robustness built into the controller affects the consumption more than necessary, and in the case of altitude variations the control does not make use of all the energy available. The control is therefore extended to also make use of topography information that could be provided by a GPS which shows a potential further decrease in fuel consumption.

  18. Evaluating the scope for energy-efficiency improvements in the public sector: Benchmarking NHSScotland's smaller health buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, Joe; Pahl, O.; Burek, S.

    2008-01-01

    The National Health Service in Scotland (NHSScotland) has, in recent years, done much to reduce energy consumption in its major healthcare buildings (hospitals). On average, a reduction of 2% per year has been achieved since 2000, based on hospital buildings. However, there had been little or no attention paid to smaller premises such as health centres, clinics, dentists, etc. Such smaller healthcare buildings in Scotland constitute 29% of the total treated floor area of all NHSScotland buildings and, therefore, may contribute a similar percentage of carbon and other emissions to the environment. By concentrating on a sample of local health centres in Scotland, this paper outlines the creation of an energy benchmark target, which is part of a wider research project to investigate the environmental impacts of small healthcare buildings in Scotland and the scope for improvements. It was found that energy consumption varied widely between different centres but this variation could not be linked to building style, floor area or volume. Overall, it was found that a benchmark of 0.2 GJ/m 3 would be challenging, but realistic

  19. Energy Benchmarking in Educational Buildings through Cluster Analysis of Energy Retrofitting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Marrone

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A large part of the stock of Italian educational buildings have undertaken energy retrofit interventions, thanks to European funds allocated by complex technical-administrative calls. In these projects, the suggested retrofit strategies are often selected based on the common best practices (considering average energy savings but are not supported by proper energy investigations. In this paper, Italian school buildings’ stock was analyzed by cluster analysis with the aim of providing a methodology able to identify the best energy retrofit interventions from the perspective of cost-benefit, and to correlate them with the specific characteristics of the educational buildings. This research is based on the analysis of about 80 school buildings located in central Italy and characterized by different features and construction technologies. The refurbished buildings were classified in homogeneous clusters and, for each of them, the most representative building was identified. Furthermore, for each representative building a validating procedure based on dynamic simulations and a comparison with actual energy use was performed. The two buildings thus singled out provide a model that could be developed into a useful tool for Public Administrations to suggest priorities in the planning of new energy retrofits of existing school building stocks.

  20. Benchmarking energy use and greenhouse gas emissions in Singapore's hotel industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Xuchao; Priyadarsini, Rajagopalan; Eang, Lee Siew

    2010-01-01

    Hotel buildings are reported in many countries as one of the most energy intensive building sectors. Besides the pressure posed on energy supply, they also have adverse impact on the environment through greenhouse gas emissions, wastewater discharge and so on. This study was intended to shed some light on the energy and environment related issues in hotel industry. Energy consumption data and relevant information collected from hotels were subjected to rigorous statistical analysis. A regression-based benchmarking model was established, which takes into account, the difference in functional and operational features when hotels are compared with regard to their energy performance. In addition, CO 2 emissions from the surveyed hotels were estimated based on a standard procedure for corporate GHG emission accounting. It was found that a hotel's carbon intensity ranking is rather sensitive to the normalizing denominator chosen. Therefore, carbon intensity estimated for the hotels must not be interpreted arbitrarily, and industry specific normalizing denominator should be sought in future studies.

  1. Toxicological Benchmarks for Wildlife

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sample, B.E. Opresko, D.M. Suter, G.W.

    1993-01-01

    Ecological risks of environmental contaminants are evaluated by using a two-tiered process. In the first tier, a screening assessment is performed where concentrations of contaminants in the environment are compared to no observed adverse effects level (NOAEL)-based toxicological benchmarks. These benchmarks represent concentrations of chemicals (i.e., concentrations presumed to be nonhazardous to the biota) in environmental media (water, sediment, soil, food, etc.). While exceedance of these benchmarks does not indicate any particular level or type of risk, concentrations below the benchmarks should not result in significant effects. In practice, when contaminant concentrations in food or water resources are less than these toxicological benchmarks, the contaminants may be excluded from further consideration. However, if the concentration of a contaminant exceeds a benchmark, that contaminant should be retained as a contaminant of potential concern (COPC) and investigated further. The second tier in ecological risk assessment, the baseline ecological risk assessment, may use toxicological benchmarks as part of a weight-of-evidence approach (Suter 1993). Under this approach, based toxicological benchmarks are one of several lines of evidence used to support or refute the presence of ecological effects. Other sources of evidence include media toxicity tests, surveys of biota (abundance and diversity), measures of contaminant body burdens, and biomarkers. This report presents NOAEL- and lowest observed adverse effects level (LOAEL)-based toxicological benchmarks for assessment of effects of 85 chemicals on 9 representative mammalian wildlife species (short-tailed shrew, little brown bat, meadow vole, white-footed mouse, cottontail rabbit, mink, red fox, and whitetail deer) or 11 avian wildlife species (American robin, rough-winged swallow, American woodcock, wild turkey, belted kingfisher, great blue heron, barred owl, barn owl, Cooper's hawk, and red

  2. Benchmark calculations on residue production within the EURISOL DS project; Part I: thin targets

    CERN Document Server

    David, J.C; Boudard, A; Doré, D; Leray, S; Rapp, B; Ridikas, D; Thiollière, N

    Report on benchmark calculations on residue production in thin targets. Calculations were performed using MCNPX 2.5.0 coupled to a selection of reaction models. The results were compared to nuclide production cross-sections measured in GSI in inverse kinematics

  3. Benchmark calculations on residue production within the EURISOL DS project; Part II: thick targets

    CERN Document Server

    David, J.-C; Boudard, A; Doré, D; Leray, S; Rapp, B; Ridikas, D; Thiollière, N

    Benchmark calculations on residue production using MCNPX 2.5.0. Calculations were compared to mass-distribution data for 5 different elements measured at ISOLDE, and to specific activities of 28 radionuclides in different places along the thick target measured in Dubna.

  4. NREL Benchmarks the Installed Cost of Residential Solar Photovoltaics with Energy Storage for the First Time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-06-13

    Fact sheet summarizing technical report TP-7A40-67474. New National Renewable Energy Laboratory research fills a gap in the existing knowledge about barriers to PV-plus-storage systems by providing detailed component- and system-level installed cost benchmarks for systems in the first quarter of 2016. The report is meant to help technology manufacturers, installers, and other stakeholders identify cost-reduction opportunities and inform decision makers about regulatory, policy, and market characteristics that impede PV-plus-storage deployment.

  5. Shielding Benchmark Computational Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, H.T.; Slater, C.O.; Holland, L.B.; Tracz, G.; Marshall, W.J.; Parsons, J.L.

    2000-01-01

    Over the past several decades, nuclear science has relied on experimental research to verify and validate information about shielding nuclear radiation for a variety of applications. These benchmarks are compared with results from computer code models and are useful for the development of more accurate cross-section libraries, computer code development of radiation transport modeling, and building accurate tests for miniature shielding mockups of new nuclear facilities. When documenting measurements, one must describe many parts of the experimental results to allow a complete computational analysis. Both old and new benchmark experiments, by any definition, must provide a sound basis for modeling more complex geometries required for quality assurance and cost savings in nuclear project development. Benchmarks may involve one or many materials and thicknesses, types of sources, and measurement techniques. In this paper the benchmark experiments of varying complexity are chosen to study the transport properties of some popular materials and thicknesses. These were analyzed using three-dimensional (3-D) models and continuous energy libraries of MCNP4B2, a Monte Carlo code developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico. A shielding benchmark library provided the experimental data and allowed a wide range of choices for source, geometry, and measurement data. The experimental data had often been used in previous analyses by reputable groups such as the Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG) and the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development/Nuclear Energy Agency Nuclear Science Committee (OECD/NEANSC)

  6. A Benchmarking Study of High Energy Carbon Ion Induced Neutron Using Several Monte Carlo Codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, D. H.; Oh, J. H.; Jung, N. S.; Lee, H. S. [Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Y. S.; Kwon, D. Y.; Kim, Y. M. [Catholic Univ., Gyeongsan (Korea, Republic of); Oranj, L. Mokhtari [POSTECH, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    In this study, the benchmarking study was done for the representative particle interaction of the heavy ion accelerator, especially carbon-induced reaction. The secondary neutron is an important particle in the shielding analysis to define the source term and penetration ability of radiation fields. The performance of each Monte Carlo codes were verified for selected codes: MCNPX 2.7, PHITS 2.64 and FLUKA 2011.2b.6. For this benchmarking study, the experimental data of Kurosawa et al. in the SINBAD database of NEA was applied. The calculated results of the differential neutron yield produced from several materials irradiated by high energy carbon beam reproduced the experimental data well in small uncertainty. But the MCNPX results showed large discrepancy with experimental data, especially at the forward angle. The calculated results were lower a little than the experimental and it was clear in the cases of lower incident carbon energy, thinner target and forward angle. As expected, the influence of different model was found clearly at forward direction. In the shielding analysis, these characteristics of each Monte Carlo codes should be considered and utilized to determine the safety margin of a shield thickness.

  7. A Benchmarking Study of High Energy Carbon Ion Induced Neutron Using Several Monte Carlo Codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, D. H.; Oh, J. H.; Jung, N. S.; Lee, H. S.; Shin, Y. S.; Kwon, D. Y.; Kim, Y. M.; Oranj, L. Mokhtari

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the benchmarking study was done for the representative particle interaction of the heavy ion accelerator, especially carbon-induced reaction. The secondary neutron is an important particle in the shielding analysis to define the source term and penetration ability of radiation fields. The performance of each Monte Carlo codes were verified for selected codes: MCNPX 2.7, PHITS 2.64 and FLUKA 2011.2b.6. For this benchmarking study, the experimental data of Kurosawa et al. in the SINBAD database of NEA was applied. The calculated results of the differential neutron yield produced from several materials irradiated by high energy carbon beam reproduced the experimental data well in small uncertainty. But the MCNPX results showed large discrepancy with experimental data, especially at the forward angle. The calculated results were lower a little than the experimental and it was clear in the cases of lower incident carbon energy, thinner target and forward angle. As expected, the influence of different model was found clearly at forward direction. In the shielding analysis, these characteristics of each Monte Carlo codes should be considered and utilized to determine the safety margin of a shield thickness

  8. Power-Energy Simulation for Multi-Core Processors in Bench-marking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona A. Abou-Of

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available At Microarchitectural level, multi-core processor, as a complex System on Chip, has sophisticated on-chip components including cores, shared caches, interconnects and system controllers such as memory and ethernet controllers. At technological level, architects should consider the device types forecast in the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS. Energy simulation enables architects to study two important metrics simultaneously. Timing is a key element of the CPU performance that imposes constraints on the CPU target clock frequency. Power and the resulting heat impose more severe design constraints, such as core clustering, while semiconductor industry is providing more transistors in the die area in pace with Moore’s law. Energy simulators provide a solution for such serious challenge. Energy is modelled either by combining performance benchmarking tool with a power simulator or by an integrated framework of both performance simulator and power profiling system. This article presents and asses trade-offs between different architectures using four cores battery-powered mobile systems by running a custom-made and a standard benchmark tools. The experimental results assure the Energy/ Frequency convexity rule over a range of frequency settings on different number of enabled cores. The reported results show that increasing the number of cores has a great effect on increasing the power consumption. However, a minimum energy dissipation will occur at a lower frequency which reduces the power consumption. Despite that, increasing the number of cores will also increase the effective cores value which will reflect a better processor performance.

  9. Climate Change Mitigation through Energy Benchmarking in the GCC Green Buildings Codes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousef Alhorr

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC of countries resides at or close to the top of the global table of CO2 emissions per capita and its economy relies heavily on its fossil fuels. This provides a context for green building programs that initially aim to create an understanding of emission pathways within the GCC and hence develop approaches to their reduction in the built environment. A set of criteria will allow specific analysis to be undertaken linked to the spatial dimensions of the sector under study. In this paper, approaches to modelling energy consumption and CO2 emissions are presented. As investment in the built environment continues, natural resources dwindle and the cost of energy increases, delivering low-energy buildings will become mandatory. In this study, a hybrid modelling approach (bottom-top & top-bottom is presented. Energy benchmarks are developed for different buildings’ uses and compared with international standards. The main goals are to establish design benchmarks and develop a modelling tool that contains specific information for all buildings types (existing and new, as well as planned and projected growths within the various city districts, then integrate this database within a geospatial information system that will allow us to answer a range of “what-if”-type questions about various intervention strategies, emissions savings, and acceptability of pre-defined course of actions in the city sector under consideration. The spatial carbon intensity may be adjusted over a certain period, (e.g., through local generation (microgeneration or due to an increasing proportion of lower carbon-energy in the generation mix and this can be related to the sector and city overall consumption.

  10. Kaiser Permanente's performance improvement system, Part 1: From benchmarking to executing on strategic priorities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, Lisa; Chase, Alide; Kehrli, Sommer; Liu, Amy Y; Stiefel, Matt; Brentari, Ruth

    2010-11-01

    By 2004, senior leaders at Kaiser Permanente, the largest not-for-profit health plan in the United States, recognizing variations across service areas in quality, safety, service, and efficiency, began developing a performance improvement (PI) system to realizing best-in-class quality performance across all 35 medical centers. MEASURING SYSTEMWIDE PERFORMANCE: In 2005, a Web-based data dashboard, "Big Q," which tracks the performance of each medical center and service area against external benchmarks and internal goals, was created. PLANNING FOR PI AND BENCHMARKING PERFORMANCE: In 2006, Kaiser Permanente national and regional continued planning the PI system, and in 2007, quality, medical group, operations, and information technology leaders benchmarked five high-performing organizations to identify capabilities required to achieve consistent best-in-class organizational performance. THE PI SYSTEM: The PI system addresses the six capabilities: leadership priority setting, a systems approach to improvement, measurement capability, a learning organization, improvement capacity, and a culture of improvement. PI "deep experts" (mentors) consult with national, regional, and local leaders, and more than 500 improvement advisors are trained to manage portfolios of 90-120 day improvement initiatives at medical centers. Between the second quarter of 2008 and the first quarter of 2009, performance across all Kaiser Permanente medical centers improved on the Big Q metrics. The lessons learned in implementing and sustaining PI as it becomes fully integrated into all levels of Kaiser Permanente can be generalized to other health care systems, hospitals, and other health care organizations.

  11. Benchmarking of Monte Carlo simulation of bremsstrahlung from thick targets at radiotherapy energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faddegon, Bruce A.; Asai, Makoto; Perl, Joseph; Ross, Carl; Sempau, Josep; Tinslay, Jane; Salvat, Francesc

    2008-01-01

    Several Monte Carlo systems were benchmarked against published measurements of bremsstrahlung yield from thick targets for 10-30 MV beams. The quantity measured was photon fluence at 1 m per unit energy per incident electron (spectra), and total photon fluence, integrated over energy, per incident electron (photon yield). Results were reported at 10-30 MV on the beam axis for Al and Pb targets and at 15 MV at angles out to 90 degree sign for Be, Al, and Pb targets. Beam energy was revised with improved accuracy of 0.5% using an improved energy calibration of the accelerator. Recently released versions of the Monte Carlo systems EGSNRC, GEANT4, and PENELOPE were benchmarked against the published measurements using the revised beam energies. Monte Carlo simulation was capable of calculation of photon yield in the experimental geometry to 5% out to 30 degree sign , 10% at wider angles, and photon spectra to 10% at intermediate photon energies, 15% at lower energies. Accuracy of measured photon yield from 0 to 30 degree sign was 5%, 1 s.d., increasing to 7% for the larger angles. EGSNRC and PENELOPE results were within 2 s.d. of the measured photon yield at all beam energies and angles, GEANT4 within 3 s.d. Photon yield at nonzero angles for angles covering conventional field sizes used in radiotherapy (out to 10 degree sign ), measured with an accuracy of 3%, was calculated within 1 s.d. of measurement for EGSNRC, 2 s.d. for PENELOPE and GEANT4. Calculated spectra closely matched measurement at photon energies over 5 MeV. Photon spectra near 5 MeV were underestimated by as much as 10% by all three codes. The photon spectra below 2-3 MeV for the Be and Al targets and small angles were overestimated by up to 15% when using EGSNRC and PENELOPE, 20% with GEANT4. EGSNRC results with the NIST option for the bremsstrahlung cross section were preferred over the alternative cross section available in EGSNRC and over EGS4. GEANT4 results calculated with the ''low energy

  12. Benchmarking of Monte Carlo simulation of bremsstrahlung from thick targets at radiotherapy energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faddegon, Bruce A.; Asai, Makoto; Perl, Joseph; Ross, Carl; Sempau, Josep; Tinslay, Jane; Salvat, Francesc [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco, California 94143 (United States); Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); National Research Council Canada, Institute for National Measurement Standards, 1200 Montreal Road, Building M-36, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6 (Canada); Institut de Tecniques Energetiques, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya and Centro de Investigacion Biomedica en Red en Bioingenieria, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (CIBER-BBN), Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Facultat de Fisica (ECM), Universitat de Barcelona, Societat Catalana de Fisica (IEC), Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2008-10-15

    Several Monte Carlo systems were benchmarked against published measurements of bremsstrahlung yield from thick targets for 10-30 MV beams. The quantity measured was photon fluence at 1 m per unit energy per incident electron (spectra), and total photon fluence, integrated over energy, per incident electron (photon yield). Results were reported at 10-30 MV on the beam axis for Al and Pb targets and at 15 MV at angles out to 90 degree sign for Be, Al, and Pb targets. Beam energy was revised with improved accuracy of 0.5% using an improved energy calibration of the accelerator. Recently released versions of the Monte Carlo systems EGSNRC, GEANT4, and PENELOPE were benchmarked against the published measurements using the revised beam energies. Monte Carlo simulation was capable of calculation of photon yield in the experimental geometry to 5% out to 30 degree sign , 10% at wider angles, and photon spectra to 10% at intermediate photon energies, 15% at lower energies. Accuracy of measured photon yield from 0 to 30 degree sign was 5%, 1 s.d., increasing to 7% for the larger angles. EGSNRC and PENELOPE results were within 2 s.d. of the measured photon yield at all beam energies and angles, GEANT4 within 3 s.d. Photon yield at nonzero angles for angles covering conventional field sizes used in radiotherapy (out to 10 degree sign ), measured with an accuracy of 3%, was calculated within 1 s.d. of measurement for EGSNRC, 2 s.d. for PENELOPE and GEANT4. Calculated spectra closely matched measurement at photon energies over 5 MeV. Photon spectra near 5 MeV were underestimated by as much as 10% by all three codes. The photon spectra below 2-3 MeV for the Be and Al targets and small angles were overestimated by up to 15% when using EGSNRC and PENELOPE, 20% with GEANT4. EGSNRC results with the NIST option for the bremsstrahlung cross section were preferred over the alternative cross section available in EGSNRC and over EGS4. GEANT4 results calculated with the &apos

  13. Regulatory Benchmarking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agrell, Per J.; Bogetoft, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Benchmarking methods, and in particular Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA), have become well-established and informative tools for economic regulation. DEA is now routinely used by European regulators to set reasonable revenue caps for energy transmission and distribution system operators. The appli......Benchmarking methods, and in particular Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA), have become well-established and informative tools for economic regulation. DEA is now routinely used by European regulators to set reasonable revenue caps for energy transmission and distribution system operators....... The application of bench-marking in regulation, however, requires specific steps in terms of data validation, model specification and outlier detection that are not systematically documented in open publications, leading to discussions about regulatory stability and economic feasibility of these techniques...

  14. Regulatory Benchmarking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agrell, Per J.; Bogetoft, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Benchmarking methods, and in particular Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA), have become well-established and informative tools for economic regulation. DEA is now routinely used by European regulators to set reasonable revenue caps for energy transmission and distribution system operators. The appli......Benchmarking methods, and in particular Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA), have become well-established and informative tools for economic regulation. DEA is now routinely used by European regulators to set reasonable revenue caps for energy transmission and distribution system operators....... The application of benchmarking in regulation, however, requires specific steps in terms of data validation, model specification and outlier detection that are not systematically documented in open publications, leading to discussions about regulatory stability and economic feasibility of these techniques...

  15. The energy in France benchmark; L'energie en France reperes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    This book provides data on the following topics, concerning the France: the energy in the economy, the different energies, the petroleum, gas, coal and electric power, the renewable energies, the cogeneration, the rational use of the energy, the prices, the energy and the environment. (A.L.B.)

  16. Installed Cost Benchmarks and Deployment Barriers for Residential Solar Photovoltaics with Energy Storage: Q1 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ardani, Kristen; O' Shaughnessy, Eric; Fu, Ran; McClurg, Chris; Huneycutt, Joshua; Margolis, Robert

    2016-12-01

    In this report, we fill a gap in the existing knowledge about PV-plus-storage system costs and value by providing detailed component- and system-level installed cost benchmarks for residential systems. We also examine other barriers to increased deployment of PV-plus-storage systems in the residential sector. The results are meant to help technology manufacturers, installers, and other stakeholders identify cost-reduction opportunities and inform decision makers about regulatory, policy, and market characteristics that impede solar plus storage deployment. In addition, our periodic cost benchmarks will document progress in cost reductions over time. To analyze costs for PV-plus-storage systems deployed in the first quarter of 2016, we adapt the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's component- and system-level cost-modeling methods for standalone PV. In general, we attempt to model best-in-class installation techniques and business operations from an installed-cost perspective. In addition to our original analysis, model development, and review of published literature, we derive inputs for our model and validate our draft results via interviews with industry and subject-matter experts. One challenge to analyzing the costs of PV-plus-storage systems is choosing an appropriate cost metric. Unlike standalone PV, energy storage lacks universally accepted cost metrics, such as dollars per watt of installed capacity and lifetime levelized cost of energy. We explain the difficulty of arriving at a standard approach for reporting storage costs and then provide the rationale for using the total installed costs of a standard PV-plus-storage system as our primary metric, rather than using a system-size-normalized metric.

  17. Development and benchmark of high energy continuous-energy neutron cross Section library HENDL-ADS/MC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Chong; Wang Minghuang; Zou Jun; Xu Dezheng; Zeng Qin

    2012-01-01

    The ADS (accelerator driven sub-critical system) has great energy spans, complex energy spectrum structures and strong physical effects. Hence, the existing nuclear data libraries can't fully meet the needs of nuclear analysis in ADS. In order to do nuclear analysis for ADS system, a point-wise data library HENDL-ADS/MC (hybrid evaluated nuclear data library) was produced by FDS team. Meanwhile, to test the availability and reliability of the HENDL-ADS/MC data library, a series of shielding and critical safety benchmarks were performed. To validate and qualify the reliability of the high-energy cross section for HENDL-ADS/MC library further, a series of high neutronics integral experiments have been performed. The testing results confirm the accuracy and reliability of HENDL-ADS/MC. (authors)

  18. Aerodynamic Benchmarking of the Deepwind Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bedona, Gabriele; Schmidt Paulsen, Uwe; Aagaard Madsen, Helge

    2015-01-01

    The aerodynamic benchmarking for the DeepWind rotor is conducted comparing different rotor geometries and solutions and keeping the comparison as fair as possible. The objective for the benchmarking is to find the most suitable configuration in order to maximize the power production and minimize...... the blade solicitation and the cost of energy. Different parameters are considered for the benchmarking study. The DeepWind blade is characterized by a shape similar to the Troposkien geometry but asymmetric between the top and bottom parts: this shape is considered as a fixed parameter in the benchmarking...

  19. Energy use pattern and benchmarking of selected greenhouses in Iran using data envelopment analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omid, M.; Ghojabeige, F.; Delshad, M.; Ahmadi, H.

    2011-01-01

    This paper studies the degree of technical efficiency (TE) and scale efficiency (SE) of selected greenhouses in Iran and describes the process of benchmarking energy inputs and cucumber yield. Inquiries on 18 greenhouses were conducted in a face-to-face interviewing during September-December 2008 period. A non-parametric data envelopment analysis (DEA) technique was applied to investigate the degree of TE and SE of producers, and evaluate and rank productivity performance of cucumber producers based on eight energy inputs: human labour, diesel, machinery, fertilizers, chemicals, water for irrigation, seeds and electricity, and output yield values of cucumber. DEA optimizes the performance measure of each greenhouse or decision making unit (DMU). Specifically, the DEA was used to compare the performance of each DMU in region of increasing, constant or decreasing return to scale in multiple-inputs situations. The CRS model helped us to decompose the pure TE into the overall TE and SE components, thereby allowing investigating the scale effects. The results of analysis showed that DEA is an effective tool for analyzing and benchmarking productive efficiency of greenhouses. The VRS analysis showed that only 12 out of the 18 DMUs were efficient. The TE of the inefficient DMUs, on average, was calculated as 91.5%. This implies that the same level of output could be produced with 91.5% of the resources if these units were performing on the frontier. Another interpretation of this result is that 8.5% of overall resources could be saved by raising the performance of these DMUs to the highest level.

  20. Energy use pattern and benchmarking of selected greenhouses in Iran using data envelopment analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omid, M.; Ghojabeige, F.; Ahmadi, H. [Department of Agricultural Machinery, College of Agriculture and Natural Resources, University of Tehran, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Delshad, M. [Department of Horticultural Sciences, College of Agriculture and Natural Resources, University of Tehran, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-01-15

    This paper studies the degree of technical efficiency (TE) and scale efficiency (SE) of selected greenhouses in Iran and describes the process of benchmarking energy inputs and cucumber yield. Inquiries on 18 greenhouses were conducted in a face-to-face interviewing during September-December 2008 period. A non-parametric data envelopment analysis (DEA) technique was applied to investigate the degree of TE and SE of producers, and evaluate and rank productivity performance of cucumber producers based on eight energy inputs: human labour, diesel, machinery, fertilizers, chemicals, water for irrigation, seeds and electricity, and output yield values of cucumber. DEA optimizes the performance measure of each greenhouse or decision making unit (DMU). Specifically, the DEA was used to compare the performance of each DMU in region of increasing, constant or decreasing return to scale in multiple-inputs situations. The CRS model helped us to decompose the pure TE into the overall TE and SE components, thereby allowing investigating the scale effects. The results of analysis showed that DEA is an effective tool for analyzing and benchmarking productive efficiency of greenhouses. The VRS analysis showed that only 12 out of the 18 DMUs were efficient. The TE of the inefficient DMUs, on average, was calculated as 91.5%. This implies that the same level of output could be produced with 91.5% of the resources if these units were performing on the frontier. Another interpretation of this result is that 8.5% of overall resources could be saved by raising the performance of these DMUs to the highest level. (author)

  1. Evaluation of U.S. Building Energy Benchmarking and Transparency Programs: Attributes, Impacts, and Best Practices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mims, Natalie [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts Div.; Schiller, Steven R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts Div.; Stuart, Elizabeth [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts Div.; Schwartz, Lisa [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts Div.; Kramer, Chris [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts Div.; Faesy, Richard [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts Div.

    2017-04-30

    In the last decade, a new policy area has emerged to boost energy efficiency in buildings that focuses on the simple action of measuring energy use as compared to buildings of similar type and size, and making that data publicly available. These efforts, referred to as benchmarking and transparency (B&T) policies, seek to unlock new energy efficiency opportunities in the country’s existing buildings by promoting data-driven decision-making and creating stronger market signals. This report focuses on the 24 state and local jurisdictions that (as of December 31, 2016) require owners of privately owned commercial buildings, multifamily buildings, or both to comply with a B&T policy. The report provides a summary of U.S. B&T policy design and implementation characteristics, reports results and impacts for jurisdictions with B&T policies, and discusses opportunities for increasing the efficacy of B&T policies, as well as suggested areas for further research. Among the findings, all but one of the B&T policy evaluation studies reviewed indicate some reduction (from 1.6% to 14%) in energy use, energy costs, or energy intensity over the two- to four-year period of the analyses. More specifically, most of the studies reviewed indicate 3% to 8% reductions in gross energy consumption or energy use intensity over a two- to four-year period of B&T policy implementation. Two additional evaluation studies indicate that there is a causal relationship between B&T policies and energy savings or energy cost savings. These documented impacts should be reviewed with some caution. While consistently showing energy savings benefits associated with B&T policies, these savings estimates should be considered preliminary because of the limited period of analyses and inconsistencies in analysis methods for the various studies. A nationally standardized method for data collection, reporting, and evaluation of B&T policies—developed with an advisory group of state and local jurisdictions

  2. Development of a new energy benchmark for improving the operational rating system of office buildings using various data-mining techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hyo Seon; Lee, Minhyun; Kang, Hyuna; Hong, Taehoon; Jeong, Jaewook

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • This study developed a new energy benchmark for office buildings. • Correlation analysis, decision tree, and analysis of variance were used. • The data from 1072 office buildings in South Korea were used. • As a result, six types of energy benchmarks for office buildings were developed. • The operational rating system can be improved by using the new energy benchmark. - Abstract: As improving energy efficiency in buildings has become a global issue today, many countries have adopted the operational rating system to evaluate the energy performance of a building based on the actual energy consumption. A rational and reasonable energy benchmark can be used in the operational rating system to evaluate the energy performance of a building accurately and effectively. This study aims to develop a new energy benchmark for improving the operational rating system of office buildings. Toward this end, this study used various data-mining techniques such as correlation analysis, decision tree (DT) analysis, and analysis of variance (ANOVA). Based on data from 1072 office buildings in South Korea, this study was conducted in three steps: (i) Step 1: establishment of the database; (ii) Step 2: development of the new energy benchmark; and (iii) Step 3: application of the new energy benchmark for improving the operational rating system. As a result, six types of energy benchmarks for office buildings were developed using DT analysis based on the gross floor area (GFA) and the building use ratio (BUR) of offices, and these new energy benchmarks were validated using ANOVA. To ensure the effectiveness of the new energy benchmark, it was applied to three operational rating systems for comparison: (i) the baseline system (the same energy benchmark is used for all office buildings); (ii) the conventional system (different energy benchmarks are used depending on the GFA, currently used in South Korea); and (iii) the proposed system (different energy benchmarks are

  3. Quantum computing applied to calculations of molecular energies: CH2 benchmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veis, Libor; Pittner, Jiří

    2010-11-21

    Quantum computers are appealing for their ability to solve some tasks much faster than their classical counterparts. It was shown in [Aspuru-Guzik et al., Science 309, 1704 (2005)] that they, if available, would be able to perform the full configuration interaction (FCI) energy calculations with a polynomial scaling. This is in contrast to conventional computers where FCI scales exponentially. We have developed a code for simulation of quantum computers and implemented our version of the quantum FCI algorithm. We provide a detailed description of this algorithm and the results of the assessment of its performance on the four lowest lying electronic states of CH(2) molecule. This molecule was chosen as a benchmark, since its two lowest lying (1)A(1) states exhibit a multireference character at the equilibrium geometry. It has been shown that with a suitably chosen initial state of the quantum register, one is able to achieve the probability amplification regime of the iterative phase estimation algorithm even in this case.

  4. Benchmarking the performance of fixed-image receptor digital radiographic systems part 1: a novel method for image quality analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kam L; Ireland, Timothy A; Bernardo, Michael

    2016-06-01

    This is the first part of a two-part study in benchmarking the performance of fixed digital radiographic general X-ray systems. This paper concentrates on reporting findings related to quantitative analysis techniques used to establish comparative image quality metrics. A systematic technical comparison of the evaluated systems is presented in part two of this study. A novel quantitative image quality analysis method is presented with technical considerations addressed for peer review. The novel method was applied to seven general radiographic systems with four different makes of radiographic image receptor (12 image receptors in total). For the System Modulation Transfer Function (sMTF), the use of grid was found to reduce veiling glare and decrease roll-off. The major contributor in sMTF degradation was found to be focal spot blurring. For the System Normalised Noise Power Spectrum (sNNPS), it was found that all systems examined had similar sNNPS responses. A mathematical model is presented to explain how the use of stationary grid may cause a difference between horizontal and vertical sNNPS responses.

  5. Benchmark studies of induced radioactivity produced in LHC materials, Part I: Specific activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugger, M; Khater, H; Mayer, S; Prinz, A; Roesler, S; Ulrici, L; Vincke, H

    2005-01-01

    Samples of materials which will be used in the LHC machine for shielding and construction components were irradiated in the stray radiation field of the CERN-EU high-energy reference field facility. After irradiation, the specific activities induced in the various samples were analysed with a high-precision gamma spectrometer at various cooling times, allowing identification of isotopes with a wide range of half-lives. Furthermore, the irradiation experiment was simulated in detail with the FLUKA Monte Carlo code. A comparison of measured and calculated specific activities shows good agreement, supporting the use of FLUKA for estimating the level of induced activity in the LHC.

  6. Benchmark studies of induced radioactivity produced in LHC materials, part I: Specific activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brugger, M.; Khater, H.; Mayer, S.; Prinz, A.; Roesler, S.; Ulrici, L.; Vincke, H.

    2005-01-01

    Samples of materials which will be used in the LHC machine for shielding and construction components were irradiated in the stray radiation field of the CERN-EU high-energy reference field facility. After irradiation, the specific activities induced in the various samples were analysed with a high-precision gamma spectrometer at various cooling times, allowing identification of isotopes with a wide range of half-lives. Furthermore, the irradiation experiment was simulated in detail with the FLUKA Monte Carlo code. A comparison of measured and calculated specific activities shows good agreement, supporting the use of FLUKA for estimating the level of induced activity in the LHC. (authors)

  7. High Performance Homes That Use 50% Less Energy Than the DOE Building America Benchmark Building

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christian, J.

    2011-01-01

    This document describes lessons learned from designing, building, and monitoring five affordable, energy-efficient test houses in a single development in the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) service area. This work was done through a collaboration of Habitat for Humanity Loudon County, the US Department of Energy (DOE), TVA, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL).The houses were designed by a team led by ORNL and were constructed by Habitat's volunteers in Lenoir City, Tennessee. ZEH5, a two-story house and the last of the five test houses to be built, provided an excellent model for conducting research on affordable high-performance houses. The impressively low energy bills for this house have generated considerable interest from builders and homeowners around the country who wanted a similar home design that could be adapted to different climates. Because a design developed without the project constraints of ZEH5 would have more appeal for the mass market, plans for two houses were developed from ZEH5: a one-story design (ZEH6) and a two-story design (ZEH7). This report focuses on ZEH6, identical to ZEH5 except that the geothermal heat pump is replaced with a SEER 16 air source unit (like that used in ZEH4). The report also contains plans for the ZEH6 house. ZEH5 and ZEH6 both use 50% less energy than the DOE Building America protocol for energyefficient buildings. ZEH5 is a 4 bedroom, 2.5 bath, 2632 ft2 house with a home energy rating system (HERS) index of 43, which qualifies it for federal energy-efficiency incentives (a HERS rating of 0 is a zero-energy house, and a conventional new house would have a HERS rating of 100). This report is intended to help builders and homeowners build similar high-performance houses. Detailed specifications for the envelope and the equipment used in ZEH5 are compared with the Building America Benchmark building, and detailed drawings, specifications, and lessons learned in the construction and analysis of data gleaned

  8. Benchmark study of shear buckling of a cylindrical vessel. Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combescure, A.; Bastien, R.; Carnoy, E.G.; Dostal, M.; Austin, N.M.; Peano, A.; Angeloni, P.

    1988-01-01

    In Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactors (LMFBR) potential shear buckling failures of the primary vessel, induced through seismic excitations, have to be considered. The primary vessel material, typically 316 stainless steel, has a low yield strength at the normal operating temperatures of around 400 0 C to 500 0 C. There characteristics tend to make the structure relatively flexible and subject to potential elasto-plastic shear buckling failure. The use of finite element techniques in buckling analyses is currently becoming more accepted. There are at present many finite element codes available which have the capacibility to solve buckling problems. The objective of the study reported herein was to follow on from the previous code validation exercise and investigate the ability of finite element codes to predict buckling behaviour in another test cylinder [a/h = 83, a/L = 1] where non-linear effects would be more significant and plastic shear buckling could be a failure mode. As before four organisations took part in the code validation exercise. NNC [UK] and ISMES [Italy] used the commercially available general purpose FE code ABAQUS. CEA [France] used INCA and BILBO which are members of the commercially available CASTEM suite of FE program. Novatome [France] used their in-house FE code NOVNL. The joint effort was co-ordinated by NNC with the assistance of the Commission of the European Communities Working on Codes and Standards AG2

  9. Estimates of the Damage Costs of Climate Change. Part 1. Benchmark Estimates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tol, R.S.J.

    2002-01-01

    A selection of the potential impacts of climate change - on agriculture, forestry, unmanaged ecosystems, sea level rise, human mortality, energy consumption, and water resources - are estimated and valued in monetary terms. Estimates are derived from globally comprehensive, internally consistent studies using GCM based scenarios. An underestimate of the uncertainty is given. New impact studies can be included following the meta-analytical methods described here. A 1C increase in the global mean surface air temperature would have, on balance, a positive effect on the OECD, China, and the Middle East, and a negative effect on other countries. Confidence intervals of regionally aggregated impacts, however, include both positive and negative impacts for all regions. Global estimates depend on the aggregation rule. Using a simple sum, world impact of a 1C warming would be a positive 2% of GDP, with a standard deviation of 1%. Using globally averaged values, world impact would be a negative 3% (standard deviation: 1%). Using equity weighting, world impact would amount to 0% (standard deviation: 1%)

  10. Performance analysis of fusion nuclear-data benchmark experiments for light to heavy materials in MeV energy region with a neutron spectrum shifter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murata, Isao; Ohta, Masayuki; Miyamaru, Hiroyuki; Kondo, Keitaro; Yoshida, Shigeo; Iida, Toshiyuki; Ochiai, Kentaro; Konno, Chikara

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear data are indispensable for development of fusion reactor candidate materials. However, benchmarking of the nuclear data in MeV energy region is not yet adequate. In the present study, benchmark performance in the MeV energy region was investigated theoretically for experiments by using a 14 MeV neutron source. We carried out a systematical analysis for light to heavy materials. As a result, the benchmark performance for the neutron spectrum was confirmed to be acceptable, while for gamma-rays it was not sufficiently accurate. Consequently, a spectrum shifter has to be applied. Beryllium had the best performance as a shifter. Moreover, a preliminary examination of whether it is really acceptable that only the spectrum before the last collision is considered in the benchmark performance analysis. It was pointed out that not only the last collision but also earlier collisions should be considered equally in the benchmark performance analysis.

  11. Benchmarking of EPRI-cell epithermal methods with the point-energy discrete-ordinates code (OZMA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, M.L.; Wright, R.Q.; Barhen, J.; Rothenstein, W.

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to benchmark E-C resonance-shielding and cell-averaging methods against a rigorous deterministic solution on a fine-group level (approx. 30 groups between 1 eV and 5.5 keV). The benchmark code used is OZMA, which solves the space-dependent slowing-down equations using continuous-energy discrete ordinates or integral transport theory to produce fine-group cross sections. Results are given for three water-moderated lattices - a mixed oxide, a uranium method, and a tight-pitch high-conversion uranium oxide configuration. The latter two lattices were chosen because of the strong self shielding of the 238 U resonances

  12. S66: A Well-balanced Database of Benchmark Interaction Energies Relevant to Biomolecular Structures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Řezáč, Jan; Riley, Kevin Eugene; Hobza, Pavel

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 8 (2011), s. 2427-2438 ISSN 1549-9618 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC512 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : noncovalent interactions * benchmarking * CCSD(T) Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 5.215, year: 2011

  13. Results of the GABLS3 diurnal-cycle benchmark for wind energy applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodrigo, J. Sanz; Allaerts, D.; Avila, M.

    2017-01-01

    errors are used to quantify model performance. The results of the benchmark are used to discuss input uncertainties from mesoscale modelling, different meso-micro coupling strategies (online vs offline) and consistency between RANS and LES codes when dealing with boundary-layer mean flow quantities....... Overall, all the microscale simulations produce a consistent coupling with mesoscale forcings....

  14. Mapping and benchmarking regional disparities in China’s energy supply, transformation, and end-use in 2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mischke, Peggy; Xiong, Weiming

    2015-01-01

    -regions of China in 2010, benchmarks those to the corresponding national Sankey diagram, and quantifies the following major regional disparities: (i) West- and Central-China account for about 89% of the country’s coal production. (ii) About 50% of coal fired power generation and about 90% of refining can be mapped...... to East- China. (iii) East-China also dominated the country’s industrial energy consumption, accounting for about 70% of oil, about 58% of coal and about 53% of electricity consumption in industry. This paper highlights the need to combine national and regional energy planning to account for this spatial...... heterogeneity in China’s energy infrastructure, such as future energy intensity and CO2 emission reduction targets. More comparable statistical research is needed to better understand inconsistencies between China’s provincial and national energy statistics, in particular for coal. We find data differences...

  15. MCNP neutron benchmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendricks, J.S.; Whalen, D.J.; Cardon, D.A.; Uhle, J.L.

    1991-01-01

    Over 50 neutron benchmark calculations have recently been completed as part of an ongoing program to validate the MCNP Monte Carlo radiation transport code. The new and significant aspects of this work are as follows: These calculations are the first attempt at a validation program for MCNP and the first official benchmarking of version 4 of the code. We believe the chosen set of benchmarks is a comprehensive set that may be useful for benchmarking other radiation transport codes and data libraries. These calculations provide insight into how well neutron transport calculations can be expected to model a wide variety of problems

  16. Benchmarking of thermalhydraulic loop models for lead-alloy-cooled advanced nuclear energy systems. Phase I: Isothermal forced convection case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-06-01

    Under the auspices of the NEA Nuclear Science Committee (NSC), the Working Party on Scientific Issues of the Fuel Cycle (WPFC) has been established to co-ordinate scientific activities regarding various existing and advanced nuclear fuel cycles, including advanced reactor systems, associated chemistry and flowsheets, development and performance of fuel and materials and accelerators and spallation targets. The WPFC has different expert groups to cover a wide range of scientific issues in the field of nuclear fuel cycle. The Task Force on Lead-Alloy-Cooled Advanced Nuclear Energy Systems (LACANES) was created in 2006 to study thermal-hydraulic characteristics of heavy liquid metal coolant loop. The objectives of the task force are to (1) validate thermal-hydraulic loop models for application to LACANES design analysis in participating organisations, by benchmarking with a set of well-characterised lead-alloy coolant loop test data, (2) establish guidelines for quantifying thermal-hydraulic modelling parameters related to friction and heat transfer by lead-alloy coolant and (3) identify specific issues, either in modelling and/or in loop testing, which need to be addressed via possible future work. Nine participants from seven different institutes participated in the first phase of the benchmark. This report provides details of the benchmark specifications, method and code characteristics and results of the preliminary study: pressure loss coefficient and Phase-I. A comparison and analysis of the results will be performed together with Phase-II

  17. Benchmark Database of Transition Metal Surface and Adsorption Energies from Many-Body Perturbation Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Per Simmendefeldt; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2018-01-01

    (RPA) is found to yield high accuracy for both adsorption and surface energies. In contrast, all the considered density functionals fail to describe both quantities accurately. This establishes the RPA as a universally accurate method for surface science. In the second part, we use the RPA to construct...... be significant. RPA is compared to the more advanced renormalized adiabatic LDA (rALDA) method for a subset of the reactions, and they are found to describe the adsorbate-metal bond as well as adsorbate-adsorbate interactions similarly. The RPA results are compared to a range of standard density functional...... theory methods typically employed for surface reactions representing the various rungs on Jacob's ladder. The deviations are found to be highly functional, surface, and reaction dependent. Our work establishes the RPA and rALDA methods as universally accurate full ab initio methods for surface science...

  18. Renewable energy in pakistan part 1: wind energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maher, M.J.

    2005-01-01

    Energy plays a very enhanced role in mans struggle with the capricious act of nature than merely sustaining life. And according to Cipolla the more successfully man can use his own energy-output to control and put to use other forms of energy, t he more he acquires control over his environment and achieves goals other than those strictly related to animal existence . He then adds what is certainly obvious -but does not suffer from repetition -that fundamental to the utilization of nonmuscular energy is the problem of transforming it into the needed form at a selected time; place and at convenient cost. In the present article an attempt is being made to encompass different sources of renewable energy, with special reference to wind energy and its role in sustaining the development process Wind-data generated through measurements by the meteorological department have their limitations. Therefore, for accurate analysis, a dedicated wind-monitoring system will have to be used for properly exploiting this form of energy. In practice, a mean annual wind speed (at 20 m above ground) of 12 mph is considered as the minimum requirement for economic power-generation. With this criterion, only a bare minimum area of the country, comprising the coastal areas of Sind and Baluchistan, desert parts of Cholistan and Thar regions are considered to possess adequate resource. Bulk of this wind potential is derived from the wind energy, which blows from southwest system during the major parts of the year. Daily and monthly variations of wind speed at potential locations need to be determined in order to bring out the highly seasonal behaviour of the wind resources. The significance of wind-power density is another important parameter to assess the wind potential. The capacity-factor, which is the ratio of the actual power-output to the rated output of typical wind machine to be used, has to be worked out using the frequency-distribution of hourly wind-speeds at the potential site. The

  19. DFTB Parameters for the Periodic Table, Part 2: Energies and Energy Gradients from Hydrogen to Calcium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Augusto F; Philipsen, Pier; Heine, Thomas

    2015-11-10

    In the first part of this series, we presented a parametrization strategy to obtain high-quality electronic band structures on the basis of density-functional-based tight-binding (DFTB) calculations and published a parameter set called QUASINANO2013.1. Here, we extend our parametrization effort to include the remaining terms that are needed to compute the total energy and its gradient, commonly referred to as repulsive potential. Instead of parametrizing these terms as a two-body potential, we calculate them explicitly from the DFTB analogues of the Kohn-Sham total energy expression. This strategy requires only two further numerical parameters per element. Thus, the atomic configuration and four real numbers per element are sufficient to define the DFTB model at this level of parametrization. The QUASINANO2015 parameter set allows the calculation of energy, structure, and electronic structure of all systems composed of elements ranging from H to Ca. Extensive benchmarks show that the overall accuracy of QUASINANO2015 is comparable to that of well-established methods, including PM7 and hand-tuned DFTB parameter sets, while coverage of a much larger range of chemical systems is available.

  20. Benchmarking in Foodservice Operations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Johnson, Bonnie

    1998-01-01

    .... The design of this study included two parts: (1) eleven expert panelists involved in a Delphi technique to identify and rate importance of foodservice performance measures and rate the importance of benchmarking activities, and (2...

  1. On the feasibility of using emergy analysis as a source of benchmarking criteria through data envelopment analysis: A case study for wind energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iribarren, Diego; Vázquez-Rowe, Ian; Rugani, Benedetto; Benetto, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    The definition of criteria for the benchmarking of similar entities is often a critical issue in analytical studies because of the multiplicity of criteria susceptible to be taken into account. This issue can be aggravated by the need to handle multiple data for multiple facilities. This article presents a methodological framework, named the Em + DEA method, which combines emergy analysis with Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) for the ecocentric benchmarking of multiple resembling entities (i.e., multiple decision making units or DMUs). Provided that the life-cycle inventories of these DMUs are available, an emergy analysis is performed through the computation of seven different indicators, which refer to the use of fossil, metal, mineral, nuclear, renewable energy, water and land resources. These independent emergy values are then implemented as inputs for DEA computation, thus providing operational emergy-based efficiency scores and, for the inefficient DMUs, target emergy flows (i.e., feasible emergy benchmarks that would turn inefficient DMUs into efficient). The use of the Em + DEA method is exemplified through a case study of wind energy farms. The potential use of CED (cumulative energy demand) and CExD (cumulative exergy demand) indicators as alternative benchmarking criteria to emergy is discussed. The combined use of emergy analysis with DEA is proven to be a valid methodological approach to provide benchmarks oriented towards the optimisation of the life-cycle performance of a set of multiple similar facilities, not being limited to the operational traits of the assessed units. - Highlights: • Combined emergy and DEA method to benchmark multiple resembling entities. • Life-cycle inventory, emergy analysis and DEA as key steps of the Em + DEA method. • Valid ecocentric benchmarking approach proven through a case study of wind farms. • Comparison with life-cycle energy-based benchmarking criteria (CED/CExD + DEA). • Analysts and decision and policy

  2. Shielding benchmark problems, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Shun-ichi; Sasamoto, Nobuo; Oka, Yoshiaki; Shin, Kazuo; Tada, Keiko.

    1980-02-01

    Shielding benchmark problems prepared by Working Group of Assessment of Shielding Experiments in the Research Committee on Shielding Design in the Atomic Energy Society of Japan were compiled by Shielding Laboratory in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. Fourteen shielding benchmark problems are presented newly in addition to twenty-one problems proposed already, for evaluating the calculational algorithm and accuracy of computer codes based on discrete ordinates method and Monte Carlo method and for evaluating the nuclear data used in codes. The present benchmark problems are principally for investigating the backscattering and the streaming of neutrons and gamma rays in two- and three-dimensional configurations. (author)

  3. Accelerator shielding benchmark problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirayama, H.; Ban, S.; Nakamura, T.

    1993-01-01

    Accelerator shielding benchmark problems prepared by Working Group of Accelerator Shielding in the Research Committee on Radiation Behavior in the Atomic Energy Society of Japan were compiled by Radiation Safety Control Center of National Laboratory for High Energy Physics. Twenty-five accelerator shielding benchmark problems are presented for evaluating the calculational algorithm, the accuracy of computer codes and the nuclear data used in codes. (author)

  4. Shielding benchmark problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Shun-ichi; Sasamoto, Nobuo; Oka, Yoshiaki; Kawai, Masayoshi; Nakazawa, Masaharu.

    1978-09-01

    Shielding benchmark problems were prepared by the Working Group of Assessment of Shielding Experiments in the Research Comittee on Shielding Design of the Atomic Energy Society of Japan, and compiled by the Shielding Laboratory of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. Twenty-one kinds of shielding benchmark problems are presented for evaluating the calculational algorithm and the accuracy of computer codes based on the discrete ordinates method and the Monte Carlo method and for evaluating the nuclear data used in the codes. (author)

  5. Energy policy and challenges: which part for the nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchard, J.

    2004-01-01

    This document provides many data and charts on the energy domain: energy consumption, energy demand, the reserves, the climatic changes, the renewable energies, the energy cost, the radioactive wastes management, the new nuclear technology. (A.L.B.)

  6. Library Benchmarking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiji Suwarno

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The term benchmarking has been encountered in the implementation of total quality (TQM or in Indonesian termed holistic quality management because benchmarking is a tool to look for ideas or learn from the library. Benchmarking is a processof measuring and comparing for continuous business process of systematic and continuous measurement, the process of measuring and comparing for continuous business process of an organization to get information that can help these organization improve their performance efforts.

  7. Benchmarking for Cost Improvement. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) conducted the Benchmarking for Cost Improvement initiative with three objectives: Pilot test benchmarking as an EM cost improvement tool; identify areas for cost improvement and recommend actions to address these areas; provide a framework for future cost improvement. The benchmarking initiative featured the use of four principal methods (program classification, nationwide cost improvement survey, paired cost comparison and component benchmarking). Interested parties contributed during both the design and execution phases. The benchmarking initiative was conducted on an accelerated basis. Of necessity, it considered only a limited set of data that may not be fully representative of the diverse and complex conditions found at the many DOE installations. The initiative generated preliminary data about cost differences and it found a high degree of convergence on several issues. Based on this convergence, the report recommends cost improvement strategies and actions. This report describes the steps taken as part of the benchmarking initiative and discusses the findings and recommended actions for achieving cost improvement. The results and summary recommendations, reported below, are organized by the study objectives.

  8. Comparability of estimating energy rebound effect should be based on uniform mechanism and benchmark: A reply to Du and Lin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Chengyu; Shao, Shuai; Yang, Lili; Yu, Mingliang

    2016-01-01

    Du and Lin (2015) argued that the estimation model of the economy-wide energy rebound effect proposed by Shao et al. (2014) should be revised and provided an alternative approach, which they considered to be more consistent with the definition of the rebound effect. However, in this comment, we do not find a valid correction or modification to our original model, because their criticism logic does not originate from the corresponding mechanism in Shao et al. (2014), and their estimation formula has a different benchmark with ours. Moreover, their data samples were also different from ours, generating the incomparable results, and there are some irrational results in the comment. Even based on different estimation formulas in the two studies and using the same estimation method and data sample, the comparison results show that the problem of the estimation formula in our previous study which they claimed does not really exist. We argue that this comment is not consistent with the principle of the rebound effect. Actually, their work can be only regarded as proposing an alternative approach for the estimate of the rebound effect. Therefore, their argument is not enough to overturn our previous study. - Highlights: • A reply to Du and Lin (2015), who questioned our previous study, is provided. • Their criticism logic does not originate from our corresponding mechanism. • Their estimation formula has a different benchmark with ours. • Different data samples in the two papers make their results incomparable. • Their argument is not enough to overturn our previous study.

  9. Benchmarking whole-building energy performance with multi-criteria technique for order preference by similarity to ideal solution using a selective objective-weighting approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Endong

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A TOPSIS based multi-criteria whole-building energy benchmarking is developed. • A selective objective-weighting procedure is used for a cost-accuracy tradeoff. • Results from a real case validated the benefits of the presented approach. - Abstract: This paper develops a robust multi-criteria Technique for Order Preference by Similarity to Ideal Solution (TOPSIS) based building energy efficiency benchmarking approach. The approach is explicitly selective to address multicollinearity trap due to the subjectivity in selecting energy variables by considering cost-accuracy trade-off. It objectively weights the relative importance of individual pertinent efficiency measuring criteria using either multiple linear regression or principal component analysis contingent on meta data quality. Through this approach, building energy performance is comprehensively evaluated and optimized. Simultaneously, the significant challenges associated with conventional single-criterion benchmarking models can be avoided. Together with a clustering algorithm on a three-year panel dataset, the benchmarking case of 324 single-family dwellings demonstrated an improved robustness of the presented multi-criteria benchmarking approach over the conventional single-criterion ones

  10. Benchmark Modeling of the Near-Field and Far-Field Wave Effects of Wave Energy Arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhinefrank, Kenneth E; Haller, Merrick C; Ozkan-Haller, H Tuba

    2013-01-26

    This project is an industry-led partnership between Columbia Power Technologies and Oregon State University that will perform benchmark laboratory experiments and numerical modeling of the near-field and far-field impacts of wave scattering from an array of wave energy devices. These benchmark experimental observations will help to fill a gaping hole in our present knowledge of the near-field effects of multiple, floating wave energy converters and are a critical requirement for estimating the potential far-field environmental effects of wave energy arrays. The experiments will be performed at the Hinsdale Wave Research Laboratory (Oregon State University) and will utilize an array of newly developed Buoys' that are realistic, lab-scale floating power converters. The array of Buoys will be subjected to realistic, directional wave forcing (1:33 scale) that will approximate the expected conditions (waves and water depths) to be found off the Central Oregon Coast. Experimental observations will include comprehensive in-situ wave and current measurements as well as a suite of novel optical measurements. These new optical capabilities will include imaging of the 3D wave scattering using a binocular stereo camera system, as well as 3D device motion tracking using a newly acquired LED system. These observing systems will capture the 3D motion history of individual Buoys as well as resolve the 3D scattered wave field; thus resolving the constructive and destructive wave interference patterns produced by the array at high resolution. These data combined with the device motion tracking will provide necessary information for array design in order to balance array performance with the mitigation of far-field impacts. As a benchmark data set, these data will be an important resource for testing of models for wave/buoy interactions, buoy performance, and far-field effects on wave and current patterns due to the presence of arrays. Under the proposed project we will initiate

  11. Monte Carlo benchmark calculations of energy deposition by electron/photon showers up to 1 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehlhorn, T.A.; Halbleib, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    Over the past several years the TIGER series of coupled electron/photon Monte Carlo transport codes has been applied to a variety of problems involving nuclear and space radiations, electron accelerators, and radioactive sources. In particular, they have been used at Sandia to simulate the interaction of electron beams, generated by pulsed-power accelerators, with various target materials for weapons effect simulation, and electron beam fusion. These codes are based on the ETRAN system which was developed for an energy range from about 10 keV up to a few tens of MeV. In this paper we will discuss the modifications that were made to the TIGER series of codes in order to extend their applicability to energies of interest to the high energy physics community (up to 1 GeV). We report the results of a series of benchmark calculations of the energy deposition by high energy electron beams in various materials using the modified codes. These results are then compared with the published results of various experimental measurements and other computational models

  12. A comparison of global optimization algorithms with standard benchmark functions and real-world applications using Energy Plus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamph, Jerome Henri; Robinson, Darren; Wetter, Michael

    2009-09-01

    There is an increasing interest in the use of computer algorithms to identify combinations of parameters which optimise the energy performance of buildings. For such problems, the objective function can be multi-modal and needs to be approximated numerically using building energy simulation programs. As these programs contain iterative solution algorithms, they introduce discontinuities in the numerical approximation to the objective function. Metaheuristics often work well for such problems, but their convergence to a global optimum cannot be established formally. Moreover, different algorithms tend to be suited to particular classes of optimization problems. To shed light on this issue we compared the performance of two metaheuristics, the hybrid CMA-ES/HDE and the hybrid PSO/HJ, in minimizing standard benchmark functions and real-world building energy optimization problems of varying complexity. From this we find that the CMA-ES/HDE performs well on more complex objective functions, but that the PSO/HJ more consistently identifies the global minimum for simpler objective functions. Both identified similar values in the objective functions arising from energy simulations, but with different combinations of model parameters. This may suggest that the objective function is multi-modal. The algorithms also correctly identified some non-intuitive parameter combinations that were caused by a simplified control sequence of the building energy system that does not represent actual practice, further reinforcing their utility.

  13. Benchmarking and Learning in Public Healthcare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buckmaster, Natalie; Mouritsen, Jan

    2017-01-01

    This research investigates the effects of learning-oriented benchmarking in public healthcare settings. Benchmarking is a widely adopted yet little explored accounting practice that is part of the paradigm of New Public Management. Extant studies are directed towards mandated coercive benchmarking...... applications. The present study analyses voluntary benchmarking in a public setting that is oriented towards learning. The study contributes by showing how benchmarking can be mobilised for learning and offers evidence of the effects of such benchmarking for performance outcomes. It concludes that benchmarking...... can enable learning in public settings but that this requires actors to invest in ensuring that benchmark data are directed towards improvement....

  14. Interactive benchmarking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lawson, Lartey; Nielsen, Kurt

    2005-01-01

    We discuss individual learning by interactive benchmarking using stochastic frontier models. The interactions allow the user to tailor the performance evaluation to preferences and explore alternative improvement strategies by selecting and searching the different frontiers using directional...... in the suggested benchmarking tool. The study investigates how different characteristics on dairy farms influences the technical efficiency....

  15. RUNE benchmarks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peña, Alfredo

    This report contains the description of a number of benchmarks with the purpose of evaluating flow models for near-shore wind resource estimation. The benchmarks are designed based on the comprehensive database of observations that the RUNE coastal experiment established from onshore lidar...

  16. Benchmark selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Jens Leth; Tvede, Mich

    2002-01-01

    Within a production theoretic framework, this paper considers an axiomatic approach to benchmark selection. It is shown that two simple and weak axioms; efficiency and comprehensive monotonicity characterize a natural family of benchmarks which typically becomes unique. Further axioms are added...... in order to obtain a unique selection...

  17. Benchmarking the energy performance of office buildings: A data envelopment analysis approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molinos-Senante, María

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The achievement of energy efficiency in buildings is an important challenge facing both developed and developing countries. Very few papers have assessed the energy efficiency of office buildings using real data. To overcome this limitation, this paper proposes an energy efficiency index for buildings having a large window-to-wall ratio, and uses this index to identify the main architectural factors affecting energy performance. This paper assesses, for the first time, the energy performances of 34 office buildings in Santiago, Chile, by using data envelopment analysis. Overall energy efficiency is decomposed into two indices: the architectural energy efficiency index, and the management energy efficiency index. This decomposition is an essential step in identifying the main drivers of energy inefficiency and designing measures for improvement. Office buildings examined here have significant room for improving their energy efficiencies, saving operational costs and reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The methodology and results of this study will be of great interest to building managers and policymakers seeking to increase the sustainability of cities.

  18. Communication: A benchmark-quality, full-dimensional ab initio potential energy surface for Ar-HOCO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conte, Riccardo; Bowman, Joel M.; Houston, Paul L.

    2014-01-01

    A full-dimensional, global ab initio potential energy surface (PES) for the Ar-HOCO system is presented. The PES consists of a previous intramolecular ab initio PES for HOCO [J. Li, C. Xie, J. Ma, Y. Wang, R. Dawes, D. Xie, J. M. Bowman, and H. Guo, J. Phys. Chem. A 116, 5057 (2012)], plus a new permutationally invariant interaction potential based on fitting 12 432 UCCSD(T)-F12a/aVDZ counterpoise-corrected energies. The latter has a total rms fitting error of about 25 cm −1 for fitted interaction energies up to roughly 12 000 cm −1 . Two additional fits are presented. One is a novel very compact permutational invariant representation, which contains terms only involving the Ar-atom distances. The rms fitting error for this fit is 193 cm −1 . The other fit is the widely used pairwise one. The pairwise fit to the entire data set has an rms fitting error of 427 cm −1 . All of these potentials are used in preliminary classical trajectory calculations of energy transfer with a focus on comparisons with the results using the benchmark potential

  19. Communication: A benchmark-quality, full-dimensional ab initio potential energy surface for Ar-HOCO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conte, Riccardo, E-mail: riccardo.conte@emory.edu, E-mail: jmbowma@emory.edu; Bowman, Joel M., E-mail: riccardo.conte@emory.edu, E-mail: jmbowma@emory.edu [Department of Chemistry and Cherry L. Emerson Center for Scientific Calculation, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States); Houston, Paul L., E-mail: paul.houston@cos.gatech.edu [School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States)

    2014-04-21

    A full-dimensional, global ab initio potential energy surface (PES) for the Ar-HOCO system is presented. The PES consists of a previous intramolecular ab initio PES for HOCO [J. Li, C. Xie, J. Ma, Y. Wang, R. Dawes, D. Xie, J. M. Bowman, and H. Guo, J. Phys. Chem. A 116, 5057 (2012)], plus a new permutationally invariant interaction potential based on fitting 12 432 UCCSD(T)-F12a/aVDZ counterpoise-corrected energies. The latter has a total rms fitting error of about 25 cm{sup −1} for fitted interaction energies up to roughly 12 000 cm{sup −1}. Two additional fits are presented. One is a novel very compact permutational invariant representation, which contains terms only involving the Ar-atom distances. The rms fitting error for this fit is 193 cm{sup −1}. The other fit is the widely used pairwise one. The pairwise fit to the entire data set has an rms fitting error of 427 cm{sup −1}. All of these potentials are used in preliminary classical trajectory calculations of energy transfer with a focus on comparisons with the results using the benchmark potential.

  20. Analytic energy gradient of excited electronic state within TDDFT/MMpol framework: Benchmark tests and parallel implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Qiao; Liang, WanZhen

    2015-10-07

    The time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) has become the most popular method to calculate the electronic excitation energies, describe the excited-state properties, and perform the excited-state geometric optimization of medium and large-size molecules due to the implementation of analytic excited-state energy gradient and Hessian in many electronic structure software packages. To describe the molecules in condensed phase, one usually adopts the computationally efficient hybrid Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics (QM/MM) models. Here, we extend our previous work on the energy gradient of TDDFT/MM excited state to account for the mutual polarization effects between QM and MM regions, which is believed to hold a crucial position in the potential energy surface of molecular systems when the photoexcitation-induced charge rearrangement in the QM region is drastic. The implementation of a simple polarizable TDDFT/MM (TDDFT/MMpol) model in Q-Chem/CHARMM interface with both the linear response and the state-specific features has been realized. Several benchmark tests and preliminary applications are exhibited to confirm our implementation and assess the effects of different treatment of environmental polarization on the excited-state properties, and the efficiency of parallel implementation is demonstrated as well.

  1. Benchmarking the scientific research on wastewater-energy nexus by using bibliometric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Tianlong; Li, Pengyu; Shi, Zhining; Liu, Jianguo

    2017-12-01

    With an exponential increase in urbanization and industrialization, water pollution is an inevitable consequence of relatively lagging wastewater treatment facilities. The conventional activated sludge process for wastewater treatment primarily emphasizes the removal of harmful substances to maintain increasingly stringent effluent discharged standards, which is considered an energy-intensive technique. Therefore, innovative and sustainable wastewater treatment should pay more attention to energy and resource recovery in dealing with fossil fuel depletion, global-scale energy security, and climate change. A bibliometric analysis was applied to trace wastewater-energy nexus-related research during the period 1991 to 2015, with respect to the Science Citation Index EXPANDED (SCI-EXPANDED) database. Journal of Hazardous Materials, ranking 1st in h-index (79), was the most productive journal (431, 4.5%) during the same time, followed by International Journal of Hydrogen Energy (422, 4.4%) and Water Research (393, 4.1%) journal, the latter owning a topmost journal impact factor. Though, China (2154, 22.5%) was the most productive country, while the USA with highest h-index (88) was the favorest collaborative country. The Chinese Academy of Sciences, China (241, 2.5%) produced the maximum publications. A novel method called "word cluster analysis" showed that the emerging sustainable processes and novel renewable energy application are applied in response to the desire for a net wastewater-energy nexus system. Based on different wastewater types, the emerging energy and sources recovery treatment processes of Anammox, anaerobic digestion, and microbial fuel cells gained extensive innovation. Evaluation indicators including sustainability, life cycle assessment, and environmental impact were appropriately used to dissert feasibility of the novel treatment methods in regard of renewable energy utilization, energy savings, and energy recovery. The transformation of the new

  2. Benchmarking of protein descriptor sets in proteochemometric modeling (part 2): modeling performance of 13 amino acid descriptor sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background While a large body of work exists on comparing and benchmarking descriptors of molecular structures, a similar comparison of protein descriptor sets is lacking. Hence, in the current work a total of 13 amino acid descriptor sets have been benchmarked with respect to their ability of establishing bioactivity models. The descriptor sets included in the study are Z-scales (3 variants), VHSE, T-scales, ST-scales, MS-WHIM, FASGAI, BLOSUM, a novel protein descriptor set (termed ProtFP (4 variants)), and in addition we created and benchmarked three pairs of descriptor combinations. Prediction performance was evaluated in seven structure-activity benchmarks which comprise Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE) dipeptidic inhibitor data, and three proteochemometric data sets, namely (1) GPCR ligands modeled against a GPCR panel, (2) enzyme inhibitors (NNRTIs) with associated bioactivities against a set of HIV enzyme mutants, and (3) enzyme inhibitors (PIs) with associated bioactivities on a large set of HIV enzyme mutants. Results The amino acid descriptor sets compared here show similar performance (set differences ( > 0.3 log units RMSE difference and >0.7 difference in MCC). Combining different descriptor sets generally leads to better modeling performance than utilizing individual sets. The best performers were Z-scales (3) combined with ProtFP (Feature), or Z-Scales (3) combined with an average Z-Scale value for each target, while ProtFP (PCA8), ST-Scales, and ProtFP (Feature) rank last. Conclusions While amino acid descriptor sets capture different aspects of amino acids their ability to be used for bioactivity modeling is still – on average – surprisingly similar. Still, combining sets describing complementary information consistently leads to small but consistent improvement in modeling performance (average MCC 0.01 better, average RMSE 0.01 log units lower). Finally, performance differences exist between the targets compared thereby underlining that

  3. Benchmarking in Czech Higher Education

    OpenAIRE

    Plaček Michal; Ochrana František; Půček Milan

    2015-01-01

    The first part of this article surveys the current experience with the use of benchmarking at Czech universities specializing in economics and management. The results indicate that collaborative benchmarking is not used on this level today, but most actors show some interest in its introduction. The expression of the need for it and the importance of benchmarking as a very suitable performance-management tool in less developed countries are the impetus for the second part of our article. Base...

  4. Basic Energy Conservation and Management--Part 2: HVAC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, Glenn

    2012-01-01

    Reducing school district energy expenditures has become a universal goal, and new technologies have brought greater energy efficiencies to the school environment. In Part 1 of this two-part series, the author discussed the steps required to establish an energy conservation and management program with an emphasis on lighting. In this article, he…

  5. Benchmarking and the laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, M; Nadin, L

    2001-01-01

    This article describes how benchmarking can be used to assess laboratory performance. Two benchmarking schemes are reviewed, the Clinical Benchmarking Company's Pathology Report and the College of American Pathologists' Q-Probes scheme. The Clinical Benchmarking Company's Pathology Report is undertaken by staff based in the clinical management unit, Keele University with appropriate input from the professional organisations within pathology. Five annual reports have now been completed. Each report is a detailed analysis of 10 areas of laboratory performance. In this review, particular attention is focused on the areas of quality, productivity, variation in clinical practice, skill mix, and working hours. The Q-Probes scheme is part of the College of American Pathologists programme in studies of quality assurance. The Q-Probes scheme and its applicability to pathology in the UK is illustrated by reviewing two recent Q-Probe studies: routine outpatient test turnaround time and outpatient test order accuracy. The Q-Probes scheme is somewhat limited by the small number of UK laboratories that have participated. In conclusion, as a result of the government's policy in the UK, benchmarking is here to stay. Benchmarking schemes described in this article are one way in which pathologists can demonstrate that they are providing a cost effective and high quality service. Key Words: benchmarking • pathology PMID:11477112

  6. Benchmark of PENELOPE code for low-energy photon transport: dose comparisons with MCNP4 and EGS4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye, Sung-Joon; Brezovich, Ivan A; Pareek, Prem; Naqvi, Shahid A

    2004-01-01

    The expanding clinical use of low-energy photon emitting 125 I and 103 Pd seeds in recent years has led to renewed interest in their dosimetric properties. Numerous papers pointed out that higher accuracy could be obtained in Monte Carlo simulations by utilizing newer libraries for the low-energy photon cross-sections, such as XCOM and EPDL97. The recently developed PENELOPE 2001 Monte Carlo code is user friendly and incorporates photon cross-section data from the EPDL97. The code has been verified for clinical dosimetry of high-energy electron and photon beams, but has not yet been tested at low energies. In the present work, we have benchmarked the PENELOPE code for 10-150 keV photons. We computed radial dose distributions from 0 to 10 cm in water at photon energies of 10-150 keV using both PENELOPE and MCNP4C with either DLC-146 or DLC-200 cross-section libraries, assuming a point source located at the centre of a 30 cm diameter and 20 cm length cylinder. Throughout the energy range of simulated photons (except for 10 keV), PENELOPE agreed within statistical uncertainties (at worst ±5%) with MCNP/DLC-146 in the entire region of 1-10 cm and with published EGS4 data up to 5 cm. The dose at 1 cm (or dose rate constant) of PENELOPE agreed with MCNP/DLC-146 and EGS4 data within approximately ±2% in the range of 20-150 keV, while MCNP/DLC-200 produced values up to 9% lower in the range of 20-100 keV than PENELOPE or the other codes. However, the differences among the four datasets became negligible above 100 keV

  7. Benchmark of PENELOPE code for low-energy photon transport: dose comparisons with MCNP4 and EGS4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Sung-Joon; Brezovich, Ivan A; Pareek, Prem; Naqvi, Shahid A

    2004-02-07

    The expanding clinical use of low-energy photon emitting 125I and 103Pd seeds in recent years has led to renewed interest in their dosimetric properties. Numerous papers pointed out that higher accuracy could be obtained in Monte Carlo simulations by utilizing newer libraries for the low-energy photon cross-sections, such as XCOM and EPDL97. The recently developed PENELOPE 2001 Monte Carlo code is user friendly and incorporates photon cross-section data from the EPDL97. The code has been verified for clinical dosimetry of high-energy electron and photon beams, but has not yet been tested at low energies. In the present work, we have benchmarked the PENELOPE code for 10-150 keV photons. We computed radial dose distributions from 0 to 10 cm in water at photon energies of 10-150 keV using both PENELOPE and MCNP4C with either DLC-146 or DLC-200 cross-section libraries, assuming a point source located at the centre of a 30 cm diameter and 20 cm length cylinder. Throughout the energy range of simulated photons (except for 10 keV), PENELOPE agreed within statistical uncertainties (at worst +/- 5%) with MCNP/DLC-146 in the entire region of 1-10 cm and with published EGS4 data up to 5 cm. The dose at 1 cm (or dose rate constant) of PENELOPE agreed with MCNP/DLC-146 and EGS4 data within approximately +/- 2% in the range of 20-150 keV, while MCNP/DLC-200 produced values up to 9% lower in the range of 20-100 keV than PENELOPE or the other codes. However, the differences among the four datasets became negligible above 100 keV.

  8. Direct Measurements of Quantum Kinetic Energy Tensor in Stable and Metastable Water near the Triple Point: An Experimental Benchmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreani, Carla; Romanelli, Giovanni; Senesi, Roberto

    2016-06-16

    This study presents the first direct and quantitative measurement of the nuclear momentum distribution anisotropy and the quantum kinetic energy tensor in stable and metastable (supercooled) water near its triple point, using deep inelastic neutron scattering (DINS). From the experimental spectra, accurate line shapes of the hydrogen momentum distributions are derived using an anisotropic Gaussian and a model-independent framework. The experimental results, benchmarked with those obtained for the solid phase, provide the state of the art directional values of the hydrogen mean kinetic energy in metastable water. The determinations of the direction kinetic energies in the supercooled phase, provide accurate and quantitative measurements of these dynamical observables in metastable and stable phases, that is, key insight in the physical mechanisms of the hydrogen quantum state in both disordered and polycrystalline systems. The remarkable findings of this study establish novel insight into further expand the capacity and accuracy of DINS investigations of the nuclear quantum effects in water and represent reference experimental values for theoretical investigations.

  9. Improving energy productivity in paddy production through benchmarking-An application of data envelopment analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chauhan, Narvendra Singh [Department of Agronomy, Uttar Banga Krishi Viswavidyalaya, P.O. Pundibari, District Cooch Behar (West Bengal) 736 165 (India)]. E-mail: nsc_01@rediffmail.com; Mohapatra, Pratap K.J. [Department of Industrial Engineering and Management, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur (West Bengal) 721 302 (India); Pandey, Keshaw Prasad [Department of Agricultural and Food Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur (West Bengal) 721 302 (India)

    2006-06-15

    In this study, a data envelopment analysis approach has been used to determine the efficiencies of farmers with regard to energy use in rice production activities in the alluvial zone in the state of West Bengal in India. The study has helped to segregate efficient farmers from inefficient ones, identify wasteful uses of energy from different sources by inefficient farmers and to suggest reasonable savings in energy uses from different sources. The methods of cross efficiency matrix and distribution of virtual inputs are used to get insights into the performance of individual farmers, rank efficient farmers and identify the improved operating practices followed by a group of truly efficient farmers. The results reveal that, on an average, about 11.6% of the total input energy could be saved if the farmers follow the input package recommended by the study. The study also suggests that better use of power tillers and introduction of improved machinery would improve the efficiency of energy use and thereby improve the energy productivity of the rice production system in the zone.

  10. Improving energy productivity in paddy production through benchmarking-An application of data envelopment analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chauhan, Narvendra Singh; Mohapatra, Pratap K.J.; Pandey, Keshaw Prasad

    2006-01-01

    In this study, a data envelopment analysis approach has been used to determine the efficiencies of farmers with regard to energy use in rice production activities in the alluvial zone in the state of West Bengal in India. The study has helped to segregate efficient farmers from inefficient ones, identify wasteful uses of energy from different sources by inefficient farmers and to suggest reasonable savings in energy uses from different sources. The methods of cross efficiency matrix and distribution of virtual inputs are used to get insights into the performance of individual farmers, rank efficient farmers and identify the improved operating practices followed by a group of truly efficient farmers. The results reveal that, on an average, about 11.6% of the total input energy could be saved if the farmers follow the input package recommended by the study. The study also suggests that better use of power tillers and introduction of improved machinery would improve the efficiency of energy use and thereby improve the energy productivity of the rice production system in the zone

  11. Planning for rural energy system: Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devadas, V.

    2001-01-01

    This paper discusses the central importance of energy inputs in development, and presents the complex interactions within subsystems that contribute a Rural Energy System. This paper also brings about the importance of the primary data for realistic renewable energy planning at the micro level in a given rural system. Factors that render secondary data somewhat inadequate for such applications are discussed. The differences between energy related data from secondary and primary sources in respect of representative villages in Kanyakumari District of Tamil Nadu, India, are detailed. A rural system model for computing the output from various components of a rural system is also presented. This projection is made by making use of a set of technical coefficients, which relate the inputs to the outputs from individual segments of the rural production system. While some of the technical coefficients are developed based on previously published data, a large number have been quantified on the basis of careful survey. The usefulness of the model is discussed. The paper also presents a Linear Programming Model for optimum resource allocation in a rural system. The objective function of the Linear Programming Model is maximizing the revenue of the rural system where in optimum resource allocation is made subject to a number of energy and non-energy related relevant constraints. The model also quantifies the major yields as well as the byproducts of different sectors of the rural economic system. (Author)

  12. Wind energy development as a part of Poland's industrial development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoerring, Dagmara; Hvelplund, Frede Kloster

    2003-01-01

    The paper concludes with recommendations on how to make wind energy development a part of the industrial development in Poland by introducing renewable energy support mechanisms to improve the conditions for companies to develop wind technology in Poland....

  13. WLUP benchmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leszczynski, Francisco

    2002-01-01

    The IAEA-WIMS Library Update Project (WLUP) is on the end stage. The final library will be released on 2002. It is a result of research and development made by more than ten investigators during 10 years. The organization of benchmarks for testing and choosing the best set of data has been coordinated by the author of this paper. It is presented the organization, name conventions, contents and documentation of WLUP benchmarks, and an updated list of the main parameters for all cases. First, the benchmarks objectives and types are given. Then, comparisons of results from different WIMSD libraries are included. Finally it is described the program QVALUE for analysis and plot of results. Some examples are given. The set of benchmarks implemented on this work is a fundamental tool for testing new multigroup libraries. (author)

  14. Solar Energy Education. Reader, Part II. Sun story. [Includes glossary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-05-01

    Magazine articles which focus on the subject of solar energy are presented. The booklet prepared is the second of a four part series of the Solar Energy Reader. Excerpts from the magazines include the history of solar energy, mythology and tales, and selected poetry on the sun. A glossary of energy related terms is included. (BCS)

  15. User's Manual for BEST-Dairy: Benchmarking and Energy/water-Saving Tool (BEST) for the Dairy Processing Industry (Version 1.2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, T.; Ke, J.; Sathaye, J.

    2011-04-20

    This User's Manual summarizes the background information of the Benchmarking and Energy/water-Saving Tool (BEST) for the Dairy Processing Industry (Version 1.2, 2011), including'Read Me' portion of the tool, the sections of Introduction, and Instructions for the BEST-Dairy tool that is developed and distributed by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL).

  16. Benchmarking Swiss electricity grids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walti, N.O.; Weber, Ch.

    2001-01-01

    This extensive article describes a pilot benchmarking project initiated by the Swiss Association of Electricity Enterprises that assessed 37 Swiss utilities. The data collected from these utilities on a voluntary basis included data on technical infrastructure, investments and operating costs. These various factors are listed and discussed in detail. The assessment methods and rating mechanisms that provided the benchmarks are discussed and the results of the pilot study are presented that are to form the basis of benchmarking procedures for the grid regulation authorities under the planned Switzerland's electricity market law. Examples of the practical use of the benchmarking methods are given and cost-efficiency questions still open in the area of investment and operating costs are listed. Prefaces by the Swiss Association of Electricity Enterprises and the Swiss Federal Office of Energy complete the article

  17. Benchmark Calculations of Interaction Energies in Noncovalent Complexes and Their Applications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Řezáč, Jan; Hobza, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 116, č. 9 (2016), s. 5038-5071 ISSN 0009-2665 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP208/12/G016 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : density functional theory * coupled cluster theory * intermolecular interaction energies Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 47.928, year: 2016

  18. Greenhouse gas emission footprints and energy use benchmarks for eight U.S. cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillman, Tim; Ramaswami, Anu

    2010-03-15

    A hybrid life cycle-based trans-boundary greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions footprint is elucidated at the city-scale and evaluated for 8 US cities. The method incorporates end-uses of energy within city boundaries, plus cross-boundary demand for airline/freight transport and embodied energy of four key urban materials [food, water, energy (fuels), and shelter (cement)], essential for life in all cities. These cross-boundary activities contributed 47% on average more than the in-boundary GHG contributions traditionally reported for cities, indicating significant truncation at city boundaries of GHG emissions associated with urban activities. Incorporating cross-boundary contributions created convergence in per capita GHG emissions from the city-scale (average 23.7 mt-CO(2)e/capita) to the national-scale (24.5 mt-CO(2)e/capita), suggesting that six key cross-boundary activities may suffice to yield a holistic GHG emission footprint for cities, with important policy ramifications. Average GHG contributions from various human activity sectors include buildings/facilities energy use (47.1%), regional surface transport (20.8%), food production (14.7%), transport fuel production (6.4%), airline transport (4.8%), long-distance freight trucking (2.8%), cement production (2.2%), and water/wastewater/waste processing (1.3%). Energy-, travel-, and key materials-consumption efficiency metrics are elucidated in these sectors; these consumption metrics are observed to be largely similar across the eight U.S. cities and consistent with national/regional averages.

  19. Benchmark calculations with correlated molecular wave functions. VII. Binding energy and structure of the HF dimer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, K.A.; Dunning, T.H. Jr.

    1995-01-01

    The hydrogen bond energy and geometry of the HF dimer have been investigated using the series of correlation consistent basis sets from aug-cc-pVDZ to aug-cc-pVQZ and several theoretical methods including Moller--Plesset perturbation and coupled cluster theories. Estimates of the complete basis set (CBS) limit have been derived for the binding energy of (HF) 2 at each level of theory by utilizing the regular convergence characteristics of the correlation consistent basis sets. CBS limit hydrogen bond energies of 3.72, 4.53, 4.55, and 4.60 kcal/mol are estimated at the SCF, MP2, MP4, and CCSD(T) levels of theory, respectively. CBS limits for the intermolecular F--F distance are estimated to be 2.82, 2.74, 2.73, and 2.73 A, respectively, for the same correlation methods. The effects of basis set superposition error (BSSE) on both the binding energies and structures have also been investigated for each basis set using the standard function counterpoise (CP) method. While BSSE has a negligible effect on the intramolecular geometries, the CP-corrected F--F distance and binding energy differ significantly from the uncorrected values for the aug-cc-pVDZ basis set; these differences decrease regularly with increasing basis set size, yielding the same limits in the CBS limit. Best estimates for the equilibrium properties of the HF dimer from CCSD(T) calculations are D e =4.60 kcal/mol, R FF =2.73 A, r 1 =0.922 A, r 2 =0.920 A, Θ 1 =7 degree, and Θ 2 =111 degree

  20. Analytic Methods for Benchmarking Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melaina, Marc; Saur, Genevieve; Ramsden, Todd; Eichman, Joshua

    2015-05-28

    This presentation summarizes NREL's hydrogen and fuel cell analysis work in three areas: resource potential, greenhouse gas emissions and cost of delivered energy, and influence of auxiliary revenue streams. NREL's hydrogen and fuel cell analysis projects focus on low-­carbon and economic transportation and stationary fuel cell applications. Analysis tools developed by the lab provide insight into the degree to which bridging markets can strengthen the business case for fuel cell applications.

  1. Renewable energy sources '91. Part 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michalicka, L.

    1991-01-01

    Part 3 of the proceedings contains a report on the conference and 10 contributions, out of which 2 have been inputted in INIS: one deals with the economic problems of wind-, solar- and oil-driven water pumps, the other deals with the decrease in sunshine brought about by the operation of Czechoslovak nuclear power plants. (M.D.). 4 tabs., 10 figs., 10 refs

  2. Aerodynamic benchmarking of the DeepWind design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bedon, Gabriele; Schmidt Paulsen, Uwe; Aagaard Madsen, Helge

    The aerodynamic benchmarking for the DeepWind rotor is conducted comparing different rotor geometries and solutions and keeping the comparison as fair as possible. The objective for the benchmarking is to find the most suitable configuration in order to maximize the power production and minimize...... the blade solicitation and the cost of energy. Different parameters are considered for the benchmarking study. The DeepWind blade is characterized by a shape similar to the Troposkien geometry but asymmetric between the top and bottom parts. The blade shape is considered as a fixed parameter...

  3. Energy key performance indicators : a european benchmark and assessment of meaningful indicators for the use of energy in large corporations

    OpenAIRE

    Friedrichs, Katja

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to identify and analyze energy key performance indicators among large European companies. Energy usage has become a very meaningful topic for both internal management as well as external stakeholders of a company. A review of current literature suggests that while environmental indicators in general have found broad attention and plenty of theories concerning good and meaningful indicators are published, no study investigating actually applied energy indicators ...

  4. Vision of nuclear energy. Second part

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    The increase in energy demand indicates that the proportion of nuclear energy will significantly increase in the coming decades. Its cost will make it necessary to apply such developments insofar as they are efficient from the economic point of view. On the other hand, though the U demand has decreased in the last few years, future perspectives indicate that the effective use of this mineral will be indispensable to cover the foreseen energy needs. This situation, added to the fact that Japan imports the uranium it needs, leads to the following basic guidelines for the future reactor strategy in this country; 1: improve the technology of existing LWRs; 2: develop advanced LWRs; 3: develop and advanced version of LWRs; 4: use Pu in LWRs; 5: maintain and improve the technology of HWRs, and 6: promote the development of FBRs. The advanced version of the LWRs is entirely japanese and emphasizes the efficient use of U and a higher economic efficiency. The first will start operating around 2005. For this type of reactors, as well as for the other ones, the use of Pu will be incorporated. As to the promotion of FBR development, it is intended to formulate as soon as possible the fundamental concept of the safety design in order to determine the basic specifications for a demostration reactor. The technology for U-Pu mixed oxide fabrication (MOX) should be ready for use by the time an FBR starts operation. (Author) [es

  5. Self-benchmarking Guide for Cleanrooms: Metrics, Benchmarks, Actions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathew, Paul; Sartor, Dale; Tschudi, William

    2009-07-13

    This guide describes energy efficiency metrics and benchmarks that can be used to track the performance of and identify potential opportunities to reduce energy use in laboratory buildings. This guide is primarily intended for personnel who have responsibility for managing energy use in existing laboratory facilities - including facilities managers, energy managers, and their engineering consultants. Additionally, laboratory planners and designers may also use the metrics and benchmarks described in this guide for goal-setting in new construction or major renovation. This guide provides the following information: (1) A step-by-step outline of the benchmarking process. (2) A set of performance metrics for the whole building as well as individual systems. For each metric, the guide provides a definition, performance benchmarks, and potential actions that can be inferred from evaluating this metric. (3) A list and descriptions of the data required for computing the metrics. This guide is complemented by spreadsheet templates for data collection and for computing the benchmarking metrics. This guide builds on prior research supported by the national Laboratories for the 21st Century (Labs21) program, supported by the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Much of the benchmarking data are drawn from the Labs21 benchmarking database and technical guides. Additional benchmark data were obtained from engineering experts including laboratory designers and energy managers.

  6. Self-benchmarking Guide for Laboratory Buildings: Metrics, Benchmarks, Actions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathew, Paul; Greenberg, Steve; Sartor, Dale

    2009-07-13

    This guide describes energy efficiency metrics and benchmarks that can be used to track the performance of and identify potential opportunities to reduce energy use in laboratory buildings. This guide is primarily intended for personnel who have responsibility for managing energy use in existing laboratory facilities - including facilities managers, energy managers, and their engineering consultants. Additionally, laboratory planners and designers may also use the metrics and benchmarks described in this guide for goal-setting in new construction or major renovation. This guide provides the following information: (1) A step-by-step outline of the benchmarking process. (2) A set of performance metrics for the whole building as well as individual systems. For each metric, the guide provides a definition, performance benchmarks, and potential actions that can be inferred from evaluating this metric. (3) A list and descriptions of the data required for computing the metrics. This guide is complemented by spreadsheet templates for data collection and for computing the benchmarking metrics. This guide builds on prior research supported by the national Laboratories for the 21st Century (Labs21) program, supported by the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Much of the benchmarking data are drawn from the Labs21 benchmarking database and technical guides. Additional benchmark data were obtained from engineering experts including laboratory designers and energy managers.

  7. Benchmarking lithium amide versus amine bonding by charge density and energy decomposition analysis arguments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelhardt, Felix; Maaß, Christian; Andrada, Diego M; Herbst-Irmer, Regine; Stalke, Dietmar

    2018-03-28

    Lithium amides are versatile C-H metallation reagents with vast industrial demand because of their high basicity combined with their weak nucleophilicity, and they are applied in kilotons worldwide annually. The nuclearity of lithium amides, however, modifies and steers reactivity, region- and stereo-selectivity and product diversification in organic syntheses. In this regard, it is vital to understand Li-N bonding as it causes the aggregation of lithium amides to form cubes or ladders from the polar Li-N covalent metal amide bond along the ring stacking and laddering principle. Deaggregation, however, is more governed by the Li←N donor bond to form amine adducts. The geometry of the solid state structures already suggests that there is σ- and π-contribution to the covalent bond. To quantify the mutual influence, we investigated [{(Me 2 NCH 2 ) 2 (C 4 H 2 N)}Li] 2 ( 1 ) by means of experimental charge density calculations based on the quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) and DFT calculations using energy decomposition analysis (EDA). This new approach allows for the grading of electrostatic Li + N - , covalent Li-N and donating Li←N bonding, and provides a way to modify traditional widely-used heuristic concepts such as the -I and +I inductive effects. The electron density ρ ( r ) and its second derivative, the Laplacian ∇ 2 ρ ( r ), mirror the various types of bonding. Most remarkably, from the topological descriptors, there is no clear separation of the lithium amide bonds from the lithium amine donor bonds. The computed natural partial charges for lithium are only +0.58, indicating an optimal density supply from the four nitrogen atoms, while the Wiberg bond orders of about 0.14 au suggest very weak bonding. The interaction energy between the two pincer molecules, (C 4 H 2 N) 2 2- , with the Li 2 2+ moiety is very strong ( ca. -628 kcal mol -1 ), followed by the bond dissociation energy (-420.9 kcal mol -1 ). Partitioning the interaction energy

  8. Overview and benchmark analysis of fuel cell parameters estimation for energy management purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandidayeni, M.; Macias, A.; Amamou, A. A.; Boulon, L.; Kelouwani, S.; Chaoui, H.

    2018-03-01

    Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) have become the center of attention for energy conversion in many areas such as automotive industry, where they confront a high dynamic behavior resulting in their characteristics variation. In order to ensure appropriate modeling of PEMFCs, accurate parameters estimation is in demand. However, parameter estimation of PEMFC models is highly challenging due to their multivariate, nonlinear, and complex essence. This paper comprehensively reviews PEMFC models parameters estimation methods with a specific view to online identification algorithms, which are considered as the basis of global energy management strategy design, to estimate the linear and nonlinear parameters of a PEMFC model in real time. In this respect, different PEMFC models with different categories and purposes are discussed first. Subsequently, a thorough investigation of PEMFC parameter estimation methods in the literature is conducted in terms of applicability. Three potential algorithms for online applications, Recursive Least Square (RLS), Kalman filter, and extended Kalman filter (EKF), which has escaped the attention in previous works, have been then utilized to identify the parameters of two well-known semi-empirical models in the literature, Squadrito et al. and Amphlett et al. Ultimately, the achieved results and future challenges are discussed.

  9. Solar Energy Education. Reader, Part IV. Sun schooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-05-01

    A collection of magazine articles which focus on solar energy is presented. This is the final book of the four part series of the Solar Energy Reader. The articles include brief discussions on energy topics such as the sun, ocean energy, methane gas from cow manure, and solar homes. Instructions for constructing a sundial and a solar stove are also included. A glossary of energy related terms is provided. (BCS)

  10. Benchmarking electricity distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watts, K. [Department of Justice and Attorney-General, QLD (Australia)

    1995-12-31

    Benchmarking has been described as a method of continuous improvement that involves an ongoing and systematic evaluation and incorporation of external products, services and processes recognised as representing best practice. It is a management tool similar to total quality management (TQM) and business process re-engineering (BPR), and is best used as part of a total package. This paper discusses benchmarking models and approaches and suggests a few key performance indicators that could be applied to benchmarking electricity distribution utilities. Some recent benchmarking studies are used as examples and briefly discussed. It is concluded that benchmarking is a strong tool to be added to the range of techniques that can be used by electricity distribution utilities and other organizations in search of continuous improvement, and that there is now a high level of interest in Australia. Benchmarking represents an opportunity for organizations to approach learning from others in a disciplined and highly productive way, which will complement the other micro-economic reforms being implemented in Australia. (author). 26 refs.

  11. A dust spectral energy distribution model with hierarchical Bayesian inference - I. Formalism and benchmarking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galliano, Frédéric

    2018-05-01

    This article presents a new dust spectral energy distribution (SED) model, named HerBIE, aimed at eliminating the noise-induced correlations and large scatter obtained when performing least-squares fits. The originality of this code is to apply the hierarchical Bayesian approach to full dust models, including realistic optical properties, stochastic heating, and the mixing of physical conditions in the observed regions. We test the performances of our model by applying it to synthetic observations. We explore the impact on the recovered parameters of several effects: signal-to-noise ratio, SED shape, sample size, the presence of intrinsic correlations, the wavelength coverage, and the use of different SED model components. We show that this method is very efficient: the recovered parameters are consistently distributed around their true values. We do not find any clear bias, even for the most degenerate parameters, or with extreme signal-to-noise ratios.

  12. In response to an open invitation for comments on AAAS project 2061's Benchmark books on science. Part 1: documentation of serious errors in cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Gilbert

    2006-01-01

    Project 2061 was founded by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) to improve secondary school science education. An in-depth study of ten 9 to 12th grade biology textbooks led to the verdict that none conveyed "Big Ideas" that would give coherence and meaning to the profusion of lavishly illustrated isolated details. However, neither the Project report itself nor the Benchmark books put out earlier by the Project carries what deserves the designation of "Big Ideas." Worse, in the two earliest-published Benchmark books, the basic unit of all life forms--the living cell--is described as a soup enclosed by a cell membrane, that determines what can enter or leave the cell. This is astonishing since extensive experimental evidence has unequivocally disproved this idea 60 years ago. A "new" version of the membrane theory brought in to replace the discredited (sieve) version is the pump model--currently taught as established truth in all high-school and college biology textbooks--was also unequivocally disproved 40 years ago. This comment is written partly in response to Bechmark's gracious open invitation for ideas to improve the books and through them, to improve US secondary school science education.

  13. Nanotechnology convergence and modeling paradigm of sustainable energy system using polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell as a benchmark example

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Pil Seung; So, Dae Sup; Biegler, Lorenz T.; Jhon, Myung S.

    2012-01-01

    Developments in nanotechnology have led to innovative progress and converging technologies in engineering and science. These demand novel methodologies that enable efficient communications from the nanoscale all the way to decision-making criteria for actual production systems. In this paper, we discuss the convergence of nanotechnology and novel multi-scale modeling paradigms by using the fuel cell system as a benchmark example. This approach includes complex multi-phenomena at different time and length scales along with the introduction of an optimization framework for application-driven nanotechnology research trends. The modeling paradigm introduced here covers the novel holistic integration from atomistic/molecular phenomena to meso/continuum scales. System optimization is also discussed with respect to the reduced order parameters for a coarse-graining procedure in multi-scale model integration as well as system design. The development of a hierarchical multi-scale paradigm consolidates the theoretical analysis and enables large-scale decision-making of process level design, based on first-principles, and therefore promotes the convergence of nanotechnology to sustainable energy technologies.

  14. Nanotechnology convergence and modeling paradigm of sustainable energy system using polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell as a benchmark example

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Pil Seung; So, Dae Sup; Biegler, Lorenz T.; Jhon, Myung S., E-mail: mj3a@andrew.cmu.edu [Carnegie Mellon University, Department of Chemical Engineering (United States)

    2012-08-15

    Developments in nanotechnology have led to innovative progress and converging technologies in engineering and science. These demand novel methodologies that enable efficient communications from the nanoscale all the way to decision-making criteria for actual production systems. In this paper, we discuss the convergence of nanotechnology and novel multi-scale modeling paradigms by using the fuel cell system as a benchmark example. This approach includes complex multi-phenomena at different time and length scales along with the introduction of an optimization framework for application-driven nanotechnology research trends. The modeling paradigm introduced here covers the novel holistic integration from atomistic/molecular phenomena to meso/continuum scales. System optimization is also discussed with respect to the reduced order parameters for a coarse-graining procedure in multi-scale model integration as well as system design. The development of a hierarchical multi-scale paradigm consolidates the theoretical analysis and enables large-scale decision-making of process level design, based on first-principles, and therefore promotes the convergence of nanotechnology to sustainable energy technologies.

  15. Benchmarking energy performance of residential buildings using two-stage multifactor data envelopment analysis with degree-day based simple-normalization approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Endong; Shen, Zhigang; Alp, Neslihan; Barry, Nate

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Two-stage DEA model is developed to benchmark building energy efficiency. • Degree-day based simple normalization is used to neutralize the climatic noise. • Results of a real case study validated the benefits of this new model. - Abstract: Being able to identify detailed meta factors of energy performance is essential for creating effective residential energy-retrofitting strategies. Compared to other benchmarking methods, nonparametric multifactor DEA (data envelopment analysis) is capable of discriminating scale factors from management factors to reveal more details to better guide retrofitting practices. A two-stage DEA energy benchmarking method is proposed in this paper. This method includes (1) first-stage meta DEA which integrates the common degree day metrics for neutralizing noise energy effects of exogenous climatic variables; and (2) second-stage Tobit regression for further detailed efficiency analysis. A case study involving 3-year longitudinal panel data of 189 residential buildings indicated the proposed method has advantages over existing methods in terms of its efficiency in data processing and results interpretation. The results of the case study also demonstrated high consistency with existing linear regression based DEA.

  16. A benchmark study of electronic excitation energies, transition moments, and excited-state energy gradients on the nicotine molecule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egidi, Franco, E-mail: franco.egidi@sns.it; Segado, Mireia; Barone, Vincenzo, E-mail: vincenzo.barone@sns.it [Scuola Normale Superiore, Piazza dei Cavalieri, 7 I-56126 Pisa (Italy); Koch, Henrik [Department of Chemistry, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 7491 Trondheim (Norway); Cappelli, Chiara [Dipartimento di Chimica e Chimica Industriale, Università di Pisa, via G. Moruzzi, 3 I-56124 Pisa (Italy)

    2014-12-14

    In this work, we report a comparative study of computed excitation energies, oscillator strengths, and excited-state energy gradients of (S)-nicotine, chosen as a test case, using multireference methods, coupled cluster singles and doubles, and methods based on time-dependent density functional theory. This system was chosen because its apparent simplicity hides a complex electronic structure, as several different types of valence excitations are possible, including n-π{sup *}, π-π{sup *}, and charge-transfer states, and in order to simulate its spectrum it is necessary to describe all of them consistently well by the chosen method.

  17. Benchmarking transition energies and emission strengths for X-ray astrophysics with measurements at the Livermore EBITs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hell, Natalie [Friedrich Alexander Univ., Erlangen (Germany)

    2017-03-15

    K-shell transitions in astrophysically abundant metals and L-shell transitions in Fe group elements show characteristic signatures in the soft X-ray spectrum in the energy range 0.1–10 keV. These signatures have great diagnostic value for plasma parameters such as electron and ion temperatures and densities, and can thus help understand the physics controlling the energetic processes in astrophysical sources. This diagnostic power increases with advances in spectral resolution and effective area of the employed X-ray observatories. However, to make optimal use of the diagnostic potential – whether through global spectral modeling or through diagnostics from local modeling of individual lines – the underlying atomic physics has to be complete and well known. With the next generation of soft X-ray observatories featuring micro-calorimeters such as the SXS on Astro- H/Hitomi and the X-IFU on Athena, broadband high-resolution spectroscopy with large effective area will become more commonly available in the next decade. With these spectrometers, the accuracy of the plasma parameters derived from spectral modeling will be limited by the uncertainty of the reference atomic data rather than by instrumental factors, as is sometimes already the case for the high-resolution grating observations with Chandra-HETG and XMM-Newton-RGS. To take full advantage of the measured spectra, assessment of the accuracy of and improvements to the available atomic reference data are therefore important. Dedicated measurements in the laboratory are essential to benchmark the theoretical calculations providing the bulk of the reference data used in astrophysics. Experiments at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory electron beam ion traps (EBIT-I and SuperEBIT) have a long history of providing this service. In this work, I present new measurements of transition energies and absolute electron impact excitation cross sections geared towards currently open atomic physics data needs.

  18. Solution of the fifth dynamic Atomic Energy Research benchmark problem using the coupled code DIN3/ATHLET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kliem, S.

    1998-01-01

    The fifth dynamic benchmark is the first benchmark for coupled thermohydraulic system/three dimensional hexagonal neutron kinetic core models. In this benchmark the interaction between the components of a WWER-440 NPP with the reactor core has been investigated. The initiating event is a symmetrical break of the main steam header at the end of the first fuel cycle and the shutdown conditions with one control rod group s tucking. This break causes an overcooling of the primary circuit. During this overcooling the scram reactivity is compensated and the scrammed reactor becomes re critical. The calculation was continued until the highly-borated water from the high pressure injection system terminated the power excursion. Several aspects of the very complex and complicated benchmark problem are analyzed in detail. Sensitivity studies with different hydraulic parameters are made. The influence on the course of the transient and on the solution is discussed.(Author)

  19. Review for session K - benchmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCracken, A.K.

    1980-01-01

    Eight of the papers to be considered in Session K are directly concerned, at least in part, with the Pool Critical Assembly (P.C.A.) benchmark at Oak Ridge. The remaining seven papers in this session, the subject of this review, are concerned with a variety of topics related to the general theme of Benchmarks and will be considered individually

  20. Two NEA sensitivity, 1-D benchmark calculations. Part I: Sensitivity of the dose rate at the outside of a PWR configuration and of the vessel damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canali, U.; Gonano, G.; Nicks, R.

    1978-01-01

    Within the framework of the coordinated programme of sensitivity analysis studies, the reactor shielding benchmark calculation concerning the shield of a typical Pressurized Water Reactor, as proposed by I.K.E. (Stuttgart) and K.W.U. (Erlangen) has been performed. The direct and adjoint fluxes were calculated using ANISN, the cross-section sensitivity using SWANLAKE. The cross-section library used was EL4, 100 neutron + 19 gamma groups. The following quantities were of interest: neutron damage in the pressure vessel; dose rate outside the concrete shield. SWANLAKE was used to calculate the sensitivity of the above mentioned results to variations in the density of each nuclide present. The contributions of the different cross-section Legendre components are also given. Sensitivity profiles indicate the energy ranges in which a cross-section variation has a greater influence on the results. (author)

  1. Evaluación de la demanda energética de edificios no residenciales en Escocia = Energy demand benchmarking of non-domestic buildings in Scotland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Chetboula

    2015-12-01

    Los parámetros decisivos fueron la intensidad de uso de la energía (kWh/m2 y el uso y la edad de los edificios. Esto permitió la creación de seis tipos de edificios, aunque siguiendo patrones de ocupación se dividió en cuatro categorías desde el s. XVI hasta el s. XXI. Los principales resultados revelan el predominio de un clúster de edificios educativos en términos de superficie (72%, el número de edificios (70%, las emisiones de carbono (68% de los cerca de 42.000 toneladas de CO2 y el consumo de energía (61% de la 38,4 MWh de electricidad consumida, y el 73% del 117,4 MWh de gas natural que se consume. Entre estos niveles de consumo destacan el potencial de ahorro de energía para las escuelas: 186 kWh / m2 / año en promedio, en comparación con la media europea de 100 kWh / m2 / año de energía térmica de uso final. Abstract Over the years building energy performance has become a predominant concern for owners and real estate managers. The focus is usually on residential buildings but in the last twenty years an interest in non-domestic buildings has emerged in the UK. Benchmarks can generally be found at UK scale, although often restricted to England and Wales. This paper aims to provide benchmarks for the Scottish non-domestic building stock as part of the City of Edinburgh Council estate. In this research, the selected sample includes energy data and calculated carbon emissions of 199 buildings. The deciding parameters were the energy use intensity (kWh/m2 and the use and age of buildings. The last two allowed the creation of six clusters in which to group buildings of similar occupancy patterns in four age categories from the 16th to the 21st century. The main findings reveal the predominance of an educational buildings cluster in terms of floor area (72%, number of buildings (70%, carbon emissions (68% of about 42,000 tons of CO2, and energy consumption (61% of the 38.4 MWh of electricity consumed, and 73% of the 117.4 MWh of natural gas

  2. Analytical solutions for benchmarking cold regions subsurface water flow and energy transport models: one-dimensional soil thaw with conduction and advection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurylyk, Barret L.; McKenzie, Jeffrey M; MacQuarrie, Kerry T. B.; Voss, Clifford I.

    2014-01-01

    Numerous cold regions water flow and energy transport models have emerged in recent years. Dissimilarities often exist in their mathematical formulations and/or numerical solution techniques, but few analytical solutions exist for benchmarking flow and energy transport models that include pore water phase change. This paper presents a detailed derivation of the Lunardini solution, an approximate analytical solution for predicting soil thawing subject to conduction, advection, and phase change. Fifteen thawing scenarios are examined by considering differences in porosity, surface temperature, Darcy velocity, and initial temperature. The accuracy of the Lunardini solution is shown to be proportional to the Stefan number. The analytical solution results obtained for soil thawing scenarios with water flow and advection are compared to those obtained from the finite element model SUTRA. Three problems, two involving the Lunardini solution and one involving the classic Neumann solution, are recommended as standard benchmarks for future model development and testing.

  3. Benchmark CCSD(T) and DFT study of binding energies in Be7 - 12: in search of reliable DFT functional for beryllium clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labanc, Daniel; Šulka, Martin; Pitoňák, Michal; Černušák, Ivan; Urban, Miroslav; Neogrády, Pavel

    2018-05-01

    We present a computational study of the stability of small homonuclear beryllium clusters Be7 - 12 in singlet electronic states. Our predictions are based on highly correlated CCSD(T) coupled cluster calculations. Basis set convergence towards the complete basis set limit as well as the role of the 1s core electron correlation are carefully examined. Our CCSD(T) data for binding energies of Be7 - 12 clusters serve as a benchmark for performance assessment of several density functional theory (DFT) methods frequently used in beryllium cluster chemistry. We observe that, from Be10 clusters on, the deviation from CCSD(T) benchmarks is stable with respect to size, and fluctuating within 0.02 eV error bar for most examined functionals. This opens up the possibility of scaling the DFT binding energies for large Be clusters using CCSD(T) benchmark values for smaller clusters. We also tried to find analogies between the performance of DFT functionals for Be clusters and for the valence-isoelectronic Mg clusters investigated recently in Truhlar's group. We conclude that it is difficult to find DFT functionals that perform reasonably well for both beryllium and magnesium clusters. Out of 12 functionals examined, only the M06-2X functional gives reasonably accurate and balanced binding energies for both Be and Mg clusters.

  4. Revealing low-energy part of the beta spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selvi, S.; Celiktas, C.

    2002-01-01

    An effective method is proposed to separate electronic noise from the beta-particle spectra revealing lower energy part of the spectra. The available methods for reducing the noise problem cut the noise along with the low-energy part of the beta spectra by using a discriminator. Our setup eliminates this undesirable effect by shifting the noise toward the lowest energy scale leaving the low-energy part of spectra undisturbed. We achieved this noise-pulse-separation by treating the noise as a pulse so that we can exploit the application of the pulse-shape analyzer equipment used for pulse shape identification of particles and rejection of defective pulses. To the best of our knowledge this method of the noise separation is a novel approach

  5. Two-dimensional geometrical corner singularities in neutron diffusion. Part 2: Application to the SNR-300 benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cacuci, D.G.; Univ. of Karlsruhe; Kiefhaber, E.; Stehle, B.

    1998-01-01

    The explicit solution developed by Cacuci for the multigroup neutron diffusion equation at interior corners in two-dimensional two-region domains has been applied to the SNR-300 fast reactor prototype design to obtain the exact behavior of the multigroup fluxes at and around typical corners arising between absorber/fuel and follower/fuel assemblies. The calculations have been performed in hexagonal geometry using four energy groups, and the results clearly show that the multigroup fluxes are finite but not analytical at interior corners. In particular, already the first-order spatial derivatives of the multigroup fluxes become unbounded at the corners between follower and fuel assemblies. These results highlight the need to treat properly the influence of corners, both for the direct calculation and for the reconstruction of pointwise neutron flux and power distributions in heterogeneous reactor cores

  6. Benchmark simulation of turbulent flow through a staggered tube bundle to support CFD as a reactor design tool. Part 2. URANS CFD simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ridluan, Artit; Tokuhiro, Akira

    2008-01-01

    In Part II, we described the unsteady flow simulation and proposed a modification of a traditional turbulence flow model. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of an isothermal, fully periodic flow across a tube bundle using unsteady Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) equations, with turbulence models such as the Reynolds stress model (RSM) were investigated at a Reynolds number of 1.8x10 4 , based on the tube diameter and inlet velocity. As noted in Part I, CFD simulation and experimental results were compared at five positions along (x,y) coordinates. The steady RANS simulation showed that four diverse turbulence models were efficient for predicting the Reynolds stresses, and generally, SRANS results were marginal to poor, using a consistent evaluation terminology. In the URANS simulation, we modeled the turbulent flow field in a manner similar to the approach used for large eddy simulation (LES). The time-dependent URANS results showed that the simulation reproduces the dynamic stability as characterized by transverse oscillatory flow structures in the near-wake region. In particular, the inclusion of terms accounting for the time scales associated with the production range and dissipation rate of turbulence generates unsteady statistics of the mean and fluctuation flow. In spite of this, the model implemented produces better agreement with a benchmark data set and is thus recommended. (author)

  7. Benchmarking and Learning in Public Healthcare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buckmaster, Natalie; Mouritsen, Jan

    2017-01-01

    This research investigates the effects of learning-oriented benchmarking in public healthcare settings. Benchmarking is a widely adopted yet little explored accounting practice that is part of the paradigm of New Public Management. Extant studies are directed towards mandated coercive benchmarking...

  8. Scaled MP3 Non-Covalent Interaction Energies Agree Closely with Accurate CCSD(T) Benchmark Data

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pitoňák, Michal; Neogrady, P.; Černý, Jiří; Grimme, S.; Hobza, Pavel

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 1 (2009), s. 282-289 ISSN 1439-4235 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC512 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : Scaled MP3 * CCSD(T) Benchmark Data * Extended Data Set Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.453, year: 2009

  9. Solar Energy Education. Reader, Part I. Energy, Society, and the Sun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-05-01

    A collection of magazine articles which were selected for information on solar energy is presented in this booklet. This booklet is the first of a four part series of the Solar Energy Reader. The articles provide brief discussions on topics such as the power of the sun, solar energy developments for homes, solar energy versus power plants, solar access laws, and the role of utilities with respect to the sun's energy. (BCS)

  10. A benchmark study for different numerical parameters and their impact on the calculated strain levels for a model part door outer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, E.; Till, E.; Brenne, T.; Heath, A.; Hochholdinger, B.; Kassem-Manthey, K.; Kessler, L.; Koch, N.; Kortmann, G.; Kroeff, A.; Otto, T.; Verhoeven, H.; Steinbeck, G.; Vu, T.-C.; Wiegand, K.

    2005-01-01

    To increase the accuracy of finite element simulations in daily practice the local German and Austrian Deep Drawing Research Groups of IDDRG founded a special Working Group in year 2000. The main objective of this group was the continuously ongoing study and discussion of numerical / material effects in simulation jobs and to work out possible solutions. As a first theme of this group the intensive study of small die radii and the possibility of detecting material failure in these critical forming positions was selected. The part itself is a fictional body panel outside in which the original door handle of the VW Golf A4 has been constructed, a typical position of possible material necking or rupture in the press shop. All conditions to do a successful simulation have been taken care of in advance, material data, boundary conditions, friction, FLC and others where determined for the two materials in investigation - a mild steel and a dual phase steel HXT500X. The results of the experiments have been used to design the descriptions of two different benchmark runs for the simulation. The simulations with different programs as well as with different parameters showed on one hand negligible and on the other hand parameters with strong impact on the result - thereby having a different impact on a possible material failure prediction

  11. New energy technologies part 2, storage and low emission technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabonnadiere, J.C.

    2007-01-01

    After a first volume devoted to renewable energy sources, this second volume follows the first one and starts with a detailed presentation of energy storage means and technologies. This first chapter is followed by a prospective presentation of innovative concepts in the domain of nuclear energy. A detailed analysis of cogeneration systems, which aim at optimizing the efficiency of heat generation facilities by the adjunction of a power generation unit, allows to outline the advantages and limitations of this process. The next two chapters deal with the development of hydrogen industry as energy vector and with its application to power generation using fuel cells in several domains of use. Content: - forewords: electric power, the new paradigm, the decentralized generation, the energy conversion means; - chapter 1: energy storage, applications in relation with the electricity vector (energy density, storage problems, storage systems); - chapter 2: nuclear fission today and tomorrow, from rebirth to technological jump (2006 energy green book, keeping all energy options opened); nuclear energy in the world: 50 years of industrial experience; main actors: common needs, international vision and strategic instruments; at the eve of a technological jump: research challenges and governmental initiatives; generation 2 (today): safety of supplies and respect of the environment; generation 3 (2010): rebirth with continuous improvements; generation 4 (2040): technological jump to satisfy new needs; education and training: general goals; conclusion: nuclear power as part of the solution for a sustainable energy mix; - chapter 3: cogeneration (estimation of cogeneration potential, environmental impact, conclusions and perspectives); - chapter 4: hydrogen as energy vector (context, energy vector of the future, hydrogen generation, transport, distribution and storage; applications of hydrogen-energy, risks, standards, regulations and acceptability; hydrogen economics; hydrogen

  12. Neutron transmission benchmark problems for iron and concrete shields in low, intermediate and high energy proton accelerator facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakane, Yoshihiro; Sakamoto, Yukio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Hayashi, Katsumi [and others

    1996-09-01

    Benchmark problems were prepared for evaluating the calculation codes and the nuclear data for accelerator shielding design by the Accelerator Shielding Working Group of the Research Committee on Reactor Physics in JAERI. Four benchmark problems: transmission of quasi-monoenergetic neutrons generated by 43 MeV and 68 MeV protons through iron and concrete shields at TIARA of JAERI, neutron fluxes in and around an iron beam stop irradiated by 500 MeV protons at KEK, reaction rate distributions inside a thick concrete shield irradiated by 6.2 GeV protons at LBL, and neutron and hadron fluxes inside an iron beam stop irradiated by 24 GeV protons at CERN are compiled in this document. Calculational configurations and neutron reaction cross section data up to 500 MeV are provided. (author)

  13. Ready to Retrofit: The Process of Project Team Selection, Building Benchmarking, and Financing Commercial Building Energy Retrofit Projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanders, Mark D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Parrish, Kristen [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Mathew, Paul [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2012-05-01

    This guide presents a process for three key activities for the building owner in preparing to retrofit existing commercial buildings: selecting project teams, benchmarking the existing building, and financing the retrofit work. Although there are other essential steps in the retrofit process, the three activities presented in this guide are the critical elements where the building owner has the greatest influence on the outcome of the project.

  14. Future Energy Benchmark for Desalination: Is it Better to have a Power (Electricity) Plant With RO or MED/MSF?

    KAUST Repository

    Shahzad, Muhammad Wakil; Ng, Kim Choon; Thu, Kyaw

    2016-01-01

    Power and desalination cogeneration plants are common in many water scared courtiers. Designers and planners for cogeneration face tough challenges in deciding the options:- Is it better to operate a power plant (PP) with the reverse osmosis (i.e., PP+RO) or the thermally-driven multi-effect distillation/multi-stage flashed ( PP+MED/MSF) methods. From literature, the RO methods are known to be energy efficient whilst the MED/MSF are known to have excellent thermodynamic synergies as only low pressure and temperature steam are used. Not with-standing the challenges of severe feed seawater of the Gulf, such as the frequent harmful algae blooms (HABs) and high silt contents, this presentation presents a quantitative analyses using the exergy and energetic approaches in evaluating the performances of a real cogeneration plant that was recently proposed in the eastern part of Saudi Arabia. We demonstrate that the process choice of PP+RO versus PP+MED depends on the inherent efficiencies of individual process method which is closely related to innovative process design. In this connection, a method of primary fuel cost apportionment for a co-generation plant with a MED desalination is presented. We show that an energy approach, that captures the quality of expanding steam, is a better method over the conventional work output (energetic) and the energy method seems to be over-penalizing a thermally-driven MED by as much as 22% in the operating cost of water.

  15. Future Energy Benchmark for Desalination: is it Better to have a Power (electricity) Plant with ro or Med/msf?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahzad, Muhammad Wakil; Ng, Kim Choon; Thu, Kyaw

    2016-06-01

    Power and desalination cogeneration plants are common in many water scared courtiers. Designers and planners for cogeneration face tough challenges in deciding the options:- Is it better to operate a power plant (PP) with the reverse osmosis (i.e., PP+RO) or the thermally-driven multi-effect distillation/multi-stage flashed (PP+MED/MSF) methods. From literature, the RO methods are known to be energy efficient whilst the MED/MSF are known to have excellent thermodynamic synergies as only low pressure and temperature steam are used. Not with-standing the challenges of severe feed seawater of the Gulf, such as the frequent harmful algae blooms (HABs) and high silt contents, this presentation presents a quantitative analyses using the exergy and energetic approaches in evaluating the performances of a real cogeneration plant that was recently proposed in the eastern part of Saudi Arabia. We demonstrate that the process choice of PP+RO versus PP+MED depends on the inherent efficiencies of individual process method which is closely related to innovative process design. In this connection, a method of primary fuel cost apportionment for a co-generation plant with a MED desalination is presented. We show that an energy approach, that captures the quality of expanding steam, is a better method over the conventional work output (energetic) and the energy method seems to be over-penalizing a thermally-driven MED by as much as 22% in the operating cost of water.

  16. Future Energy Benchmark for Desalination: Is it Better to have a Power (Electricity) Plant With RO or MED/MSF?

    KAUST Repository

    Shahzad, Muhammad Wakil

    2016-06-23

    Power and desalination cogeneration plants are common in many water scared courtiers. Designers and planners for cogeneration face tough challenges in deciding the options:- Is it better to operate a power plant (PP) with the reverse osmosis (i.e., PP+RO) or the thermally-driven multi-effect distillation/multi-stage flashed ( PP+MED/MSF) methods. From literature, the RO methods are known to be energy efficient whilst the MED/MSF are known to have excellent thermodynamic synergies as only low pressure and temperature steam are used. Not with-standing the challenges of severe feed seawater of the Gulf, such as the frequent harmful algae blooms (HABs) and high silt contents, this presentation presents a quantitative analyses using the exergy and energetic approaches in evaluating the performances of a real cogeneration plant that was recently proposed in the eastern part of Saudi Arabia. We demonstrate that the process choice of PP+RO versus PP+MED depends on the inherent efficiencies of individual process method which is closely related to innovative process design. In this connection, a method of primary fuel cost apportionment for a co-generation plant with a MED desalination is presented. We show that an energy approach, that captures the quality of expanding steam, is a better method over the conventional work output (energetic) and the energy method seems to be over-penalizing a thermally-driven MED by as much as 22% in the operating cost of water.

  17. Wind energy assessment for the coastal part of Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khadem, S.K.; Ghosh, H.R.; Kaiser, S.; Aditya, S.K.; Hussain, M.

    2005-01-01

    Earlier measurement and study of wind speed for the coastal part of Bangladesh showed that some of the areas of this part would be useful for wind power generation. But till now no measurement at the hub height of wind machine has yet done. Data has been collected from different sources and analysis has been done using logarithmic law and micro scale modeling software, WAsP for wind energy assessment over the coastal part. It has been found that the speed varies from 4m/s to 5.7 m/s at a height of 50m above ground level depending on the land type. Wind power density varies from 100 to 250 w/m/sub 2/ indicate the wind power can play an important role in the energy sector. (author)

  18. Analysis of Benchmark 2 results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacha, F.; Lefievre, B.; Maillard, J.; Silva, J.

    1994-01-01

    The code GEANT315 has been compared to different codes in two benchmarks. We analyze its performances through our results, especially in the thick target case. In spite of gaps in nucleus-nucleus interaction theories at intermediate energies, benchmarks allow possible improvements of physical models used in our codes. Thereafter, a scheme of radioactive waste burning system is studied. (authors). 4 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  19. Benchmarking the Netherlands. Benchmarking for growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    This is the fourth edition of the Ministry of Economic Affairs' publication 'Benchmarking the Netherlands', which aims to assess the competitiveness of the Dutch economy. The methodology and objective of the benchmarking remain the same. The basic conditions for economic activity (institutions, regulation, etc.) in a number of benchmark countries are compared in order to learn from the solutions found by other countries for common economic problems. This publication is devoted entirely to the potential output of the Dutch economy. In other words, its ability to achieve sustainable growth and create work over a longer period without capacity becoming an obstacle. This is important because economic growth is needed to increase prosperity in the broad sense and meeting social needs. Prosperity in both a material (per capita GDP) and immaterial (living environment, environment, health, etc) sense, in other words. The economy's potential output is determined by two structural factors: the growth of potential employment and the structural increase in labour productivity. Analysis by the Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis (CPB) shows that in recent years the increase in the capacity for economic growth has been realised mainly by increasing the supply of labour and reducing the equilibrium unemployment rate. In view of the ageing of the population in the coming years and decades the supply of labour is unlikely to continue growing at the pace we have become accustomed to in recent years. According to a number of recent studies, to achieve a respectable rate of sustainable economic growth the aim will therefore have to be to increase labour productivity. To realise this we have to focus on for six pillars of economic policy: (1) human capital, (2) functioning of markets, (3) entrepreneurship, (4) spatial planning, (5) innovation, and (6) sustainability. These six pillars determine the course for economic policy aiming at higher productivity growth. Throughout

  20. Benchmarking the Netherlands. Benchmarking for growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-01-01

    This is the fourth edition of the Ministry of Economic Affairs' publication 'Benchmarking the Netherlands', which aims to assess the competitiveness of the Dutch economy. The methodology and objective of the benchmarking remain the same. The basic conditions for economic activity (institutions, regulation, etc.) in a number of benchmark countries are compared in order to learn from the solutions found by other countries for common economic problems. This publication is devoted entirely to the potential output of the Dutch economy. In other words, its ability to achieve sustainable growth and create work over a longer period without capacity becoming an obstacle. This is important because economic growth is needed to increase prosperity in the broad sense and meeting social needs. Prosperity in both a material (per capita GDP) and immaterial (living environment, environment, health, etc) sense, in other words. The economy's potential output is determined by two structural factors: the growth of potential employment and the structural increase in labour productivity. Analysis by the Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis (CPB) shows that in recent years the increase in the capacity for economic growth has been realised mainly by increasing the supply of labour and reducing the equilibrium unemployment rate. In view of the ageing of the population in the coming years and decades the supply of labour is unlikely to continue growing at the pace we have become accustomed to in recent years. According to a number of recent studies, to achieve a respectable rate of sustainable economic growth the aim will therefore have to be to increase labour productivity. To realise this we have to focus on for six pillars of economic policy: (1) human capital, (2) functioning of markets, (3) entrepreneurship, (4) spatial planning, (5) innovation, and (6) sustainability. These six pillars determine the course for economic policy aiming at higher productivity

  1. Code assessment and modelling for Design Basis Accident Analysis of the European sodium fast reactor design. Part I: System description, modelling and benchmarking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lázaro, A.; Ammirabile, L.; Bandini, G.; Darmet, G.; Massara, S.; Dufour, Ph.; Tosello, A.; Gallego, E.; Jimenez, G.; Mikityuk, K.; Schikorr, M.; Bubelis, E.; Ponomarev, A.; Kruessmann, R.; Stempniewicz, M.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Ten system-code models of the ESFR were developed in the frame of the CP-ESFR project. • Eight different thermohydraulic system codes adapted to sodium fast reactor's technology. • Benchmarking exercise settled to check the consistency of the calculations. • Upgraded system codes able to simulate the reactivity feedback and key safety parameters. -- Abstract: The new reactor concepts proposed in the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) are conceived to improve the use of natural resources, reduce the amount of high-level radioactive waste and excel in their reliability and safe operation. Among these novel designs sodium fast reactors (SFRs) stand out due to their technological feasibility as demonstrated in several countries during the last decades. As part of the contribution of EURATOM to GIF the CP-ESFR is a collaborative project with the objective, among others, to perform extensive analysis on safety issues involving renewed SFR demonstrator designs. The verification of computational tools able to simulate the plant behaviour under postulated accidental conditions by code-to-code comparison was identified as a key point to ensure reactor safety. In this line, several organizations employed coupled neutronic and thermal-hydraulic system codes able to simulate complex and specific phenomena involving multi-physics studies adapted to this particular fast reactor technology. In the “Introduction” of this paper the framework of this study is discussed, the second section describes the envisaged plant design and the commonly agreed upon modelling guidelines. The third section presents a comparative analysis of the calculations performed by each organisation applying their models and codes to a common agreed transient with the objective to harmonize the models as well as validating the implementation of all relevant physical phenomena in the different system codes

  2. Code assessment and modelling for Design Basis Accident Analysis of the European sodium fast reactor design. Part I: System description, modelling and benchmarking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lázaro, A., E-mail: aurelio.lazaro-chueca@ec.europa.eu [JRC-IET European Commission—Westerduinweg 3, PO Box-2, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); UPV—Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Cami de vera s/n-46002, Valencia (Spain); Ammirabile, L. [JRC-IET European Commission—Westerduinweg 3, PO Box-2, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Bandini, G. [ENEA, Via Martiri di Monte Sole 4, 40129 Bologna (Italy); Darmet, G.; Massara, S. [EDF, 1 avenue du Général de Gaulle, 92141 Clamart (France); Dufour, Ph.; Tosello, A. [CEA, St Paul lez Durance, 13108 Cadarache (France); Gallego, E.; Jimenez, G. [UPM, José Gutiérrez Abascal, 2-28006 Madrid (Spain); Mikityuk, K. [PSI—Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen Switzerland (Switzerland); Schikorr, M.; Bubelis, E.; Ponomarev, A.; Kruessmann, R. [KIT—Institute for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen Germany (Germany); Stempniewicz, M. [NRG, Utrechtseweg 310, PO Box 9034 6800 ES, Arnhem (Netherlands)

    2014-01-15

    Highlights: • Ten system-code models of the ESFR were developed in the frame of the CP-ESFR project. • Eight different thermohydraulic system codes adapted to sodium fast reactor's technology. • Benchmarking exercise settled to check the consistency of the calculations. • Upgraded system codes able to simulate the reactivity feedback and key safety parameters. -- Abstract: The new reactor concepts proposed in the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) are conceived to improve the use of natural resources, reduce the amount of high-level radioactive waste and excel in their reliability and safe operation. Among these novel designs sodium fast reactors (SFRs) stand out due to their technological feasibility as demonstrated in several countries during the last decades. As part of the contribution of EURATOM to GIF the CP-ESFR is a collaborative project with the objective, among others, to perform extensive analysis on safety issues involving renewed SFR demonstrator designs. The verification of computational tools able to simulate the plant behaviour under postulated accidental conditions by code-to-code comparison was identified as a key point to ensure reactor safety. In this line, several organizations employed coupled neutronic and thermal-hydraulic system codes able to simulate complex and specific phenomena involving multi-physics studies adapted to this particular fast reactor technology. In the “Introduction” of this paper the framework of this study is discussed, the second section describes the envisaged plant design and the commonly agreed upon modelling guidelines. The third section presents a comparative analysis of the calculations performed by each organisation applying their models and codes to a common agreed transient with the objective to harmonize the models as well as validating the implementation of all relevant physical phenomena in the different system codes.

  3. Guideline for benchmarking thermal treatment systems for low-level mixed waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, D.P.; Gibson, L.V. Jr.; Hermes, W.H.; Bastian, R.E.; Davis, W.T.

    1994-01-01

    A process for benchmarking low-level mixed waste (LLMW) treatment technologies has been developed. When used in conjunction with the identification and preparation of surrogate waste mixtures, and with defined quality assurance and quality control procedures, the benchmarking process will effectively streamline the selection of treatment technologies being considered by the US Department of Energy (DOE) for LLMW cleanup and management. Following the quantitative template provided in the benchmarking process will greatly increase the technical information available for the decision-making process. The additional technical information will remove a large part of the uncertainty in the selection of treatment technologies. It is anticipated that the use of the benchmarking process will minimize technology development costs and overall treatment costs. In addition, the benchmarking process will enhance development of the most promising LLMW treatment processes and aid in transferring the technology to the private sector. To instill inherent quality, the benchmarking process is based on defined criteria and a structured evaluation format, which are independent of any specific conventional treatment or emerging process technology. Five categories of benchmarking criteria have been developed for the evaluation: operation/design; personnel health and safety; economics; product quality; and environmental quality. This benchmarking document gives specific guidance on what information should be included and how it should be presented. A standard format for reporting is included in Appendix A and B of this document. Special considerations for LLMW are presented and included in each of the benchmarking categories

  4. 24 CFR 990.185 - Utilities expense level: Incentives for energy conservation/rate reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... (of the type affected by the energy conservation measure) after implementation of the energy...) Utility benchmarking. HUD will pursue benchmarking utility consumption at the project level as part of the... convene a meeting with representation of appropriate stakeholders to review utility benchmarking options...

  5. International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) - ICSBEP 2015 Handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bess, John D.

    2015-01-01

    The Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (CSBEP) was initiated in October of 1992 by the United States Department of Energy (DOE). The project quickly became an international effort as scientists from other interested countries became involved. The International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) became an official activity of the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) in 1995. This handbook contains criticality safety benchmark specifications that have been derived from experiments performed at various critical facilities around the world. The benchmark specifications are intended for use by criticality safety engineers to validate calculation techniques used to establish minimum subcritical margins for operations with fissile material and to determine criticality alarm requirements and placement. Many of the specifications are also useful for nuclear data testing. Example calculations are presented; however, these calculations do not constitute a validation of the codes or cross-section data. The evaluated criticality safety benchmark data are given in nine volumes. These volumes span approximately 69000 pages and contain 567 evaluations with benchmark specifications for 4874 critical, near-critical or subcritical configurations, 31 criticality alarm placement/shielding configurations with multiple dose points for each, and 207 configurations that have been categorised as fundamental physics measurements that are relevant to criticality safety applications. New to the handbook are benchmark specifications for neutron activation foil and thermoluminescent dosimeter measurements performed at the SILENE critical assembly in Valduc, France as part of a joint venture in 2010 between the US DOE and the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA). A photograph of this experiment is shown on the front cover. Experiments that are found unacceptable for use as criticality safety benchmark experiments are discussed in these

  6. Validation of the Continuous-Energy Monte Carlo Criticality-Safety Analysis System MVP and JENDL-3.2 Using the Internationally Evaluated Criticality Benchmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitake, Susumu

    2003-01-01

    Validation of the continuous-energy Monte Carlo criticality-safety analysis system, comprising the MVP code and neutron cross sections based on JENDL-3.2, was examined using benchmarks evaluated in the 'International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments'. Eight experiments (116 configurations) for the plutonium solution and plutonium-uranium mixture systems performed at Valduc, Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories, and other facilities were selected and used in the studies. The averaged multiplication factors calculated with MVP and MCNP-4B using the same neutron cross-section libraries based on JENDL-3.2 were in good agreement. Based on methods provided in the Japanese nuclear criticality-safety handbook, the estimated criticality lower-limit multiplication factors to be used as a subcriticality criterion for the criticality-safety evaluation of nuclear facilities were obtained. The analysis proved the applicability of the MVP code to the criticality-safety analysis of nuclear fuel facilities, particularly to the analysis of systems fueled with plutonium and in homogeneous and thermal-energy conditions

  7. Benchmarking in Foodservice Operations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Johnson, Bonnie

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify usage of foodservice performance measures, important activities in foodservice benchmarking, and benchmarking attitudes, beliefs, and practices by foodservice directors...

  8. Benchmarking in Czech Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plaček Michal

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The first part of this article surveys the current experience with the use of benchmarking at Czech universities specializing in economics and management. The results indicate that collaborative benchmarking is not used on this level today, but most actors show some interest in its introduction. The expression of the need for it and the importance of benchmarking as a very suitable performance-management tool in less developed countries are the impetus for the second part of our article. Based on an analysis of the current situation and existing needs in the Czech Republic, as well as on a comparison with international experience, recommendations for public policy are made, which lie in the design of a model of a collaborative benchmarking for Czech economics and management in higher-education programs. Because the fully complex model cannot be implemented immediately – which is also confirmed by structured interviews with academics who have practical experience with benchmarking –, the final model is designed as a multi-stage model. This approach helps eliminate major barriers to the implementation of benchmarking.

  9. Calculations of IAEA-CRP-6 Benchmark Case 1 through 7 for a TRISO-Coated Fuel Particle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Min; Lee, Y. W.; Chang, J. H.

    2005-01-01

    IAEA-CRP-6 is a coordinated research program of IAEA on Advances in HTGR fuel technology. The CRP examines aspects of HTGR fuel technology, ranging from design and fabrication to characterization, irradiation testing, performance modeling, as well as licensing and quality control issues. The benchmark section of the program treats simple analytical cases, pyrocarbon layer behavior, single TRISO-coated fuel particle behavior, and benchmark calculations of some irradiation experiments performed and planned. There are totally seventeen benchmark cases in the program. Member countries are participating in the benchmark calculations of the CRP with their own developed fuel performance analysis computer codes. Korea is also taking part in the benchmark calculations using a fuel performance analysis code, COPA (COated PArticle), which is being developed in Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute. The study shows the calculational results of IAEACRP- 6 benchmark cases 1 through 7 which describe the structural behaviors for a single fuel particle

  10. Benchmarking and Performance Measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Town, J. Stephen

    This paper defines benchmarking and its relationship to quality management, describes a project which applied the technique in a library context, and explores the relationship between performance measurement and benchmarking. Numerous benchmarking methods contain similar elements: deciding what to benchmark; identifying partners; gathering…

  11. Benchmarking Cloud Storage Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xing

    2014-01-01

    With the rise of cloud computing, many cloud storage systems like Dropbox, Google Drive and Mega have been built to provide decentralized and reliable file storage. It is thus of prime importance to know their features, performance, and the best way to make use of them. In this context, we introduce BenchCloud, a tool designed as part of this thesis to conveniently and efficiently benchmark any cloud storage system. First, we provide a study of six commonly-used cloud storage systems to ident...

  12. Trends in Energy Management Technology - Part 3: State of Practiceof Energy Management, Control, and Information Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yee, Gaymond; Webster, Tom

    2004-02-01

    In this report, the third in a series, we provide an evaluation of several products that exemplify the current state of practice of Energy Management, Control, and Information Systems (EMCIS). The available features for these products are summarized and analyzed with regard to emerging trends in EMCIS and potential benefits to the federal sector. The first report [1] covered enabling technologies for emerging energy management systems. The second report [2] serves as a basic reference for building control system (BCS) networking fundamentals and includes an assessment of current approaches to open communications. Part 4 of this series will discuss applications software from a user's perspective. It is important for energy managers in the Federal sector to have a high level of knowledge and understanding of these complex energy management systems. This series of reports provides energy practitioners with some basic informational and educational tools to help make decisions relative to energy management systems design, specification, procurement, and energy savings potential.

  13. A simplified approach to WWER-440 fuel assembly head benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muehlbauer, P.

    2010-01-01

    The WWER-440 fuel assembly head benchmark was simulated with FLUENT 12 code as a first step of validation of the code for nuclear reactor safety analyses. Results of the benchmark together with comparison of results provided by other participants and results of measurement will be presented in another paper by benchmark organisers. This presentation is therefore focused on our approach to this simulation as illustrated on the case 323-34, which represents a peripheral assembly with five neighbours. All steps of the simulation and some lessons learned are described. Geometry of the computational region supplied as STEP file by organizers of the benchmark was first separated into two parts (inlet part with spacer grid, and the rest of assembly head) in order to keep the size of the computational mesh manageable with regard to the hardware available (HP Z800 workstation with Intel Zeon four-core CPU 3.2 GHz, 32 GB of RAM) and then further modified at places where shape of the geometry would probably lead to highly distorted cells. Both parts of the geometry were connected via boundary profile file generated at cross section, where effect of grid spacers is still felt but the effect of out flow boundary condition used in the computations of the inlet part of geometry is negligible. Computation proceeded in several steps: start with basic mesh, standard k-ε model of turbulence with standard wall functions and first order upwind numerical schemes; after convergence (scaled residuals lower than 10-3) and near-wall meshes local adaptation when needed, realizable k-ε of turbulence was used with second order upwind numerical schemes for momentum and energy equations. During iterations, area-average temperature of thermocouples and area-averaged outlet temperature which are the main figures of merit of the benchmark were also monitored. In this 'blind' phase of the benchmark, effect of spacers was neglected. After results of measurements are available, standard validation

  14. Role of dispersion corrected hybrid GGA class in accurately calculating the bond dissociation energy of carbon halogen bond: A benchmark study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosar, Naveen; Mahmood, Tariq; Ayub, Khurshid

    2017-12-01

    Benchmark study has been carried out to find a cost effective and accurate method for bond dissociation energy (BDE) of carbon halogen (Csbnd X) bond. BDE of C-X bond plays a vital role in chemical reactions, particularly for kinetic barrier and thermochemistry etc. The compounds (1-16, Fig. 1) with Csbnd X bond used for current benchmark study are important reactants in organic, inorganic and bioorganic chemistry. Experimental data of Csbnd X bond dissociation energy is compared with theoretical results. The statistical analysis tools such as root mean square deviation (RMSD), standard deviation (SD), Pearson's correlation (R) and mean absolute error (MAE) are used for comparison. Overall, thirty-one density functionals from eight different classes of density functional theory (DFT) along with Pople and Dunning basis sets are evaluated. Among different classes of DFT, the dispersion corrected range separated hybrid GGA class along with 6-31G(d), 6-311G(d), aug-cc-pVDZ and aug-cc-pVTZ basis sets performed best for bond dissociation energy calculation of C-X bond. ωB97XD show the best performance with less deviations (RMSD, SD), mean absolute error (MAE) and a significant Pearson's correlation (R) when compared to experimental data. ωB97XD along with Pople basis set 6-311g(d) has RMSD, SD, R and MAE of 3.14 kcal mol-1, 3.05 kcal mol-1, 0.97 and -1.07 kcal mol-1, respectively.

  15. Leading Players of the Global Renewable Energy Equipment Industry. Overview of Groups - SWOTs - Benchmarking - Company Profiles and Financials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-06-01

    This study presents: The medium-term and mega trends of the industry market developments and geographical segments; The competitive landscape and the main corporate rankings; The main conclusions of the report, summarised in 10 analytical slides. Content: 1. Overview: The Sector, Ranking, Performance Analysis; 2. Company Profiles: Toshiba, Vestas, Dong Energy, GE Renewable Energy, Siemens, Goldwind, First Solar, SunPower, Andritz, Yingli Green Energy; 3. Sources; 4. Annexes

  16. Dynamic benchmarking of simulation codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henry, R.E.; Paik, C.Y.; Hauser, G.M.

    1996-01-01

    output includes a plot of the MAAP calculation and the plant data. For the large integral experiments, a major part, but not all of the MAAP code is needed. These use an experiment specific benchmark routine that includes all of the information and boundary conditions for performing the calculation, as well as the information of which parts of MAAP are unnecessary and can be 'bypassed'. Lastly, the separate effects tests only require a few MAAP routines. These are exercised through their own specific benchmark routine that includes the experiment specific information and boundary conditions. This benchmark routine calls the appropriate MAAP routines from the source code, performs the calculations, including integration where necessary and provide the comparison between the MAAP calculation and the experimental observations. (author)

  17. Criticality Benchmark Results Using Various MCNP Data Libraries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frankle, Stephanie C.

    1999-01-01

    A suite of 86 criticality benchmarks has been recently implemented in MCNPtrademark as part of the nuclear data validation effort. These benchmarks have been run using two sets of MCNP continuous-energy neutron data: ENDF/B-VI based data through Release 2 (ENDF60) and the ENDF/B-V based data. New evaluations were completed for ENDF/B-VI for a number of the important nuclides such as the isotopes of H, Be, C, N, O, Fe, Ni, 235,238 U, 237 Np, and 239,240 Pu. When examining the results of these calculations for the five manor categories of 233 U, intermediate-enriched 235 U (IEU), highly enriched 235 U (HEU), 239 Pu, and mixed metal assembles, we find the following: (1) The new evaluations for 9 Be, 12 C, and 14 N show no net effect on k eff ; (2) There is a consistent decrease in k eff for all of the solution assemblies for ENDF/B-VI due to 1 H and 16 O, moving k eff further from the benchmark value for uranium solutions and closer to the benchmark value for plutonium solutions; (3) k eff decreased for the ENDF/B-VI Fe isotopic data, moving the calculated k eff further from the benchmark value; (4) k eff decreased for the ENDF/B-VI Ni isotopic data, moving the calculated k eff closer to the benchmark value; (5) The W data remained unchanged and tended to calculate slightly higher than the benchmark values; (6) For metal uranium systems, the ENDF/B-VI data for 235 U tends to decrease k eff while the 238 U data tends to increase k eff . The net result depends on the energy spectrum and material specifications for the particular assembly; (7) For more intermediate-energy systems, the changes in the 235,238 U evaluations tend to increase k eff . For the mixed graphite and normal uranium-reflected assembly, a large increase in k eff due to changes in the 238 U evaluation moved the calculated k eff much closer to the benchmark value. (8) There is little change in k eff for the uranium solutions due to the new 235,238 U evaluations; and (9) There is little change in k eff

  18. A simulation study on proton computed tomography (CT) stopping power accuracy using dual energy CT scans as benchmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, David Christoffer; Seco, Joao; Sørensen, Thomas Sangild

    2015-01-01

    Background. Accurate stopping power estimation is crucial for treatment planning in proton therapy, and the uncertainties in stopping power are currently the largest contributor to the employed dose margins. Dual energy x-ray computed tomography (CT) (clinically available) and proton CT (in...... development) have both been proposed as methods for obtaining patient stopping power maps. The purpose of this work was to assess the accuracy of proton CT using dual energy CT scans of phantoms to establish reference accuracy levels. Material and methods. A CT calibration phantom and an abdomen cross section...... phantom containing inserts were scanned with dual energy and single energy CT with a state-of-the-art dual energy CT scanner. Proton CT scans were simulated using Monte Carlo methods. The simulations followed the setup used in current prototype proton CT scanners and included realistic modeling...

  19. The cross-section of returns, benchmark model parameters, and idiosyncratic volatility of nuclear energy firms after Fukushima Daiichi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopatta, Kerstin; Kaspereit, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    This study analyzes how the stock market returns, the factor loadings from the Carhart (1997) 4-factor model, and the idiosyncratic volatility of shares in energy firms have been affected by the Fukushima nuclear accident. Unlike existing studies, which provide evidence of a wealth transfer from nuclear to renewable energy firms for specific countries, we use an international sample and investigate whether changes in the regulatory environment and the firm-specific commitment to nuclear and renewable energies correlate with the capital market's reactions to the Fukushima Daiichi accident. Our findings suggest that the more a firm relies on nuclear power, the more its share price declined after the accident. A commitment to renewable energies does not prevent declines in share prices but significantly helps to reduce the increase in market beta that is associated with this event. Nuclear energy firms domiciled in countries with a higher number of regulatory interventions that were triggered by the catastrophe have lower abnormal returns than those that are domiciled elsewhere. However, as a cross-sectional analysis reveals, a stronger commitment to nuclear power is the main driver for negative stock market returns. Furthermore, nuclear energy firms domiciled in countries with stronger regulatory shifts away from nuclear energy experience significant increases in market beta and the book-to-market equity factor loading according to the Carhart (1997) 4-factor model. We conclude that capital market participants are able to differentiate between the affectedness of firms with respect to their product portfolio. Energy firms could prevent increases in market beta due to catastrophes such as the Fukushima Daiichi accident by shifting some of their energy production from nuclear to renewable or other sources. - Highlights: • Abnormal stock returns of nuclear energy firms around Fukushima Daiichi depend on the mix of their energy portfolio. • Higher commitment to

  20. A simulation study on proton computed tomography (CT) stopping power accuracy using dual energy CT scans as benchmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, David C; Seco, Joao; Sørensen, Thomas Sangild; Petersen, Jørgen Breede Baltzer; Wildberger, Joachim E; Verhaegen, Frank; Landry, Guillaume

    2015-01-01

    Accurate stopping power estimation is crucial for treatment planning in proton therapy, and the uncertainties in stopping power are currently the largest contributor to the employed dose margins. Dual energy x-ray computed tomography (CT) (clinically available) and proton CT (in development) have both been proposed as methods for obtaining patient stopping power maps. The purpose of this work was to assess the accuracy of proton CT using dual energy CT scans of phantoms to establish reference accuracy levels. A CT calibration phantom and an abdomen cross section phantom containing inserts were scanned with dual energy and single energy CT with a state-of-the-art dual energy CT scanner. Proton CT scans were simulated using Monte Carlo methods. The simulations followed the setup used in current prototype proton CT scanners and included realistic modeling of detectors and the corresponding noise characteristics. Stopping power maps were calculated for all three scans, and compared with the ground truth stopping power from the phantoms. Proton CT gave slightly better stopping power estimates than the dual energy CT method, with root mean square errors of 0.2% and 0.5% (for each phantom) compared to 0.5% and 0.9%. Single energy CT root mean square errors were 2.7% and 1.6%. Maximal errors for proton, dual energy and single energy CT were 0.51%, 1.7% and 7.4%, respectively. Better stopping power estimates could significantly reduce the range errors in proton therapy, but requires a large improvement in current methods which may be achievable with proton CT.

  1. Benchmark calculations for VENUS-2 MOX -fueled reactor dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Kung; Kim, Hong Chul; Shin, Chang Ho; Han, Chi Young; Na, Byung Chan

    2004-01-01

    As a part of a Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Project, it was pursued the benchmark for dosimetry calculation of the VENUS-2 MOX-fueled reactor. In this benchmark, the goal is to test the current state-of-the-art computational methods of calculating neutron flux to reactor components against the measured data of the VENUS-2 MOX-fuelled critical experiments. The measured data to be used for this benchmark are the equivalent fission fluxes which are the reaction rates divided by the U 235 fission spectrum averaged cross-section of the corresponding dosimeter. The present benchmark is, therefore, defined to calculate reaction rates and corresponding equivalent fission fluxes measured on the core-mid plane at specific positions outside the core of the VENUS-2 MOX-fuelled reactor. This is a follow-up exercise to the previously completed UO 2 -fuelled VENUS-1 two-dimensional and VENUS-3 three-dimensional exercises. The use of MOX fuel in LWRs presents different neutron characteristics and this is the main interest of the current benchmark compared to the previous ones

  2. A Comprehensive Energy Analysis and Related Carbon Footprint of Dairy Farms, Part 1: Direct Energy Requirements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Todde

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Dairy cattle farms are continuously developing more intensive systems of management which require higher utilization of durable and not-durable inputs. These inputs are responsible of significant direct and indirect fossil energy requirements which are related to remarkable emissions of CO2. This study aims to analyze direct energy requirements and the related carbon footprint of a large population of conventional dairy farms located in the south of Italy. A detailed survey of electricity, diesel and Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG consumptions has been carried out among on-farm activities. The results of the analyses showed an annual average fuel consumption of 40 kg per tonne of milk, while electricity accounted for 73 kWh per tonne of milk produced. Expressing the direct energy inputs as primary energy, diesel fuel results the main resource used in on-farm activities, accounting for 72% of the total fossil primary energy requirement, while electricity represents only 27%. Moreover, larger farms were able to use more efficiently the direct energy inputs and reduce the related emissions of carbon dioxide per unit of milk produced, since the milk yield increases with the herd size. The global average farm emissions of carbon dioxide equivalent, due to all direct energy usages, accounted for 156 kg CO2-eq per tonne of Fat and Protein Corrected Milk (FPCM, while farms that raise more than 200 heads emitted 36% less than the average value. In this two-part series, the total energy demand (Part 1 + Part 2 per farm is mainly due to agricultural inputs and fuel consumption, which have the largest quota of the annual requirements for each milk yield class. These results also showed that large size farms held lower CO2-eq emissions when referred to the mass of milk produced.

  3. A novel methodology for energy performance benchmarking of buildings by means of Linear Mixed Effect Model: The case of space and DHW heating of out-patient Healthcare Centres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capozzoli, Alfonso; Piscitelli, Marco Savino; Neri, Francesco; Grassi, Daniele; Serale, Gianluca

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • 100 Healthcare Centres were analyzed to assess energy consumption reference values. • A novel robust methodology for energy benchmarking process was proposed. • A Linear Mixed Effect estimation Model was used to treat heterogeneous datasets. • A nondeterministic approach was adopted to consider the uncertainty in the process. • The methodology was developed to be upgradable and generalizable to other datasets. - Abstract: The current EU energy efficiency directive 2012/27/EU defines the existing building stocks as one of the most promising potential sector for achieving energy saving. Robust methodologies aimed to quantify the potential reduction of energy consumption for large building stocks need to be developed. To this purpose, a benchmarking analysis is necessary in order to support public planners in determining how well a building is performing, in setting credible targets for improving performance or in detecting abnormal energy consumption. In the present work, a novel methodology is proposed to perform a benchmarking analysis particularly suitable for heterogeneous samples of buildings. The methodology is based on the estimation of a statistical model for energy consumption – the Linear Mixed Effects Model –, so as to account for both the fixed effects shared by all individuals within a dataset and the random effects related to particular groups/classes of individuals in the population. The groups of individuals within the population have been classified by resorting to a supervised learning technique. Under this backdrop, a Monte Carlo simulation is worked out to compute the frequency distribution of annual energy consumption and identify a reference value for each group/class of buildings. The benchmarking analysis was tested for a case study of 100 out-patient Healthcare Centres in Northern Italy, finally resulting in 12 different frequency distributions for space and Domestic Hot Water heating energy consumption, one for

  4. Benchmarking set for domestic smart grid management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosman, M.G.C.; Bakker, Vincent; Molderink, Albert; Hurink, Johann L.; Smit, Gerardus Johannes Maria

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we propose a benchmark for domestic smart grid management. It consists of an in-depth description of a domestic smart grid, in which local energy consumers, producers and buffers can be controlled. First, from this description a general benchmark framework is derived, which can be used

  5. Inventory management of spare parts in an energy company

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guajardo, Mario; Roennqvist, Mikael; Halvorsen, Ann Mari; Kallevik, Svein Inge

    2012-06-15

    We address a problem of inventory management of spare parts in the context of a large energy company, producer of oil and gas. Spare parts are critical for assuring operational conditions in offshore platforms. About 200,000 different items are held in several inventory plants. The inventory system implemented at the company corresponds to a min-max system. The control parameters are decided based mainly on the expert judgment of the planners. Also, though the inventory plants can in practice be supplied from each other, the inventory planning is performed separately by the plant planners. This is because of different ownership structures where the studied company has the operative responsibility. The company is pursuing a system in which all planners conform to the same inventory management approach and evaluation, as well as being more cost efficient. Our work focuses on supporting this goal. We apply methods to decide the inventory control parameters for this system under a service level constraint. The methodology we use distinguishes unit-size and lot-size demand cases. We perform computational experiments to find control parameters for a sample of items. After the control parameters are found, we use them to explore the impact of risk pooling among the plants and inaccuracy arising from duplicate item codes.(Author)

  6. Aquatic Life Benchmarks

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Aquatic Life Benchmarks is an EPA-developed set of criteria for freshwater species. These benchmarks are based on toxicity values reviewed by EPA and used in the...

  7. Marine Hydrokinetic Energy Site Identification and Ranking Methodology Part II: Tidal Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilcher, Levi [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Thresher, Robert [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Tinnesand, Heidi [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Marine hydrokinetic energy is a promising and growing piece of the renewable energy sector that offers high predictability and additional energy sources for a diversified energy economy. This report investigates the market opportunities for tidal energy along the U.S. coastlines. It is part one of a two-part investigation into the United States' two largest marine hydrokinetic resources (wave and tidal). Tidal energy technology is still an emerging form of renewable energy for which large-scale grid-connected project costs are currently poorly defined. Ideally, device designers would like to know the resource conditions at economical project sites so they can optimize device designs. On the other hand, project developers need detailed device cost data to identify sites where projects are economical. That is, device design and siting are, to some extent, a coupled problem. This work describes a methodology for identifying likely deployment locations based on a set of criteria that tidal energy experts in industry, academia, and national laboratories agree are likely to be important factors for all technology types. Several factors that will affect tidal project costs and siting have not been considered here -- including permitting constraints, conflicting use, seasonal resource variability, extreme event likelihood, and distance to ports -- because consistent data are unavailable or technology-independent scoring could not be identified. As the industry continues to mature and converge around a subset of device archetypes with well-defined costs, more precise investigations of project siting that include these factors will be possible. For now, these results provide a high-level guide pointing to the regions where markets and resource will one day support commercial tidal energy projects.

  8. Modelling of natural convection flows with large temperature differences: a benchmark problem for low Mach number solvers. Part. 1 reference solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Quere, P.; Weisman, C.; Paillere, H.; Vierendeels, J.; Dick, E.; Becker, R.; Braack, M.; Locke, J.

    2005-01-01

    Heat transfer by natural convection and conduction in enclosures occurs in numerous practical situations including the cooling of nuclear reactors. For large temperature difference, the flow becomes compressible with a strong coupling between the continuity, the momentum and the energy equations through the equation of state, and its properties (viscosity, heat conductivity) also vary with the temperature, making the Boussinesq flow approximation inappropriate and inaccurate. There are very few reference solutions in the literature on non-Boussinesq natural convection flows. We propose here a test case problem which extends the well-known De Vahl Davis differentially heated square cavity problem to the case of large temperature differences for which the Boussinesq approximation is no longer valid. The paper is split in two parts: in this first part, we propose as yet unpublished reference solutions for cases characterized by a non-dimensional temperature difference of 0.6, Ra 10 6 (constant property and variable property cases) and Ra = 10 7 (variable property case). These reference solutions were produced after a first international workshop organized by Cea and LIMSI in January 2000, in which the above authors volunteered to produce accurate numerical solutions from which the present reference solutions could be established. (authors)

  9. Benchmarking multimedia performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandi, Ahmad; Sudharsanan, Subramania I.

    1998-03-01

    With the introduction of faster processors and special instruction sets tailored to multimedia, a number of exciting applications are now feasible on the desktops. Among these is the DVD playback consisting, among other things, of MPEG-2 video and Dolby digital audio or MPEG-2 audio. Other multimedia applications such as video conferencing and speech recognition are also becoming popular on computer systems. In view of this tremendous interest in multimedia, a group of major computer companies have formed, Multimedia Benchmarks Committee as part of Standard Performance Evaluation Corp. to address the performance issues of multimedia applications. The approach is multi-tiered with three tiers of fidelity from minimal to full compliant. In each case the fidelity of the bitstream reconstruction as well as quality of the video or audio output are measured and the system is classified accordingly. At the next step the performance of the system is measured. In many multimedia applications such as the DVD playback the application needs to be run at a specific rate. In this case the measurement of the excess processing power, makes all the difference. All these make a system level, application based, multimedia benchmark very challenging. Several ideas and methodologies for each aspect of the problems will be presented and analyzed.

  10. Benchmarking for Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Norman, Ed.; Lund, Helen, Ed.

    The chapters in this collection explore the concept of benchmarking as it is being used and developed in higher education (HE). Case studies and reviews show how universities in the United Kingdom are using benchmarking to aid in self-regulation and self-improvement. The chapters are: (1) "Introduction to Benchmarking" (Norman Jackson…

  11. Scaled MP3 non-covalent interaction energies agree closely with accurate CCSD(T) benchmark data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitonák, Michal; Neogrády, Pavel; Cerný, Jirí; Grimme, Stefan; Hobza, Pavel

    2009-01-12

    Scaled MP3 interaction energies calculated as a sum of MP2/CBS (complete basis set limit) interaction energies and scaled third-order energy contributions obtained in small or medium size basis sets agree very closely with the estimated CCSD(T)/CBS interaction energies for the 22 H-bonded, dispersion-controlled and mixed non-covalent complexes from the S22 data set. Performance of this so-called MP2.5 (third-order scaling factor of 0.5) method has also been tested for 33 nucleic acid base pairs and two stacked conformers of porphine dimer. In all the test cases, performance of the MP2.5 method was shown to be superior to the scaled spin-component MP2 based methods, e.g. SCS-MP2, SCSN-MP2 and SCS(MI)-MP2. In particular, a very balanced treatment of hydrogen-bonded compared to stacked complexes is achieved with MP2.5. The main advantage of the approach is that it employs only a single empirical parameter and is thus biased by two rigorously defined, asymptotically correct ab-initio methods, MP2 and MP3. The method is proposed as an accurate but computationally feasible alternative to CCSD(T) for the computation of the properties of various kinds of non-covalently bound systems.

  12. Description and exploitation of benchmarks involving {sup 149}Sm, a fission product taking part of the burn up credit in spent fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anno, J.; Poullot, G. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (France). Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire; Fouillaud, P.; Grivot, P. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Valduc, 21 - Is-sur-Tille (France)

    1995-12-31

    Up to now, there was no benchmark to validate the Fission Products (FPs) cross sections in criticality safety calculations. The protection and nuclear safety institute (IPSN) has begun an experimental program on 6 FPs ({sup 103}Rh, {sup 133}Cs, {sup 143}Nd, {sup 149}Sm, {sup 152}Sm, and {sup 155}Gd daughter of {sup 155}Eu) giving alone a decrease of reactivity equal to half the whole FPs in spent fuels (except Xe and I). Here are presented the experiments with the {sup 149}Sm and the results obtained with the APOLLO I-MORET III calculations codes. 11 experiments are carried out in a zircaloy tank of 3.5 1 containing slightly nitric acid solutions of Samarium (96,9% in weight of {sup 149S}m) at 0.1048 -0.2148 - 0.6262 g/l concentrations. It was placed in the middle of arrays of UO{sub 2} rods (4.742 % U5 weight %) at square pitch of 13 mm. The underwater height of the rods is the critical parameter. In addition, 7 experiments were performed with the same apparatus with water and boron proving a good experimental representativeness and a good accuracy of the calculations. As the reactivity worth of the Sm tank is between 2000 and 6000 10{sup -5}, the benchmarks are well representative and the cumulative absorption ratios show that {sup 149}Sm is well qualified under 1 eV. (authors). 8 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

  13. Description and exploitation of benchmarks involving 149Sm, a fission product taking part of the burn up credit in spent fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anno, J.; Poullot, G.

    1995-01-01

    Up to now, there was no benchmark to validate the Fission Products (FPs) cross sections in criticality safety calculations. The protection and nuclear safety institute (IPSN) has begun an experimental program on 6 FPs ( 103 Rh, 133 Cs, 143 Nd, 149 Sm, 152 Sm, and 155 Gd daughter of 155 Eu) giving alone a decrease of reactivity equal to half the whole FPs in spent fuels (except Xe and I). Here are presented the experiments with the 149 Sm and the results obtained with the APOLLO I-MORET III calculations codes. 11 experiments are carried out in a zircaloy tank of 3.5 1 containing slightly nitric acid solutions of Samarium (96,9% in weight of 149S m) at 0.1048 -0.2148 - 0.6262 g/l concentrations. It was placed in the middle of arrays of UO 2 rods (4.742 % U5 weight %) at square pitch of 13 mm. The underwater height of the rods is the critical parameter. In addition, 7 experiments were performed with the same apparatus with water and boron proving a good experimental representativeness and a good accuracy of the calculations. As the reactivity worth of the Sm tank is between 2000 and 6000 10 -5 , the benchmarks are well representative and the cumulative absorption ratios show that 149 Sm is well qualified under 1 eV. (authors). 8 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs

  14. Renewable energy investment and job creation; a cross-sectoral assessment for the Czech Republic with reference to EU benchmarks

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dvořák, Petr; Martinát, S.; Van der Horst, D.; Frantál, Bohumil; Turečková, K.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 69, č. 69 (2017), s. 360-368 ISSN 1364-0321 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA16-04483S Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : renewable energy * green jobs * rural employment * financial incentives Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography OBOR OECD: Environmental sciences (social aspects) Impact factor: 8.050, year: 2016 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1364032116309121

  15. Renewable energy investment and job creation, a cross-sectoral assessment for the Czech Republic with reference to EU benchmarks

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dvořák, Petr; Martinát, S.; Van der Horst, D.; Frantál, Bohumil; Turečková, K.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 69, č. 69 (2017), s. 360-368 ISSN 1364-0321 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA16-04483S Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : renewable energy * green jobs * rural employment * financial incentives Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography OBOR OECD: Environmental sciences (social aspects) Impact factor: 8.050, year: 2016 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1364032116309121

  16. Benchmarking semantic web technology

    CERN Document Server

    García-Castro, R

    2009-01-01

    This book addresses the problem of benchmarking Semantic Web Technologies; first, from a methodological point of view, proposing a general methodology to follow in benchmarking activities over Semantic Web Technologies and, second, from a practical point of view, presenting two international benchmarking activities that involved benchmarking the interoperability of Semantic Web technologies using RDF(S) as the interchange language in one activity and OWL in the other.The book presents in detail how the different resources needed for these interoperability benchmarking activities were defined:

  17. Benchmarking in University Toolbox

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Kuźmicz

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In the face of global competition and rising challenges that higher education institutions (HEIs meet, it is imperative to increase innovativeness and efficiency of their management. Benchmarking can be the appropriate tool to search for a point of reference necessary to assess institution’s competitive position and learn from the best in order to improve. The primary purpose of the paper is to present in-depth analysis of benchmarking application in HEIs worldwide. The study involves indicating premises of using benchmarking in HEIs. It also contains detailed examination of types, approaches and scope of benchmarking initiatives. The thorough insight of benchmarking applications enabled developing classification of benchmarking undertakings in HEIs. The paper includes review of the most recent benchmarking projects and relating them to the classification according to the elaborated criteria (geographical range, scope, type of data, subject, support and continuity. The presented examples were chosen in order to exemplify different approaches to benchmarking in higher education setting. The study was performed on the basis of the published reports from benchmarking projects, scientific literature and the experience of the author from the active participation in benchmarking projects. The paper concludes with recommendations for university managers undertaking benchmarking, derived on the basis of the conducted analysis.

  18. Nuclear energy as a part of national energy strategy of Slovenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stritar, A.

    2002-01-01

    Slovenian National Committee of the World Energy Council has prepared the draft of the National Energy Strategy of Slovenia for next 20 years. Following are the main conclusions of the nuclear part of proposed National Energy Strategy of Slovenia: NPP Krsko should operate until the end of its lifetime; possibilities for the extension of the operating lifetime of NPP Krsko should be investigated; possible new nuclear units of smaller size should be seriously considered after 2010; advantage should be taken of established knowledge basis and infrastructure and the option for construction of additional nuclear unit for production for European electricity market should be kept open; the site for the low and intermediate waste repository should be found as soon as possible, while the spent nuclear fuel should be stored temporarily until some regional solutions are available.(author)

  19. Marine Hydrokinetic Energy Site Identification and Ranking Methodology Part I: Wave Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilcher, Levi [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Thresher, Robert [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Marine hydrokinetic energy is a promising and growing piece of the renewable energy sector that offers high predictability and additional energy sources for a diversified energy economy. This report investigates the market opportunities for wave energy along the U.S. coastlines. It is part one of a two-part investigation into the United State's two largest marine hydrokinetic resources (wave and tidal). Wave energy technology is still an emerging form of renewable energy for which large-scale, grid-connected project costs are currently poorly defined. Ideally, device designers would like to know the resource conditions at economical project sites so they can optimize device designs. On the other hand, project developers need detailed device cost data to identify sites where projects are economical. That is, device design and siting are, to some extent, a coupled problem. This work describes a methodology for identifying likely deployment locations based on a set of criteria that wave energy experts in industry, academia, and national laboratories agree are likely to be important factors for all technology types. This work groups the data for the six criteria into 'locales' that are defined as the smaller of either the local transmission grid or a state boundary. The former applies to U.S. islands (e.g., Hawaii, American Samoa) and rural villages (e.g., in Alaska); the latter applies to states in the contiguous United States. These data are then scored from 0 to 10 according to scoring functions that were developed with input from wave energy industry and academic experts. The scores are aggregated using a simple product method that includes a weighting factor for each criterion. This work presents two weighting scenarios: a long-term scenario that does not include energy price (weighted zero) and a near term scenario that includes energy price. The aggregated scores are then used to produce ranked lists of likely deployment locales. In both scenarios

  20. Development of a California commercial building benchmarking database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinney, Satkartar; Piette, Mary Ann

    2002-01-01

    Building energy benchmarking is a useful starting point for commercial building owners and operators to target energy savings opportunities. There are a number of tools and methods for benchmarking energy use. Benchmarking based on regional data can provides more relevant information for California buildings than national tools such as Energy Star. This paper discusses issues related to benchmarking commercial building energy use and the development of Cal-Arch, a building energy benchmarking database for California. Currently Cal-Arch uses existing survey data from California's Commercial End Use Survey (CEUS), a largely underutilized wealth of information collected by California's major utilities. Doe's Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) is used by a similar tool, Arch, and by a number of other benchmarking tools. Future versions of Arch/Cal-Arch will utilize additional data sources including modeled data and individual buildings to expand the database

  1. Development of a California commercial building benchmarking database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinney, Satkartar; Piette, Mary Ann

    2002-05-17

    Building energy benchmarking is a useful starting point for commercial building owners and operators to target energy savings opportunities. There are a number of tools and methods for benchmarking energy use. Benchmarking based on regional data can provides more relevant information for California buildings than national tools such as Energy Star. This paper discusses issues related to benchmarking commercial building energy use and the development of Cal-Arch, a building energy benchmarking database for California. Currently Cal-Arch uses existing survey data from California's Commercial End Use Survey (CEUS), a largely underutilized wealth of information collected by California's major utilities. Doe's Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) is used by a similar tool, Arch, and by a number of other benchmarking tools. Future versions of Arch/Cal-Arch will utilize additional data sources including modeled data and individual buildings to expand the database.

  2. Radiation Detection Computational Benchmark Scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaver, Mark W.; Casella, Andrew M.; Wittman, Richard S.; McDonald, Ben S.

    2013-09-24

    Modeling forms an important component of radiation detection development, allowing for testing of new detector designs, evaluation of existing equipment against a wide variety of potential threat sources, and assessing operation performance of radiation detection systems. This can, however, result in large and complex scenarios which are time consuming to model. A variety of approaches to radiation transport modeling exist with complementary strengths and weaknesses for different problems. This variety of approaches, and the development of promising new tools (such as ORNL’s ADVANTG) which combine benefits of multiple approaches, illustrates the need for a means of evaluating or comparing different techniques for radiation detection problems. This report presents a set of 9 benchmark problems for comparing different types of radiation transport calculations, identifying appropriate tools for classes of problems, and testing and guiding the development of new methods. The benchmarks were drawn primarily from existing or previous calculations with a preference for scenarios which include experimental data, or otherwise have results with a high level of confidence, are non-sensitive, and represent problem sets of interest to NA-22. From a technical perspective, the benchmarks were chosen to span a range of difficulty and to include gamma transport, neutron transport, or both and represent different important physical processes and a range of sensitivity to angular or energy fidelity. Following benchmark identification, existing information about geometry, measurements, and previous calculations were assembled. Monte Carlo results (MCNP decks) were reviewed or created and re-run in order to attain accurate computational times and to verify agreement with experimental data, when present. Benchmark information was then conveyed to ORNL in order to guide testing and development of hybrid calculations. The results of those ADVANTG calculations were then sent to PNNL for

  3. Performance of Generating Plant: Managing the Changes. Part 3: Renewable energy plant: reports on wind, photovoltaics and biomas energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manoha, Bruno; Cohen, Martin [Electricite de France (France)

    2008-05-15

    The WEC Committee on the Performance of Generating Plant (PGP) has been collecting and analysing power plant performance statistics worldwide for more than 30 years and has produced regular reports, which include examples of advanced techniques and methods for improving power plant performance through benchmarking. A series of reports from the various working groups was issued in 2008. This reference presents the results of Working Group 3 (WG3). WG3 will promote the introduction of performance indicators for renewable energy generating plant (wind, geothermal, solar and biomass) developed by the Committee. It will also assess selected transitional technology issues and environmental factors related to non-conventional technologies. The WG3 report includes sections on Wind Energy Today, Photovoltaics Energy Today, Biomass Electricity Today and appendices.

  4. Stimulation of renewable energy. Part 1, Inefficient top electricity. Part 2, Appreciation of sustainable heat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruijgrok, W.

    1999-09-01

    The Third Energy Policy Memorandum and Action Programme 'The Advance of Sustainable Energy' depicts the objectives for sustainable energy consumption in the Netherlands. A major condition for achieving a successful market introduction of these sources of energy is a profitable operation. This study looks at the question of how profitable the various energy sources are at the moment what the contribution to this is of the existing package of stimulation measures provided by the Dutch government, and what improvements are possible. 20 refs

  5. Development of bench marking services for energy efficiency and CO{sub 2} emissions in forest industry; Metsaeteollisuuden energiatehokkuutta ja CO{sub 2}-paeaestoejae koskevien benchmarking-palvelujen kehittaeminen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saarentaus, A. [Poeyry Forest Industry Consulting Oy, Vantaa (Finland)

    2006-12-19

    The goal of the project is to develop energy-efficiency and CO{sub 2} missions related benchmarking services for pulp and paper and mechanical wood working industry. The services make it possible to 1) position individual production plants based on their energy-efficiency and CO{sub 2} missions, 2) offer process phase level information on energy-efficient and low mission process technology, 3) analyse changes in the competitive position both at production plant as well as country level due to changes in CO{sub 2}-allocation and energy procurement. (orig.)

  6. An integrated model of tritium transport and corrosion in Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactors (FHRs) – Part I: Theory and benchmarking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stempien, John D., E-mail: john.stempien@inl.gov; Ballinger, Ronald G., E-mail: hvymet@mit.edu; Forsberg, Charles W., E-mail: cforsber@mit.edu

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • A model was developed for use with FHRs and benchmarked with experimental data. • Model results match results of tritium diffusion experiments. • Corrosion simulations show reasonable agreement with molten salt loop experiments. • This is the only existing model of tritium transport and corrosion in FHRs. • Model enables proposing and evaluating tritium control options in FHRs. - Abstract: The Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactor (FHR) is a pebble bed nuclear reactor concept cooled by a liquid fluoride salt known as “flibe” ({sup 7}LiF-BeF{sub 2}). A model of TRITium Diffusion EvolutioN and Transport (TRIDENT) was developed for use with FHRs and benchmarked with experimental data. TRIDENT is the first model to integrate the effects of tritium production in the salt via neutron transmutation, with the effects of the chemical redox potential, tritium mass transfer, tritium diffusion through pipe walls, tritium uptake by graphite, selective chromium attack by tritium fluoride, and corrosion product mass transfer. While data from a forced-convection polythermal loop of molten salt containing tritium did not exist for comparison, TRIDENT calculations were compared to data from static salt diffusion tests in flibe and flinak (0.465LiF-0.115NaF-0.42KF) salts. In each case, TRIDENT matched the transient and steady-state behavior of these tritium diffusion experiments. The corrosion model in TRIDENT was compared against the natural convection flow-loop experiments at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) from the 1960s and early 1970s which used Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) fuel-salt containing UF{sub 4}. Despite the lack of data required by TRIDENT for modeling the loops, some reasonable results were obtained. The TRIDENT corrosion rates follow the experimentally observed dependence on the square root of the product of the chromium solid-state diffusion coefficient with time. Additionally the TRIDENT model predicts mass

  7. Benchmarking monthly homogenization algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venema, V. K. C.; Mestre, O.; Aguilar, E.; Auer, I.; Guijarro, J. A.; Domonkos, P.; Vertacnik, G.; Szentimrey, T.; Stepanek, P.; Zahradnicek, P.; Viarre, J.; Müller-Westermeier, G.; Lakatos, M.; Williams, C. N.; Menne, M.; Lindau, R.; Rasol, D.; Rustemeier, E.; Kolokythas, K.; Marinova, T.; Andresen, L.; Acquaotta, F.; Fratianni, S.; Cheval, S.; Klancar, M.; Brunetti, M.; Gruber, C.; Prohom Duran, M.; Likso, T.; Esteban, P.; Brandsma, T.

    2011-08-01

    The COST (European Cooperation in Science and Technology) Action ES0601: Advances in homogenization methods of climate series: an integrated approach (HOME) has executed a blind intercomparison and validation study for monthly homogenization algorithms. Time series of monthly temperature and precipitation were evaluated because of their importance for climate studies and because they represent two important types of statistics (additive and multiplicative). The algorithms were validated against a realistic benchmark dataset. The benchmark contains real inhomogeneous data as well as simulated data with inserted inhomogeneities. Random break-type inhomogeneities were added to the simulated datasets modeled as a Poisson process with normally distributed breakpoint sizes. To approximate real world conditions, breaks were introduced that occur simultaneously in multiple station series within a simulated network of station data. The simulated time series also contained outliers, missing data periods and local station trends. Further, a stochastic nonlinear global (network-wide) trend was added. Participants provided 25 separate homogenized contributions as part of the blind study as well as 22 additional solutions submitted after the details of the imposed inhomogeneities were revealed. These homogenized datasets were assessed by a number of performance metrics including (i) the centered root mean square error relative to the true homogeneous value at various averaging scales, (ii) the error in linear trend estimates and (iii) traditional contingency skill scores. The metrics were computed both using the individual station series as well as the network average regional series. The performance of the contributions depends significantly on the error metric considered. Contingency scores by themselves are not very informative. Although relative homogenization algorithms typically improve the homogeneity of temperature data, only the best ones improve precipitation data

  8. A Three-Part Electricity Price Mechanism for Photovoltaic-Battery Energy Storage Power Plants Considering the Power Quality and Ancillary Service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yajing Gao

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available To solve the problem of solar abandoning, which is accompanied by the rapid development of photovoltaic (PV power generation, a demonstration of a photovoltaic-battery energy storage system (PV-BESS power plant has been constructed in Qinghai province in China. However, it is difficult for the PV-BESS power plant to survive and develop with the current electricity price mechanism and subsidy policy. In this paper, a three-part electricity price mechanism is proposed based on a deep analysis of the construction and operation costs and economic income. The on-grid electricity price is divided into three parts: the capacity price, graded electricity price, and ancillary service price. First, to ensure that the investment of the PV-BESS power plant would achieve the industry benchmark income, the capacity price and benchmark electricity price are calculated using the discounted cash flow method. Then, the graded electricity price is calculated according to the grade of the quality of grid-connected power. Finally, the ancillary service price is calculated based on the graded electricity price and ancillary service compensation. The case studies verify the validity of the three-part electricity price mechanism. The verification shows that the three-part electricity price mechanism can help PV-BESS power plants to obtain good economic returns, which can promote the development of PV-BESS power plants.

  9. High energy physics studies. Progress report. Part I. Experimental program. Part II. Theoretical program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romanowski, T.A.; Tanaka, K.; Wada, W.W.

    1978-01-01

    Experimental Program: assembly of an experiment as Fermilab E-531 to measure decay lifetimes, with tagged emulsion of charmed particles produced by high energy neutrinos was finished, and data taking now is in progress. An experiment to measure prompt neutrino production at Fermilab, E-613, was approved and detailed design of it is continuing. Search for parity violation in scattering of polarized protons, an experiment E-446-ZGS at ANL, was performed with the sensitivity of 10 -6 for detection of that process and yielded null results. Another run with improved sensitivity of 10 -7 is in preparation. Data analysis of the neutrino experiment E-310 at Fermilab will continue. Trimuon events, a new discovery, were identified in those data. Analysis of data on meson production from experiments performed at the ZGS--ANL, E-397, E-420 and E-428, with charged and neutral spectrometer will continue. A new relatively broad resonance (T approx. 70 MeV) with quantum numbers IJ/sup P/ = 00 -1 was discovered in the data from E-397. Analysis of beta decay of polarized Σ - hyperons is in progress. Participation in the design of the experimental areas for the Isabelle colliding proton beam accelerator will continue. Theoretical Program: topics of current interest in particle theory which will be investigated in the coming year are: the instanton-anti-instanton QCD gauge fields, discrete symmetries which may determine quark masses in the SU(2) x U(1) model, calculation of charmed meson production in e + e - collisions and formation of gluon jets, Higgs boson production in pp collisions, calculation of Higgs boson mass in terms of vector boson mass, study of Lagrangians with gauge and Higgs scalar fields, investigation of Faddeev--Popov determinants as related to quantum chromodynamics, a study of quantum flavor dynamics and anomalies in the axial vector Ward identity and a study of super symmetry as a part of a realistic model of leptonic interactions

  10. Benchmarking foreign electronics technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bostian, C.W.; Hodges, D.A.; Leachman, R.C.; Sheridan, T.B.; Tsang, W.T.; White, R.M.

    1994-12-01

    This report has been drafted in response to a request from the Japanese Technology Evaluation Center`s (JTEC) Panel on Benchmarking Select Technologies. Since April 1991, the Competitive Semiconductor Manufacturing (CSM) Program at the University of California at Berkeley has been engaged in a detailed study of quality, productivity, and competitiveness in semiconductor manufacturing worldwide. The program is a joint activity of the College of Engineering, the Haas School of Business, and the Berkeley Roundtable on the International Economy, under sponsorship of the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, and with the cooperation of semiconductor producers from Asia, Europe and the United States. Professors David A. Hodges and Robert C. Leachman are the project`s Co-Directors. The present report for JTEC is primarily based on data and analysis drawn from that continuing program. The CSM program is being conducted by faculty, graduate students and research staff from UC Berkeley`s Schools of Engineering and Business, and Department of Economics. Many of the participating firms are represented on the program`s Industry Advisory Board. The Board played an important role in defining the research agenda. A pilot study was conducted in 1991 with the cooperation of three semiconductor plants. The research plan and survey documents were thereby refined. The main phase of the CSM benchmarking study began in mid-1992 and will continue at least through 1997. reports are presented on the manufacture of integrated circuits; data storage; wireless technology; human-machine interfaces; and optoelectronics. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  11. Renewable energy utilization in 3 european cities. Part 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-07-01

    Energy production based on fossil fuels produces CO2, SO2 and NOx, which are harmful to the environment. It is agreed, both nationally and internationally, that it is necessary to considerably reduce the energy consumption. The difference between different European countries politically, financially, culturally, and socially needs to be acknowledged when energy initiatives are considered for implementation on a local as well as an international scale. This was the basis for the initiation of the project `Renewable Energy Utilization in 3 European Cities`. Three very different cities with different problems and thus different interests got together and joined efforts to develop action plans to increase renewable energy use to reduce the burden on the environment from energy consumption in the urban and regional areas. The work has been undertaken by the working group presented in appendix 3. (EG) ALTENER. 25 refs.

  12. The role of benchmarking for yardstick competition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, Phil; Jenkins, Cloda; Riechmann, Christoph

    2005-01-01

    With the increasing interest in yardstick regulation, there is a need to understand the most appropriate method for realigning tariffs at the outset. Benchmarking is the tool used for such realignment and is therefore a necessary first-step in the implementation of yardstick competition. A number of concerns have been raised about the application of benchmarking, making some practitioners reluctant to move towards yardstick based regimes. We assess five of the key concerns often discussed and find that, in general, these are not as great as perceived. The assessment is based on economic principles and experiences with applying benchmarking to regulated sectors, e.g. in the electricity and water industries in the UK, The Netherlands, Austria and Germany in recent years. The aim is to demonstrate that clarity on the role of benchmarking reduces the concern about its application in different regulatory regimes. We find that benchmarking can be used in regulatory settlements, although the range of possible benchmarking approaches that are appropriate will be small for any individual regulatory question. Benchmarking is feasible as total cost measures and environmental factors are better defined in practice than is commonly appreciated and collusion is unlikely to occur in environments with more than 2 or 3 firms (where shareholders have a role in monitoring and rewarding performance). Furthermore, any concern about companies under-recovering costs is a matter to be determined through the regulatory settlement and does not affect the case for using benchmarking as part of that settlement. (author)

  13. Investible benchmarks & hedge fund liquidity

    OpenAIRE

    Freed, Marc S; McMillan, Ben

    2011-01-01

    A lack of commonly accepted benchmarks for hedge fund performance has permitted hedge fund managers to attribute to skill returns that may actually accrue from market risk factors and illiquidity. Recent innovations in hedge fund replication permits us to estimate the extent of this misattribution. Using an option-based model, we find evidence that the value of liquidity options that investors implicitly grant managers when they invest may account for part or even all hedge fund returns. C...

  14. Discussion of OECD LWR Uncertainty Analysis in Modelling Benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, K.; Avramova, M.; Royer, E.; Gillford, J.

    2013-01-01

    The demand for best estimate calculations in nuclear reactor design and safety evaluations has increased in recent years. Uncertainty quantification has been highlighted as part of the best estimate calculations. The modelling aspects of uncertainty and sensitivity analysis are to be further developed and validated on scientific grounds in support of their performance and application to multi-physics reactor simulations. The Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) / Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Nuclear Science Committee (NSC) has endorsed the creation of an Expert Group on Uncertainty Analysis in Modelling (EGUAM). Within the framework of activities of EGUAM/NSC the OECD/NEA initiated the Benchmark for Uncertainty Analysis in Modelling for Design, Operation, and Safety Analysis of Light Water Reactor (OECD LWR UAM benchmark). The general objective of the benchmark is to propagate the predictive uncertainties of code results through complex coupled multi-physics and multi-scale simulations. The benchmark is divided into three phases with Phase I highlighting the uncertainty propagation in stand-alone neutronics calculations, while Phase II and III are focused on uncertainty analysis of reactor core and system respectively. This paper discusses the progress made in Phase I calculations, the Specifications for Phase II and the incoming challenges in defining Phase 3 exercises. The challenges of applying uncertainty quantification to complex code systems, in particular the time-dependent coupled physics models are the large computational burden and the utilization of non-linear models (expected due to the physics coupling). (authors)

  15. Integrated visions (part II): Envisioning Sustainable Energy Landscapes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stremke, S.; Koh, J.; Neven, C.T.; Boekel, A.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Climate change and resource depletion are driving the transition to renewable energy sources. Both the supply of renewables and the demand for energy are influenced by the physical environment and therefore concern spatial planning and landscape design. Envisioning the longterm development

  16. Energy and ecology. Revision of opinions and strategy. Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sala, A.

    1993-01-01

    The pollution of air by dust sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides and carbon dioxide emitted from Polish power plants fuelled by coal is discussed and some technical and economical aspects of environment protection are presented. The influence of nuclear power plants and renewable energy sources on the environment is also considered. Some conclusions important for energy policy are given. 39 refs, 21 figs, 17 tabs

  17. Republic of Macedonia. Regular Review 2006. Part 1. Trends in energy and energy efficiency policies, instruments and actors. Part 2. Indicators on Energy, Energy Efficiency, Economy and Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The Republic of Macedonia has been an independent country since 1991. It is also a country with its economy in transition. Against this background, efforts dedicated towards implementing the provisions of the Energy Charter Treaty (ECT) and of the Protocol on Energy Efficiency and Related Environmental Aspects (PEEREA) have to be noted. The country ratified the ECT and PEEREA in September 1998. The country is not rich in natural resources, with the exception of lignite and hydro. Fuel diversification and reducing dependence on imported resources are strong reasons for promoting energy savings. Increasing the penetration of natural gas and improving the interconnection with neighbouring countries are high priorities. The average total primary consumption of energy in the Republic of Macedonia is around 2.6 Mtoe annually. Within the primary energy supply, the share of crude oil is 30%, of coal 51%, of natural gas 3%, and the remaining around 15% are hydro energy, fire-wood and geothermal energy. The total consumption of energy is provided by around 60% of domestic production and 40% from import. The basic energy infrastructure in the Republic of Macedonia includes the following: electricity power system with 1524 MW installed capacity, lignite coal mines, gas pipeline system with annual capacity of 800 million m 3 , an oil refinery, an oil pipeline, five district heating systems with total capacity of 600 MW and small geothermal systems. The Ministry of Economy is the responsible government body for the energy issues. The regulation of the energy market is performed by the independent regulatory body, the Energy Regulatory Commission of the Republic of Macedonia. In 1999 the Government adopted a Programme on Efficient Energy Use in the Republic of Macedonia until 2020. The preparation of this programme was also a legal obligation stemming from the Energy Law adopted in 1997. This Programme includes measures for increasing the energy efficiency, among which

  18. Levy-free part in energy tax is not wanted

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilijamse, W.

    1995-01-01

    The Dutch government proposed to implement an energy levy for small-scale consumers in 1996. The yields will be reimbursed by means of a reduction of the tax burden. By applying a levy-free tax allowance the tax reduction can be limited. However, it appears that this allowance does not work: it reduces the energy saving impact of the energy levy, because it does not stimulate investments in energy saving housing construction and energy saving heat supply. It also interferes with a just compensation of income. It is recommended to cancel the levy-free tax allowance and to realize compensation by raising the tax free allowance in the income tax. 2 figs., 1 tab., 6 refs

  19. Economic energy distribution and consumption in a microgrid Part 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tahersima, Fatemeh; Stoustrup, Jakob; Andersen, Palle

    2014-01-01

    Energy management of a small scale electrical microgrid is investigated. The microgrid comprises residential houses with local renewable generation, consumption and storage units. The microgrid has the possibility of connection to the electricity grid as well to compensate energy decit of local...... power producers. The nal objective is to full the microgrid's energy demands mainly from the local electricity producers. The other objective is to manage power consumption such that the consumption cost is minimum for individual households. In this study, a hierarchical controller composed of three...... levels is proposed. Each layer from bottom to top focus on individual energy consuming units, individual buildings, and the microgrid respectively. At the middle layer, a model predictive controller is formulated to schedule the building's energy consumption using potential load exibilities. The top...

  20. An investigation of routes to cancer diagnosis in 10 international jurisdictions, as part of the International Cancer Benchmarking Partnership: survey development and implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, David; Vedsted, Peter; Anandan, Chantelle; Zalounina, Alina; Fourkala, Evangelia Ourania; Desai, Rakshit; Liston, William; Jensen, Henry; Barisic, Andriana; Gavin, Anna; Grunfeld, Eva; Lambe, Mats; Law, Rebecca-Jane; Malmberg, Martin; Neal, Richard D; Kalsi, Jatinderpal; Turner, Donna; White, Victoria; Bomb, Martine

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This paper describes the methods used in the International Cancer Benchmarking Partnership Module 4 Survey (ICBPM4) which examines time intervals and routes to cancer diagnosis in 10 jurisdictions. We present the study design with defining and measuring time intervals, identifying patients with cancer, questionnaire development, data management and analyses. Design and setting Recruitment of participants to the ICBPM4 survey is based on cancer registries in each jurisdiction. Questionnaires draw on previous instruments and have been through a process of cognitive testing and piloting in three jurisdictions followed by standardised translation and adaptation. Data analysis focuses on comparing differences in time intervals and routes to diagnosis in the jurisdictions. Participants Our target is 200 patients with symptomatic breast, lung, colorectal and ovarian cancer in each jurisdiction. Patients are approached directly or via their primary care physician (PCP). Patients’ PCPs and cancer treatment specialists (CTSs) are surveyed, and ‘data rules’ are applied to combine and reconcile conflicting information. Where CTS information is unavailable, audit information is sought from treatment records and databases. Main outcomes Reliability testing of the patient questionnaire showed that agreement was complete (κ=1) in four items and substantial (κ=0.8, 95% CI 0.333 to 1) in one item. The identification of eligible patients is sufficient to meet the targets for breast, lung and colorectal cancer. Initial patient and PCP survey response rates from the UK and Sweden are comparable with similar published surveys. Data collection was completed in early 2016 for all cancer types. Conclusion An international questionnaire-based survey of patients with cancer, PCPs and CTSs has been developed and launched in 10 jurisdictions. ICBPM4 will help to further understand international differences in cancer survival by comparing time intervals and routes to cancer

  1. Wind energy assessment for the coastal part of Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khadem, S.K.; Ghosh, H.R.; Kaiser, S.; Aditya, S.K.

    2005-01-01

    St Martin's is one of the most beautiful Tourist Islands in Bangladesh where grid connected electric system for the inhabitants will not be possible to establish even in future. Diesel, Kerosene and wood are the main fuels for fulfilling the energy demand. Solar and Wind resources are the hybrid options for the Island. HOMER, a software for optimization of renewable based hybrid systems, has been used to find out the best technically viable renewable based energy efficient system for different numbers of households -1, 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50. It shows that per unit (KWh) cost of energy varies from 48 to 19 taka. (author)

  2. Report on broad reconsiderations. Part 1. Energy and Climate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-04-01

    In twenty policy areas various working groups have studied variants that can lead to a 20% budget cut in the government budgets of the Netherlands, which must be realized in 2015. The aim of the reconsiderations is to use less government means to realize the same results, or even better results if possible. The broad reconsideration in the field of energy and climate focuses on the expenditure for renewable energy and energy efficiency, mitigating (inter)national climate policy and fiscal benefits. This report addresses six policy variants. [nl

  3. SU-E-T-53: Benchmarking a Monte Carlo Model for Patient Plane Leakage Calculations of Low Energy 6MV Unique Linacs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Constantin, M; Sawkey, D; Johnsen, S; Hsu, H [Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To validate the physics parameters of a Monte Carlo model for patient plane leakage calculations on the 6MV Unique linac by comparing the simulations against IEC patient plane leakage measurements. The benchmarked model can further be used for shielding design optimization, to predict leakage in the proximity of intended treatment fields, reduce the system weight and cost, and improve components reliability. Methods: The treatment head geometry of the Unique linac was simulated in Geant4 (v9.4.p02 with “Opt3” standard electromagnetic physics list) based on CAD drawings of all collimation and shielding components projected from the target to the area within 2m from isocenter. A 4×4m2 scorer was inserted 1m from the target in the patient plane and multiple phase space files were recorded by performing a 40-node computing cluster simulation on the EC2 cloud. The photon energy fluence was calculated relative to the value at isocenter for a 10×10cm2 field using 10×10mm2 bins. Tungsten blocks were parked accordingly to represent MLC120. The secondary particle contamination to patient plane was eliminated by “killing” those particles prior to the primary collimator entrance using a “kill-plane”, which represented the upper head shielding components not being modeled. Both IEC patient-plane leakage and X/Y-jaws transmission were simulated. Results: The contribution of photons to energy fluence was 0.064% on average, in excellent agreement with the experimental data available at 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5m from isocenter, characterized by an average leakage of 0.045% and a maximum leakage of 0.085%. X- and Y-jaws transmissions of 0.43% and 0.44% were found in good agreement with measurements of 0.48% and 0.43%, respectively. Conclusion: A Geant4 model based on energy fluence calculations for the 6MV Unique linac was created and validated using IEC patient plane leakage measurements. The “kill-plane” has effectively eliminated electron contamination to

  4. Benchmarking af kommunernes sagsbehandling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amilon, Anna

    Fra 2007 skal Ankestyrelsen gennemføre benchmarking af kommuernes sagsbehandlingskvalitet. Formålet med benchmarkingen er at udvikle praksisundersøgelsernes design med henblik på en bedre opfølgning og at forbedre kommunernes sagsbehandling. Dette arbejdspapir diskuterer metoder for benchmarking...

  5. Internet based benchmarking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogetoft, Peter; Nielsen, Kurt

    2005-01-01

    We discuss the design of interactive, internet based benchmarking using parametric (statistical) as well as nonparametric (DEA) models. The user receives benchmarks and improvement potentials. The user is also given the possibility to search different efficiency frontiers and hereby to explore...

  6. The Drill Down Benchmark

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.A. Boncz (Peter); T. Rühl (Tim); F. Kwakkel

    1998-01-01

    textabstractData Mining places specific requirements on DBMS query performance that cannot be evaluated satisfactorily using existing OLAP benchmarks. The DD Benchmark - defined here - provides a practical case and yardstick to explore how well a DBMS is able to support Data Mining applications. It

  7. Benchmarking Tool Kit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canadian Health Libraries Association.

    Nine Canadian health libraries participated in a pilot test of the Benchmarking Tool Kit between January and April, 1998. Although the Tool Kit was designed specifically for health libraries, the content and approach are useful to other types of libraries as well. Used to its full potential, benchmarking can provide a common measuring stick to…

  8. Progress in passive solar energy systems. Volume 8. Part 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayes, J.; Andrejko, D.A.

    1983-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference sponsored by the US DOE, the Solar Energy Research Institute, SolarVision, Inc., and the Southern California Solar Energy Society. The topics considered at the conference included sizing solar energy systems for agricultural applications, a farm scale ethanol production plant, the EEC wind energy RandD program, the passive solar performance assessment of an earth-sheltered house, the ARCO 1 MW photovoltaic power plant, the performance of a dendritic web photovoltaic module, second generation point focused concentrators, linear fresnel lens concentrating photovoltaic collectors, photovoltaic conversion efficiency, amorphous silicon thin film solar cells, a photovoltaic system for a shopping center, photovoltaic power generation for the utility industry, spectral solar radiation, and the analysis of insolation data.

  9. How Activists Use Benchmarks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seabrooke, Leonard; Wigan, Duncan

    2015-01-01

    Non-governmental organisations use benchmarks as a form of symbolic violence to place political pressure on firms, states, and international organisations. The development of benchmarks requires three elements: (1) salience, that the community of concern is aware of the issue and views...... are put to the test. The first is a reformist benchmarking cycle where organisations defer to experts to create a benchmark that conforms with the broader system of politico-economic norms. The second is a revolutionary benchmarking cycle driven by expert-activists that seek to contest strong vested...... interests and challenge established politico-economic norms. Differentiating these cycles provides insights into how activists work through organisations and with expert networks, as well as how campaigns on complex economic issues can be mounted and sustained....

  10. EGS4 benchmark program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasu, Y.; Hirayama, H.; Namito, Y.; Yashiro, S.

    1995-01-01

    This paper proposes EGS4 Benchmark Suite which consists of three programs called UCSAMPL4, UCSAMPL4I and XYZDOS. This paper also evaluates optimization methods of recent RISC/UNIX systems, such as IBM, HP, DEC, Hitachi and Fujitsu, for the benchmark suite. When particular compiler option and math library were included in the evaluation process, system performed significantly better. Observed performance of some of the RISC/UNIX systems were beyond some so-called Mainframes of IBM, Hitachi or Fujitsu. The computer performance of EGS4 Code System on an HP9000/735 (99MHz) was defined to be the unit of EGS4 Unit. The EGS4 Benchmark Suite also run on various PCs such as Pentiums, i486 and DEC alpha and so forth. The performance of recent fast PCs reaches that of recent RISC/UNIX systems. The benchmark programs have been evaluated with correlation of industry benchmark programs, namely, SPECmark. (author)

  11. Vver-1000 Mox core computational benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The NEA Nuclear Science Committee has established an Expert Group that deals with the status and trends of reactor physics, fuel performance and fuel cycle issues related to disposing of weapons-grade plutonium in mixed-oxide fuel. The objectives of the group are to provide NEA member countries with up-to-date information on, and to develop consensus regarding, core and fuel cycle issues associated with burning weapons-grade plutonium in thermal water reactors (PWR, BWR, VVER-1000, CANDU) and fast reactors (BN-600). These issues concern core physics, fuel performance and reliability, and the capability and flexibility of thermal water reactors and fast reactors to dispose of weapons-grade plutonium in standard fuel cycles. The activities of the NEA Expert Group on Reactor-based Plutonium Disposition are carried out in close co-operation (jointly, in most cases) with the NEA Working Party on Scientific Issues in Reactor Systems (WPRS). A prominent part of these activities include benchmark studies. At the time of preparation of this report, the following benchmarks were completed or in progress: VENUS-2 MOX Core Benchmarks: carried out jointly with the WPRS (formerly the WPPR) (completed); VVER-1000 LEU and MOX Benchmark (completed); KRITZ-2 Benchmarks: carried out jointly with the WPRS (formerly the WPPR) (completed); Hollow and Solid MOX Fuel Behaviour Benchmark (completed); PRIMO MOX Fuel Performance Benchmark (ongoing); VENUS-2 MOX-fuelled Reactor Dosimetry Calculation (ongoing); VVER-1000 In-core Self-powered Neutron Detector Calculational Benchmark (started); MOX Fuel Rod Behaviour in Fast Power Pulse Conditions (started); Benchmark on the VENUS Plutonium Recycling Experiments Configuration 7 (started). This report describes the detailed results of the benchmark investigating the physics of a whole VVER-1000 reactor core using two-thirds low-enriched uranium (LEU) and one-third MOX fuel. It contributes to the computer code certification process and to the

  12. A Seafloor Benchmark for 3-dimensional Geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwell, C. D.; Webb, S. C.; Nooner, S. L.

    2014-12-01

    We have developed an inexpensive, permanent seafloor benchmark to increase the longevity of seafloor geodetic measurements. The benchmark provides a physical tie to the sea floor lasting for decades (perhaps longer) on which geodetic sensors can be repeatedly placed and removed with millimeter resolution. Global coordinates estimated with seafloor geodetic techniques will remain attached to the benchmark allowing for the interchange of sensors as they fail or become obsolete, or for the sensors to be removed and used elsewhere, all the while maintaining a coherent series of positions referenced to the benchmark. The benchmark has been designed to free fall from the sea surface with transponders attached. The transponder can be recalled via an acoustic command sent from the surface to release from the benchmark and freely float to the sea surface for recovery. The duration of the sensor attachment to the benchmark will last from a few days to a few years depending on the specific needs of the experiment. The recovered sensors are then available to be reused at other locations, or again at the same site in the future. Three pins on the sensor frame mate precisely and unambiguously with three grooves on the benchmark. To reoccupy a benchmark a Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) uses its manipulator arm to place the sensor pins into the benchmark grooves. In June 2014 we deployed four benchmarks offshore central Oregon. We used the ROV Jason to successfully demonstrate the removal and replacement of packages onto the benchmark. We will show the benchmark design and its operational capabilities. Presently models of megathrust slip within the Cascadia Subduction Zone (CSZ) are mostly constrained by the sub-aerial GPS vectors from the Plate Boundary Observatory, a part of Earthscope. More long-lived seafloor geodetic measures are needed to better understand the earthquake and tsunami risk associated with a large rupture of the thrust fault within the Cascadia subduction zone

  13. Verification and validation benchmarks.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oberkampf, William Louis; Trucano, Timothy Guy

    2007-02-01

    Verification and validation (V&V) are the primary means to assess the accuracy and reliability of computational simulations. V&V methods and procedures have fundamentally improved the credibility of simulations in several high-consequence fields, such as nuclear reactor safety, underground nuclear waste storage, and nuclear weapon safety. Although the terminology is not uniform across engineering disciplines, code verification deals with assessing the reliability of the software coding, and solution verification deals with assessing the numerical accuracy of the solution to a computational model. Validation addresses the physics modeling accuracy of a computational simulation by comparing the computational results with experimental data. Code verification benchmarks and validation benchmarks have been constructed for a number of years in every field of computational simulation. However, no comprehensive guidelines have been proposed for the construction and use of V&V benchmarks. For example, the field of nuclear reactor safety has not focused on code verification benchmarks, but it has placed great emphasis on developing validation benchmarks. Many of these validation benchmarks are closely related to the operations of actual reactors at near-safety-critical conditions, as opposed to being more fundamental-physics benchmarks. This paper presents recommendations for the effective design and use of code verification benchmarks based on manufactured solutions, classical analytical solutions, and highly accurate numerical solutions. In addition, this paper presents recommendations for the design and use of validation benchmarks, highlighting the careful design of building-block experiments, the estimation of experimental measurement uncertainty for both inputs and outputs to the code, validation metrics, and the role of model calibration in validation. It is argued that the understanding of predictive capability of a computational model is built on the level of

  14. Verification and validation benchmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oberkampf, William Louis; Trucano, Timothy Guy

    2007-01-01

    Verification and validation (V and V) are the primary means to assess the accuracy and reliability of computational simulations. V and V methods and procedures have fundamentally improved the credibility of simulations in several high-consequence fields, such as nuclear reactor safety, underground nuclear waste storage, and nuclear weapon safety. Although the terminology is not uniform across engineering disciplines, code verification deals with assessing the reliability of the software coding, and solution verification deals with assessing the numerical accuracy of the solution to a computational model. Validation addresses the physics modeling accuracy of a computational simulation by comparing the computational results with experimental data. Code verification benchmarks and validation benchmarks have been constructed for a number of years in every field of computational simulation. However, no comprehensive guidelines have been proposed for the construction and use of V and V benchmarks. For example, the field of nuclear reactor safety has not focused on code verification benchmarks, but it has placed great emphasis on developing validation benchmarks. Many of these validation benchmarks are closely related to the operations of actual reactors at near-safety-critical conditions, as opposed to being more fundamental-physics benchmarks. This paper presents recommendations for the effective design and use of code verification benchmarks based on manufactured solutions, classical analytical solutions, and highly accurate numerical solutions. In addition, this paper presents recommendations for the design and use of validation benchmarks, highlighting the careful design of building-block experiments, the estimation of experimental measurement uncertainty for both inputs and outputs to the code, validation metrics, and the role of model calibration in validation. It is argued that the understanding of predictive capability of a computational model is built on the

  15. Verification and validation benchmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oberkampf, William L.; Trucano, Timothy G.

    2008-01-01

    Verification and validation (V and V) are the primary means to assess the accuracy and reliability of computational simulations. V and V methods and procedures have fundamentally improved the credibility of simulations in several high-consequence fields, such as nuclear reactor safety, underground nuclear waste storage, and nuclear weapon safety. Although the terminology is not uniform across engineering disciplines, code verification deals with assessing the reliability of the software coding, and solution verification deals with assessing the numerical accuracy of the solution to a computational model. Validation addresses the physics modeling accuracy of a computational simulation by comparing the computational results with experimental data. Code verification benchmarks and validation benchmarks have been constructed for a number of years in every field of computational simulation. However, no comprehensive guidelines have been proposed for the construction and use of V and V benchmarks. For example, the field of nuclear reactor safety has not focused on code verification benchmarks, but it has placed great emphasis on developing validation benchmarks. Many of these validation benchmarks are closely related to the operations of actual reactors at near-safety-critical conditions, as opposed to being more fundamental-physics benchmarks. This paper presents recommendations for the effective design and use of code verification benchmarks based on manufactured solutions, classical analytical solutions, and highly accurate numerical solutions. In addition, this paper presents recommendations for the design and use of validation benchmarks, highlighting the careful design of building-block experiments, the estimation of experimental measurement uncertainty for both inputs and outputs to the code, validation metrics, and the role of model calibration in validation. It is argued that the understanding of predictive capability of a computational model is built on the

  16. Production of neutronic discrete equations for a cylindrical geometry in one group energy and benchmark the results with MCNP-4B code with one group energy library

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salehi, A. A.; Vosoughi, N.; Shahriari, M.

    2002-01-01

    In reactor core neutronic calculations, we usually choose a control volume and investigate about the input, output, production and absorption inside it. Finally, we derive neutron transport equation. This equation is not easy to solve for simple and symmetrical geometry. The objective of this paper is to introduce a new direct method for neutronic calculations. This method is based on physics of problem and with meshing of the desired geometry, writing the balance equation for each mesh intervals and with notice to the conjunction between these mesh intervals, produce the final discrete equation series without production of neutron transport differential equation and mandatory passing form differential equation bridge. This method, which is named Direct Discrete Method, was applied in static state, for a cylindrical geometry in one group energy. The validity of the results from this new method are tested with MCNP-4B code with a one group energy library. One energy group direct discrete equation produces excellent results, which can be compared with the results of MCNP-4B

  17. Employment from Solar Energy: A Bright but Partly Cloudy Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeltzer, K. K.; Santini, D. J.

    A comparison of quantitative and qualitative employment effects of solar and conventional systems can prove the increased employment postulated as one of the significant secondary benefits of a shift from conventional to solar energy use. Current quantitative employment estimates show solar technology-induced employment to be generally greater…

  18. Rotating gravity currents. Part 1. Energy loss theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, J. R.; Lane-Serff, G. F.

    2005-01-01

    A comprehensive energy loss theory for gravity currents in rotating rectangular channels is presented. The model is an extension of the non-rotating energy loss theory of Benjamin (J. Fluid Mech. vol. 31, 1968, p. 209) and the steady-state dissipationless theory of rotating gravity currents of Hacker (PhD thesis, 1996). The theory assumes the fluid is inviscid, there is no shear within the current, and the Boussinesq approximation is made. Dissipation is introduced using a simple method. A head loss term is introduced into the Bernoulli equation and it is assumed that the energy loss is uniform across the stream. Conservation of momentum, volume flux and potential vorticity between upstream and downstream locations is then considered. By allowing for energy dissipation, results are obtained for channels of arbitrary depth and width (relative to the current). The results match those from earlier workers in the two limits of (i) zero rotation (but including dissipation) and (ii) zero dissipation (but including rotation). Three types of flow are identified as the effect of rotation increases, characterized in terms of the location of the outcropping interface between the gravity current and the ambient fluid on the channel boundaries. The parameters for transitions between these cases are quantified, as is the detailed behaviour of the flow in all cases. In particular, the speed of the current can be predicted for any given channel depth and width. As the channel depth increases, the predicted Froude number tends to surd 2, as for non-rotating flows.

  19. Geothermal Heat Pump Benchmarking Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1997-01-17

    A benchmarking study was conducted on behalf of the Department of Energy to determine the critical factors in successful utility geothermal heat pump programs. A Successful program is one that has achieved significant market penetration. Successfully marketing geothermal heat pumps has presented some major challenges to the utility industry. However, select utilities have developed programs that generate significant GHP sales. This benchmarking study concludes that there are three factors critical to the success of utility GHP marking programs: (1) Top management marketing commitment; (2) An understanding of the fundamentals of marketing and business development; and (3) An aggressive competitive posture. To generate significant GHP sales, competitive market forces must by used. However, because utilities have functioned only in a regulated arena, these companies and their leaders are unschooled in competitive business practices. Therefore, a lack of experience coupled with an intrinsically non-competitive culture yields an industry environment that impedes the generation of significant GHP sales in many, but not all, utilities.

  20. In search of income reference points for SLCA using a country level sustainability benchmark (part 2): fair minimum wage. A contribution to the Oiconomy project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Croes, Pim R.; Vermeulen, Walter J. V.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This paper is part 2 of our twin articles on income reference points for social life cycle assessment (SLCA). The purpose of this article is to provide a well-founded fair minimum wage standard, which enables the determination of the preventative costs for the impact category of unfair

  1. Benchmarking Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakic, I.

    2016-01-01

    One of the main tasks an owner have is to keep its business competitive on the market while delivering its product. Being owner of nuclear power plant bear the same (or even more complex and stern) responsibility due to safety risks and costs. In the past, nuclear power plant managements could (partly) ignore profit or it was simply expected and to some degree assured through the various regulatory processes governing electricity rate design. It is obvious now that, with the deregulation, utility privatization and competitive electricity market, key measure of success used at nuclear power plants must include traditional metrics of successful business (return on investment, earnings and revenue generation) as well as those of plant performance, safety and reliability. In order to analyze business performance of (specific) nuclear power plant, benchmarking, as one of the well-established concept and usual method was used. Domain was conservatively designed, with well-adjusted framework, but results have still limited application due to many differences, gaps and uncertainties. (author).

  2. Toxicological benchmarks for screening contaminants of potential concern for effects on freshwater biota

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suter, G.W. II

    1996-01-01

    An important early step in the assessment of ecological risks at contaminated sites is the screening of chemicals detected on the site to identify those that constitute a potential risk. Part of this screening process is the comparison of measured ambient concentrations to concentrations that are believed to be nonhazardous, termed benchmarks. This article discusses 13 methods by which benchmarks may be derived for aquatic biota and presents benchmarks for 105 chemicals. It then compares them with respect to their sensitivity, availability, magnitude relative to background concentrations, and conceptual bases. This compilation is limited to chemicals that have been detected on the US Department of Energy's Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and to benchmarks derived from studies of toxic effects on freshwater organisms. The list of chemicals includes 45 metals and 56 industrial organic chemicals but only four pesticides. Although some individual values can be shown to be too high to be protective and others are too low to be useful for screening, none of the approaches to benchmark derivation can be rejected without further definition of what constitutes adequate protection. The most appropriate screening strategy is to use multiple benchmark values along with background concentrations, knowledge of waste composition, and physicochemical properties to identify contaminants of potential concern

  3. Benchmarking biofuels; Biobrandstoffen benchmarken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croezen, H.; Kampman, B.; Bergsma, G.

    2012-03-15

    A sustainability benchmark for transport biofuels has been developed and used to evaluate the various biofuels currently on the market. For comparison, electric vehicles, hydrogen vehicles and petrol/diesel vehicles were also included. A range of studies as well as growing insight are making it ever clearer that biomass-based transport fuels may have just as big a carbon footprint as fossil fuels like petrol or diesel, or even bigger. At the request of Greenpeace Netherlands, CE Delft has brought together current understanding on the sustainability of fossil fuels, biofuels and electric vehicles, with particular focus on the performance of the respective energy carriers on three sustainability criteria, with the first weighing the heaviest: (1) Greenhouse gas emissions; (2) Land use; and (3) Nutrient consumption [Dutch] Greenpeace Nederland heeft CE Delft gevraagd een duurzaamheidsmeetlat voor biobrandstoffen voor transport te ontwerpen en hierop de verschillende biobrandstoffen te scoren. Voor een vergelijk zijn ook elektrisch rijden, rijden op waterstof en rijden op benzine of diesel opgenomen. Door onderzoek en voortschrijdend inzicht blijkt steeds vaker dat transportbrandstoffen op basis van biomassa soms net zoveel of zelfs meer broeikasgassen veroorzaken dan fossiele brandstoffen als benzine en diesel. CE Delft heeft voor Greenpeace Nederland op een rijtje gezet wat de huidige inzichten zijn over de duurzaamheid van fossiele brandstoffen, biobrandstoffen en elektrisch rijden. Daarbij is gekeken naar de effecten van de brandstoffen op drie duurzaamheidscriteria, waarbij broeikasgasemissies het zwaarst wegen: (1) Broeikasgasemissies; (2) Landgebruik; en (3) Nutriëntengebruik.

  4. Exergy recovery during LNG regasification: Electric energy production - Part two

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dispenza, Celidonio; Dispenza, Giorgio; Rocca, Vincenzo La; Panno, Giuseppe

    2009-01-01

    In liquefied natural gas (LNG) regasification facilities, for exergy recovery during regasification, an option could be the production of electric energy recovering the energy available as cold. In a previous paper, the authors propose an innovative process which uses a cryogenic stream of LNG during regasification as a cold source in an improved combined heat and power (CHP) plant. Considering the LNG regasification projects in progress all over the World, an appropriate design option could be based on a modular unit having a mean regasification capacity of 2 x 10 9 standard cubic meters/year. This paper deals with the results of feasibility studies, developed by the authors at DREAM in the context of a research program, on ventures based on thermodynamic and economic analysis of improved CHP cycles and related innovative technology which demonstrate the suitability of the proposal

  5. Nuclear Energy Center Site Survey, 1975. Part III. Technical considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    Studies of the technical feasibility of nuclear energy centers (NECs) and the comparison between NEC technical feasibility and that of nuclear facilities on dispersed sites are reviewed. The conclusions related to technical feasibility of NEC are summarized. Technical feasibility was found to rest mainly on five major issues: heat dissipation, transmission, facility construction, radiological impact, and environmental impact. Although general conclusions can be reached in these five areas, it is recognized that they are interdependent, and detailed site-by-site analysis will be necessary. Some general conclusions on technical feasibility of NECs are presented, then detailed conclusions derived from the technical evaluation of NECs compared to dispersed site facilities are presented. The findings of this study on each of the five major feasibility issues are then discussed in sequence. The study concludes that nuclear energy centers, as defined herein, are technically feasible

  6. Technology assessment HTR. Part 8. Nuclear energy and sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turkenburg, W.C.

    1996-06-01

    The small social acceptance of nuclear power for power generation suggests that in the present situation nuclear technology does not meet certain sustainable criteria. First, the concept of sustainable development is explained and which dimensions can be distinguished. Next, the sustainable development with regard to the development of the energy supply is outlined and the energy policy to obtain this situation is discussed. Subsequently, the impact of the sustainable development and the policy used to realize this on the nuclear technology are dealt with. As a result, criteria are formulated that can be used to verify how nuclear technology will meet this criteria and which demands should be used to fit this technology so it can be used in a sustainable development of the society. 55 refs

  7. Urban Greening as part ofDistrict Energy Services

    OpenAIRE

    MELIN, Sébastien

    2017-01-01

    Work carried out during this master’s thesis is about urban greening and its close integration with district energy systems. Urban greening is the fact to develop green infrastructures (parks, street trees, ...) instead of grey infrastructures (buildings, roads, ...) in cities. Despite that the actual economic value of green infrastructure is less appreciated at first glance and very difficult to valorize, urban greening has many undeniable advantages such as reducing pollution and heat islan...

  8. Renewable energy for passive house heating. Part 1. Building description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badescu, V. [Polytechnic Univ., Bucharest (Romania). Faculty of Mechanical Engineering; Sicre, B. [Technical Univ., Chemnitz (Germany). Computational Physics

    2003-12-01

    A passive house is a cost-efficient building that can manage throughout the heating period, due to its specific construction design, with more than 10 times less heat energy than the same building designed to standards presently applicable across Europe. Its extended thermal insulation and enhanced air-tightness removes the need for temperatures higher than 50 {sup o}C. This makes renewable energy sources particularly suitable for heating, cooling and domestic hot water production. Modeling of renewable energy usage for space heating requires as a preliminary stage the detailed description of the building structure, of the HVAC equipment and of the internal heat sources. This paper shows the main data used to model the thermal behavior of a passive house. Details about Pirmasens Passive House (Rhineland Palatinate, Germany) are given, as for example, the internal heat sources, including electric appliances, heat and humidity released by human bodies, thermal internal facilities as hot and cold water pipes. All these are quantified by using statistically derived data. A detailed time schedule for a standard German family with two adults and two children was prepared. It takes into account the national celebrations, vacation and weekends among others. (Author)

  9. High energy physics studies progress report. Part I. Experimental program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    The experimental program of research, including Assembly of an experiment at Fermilab E-351 to measure decay lifetimes, with tagged emulsion, of charmed particles produced by high energy neutrinos will continue. A data-taking run will take place in the coming fiscal year. Participation in the neutrino experiment E-310, Fermilab-Harvard-Pennsylvania-Rutgers-Wisconsin, will also continue. Data analysis from several experiments performed in the recent past at the ZGS ANL is in progress and will be pursued. These experiments are, E-397, E-420 and E-428 performed with the Charged and Neutral Spectrometer, and E-347 with the Σ/sub β/ Spectrometer. Plans are in the making to collaborate with a polarized proton experiment at the ZGS. New approaches to ''third generation'' neutrino experiments at Fermilab are being discussed by the whole high energy group. Ideas of pursuing experiments at the AGS-BNL with the Σ/sub β/ Spectrometer are explored. The theoretical research program covers topics of current interest in particle theory which will be investigated in the coming year; namely, the role of instantons in quantum chromodynamics, Higgs Lagrangian involving scalar fields, phenomenology of neutrino physics and in particular the nature of trimuon production, higher order symmetries like SU(3) x U(1) SU(5) and SU(6), dynamics of high energy diffractive scattering, classical solutions to the gauge field theories

  10. Solar energy scenarios in Brazil. Part two: Photovoltaics applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins, F.R.; Ruether, R.; Pereira, E.B.; Abreu, S.L.

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses some energy scenarios for photovoltaic applications in Brazil engendered by using SWERA database in order to demonstrate its potential for feasibility analysis and application in the energy planning for electricity generation. It discusses two major different markets: hybrid PV-Diesel installations in mini-grids of the off-grid Brazilian electricity system in the Amazon region, and grid-connected PV in urban areas of the interconnected Brazilian electricity system. The potential for using PV is huge, and can be estimated in tens to hundreds of MWp in the Amazon region alone, even if only a fraction of the existing Diesel-fired plants with a total installed capacity of over 620 MVA would fit to run in an optimum Diesel/PV mix. Most of the major cities in Brazil present greater electricity demand in summertime with the demand peak happening in the daytime period. This energy profile match the actual solar resource assessment provided by SWERA Data Archive, enabling grid-connected PV systems to provide an important contribution to the utility's capacity

  11. In search of income reference points for SLCA using a country level sustainability benchmark (part 2): fair minimum wage. A contribution to the Oiconomy project

    OpenAIRE

    Croes, Pim R.; Vermeulen, Walter J. V.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This paper is part 2 of our twin articles on income reference points for social life cycle assessment (SLCA). The purpose of this article is to provide a well-founded fair minimum wage standard, which enables the determination of the preventative costs for the impact category of unfair prices for labour in preventative costs-based SLCA. Methods: A five-step procedure was followed, comprising of (1) definition of the impact category and characterization factor, (2) a literature survey...

  12. Future electricity production methods. Part 1: Nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nifenecker, Herve

    2011-01-01

    The global warming challenge aims at stabilizing the concentrations of Green House Gas (GHG) in the atmosphere. Carbon dioxide is the most effective of the anthropogenic GHG and is essentially produced by consumption of fossil fuels. Electricity production is the dominant cause of CO 2 emissions. It is, therefore, crucial that the share of 'carbon less' electricity production techniques increases at a fast pace. This is the more so, that 'clean' electricity would be useful to displace 'dirty' techniques in other fields such as heat production and transportation. Here we examine the extent to which nuclear energy could be operational in providing 'clean' electricity. A nuclear intensive scenario is shown to give the possibility to divide CO 2 emissions by a factor of 2 worldwide, within 50 years. However, the corresponding sharp increase in nuclear power will put a heavy burden on uranium reserves and will necessitate the development of breeding reactors as soon as possible. A review of present and future reactors is given with special attention to the safety issues. The delicate question of nuclear fuel cycle is discussed concerning uranium reserves and management of used fuels. It is shown that dealing with nuclear wastes is more a socio-political problem than a technical one. The third difficult question associated with the development of nuclear energy is the proliferation risk. It is advocated that, while this is, indeed, a very important question, it is only weakly related to nuclear power development. Finally, the possibilities of nuclear fusion are discussed and it is asserted that, under no circumstances, could nuclear fusion give a significant contribution to the solution of the energy problem before 50 years, too late for dealing with the global warming challenge.

  13. Sensitivity Analysis of OECD Benchmark Tests in BISON

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swiler, Laura Painton [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gamble, Kyle [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Schmidt, Rodney C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Williamson, Richard [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-01

    This report summarizes a NEAMS (Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation) project focused on sensitivity analysis of a fuels performance benchmark problem. The benchmark problem was defined by the Uncertainty Analysis in Modeling working group of the Nuclear Science Committee, part of the Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD ). The benchmark problem involv ed steady - state behavior of a fuel pin in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). The problem was created in the BISON Fuels Performance code. Dakota was used to generate and analyze 300 samples of 17 input parameters defining core boundary conditions, manuf acturing tolerances , and fuel properties. There were 24 responses of interest, including fuel centerline temperatures at a variety of locations and burnup levels, fission gas released, axial elongation of the fuel pin, etc. Pearson and Spearman correlatio n coefficients and Sobol' variance - based indices were used to perform the sensitivity analysis. This report summarizes the process and presents results from this study.

  14. Diagnostic Algorithm Benchmarking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poll, Scott

    2011-01-01

    A poster for the NASA Aviation Safety Program Annual Technical Meeting. It describes empirical benchmarking on diagnostic algorithms using data from the ADAPT Electrical Power System testbed and a diagnostic software framework.

  15. Benchmarking and Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agrell, Per J.; Bogetoft, Peter

    . The application of benchmarking in regulation, however, requires specific steps in terms of data validation, model specification and outlier detection that are not systematically documented in open publications, leading to discussions about regulatory stability and economic feasibility of these techniques...

  16. Financial Integrity Benchmarks

    Data.gov (United States)

    City of Jackson, Mississippi — This data compiles standard financial integrity benchmarks that allow the City to measure its financial standing. It measure the City's debt ratio and bond ratings....

  17. MFTF TOTAL benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choy, J.H.

    1979-06-01

    A benchmark of the TOTAL data base management system as applied to the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) data base was implemented and run in February and March of 1979. The benchmark was run on an Interdata 8/32 and involved the following tasks: (1) data base design, (2) data base generation, (3) data base load, and (4) develop and implement programs to simulate MFTF usage of the data base

  18. Benchmark analysis of MCNP trademark ENDF/B-VI iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Court, J.D.; Hendricks, J.S.

    1994-12-01

    The MCNP ENDF/B-VI iron cross-section data was subjected to four benchmark studies as part of the Hiroshima/Nagasaki dose re-evaluation for the National Academy of Science and the Defense Nuclear Agency. The four benchmark studies were: (1) the iron sphere benchmarks from the Lawrence Livermore Pulsed Spheres; (2) the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Fusion Reactor Shielding Benchmark; (3) a 76-cm diameter iron sphere benchmark done at the University of Illinois; (4) the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Benchmark for Neutron Transport through Iron. MCNP4A was used to model each benchmark and computational results from the ENDF/B-VI iron evaluations were compared to ENDF/B-IV, ENDF/B-V, the MCNP Recommended Data Set (which includes Los Alamos National Laboratory Group T-2 evaluations), and experimental data. The results show that the ENDF/B-VI iron evaluations are as good as, or better than, previous data sets

  19. Electricity consumption in school buildings - benchmark and web tools; Elforbrug i skoler - benchmark og webvaerktoej

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    The aim of this project has been to produce benchmarks for electricity consumption in Danish schools in order to encourage electricity conservation. An internet programme has been developed with the aim of facilitating schools' access to benchmarks and to evaluate energy consumption. The overall purpose is to create increased attention to the electricity consumption of each separate school by publishing benchmarks which take the schools' age and number of pupils as well as after school activities into account. Benchmarks can be used to make green accounts and work as markers in e.g. energy conservation campaigns, energy management and for educational purposes. The internet tool can be found on www.energiguiden.dk. (BA)

  20. Effect of isovector coupling channel on the macroscopic part of the nuclear binding energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haddad, S.

    2011-04-01

    The effect of the isovector coupling channel on the macroscopic part of the nuclear binding energy is determined utilizing the relativistic density dependent Thomas-Fermi approach for the calculation of the macroscopic part of the nuclear binding energy, and the dependency of this effect on the numbers of neutrons and protons is studied. The isovector coupling channel leads to increased nuclear binding energy, and this effect sharpens with growing excess of the number of neutrons on the number of protons. (author)

  1. Low-Energy City Policy Handbook. Part A: The city of the future, the future of the city; Part B: Lost in (energy) transition? Methods and tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    Energy Cities started the IMAGINE initiative in 2006 to bring together cities and various stakeholders involved in urban energy issues. IMAGINE focuses on long-term perspectives and visioning approaches to energy and territory. Although an increasing number of cities are committing to achieving the EU objectives, notably through the Covenant of Mayors, they are also facing several obstacles. One of them is the difficulty for cities, their citizens and stakeholders to imagine, evaluate and accept the changes that are needed. Helping cities overcome such obstacles is the objective of the IMAGINE initiative. It is a platform for foresight, collaboration and exchanges, leading to action and change. Between 2012 and 2014, IMAGINE benefited from the support of the INTERREG IV program through a project called 'IMAGINE... low energy cities'. This project gathered 10 partners: Energy Cities - coordinator, Hafen City University - academic partner, and 8 pilot cities: Bistrita (Romania), Dobrich (Bulgaria), Figueres (Spain), Lille (France), Milton Keynes (United Kingdom), Modena (Italy), Munich (Germany), Odense (Denmark). These local authorities have committed to involving local stakeholders in co-building their cities' Local Energy Road-maps 2050 thanks to participatory approaches. Final publication from the 'IMAGINE low energy cities' project, this handbook is aimed at decision makers in European local authorities searching for new ways to work towards achieving low energy cities. It is intended to give inspiration and practical advice to elected political leaders as well as civil servants to run their own energy transition process at the local level. There are two ways to read this handbook. In Part A, it explains the way local authorities organise themselves to start and run a political and organisational process to set sustainable energy policies. This part of the handbook presents the results of the development of Local Energy Road-maps 2050 in the eight IMAGINE pilot

  2. 16 CFR Table 4 to Part 1512 - Relative Energy Distribution of Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Relative Energy Distribution of Sources 4... SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR BICYCLES Pt. 1512, Table 4 Table 4 to Part 1512—Relative Energy Distribution of Sources Wave length (nanometers) Relative energy 380 9.79 390 12.09 400 14.71 410 17.68 420 21...

  3. Comparative evaluation of solar, fission, fusion, and fossil energy resources. Part 1: Solar energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    The utilization of solar energy to meet the energy needs of the U.S. is discussed. Topics discussed include: availability of solar energy, solar energy collectors, heating for houses and buildings, solar water heater, electric power generation, and ocean thermal power.

  4. The KMAT: Benchmarking Knowledge Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jager, Martha

    Provides an overview of knowledge management and benchmarking, including the benefits and methods of benchmarking (e.g., competitive, cooperative, collaborative, and internal benchmarking). Arthur Andersen's KMAT (Knowledge Management Assessment Tool) is described. The KMAT is a collaborative benchmarking tool, designed to help organizations make…

  5. Benchmark simulation of turbulent flow through a staggered tube bundle to support CFD as a reactor design tool. Part 1. SRANS CFD simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ridluan, Artit; Tokuhiro, Akira

    2008-01-01

    Time-invariant and time-variant numerical simulations of flow through a staggered tube bundle array, idealizing the lower plenum (LP) subsystem configuration of a very high temperature reactor (VHTR), were performed. In Part 1, the CFD prediction of fully periodic isothermal tube-bundle flow using steady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (SRANS) equations with common turbulence models was investigated at a Reynolds number (Re) of 1.8x10 4 , based on the tube diameter and inlet velocity. Three first-order turbulence models, standard k-ε turbulence, renormalized group (RNG) k-ε, and shear stress transport (SST) k-ω models, and a second-order turbulence model, Reynolds stress model (RSM), were considered. A comparison of CFD simulations and experiment results was made at five locations along (x,y) coordinates. The SRANS simulation showed that no universal model predicted the turbulent Reynolds stresses, and generally, the results were marginal to poor. This is because these models cannot accurately model the periodic, spatiotemporal nature of the complex wake flow structure. (author)

  6. On the road to a free energy market. Part 5. Sustainable electricity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koevoet, H.

    2001-01-01

    The liberalization of the energy market is near. In two years the second group of large-scale energy consumers (60,000 customers) in the Netherlands can choose their own energy supplier. In this fifth part of a series of articles on the energy market attention is paid to the possibility for small-scale consumers to purchase so-called 'green' electricity from the supplier of their choice, starting July 1, 2001

  7. Benchmarking in Mobarakeh Steel Company

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasan Ghasemi

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Benchmarking is considered as one of the most effective ways of improving performance incompanies. Although benchmarking in business organizations is a relatively new concept and practice, ithas rapidly gained acceptance worldwide. This paper introduces the benchmarking project conducted in Esfahan’s Mobarakeh Steel Company, as the first systematic benchmarking project conducted in Iran. It aimsto share the process deployed for the benchmarking project in this company and illustrate how the projectsystematic implementation led to succes.

  8. Benchmarking in Mobarakeh Steel Company

    OpenAIRE

    Sasan Ghasemi; Mohammad Nazemi; Mehran Nejati

    2008-01-01

    Benchmarking is considered as one of the most effective ways of improving performance in companies. Although benchmarking in business organizations is a relatively new concept and practice, it has rapidly gained acceptance worldwide. This paper introduces the benchmarking project conducted in Esfahan's Mobarakeh Steel Company, as the first systematic benchmarking project conducted in Iran. It aims to share the process deployed for the benchmarking project in this company and illustrate how th...

  9. Energy analysis of batteries in photovoltaic systems. Part II: Energy return factors and overall battery efficiencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rydh, Carl Johan; Sanden, Bjoern A.

    2005-01-01

    Energy return factors and overall energy efficiencies are calculated for a stand-alone photovoltaic (PV)-battery system. Eight battery technologies are evaluated: lithium-ion (nickel), sodium-sulphur, nickel-cadmium, nickel-metal hydride, lead-acid, vanadium-redox, zinc-bromine and polysulphide-bromide. With a battery energy storage capacity three times higher than the daily energy output, the energy return factor for the PV-battery system ranges from 2.2 to 10 in our reference case. For a PV-battery system with a service life of 30 yr, this corresponds to energy payback times between 2.5 and 13 yr. The energy payback time is 1.8-3.3 yr for the PV array and 0.72-10 yr for the battery, showing the energy related significance of batteries and the large variation between different technologies. In extreme cases, energy return factors below one occur, implying no net energy output. The overall battery efficiency, including not only direct energy losses during operation but also energy requirements for production and transport of the charger, the battery and the inverter, is 0.41-0.80. For some batteries, the overall battery efficiency is significantly lower than the direct efficiency of the charger, the battery and the inverter (0.50-0.85). The ranking order of batteries in terms of energy efficiency, the relative importance of different battery parameters and the optimal system design and operation (e.g. the use of air conditioning) are, in many cases, dependent on the characterisation of the energy background system and on which type of energy efficiency measure is used (energy return factor or overall battery efficiency)

  10. Evaluation of energy efficiency opportunities of a typical Moroccan cement plant: Part I. Energy analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fellaou, S.; Bounahmidi, T.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • We have analyzed the degree of freedom of the overall system. • We validated the redundant measurements by the Lagrange multipliers technique. • We have analyzed the mass and the energy balances by two approaches. • We identified the factors that penalize the energetic performance of the whole plant. • We assessed options to improve energy efficiency of the entire cement plant. - Abstract: The cement industry is one of Morocco’s most highly energy intensive economic sectors. It suffers from abnormally high cost of energy supplies, representing more than two thirds of the cost of cement; the first item of expenditure is electricity and fuel with 40% and 30% respectively. Herefor, much more effort is needed to make the cement sector reach energy saving targets set by the Moroccan energy efficiency strategy. The present work aims to evaluate energy performance of an existing Moroccan cement plant based on a detailed mass and energy balances analysis. Redundant measurements were validated by the Lagrange multipliers technique before being used for the calculation of unmeasured variables. The values for energy consumption and related losses through the whole production line are reported, and the results obtained have been used to assess the energy performance of the process. The evaluation was completed by both an analysis of possible energy loss sources and important solutions described in the international literature to improve the energy efficiency of the entire cement plant.

  11. A framework for benchmarking land models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Q. Luo

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Land models, which have been developed by the modeling community in the past few decades to predict future states of ecosystems and climate, have to be critically evaluated for their performance skills of simulating ecosystem responses and feedback to climate change. Benchmarking is an emerging procedure to measure performance of models against a set of defined standards. This paper proposes a benchmarking framework for evaluation of land model performances and, meanwhile, highlights major challenges at this infant stage of benchmark analysis. The framework includes (1 targeted aspects of model performance to be evaluated, (2 a set of benchmarks as defined references to test model performance, (3 metrics to measure and compare performance skills among models so as to identify model strengths and deficiencies, and (4 model improvement. Land models are required to simulate exchange of water, energy, carbon and sometimes other trace gases between the atmosphere and land surface, and should be evaluated for their simulations of biophysical processes, biogeochemical cycles, and vegetation dynamics in response to climate change across broad temporal and spatial scales. Thus, one major challenge is to select and define a limited number of benchmarks to effectively evaluate land model performance. The second challenge is to develop metrics of measuring mismatches between models and benchmarks. The metrics may include (1 a priori thresholds of acceptable model performance and (2 a scoring system to combine data–model mismatches for various processes at different temporal and spatial scales. The benchmark analyses should identify clues of weak model performance to guide future development, thus enabling improved predictions of future states of ecosystems and climate. The near-future research effort should be on development of a set of widely acceptable benchmarks that can be used to objectively, effectively, and reliably evaluate fundamental properties

  12. Deviating From the Benchmarks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rocha, Vera; Van Praag, Mirjam; Carneiro, Anabela

    This paper studies three related questions: To what extent otherwise similar startups employ different quantities and qualities of human capital at the moment of entry? How persistent are initial human capital choices over time? And how does deviating from human capital benchmarks influence firm......, founders human capital, and the ownership structure of startups (solo entrepreneurs versus entrepreneurial teams). We then study the survival implications of exogenous deviations from these benchmarks, based on spline models for survival data. Our results indicate that (especially negative) deviations from...... the benchmark can be substantial, are persistent over time, and hinder the survival of firms. The implications may, however, vary according to the sector and the ownership structure at entry. Given the stickiness of initial choices, wrong human capital decisions at entry turn out to be a close to irreversible...

  13. Romania. Regular Review 2006. Part 1. Trends in energy and energy efficiency policies, instruments and actors. Part 2. Indicators on Energy, Energy Efficiency, Economy and Environment. Based on national sources of data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    Although Romania has the largest oil and gas resources in Central Europe, it is nonetheless a net importer of hydrocarbons, and the efficient use of energy along the entire energy chain from production to consumption has been a consistent feature of Romanian policy in recent years. Romania's national energy strategy foresees an annual reduction of the energy intensity of the national economy of approximately 3%. Energy efficiency measures have concentrated on the industrial and residential sectors, where there is the clearest scope for improvements. Programmes for the services and transport sectors are now also being developed. As Romania prepares for accession to the European Union, the PEEREA review of Romania's energy efficiency policies and programmes provides a detailed overview of the transposition of the relevant parts of the EU acquis, as well as an insight into particular challenges for Romania - such as the modernisation of the district heating network, which accounts for a third of the country's heat and hot water demand

  14. HPCG Benchmark Technical Specification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heroux, Michael Allen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Dongarra, Jack [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Luszczek, Piotr [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2013-10-01

    The High Performance Conjugate Gradient (HPCG) benchmark [cite SNL, UTK reports] is a tool for ranking computer systems based on a simple additive Schwarz, symmetric Gauss-Seidel preconditioned conjugate gradient solver. HPCG is similar to the High Performance Linpack (HPL), or Top 500, benchmark [1] in its purpose, but HPCG is intended to better represent how today’s applications perform. In this paper we describe the technical details of HPCG: how it is designed and implemented, what code transformations are permitted and how to interpret and report results.

  15. Benchmarking for Best Practice

    CERN Document Server

    Zairi, Mohamed

    1998-01-01

    Benchmarking for Best Practice uses up-to-the-minute case-studies of individual companies and industry-wide quality schemes to show how and why implementation has succeeded. For any practitioner wanting to establish best practice in a wide variety of business areas, this book makes essential reading. .It is also an ideal textbook on the applications of TQM since it describes concepts, covers definitions and illustrates the applications with first-hand examples. Professor Mohamed Zairi is an international expert and leading figure in the field of benchmarking. His pioneering work in this area l

  16. Benchmarking Danish Industries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Britta; Bentzen, Eric; Aagaard Andreassen, Mette

    2003-01-01

    compatible survey. The International Manufacturing Strategy Survey (IMSS) doesbring up the question of supply chain management, but unfortunately, we did not have access to thedatabase. Data from the members of the SCOR-model, in the form of benchmarked performance data,may exist, but are nonetheless...... not public. The survey is a cooperative project "Benchmarking DanishIndustries" with CIP/Aalborg University, the Danish Technological University, the DanishTechnological Institute and Copenhagen Business School as consortia partners. The project has beenfunded by the Danish Agency for Trade and Industry...

  17. [Do you mean benchmarking?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet, F; Solignac, S; Marty, J

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of benchmarking is to settle improvement processes by comparing the activities to quality standards. The proposed methodology is illustrated by benchmark business cases performed inside medical plants on some items like nosocomial diseases or organization of surgery facilities. Moreover, the authors have built a specific graphic tool, enhanced with balance score numbers and mappings, so that the comparison between different anesthesia-reanimation services, which are willing to start an improvement program, is easy and relevant. This ready-made application is even more accurate as far as detailed tariffs of activities are implemented.

  18. RB reactor benchmark cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pesic, M.

    1998-01-01

    A selected set of the RB reactor benchmark cores is presented in this paper. The first results of validation of the well-known Monte Carlo MCNP TM code and adjoining neutron cross section libraries are given. They confirm the idea for the proposal of the new U-D 2 O criticality benchmark system and support the intention to include this system in the next edition of the recent OECD/NEA Project: International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Experiment, in near future. (author)

  19. Reevaluation of the Jezebel Benchmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Favorite, Jeffrey A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-03-10

    Every nuclear engineering student is familiar with Jezebel, the homogeneous bare sphere of plutonium first assembled at Los Alamos in 1954-1955. The actual Jezebel assembly was neither homogeneous, nor bare, nor spherical; nor was it singular – there were hundreds of Jezebel configurations assembled. The Jezebel benchmark has been reevaluated for the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) Handbook. Logbooks, original drawings, mass accountability statements, internal reports, and published reports have been used to model four actual three-dimensional Jezebel assemblies with high fidelity. Because the documentation available today is often inconsistent, three major assumptions were made regarding plutonium part masses and dimensions. The first was that the assembly masses given in Los Alamos report LA-4208 (1969) were correct, and the second was that the original drawing dimension for the polar height of a certain major part was correct. The third assumption was that a change notice indicated on the original drawing was not actually implemented. This talk will describe these assumptions, the alternatives, and the implications. Since the publication of the 2013 ICSBEP Handbook, the actual masses of the major components have turned up. Our assumption regarding the assembly masses was proven correct, but we had the mass distribution incorrect. Work to incorporate the new information is ongoing, and this talk will describe the latest assessment.

  20. Benchmarking ENDF/B-VII.0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marck, Steven C. van der

    2006-01-01

    The new major release VII.0 of the ENDF/B nuclear data library has been tested extensively using benchmark calculations. These were based upon MCNP-4C3 continuous-energy Monte Carlo neutronics simulations, together with nuclear data processed using the code NJOY. Three types of benchmarks were used, viz., criticality safety benchmarks (fusion) shielding benchmarks, and reference systems for which the effective delayed neutron fraction is reported. For criticality safety, more than 700 benchmarks from the International Handbook of Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments were used. Benchmarks from all categories were used, ranging from low-enriched uranium, compound fuel, thermal spectrum ones (LEU-COMP-THERM), to mixed uranium-plutonium, metallic fuel, fast spectrum ones (MIX-MET-FAST). For fusion shielding many benchmarks were based on IAEA specifications for the Oktavian experiments (for Al, Co, Cr, Cu, LiF, Mn, Mo, Si, Ti, W, Zr), Fusion Neutronics Source in Japan (for Be, C, N, O, Fe, Pb), and Pulsed Sphere experiments at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (for 6 Li, 7 Li, Be, C, N, O, Mg, Al, Ti, Fe, Pb, D 2 O, H 2 O, concrete, polyethylene and teflon). For testing delayed neutron data more than thirty measurements in widely varying systems were used. Among these were measurements in the Tank Critical Assembly (TCA in Japan) and IPEN/MB-01 (Brazil), both with a thermal spectrum, and two cores in Masurca (France) and three cores in the Fast Critical Assembly (FCA, Japan), all with fast spectra. In criticality safety, many benchmarks were chosen from the category with a thermal spectrum, low-enriched uranium, compound fuel (LEU-COMP-THERM), because this is typical of most current-day reactors, and because these benchmarks were previously underpredicted by as much as 0.5% by most nuclear data libraries (such as ENDF/B-VI.8, JEFF-3.0). The calculated results presented here show that this underprediction is no longer there for ENDF/B-VII.0. The average over 257

  1. On the Efficiency of Connection Charges---Part II: Integration of Distributed Energy Resources

    OpenAIRE

    Munoz-Alvarez, Daniel; Garcia-Franco, Juan F.; Tong, Lang

    2017-01-01

    This two-part paper addresses the design of retail electricity tariffs for distribution systems with distributed energy resources (DERs). Part I presents a framework to optimize an ex-ante two-part tariff for a regulated monopolistic retailer who faces stochastic wholesale prices on the one hand and stochastic demand on the other. In Part II, the integration of DERs is addressed by analyzing their endogenous effect on the optimal two-part tariff and the induced welfare gains. Two DER integrat...

  2. Regulation of the energy infrastructure. Load management. Part 1. Fiscal aspects of energy networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smits, L.

    2008-01-01

    The Dutch energy system depends on the presence of a good infrastructure. For many decades little attention was paid to infrastructure, but due to the liberalization infrastructure is receiving renewed attention. The grids are now considered the backbone of the energy system and essential for security of supply. Moreover, future electricity plants may have to adhere to the 'zero emission' demands in the future and (nearly) empty oil and gas fields will be used for underground storage of substances such as CO2. This new series addresses the existing and new regulation for the energy infrastructure. This edition addresses a number of fiscal aspects of the energy infrastructure. [mk] [nl

  3. What does benchmarking of wheat farmers practicing conservation tillage in the eastern Indo-Gangetic Plains tell us about energy use efficiency? An application of slack-based data envelopment analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aravindakshan, Sreejith; Rossi, Frederick J.; Krupnik, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    Escalating energy costs are an increasing concern for South Asian farmers growing rice and wheat in rotation. Millions of people in the IGP (Indo-Gangetic Plains) depend on this cropping system for food and income security. CT (conservation tillage) practices, including mechanical BP (bed planting), PTOS (power-tiller operated seeding), and ST (strip tillage), are advocated by donors and development organizations as profitable, high yielding, and energy-efficient alternatives to TT (traditional tillage). However, most studies on the EUE (energy input use efficiency) of CT originate from researcher-controlled and on-station experiments. Comparatively little information is available on the EUE of CT practices as farmers apply them in their own fields, and under their own management decisions. This research responds to this gap, and analyzes EUE of each of these three CT options, compared to TT, by surveying 328 rice-wheat farmers in north-western Bangladesh. Concentrating on wheat production, we employed a non-parametric benchmarking technique involving slack-based measures of technical efficiency, along with a fractional regression model to identify and compute the wasteful use of energy. PTOS achieved the highest EUE score (0.92), followed closely by BP and ST (both 0.91), whereas TT (0.68) was significantly (p < 0.001) different and lower than the CT practices. - Highlights: • On-farm evidence of the energy efficiency of CT (conservation tillage) is lacking. • We benchmark and analyze CT vs. TT (traditional tillage) energy input slacks. • Fertilizers and pesticides had the highest component slack values across CT options. • Slacks for TT were comparatively large for labor, fuel, pesticides, and irrigation. • Under farmer adaptation, CT is more efficient than TT, though both can be improved.

  4. Ion optical layout and focusing elements for the high energy part of the SNQ-LINAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hacker, H.U.; Hardt, A.H.; Martin, S.A.

    1984-01-01

    The ionoptical layout and the design of the focusing elements for the high energy part (HELA) of the SNQ-LINAC is discussed. A simple FOOD-structure for the single cell LINAC part has been optimized. Tolerances are discussed. Optical, electrical and magnetic data of a fast Kicker system is given. (orig.)

  5. Kazakhstan. Regular Review 2006. Part 1. Trends in energy and energy efficiency policies, instruments and actors. Part 2. Indicators on Energy, Energy Efficiency, Economy and Environment. Based on IEA data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    Kazakhstan is one of the ten largest countries in the world with very important and large energy and mineral resources and also possesses significant renewable energy resources. Energy policy objectives are presented throughout a number of documents (strategies, concepts etc.). One of the most crucial is the Development Strategy of Kazakhstan until 2030, which focuses on energy as one of the priority areas and determines the necessity of a 'rapid increase of production and export of oil and gas in order to receive revenues that would contribute to sustained economic growth and an improvement of the living standard of the people'. 'Strategy 2030' is the strategy of the development of the fuel and energy sector of the country and has been developed for both the period until 2015 and the period up to 2030. This document contains sections concerning energy efficiency and energy saving. Kazakhstan has a substantial electric power industry - third largest in the former Soviet Union after Russia and Ukraine with installed capacity of around 18500 MW. The goal and the basic priorities of the development of the sector are presented in the 'Programme for the Development of the Electricity Sector up to 2030'. The Ministry of Energy and Mineral Resources of the Republic of Kazakhstan ensures the implementation of the state policy, including the sphere of energy saving. Among the functions of the Ministry is the elaboration of programmes of the energy sector strategic development as a constituent part of the development strategy of the Republic of Kazakhstan, implementation of the strategy and organisation of the implementation of the state energy saving policy. The main objective of the Committee for State Energy Supervision under the Ministry of Energy and Mineral Resources of the Republic of Kazakhstan is supervision and control of the reliability, security and efficiency of energy generation, transmission, distribution and consumption. The special State Energy Saving

  6. Benchmarking and Performance Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian TANTAU

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The relevance of the chosen topic is explained by the meaning of the firm efficiency concept - the firm efficiency means the revealed performance (how well the firm performs in the actual market environment given the basic characteristics of the firms and their markets that are expected to drive their profitability (firm size, market power etc.. This complex and relative performance could be due to such things as product innovation, management quality, work organization, some other factors can be a cause even if they are not directly observed by the researcher. The critical need for the management individuals/group to continuously improve their firm/company’s efficiency and effectiveness, the need for the managers to know which are the success factors and the competitiveness determinants determine consequently, what performance measures are most critical in determining their firm’s overall success. Benchmarking, when done properly, can accurately identify both successful companies and the underlying reasons for their success. Innovation and benchmarking firm level performance are critical interdependent activities. Firm level variables, used to infer performance, are often interdependent due to operational reasons. Hence, the managers need to take the dependencies among these variables into account when forecasting and benchmarking performance. This paper studies firm level performance using financial ratio and other type of profitability measures. It uses econometric models to describe and then propose a method to forecast and benchmark performance.

  7. Surveys and Benchmarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bers, Trudy

    2012-01-01

    Surveys and benchmarks continue to grow in importance for community colleges in response to several factors. One is the press for accountability, that is, for colleges to report the outcomes of their programs and services to demonstrate their quality and prudent use of resources, primarily to external constituents and governing boards at the state…

  8. Evaluation of PWR and BWR pin cell benchmark results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pijlgroms, B.J.; Gruppelaar, H.; Janssen, A.J.; Hoogenboom, J.E.; Leege, P.F.A. de; Voet, J. van der; Verhagen, F.C.M.

    1991-12-01

    Benchmark results of the Dutch PINK working group on PWR and BWR pin cell calculational benchmark as defined by EPRI are presented and evaluated. The observed discrepancies are problem dependent: a part of the results is satisfactory, some other results require further analysis. A brief overview is given of the different code packages used in this analysis. (author). 14 refs., 9 figs., 30 tabs

  9. Evaluation of PWR and BWR pin cell benchmark results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pijlgroms, B.J.; Gruppelaar, H.; Janssen, A.J. (Netherlands Energy Research Foundation (ECN), Petten (Netherlands)); Hoogenboom, J.E.; Leege, P.F.A. de (Interuniversitair Reactor Inst., Delft (Netherlands)); Voet, J. van der (Gemeenschappelijke Kernenergiecentrale Nederland NV, Dodewaard (Netherlands)); Verhagen, F.C.M. (Keuring van Electrotechnische Materialen NV, Arnhem (Netherlands))

    1991-12-01

    Benchmark results of the Dutch PINK working group on PWR and BWR pin cell calculational benchmark as defined by EPRI are presented and evaluated. The observed discrepancies are problem dependent: a part of the results is satisfactory, some other results require further analysis. A brief overview is given of the different code packages used in this analysis. (author). 14 refs., 9 figs., 30 tabs.

  10. Production of neutron cross section library based on JENDL-4.0 to continuous-energy Monte Carlo code MVP and its application to criticality analysis of benchmark problems in the ICSBEP handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okumura, Keisuke; Nagaya, Yasunobu

    2011-09-01

    In May 2010, JENDL-4.0 was released from Japan Atomic Energy Agency as the updated Japanese Nuclear Data Library. It was processed by the nuclear data processing system LICEM and an arbitrary-temperature neutron cross section library MVPlib - nJ40 was produced for the neutron and photon transport calculation code MVP based on the continuous-energy Monte Carlo method. The library contains neutron cross sections for 406 nuclides on the free gas model, thermal scattering cross sections, and cross sections of pseudo fission products for burn-up calculations with MVP. Criticality benchmark calculations were carried out with MVP and MVPlib - nJ40 for about 1,000 cases of critical experiments stored in the hand book of International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP), which covers a wide variety of fuel materials, fuel forms, and neutron spectra. We report all comparison results (C/E values) of effective neutron multiplication factors between calculations and experiments to give a validation data for the prediction accuracy of JENDL-4.0 for criticalities. (author)

  11. International benchmark on the natural convection test in Phenix reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tenchine, D.; Pialla, D.; Fanning, T.H.; Thomas, J.W.; Chellapandi, P.; Shvetsov, Y.; Maas, L.; Jeong, H.-Y.; Mikityuk, K.; Chenu, A.; Mochizuki, H.; Monti, S.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Phenix main characteristics, instrumentation and natural convection test are described. ► “Blind” calculations and post-test calculations from all the participants to the benchmark are compared to reactor data. ► Lessons learned from the natural convection test and the associated calculations are discussed. -- Abstract: The French Phenix sodium cooled fast reactor (SFR) started operation in 1973 and was stopped in 2009. Before the reactor was definitively shutdown, several final tests were planned and performed, including a natural convection test in the primary circuit. During this natural convection test, the heat rejection provided by the steam generators was disabled, followed several minutes later by reactor scram and coast-down of the primary pumps. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) launched a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) named “control rod withdrawal and sodium natural circulation tests performed during the Phenix end-of-life experiments”. The overall purpose of the CRP was to improve the Member States’ analytical capabilities in the field of SFR safety. An international benchmark on the natural convection test was organized with “blind” calculations in a first step, then “post-test” calculations and sensitivity studies compared with reactor measurements. Eight organizations from seven Member States took part in the benchmark: ANL (USA), CEA (France), IGCAR (India), IPPE (Russian Federation), IRSN (France), KAERI (Korea), PSI (Switzerland) and University of Fukui (Japan). Each organization performed computations and contributed to the analysis and global recommendations. This paper summarizes the findings of the CRP benchmark exercise associated with the Phenix natural convection test, including blind calculations, post-test calculations and comparisons with measured data. General comments and recommendations are pointed out to improve future simulations of natural convection in SFRs

  12. On the physics of power, energy and economics of renewable electric energy sources - Part II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skoglund, Annika; Leijon, Mats; Waters, Rafael; Rehn, Alf; Lindahl, Marcus

    2010-01-01

    Renewable Energy Technologies (RETs) are often recognized as less competitive than traditional electric energy conversion systems. Obstacles with renewable electric energy conversion systems are often referred to the intermittency of the energy sources and the relatively high maintenance cost. However, due to an intensified discourse on climate change and its effects, it has from a societal point of view, become more desirable to adopt and install CO 2 neutral power plants. Even if this has increased the competitiveness of RETs in a political sense, the new goals for RET installations must also be met with economical viability. We propose that the direction of technical development, as well as the chosen technology in new installations, should not primarily be determined by policies, but by the basic physical properties of the energy source and the associated potential for inexpensive energy production. This potential is the basic entity that drives the payback of the investment of a specific RET power plant. With regard to this, we argue that the total electric energy conversion system must be considered if effective power production is to be achieved, with focus on the possible number of full loading hours and the Degree of Utilization. This will increase the cost efficiency and economical competitiveness of RET investments, and could enhance faster diffusion of new innovations and installations without over-optimistic subsidies. This paper elaborates on the overall problem of the economy of renewable electric energy conversion systems by studying the interface between physics, engineering and economy reported for RET power plants in different scientific publications. The core objective is to show the practical use of the Degree of Utilization and how the concept is crucial for the design and economical optimization disregarding subsidies. The results clearly indicate that the future political regulative frameworks should consider the choice of renewable energy

  13. Benchmarking D and D procurement best practices at four commercial nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arflin, J.; Baker, G.; Bidwell, B.; Bugielski, D.; Cavanagh, J.; Sandlin, N.

    1999-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has as two of its strategic objectives to safely accomplish the world's largest environmental clean-up of contaminated sites and the adoption of the best management practices of the private sector to achieve business-like results efficiently and effectively. An integral part of the strategic response to the challenges facing the Department has been the use of benchmarking and best practice management to facilitate identifying and implementing leading-edge thinking, practices, approaches, and solutions

  14. Energy map of southwestern Wyoming, Part B: oil and gas, oil shale, uranium, and solar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biewick, Laura R.H.; Wilson, Anna B.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has compiled Part B of the Energy Map of Southwestern Wyoming for the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative (WLCI). Part B consists of oil and gas, oil shale, uranium, and solar energy resource information in support of the WLCI. The WLCI represents the USGS partnership with other Department of the Interior Bureaus, State and local agencies, industry, academia, and private landowners, all of whom collaborate to maintain healthy landscapes, sustain wildlife, and preserve recreational and grazing uses while developing energy resources in southwestern Wyoming. This product is the second and final part of the Energy Map of Southwestern Wyoming series (also see USGS Data Series 683, http://pubs.usgs.gov/ds/683/), and encompasses all of Carbon, Lincoln, Sublette, Sweetwater, and Uinta Counties, as well as areas in Fremont County that are in the Great Divide and Green River Basins.

  15. Benchmarking European Gas Transmission System Operators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agrell, Per J.; Bogetoft, Peter; Trinkner, Urs

    This is the final report for the pan-European efficiency benchmarking of gas transmission system operations commissioned by the Netherlands Authority for Consumers and Markets (ACM), Den Haag, on behalf of the Council of European Energy Regulators (CEER) under the supervision of the authors....

  16. Benchmarking of nuclear economics tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, Megan; Korinny, Andriy; Shropshire, David; Sadhankar, Ramesh

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • INPRO and GIF economic tools exhibited good alignment in total capital cost estimation. • Subtle discrepancies in the cost result from differences in financing and the fuel cycle assumptions. • A common set of assumptions was found to reduce the discrepancies to 1% or less. • Opportunities for harmonisation of economic tools exists. - Abstract: Benchmarking of the economics methodologies developed by the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) and the International Atomic Energy Agency’s International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO), was performed for three Generation IV nuclear energy systems. The Economic Modeling Working Group of GIF developed an Excel based spreadsheet package, G4ECONS (Generation 4 Excel-based Calculation Of Nuclear Systems), to calculate the total capital investment cost (TCIC) and the levelised unit energy cost (LUEC). G4ECONS is sufficiently generic in the sense that it can accept the types of projected input, performance and cost data that are expected to become available for Generation IV systems through various development phases and that it can model both open and closed fuel cycles. The Nuclear Energy System Assessment (NESA) Economic Support Tool (NEST) was developed to enable an economic analysis using the INPRO methodology to easily calculate outputs including the TCIC, LUEC and other financial figures of merit including internal rate of return, return of investment and net present value. NEST is also Excel based and can be used to evaluate nuclear reactor systems using the open fuel cycle, MOX (mixed oxide) fuel recycling and closed cycles. A Super Critical Water-cooled Reactor system with an open fuel cycle and two Fast Reactor systems, one with a break-even fuel cycle and another with a burner fuel cycle, were selected for the benchmarking exercise. Published data on capital and operating costs were used for economics analyses using G4ECONS and NEST tools. Both G4ECONS and

  17. Theory comparison and numerical benchmarking on neoclassical toroidal viscosity torque

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhirui; Park, Jong-Kyu; Logan, Nikolas; Kim, Kimin; Menard, Jonathan E. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Liu, Yueqiang [Euratom/CCFE Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-15

    Systematic comparison and numerical benchmarking have been successfully carried out among three different approaches of neoclassical toroidal viscosity (NTV) theory and the corresponding codes: IPEC-PENT is developed based on the combined NTV theory but without geometric simplifications [Park et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 065002 (2009)]; MARS-Q includes smoothly connected NTV formula [Shaing et al., Nucl. Fusion 50, 025022 (2010)] based on Shaing's analytic formulation in various collisionality regimes; MARS-K, originally computing the drift kinetic energy, is upgraded to compute the NTV torque based on the equivalence between drift kinetic energy and NTV torque [J.-K. Park, Phys. Plasma 18, 110702 (2011)]. The derivation and numerical results both indicate that the imaginary part of drift kinetic energy computed by MARS-K is equivalent to the NTV torque in IPEC-PENT. In the benchmark of precession resonance between MARS-Q and MARS-K/IPEC-PENT, the agreement and correlation between the connected NTV formula and the combined NTV theory in different collisionality regimes are shown for the first time. Additionally, both IPEC-PENT and MARS-K indicate the importance of the bounce harmonic resonance which can greatly enhance the NTV torque when E×B drift frequency reaches the bounce resonance condition.

  18. Benchmarking i den offentlige sektor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bukh, Per Nikolaj; Dietrichson, Lars; Sandalgaard, Niels

    2008-01-01

    I artiklen vil vi kort diskutere behovet for benchmarking i fraværet af traditionelle markedsmekanismer. Herefter vil vi nærmere redegøre for, hvad benchmarking er med udgangspunkt i fire forskellige anvendelser af benchmarking. Regulering af forsyningsvirksomheder vil blive behandlet, hvorefter...

  19. HYDROCOIN [HYDROlogic COde INtercomparison] Level 1: Benchmarking and verification test results with CFEST [Coupled Fluid, Energy, and Solute Transport] code: Draft report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yabusaki, S.; Cole, C.; Monti, A.M.; Gupta, S.K.

    1987-04-01

    Part of the safety analysis is evaluating groundwater flow through the repository and the host rock to the accessible environment by developing mathematical or analytical models and numerical computer codes describing the flow mechanisms. This need led to the establishment of an international project called HYDROCOIN (HYDROlogic COde INtercomparison) organized by the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, a forum for discussing techniques and strategies in subsurface hydrologic modeling. The major objective of the present effort, HYDROCOIN Level 1, is determining the numerical accuracy of the computer codes. The definition of each case includes the input parameters, the governing equations, the output specifications, and the format. The Coupled Fluid, Energy, and Solute Transport (CFEST) code was applied to solve cases 1, 2, 4, 5, and 7; the Finite Element Three-Dimensional Groundwater (FE3DGW) Flow Model was used to solve case 6. Case 3 has been ignored because unsaturated flow is not pertinent to SRP. This report presents the Level 1 results furnished by the project teams. The numerical accuracy of the codes is determined by (1) comparing the computational results with analytical solutions for cases that have analytical solutions (namely cases 1 and 4), and (2) intercomparing results from codes for cases which do not have analytical solutions (cases 2, 5, 6, and 7). Cases 1, 2, 6, and 7 relate to flow analyses, whereas cases 4 and 5 require nonlinear solutions. 7 refs., 71 figs., 9 tabs

  20. Full dimensional (15-dimensional) quantum-dynamical simulation of the protonated water-dimer III: Mixed Jacobi-valence parametrization and benchmark results for the zero point energy, vibrationally excited states, and infrared spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendrell, Oriol; Brill, Michael; Gatti, Fabien; Lauvergnat, David; Meyer, Hans-Dieter

    2009-06-21

    Quantum dynamical calculations are reported for the zero point energy, several low-lying vibrational states, and the infrared spectrum of the H(5)O(2)(+) cation. The calculations are performed by the multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree (MCTDH) method. A new vector parametrization based on a mixed Jacobi-valence description of the system is presented. With this parametrization the potential energy surface coupling is reduced with respect to a full Jacobi description, providing a better convergence of the n-mode representation of the potential. However, new coupling terms appear in the kinetic energy operator. These terms are derived and discussed. A mode-combination scheme based on six combined coordinates is used, and the representation of the 15-dimensional potential in terms of a six-combined mode cluster expansion including up to some 7-dimensional grids is discussed. A statistical analysis of the accuracy of the n-mode representation of the potential at all orders is performed. Benchmark, fully converged results are reported for the zero point energy, which lie within the statistical uncertainty of the reference diffusion Monte Carlo result for this system. Some low-lying vibrationally excited eigenstates are computed by block improved relaxation, illustrating the applicability of the approach to large systems. Benchmark calculations of the linear infrared spectrum are provided, and convergence with increasing size of the time-dependent basis and as a function of the order of the n-mode representation is studied. The calculations presented here make use of recent developments in the parallel version of the MCTDH code, which are briefly discussed. We also show that the infrared spectrum can be computed, to a very good approximation, within D(2d) symmetry, instead of the G(16) symmetry used before, in which the complete rotation of one water molecule with respect to the other is allowed, thus simplifying the dynamical problem.

  1. Dynamic Monte Carlo transient analysis for the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD/NEA) C5G7-TD benchmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaukat, Nadeem; Ryu, Min; Shim, Hyung Jin [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-08-15

    With ever-advancing computer technology, the Monte Carlo (MC) neutron transport calculation is expanding its application area to nuclear reactor transient analysis. Dynamic MC (DMC) neutron tracking for transient analysis requires efficient algorithms for delayed neutron generation, neutron population control, and initial condition modeling. In this paper, a new MC steady-state simulation method based on time-dependent MC neutron tracking is proposed for steady-state initial condition modeling; during this process, prompt neutron sources and delayed neutron precursors for the DMC transient simulation can easily be sampled. The DMC method, including the proposed time-dependent DMC steady-state simulation method, has been implemented in McCARD and applied for two-dimensional core kinetics problems in the time-dependent neutron transport benchmark C5G7-TD. The McCARD DMC calculation results show good agreement with results of a deterministic transport analysis code, nTRACER.

  2. Sustainable energy development as an integral part of hydroelectric business management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, W.; Yu, M.; Young, C.

    1996-01-01

    Elements of Ontario Hydro's strategy for sustainable energy development were discussed, highlighting key developments in the business management practices in Ontario Hydro's Hydroelectric Business Unit. Sustainable development considerations are now integral part of any business case analysis; management of the environment also has been integrated into the Utilities' business management process. Several environmental management practices intended to enhance sustainability have been introduced, including a full-fledged environmental management system based on ISO 14001 standards. Energy efficiency opportunities are aggressively pursued, including turbine upgrades, and energy efficient lighting. Experience to date indicates that business performance and progress towards sustainable energy development need not be mutually exclusive

  3. Benchmark calculations of power distribution within assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavarec, C.; Perron, J.F.; Verwaerde, D.; West, J.P.

    1994-09-01

    The main objective of this Benchmark is to compare different techniques for fine flux prediction based upon coarse mesh diffusion or transport calculations. We proposed 5 ''core'' configurations including different assembly types (17 x 17 pins, ''uranium'', ''absorber'' or ''MOX'' assemblies), with different boundary conditions. The specification required results in terms of reactivity, pin by pin fluxes and production rate distributions. The proposal for these Benchmark calculations was made by J.C. LEFEBVRE, J. MONDOT, J.P. WEST and the specification (with nuclear data, assembly types, core configurations for 2D geometry and results presentation) was distributed to correspondents of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency. 11 countries and 19 companies answered the exercise proposed by this Benchmark. Heterogeneous calculations and homogeneous calculations were made. Various methods were used to produce the results: diffusion (finite differences, nodal...), transport (P ij , S n , Monte Carlo). This report presents an analysis and intercomparisons of all the results received

  4. Toxicological benchmarks for wildlife: 1994 Revision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Opresko, D.M.; Sample, B.E.; Suter, G.W. II.

    1994-09-01

    The process by which ecological risks of environmental contaminants are evaluated is two-tiered. The first tier is a screening assessment where concentrations of contaminants in the environment are compared to toxicological benchmarks which represent concentrations of chemicals in environmental media (water, sediment, soil, food, etc.) that are presumed to be nonhazardous to the surrounding biota. The second tier is a baseline ecological risk assessment where toxicological benchmarks are one of several lines of evidence used to support or refute the presence of ecological effects. The report presents toxicological benchmarks for assessment of effects of 76 chemicals on 8 representative mammalian wildlife species and 31 chemicals on 9 avian wildlife species. The chemicals are some of those that occur at United States Department of Energy waste sites; the wildlife species were chosen because they are widely distributed and provide a representative range of body sizes and diets. Further descriptions of the chosen wildlife species and chemicals are provided in the report. The benchmarks presented in this report represent values believed to be nonhazardous for the listed wildlife species. These benchmarks only consider contaminant exposure through oral ingestion of contaminated media; exposure through inhalation or direct dermal exposure are not considered in this report

  5. Toxicological benchmarks for wildlife: 1994 Revision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Opresko, D.M.; Sample, B.E.; Suter, G.W. II

    1994-09-01

    The process by which ecological risks of environmental contaminants are evaluated is two-tiered. The first tier is a screening assessment where concentrations of contaminants in the environment are compared to toxicological benchmarks which represent concentrations of chemicals in environmental media (water, sediment, soil, food, etc.) that are presumed to be nonhazardous to the surrounding biota. The second tier is a baseline ecological risk assessment where toxicological benchmarks are one of several lines of evidence used to support or refute the presence of ecological effects. The report presents toxicological benchmarks for assessment of effects of 76 chemicals on 8 representative mammalian wildlife species and 31 chemicals on 9 avian wildlife species. The chemicals are some of those that occur at United States Department of Energy waste sites; the wildlife species were chosen because they are widely distributed and provide a representative range of body sizes and diets. Further descriptions of the chosen wildlife species and chemicals are provided in the report. The benchmarks presented in this report represent values believed to be nonhazardous for the listed wildlife species. These benchmarks only consider contaminant exposure through oral ingestion of contaminated media; exposure through inhalation or direct dermal exposure are not considered in this report.

  6. A concept paper: using the outcomes of common surgical conditions as quality metrics to benchmark district surgical services in South Africa as part of a systematic quality improvement programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Damian L; Kong, Victor Y; Handley, Jonathan; Aldous, Colleen

    2013-07-31

    The fourth, fifth and sixth Millennium Development Goals relate directly to improving global healthcare and health outcomes. The focus is to improve global health outcomes by reducing maternal and childhood mortality and the burden of infectious diseases such as HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria. Specific targets and time frames have been set for these diseases. There is, however, no specific mention of surgically treated diseases in these goals, reflecting a bias that is slowly changing with emerging consensus that surgical care is an integral part of primary healthcare systems in the developing world. The disparities between the developed and developing world in terms of wealth and social indicators are reflected in disparities in access to surgical care. Health administrators must develop plans and strategies to reduce these disparities. However, any strategic plan that addresses deficits in healthcare must have a system of metrics, which benchmark the current quality of care so that specific improvement targets may be set.This concept paper outlines the role of surgical services in a primary healthcare system, highlights the ongoing disparities in access to surgical care and outcomes of surgical care, discusses the importance of a systems-based approach to healthcare and quality improvement, and reviews the current state of surgical care at district hospitals in South Africa. Finally, it proposes that the results from a recently published study on acute appendicitis, as well as data from a number of other common surgical conditions, can provide measurable outcomes across a healthcare system and so act as an indicator for judging improvements in surgical care. This would provide a framework for the introduction of collection of these outcomes as a routine epidemiological health policy tool.

  7. Cloud benchmarking for performance

    OpenAIRE

    Varghese, Blesson; Akgun, Ozgur; Miguel, Ian; Thai, Long; Barker, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Date of Acceptance: 20/09/2014 How can applications be deployed on the cloud to achieve maximum performance? This question has become significant and challenging with the availability of a wide variety of Virtual Machines (VMs) with different performance capabilities in the cloud. The above question is addressed by proposing a six step benchmarking methodology in which a user provides a set of four weights that indicate how important each of the following groups: memory, processor, computa...

  8. Introduction to 'International Handbook of Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komuro, Yuichi

    1998-01-01

    The Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (CSBEP) was initiated in 1992 by the United States Department of Energy. The project quickly became an international effort as scientists from other interested countries became involved. The International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) is now an official activity of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development-Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD-NEA). 'International Handbook of Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments' was prepared and is updated year by year by the working group of the project. This handbook contains criticality safety benchmark specifications that have been derived from experiments that were performed at various nuclear critical facilities around the world. The benchmark specifications are intended for use by criticality safety engineers to validate calculation techniques used. The author briefly introduces the informative handbook and would like to encourage Japanese engineers who are in charge of nuclear criticality safety to use the handbook. (author)

  9. Optimisation of energy absorbing liner for equestrian helmets. Part II: Functionally graded foam liner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui, L.; Forero Rueda, M.A.; Gilchrist, M.D.

    2009-01-01

    The energy absorbing liner of safety helmets was optimised using finite element modelling. In this present paper, a functionally graded foam (FGF) liner was modelled, while keeping the average liner density the same as in a corresponding reference single uniform density liner model. Use of a functionally graded foam liner would eliminate issues regarding delamination and crack propagation between interfaces of different density layers which could arise in liners with discrete density variations. As in our companion Part I paper [Forero Rueda MA, Cui L, Gilchrist MD. Optimisation of energy absorbing liner for equestrian helmets. Part I: Layered foam liner. Mater Des [submitted for publication

  10. High energy X-ray CT system using a linear accelerator for automobile parts inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanamori, T.; Sukita, T.

    1995-01-01

    A high energy X-ray CT system (maximum photon energy: 0.95 MeV) has been developed for industrial use. This system employs a linear accelerator as an X-ray source. It is able to image the cross section of automobile parts and can be applied to a solidification analysis study of the cylinder head in an automobile. This paper describes the features of the system and application results which can be related to solidification analysis of the cylinder head when fabricated from an aluminum casting. Some cross-sectional images are also presented as evidence for nondestructive inspection of automobile parts. (orig.)

  11. Nuclear energy and public safety (Part I): a bibliography of popular literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabriel, M.R.

    1982-01-01

    The focus of Part 1 is to aid the general research (especially undergraduate students and the general public) to locate information on the safety aspects of nuclear energy. A subject index after the bibliography breaks down the entries into 11 subtopics. An author index is also provided. This part of the bibliography consists of books, periodical articles, and government publications dating from 1959 to 1980

  12. Benchmarking reference services: an introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, J G; Buchanan, H S

    1995-01-01

    Benchmarking is based on the common sense idea that someone else, either inside or outside of libraries, has found a better way of doing certain things and that your own library's performance can be improved by finding out how others do things and adopting the best practices you find. Benchmarking is one of the tools used for achieving continuous improvement in Total Quality Management (TQM) programs. Although benchmarking can be done on an informal basis, TQM puts considerable emphasis on formal data collection and performance measurement. Used to its full potential, benchmarking can provide a common measuring stick to evaluate process performance. This article introduces the general concept of benchmarking, linking it whenever possible to reference services in health sciences libraries. Data collection instruments that have potential application in benchmarking studies are discussed and the need to develop common measurement tools to facilitate benchmarking is emphasized.

  13. Binary Associative Memories as a Benchmark for Spiking Neuromorphic Hardware

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Stöckel

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Large-scale neuromorphic hardware platforms, specialized computer systems for energy efficient simulation of spiking neural networks, are being developed around the world, for example as part of the European Human Brain Project (HBP. Due to conceptual differences, a universal performance analysis of these systems in terms of runtime, accuracy and energy efficiency is non-trivial, yet indispensable for further hard- and software development. In this paper we describe a scalable benchmark based on a spiking neural network implementation of the binary neural associative memory. We treat neuromorphic hardware and software simulators as black-boxes and execute exactly the same network description across all devices. Experiments on the HBP platforms under varying configurations of the associative memory show that the presented method allows to test the quality of the neuron model implementation, and to explain significant deviations from the expected reference output.

  14. Quality in E-Learning--A Conceptual Framework Based on Experiences from Three International Benchmarking Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ossiannilsson, E.; Landgren, L.

    2012-01-01

    Between 2008 and 2010, Lund University took part in three international benchmarking projects, "E-xcellence+," the "eLearning Benchmarking Exercise 2009," and the "First Dual-Mode Distance Learning Benchmarking Club." A comparison of these models revealed a rather high level of correspondence. From this finding and…

  15. Building America Research Benchmark Definition: Updated December 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendron, R.; Engebrecht, C.

    2010-01-01

    The Benchmark represents typical construction at a fixed point in time so it can be used as the basis for Building America's multi-year energy savings goals without chasing a 'moving target.'

  16. Thought Experiment to Examine Benchmark Performance for Fusion Nuclear Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Isao; Ohta, Masayuki; Kusaka, Sachie; Sato, Fuminobu; Miyamaru, Hiroyuki

    2017-09-01

    There are many benchmark experiments carried out so far with DT neutrons especially aiming at fusion reactor development. These integral experiments seemed vaguely to validate the nuclear data below 14 MeV. However, no precise studies exist now. The author's group thus started to examine how well benchmark experiments with DT neutrons can play a benchmarking role for energies below 14 MeV. Recently, as a next phase, to generalize the above discussion, the energy range was expanded to the entire region. In this study, thought experiments with finer energy bins have thus been conducted to discuss how to generally estimate performance of benchmark experiments. As a result of thought experiments with a point detector, the sensitivity for a discrepancy appearing in the benchmark analysis is "equally" due not only to contribution directly conveyed to the deterctor, but also due to indirect contribution of neutrons (named (A)) making neutrons conveying the contribution, indirect controbution of neutrons (B) making the neutrons (A) and so on. From this concept, it would become clear from a sensitivity analysis in advance how well and which energy nuclear data could be benchmarked with a benchmark experiment.

  17. Thought Experiment to Examine Benchmark Performance for Fusion Nuclear Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murata Isao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available There are many benchmark experiments carried out so far with DT neutrons especially aiming at fusion reactor development. These integral experiments seemed vaguely to validate the nuclear data below 14 MeV. However, no precise studies exist now. The author’s group thus started to examine how well benchmark experiments with DT neutrons can play a benchmarking role for energies below 14 MeV. Recently, as a next phase, to generalize the above discussion, the energy range was expanded to the entire region. In this study, thought experiments with finer energy bins have thus been conducted to discuss how to generally estimate performance of benchmark experiments. As a result of thought experiments with a point detector, the sensitivity for a discrepancy appearing in the benchmark analysis is “equally” due not only to contribution directly conveyed to the deterctor, but also due to indirect contribution of neutrons (named (A making neutrons conveying the contribution, indirect controbution of neutrons (B making the neutrons (A and so on. From this concept, it would become clear from a sensitivity analysis in advance how well and which energy nuclear data could be benchmarked with a benchmark experiment.

  18. A Benchmarking System for Domestic Water Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dexter V. L. Hunt

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The national demand for water in the UK is predicted to increase, exacerbated by a growing UK population, and home-grown demands for energy and food. When set against the context of overstretched existing supply sources vulnerable to droughts, particularly in increasingly dense city centres, the delicate balance of matching minimal demands with resource secure supplies becomes critical. When making changes to "internal" demands the role of technological efficiency and user behaviour cannot be ignored, yet existing benchmarking systems traditionally do not consider the latter. This paper investigates the practicalities of adopting a domestic benchmarking system (using a band rating that allows individual users to assess their current water use performance against what is possible. The benchmarking system allows users to achieve higher benchmarks through any approach that reduces water consumption. The sensitivity of water use benchmarks are investigated by making changes to user behaviour and technology. The impact of adopting localised supplies (i.e., Rainwater harvesting—RWH and Grey water—GW and including "external" gardening demands are investigated. This includes the impacts (in isolation and combination of the following: occupancy rates (1 to 4; roof size (12.5 m2 to 100 m2; garden size (25 m2 to 100 m2 and geographical location (North West, Midlands and South East, UK with yearly temporal effects (i.e., rainfall and temperature. Lessons learnt from analysis of the proposed benchmarking system are made throughout this paper, in particular its compatibility with the existing Code for Sustainable Homes (CSH accreditation system. Conclusions are subsequently drawn for the robustness of the proposed system.

  19. The energy balance experiment EBEX-2000. Part III: Behaviour and quality of the radiation measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kohsiek, W.; Liebethal, C.; Foken, T.; Vogt, R.; Oncley, S.P.; Bernhofer, C.; Debruin, H.A.R.

    2007-01-01

    An important part of the Energy Balance Experiment (EBEX-2000) was the measurement of the net radiation and its components. Since the terrain, an irrigated cotton field, could not be considered homogeneous, radiation measurements were made at nine sites using a variety of radiation instruments,

  20. Benchmarking HIV health care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Podlekareva, Daria; Reekie, Joanne; Mocroft, Amanda

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: State-of-the-art care involving the utilisation of multiple health care interventions is the basis for an optimal long-term clinical prognosis for HIV-patients. We evaluated health care for HIV-patients based on four key indicators. METHODS: Four indicators of health care we...... document pronounced regional differences in adherence to guidelines and can help to identify gaps and direct target interventions. It may serve as a tool for assessment and benchmarking the clinical management of HIV-patients in any setting worldwide....

  1. The COST Benchmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Christian Søndergaard; Tiesyte, Dalia; Tradisauskas, Nerius

    2006-01-01

    An infrastructure is emerging that enables the positioning of populations of on-line, mobile service users. In step with this, research in the management of moving objects has attracted substantial attention. In particular, quite a few proposals now exist for the indexing of moving objects...... takes into account that the available positions of the moving objects are inaccurate, an aspect largely ignored in previous indexing research. The concepts of data and query enlargement are introduced for addressing inaccuracy. As proof of concepts of the benchmark, the paper covers the application...

  2. Fiscal greening and energy. Part 2. Economic effects of increase and broadening of the Regulating Energy Levy (REB)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lijesen, M.; Mulder, M.; Vromans, M.

    2001-07-01

    For the benefit of the discussion on greening the Dutch tax system, The Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis (CPB) has made an analysis of the economic and environmental effects of raising the energy tax in the Netherlands, the so called Regulating Energy Tax.This energy tax is introduced in 1996 and has been raised in the following years in order to encourage energy efficiency improvement and the production of renewable energy. Since the introduction and the raising of this energy tax is coupled with a reduction of the tax tariffs on labour and capital, the tax basis is shifted towards environment polluting factors.This tax shift is called 'greening the tax system'. Five variants for raising the energy tax are analysed. In two of these variants the existing tariffs are raised by maintaining the existing exemption for energy use above a certain level. In the other two variants this level is raised, meaning that a larger part of the total energy use is taxed.In addition to these 4 variants, CPB has formulated a variant in which taxes have to be paid for all energy use without any exemption. In the long run uniform marginal tariffs for all energy users is the most efficient variant. Measures to reduce emissions will then be taken by the firms and households where the marginal reduction costs are relatively low. In the medium run the environmental and macroeconomic effects are almost the same in all variants. Raising the energy tax will result in a reduction of the emissions of CO2 in 2020 by 2,5 -8,5 Mton. The explanation for this range is the existence of large uncertainties concerning the development of costs and non-financial bottlenecks in the field of renewable energy production. The macro-economic costs of all variants in 2020 will be less then 0,1% GDP. The differences in environmental and macro-economic effects in the medium run are too small and the uncertainties about these effects are too large to rank these variants according their cost

  3. ZZ ECN-BUBEBO, ECN-Petten Burnup Benchmark Book, Inventories, Afterheat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kloosterman, Jan Leen

    1999-01-01

    Description of program or function: Contains experimental benchmarks which can be used for the validation of burnup code systems and accompanied data libraries. Although the benchmarks presented here are thoroughly described in literature, it is in many cases not straightforward to retrieve unambiguously the correct input data and corresponding results from the benchmark Descriptions. Furthermore, results which can easily be measured, are sometimes difficult to calculate because of conversions to be made. Therefore, emphasis has been put to clarify the input of the benchmarks and to present the benchmark results in such a way that they can easily be calculated and compared. For more thorough Descriptions of the benchmarks themselves, the literature referred to here should be consulted. This benchmark book is divided in 11 chapters/files containing the following in text and tabular form: chapter 1: Introduction; chapter 2: Burnup Credit Criticality Benchmark Phase 1-B; chapter 3: Yankee-Rowe Core V Fuel Inventory Study; chapter 4: H.B. Robinson Unit 2 Fuel Inventory Study; chapter 5: Turkey Point Unit 3 Fuel Inventory Study; chapter 6: Turkey Point Unit 3 Afterheat Power Study; chapter 7: Dickens Benchmark on Fission Product Energy Release of U-235; chapter 8: Dickens Benchmark on Fission Product Energy Release of Pu-239; chapter 9: Yarnell Benchmark on Decay Heat Measurements of U-233; chapter 10: Yarnell Benchmark on Decay Heat Measurements of U-235; chapter 11: Yarnell Benchmark on Decay Heat Measurements of Pu-239

  4. Calculation of Single Cell and Fuel Assembly IRIS Benchmarks Using WIMSD5B and GNOMER Codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pevec, D.; Grgic, D.; Jecmenica, R.

    2002-01-01

    IRIS reactor (an acronym for International Reactor Innovative and Secure) is a modular, integral, light water cooled, small to medium power (100-335 MWe/module) reactor, which addresses the requirements defined by the United States Department of Energy for Generation IV nuclear energy systems, i.e., proliferation resistance, enhanced safety, improved economics, and waste reduction. An international consortium led by Westinghouse/BNFL was created for development of IRIS reactor; it includes universities, institutes, commercial companies, and utilities. Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Computing, University of Zagreb joined the consortium in year 2001, with the aim to take part in IRIS neutronics design and safety analyses of IRIS transients. A set of neutronic benchmarks for IRIS reactor was defined with the objective to compare results of all participants with exactly the same assumptions. In this paper a calculation of Benchmark 44 for IRIS reactor is described. Benchmark 44 is defined as a core depletion benchmark problem for specified IRIS reactor operating conditions (e.g., temperatures, moderator density) without feedback. Enriched boron, inhomogeneously distributed in axial direction, is used as an integral fuel burnable absorber (IFBA). The aim of this benchmark was to enable a more direct comparison of results of different code systems. Calculations of Benchmark 44 were performed using the modified CORD-2 code package. The CORD-2 code package consists of WIMSD and GNOMER codes. WIMSD is a well-known lattice spectrum calculation code. GNOMER solves the neutron diffusion equation in three-dimensional Cartesian geometry by the Green's function nodal method. The following parameters were obtained in Benchmark 44 analysis: effective multiplication factor as a function of burnup, nuclear peaking factor as a function of burnup, axial offset as a function of burnup, core-average axial power profile, core radial power profile, axial power profile for selected

  5. Core Benchmarks Descriptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlovichev, A.M.

    2001-01-01

    Actual regulations while designing of new fuel cycles for nuclear power installations comprise a calculational justification to be performed by certified computer codes. It guarantees that obtained calculational results will be within the limits of declared uncertainties that are indicated in a certificate issued by Gosatomnadzor of Russian Federation (GAN) and concerning a corresponding computer code. A formal justification of declared uncertainties is the comparison of calculational results obtained by a commercial code with the results of experiments or of calculational tests that are calculated with an uncertainty defined by certified precision codes of MCU type or of other one. The actual level of international cooperation provides an enlarging of the bank of experimental and calculational benchmarks acceptable for a certification of commercial codes that are being used for a design of fuel loadings with MOX fuel. In particular, the work is practically finished on the forming of calculational benchmarks list for a certification of code TVS-M as applied to MOX fuel assembly calculations. The results on these activities are presented

  6. A benchmarking study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Groessing

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A benchmark study for permeability measurement is presented. In the past studies of other research groups which focused on the reproducibility of 1D-permeability measurements showed high standard deviations of the gained permeability values (25%, even though a defined test rig with required specifications was used. Within this study, the reproducibility of capacitive in-plane permeability testing system measurements was benchmarked by comparing results of two research sites using this technology. The reproducibility was compared by using a glass fibre woven textile and carbon fibre non crimped fabric (NCF. These two material types were taken into consideration due to the different electrical properties of glass and carbon with respect to dielectric capacitive sensors of the permeability measurement systems. In order to determine the unsaturated permeability characteristics as function of fibre volume content the measurements were executed at three different fibre volume contents including five repetitions. It was found that the stability and reproducibility of the presentedin-plane permeability measurement system is very good in the case of the glass fibre woven textiles. This is true for the comparison of the repetition measurements as well as for the comparison between the two different permeameters. These positive results were confirmed by a comparison to permeability values of the same textile gained with an older generation permeameter applying the same measurement technology. Also it was shown, that a correct determination of the grammage and the material density are crucial for correct correlation of measured permeability values and fibre volume contents.

  7. The OECD/NEA/NSC PBMR coupled neutronics/thermal hydraulics transient benchmark: The PBMR-400 core design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reitsma, F.; Ivanov, K.; Downar, T.; De Haas, H.; Gougar, H. D.

    2006-01-01

    The Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) is a High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) concept to be built in South Africa. As part of the verification and validation program the definition and execution of code-to-code benchmark exercises are important. The Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) has accepted, through the Nuclear Science Committee (NSC), the inclusion of the Pebble-Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) coupled neutronics/thermal hydraulics transient benchmark problem in its program. The OECD benchmark defines steady-state and transients cases, including reactivity insertion transients. It makes use of a common set of cross sections (to eliminate uncertainties between different codes) and includes specific simplifications to the design to limit the need for participants to introduce approximations in their models. In this paper the detailed specification is explained, including the test cases to be calculated and the results required from participants. (authors)

  8. Benchmarking Using Basic DBMS Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crolotte, Alain; Ghazal, Ahmad

    The TPC-H benchmark proved to be successful in the decision support area. Many commercial database vendors and their related hardware vendors used these benchmarks to show the superiority and competitive edge of their products. However, over time, the TPC-H became less representative of industry trends as vendors keep tuning their database to this benchmark-specific workload. In this paper, we present XMarq, a simple benchmark framework that can be used to compare various software/hardware combinations. Our benchmark model is currently composed of 25 queries that measure the performance of basic operations such as scans, aggregations, joins and index access. This benchmark model is based on the TPC-H data model due to its maturity and well-understood data generation capability. We also propose metrics to evaluate single-system performance and compare two systems. Finally we illustrate the effectiveness of this model by showing experimental results comparing two systems under different conditions.

  9. Benchmarking & European Sustainable Transport Policies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudmundsson, H.

    2003-01-01

    , Benchmarking is one of the management tools that have recently been introduced in the transport sector. It is rapidly being applied to a wide range of transport operations, services and policies. This paper is a contribution to the discussion of the role of benchmarking in the future efforts to...... contribution to the discussions within the Eusponsored BEST Thematic Network (Benchmarking European Sustainable Transport) which ran from 2000 to 2003....

  10. Power reactor pressure vessel benchmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahn, F.J.

    1978-01-01

    A review is given of the current status of experimental and calculational benchmarks for use in understanding the radiation embrittlement effects in the pressure vessels of operating light water power reactors. The requirements of such benchmarks for application to pressure vessel dosimetry are stated. Recent developments in active and passive neutron detectors sensitive in the ranges of importance to embrittlement studies are summarized and recommendations for improvements in the benchmark are made. (author)

  11. Nuclear energy is part of the solution to struggle against climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faudon, Valerie; Jouette, Isabelle; Le Ngoc, Boris

    2015-01-01

    This document is the contribution of the SFEN to the preparation of the Paris Conference on Climate (COP21). It is based on various scenarios proposed by the IEA and assessments made by different work groups of the IPCC. This contribution outlines that the world will need all low-carbon energies, notably nuclear energy. It outlines that, in 35 years of time, 80 pc of electricity will have to be low-carbon electricity, that the situation is complex as CO 2 emission must be decreased while facing basic needs of humanity, that the IPCC identifies three types of low-carbon electricity (renewable, nuclear and CCS for carbon capture and sequestration), and that the electrification of uses is an efficient vector for de-carbonation. It also outlines that we must at once use available low-carbon energies: 70 pc of the carbon budget has already been spent; nuclear energy is an industrial, available, low-carbon and efficient solution; nuclear energy is the first low-carbon electricity source in OECD countries; nuclear energy is a solution to support growth in emerging countries; nuclear energy will keep on being an asset to reduce CO 2 emissions. The last part outlines that every country should be able to access an as large as possible portfolio of low-carbon technologies, and that nuclear energy is an opportunity to meet this challenge

  12. Benchmark Evaluation of HTR-PROTEUS Pebble Bed Experimental Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bess, John D.; Montierth, Leland; Köberl, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    Benchmark models were developed to evaluate 11 critical core configurations of the HTR-PROTEUS pebble bed experimental program. Various additional reactor physics measurements were performed as part of this program; currently only a total of 37 absorber rod worth measurements have been evaluated as acceptable benchmark experiments for Cores 4, 9, and 10. Dominant uncertainties in the experimental keff for all core configurations come from uncertainties in the 235 U enrichment of the fuel, impurities in the moderator pebbles, and the density and impurity content of the radial reflector. Calculations of k eff with MCNP5 and ENDF/B-VII.0 neutron nuclear data are greater than the benchmark values but within 1% and also within the 3σ uncertainty, except for Core 4, which is the only randomly packed pebble configuration. Repeated calculations of k eff with MCNP6.1 and ENDF/B-VII.1 are lower than the benchmark values and within 1% (~3σ) except for Cores 5 and 9, which calculate lower than the benchmark eigenvalues within 4σ. The primary difference between the two nuclear data libraries is the adjustment of the absorption cross section of graphite. Simulations of the absorber rod worth measurements are within 3σ of the benchmark experiment values. The complete benchmark evaluation details are available in the 2014 edition of the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments

  13. Benchmarking singlet and triplet excitation energies of molecular semiconductors for singlet fission: Tuning the amount of HF exchange and adjusting local correlation to obtain accurate functionals for singlet-triplet gaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brückner, Charlotte; Engels, Bernd

    2017-01-01

    Vertical and adiabatic singlet and triplet excitation energies of molecular p-type semiconductors calculated with various DFT functionals and wave-function based approaches are benchmarked against MS-CASPT2/cc-pVTZ reference values. A special focus lies on the singlet-triplet gaps that are very important in the process of singlet fission. Singlet fission has the potential to boost device efficiencies of organic solar cells, but the scope of existing singlet-fission compounds is still limited. A computational prescreening of candidate molecules could enlarge it; yet it requires efficient methods accurately predicting singlet and triplet excitation energies. Different DFT formulations (Tamm-Dancoff approximation, linear response time-dependent DFT, Δ-SCF) and spin scaling schemes along with several ab initio methods (CC2, ADC(2)/MP2, CIS(D), CIS) are evaluated. While wave-function based methods yield rather reliable singlet-triplet gaps, many DFT functionals are shown to systematically underestimate triplet excitation energies. To gain insight, the impact of exact exchange and correlation is in detail addressed.

  14. Developing Benchmarking Criteria for CO2 Emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neelis, M.; Worrell, E.; Mueller, N.; Angelini, T. [Ecofys, Utrecht (Netherlands); Cremer, C.; Schleich, J.; Eichhammer, W. [The Fraunhofer Institute for Systems and Innovation research, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2009-02-15

    A European Union (EU) wide greenhouse gas (GHG) allowance trading scheme (EU ETS) was implemented in the EU in 2005. In the first two trading periods of the scheme (running up to 2012), free allocation based on historical emissions was the main methodology for allocation of allowances to existing installations. For the third trading period (2013 - 2020), the European Commission proposed in January 2008 a more important role of auctioning of allowances rather then free allocation. (Transitional) free allocation of allowances to industrial sectors will be determined via harmonized allocation rules, where feasible based on benchmarking. In general terms, a benchmark based method allocates allowances based on a certain amount of emissions per unit of productive output (i.e. the benchmark). This study aims to derive criteria for an allocation methodology for the EU Emission Trading Scheme based on benchmarking for the period 2013 - 2020. To test the feasibility of the criteria, we apply them to four example product groups: iron and steel, pulp and paper, lime and glass. The basis for this study is the Commission proposal for a revised ETS directive put forward on 23 January 2008 and does not take into account any changes to this proposal in the co-decision procedure that resulted in the adoption of the Energy and Climate change package in December 2008.

  15. Low energy isomers of (H2O)25 from a hierarchical method based on Monte Carlo temperature basin paving and molecular tailoring approaches benchmarked by MP2 calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahu, Nityananda; Gadre, Shridhar R.; Rakshit, Avijit; Bandyopadhyay, Pradipta; Miliordos, Evangelos; Xantheas, Sotiris S.

    2014-01-01

    We report new global minimum candidate structures for the (H 2 O) 25 cluster that are lower in energy than the ones reported previously and correspond to hydrogen bonded networks with 42 hydrogen bonds and an interior, fully coordinated water molecule. These were obtained as a result of a hierarchical approach based on initial Monte Carlo Temperature Basin Paving sampling of the cluster's Potential Energy Surface with the Effective Fragment Potential, subsequent geometry optimization using the Molecular Tailoring Approach with the fragments treated at the second order Møller-Plesset (MP2) perturbation (MTA-MP2) and final refinement of the entire cluster at the MP2 level of theory. The MTA-MP2 optimized cluster geometries, constructed from the fragments, were found to be within 2 O) 25 cluster. In addition, the grafting of the MTA-MP2 energies yields electronic energies that are within <0.3 kcal/mol from the MP2 energies of the entire cluster while preserving their energy rank order. Finally, the MTA-MP2 approach was found to reproduce the MP2 harmonic vibrational frequencies, constructed from the fragments, quite accurately when compared to the MP2 ones of the entire cluster in both the HOH bending and the OH stretching regions of the spectra

  16. MOx Depletion Calculation Benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    San Felice, Laurence; Eschbach, Romain; Dewi Syarifah, Ratna; Maryam, Seif-Eddine; Hesketh, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Under the auspices of the NEA Nuclear Science Committee (NSC), the Working Party on Scientific Issues of Reactor Systems (WPRS) has been established to study the reactor physics, fuel performance, radiation transport and shielding, and the uncertainties associated with modelling of these phenomena in present and future nuclear power systems. The WPRS has different expert groups to cover a wide range of scientific issues in these fields. The Expert Group on Reactor Physics and Advanced Nuclear Systems (EGRPANS) was created in 2011 to perform specific tasks associated with reactor physics aspects of present and future nuclear power systems. EGRPANS provides expert advice to the WPRS and the nuclear community on the development needs (data and methods, validation experiments, scenario studies) for different reactor systems and also provides specific technical information regarding: core reactivity characteristics, including fuel depletion effects; core power/flux distributions; Core dynamics and reactivity control. In 2013 EGRPANS published a report that investigated fuel depletion effects in a Pressurised Water Reactor (PWR). This was entitled 'International Comparison of a Depletion Calculation Benchmark on Fuel Cycle Issues' NEA/NSC/DOC(2013) that documented a benchmark exercise for UO 2 fuel rods. This report documents a complementary benchmark exercise that focused on PuO 2 /UO 2 Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel rods. The results are especially relevant to the back-end of the fuel cycle, including irradiated fuel transport, reprocessing, interim storage and waste repository. Saint-Laurent B1 (SLB1) was the first French reactor to use MOx assemblies. SLB1 is a 900 MWe PWR, with 30% MOx fuel loading. The standard MOx assemblies, used in Saint-Laurent B1 reactor, include three zones with different plutonium enrichments, high Pu content (5.64%) in the center zone, medium Pu content (4.42%) in the intermediate zone and low Pu content (2.91%) in the peripheral zone

  17. Benchmarking Academic Anatomic Pathologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara S. Ducatman MD

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The most common benchmarks for faculty productivity are derived from Medical Group Management Association (MGMA or Vizient-AAMC Faculty Practice Solutions Center ® (FPSC databases. The Association of Pathology Chairs has also collected similar survey data for several years. We examined the Association of Pathology Chairs annual faculty productivity data and compared it with MGMA and FPSC data to understand the value, inherent flaws, and limitations of benchmarking data. We hypothesized that the variability in calculated faculty productivity is due to the type of practice model and clinical effort allocation. Data from the Association of Pathology Chairs survey on 629 surgical pathologists and/or anatomic pathologists from 51 programs were analyzed. From review of service assignments, we were able to assign each pathologist to a specific practice model: general anatomic pathologists/surgical pathologists, 1 or more subspecialties, or a hybrid of the 2 models. There were statistically significant differences among academic ranks and practice types. When we analyzed our data using each organization’s methods, the median results for the anatomic pathologists/surgical pathologists general practice model compared to MGMA and FPSC results for anatomic and/or surgical pathology were quite close. Both MGMA and FPSC data exclude a significant proportion of academic pathologists with clinical duties. We used the more inclusive FPSC definition of clinical “full-time faculty” (0.60 clinical full-time equivalent and above. The correlation between clinical full-time equivalent effort allocation, annual days on service, and annual work relative value unit productivity was poor. This study demonstrates that effort allocations are variable across academic departments of pathology and do not correlate well with either work relative value unit effort or reported days on service. Although the Association of Pathology Chairs–reported median work relative

  18. Zn Coordination Chemistry:  Development of Benchmark Suites for Geometries, Dipole Moments, and Bond Dissociation Energies and Their Use To Test and Validate Density Functionals and Molecular Orbital Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Elizabeth A; Truhlar, Donald G

    2008-01-01

    We present nonrelativistic and relativistic benchmark databases (obtained by coupled cluster calculations) of 10 Zn-ligand bond distances, 8 dipole moments, and 12 bond dissociation energies in Zn coordination compounds with O, S, NH3, H2O, OH, SCH3, and H ligands. These are used to test the predictions of 39 density functionals, Hartree-Fock theory, and seven more approximate molecular orbital theories. In the nonrelativisitic case, the M05-2X, B97-2, and mPW1PW functionals emerge as the most accurate ones for this test data, with unitless balanced mean unsigned errors (BMUEs) of 0.33, 0.38, and 0.43, respectively. The best local functionals (i.e., functionals with no Hartree-Fock exchange) are M06-L and τ-HCTH with BMUEs of 0.54 and 0.60, respectively. The popular B3LYP functional has a BMUE of 0.51, only slightly better than the value of 0.54 for the best local functional, which is less expensive. Hartree-Fock theory itself has a BMUE of 1.22. The M05-2X functional has a mean unsigned error of 0.008 Å for bond lengths, 0.19 D for dipole moments, and 4.30 kcal/mol for bond energies. The X3LYP functional has a smaller mean unsigned error (0.007 Å) for bond lengths but has mean unsigned errors of 0.43 D for dipole moments and 5.6 kcal/mol for bond energies. The M06-2X functional has a smaller mean unsigned error (3.3 kcal/mol) for bond energies but has mean unsigned errors of 0.017 Å for bond lengths and 0.37 D for dipole moments. The best of the semiempirical molecular orbital theories are PM3 and PM6, with BMUEs of 1.96 and 2.02, respectively. The ten most accurate functionals from the nonrelativistic benchmark analysis are then tested in relativistic calculations against new benchmarks obtained with coupled-cluster calculations and a relativistic effective core potential, resulting in M05-2X (BMUE = 0.895), PW6B95 (BMUE = 0.90), and B97-2 (BMUE = 0.93) as the top three functionals. We find significant relativistic effects (∼0.01 Å in bond lengths, ∼0

  19. Benchmark testing calculations for 232Th

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Ping

    2003-01-01

    The cross sections of 232 Th from CNDC and JENDL-3.3 were processed with NJOY97.45 code in the ACE format for the continuous-energy Monte Carlo Code MCNP4C. The K eff values and central reaction rates based on CENDL-3.0, JENDL-3.3 and ENDF/B-6.2 were calculated using MCNP4C code for benchmark assembly, and the comparisons with experimental results are given. (author)

  20. Shielding benchmark test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawai, Masayoshi

    1984-01-01

    Iron data in JENDL-2 have been tested by analyzing shielding benchmark experiments for neutron transmission through iron block performed at KFK using CF-252 neutron source and at ORNL using collimated neutron beam from reactor. The analyses are made by a shielding analysis code system RADHEAT-V4 developed at JAERI. The calculated results are compared with the measured data. As for the KFK experiments, the C/E values are about 1.1. For the ORNL experiments, the calculated values agree with the measured data within an accuracy of 33% for the off-center geometry. The d-t neutron transmission measurements through carbon sphere made at LLNL are also analyzed preliminarily by using the revised JENDL data for fusion neutronics calculation. (author)

  1. SSI and structural benchmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philippacopoulos, A.J.; Miller, C.A.; Costantino, C.J.; Graves, H.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents the latest results of the ongoing program entitled, Standard Problems for Structural Computer Codes, currently being worked on at BNL for the USNRC, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. During FY 1986, efforts were focussed on three tasks, namely, (1) an investigation of ground water effects on the response of Category I structures, (2) the Soil-Structure Interaction Workshop and (3) studies on structural benchmarks associated with Category I structures. The objective of the studies on ground water effects is to verify the applicability and the limitations of the SSI methods currently used by the industry in performing seismic evaluations of nuclear plants which are located at sites with high water tables. In a previous study by BNL (NUREG/CR-4588), it has been concluded that the pore water can influence significantly the soil-structure interaction process. This result, however, is based on the assumption of fully saturated soil profiles. Consequently, the work was further extended to include cases associated with variable water table depths. In this paper, results related to cut-off depths beyond which the pore water effects can be ignored in seismic calculations, are addressed. Comprehensive numerical data are given for soil configurations typical to those encountered in nuclear plant sites. These data were generated by using a modified version of the SLAM code which is capable of handling problems related to the dynamic response of saturated soils. Further, the paper presents some key aspects of the Soil-Structure Interaction Workshop (NUREG/CP-0054) which was held in Bethesda, MD on June 1, 1986. Finally, recent efforts related to the task on the structural benchmarks are described

  2. Real part of amplitude and hadron scattering cross section at superhigh energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Troshin, S.M.; Tyurin, N.E.

    1987-01-01

    New data on measuring the ratio of the real to imaginary part of the forward scattering amplitude: ρ pp-bar (√s=546 GeV)=0.24±0.04 have been considered. This result is shown to agree with the behaviour of σ tot (s), predicted by the U-matrix model. A possibility of transition to antishadow scattering mode at superhigh energies is stated

  3. Internal Benchmarking for Institutional Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronco, Sharron L.

    2012-01-01

    Internal benchmarking is an established practice in business and industry for identifying best in-house practices and disseminating the knowledge about those practices to other groups in the organization. Internal benchmarking can be done with structures, processes, outcomes, or even individuals. In colleges or universities with multicampuses or a…

  4. Entropy-based benchmarking methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Temurshoev, Umed

    2012-01-01

    We argue that benchmarking sign-volatile series should be based on the principle of movement and sign preservation, which states that a bench-marked series should reproduce the movement and signs in the original series. We show that the widely used variants of Denton (1971) method and the growth

  5. Benchmark simulation models, quo vadis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppsson, U.; Alex, J; Batstone, D. J.

    2013-01-01

    As the work of the IWA Task Group on Benchmarking of Control Strategies for wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) is coming to an end, it is essential to disseminate the knowledge gained. For this reason, all authors of the IWA Scientific and Technical Report on benchmarking have come together to p...

  6. EPA's Benchmark Dose Modeling Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    The EPA developed the Benchmark Dose Software (BMDS) as a tool to help Agency risk assessors facilitate applying benchmark dose (BMD) method’s to EPA’s human health risk assessment (HHRA) documents. The application of BMD methods overcomes many well know limitations ...

  7. Benchmark for Strategic Performance Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gohlke, Annette

    1997-01-01

    Explains benchmarking, a total quality management tool used to measure and compare the work processes in a library with those in other libraries to increase library performance. Topics include the main groups of upper management, clients, and staff; critical success factors for each group; and benefits of benchmarking. (Author/LRW)

  8. Benchmarking: A Process for Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peischl, Thomas M.

    One problem with the outcome-based measures used in higher education is that they measure quantity but not quality. Benchmarking, or the use of some external standard of quality to measure tasks, processes, and outputs, is partially solving that difficulty. Benchmarking allows for the establishment of a systematic process to indicate if outputs…

  9. Benchmark job – Watch out!

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    On 12 December 2016, in Echo No. 259, we already discussed at length the MERIT and benchmark jobs. Still, we find that a couple of issues warrant further discussion. Benchmark job – administrative decision on 1 July 2017 On 12 January 2017, the HR Department informed all staff members of a change to the effective date of the administrative decision regarding benchmark jobs. The benchmark job title of each staff member will be confirmed on 1 July 2017, instead of 1 May 2017 as originally announced in HR’s letter on 18 August 2016. Postponing the administrative decision by two months will leave a little more time to address the issues related to incorrect placement in a benchmark job. Benchmark job – discuss with your supervisor, at the latest during the MERIT interview In order to rectify an incorrect placement in a benchmark job, it is essential that the supervisor and the supervisee go over the assigned benchmark job together. In most cases, this placement has been done autom...

  10. Increasing awareness among fluid milk processors of the economic feasibility of energy efficiency projects, and encouraging their adoption through access to benchmarking and other decision-support tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Based on a study done by Thoma et al. (2010) the energy used in fluid milk processing in the United States of America is responsible for approximately 2 million metric tons of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions within the total life cycle of milk. These emissions come from electricity use (about 75 perc...

  11. Building America Research Benchmark Definition, Updated December 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendron, Robert [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Engebrecht, Cheryn [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2010-01-01

    To track progress toward aggressive multi-year, whole-house energy savings goals of 40%–70% and on-site power production of up to 30%, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Residential Buildings Program and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed the Building America (BA) Research Benchmark in consultation with the Building America industry teams.

  12. Transport properties of gaseous ions over a wide energy range. Part III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, H.W.; Thackston, M.G.; McDaniel, E.W.; Mason, E.A.

    1984-01-01

    This paper updates and extends in scope our two previous papers entitled ''Transport Properties of Gaseous Ions over a Wide Energy Range.'' The references to the earlier publications (referred to as ''Part I'' and ''Part II'') are I, H. W. Ellis, R. Y. Pai, E. W. McDonald, E. A. Mason, and L. A. Viehland, ATOMIC DATA AND NUCLEAR DATA TABLES 17, 177--210 (19876); and II, H. W. Ellis, E. W. McDaniel, D. L. Albritton, L. A. Veihland, S. L. Lin, and E. A. Mason, ATOMIC DATA AND NUCLEAR DATA TABLES 22, 179--217 (1978). Parts I and II contained compilations of experimental data on ionic mobilities and diffusion coefficients (both longitudinal and transverse) for ions in neutral gase (almost exclusively at room temperature) in an externally applied electric field

  13. Scope Oriented Thermoeconomic analysis of energy systems. Part II: Formation Structure of Optimality for robust design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piacentino, Antonio; Cardona, Ennio

    2010-01-01

    This paper represents the Part II of a paper in two parts. In Part I the fundamentals of Scope Oriented Thermoeconomics have been introduced, showing a scarce potential for the cost accounting of existing plants; in this Part II the same concepts are applied to the optimization of a small set of design variables for a vapour compression chiller. The method overcomes the limit of most conventional optimization techniques, which are usually based on hermetic algorithms not enabling the energy analyst to recognize all the margins for improvement. The Scope Oriented Thermoeconomic optimization allows us to disassemble the optimization process, thus recognizing the Formation Structure of Optimality, i.e. the specific influence of any thermodynamic and economic parameter in the path toward the optimal design. Finally, the potential applications of such an in-depth understanding of the inner driving forces of the optimization are discussed in the paper, with a particular focus on the sensitivity analysis to the variation of energy and capital costs and on the actual operation-oriented design.

  14. Spent reactor fuel benchmark composition data for code validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bierman, S.R.

    1991-09-01

    To establish criticality safety margins utilizing burnup credit in the storage and transport of spent reactor fuels requires a knowledge of the uncertainty in the calculated fuel composition used in making the reactivity assessment. To provide data for validating such calculated burnup fuel compositions, radiochemical assays are being obtained as part of the United States Department of Energy From-Reactor Cask Development Program. Destructive assay data are being obtained from representative reactor fuels having experienced irradiation exposures up to about 55 GWD/MTM. Assay results and associated operating histories on the initial three samples analyzed in this effort are presented. The three samples were taken from different axial regions of the same fuel rod and represent radiation exposures of about 27, 37, and 44 GWD/MTM. The data are presented in a benchmark type format to facilitate identification/referencing and computer code input

  15. The exponentiated Hencky-logarithmic strain energy. Part II: Coercivity, planar polyconvexity and existence of minimizers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neff, Patrizio; Lankeit, Johannes; Ghiba, Ionel-Dumitrel; Martin, Robert; Steigmann, David

    2015-08-01

    We consider a family of isotropic volumetric-isochoric decoupled strain energies based on the Hencky-logarithmic (true, natural) strain tensor log U, where μ > 0 is the infinitesimal shear modulus, is the infinitesimal bulk modulus with the first Lamé constant, are dimensionless parameters, is the gradient of deformation, is the right stretch tensor and is the deviatoric part (the projection onto the traceless tensors) of the strain tensor log U. For small elastic strains, the energies reduce to first order to the classical quadratic Hencky energy which is known to be not rank-one convex. The main result in this paper is that in plane elastostatics the energies of the family are polyconvex for , extending a previous finding on its rank-one convexity. Our method uses a judicious application of Steigmann's polyconvexity criteria based on the representation of the energy in terms of the principal invariants of the stretch tensor U. These energies also satisfy suitable growth and coercivity conditions. We formulate the equilibrium equations, and we prove the existence of minimizers by the direct methods of the calculus of variations.

  16. Energy consumption for sugar manufacturing. Part I: Evaporation versus reverse osmosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madaeni, S.S.; Zereshki, S.

    2010-01-01

    Removing water from various feeds is usually carried out using evaporation process especially in food industry. Due to the high latent heat of water, this unit operation results in consumption of unacceptable amount of energy. Finding low energy consuming processes which could be replaced with this process is still a challenge. The processes with no phase inversion may be considered for concentration purposes with reasonable energy consumption in comparison with the other various separation procedures. Reverse osmosis and most of the other membrane technologies are separation techniques without any change in the phase and therefore consume low amount of energy. Concentrating the sugar thin juice in the classical sugar manufacturing procedure is carried out using conventional evaporation. Reverse osmosis membranes may be used as a pre-concentration step to partially separate water from the sugar thin juice in combination with this part of the plant. Final concentration and thick juice preparation for crystallization may be carried out in the evaporation unit. In this study, membranes were employed for sugar thin juice concentration using a two-stage reverse osmosis process in two different arrangements. The energy consumption was calculated and compared for conventional evaporation versus reverse osmosis combined with evaporation. The results indicate that the employment of reverse osmosis membranes for concentrating the sugar thin juice leads to sensibly lower energy requirements. Furthermore, there is no thermal loss of sugar in the membrane process.

  17. The X-ray energy response of silicon. Part A. Theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraser, G.W.; Abbey, A.F.; Holland, A.; McCarthy, K.; Owens, A.; Wells, A.

    1994-01-01

    In this, the first part of a two-part study of the interaction of soft X-rays with silicon, motivated by the calibration requirements of CCD imaging spectrometers in astronomy, we describe a Monte Carlo model of X-ray energy loss whose products are the energy- and temperature-dependences of (i) W, the average energy required to create an electron-hole pair, and (ii) the Fano factor F. W and F have invariably been treated as material constants in previous analyses of Si X-ray detector performance. We show that in fact, at constant detector temperature T, W is an increasing function of X-ray energy for E -4 K -1 at a typical CCD operating temperature of 170 K. We discuss the practical implications of these results. Finally, we describe our separate calculations of the near-edge variation of CCD quantum detection efficiency arising from silicon K-shell Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS). ((orig.))

  18. The deployment of decentralised energy systems as part of the housing growth programme in the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, Jo

    2010-01-01

    The housing growth programme could offer an opportunity for accelerating the deployment of decentralised renewable energy systems (DRES) in the UK. The Government hopes to leverage private sector investment into DRES as part of new housing projects. The aim of this paper is to assess whether current regulatory and funding frameworks are sufficient to achieve this. The question is explored by drawing on the experience of developers, local authorities, energy utilities and service companies operating in the largest housing growth region in the UK-Thames Gateway. Their experience suggests that the current low intervention approach will be insufficient to generate the shift required in both industries. In order to be more successful economic and regulatory instruments should focus on producers (house-builders and energy providers) rather than consumers (households). Tighter regulation is needed to ensure that producers have a responsibility to install DRES as part of new developments, to enable connection to the grid, to ensure a sustained financial return from investment and revenue is spent on the expansion of new renewable energy infrastructure. This regulatory framework must be under-pinned by substantial funds focused on producers. Greater intervention is needed if DRES is to be included in new housing development.

  19. PIC Simulations in Low Energy Part of PIP-II Proton Linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romanov, Gennady

    2014-07-01

    The front end of PIP-II linac is composed of a 30 keV ion source, low energy beam transport line (LEBT), 2.1 MeV radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ), and medium energy beam transport line (MEBT). This configuration is currently being assembled at Fermilab to support a complete systems test. The front end represents the primary technical risk with PIP-II, and so this step will validate the concept and demonstrate that the hardware can meet the specified requirements. SC accelerating cavities right after MEBT require high quality and well defined beam after RFQ to avoid excessive particle losses. In this paper we will present recent progress of beam dynamic study, using CST PIC simulation code, to investigate partial neutralization effect in LEBT, halo and tail formation in RFQ, total emittance growth and beam losses along low energy part of the linac.

  20. The International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briggs, J.B.

    2003-01-01

    The International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) was initiated in 1992 by the United States Department of Energy. The ICSBEP became an official activity of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) - Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) in 1995. Representatives from the United States, United Kingdom, France, Japan, the Russian Federation, Hungary, Republic of Korea, Slovenia, Yugoslavia, Kazakhstan, Israel, Spain, and Brazil are now participating. The purpose of the ICSBEP is to identify, evaluate, verify, and formally document a comprehensive and internationally peer-reviewed set of criticality safety benchmark data. The work of the ICSBEP is published as an OECD handbook entitled 'International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments.' The 2003 Edition of the Handbook contains benchmark model specifications for 3070 critical or subcritical configurations that are intended for validating computer codes that calculate effective neutron multiplication and for testing basic nuclear data. (author)

  1. Benchmarking: applications to transfusion medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apelseth, Torunn Oveland; Molnar, Laura; Arnold, Emmy; Heddle, Nancy M

    2012-10-01

    Benchmarking is as a structured continuous collaborative process in which comparisons for selected indicators are used to identify factors that, when implemented, will improve transfusion practices. This study aimed to identify transfusion medicine studies reporting on benchmarking, summarize the benchmarking approaches used, and identify important considerations to move the concept of benchmarking forward in the field of transfusion medicine. A systematic review of published literature was performed to identify transfusion medicine-related studies that compared at least 2 separate institutions or regions with the intention of benchmarking focusing on 4 areas: blood utilization, safety, operational aspects, and blood donation. Forty-five studies were included: blood utilization (n = 35), safety (n = 5), operational aspects of transfusion medicine (n = 5), and blood donation (n = 0). Based on predefined criteria, 7 publications were classified as benchmarking, 2 as trending, and 36 as single-event studies. Three models of benchmarking are described: (1) a regional benchmarking program that collects and links relevant data from existing electronic sources, (2) a sentinel site model where data from a limited number of sites are collected, and (3) an institutional-initiated model where a site identifies indicators of interest and approaches other institutions. Benchmarking approaches are needed in the field of transfusion medicine. Major challenges include defining best practices and developing cost-effective methods of data collection. For those interested in initiating a benchmarking program, the sentinel site model may be most effective and sustainable as a starting point, although the regional model would be the ideal goal. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Evaluation of PWR and BWR pin cell benchmark results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pilgroms, B.J.; Gruppelaar, H.; Janssen, A.J. (Netherlands Energy Research Foundation (ECN), Petten (Netherlands)); Hoogenboom, J.E.; Leege, P.F.A. de (Interuniversitair Reactor Inst., Delft (Netherlands)); Voet, J. van der (Gemeenschappelijke Kernenergiecentrale Nederland NV, Dodewaard (Netherlands)); Verhagen, F.C.M. (Keuring van Electrotechnische Materialen NV, Arnhem (Netherlands))

    1991-12-01

    Benchmark results of the Dutch PINK working group on the PWR and BWR pin cell calculational benchmark as defined by EPRI are presented and evaluated. The observed discrepancies are problem dependent: a part of the results is satisfactory, some other results require further analysis. A brief overview is given of the different code packages used in this analysis. (author). 14 refs.; 9 figs.; 30 tabs.

  3. Incentive Regulation and Utility Benchmarking for Electricity Network Security

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Y.; Nepal, R.

    2014-01-01

    The incentive regulation of costs related to physical and cyber security in electricity networks is an important but relatively unexplored and ambiguous issue. These costs can be part of cost efficiency benchmarking or, alternatively, dealt with separately. This paper discusses the issues and proposes options for incorporating network security costs within incentive regulation in a benchmarking framework. The relevant concerns and limitations associated with the accounting and classification ...

  4. Building America Research Benchmark Definition, Updated December 15, 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendron, R.

    2007-01-01

    To track progress toward aggressive multi-year whole-house energy savings goals of 40-70% and onsite power production of up to 30%, DOE's Residential Buildings Program and NREL developed the Building America Research Benchmark in consultation with the Building America industry teams. The Benchmark is generally consistent with mid-1990s standard practice, as reflected in the Home Energy Rating System (HERS) Technical Guidelines (RESNET 2002), with additional definitions that allow the analyst to evaluate all residential end-uses, an extension of the traditional HERS rating approach that focuses on space conditioning and hot water. Unlike the reference homes used for HERS, EnergyStar, and most energy codes, the Benchmark represents typical construction at a fixed point in time so it can be used as the basis for Building America's multi-year energy savings goals without the complication of chasing a ''moving target''.

  5. Building America Research Benchmark Definition: Updated December 20, 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendron, R.

    2008-01-01

    To track progress toward aggressive multi-year whole-house energy savings goals of 40-70% and onsite power production of up to 30%, DOE's Residential Buildings Program and NREL developed the Building America Research Benchmark in consultation with the Building America industry teams. The Benchmark is generally consistent with mid-1990s standard practice, as reflected in the Home Energy Rating System (HERS) Technical Guidelines (RESNET 2002), with additional definitions that allow the analyst to evaluate all residential end-uses, an extension of the traditional HERS rating approach that focuses on space conditioning and hot water. Unlike the reference homes used for HERS, EnergyStar, and most energy codes, the Benchmark represents typical construction at a fixed point in time so it can be used as the basis for Building America's multi-year energy savings goals without the complication of chasing a 'moving target'.

  6. Building America Research Benchmark Definition: Updated August 15, 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendron, R.

    2007-09-01

    To track progress toward aggressive multi-year whole-house energy savings goals of 40-70% and onsite power production of up to 30%, DOE's Residential Buildings Program and NREL developed the Building America Research Benchmark in consultation with the Building America industry teams. The Benchmark is generally consistent with mid-1990s standard practice, as reflected in the Home Energy Rating System (HERS) Technical Guidelines (RESNET 2002), with additional definitions that allow the analyst to evaluate all residential end-uses, an extension of the traditional HERS rating approach that focuses on space conditioning and hot water. Unlike the reference homes used for HERS, EnergyStar, and most energy codes, the Benchmark represents typical construction at a fixed point in time so it can be used as the basis for Building America's multi-year energy savings goals without the complication of chasing a 'moving target'.

  7. Low-Carbon City Policy Databook: 72 Policy Recommendations for Chinese Cities from the Benchmarking and Energy Savings Tool for Low Carbon Cities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, Lynn [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Energy Technologies Area. Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts Division. China Energy Group; Zhou, Nan [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Energy Technologies Area. Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts Division. China Energy Group; Fridley, David [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Energy Technologies Area. Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts Division. China Energy Group; Ohshita, Stephanie [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Energy Technologies Area. Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts Division. China Energy Group; Khanna, Nina [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Energy Technologies Area. Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts Division. China Energy Group; Lu, Hongyou [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Energy Technologies Area. Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts Division. China Energy Group; Hong, Lixuan [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Energy Technologies Area. Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts Division. China Energy Group; He, Gang [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Energy Technologies Area. Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts Division. China Energy Group; Romankiewicz, John [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Energy Technologies Area. Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts Division. China Energy Group; Min, Hu [Energy Foundation China, Beijing (China)

    2016-07-01

    This report is designed to help city authorities evaluate and prioritize more than 70 different policy strategies that can reduce their city’s energy use and carbon-based greenhouse gas emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4). Local government officials, researchers, and planners can utilize the report to identify policies most relevant to local circumstances and to develop a low carbon city action plan that can be implemented in phases, over a multi-year timeframe. The policies cover nine city sectors: industry, public and commercial buildings, residential buildings, transportation, power and heat, street lighting, water & wastewater, solid waste, and urban green space. See Table 1 for a listing of the policies. Recognizing the prominence of urban industry in the energy and carbon inventories of Chinese cities, this report includes low carbon city policies for the industrial sector. The policies gathered here have proven effective in multiple locations around the world and have the potential to achieve future energy and carbon savings in Chinese cities.

  8. Benchmarking school nursing practice: the North West Regional Benchmarking Group

    OpenAIRE

    Littler, Nadine; Mullen, Margaret; Beckett, Helen; Freshney, Alice; Pinder, Lynn

    2016-01-01

    It is essential that the quality of care is reviewed regularly through robust processes such as benchmarking to ensure all outcomes and resources are evidence-based so that children and young people’s needs are met effectively. This article provides an example of the use of benchmarking in school nursing practice. Benchmarking has been defined as a process for finding, adapting and applying best practices (Camp, 1994). This concept was first adopted in the 1970s ‘from industry where it was us...

  9. On the Processing of Spalling Experiments. Part II: Identification of Concrete Fracture Energy in Dynamic Tension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukić, Bratislav B.; Saletti, Dominique; Forquin, Pascal

    2017-12-01

    This paper presents a second part of the study aimed at investigating the fracture behavior of concrete under high strain rate tensile loading. The experimental method together with the identified stress-strain response of three tests conducted on ordinary concrete have been presented in the paper entitled Part I (Forquin and Lukić in Journal of Dynamic Behavior of Materials, 2017. https://doi.org/10.1007/s40870-017-0135-1). In the present paper, Part II, the investigation is extended towards directly determining the specific fracture energy of each observed fracture zone by visualizing the dynamic cracking process with a temporal resolution of 1 µs. Having access to temporal displacement fields of the sample surface, it is possible to identify the fracture opening displacement (FOD) and the fracture opening velocity of any principle (open) and secondary (closed) fracture at each measurement instance, that may or may not lead to complete physical failure of the sample. Finally, the local Stress-FOD curves were obtained for each observed fracture zone, opposed to previous works where indirect measurements were used. The obtained results indicated a much lower specific fracture energy compared to the results often found in the literature. Furthermore, numerical simulations were performed with a damage law to evaluate the validity of the proposed experimental data processing and compare it to the most often used one in the previous works. The results showed that the present method can reliably predict the specific fracture energy needed to open one macro-fracture and suggested that indirect measurement techniques can lead to an overestimate of specific fracture energy due to the stringent assumption of linear elasticity up-to the peak and the inability of having access to the real post-peak change of axial stress.

  10. HPL and STREAM Benchmarks on SANAM Supercomputer

    KAUST Repository

    Bin Sulaiman, Riman A.

    2017-01-01

    SANAM supercomputer was jointly built by KACST and FIAS in 2012 ranking second that year in the Green500 list with a power efficiency of 2.3 GFLOPS/W (Rohr et al., 2014). It is a heterogeneous accelerator-based HPC system that has 300 compute nodes. Each node includes two Intel Xeon E5?2650 CPUs, two AMD FirePro S10000 dual GPUs and 128 GiB of main memory. In this work, the seven benchmarks of HPCC were installed and configured to reassess the performance of SANAM, as part of an unpublished master thesis, after it was reassembled in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. We present here detailed results of HPL and STREAM benchmarks.

  11. HPL and STREAM Benchmarks on SANAM Supercomputer

    KAUST Repository

    Bin Sulaiman, Riman A.

    2017-03-13

    SANAM supercomputer was jointly built by KACST and FIAS in 2012 ranking second that year in the Green500 list with a power efficiency of 2.3 GFLOPS/W (Rohr et al., 2014). It is a heterogeneous accelerator-based HPC system that has 300 compute nodes. Each node includes two Intel Xeon E5?2650 CPUs, two AMD FirePro S10000 dual GPUs and 128 GiB of main memory. In this work, the seven benchmarks of HPCC were installed and configured to reassess the performance of SANAM, as part of an unpublished master thesis, after it was reassembled in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. We present here detailed results of HPL and STREAM benchmarks.

  12. Summary of ACCSIM and ORBIT Benchmarking Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    AIBA, M

    2009-01-01

    We have performed a benchmarking study of ORBIT and ACCSIM which are accelerator tracking codes having routines to evaluate space charge effects. The study is motivated by the need of predicting/understanding beam behaviour in the CERN Proton Synchrotron Booster (PSB) in which direct space charge is expected to be the dominant performance limitation. Historically at CERN, ACCSIM has been employed for space charge simulation studies. A benchmark study using ORBIT has been started to confirm the results from ACCSIM and to profit from the advantages of ORBIT such as the capability of parallel processing. We observed a fair agreement in emittance evolution in the horizontal plane but not in the vertical one. This may be partly due to the fact that the algorithm to compute the space charge field is different between the two codes.

  13. 23 CFR Appendix A to Part 772 - National Reference Energy Mean Emission Levels as a Function of Speed

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false National Reference Energy Mean Emission Levels as a Function of Speed A Appendix A to Part 772 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... NOISE Pt. 772, App. A Appendix A to Part 772—National Reference Energy Mean Emission Levels as a...

  14. Making Homes Part of the Climate Solution: Policy Options To Promote Energy Efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Dr. Marilyn Ann [Georgia Institute of Technology; Chandler, Jess [Georgia Institute of Technology; Lapsa, Melissa Voss [ORNL; Ally, Moonis [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

    2009-06-01

    In the area of energy efficiency, advanced technologies combined with best practices appear to afford not only large, but also cost-effective options to conserve energy and reduce greenhouse gas emissions (McKinsey & Company, 2007). In practice, however, the realization of this potential has often proven difficult. Progress appears to require large numbers of individuals to act knowledgeably, and each individual must often act with enabling assistance from others. Even when consumer education is effective and social norms are supportive, the actions of individuals and businesses can be impeded by a broad range of barriers, many of which are non-technical in nature. Title XVI of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 included a mandate to examine barriers to progress and make recommendations in this regard. A detailed report on barriers as well as the National strategy for overcoming barriers met this requirement (Brown et al, 2008; CCCSTI, 2009). Following up on this mandate, the U.S. Climate Change Technology Program (CCTP) chose to focus next on the development of policy options to improve energy efficiency in residential buildings, with supporting analysis of pros and cons, informed in part by behavioral research. While this work is sponsored by CCTP, it has been undertaken in coordination with DOE's Building Technologies Program and Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability.

  15. Virtual machine performance benchmarking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Steve G; French, Todd

    2011-10-01

    The attractions of virtual computing are many: reduced costs, reduced resources and simplified maintenance. Any one of these would be compelling for a medical imaging professional attempting to support a complex practice on limited resources in an era of ever tightened reimbursement. In particular, the ability to run multiple operating systems optimized for different tasks (computational image processing on Linux versus office tasks on Microsoft operating systems) on a single physical machine is compelling. However, there are also potential drawbacks. High performance requirements need to be carefully considered if they are to be executed in an environment where the running software has to execute through multiple layers of device drivers before reaching the real disk or network interface. Our lab has attempted to gain insight into the impact of virtualization on performance by benchmarking the following metrics on both physical and virtual platforms: local memory and disk bandwidth, network bandwidth, and integer and floating point performance. The virtual performance metrics are compared to baseline performance on "bare metal." The results are complex, and indeed somewhat surprising.

  16. AER benchmark specification sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aszodi, A.; Toth, S.

    2009-01-01

    In the VVER-440/213 type reactors, the core outlet temperature field is monitored with in-core thermocouples, which are installed above 210 fuel assemblies. These measured temperatures are used in determination of the fuel assembly powers and they have important role in the reactor power limitation. For these reasons, correct interpretation of the thermocouple signals is an important question. In order to interpret the signals in correct way, knowledge of the coolant mixing in the assembly heads is necessary. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes and experiments can help to understand better these mixing processes and they can provide information which can support the more adequate interpretation of the thermocouple signals. This benchmark deals with the 3D CFD modeling of the coolant mixing in the heads of the profiled fuel assemblies with 12.2 mm rod pitch. Two assemblies of the 23rd cycle of the Paks NPP's Unit 3 are investigated. One of them has symmetrical pin power profile and another possesses inclined profile. (authors)

  17. AER Benchmark Specification Sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aszodi, A.; Toth, S.

    2009-01-01

    In the WWER-440/213 type reactors, the core outlet temperature field is monitored with in-core thermocouples, which are installed above 210 fuel assemblies. These measured temperatures are used in determination of the fuel assembly powers and they have important role in the reactor power limitation. For these reasons, correct interpretation of the thermocouple signals is an important question. In order to interpret the signals in correct way, knowledge of the coolant mixing in the assembly heads is necessary. Computational fluid dynamics codes and experiments can help to understand better these mixing processes and they can provide information which can support the more adequate interpretation of the thermocouple signals. This benchmark deals with the 3D computational fluid dynamics modeling of the coolant mixing in the heads of the profiled fuel assemblies with 12.2 mm rod pitch. Two assemblies of the twenty third cycle of the Paks NPPs Unit 3 are investigated. One of them has symmetrical pin power profile and another possesses inclined profile. (Authors)

  18. The Benchmark Test Results of QNX RTOS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jang Yeol; Lee, Young Jun; Cheon, Se Woo; Lee, Jang Soo; Kwon, Kee Choon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    A Real-Time Operating System(RTOS) is an Operating System(OS) intended for real-time applications. Benchmarking is a point of reference by which something can be measured. The QNX is a Real Time Operating System(RTOS) developed by QSSL(QNX Software Systems Ltd.) in Canada. The ELMSYS is the brand name of commercially available Personal Computer(PC) for applications such as Cabinet Operator Module(COM) of Digital Plant Protection System(DPPS) and COM of Digital Engineered Safety Features Actuation System(DESFAS). The ELMSYS PC Hardware is being qualified by KTL(Korea Testing Lab.) for use as a Cabinet Operator Module(COM). The QNX RTOS is being dedicated by Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). This paper describes the outline and benchmarking test results on Context Switching, Message Passing, Synchronization and Deadline Violation of QNX RTOS under the ELMSYS PC platform

  19. The Benchmark Test Results of QNX RTOS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jang Yeol; Lee, Young Jun; Cheon, Se Woo; Lee, Jang Soo; Kwon, Kee Choon

    2010-01-01

    A Real-Time Operating System(RTOS) is an Operating System(OS) intended for real-time applications. Benchmarking is a point of reference by which something can be measured. The QNX is a Real Time Operating System(RTOS) developed by QSSL(QNX Software Systems Ltd.) in Canada. The ELMSYS is the brand name of commercially available Personal Computer(PC) for applications such as Cabinet Operator Module(COM) of Digital Plant Protection System(DPPS) and COM of Digital Engineered Safety Features Actuation System(DESFAS). The ELMSYS PC Hardware is being qualified by KTL(Korea Testing Lab.) for use as a Cabinet Operator Module(COM). The QNX RTOS is being dedicated by Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). This paper describes the outline and benchmarking test results on Context Switching, Message Passing, Synchronization and Deadline Violation of QNX RTOS under the ELMSYS PC platform

  20. Toxicological benchmarks for wildlife. Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Opresko, D.M.; Sample, B.E.; Suter, G.W.

    1993-09-01

    This report presents toxicological benchmarks for assessment of effects of 55 chemicals on six representative mammalian wildlife species (short-tailed shrew, white-footed mouse, cottontail ink, red fox, and whitetail deer) and eight avian wildlife species (American robin, woodcock, wild turkey, belted kingfisher, great blue heron, barred owl, Cooper`s hawk, and redtailed hawk) (scientific names are presented in Appendix C). These species were chosen because they are widely distributed and provide a representative range of body sizes and diets. The chemicals are some of those that occur at United States Department of Energy (DOE) waste sites. The benchmarks presented in this report are values believed to be nonhazardous for the listed wildlife species.

  1. Renewable energy in pakistan: part-II mini/micro hydropower plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maher, M.J.

    2005-01-01

    Part-1 of this series dealt with Wind-Energy Prospects in Pakistan. This second part gives a brief account Mini/Micro Hydro-Power Plants in Pakistan. Hydropower is well-known throughout the world and currently contributes 6-7% of total world energy-production and 20% of total world electricity generation. Most of the hydro-plants are usually designed for higher generation capacity than that which could be needed to utilize the average water-flows. Small hydro-plants are another potential source of energy among the non-conventional energy sources, which can reduce the load on conventional-energy production. Small hydropower technology is today a mature and proven technology. Civil works and installation of equipment involve simple process, which offer good opportunity to local people for employment and use locally available materials Nevertheless a small decentralized hydel plant, based on natural waterfalls is a very desirable option for geographically remote, but naturally suitable locations which are otherwise far from the national physical infrastructure. The development of Mini/Micro hydel stations in these areas, with isolated, thinly clustered, population, is a very appropriate solution to meet power-needs of such areas for lighting as well as cottage industry. The unique feature of these installations is the participation of local community to the optimum extent. The entire civil works, the intake system, power channel, forebay, penstock and power house building, as well as labour is provided by the inhabitants voluntarily. While maximum use is made of stone, with minimum use of cement, the generator, distribution wires, etc., need to be arranged from the market. The turbine is manufactured using indigenous materials. The installation-cost per KW is relatively low i.e. Rs. 25,000/- as compared to large-scale installations. There could of course be variations, in the installation-cost, depending on the market prices of the material. (author)

  2. Benchmarking in academic pharmacy departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosso, John A; Chisholm-Burns, Marie; Nappi, Jean; Gubbins, Paul O; Ross, Leigh Ann

    2010-10-11

    Benchmarking in academic pharmacy, and recommendations for the potential uses of benchmarking in academic pharmacy departments are discussed in this paper. Benchmarking is the process by which practices, procedures, and performance metrics are compared to an established standard or best practice. Many businesses and industries use benchmarking to compare processes and outcomes, and ultimately plan for improvement. Institutions of higher learning have embraced benchmarking practices to facilitate measuring the quality of their educational and research programs. Benchmarking is used internally as well to justify the allocation of institutional resources or to mediate among competing demands for additional program staff or space. Surveying all chairs of academic pharmacy departments to explore benchmarking issues such as department size and composition, as well as faculty teaching, scholarly, and service productivity, could provide valuable information. To date, attempts to gather this data have had limited success. We believe this information is potentially important, urge that efforts to gather it should be continued, and offer suggestions to achieve full participation.

  3. Validation of Neutron Calculation Codes and Models by means of benchmark cases in the frame of the Binational Commission of Nuclear Energy. Probabilistic Models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dos Santos, Adimir; Siqueira, Paulo de Tarso D.; Andrade e Silva, Graciete Simões; Grant, Carlos; Tarazaga, Ariel E.; Barberis, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    In year 2008 the Atomic Energy National Commission (CNEA) of Argentina, and the Brazilian Institute of Energetic and Nuclear Research (IPEN), under the frame of Nuclear Energy Argentine Brazilian Agreement (COBEN), among many others, included the project “Validation and Verification of Calculation Methods used for Research and Experimental Reactors . At this time, it was established that the validation was to be performed with models implemented in the deterministic codes HUEMUL and PUMA (cell and reactor codes) developed by CNEA and those ones implemented in MCNP by CNEA and IPEN. The necessary data for these validations would correspond to theoretical-experimental reference cases in the research reactor IPEN/MB-01 located in São Paulo, Brazil. The staff of the group Reactor and Nuclear Power Studies (SERC) of CNEA, from the argentine side, performed calculations with deterministic models (HUEMUL-PUMA) and probabilistic methods (MCNP) modeling a great number of physical situations of de reactor, which previously have been studied and modeled by members of the Center of Nuclear Engineering of the IPEN, whose results were extensively provided to CNEA. In this paper results of comparison of calculated and experimental results for critical configurations, temperature coefficients, kinetic parameters and fission rates evaluated with probabilistic models spatial distributions are shown. (author)

  4. Validation of Neutron Calculation Codes and Models by means of benchmark cases in the frame of the Binational Commission of Nuclear Energy. Criticality Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dos Santos, Adimir; Siqueira, Paulo de Tarso D.; Andrade e Silva, Graciete Simões; Grant, Carlos; Tarazaga, Ariel E.; Barberis, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    In year 2008 the Atomic Energy National Commission (CNEA) of Argentina, and the Brazilian Institute of Energetic and Nuclear Research (IPEN), under the frame of Nuclear Energy Argentine Brazilian Agreement (COBEN), among many others, included the project “Validation and Verification of Calculation Methods used for Research and Experimental Reactors . At this time, it was established that the validation was to be performed with models implemented in the deterministic codes HUEMUL and PUMA (cell and reactor codes) developed by CNEA and those ones implemented in MCNP by CNEA and IPEN. The necessary data for these validations would correspond to theoretical-experimental reference cases in the research reactor IPEN/MB-01 located in São Paulo, Brazil. The staff of the group Reactor and Nuclear Power Studies (SERC) of CNEA, from the argentine side, performed calculations with deterministic models (HUEMUL-PUMA) and probabilistic methods (MCNP) modeling a great number of physical situations of de reactor, which previously have been studied and modeled by members of the Center of Nuclear Engineering of the IPEN, whose results were extensively provided to CNEA. In this paper results for critical configurations are shown. (author)

  5. Portugal and United States cooperative energy assessment. Volume 3. Reference reports, Part 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-09-01

    Statistical data on energy production and consumption and supporting information were obtained from US Bureau of Mines records supplemented by additional data obtained in Portugal. Geologic descriptions and analysis of known areas and of areas having possible future potential have been prepared by the US Geological Survey. Portugal lacks sufficient indigenous supplies of organic fuels to meet its energy demands, and so must import large quantities of petroleum and coal. Approximately 80% of Portugal's electric energy is produced by hydroelectric stations; thermal stations produce the other 20%. Portugal has produced no crude oil, natural gas, or condensate; no resources or reserves in these categories are listed for Portugal in the 1976 World Energy Conference report. Until the last year or so (1980), no significant onshore petroleum exploration had been done in Portugal since 1963. Production of coal in Portugal has declined steadily to the present annual yield of about 200,000 metric tons. On the basis of estimates in only three coal fields, resources of coal of all ranks in Portugal total at least 76 million (10/sup 6/) metric tons. Uranium is mined near Viseu and Guarda in the northern part of Portugal; the Nisa mine in east-central Portugal will begin producing uranium ore in 1985 after installation of a processing plant. Portugal produced 95 metric tons of uranium oxide (U/sub 3/O/sub 8/) from ore stocks in each year from 1972 through 1974; production is assumed to have continued at the same rate since then. Geothermal energy has not been developed in mainland Portugal; however, hot springs that may have geothermal energy potential are known in the Minho district in the northwest. Geothermal energy resources exist in the Azores and a program of evaluation and exploration with technical assistance from the USGS is presently in progress there.

  6. How to Advance TPC Benchmarks with Dependability Aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Raquel; Poess, Meikel; Nambiar, Raghunath; Patil, Indira; Vieira, Marco

    Transactional systems are the core of the information systems of most organizations. Although there is general acknowledgement that failures in these systems often entail significant impact both on the proceeds and reputation of companies, the benchmarks developed and managed by the Transaction Processing Performance Council (TPC) still maintain their focus on reporting bare performance. Each TPC benchmark has to pass a list of dependability-related tests (to verify ACID properties), but not all benchmarks require measuring their performances. While TPC-E measures the recovery time of some system failures, TPC-H and TPC-C only require functional correctness of such recovery. Consequently, systems used in TPC benchmarks are tuned mostly for performance. In this paper we argue that nowadays systems should be tuned for a more comprehensive suite of dependability tests, and that a dependability metric should be part of TPC benchmark publications. The paper discusses WHY and HOW this can be achieved. Two approaches are introduced and discussed: augmenting each TPC benchmark in a customized way, by extending each specification individually; and pursuing a more unified approach, defining a generic specification that could be adjoined to any TPC benchmark.

  7. Issues in Benchmark Metric Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crolotte, Alain

    It is true that a metric can influence a benchmark but will esoteric metrics create more problems than they will solve? We answer this question affirmatively by examining the case of the TPC-D metric which used the much debated geometric mean for the single-stream test. We will show how a simple choice influenced the benchmark and its conduct and, to some extent, DBMS development. After examining other alternatives our conclusion is that the “real” measure for a decision-support benchmark is the arithmetic mean.

  8. A Heterogeneous Medium Analytical Benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganapol, B.D.

    1999-01-01

    A benchmark, called benchmark BLUE, has been developed for one-group neutral particle (neutron or photon) transport in a one-dimensional sub-critical heterogeneous plane parallel medium with surface illumination. General anisotropic scattering is accommodated through the Green's Function Method (GFM). Numerical Fourier transform inversion is used to generate the required Green's functions which are kernels to coupled integral equations that give the exiting angular fluxes. The interior scalar flux is then obtained through quadrature. A compound iterative procedure for quadrature order and slab surface source convergence provides highly accurate benchmark qualities (4- to 5- places of accuracy) results

  9. A Global Vision over Benchmarking Process: Benchmarking Based Enterprises

    OpenAIRE

    Sitnikov, Catalina; Giurca Vasilescu, Laura

    2008-01-01

    Benchmarking uses the knowledge and the experience of others to improve the enterprise. Starting from the analysis of the performance and underlying the strengths and weaknesses of the enterprise it should be assessed what must be done in order to improve its activity. Using benchmarking techniques, an enterprise looks at how processes in the value chain are performed. The approach based on the vision “from the whole towards the parts” (a fragmented image of the enterprise’s value chain) redu...

  10. Benchmark shielding calculations for the NEACRP [Nuclear Energy Agency-Committee on Reactor Physics] Working Group on shielding assessment of transportation packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broadhead, B.L.; Brady, M.C.; Parks, C.V.

    1990-11-01

    In 1985, the Nuclear Energy Agency-Committee on Reactor Physics (NEACRP) established a working group on shielding assessment of transportation packages. Following the initial distribution of a set of six problems, discussions were held at the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Headquarters in Paris, France, in June/July 1986, May 1988, and February/March 1990. The US contribution to the working group is documented in this report. The results from this effort permit the evaluation of a number of approximations and effects that must be considered in a typical shielding analysis of a transportation cask. Among the effects reported here are the performance of multiple cross-section sets, the comparison of several source generation codes, and multidimensional versus one-dimensional (1-D) analyses. 18 refs., 16 figs., 33 tabs

  11. Establishing a benchmarking for fish farming - profitability, productivity and energy efficiency of German, Danish and Turkish rainbow trout grow-out systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lasner, Tobias; Brinker, Alexander; Nielsen, Rasmus

    2017-01-01

    The promotion of Blue Growth in aquaculture requires an understanding of the economic drivers influencing the sector at farm level, but the collection of reliable and comparable data at this level is time-consuming and expensive. This study suggests an alternative strategy for qualitative sampling...... of freshwater trout farms in Germany, Denmark and Turkey, using a combination of existing data, group discussions and interviews with trout farmers, consultants and researchers. Nine 'typical' trout farming models are described, focusing on profitability, productivity and energy efficiency and allowing in......-depth comparative economic analyses of different production systems at farm level, across regions. Our results show that the majority of the farms investigated have been profitable. Turkish farms benefit from competitive advantages due to low wages, low capital investment and favourable climate conditions. Large...

  12. Geo-energy Test Beds: part of the European Plate Observing System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Michael; Schofield, David; Luton, Christopher; Haslinger, Florian; Henninges, Jan; Giardini, Domenico

    2016-04-01

    For 2020, the EU has committed to cutting its greenhouse gas emissions to 20% below 1990 levels and further cuts are being decided for 2050. This commitment is one of the headline targets of the Europe 2020 growth strategy and is being implemented through binding legislation. This decarbonisation of the EU economy is one dimension of an overall EU energy and climate framework that is mutually interlinked with the need to ensure energy security, promote a fully integrated energy market, promote energy efficiency and promote research innovation and competitiveness. Power generation will have to take a particularly large part in emissions reductions (-54 to -68% by 2030 and -93 to -99% by 2050), mainly by focussing on increasing surface renewables (wind, tidal and solar) but also on carbon capture and storage on fossil fuel and biofuel power plants, shale gas, nuclear and geothermal power. All the above generation technologies share common geological challenges around containment, safety and environmental sustainability. In a densely populated continent, this means that high levels of subsurface management are needed to fully realise the energy potential. In response to this need, across Europe, public and private sector funded, experimental test and monitoring facilities and infrastructures (Geo-energy Test Beds, GETB) are being developed. These GETB investigate the processes, technology and practices that facilitate the sustainable exploitation of Geo-energy resources and are of intense interest to the public and regulators alike. The vision of EPOS IP Work Package 17 (wp17) is to promote research and innovation in Geo-energy that reflects core European energy priorities through provision of virtual access to data and protocols and trans-national access to GETB experiments. This will be achieved through provision of access to continuous strategic observations, promotion of the integrated use of data and models from European GETB, development of underpinning research

  13. Chronicle of administrative law enforcement in the energy market. Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Leeuwen, E.W.T.M.; De Rijke, M.

    2012-01-01

    In addition to the Netherlands Competition Authority (NMa), the Netherlands Consumer Authority (CA) also regulates the energy market in the area of consumer rights. Both organizations will merge into the Consumer and Market Authority (ACM). This article provides an overview of the powers of the NMA and CA in relation to law enforcement as shaped by the various laws and law amendments. By means of settlement practices and the administration of justice, an overview is given of the main developments in law enforcement. In this first part, attention is paid to the enforcement instruments of both regulators and one instrument is examined in more detail: the injunction. Part two addresses the order for penalty payment, the civil penalty and the modification and revocation of licenses and exemptions. [nl

  14. Analysis of a multigroup stylized CANDU half-core benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pounders, Justin M.; Rahnema, Farzad; Serghiuta, Dumitru

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → This paper provides a benchmark that is a stylized model problem in more than two energy groups that is realistic with respect to the underlying physics. → An 8-group cross section library is provided to augment a previously published 2-group 3D stylized half-core CANDU benchmark problem. → Reference eigenvalues and selected pin and bundle fission rates are included. → 2-, 4- and 47-group Monte Carlo solutions are compared to analyze homogenization-free transport approximations that result from energy condensation. - Abstract: An 8-group cross section library is provided to augment a previously published 2-group 3D stylized half-core Canadian deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactor benchmark problem. Reference eigenvalues and selected pin and bundle fission rates are also included. This benchmark is intended to provide computational reactor physicists and methods developers with a stylized model problem in more than two energy groups that is realistic with respect to the underlying physics. In addition to transport theory code verification, the 8-group energy structure provides reactor physicist with an ideal problem for examining cross section homogenization and collapsing effects in a full-core environment. To this end, additional 2-, 4- and 47-group full-core Monte Carlo benchmark solutions are compared to analyze homogenization-free transport approximations incurred as a result of energy group condensation.

  15. Intercomparison of radiation protection devices in a high-energy stray neutron field, Part II: Bonner sphere spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiegel, B.; Agosteo, S.; Bedogni, R.; Caresana, M.; Esposito, A.; Fehrenbacher, G.; Ferrarini, M.; Hohmann, E.; Hranitzky, C.; Kasper, A.; Khurana, S.; Mares, V.; Reginatto, M.; Rollet, S.; Ruehm, W.; Schardt, D.; Silari, M.; Simmer, G.; Weitzenegger, E.

    2009-01-01

    The European Commission has funded within its 6th Framework Programme a three-year project (2005-2007) called CONRAD, COordinated Network for RAdiation Dosimetry. A major task of the CONRAD Work Package 'complex mixed radiation fields at workplaces' was to organise a benchmark exercise in a workplace field at a high-energy particle accelerator where neutrons are the dominant radiation component. The CONRAD benchmark exercise took place at the Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH (GSI) in Darmstadt, Germany in July 2006. In this paper, the results of the spectrometry using four extended -range Bonner sphere spectrometers of four different institutes are reported. Outside Cave A the neutron spectra were measured with three spectrometers at six selected positions and ambient dose equivalent values were derived for use in the intercomparison with other area monitors and dosemeters. At a common position all three spectrometers were used to allow a direct comparison of their results which acts as an internal quality assurance. The comparison of the neutron spectra measured by the different groups shows very good agreement. A detailed analysis presents some differences between the shapes of the spectra and possible sources of these differences are discussed. However, the ability of Bonner sphere spectrometers to provide reliable integral quantities like fluence and ambient dose equivalent is well demonstrated in this exercise. The fluence and dose results derived by the three groups agree very well within the given uncertainties, not only with respect to the total energy region present in this environment but also for selected energy regions which contribute in certain strength to the total values. In addition to the positions outside Cave A one spectrometer was used to measure the neutron spectrum at one position in the entry maze of Cave A. In this case a comparison was possible to earlier measurements.

  16. Experimental determination of the energy efficiency of an air-cooled chiller under part load conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, F.W.; Chan, K.T.

    2005-01-01

    In cities located in a subtropical climate, air-cooled chillers are commonly used to provide cooling to the indoor environment. This accounts for the increasing electricity demand of buildings over the decades. This paper investigates how the condensing temperature serves to accurately determine the energy efficiency, or coefficient of performance (COP), of air-cooled chillers under part load conditions. An experiment on an air-cooled reciprocating chiller showed that for any given operating condition, the COP of the chiller varies, depending on how the condensing temperature is controlled. A sensitivity analysis is implemented to investigate to what extent COP is responding to changes in operating variables and confirms that the condensing temperature is an adequate variable to gauge COP under various operating conditions. The specifications of the upper limit for the condensing temperature in order to improve the energy efficiency of air-cooled chillers are discussed. The results of this work will give designers and researchers a good idea about how to model chiller energy performance curves in the thermal and energy computation exercises

  17. The development of GRTgaz - A vital part of the European energy mix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garnier, J.Ph.

    2011-01-01

    The energy future has become one of the major stakes of the next presidential election in France. After the Fukushima disaster, the debates on our own energy future mainly cover the closing down, or not, in full or in part, of nuclear power stations. Natural gas is, most of the time, absent from the debate. Yet it has many advantages and should be viewed as a solution that favours renewable energy development, while being essential to achieving a more diversified and more environment-friendly energy mix. In addition, our country is at the crossroads of different European as networks. Given this situation, GRTGaz is doing its utmost to develop an attractive and dynamic wholesale market. With the prospect of increased European market integration and in spite of an uncertain economic environment, investments must be made to develop infrastructure. In 2011, with the financial backing of the European Union, GRTGaz has launched two major gas transport grid reinforcement projects in the South and North of France. These will allow us to strengthen our position as one the major gas hubs in Europe. This is good news for our industry and for employment too. (author)

  18. Performance Targets and External Benchmarking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Ivar; Hansen, Allan; Vámosi, Tamás S.

    Research on relative performance measures, transfer pricing, beyond budgeting initiatives, target costing, piece rates systems and value based management has for decades underlined the importance of external benchmarking in performance management. Research conceptualises external benchmarking...... as a market mechanism that can be brought inside the firm to provide incentives for continuous improvement and the development of competitive advances. However, whereas extant research primarily has focused on the importance and effects of using external benchmarks, less attention has been directed towards...... the conditions upon which the market mechanism is performing within organizations. This paper aims to contribute to research by providing more insight to the conditions for the use of external benchmarking as an element in performance management in organizations. Our study explores a particular type of external...

  19. Benchmarking and Sustainable Transport Policy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudmundsson, Henrik; Wyatt, Andrew; Gordon, Lucy

    2004-01-01

    Order to learn from the best. In 2000 the European Commission initiated research to explore benchmarking as a tool to promote policies for ‘sustainable transport’. This paper reports findings and recommendations on how to address this challenge. The findings suggest that benchmarking is a valuable...... tool that may indeed help to move forward the transport policy agenda. However, there are major conditions and limitations. First of all it is not always so straightforward to delimit, measure and compare transport services in order to establish a clear benchmark. Secondly ‘sustainable transport......’ evokes a broad range of concerns that are hard to address fully at the level of specific practices. Thirdly policies are not directly comparable across space and context. For these reasons attempting to benchmark ‘sustainable transport policies’ against one another would be a highly complex task, which...

  20. Joint Thesaurus. Part I (A-L) + Part II (M-Z)[International Nuclear Information System. Energy Technology Data Exchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-04-01

    This is the 1st revision of the INIS/ETDE Joint Thesaurus. It contains 20 953 valid descriptors and 8 600 forbidden terms. It was last updated in December 2003. The Joint Thesaurus contains the controlled terminology for indexing all information within the subject scope of both INIS (International Nuclear Information System) and ETDE (Energy Technology Data Exchange) information systems. The terminology is intended for use in subject description for input or retrieval of information in those systems. The thesaurus is a terminological control device used in translating from the natural language of documents, indexers or users into a more constrained system language It is also a controlled and dynamic vocabulary of semantically and generically related terms which covers a specific domain of knowledge. The domain of knowledge covered by this Thesaurus includes physics (in particular, plasma physics, atomic and molecular physics, and especially nuclear and high-energy physics), chemistry, materials, earth sciences, radiation biology, radioisotope effects and kinetics, applied life sciences, radiology and nuclear medicine, isotope and radiation source technology, radiation protection, radiation applications, engineering, instrumentation, fossil fuels, synthetic fuels, renewable energy sources, advanced energy systems, fission and fusion reactor technology, safeguards and inspection, waste management, environmental aspects of the production and consumption of energy from nuclear and non-nuclear sources, energy efficiency and energy conservation, economics and sociology of energy production and use, energy policy, and nuclear law. The terms in the Thesaurus are listed alphabetically, and with each alphabetic entry a word block containing the terms associated with the particular entry is displayed. In the word block, terms that have a hierarchical relationship to the entry are identified by the symbols BT and NT, for Broader Term and Narrower Term. Those with an affinitive

  1. Benchmarking: contexts and details matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Siyuan

    2017-07-05

    Benchmarking is an essential step in the development of computational tools. We take this opportunity to pitch in our opinions on tool benchmarking, in light of two correspondence articles published in Genome Biology.Please see related Li et al. and Newman et al. correspondence articles: www.dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13059-017-1256-5 and www.dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13059-017-1257-4.

  2. Handbook of critical experiments benchmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durst, B.M.; Bierman, S.R.; Clayton, E.D.

    1978-03-01

    Data from critical experiments have been collected together for use as benchmarks in evaluating calculational techniques and nuclear data. These benchmarks have been selected from the numerous experiments performed on homogeneous plutonium systems. No attempt has been made to reproduce all of the data that exists. The primary objective in the collection of these data is to present representative experimental data defined in a concise, standardized format that can easily be translated into computer code input

  3. JENDL-4.0 benchmarking for fission reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiba, Go; Okumura, Keisuke; Sugino, Kazuteru; Nagaya, Yasunobu; Yokoyama, Kenji; Kugo, Teruhiko; Ishikawa, Makoto; Okajima, Shigeaki

    2011-01-01

    Benchmark testing for the newly developed Japanese evaluated nuclear data library JENDL-4.0 is carried out by using a huge amount of integral data. Benchmark calculations are performed with a continuous-energy Monte Carlo code and with the deterministic procedure, which has been developed for fast reactor analyses in Japan. Through the present benchmark testing using a wide range of benchmark data, significant improvement in the performance of JENDL-4.0 for fission reactor applications is clearly demonstrated in comparison with the former library JENDL-3.3. Much more accurate and reliable prediction for neutronic parameters for both thermal and fast reactors becomes possible by using the library JENDL-4.0. (author)

  4. Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bobin, J.L.

    1996-01-01

    Object of sciences and technologies, energy plays a major part in economics and relations between nations. Jean-Louis Bobin, physicist, analyses the relations between man and energy and wonders about fears that delivers nowadays technologies bound to nuclear energy and about the fear of a possible shortage of energy resources. (N.C.). 17 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs

  5. A PWR Thorium Pin Cell Burnup Benchmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, Kevan Dean; Zhao, X.; Pilat, E. E; Hejzlar, P.

    2000-05-01

    As part of work to evaluate the potential benefits of using thorium in LWR fuel, a thorium fueled benchmark comparison was made in this study between state-of-the-art codes, MOCUP (MCNP4B + ORIGEN2), and CASMO-4 for burnup calculations. The MOCUP runs were done individually at MIT and INEEL, using the same model but with some differences in techniques and cross section libraries. Eigenvalue and isotope concentrations were compared on a PWR pin cell model up to high burnup. The eigenvalue comparison as a function of burnup is good: the maximum difference is within 2% and the average absolute difference less than 1%. The isotope concentration comparisons are better than a set of MOX fuel benchmarks and comparable to a set of uranium fuel benchmarks reported in the literature. The actinide and fission product data sources used in the MOCUP burnup calculations for a typical thorium fuel are documented. Reasons for code vs code differences are analyzed and discussed.

  6. Benchmarking Organisational Capability using The 20 Keys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dino Petrarolo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Organisations have over the years implemented many improvement initiatives, many of which were applied individually with no real, lasting improvement. Approaches such as quality control, team activities, setup reduction and many more seldom changed the fundamental constitution or capability of an organisation. Leading companies in the world have come to realise that an integrated approach is required which focuses on improving more than one factor at the same time - by recognising the importance of synergy between different improvement efforts and the need for commitment at all levels of the company to achieve total system-wide improvement.

    The 20 Keys approach offers a way to look at the strenqth of organisations and to systemically improve it, one step at a time by focusing on 20 different but interrelated aspects. One feature of the approach is the benchmarking system which forms the main focus of this paper. The benchmarking system is introduced as an important part of the 20 Keys philosophy in measuring organisational strength. Benchmarking results from selected South African companies are provided, as well as one company's results achieved through the adoption of the 20 Keys philosophy.

  7. Benchmarks for GADRAS performance validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattingly, John K.; Mitchell, Dean James; Rhykerd, Charles L. Jr.

    2009-01-01

    The performance of the Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software (GADRAS) was validated by comparing GADRAS model results to experimental measurements for a series of benchmark sources. Sources for the benchmark include a plutonium metal sphere, bare and shielded in polyethylene, plutonium oxide in cans, a highly enriched uranium sphere, bare and shielded in polyethylene, a depleted uranium shell and spheres, and a natural uranium sphere. The benchmark experimental data were previously acquired and consist of careful collection of background and calibration source spectra along with the source spectra. The calibration data were fit with GADRAS to determine response functions for the detector in each experiment. A one-dimensional model (pie chart) was constructed for each source based on the dimensions of the benchmark source. The GADRAS code made a forward calculation from each model to predict the radiation spectrum for the detector used in the benchmark experiment. The comparisons between the GADRAS calculation and the experimental measurements are excellent, validating that GADRAS can correctly predict the radiation spectra for these well-defined benchmark sources.

  8. Field theory reformulated without self-energy parts: the dressing operator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haan, M. de

    2004-01-01

    The reformulation of field theory for avoiding self-energy parts in the dynamical evolution has been applied successfully in the framework of the Lee model [Ann. Phys. 311 (2004) 314], enabling a kinetic extension of the description. The basic ingredient is the recognition of these self-energy parts [Trends Stat. Phys. 3 (2000) 115]. The original reversible description is embedded in the new one and appears now as a restricted class of initial conditions [Progr. Theor. Phys. 109 (2003) 881]. This program is realized here in the reduced formalism for a scalar field, interacting with a two-level atom, beyond the usual rotating wave approximation. The kinetic evolution operator, previously surmised [Physica A 171 (1991) 159], is here derived from first principles, justifying the usual practice in optics where the common use of the so-called pole approximation [Atoms in Electromagnetic Fields, 1994, 119] should no longer be viewed as an approximation but as an alternative description in the appropriate formalism. That model illustrates how some dressing of the atomic levels (and vertices), through an appropriate operator, finds its place naturally into the new formalism since the bare and dressed ground states do no longer coincide. Moreover, finite velocity for field propagation is now possible in all cases, without the presence of precursors for multiple detections

  9. Providing for energy efficiency in homes and small buildings. Part III. Determining which practices are most effective and installing materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-06-01

    The training program is designed to educate students and individuals in the importance of conserving energy and to provide for developing skills needed in the application of energy-saving techniques that result in energy-efficient buildings. A teacher guide and student workbook are available to supplement the basic manual. Subjects covered in Part III are: determining which practices are most efficient and economical; installing energy-saving materials; and improving efficiency of equipment.

  10. On the road to a free energy market. Part 4. Little comfort for bound natural gas consumers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koevoet, H.

    2001-01-01

    The liberalization of the energy market is near. In two years the second group of large-scale energy consumers (60,000 customers) in the Netherlands can choose their own energy supplier. In this fourth part of a series of articles on the energy market attention is paid to the position of the small-scale consumers, the last group that will be free to choose their natural gas supplier

  11. Energy booklet. Part 2. Energy saving tips for more pocket money and environment; EnergieFibel. Heft 2. EnergieSparTipps fuer mehr Taschengeld und Umwelt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-07-01

    The effective environmental protection begins when saving. Energy which is not used at all also cannot burden the environment. Pleasant side effect: also the purse is treated gently. One of the most important measures for the reduction of energy consumption is the correct thermal insulation of a building so that heating energy cannot escape unused in the free. Thus, between 50 and 75 per cent of energy can be saved. Investments within this range usually are profitable already after a short time. The utilization of damming materials from regenerative raw materials enables application of financial incentives. In addition, within other ranges of the house modernizations and a change of the behaviour of utilization help to save energy. The contribution under consideration gives advices in order to improve dwellings energy-technically. The environment and the purse will thank it.

  12. Intercomparison of radiation protection devices in a high-energy stray neutron field. Part III: Instrument response

    CERN Document Server

    Silari, M; Beck, P; Bedogni, R; Cale, E; Caresana, M; Domingo, C; Donadille, L; Dubourg, N; Esposito, A; Fehrenbacher, G; Fernández, F; Ferrarini, M; Fiechtner, A; Fuchs, A; García, M J; Golnik, N; Gutermuth, F; Khurana, S; Klages, Th; Latocha, M; Mares, V; Mayer, S; Radon, T; Reithmeier, H; Rollet, S; Roos, H; Rühm, W; Sandri, S; Schardt, D; Simmer, G; Spurný, F; Trompier, F; Villa-Grasa, C; Weitzenegger, E; Wiegel, B; Wielunski, M; Wissmann, F; Zechner, A; Zielczyński, M

    2009-01-01

    The European Commission has funded within its 6th Framework Programme a three-year project (2005–2007) called CONRAD, COordinated Network for RAdiation Dosimetry. The organizational framework for this project was provided by the European radiation Dosimetry Group EURADOS. Work Package 6 of CONRAD dealt with “complex mixed radiation fields at workplaces” and in this context it organised a benchmark exercise, which included both measurements and calculations, in a stray radiation field at a high-energy particle accelerator at GSI, Germany. The aim was to intercompare the response of several types of active detectors and passive dosemeters in a well-characterised workplace field. The Monte Carlo simulations of the radiation field and the experimental determination of the neutron spectra with various Bonner Sphere Spectrometers are discussed in Rollet et al. (2008) and in Wiegel et al. (2008). This paper focuses on the intercomparison of the response of the dosemeters in terms of ambient dose equivalent. Th...

  13. Benchmarking D and D procurement best practices at four commercial nuclear power plants.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arflin, J.; Baker, G.; Bidwell, B.; Bugielski, D.; Cavanagh, J.; Sandlin, N.

    1999-05-11

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has as two of its strategic objectives to safely accomplish the world's largest environmental clean-up of contaminated sites and the adoption of the best management practices of the private sector to achieve business-like results efficiently and effectively. An integral part of the strategic response to the challenges facing the Department has been the use of benchmarking and best practice management to facilitate identifying and implementing leading-edge thinking, practices, approaches, and solutions.

  14. Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis in reactivity-initiated accident fuel modeling: synthesis of organisation for economic co-operation and development (OECD/nuclear energy agency (NEA benchmark on reactivity-initiated accident codes phase-II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Marchand

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of OECD/NEA Working Group on Fuel Safety, a RIA fuel-rod-code Benchmark Phase I was organized in 2010–2013. It consisted of four experiments on highly irradiated fuel rodlets tested under different experimental conditions. This benchmark revealed the need to better understand the basic models incorporated in each code for realistic simulation of the complicated integral RIA tests with high burnup fuel rods. A second phase of the benchmark (Phase II was thus launched early in 2014, which has been organized in two complementary activities: (1 comparison of the results of different simulations on simplified cases in order to provide additional bases for understanding the differences in modelling of the concerned phenomena; (2 assessment of the uncertainty of the results. The present paper provides a summary and conclusions of the second activity of the Benchmark Phase II, which is based on the input uncertainty propagation methodology. The main conclusion is that uncertainties cannot fully explain the difference between the code predictions. Finally, based on the RIA benchmark Phase-I and Phase-II conclusions, some recommendations are made. Keywords: RIA, Codes Benchmarking, Fuel Modelling, OECD

  15. Air Quality Monitoring System and Benchmarking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Xiufeng; Nielsen, Per Sieverts

    2017-01-01

    Air quality monitoring has become an integral part of smart city solutions. This paper presents an air quality monitoring system based on Internet of Things (IoT) technologies, and establishes a cloud-based platform to address the challenges related to IoT data management and processing capabilit...... capabilities, including data collection, storage, analysis, and visualization. In addition, this paper also benchmarks four state-of-the-art database systems to investigate the appropriate technologies for managing large-scale IoT datasets....

  16. Benchmark calculation programme concerning typical LMFBR structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donea, J.; Ferrari, G.; Grossetie, J.C.; Terzaghi, A.

    1982-01-01

    This programme, which is part of a comprehensive activity aimed at resolving difficulties encountered in using design procedures based on ASME Code Case N-47, should allow to get confidence in computer codes which are supposed to provide a realistic prediction of the LMFBR component behaviour. The calculations started on static analysis of typical structures made of non linear materials stressed by cyclic loads. The fluid structure interaction analysis is also being considered. Reasons and details of the different benchmark calculations are described, results obtained are commented and future computational exercise indicated

  17. Energy from biomass. Summaries of the Biomass Projects carried out as part of the Department of Trade and Industry's New and Renewable Energy Programme. Vol. 5: straw, poultry litter and energy crops as energy sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-01-01

    These volumes of summaries provide easy access to the many projects carried out in the Energy from Biomass programme area as part of the Department of Trade and Industry's New and Renewable Energy Programme. The summaries in this volume cover contractor reports on the subject published up to December 1997. (author)

  18. Benchmarking comprehensive cancer care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wind, Anke

    2017-01-01

    The number of cancer patients and survivors is steadily increasing and despite or perhaps because of rapid improvements in diagnostics and therapeutics, important inequalities in cancer survival exist within and between different countries in Europe. Improving the quality of care is part of the

  19. International Benchmarking of Electricity Transmission System Operators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agrell, Per J.; Bogetoft, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Electricity transmission system operators (TSO) in Europe are increasing subject to high-powered performance-based regulation, such as revenue-cap regimes. The determination of the parameters in such regimes is challenging for national regulatory authorities (NRA), since there is normally a single...... TSO operating in each jurisdiction. The solution for European regulators has been found in international regulatory benchmarking, organized in collaboration with the Council of European Energy Regulators (CEER) in 2008 and 2012 for 22 and 23 TSOs, respectively. The frontier study provides static cost...... weight restrictions and a correction method for opening balances....

  20. Regional Competitive Intelligence: Benchmarking and Policymaking

    OpenAIRE

    Huggins , Robert

    2010-01-01

    Benchmarking exercises have become increasingly popular within the sphere of regional policymaking in recent years. The aim of this paper is to analyse the concept of regional benchmarking and its links with regional policymaking processes. It develops a typology of regional benchmarking exercises and regional benchmarkers, and critically reviews the literature, both academic and policy oriented. It is argued that critics who suggest regional benchmarking is a flawed concept and technique fai...

  1. Benchmarking of human resources management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M. Akinnusi

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the role of human resource management (HRM which, today, plays a strategic partnership role in management. The focus of the paper is on HRM in the public sector, where much hope rests on HRM as a means of transforming the public service and achieving much needed service delivery. However, a critical evaluation of HRM practices in the public sector reveals that these services leave much to be desired. The paper suggests the adoption of benchmarking as a process to revamp HRM in the public sector so that it is able to deliver on its promises. It describes the nature and process of benchmarking and highlights the inherent difficulties in applying benchmarking in HRM. It concludes with some suggestions for a plan of action. The process of identifying “best” practices in HRM requires the best collaborative efforts of HRM practitioners and academicians. If used creatively, benchmarking has the potential to bring about radical and positive changes in HRM in the public sector. The adoption of the benchmarking process is, in itself, a litmus test of the extent to which HRM in the public sector has grown professionally.

  2. Benchmark simulation models, quo vadis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeppsson, U; Alex, J; Batstone, D J; Benedetti, L; Comas, J; Copp, J B; Corominas, L; Flores-Alsina, X; Gernaey, K V; Nopens, I; Pons, M-N; Rodríguez-Roda, I; Rosen, C; Steyer, J-P; Vanrolleghem, P A; Volcke, E I P; Vrecko, D

    2013-01-01

    As the work of the IWA Task Group on Benchmarking of Control Strategies for wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) is coming to an end, it is essential to disseminate the knowledge gained. For this reason, all authors of the IWA Scientific and Technical Report on benchmarking have come together to provide their insights, highlighting areas where knowledge may still be deficient and where new opportunities are emerging, and to propose potential avenues for future development and application of the general benchmarking framework and its associated tools. The paper focuses on the topics of temporal and spatial extension, process modifications within the WWTP, the realism of models, control strategy extensions and the potential for new evaluation tools within the existing benchmark system. We find that there are major opportunities for application within all of these areas, either from existing work already being done within the context of the benchmarking simulation models (BSMs) or applicable work in the wider literature. Of key importance is increasing capability, usability and transparency of the BSM package while avoiding unnecessary complexity.

  3. Benchmarking to improve the quality of cystic fibrosis care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schechter, Michael S

    2012-11-01

    Benchmarking involves the ascertainment of healthcare programs with most favorable outcomes as a means to identify and spread effective strategies for delivery of care. The recent interest in the development of patient registries for patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) has been fueled in part by an interest in using them to facilitate benchmarking. This review summarizes reports of how benchmarking has been operationalized in attempts to improve CF care. Although certain goals of benchmarking can be accomplished with an exclusive focus on registry data analysis, benchmarking programs in Germany and the United States have supplemented these data analyses with exploratory interactions and discussions to better understand successful approaches to care and encourage their spread throughout the care network. Benchmarking allows the discovery and facilitates the spread of effective approaches to care. It provides a pragmatic alternative to traditional research methods such as randomized controlled trials, providing insights into methods that optimize delivery of care and allowing judgments about the relative effectiveness of different therapeutic approaches.

  4. Benchmarking: a method for continuous quality improvement in health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettorchi-Tardy, Amina; Levif, Marie; Michel, Philippe

    2012-05-01

    Benchmarking, a management approach for implementing best practices at best cost, is a recent concept in the healthcare system. The objectives of this paper are to better understand the concept and its evolution in the healthcare sector, to propose an operational definition, and to describe some French and international experiences of benchmarking in the healthcare sector. To this end, we reviewed the literature on this approach's emergence in the industrial sector, its evolution, its fields of application and examples of how it has been used in the healthcare sector. Benchmarking is often thought to consist simply of comparing indicators and is not perceived in its entirety, that is, as a tool based on voluntary and active collaboration among several organizations to create a spirit of competition and to apply best practices. The key feature of benchmarking is its integration within a comprehensive and participatory policy of continuous quality improvement (CQI). Conditions for successful benchmarking focus essentially on careful preparation of the process, monitoring of the relevant indicators, staff involvement and inter-organizational visits. Compared to methods previously implemented in France (CQI and collaborative projects), benchmarking has specific features that set it apart as a healthcare innovation. This is especially true for healthcare or medical-social organizations, as the principle of inter-organizational visiting is not part of their culture. Thus, this approach will need to be assessed for feasibility and acceptability before it is more widely promoted.

  5. Study of a phase change energy storage using spherical capsules. Part II: Numerical modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bedecarrats, J.P.; Castaing-Lasvignottes, J.; Strub, F.; Dumas, J.P.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this work is the numerical study of an industrial process of energy storage which consists in the use of a cylindrical tank filled with encapsulated phase change materials (PCM). A particularity is present in this kind of processes; it concerns the delay of the crystallization of the PCM, called supercooling phenomenon. The development of the model for cold storage with heat transfer fluid flowing enables a detailed analysis of this process. The effects of different parameters on the behaviour of the tank, such as the inlet temperature, the flow rate, are examined when the tank is in vertical position. There is substantial agreement between the prediction and the experimental values already presented in part I.

  6. The International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briggs, B. J.; Dean, V. F.; Pesic, M. P.

    2001-01-01

    In order to properly manage the risk of a nuclear criticality accident, it is important to establish the conditions for which such an accident becomes possible for any activity involving fissile material. Only when this information is known is it possible to establish the likelihood of actually achieving such conditions. It is therefore important that criticality safety analysts have confidence in the accuracy of their calculations. Confidence in analytical results can only be gained through comparison of those results with experimental data. The Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (CSBEP) was initiated in October of 1992 by the US Department of Energy. The project was managed through the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), but involved nationally known criticality safety experts from Los Alamos National Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Savannah River Technology Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the Y-12 Plant, Hanford, Argonne National Laboratory, and the Rocky Flats Plant. An International Criticality Safety Data Exchange component was added to the project during 1994 and the project became what is currently known as the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP). Representatives from the United Kingdom, France, Japan, the Russian Federation, Hungary, Kazakhstan, Korea, Slovenia, Yugoslavia, Spain, and Israel are now participating on the project In December of 1994, the ICSBEP became an official activity of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development - Nuclear Energy Agency's (OECD-NEA) Nuclear Science Committee. The United States currently remains the lead country, providing most of the administrative support. The purpose of the ICSBEP is to: (1) identify and evaluate a comprehensive set of critical benchmark data; (2) verify the data, to the extent possible, by reviewing original and subsequently revised documentation, and by talking with the

  7. Benchmarking survey for recycling.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marley, Margie Charlotte; Mizner, Jack Harry

    2005-06-01

    This report describes the methodology, analysis and conclusions of a comparison survey of recycling programs at ten Department of Energy sites including Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM). The goal of the survey was to compare SNL/NM's recycling performance with that of other federal facilities, and to identify activities and programs that could be implemented at SNL/NM to improve recycling performance.

  8. Heavy nucleus resonant absorption calculation benchmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tellier, H.; Coste, H.; Raepsaet, C.; Van der Gucht, C.

    1993-01-01

    The calculation of the space and energy dependence of the heavy nucleus resonant absorption in a heterogeneous lattice is one of the hardest tasks in reactor physics. Because of the computer time and memory needed, it is impossible to represent finely the cross-section behavior in the resonance energy range for everyday computations. Consequently, reactor physicists use a simplified formalism, the self-shielding formalism. As no clean and detailed experimental results are available to validate the self-shielding calculations, Monte Carlo computations are used as a reference. These results, which were obtained with the TRIPOLI continuous-energy Monte Carlo code, constitute a set of numerical benchmarks than can be used to evaluate the accuracy of the techniques or formalisms that are included in any reactor physics codes. Examples of such evaluations, for the new assembly code APOLLO2 and the slowing-down code SECOL, are given for cases of 238 U and 232 Th fuel elements

  9. National Energy Board 1992-93 estimates part III expenditure plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This Expenditure Plan is designed to be used as a reference document. As such, it contains several levels of detail to respond to the various needs of its audience. This Plan is divided into two sections. Section 1 presents an overview of the Program including a description, information on its background, objectives and planning perspective as well as performance information that forms the basis for the resources requested. Section 2 provides further information on costs and resources as well as special analyses that the reader may require to understand the Program more fully. Section 1 is preceded by details of Spending Authorities from Part 2 of the Estimates and Volume 2 of the Public Accounts. This is to provide continuity with other Estimates documents and to help in assessing the Program's financial performance over the past year. The format and organization of the document should be regarded as transitional. For the most part the document is organized to be consistent with the program structure approved for the National Energy Board. 16 figs

  10. National Energy Board 1992-93 estimates part III expenditure plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    This Expenditure Plan is designed to be used as a reference document. As such, it contains several levels of detail to respond to the various needs of its audience. This Plan is divided into two sections. Section 1 presents an overview of the Program including a description, information on its background, objectives and planning perspective as well as performance information that forms the basis for the resources requested. Section 2 provides further information on costs and resources as well as special analyses that the reader may require to understand the Program more fully. Section 1 is preceded by details of Spending Authorities from Part 2 of the Estimates and Volume 2 of the Public Accounts. This is to provide continuity with other Estimates documents and to help in assessing the Program`s financial performance over the past year. The format and organization of the document should be regarded as transitional. For the most part the document is organized to be consistent with the program structure approved for the National Energy Board. 16 figs.

  11. Energy policy and challenges: which part for the nuclear energy; Politique et defis energetiques: quel role pour l'energie nucleaire?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouchard, J

    2004-07-01

    This document provides many data and charts on the energy domain: energy consumption, energy demand, the reserves, the climatic changes, the renewable energies, the energy cost, the radioactive wastes management, the new nuclear technology. (A.L.B.)

  12. 3-D neutron transport benchmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, T.; Ikeda, H.

    1991-03-01

    A set of 3-D neutron transport benchmark problems proposed by the Osaka University to NEACRP in 1988 has been calculated by many participants and the corresponding results are summarized in this report. The results of K eff , control rod worth and region-averaged fluxes for the four proposed core models, calculated by using various 3-D transport codes are compared and discussed. The calculational methods used were: Monte Carlo, Discrete Ordinates (Sn), Spherical Harmonics (Pn), Nodal Transport and others. The solutions of the four core models are quite useful as benchmarks for checking the validity of 3-D neutron transport codes

  13. Strategic behaviour under regulatory benchmarking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamasb, T. [Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Applied Economics; Nillesen, P. [NUON NV (Netherlands); Pollitt, M. [Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom). Judge Inst. of Management

    2004-09-01

    In order to improve the efficiency of electricity distribution networks, some regulators have adopted incentive regulation schemes that rely on performance benchmarking. Although regulation benchmarking can influence the ''regulation game,'' the subject has received limited attention. This paper discusses how strategic behaviour can result in inefficient behaviour by firms. We then use the Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) method with US utility data to examine implications of illustrative cases of strategic behaviour reported by regulators. The results show that gaming can have significant effects on the measured performance and profitability of firms. (author)

  14. Update of KASHIL-E6 library for shielding analysis and benchmark calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, D. H.; Kil, C. S.; Jang, J. H.

    2004-01-01

    For various shielding and reactor pressure vessel dosimetry applications, a pseudo-problem-independent neutron-photon coupled MATXS-format library based on the last release of ENDF/B-VI has been generated as a part of the update program for KASHIL-E6, which was based on ENDF/B-VI.5. It has VITAMIN-B6 neutron and photon energy group structures, i.e., 199 groups for neutron and 42 groups for photon. The neutron and photon weighting functions and the Legendre order of scattering are same as KASHIL-E6. The library has been validated through some benchmarks: the PCA-REPLICA and NESDIP-2 experiments for LWR pressure vessel facility benchmark, the Winfrith Iron88 experiment for validation of iron data, and the Winfrith Graphite experiment for validation of graphite data. These calculations were performed by the TRANSXlDANTSYS code system. In addition, the substitutions of the JENDL-3.3 and JEFF-3.0 data for Fe, Cr, Cu and Ni, which are very important nuclides for shielding analyses, were investigated to estimate the effects on the benchmark calculation results

  15. Current Reactor Physics Benchmark Activities at the Idaho National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bess, John D.; Marshall, Margaret A.; Gorham, Mackenzie L.; Christensen, Joseph; Turnbull, James C.; Clark, Kim

    2011-01-01

    The International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) (1) and the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) (2) were established to preserve integral reactor physics and criticality experiment data for present and future research. These valuable assets provide the basis for recording, developing, and validating our integral nuclear data, and experimental and computational methods. These projects are managed through the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD-NEA). Staff and students at the Department of Energy - Idaho (DOE-ID) and INL are engaged in the development of benchmarks to support ongoing research activities. These benchmarks include reactors or assemblies that support Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) research, space nuclear Fission Surface Power System (FSPS) design validation, and currently operational facilities in Southeastern Idaho.

  16. Development of a wind converter and investigation of its operational function. Part 1: Technical description of the wind energy converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molly, J. P.; Steinheber, R.

    1982-11-01

    A 10 kW wind energy converter was developed by using as far possible standard serial production parts. The design criteria and the description of the essential machinery components of the MODA 10 wind energy converter are discussed. For some special load cases the safety calculation of the important components is shown. The blade control system which qualified for small wind energy converters, is explained. Weight and cost of the MODA 10 are considered.

  17. OECD/NRC Benchmark Based on NUPEC PWR Sub-channel and Bundle Test (PSBT). Volume I: Experimental Database and Final Problem Specifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubin, A.; Schoedel, A.; Avramova, M.; Utsuno, H.; Bajorek, S.; Velazquez-Lozada, A.

    2012-01-01

    The need to refine models for best-estimate calculations, based on good-quality experimental data, has been expressed in many recent meetings in the field of nuclear applications. The needs arising in this respect should not be limited to the currently available macroscopic methods but should be extended to next-generation analysis techniques that focus on more microscopic processes. One of the most valuable databases identified for the thermal-hydraulics modelling was developed by the Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC), Japan, which includes sub-channel void fraction and departure from nucleate boiling (DNB) measurements in a representative Pressurised Water Reactor (PWR) fuel assembly. Part of this database has been made available for this international benchmark activity entitled 'NUPEC PWR Sub-channel and Bundle Tests (PSBT) benchmark'. This international project has been officially approved by the Japanese Ministry of Economy, Trade, and Industry (METI), the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and endorsed by the OECD/NEA. The benchmark team has been organised based on the collaboration between Japan and the USA. A large number of international experts have agreed to participate in this programme. The fine-mesh high-quality sub-channel void fraction and departure from nucleate boiling data encourages advancement in understanding and modelling complex flow behaviour in real bundles. Considering that the present theoretical approach is relatively immature, the benchmark specification is designed so that it will systematically assess and compare the participants' analytical models on the prediction of detailed void distributions and DNB. The development of truly mechanistic models for DNB prediction is currently underway. The benchmark problem includes both macroscopic and microscopic measurement data. In this context, the sub-channel grade void fraction data are regarded as the macroscopic data and the digitised computer graphic images are the

  18. Benchmarking analysis of three multimedia models: RESRAD, MMSOILS, and MEPAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, J.J.; Faillace, E.R.; Gnanapragasam, E.K.

    1995-11-01

    Multimedia modelers from the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) collaborated to conduct a comprehensive and quantitative benchmarking analysis of three multimedia models. The three models-RESRAD (DOE), MMSOILS (EPA), and MEPAS (DOE)-represent analytically based tools that are used by the respective agencies for performing human exposure and health risk assessments. The study is performed by individuals who participate directly in the ongoing design, development, and application of the models. A list of physical/chemical/biological processes related to multimedia-based exposure and risk assessment is first presented as a basis for comparing the overall capabilities of RESRAD, MMSOILS, and MEPAS. Model design, formulation, and function are then examined by applying the models to a series of hypothetical problems. Major components of the models (e.g., atmospheric, surface water, groundwater) are evaluated separately and then studied as part of an integrated system for the assessment of a multimedia release scenario to determine effects due to linking components of the models. Seven modeling scenarios are used in the conduct of this benchmarking study: (1) direct biosphere exposure, (2) direct release to the air, (3) direct release to the vadose zone, (4) direct release to the saturated zone, (5) direct release to surface water, (6) surface water hydrology, and (7) multimedia release. Study results show that the models differ with respect to (1) environmental processes included (i.e., model features) and (2) the mathematical formulation and assumptions related to the implementation of solutions (i.e., parameterization)

  19. The tensor part of the Skyrme energy density functional. I. Spherical nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesinski, T.; Meyer, J. [Universite de Lyon, F-69003 Lyon (France)]|[Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon, CNRS/IN2P3, Universite Lyon 1, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Bender, M. [DSM/DAPNIA/SPhN, CEA Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)]|[Universite Bordeaux, CNRS/IN2P3, Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Bordeaux Gradignan, UMR5797, Chemin du Solarium, BP120, F-33175 Gradignan (France); Bennaceur, K. [Universite de Lyon, F-69003 Lyon (France)]|[Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon, CNRS/IN2P3, Universite Lyon 1, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France)]|[DSM/DAPNIA/SPhN, CEA Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Duguet, T. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States)

    2007-04-15

    agreement of the single-particle spectra in doubly-magic nuclei is deteriorated, which can be traced back to features of the single-particle spectra that are not related to the tensor terms. We conclude that the currently used central and spin-orbit parts of the Skyrme energy density functional are not flexible enough to allow for the presence of large tensor terms. (authors)

  20. Benchmarking the internal combustion engine and hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallace, J.S.

    2006-01-01

    The internal combustion engine is a cost-effective and highly reliable energy conversion technology. Exhaust emission regulations introduced in the 1970's triggered extensive research and development that has significantly improved in-use fuel efficiency and dramatically reduced exhaust emissions. The current level of gasoline vehicle engine development is highlighted and representative emissions and efficiency data are presented as benchmarks. The use of hydrogen fueling for IC engines has been investigated over many decades and the benefits and challenges arising are well-known. The current state of hydrogen-fueled engine development will be reviewed and evaluated against gasoline-fueled benchmarks. The prospects for further improvements to hydrogen-fueled IC engines will be examined. While fuel cells are projected to offer greater energy efficiency than IC engines and zero emissions, the availability of fuel cells in quantity at reasonable cost is a barrier to their widespread adaptation for the near future. In their current state of development, hydrogen fueled IC engines are an effective technology to create demand for hydrogen fueling infrastructure until fuel cells become available in commercial quantities. During this transition period, hydrogen fueled IC engines can achieve PZEV/ULSLEV emissions. (author)

  1. Switzerland. Regular Review 2006. Part 1. Trends in energy and energy efficiency policies, instruments and actors. Part 2. Indicators on Energy, Energy Efficiency, Economy and Environment. Based on national data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    Swiss energy policy is characterised by a number of specific factors, which are: (1) the federal structure of the country and its direct democracy; (2) the subsidiarity principle, which calls for state regulation as a last resort after private initiatives have failed; (3) its economic structure with a dominant services sector and little heavy industry; and finally (4) the growing influence of EU policymaking. Energy policy is a split responsibility between the federal state and the twenty-six cantons. Federal energy policymaking has been strengthened in recent years (in matters such as standards and labels), chiefly by means of the 1998 Energy Law and its subsequent amendments. In other domains such as buildings, cantons have clung to their prerogatives and merely consented to harmonised regulations and standards. In many instances, the federal state sets a minimum standard (like e.g. for feed-in tariffs), leaving it to cantons to pursue more generous policies. A sizeable portion of the federal SwissEnergy programme is allocated to co-financing cantonal programmes and projects. The efficiency of energy policies and programmes has improved over the last few years owing to stricter monitoring and harmonisation, but large disparities among cantonal policies prevail. Some indicators, such as per capita energy efficiency spending, highlight the scope for action in laggard cantons. Under Swiss direct democracy, any law, even those passed by parliament, may be subjected to a popular verdict. This has happened to seven energy-related items since 2000, including pro-renewable proposals, which were defeated. This underscores the importance of communication of energy policy matters. According to polls, Swiss people tend to have become less concerned with environmental issues in recent years. But climate change, as it manifests itself in receding glaciers, devastating floods and landslides, has sharpened the public's receptiveness for the cause of sustainable energy. This

  2. Trends in Energy Management Technology - Part 4: Review ofAdvanced Applications in Energy Management, Control, and InformationSystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yee, Gaymond; Webster, Tom

    2003-08-01

    In this article, the fourth in a series, we provide a review of advanced applications in Energy Management, Control, and Information Systems (EMCIS). The available features for these products are summarized and analyzed with regard to emerging trends in EMCIS and potential benefits to the Federal sector. The first article [1] covered enabling technologies for emerging energy management systems. The second article [2] serves as a basic reference for building control system (BCS) networking fundamentals and includes an assessment of current approaches to open communications. The third article [3] evaluated several products that exemplify the current state of practice in EMCIS. It is important for energy managers in the Federal sector to have a high level of knowledge and understanding of these complex energy management systems. This series of articles provides energy practitioners with some basic informational and educational tools to help make decisions relative to energy management systems design, specification, procurement, and energy savings potential.

  3. Benchmarked Library Websites Comparative Study

    KAUST Repository

    Ramli, Rindra M.; Tyhurst, Janis

    2015-01-01

    This presentation provides an analysis of services provided by the benchmarked library websites. The exploratory study includes comparison of these websites against a list of criterion and presents a list of services that are most commonly deployed by the selected websites. In addition to that, the investigators proposed a list of services that could be provided via the KAUST library website.

  4. Prismatic Core Coupled Transient Benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortensi, J.; Pope, M.A.; Strydom, G.; Sen, R.S.; DeHart, M.D.; Gougar, H.D.; Ellis, C.; Baxter, A.; Seker, V.; Downar, T.J.; Vierow, K.; Ivanov, K.

    2011-01-01

    The Prismatic Modular Reactor (PMR) is one of the High Temperature Reactor (HTR) design concepts that have existed for some time. Several prismatic units have operated in the world (DRAGON, Fort St. Vrain, Peach Bottom) and one unit is still in operation (HTTR). The deterministic neutronics and thermal-fluids transient analysis tools and methods currently available for the design and analysis of PMRs have lagged behind the state of the art compared to LWR reactor technologies. This has motivated the development of more accurate and efficient tools for the design and safety evaluations of the PMR. In addition to the work invested in new methods, it is essential to develop appropriate benchmarks to verify and validate the new methods in computer codes. The purpose of this benchmark is to establish a well-defined problem, based on a common given set of data, to compare methods and tools in core simulation and thermal hydraulics analysis with a specific focus on transient events. The benchmark-working group is currently seeking OECD/NEA sponsorship. This benchmark is being pursued and is heavily based on the success of the PBMR-400 exercise.

  5. International benchmarking of electricity transmission by regulators: A contrast between theory and practice?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haney, Aoife Brophy; Pollitt, Michael G.

    2013-01-01

    Benchmarking of electricity networks has a key role in sharing the benefits of efficiency improvements with consumers and ensuring regulated companies earn a fair return on their investments. This paper analyses and contrasts the theory and practice of international benchmarking of electricity transmission by regulators. We examine the literature relevant to electricity transmission benchmarking and discuss the results of a survey of 25 national electricity regulators. While new panel data techniques aimed at dealing with unobserved heterogeneity and the validity of the comparator group look intellectually promising, our survey suggests that they are in their infancy for regulatory purposes. In electricity transmission, relative to electricity distribution, choosing variables is particularly difficult, because of the large number of potential variables to choose from. Failure to apply benchmarking appropriately may negatively affect investors’ willingness to invest in the future. While few of our surveyed regulators acknowledge that regulatory risk is currently an issue in transmission benchmarking, many more concede it might be. In the meantime new regulatory approaches – such as those based on tendering, negotiated settlements, a wider range of outputs or longer term grid planning – are emerging and will necessarily involve a reduced role for benchmarking. -- Highlights: •We discuss how to benchmark electricity transmission. •We report survey results from 25 national energy regulators. •Electricity transmission benchmarking is more challenging than benchmarking distribution. •Many regulators concede benchmarking may raise capital costs. •Many regulators are considering new regulatory approaches

  6. How Are You Doing? Key Performance Indicators and Benchmarking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahey, John P.

    2011-01-01

    School business officials need to "know and show" that their operations are well managed. To do so, they ask themselves questions, such as "How are they doing? How do they compare with others? Are they making progress fast enough? Are they using the best practices?" Using key performance indicators (KPIs) and benchmarking as regular parts of their…

  7. Thermal reactor benchmark tests on JENDL-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takano, Hideki; Tsuchihashi, Keichiro; Yamane, Tsuyoshi; Akino, Fujiyoshi; Ishiguro, Yukio; Ido, Masaru.

    1983-11-01

    A group constant library for the thermal reactor standard nuclear design code system SRAC was produced by using the evaluated nuclear data JENDL-2. Furthermore, the group constants for 235 U were calculated also from ENDF/B-V. Thermal reactor benchmark calculations were performed using the produced group constant library. The selected benchmark cores are two water-moderated lattices (TRX-1 and 2), two heavy water-moderated cores (DCA and ETA-1), two graphite-moderated cores (SHE-8 and 13) and eight critical experiments for critical safety. The effective multiplication factors and lattice cell parameters were calculated and compared with the experimental values. The results are summarized as follows. (1) Effective multiplication factors: The results by JENDL-2 are considerably improved in comparison with ones by ENDF/B-IV. The best agreement is obtained by using JENDL-2 and ENDF/B-V (only 235 U) data. (2) Lattice cell parameters: For the rho 28 (the ratio of epithermal to thermal 238 U captures) and C* (the ratio of 238 U captures to 235 U fissions), the values calculated by JENDL-2 are in good agreement with the experimental values. The rho 28 (the ratio of 238 U to 235 U fissions) are overestimated as found also for the fast reactor benchmarks. The rho 02 (the ratio of epithermal to thermal 232 Th captures) calculated by JENDL-2 or ENDF/B-IV are considerably underestimated. The functions of the SRAC system have been continued to be extended according to the needs of its users. A brief description will be given, in Appendix B, to the extended parts of the SRAC system together with the input specification. (author)

  8. Pericles and Attila results for the C5G7 MOX benchmark problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wareing, T.A.; McGhee, J.M.

    2002-01-01

    Recently the Nuclear Energy Agency has published a new benchmark entitled, 'C5G7 MOX Benchmark.' This benchmark is to test the ability of current transport codes to treat reactor core problems without spatial homogenization. The benchmark includes both a two- and three-dimensional problem. We have calculated results for these benchmark problems with our Pericles and Attila codes. Pericles is a one-,two-, and three-dimensional unstructured grid discrete-ordinates code and was used for the twodimensional benchmark problem. Attila is a three-dimensional unstructured tetrahedral mesh discrete-ordinate code and was used for the three-dimensional problem. Both codes use discontinuous finite element spatial differencing. Both codes use diffusion synthetic acceleration (DSA) for accelerating the inner iterations.

  9. Benchmark experiment on vanadium assembly with D-T neutrons. In-situ measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maekawa, Fujio; Kasugai, Yoshimi; Konno, Chikara; Wada, Masayuki; Oyama, Yukio; Ikeda, Yujiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Murata, Isao; Kokooo; Takahashi, Akito

    1998-03-01

    Fusion neutronics benchmark experimental data on vanadium were obtained for neutrons in almost entire energies as well as secondary gamma-rays. Benchmark calculations for the experiment were performed to investigate validity of recent nuclear data files, i.e., JENDL Fusion File, FENDL/E-1.0 and EFF-3. (author)

  10. Energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    In the framework of the National Debate on the energies in a context of a sustainable development some associations for the environment organized a debate on the nuclear interest facing the renewable energies. The first part presents the nuclear energy as a possible solution to fight against the greenhouse effect and the associated problem of the wastes management. The second part gives information on the solar energy and the possibilities of heat and electric power production. A presentation of the FEE (French wind power association) on the situation and the development of the wind power in France, is also provided. (A.L.B.)

  11. Building America Research Benchmark Definition: Updated December 19, 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendron, R.

    2008-12-01

    To track progress toward aggressive multi-year whole-house energy savings goals of 40-70% and onsite power production of up to 30%, DOE's Residential Buildings Program and NREL developed the Building America Research Benchmark in consultation with the Building America industry teams.

  12. Building America Research Benchmark Definition, Updated December 19, 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendron, R. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2008-12-19

    To track progress toward aggressive multi-year whole-house energy savings goals of 40-70% and onsite power production of up to 30%, DOE's Residential Buildings Program and NREL developed the Building America Research Benchmark in consultation with the Bui

  13. Multi-annual energy plan. Part relating to the Ponant islands. The Energy transition for green growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    The multi-annual energy plan aims at completing the transition towards an energy system which is more efficient, less wasteful, more diverse and therefore more resilient. It reaffirms France's commitment to reducing energy consumption, particularly energy from fossil fuels. The future of France's energy sector lies in striking a harmonious balance between different energy sources. These strategic decisions will help to meet France's objectives to keep greenhouse gas emissions to a minimum in line with its commitments to the EU and to the Paris Climate Agreement, to protect human health and the environment and to ensure access to energy at a reasonable cost whilst stimulating economic activity and employment. This document is the multi-annual energy plan for the inhabited and non-interconnected Ponant Islands (Ouessant, Molene, Sein). It establishes the priority actions for all energy sources with respect to demand control, supply diversification, supply security, supply and demand management, renewal of production means. It covers a first 3-years period (2016-2018) followed by a second 5-years period (2019-2023)

  14. Advanced light water reactors: an economically viable part of the world's future energy mix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruschi, H.J.

    1996-01-01

    In addition to safety and reliability, a common mission for the international nuclear industry in the 21. century will be ensure affordable electricity. At the Westinghouse Electric Corporation believe our advanced light water reactor (ALWR) design gives us the opportunity to provide the safest, most reliable, lowest cost, most competitive generation method possible for use by nations and utilities worldwide. While the safety and reliability aspects of the ALWR can be proven tangibly and are well-documented, questions have been raised about the technology's ability to work within the world's selling price range for electricity generation. For our industry's financial stability, and especially for the stability of the world's future power needs, Westinghouse has done extensive work on this issue and we are convinced we can meet the competitive challenge. We believe the ALWR can be an economically viable part of the world's future energy mix. This paper will define the competitive challenge that is being addressed by the industry and then analyze three specific areas: capital costs, operating costs, and financing costs. The hidden advantage of nuclear power in responding to these challenges will be explored, and a strong case will be made asserting that the advanced light water reactor will be able to compete in international markets with viable production costs. (authors)

  15. Burn-up TRIGA Mark II benchmark experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persic, A.; Ravnik, M.; Zagar, T.

    1998-01-01

    Different reactor codes are used for calculations of reactor parameters. The accuracy of the programs is tested through comparison of the calculated values with the experimental results. Well-defined and accurately measured benchmarks are required. The experimental results of reactivity measurements, fuel element reactivity worth distribution and fuel-up measurements are presented in this paper. The experiments were performed with partly burnt reactor core. The experimental conditions were well defined, so that the results can be used as a burn-up benchmark test case for a TRIGA Mark II reactor calculations.(author)

  16. Benchmarking and Self-Assessment in the Wine Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galitsky, Christina; Radspieler, Anthony; Worrell, Ernst; Healy,Patrick; Zechiel, Susanne

    2005-12-01

    Not all industrial facilities have the staff or theopportunity to perform a detailed audit of their operations. The lack ofknowledge of energy efficiency opportunities provides an importantbarrier to improving efficiency. Benchmarking programs in the U.S. andabroad have shown to improve knowledge of the energy performance ofindustrial facilities and buildings and to fuel energy managementpractices. Benchmarking provides a fair way to compare the energyintensity of plants, while accounting for structural differences (e.g.,the mix of products produced, climate conditions) between differentfacilities. In California, the winemaking industry is not only one of theeconomic pillars of the economy; it is also a large energy consumer, witha considerable potential for energy-efficiency improvement. LawrenceBerkeley National Laboratory and Fetzer Vineyards developed the firstbenchmarking tool for the California wine industry called "BEST(Benchmarking and Energy and water Savings Tool) Winery". BEST Wineryenables a winery to compare its energy efficiency to a best practicereference winery. Besides overall performance, the tool enables the userto evaluate the impact of implementing efficiency measures. The toolfacilitates strategic planning of efficiency measures, based on theestimated impact of the measures, their costs and savings. The tool willraise awareness of current energy intensities and offer an efficient wayto evaluate the impact of future efficiency measures.

  17. Energy and water development appropriations for 1999: Part 5. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, One Hundred Fifth Congress, Second Session

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This is part 5 of the hearings before the subcommittee on energy and water development of the committee on appropriations. Included are statements from witnesses of the Secretary of Energy, departmental administration, energy research, renewable energy, nuclear energy, Power Marketing Administration, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission

  18. Benchmarking computer platforms for lattice QCD applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasenbusch, M.; Jansen, K.; Pleiter, D.; Wegner, P.; Wettig, T.

    2003-09-01

    We define a benchmark suite for lattice QCD and report on benchmark results from several computer platforms. The platforms considered are apeNEXT, CRAY T3E, Hitachi SR8000, IBM p690, PC-Clusters, and QCDOC. (orig.)

  19. Benchmarking computer platforms for lattice QCD applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasenbusch, M.; Jansen, K.; Pleiter, D.; Stueben, H.; Wegner, P.; Wettig, T.; Wittig, H.

    2004-01-01

    We define a benchmark suite for lattice QCD and report on benchmark results from several computer platforms. The platforms considered are apeNEXT, CRAY T3E; Hitachi SR8000, IBM p690, PC-Clusters, and QCDOC

  20. Technology centre ''aspern IQ''. Office buildings in the plus-energy building as a benchmark for future projects; Technologiezentrum ''aspern IQ''. Buerohaus im Plus-Energie-Standard als Benchmark fuer kuenftige Projekte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Achammer, Hannes [ATP Wien (Austria); IWP Liebhartstal II, Wien (Austria); Technologiezentrum aspern IQ, Wien (Austria)

    2012-11-01

    With 240 hectares per 20,000 residents and working people the future seaside town Aspern is one of the largest urban development projects in Europe and the largest in Vienna (Austria). At the end of August 2012, the component 1 of the technology centre ''aspern IQ'' of the Vienna Business Agency has been completed at the first construction site. This first building construction was designed in the plus-energy standard. As a flagship project it exemplary shall be adapted to the local resource supply, provide the highest possible user experience and meet the requirements of sustainability.

  1. Providing all global energy with wind, water, and solar power, Part II: Reliability, system and transmission costs, and policies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delucchi, Mark A.; Jacobson, Mark Z.

    2011-01-01

    This is Part II of two papers evaluating the feasibility of providing all energy for all purposes (electric power, transportation, and heating/cooling), everywhere in the world, from wind, water, and the sun (WWS). In Part I, we described the prominent renewable energy plans that have been proposed and discussed the characteristics of WWS energy systems, the global demand for and availability of WWS energy, quantities and areas required for WWS infrastructure, and supplies of critical materials. Here, we discuss methods of addressing the variability of WWS energy to ensure that power supply reliably matches demand (including interconnecting geographically dispersed resources, using hydroelectricity, using demand-response management, storing electric power on site, over-sizing peak generation capacity and producing hydrogen with the excess, storing electric power in vehicle batteries, and forecasting weather to project energy supplies), the economics of WWS generation and transmission, the economics of WWS use in transportation, and policy measures needed to enhance the viability of a WWS system. We find that the cost of energy in a 100% WWS will be similar to the cost today. We conclude that barriers to a 100% conversion to WWS power worldwide are primarily social and political, not technological or even economic. - Research highlights: → We evaluate the feasibility of global energy supply from wind, water, and solar energy. → WWS energy can be supplied reliably and economically to all energy-use sectors. → The social cost of WWS energy generally is less than the cost of fossil-fuel energy. → Barriers to 100% WWS power worldwide are socio-political, not techno-economic.

  2. Tourism Destination Benchmarking: Evaluation and Selection of the Benchmarking Partners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luštický Martin

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Tourism development has an irreplaceable role in regional policy of almost all countries. This is due to its undeniable benefits for the local population with regards to the economic, social and environmental sphere. Tourist destinations compete for visitors at tourism market and subsequently get into a relatively sharp competitive struggle. The main goal of regional governments and destination management institutions is to succeed in this struggle by increasing the competitiveness of their destination. The quality of strategic planning and final strategies is a key factor of competitiveness. Even though the tourism sector is not the typical field where the benchmarking methods are widely used, such approaches could be successfully applied. The paper focuses on key phases of the benchmarking process which lies in the search for suitable referencing partners. The partners are consequently selected to meet general requirements to ensure the quality if strategies. Following from this, some specific characteristics are developed according to the SMART approach. The paper tests this procedure with an expert evaluation of eight selected regional tourism strategies of regions in the Czech Republic, Slovakia and Great Britain. In this way it validates the selected criteria in the frame of the international environment. Hence, it makes it possible to find strengths and weaknesses of selected strategies and at the same time facilitates the discovery of suitable benchmarking partners.

  3. Providing all global energy with wind, water, and solar power, Part I: Technologies, energy resources, quantities and areas of infrastructure, and materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobson, Mark Z., E-mail: jacobson@stanford.ed [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-4020 (United States); Delucchi, Mark A., E-mail: madelucchi@ucdavis.ed [Institute of Transportation Studies, University of California at Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States)

    2011-03-15

    Climate change, pollution, and energy insecurity are among the greatest problems of our time. Addressing them requires major changes in our energy infrastructure. Here, we analyze the feasibility of providing worldwide energy for all purposes (electric power, transportation, heating/cooling, etc.) from wind, water, and sunlight (WWS). In Part I, we discuss WWS energy system characteristics, current and future energy demand, availability of WWS resources, numbers of WWS devices, and area and material requirements. In Part II, we address variability, economics, and policy of WWS energy. We estimate that {approx}3,800,000 5 MW wind turbines, {approx}49,000 300 MW concentrated solar plants, {approx}40,000 300 MW solar PV power plants, {approx}1.7 billion 3 kW rooftop PV systems, {approx}5350 100 MW geothermal power plants, {approx}270 new 1300 MW hydroelectric power plants, {approx}720,000 0.75 MW wave devices, and {approx}490,000 1 MW tidal turbines can power a 2030 WWS world that uses electricity and electrolytic hydrogen for all purposes. Such a WWS infrastructure reduces world power demand by 30% and requires only {approx}0.41% and {approx}0.59% more of the world's land for footprint and spacing, respectively. We suggest producing all new energy with WWS by 2030 and replacing the pre-existing energy by 2050. Barriers to the plan are primarily social and political, not technological or economic. The energy cost in a WWS world should be similar to that today. - Research highlights: {yields} Replacing world energy with wind, water, and sun (WWS) reduces world power demand 30%. {yields} WWS for world requires only 0.41% and 0.51% more world land for footprint and spacing, respectively. {yields} Practical to provide 100% new energy with WWS by 2030 and replace existing energy by 2050.

  4. BONFIRE: benchmarking computers and computer networks

    OpenAIRE

    Bouckaert, Stefan; Vanhie-Van Gerwen, Jono; Moerman, Ingrid; Phillips, Stephen; Wilander, Jerker

    2011-01-01

    The benchmarking concept is not new in the field of computing or computer networking. With “benchmarking tools”, one usually refers to a program or set of programs, used to evaluate the performance of a solution under certain reference conditions, relative to the performance of another solution. Since the 1970s, benchmarking techniques have been used to measure the performance of computers and computer networks. Benchmarking of applications and virtual machines in an Infrastructure-as-a-Servi...

  5. Benchmarking clinical photography services in the NHS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbon, Giles

    2015-01-01

    Benchmarking is used in services across the National Health Service (NHS) using various benchmarking programs. Clinical photography services do not have a program in place and services have to rely on ad hoc surveys of other services. A trial benchmarking exercise was undertaken with 13 services in NHS Trusts. This highlights valuable data and comparisons that can be used to benchmark and improve services throughout the profession.

  6. Grant request: to implement energy conservation measures as part of the state original and supplemental energy conservation plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-01-16

    The program measures described in this document comprise a grant request to DOE under the Energy Policy and Conservation Act of 1975 and the Energy Conservation and Production Act of 1976. The amount requested, $5,555,000, will allow the extension, acceleration, and implementation of energy conservation activities already in progress in California. Accomplishments to date have included the adoption of residential standards, and the implementation of an energy survey program for public buildings. Efficiency standards have been established for refrigerators and room and central air conditioners, appliances which utilize a significant amount of residential energy. Before the end of 1977, efficiency standards will be established for clothes dryers, washers, and water heaters. Program elements are: technical/financial assistance; public awareness; standards setting; solar element; research/analysis/evaluation; and coordination and management.

  7. How Benchmarking and Higher Education Came Together

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Gary D.; Ronco, Sharron L.

    2012-01-01

    This chapter introduces the concept of benchmarking and how higher education institutions began to use benchmarking for a variety of purposes. Here, benchmarking is defined as a strategic and structured approach whereby an organization compares aspects of its processes and/or outcomes to those of another organization or set of organizations to…

  8. WWER-1000 Burnup Credit Benchmark (CB5)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manolova, M.A.

    2002-01-01

    In the paper the specification of WWER-1000 Burnup Credit Benchmark first phase (depletion calculations), given. The second phase - criticality calculations for the WWER-1000 fuel pin cell, will be given after the evaluation of the results, obtained at the first phase. The proposed benchmark is a continuation of the WWER benchmark activities in this field (Author)

  9. IT-benchmarking of clinical workflows: concept, implementation, and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thye, Johannes; Straede, Matthias-Christopher; Liebe, Jan-David; Hübner, Ursula

    2014-01-01

    Due to the emerging evidence of health IT as opportunity and risk for clinical workflows, health IT must undergo a continuous measurement of its efficacy and efficiency. IT-benchmarks are a proven means for providing this information. The aim of this study was to enhance the methodology of an existing benchmarking procedure by including, in particular, new indicators of clinical workflows and by proposing new types of visualisation. Drawing on the concept of information logistics, we propose four workflow descriptors that were applied to four clinical processes. General and specific indicators were derived from these descriptors and processes. 199 chief information officers (CIOs) took part in the benchmarking. These hospitals were assigned to reference groups of a similar size and ownership from a total of 259 hospitals. Stepwise and comprehensive feedback was given to the CIOs. Most participants who evaluated the benchmark rated the procedure as very good, good, or rather good (98.4%). Benchmark information was used by CIOs for getting a general overview, advancing IT, preparing negotiations with board members, and arguing for a new IT project.

  10. Criticality benchmark comparisons leading to cross-section upgrades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alesso, H.P.; Annese, C.E.; Heinrichs, D.P.; Lloyd, W.R.; Lent, E.M.

    1993-01-01

    For several years criticality benchmark calculations with COG. COG is a point-wise Monte Carlo code developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). It solves the Boltzmann equation for the transport of neutrons and photons. The principle consideration in developing COG was that the resulting calculation would be as accurate as the point-wise cross-sectional data, since no physics computational approximations were used. The objective of this paper is to report on COG results for criticality benchmark experiments in concert with MCNP comparisons which are resulting in corrections an upgrades to the point-wise ENDL cross-section data libraries. Benchmarking discrepancies reported here indicated difficulties in the Evaluated Nuclear Data Livermore (ENDL) cross-sections for U-238 at thermal neutron energy levels. This led to a re-evaluation and selection of the appropriate cross-section values from several cross-section sets available (ENDL, ENDF/B-V). Further cross-section upgrades anticipated

  11. Swiss electricity grid - Benchmarking pilot project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    This article is a short version of the ENET number 210369. This report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) describes a benchmarking pilot project carried out as a second phase in the development of a formula for the regulation of an open electricity market in Switzerland. It follows on from an initial phase involving the definition of a 'blue print' and a basic concept. The aims of the pilot project - to check out the practicability of the concept - are discussed. The collection of anonymised data for the benchmarking model from over 30 electricity utilities operating on all 7 Swiss grid levels and their integration in the three areas 'Technology', 'Grid Costs' and 'Capital Invested' are discussed in detail. In particular, confidentiality and data protection aspects are looked at. The methods used in the analysis of the data are described and the results of an efficiency analysis of various utilities are presented. The report is concluded with a listing of questions concerning data collection and analysis as well as operational and capital costs that are still to be answered

  12. Resource analysis of the Chinese society 1980-2002 based on energy-Part 5: Resource structure and intensity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, G.Q.; Chen, B.

    2007-01-01

    This paper is the continuation of the fourth part on fishery and rangeland. The total resource inflow to the Chinese society from 1980 to 2002 is investigated in four parts published afore. The total resource energy input corresponds to GDP is presented in comparison with the purchasing power parity in this paper. The structure of the resource energy inflow is also outlined. Finally, a novel concept referred to as resource intensity is suggested to serve as a basic indicator to illustrate the real status of the economic development in China

  13. Competitive policies in the Nordic energy research and innovation area - eNERGIA : Part 1: Country reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klitkou, Antje; Pedersen, Trond Einar; Scordato, Lisa; Mariussen, Aage

    2008-07-01

    This (Part 1: Country reports) is the first report about the results from the eNERGIA project. The second report mainly deals with selected renewable energy technologies from different perspectives, while the third report sums up the SWOT-analysis, the eNERGIA workshops and the case studies of good practice. A short synthesis report summarises the entire project. This first report is the presentation of the countries studied in the project - Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, Sweden, Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania. The policy system and the political framework conditions that underpin energy related industrial activity are reviewed for each country. This includes energy strategies, laws and regulations, R&D and innovation policies and instruments, and international collaboration. Key actors and institutions in the public domain, research and education, and non-governmental organisations are mapped. Finally, the descriptions of the countries include also technology specific overviews of R&D-intensive firms in the energy sector. The report comprises three parts: Part 1: Country reports Part 2: Technology reports Part 3: Special reports The results are summarised in the Synthesis report. (Author). refs., 24 figs., 49 tabs

  14. The tropical water and energy cycles in a cumulus ensemble model. Part 1: Equilibrium climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, C. H.; Lau, K. M.; Tao, W. K.; Simpson, J.

    1994-01-01

    A cumulus ensemble model is used to study the tropical water and energy cycles and their role in the climate system. The model includes cloud dynamics, radiative processes, and microphysics that incorporate all important production and conversion processes among water vapor and five species of hydrometeors. Radiative transfer in clouds is parameterized based on cloud contents and size distributions of each bulk hydrometeor. Several model integrations have been carried out under a variety of imposed boundary and large-scale conditions. In Part 1 of this paper, the primary focus is on the water and heat budgets of the control experiment, which is designed to simulate the convective - radiative equilibrium response of the model to an imposed vertical velocity and a fixed sea surface temperature at 28 C. The simulated atmosphere is conditionally unstable below the freezing level and close to neutral above the freezing level. The equilibrium water budget shows that the total moisture source, M(sub s), which is contributed by surface evaporation (0.24 M(sub s)) and the large-scale advection (0.76 M(sub s)), all converts to mean surface precipitation bar-P(sub s). Most of M(sub s) is transported verticaly in convective regions where much of the condensate is generated and falls to surface (0.68 bar-P(sub s)). The remaining condensate detrains at a rate of 0.48 bar-P(sub s) and constitutes 65% of the source for stratiform clouds above the melting level. The upper-level stratiform cloud dissipates into clear environment at a rate of 0.14 bar-P(sub s), which is a significant moisture source comparable to the detrained water vapor (0.15 bar-P(sub s)) to the upper troposphere from convective clouds. In the lower troposphere, stratiform clouds evaporate at a rate of 0.41 bar-P(sub s), which is a more dominant moisture source than surface evaporation (0.22 bar-P(sub s)). The precipitation falling to the surface in the stratiform region is about 0.32 bar-P(sub s). The associated

  15. Consumption of forest chips as an energy source as part of the national action plan for renewable energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ylitalo, E.

    2004-01-01

    A specific Action Plan for Renewable Energy was introduced in 1999 in order to increase the utilisation of renewable energy sources in Finland. The Plan was renewed in 2002, taking into account a revision of the goals defined in the statements given by the Parliament in the de-bate on national Climate Strategy and the decision on building a new nuclear power plant. The main reason for increasing the consumption of renewable energy is the aim of decreasing emissions of greenhouse gases caused by fossil fuels. The renewed Action Plan includes aims and means of how to increase the consumption of renewable energy in practice in the future. Specific goals for separate renewable energy sources were set for the years 2005, 2010 and 2025. Proportional targets were set for the consumption of forest chips: in 2010 consumption is expected to be four times larger than in 2001 and in 2025 seven times larger. In Finland, the most important source for renewable energy is wood and wood waste, which currently makes up approximately 20 per cent of total energy consumption. Wood waste (incl. waste liquor and solid wood waste) produced by the forest industries can be considered as being fully utilized at the moment. Therefore, the most important means of increasing the consumption of wood energy in the future is in the utilisation of forest chips resources. Since 2000, the Finnish Forest Re-search Institute has compiled statistics on the consumption of forest chips and forest industry by-products used in energy generation. One aim of these statistics is to monitor the fruition of the Action Plan mentioned. In 2003, the volume of forest chips consumed in energy generation was 2.1 mill. m3, i.e. approximately five per cent of all energy sources consumed. According to the statistics, the consumption of forest chips has doubled during the period 2000-2003 with an annual average increase of 0.4 mill. m 3 . The goals set in the Action Plan can be considered to be high. In order to achieve

  16. Qinshan CANDU NPP outage performance improvement through benchmarking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Fuming

    2005-01-01

    With the increasingly fierce competition in the deregulated Energy Market, the optimization of outage duration has become one of the focal points for the Nuclear Power Plant owners around the world. People are seeking various ways to shorten the outage duration of NPP. Great efforts have been made in the Light Water Reactor (LWR) family with the concept of benchmarking and evaluation, which great reduced the outage duration and improved outage performance. The average capacity factor of LWRs has been greatly improved over the last three decades, which now is close to 90%. CANDU (Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor) stations, with its unique feature of on power refueling, of nuclear fuel remaining in the reactor all through the planned outage, have given raise to more stringent safety requirements during planned outage. In addition, the above feature gives more variations to the critical path of planned outage in different station. In order to benchmarking again the best practices in the CANDU stations, Third Qinshan Nuclear Power Company (TQNPC) have initiated the benchmarking program among the CANDU stations aiming to standardize the outage maintenance windows and optimize the outage duration. The initial benchmarking has resulted the optimization of outage duration in Qinshan CANDU NPP and the formulation of its first long-term outage plan. This paper describes the benchmarking works that have been proven to be useful for optimizing outage duration in Qinshan CANDU NPP, and the vision of further optimize the duration with joint effort from the CANDU community. (authors)

  17. International benchmark tests of the FENDL-1 Nuclear Data Library

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, U.

    1997-01-01

    An international benchmark validation task has been conducted to validate the fusion evaluated nuclear data library FENDL-1 through data tests against integral 14 MeV neutron experiments. The main objective of this task was to qualify the FENDL-1 working libraries for fusion applications and to elaborate recommendations for further data improvements. Several laboratories and institutions from the European Union, Japan, the Russian Federation and US have contributed to the benchmark task. A large variety of existing integral 14 MeV benchmark experiments was analysed with the FENDL-1 working libraries for continuous energy Monte Carlo and multigroup discrete ordinate calculations. Results of the benchmark analyses have been collected, discussed and evaluated. The major findings, conclusions and recommendations are presented in this paper. With regard to the data quality, it is summarised that fusion nuclear data have reached a high confidence level with the available FENDL-1 data library. With few exceptions this holds for the materials of highest importance for fusion reactor applications. As a result of the performed benchmark analyses, some existing deficiencies and discrepancies have been identified that are recommended for removal in theforthcoming FENDL-2 data file. (orig.)

  18. The development of code benchmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has undertaken a code benchmarking effort to define a series of cask-like problems having both numerical solutions and experimental data. The development of the benchmarks includes: (1) model problem definition, (2) code intercomparison, and (3) experimental verification. The first two steps are complete and a series of experiments are planned. The experiments will examine the elastic/plastic behavior of cylinders for both the end and side impacts resulting from a nine meter drop. The cylinders will be made from stainless steel and aluminum to give a range of plastic deformations. This paper presents the results of analyses simulating the model's behavior using materials properties for stainless steel and aluminum

  19. Benchmarking Variable Selection in QSAR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eklund, Martin; Norinder, Ulf; Boyer, Scott; Carlsson, Lars

    2012-02-01

    Variable selection is important in QSAR modeling since it can improve model performance and transparency, as well as reduce the computational cost of model fitting and predictions. Which variable selection methods that perform well in QSAR settings is largely unknown. To address this question we, in a total of 1728 benchmarking experiments, rigorously investigated how eight variable selection methods affect the predictive performance and transparency of random forest models fitted to seven QSAR datasets covering different endpoints, descriptors sets, types of response variables, and number of chemical compounds. The results show that univariate variable selection methods are suboptimal and that the number of variables in the benchmarked datasets can be reduced with about 60 % without significant loss in model performance when using multivariate adaptive regression splines MARS and forward selection. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Closed-loop neuromorphic benchmarks

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Stewart, TC

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Benchmarks   Terrence C. Stewart 1* , Travis DeWolf 1 , Ashley Kleinhans 2 , Chris Eliasmith 1   1 University of Waterloo, Canada, 2 Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, South Africa   Submitted to Journal:   Frontiers in Neuroscience   Specialty... Eliasmith 1 1Centre for Theoretical Neuroscience, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada 2Mobile Intelligent Autonomous Systems group, Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, Pretoria, South Africa Correspondence*: Terrence C. Stewart Centre...