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Sample records for energy agency iaea

  1. The International Atomic Energy Agency - IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pezzutti, A.A.C.

    1980-01-01

    The origens, functions and objectives of the IAEA are analysed. The application of safeguards to avoid military uses of nuclear energy is discussed. In the final section the agrement between Brazil and Germany regarding IAEA safeguards, as well as the competence for executing the brazilian program are explained. It is, then, an informative study dealing with nuclear energy and its peaceful path, the creation of International Fuel Cycle Evaluation and nonproliferation [pt

  2. Decommissioning: Strategies and programmes at the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laraia, M.

    2003-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has included decommissioning in its regular programmes since 1985. Until a few years ago, attention was focused on the decommissioning of nuclear power plants, and to a lesser extent, research reactors. Some countries, however, are now devoting greater attention to the decommissioning of non-reactor facilities, with implementation of these programmes being seen as a high priority. This demanded equal attention in IAEA's programmes. In recent years, the IAEA has expanded its programmes to include guidance on decommissioning of small medical, industrial and research facilities which are prevailing in most of its over 130 Member States. By 2010-2020, a significant number of nuclear power plants, research reactors, fuel cycle and non-reactor facilities will have exceeded their normal design lifetimes. Many of these facilities are already shutdown and are awaiting decommissioning. In 1996, the IAEA organized the decommissioning programme along two directions. A first direction focuses on the safety of management of radioactive waste including decommissioning. A second direction focuses on the technology and strategies to support waste management and decommissioning activities. This split of activities was instituted in order to keep the regulatory aspects separated from the strategic and technology-related activities. The focus of this paper will be on current and foreseen activities related to strategies and technologies of decommissioning, but other activities will be touched upon as well. All technical divisions of the IAEA provide technical support for Technical Co-operation (TC) projects with developing countries. TC projects in the field of decommissioning are given separate coverage in this paper. The IAEA documents on decommissioning strategies and technologies are presented in Section 2. Technical Co-operation Programme concerning Decommissioning is discussed focusing the objectives, the specific projects and the

  3. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) standards and recommendations on radioactive waste and transport safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warnecke, E.; Rawl, R.

    1996-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) publishes standards and recommendations on all aspects of nuclear safety in its Safety Series, which includes radioactive waste management and transport of radioactive materials. Safety Series documents may be adopted by a State into its national legal framework. Most of the States used the IAEA transport regulations (Safety Series No. 6) as a basis for their national regulation. The two highest ranking documents of the Radioactive Waste Safety Standards (RADWASS) programme, the Safety Fundamentals and the Safety Standard on the national waste management system, have been published. Both provide impetus into the waste management safety convention, a legally binding document for signatory states, which is being drafted. The already existing Convention on Nuclear Safety covers the management of radioactive waste at land-based civil nuclear power plants. (author) 1 fig., 18 refs

  4. Gamma techniques for IAEA [International Atomic Energy Agency] safeguards at centrifuge enrichment cascades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aaldijk, J.K.; de Betue, P.A.C.; van der Meer, K.; Harry, R.J.S.

    1987-01-01

    On February 4, 1983, the Hexapartite Safeguards Project (HSP) concluded that the safeguards approach involving limited frequency unannounced access (LFUA) by International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) inspectors to cascades areas together with inspection activities outside the cascade areas meets the IAEA safeguards objectives in an effective and efficient way. In this way, the risks of revealing sensitive information were also minimized. The approach has been defined clearly and unambiguously, and it should be applied equally to all technology holders. One of the conclusions of the HSP was that a nondestructive assay go/no-go technique should be used during the LFUA inspections in the cascade areas of centrifuge enrichment plants. The purpose is to verify that the enrichment of the product UF 6 gas is in the range of low-enriched uranium (LEU), i.e., the enrichment is below 20%

  5. International Atomic Energy Agency publications. Publications catalogue 2001-2002, including IAEA technical documents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-09-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications of the IAEA issued and forthcoming between January 2001 and September 2002. Most Agency publications are issued in English, though some are also available in Arabic, Chinese, French, Russian or Spanish. The lists all publications by subject category, in alphabetical order within each category

  6. International atomic energy agency organization (IAEA) in case of extra territorial accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mrabit, K.; Nogueira de Oliveira, C.

    2006-01-01

    This article sums up the actual activities of IAEA in terms of preparation and responses to nuclear or radiological emergencies. The Agency has established in 1986 a surveillance unit 24 h/24 h and an operational unit: the center of response to emergencies (C.R.U). The C.R.U. is the principal operational unit in charge of acting in case of nuclear emergency notification and to answer to the demand of information or help during an incident or emergency. It receives the reports of an authority of any state, on an incident and checks any report that is not confirmed. It establishes the first functional links with the state at the origin o the report and any state potentially concerned. It establishes links with W.H.O (world health organization), W.M.O.(world meteorological organization), (B.C.A.H.) the office of coordination of humanitarian affairs of united nations, the FAO ( food and agriculture organization).The principal lessons got from interventions made during real events have been the following ones: first, official information communicated by the Center for the IAEA emergency interventions have contributed to avoid the propagations of hearsay and panic, secondly a fast international cooperation and the presence of the team of IAEA center on the premises during an intervention in case of event with multi sectorial consequences are extremely important. (N.C.)

  7. Development of a brittle fracture acceptance criterion for the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorenson, K.B.; Salzbrenner, R.; Nickell, R.E.

    1992-01-01

    An effort has been undertaken to develop a brittle fracture acceptance criterion for structural components of nuclear material transportation casks. The need for such a criterion was twofold. First, new generation cask designs have proposed the use of ferritic steels and other materials to replace the austenitic stainless steel commonly used for structural components in transport casks. Unlike austenitic stainless steel which fails in a high-energy absorbing, ductile tearing mode, it is possible for these candidate materials to fail via brittle fracture when subjected to certain combinations of elevated loading rates and low temperatures. Second, there is no established brittle fracture criterion accepted by the regulatory community that covers a broad range of structural materials. Although the existing IAEA Safety Series number-sign 37 addressed brittle fracture, its the guidance was dated and pertained only to ferritic steels. Consultant's Services Meetings held under the auspices of the IAEA have resulted in a recommended brittle fracture criterion. The brittle fracture criterion is based on linear elastic fracture mechanics, and is the result of a consensus of experts from six participating IAEA-member countries. The brittle fracture criterion allows three approaches to determine the fracture toughness of the structural material. The three approaches present the opportunity to balance material testing requirements and the conservatism of the material's fracture toughness which must be used to demonstrate resistance to brittle fracture. This work has resulted in a revised Appendix IX to Safety Series number-sign 37 which will be released as an IAEA Technical Document within the coming year

  8. United States of America activities relative to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) initiative: Records management for deep geologic repositories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warner, P.J.

    1997-03-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has conducted consultant and advisory meetings to prepare a Technical Document which is intended to provide guidance to all IAEA Member States (otherwise known as countries) that are currently planning, designing, constructing or operating a deep or near surface geological repository for the storage and protection of vitrified high-level radioactive waste, spent fuel waste and TRU-waste (transuranic). Eleven countries of the international community are presently in various stages of siting, designing, or constructing deep geologic repositories. Member States of the IAEA have determined that the principle safety of such completed and operation sites must not rely solely on long term institutional arrangements for the retention of information. It is believed that repository siting, design, operation and postoperation information should be gathered, managed and retained in a manner that will provide information to future societies over a very long period of time. The radionuclide life is 10,000 years thus the retention of information must outlive current societies, languages, and be continually migrated to new technology to assure retrieval. This presentation will provide an overview of the status of consideration and implementation of these issues within the United States efforts relative to deep geologic repository projects.

  9. United States of America activities relative to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) initiative: Records management for deep geologic repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warner, P.J.

    1997-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has conducted consultant and advisory meetings to prepare a Technical Document which is intended to provide guidance to all IAEA Member States (otherwise known as countries) that are currently planning, designing, constructing or operating a deep or near surface geological repository for the storage and protection of vitrified high-level radioactive waste, spent fuel waste and TRU-waste (transuranic). Eleven countries of the international community are presently in various stages of siting, designing, or constructing deep geologic repositories. Member States of the IAEA have determined that the principle safety of such completed and operation sites must not rely solely on long term institutional arrangements for the retention of information. It is believed that repository siting, design, operation and postoperation information should be gathered, managed and retained in a manner that will provide information to future societies over a very long period of time. The radionuclide life is 10,000 years thus the retention of information must outlive current societies, languages, and be continually migrated to new technology to assure retrieval. This presentation will provide an overview of the status of consideration and implementation of these issues within the United States efforts relative to deep geologic repository projects

  10. IAEA technical documents (TECDOCs) 1992-2002. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-02-01

    This catalogue lists all technical documents (TECDOCs) of the International Atomic Energy Agency issued between 1 January 1992 and 31 December 2002. It is divided into two parts. The first part lists all documents in numerical order, starting with the most recent publication. The second part lists all documents by subject category, in alphabetical order within each category. Most publications are issued in English, although some are also available in other languages

  11. International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) initiatives: Records management for deep and near surface geologic repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warner, P.J.

    1996-01-01

    The international scientific community has long had an interest in determining methods by which information regarding nuclear waste repositories, and the inherent danger to humanity, could be passed from generation to generation and society to society. Because nuclear waste will remain radioactive for thousands of years future generations must be warned of the dangers thus eliminating intentional or inadvertent intrusion. Member States of the IAEA have determined that the principle safety of such sites must not rely solely on long term institutional arrangements for the retention of information. It is believed that repository siting, design, operation and postoperation information should be gathered, managed and retained so that this information remains accessible to future societies over a very long period of time. The radionuclide life is 10,000 years; thus the retention of information continues beyond current societies, cultures and languages, and must be continually migrated to new retrieval technologies to assure access

  12. The role of International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Technical Cooperation (TC) programs in enhancing socioeconomic development in Sudan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salih, A Y.S. [Development Studies and Research Institute, University of Khartoum, Khartoum (Sudan)

    2006-04-15

    The main objective of this study is to reflect the role of nuclear Techniques in development through the IAEA provision of the technical cooperation (TC) projects in Sudan, and to show their impact on socio-economic activities, improvement of infrastructures, technology transfer, and whether the targeted institutes become economically self-reliant. This study as an analytical study uses secondary sources, namely reports from IAEA and coordinators of the projects. The study also uses primary data received mainly through conducting interviews with stake holders. The study has come out with some main findings: that the IAEA technical assistances played a major role in addressing pressing issues such as socio-economic development, sustainable development and management of different fields related to application of nuclear technology. The TC assistance depends on the local component of the country, also it depends on Sudan payments of it is annual share to the IAEA technical cooperation. The important role played by Sudan Atomic Energy Commission (SAEC) in its capacity as the national coordinating body with respect to Technical Cooperation (TC) is highly appreciated. The total number of projects increased rapidly from 16 projects in 1959 to 55 projects in 2005 in different fields includes human health, agriculture, animal production, waste management, water resources, ... etc. The TC projects are associated with the country's development programmes framework (CPF) and support socio-economic activities. The management of TC projects activated at the national level were successful and have significant impact, particularly in human heath, agriculture, instrumentation and Non Destructive Testing. All the TC projects provided their funds mainly from IAEA, and assistance received from IAEA is highly effective. Sudan TC Programme had achieved a high implementation rate, where most of the projects attained their objectives, showing good results in socio-economic and infra

  13. The role of International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Technical Cooperation (TC) programs in enhancing socioeconomic development in Sudan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salih, A.Y.S.

    2006-04-01

    The main objective of this study is to reflect the role of nuclear Techniques in development through the IAEA provision of the technical cooperation (TC) projects in Sudan, and to show their impact on socio-economic activities, improvement of infrastructures, technology transfer, and whether the targeted institutes become economically self-reliant. This study as an analytical study uses secondary sources, namely reports from IAEA and coordinators of the projects. The study also uses primary data received mainly through conducting interviews with stake holders. The study has come out with some main findings: that the IAEA technical assistances played a major role in addressing pressing issues such as socio-economic development, sustainable development and management of different fields related to application of nuclear technology. The TC assistance depends on the local component of the country, also it depends on Sudan payments of it is annual share to the IAEA technical cooperation. The important role played by Sudan Atomic Energy Commission (SAEC) in its capacity as the national coordinating body with respect to Technical Cooperation (TC) is highly appreciated. The total number of projects increased rapidly from 16 projects in 1959 to 55 projects in 2005 in different fields includes human health, agriculture, animal production, waste management, water resources, ... etc. The TC projects are associated with the country's development programmes framework (CPF) and support socio-economic activities. The management of TC projects activated at the national level were successful and have significant impact, particularly in human heath, agriculture, instrumentation and Non Destructive Testing. All the TC projects provided their funds mainly from IAEA, and assistance received from IAEA is highly effective. Sudan TC Programme had achieved a high implementation rate, where most of the projects attained their objectives, showing good results in socio-economic and infra

  14. Training tissue bank operators: the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)/National University of Singapore (NUS) 10 years of experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nather, A; Phillips, G O; Morales Pedraza, Jorge; Lee, Chris C W

    2009-05-01

    National University of Singapore (NUS) was appointed by IAEA to become IAEA/NUS Regional Training Centre (RTC) for Asia and the Pacific region in September 1996. The Government of Singapore (represented by the Ministry of Environment) with the National Science and Technology Board as the funding agency awarded a grant of S$225,500 to build a new purpose-built tissue bank to be the Regional Training Centre. National University Hospital provided a space of 2,000 square feet for this purpose. The first Diploma Course was launched on 3 November 1997 with 17 candidates with the first NUS Diploma Examination being held in October 1998. Between November 1997 and April 2007, a total of nine courses were conducted by RTC with a total of 180 tissue bank operators, 133 from Asia and the Pacific region (13 countries including 2 from Iran), 14 from Africa (Algeria, Egypt, Libya, Egypt, South Africa and Zambia), 6 from Latin America (Brazil, Chile, Cuba, Peru and Uruguay), 9 from Europe (Greece, Slovakia, Poland, Ukraine) and 2 from Australia. The last batch (ninth batch) involved twenty students registered in April 2007 and will be due to sit for the terminal examination only in April 2008.

  15. The impact of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) program on radiation and tissue banking in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamero, Emma Castro; Morales Pedraza, Jorge

    2009-05-01

    The tissue bank "Rosa Guerzoni Chambergo" (RGCTB) located at the Child's Health Institute was inaugurated in 1996, with the financial and technical support of the IAEA program on radiation and tissue banking. Since 1998, the biological bandage of fresh and lyophilised pigskin, amnion and bone tissue is processed routinely in this bank. In all cases, the tissue is sterilised with the use of Cobalt-60 radiation, process carried out at the Laboratories of Irradiation of the Peruvian Institute of Nuclear Energy (IPEN). The tissue bank in the Child's Health Institute helped to save lives in an accident occurred in Lima, when a New Year's fireworks celebration ran out of control in January 2002. Nearly 300 people died in the tragic blaze and hundreds more were seriously burned and injured. Eight Lima hospitals and clinics suddenly were faced with saving the lives of severely burned men, women and children. Fortunately, authorities were ready to respond to the emergency. More than 1,600 dressings were sterilised and supplied to Lima surgeons. The efforts helped save the lives of patients who otherwise might not have survived the Lima fire. Between 1998 and September 2007, 35,012 tissue grafts were produced and irradiated. Radiation sterilised tissues are used by 20 national medical institutions as well as 17 private health institutions. The tissue bank established in Peru with the support of the IAEA is now producing the following tissues: pigskin dressings, fresh and freeze-dried; bone allografts, chips, wedges and powdered, and amnion dressings air-dried. It is also now leading the elaboration of national standards, assignment being entrusted by ONDT (Organización Nacional de Donación y Transplantes; National Organisation on Donation and Transplant). This among other will permit the accreditation of the tissue bank. In this task is also participating IPEN.

  16. International Atomic Energy Agency and Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd Rahim Mohd Nor

    1985-01-01

    A review on IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency) and its relation with Malaysia is given. This article also discusses the background history of IAEA, its organization and functions in the field of nuclear energy

  17. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) research program to improve safety assessment methodologies for near-surface radioactive waste disposal facilities (ISAM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres-Vidal, C.; Kozak, M.W.

    2000-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) launched a Coordinated Research Program in November 1997 on Improvement of Safety Assessment Methodologies for Near Surface Radioactive Waste Disposal Facilities (ISAM). The purpose of this paper is to describe the program and its goals, and to describe achievements of the program to date. The main objectives of the ISAM program are outlined. The primary focus of ISAM is on the practical application of safety assessment methodologies. Three kinds of practical situations are being addressed in the program: safety assessments for large vaults typical of those in Western Europe and North America, smaller vaults for medium and industrial wastes typical in eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union, and a proposed borehole technology for disposal of spent sources in low-technology conditions. (author)

  18. Developing a brittle fracture acceptance criterion for transport casks for adoption by the International Atomic Energy Agency(IAEA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorenson, K.B.; Falci, F.P.

    1991-01-01

    With increasing nuclear material transportation demands, new generation casks have included designs which propose the use of structural materials other than austenitic stainless steel. Motivation for using alternate materials include potentials for lower cost, easier fabrication, no welding and less weight (higher payload). Examples of candidate materials for structural components include ferritic steels and ductile cast iron for the containment boundary and borated stainless steel for the basket. The primary technical issue which separates these candidate materials from austenitic stainless steel is that they may, under certain combinations of mechanical and environmental loadings, fail in a brittle fracture mode. There is a clear need to develop a consensus criterion that will encompass a broad range of materials and provide a consistent method for evaluating candidate materials with respect to brittle fracture. Adopting such a criterion through the auspices of the IAEA has distinct advantages. An international consensus would provide assurance to regulators and the public that the most appropriate method is used, and countries developing packages using candidate materials could work with a single criterion without concern that another country is setting precedent using a different criterion. The development of such a criterion has been in progress for two and one-half years. There are two major efforts which are being pursued in parallel. There is the technical effort to write a draft document and the formal effort to facilitate adoption of a criterion by the IAEA. 7 refs., 1 fig

  19. The impact of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) program on radiation and tissue banking in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Pardo, María Esther; Morales Pedraza, Jorge; Sánchez Ramírez, Omar

    2009-05-01

    Tissue banking started in Mexico in 1948-1949, when two bone banks were established, one at the Infantile Hospital of Mexico and other at the Central Military Hospital. Mexico has benefited for the implementation of the IAEA program since through it has been able to settle down and to consolidate the Tissue Bank at the Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares ININ (National Institute for Nuclear Research). This is the only bank in Latin America that has a Quality Management System in force, certified under ISO 9001:2000 since August 1, 2003. The first tissue processed was amnion. The main products of the BTR are amnion and pig skin. Both are biological tissues which their main use is as a wound dressing in patients with burns, scars, diabetic ulcers, epidermolysis bullosa, damaged ocular surface, etc. The General Health Law, published in 1984 and reformed in June 19, 2007, describes the procedure for the disposal of organs, tissues and human cadavers in its fourteenth title and in the Regulation for Sanitary Control. During the period 2001-2005, the ININ Tissue Bank produced 292 sterilised tissues (amnion, 86,668 cm(2), and frozen pig skin, 164,220 cm(2), at an estimated cost of 1,012,668 Mexican pesos. Until 2006, one hundred eighty five (185) patients have been treated with the use of sterilised tissues produced by the ININ Tissue Bank. The radiation source used for sterilisation of tissues is an industrial Cobalt-60 irradiator model JS-6500 AECL, which belongs to ININ. This equipment is located in other building, close to the BTR, in the Centro Nuclear de México "Dr. Nabor Carrillo Flores" (Nuclear Center of Mexico). Until 2006, six hospitals use in a routine way the sterilised tissues produced by the ININ Tissue Bank, for the treatment of burns originated by diverse agents like flame, electricity, liquids in boil, chemical reagents, as well as for the reconstruction of the ocular surface. Two of these hospitals treat patients of very low economic

  20. International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Activity on Technical Influence of High Burnup UOX and MOX Water Reactor Fuel on Spent Fuel Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovasic, Z.; Einziger, R.

    2009-01-01

    This paper briefly reviews the results of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) project investigating the influence of high burnup and mixed-oxide (MOX) fuels, from water power reactors, on spent fuel management. These data will provide information on the impacts, regarding spent fuel management, for those countries operating light-water reactors (LWR)s and heavy-water reactors (HWR)s with zirconium alloy-clad uranium dioxide (UOX) fuels, that are considering the use of higher burnup UOX or the introduction of reprocessing and MOX fuels. The mechanical designs of lower burnup UOX and higher burnup UOX or MOX fuel are very similar, but some of the properties (e.g., higher fuel rod internal pressures; higher decay heat; higher specific activity; and degraded cladding mechanical properties of higher burnup UOX and MOX spent fuels) may potentially significantly affect the behavior of the fuel after irradiation. These properties are reviewed. The effects of these property changes on wet and dry storage, transportation, reprocessing, re-fabrication of fuel, and final disposal were evaluated, based on regulatory, safety, and operational considerations. Political and strategic considerations were not taken into account since relative importance of technical, economic and strategic considerations vary from country to country. There will also be an impact of these fuels on issues like non-proliferation, safeguards, and sustainability, but because of the complexity of factors affecting those issues, they are only briefly discussed. Data gaps were also identified during this investigation. The pros and cons of using high burnup UOX or MOX, for each applicable issue in each stage of the back end of the fuel cycle, were evaluated and are discussed.. Although, in theory, higher burnup fuel and MOX fuels mean a smaller quantity of spent fuel, the potential need for some changes in design of spent fuel storage, transportation, handling, reprocessing, re-fabrication, and

  1. Proposal for a coordination research programme (CRP) of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) on stable isotope tracer techniques for studies on protein-energy interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shetty, P.; James, W.P.T.

    1993-01-01

    This Report provides a rationale and justification for the initiation of a Coordinated Research programme to support studies using stable isotopic tracer techniques to address priority areas of human protein-energy interactions with special emphasis on the problems of human nutrition in developing countries. The Report suggests a modus for establishing such a practically oriented Coordinated Research Programme under the aegis of the International Atomic Energy Agency with concrete suggestions for its organization and the identification of probable participants in such a programme. The likely sources of additional funding to sustain such an activity viable for a period of 4 to 5 years are also indicated. 8 refs

  2. The IAEA energy and economic data bank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charpentier, J.P.; Russell, J.E.

    1978-01-01

    In 1976, the IAEA established a computerized energy and economic data bank not only on nuclear energy but on other forms of energy as well. The purpose of the data bank is to provide in a unified and systematic way energy and related economic data needed for long-term energy planning. A computer program permits the production of a variety of up-to-date tables and graphs

  3. 17. IAEA fusion energy conference. Extended synopses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    Book of extended synopses of the papers, accepted by a international programme committee for presentation at the 17th IAEA Fusion Energy Conference in Yokohama, Japan. The subjects covered are magnetic confinement experiments, plasma heating and current drive, ITER EDA, inertial fusion energy, innovative concepts, fusion technology and theory

  4. 17. IAEA fusion energy conference. Extended synopses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-12-31

    Book of extended synopses of the papers, accepted by a international programme committee for presentation at the 17th IAEA Fusion Energy Conference in Yokohama, Japan. The subjects covered are magnetic confinement experiments, plasma heating and current drive, ITER EDA, inertial fusion energy, innovative concepts, fusion technology and theory Refs, figs, tabs

  5. Japan - IAEA joint Nuclear Energy Management School 2016

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Mika; Hidaka, Akihide; Ikuta, Yuko; Yamashita, Kiyonobu; Sawai, Tomotsugu; Murakami, Kenta; Uesaka, Mitsuru; Tomita, Akira; Toba, Akio; Hirose, Hiroya; Watanabe, Masanori; Kitabata, Takuya; Ueda, Kinichi; Kita, Tomohiko; Namaizawa, Ken; Onose, Takatoshi

    2017-03-01

    Since 2010, International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has held the 'Nuclear Energy Management School' so-called 'IAEA-NEM' to develop future leaders who plan and manage nuclear energy utilization in their county. Since 2012, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) together with the Japan Nuclear Human Resource Development Network (JN-HRD Net), the University of Tokyo (UT), the Japan Atomic Industrial Forum (JAIF) and JAIF International Cooperation Center (JICC) have cohosted the NEM school in Japan in cooperation with IAEA. Since then, the school has been held every year, with the school in 2016 marking the fifth. In the 2016 NEM school, Japanese nuclear energy technology and experience, such as lessons learned from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station accident, were provided by not only lectures by IAEA experts, but also lectures by Japanese experts and leaders in order to offer a unique opportunity for the participants from other countries to learn about particular cases in Japan. Opportunities to visit a variety of nuclear facilities were offered for the participants in the form of technical tours in Fukui and Kobe. Through the school, we contributed to the internationalization of Japanese young nuclear professionals, development of nuclear human resource of other countries including nuclear newcomers, and enhanced cooperative relationship between IAEA and Japan. Additionally, collaborative relationship with JN-HRD Net was strengthened solidly through the integrated cooperation among ministries, universities, manufacturers and research organizations across the county by holding the school in Japan. In this report, findings obtained during the preparatory work and the school period were reported in order to make a valuable contribution towards effectively and efficiently conducting future international nuclear human resource development activities in Japan. (author)

  6. International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and its role in world-wide security of nuclear fuels and facilities and non-proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eklund, S.

    1976-01-01

    This article outlines the wide range of the Agency's concerns in both promoting the peaceful uses of nuclear energy and ensuring that it is safely used with minimal risk of damage to man and his environment. This latter aspect includes measures against diversion to military purposes, theft or sabotage. There is a marked tendency to leave the promotion of nuclear energy to industry and commerce, and for many regional and national nuclear energy authorities to become increasingly absorbed in its safety and regulatory aspects--the ultimate aim being the establishment of a world nuclear law. This trend will certainly also be reflected in the Agency's program and will gain strength as time goes on. However, the International Atomic Energy Agency is sharply differentiated from national authorities in the industrial countries and from most regional nuclear energy authorities by the fact that its program must continue to reflect the needs of the developing nations which constitute a majority of its Member States. These nations--most of which are ''energy hungry''--need the Agency's help to benefit from the peaceful applications of nuclear science and technology

  7. Mass media and nuclear energy - IAEA's role

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyd, D.R.

    1993-11-01

    The presentation covers the following areas: the wide spectrum of media outlets that the IAEA seeks to serve and their differing needs; the resources available to the IAEA for that purpose; the way in which IAEA endeavours to disseminate authoritative, reliable nuclear-related information to media; the exceptional role the IAEA may be called on to play in emergency situations

  8. 20th IAEA fusion energy conference 2004. Conference proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The 20th International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Fusion Energy Conference (FEC) was held in Vilamoura, Portugal, from 1 to 6 November 2004. The Instituto Superior Tecnico through the Centro de Fusao Nuclear on behalf of the Portuguese Government and the Association EURATOM/IST hosted the conference. The IAEA wishes to express its gratitude to the host. More than 600 delegates representing 33 countries and three international organizations attended the Fusion Energy Conference 2004. The Programme Committee accepted a total of some 437 papers for presentation at the conference. The scientific experimental and theoretical papers have been grouped with respect to the following themes: Overview on magnetic and inertial fusion; Advanced Scenarios and Steady State; Edge Localized Modes; Fusion Technology; Transport Theory; Beta Limits; Hybrid Scenarios; H-mode and Transport; ITER; Alfven Modes and Wave Heating; Operational Limits and Momentum Transport; Energetic Particles and Stability; Neoclassical Tearing Modes; Transport and Turbulence; Inertial Fusion; Configuration Effects and Transport; and Plasma-wall Interaction. The conference adjourned with the announcement of the next IAEA Fusion Energy Conference, which will be held for the first time in the People's Republic of China, in the city of Chengdu, October 16-22, 2006

  9. [Nuclear energy and environment: review of the IAEA environmental projects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fesenko, S; Fogt, G

    2012-01-01

    The review of the environmental projects of the International Atomic Energy Agency is presented. Basic IAEA documents intended to protect humans and the Environment are considered and their main features are discussed. Some challenging issues in the area of protection of the Environment and man, including the impact of nuclear facilities on the environment, radioactive waste management, and remediation of the areas affected by radiological accidents, nuclear testing and sites of nuclear facilities are also discussed. The need to maintain the existing knowledge in radioecology and protection of the environment is emphasised.

  10. 21. IAEA fusion energy conference. Book of abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    Recognizing the prominent role that nuclear energy plays in the world, and based on the expectation that nuclear fusion will be able to provide an abundant source of energy, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) supports the exchange of scientific and technical information on fusion research through conferences, meetings and projects. The 21st IAEA Fusion Energy Conference (FEC 2006) provided a forum for presenting and discussing the progress that is being made in fusion experiments, theory and technological developments. It is expected that the progress in the establishment of ITER since the last Fusion Energy Conference will put more emphasis on the physics and technology R and D aspects in the realization of fusion as a clean and lasting energy source. FEC 2006 covered the following topics: OV Overviews; EX Magnetic Confinement Experiments; TH Magnetic Confinement Theory and Modelling; IT ITER Activities; IF Inertial Fusion Experiments and Theory; IC Innovative Concepts; FT Fusion Technology and Power Plant Design; SE Safety, Environmental and Economic Aspects of Fusion. At the same time, a series of satellite meetings and fusion related exhibitions took place.

  11. Summary of the IAEA's BIOMASS reference biosphere methodology for Environment Agency staff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coughtrey, P.

    2001-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) programme on BIOsphere Modelling and ASSessment (BIOMASS) was launched in October 1996, and will complete during 2001. The BIOMASS programme aimed to develop and apply a methodology for defining biospheres for practical radiological assessment of releases from radioactive waste disposal. This report provides a summary description of the BIOMASS methodology. The BIOMASS methodology has been developed through international collaboration and represents a major milestone in biosphere modelling. It provides an approach supported by a wide range of developers, regulators, biosphere experts and safety assessment specialists. The Environment Agency participated actively in the BIOMASS programme

  12. A study of a zone approach to IAEA [International Atomic Energy Agency] safeguards: The low-enriched-uranium zone of a light-water-reactor fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fishbone, L.G.; Higinbotham, W.A.

    1986-06-01

    At present the IAEA designs its safeguards approach with regard to each type of nuclear facility so that the safeguards activities and effort are essentially the same for a given type and size of nuclear facility wherever it may be located. Conclusions regarding a state are derived by combining the conclusions regarding the effectiveness of safeguards for the individual facilities within a state. In this study it was convenient to define three zones in a state with a closed light-water-reactor nuclear fuel cycle. Each zone contains those facilities or parts thereof which use or process nuclear materials of the same safeguards significance: low-enriched uranium, radioactive spent fuel, or recovered plutonium. The possibility that each zone might be treated as an extended material balance area for safeguards purposes is under investigation. The approach includes defining the relevant features of the facilities in the three zones and listing the safeguards activities which are now practiced. This study has focussed on the fresh-fuel zone, the several facilities of which use or process low-enriched uranium. At one extreme, flows and inventories would be verified at each material balance area. At the other extreme, the flows into and out of the zone and the inventory of the whole zone would be verified. There are a number of possible safeguards approaches which fall between the two extremes. The intention is to develop a rational approach which will make it possible to compare the technical effectiveness and the inspection effort for the facility-oriented approach, for the approach involving the zone as a material balance area, and for some reasonable intermediate safeguards approaches

  13. A study of a zone approach to IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency) safeguards: The low-enriched-uranium zone of a light-water-reactor fuel cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fishbone, L.G.; Higinbotham, W.A.

    1986-06-01

    At present the IAEA designs its safeguards approach with regard to each type of nuclear facility so that the safeguards activities and effort are essentially the same for a given type and size of nuclear facility wherever it may be located. Conclusions regarding a state are derived by combining the conclusions regarding the effectiveness of safeguards for the individual facilities within a state. In this study it was convenient to define three zones in a state with a closed light-water-reactor nuclear fuel cycle. Each zone contains those facilities or parts thereof which use or process nuclear materials of the same safeguards significance: low-enriched uranium, radioactive spent fuel, or recovered plutonium. The possibility that each zone might be treated as an extended material balance area for safeguards purposes is under investigation. The approach includes defining the relevant features of the facilities in the three zones and listing the safeguards activities which are now practiced. This study has focussed on the fresh-fuel zone, the several facilities of which use or process low-enriched uranium. At one extreme, flows and inventories would be verified at each material balance area. At the other extreme, the flows into and out of the zone and the inventory of the whole zone would be verified. There are a number of possible safeguards approaches which fall between the two extremes. The intention is to develop a rational approach which will make it possible to compare the technical effectiveness and the inspection effort for the facility-oriented approach, for the approach involving the zone as a material balance area, and for some reasonable intermediate safeguards approaches.

  14. Intergovernmental organisation activities: European Atomic Energy Community, International Atomic Energy Agency, OECD Nuclear Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2012-01-01

    European Atomic Energy Community: Proposed legislative instruments, Adopted legislative instruments, Non-legislative instruments, Other activities (meetings). International Atomic Energy Agency: IAEA Action Plan on Nuclear Safety. OECD Nuclear Energy Agency: The Russian Federation to join the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency; Participation by the regulatory authorities of India and the United Arab Emirates in the Multinational Design Evaluation Programme (MDEP); NEA International Workshop on Crisis Communication, 9-10 May 2012; International School of Nuclear Law: 2013; Next NEA International Nuclear Law Essentials Course

  15. 24. IAEA Fusion Energy Conference. Programme and Book of Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-09-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) fosters the exchange of scientific and technical results in nuclear fusion research through its series of Fusion Energy Conferences. The 24th IAEA Fusion Energy Conference (FEC 2012) aims to provide a forum for the discussion of key physics and technology issues as well as innovative concepts of direct relevance to fusion as a source of nuclear energy. With a number of next-step fusion devices currently being implemented - such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) in Cadarache, France, and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) in Livermore, USA - and in view of the concomitant need to demonstrate the technological feasibility of fusion power plants as well as the economical viability of this method of energy production, the fusion community is now facing new challenges. The resolution of these challenges will dictate research orientations in the present and coming decades. The scientific scope of FEC 2012 is, therefore, intended to reflect the priorities of this new era in fusion energy research. The conference aims to be a platform for sharing the results of research and development efforts in both national and international fusion experiments that have been shaped by these new priorities, and thereby help in pinpointing worldwide advances in fusion theory, experiments, technology, engineering, safety and socio-economics. Furthermore, the conference will also set these results against the backdrop of the requirements for a net energy producing fusion device and a fusion power plant in general, and will thus help in defining the way forward. With the participation of international organizations such as the ITER International Organization and EURATOM, as well as the collaboration of more than forty countries and several research institutes, including those working on smaller plasma devices, it is expected that this conference will, as in the past, serve to identify possibilities and means for a

  16. Nuclear medicine in the management of patients with heart failure: guidance from an expert panel of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peix, Amalia; Mesquita, Claudio Tinoco; Paez, Diana; Pereira, Carlos Cunha; Felix, Renata; Gutierrez, Claudia; Jaimovich, Rodrigo; Ianni, Barbara Maria; Soares, Jose; Olaya, Pastor; Rodriguez, Ma Victoria; Flotats, Albert; Giubbini, Raffaele; Travin, Mark; Garcia, Ernest V

    2014-08-01

    Heart failure is increasing worldwide at epidemic proportions, resulting in considerable disability, mortality, and increase in healthcare costs. Gated myocardial perfusion single photon emission computed tomography or PET imaging is the most prominent imaging modality capable of providing information on global and regional ventricular function, the presence of intraventricular synchronism, myocardial perfusion, and viability on the same test. In addition, I-mIBG scintigraphy is the only imaging technique approved by various regulatory agencies able to provide information regarding the adrenergic function of the heart. Therefore, both myocardial perfusion and adrenergic imaging are useful tools in the workup and management of heart failure patients. This guide is intended to reinforce the information on the use of nuclear cardiology techniques for the assessment of heart failure and associated myocardial disease.

  17. NIFS contributions to 19th IAEA fusion energy conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-11-01

    NIFS has presented 21 papers at the 19th IAEA Fusion Energy Conference (Lyon, France, 14-19 October 2002). The contributed papers are collected in this report. The 21 papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  18. 19. IAEA fusion energy conference. Book of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    Book of abstracts of the papers, accepted by an international programme committee for presentation at the 19th IAEA Fusion Energy Conference in Lyon, France. The subjects covered are magnetic confinement experiments, plasma heating and current drive, ITER EDA, inertial fusion energy, innovative concepts, fusion technology and theory

  19. IAEA and IEA roles in international fusion energy research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolan, T.; Nakamura, K.

    2000-01-01

    The article describes the IAEA's and the IEA's complementary roles in facilitating international fusion research cooperation. These roles represent highly desirable contributions to fusion research through pooling of limited human and financial resources. The two Agencies both coordinate research and organize technical meeting, but in different ways. They each have unique strengths and different modes of operation. In order to deal with potential overlaps and serve the fusion research community optimally, they are coordinating their activities

  20. Report by the Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency on behalf of the Board of Governors to all members of the Agency on the Non-Compliance of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea with the agreement between the IAEA and the Democratic People's Republic of Korea for the application of safeguards in connection with the treaty on the non-proliferation of nuclear weapons (INFCIRC/403) and on the Agency's inability to verify the non-diversion of material required to be safeguarded

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The document contains the following items: Report by the Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency on behalf of the Board of Governors to all members of the Agency on the non-compliance of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea with the agreement between the IAEA and the Democratic People's Republic of Korea for the application of Safeguards in connection with the treaty on the non-proliferation of nuclear weapons and on the Agency's inability to verify the non-diversion of material required to be safeguarded; resolution adopted by the Board on 1 April 1993 (Annex 1); Agreement of 30 January 1992 between the Government of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the application of safeguards connection with the treaty on the non-proliferation of nuclear weapons (Annex 2); resolution adopted by the Board of Governors on 25 February 1993 (Annex 3); Communications from the Director General of the IAEA to the Minister for Atomic Energy of DPRK or from the Minister for Atomic Energy of the DPRK of the Director General of the IAEA (Annexes 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 11, 12); statement of the Government of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Pyongyang, 12 March 1993 (Annex 7); resolution adopted by the Board on 18 March 1993 (Annex 10)

  1. Australia and the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    Australia's support for the IAEA's safeguards program is described. Through a program of bilateral assistance to the Agency, Austrlia has developed and sponsored special programs of assistance to the IAEA's Safeguards over the period 1980 to 1986. The speech by the Minister for Foreign Affairs and Trade, Mr Bill Hayden, to the IAEA Thirtieth Anniversary Conference in Vienna on 21 September 1987 is included

  2. Malaysia's Experiences in Analyzing the Energy Policy and Strategies to Promote Sustainable Development using IAEA Tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fairuz Suzana Mohd Chachuli; Faisal Izwan Abdul Rashid; Muhammed Zolfakar Zolkaffly; Siti Syarina Mat Sali; Noriah Jamal

    2016-01-01

    Full text: Malaysia has long experiences in using the IAEA tools for energy planning and analysis since year 1980s. However due to renewed interest in nuclear power programme, Malaysia has started again developing our national capabilities in using the IAEA tools through our national project MAL4009 entitled Building Capacities In Nuclear Power Programme Planning. Under this project, Malaysia has successful trained our researchers from various agencies, through participation in national workshops and development of case studies using IAEAs tools particularly Model for Analysis of Energy Demand (MAED), Model of Energy Supply Strategy Alternatives and their General Environmental Impacts (MESSAGE), Wien Automatic System Planning Package (WASP), Model for Financial Analysis of Electric Sector Expansion Plans (FINPLAN), Simplified Approach for Estimating Impacts of Electricity Generation (SIMPACTS) and Indicators for Sustainable Energy Development (ISED). Through this project, Malaysia has developed various case studies to evaluate the competitiveness of nuclear power plant in comparison with the non-nuclear energy technologies such as coal, natural gas, hydro and renewable energy. The IAEA energy planning tools has assisted Malaysia in assessing our energy situation and evaluating alternatives energy strategies that take into account the techno-economic and environmental aspects of various energy option parameters in relation to energy afford ability, energy security, environmental and climate change impacts in the context of sustainable development. In this regards, Malaysia as a newcomer country wishing to embark on nuclear power programme, has shown our interest in conducting a Nuclear Energy System Assessment (NESA) to consider possible future nuclear systems in a holistic and comprehensive manner to determine whether or nor this technology would meet our country sustainable development objectives. (author)

  3. IAEA safeguards: some pros and cons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, P.

    1986-01-01

    The author gives a personal view of the International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA) safeguards. The IAEA safeguards system is described (including containment, surveillance and inspection), and the limitations and strengths of the system are examined. (U.K.)

  4. IAEA support of international research and development of materials for sustainable energy applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeman, Andrej; Kaiser, Ralf; Simon, Aliz

    2013-01-01

    Full-text:The key mandate of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is to promote the peaceful application of nuclear science and technology, verification as well as nuclear safety in the world. This includes a number of activities which aim to support the Member States and stimulate international cooperation in order for sustainable development. During the last 35 years, a well-established mechanism called the Coordinated Research Projects (CRP) has been effectively used to stimulate international research and scientific interaction among the Member States, covering various topics in the nuclear science and technology. Besides direct support of, so called coordinated research, the IAEA is also involved in organizing a number of highly specific international conferences and technical meetings which help to provide a broader platform for the specialist and experts in dedicated areas of nuclear science and technology. In view of support for renewable energy and its application, the IAEA organized series of meetings in 2009 (IEA France), 2010 (UQTR Canada) and 2011 (ANL USA) in order to discuss the scientific and technical issues of particular of national research initiatives related to the hydrogen storage and conversion technologies. All selected outputs of the meetings were published in a technical document publication series which are available to all member states. More recent initiatives are focus on the key nuclear techniques which are extremely valuable in research and development of new innovative materials, methods and technologies, characterization and performance testing of functional materials for innovative energy technologies and their application in sustainable energy sources (nuclear and non-nuclear). It is also important to underline that these programmatic activities are an integral part of the IAEA program on the Road to Rio+20: Applying Nuclear Technology for Sustainable Development. The paper summarizes the IAEA actions relevant to the

  5. IAEA technical meeting on fissile material strategies for sustainable nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganguly, Chaitanyamoy; Koyama, Kazutoshi

    2005-01-01

    A Technical Meeting (TM) on 'Fissile Material Management Strategies for Sustainable Nuclear Energy' was organized by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in Vienna from 12 to 15 September 2005. Prior to the TM, three Working Groups (WG) composed of experts from 10 countries prepared Key Issues papers on: 1) Uranium Demand and Supply through 2050; 2) Back-end Fuel Cycle Options; and 3) Sustainable Nuclear Energy beyond 2050: Cross-cutting Issues. Some 36 papers, including 3 key issue papers, were presented during the TM in 3 different sessions. The present paper summarizes the deliberations of the TM. (author)

  6. Energy and nuclear power planning using the IAEA`s ENPEP computer package. Proceedings of a workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-09-01

    The Regional (Europe) Technical Co-operation Project on the Study of Energy Options Using the IAEA Planning Methodologies was first implemented by the IAEA in 1995. The project aims at improving national capabilities for energy, electricity and nuclear power planning and promoting regional co-operation among participating countries in the European region. The project includes the organization of workshops, training activities at the regional and national levels, scientific visits, etc. The proceedings of a workshop held in Warsaw, Poland, from 4 to 8 September 1995 are contained herein. The workshop had as a basic objective the analysis of the specific problems encountered by the represented countries during application of the IAEA`s ENPEP package in the conduct of national studies and to provide a forum for further co-operation among participating countries. A second objective of the workshop was to make proposals for future activities to be organized within the project. This publication is intended to serve as reference for the users of the IAEA`s ENPEP package, as well as for energy and electricity planners in general. Refs, figs, tabs.

  7. JAERI contribution to the 19th IAEA Fusion Energy Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-03-01

    This report compiles the contributed papers and presentation materials from JAERI to the 19th IAEA Fusion Energy Conference held at Lyon, France, from October 14th to 19th, 2002. The papers describe the recent progress in the experimental research in JT-60U and JFT-2M tokamaks, theoretical studies, fusion technology and R and D for ITER and fusion reactors. Total 32 papers consist of 1 overview talk, 14 oral and 17 poster presentations. Eight papers written by authors from other institutes and universities under collaboration with JAERI are also included. The 40 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  8. Report to the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woznicka, U.

    1986-07-01

    The results of research done under the International Atomic Energy Agency Contract no 4121/RB: 'Measurement of the thermal neutron macroscopic absorption cross-section on small samples' at the Institut of Nuclear Physics during the period from July 1, 1985 to June 30, 1986 are presented. The research was based on the Plexiglass thermal neutron diffusion parameters and on the method of preparation of the rock samples for the measurements according to the INP method. Three rock samples delivered by the IAEA: Ottawa Sand, Royer Dolomite and Dunite Sand have been measured. (author)

  9. Annual report 2001[International Atomic Energy Agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    Article VI.J of the Agency's Statute requires the Board of Governors to submit 'an annual report to the General Conference concerning the affairs of the Agency and any projects approved by the Agency'. This report covers the period 1 January to 31 December 2001. The report outlines the IAEA activities in the following fields: nuclear power, nuclear fuel cycle and waste management technology, comparative assessment for sustainable energy development; food and agriculture, human health, marine environment and water resources, applications of physical and chemical sciences, nuclear safety, radiation safety, radioactive waste safety, co-ordination of safety activities, safeguards, security of material, verification in Iraq pursuant to UNSC resolutions, management of technical co-operation for development, policy-making, management and support.

  10. International Atomic Energy Agency Safeguards: Challenge and response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spector, Leonard S.

    2017-11-01

    This article provides a critical review of the nuclear accounting and inspection system of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), known as "IAEA safeguards." The article focuses on the multiple challenges the Agency confronts in verifying that all nuclear activities in the countries under its safeguards system are being pursued for exclusively peaceful purposes. The principal challenges noted are those posed by: undeclared facilities, the development of enrichment and reprocessing capabilities, illicit procurement activities, denial of inspector access, difficulties in verifying absence of weaponization activities, and difficulties in establishing that all nuclear-relevant activities in a state are peaceful. The article is in the form of annotated PowerPoint briefing slides.

  11. Nuclear energy and non proliferation. The role of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooley, J.; Rauf, T.

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses the role of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in the prevention of the spread of nuclear weapons. The IAEA verifies States compliance with their non-proliferation commitments through the application of safeguards on their civilian nuclear programmes to ensure that they are being used solely for peaceful purposes. The IAEA safeguards have evolved in the course of five decades and have become an integral part of the international non-proliferation regime and the global security system. To continue to serve the international community, they need to continue to move with the times, especially in light of the renewed interest in nuclear energy. (Author)

  12. Atoms in the service of agriculture: 25 years of co-operation of the Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This film displays joint FAO/IAEA co-operation in developing nuclear technology to improve methods in agriculture. The goal of these methods is to help end world hunger without destroying the environment. Such technology includes: monitoring water levels beneath the earth's surface, improving plant varieties, enriching the soil, preserving foods, eradicating harmful insects, etc., by using isotopes and radiation techniques

  13. Atoms in the service of agriculture: 25 years of co-operation of the Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1990-12-31

    This film displays joint FAO/IAEA co-operation in developing nuclear technology to improve methods in agriculture. The goal of these methods is to help end world hunger without destroying the environment. Such technology includes: monitoring water levels beneath the earth`s surface, improving plant varieties, enriching the soil, preserving foods, eradicating harmful insects, etc., by using isotopes and radiation techniques

  14. The International Atomic Energy Agency's program on decontamination and decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feraday, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    The International Atomic energy Agency (IAEA) is developing an integrated information base that will systematically cover the technical, regulatory, radiation protection, planning, and economic aspects related to the decontamination and decommissioning (D/D) of nuclear facilities. The object of this program is to assist member states in developing the required expertise, equipment, and programs so that they can decommission their nuclear facilities in a safe, timely, and cost-effective manner. In addition to providing information, the IAEA encourages research and provides technical assistance in the form of expert missions, equipment design and procurement, etc., to assist member states in implementing their D/D programs. The technology contained in some recent IAEA reports is reviewed, including the decontamination, segmentation, and demolition of concrete and steel; the recycle/reuse of components from decommissioning; and the reduction of occupational exposures in D/D and the regulatory process in decommissioning. The IAEA's future program is briefly reviewed

  15. Optimal allocation of International Atomic Energy Agency inspection resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markin, J.T.

    1987-12-01

    The Safeguards Department of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) conducts inspections to assure the peaceful use of a state's nuclear materials and facilities. Because of limited resources for conducting inspections, the careful disposition of inspection effort among these facilities is essential if the IAEA is to attain its safeguards goals. This report describes an optimization procedure for assigning an inspection effort to maximize attainment of IAEA goals. The procedure does not require quantitative estimates of safeguards effectiveness, material value, or facility importance. Instead, the optimization is based on qualitative, relative prioritizations of inspection activities and materials to be safeguarded. This allocation framework is applicable to an arbitrary group of facilities such as a state's fuel cycle, the facilities inspected by an operations division, or all of the facilities inspected by the IAEA

  16. International Atomic Energy Agency annual report 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The Annual Report reviews the results of the Agency's programme according to the three pillars of technology, safety and verification. The main part of the report generally follows the programme structure as given in The Agency's Programme and Budget 2006-2007 (GC(49)/2). The introductory chapter seeks to provide a thematic analysis, based on the three pillars, of the Agency's activities within the overall context of notable developments during the year. More detailed information can be found in the latest editions of the Agency's Nuclear Safety Review, Nuclear Technology Review, Technical Cooperation Report and the Safeguards Statement for 2006 and Background to the Safeguards Statement. For the convenience of readers, these documents are available on the CD-ROM attached to the inside back cover of this report. Additional information covering various aspects of the Agency's programme is provided on the attached CD-ROM, and is also available on the Agency's web site at http://www.iaea.org/Worldatom/Documents/Anrep/Anrep2006/. Except where indicated, all sums of money are expressed in United States dollars. The designations employed and the presentation of material in this document do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the Secretariat concerning the legal status of any country or territory or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers. The topics covered in the chapter related to technology are: nuclear power; nuclear fuel cycle and materials technologies; capacity building and nuclear knowledge maintenance for sustainable energy development; nuclear science; food and agriculture; human health; water resources; assessment and management of marine and terrestrial environments; radioisotope production and radiation technology; safety and security; incident and emergency preparedness and response; safety of nuclear installations; radiation and transport safety; management of radioactive waste; nuclear security

  17. The regional (Europe) project on study of energy options using the IAEA planning methodologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molina, P.

    1997-01-01

    As a means to assist developing IAEA Member States in the Europe region in the broad area of energy, electricity and nuclear power planning, a new project has been implemented as part of the IAEA Technical Cooperation Programme. This paper describes the major objectives of this regional TC project and the activities to be organized in order to provide the required assistance. Focus is made on the present workshop and the current activities sponsored by the IAEA for further developments of the IAEA planning tools for energy, electricity and nuclear power planning with emphasis on the Energy and Power Evaluation Program (ENPEP) and the Wien Automatic System Planning (WASP) packages. (author)

  18. The regional (Europe) project on study of energy options using the IAEA planning methodologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molina, P [Division of Nuclear Power, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

    1997-09-01

    As a means to assist developing IAEA Member States in the Europe region in the broad area of energy, electricity and nuclear power planning, a new project has been implemented as part of the IAEA Technical Cooperation Programme. This paper describes the major objectives of this regional TC project and the activities to be organized in order to provide the required assistance. Focus is made on the present workshop and the current activities sponsored by the IAEA for further developments of the IAEA planning tools for energy, electricity and nuclear power planning with emphasis on the Energy and Power Evaluation Program (ENPEP) and the Wien Automatic System Planning (WASP) packages. (author).

  19. Atoms for peace - the work of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daglish, J.

    1984-01-01

    The article deals with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), which is situated in Vienna. The aims of the IAEA and its work are described. The safeguards system; promotional work; technical cooperation programme; and nuclear safety work concerned with basic safety standards for radiation protection; are all discussed. (U.K.)

  20. High Temperature Reactors for a proposed IAEA Coordinated Research Project on Energy Neutral Mineral Development Processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haneklaus, Nils; Reitsma, Frederik; Tulsidas, Harikrishnan

    2014-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is promoting a new Coordinated Research Project (CRP) to elaborate on the applicability and potential of using High Temperature Reactors (HTRs) to provide process heat and/or electricity to power energy intensive mineral development processes. The CRP aims to provide a platform for cooperation between HTR-developers and mineral development processing experts. Energy intensive mineral development processes with (e.g. phosphate-, gold-, copper-, rare earth ores) or without (e.g. titanium-, aluminum ore) the possibility to recover accompanying uranium and/or thorium that could be developed and used to run the HTR for “energy neutral” processing of the primary ore shall be discussed according to the participants needs. This paper specifically focuses on the aspects that need to be addressed by HTR-designers and developers. First requirements that should be fulfilled by the HTR-designs are highlighted together with the desired outcomes of the research project. (author)

  1. The International Atomic Energy Agency: activities and relationship with Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abud Osuna, Javier.

    1987-01-01

    Legal and political studies on the activities of the IAEA infer that the pacific uses of nuclear energy become more significant every day in the ambit of international relationships. The studies analyze as a whole relationships among member states. The first part is divided into four chapters, starting with the background and creation of the agency, its structure, statutes, amendments and the performance of its main organisms. It continues to describe mechanisms and programmes carried out, including cooperation agreements between the IAEA and other specialized organizations in the United Nations. It ends up with the IAEA performance resulting from different treaties. The second part examines Mexican norms on nuclear matter as well as relationships between Mexico and the IAEA. It demonstrates that achievements in the Agency have been possible because of the establishment of an international cooperation basis, which avoids duplicity of actions. The conclusions recommend joint efforts from both the developed and the developing countries in the following: a) to imbue public opinion with the goodness of nuclear energy; b) to discourage the construction and operation of nuclear installations; c) to unify national standards on nuclear safety and control; d) to decrease export restrictions, based on safeguards; e) to promote internal nuclear research in Mexico or throught regional integration agreements, with technical assistance and support from the IAEA. (author)

  2. International Atomic Energy Agency activities in decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reisenweaver, D W.; )

    2005-01-01

    Full text: The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has been addressing the safety and technical issues of decommissioning for over 20 years, but their focus has been primarily on planning. Up to know, the activities have been on an ad hoc basis and sometimes, important issues have been missed. A new Action Plan on the Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities has recently been approved by the Agency's board of Governors which will focus the Agency's efforts and ensure that our Member States' concerns are addressed. The new initiatives associated with this Action Plan will help ensure that decommissioning activities in the future are performed in a safe and coherent manner. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has been preparing safety and technical documents concerning decommissioning since the mid-1980's. There have been over 30 documents prepared that provide safety requirements, guidance and supporting technical information. Many of these documents are over 10 years old and need updating. The main focus in the past has been on planning for decommissioning. During the past five years, a set of Safety Standards have been prepared and issued to provide safety requirements and guidance to Member States. However, decommissioning was never a real priority with the Agency, but was something that had to be addressed. To illustrate this point, the first requirements documents on decommissioning were issued as part of a Safety Requirements [1] on pre-disposal management of radioactive waste. It was felt that decommissioning did not deserve its own document because it was just part of the normal waste management process. The focus was mostly on waste management. The Agency has assisted Member States with the planning process for decommissioning. Most of these activities have been focused on nuclear power plants and research reactors. Now, support for the decommissioning of other types of facilities is being requested. The Agency is currently providing technical

  3. Optimal allocation of international atomic energy agency inspection resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markin, J.T.

    1987-01-01

    Each year the Department of Safeguards of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) conducts inspections to confirm that nuclear materials and facilities are employed for peaceful purposes. Because of limited inspection resources, however, the IAEA cannot fully attain its safeguards goals either quantitatively as measured by the inspection effort negotiated in the facility attachments or qualitatively as measured by the IAEA criteria for evaluating attainment of safeguards goals. Under current IAEA procedures the allocation of inspection resources assigns essentially equal inspection effort to facilities of the same type. An alternative approach would incorporate consideration of all material categories and facilities to be assigned inspection resources when allocating effort to a particular facility. One such method for allocating inspection resources is based on the IAEA criteria. The criteria provide a framework for allocating inspection effort that includes a ranking of material types according to their safeguards importance, an implicit definition of inspection activities for each material and facility type, and criteria for judging the attainment of safeguards goals in terms of the quality and frequency of these inspection activities. This framework is applicable to resource allocation for an arbitrary group of facilities such as a state's fuel cycle, the facilities inspected by an operations division, or all of the facilities inspected by the IAEA

  4. Nuclear information: An overview of IAEA's activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchesi, I.H.; Konstantinov, L.V.

    1986-01-01

    As stated in this overview of IAEA nuclear information activities the Agency's role in information services is rapidly evolving and multifaceted. The Agency maintains more than 200 computerized files of information. Some 60 of these are part of systems directly related to nuclear activities. Some of these are briefly profiled in this overview such as INIS, the IAEA Nuclear Data Programme, the IAEA Incident Reporting System, the IAEA Energy and Economic Databank, the IAEA Power Reactor Information System, the Nuclear Fuel Cycle Information System, and the International Uranium Geology Information System. Future directions are pointed out. Different ways to upgrade information systems are listed

  5. Nuclear Power Remains Important Energy Option for Many Countries, IAEA Ministerial Conference Concludes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    Full text: Nuclear power remains an important option for many countries to improve energy security, provide energy for development and fight climate change, the International Ministerial Conference on Nuclear Power in the 21st Century concluded today. Participants also emphasised the importance of nuclear safety in the future growth of nuclear power, noting that nuclear safety has been strengthened worldwide following the March 2011 accident at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station. The Conference was organised by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in cooperation with the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), and hosted by the Government of the Russian Federation through the State Atomic Energy Corporation ROSATOM. Sergei Kirienko, Director General of the State Atomic Energy Corporation ROSATOM, said: ''The Conference has achieved its main goal: to confirm that nuclear energy is an important part of the world's energy-mix. The innovative character of this type of energy provides us with sustainable development in the future. The closed nuclear fuel cycle and fusion may open for humanity absolutely new horizons. The Conference underlined the leading role of the IAEA in promoting the peaceful use of nuclear power and provision of the non-proliferation regime. Russia as a co-founder of the IAEA will always support its efforts to develop and expand safety and security standards all over the world.'' ''I believe we can look ahead with confidence and optimism to the future of nuclear power in the 21st century,'' said IAEA Director General Yukiya Amano. After the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in Japan in March 2011, ''effective steps have been taken to make nuclear power plants safer everywhere,'' he stressed. ''Nuclear power will make a significant and growing contribution to sustainable development in the coming decades. The IAEA is committed to ensuring that the

  6. The IAEA hears about regional nuclear energy bodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1966-01-01

    Full text: During the early part of 1966, executive heads or senior officials of certain regional organizations working in atomic energy are visiting the Agency in order to give general talks on the activities of their organizations. The first to be arranged was Dr. Jules Gueron, Director General of Research and Training of Euratom, on 14 January 1966. These lectures are likely to be followed by others, given by the representatives of bodies such as the Council for Mutual Economic Aid (COMECON) the Inter-American Nuclear Energy Commission (IANEC), the European Nuclear Energy Agency (ENEA) of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), and the Scientific and Technical Research Commission of the Organization of African Unity. (author)

  7. The IAEA hears about regional nuclear energy bodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1966-03-15

    Full text: During the early part of 1966, executive heads or senior officials of certain regional organizations working in atomic energy are visiting the Agency in order to give general talks on the activities of their organizations. The first to be arranged was Dr. Jules Gueron, Director General of Research and Training of Euratom, on 14 January 1966. These lectures are likely to be followed by others, given by the representatives of bodies such as the Council for Mutual Economic Aid (COMECON) the Inter-American Nuclear Energy Commission (IANEC), the European Nuclear Energy Agency (ENEA) of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), and the Scientific and Technical Research Commission of the Organization of African Unity. (author)

  8. Emerging applications of advanced fuels for energy generation and transmutation. Overview of IAEA activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pong Eil Juhn; Arkhipov, V.

    1996-01-01

    Nuclear power generation is an established part of the world's electricity mix. However, the highly radioactive waste generated during power production is of great concern of public perception of nuclear energy. In order for nuclear power to realize its full potential as a major energy source for the entire world, there must be a safe and effective way to deal with this waste. Therefore, science must come to the rescue in the form of new, more effective technology aimed at reducing the amount of long-lived radioactive waste and eliminating nuclear weapons' grade material through transmutation of these isotopes in fission reactors or accelerators. In the framework of IAEA activities on the use of this new technologies the Agency has periodically review and assess the current status of the new fuel cycles, its applications worldwide, its economic benefits, and its perceived advantages vis-a-vis other nuclear fuel cycles. (author)

  9. Renewable energy sources: Energy Efficiency Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulgarensky, Mihael

    2004-01-01

    The paper presents the activities of the Energy Efficiency Agency, its main functions, as well as the new legislation stimulating the use of RES, stipulated in the new Energy Law of Bulgaria. The second part of the paper describes the potential of renewable energy in i.e. wind energy; solar energy; biomass energy; hydro energy; geothermal energy; draft of a National Program on RES 2005-2015. The third part describes the main issues of the new ENERGY EFFICIENCY LAW and the established Energy efficiency fund. (Author)

  10. The IAEA and Y2K. The Agency's action plan on the year 2000 problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherif, H.S.; Winkels, J.

    1999-01-01

    The article describes the aims of it IAEA action plan concerned with Year 2000 (Y2K) problem and the results achieved during four years of work, including the technical documents dealing with the Y2K computer problem, published by IAEA. This include IAEA systems and operations, contingency plans, coordination in the United Nations system. Through the IAEA Internet site, a series of Web pages were developed by the Division of Public Information to co-ordinate the global exchange of information on the IAEA Y2K activities and related topics. The site is open to Member States and international organisations within and outside United Nations system

  11. Safe and peaceful use of nuclear energy - an IAEA perspective. Address. Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Auswaertige Politik, Bonn, 17 April 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    1998-01-01

    The document reproduces the text of the conference given by the Director General of the IAEA at the Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Auswaertige Politik in Bonn on 17 April 1998. After a presentation of the Agency's role in the safe and peaceful use of nuclear energy, the conference gives an overview of the main issues facing nuclear energy in the following three major areas: the contribution of nuclear energy to economic and social development, nuclear safety, and verification. In the last part, the Director General makes some comments about the future

  12. The origins of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldschmidt, B [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, International Relations (France)

    1977-08-15

    On 23 October 1956 in New York, 81 member countries of the United Nations Organization or of its specialized agencies adopted the Statute of the International Atomic Energy Agency, which was to go into formal operation before the end of 1957. A major step towards world-wide control of nuclear energy thus came to be taken more than ten years after the idea of establishing such control had been launched - the first tentative efforts, from 1946 to 1948, having ended in failure. The account follows in an attempt to retrace this 'prehistory' of the IAEA.

  13. The origins of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldschmidt, B.

    1977-01-01

    On 23 October 1956 in New York, 81 member countries of the United Nations Organization or of its specialized agencies adopted the Statute of the International Atomic Energy Agency, which was to go into formal operation before the end of 1957. A major step towards world-wide control of nuclear energy thus came to be taken more than ten years after the idea of establishing such control had been launched - the first tentative efforts, from 1946 to 1948, having ended in failure. The account follows in an attempt to retrace this 'prehistory' of the IAEA

  14. Nuclear power issue as seen by the International Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, P.

    1976-01-01

    An account is given of the work of the International Energy Agency towards reducing the dependence of member states on imported oil. Forecasts of energy consumption are discussed, and the contributions that could be made by various energy sources, and by energy conservation, are examined. It is concluded that nuclear power is essential to a reduced dependence policy. The constraints on full realization of national nuclear programmes are stated as follows: licensing delays, waste disposal, financing, uranium supply, and fuel services. Ways in which these could be overcome by national and international action are suggested. Reference is made to the work of other atomic energy agencies: IAEA and OECD Nuclear Energy Agency. (U.K.)

  15. Current radiation protection activities of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, G.A.M.

    1996-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) program of the Radiation Safety Section is described in this paper. The Section has two main components: (1) the development of consensus safety documentation and (2) the use of that documentation as the basis for assisting countries to deal safely with their applications of radiation and radioactivity. Main activities of the section are listed for each of these components. Activities include documentation, coordinated research programs, and assistance to developing countries. 14 tabs

  16. Department of Energy Efforts to Promote Universal Adherence to the IAEA Additional Protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Killinger, Mark H.; Hansen, Linda H.; Kovacic, Don N.; VanSickle, Matthew; Apt, Kenneth E.

    2009-01-01

    Entry-into-force of the U.S. Additional Protocol (AP) in January 2009 continues to demonstrate the ongoing commitment by the United States to promote universal adherence to the AP. The AP is a critical tool for improving the International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA) capabilities to detect undeclared activities that indicate a clandestine nuclear weapons program. This is because States Parties are required to provide information about, and access to, nuclear fuel cycle activities beyond their traditional safeguards reporting requirements. As part of the U.S. AP Implementation Act and Senate Resolution of Ratification, the Administration is required to report annually to Congress on measures taken to achieve the adoption of the AP in non-nuclear weapon states, as well as assistance to the IAEA to promote the effective implementation of APs in those states. A key U.S. effort in this area is being managed by the International Nuclear Safeguards and Engagement Program (INSEP) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Through new and existing bilateral cooperation agreements, INSEP has initiated technical assistance projects for AP implementation with selected non-weapon states. States with which INSEP is currently cooperating include Vietnam and Thailand, with Indonesia, Algeria, Morocco, and other countries as possible future collaborators in the area of AP implementation. The INSEP collaborative model begins with a joint assessment with our partners to identify specific needs they may have regarding entering the AP into force and any impediments to successful implementation. An action plan is then developed detailing and prioritizing the necessary joint activities. Such assistance may include: advice on developing legal frameworks and regulatory documents; workshops to promote understanding of AP requirements; training to determine possible declarable activities; assistance in developing a system to collect and submit declarations; performing industry outreach to

  17. International Atomic Energy Agency Annual Report 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The IAEA Annual Report 2011 aims to summarize only the significant activities of the Agency during the year in question. This report covers the period 1 January to 31 December 2011. The main part of the report, starting on page 21, generally follows the programme structure as given in The Agency's Programme and Budget 2010-2011 (GC(53)/5). The introductory chapter, 'The Year in Review', seeks to provide a thematic analysis of the Agency's activities within the context of notable developments during the year. More detailed information can be found in the latest editions of the Agency's Nuclear Safety Review, Nuclear Technology Review, Technical Cooperation Report and the Safeguards Statement for 2011 and Background to the Safeguards Statement. Additional information covering various aspects of the Agency's programme is available in electronic form only on iaea.org, along with the Annual Report.

  18. The International Atomic Energy Agency Nuclear Security Education Strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BRAUNEGGER-GUELICH, A.; RUKHLO, V.; GREGORIC, M.; COLGAN, P.

    2011-01-01

    The threat of nuclear terrorism has not diminished. In response to the concerns of States, an international nuclear security framework has emerged through the establishment of a number of legally binding and non-binding international instruments which obligates or commits States to carry out a number of actions to protect against nuclear terrorism. In this context, the need for human resource development programmes in nuclear security was underscored at several International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) General Conferences and Board of Governors' Meetings. In the pursuit of this need, the IAEA provides a comprehensive nuclear security training programme to States on a regular basis, and has developed a concept that seeks to effectively pass ownership of nuclear security knowledge and skills to States through the establishment of a Nuclear Security Support Centre. In addition, the IAEA has developed a technical guidance titled IAEA Nuclear Security Series No. 12 - Educational Programme in Nuclear Security that consists of a model of a Master of Science (M.Sc.) and assists educational institutions to provide nuclear security education. The article sets out IAEA efforts in the area of nuclear security training and education, including the assistance to States for establishing a Nuclear Security Support Centre. It underlines the objective and content of the IAEA Nuclear Security Series No. 12, discusses different concepts on how to establish nuclear security at universities and, emphasizes on the IAEA efforts to assist educational and research institutions, and other stake holders to enhance global nuclear security by developing, sharing and promoting excellence in nuclear security education. (author)

  19. Hope over fear. The establishment of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forland, A.

    1995-01-01

    President Eisenhower's ''Atoms for Peace'' speech in 1953 started a process that led to the establishment of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). This study analyses the negotiations of the Statute of the Agency. It focuses on how the Agency's scope of action regarding safeguards was negotiated. The Statute is seen as a reflection of the dual purpose of the new Agency to promote peaceful uses of nuclear energy, and to control that peaceful nuclear activities receiving IAEA assistance are not diverted to military purposes. On one hand, the countries receiving assistance from the Agency accepted a degree of international control that represented a breakthrough in international relations. On the other hand, many countries strongly resented controls. Consequently, compromises had to be made in the course of the negotiations in order to reach a consensus. Thus, although the IAEA was established as a competent and technical body, the underlying compromises meant that its scope of actions was restricted. 6 refs

  20. US energy agency making progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    The Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E) has the ability to make significant contributions to energy research but must be allowed time to do so, according to a report by the US National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine.

  1. Contribution to the 22. IAEA Fusion Energy Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    This report is a compilation of the papers, concerning the FAST (Fusion Advanced Studies Torus) proposal, presented to the 22. IAEA conference on Fusion Energy. FAST is a new machine proposed to support ITER experimental exploitation as well as to anticipate DEMO relevant physics and technology. FAST is aimed at studying, in burning plasma relevant conditions, fast particle physics, plasma operations and plasma wall interaction in an integrated way. FAST has the capability to approach all the ITER scenarios significantly closer than present day experiments by using Deuterium plasmas. The necessity of achieving ITER relevant performance with a moderate cost has led to conceiving a compact Tokamak (R=1.82 m, a= 0.64 m) with high toroidal field (BT up to 8.5 T) and plasma current (Ip up to 8 MA). In order to study fast particle behaviours in conditions similar to those of ITER, the project has been provided with a dominant Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating System (ICRH; 30 MW on the plasma). Moreover, the experiment foresees the use of 6 MW of Lower Hybrid (LHCD), essentially for plasma control and for non-inductive Current Drive, and of Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ECRH, 4MW) for localized electron heating and plasma control. The ports have been designed to accommodate up to 10 MW of negative beams (NNBI) in the energy range of 0.5-1 MeV. The total power input will be in the 30-40 MW range in the different plasma scenarios with a wall power load comparable with that of ITER (P/R∼22 MW/m). All the ITER scenarios will be studied: from the reference H-mode, with plasma edge and ELMs characteristics similar to the ITER ones (Q up to ≅ 2.5), to a full current drive scenario, lasting around 170 s. The first wall as well as the divertor plates will be of Tungsten in order to ensure reactor relevant operation regimes. The divertor itself is designed to be completely removable by remote handling. This will allow studying (in view of DEMO) the behaviour of

  2. IAEA: 17 countries are candidates for nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2011-01-01

    In january 2011 IAEA announced that 17 countries had officially expressed their willingness to home nuclear power plants, they have filed applications for the construction of nuclear power plants. Among the countries concerned we find: Poland, Kuwait, Jordan, Morocco, Tunisia, Nigeria, Bangladesh, Thailand, Vietnam, Chile and Uruguay

  3. Workshop on IAEA Tools for Nuclear Energy System Assessment for Long-Term Planning and Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the workshop is to present to Member States tools and methods that are available from the IAEA in support of long-term energy planning and nuclear energy system assessments, both focusing on the sustainable development of nuclear energy. This includes tools devoted to energy system planning, indicators for sustainable energy development, the INPRO methodology for Nuclear Energy System Assessment (NESA) and tools for analysing nuclear fuel cycle material balance. The workshop also intends to obtain feedback from Member States on applying the tools, share experiences and lessons learned, and identify needs for IAEA support

  4. The International Atomic Energy Agency Flag Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The document reproduces the text of the IAEA Flag Code which was promulgated by the Director General on 15 September 1999, pursuant to the decision of the Board of Governors on 10 June 1999 to adopt an Agency flag as described in document GOV/1999/41 and its use in accordance with a flag code to be promulgated by the Director General

  5. The International Atomic Energy Agency Flag Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-11-17

    The document reproduces the text of the IAEA Flag Code which was promulgated by the Director General on 15 September 1999, pursuant to the decision of the Board of Governors on 10 June 1999 to adopt an Agency flag as described in document GOV/1999/41 and its use in accordance with a flag code to be promulgated by the Director General.

  6. International Atomic Energy Agency publications. New publications Autumn 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    This Publications Catalogue lists all sales publications of the IAEA issued and forthcoming for the period Autumn 2003 - early 2004. Most Agency publications are issued in English, though some are also available in Arabic, Chinese, French, Russian or Spanish. This is indicated at the bottom of the book entry. A complete listing of all IAEA priced publications is available on the IAEA's web site: http://www.iaea.org/books

  7. International Atomic Energy Agency publications. New publications Spring 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    This Publications Catalogue lists all sales publications of the IAEA issued and forthcoming during the period Spring 2003. Most Agency publications are issued in English, though some are also available in Arabic, Chinese, French, Russian or Spanish. This is indicated at the bottom of the book entry. A complete listing of all IAEA priced publications is available on the IAEA's web site: http://www.iaea.org/books

  8. High Temperature Reactors for a new IAEA Coordinated Research Project on energy neutral mineral development processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haneklaus, Nils, E-mail: n.haneklaus@berkeley.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, 4118 Etcheverry Hall, MC 1730, Berkeley, CA 94720-1730 (United States); Reitsma, Frederik [IAEA, Division of Nuclear Power, Section of Nuclear Power Technology Development, VIC, PO Box 100, Vienna 1400 (Austria); Tulsidas, Harikrishnan [IAEA, Division of Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Waste Technology, Section of Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Materials, VIC, PO Box 100, Vienna 1400 (Austria)

    2016-09-15

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is promoting a new Coordinated Research Project (CRP) to elaborate on the applicability and potential of using High Temperature Reactors (HTRs) to provide process heat and/or electricity to power energy intensive mineral development processes. The CRP aims to provide a platform for cooperation between HTR-developers and mineral development processing experts. Energy intensive mineral development processes with (e.g. phosphate-, gold-, copper-, rare earth ores) or without (e.g. titanium-, aluminum ore) the possibility to recover accompanying uranium and/or thorium that could be developed and used as raw material for nuclear reactor fuel enabling “energy neutral” processing of the primary ore if the recovered uranium and/or thorium is sufficient to operate the greenhouse gas lean energy source used shall be discussed according to the participants needs. This paper specifically focuses on the aspects to be addressed by HTR-designers and developers. First requirements that should be fulfilled by the HTR-designs are highlighted together with the desired outcomes of the research project.

  9. Annual report 2003[International Atomic Energy Agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    The Annual Report reviews the results of the Agency's programme according to the three 'pillars' of technology, safety and verification. The main part of the report, starting on page 9, generally follows the programme structure as it applied in 2003. The introductory chapter, seeks to provide a thematic analysis, based on the three pillars, of the Agency's activities within the overall context of notable developments during the year. Additional information on specific issues can be found in the latest editions of the Agency's Nuclear Safety Review, Nuclear Technology Review and Technical Co-operation Report. This material is also available on the Agency's WorldAtom web site (http://www.iaea.org/Worldatom/Documents/Anrep/Anrep2003/). All sums of money are expressed in United States dollars. The designations employed and the presentation of material in this document do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the Secretariat concerning the legal status of any country or territory or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers. The topics covered in the chapter related to Technology are: Nuclear Power; Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Material Technologies; Analysis for Sustainable Energy Development; Nuclear Science; Food and Agriculture; Human Health; Water Resources; Protection of the Marine and Terrestrial Environments; Physical and Chemical Applications. Topics related to safety discussed in this report are: Safety of Nuclear Installations; Radiation Safety; Management of Radioactive Waste; Security of Material. Topics related to Verification are Safeguards and Verification in Iraq Pursuant to UNSC Resolutions. A separate chapter is devoted to Management of Technical Cooperation for Development.

  10. Making a real difference: Working for the IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) offers challenging assignments and provides a stimulating multicultural environment for people who are interested in international work experience in a specific area of expertise. This brochure provides general information on the possibilities for employment as a Professional staff member of the IAEA and other information which may be useful to persons interested in joining the IAEA's Professional staff.

  11. IAEA at a glance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinley, D. III

    1997-12-01

    The publication briefly describes the 'peaceful universe' and the work carries out by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), UN organisation responsible for accelerating and enlarging the contribution of atomic energy to peace, health and prosperity throughout the world. The following subjects are presented: Ensuring safe nuclear energy; Protecting against radiation risks; Safeguarding nuclear materials; Assisting developing countries; Nuclear Technologies solving problems; Providing information and technical services

  12. IAEA at a glance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinley, D III

    1997-12-01

    The publication briefly describes the `peaceful universe` and the work carries out by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), UN organisation responsible for accelerating and enlarging the contribution of atomic energy to peace, health and prosperity throughout the world. The following subjects are presented: Ensuring safe nuclear energy; Protecting against radiation risks; Safeguarding nuclear materials; Assisting developing countries; Nuclear Technologies solving problems; Providing information and technical services

  13. The 25th anniversary of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osztrovszki, Gy.

    1982-01-01

    The leader of the Hungarian delegation at the 26th General Assembly of the International Atomic Energy (IAEA) held in Vienna in September, 1982, on the occasion of the IAEA's 25th anniversary, presented a short review of the IAEA's activities during its existence, the Hungarian participation in them and Hungary's efforts in the peaceful uses of the nuclear energy. (A.L.)

  14. Statement to ICTP/IAEA School of Nuclear Energy Management, 8 August 2011, Trieste, Italy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Y.

    2011-01-01

    ensure the safe disposal of nuclear waste. Countries which have ambitious expansion plans, and what the IAEA calls ''newcomer'' countries, also have considerable needs for new nuclear expertise. The generation of professionals who built and led the nuclear power industry for the past 50 years is approaching retirement. Many countries are having difficulty in educating an adequate number of new nuclear specialists to take their place. This School of Nuclear Management, organized jointly by the IAEA and the ICTP, has been created to help address this problem. This training represents a unique educational experience for promising young professionals from developing countries, particularly those which are considering adding nuclear power to their energy mix. It is one of the ways in which the IAEA helps Member States to train future leaders in the field of nuclear energy. The next generation of nuclear managers will have to deal with complex issues facing their own countries and the international nuclear community. You come from many different countries which require different approaches, but your objective is the same: to secure the most advanced education and training in nuclear science and technology. For countries with expanding nuclear power programmes, the challenge is to scale up their existing education and training in order to have the required qualified workforce in time. Countries planning to supply nuclear technology to others must not only meet their national human resource needs, but also be able to transfer education and training capacity, together with the technology they provide. Finally, countries embarking on nuclear power need to avoid becoming too dependent on their technology suppliers. They need to develop their own home-grown expertise and skills base. The Agency can help Member States to develop country-specific policies for nuclear power development, for human resource development, and for education, training and knowledge management - all in

  15. Nuclear Energy Agency. 6. activity report. 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    NEA has, as a primary objective, to ensure through international co-operation that the nuclear option is available for consideration in its true worth. The safety and regulatory aspects of nulear development have represented in 1977 about two thirds of NEA's total effort; and a high degree of priority was given to questions of nuclear safety and of radioactive waste management. Similarly, the growing need of Member countries for an integrated appraisal of technical, economic, safety, environmental and political questions influencing the nuclear fuel cycle was increasingly taken into account. Finally, a general effort was made to achieve greater visibility for the positive results of the NEA programme, as a contribution to improved public understanding of the factors underlying nuclear power programmes. As in previous years, the NEA programme continued to involve close collaboration with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the Commission of the European Communities. Within the OECD, close collaboration was maintained with the Combined Energy Staff and the Environment Directorate

  16. International Atomic Energy Agency. Highlights of activities. September 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillen, V.A.

    1994-09-01

    The document presents the main activities of the IAEA between September 1993-September 1994 in the following fields: Nuclear power, Nuclear fuel cycle, Radioactive waste management, Comparative assessment of energy sources, IAEA laboratories, Food and agriculture, Human health, Industry and earth sciences, Radiation protection, Safety of nuclear installations, Safeguards and non-proliferation activities, Public and technical information, Research and technical co-operation. There are also given information about IAEA secretariat, organization and administration, the 1993 IAEA General Conference, IAEA Member States and IAEA Network

  17. Annual report 2005[International Atomic Energy Agency]; Informe anual 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    The Annual Report reviews the results of the Agency's programme according to the three 'pillars' of technology, safety and verification. The main part of the report, starting on page 13, generally follows the programme structure as it applied in 2005. The introductory chapter, 'The Year in Review', seeks to provide a thematic analysis, based on the three pillars, of the Agency's activities within the overall context of notable developments during the year. Information on specific issues can be found in the latest editions of the Agency's Nuclear Safety Review, Nuclear Technology Review and Technical Cooperation Report. For the convenience of readers, these documents are available on the CD-ROM attached to the inside back cover of this report. Additional information covering various aspects of the Agency's programme is also provided on the attached CD-ROM, and is also available on the Agency?s iaea.org web site (http://www.iaea.org/Worldatom/Documents/Anrep/Anrep2005/). All sums of money are expressed in United States dollars. The designations employed and the presentation of material in this document do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the Secretariat concerning the legal status of any country or territory or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers. The topics covered in the chapter related to Technology are: Nuclear Power; Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Materials Technologies; Capacity Building and Nuclear Knowledge Maintenance for Sustainable Energy Development; Nuclear Science; Food and Agriculture; Human Health; Water Resources; Protection of the Marine and Terrestrial Environment; Physical and Chemical Applications. Topics related to Safety and Security discussed in this report are: Safety of Nuclear Installations; Radiation and Transport Safety; Management of Radioactive Waste; Nuclear Security. Topics related to Verification are Safeguards and Verification in Iraq Pursuant to UNSC Resolutions. A separate

  18. Activities of the IAEA Nuclear Energy Department in the area of fuel engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bychkov, A.; ); Inozemtsev, V.; )

    2012-01-01

    The IAEA presentation provides an outlook on the current status and projections of nuclear power development in the world taking into account the affect of the Fukushima accident, as well as information about the IAEA Action Plan on Nuclear Safety that was unanimously enforced by 151 Member States at the IAEA General Conference in September 2011. Details are given about the implementation tools of the sub-programme 'Nuclear Power Reactor Fuel Engineering': Technical Meetings, Coordinated Research Projects, and Expert Reviews. This information about recent, on-going and planned IAEA activities related to fuel R and D, design, manufacturing, in-reactor behaviour and operational experience will be useful for specialists interested in corresponding publications or for those planning participation in the IAEA projects. Particular emphasis is made on CQCNF priority subjects, including preparation of the IAEA Nuclear Energy Series Guide on Quality and Reliability of Fuel for Water-Cooled Power Reactors, where the expert group from the Nuclear Fuel Complex in Hyderabad was among the key contributors. (author)

  19. Nuclear technology: the role of the IAEA. Ninth international conference on emerging nuclear energy systems, Tel Aviv, 28 June 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    1998-01-01

    The document reproduces the text of the conference given by the Director General of the IAEA at the Ninth International Conference on Emerging Nuclear Energy Systems, in Tel Aviv, Israel, on 28 June 1998. The Director General outlines the role of the IAEA in assisting its Member States to meet the challenges facing the use of nuclear energy, based on the Agency' mandate on the following inter-related tasks: ta act as a catalyst for the scientific community and as a hub for state-of-the-art technology; to act as a centre for the transfer of nuclear technologies so as to ensure their accessibility to member State in general, and to developing countries in particular; to assist Member States to make informed and appropriate choices concerning the energy mix by producing comparative assessments of nuclear and other technologies; to strive for the highest level of safety in all areas of the use of nuclear energy; and to assure, through its verification system, the pledges to use nuclear energy exclusively for peaceful purposes are fulfilled

  20. IAEA film library

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1959-01-15

    Most of the scientific and technical films shown during the Second Geneva Conference for the Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy were donated to IAEA by the producing countries at the end of the Conference. They will form the basic stock for the Agency's loan service intended to provide atomic energy institutions in Member States with film material. A detailed catalogue of the films, classified according to subject and giving conditions of loan or purchase, is now being prepared. In addition to this, information on all films produced in Member Countries dealing with the peaceful uses cf atomic energy is being assembled. The documentary information contained in the films in IAEA's possession relates to the following subjects: national programmes; nuclear physics; accelerators; plasma and fusion; reactors (power, research, material testing and experimental); prospecting and mining; ore dressing; metallurgy; production of fuel elements; treatment of irradiated fuel elements; protection against radiation; detection and counting; uses of radiation in medicine, biochemistry, agriculture and industry; industrial application of nuclear explosions. Most of the commentaries are in the language of the producing country. A few films are available in a choice of two languages. The films donated to the Agency total 82, two of which have been produced in Canada, 13 in France, one in India, one in Romania, one in Spain, 14 in the United Kingdom, one in the Union of South Africa, 47 in the United States of America and two in the USSR: they are mostly illustrations of papers presented at the Second Geneva Conference. In arranging for the circulation of scientific and technical films IAEA wishes to help meet some of the training and information needs of Member States. It is hoped that all organizations producing films on the peaceful uses of atomic energy will entrust copies to the IAEA with a view to their widest possible circulation. In the meantime, the Agency's films have been given

  1. IAEA film library

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1959-01-01

    Most of the scientific and technical films shown during the Second Geneva Conference for the Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy were donated to IAEA by the producing countries at the end of the Conference. They will form the basic stock for the Agency's loan service intended to provide atomic energy institutions in Member States with film material. A detailed catalogue of the films, classified according to subject and giving conditions of loan or purchase, is now being prepared. In addition to this, information on all films produced in Member Countries dealing with the peaceful uses cf atomic energy is being assembled. The documentary information contained in the films in IAEA's possession relates to the following subjects: national programmes; nuclear physics; accelerators; plasma and fusion; reactors (power, research, material testing and experimental); prospecting and mining; ore dressing; metallurgy; production of fuel elements; treatment of irradiated fuel elements; protection against radiation; detection and counting; uses of radiation in medicine, biochemistry, agriculture and industry; industrial application of nuclear explosions. Most of the commentaries are in the language of the producing country. A few films are available in a choice of two languages. The films donated to the Agency total 82, two of which have been produced in Canada, 13 in France, one in India, one in Romania, one in Spain, 14 in the United Kingdom, one in the Union of South Africa, 47 in the United States of America and two in the USSR: they are mostly illustrations of papers presented at the Second Geneva Conference. In arranging for the circulation of scientific and technical films IAEA wishes to help meet some of the training and information needs of Member States. It is hoped that all organizations producing films on the peaceful uses of atomic energy will entrust copies to the IAEA with a view to their widest possible circulation. In the meantime, the Agency's films have been given

  2. International Atomic Energy Agency Annual Report 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    Article VI.J of the Agency's Statute requires the Board of Governors to submit 'an annual report to the General Conference concerning the affairs of the Agency and any projects approved by the Agency'. This report covers the period 1 January to 31 December 2013. The IAEA Annual Report 2013 aims to summarize only the significant activities of the Agency during the year in question. The main part of the report, starting on page 15, generally follows the programme structure as given in The Agency's Programme and Budget 2012-2013 (GC(55)/5). The introductory chapter, 'The Year in Review', seeks to provide a thematic analysis of the Agency's activities within the context of notable developments during the year. More detailed information can be found in the latest editions of the Agency's Nuclear Safety Review, Nuclear Technology Review, Technical Cooperation Report and the Safeguards Statement for 2013 and Background to the Safeguards Statement. Additional information covering various aspects of the Agency's programme is available, in electronic form only, on iaea.org, along with the Annual Report. Except where indicated, all sums of money are expressed in United States dollars. The designations employed and the presentation of material in this document do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the Secretariat concerning the legal status of any country or territory or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers. The mention of names of specific companies or products (whether or not indicated as registered) does not imply any intention to infringe proprietary rights, nor should it be construed as an endorsement or recommendation on the part of the Agency. The term 'non-nuclear-weapon State' is used as in the Final Document of the 1968 Conference of Non-Nuclear- Weapon States (United Nations document A/7277) and in the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT). The term 'nuclear-weapon State' is as used in

  3. International Atomic Energy Agency Annual Report 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    Article VI.J of the Agency's Statute requires the Board of Governors to submit 'an annual report to the General Conference concerning the affairs of the Agency and any projects approved by the Agency'. This report covers the period 1 January to 31 December 2012. - The IAEA Annual Report 2012 aims to summarize only the significant activities of the Agency during the year in question. The main part of the report, starting on page 17, generally follows the programme structure as given in The Agency's Programme and Budget 2012-2013 (GC(55)/5). - The introductory chapter, 'Overview', seeks to provide a thematic analysis of the Agency's activities within the context of notable developments during the year. More detailed information can be found in the latest editions of the Agency's Nuclear Safety Review, Nuclear Technology Review, Technical Cooperation Report and the Safeguards Statement for 2012 and Background to the Safeguards Statement. - Additional information covering various aspects of the Agency's programme is available, in electronic form only, on iaea.org, along with the Annual Report. - Except where indicated, all sums of money are expressed in United States dollars. - The designations employed and the presentation of material in this document do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the Secretariat concerning the legal status of any country or territory or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers. - The mention of names of specific companies or products (whether or not indicated as registered) does not imply any intention to infringe proprietary rights, nor should it be construed as an endorsement or recommendation on the part of the Agency. - The term 'non-nuclear-weapon State' is used as in the Final Document of the 1968 Conference of Non- Nuclear-Weapon States (United Nations document A/7277) and in the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT). The term 'nuclear-weapon State' is as used

  4. 23rd IAEA Fusion Energy Conference: Summary Of Sessions EX/C and ICC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawryluk, Richard J.

    2011-01-01

    An overview is given of recent experimental results in the areas of innovative confinement concepts, operational scenarios and confinement experiments as presented at the 2010 IAEA Fusion Energy Conference. Important new findings are presented from fusion devices worldwide, with a strong focus towards the scientific and technical issues associated with ITER and W7-X devices, presently under construction.

  5. 23rd IAEA Fusion Energy Conference: summary of sessions EX/C and ICC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawryluk, R.J.

    2011-01-01

    An overview is given of recent experimental results in the areas of innovative confinement concepts, operational scenarios and confinement experiments as presented at the 2010 IAEA Fusion Energy Conference. Important new findings are presented from fusion devices worldwide, with a strong focus towards the scientific and technical issues associated with ITER and W7-X devices, presently under construction.

  6. 23rd IAEA Fusion Energy Conference: Summary Of Sessions EX/C and ICC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawryluk, R J [PPPL

    2011-01-05

    An overview is given of recent experimental results in the areas of innovative confinement concepts, operational scenarios and confinement experiments as presented at the 2010 IAEA Fusion Energy Conference. Important new findings are presented from fusion devices worldwide, with a strong focus towards the scientific and technical issues associated with ITER and W7-X devices, presently under construction.

  7. IAEA safeguards glossary. 2001 ed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    IAEA safeguards have evolved since their inception in the late 1960s. In 1980 the IAEA published the first IAEA Safeguards Glossary (IAEA/SG/INF/l) with the aim of facilitating understanding of the specialized safeguards terminology within the international community. In 1987 the IAEA published a revised edition of the Glossary (IAEA/SG/INF/l (Rev.l)) which took into account developments in the safeguards area as well as comments received since the first edition appeared. Since 1987, IAEA safeguards have become more effective and efficient, mainly through the series of strengthening measures approved by the IAEA Board of Governors during 1992-1997, the Board's approval, in 1997, of the Model Protocol Additional to the Agreement(s) between State(s) and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards (issued as INFCIRC/540 (Corrected)), and the work, begun in 1999, directed towards the development and implementation of integrated safeguards. The IAEA Safeguards Glossary 2001 Edition reflects these developments. Each of the 13 sections of the Glossary addresses a specific subject related to IAEA safeguards. To facilitate understanding. definitions and, where applicable, explanations have been given for each of the terms listed. The terms defined and explained intentionally have not been arranged in alphabetical order, but their sequence within each section corresponds to the internal relationships of the subject treated. The terms are numbered consecutively within each section and an index referring to these numbers has been provided for ease of reference. The terms used have been translated into the official languages of the IAEA, as well as into German and Japanese. The IAEA Safeguards Glossary 2001 Edition has no legal status and is not intended to serve as a basis for adjudicating on problems of definition such as might arise during the negotiation or in the interpretation of safeguards agreements or additional protocols. The IAEA

  8. IAEA safeguards glossary. 2001 ed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-06-01

    IAEA safeguards have evolved since their inception in the late 1960s. In 1980 the IAEA published the first IAEA Safeguards Glossary (IAEA/SG/INF/l) with the aim of facilitating understanding of the specialized safeguards terminology within the international community. In 1987 the IAEA published a revised edition of the Glossary (IAEA/SG/INF/l (Rev.l)) which took into account developments in the safeguards area as well as comments received since the first edition appeared. Since 1987, IAEA safeguards have become more effective and efficient, mainly through the series of strengthening measures approved by the IAEA Board of Governors during 1992-1997, the Board's approval, in 1997, of the Model Protocol Additional to the Agreement(s) between State(s) and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards (issued as INFCIRC/540 (Corrected)), and the work, begun in 1999, directed towards the development and implementation of integrated safeguards. The IAEA Safeguards Glossary 2001 Edition reflects these developments. Each of the 13 sections of the Glossary addresses a specific subject related to IAEA safeguards. To facilitate understanding. definitions and, where applicable, explanations have been given for each of the terms listed. The terms defined and explained intentionally have not been arranged in alphabetical order, but their sequence within each section corresponds to the internal relationships of the subject treated. The terms are numbered consecutively within each section and an index referring to these numbers has been provided for ease of reference. The terms used have been translated into the official languages of the IAEA, as well as into German and Japanese. The IAEA Safeguards Glossary 2001 Edition has no legal status and is not intended to serve as a basis for adjudicating on problems of definition such as might arise during the negotiation or in the interpretation of safeguards agreements or additional protocols. The IAEA

  9. IAEA safeguards glossary. 2001 ed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-06-01

    IAEA safeguards have evolved since their inception in the late 1960s. In 1980 the IAEA published the first IAEA Safeguards Glossary (IAEA/SG/INF/l) with the aim of facilitating understanding of the specialized safeguards terminology within the international community. In 1987 the IAEA published a revised edition of the Glossary (IAEA/SG/INF/l (Rev.l)) which took into account developments in the safeguards area as well as comments received since the first edition appeared. Since 1987, IAEA safeguards have become more effective and efficient, mainly through the series of strengthening measures approved by the IAEA Board of Governors during 1992-1997, the Board's approval, in 1997, of the Model Protocol Additional to the Agreement(s) between State(s) and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards (issued as INFCIRC/540 (Corrected)), and the work, begun in 1999, directed towards the development and implementation of integrated safeguards. The IAEA Safeguards Glossary 2001 Edition reflects these developments. Each of the 13 sections of the Glossary addresses a specific subject related to IAEA safeguards. To facilitate understanding. definitions and, where applicable, explanations have been given for each of the terms listed. The terms defined and explained intentionally have not been arranged in alphabetical order, but their sequence within each section corresponds to the internal relationships of the subject treated. The terms are numbered consecutively within each section and an index referring to these numbers has been provided for ease of reference. The terms used have been translated into the official languages of the IAEA, as well as into German and Japanese. The IAEA Safeguards Glossary 2001 Edition has no legal status and is not intended to serve as a basis for adjudicating on problems of definition such as might arise during the negotiation or in the interpretation of safeguards agreements or additional protocols. The IAEA

  10. IAEA safeguards glossary. 2001 ed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    IAEA safeguards have evolved since their inception in the late 1960s. In 1980 the IAEA published the first IAEA Safeguards Glossary (IAEA/SG/INF/l) with the aim of facilitating understanding of the specialized safeguards terminology within the international community. In 1987 the IAEA published a revised edition of the Glossary (IAEA/SG/INF/l (Rev.l)) which took into account developments in the safeguards area as well as comments received since the first edition appeared. Since 1987, IAEA safeguards have become more effective and efficient, mainly through the series of strengthening measures approved by the IAEA Board of Governors during 1992-1997, the Board's approval, in 1997, of the Model Protocol Additional to the Agreement(s) between State(s) and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards (issued as INFCIRC/540 (Corrected)), and the work, begun in 1999, directed towards the development and implementation of integrated safeguards. The IAEA Safeguards Glossary 2001 Edition reflects these developments. Each of the 13 sections of the Glossary addresses a specific subject related to IAEA safeguards. To facilitate understanding. definitions and, where applicable, explanations have been given for each of the terms listed. The terms defined and explained intentionally have not been arranged in alphabetical order, but their sequence within each section corresponds to the internal relationships of the subject treated. The terms are numbered consecutively within each section and an index referring to these numbers has been provided for ease of reference. The terms used have been translated into the official languages of the IAEA, as well as into German and Japanese. The IAEA Safeguards Glossary 2001 Edition has no legal status and is not intended to serve as a basis for adjudicating on problems of definition such as might arise during the negotiation or in the interpretation of safeguards agreements or additional protocols. The IAEA

  11. Special symposium for the IAEA 50th anniversary: Global challenges for the future of nuclear energy and the IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The objective of the symposium was to review the 50 years history of the activities of the IAEA and the current status of nuclear power and fuel cycle in the world and discuss the future vision regarding development and safety of nuclear power and fuel cycle and international cooperation. Topics covered were nuclear power and fuel cycle, nuclear safety and security, non proliferation, and national, regional, and IAEA's challenges for the future

  12. Energy and nuclear power planning using the IAEA's ENPEP computer package. Proceedings of a workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-09-01

    The Regional (Europe) Technical Co-operation Project on the Study of Energy Options Using the IAEA Planning Methodologies was first implemented by the IAEA in 1995. The project aims at improving national capabilities for energy, electricity and nuclear power planning and promoting regional co-operation among participating countries in the European region. The project includes the organization of workshops, training activities at the regional and national levels, scientific visits, etc. The proceedings of a workshop held in Warsaw, Poland, from 4 to 8 September 1995 are contained herein. The workshop had as a basic objective the analysis of the specific problems encountered by the represented countries during application of the IAEA's ENPEP package in the conduct of national studies and to provide a forum for further co-operation among participating countries. A second objective of the workshop was to make proposals for future activities to be organized within the project. This publication is intended to serve as reference for the users of the IAEA's ENPEP package, as well as for energy and electricity planners in general. Refs, figs, tabs

  13. International Atomic Energy Agency. Highlights of activities. September 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillen, V.A.

    1993-09-01

    This document describes the most important activities of the International Atomic Energy Agency during the period September 1992 - September 1993, in particular in the following areas: (i) nuclear power; (ii) nuclear fuel cycle; (iii) radioactive waste management; (iv) comparative assessment of energy sources; (v) IAEA laboratory activities; (vi) nuclear applications in the food industry and in agriculture; (vii) human health applications of nuclear techniques, especially in the treatment and prevention of diseases and in the analysis of health problems related to the environment; (viii) industry and earth sciences; (ix) physical and chemical sciences; (x) radiation protection; (xi) safety of nuclear installations; (xii) safeguards and non-proliferation activities; (xiii) activities in the area of public and technical information such as the International Nuclear Information System (INIS) and other IAEA computerized databases and reference systems, the publication Nuclear Fusion, a monthly scientific journal of articles on thermonuclear fusion research and development, and the organization of meetings on atomic energy; and (xiv) a description of the Agency's technical assistance activities, including financial data

  14. Transport of radioactive material. 1994-2002. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-10-01

    This document lists all sales publications, IAEA-TECDOC Series, Training Course Series and National Competent Authorities Lists of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with the transport of radioactive materials during the period 1994-2002. It gives a short abstract and contents of these issues along with their costs in EURO

  15. Negotiating supranational rules - The genesis of the International Atomic Energy Agency Safeguards System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forland, Astrid

    1998-12-31

    The object of this thesis is the evolution from 1954-56 up until the mid 1970s of the nuclear safeguards system administered by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in Vienna. The evolution is traced not through the practical implementation of the safeguards system, but through the various multilateral negotiations through which it was created. The focus is on analysing the arguments advanced in the various negotiations, and the main objective is to single out the factors determining the result. The discussion is organised into the following chapters: (1) The statute of the IAEA, (2) The IAEA 1961 safeguard document (INFCIRC/26), (3) The IAEA 1965 safeguards document (INFCIRC/66), (4) The non-proliferation treaty, (5) NPT safeguards. 92 refs.

  16. Negotiating supranational rules - The genesis of the International Atomic Energy Agency Safeguards System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forland, Astrid

    1999-12-31

    The object of this thesis is the evolution from 1954-56 up until the mid 1970s of the nuclear safeguards system administered by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in Vienna. The evolution is traced not through the practical implementation of the safeguards system, but through the various multilateral negotiations through which it was created. The focus is on analysing the arguments advanced in the various negotiations, and the main objective is to single out the factors determining the result. The discussion is organised into the following chapters: (1) The statute of the IAEA, (2) The IAEA 1961 safeguard document (INFCIRC/26), (3) The IAEA 1965 safeguards document (INFCIRC/66), (4) The non-proliferation treaty, (5) NPT safeguards. 92 refs.

  17. International Atomic Energy Agency: activities in Malaysia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayati, Ainul [Nuclear Energy Unit, Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    1994-12-31

    The two main IAEA activities participated by Malaysia - technical cooperation programme (TC) and regional cooperative agreement programme (RCA/IAEA AND IAEA/RCA/UNDP). This article highlighted some of the IAEA technical cooperation activities in Malaysia (i.e. Medicine, Agriculture, Industry, Strategic, Social Science), assistance, funding and contribution made by Malaysia to the IAEA since 1989.

  18. International Atomic Energy Agency: activities in Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ainul Hayati

    1994-01-01

    The two main IAEA activities participated by Malaysia - technical cooperation programme (TC) and regional cooperative agreement programme (RCA/IAEA AND IAEA/RCA/UNDP). This article highlighted some of the IAEA technical cooperation activities in Malaysia (i.e. Medicine, Agriculture, Industry, Strategic, Social Science), assistance, funding and contribution made by Malaysia to the IAEA since 1989

  19. The NEA and the IAEA: partnering for progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcus, G.H.

    2005-01-01

    This presentation aims to answer the following question: What is the difference between the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)? Or, to put it bluntly, why are two international intergovernmental agencies needed in the nuclear field? This careful analysis shows that each agency has different areas of emphasis and different strengths. (A.L.B.)

  20. Opening Statement to ICTP/IAEA School of Nuclear Energy Management, 8 August 2011, Trieste, Italy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bychkov, A.

    2011-01-01

    turn a crisis into a challenge for which solutions could be found. We started to cooperate on an international level. My team played a key role in experimental research and development of the new technology and established its place in the international community. Today, pyrochemical approaches for fast reactor fuel recycling are one of the promising innovative technologies. Before I joined the Agency last February, I was Director General of the Institute for the past five years. It was a difficult and challenging time. Sometimes we were not able to pay salaries on time. But we worked very hard, and we managed to restore the stability of the work, enhance productivity and increase safety. In the end, we have been able to prove to the government that the Institute is the best place for some new, innovative technology projects in Russia. Why do I underline these episodes? I want to emphasize that my own development as a nuclear manager continues all the time. The nuclear field is very high-tech and not without potential danger. It is my firm opinion that the nuclear manager of the 21st century must be three things: first, a good specialist in one of the nuclear areas (such as fuel cycle, reactor technology, reactor physics or others); second, he or she must have broad knowledge of all nuclear branches, and; third, a basic understanding of economics, social science and psychology is required. If you constantly continue your professional development and add to your pool of knowledge, you will understand my slogan: ''There are no problems, only engineering and scientific challenges that are awaiting our decisions.'' These challenges are also faced by the IAEA Department of Nuclear Energy which I lead. The Department has principal responsibility for all aspects of Nuclear Power, Fuel Cycle and Waste Technology. Our work can be described in three brief words: support - catalyze - build. We support existing, expanding and new nuclear power programmes around the world. We

  1. ITER session at the IAEA fusion energy conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, M.J.

    2003-01-01

    A highlight of this year's Fusion Energy Conference, held in Lyon, France, on 14-19 October, was the participation by the ITER Parties in both a Special ITER Informal Session and in the Fusion Institute Exhibition at the Paella's des Congres de Lyon. These gave conference participants an opportunity to hear the latest on this collaborative international fusion energy research and development project, and to speak with the experts from each of the four sites being offered for the construction of ITER. The Special ITER Informal Session was held on the evening of 16 October and it was very well attended, with approximately 350 conference participants attending

  2. International Atomic Energy Agency/Hanford Site shared use of calorimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welsh, T.L.

    1997-01-01

    Hanford Site operators combine gamma ray isotopic and calorimetry measurements for nondestructive plutonium assay. Such measurements offer lower variability (particularly for heterogeneous materials) and decreased radiation exposure, cost, waste, intrusiveness, and material handling compared to destructive analysis. Until now, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has relied on destructive analysis to perform the most accurate verification requirements for plutonium stored under safeguards at the Hanford Site. It was recognized that using calorimetry could significantly reduce the need for the IAEA to perform destructive analysis. To authorize the operator's calorimeters for routine IAEA use, however, it was necessary to develop authentication features and perform independent 1558 testing. Authentication features include IAEA control of the hardware and calorimeter operating system software, measurement of certified IAEA standards, sealing of calorimeter chambers, and limited destructive analysis of IAEA selected items. A field test of these authentication features was performed at the Hanford Site in June 1997. The field test also was meant to enhance the credibility the IAEA imputes to calorimetry prior to its implementation. Progress in shared use of the Hanford Site calorimeters is reported

  3. Additional protocol between France, EURATOM and IAEA. 2001-2002 ordinary session. Project of law authorizing the ratification of the additional protocol to the agreement between France, the European Atomic Energy Community and the International Atomic Energy Agency relative to the application of warranties in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This additional protocol to the agreement between France, EURATOM and the IAEA aims at reinforcing the nuclear weapons non-proliferation regime. This protocol widens the field of competences of the IAEA with the supply of new information relative to: the civil nuclear cooperation between France and countries having no nuclear weapons in the domain of fuel cycle; the regular inspection of French nuclear facilities; the trade (import and export) of medium- or high-level radioactive wastes containing plutonium, highly enriched uranium or 233 U, and the trade of some non-nuclear equipments or materials with countries having no nuclear weapons. The protocol defines also some practical dispositions relative to the delays and periodicity of controls, to the transmission of data, to the appointment of IAEA inspectors and their access to the facilities and sites considered. The list of the activities and equipments covered by the protocol are given in appendixes. (J.S.)

  4. The international atomic energy agency's programme on utilization of accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dytlewski, Nikolai [International Atomic Energy Agency, Wagramer Str. 5, A-1400 Vienna (Austria); Mank, Guenter [International Atomic Energy Agency, Wagramer Str. 5, A-1400 Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: g.mank@iaea.org; Rosengard, Ulf [International Atomic Energy Agency, Wagramer Str. 5, A-1400 Vienna (Austria); Bamford, Samuel [International Atomic Energy Agency, Wagramer Str. 5, A-1400 Vienna (Austria); Markowicz, Andrzej [International Atomic Energy Agency, Wagramer Str. 5, A-1400 Vienna (Austria); Wegrzynek, Dariusz [International Atomic Energy Agency, Wagramer Str. 5, A-1400 Vienna (Austria)

    2006-06-23

    Low-energy accelerators have in the past produced a major part of our current knowledge of nuclear physics. Today they are mainly used for applied research and industrial applications. In view of this, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has during recent years initiated several Coordinated Research Projects (CRPs) concerning Ion Beam Analysis of Materials, Accelerator Mass Spectrometry and Nuclear Microprobe Techniques. The CRPs involve laboratories from developing as well as developed Member States, networking on a common topic coordinated by the IAEA. In order to facilitate networking, the IAEA has recently published the 'World Survey of Accelerator Based Analytical Techniques' available on the Internet and as a CD-ROM. The IAEA maintains also a beamline at a 6 MV Van de Graaff accelerator in the Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Zagreb, Croatia. Small and medium power accelerator driven spallation neutron sources will become more important as many small neutron producing research reactors are approaching the end of their useful working life. The IAEA has, within its Department for Nuclear Sciences and Applications, a programme on the Effective Utilization of Accelerators. This programme helps Member States, in particular developing Member States, in finding new areas of applications for their low and medium energy accelerators through increased participation in activities such as Coordinated Research Projects, Technical Meetings and Conferences. This paper describes the IAEA's current programme on accelerator utilization and proposed future activities.

  5. International Atomic Energy Agency Annual Report 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    Along with an examination of the state of worldwide nuclear-related developments last year, the IAEA Annual Report 2014 provides a comprehensive look at the Agency’s activities over the course of the year. From coordinating 125 research projects to conducting 2114 nuclear verification inspections worldwide, the IAEA’s 2560 employees continued to work on a wide range of areas to meet the evolving needs of Member States. The Annual Report, published in August, will be discussed and endorsed at the IAEA’s General Conference in September. Serving 162 Member States, two more than the year before, the IAEA’s activities in 2014 focused on the following areas, in line with its mandate: • Nuclear Energy: The IAEA assisted Member States in the introduction of nuclear power programmes and in the efficient and safe use of nuclear energy, fostering innovation and building capability in energy planning, analysis, and nuclear information and knowledge management. • Nuclear Sciences and Applications: The IAEA continued to assist Member States in building, strengthening and maintaining capacities in the safe, peaceful and secure use of nuclear technology. • Nuclear Safety and Security: The IAEA and its Member States continued to strengthen nuclear safety worldwide, including through the implementation of the Action Plan on Nuclear Safety, which had been endorsed by the General Conference in 2011 after the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant earlier that year. The IAEA also supported States, upon request, in their efforts to achieve effective security wherever nuclear and other radioactive materials are in use. • Nuclear Verification: The IAEA implemented safeguards in 180 States and as at the end of every year, it drew conclusions for each State for which safeguards were applied. • Technical Cooperation: The IAEA assisted Member States in their efforts to achieve the Millennium Development Goals and in preparation for the post-2015 Sustainable

  6. Note by the IAEA Secretariat in connection with the statement of 11 October 1993 by the Minister of Atomic Energy of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (INFCIRC/422)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The attached Note by the Secretariat of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in connection with the statement of 11 October 1993 by the Minister of Atomic Energy of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (INFCIRC/442) is being circulated for the information of Member States

  7. The nuclear techniques and IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2006-01-01

    The International atomic energy agency (IAEA) and its member states help hundred of development projects using nuclear science and technology. Specialists are sent in centers and research laboratories as counselors or speaker, activities of collective and personal training are organised with national institutes, material is supplied for research works or technical projects executed locally. (N.C.)

  8. An international peer review of the biosphere modelling programme of the US Department of Energy's Yucca mountain site characterization project. Report of the IAEA International Review Team

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-04-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) has a project for characterizing the site of a facility for disposing of radioactive waste located at Yucca Mountain Nevada, USA (the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project). This Project has developed an approach for assessing the future potential impact of any releases of radionuclides to the biosphere from a potential disposal facility sited at Yucca Mountain The DOE requested the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to organize an independent international expert review of the assessment methodology being used in its biosphere modelling programme. The IAEA accepted the request in the context of its statutory obligation to provide for the application of its established international standards of safety for the protection of health, at the request of a State, to any of that State's activities in the field of atomic energy. The terms of reference of the peer review were to review the biosphere assessment methodology being used for the total system performance assessment of the potential disposal facility. The main purpose was to analyze critically the proposed rationale and methodology and to identify consistencies and inconsistencies between methods being used in the frame of the Project and those established in international standards or in international programmes such as the IAEA's Biosphere Modelling and Assessment Programme (BIOMASS). This report presents the consensus view of the international experts convened by the IAEA for carrying out the review

  9. The contribution of the International Atomic Energy Agency to peace and development. Address at the Diplomatic Academy conference, Lima, Peru, 20 October 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    1999-01-01

    In his address at the Diplomatic Academy Conference (Lima, Peru, 20 October 1999), the Director General of the IAEA described the role of the IAEA and its contribution to peace and development, focussing in four areas: technology transfer, nuclear power and sustainable energy development, nuclear safety, and the Agency's verification system

  10. International Atomic Energy Agency thirty-third general conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    A brief account is given of the 33rd session of IAEA General Conference held in Vienna from 25 to 29 September 1989. The Minister for Primary Industry and Energy, Mr John Kerin, led the Australian delegation. His statement to the General Conference highlighted Australia's role as a major uranium exporter, its committment to the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapon Treaty and support for the role which the Agency plays in it. The major Australian policy initiatives in environmental areas were also outlined. Australia continues to make a substantial extra-budgetary contribution to the Regional Cooperation Agreement for Asia and Pacific (RCA), and it has recently expanded its committment by agreeing to support a series of new RCA projects. In this context, the role played by the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization for the provision of technical assistance and cooperation in many areas of the Agency's activities is discussed. ills

  11. The IAEA at work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-03-01

    Fifty years ago, Dwight Eisenhower stood before the United Nations to offer both a warning and a vision. The knowledge to build an atomic bomb was in the hands of rival powers and would soon be shared by many countries, the President said. It was time to create a U.N. body that could ensure that the new technology served no military purpose. It was time, moreover, to 'devise methods whereby this fissionable material would be allocated to serve the peaceful pursuits of mankind' in agriculture, medicine and other peaceful activities. Eisenhower foresaw a world safe from the destructive power of atomic fission but gaining from its technological advances. Half a century later, the world continues to witness his foresight through the work of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The IAEA aims at four formidable goals: safeguarding nuclear nonproliferation; enhancing the security of nuclear facilities and radioactive materials; ensuring the safety of nuclear technologies; and promoting nuclear science to meet human needs. As the world's 'nuclear watchdog,' the IAEA's impartial inspectorate verifies the peaceful uses of nuclear energy in scores of countries. By joining the Agency's strengthened safeguards system and concluding an Additional Protocol, countries can assure the world-and the IAEA can verify-that their nuclear activities are not used for weapons purposes. True to Eisenhower's vision, the power of the atom is being tapped for many human benefits, especially in the world's less developed nations. Extreme poverty remains a profound problem today: some 1.2 billion people in the developing world survive marginally on less that US$1 per day. Another 2.8 billion struggle on less than US$2 per day. The IAEA is mobilizing nuclear science to help address these pressing needs. From managing water better, to controlling pests and diseases, to protecting the environment, the IAEA is helping poor countries make sizeable advances. At the same time, the IAEA works

  12. IAEA monitoring field trials workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, H.H.; Cooley, J.N.; Belew, W.L.

    1995-01-01

    Recent safeguards inspections in Iraq and elsewhere by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) have led to the supposition that environmental monitoring can aid in verifying declared and in detecting undeclared nuclear activities or operations. This assumption was most recently examined by the IAEA's Standing Advisory Group on Safeguards Implementation (SAGSI), in their reports to the IAEA Board of Governors. In their reports, SAGSI suggested that further assessment and development of environmental monitoring would be needed to fully evaluate its potential application to enhanced IAEA safeguards. Such an inquiry became part of the IAEA ''Programme 93+2'' assessment of measures to enhance IAEA safeguards. In March, 1994, the International Safeguards Group at Oak Ridge hosted an environmental monitoring field trial workshop for IAEA inspectors to train them in the techniques needed for effective environmental sampling. The workshop included both classroom lectures and actual field sampling exercises. The workshop was designed to emphasize the analytical infrastructure needed for an environmental program, practical sampling methods, and suggested procedures for properly planning a sampling campaign. Detailed techniques for swipe, vegetation, soil, biota, and water associated sampling were covered. The overall approach to the workshop, and observed results, are described

  13. IAEA's role in nuclear desalination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khamis, I.; )

    2010-01-01

    Currently, several Member States have shown interest in the utilization of the nuclear energy for seawater desalination not only because recent studies have demonstrated that nuclear desalination is feasible, but also economical and has been already demonstrated in several countries. Therefore, the article will provide a highlight on sea water desalination using nuclear energy as a potential for a sustainable development around the world and the IAEA role in this regards. Special emphasis is placed on past, present, and future nuclear desalination experience in various IAEA Member States. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) role could be summarized in facilitating cutting-edge developments in the area of seawater desalination using nuclear energy, and establishing a framework for facilitating activities in Member States through information exchange and provision of technical assistance. (author)

  14. Introducing the Brazilian program of technical support to the International Atomic Energy Agency - Department of Safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinhas, Laercio A.; Palhares, Lilia C.; Dias, Fabio C.; Khlebnikov, Nikolai

    2009-01-01

    As an active Member State of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Brazil has applied substantial resources in order to maintain the best possible cooperation with the Agency, aiming at a continuous improvement of the effectiveness and efficiency of the safeguards system. Over the last decades a number of projects, involving the participation of high-level Brazilian professionals in the nuclear area, have already been jointly completed. To continue providing this voluntary support to the IAEA Department of Safeguards for research, development and implementation, in 2006 Brazil decided to accept the IAEA's invitation to participate in the IAEA Member States Support Programmes initiative, which currently includes 21 Member States. The Research and Development (R and D) Programme for Nuclear Verification is the IAEA reference in this regard, establishing the high priority needs and describing each recognized departmental project. The Programme is issued every two years. The 'Brazilian Support Programme (BRZ SP)' was established on the basis of a set of administrative procedures titled 'Cooperation Arrangements and Guidelines', agreed between the Brazilian National Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN) and the IAEA - Department of Safeguards. The scope of the BRZ SP includes: the participation in field tests and the evaluation of state-of-the-art technologies as requested by the IAEA for its safeguards applications; the training of safeguards personnel involved with safeguards implementation at both facility and State levels; laboratorial support in the area of destructive and nondestructive analysis of nuclear materials; the analysis of safeguards issues; information acquisition, analysis and evaluation; and the provision of human resources, such as experts and consultants to work directly with the IAEA Secretariat. The activities agreed under the BRZ SP are not restricted to CNEN staff members. Professionals from other Brazilian organizations may also be involved

  15. The IAEA programme of action for cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliver, L. D.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize on 10 December 2005. To acknowledge receiving this prestigious award, the IAEA arranged three special workshops in the regions of Asia, Africa and South America. These special events brought together high-ranking delegates from IAEA member countries within their regions. The theme of the workshop was on human resources development in radiation oncology in the context mmcer control programs. This paper presents information on the world cancer incidence provided the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). Details of the IAEA Programme of Action for Cancer Therapy (PACT) 2 are also presented.

  16. Hope over fear. The establishment of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forland, A.

    1995-12-01

    President Eisenhower`s ``Atoms for Peace`` speech in 1953 started a process that led to the establishment of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). This study analyses the negotiations of the Statute of the Agency. It focuses on how the Agency`s scope of action regarding safeguards was negotiated. The Statute is seen as a reflection of the dual purpose of the new Agency to promote peaceful uses of nuclear energy, and to control that peaceful nuclear activities receiving IAEA assistance are not diverted to military purposes. On one hand, the countries receiving assistance from the Agency accepted a degree of international control that represented a breakthrough in international relations. On the other hand, many countries strongly resented controls. Consequently, compromises had to be made in the course of the negotiations in order to reach a consensus. Thus, although the IAEA was established as a competent and technical body, the underlying compromises meant that its scope of actions was restricted. 6 refs.

  17. 76 FR 69714 - International Energy Agency Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-09

    ...: Notice of Meetings. SUMMARY: The Industry Advisory Board (IAB) to the International Energy Agency (IEA... Industry Advisory Board (IAB) to the International Energy Agency (IEA) will be held at the headquarters of... of Switzerland --Questionnaire Response of The Netherlands 5. Emergency Response Exercises...

  18. The Role of the International Atomic Energy Agency in a Response to Nuclear and Radiological Incidents and Emergencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buglova, E.; Baciu, F., E-mail: E.Buglova@iaea.org [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Department of Nuclear Safety and Security, Wagramer Strasse 5, P.O. Box 100, 1400 Vienna (Austria)

    2014-10-15

    Full text: The role of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in a response to nuclear and radiological incidents and emergencies has been defined and further expanded through the IAEA Statute, the Convention on Early Notification of a Nuclear Accident, the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency, the Convention on Physical Protection of Nuclear Material, IAEA safety standards, relevant decisions by Policy Making Organs of the IAEA, inter-agency agreements and other documents such as the IAEA Action Plan on Nuclear Safety. The IAEA Secretariat fulfils its roles through the Agency's Incident and Emergency System (IES) and the Incident and Emergency Centre (IEC). The IEC is the global focal point for international preparedness and response to nuclear and radiological safety or security related incidents, emergencies, threats or events of media interest and for coordination of International assistance. During a response the IEC performs and facilitates for Member States many specific functions which include: prompt notification; official information exchange; assessment of potential consequences; prognosis of emergency progression; provision, facilitation and coordination of International assistance; provision of timely, accurate and easily understandable public information; coordination of inter-agency response at the International level. Through officially designated contact points of Member States the IEC is able to communicate at any time with national authorities to ensure the prompt and successful sharing of information and resources. The IEC routinely performs internal exercising of all aspects of the IAEA response and in cooperation with Member States, the IAEA organizes and facilitates the conduct of large scale international exercises to practice cooperation and coordination. This presentation outlines in detail the specific functions of the IAEA IEC during a response. (author)

  19. International Atomic Energy Agency highlights of activities. 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    The IAEA activities are outlined in the following areas: nuclear power, nuclear fuel cycle, radioactive waste management, comparative assessment of energy sources, IAEA laboratories, research and technical cooperation, food and agriculture, human health, industry and earth sciences, physical and chemical sciences, safety of nuclear installations, radiation protection, safeguards and non-proliferation activities, public and technical information

  20. International Atomic Energy Agency Annual Report 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    The Annual Report 2010 aims to summarize only the significant activities of the Agency during the year in question The main part of the report, starting on page 17, generally follows the programme structure as given in The Agency's Programme and Budget 2010-2011 (GC(53)/5). The introductory chapter, 'Overview', seeks to provide a thematic analysis of the Agency's activities within the context of notable developments during the year More detailed information can be found in the latest editions of the Agency's Nuclear Safety Review, Nuclear Technology Review, Technical Cooperation Report and the Safeguards Statement and Background to the Safeguards Statement and Summary. For the convenience of readers, these documents are available on the CD-ROM attached to the inside back cover of this report. Additional information covering various aspects of the Agency's programme is provided on the attached CD-ROM and is also available on the Agency's web site at http://www.iaea.org./Publications/ Reports/index.html. Except where indicated, all sums of money are expressed in United States dollars. The designations employed and the presentation of material in this report do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the Secretariat concerning the legal status of any country or territory or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers. The mention of names of specific companies or products (whether or not indicated as registered) does not imply any intention to infringe proprietary rights, nor should it be construed as an endorsement or recommendation on the part of the Agency. The term 'non-nuclear-weapon State' is used as in the Final Document of the 1968 Conference of Non-Nuclear-Weapon States (United Nations document A/7277) and in the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) The term 'nuclear weapon State' is as used in the NPT.

  1. International Atomic Energy Agency Annual Report 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The Annual Report 2010 aims to summarize only the significant activities of the Agency during the year in question The main part of the report, starting on page 17, generally follows the programme structure as given in The Agency's Programme and Budget 2010-2011 (GC(53)/5). The introductory chapter, 'Overview', seeks to provide a thematic analysis of the Agency's activities within the context of notable developments during the year More detailed information can be found in the latest editions of the Agency's Nuclear Safety Review, Nuclear Technology Review, Technical Cooperation Report and the Safeguards Statement and Background to the Safeguards Statement and Summary. For the convenience of readers, these documents are available on the CD-ROM attached to the inside back cover of this report. Additional information covering various aspects of the Agency's programme is provided on the attached CD-ROM and is also available on the Agency's web site at http://www.iaea.org./Publications/ Reports/index.html. Except where indicated, all sums of money are expressed in United States dollars. The designations employed and the presentation of material in this report do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the Secretariat concerning the legal status of any country or territory or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers. The mention of names of specific companies or products (whether or not indicated as registered) does not imply any intention to infringe proprietary rights, nor should it be construed as an endorsement or recommendation on the part of the Agency. The term 'non-nuclear-weapon State' is used as in the Final Document of the 1968 Conference of Non-Nuclear-Weapon States (United Nations document A/7277) and in the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) The term 'nuclear weapon State' is as used in the NPT.

  2. International Atomic Energy Agency Annual Report 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The Annual Report 2009 aims to summarize only the significant activities of the Agency during the year in question. The main part of the report generally follows the programme structure as given in The Agency's Programme and Budget 2008-2009 (GC(51)/2). The introductory chapter, '2009 in Perspective', seeks to provide a thematic analysis of the Agency's activities within the context of notable developments during the year. More detailed information can be found in the latest editions of the Agency's Nuclear Safety Review, Nuclear Technology Review, Technical Cooperation Report and the Safeguards Statement for 2009 and Background to the Safeguards Statement. For the convenience of readers, these documents are available on the CD-ROM attached to the inside back cover of this report. Additional infomation covering various aspects of the Agency's programme is provided on the attached CD-ROM, and is also available on the Agency's web site at http://www.iaea.org/Publications/Reports/Anrep2009/index.html. Except where indicated, all sums of money are expressed in United States dollars. The designations employed and the presentation of material in this document do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the Secretariat concerning the legal status of any country or territory or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers. The mention of names of specific companies or products (whether or not indicated as registered) does not imply any intention to infringe proprietary rights, nor should it be construed as an endorsement or recommendation on the part of the Agency. The term 'non-nuclear-weapon State' is used as in the Final Document of the 1968 Conference of Non-Nuclear-Weapon States (United Natinos document A/7277) and in the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT). The term 'nuclear weapon State' is as used in the NPT

  3. International Atomic Energy Agency Annual Report 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-07-01

    The Annual Report 2009 aims to summarize only the significant activities of the Agency during the year in question. The main part of the report generally follows the programme structure as given in The Agency's Programme and Budget 2008-2009 (GC(51)/2). The introductory chapter, '2009 in Perspective', seeks to provide a thematic analysis of the Agency's activities within the context of notable developments during the year. More detailed information can be found in the latest editions of the Agency's Nuclear Safety Review, Nuclear Technology Review, Technical Cooperation Report and the Safeguards Statement for 2009 and Background to the Safeguards Statement. For the convenience of readers, these documents are available on the CD-ROM attached to the inside back cover of this report. Additional infomation covering various aspects of the Agency's programme is provided on the attached CD-ROM, and is also available on the Agency's web site at http://www.iaea.org/Publications/Reports/Anrep2009/index.html. Except where indicated, all sums of money are expressed in United States dollars. The designations employed and the presentation of material in this document do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the Secretariat concerning the legal status of any country or territory or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers. The mention of names of specific companies or products (whether or not indicated as registered) does not imply any intention to infringe proprietary rights, nor should it be construed as an endorsement or recommendation on the part of the Agency. The term 'non-nuclear-weapon State' is used as in the Final Document of the 1968 Conference of Non-Nuclear-Weapon States (United Natinos document A/7277) and in the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT). The term 'nuclear weapon State' is as used in the NPT

  4. Alternate Funding Sources for the International Atomic Energy Agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toomey, Christopher; Wyse, Evan T.; Kurzrok, Andrew J.; Swarthout, Jordan M.

    2012-09-04

    Since 1957, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has worked to ensure the safe and responsible promotion of nuclear technology throughout the world. The IAEA operates at the intersection of the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty’s (NPT) fourth and third articles, which guarantee Parties to the Treaty the right to peaceful uses of nuclear technology, provided those activities are placed under safeguards verified by the IAEA. However, while the IAEA has enjoyed substantial success and prestige in the international community, there is a concern that its resources are being stretched to a point where it may no longer be possible to execute its multifaceted mission in its entirety. As noted by the Director General (DG) in 2008, demographics suggest that every aspect of the IAEA’s operations will be in higher demand due to increasing reliance on non-carbon-based energy and the concomitant nonproliferation, safety, and security risks that growth entails. In addition to these nuclear energy concerns, the demand for technical developmental assistance in the fields of food security, resource conservation, and human health is also predicted to increase as the rest of the world develops. Even with a 100% value-for-money rating by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB) and being described as an “extraordinary bargain” by the United Nations Secretary-General’s High-level Panel on Threats, Challenges and Change, real budget growth at the Agency has been limited to zero-real growth for a better part of the last two decades. Although the 2012 regular budget (RB) received a small increase for most programs, the 2013 RB has been set at zero-real growth. As a result, the IAEA has had to defer infrastructure investments, which has hindered its ability to provide the public goods its Members seek, decreased global security and development opportunities, and functionally transformed the IAEA into a charity, dependent on extrabudgetary (EB) contributions to sustain

  5. Dosimetry study comparing NCS report-2 versus IAEA TRS-398 protocol for high energy photon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attalaa, E.M.; Khaled, N.E.; Abou Elenein, H.S.; Elsayed, A.A.

    2005-01-01

    In this work a dosimetry study is presented in which the results of absorbed dose determined at reference condition according to the IAEA TRS-398 protocol and the NCS report-2 are compared. The IAEA TRS-398 protocol for absorbed dose calibration is based on ionization chamber having absorbed dose to water calibration factor N d w, while the NCS-2 dosimetry report for absorbed dose calibration is based on an ionization chamber having air- kerma calibration factor N k . This study shows that the absorbed dose which is calculated with The IAEA TRS-398 formalisms is higher than that calculated with NCS report-2 formalisms within range from 0.4 to 0.9% in cobalt-60 beam as sensed by different ionization chambers, and from 0.2 to 1.1% for different higher energy photon beams of 6, 8 and 18 MV. The chambers used are PTW 30001, 30004, and NE-2571; which have calibration factors N k and N d w traceable to the BIPM (Bureau International des Poids et Mesures)

  6. Excerpts from the introductory statement by IAEA Director General. IAEA Board of Governors, Vienna, 8 December 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    1997-01-01

    The document contains excerpts from the Introductory Statement made by the Director General of the IAEA at the IAEA Board of Governors on 8 December 1997. The following aspects from the Agency's activity are presented: nuclear energy, Agency's inspections in Iraq in relation to its clandestine nuclear programme, Agency's involvement in safeguards verification in the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK), and conclusion of safeguards agreements and additional protocols

  7. INF and IAEA: A comparative analysis of verification strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheinman, L.; Kratzer, M.

    1992-07-01

    This is the final report of a study on the relevance and possible lessons of Intermediate Range Nuclear Force (INF) verification to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) international safeguards activities

  8. International Atomic Energy Agency programme and activity on the utilization of low energy accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shalnov, A.V.; Whetstone, S.L.

    1974-01-01

    One of the chief missions of the Agency is as intermediary between the more highly developed of its member states and the less developed. This involves transmittal of needs of the latter to the former and, where possible, in response to the needs, an appropriate transfer of information and technical assistance. The physics section of the IAEA has recently encouraged and supported requests for technical assistance for programs based on neutron activation studies or pedagogic neutron physics experiments for institutes entering the nuclear field. Neutron generator laboratories have been set up with IAEA-assistance most recently in Burma, Hong Kong, Lebanon. Other recent technical assistance projects involving low-energy accelerators include: (1) consultation on the future program for the accelerator laboratory in Algeria; (2) equipment and experts to assist the nuclear physics program at the Van de Graaff in Bangladesh; (3) expert assistance and equipment in support of the installation of an electron linear accelerator in Egypt; and (4) expert assistance for nuclear physics studies at the cyclotron in Chile. A large number of young scientists, particularly from S.E. Europe, but also from the Middle East and South America, have received training in nuclear physics experimentation by advanced countries at low energy accelerator laboratories under the IAEA fellowship program

  9. Participation of Czechoslovakia in the beginnings of international cooperation on peaceful use of atomic energy (IAEA, UNSCEAR, ICRP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tesinska, E.

    2006-01-01

    The former Czechoslovakia, as a producer or natural uranium and a country heading to construction of nuclear power stations, took an active part in the establishment of international cooperation in peaceful use of atomic energy in the mid-1950s. Its 17-member delegation attended the 1 st International Conference on Peaceful Use of Atomic Energy in Geneva in August 1955. Czechoslovakia was invited to work of the twelve countries on the final draft of the International Atomic Energy Agency Statutes in 1956, it became a member of the IAEA Board of Governors (alternating with Poland), and the first Czechoslovak Governor P. Winkler was elected President of the Board in 1957. Czechoslovakia also was one of the fifteen countries designated to the UN Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation in 1955. Besides, Czechoslovak specialists participated actively in the work of committees of the International Commission on Radiological Protection for many years. Involvement in the international cooperation on peaceful use of atomic energy represented for Czechoslovakia obligations as well as stimuli to the national development of nuclear fields, including radiobiology. (author)

  10. OECD Nuclear Energy Agency activities on PTS evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, A.

    1997-01-01

    The Safety Division of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency provides the secretariat for the Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI), which deals with technological aspects, and for the Committee for Nuclear Regulatory Activities (CNRA) dealing with regulatory aspects. Under these committees, activities are carried out through five Principal Working Groups (PWGs). The relevant group for PTS is PWG-3 on the integrity of structures and components. There is also PWG-2 on coolant system behavior, but the thermal hydraulic aspects of PTS have not been considered by PWG-2. PWG-3 carries out it work in a similar manner to the IAEA IWG LMNPP, by preparing reports and organizing round robins, Specialists Meetings and Workshops. The general context of RPV PTS has been considered in several workshops: on the 'Complementary roles of Fracture Mechanics and Non-Destructive Examination in the Safety Assessment of Components' in Wuerenlingen in 1988; on the 'Safety Assessment of RPVs' in Espoo in 1990; and on 'Fracture Mechanics Verification by Large Scale Testing' (joint with IAEA) at Oak Ridge in 1992. Activities specific to PTS have been an international survey on regulatory practices on PTS carried out in 1991, and a series of fracture round robins addressing PTS conditions organized by GRS in Germany and ORNL in the USA. 3 refs, 5 tabs

  11. OECD Nuclear Energy Agency activities on PTS evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, A [NEA Nuclear Safety Div., Issy-les-Moulineaux (France)

    1997-09-01

    The Safety Division of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency provides the secretariat for the Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI), which deals with technological aspects, and for the Committee for Nuclear Regulatory Activities (CNRA) dealing with regulatory aspects. Under these committees, activities are carried out through five Principal Working Groups (PWGs). The relevant group for PTS is PWG-3 on the integrity of structures and components. There is also PWG-2 on coolant system behavior, but the thermal hydraulic aspects of PTS have not been considered by PWG-2. PWG-3 carries out it work in a similar manner to the IAEA IWG LMNPP, by preparing reports and organizing round robins, Specialists Meetings and Workshops. The general context of RPV PTS has been considered in several workshops: on the `Complementary roles of Fracture Mechanics and Non-Destructive Examination in the Safety Assessment of Components` in Wuerenlingen in 1988; on the `Safety Assessment of RPVs` in Espoo in 1990; and on `Fracture Mechanics Verification by Large Scale Testing` (joint with IAEA) at Oak Ridge in 1992. Activities specific to PTS have been an international survey on regulatory practices on PTS carried out in 1991, and a series of fracture round robins addressing PTS conditions organized by GRS in Germany and ORNL in the USA. 3 refs, 5 tabs.

  12. The IAEA '97 Pacific Ocean expedition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Povinec, P.P.; Huynh-Ngoc, L.; Liong Wee Kwong, L.

    1999-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency's Marine Environment Laboratory (IAEA-MEL) started in 1995 a five-year project 'Research on World-wide Marine Radioactivity', generously supported by the Government of Japan. In the framework of the project, IAEA-MEL conducted the 'IAEA '97 Pacific Ocean Expedition' to the NW Pacific Ocean from 21 October to 20 November, 1997. The objectives of the expedition were to provide new data on the current marine radioactivity in order to compare them with data sets obtained during national and international surveys at sites used for radioactive waste dumping or nuclear bomb testing in the NW Pacific Ocean and its marginal seas

  13. The International Atomic Energy Agency's safeguards system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, W.

    2000-01-01

    A system of international safeguards has been established to provide assurance that nuclear materials in civilian use are not diverted from their peaceful purpose. The safeguards system is administered by the International Atomic Energy Agency/Department of Safeguards and devolves from treaties and other international agreements. Inspectors from the Agency verify reports from States about nuclear facilities by audits, observation, and measurements. (author)

  14. IAEA statement on Iranian enrichment announcement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    Full text: The following is a statement attributable to IAEA Spokesperson Gill Tudor: 'The IAEA can confirm that it has received a letter from the Atomic Energy Organization of Iran (AEOI) on 8 February 2010, in which the AEOI informed the Agency that production of less than 20% enriched uranium is being foreseen at the Pilot Fuel Enrichment Plant at Natanz for fuel for the Tehran Research Reactor'. 'IAEA Director General Yukiya Amano noted with concern this decision, as it may affect, in particular, ongoing international efforts to ensure the availability of nuclear fuel for the Tehran Research Reactor.' 'The Director General reiterated the Agency's readiness to play an intermediary role on the issue of the Tehran Research Reactor.' (IAEA)

  15. The International Energy Agency's world energy outlook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Dell, S.

    1996-01-01

    The 1996 edition of the World Energy Outlook to 2010 was reviewed. An overview of the energy projections was provided based on assumptions about economic growth and energy prices, geological potential, technological developments, the availability of traditional fuels outside the OECD and the future preferences of energy users. Demand vs. price movements were modelled, based on 'capacity constraints' and 'energy saving ' scenarios. Three major conclusions derived from the projections were: (1) world primary energy demand will grow steadily as it has over the past two decades, (2) fossil fuels will account for 90 per cent of total primary energy demand in 2010, and (3) a structural shift in the shares of different regions in world energy demand is likely to occur, i.e., the OECD share will fall in favor of the share of the ROW (rest of the world). 4 tabs., 9 figs

  16. Energy and environment policies. International Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    An analysis is made of how energy policies can be adapted to environmental concerns. The efficiency of measures solving environmental problems is investigated, in particular measures substituting energy carriers, improving energy efficiency rates, postfitting pollution control devices, and applying clean energy technologies. In connection with methods of state control the report deals with questions of taxation and regularization which are to induce the private sector to actively to something for the protection of the environment. (orig.) [de

  17. Role of nuclear energy in Bangladesh: experience with IAEA and RCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quaiyum, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    Electricity is one of the most convenient forms of energy for sustaining and accelerating industrial growth and thus augmenting the poverty alleviation. All conventional modes of generation of electricity have adverse effects on environment. The nature, quantities and extents of such effects are, however, specific to the type of generations. Taking Bangladesh as a representative developing country the role of nuclear energy is presented. Demand projections for electricity, energy resources and energy development are discussed. It is highlighted that the lack of suitably qualified and experienced manpower has to be addressed properly. Hence training in selected areas is being arranged at home and abroad with own resources and also under different IAEA, RCA and bilateral assistance programmes. The paper also discusses the safety and environmental aspects of nuclear energy and highlights the contribution of IAEA and RCA in establishing global safety culture and pollution free environment. It is concluded that Bangladesh has to depend heavily on imported fuel. Among the important fuels, nuclear is a viable proposition and hence needs careful consideration. This is of course true for all other developing countries like Bangladesh. It is hoped that in order to dispel the apprehension of nuclear proliferation, the concept of regional reprocessing centre may be thought of. This centre may be planned and implemented by pulling resources and expertise of developing countries, specially the neighbouring ones, so as to recover the fissile materials from the spent fuel and use them in the fast breeder reactor which may be considered as the energy source of the future, and thus sustainable development can be ensured. (author)

  18. The IAEA moves forward

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1965-12-15

    At the opening of the Ninth Regular Session of the Agency's General Conference in Tokyo on 21 September, the Director General, Dr. Sigvard Eklund, made a brief survey of some of the current developments in the Agency's activities. The implementation of the Special Fund project for the eradication in Central America of the Mediterranean Fruit Fly by using the sterile male technique has commenced. This project is technically directed by the Joint IAEA/FAO Division of Atomic Energy in Agriculture. This division will also implement the latest project entrusted to the Agency by the Special Fund concerning the establishment in Turkey of a pilot plant for grain disinfestation by radiation. It is anticipated that this pilot plant will demonstrate successfully the feasibility and economic practicability of using radiation on a commercial scale to eliminate considerable losses of stored grain by damage inflicted by insect pests

  19. International Atomic Energy Agency Annual Report 2011 (Chinese Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The IAEA Annual Report 2011 aims to summarize only the significant activities of the Agency during the year in question. This report covers the period 1 January to 31 December 2011. The main part of the report, starting on page 21, generally follows the programme structure as given in The Agency's Programme and Budget 2010-2011 (GC(53)/5). The introductory chapter, 'The Year in Review', seeks to provide a thematic analysis of the Agency's activities within the context of notable developments during the year. More detailed information can be found in the latest editions of the Agency's Nuclear Safety Review, Nuclear Technology Review, Technical Cooperation Report and the Safeguards Statement for 2011 and Background to the Safeguards Statement. Additional information covering various aspects of the Agency's programme is available in electronic form only on iaea.org, along with the Annual Report.

  20. International Atomic Energy Agency Annual Report 2011 (Russian Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The IAEA Annual Report 2011 aims to summarize only the significant activities of the Agency during the year in question. This report covers the period 1 January to 31 December 2011. The main part of the report, starting on page 21, generally follows the programme structure as given in The Agency's Programme and Budget 2010-2011 (GC(53)/5). The introductory chapter, 'The Year in Review', seeks to provide a thematic analysis of the Agency's activities within the context of notable developments during the year. More detailed information can be found in the latest editions of the Agency's Nuclear Safety Review, Nuclear Technology Review, Technical Cooperation Report and the Safeguards Statement for 2011 and Background to the Safeguards Statement. Additional information covering various aspects of the Agency's programme is available in electronic form only on iaea.org, along with the Annual Report.

  1. International Atomic Energy Agency Annual Report 2011 (French Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The IAEA Annual Report 2011 aims to summarize only the significant activities of the Agency during the year in question. This report covers the period 1 January to 31 December 2011. The main part of the report, starting on page 21, generally follows the programme structure as given in The Agency's Programme and Budget 2010-2011 (GC(53)/5). The introductory chapter, 'The Year in Review', seeks to provide a thematic analysis of the Agency's activities within the context of notable developments during the year. More detailed information can be found in the latest editions of the Agency's Nuclear Safety Review, Nuclear Technology Review, Technical Cooperation Report and the Safeguards Statement for 2011 and Background to the Safeguards Statement. Additional information covering various aspects of the Agency's programme is available in electronic form only on iaea.org, along with the Annual Report.

  2. International Atomic Energy Agency Annual Report 2011 (Arabic Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The IAEA Annual Report 2011 aims to summarize only the significant activities of the Agency during the year in question. This report covers the period 1 January to 31 December 2011. The main part of the report, starting on page 21, generally follows the programme structure as given in The Agency's Programme and Budget 2010-2011 (GC(53)/5). The introductory chapter, 'The Year in Review', seeks to provide a thematic analysis of the Agency's activities within the context of notable developments during the year. More detailed information can be found in the latest editions of the Agency's Nuclear Safety Review, Nuclear Technology Review, Technical Cooperation Report and the Safeguards Statement for 2011 and Background to the Safeguards Statement. Additional information covering various aspects of the Agency's programme is available in electronic form only on iaea.org, along with the Annual Report.

  3. International Atomic Energy Agency Annual Report 2011 (Spanish Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The IAEA Annual Report 2011 aims to summarize only the significant activities of the Agency during the year in question. This report covers the period 1 January to 31 December 2011. The main part of the report, starting on page 21, generally follows the programme structure as given in The Agency's Programme and Budget 2010-2011 (GC(53)/5). The introductory chapter, 'The Year in Review', seeks to provide a thematic analysis of the Agency's activities within the context of notable developments during the year. More detailed information can be found in the latest editions of the Agency's Nuclear Safety Review, Nuclear Technology Review, Technical Cooperation Report and the Safeguards Statement for 2011 and Background to the Safeguards Statement. Additional information covering various aspects of the Agency's programme is available in electronic form only on iaea.org, along with the Annual Report.

  4. Negotiating supranational rules. The genesis of the International Atomic Energy Agency safeguards system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forland, A.

    1997-12-31

    The object of this study is the evolution from 1954-56 up until the mid-1970s of the nuclear safeguards system administered by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in Vienna. The main aim of the study is not to describe the IAEA safeguards system as such. The focus will be on analysing the arguments advanced in the various negotiations, and the main objective will be to single out the factors determining the result. In the course of the time span under study two international treaties were negotiated which were decisive for the development of international nuclear safeguards. These were the IAEA Stature (1956) and the Non-Proliferation Treaty (1968). The Statue as well as the NPT contain articles on international nuclear safeguards. These articles limit themselves to spelling out the safeguards principles. It was thus left to the IAEA Board of Governors to develop the safeguards procedures in detail. Two IAEA safeguards documents were negotiated between 1959 and 1965 in order to implement the safeguards article of the Statue. The safeguards requirements of the NPT were spelled out in a new model agreement in 1972. 58 refs.

  5. Negotiating supranational rules. The genesis of the International Atomic Energy Agency safeguards system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forland, A

    1998-12-31

    The object of this study is the evolution from 1954-56 up until the mid-1970s of the nuclear safeguards system administered by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in Vienna. The main aim of the study is not to describe the IAEA safeguards system as such. The focus will be on analysing the arguments advanced in the various negotiations, and the main objective will be to single out the factors determining the result. In the course of the time span under study two international treaties were negotiated which were decisive for the development of international nuclear safeguards. These were the IAEA Stature (1956) and the Non-Proliferation Treaty (1968). The Statue as well as the NPT contain articles on international nuclear safeguards. These articles limit themselves to spelling out the safeguards principles. It was thus left to the IAEA Board of Governors to develop the safeguards procedures in detail. Two IAEA safeguards documents were negotiated between 1959 and 1965 in order to implement the safeguards article of the Statue. The safeguards requirements of the NPT were spelled out in a new model agreement in 1972. 58 refs.

  6. Negotiating supranational rules. The genesis of the International Atomic Energy Agency safeguards system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forland, A.

    1997-01-01

    The object of this study is the evolution from 1954-56 up until the mid-1970s of the nuclear safeguards system administered by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in Vienna. The main aim of the study is not to describe the IAEA safeguards system as such. The focus will be on analysing the arguments advanced in the various negotiations, and the main objective will be to single out the factors determining the result. In the course of the time span under study two international treaties were negotiated which were decisive for the development of international nuclear safeguards. These were the IAEA Stature (1956) and the Non-Proliferation Treaty (1968). The Statue as well as the NPT contain articles on international nuclear safeguards. These articles limit themselves to spelling out the safeguards principles. It was thus left to the IAEA Board of Governors to develop the safeguards procedures in detail. Two IAEA safeguards documents were negotiated between 1959 and 1965 in order to implement the safeguards article of the Statue. The safeguards requirements of the NPT were spelled out in a new model agreement in 1972. 58 refs

  7. Tumor radiosensitizers - current status of development of various approaches: Report of an International Atomic Energy Agency meeting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horsman, Michael Robert; Bohm, Lothar; Margison, Geoffrey P.

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) held a Technical Meeting of Consultants to (1) discuss a selection of relatively new agents, not those well-established in clinical practice, that operated through a variety of mechanisms to sensitize tumors to radiation and (2) to compare...... and contrast their tumor efficacy, normal tissue toxicity, and status of development regarding clinical application. The aim was to advise the IAEA as to which developing agent or class of agents would be worth promoting further, by supporting additional laboratory research or clinical trials...... and for clinical trials that would be suitable for industrialized countries, as well as trials that were considered more appropriate for developing countries.PURPOSE: The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) held a Technical Meeting of Consultants to (1) discuss a selection of relatively new agents, not those...

  8. The continuing role of item-specific agreements in the IAEA safeguards system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeFrancia, Cristian

    2012-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA) 'safeguards system' serves as the foundation of the global nuclear non-proliferation regime, under which the IAEA acts as an auditor, monitor and inspector of state-administered nuclear energy programmes. The system consists of agreements and practices that enable the IAEA to gain a clear picture of a state's nuclear activities in order to provide credible assurances that nuclear energy is used for exclusively peaceful purposes

  9. IAEA safeguards approaches and goals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khlebnikov, Nikolai

    2001-01-01

    IAEA safeguards provide a technical means of verifying that political obligations undertaken by States party to international agreements relating to the peaceful uses of nuclear energy are being honored. The Agency assures the international community that States party to Safeguards Agreements are complying with their undertaking not to use facilities and divert nuclear materials from peaceful uses to the manufacture of nuclear explosive devices. The task of IAEA safeguards can be summed up as to detect diversion of nuclear materials committed to peaceful uses of nuclear energy, or the misuse of equipment or facilities subject to certain safeguards agreements, and to deter such diversion or misuse through the risk of early detection. This lecture concentrates on the factors the Agency takes into account in designing and implementing safeguards approaches at facilities. (author)

  10. The international ISOE programme. ISOE IAEA technical centre activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gustafsson, M.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of the sub-programme on Occupational Radiation Protection in the International Atomic Energy Agency, IAEA, is to promote a harmonized approach to optimizing occupational radiation protection by developing guidelines for controlling radiation doses in the workplace and on current occupational radiation protection techniques. A significant part of this programme is the provision of assistance to developing member states to bring their radiation safety infrastructure to an appropriate level for the usage of radiation in the state. In consistence with these objectives the IAEA has been involved with the ISOE programme from its inception and has contributed actively to its growth. In 1993 an arrangement was agreed between the IAEA and the Nuclear Energy Agency, NEA, by which the IAEA co-sponsors ISOE inviting those IAEA member states which are not members of the NEA to participate cost-free in the programme. (author)

  11. Efforts made for health and medical care by International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Naoyuki

    2016-01-01

    The author, being a former senior medical officer and currently a consultant of the Nuclear Medicine Section, the Division of Human Health, the Department of Nuclear Sciences and Applications, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to standardize the isotope and radiation technologies for health and medical care and transfer them to the IAEA member states to address their health issues, participated in an international cooperation project to survey the current situation of the health and medical care in Viet Nam and exchange opinions with the World Health Organization Western Pacific Regional Office Viet Nam Office and the Viet Nam Health Department coordinated by the Japan Public Health Association from 10th to 15th January 2016 and perceived efforts made and action plans for the health and medical care in Viet Nam by the international organizations of the IAEA and the World Health Organization (WHO). IAEA has verified various isotopes and radiation technologies up to now in the international field of health and medical care and has being offered them to the member states under the sustainable frame work of technical co-operation. However, the activity in the health and medical care field of IAEA is hardly recognized by the public health professionals in Japan. In order to attain the objective to improve and maintain human health under the umbrella of the United Nations system, the peaceful use of nuclear technology has been promoted in the field of non-electric applications of nuclear energy including human health and medical care by the IAEA. There are several discrepancies seen with the field and tactics of health and medical care between the IAEA and the WHO. In terms of measures to fight NCDs which should be an urgent issue in most of the member states, a comprehensive approach is often needed beyond the capability of IAEA as isotopes and radiation technologies. The IAEA should strive to solve issues on human health and medical care maintaining much

  12. Role of IAEA in non-electric applications of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupitz, J.

    1997-01-01

    Worldwide, approximately 30% of total primary energy is used to produce electricity. Most of the remaining 70% is either used for transportation or is converted into hot water, steam and heat. The International Atomic Energy Agency is a specialized agency within the United Nations family whose role includes the development and practical application of atomic energy for peaceful uses throughout the world. The focus of this paper is on those applications associated with district heating and process heat production for industrial use. 14 refs, 3 figs, 1 tab

  13. IAEA nuclear databases for applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwerer, Otto

    2003-01-01

    The Nuclear Data Section (NDS) of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) provides nuclear data services to scientists on a worldwide scale with particular emphasis on developing countries. More than 100 data libraries are made available cost-free by Internet, CD-ROM and other media. These databases are used for practically all areas of nuclear applications as well as basic research. An overview is given of the most important nuclear reaction and nuclear structure databases, such as EXFOR, CINDA, ENDF, NSR, ENSDF, NUDAT, and of selected special purpose libraries such as FENDL, RIPL, RNAL, the IAEA Photonuclear Data Library, and the IAEA charged-particle cross section database for medical radioisotope production. The NDS also coordinates two international nuclear data centre networks and is involved in data development activities (to create new or improve existing data libraries when the available data are inadequate) and in technology transfer to developing countries, e.g. through the installation and support of the mirror web site of the IAEA Nuclear Data Services at IPEN (operational since March 2000) and by organizing nuclear-data related workshops. By encouraging their participation in IAEA Co-ordinated Research Projects and also by compiling their experimental results in databases such as EXFOR, the NDS helps to make developing countries' contributions to nuclear science visible and conveniently available. The web address of the IAEA Nuclear Data Services is http://www.nds.iaea.org and the NDS mirror service at IPEN (Brasil) can be accessed at http://www.nds.ipen.br/ (author)

  14. IAEA activities in gas-cooled reactor technology development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleveland, J.; Kupitz, J.

    1992-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has the charter to ''foster the exchange of scientific and technical information'', and ''encourage and assist research on, and development and practical application of, atomic energy for peaceful uses throughout the world''. This paper describes the Agency's activities in Gas-cooled Reactor (GCR) technology development

  15. The contribution of the International Atomic Energy Agency to peace and development. Address at the conference of the Diplomatic Academy at the Institute of 'Matias Romero', Mexico City, Mexico, 13 October 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    1999-01-01

    In his address at the Conference of the Diplomatic Academy at the Institute of 'Matias Romero' (Mexico City, Mexico, 13 October 1999), the Director General of the IAEA described the role of the IAEA and its contribution to peace and development, focussing in four areas: technology transfer, nuclear power and sustainable energy development, nuclear safety, and the Agency's verification system

  16. Statement to the 40th session of the General Conference of the International Atomic Energy Agency 16 September 1996; Statement to the 51st session of the United Nations General Assembly 28 October 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blix, H.

    1996-11-01

    In the Statement to the 40th Session of the General Conference of the International Atomic Energy Agency main directions of the IAEA activities and plans for the future are outlined. In the Statement to the 51th Session of the United Nations General Assembly main achievements and challenge facing the international community in the field of IAEA competence are discussed

  17. Promoting nuclear security: What the IAEA is doing. The Agency is implementing a comprehensive programme aimed at stemming the threat of nuclear terrorism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The threat to public safety and security posed by some form of nuclear terrorism is not new. But in the wake of recent highly organized terrorist attacks in Kenya, Tanzania, the US, Indonesia, Saudi Arabia, Morocco and numerous other nations, the international community has come to recognize that new and stronger measures must be taken to protect against and prepare for a diverse range of terrorist scenarios. Given the multiplicity of targets and scenarios for terrorists, States must consider a comprehensive approach to combating nuclear terrorism. Among the key priorities: Adequate physical protection of all nuclear materials, radioactive materials and facilities plus transport systems; Proper regulatory control of nuclear and radioactive material; Effective detection and interdiction of illicit trafficking in nuclear and radioactive materials; Integration of nuclear safety and security systems for maximum benefits; and Readiness for implementing emergency response plans. The IAEA is assisting its Member States with these challenges in many ways. Through well-established activities, the Agency has been heavily involved in providing assistance and technical support to States in all these areas. The IAEA has established several advisory services to help Member States to assess the effectiveness and the need for improvement of their national physical oversight systems. The IAEA provides peer reviews in related areas such as regulatory or control infrastructures, and also supplies expert technical advice on the required upgrades. Several of these specialized services aim directly at protecting against terrorist threats. The International Nuclear Security Advisory Service is a new initiative that is providing specialized services promoting enhanced nuclear security. The International SSAC Advisory Service (ISSAS) is another new initiative providing advice to Member States in strengthening their SSAC. The IAEA also offers the EPREV (Emergency Preparedness REView

  18. Contribution of the Member State Support Programmes to IAEA safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortakov, V.; Gardiner, D.; Rautjaervi, J.

    1999-01-01

    Over the last twenty years, Member States of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) have provided invaluable technical support to IAEA Safeguards. This support has covered practically all aspects of traditional safeguards activities and also those activities recently proposed and introduced for strengthening the safeguards system. As of August 1997, there were fourteen Member States, plus EURATOM, with active programmes in support of IAEA safeguards and the activities conducted under these Member State Support Programmes (MSSPs) are currently valued at an annual twenty million dollars of extra-budgetary contribution to the IAEA. The overall administration in the IAEA of the support programmes is the responsibility of Support Programmes Administration (SPA) in the Safeguards Division of Technical Services. This paper describes the roles and the contributions of the MSSPs, the functions of the MSSP administration activities, and the vital importance the IAEA attaches to the MSSPs. (author)

  19. IAEA safeguards for the Fissile Materials Disposition Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Close, D.A.

    1995-06-01

    This document is an overview of International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards and the basic requirements or elements of an IAEA safeguards regime. The primary objective of IAEA safeguards is the timely detection of the diversion of a significant quantity of material and the timely detection of undeclared activities. The two important components of IAEA safeguards to accomplish their primary objective are nuclear material accountancy and containment and surveillance. This overview provides guidance to the Fissile Materials Disposition Project for IAEA inspection requirements. IAEA requirements, DOE Orders, and Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulations will be used as the basis for designing a safeguards and security system for the facilities recommended by the Fissile Materials Disposition Project

  20. United States Program for Technical assistance to IAEA Standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, F.A.; Toquam, J.L.

    1993-11-01

    This concept paper explores the potential contribution of ''Knowledge Acquisition Skills'' in enhancing the effectiveness of international safeguards inspections by the International Atomic energy Agency (IAEA, or Agency) and identifies types of training that could be provided to develop or improve such skills. For purposes of this concept paper, Knowledge Acquisition Skills are defined broadly to include all appropriate techniques that IAEA safeguards inspectors can use to acquire and analyze information relevant to the performance of successful safeguards inspections. These techniques include a range of cognitive, analytic, judgmental, interpersonal, and communications skills that have the potential to help IAEA safeguards inspectors function more effectively

  1. Physics and Its Multiple Roles in the International Atomic Energy Agency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, Charles D.

    2017-01-01

    The IAEA is the world's centre for cooperation in the nuclear field. It was set up as the world's ``Atoms for Peace'' organization in 1957 within the United Nations family. The Agency works with its Member States and multiple partners worldwide to promote the safe, secure and peaceful use of nuclear technologies. Three main areas of work underpin the IAEA's mission: Safety and Security, Science and Technology, and Safeguards and Verification. To carry out its mission, the Agency is authorized to encourage and assist research on, and development and practical application of, atomic energy for peaceful uses throughout the world; foster the exchange of scientific and technical information on peaceful uses of atomic energy; and encourage the exchange of training of scientists and experts in the field of peaceful uses of atomic energy. Nowadays, nuclear physics and nuclear technology are applied in a great variety of social areas, such as power production, medical diagnosis and therapies, environmental protection, security control, material tests, food processing, waste treatments, agriculture and artifacts analysis. This presentation will cover the role and practical application of physics at the IAEA, and, in particular, focus on the role physics has, and will play, in nuclear security.

  2. On the International Atomic Energy Agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eklund, S [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

    1963-07-15

    The main concepts motivating the decision to establish an international agency for peaceful uses of atomic energy are presented in the paper. They consists of: 1) co-ordination in the fields of safety field, legal liability and safeguards; 2) ensuring that scientific and technical data are made freely accessible on a worldwide scale and 3) assisting the developing countries in benefiting from this new science and technology and use the atomic energy for economic and social development

  3. International Atomic Energy Agency. Highlights of activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillen, V.A.

    1991-09-01

    This document provides a brief, well-illustrated summary of the activities of the International Atomic Energy Agency in the months up to September 1991. Especially mentioned are the programmes to enhance the safety of nuclear power, from the study of nuclear reactors to assessing the radiological consequences of reactor accidents, and the areas of non-proliferation and safeguards

  4. International Atomic Energy Agency: Highlights of activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillen, A.

    1992-09-01

    This document provides a brief, well-illustrated summary of the activities of the International Atomic Energy Agency in the months up to September 1992. Especially mentioned are the programmes to enhance the safety of nuclear power, from the study of nuclear reactors to assessing the radiological consequences of reactor accidents, and the areas of non-proliferation and safeguards

  5. 77 FR 61583 - International Energy Agency Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-10

    ...) will meet on October 17 and 18, 2012, at the headquarters of the IEA in Paris, France in connection... the International Energy Agency (IEA) will be held at the headquarters of the IEA, 9, rue de la F... October 18. The purpose of this notice is to permit attendance by representatives of U.S. company members...

  6. IAEA fellows report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1962-04-15

    More than 500 scientists and technicians had completed their studies abroad under IAEA's fellowship programme at the end of 1961. At the same time, some 300 fellows were studying at universities, research institutions and atomic energy establishments in Member States. It is the policy of the Agency to keep in touch with fellows also after their training has been completed and they have returned home to put into practice what they have learnt during their time of study. The short reports which most of the former fellowship holders send to the Agency's secretariat give a good indication of the usefulness of the training and the extent to which the newly acquired knowledge is being constructively absorbed in the fellow's native country

  7. IAEA Statement After Iran Meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Senior International Atomic Energy Agency officials met an Iranian delegation in Vienna today to seek agreement on a structured approach document to resolve outstanding issues relating to Iran's nuclear programme. The following is a statement by IAEA Deputy Director General Herman Nackaerts after the meeting: ''As announced by the Director General earlier this week, we met today to discuss the structured approach paper. The Agency team came to the meeting in a constructive spirit with the desire and intention of finalising the paper. We presented a revised draft which addressed Iran's earlier stated concerns. However, there has been no progress and, indeed, Iran raised issues that we have already discussed and added new ones. This is disappointing. A date for a follow-on meeting has yet to be fixed.'' (IAEA)

  8. Inspections talks with IAEA again broken off

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    North Korea again appears likely to resist more detailed safeguards inspections of its disputed nuclear facilities by the International Atomic Energy Agency. The country's loner status was reinforced during the IAEA General Conference in September, when no other nation joined North Korea in voting against the placement of the inspection issue on the conference's agenda

  9. A dosimetry study comparing NCS report-5, IAEA TRS-381, AAPM TG-51 and IAEA TRS-398 in three clinical electron beam energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmans, Hugo; Nafaa, Laila; Patoul, Nathalie de; Denis, Jean-Marc; Tomsej, Milan; Vynckier, Stefaan

    2003-01-01

    New codes of practice for reference dosimetry in clinical high-energy photon and electron beams have been published recently, to replace the air kerma based codes of practice that have determined the dosimetry of these beams for the past twenty years. In the present work, we compared dosimetry based on the two most widespread absorbed dose based recommendations (AAPM TG-51 and IAEA TRS-398) with two air kerma based recommendations (NCS report-5 and IAEA TRS-381). Measurements were performed in three clinical electron beam energies using two NE2571-type cylindrical chambers, two Markus-type plane-parallel chambers and two NACP-02-type plane-parallel chambers. Dosimetry based on direct calibrations of all chambers in 60 Co was investigated, as well as dosimetry based on cross-calibrations of plane-parallel chambers against a cylindrical chamber in a high-energy electron beam. Furthermore, 60 Co perturbation factors for plane-parallel chambers were derived. It is shown that the use of 60 Co calibration factors could result in deviations of more than 2% for plane-parallel chambers between the old and new codes of practice, whereas the use of cross-calibration factors, which is the first recommendation in the new codes, reduces the differences to less than 0.8% for all situations investigated here. The results thus show that neither the chamber-to-chamber variations, nor the obtained absolute dose values are significantly altered by changing from air kerma based dosimetry to absorbed dose based dosimetry when using calibration factors obtained from the Laboratory for Standard Dosimetry, Ghent, Belgium. The values of the 60 Co perturbation factor for plane-parallel chambers (k att · k m for the air kerma based and p wall for the absorbed based codes of practice) that are obtained from comparing the results based on 60 Co calibrations and cross-calibrations are within the experimental uncertainties in agreement with the results from other investigators

  10. REVIEW OF THE NEGOTIATION OF THE MODEL PROTOCOL ADDITIONAL TO THE AGREEMENT(S) BETWEEN STATE(S) AND THE INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY FOR THE APPLICATION OF SAFEGUARDS, INFCIRC/540 (Corrected) VOLUME II/III IAEA COMMITTEE 24, Major Issues Underlying the Model Additional Protocol (1996-1997).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenthal, M.D.; Saum-Manning, L.; Houck, F.

    2010-01-01

    Volume I of this Review traces the origins of the Model Additional Protocol. It covers the period from 1991, when events in Iraq triggered an intensive review of the safeguards system, until 1996, when the IAEA Board of Governors established Committee 24 to negotiate a new protocol to safeguards agreement. The period from 1991-1996 set the stage for this negotiation and shaped its outcome in important ways. During this 5-year period, many proposals for strengthening safeguards were suggested and reviewed. Some proposals were dropped, for example, the suggestion by the IAEA Secretariat to verify certain imports, and others were refined. A rough consensus was established about the directions in which the international community wanted to go, and this was reflected in the draft of an additional protocol that was submitted to the IAEA Board of Governors on May 6, 1996 in document GOV/2863, Strengthening the Effectiveness and Improving the Efficiency of the Safeguards System - Proposals For Implementation Under Complementary Legal Authority, A Report by the Director General. This document ended with a recommendation that, 'the Board, through an appropriate mechanism, finalize the required legal instrument taking as a basis the draft protocol proposed by the Secretariat and the explanation of the measures contained in this document.'

  11. United States Program for Technical assistance to IAEA Standards. Concept Paper: Knowledge Acquisition, Skills training for enhanced IAEA safeguards inspections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, F.A.; Toquam, J.L.

    1993-11-01

    This concept paper explores the potential contribution of ``Knowledge Acquisition Skills`` in enhancing the effectiveness of international safeguards inspections by the International Atomic energy Agency (IAEA, or Agency) and identifies types of training that could be provided to develop or improve such skills. For purposes of this concept paper, Knowledge Acquisition Skills are defined broadly to include all appropriate techniques that IAEA safeguards inspectors can use to acquire and analyze information relevant to the performance of successful safeguards inspections. These techniques include a range of cognitive, analytic, judgmental, interpersonal, and communications skills that have the potential to help IAEA safeguards inspectors function more effectively.

  12. IAEA activities on research reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcala-Ruiz, F.

    1995-01-01

    Since its inception in 1957, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has included activities in its programme to address aspects of research reactors such as safety, utilization and fuel cycle considerations. These activities were based on statutory functions and responsibilities, and on the current situation of research reactors in operation around the world; they responded to IAEA Member States' general or specific demands. At present, the IAEA activities on research reactors cover the above aspects and respond to specific and current issues, amongst which safety-related are of major concern to Member States. The present IAEA Research Reactor Safety Programme (RRSP) is a response to the current situation of about 300 research reactors in operation in 59 countries around the world. (orig.)

  13. A clinical audit programme for diagnostic radiology: The Approach adopted by the international atomic energy agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faulkner, K.; Jaervinen, H.; Butler, P.; McLean, I. D.; Pentecost, M.; Rickard, M.; Abdullah, B.

    2010-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has a mandate to assist member states in areas of human health and particularly in the use of radiation for diagnosis and treatment. Clinical audit is seen as an essential tool to assist in assuring the quality of radiation medicine, particularly in the instance of multidisciplinary audit of diagnostic radiology. Consequently, an external clinical audit programme has been developed by the IAEA to examine the structure and processes existent at a clinical site, with the basic objectives of: (1) improvement in the quality of patient care; (2) promotion of the effective use of resources; (3) enhancement of the provision and organisation of clinical services; (4) further professional education and training. These objectives apply in four general areas of service delivery, namely quality management and infrastructure, patient procedures, technical procedures and education, training and research. In the IAEA approach, the audit process is initiated by a request from the centre seeking the audit. A three-member team, comprising a radiologist, medical physicist and radiographer, subsequently undertakes a 5-d audit visit to the clinical site to perform the audit and write the formal audit report. Preparation for the audit visit is crucial and involves the local clinical centre completing a form, which provides the audit team with information on the clinical centre. While all main aspects of clinical structure and process are examined, particular attention is paid to radiation-related activities as described in the relevant documents such as the IAEA Basic Safety Standards, the Code of Practice for Dosimetry in Diagnostic Radiology and related equipment and quality assurance documentation. It should be stressed, however, that the clinical audit does not have any regulatory function. The main purpose of the IAEA approach to clinical audit is one of promoting quality improvement and learning. This paper describes the background to

  14. A clinical audit programme for diagnostic radiology: the approach adopted by the International Atomic Energy Agency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulkner, K; Järvinen, H; Butler, P; McLean, I D; Pentecost, M; Rickard, M; Abdullah, B

    2010-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has a mandate to assist member states in areas of human health and particularly in the use of radiation for diagnosis and treatment. Clinical audit is seen as an essential tool to assist in assuring the quality of radiation medicine, particularly in the instance of multidisciplinary audit of diagnostic radiology. Consequently, an external clinical audit programme has been developed by the IAEA to examine the structure and processes existent at a clinical site, with the basic objectives of: (1) improvement in the quality of patient care; (2) promotion of the effective use of resources; (3) enhancement of the provision and organisation of clinical services; (4) further professional education and training. These objectives apply in four general areas of service delivery, namely quality management and infrastructure, patient procedures, technical procedures and education, training and research. In the IAEA approach, the audit process is initiated by a request from the centre seeking the audit. A three-member team, comprising a radiologist, medical physicist and radiographer, subsequently undertakes a 5-d audit visit to the clinical site to perform the audit and write the formal audit report. Preparation for the audit visit is crucial and involves the local clinical centre completing a form, which provides the audit team with information on the clinical centre. While all main aspects of clinical structure and process are examined, particular attention is paid to radiation-related activities as described in the relevant documents such as the IAEA Basic Safety Standards, the Code of Practice for Dosimetry in Diagnostic Radiology and related equipment and quality assurance documentation. It should be stressed, however, that the clinical audit does not have any regulatory function. The main purpose of the IAEA approach to clinical audit is one of promoting quality improvement and learning. This paper describes the background to

  15. Additional protocol between France, EURATOM and IAEA. 2001-2002 ordinary session. Project of law authorizing the ratification of the additional protocol to the agreement between France, the European Atomic Energy Community and the International Atomic Energy Agency relative to the application of warranties in France; Protocole additionnel entre la France, Euratom et l'AIEA. Session ordinaire de 2001-2002. Projet de loi autorisant la ratification du protocole additionnel a l'accord entre la France, la Communaute europeenne de l'energie atomique et l'Agence internationale de l'energie atomique relatif a l'application de garanties en France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    This additional protocol to the agreement between France, EURATOM and the IAEA aims at reinforcing the nuclear weapons non-proliferation regime. This protocol widens the field of competences of the IAEA with the supply of new information relative to: the civil nuclear cooperation between France and countries having no nuclear weapons in the domain of fuel cycle; the regular inspection of French nuclear facilities; the trade (import and export) of medium- or high-level radioactive wastes containing plutonium, highly enriched uranium or {sup 233}U, and the trade of some non-nuclear equipments or materials with countries having no nuclear weapons. The protocol defines also some practical dispositions relative to the delays and periodicity of controls, to the transmission of data, to the appointment of IAEA inspectors and their access to the facilities and sites considered. The list of the activities and equipments covered by the protocol are given in appendixes. (J.S.)

  16. Peaceful uses of nuclear energy and IAEA safeguards and related activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports that deliberations on the peaceful uses of nuclear energy, both within and outside the United Nations, have focused on two divergent points of view. One emphasizes the potential benefits of the peaceful application of this source of energy to a variety of purposes, particularly the generation of electric power. The other stresses the risks engendered by the transfer of nuclear material, equipment and technology that might lend themselves to the manufacture of nuclear weapons. Recipient States have traditionally underlined their need and their inherent right to have unimpaired access to the peaceful applications of nuclear energy, while the supplier States, wishing to avoid contributing to the spread of a nuclear-weapon capability among recipients, have advocated restrictions on international transfers, especially of nuclear know-how and installations. In 1977, 15 supplier States agreed upon criteria for the application of IAEA safeguards to exports and formulated requirements to prevent unauthorized transactions, including restrictions on re-exportation. In February 1980, the Conference on the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Evaluation (INFCE), initiated by the United States, completed a technical evaluation of data and options that it had undertaken to find less proliferation-prone nuclear fuel cycles. Sixty-six States-both suppliers and recipients of nuclear technology-took part in the evaluation, which did not, however, lead to the hoped-for result

  17. IAEA Orientation for Diplomats 2013. The IAEA in Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-02-01

    The IAEA's mission is to prevent the spread of nuclear weapons and to help all countries - especially in the developing world - benefit from the peaceful, safe and secure use of nuclear science and technology. Since the Agency was founded in 1957, our work has constantly evolved to meet the changing needs of our member states. We work to improve human and animal health. We help farmers to grow more abundant and robust crops. We help to make clean water more available and to combat environmental pollution. We help countries which wish to use nuclear power to do so safely and securely. Through all of these activities, the IAEA helps member states to use nuclear technology to meet the basic needs of their people. Nuclear power is the best-known peaceful application of nuclear energy. The fukushima Daiichi accident in Japan in 2011 caused considerable public anxiety throughout the world and damaged confidence in nuclear power. Nevertheless, use of nuclear power looks set to grow steadily in the next 20 years, although at a slower rate than was expected before the accident. The fukushima Daiichi accident led to a renewed focus on safety. In 2011, IAEA member states agreed an Action Plan on nuclear safety which they, and the Agency, are now implementing. The Agency also serves as the global platform for strengthening nuclear security. Our work focuses on helping to minimize the risk of nuclear and other radioactive material falling into the hands of terrorists, or of nuclear facilities being subjected to malicious acts. The IAEA is the only organization within the UN system with expertise in nuclear technologies. Our unique specialist laboratories help transfer knowledge and expertise to our member states in areas such as human health, food, water and the environment. cancer control in developing countries is a major priority for the Agency and for me personally. Hundreds of thousands of patients in developing countries do not have access to treatment that could save

  18. IAEA Orientation for Diplomats 2013. The IAEA in Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-02-15

    The IAEA's mission is to prevent the spread of nuclear weapons and to help all countries - especially in the developing world - benefit from the peaceful, safe and secure use of nuclear science and technology. Since the Agency was founded in 1957, our work has constantly evolved to meet the changing needs of our member states. We work to improve human and animal health. We help farmers to grow more abundant and robust crops. We help to make clean water more available and to combat environmental pollution. We help countries which wish to use nuclear power to do so safely and securely. Through all of these activities, the IAEA helps member states to use nuclear technology to meet the basic needs of their people. Nuclear power is the best-known peaceful application of nuclear energy. The fukushima Daiichi accident in Japan in 2011 caused considerable public anxiety throughout the world and damaged confidence in nuclear power. Nevertheless, use of nuclear power looks set to grow steadily in the next 20 years, although at a slower rate than was expected before the accident. The fukushima Daiichi accident led to a renewed focus on safety. In 2011, IAEA member states agreed an Action Plan on nuclear safety which they, and the Agency, are now implementing. The Agency also serves as the global platform for strengthening nuclear security. Our work focuses on helping to minimize the risk of nuclear and other radioactive material falling into the hands of terrorists, or of nuclear facilities being subjected to malicious acts. The IAEA is the only organization within the UN system with expertise in nuclear technologies. Our unique specialist laboratories help transfer knowledge and expertise to our member states in areas such as human health, food, water and the environment. cancer control in developing countries is a major priority for the Agency and for me personally. Hundreds of thousands of patients in developing countries do not have access to treatment that could save

  19. Establishment of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okazaki, Toshio

    2006-01-01

    A goal of the 21. century is for society to pursue 'sustainable economic development and prosperous life by recycling resources', thus rejecting 'development based on the waste of resources'. For Japan, which has limited energy resources, it is important to secure safe, inexpensive, environmentally friendly energy resources having long-term availability. To contribute to long-term energy security and solve global environmental issues, and to create advanced competitive science and technology, the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) was established by integrating the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) and the Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) in October 2005. JAEA is endeavoring to establish nuclear fuel cycles, to contribute to social improvement through hydrogen production initiated by atomic energy, and to pursue research and development of thermonuclear fusion and quantum beam technology. This paper reviews the main R and D activities of JAEA. The structure of the paper is the following: 1. Introduction; 2. Japan Atomic Energy Agency; 3. Efforts to Commercialize the Fast Reactor Cycle; 4. Monju Progress; 5. Geological Disposal of High-Level Radioactive Waste R and D; 6. High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor System R and D; 7. Fusion Research and Development; 8. LWR Spent Fuel Reprocessing Technology; 9. Quantum Beam Technologies; 10. Nuclear Safety Research and Regulatory Applications; 11. Basic Science and Engineering Research; 12. Contribution to the Enhanced International Nonproliferation Regimes; 13. Conclusions. To summarize, JAEA will promote the above R and D activities, addressing the following commitments: - On problems that atomic energy faces, we shall extend technical assistance in response to the government and the industrial sectors. - We shall produce technical options to attain political goals to secure medium to long-term stable energy supplies and to solve global environmental issues. - With the high potentials of atomic

  20. French local agencies of energy control; Agences locales francaise de maitrise de l'energie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    In the framework of the SAVE program, the European Commission brings financial assistance to the creation of local or regional agencies of energy control in municipalities and regions. The main criteria are the impacts on the energy demand, the reinforcement of the economic and social cohesion, the environmental quality and the contribution to the economic development and the employment creation. In this document, realized by Energie-Cites, the Ademe objective is to present a state of the art of french local agencies. Ten agencies are presented as case study. Each case deals with the following topics: the main context of the action which details the energy and the environmental policy of the municipality, the creation and the description of the agency, the implemented actions and the perspectives. (A.L.B.)

  1. French local agencies of energy control; Agences locales francaise de maitrise de l'energie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    In the framework of the SAVE program, the European Commission brings financial assistance to the creation of local or regional agencies of energy control in municipalities and regions. The main criteria are the impacts on the energy demand, the reinforcement of the economic and social cohesion, the environmental quality and the contribution to the economic development and the employment creation. In this document, realized by Energie-Cites, the Ademe objective is to present a state of the art of french local agencies. Ten agencies are presented as case study. Each case deals with the following topics: the main context of the action which details the energy and the environmental policy of the municipality, the creation and the description of the agency, the implemented actions and the perspectives. (A.L.B.)

  2. The nuclear detectives. The international atomic energy agency IAEA is supposed to trace countries that produce or disseminate nuclear materials for nuclear weapons. A team from Juelich is supporting the process; Die Nukleardetektive. Die internationale Atomenergie-Organisation IAEO soll Staaten aufspueren, die heimlich nukleares Material fuer Atomwaffen herstellen oder verbreiten. Ein Juelicher Team unterstuetzt sie dabei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frick, Frank

    2015-07-01

    The Juelich Team is part of the International Standing Advisory Group on Safeguard Implementation that is supposed to find violations of the Non-Proliferation Treaty. Using wipe cloth in nuclear facilities it is possible to find uranium or plutonium containing particles. The study of the isotopic composition of uranium particles allows the identification of the uranium enrichment in the facility. In Juelich reference uranium particles with defined isotopic composition are produced for calibration purposes. The Juelich team supporting IAEA is also developing computer programs for the automatic processing of satellite data with respect to nuclear facilities.

  3. Earth sciences: Uranium geology, exploration and mining, hydrology, 1986-1996. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-03-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with earth sciences and issued during the period of 1986-1996. These topics are mainly in the field of uranium geology, exploration and mining, isotope applications in hydrology, IAEA Yearbook 1996 on the developments in nuclear science and technology and meetings on atomic energy. Proceedings of conferences, symposia and panels of experts may contain some papers in languages other than English but all of these papers have English abstracts. The prices of books are quoted in Austrian Schillings

  4. IAEA wants data, access for two Yongbyon facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    At a meeting of the Board of Governors of the International Atomic Energy Agency held February 22-25, a resolution was passed calling upon the government of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK; more commonly known as North Korea) to respond positively and without delay to IAEA Director General Hans Blix's February 9 request for access to additional information and two additional sites related to North Korea's nuclear energy program. IAEA inspectors had been given access to some of the nuclear facilities in 1992, but early this year the North Korean government refused to let the IAEA see these other facilities

  5. Absorbed dose determination in high energy photon beams using new IAEA TRS - 398 Code of Practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suriyapee, S.; Srimanoroath, S.; Jumpangern, C.

    2002-01-01

    The absorbed dose calibration of 6 and 10 MV X-ray beams from Varian Clinac 1800 at King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital Bangkok, Thailand were performed using cylindrical chamber 0.6 cc NE2571 Serial No. 1633 with graphite wall and Delrin build up cap and lonex Dosemaster NE 2590 Serial No. 223. The absorbed dose determination followed the IAEA code of practice TRS-277. The new IAEA code of practice TRS-398 have been studied to compare the result with the IAEA TRS-277

  6. IAEA Perspectives on Future of Nuclear Energy, 11 March 2013, Mumbai, India, Indian Nuclear Society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Y.

    2013-01-01

    It is a great pleasure for me to address the Indian Nuclear Society once again. When I last spoke to you, in January 2011, the nuclear world looked somewhat different from today. There was still talk of a global nuclear renaissance. Dozens of countries were thinking about introducing nuclear power. Many of the 30 or so existing users planned to build additional plants. Then came the Fukushima Daiichi accident, two years ago today. It caused profound public anxiety and damaged confidence in nuclear power. Some people predicted that nuclear power would go into decline. However, the evidence suggests that this will not be the case. Some European countries announced plans to move away from nuclear power. But, globally, nuclear power looks set to continue to grow steadily, although more slowly than we expected before the Fukushima Daiichi accident. There are 437 operating nuclear power reactors in the world today. The latest IAEA projections, which are based on what Member States tell us, suggest that number could increase by 80 or 90 in the next 20 years. It could even double. At the moment, there are 66 new reactors under construction. Seven of them are in India. I understand your country plans continued expansion in the coming decades. Other major users of nuclear power such as China and Russia also have significant expansion plans. A number of countries have taken the decision to introduce nuclear power, including Bangladesh, Egypt, Jordan, Nigeria, Poland, Turkey and Vietnam. The United Arab Emirates has started building a nuclear power plant, the first new country to do so for 27 years. I visited the site in January and was impressed by the progress being made. Ladies and Gentlemen, This audience understands better than most the many benefits which nuclear power offers. Nuclear power can help to improve energy security. It can reduce the impact of volatile fossil fuel prices and mitigate the effects of climate change. For a rapidly developing economy such as India

  7. IAEA safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    IAEA safeguards are a system of technical measures within the framework of international non-proliferation policy entrusted to the IAEA in its Statute and by other treaties. About 98% of the world's nuclear installations outside the nuclear-weapon countries are now under safeguards. This paper gives a review of IAEA activities in this field: objectives, agreements, work and development of staff of the IAEA's Department of Safeguards, instruments and techniques for direct measurement and verification of nuclear material. (author)

  8. IAEA and the UN partnerships for development and peace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    IAEA collaborates with almost every major UN agency on a vast array of scientific challenges: improving human health; promoting food security; controlling pollution; managing freshwater resources; understanding climate change; protecting the oceans; boosting energy production; and a variety of other pressing concerns affecting economic development and the environment. This booklet illustrates such inter-agency co-operation through concrete examples.

  9. IAEA and the UN partnerships for development and peace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-10-01

    IAEA collaborates with almost every major UN agency on a vast array of scientific challenges: improving human health; promoting food security; controlling pollution; managing freshwater resources; understanding climate change; protecting the oceans; boosting energy production; and a variety of other pressing concerns affecting economic development and the environment. This booklet illustrates such inter-agency co-operation through concrete examples

  10. The IAEA's WorldAtom Internet site: International news and information services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyd, D.R.

    2000-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) provides news and public information services via the Internet through its WorldAtom home page. The page is accessible at www.iaea.org/worldatom. Following are brief highlights of the items available on the site by clicking Press Centre, Reference Centre, or other links: Daily Press Review: Summaries of selected news items pertaining to global nuclear developments and the IAEA's work are provided each day, drawing upon a wide range of global media sources. IAEA NewsBriefs: Regularly featured are updates about IAEA activities related to areas of safety, technology transfer, and nuclear safeguards. Meetings and training courses: News about IAEA-sponsored symposia, seminars, and other meetings, as well as information about international meetings on atomic energy sponsored by other organizations, are updated on a daily basis. Press releases and statements: All IAEA press releases and media advisories since 1995 are accessible on the site. Topical and feature pages: In-depth coverage and links to information resources within and outside the IAEA are regularly given to selected topics of high international interest involving the IAEA. IAEA publications: listings and overviews of IAEA technical reports, safety standards, and other publications are updated as they are issued. Scientific and technical information: WorldAtom includes links (Reference Centre) to the International Nuclear Information System, IAEA's extensive bibliographic database of references and resources, to the nuclear database, and to departmental pages at IAEA that focus on IAEA programs and activities. IAEA documents: Electronic versions of official IAEA documents are added as they are issued. These documents include the texts and status lists of international conventions under IAEA auspices; IAEA information circulars to member states; IAEA annual reports (since 1995); and background reports and documents for the IAEA General Conference related to

  11. The role of the International Atomic Energy Agency in technology transfer for the peaceful use of nuclear energy and the strengthening of the Safeguards system, Santiago, 9 December 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    1998-01-01

    The document reproduces the text of the conference given by the Director General of the IAEA at the IAEA national seminar on 'Nuclear Development and its Implications for Chilean International Policy' in Santiago, Chile, on 9 December 1998. After a short presentation of Chile's participation in all aspects of the work of the Agency, the conference focuses on the Agency's role in the following areas: technology transfer with emphasis on Agency's Technical Co-operation Programme, nuclear power and sustainable energy development, including nuclear safety aspects, and the strengthened safeguards system, including future prospects of verification

  12. REVIEW OF THE NEGOTIATION OF THE MODEL PROTOCOL ADDITIONAL TO THE AGREEMENT(S) BETWEEN STATE(S) AND THE INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY FOR THE APPLICATION OF SAFEGUARDS, INFCIRC/540 (Corrected) VOLUME III/III, IAEA COMMITTEE 24, DEVELOPMENT OF INFCIRC/540, ARTICLE-BY-ARTICLE REVIEW (1996-1997).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenthal, M.D.; Houck, F.

    2010-01-01

    In this section of the report, the development of INFCIRC/540 is traced by a compilation of citations from the IAEA documents presented to the Board of Governors and the records of discussions in the Board that took place prior to the establishment of Committee 24 as well as the documents and discussions of that committee. The evolution of the text is presented separately for each article or, for the more complex articles, for each paragraph or group of paragraphs of the article. This section covers all articles, including those involving no issues. Background, issues, interpretations and conclusions, which were addressed in Volumes I, II, and III are not repeated here. The comments by states that are included are generally limited to objections and suggested changes. Requests for clarification or elaboration have been omitted, although it is recognized that such comments were sometimes veiled objections.

  13. The IAEA international project on innovative nuclear reactors and fuel cycles (INPRO): study on opportunities and challenges of large-scale nuclear energy development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoroshev, M.; Subbotin, S.

    2006-01-01

    Existing scenarios for global energy use project that demand will at least double over the next 50 years. Electricity demand is projected to grow even faster. These scenarios suggest that the use of all available generating options, including nuclear energy, will inevitably be required to meet those demands. If nuclear energy is to play a meaningful role in the global energy supply in the foreseeable future, innovative approaches will be required to address concerns about economic competitiveness, environment, safety, waste management, potential proliferation risks and necessary infrastructure. In the event of a renaissance of nuclear energy, adequate infrastructure development will become crucial for Member States considering the future use of nuclear power. The IAEA should be ready to provide assistance in this area. A special resolution was adopted by the General Conference in September 2005 on 'Strengthening the Agency's Activities Related to Nuclear Science, Technology and Applications: Approaches to Supporting Nuclear Power Infrastructure Development'. Previously, in 2000, taking into account future energy scenarios and the needs of Member States, the IAEA General Conference had adopted a resolution initiating the International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO). Based on scenarios for the next fifty years, INPRO identified requirements for different aspects of future nuclear energy systems, such as economics, environment, safety, waste management, proliferation resistance and infrastructure and developed a methodology to assess innovative nuclear systems and fuel cycles. Using this assessment tool, the need for innovations in nuclear technology can be defined, which can be achieved through research, development and demonstration (RD and D). INPRO developed these requirements during its first stage, Phase 1A, which lasted from 2001 to mid-2003. In the second stage, Phase 1B (first part), INPRO organized 14 case studies (8 by

  14. Highlights 97. International Atomic Energy Agency. Annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinley, D.H. III

    1997-09-01

    The report outlines the IAEA activities in the following fields: nuclear power, nuclear fuel cycle, radioactive waste management, comparative assessment of nuclear power and other energy sources, food and agriculture, human health, industry and earth sciences, physical and chemical sciences, radiation safety, safety of nuclear installations, safeguards, financing

  15. Highlights 97. International Atomic Energy Agency. Annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinley, III, D H [ed.

    1997-09-01

    The report outlines the IAEA activities in the following fields: nuclear power, nuclear fuel cycle, radioactive waste management, comparative assessment of nuclear power and other energy sources, food and agriculture, human health, industry and earth sciences, physical and chemical sciences, radiation safety, safety of nuclear installations, safeguards, financing.

  16. International Atomic Energy Agency holds first industry forum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The document gives information about the first forum organized by the IAEA with representatives of entities dealing with industrial aspects of nuclear energy (Vienna, January 25-26, 2000). 35 participants from such groups with broad geographical distribution participated in the discussions. The main issues debated were: Innovative Technical Developments, Safety and Regulation, Economic Competitiveness and Back-end of the Fuel Cycle

  17. IAEA Tools and Methodology for Energy System Planning and Nuclear Energy System Assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    Energy is essential for all human activities, and its availability is critical to economic and social development. Energy is the engine for the production of goods and services across all economic sectors. It is vital to the provision of basic civic services in education, health care, clean water supply and sanitation, and also for wealth creation. Lack of energy is a contributing factor to the poverty of individuals, communities, nations and regions. While not an end itself, energy, jointly with appropriate technologies and infrastructure, generates the services modern societies demand (transportation, lighting, air conditioning, information exchange, etc.). Meeting the United Nations Millennium Development Goals can be only accomplished with access to affordable energy services. Energy planning aims at ensuring that decisions on energy demand and supply infrastructures involve all stake holders, consider all possible energy supply and demand options, and are consistent with overall goals for national sustainable development. The concept of sustainable development encompasses three interdependent and mutually reinforcing pillars : social development, economic development and environmental protection, linked by effective government institutions. (author)

  18. Summary of remarks and recommendations concerning the 2nd draft revision of the IAEA transport regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report contains a summary of all the remarks and recommendations that had been received by the International Atomic Energy Agency from Member States and International Organizations on the second draft revision of the IAEA transport regulations

  19. The OEEC European Nuclear Energy Agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1961-07-15

    The European Nuclear Energy Agency (ENEA) was set up in December 1957 as part of the OEEC to develop nuclear collaboration in Western Europe. The promotion of joint undertakings is one of the most important functions of ENEA, and why one of the first committees of the Agency to be set up was its Top Level Group on Co-operation in the Reactor Field. International collaboration in joint undertakings enables resources in effort, equipment and money to be pooled for the maximum benefit of the countries participating, and is the only way whereby a sufficiently wide range of research possibilities can be covered in a reasonable time. Examples fro such projects are: 1) Halden project - a joint three-year project to exploit the boiling heavy water reactor built by the Norwegian Institute for Atom energy at Halden; 2) Dragon Project - to investigate the possibilities of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors centered on the construction and operation, by an international team, of an experimental 20 MWt high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (Dragon) at the UK Atomic Energy Establishment at Winfrith; 3) Eurochemic - with a principle objective to construct an experimental plant for the treatment of used uranium fuel from reactors in the participating countries; 4) Nuclear Shops. In addition to promoting joint undertakings, a function of ENEA is to encourage scientific and technical collaboration between national research organizations. Co-operation has been facilitated in the areas od nuclear data, food irradiation, environment radioactivity, training, information and nuclear legislation.

  20. The OEEC European Nuclear Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1961-01-01

    The European Nuclear Energy Agency (ENEA) was set up in December 1957 as part of the OEEC to develop nuclear collaboration in Western Europe. The promotion of joint undertakings is one of the most important functions of ENEA, and why one of the first committees of the Agency to be set up was its Top Level Group on Co-operation in the Reactor Field. International collaboration in joint undertakings enables resources in effort, equipment and money to be pooled for the maximum benefit of the countries participating, and is the only way whereby a sufficiently wide range of research possibilities can be covered in a reasonable time. Examples fro such projects are: 1) Halden project - a joint three-year project to exploit the boiling heavy water reactor built by the Norwegian Institute for Atom energy at Halden; 2) Dragon Project - to investigate the possibilities of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors centered on the construction and operation, by an international team, of an experimental 20 MWt high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (Dragon) at the UK Atomic Energy Establishment at Winfrith; 3) Eurochemic - with a principle objective to construct an experimental plant for the treatment of used uranium fuel from reactors in the participating countries; 4) Nuclear Shops. In addition to promoting joint undertakings, a function of ENEA is to encourage scientific and technical collaboration between national research organizations. Co-operation has been facilitated in the areas od nuclear data, food irradiation, environment radioactivity, training, information and nuclear legislation

  1. Medical physics in Europe following recommendations of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casar, Bozidar; Lopes, Maria do Carmo; Drljević, Advan; Gershkevitsh, Eduard; Pesznyak, Csilla

    2016-01-01

    Medical physics is a health profession where principles of applied physics are mostly directed towards the application of ionizing radiation in medicine. The key role of the medical physics expert in safe and effective use of ionizing radiation in medicine was widely recognized in recent European reference documents like the European Union Council Directive 2013/59/EURATOM (2014), and European Commission Radiation Protection No. 174, European Guidelines on Medical Physics Expert (2014). Also the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has been outspoken in supporting and fostering the status of medical physics in radiation medicine through multiple initiatives as technical and cooperation projects and important documents like IAEA Human Health Series No. 25, Roles and Responsibilities, and Education and Training Requirements for Clinically Qualified Medical Physicists (2013) and the International Basic Safety Standards, General Safety Requirements Part 3 (2014). The significance of these documents and the recognition of the present insufficient fulfilment of the requirements and recommendations in many European countries have led the IAEA to organize in 2015 the Regional Meeting on Medical Physics in Europe, where major issues in medical physics in Europe were discussed. Most important outcomes of the meeting were the recommendations addressed to European member states and the survey on medical physics status in Europe conducted by the IAEA and European Federation of Organizations for Medical Physics. Published recommendations of IAEA Regional Meeting on Medical Physics in Europe shall be followed and enforced in all European states. Appropriate qualification framework including education, clinical specialization, certification and registration of medical physicists shall be established and international recommendation regarding staffing levels in the field of medical physics shall be fulfilled in particular. European states have clear legal and moral

  2. Medical physics in Europe following recommendations of the International Atomic Energy Agency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casar, Bozidar; Lopes, Maria do Carmo; Drljević, Advan; Gershkevitsh, Eduard; Pesznyak, Csilla

    2016-03-01

    Medical physics is a health profession where principles of applied physics are mostly directed towards the application of ionizing radiation in medicine. The key role of the medical physics expert in safe and effective use of ionizing radiation in medicine was widely recognized in recent European reference documents like the European Union Council Directive 2013/59/EURATOM (2014), and European Commission Radiation Protection No. 174, European Guidelines on Medical Physics Expert (2014). Also the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has been outspoken in supporting and fostering the status of medical physics in radiation medicine through multiple initiatives as technical and cooperation projects and important documents like IAEA Human Health Series No. 25, Roles and Responsibilities, and Education and Training Requirements for Clinically Qualified Medical Physicists (2013) and the International Basic Safety Standards, General Safety Requirements Part 3 (2014). The significance of these documents and the recognition of the present insufficient fulfilment of the requirements and recommendations in many European countries have led the IAEA to organize in 2015 the Regional Meeting on Medical Physics in Europe, where major issues in medical physics in Europe were discussed. Most important outcomes of the meeting were the recommendations addressed to European member states and the survey on medical physics status in Europe conducted by the IAEA and European Federation of Organizations for Medical Physics. Published recommendations of IAEA Regional Meeting on Medical Physics in Europe shall be followed and enforced in all European states. Appropriate qualification framework including education, clinical specialization, certification and registration of medical physicists shall be established and international recommendation regarding staffing levels in the field of medical physics shall be fulfilled in particular. European states have clear legal and moral

  3. Medical physics in Europe following recommendations of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Maria do Carmo; Drljević, Advan; Gershkevitsh, Eduard; Pesznyak, Csilla

    2016-01-01

    Background Medical physics is a health profession where principles of applied physics are mostly directed towards the application of ionizing radiation in medicine. The key role of the medical physics expert in safe and effective use of ionizing radiation in medicine was widely recognized in recent European reference documents like the European Union Council Directive 2013/59/EURATOM (2014), and European Commission Radiation Protection No. 174, European Guidelines on Medical Physics Expert (2014). Also the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has been outspoken in supporting and fostering the status of medical physics in radiation medicine through multiple initiatives as technical and cooperation projects and important documents like IAEA Human Health Series No. 25, Roles and Responsibilities, and Education and Training Requirements for Clinically Qualified Medical Physicists (2013) and the International Basic Safety Standards, General Safety Requirements Part 3 (2014). The significance of these documents and the recognition of the present insufficient fulfilment of the requirements and recommendations in many European countries have led the IAEA to organize in 2015 the Regional Meeting on Medical Physics in Europe, where major issues in medical physics in Europe were discussed. Most important outcomes of the meeting were the recommendations addressed to European member states and the survey on medical physics status in Europe conducted by the IAEA and European Federation of Organizations for Medical Physics. Conclusions Published recommendations of IAEA Regional Meeting on Medical Physics in Europe shall be followed and enforced in all European states. Appropriate qualification framework including education, clinical specialization, certification and registration of medical physicists shall be established and international recommendation regarding staffing levels in the field of medical physics shall be fulfilled in particular. European states have clear

  4. Information system for IAEA inspectors at a centrifuge enrichment plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, A.L.; Tape, J.W.; Picard, R.R.; Strittmatter, R.B.

    1985-01-01

    An information system has been developed to aid International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) inspectors at the Portsmouth Gas Centrifuge Plant in the US. This system is designed to provide the inspectors with data storage, data analysis, and data evaluation and decision capabilities with minimal impact on the plant operations. The techniques and methodologies developed for this specific case are described with discussion of their general applicability to IAEA inspections at all types of facilities. 7 refs

  5. Have IAEA safety precautions failed in Iraq

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruemm, H.

    1981-01-01

    Israel's air raid on the Tamuz-1 research reactor (Osirak) in Iraq has given new impetus to the discussion of the potential and limits of international control as carried out by the IAEA in the framework of the non-proliferation treaty. A lack of faith in the effectiveness of IAEA control must be assuemd to be one of the main reasons for this attack. Prof. Grimm, vice chairman of the nuclear safeguards department of the International Atomic Energy Agency, comments on the possibility of producing nuclear weapons with the aid of this reactor and on the efficiency of present and projected nuclear safeguards measures. (orig.) [de

  6. IAEA Safeguards: Past, Present, and Future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santi, Peter A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hypes, Philip A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-14

    This talk will present an overview of the International Atomic Energy Agency with a specific focus on its international safeguards mission and activities. The talk will first present a brief history of the IAEA and discuss its current governing structure. It will then focus on the Safeguards Department and its role in providing assurance that nuclear materials are being used for peaceful purposes. It will then look at how the IAEA is currently evolving the way in which it executes its safeguards mission with a focus on the idea of a state-level approach.

  7. Nuclear energy and the IAEA: Fostering the efficient and safe use of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinley, D. III

    2006-05-01

    Any discussion of 21st century energy trends must take into account the global energy imbalance. Roughly 1.6 billion people still lack access to modern energy services, and few aspects of development - whether related to living standards, health care or industrial productivity - can take place without the requisite energy supply. As we look to the century before us, the growth in energy demand will be substantial, and 'connecting the unconnected' will be a key to progress. Another challenge will be sustainability; meeting these growing energy needs without creating negative side effects that could compromise the living environment of future generations. Nuclear power is not a 'fix-all', but it will certainly be part of this mix of solutions, and the expectations for the expanding use of nuclear power are rising. In addition to the growth in demand, these expectations are driven by: energy security concerns; nuclear power's low greenhouse gas emissions; and the sustained strong performance of nuclear plants. Each country must make its own energy choices; one size does not fit all. But for those countries interested in making nuclear power part of their sustainable development strategies, the Agency stands ready to offer a broad range of assistance programmes

  8. Improving the Transparency of IAEA Safeguards Reporting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toomey, Christopher; Hayman, Aaron M.; Wyse, Evan T.; Odlaug, Christopher S.

    2011-01-01

    In 2008, the Standing Advisory Group on Safeguards Implementation (SAGSI) indicated that the International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA) Safeguards Implementation Report (SIR) has not kept pace with the evolution of safeguards and provided the IAEA with a set of recommendations for improvement. The SIR is the primary mechanism for providing an overview of safeguards implementation in a given year and reporting on the annual safeguards findings and conclusions drawn by the Secretariat. As the IAEA transitions to State-level safeguards approaches, SIR reporting must adapt to reflect these evolutionary changes. This evolved report will better reflect the IAEA's transition to a more qualitative and information-driven approach, based upon State-as-a-whole considerations. This paper applies SAGSI's recommendations to the development of multiple models for an evolved SIR and finds that an SIR repurposed as a 'safeguards portal' could significantly enhance information delivery, clarity, and transparency. In addition, this paper finds that the 'portal concept' also appears to have value as a standardized information presentation and analysis platform for use by Country Officers, for continuity of knowledge purposes, and the IAEA Secretariat in the safeguards conclusion process. Accompanying this paper is a fully functional prototype of the 'portal' concept, built using commercial software and IAEA Annual Report data.

  9. IAEA and the international nuclear law development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jankowitsh, O.

    1996-01-01

    This paper summarizes the different objectives of the IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency) as far as nuclear energy use is concerned. It presents the status of the organization, its action int the non-proliferation treaty, and its work on the safeguard regulations. These measures have been taken during the Convention on nuclear safety in 1994. This convention concerns nuclear power plants as well as storage of radioactive wastes. (TEC)

  10. NIRS inaugurated as IAEA Collaborating Centre. Its presence and function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonekura, Yoshiharu; Watanabe, Naoyuki; Sakai, Kazuo; Kamada, Tadashi; Imai, Reiko; Fujibayashi, Yasuhisa; Nakane, Takeshi; Burkart, W.; Chhem, R.; Matsuura, Shojiro

    2010-01-01

    The feature article is the collection of documents commemorating the 2010 designation of National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) as one of International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Collaborating Centres (CC) again, involving 4 introductory chapters containing 9 sections in total. The IAEA-CC concept, essentially for the 4-year project, started to globally give shape by designating 3 organizations in some countries in 2004, NIRS as a CC worked from 2006 and the present designation is the renewed one. There are 17 IAEA-CCs at present. The title of Chapter 1 of the article is the same as above title by NIRS President and of Chapter 2, ''IAEA-CC scheme'' by NIRS Senior Specialist/ professor of Gunma Pref. College of Health Sciences/ former IAEA staff. Chapter 3 entitled ''Research Development of Next Four Years in Three Collaboration Areas'', contains 3 topics of the very areas mainly responsible to the project, of biological effect and mechanism of low dose radiation by NIRS Director of Res. Center for Radiation Protection, IAEA-CC plan (radiotherapy) by the Director for Charged Particle Therapy, and IAEA-CC activity and research at Molecular Imaging Center by its Director. Chapter 4 entitled ''Expectation to NIRS'' contains four topics; Expectations for the reinforcement of collaboration with IAEA whose new priority is cancer control by the Japanese Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary in Vienna; Welcoming NIRS to join IAEA-CC network (an interview with IAEA Deputy Director General and Head of Nuclear Sciences and Applications); Honoured to invite NIRS to establish a new partnership with IAEA (an interview with IAEA Director of Division of Human Health, Dept. of Nuclear Sciences and Applications); Expectation to NIRS in peaceful use of nuclear and radiation by President of the Nuclear Safety Research Association. (T.T.)

  11. IAEA activities in nuclear reactor simulation for educational purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badulescu, A.; Lyon, R.

    2001-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has established a programme in nuclear reactor simulation computer programs to assist its Member States in education and training. The objective is to provide, for a variety of advanced reactor types, insight and practice in their operational characteristics and their response to perturbations and accident situations. To achieve this, the IAEA arranges for the supply or development of simulation programs and training material, sponsors training courses and workshops, and distributes documentation and computer programs. Currently, the IAEA has simulation programs available for distribution that simulate the behaviour of BWR, PWR and HWR reactor types. (authors)

  12. IAEA workshop on 'Atomic and molecular data for fusion energy research'. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, R.E.H.

    2004-05-01

    On September 8-12 a workshop on Atomic and Molecular (A+M) Data for Fusion Energy Research was hosted by the International Centre for Theoretical Physics in Trieste Italy. The workshop was attended by twelve students representing eleven Member States. A total of five lecturers, including four external to the Agency, made presentations to the workshop. All lecturers provided advance copies of the lecture materials and all provided written assignments for the students, to provide practical examples of applications of data issues to actual problems related to fusion energy research. All materials were collected on CDs, which were distributed to the students by the conclusion of the workshop. During the course of the workshop the students were given the opportunity to describe their backgrounds and research interests. The workshop did arouse interest in A+M processes related to fusion. The workshop was viewed as successful by the students. (author)

  13. Summary report of IAEA workshop on atomic and molecular data for fusion energy research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, R.E.H.

    2007-02-01

    A workshop on Atomic and Molecular (A+M) Data for Fusion Energy Research was held at the International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) in Trieste, Italy, from 28 August until 8 September 2006. The workshop was attended by fourteen students and three ICTP associates representing eleven Member States. A total of eight lecturers, including six external to the Agency, made presentations to the workshop. All lecturers provided advance copies of the lecture materials, and provided written assignments for the students to provide practical examples of applications of data issues to actual problems related to fusion energy research. All materials were collected on CDs, which were distributed to the students at the conclusion of the workshop. During the course of the workshop, the students were given the opportunity to describe their background and research interests. The workshop did arouse interest in A+M processes related to fusion, and was viewed as successful by both the students and lecturers. (author)

  14. Role of International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bianco, A.

    1986-01-01

    About 10 years ago, the IAEA formulated guidelines for mutual emergency assistance in case of accidents. These guidelines have been revised periodically and updated, with the latest revision prepared in 1984. As a response to Chernobyl, two new conventions have been produced: (1) the Convention on Early Notification of a Nuclear Accident, and (2) the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency. It is important to emphasize that points of contact and a focal point within the IAEA shall be available continuously for the implementation of the Conventions. A total of 58 and 57 Member States have signed Conventions 1 and 2, respectively, as of October 27, 1987. It is expected that these numbers will increase significantly in the near future. According to the INSAG Summary Report, the following areas have been recommended as top priority: epidemiology study; problems of skin lesions, problem of biological dosimetry in selected cohorts of the population; and medical literature. The IAEA has been designated to take the lead in these areas in close collaboration with WHO and other international organizations

  15. IDEAS/IAEA intercomparison exercise on internal dose assessment. Intercomparison exercise on Internal Dose Assessment performed jointly by the International Atomic Energy Agency and the IDEAS project (''General Guidelines for the Evaluation of Incorporation Monitoring Data'', carried out within the 5th EU Framework Programme)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurtgen, C.; Andrasi, A.; Bailey, M.R.

    2005-10-01

    There were several intercomparison exercises organized already at national and international levels for the assessment of occupational exposure due to intakes of radionuclides. These intercomparison exercises revealed significant differences in the approaches, methods and assumptions, and consequently in the results. In the frame of the IDEAS project .General Guidelines for the Evaluation of Incorporation Monitoring Data., launched in the 5th EU Framework Programme, a new intercomparison exercise was performed. Originally it was planned to organise this intercomparison exercise on a European scale. Because of the relevance of the issue for the whole community of internal dosimetrists, however, it was decided to organise the exercise on a broader scale together with the IAEA. This new intercomparison exercise especially focuses on the effect of the guidelines for harmonisation of internal dosimetry. In addition it also consider the following aspects: - to provide possibilities for the participating laboratories to check the quality of their internal dose assessment methods in applying the recent ICRP recommendations (new respiratory tract model etc.); - to compare different approaches in interpretation of internal contamination monitoring data; - to quantify the differences in internal dose assessment based on the new guidelines or on other procedures, respectively; - to provide some figures of the influence of the input parameters on the monitoring results and - to provide a broad forum for information exchange. Several cases have been selected for the exercise with the aim to cover a wide range of practices in the nuclear fuel cycle and medical applications. The case were: 1. Acute intake of HTO; 2. Acute inhalation of fission products 137 Cs and 90 Sr; 3. Intake of 60 Co; 4. Repeated intakes of 131 I; 5. Intake of enriched uranium; 6. Single intake of Pu radionuclides and 241 Am. A web-based approach was being used for the presentation of the cases, collection of

  16. International Atomic Energy Agency annual report 2007: 50 years of atoms for peace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The Annual Report reviews the results of the Agency's programme according to the three pillars of technology, safety and verification. The main part of the report generally follows the programme structure as given in The Agency's Programme and Budget 2006-2007 (GC(49)/2). The introductory chapter seeks to provide a thematic analysis, based on the three pillars, of the Agency's activities within the overall context of notable developments during the year. More detailed information can be found in the latest editions of the Agency's Nuclear Safety Review, Nuclear Technology Review, Technical Cooperation Report and the Safeguards Statement for 2007 and Background to the Safeguards Statement. For the convenience of readers, these documents are available on the CD-ROM attached to the inside back cover of this report. Additional information covering various aspects of the Agency's programme is provided on the attached CD-ROM, and is also available on the Agency's web site at http://www.iaea.org/Worldatom/Documents/Anrep/Anrep2007/. Except where indicated, all sums of money are expressed in United States dollars. The designations employed and the presentation of material in this document do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the Secretariat concerning the legal status of any country or territory or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers. The topics covered in the chapter related to technology are: nuclear power; nuclear fuel cycle and materials technologies; capacity building and nuclear knowledge maintenance for sustainable energy development; nuclear science; food and agriculture; human health; water resources; assessment and management of marine and terrestrial environments; radioisotope production and radiation technology; safety and security; incident and emergency preparedness and response; safety of nuclear installations; radiation and transport safety; management of radioactive waste; nuclear security

  17. Correlation study among the International Atomic Energy Agency standards and market standards on management system applicable to a UF6 conversion plant operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Dirceu Paulo de

    2008-01-01

    The Agency - International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), following the market trend of the management system integration, has decided to revise the quality assurance standards - IAEA 50-C/SG-Q publishing, in 2006, the standard on Management System (MS). IAEA GS-R-3 and its IAEA GS-G-3.1 guide. Also, the IAEA is about to publish a supplementary guide - IAEA DS349, which consider the integration of several functions involved in management of nuclear facilities, such as: safety, health, environmental and quality, ensuring that nuclear safety is not compromised. Conversion plants of 'Yellowcake' in UF 6 use and process radioactive materials, as well as other substances normally found in the chemical conventional industry, inserting themselves in the organization profile that require a high pattern of definition, implementation and continuous improvement of their MS and, therefore, should consider an approach of management integrated system (MIS). Taking a UF 6 conversion plant as focus, the correlation was performed among the Agency MS standards and those of the market - ISO 9001, ISO 14001 and OHSAS 18001, as well as with the Agency drafts standards on safety (DS316 and DS344), concluding that, in structuring an MIS, in compliance with the Agency MS standards, except for some adjustments, the ISO 9001, ISO 14001, and OHSAS 18001 are going to be met. On the other hand, the structuring of MIS should identify other requirements on safety, health and environmental, which also consider the conventional chemical and industrial characteristics that are out of the scope (ionizing radiation) of the safety standards of the Agency. The research proposes a documental procedure for a MIS applicable to this plant, providing elements for rationalization and contents of the identified documentation, for the promotion of the integration of the considered MS functions. (author)

  18. International Atomic Energy Agency Annual Report 2014 [Russian Version

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    Along with an examination of the state of worldwide nuclear-related developments last year, the IAEA Annual Report 2014 provides a comprehensive look at the Agency’s activities over the course of the year. From coordinating 125 research projects to conducting 2114 nuclear verification inspections worldwide, the IAEA’s 2560 employees continued to work on a wide range of areas to meet the evolving needs of Member States. The Annual Report, published in August, will be discussed and endorsed at the IAEA’s General Conference in September. Serving 162 Member States, two more than the year before, the IAEA’s activities in 2014 focused on the following areas, in line with its mandate: • Nuclear Energy: The IAEA assisted Member States in the introduction of nuclear power programmes and in the efficient and safe use of nuclear energy, fostering innovation and building capability in energy planning, analysis, and nuclear information and knowledge management. • Nuclear Sciences and Applications: The IAEA continued to assist Member States in building, strengthening and maintaining capacities in the safe, peaceful and secure use of nuclear technology. • Nuclear Safety and Security: The IAEA and its Member States continued to strengthen nuclear safety worldwide, including through the implementation of the Action Plan on Nuclear Safety, which had been endorsed by the General Conference in 2011 after the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant earlier that year. The IAEA also supported States, upon request, in their efforts to achieve effective security wherever nuclear and other radioactive materials are in use. • Nuclear Verification: The IAEA implemented safeguards in 180 States and as at the end of every year, it drew conclusions for each State for which safeguards were applied. • Technical Cooperation: The IAEA assisted Member States in their efforts to achieve the Millennium Development Goals and in preparation for the post-2015 Sustainable

  19. International Atomic Energy Agency Annual Report 2014 [Chinese Version

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    Along with an examination of the state of worldwide nuclear-related developments last year, the IAEA Annual Report 2014 provides a comprehensive look at the Agency’s activities over the course of the year. From coordinating 125 research projects to conducting 2114 nuclear verification inspections worldwide, the IAEA’s 2560 employees continued to work on a wide range of areas to meet the evolving needs of Member States. The Annual Report, published in August, will be discussed and endorsed at the IAEA’s General Conference in September. Serving 162 Member States, two more than the year before, the IAEA’s activities in 2014 focused on the following areas, in line with its mandate: • Nuclear Energy: The IAEA assisted Member States in the introduction of nuclear power programmes and in the efficient and safe use of nuclear energy, fostering innovation and building capability in energy planning, analysis, and nuclear information and knowledge management. • Nuclear Sciences and Applications: The IAEA continued to assist Member States in building, strengthening and maintaining capacities in the safe, peaceful and secure use of nuclear technology. • Nuclear Safety and Security: The IAEA and its Member States continued to strengthen nuclear safety worldwide, including through the implementation of the Action Plan on Nuclear Safety, which had been endorsed by the General Conference in 2011 after the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant earlier that year. The IAEA also supported States, upon request, in their efforts to achieve effective security wherever nuclear and other radioactive materials are in use. • Nuclear Verification: The IAEA implemented safeguards in 180 States and as at the end of every year, it drew conclusions for each State for which safeguards were applied. • Technical Cooperation: The IAEA assisted Member States in their efforts to achieve the Millennium Development Goals and in preparation for the post-2015 Sustainable

  20. International Atomic Energy Agency Annual Report 2014 [French Version

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    Along with an examination of the state of worldwide nuclear-related developments last year, the IAEA Annual Report 2014 provides a comprehensive look at the Agency’s activities over the course of the year. From coordinating 125 research projects to conducting 2114 nuclear verification inspections worldwide, the IAEA’s 2560 employees continued to work on a wide range of areas to meet the evolving needs of Member States. The Annual Report, published in August, will be discussed and endorsed at the IAEA’s General Conference in September. Serving 162 Member States, two more than the year before, the IAEA’s activities in 2014 focused on the following areas, in line with its mandate: • Nuclear Energy: The IAEA assisted Member States in the introduction of nuclear power programmes and in the efficient and safe use of nuclear energy, fostering innovation and building capability in energy planning, analysis, and nuclear information and knowledge management. • Nuclear Sciences and Applications: The IAEA continued to assist Member States in building, strengthening and maintaining capacities in the safe, peaceful and secure use of nuclear technology. • Nuclear Safety and Security: The IAEA and its Member States continued to strengthen nuclear safety worldwide, including through the implementation of the Action Plan on Nuclear Safety, which had been endorsed by the General Conference in 2011 after the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant earlier that year. The IAEA also supported States, upon request, in their efforts to achieve effective security wherever nuclear and other radioactive materials are in use. • Nuclear Verification: The IAEA implemented safeguards in 180 States and as at the end of every year, it drew conclusions for each State for which safeguards were applied. • Technical Cooperation: The IAEA assisted Member States in their efforts to achieve the Millennium Development Goals and in preparation for the post-2015 Sustainable

  1. International Atomic Energy Agency Annual Report 2014 [Arabic Version

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    Along with an examination of the state of worldwide nuclear-related developments last year, the IAEA Annual Report 2014 provides a comprehensive look at the Agency’s activities over the course of the year. From coordinating 125 research projects to conducting 2114 nuclear verification inspections worldwide, the IAEA’s 2560 employees continued to work on a wide range of areas to meet the evolving needs of Member States. The Annual Report, published in August, will be discussed and endorsed at the IAEA’s General Conference in September. Serving 162 Member States, two more than the year before, the IAEA’s activities in 2014 focused on the following areas, in line with its mandate: • Nuclear Energy: The IAEA assisted Member States in the introduction of nuclear power programmes and in the efficient and safe use of nuclear energy, fostering innovation and building capability in energy planning, analysis, and nuclear information and knowledge management. • Nuclear Sciences and Applications: The IAEA continued to assist Member States in building, strengthening and maintaining capacities in the safe, peaceful and secure use of nuclear technology. • Nuclear Safety and Security: The IAEA and its Member States continued to strengthen nuclear safety worldwide, including through the implementation of the Action Plan on Nuclear Safety, which had been endorsed by the General Conference in 2011 after the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant earlier that year. The IAEA also supported States, upon request, in their efforts to achieve effective security wherever nuclear and other radioactive materials are in use. • Nuclear Verification: The IAEA implemented safeguards in 180 States and as at the end of every year, it drew conclusions for each State for which safeguards were applied. • Technical Cooperation: The IAEA assisted Member States in their efforts to achieve the Millennium Development Goals and in preparation for the post-2015 Sustainable

  2. International Atomic Energy Agency Annual Report 2014 [Spanish Version

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    Along with an examination of the state of worldwide nuclear-related developments last year, the IAEA Annual Report 2014 provides a comprehensive look at the Agency’s activities over the course of the year. From coordinating 125 research projects to conducting 2114 nuclear verification inspections worldwide, the IAEA’s 2560 employees continued to work on a wide range of areas to meet the evolving needs of Member States. The Annual Report, published in August, will be discussed and endorsed at the IAEA’s General Conference in September. Serving 162 Member States, two more than the year before, the IAEA’s activities in 2014 focused on the following areas, in line with its mandate: • Nuclear Energy: The IAEA assisted Member States in the introduction of nuclear power programmes and in the efficient and safe use of nuclear energy, fostering innovation and building capability in energy planning, analysis, and nuclear information and knowledge management. • Nuclear Sciences and Applications: The IAEA continued to assist Member States in building, strengthening and maintaining capacities in the safe, peaceful and secure use of nuclear technology. • Nuclear Safety and Security: The IAEA and its Member States continued to strengthen nuclear safety worldwide, including through the implementation of the Action Plan on Nuclear Safety, which had been endorsed by the General Conference in 2011 after the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant earlier that year. The IAEA also supported States, upon request, in their efforts to achieve effective security wherever nuclear and other radioactive materials are in use. • Nuclear Verification: The IAEA implemented safeguards in 180 States and as at the end of every year, it drew conclusions for each State for which safeguards were applied. • Technical Cooperation: The IAEA assisted Member States in their efforts to achieve the Millennium Development Goals and in preparation for the post-2015 Sustainable

  3. Joint IAEA/NEA IRS guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The Incident Reporting System (IRS) is an international system jointly operated by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD/NEA). The fundamental objective of the IRS is to contribute to improving the safety of commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs) which are operated worldwide. This objective can be achieved by providing timely and detailed information on both technical and human factors related to events of safety significance which occur at these plants. The purpose of these guidelines, which supersede the previous IAEA Safety Series No. 93 (Part II) and the NEA IRS guidelines, is to describe the system and to give users the necessary background and guidance to enable them to produce IRS reports meeting a high standard of quality while retaining the high efficiency of the system expected by all Member States operating nuclear power plants

  4. Atomic energy training centres in Latin America. Report of IAEA Mission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1959-01-15

    In January 1958, the Brazilian representative on the Board of Governors of the International Atomic Energy Agency - supported by the Governors from Argentina and Guatemala - proposed that a study should be made of the possibility of setting up one or more atomic energy training centres in Latin America. Countries now having facilities that could be used for co-operative training are Argentina, where rapid strides are being made in building up an integrated atomic energy centre in the Buenos Aires; Brazil, which has successfully established a physical science nuclear laboratory and a radio-biology centre; Venezuela, with a medico-biological centre from which much may be expected; and Mexico, where nuclear science courses are to be provided by the University of Mexico. The report discusses two alternatives for the establishment of training centres: 'specialized centres' or 'integrated centres' and concludes that the integrated centre is the preferable one however specialized centres stand a much higher chance of being staffed successfully. They are inherently smaller and consequently costs for facilities and equipment are much less. In addition use might be made of existing facilities. It is stated that one of the specialized atomic energy training centres to be established might well be in the field of radio-botany. Agriculture is a major source of income throughout Latin America. There are many agricultural schools and experimental stations throughout the region and also the Inter-American Institute of Agricultural Science at Turrialba, Costa Rica. The authors of the report concluded that a training centre in radio-botany should provide vitally needed knowledge and vitally needed specialists to all the agricultural installations in Latin America. The report recommends that (1) the Agency should meet the requests of Latin American universities by, for example, supplying equipment and sending experts; (2) at least one specialized training centre should be established

  5. Atomic energy training centres in Latin America. Report of IAEA Mission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1959-01-01

    In January 1958, the Brazilian representative on the Board of Governors of the International Atomic Energy Agency - supported by the Governors from Argentina and Guatemala - proposed that a study should be made of the possibility of setting up one or more atomic energy training centres in Latin America. Countries now having facilities that could be used for co-operative training are Argentina, where rapid strides are being made in building up an integrated atomic energy centre in the Buenos Aires; Brazil, which has successfully established a physical science nuclear laboratory and a radio-biology centre; Venezuela, with a medico-biological centre from which much may be expected; and Mexico, where nuclear science courses are to be provided by the University of Mexico. The report discusses two alternatives for the establishment of training centres: 'specialized centres' or 'integrated centres' and concludes that the integrated centre is the preferable one however specialized centres stand a much higher chance of being staffed successfully. They are inherently smaller and consequently costs for facilities and equipment are much less. In addition use might be made of existing facilities. It is stated that one of the specialized atomic energy training centres to be established might well be in the field of radio-botany. Agriculture is a major source of income throughout Latin America. There are many agricultural schools and experimental stations throughout the region and also the Inter-American Institute of Agricultural Science at Turrialba, Costa Rica. The authors of the report concluded that a training centre in radio-botany should provide vitally needed knowledge and vitally needed specialists to all the agricultural installations in Latin America. The report recommends that (1) the Agency should meet the requests of Latin American universities by, for example, supplying equipment and sending experts; (2) at least one specialized training centre should be established

  6. Annual report 2000[International Atomic Energy Agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    Article VI.J of the Agency's Statute requires the Board of Governors to submit 'an annual report to the General Conference concerning the affairs of the Agency and any projects approved by the Agency'. This report covers the period 1 January to 31 December 2000.

  7. Recommended observational skills training for IAEA safeguards inspections. Final report: Recommended observational skills training for IAEA safeguards inspections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toquam, J.L.; Morris, F.A.

    1994-09-01

    This is the second of two reports prepared to assist the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA or Agency) in enhancing the effectiveness of its international safeguards inspections through inspector training in open-quotes Observational Skillsclose quotes. The first (Phase 1) report was essentially exploratory. It defined Observational Skills broadly to include all appropriate cognitive, communications, and interpersonal techniques that have the potential to help IAEA safeguards inspectors function more effectively. It identified 10 specific Observational Skills components, analyzed their relevance to IAEA safeguards inspections, and reviewed a variety of inspection programs in the public and private sectors that provide training in one or more of these components. The report concluded that while it should be possible to draw upon these other programs in developing Observational Skills training for IAEA inspectors, the approaches utilized in these programs will likely require significant adaption to support the specific job requirements, policies, and practices that define the IAEA inspector's job. The overall objective of this second (Phase 2) report is to provide a basis for the actual design and delivery of Observational Skills training to IAEA inspectors. The more specific purposes of this report are to convey a fuller understanding of the potential application of Observational Skills to the inspector's job, describe inspector perspectives on the relevance and importance of particular Observational Skills, identify the specific Observational Skill components that are most important and relevant to enhancing safeguards inspections, and make recommendations as to Observational Skills training for the IAEA's consideration in further developing its Safeguards training program

  8. Public information attitudes towards nuclear energy and the IAEA role in public information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, Hans-Friedrich

    1998-01-01

    It includes information on the relation that exists between the Division of Public Information of the International Atomic Energy Agency, and different journalists, in answering questions on nuclear energy and nuclear applications. Also, questions whenever there was a rumor or a report of a receives a growing number of E-mail letters from all over the world, on the same subjects. Increasingly, international organizations are contacted by journalists and the public, for information on incidents and accidents, in the nuclear or the radiation field. This article states that the interest on nuclear energy, isotopes and radiation is focusing in the public media on following points: the fear for an accident; the fear for radiation escaping; the belief that nuclear power plants are too expensive; the belief that electricity could be saved; the belief that nuclear wastes cannot be properly disposed; the fear for unsafe transport; the fears that the neighbors operate their plants carelessly; and fears that radiation treatment makes food or agricultural products radioactive or poisonous. (S. Grainger)

  9. The International Energy Agency`s role in world-wide wind energy development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rangi, R. [Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Ancona, D. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Wind energy is now being deployed world-wide at a rapidly increasing rate and the International Energy Agency (IEA) has a changing role in its growth. IEA was founded in 1974 within the framework of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) to collaborate on comprehensive international energy programs. IEA membership consists of eighteen parties from sixteen countries and the European Commission. Recently there has been increasing interest in IEA participation from both OECD and non-OECD countries. Non-OECD countries participating in various IEA Agreements include: China, India, Israel, Korea, and Russia. Because of its diverse international makeup, the IEA is viewed as a source of reliable technical and economic information. The World Bank has approached the Executive Committee for Wind Energy R & D, through the IEA Renewable Energy Working Party, to assist in the expansion of wind deployment. In addition, IEA is moving from R & D programs to include tracking of implementation incentives offered by its members.

  10. The International Atomic Energy Agency - Organization, Work and Services in Selected Fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Köteles, G.J.

    1979-01-01

    In an address to the 8th General Assembly of the United Nations (1953) the President of the United States suggested that Governments should begin to make joint contributions from their stockpiles of fissile materials to an international atomic energy agency which would be set up under the aegis of the United Nations. The fissile material so collected would be used to serve the peaceful pursuits of mankind. Experts would be mobilized to apply atomic energy to the needs of agriculture, medicine and other peaceful purposes and a special effort would be made to provide abundant electrical energy in the power-starved areas of the world. This suggestion was taken up. A Statute which defines the structure and purpose of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) was prepared by a group of nations and approved by a conference at the United Nations Headquarters in 1956. The Statute entered into force on 29 July 1957. The Agency's objectives, as defined in its Statute, are that it ''shall seek to accelerate and enlarge the contribution of atomic energy to peace, health and prosperity throughout the world. It shall ensure, as far as it is able, that assistance provided by it or at its request or under its supervision or control is not used in such a way as to further any military purpose''. To attain these objectives, the IAEA is authorized ''to encourage and assist research on, and development and practical application of, atomic energy for peaceful uses throughout the world; and, if requested to do so, to act as an intermediary for the purposes of securing the performance of services or the supplying of materials, equipment, or facilities by one member of the Agency for another''; to ''... assemble and make available in an accessible form the [scientific] information made available to it...'' and furthermore ''to make provision, ... for materials, services, equipment, and facilities to meet the

  11. The International Energy Agency collaboration in wind energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beurskens, H.J.M.; Pershagen, B.

    1991-07-01

    The International Energy Agency (IEA) wind energy agreements have provided a useful framework for international cooperative efforts during more than thirteen years. Nine comprehensive research Tasks have been successfully completed and three Tasks are currently in progress. The sharing of research and information has clearly contributed to the development of wind technology, has eliminated unnecessary redundancy in national programmes, has encouraged utilization of the most efficient approaches to solve common problems, and has created a cooperative spirit among the professional groups that seems to be unique. After a brief introduction on the activities of the IEA on wind energy an overview is given of the ongoing tasks and other current activities with regard to the subject. 1 fig., 5 tabs., 9 refs

  12. IAEA safeguards assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruemm, H.; Parisick, R.; Pushkarjov, V.; Shea, T.; Brach, E.

    1981-01-01

    This paper describes the safeguards program administered by the IAEA, which must provide assurance to the international community that agency safeguards have the capacity to deter diversion, if contemplated, to detect diversion, if undertaken, and to provide assurance that no diversions have occurred when none are detected. This assurance to the international community is based upon the capability of the Agency's safeguards program to detect diversion and its complementary effect of deterrance

  13. IAEA safeguards and classified materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilat, J.F.; Eccleston, G.W.; Fearey, B.L.; Nicholas, N.J.; Tape, J.W.; Kratzer, M.

    1997-01-01

    The international community in the post-Cold War period has suggested that the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) utilize its expertise in support of the arms control and disarmament process in unprecedented ways. The pledges of the US and Russian presidents to place excess defense materials, some of which are classified, under some type of international inspections raises the prospect of using IAEA safeguards approaches for monitoring classified materials. A traditional safeguards approach, based on nuclear material accountancy, would seem unavoidably to reveal classified information. However, further analysis of the IAEA's safeguards approaches is warranted in order to understand fully the scope and nature of any problems. The issues are complex and difficult, and it is expected that common technical understandings will be essential for their resolution. Accordingly, this paper examines and compares traditional safeguards item accounting of fuel at a nuclear power station (especially spent fuel) with the challenges presented by inspections of classified materials. This analysis is intended to delineate more clearly the problems as well as reveal possible approaches, techniques, and technologies that could allow the adaptation of safeguards to the unprecedented task of inspecting classified materials. It is also hoped that a discussion of these issues can advance ongoing political-technical debates on international inspections of excess classified materials

  14. The International Atomic Energy Agency's Laboratories Seibersdorf and Vienna. Meeting the challenges of research and international co-operation in the application of nuclear techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krippl, E.

    1999-08-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency therefore maintains a unique, multidisciplinary, analytical, research and training centre: the IAEA Laboratories, located at Seibersdorf near Vienna and at the Agency's Headquarters in the Vienna International Centre. They are organized in three branches: (i) the FAO/IAEA Agriculture and Biotechnology Laboratory: Soil Science, Plant Breeding, Animal Production and Health, Entomology, Agrochemicals; (ii) the Physics, Chemistry and Instrumentation Laboratory: Chemistry, Instrumentation, Dosimetry, Isotope Hydrology; (iii) the Safeguards Analytical Laboratory: Isotopic Analysis, Chemical Analysis, Clean Laboratory. 'The Mission of the IAEA Laboratories is to contribute to the implementation of the Agency's programmes in food and agriculture, human health, physical and chemical sciences, water resources, industry, environment, radiation protection and safeguards verification'. Together with a General Services and Safety Section, which provides logistics, information, industrial safety and maintenance services and runs a mechanical workshop, the three groups form the 'Seibersdorf Laboratories' and are part of the IAEA Department of Nuclear Sciences and Applications. The Laboratories contribute an important share to projects fostering peaceful applications of radiation and isotopes and radiation protection, and play a significant part in the nuclear verification mechanism. All activities are therefore planned and implemented in close co-operation with relevant divisions and departments of the IAEA. In specific sectors, the Laboratories also operate in conjunction with other organizations in the UN system, such as the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the World Health Organization (WHO) and the World Meteorological Organization (WMO), and with networks of national laboratories in Member States

  15. 78 FR 29749 - Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy; Agency Information Collection Extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-21

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy; Agency Information Collection Extension AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE..., DC 20503 And to Mr. Dana O'Hara, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EE- 2G), U.S...

  16. IAEA receives Iraq's nuclear-related declaration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency, Mohamed ElBaradei, announced that the IAEA received this evening, Sunday, 8 December 2002, at its Headquarters in Vienna, an approximately 2400 page declaration on Iraq's nuclear programme. The declaration consists of about 2100 pages in English and 300 pages in Arabic. The declaration was submitted by the Government of Iraq in response to paragraph 3 of Security Council resolution 1441 (8 November 2002), which requires Iraq to provide to UNMOVIC, the IAEA and to the Security Council, not later than 30 days of the date of that resolution, with 'currently accurate, full, and complete declaration of all aspects of its programmes to develop chemical, biological, and nuclear weapons, ballistic missiles, and other delivery systems... as well as all other chemical, biological, and nuclear programmes, including any which it claims are for purposes not related to weapon production or material'. 'The IAEA will immediately begin to assess this important new document,' said Mr. ElBaradei, 'including the painstaking and systematic cross-checking of the information provided by Iraq against information which the IAEA already has, information that it expects to receive from other Member States, as contemplated in resolution 1441, and results of past and present Agency verification activities.' Complete assessment of the declaration will be time consuming, particularly in light of the need to translate the 300 pages of Arabic text into English. However, the IAEA expects to be able to provide a preliminary analysis of the document to the Security Council within the next ten days, with a fuller assessment to be provided when it reports to the Council at the end of January. (IAEA)

  17. Geothermal energy in Denmark. The Committee for Geothermal Energy of the Danish Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-06-01

    The Danish Energy Agency has prepared a report on the Danish geothermal resources and their contribution to the national energy potential.Environmental and socio-economic consequences of geothermal power systems implementation are reviewed. Organizational models and financing of geothermal-seismic research are discussed, and the Committee of the Energy Agency for Geothermal Energy recommends financing of a pilot plant as well as a prompt elucidation of concession/licensing problems. (EG)

  18. The International Atomic Energy Agency's activities in radiation medicine and cancer: promoting global health through diplomacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deatsch-Kratochvil, Amanda N; Pascual, Thomas Neil; Kesner, Adam; Rosenblatt, Eduardo; Chhem, Rethy K

    2013-02-01

    Global health has been an issue of seemingly low political importance in comparison with issues that have direct bearing on countries' national security. Recently, health has experienced a "political revolution" or a rise in political importance. Today, we face substantial global health challenges, from the spread of infectious disease, gaps in basic maternal and child health care, to the globalization of cancer. A recent estimate states that the "overall lifetime risk of developing cancer (both sexes) is expected to rise from more than one in three to one in two by 2015." These issues pose significant threats to international health security. To successfully combat these grave challenges, the international community must embrace and engage in global health diplomacy, defined by scholars Thomas Novotny and Vicanne Adams as a political activity aimed at improving global health, while at the same time maintaining and strengthening international relations. The IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency) is an international organization with a unique mandate to "accelerate and enlarge the contribution of atomic energy to peace, health, and prosperity throughout the world." This article discusses global health diplomacy, reviews the IAEA's program activities in human health by focusing on radiation medicine and cancer, and the peaceful applications of atomic energy within the context of global health diplomacy. Copyright © 2013 Canadian Association of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Quality assurance measures applicable to IAEA anomaly and discrepancy resolution (ISPO Task D.52). Program for technical assistance to IAEA safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harms, N.L.; Smith, B.W.

    1984-11-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards program provides assurance to the international community that nations comply with their commitments for the peaceful use of nuclear energy. This assurance is based on the capabilities of the IAEA safeguards program to detect diversion of nuclear material. Anomalies and discrepancies, which occur in the event of a diversion or concealment, are detected as part of the IAEA safeguards program. Anomalies and discrepancies normally result from innocent causes and it is the purpose of the resolution process to determine the significance of them. The IAEA is instituting quality assurance measures for the IAEA inspection process. This paper reviews the anomaly and discrepancy resolution process and describes quality control measures which are the basis for quality assurance. 13 references, 6 tables

  20. IAEA: 17 countries are candidates for nuclear energy; AIEA: 17 pays candidats a l'energie nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2011-01-15

    In january 2011 IAEA announced that 17 countries had officially expressed their willingness to home nuclear power plants, they have filed applications for the construction of nuclear power plants. Among the countries concerned we find: Poland, Kuwait, Jordan, Morocco, Tunisia, Nigeria, Bangladesh, Thailand, Vietnam, Chile and Uruguay

  1. The IAEA safety standards for radiation, waste and nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, Abel J.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents a brief description of the standards for radiation, waste and nuclear safety established by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). It provides a historical overview of their development and also summarizes the standards' current preparation and review process. The final paragraphs offer an outlook on future developments. (author)

  2. Review of WHO/PAHO/IAEA recommendations concerning radiotherapy facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, G P [Worl Health Organization, Geneva (Switzerland). Radiation Medicine

    1996-08-01

    Since the mid 1960s the World Health Organization, the Pan American Health Organization, and the International Atomic Energy Agency have provided recommendations concerning radiotherapy services, including organization, staff requirements and facilities. These are contained in various reports of WHO, PAHO and IAEA, which are reviewed and summarized. (author). 9 refs.

  3. Design features to facilitate IAEA safeguards at light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasternak, T.; Glancy, J.; Goldman, L.; Swartz, J.

    1981-01-01

    Several studies have been performed recently to identify and analyze light water reactor (LWR) features that, if incorporated into the facility design, would facilitate the implementation of International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards. This paper presents results and conclusions of these studies. 2 refs

  4. Review of WHO/PAHO/IAEA recommendations concerning radiotherapy facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, G.P.

    1996-01-01

    Since the mid 1960s the World Health Organization, the Pan American Health Organization, and the International Atomic Energy Agency have provided recommendations concerning radiotherapy services, including organization, staff requirements and facilities. These are contained in various reports of WHO, PAHO and IAEA, which are reviewed and summarized. (author). 9 refs

  5. IAEA puts cyber security in focus for nuclear facilities in 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepherd, John

    2015-01-01

    Later in 2015 the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) will convene a special conference to discuss computer security, in the wake of cyber attacks on global financial institutions and government agencies that were increasingly in the news. According to the IAEA, the prevalence of IT security incidents in recent years involving the Stuxnet malware 'demonstrated that nuclear facilities can be susceptible to cyber attack'. The IAEA said this and other events have significantly raised global concerns over potential vulnerabilities and the possibility of a cyber attack, or a joint cyber-physical attack, that could impact on nuclear security. The IAEA has correctly identified that the use of computers and other digital electronic equipment in physical protection systems at nuclear facilities, as well as in facility safety systems, instrumentation, information processing and communication, 'continues to grow and presents an ever more likely target for cyber attack'. The agency's Vienna conference, to be held in June, will review emerging trends in computer security and areas that may still need to be addressed. The meeting follows a declaration of ministers of IAEA member states in 2013 that called on the agency to help raise awareness of the growing threat of cyber attacks and their potential impact on nuclear security. The conference is being organised 'to foster international cooperation in computer security as an essential element of nuclear security', the IAEA said. Details of the IAEA's 'International Conference on Computer Security in a Nuclear World: Expert Discussion and Exchange' are on the 'meetings' section of the agency's web site.

  6. The IAEA as a publisher

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1965-01-01

    One of the largest publishing enterprises in Vienna has developed in then Agency, incidental to its function of disseminating scientific information. The Agency recently completed its sixth year of scientific publication of literature dealing with the peaceful uses of atomic energy. Quite early in the history of IAEA, this work grew to considerable dimensions. In 1959 the programme consisted of two volumes in the Proceedings series, one in the Safety series, and four Technical Directories, making a total in that year of 18 000 books, in addition to those prepared for free distribution. In the following year, as Agency meetings and other activities developed, the list was much longer consisting of six volumes in the Proceedings series, two in the Safety series, two in the Technical Directory series, eight in the Review series, two in the Bibliographical series, three panel reports, one volume in the legal series and the first issue of 'Nuclear Fusion'. The total number of volumes sold was 24 000, in addition to the large number for free distribution. Thereafter, there was some difficulty in keeping up with the expanding demands, and some arrears of contract printing began to accumulate. It was therefore decided to introduce internal printing of Agency publications. The adoption of the 'cold type' method in 1962 led to considerable savings and faster production. During 1963, printing and binding equipment was installed which rendered the Agency independent of contractual services. Current policy is to print and bind internally all IAEA publications except the journal, 'Nuclear Fusion', Average annual production now consists of about twenty volumes of the proceedings of scientific meetings, six technical directories (the Directory of Nuclear Reactors has been published in its fifth edition), several bibliographies and numerous technical reports

  7. International Nuclear Information System 1983-1996. International Atomic Energy Agency Publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-03-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with the International Nuclear Information System (INIS). INIS was established in 1969 to announced the scientific literature published worldwide on the peaceful uses of nuclear energy. All books are published in English. It should be noted that prices of books are quoted in Austrian Schillings. The prices do not include local taxes and are subject to change without notice. All books in this catalogue are 21 x 30 cm, paper-bound, unless otherwise stated. In addition all books in this catalogue, except for the INIS Input Training Kit, are available on microfiche. For information on the microfiche versions, contact the INIS Clearinghouse of the IAEA

  8. International Energy Agency Ocean Energy Systems Task 10 Wave Energy Converter Modeling Verification and Validation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wendt, Fabian F.; Yu, Yi-Hsiang; Nielsen, Kim

    2017-01-01

    This is the first joint reference paper for the Ocean Energy Systems (OES) Task 10 Wave Energy Converter modeling verification and validation group. The group is established under the OES Energy Technology Network program under the International Energy Agency. OES was founded in 2001 and Task 10 ...

  9. International Atomic Energy Agency publications. Publications catalogue 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-03-01

    This Publications Catalogue lists all sales publications of the IAEA published in 2002, 2003 and forthcoming in early 2004. Most IAEA publications are issued in English, though some are also available in Arabic, Chinese, French, Russian or Spanish. This is indicated at the bottom of the book entry. A complete listing of all IAEA priced publications is available on the IAEA's web site: http://www.iaea.org/books

  10. Summary report of the 20th IAEA fusion energy conference (November 1-6, 2004, Vilamoura, Portugal)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-09-01

    Fusion Energy Conference has been held aiming to report and exchange the information concerning the nuclear fusion research every two years since 1961 by IAEA. The conference has authorities most in the field of the fusion research. The 20th Fusion Energy Conference was held at Vilamoura in Portugal on November 1st through 6th in 2004, and 700 researchers or more participated in the conference from 35 countries. This report is a summary of the conference that the JAERI researchers who participated in this conference (35 persons in total) have seen presentations of each contributed papers at the conference room and have understood from each point of view. The contents of this report are very comprehensible, because those are written from the viewpoint of each researchers of JAERI. The purpose of this report is to provide the information which is useful for many researchers to understand the latest study results over a wide field of fusion research. (author)

  11. The IAEA/WHO TLD postal programme for radiotherapy hospitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izewska, J.; Andreo, P.

    2000-01-01

    Since 1969 the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), together with the World Health Organization (WHO), has performed postal TLD audits to verify the calibration of radiotherapy beams in developing countries. A number of changes have recently been implemented to improve the efficiency of the IAEA/WHO TLD programme. The IAEA has increased the number of participants and reduced significantly the total turn-around time to provide results to the hospitals within the shortest possible time following the TLD irradiations. The IAEA has established a regular follow-up programme for hospitals with results outside acceptance limits of ±5%. The IAEA has, over 30 years, verified the calibration of more than 3300 clinical photon beams at approximately 1000 radiotherapy hospitals. Only 65% of those hospitals who receive TLDs for the first time have results within the acceptance limits, while more than 80% of the users that have benefited from a previous TLD audit are successful. The experience of the IAEA in TLD audits has been transferred to the national level. The IAEA offers a standardized TLD methodology, provides Guidelines and gives technical back-up to the national TLD networks. The unsatisfactory status of the dosimetry for radiotherapy, as noted in the past, is gradually improving however, the dosimetry practices in many hospitals in developing countries need to be revised in order to reach adequate conformity to hospitals that perform modern radiotherapy in Europe, USA and Australia. (author)

  12. International Atomic Energy Agency Annual Report 2010 [Russian Version

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The Annual Report 2010 aims to summarize only the significant activities of the Agency during the year in question The main part of the report, starting on page 17, generally follows the programme structure as given in The Agency's Programme and Budget 2010-2011 (GC(53)/5). The introductory chapter, 'Overview', seeks to provide a thematic analysis of the Agency's activities within the context of notable developments during the year More detailed information can be found in the latest editions of the Agency's Nuclear Safety Review, Nuclear Technology Review, Technical Cooperation Report and the Safeguards Statement and Background to the Safeguards Statement and Summary. For the convenience of readers, these documents are available on the CD-ROM attached to the inside back cover of this report. Additional information covering various aspects of the Agency's programme is provided on the attached CD-ROM and is also available on the Agency's web site at http://www.iaea.org./Publications/ Reports/index.html. Except where indicated, all sums of money are expressed in United States dollars. The designations employed and the presentation of material in this report do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the Secretariat concerning the legal status of any country or territory or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers. The mention of names of specific companies or products (whether or not indicated as registered) does not imply any intention to infringe proprietary rights, nor should it be construed as an endorsement or recommendation on the part of the Agency. The term 'non-nuclear-weapon State' is used as in the Final Document of the 1968 Conference of Non-Nuclear-Weapon States (United Nations document A/7277) and in the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) The term 'nuclear weapon State' is as used in the NPT.

  13. International Atomic Energy Agency Annual Report 2010 [French Version

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The Annual Report 2010 aims to summarize only the significant activities of the Agency during the year in question The main part of the report, starting on page 17, generally follows the programme structure as given in The Agency's Programme and Budget 2010-2011 (GC(53)/5). The introductory chapter, 'Overview', seeks to provide a thematic analysis of the Agency's activities within the context of notable developments during the year More detailed information can be found in the latest editions of the Agency's Nuclear Safety Review, Nuclear Technology Review, Technical Cooperation Report and the Safeguards Statement and Background to the Safeguards Statement and Summary. For the convenience of readers, these documents are available on the CD-ROM attached to the inside back cover of this report. Additional information covering various aspects of the Agency's programme is provided on the attached CD-ROM and is also available on the Agency's web site at http://www.iaea.org./Publications/ Reports/index.html. Except where indicated, all sums of money are expressed in United States dollars. The designations employed and the presentation of material in this report do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the Secretariat concerning the legal status of any country or territory or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers. The mention of names of specific companies or products (whether or not indicated as registered) does not imply any intention to infringe proprietary rights, nor should it be construed as an endorsement or recommendation on the part of the Agency. The term 'non-nuclear-weapon State' is used as in the Final Document of the 1968 Conference of Non-Nuclear-Weapon States (United Nations document A/7277) and in the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) The term 'nuclear weapon State' is as used in the NPT.

  14. International Atomic Energy Agency Annual Report 2010 [Chinese Version

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The Annual Report 2010 aims to summarize only the significant activities of the Agency during the year in question The main part of the report, starting on page 17, generally follows the programme structure as given in The Agency's Programme and Budget 2010-2011 (GC(53)/5). The introductory chapter, 'Overview', seeks to provide a thematic analysis of the Agency's activities within the context of notable developments during the year More detailed information can be found in the latest editions of the Agency's Nuclear Safety Review, Nuclear Technology Review, Technical Cooperation Report and the Safeguards Statement and Background to the Safeguards Statement and Summary. For the convenience of readers, these documents are available on the CD-ROM attached to the inside back cover of this report. Additional information covering various aspects of the Agency's programme is provided on the attached CD-ROM and is also available on the Agency's web site at http://www.iaea.org./Publications/ Reports/index.html. Except where indicated, all sums of money are expressed in United States dollars. The designations employed and the presentation of material in this report do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the Secretariat concerning the legal status of any country or territory or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers. The mention of names of specific companies or products (whether or not indicated as registered) does not imply any intention to infringe proprietary rights, nor should it be construed as an endorsement or recommendation on the part of the Agency. The term 'non-nuclear-weapon State' is used as in the Final Document of the 1968 Conference of Non-Nuclear-Weapon States (United Nations document A/7277) and in the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) The term 'nuclear weapon State' is as used in the NPT.

  15. International Atomic Energy Agency Annual Report 2010 [Chinese Version

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    The Annual Report 2010 aims to summarize only the significant activities of the Agency during the year in question The main part of the report, starting on page 17, generally follows the programme structure as given in The Agency's Programme and Budget 2010-2011 (GC(53)/5). The introductory chapter, 'Overview', seeks to provide a thematic analysis of the Agency's activities within the context of notable developments during the year More detailed information can be found in the latest editions of the Agency's Nuclear Safety Review, Nuclear Technology Review, Technical Cooperation Report and the Safeguards Statement and Background to the Safeguards Statement and Summary. For the convenience of readers, these documents are available on the CD-ROM attached to the inside back cover of this report. Additional information covering various aspects of the Agency's programme is provided on the attached CD-ROM and is also available on the Agency's web site at http://www.iaea.org./Publications/ Reports/index.html. Except where indicated, all sums of money are expressed in United States dollars. The designations employed and the presentation of material in this report do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the Secretariat concerning the legal status of any country or territory or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers. The mention of names of specific companies or products (whether or not indicated as registered) does not imply any intention to infringe proprietary rights, nor should it be construed as an endorsement or recommendation on the part of the Agency. The term 'non-nuclear-weapon State' is used as in the Final Document of the 1968 Conference of Non-Nuclear-Weapon States (United Nations document A/7277) and in the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) The term 'nuclear weapon State' is as used in the NPT.

  16. International Atomic Energy Agency Annual Report 2010 [Spanish Version

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The Annual Report 2010 aims to summarize only the significant activities of the Agency during the year in question The main part of the report, starting on page 17, generally follows the programme structure as given in The Agency's Programme and Budget 2010-2011 (GC(53)/5). The introductory chapter, 'Overview', seeks to provide a thematic analysis of the Agency's activities within the context of notable developments during the year More detailed information can be found in the latest editions of the Agency's Nuclear Safety Review, Nuclear Technology Review, Technical Cooperation Report and the Safeguards Statement and Background to the Safeguards Statement and Summary. For the convenience of readers, these documents are available on the CD-ROM attached to the inside back cover of this report. Additional information covering various aspects of the Agency's programme is provided on the attached CD-ROM and is also available on the Agency's web site at http://www.iaea.org./Publications/ Reports/index.html. Except where indicated, all sums of money are expressed in United States dollars. The designations employed and the presentation of material in this report do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the Secretariat concerning the legal status of any country or territory or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers. The mention of names of specific companies or products (whether or not indicated as registered) does not imply any intention to infringe proprietary rights, nor should it be construed as an endorsement or recommendation on the part of the Agency. The term 'non-nuclear-weapon State' is used as in the Final Document of the 1968 Conference of Non-Nuclear-Weapon States (United Nations document A/7277) and in the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) The term 'nuclear weapon State' is as used in the NPT.

  17. The Nuclear Energy Agency of the OECD through its history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Echavarri, L.

    2008-01-01

    This year, 2008, marks the 50th Anniversary of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA). During these years the Agency has adapted to the evolution of the world energy situation. At the beginning the Agency launches international collaboration projects to establish the technological bases required for nuclear energy, then helps member countries in the construction of nuclear power plants and later analyzes the safety criteria as a consequence of the Three Miles Island and Chernobyl accidents. Based on this experience, the NEA faces the X XI Century prepared to contribute, even more, to a better international collaboration for a safe, environmentally friendly and economical use of the nuclear energy. (Author)

  18. Science serving people. International Atomic Energy Agency technical co-operation for development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    This brochure tells the story of how the IAEA is helping to harness knowledge to promote development and deliver real benefits to the poor. It demonstrates how nuclear science and technology applications are being employed to overcome the challenges of water scarcity, food insecurity, malnutrition, malaria, environmental degradation and many other problems. It also shows how the complementary development, safety, and security initiatives of the IAEA are fulfilling the 'Atoms for Peace' mandate of the Agency in the developing world.

  19. Science serving people. International Atomic Energy Agency technical co-operation for development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-07-01

    This brochure tells the story of how the IAEA is helping to harness knowledge to promote development and deliver real benefits to the poor. It demonstrates how nuclear science and technology applications are being employed to overcome the challenges of water scarcity, food insecurity, malnutrition, malaria, environmental degradation and many other problems. It also shows how the complementary development, safety, and security initiatives of the IAEA are fulfilling the 'Atoms for Peace' mandate of the Agency in the developing world

  20. Nuclear non-proliferation states urged to conclude Safeguards Agreement with International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The document contains a brief presentation of the annual report of the IAEA, the statement of the Director General of the IAEA at the General Assembly Plenary with emphasis on Agency's actions to strengthen safeguards, and statements made by the representatives of Brazil, Finland, Mexico, United States, Lithuania, Cuba, Czech Republic, Japan, Egypt, Ukraine, South Africa, India, Myanmar, and the Russian Federation at the 46th Meeting, on 4 November 1999

  1. Science serving people. International Atomic Energy Agency technical co-operation for development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-12-01

    This brochure tells the story of how the IAEA is helping to harness knowledge to promote development and deliver real benefits to the poor. It demonstrates how nuclear science and technology applications are being employed to overcome the challenges of water scarcity, food insecurity, malnutrition, malaria, environmental degradation and many other problems. It also shows how the complementary development, safety, and security initiatives of the IAEA are fulfilling the 'Atoms for Peace' mandate of the Agency in the developing world

  2. Using research metrics to evaluate the International Atomic Energy Agency guidelines on quality assurance for R&D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodnarczuk, M.

    1994-06-01

    The objective of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Guidelines on Quality Assurance for R&D is to provide guidance for developing quality assurance (QA) programs for R&D work on items, services, and processes important to safety, and to support the siting, design, construction, commissioning, operation, and decommissioning of nuclear facilities. The standard approach to writing papers describing new quality guidelines documents is to present a descriptive overview of the contents of the document. I will depart from this approach. Instead, I will first discuss a conceptual framework of metrics for evaluating and improving basic and applied experimental science as well as the associated role that quality management should play in understanding and implementing these metrics. I will conclude by evaluating how well the IAEA document addresses the metrics from this conceptual framework and the broader principles of quality management.

  3. Regulation and control by international organizations in the context of a nuclear accident. The International Atomic Energy Agency and the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyners, P.; Lellouche, E.

    1988-01-01

    IAEA and NEA rapidly reoriented their work programmes to respond to the problems raised by the Chernobyl accident. This chapter describes both Agencies' statutory responsabilities, their work in the areas of radiation protection, nuclear safety and nuclear liability and the actions they took post-Chernobyl to increase international co-operation for prevention and management of nuclear accidents and their consequences (NEA) [fr

  4. Containment and surveillance -- A principle IAEA safeguards measure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonnier, C.S.

    1997-01-01

    In October 1954, the Statue of the IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency) had been signed by 70 nations. The Agency was established in 1957, and at the end of its first year of operation 130 professionals were employed in all departments. By the end of 1990, the number of professionals in the Safeguards Department had increased to over 270, over 200 of whom are designated inspectors. One of the unique features of the IAEA which directly interfaces with Member States is that of on-site inspections by international officials of the IAEA. This growth cycle, spanning some 40 years, has produced a variety of interesting subjects (legal, technical, political, etc.) for recollection, discussion, and study. This paper addresses the specific subject of technical means to maintain continuity of knowledge between inspection intervals--classically referred to as Containment and Surveillance

  5. IAEA Sets Up Team to Drive Nuclear Safety Action Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Full text: The International Atomic Energy Agency is setting up a Nuclear Safety Action Team to oversee prompt implementation of the IAEA Action Plan on Nuclear Safety and ensure proper coordination among all stakeholders. The 12-point Action Plan, drawn up in the wake of the Fukushima Daiichi accident, was approved by the Agency's Board of Governors on 13 September and endorsed by all 151 Member States at its General Conference last week. The team will work within the Agency's Department of Nuclear Safety and Security, headed by Deputy Director General Denis Flory, and will coordinate closely with the Director General's Office for Policy. ''The Action Plan requires immediate follow-up,'' Director General Yukiya Amano said. ''This compact, dedicated team will assist Deputy Director General Flory in implementing the measures agreed in the Action Plan.'' Gustavo Caruso, Head of the Regulatory Activities Section in the IAEA's Division of Installation Safety, has been designated as the team's Special Coordinator for the implementation of the Action Plan. The IAEA has already started implementing its responsibilities under the Action Plan, including development of an IAEA methodology for stress tests for nuclear power plants. The methodology will be ready in October. (IAEA)

  6. Safeguards Implementation Practices Guide on Facilitating IAEA Verification Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-12-15

    The IAEA implements safeguards pursuant to agreements concluded with States. It is in the interests of both States and the IAEA to cooperate to facilitate the practical implementation of safeguards. Such cooperation is explicitly required under all types of safeguards agreement. Effective cooperation depends upon States and the IAEA sharing a common understanding of their respective rights and obligations. To address this, in 2012 the IAEA published Services Series 21, Guidance for States Implementing Comprehensive Safeguards Agreements and Additional Protocols, which aimed at enhancing understanding of the safeguards obligations of both States and the IAEA and at improving their cooperation in safeguards implementation. States may establish different processes and procedures at the national level, and set up different systems as required to meet their safeguards obligations. Indeed, a variety of approaches are to be expected, owing to such differences as the size and complexity of States’ nuclear programmes and their regulatory framework. The purpose of this Safeguards Implementation Practices (SIP) Guide is to share the experiences and good practices as well as the lessons learned by both States and the IAEA, acquired over the many decades of safeguards implementation. The information contained in the SIP Guides is provided for explanatory purposes and use of the Guides is not mandatory. The descriptions in the SIP Guides have no legal status and are not intended to add to, subtract from, amend or derogate from, in any way, the rights and obligations of the IAEA and the States set forth in The Structure and Content of Agreements between the Agency and States Required in Connection with the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (issued as INFCIRC/153 (Corrected)) and Model Protocol Additional to the Agreement(s) between State(s) and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards (issued as INFCIRC/540 (Corrected)). This SIP

  7. IAEA calls for urgent action on nuclear situation in Iraq

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    Full text: The Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Dr. Mohamed ElBaradei, called on the United States and other Coalition authorities to allow IAEA experts to return to Iraq to address a possible radiological emergency there. 'I am deeply concerned by the almost daily reports of looting and destruction at nuclear sites and about the potential radiological safety and security implications of nuclear and radiological materials that may no longer be under control.' Such reports have described among other things yellow cake emptied on the ground from containers then taken for domestic use, and radioactive sources being stolen and removed from their shielding. 'We have a moral responsibility to establish the facts without delay and take urgent remedial action,' said Dr. ElBaradei. As hostilities in Iraq were coming to an end, Dr. ElBaradei wrote on 10 April to the US government bringing its attention to the need to secure the nuclear material stored at Tuwaitha - Iraq's nuclear research centre - and under IAEA seal since 1991. The IAEA also provided the United States with information about the nuclear material, radioactive sources, and nuclear waste in Iraq. The IAEA received oral assurances that physical protection of the site was in place; but following reports of looting there and at other sites, Dr. ElBaradei wrote again on 29 April, emphasizing the responsibility of the Coalition forces to maintain appropriate protection over the materials in question. This includes natural and low-enriched uranium, radioactive sources such as Cobalt 60 and Caesium 137, and nuclear waste. Dr. ElBaradei regrets that the IAEA has to date not received a response. He again urged that the Agency be allowed to send a safety and security team to Iraq so that a potentially serious humanitarian situation can be addressed without further delay. The IAEA has experienced international teams of radiation safety, nuclear security and emergency response specialists

  8. Safeguards Implementation Practices Guide on Facilitating IAEA Verification Activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The IAEA implements safeguards pursuant to agreements concluded with States. It is in the interests of both States and the IAEA to cooperate to facilitate the practical implementation of safeguards. Such cooperation is explicitly required under all types of safeguards agreement. Effective cooperation depends upon States and the IAEA sharing a common understanding of their respective rights and obligations. To address this, in 2012 the IAEA published Services Series 21, Guidance for States Implementing Comprehensive Safeguards Agreements and Additional Protocols, which aimed at enhancing understanding of the safeguards obligations of both States and the IAEA and at improving their cooperation in safeguards implementation. States may establish different processes and procedures at the national level, and set up different systems as required to meet their safeguards obligations. Indeed, a variety of approaches are to be expected, owing to such differences as the size and complexity of States’ nuclear programmes and their regulatory framework. The purpose of this Safeguards Implementation Practices (SIP) Guide is to share the experiences and good practices as well as the lessons learned by both States and the IAEA, acquired over the many decades of safeguards implementation. The information contained in the SIP Guides is provided for explanatory purposes and use of the Guides is not mandatory. The descriptions in the SIP Guides have no legal status and are not intended to add to, subtract from, amend or derogate from, in any way, the rights and obligations of the IAEA and the States set forth in The Structure and Content of Agreements between the Agency and States Required in Connection with the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (issued as INFCIRC/153 (Corrected)) and Model Protocol Additional to the Agreement(s) between State(s) and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards (issued as INFCIRC/540 (Corrected)). This SIP

  9. Arrangement between the International Atomic Energy Agency and the World Health Organization concerning the establishment and operation of a network of Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the World Health Organization (WHO), recognizing that they have been co-operating in the operation of a network of Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratories (the Network), established pursuant to a Working Arrangement, dated 5 April 1976; and desiring to continue this co-operation in accordance with Article V of the relationship agreement concluded by IAEA and WHO in 1959; hereby enter a new arrangement to guide their work in operating the Network and providing assistance, when needed, to individual Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratories (SSDLs). The purpose of this Arrangement is to set forth responsibilities of IAEA and WHO in the operation and support of the Network and to establish criteria for SSDLs

  10. Recommended observational skills training for IAEA safeguards inspections. Final report: Recommended observational skills training for IAEA safeguards inspections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toquam, J.L.; Morris, F.A.

    1994-09-01

    This is the second of two reports prepared to assist the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA or Agency) in enhancing the effectiveness of its international safeguards inspections through inspector training in {open_quotes}Observational Skills{close_quotes}. The first (Phase 1) report was essentially exploratory. It defined Observational Skills broadly to include all appropriate cognitive, communications, and interpersonal techniques that have the potential to help IAEA safeguards inspectors function more effectively. It identified 10 specific Observational Skills components, analyzed their relevance to IAEA safeguards inspections, and reviewed a variety of inspection programs in the public and private sectors that provide training in one or more of these components. The report concluded that while it should be possible to draw upon these other programs in developing Observational Skills training for IAEA inspectors, the approaches utilized in these programs will likely require significant adaption to support the specific job requirements, policies, and practices that define the IAEA inspector`s job. The overall objective of this second (Phase 2) report is to provide a basis for the actual design and delivery of Observational Skills training to IAEA inspectors. The more specific purposes of this report are to convey a fuller understanding of the potential application of Observational Skills to the inspector`s job, describe inspector perspectives on the relevance and importance of particular Observational Skills, identify the specific Observational Skill components that are most important and relevant to enhancing safeguards inspections, and make recommendations as to Observational Skills training for the IAEA`s consideration in further developing its Safeguards training program.

  11. Comparison of energy sources in terms of their full-energy-chain emission factors of greenhouse gases. Proceedings of an IAEA advisory group meeting/workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-07-01

    Sustainable and therefore climate benign energy planning is becoming a cornerstone of national energy policies in many countries that ratified the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. The ratification implies a commitment to lowering greenhouse gas emissions by the so-called Annex I countries, i.e. the developed countries. Sustainable energy planning requires comparing the advantages and disadvantages of different energy sources. Such comparison cannot be done objectively without accounting for the emissions of all greenhouse gases (GHGs) - not only CO{sub 2} - from the whole energy chain, from ``cradle to grave``. The greenhouse gas emissions upstream and downstream of the energy conversion step are inherently associated with the production of any energy carrier, such as electricity. Therefore, analysis of the emissions of all greenhouse gases from the full energy chain FENCH is considered to be the only fair approach in comparing energy sources for climate benign energy planning. This publication reports on the IAEA Advisory Group Meeting on Analysis of Net Energy Balance and Full-Energy-Chain Greenhouse Gas Emissions for Nuclear and Other Energy Systems, held in Beijing, China, 4-7 October 1994. Refs., figs., tabs.

  12. Comparison of energy sources in terms of their full-energy-chain emission factors of greenhouse gases. Proceedings of an IAEA advisory group meeting/workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-07-01

    Sustainable and therefore climate benign energy planning is becoming a cornerstone of national energy policies in many countries that ratified the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. The ratification implies a commitment to lowering greenhouse gas emissions by the so-called Annex I countries, i.e. the developed countries. Sustainable energy planning requires comparing the advantages and disadvantages of different energy sources. Such comparison cannot be done objectively without accounting for the emissions of all greenhouse gases (GHGs) - not only CO 2 - from the whole energy chain, from ''cradle to grave''. The greenhouse gas emissions upstream and downstream of the energy conversion step are inherently associated with the production of any energy carrier, such as electricity. Therefore, analysis of the emissions of all greenhouse gases from the full energy chain FENCH is considered to be the only fair approach in comparing energy sources for climate benign energy planning. This publication reports on the IAEA Advisory Group Meeting on Analysis of Net Energy Balance and Full-Energy-Chain Greenhouse Gas Emissions for Nuclear and Other Energy Systems, held in Beijing, China, 4-7 October 1994. Refs., figs., tabs

  13. IAEA Catalogue of Services for Nuclear Infrastructure Development. Rev. 1, April 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-04-01

    This IAEA Catalogue offers a wide range of services to Member States embarking on a new nuclear power programme or expanding an existing one. A new IAEA Catalogue of Services for Nuclear Infrastructure Development helps Member States to identify and request IAEA assistance for national organizations at different stages of the development or expansion of a nuclear power programme. This IAEA Catalogue of Services is presented in two tables. It is based on the IAEA Milestones Approach for nuclear power infrastructure development, documented in 'Milestones in the Development of a National Infrastructure for Nuclear Power' (IAEA Nuclear Energy Series NG-G-3.1). The two tables allow users to identify and select available IAEA services by: i) The three phases of the IAEA Milestones Approach, or ii) Organizations typically involved in the development of a nuclear power programme: the government / Nuclear Energy Programme Implementing Organization (NEPIO), the regulatory body and the owner operator of a nuclear power plant. This Catalogue includes information on the following IAEA services: i) Workshops / Training Courses; ii) Expert Missions / Advisory Services; iii) Review Missions / Peer Reviews; iv) Training tools and networks. The Catalogue lists both existing IAEA services and those being developed for the 19 issues to be addressed in developing a national nuclear infrastructure. Each existing service is linked to a relevant IAEA webpage that either describes a particular service or gives practical examples of the type of assistance that the Agency offers (e.g. workshops or missions). The owners of these webpages can be contacted for more detailed information or to request assistance. This IAEA Catalogue of Services will be updated regularly

  14. OECD Nuclear Energy Agency. 3. Activity report, 1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    The main activities of the Agency are reviewed: study of nuclear power trends; regulatory aspects of nuclear power; technical developments: Eurochemic, Halden, Dragon, food irradiation, gas-cooled fast reactors, direct conversion, isotopic batteries; nuclear energy information

  15. INVOLVEMENT OF THE FACULTY OF MINING, GEOLOGY & PETROLEUM ENGINEERING IN TECHNICAL COOPERATION OF THE REPUBLIC OF CROATIA WITH THE INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biljana Kovačević Zelić

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the question of energy production from nuclear sources considering the growing demand for energy worldwide, the advantages and disadvantages of using nuclear energy. International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA promotes the peaceful use of nuclear energy, and the State Office for Radiological and Nuclear Safety (DZNRS monitors the use of ionizing radiation sources in Republic of Croatia. Paper describes the role of the IAEA technical cooperation program involving Croatia (INT9173 "Training in Radioactive Waste Disposal Technologies in Underground Research Facilities - URFs". The importance of the involvement of Croatian scientists and experts, in the said project of technical cooperation in the field of radioactive waste management, is presented through activities conducted during the period since 2009 to date, taking into account Croatia's obligations regarding the disposal of radioactive waste generated by operation of the nuclear power plant Krško (the paper is published in Croatian.

  16. Nuclear power plant operating experiences from the IAEA / Nea incident reporting system 2002-2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The Incident Reporting System (IRS) is an essential element of the international operating experience feedback system for nuclear power plants. The IRS is jointly operated and managed by the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), a semi-autonomous body within the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), a specialized agency within the United Nations System. (author)

  17. Work of the IAEA laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1962-01-01

    Most of the IAEA laboratory facilities a r e now in full operation, and work has begun on a number of problems that can best be dealt with by an international centre. The laboratory at Seibersdorf, about 30 km from the Agency's headquarters in Vienna, started functioning in October last year, and a certain amount of work is also being done with a few facilities installed in the headquarters building. During the past year laboratory work has steadily increased and several programmes are now fully established. The Agency's laboratory is not intended to be a centre of independent research; in the main, its scope is governed by the scientific requirements of the Agency's programmes of assistance to its Member States and its role in connection with safety and security in atomic energy work. The functions of the laboratory are thus limited to (a) measurement of radionuclides and preparation of radioactive standards, (b) calibration and adaptation of measuring equipment, (c) quality control of special materials for nuclear technology, (d) measurement and analyses in connection with the Agency's safeguards and health and safety programme, and (e) services to Member States that can be provided with the facilities established for these tasks

  18. Role of executive agencies for energy efficiency with a view on activities of Serbian Energy Efficiency Agency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovačić Bojan J.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Many countries, particularly in Europe, have executive energy efficiency agencies at national, regional and local levels that are organized in different ways. For all of them, it is common that there are existing strategic needs in their countries for enhancement of conditions and measures for rational use of energy and fuels. Serbian Energy Efficiency Agency was established in 2002 within the reform of the energy sector in Serbia and its current status was defined in 2004 by the Energy Law. It contributes to the improvement of social responsibility towards energy in all structures of the state and society, by proposing energy efficiency incentives, promoting importance of energy efficiency, as well as by managing energy efficiency and renewable energy programs and projects.

  19. Recruitment of U.S. citizens for vacancies in IAEA Safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pepper, S.E.; Decaro, D.; Williams, G.; Carelli, J.; Assur, M.

    1999-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) relies on its member states to assist with recruiting qualified individuals for positions within the IAEA's secretariat. It is important that persons within and outside the US nuclear and safeguards industries become aware of career opportunities available at the IAEA, and informed about important vacancies. The IAEA has established an impressive web page to advertise opportunities for employment. However, additional effort is necessary to ensure that there is sufficient awareness in the US of these opportunities, and assistance for persons interested in taking positions at the IAEA. In 1998, the Subgroup on Safeguards Technical Support (SSTS) approved a special task under the US Support Program to IAEA Safeguards (USSP) for improving US efforts to identify qualified candidates for vacancies in IAEA's Department of Safeguards. The International Safeguards Project Office (ISPO) developed a plan that includes increased advertising, development of a web page to support US recruitment efforts, feedback from the US Mission in Vienna, and interaction with other recruitment services provided by US professional organizations. The main purpose of this effort is to educate US citizens about opportunities at the IAEA so that qualified candidates can be identified for the IAEA's consideration

  20. CNEN, IAEA and ISO normative requirements for measurement management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kibrit, Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    International standard ISO 10012:2003 establishes requirements for measurement management systems, including requirements for measurement processes and measuring equipment. ISO 9001:2008 presents requirements for quality management systems, including requirements for the control of monitoring and measuring equipment. ISO 17025:2005 presents general requirements for the competence of testing and calibration laboratories. In the nuclear field the requirements for measurement management are established by standards published by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), and in Brazil, by the National Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN). The present paper presents and discusses the normative requirements for measurement management, considering requirements established by National Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN), International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), and International Organisation for Standardisation (ISO). (author)

  1. Declaration by the IAEA Ministerial Conference on Nuclear Safety in Vienna on 20 June 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    We, the Ministers of the Member States of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), gathered in Vienna in light of the serious consequences of the nuclear accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station caused by the Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami to direct, under the leading role of the IAEA, the process of learning and acting upon lessons to strengthen nuclear safety, emergency preparedness and radiation protection of people and the environment worldwide [es

  2. IAEA programme to support development and validation of advanced design and safety analysis codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, J., E-mail: J.H.Choi@iaea.org [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

    2013-07-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has been organized many international collaboration programs to support the development and validation of design and safety analysis computer codes for nuclear power plants. These programs are normally implemented with a frame of Coordinated Research Project (CRP) or International Collaborative Standard Problem (ICSP). This paper introduces CRPs and ICSPs currently being organized or recently completed by IAEA for this purpose. (author)

  3. Declaration by the IAEA Ministerial Conference on Nuclear Safety in Vienna on 20 June 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    We, the Ministers of the Member States of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), gathered in Vienna in light of the serious consequences of the nuclear accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station caused by the Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami to direct, under the leading role of the IAEA, the process of learning and acting upon lessons to strengthen nuclear safety, emergency preparedness and radiation protection of people and the environment worldwide

  4. IAEA regulatory initiatives for the air transport of large quantities of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luna, R.E.; Wangler, M.W.; Selling, H.A.

    1992-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has been laboring since 1988 over a far reaching change to its model regulations (IAEA, 1990) for the transport of radioactive materials (RAM). This change could impact the manner in which certain classes of radioactive materials are shipped by air and change some of the basic tenets of radioactive material transport regulations around the world. This report discusses issues associated with air transport regulations

  5. The management of low activity radioactive waste: IAEA guidance and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louvat, D.; Rowat, J.H.; Potier, J.M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the safety standards and reports of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) applicable to the management and disposal of low activity radioactive waste and provides some historical perspective on their development. Some of the most important current issues in the area of low activity radioactive waste management are discussed in the context of related ongoing IAEA activities. At the end of the paper, a number of issues and questions are raised for consideration and discussion at this symposium. (author)

  6. Declaration by the IAEA Ministerial Conference on Nuclear Safety in Vienna on 20 June 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    We, the Ministers of the Member States of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), gathered in Vienna in light of the serious consequences of the nuclear accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station caused by the Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami to direct, under the leading role of the IAEA, the process of learning and acting upon lessons to strengthen nuclear safety, emergency preparedness and radiation protection of people and the environment worldwide [fr

  7. Case study application of the IAEA safeguards assessment methodology to a mixed oxide fuel fabrication facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swartz, J.; McDaniel, T.

    1981-01-01

    Science Applications, Inc. has prepared a case study illustrating the application of an assessment methodology to an international system for safeguarding mixed oxide (MOX) fuel fabrication facilities. This study is the second in a series of case studies which support an effort by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and an international Consultant Group to develop a methodology for assessing the effectiveness of IAEA safeguards. 3 refs

  8. International Energy Agency 2013 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-03-01

    The IEA Executive Director's Annual Report 2013 is the second of a regular annual series reporting on the IEA’s operational and organisational achievements, as well as challenges and events over the year. It was presented to the IEA Governing Board and is also released publicly to ensure transparency and to take stock of the organisation's activities from a strategic perspective. 2013 was a banner year for the IEA, given continued changes in the global energy economy as well as the IEA Ministerial meeting in November which brought together Energy Ministers from all 28 IEA member countries, accession countries Chile and Estonia, seven key partner countries - Brazil, China, India, Indonesia, Mexico, Russian Federation and South Africa - as well as more that 30 top-level executives from the energy industry. Key Ministerial outcomes included the first IEA Ministers' Joint Statement on Climate Change and a declaration of association by six key partner countries to build multilateral cooperation with the IEA.

  9. Communication of 19 June 1997 received from the resident representative of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland to the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-07-01

    The document reproduces the text of a letter dated 19 June 1997 received by the Director General of the IAEA from the Resident Representative of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, referring to the Revised Supplementary Agreement Concerning the Provision of Technical Assistance by the International Atomic Energy Agency to the Government of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland on behalf of the Government of Hong Kong done at Vienna on 4 February 1983

  10. The standards of Radiation Protection of IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butragueno, J. L.

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear Safety and Radiation Protection are technological disciplines whose international character have been recognised since the very beginning. Safety culture and the defense in depth criterium address in the same way this international collaboration. The International Atomic Energy Agency, with headquater in Vienna, is specially sensitive to this aspect and a significant amount of resources has been dedicated to the promotion of a closer international collaboration through the promotion of two complementary programs: the Convention on Nuclear Safety and the Convention on Rad waste Management, and the reconstruction of a great piramide of standards, that staring with Fundamental Principles, is followed with a set of Basic Safety Standards and completed with Safety Requirements and additional technical information, that provide practical ways to implement the Fundamental Principles. This article describe briefly the RASS Program of the IAEA (Radiation Safety Standards) and the work of the Technical Committees established to assess the Director General of the IAEA in this task. (Author)

  11. Nuclear energy in the service of development and peace: the role of the International Atomic Energy Agency. New Delhi, 19 February 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    1999-01-01

    The document reproduces the text of the conference given by the Director General of the IAEA at a meeting held at the India Habitat Centre, New Delhi, 19 February 1999. The following aspects from the Agency's activity are presented to emphasize its role in the use of nuclear energy for development and peace: nuclear power for electricity production, nuclear safety, transfer of nuclear technologies through the technical co-operation programme, safeguards and verification including the strengthened safeguards system, present verification activities and future prospects of verification, illicit trafficking of nuclear materials and other radioactive sources

  12. 78 FR 16665 - International Energy Agency Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-18

    ... this notice is to permit attendance by representatives of U.S. company members of the IAB at a meeting... meeting among company representatives at the same location at 8:30 a.m. on March 26. The agenda for this... Refining Crisis 8. Middle East Energy Exports and the Arab Spring 9. The Turmoil in North Africa and the...

  13. 75 FR 67711 - International Energy Agency Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-03

    .... Opening Session Address. 3. Introduction to IEA Emergency Response Policies and Objectives. 4. How the Global Oil Market Works. 5. Natural Gas Market. 6. IEA Energy Statistics and Oil Data Systems. 7. The.... Discussion (Plenary). Day 2 6. Introduction (Plenary). 7. Simulation (Breakout Groups). 8. Discussion...

  14. 77 FR 69613 - International Energy Agency Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-20

    ... Policy and Conservation Act (42 U.S.C. 6272(c)(1)(A)(i)) (EPCA), the following notice of meeting is... the IEA 2. IEA Emergency Response Policies, Market Assessment, Industry Perspective 3. IEA Oil Data...)(A)(ii) of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act (42 U.S.C. 6272(c)(1)(A)(ii)), the meeting of the...

  15. 76 FR 14003 - International Energy Agency Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-15

    ... Hub? 9. Workshop Scene Setter --Commodity Derivatives Market and Recent Regulatory Trends 10. Other... Financial Market Participants on Energy Futures Markets 1. How do the investment strategies of financial... the Oil Market (SOM) on March 22; and on March 23 and March 24 in connection with a meeting of the SEQ...

  16. Prospects of nuclear power in Finland. A joint study by the IAEA and the Finnish Atomic Energy Commission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1960-12-01

    Nuclear power is one of the most important practical applications of atomic energy and a major function of the Agency is to further its development. It became apparent in the Agency's early studies in this field that too often the economics of nuclear power were discussed in general terms and without reference to the multitude of conditions governing each specific power situation, which vary widely from country to country and even within a given country. It was also found that the few specific studies which existed had been carried out in countries where it had already been decided to establish a nuclear power station or even to embark on a full-scale nuclear power program. It was therefore considered that the prospects of nuclear power throughout the world could be realistically assessed only on the basis of a series of studies of as wide a range of different actual situations as possible. At its fourth regular session, the General Conference of the Agency adopted a resolution calling for the continuation of nuclear power surveys in Member States at their request. The Government of Finland invited the Agency to participate in a study of the prospects of nuclear power in Finland during the next decade. The desire of the Government of Finland was, on the one hand, to benefit from the specialized experience of the Agency, and on the other, to make a contribution to the Agency's program of furthering the development of nuclear power. We fully appreciate the value of this contribution and consider it very important for the Agency's program that this first nuclear power study has been undertaken together with a Member State which has long experience in conventional power planning and has consistently looked at nuclear power within the general context of the problem of meeting her growing power needs. The Board of Governors of the International Atomic Energy Agency approved the Agency's participation in the study and work began in March 1960. A joint study group was set

  17. Prospects of nuclear power in Finland. A joint study by the IAEA and the Finnish Atomic Energy Commission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1960-01-01

    Nuclear power is one of the most important practical applications of atomic energy and a major function of the Agency is to further its development. It became apparent in the Agency's early studies in this field that too often the economics of nuclear power were discussed in general terms and without reference to the multitude of conditions governing each specific power situation, which vary widely from country to country and even within a given country. It was also found that the few specific studies which existed had been carried out in countries where it had already been decided to establish a nuclear power station or even to embark on a full-scale nuclear power program. It was therefore considered that the prospects of nuclear power throughout the world could be realistically assessed only on the basis of a series of studies of as wide a range of different actual situations as possible. At its fourth regular session, the General Conference of the Agency adopted a resolution calling for the continuation of nuclear power surveys in Member States at their request. The Government of Finland invited the Agency to participate in a study of the prospects of nuclear power in Finland during the next decade. The desire of the Government of Finland was, on the one hand, to benefit from the specialized experience of the Agency, and on the other, to make a contribution to the Agency's program of furthering the development of nuclear power. We fully appreciate the value of this contribution and consider it very important for the Agency's program that this first nuclear power study has been undertaken together with a Member State which has long experience in conventional power planning and has consistently looked at nuclear power within the general context of the problem of meeting her growing power needs. The Board of Governors of the International Atomic Energy Agency approved the Agency's participation in the study and work began in March 1960. A joint study group was set

  18. Communication of 29 September 1998 received from the Permanent Mission of Qatar to the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The document reproduces the text of a Communication received at IAEA on 29 September 1998 from the Permanent Mission of Qatar to the IAEA in connection with the vote of the delegation of Qatar to the forty-second session of the Agency's General Conference regarding the agenda item 19 on the 'Implementation of United Nations Security Council resolution relating to Iraq'

  19. IAEA Sends International Fact-finding Expert Mission to Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Full text: The International Atomic Energy Agency will dispatch an international expert fact-finding mission to Japan. Based upon the agreement between the IAEA and the Government of Japan, the mission, comprising nearly 20 international and IAEA experts from a dozen countries, will visit Japan between 24 May and 2 June 2011. Under the leadership of Mr. Mike Weightman, HM Chief Inspector of Nuclear Installations of the United Kingdom, the mission will conduct fact-finding activities at Tokyo Electric Power Company's Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Station (NPS) site and in other locations. The expert mission will make a preliminary assessment of the safety issues linked with TEPCO's Fukushima Dai-ichi NPS accident following the Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami. During the mission, areas that need further exploration or assessment based on the IAEA safety standards will also be identified. In the course of the IAEA mission, the international experts will become acquainted with the Japanese lessons learned from the accident and will share their experience and expertise in their fields of competence with the Japanese authorities. Mr. Weightman will present the mission's report at the Ministerial Conference on Nuclear Safety organised by the IAEA in Vienna from 20 to 24 June 2011, as an important input in the process of reviewing and strengthening the global nuclear safety framework that will be launched by the Conference. (IAEA)

  20. IAEA support for the establishment of nuclear security education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braunegger-Guelich, Andrea; Rukhlo, Vladimir

    2010-01-01

    The threat of nuclear terrorism has not diminished. In response to the concerns of States, an international nuclear security framework has emerged through the establishment of a number of legally binding and non-binding international instruments which obligates or commits States to carry out a number of actions to protect against nuclear terrorism. In this context, the need for human resource development programmes in nuclear security was underscored at several International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) General Conferences and Board of Governors' Meetings. In the pursuit of this need, the IAEA has developed - together with academics and nuclear security experts from Member States - a technical guidance entitled IAEA Nuclear Security Series No. 12 - Educational Programme in Nuclear Security that consists of a model Master of Science (M.Sc.) and a certificate programme in nuclear security. The paper sets out IAEA efforts to support the establishment of nuclear security at educational institutions, underlines particularly the objective and content of the IAEA Nuclear Security Series No. 12 and discusses the efforts made by the IAEA to establish a network among educational and research institutions, and other stakeholders to enhance global nuclear security by developing, sharing and promoting excellence in nuclear security education. (orig.)

  1. The role and place of National Atomic Energy Agency in Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rapeanu, S.

    1996-01-01

    The paper presents the structure and the main tasks of the National Atomic Energy Agency (ANEA), a Romanian governmental authority established in the fall of the year 1994. The agency has two divisions: the first devoted to elaboration of long term strategies and coordination of national programs and the second devoted to the international co-operations with institutes and international organizations. The author reports the measures taken by the Agency to solve a number of problems and programs, some of them still under way: nuclear safety, CANDU reactor improvements, nuclear fuel cycle, heavy water cryogenic detritiation, radiation protection of population and environment, domestic manufacturing of NPP equipment and nuclear materials, decommissioning the nuclear facilities, radioactive waste processing and disposal, and emergency provisions in case of nuclear events. The author mentions also the open question of resumption of building the Unit 2 of Cernavoda NPP, the expertise potential of Romania in nuclear field, the meetings with experts from IAEA in technical cooperation problems and works of the international group (with participation of Argentina, Canada, Korea, India, Japan, Pakistan and Romania) on progress in HWR reactors

  2. Instrumental neutron activation analysis of proposed marine sediment reference material (IAEA-158)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siddique, N.; Waheed, S.

    2009-01-01

    IAEA-158, sediment prepared by the International Atomic Energy Agency -Marine Environmental Laboratory (IAEA-MEL), Monaco was received under the IAEA Analytical Quality Control Services (AQCS) Intercomparison Programme. Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) was used to determine AI, As, Br, Ce, Co, Cr, Cs, Eu, Fe, Hf, K, La, Lu, Mn, Na, Nd, Rb, Sb, Sc, Se, Sm, Ta, Tb, Th, V, Vb and Zn in this proposed reference material (RM). Four different irradiation protocols were adopted using a miniature neutron source reactor (MNSR) by varying the irradiation, cooling and counting times. IAEA-405 (Estuarine Sediment) and IAEA-SLI (Lake Sediment) were used as compatible matrix reference materials for quality assurance (QA) purposes. Good agreement between our data and lAEA certified values was obtained providing confidence in the reported data. (author)

  3. IAEA yearbook 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-09-01

    Part A of the Yearbook describes the role played by the IAEA in helping to advance sustainable development by the transfer of nuclear and radiation technology. The introduction to this section this year discusses the application of quality assurance practices to this important work. The main article describes new planning procedures that are being adopted to ensure that these technical co-operation activities are of significant and practical benefit to the States concerned. The work routinely carried out by the IAEA on the development and dissemination of nuclear and radiation techniques covers a wide range of subjects - the practical aspects of physics and chemistry, hydrology, industrial applications, human health, and food and agriculture. Part B of the Yearbook concentrates on food irradiation and the use of nuclear monitoring techniques in programmes for improving human nutrition. Part C of the Yearbook deals with nuclear power and its fuel cycle and waste management technology. The section on nuclear power describes developments during 1995 in a wide range of countries. It also details the IAEA's work on the comparative health and environmental impacts of different types of energy systems. Of particular interest this year in the fuel cycle area is the report of the downturn in world uranium activities that has lasted for more than 15 years may be coming to an end. In the waste management section, emphasis is given to the technology of environmental restoration of sites after contamination resulting from past nuclear activities. A discussion of different aspects of the safety of nuclear power and of the uses of radiation is to be found in Part D, The Nuclear Safety Review. As in previous years, Part E of the IAEA Yearbook 1996 deals with the IAEA's major contribution to the non-proliferation regime - international safeguards. Part E also contains a description of IAEA activities designed to assist Member States in preventing trafficking in nuclear materials

  4. International Energy Agency 2013 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-03-01

    The IEA Executive Director's Annual Report 2013 is the second of a regular annual series reporting on the IEA’s operational and organisational achievements, as well as challenges and events over the year. It was presented to the IEA Governing Board and is also released publicly to ensure transparency and to take stock of the organisation's activities from a strategic perspective. 2013 was a banner year for the IEA, given continued changes in the global energy economy as well as the IEA Ministerial meeting in November which brought together Energy Ministers from all 28 IEA member countries, accession countries Chile and Estonia, seven key partner countries - Brazil, China, India, Indonesia, Mexico, Russian Federation and South Africa - as well as more that 30 top-level executives from the energy industry. Key Ministerial outcomes included the first IEA Ministers' Joint Statement on Climate Change and a declaration of association by six key partner countries to build multilateral cooperation with the IEA.

  5. IAEA activities related to ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolan, T.J.; Schneider, U.

    2001-01-01

    As agreed between the IAEA and the ITER Parties, special sessions are dedicated to ITER at the IAEA Fusion Energy Conferences. At the 18th IAEA Fusion Energy Conference, held on 4-10 October 2000 in Sorrento, Italy, in the Artsimovich-Kadomtsev Memorial opening session there were special lectures by Carlo Rubbia (President, ENEA, Italy), A. Arima (Japan), and E.P. Velikhov (Russia); an overview talk on ITER by R. Aymar (ITER Director); and a talk on the FTU experiment by F. Romanelli. In total, 573 participants from 34 countries presented 389 papers (including 11 post-deadline papers and the 4 summaries)

  6. Review of the International Atomic Energy Agency International database on reactor pressure vessel materials and US Nuclear Regulatory Commission/Oak Ridge National Laboratory embrittlement data base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.A.; Kam, F.B.K.

    1998-02-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has supported neutron radiation effects information exchange through meetings and conferences since the mid-1960s. Through an International Working Group on Reliability of Reactor Pressure Components, information exchange and research activities were fostered through the Coordinated Research Program (CRP) sponsored by the IAEA. The final CRP meeting was held in November 1993, where it was recommended that the IAEA coordinate the development of an International Database on Reactor Pressure Vessel Material (IDRPVM) as the first step in generating an International Database on Aging Management. The purpose of this study was to provide special technical assistance to the NRC in monitoring and evaluating the IAEA activities in developing the IAEA IDRPVM, and to compare the IDRPVM with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) - Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Power Reactor Embrittlement Data Base (PR-EDB) and provide recommendations for improving the PR-EDB. A first test version of the IDRPVM was distributed at the First Meeting of Liaison Officers to the IAEA IDRPVM, in November 1996. No power reactor surveillance data were included in this version; the testing data were mainly from CRP Phase III data. Therefore, because of insufficient data and a lack of power reactor surveillance data received from the IAEA IDRPVM, the comparison is made based only on the structure of the IDRPVM. In general, the IDRPVM and the EDB have very similar data structure and data format. One anticipates that because the IDRPVM data will be collected from so many different sources, quality assurance of the data will be a difficult task. The consistency of experimental test results will be an important issue. A very wide spectrum of material characteristics of RPV steels and irradiation environments exists among the various countries. Hence the development of embrittlement prediction models will be a formidable task. 4 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs

  7. Statement to the 41st session of the General Conference of the International Atomic Energy Agency 29 September 1997; Statement to the 52nd session of the United Nations General Assembly 12 November 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blix, H.

    1997-12-01

    The document presents Statement to the 41st Session of the General Conference of the International Atomic Energy Agency and Statement to the 52nd Session of the United Nations General Assembly made at the 40th anniversary of the IAEA

  8. Communication from the Permanent Mission of the Russian Federation to the International Atomic Energy Agency regarding guidelines for transfers of nuclear-related dual-use equipment, materials, software and related technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-08-04

    The document reproduces the text of the Note Verbale received by the Director General of the IAEA from the Permanent Mission of the Russian Federation to the International Atomic Energy Agency providing information on the export policies and practices of the Government of the Russian Federation with respect to the export of nuclear-related dual-use equipment, materials, software and related technology.

  9. Communication from the Permanent Mission of the Russian Federation to the International Atomic Energy Agency regarding guidelines for transfers of nuclear-related dual-use equipment, materials, software and related technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The document reproduces the text of the Note Verbale received by the Director General of the IAEA from the Permanent Mission of the Russian Federation to the International Atomic Energy Agency providing information on the export policies and practices of the Government of the Russian Federation with respect to the export of nuclear-related dual-use equipment, materials, software and related technology

  10. Communication from the Permanent Mission of the Russian Federation to the International Atomic Energy Agency regarding the export of nuclear material and of certain categories of equipment and other material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The document reproduces the text of a letter received by the Director general of the IAEA from Permanent Mission of the Russian Federation to the International Atomic Energy Agency concerning the export of nuclear material and of certain categories of equipment and other material

  11. Statement to the 34th session of the general conference of the International Atomic Energy Agency, 17 September 1990. Statement to the 45th session of the United Nations general assembly, 23 October 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blix, H.

    1991-01-01

    The document contains the following two statements of Hans Blix, Director General of the IAEA: Statement to the 34th Session of the General Conference of the International Atomic Energy Agency, 17 September 1990; Statement to the 45th Session of the United Nations General Assembly, 23 October 1990. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these statements

  12. Statement to the 35th session of the General Conference of the International Atomic Energy Agency 16 September 1991; Statement to the 46th session of the United Nations General Assembly 21 October 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blix, H.

    1991-01-01

    The document contains the following two statements of Hans Blix, Director General of the IAEA: Statement to the 35th session of the General Conference of the International Atomic Energy Agency, 16 September 1991; Statement to the 46th session of the United Nations General Assembly, 21 October 1991. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these statements

  13. The role of the International Atomic Energy Agency in technology transfer for the peaceful use of nuclear energy and the strengthening of the Safeguards system, Buenos Aires, 15 December 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    1998-01-01

    The document reproduces the text of the conference given by the Director General of the IAEA at the meeting of the Council for International Relations in Buenos Aires, Argentina, on 15 December 1998. After a short presentation of Argentina's participation in all aspects of the work of the Agency, the conference focuses on the Agency's role in the following areas: nuclear power and sustainable energy development, including nuclear safety aspects, verification and the strengthened safeguards system (including future prospects of verification), and technology transfer with emphasis on Agency's Technical Co-operation Programme

  14. IAEA's Implementation of the State-Level Concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trimble, D.; Ballenger, J.; Levis, G.

    2015-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has taken several steps over the years to strengthen its safeguards program, including successfully encouraging more countries to bring an Additional Protocol into force, increasing the number of countries that are subject to a broader range of safeguards measures, and upgrading its safeguards analytical laboratories. IAEA's latest strategy to further improve the effectiveness and efficiency of the safeguards programme is to expand implementation of the 'state-level concept' to all countries with safeguards agreements. The state-level concept is an approach in which IAEA considers a broad range of information about a country's nuclear capabilities and tailors its safeguards activities in each country accordingly. IAEA officials have stated that broader implementation of this approach will allow the agency to better allocate resources by reducing safeguards activities where there is no indication of undeclared nuclear activities and to focus its efforts on any issues of safeguards concern. Several member countries, including the United States, support IAEA's plans to broaden implementation of the state- level concept, but other member countries - including some countries with significant nuclear activities - have raised concerns that the agency has not clearly defined and communicated how the state-level concept will be implemented or how it will stay within bounds of the agency's existing legal authorities. In September 2012, the General Conference passed a resolution that included a request for IAEA's Secretariat to report to the Board of Governors on the conceptualization and development of the state-level concept. In August 2013, IAEA released that report to the Board of Governors and started briefing member states on its content. Our paper will discuss (1) IAEA's efforts to clearly define and communicate how IAEA will implement the state-level concept and (2) the status of its

  15. IAEA introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeman, A.

    2009-01-01

    The Physics Section supports the IAEA Member States regarding utilization of: Accelerators; Research reactors; Cross-cutting material research; Controlled fusion. The activities in the field of material science include studies of present NPP structural materials; investigation of degradation mechanisms and contribution to research programs of new materials, as well as education and training activities. The Section is participating in the coordinated research projects 'Accelerator Simulation and Theoretical Modeling of Radiation Effects' (Jointly NA-NE) and 'Benchmarking of advanced materials pre-selected for innovative nuclear reactors' (Jointly NA and NE)

  16. News from IAEA Headquarters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1966-01-01

    Full text: Two more countries have joined the Agency - Panama and Jordan - bringing IAEA membership up to 96. Mr. Ginige Richard Walter de Silva (Ceylon) has been appointed Director of the Division of Conference and General Services of the Agency. Born in 1911 at Nugegeda, Ceylon, Mr. de Silva obtained his B.Sc. in Physics at London University and his M.A. in Physics and Mathematics at Cambridge University. He has had a long career in the Civil Service, mainly in the administrative, commercial and finance branches of government. Mr.de Silva took over from Mr. Arthur E. Barrett, Chief of the Conference and Engineering Services, who had been Acting Director of the Division for a long period of time, and who will be leaving the Agency later this year to take up work elsewhere. From the early days of IAEA in 1957, Mr. Barrett has been closely associated with the establishment of the Agency's temporary headquarters in Vienna. He has been in charge of the planning and design of the technical facilities for the various conference installations and responsible for the servicing of all the General Conference sessions since 1958. In fact, Mr. Barrett has played an essential part in the creation of the Vienna Congress Centre in the former Hofburg Imperial Palace. Educated at Cambridge and London Universities, Mr. Barrett has had some 35 years of public service, first in the BBC in London and subsequently with the United Nations in New York. (author)

  17. News from IAEA Headquarters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1966-06-15

    Full text: Two more countries have joined the Agency - Panama and Jordan - bringing IAEA membership up to 96. Mr. Ginige Richard Walter de Silva (Ceylon) has been appointed Director of the Division of Conference and General Services of the Agency. Born in 1911 at Nugegeda, Ceylon, Mr. de Silva obtained his B.Sc. in Physics at London University and his M.A. in Physics and Mathematics at Cambridge University. He has had a long career in the Civil Service, mainly in the administrative, commercial and finance branches of government. Mr.de Silva took over from Mr. Arthur E. Barrett, Chief of the Conference and Engineering Services, who had been Acting Director of the Division for a long period of time, and who will be leaving the Agency later this year to take up work elsewhere. From the early days of IAEA in 1957, Mr. Barrett has been closely associated with the establishment of the Agency's temporary headquarters in Vienna. He has been in charge of the planning and design of the technical facilities for the various conference installations and responsible for the servicing of all the General Conference sessions since 1958. In fact, Mr. Barrett has played an essential part in the creation of the Vienna Congress Centre in the former Hofburg Imperial Palace. Educated at Cambridge and London Universities, Mr. Barrett has had some 35 years of public service, first in the BBC in London and subsequently with the United Nations in New York. (author)

  18. The withdrawal of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea from the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The Minister for Foreign Affairs of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea has informed the Government of the United States of America, as depository of the Agency's Statute, in a diplomatic note dated 13 June 1994, that the Government of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea has decided to withdraw from the IAEA as of 13 June 1994. The Director General of the IAEA was notified of this withdrawal by a letter dated 15 June 1994 from the Resident Representative of the United States of America to the IAEA. The text of this letter and the enclosed diplomatic note from the DPRK are attached hereto. In accordance with Article XVIII, D of the Statute, the Board of Governors was informed on 15 June 1994 (GOV/INF/748). In compliance with the request of the Resident Representative of the United States of America, the Member States of the Agency are informed by this INFCIRC

  19. International Energy Agency 2012 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-06-01

    The IEA Executive Director’s Annual Report 2012 is the first of a regular annual series reporting on the IEA’s operational and organisational achievements, as well as challenges and events over the year. It is presented to the IEA Governing Board and released publicly to ensure transparency and also to take stock of the organisation’s activities from a strategic perspective. 2012 was a transitional year for the IEA, given fundamental changes in the global energy economy as well as internal management and budget issues. At the same time demand for IEA products set new records, and the public and political impact of IEA work through effective communication was measured as high.

  20. US enrichment safeguards program development activities with potential International Atomic Energy Agency safeguards applications. Part 1. Executive summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swindle, D.W. Jr.

    1984-07-01

    The most recent progress, results, and plans for future work on the US Enrichment Safeguards Program's principal development activities are summarized. Nineteen development activities are reported that have potential International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards applications. Part 1 presents Executive Summaries for these, each of which includes information on (1) the purpose and scope of the development activity; (2) the potential IAEA safeguards application and/or use if adopted; (3) significant development work, results, and/or conclusions to date; and where appropriate (4) future activities and plans for continued work. Development activities cover: measurement technology for limited-frequency-unannounced-access stategy inspections; integrated data acquisition system; enrichment-monitoring system; load-cell-based weighing system for UF 6 cylinder mass verifications; vapor phase versus liquid phase sampling of UF 6 cylinders; tamper-safing hardware and systems; an alternative approach to IAEA nuclear material balance verifications resulting from intermittent inspections; UF 6 sample bottle enrichment analyzer; crated waste assay monitor; and compact 252 Cf shuffler for UF 6 measurements

  1. IAEA Nobel Peace fund schools for nutrition. Combating child malnutrition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Dhaka, Bangladesh - Malnutrition remains the world's most serious health problem and the single biggest contributor to child deaths in the developing world, according to the World Bank. Now, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is using its Nobel Peace Prize earnings to promote the use of nuclear techniques to combat malnutrition during the earliest years of life. 'One out of every ten children born in developing countries will die before his or her fifth birthday,' explains IAEA nutrition expert Lena Davidsson. 'That's more than 10 million dead children each year. And the vast majority of these child deaths in developing countries are preventable with a combination of good care, adequate nutrition and appropriate medical treatment,' explains Dr. Davidsson. 'This brings us hope that unacceptably high childhood mortality can be substantially reduced with effective and well-targeted nutritional interventions.' Undernutrition is an important factor in more than half of all child deaths worldwide. The high prevalence of infants born with low birth weight and undernutrition among Asian children, especially in South Asia, emphasizes the urgent need to develop effective nutrition interventions within 'the window of opportunity', i.e., to target young women before pregnancy as well as infants and young children during the first 2 years of life. The IAEA Nobel Peace Prize Fund School for Nutrition for Asia will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh, April 22-26, 2007. It will focus on Interventions to combat undernutrition during early life and seeks to disseminate information about the usefulness of stable isotope techniques in intervention programs that reduce malnutrition, in particular in infants and children. The event is hosted by the Government of Bangladesh through the International Centre for Health and Population Research (ICDDR, B) and the Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission (BAEC). The IAEA is assisting some of the world's poorest countries in their

  2. IAEA Technical Cooperation and the NPT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barretto, Paulo M.C.; Cetto, Ana Maria

    2005-01-01

    The NPT rests on three interlinked pillars: cooperation in peaceful uses of nuclear energy, verified nuclear non-proliferation, and nuclear disarmament. This article looks specifically at the first pillar and its linkage with the second one. Non-nuclear weapon States are the vast majority of NPT Parties. The right of NPT Parties to have access to information, exchange of equipment and materials is explicitly recognized in Article IV of the Treaty. This Article stipulates that all Parties of the Treaty undertake to facilitate and have the right to participate in the fullest possible exchange of equipment, materials and scientific and technological information for the peaceful uses of nuclear energy. A successful campaign after the 1995 NPT Review Conference increased the NPT membership from 178 to near universality, and today 189 States are Parties to the Treaty. In the same period the IAEA's membership increased from 127 to 138. Today all IAEA Member States are participating in the Agency's Technical Cooperation Programme (TCP) in varying mixed capacities of donors or recipients. The IAEA, although not referred to in Article IV of the NPT, plays a major role in planning and implementing multilateral cooperation stipulated in the Treaty. It encourages and assists research, development and application of atomic energy; it provides technical advice, training, materials, services and equipment; fosters exchange of scientific and technical information; develops standards and guidelines for the appropriate utilization of nuclear technology and materials, and builds strategic partnerships to increase the leverage of the limited resources available. At all times, the Agency seeks to support the use of nuclear technology in a way that is safe for humans and the environment. All these activities are related to key statutory functions of the IAEA. Efforts to assist Member States are impressive. Since its inception in 1957, the Agency has provided direct assistance valued at

  3. Remarks on energy and development at IAEA Scientific Forum, 15 September 2009, Vienna, Austria. 12th Scientific Forum during the 53rd Session of the IAEA General Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    2009-01-01

    My purpose this morning is to stimulate thinking about how the world might deal effectively with two major problems, energy poverty and energy insecurity. Energy poverty is widespread and persistent. Some 2.4 billion people still rely on traditional biomass fuels, and 1.6 billion people have no access to electricity. Africa suffers particularly severely. Annual electricity use in some African countries is only 50 kilowatt-hours (kWh) per person, an average of 6 watts, less than a normal light bulb. Average annual consumption in the OECD is 8600 kWh/person, roughly 170 times higher. Energy insecurity also persists. Even affluent nations have seen major blackouts and price escalation. Insecure energy markets due to political instability and price volatility are as unwelcome to producers as they are to consumers. I have argued for some time that one way of improving the way we address these problems is to create a new global energy organization to complement, not replace, existing bodies. At the moment, many institutions deal with energy, but none with a mandate that is global, comprehensive and encompasses all energy forms

  4. Statement of the Director General to the forty-third regular session of the General Conference of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    1999-01-01

    In his Statement on the forty-third regular session of the General Conference of the IAEA, the Director General of the Agency presented the past, present and future programme of the Agency in terms of the three 'pillars' that constitute its mandate: Nuclear technology (with emphasis on nuclear power and nuclear applications); Nuclear, radiation and waste safety (with emphasis on international conventions prescribing the basic legal norms for the safe use of nuclear energy, internationally accepted safety standards, and measures to assist Member States in the implementation of these conventions and standards, including technological solutions for improving safety); Nuclear verification and the security of material (with emphasis on IAEA safeguards, and physical protection of nuclear material), including possible new verification activities and specific verification issues (Iraq, DPRK, Middle East region). The Director General also touched in his Statement on two supporting elements that undergird these 'pillars': effective interaction with partners and the public, and achieving excellence in management

  5. IAEA activities in nuclear reactors simulation for educational purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyon, R.B.

    1998-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has established a programme in nuclear reactor simulation computer programs to assist its Member States in education and training. The objective is to provide, for a variety of advanced reactor types, insight and practice in their operational characteristics and their response to perturbations and accident situations. To achieve this, the IAEA arranges for the supply or development of simulation programs and training material, sponsors training courses and workshops, and distributes documentation and computer programs. Currently, the IAEA has two simulation programs: the Classroom-based Advanced Reactor Demonstrators package, and the Advanced Reactor Simulator. Both packages simulate the behaviour of BWR, PWR and HWR reactor types. For each package, the modeling approach and assumptions are broadly described, together with a general description of the operation of the computer programs. (author)

  6. Taking another look at the IAEA's OSART programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franzen, F.L.

    1990-01-01

    The Operational Safety Review Team (OSART) programme of the International Atomic Energy Agency continues a high level of activity. In 1989 there were eleven OSART missions to nuclear power plants operating or approaching operation. The programme, now in its seventh year, has matured with its implementation. It reflects the principal change in operational safety that has occurred worldwide during these years: utilities operating nuclear power plants and industry organisations supporting the plants have become the spearhead in the international drive for excellence in operational safety. While this may reach beyond and supplement compliance with regulatory requirements, it also affects the IAEA's relation with regulatory authorities and utilities. Utilities have become the most important counterparts of the IAEA in implementing the OSART programme; in fact, the programme is now a special form of utility co-operation under the auspices of the IAEA. (author)

  7. The prepossession of international institutions for energy. The example International Energy Agency (IEA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fell, H.J.

    2007-01-01

    In the contribution under consideration, the author reports on the fact that large international energy agencies, which are advisory active in energy questions active, affect the world-wide policy. In particular, these are the International Atomic Energy Authority in Vienna (Austria) and the International Energy Agency in Paris (France). The International Energy Agency is considered world-wide as the most important institution for all energy questions. Nearly annually, it publishes the World Energy Outlook by summarizing the most important current energy data of the world, prognoses the future power supply and makes future energy prices. The reality of the International Energy Agency looks completely differently: It performs no own sciences, but consists of statisticians, who gather only statistical data without scientific analysis. The author of this contribution summarizes the work of the International Energy Agency in three points: (a) Promotion of the interests of companies in mineral oil, natural gas, coal and atomic energy; (b) Hindering the world-wide conversion of renewable energy; (c) Endangerment of the world economy and prevention of an effective climate protection. The International Energy Agency does not justice to its own goal of a reliable, economical and pollution free power supply

  8. Directory of IAEA databases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-11-01

    The first edition of the Directory of IAEA Databases is intended to describe the computerized information sources available to IAEA staff members. It contains a listing of all databases produced at the IAEA, together with information on their availability

  9. IAEA fifty years: more than just safeguards. Interview with Professor Werner Burkart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2007-01-01

    Professor Werner Burkart, IAEA Deputy Director General and head of the Nuclear Sciences and Applications Division, comments upon matters associated with the fiftieth anniversary of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The Agency was founded on July 29, 1957. Today it is a worldwide organization of the United Nations with 144 member countries and manifold duties in the field of nuclear power utilization. The mandate of IAEA is based on the 'Atoms for Peace' initiative, its essence being support of all member countries in the use of nuclear power as long as IAEA safeguards on the spot ensure that no military aims are pursued in those activities. The safeguards work serves to prevent military uses. IAEA recommendations for a global nuclear safety culture, the so-called Safety Standards, are employed by member countries as a basis of legislation and ordinances. The emerging renaissance of nuclear power will be accompanied by the IAEA especially with regard to the important aspects of harmonization, safeguards, safety, security, and readiness for emergencies. The interview took place in Vienna on September 20, 2007. The questions were asked by the President of the Swiss Nuclear Forum, Dr. Bruno Pellaud, former Deputy Director General of IAEA. (orig.)

  10. EURATOM-CEA association contributions to the 18. IAEA fusion energy conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghendrih, Ph.; Peysson, Y.; Hoang, G.T. [and others

    2000-12-01

    The 9 contributions of EURATOM-Cea association to the fusion energy conference hold at Sorrento are gathered in this document with 7 additional papers. The different titles are: 1) Ergodic divertor experiments on the route to steady state operation of Tore-Supra, 2) High power lower hybrid current drive experiments in Tore-Supra tokamak, 3) Electron transport and improved confinement on Tore-Supra, 4) ECRH experiments and developments for long pulse in Tore-Supra, 5) Impurity penetration and contamination in Tore-Supra ergodic divertor experiments, 6) Real time plasma feed-back control: an overview of Tore-Supra achievements, 7) Numerical assessment of the ion turbulent thermal transport scaling laws, 8) Design of next step tokamak: consistent analysis of plasma flux consumption and poloidal, 9) Large superconducting conductors and joints for fusion magnets: from conceptual design to test at full size scale, 10) Burst-prone transport in tokamaks with internal transport barriers, 11) Electrostatic turbulence with finite parallel correlation length and radial electric field generation, 12) Theoretical issues in tokamak confinement: internal-edge transport barriers and runaway avalanche confinement, 13) Core and edge confinement studies with different heating methods in JET, 14) Confinement and transport studies of conventional scenarios in ASDEX upgrade, 15) First test results for the ITER central solenoid model coil, and 16) Progress of the ITER central solenoid model coil program.

  11. EURATOM-CEA association contributions to the 18. IAEA fusion energy conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghendrih, Ph.; Peysson, Y.; Hoang, G.T.

    2000-12-01

    The 9 contributions of EURATOM-Cea association to the fusion energy conference hold at Sorrento are gathered in this document with 7 additional papers. The different titles are: 1) Ergodic divertor experiments on the route to steady state operation of Tore-Supra, 2) High power lower hybrid current drive experiments in Tore-Supra tokamak, 3) Electron transport and improved confinement on Tore-Supra, 4) ECRH experiments and developments for long pulse in Tore-Supra, 5) Impurity penetration and contamination in Tore-Supra ergodic divertor experiments, 6) Real time plasma feed-back control: an overview of Tore-Supra achievements, 7) Numerical assessment of the ion turbulent thermal transport scaling laws, 8) Design of next step tokamak: consistent analysis of plasma flux consumption and poloidal, 9) Large superconducting conductors and joints for fusion magnets: from conceptual design to test at full size scale, 10) Burst-prone transport in tokamaks with internal transport barriers, 11) Electrostatic turbulence with finite parallel correlation length and radial electric field generation, 12) Theoretical issues in tokamak confinement: internal-edge transport barriers and runaway avalanche confinement, 13) Core and edge confinement studies with different heating methods in JET, 14) Confinement and transport studies of conventional scenarios in ASDEX upgrade, 15) First test results for the ITER central solenoid model coil, and 16) Progress of the ITER central solenoid model coil program

  12. 77 FR 61592 - Arkansas Electric Cooperative Corporation; Mississippi Delta Energy Agency; Clarksdale Public...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-10

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket No. EL12-110-000] Arkansas Electric Cooperative Corporation; Mississippi Delta Energy Agency; Clarksdale Public Utilities Commission.... 825(h), Arkansas Electric Cooperative Corporation, Mississippi Delta Energy Agency, and its two...

  13. IAEA Director General Comments on Cooperation Framework with Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    Full text: The following are remarks by the Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency, Yukiya Amano, at a News Conference after he signed a Joint Statement on a Framework for Cooperation with the Islamic Republic of Iran: ''The International Atomic Energy Agency and the Islamic Republic of Iran have just issued the Joint Statement on a Framework for Cooperation. ''Under the Framework, Iran and the IAEA will cooperate further with respect to verification activities to be undertaken by the IAEA to resolve all present and past issues. The practical measures contained in the Annex are substantive measures and will be implemented in three months starting from today. ''This is an important step forward to start with, but much more needs to be done. ''The outstanding issues that are not contained in the Annex to the Framework for Cooperation, including those in my previous reports to the Board of Governors, will be addressed in the subsequent steps under the Framework for Cooperation. ''The IAEA is firmly committed to resolving all outstanding issues through dialogue and cooperation . (IAEA)

  14. Environment. 1980-1994. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-06-01

    The catalogue lists all publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with the Environment issued during the period 1980-1993. The major subjects covered include: effect of agrochemical residues on soils and aquatic ecosystems, application of radioisotopes in conservation of the environment, siting of nuclear power plants, environmental isotope data and environmental contamination due to nuclear accidents

  15. Radiation therapy. 1990-2001. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-04-01

    This catalog lists all sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with Radiation Therapy, and issued during the period 1 January 1990 - 30 April 2001. Most publications are issued in English, though some are also available in other languages. These are noted in the catalogue

  16. Environment. 1990-2001. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-05-01

    This catalog lists all sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with the Environment, and issued during the period 1 January 1990 - 30 April 2001. Most publications are issued in English, though some are also available in other languages. These are noted in the catalogue

  17. International Atomic Energy Agency Publications. Catalogue 1986-1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-11-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency issued from 1986 up to the end of 1999 and still available. Some earlier titles which form part of an established series or are still considered important have also been included. The catalogue is in CD-ROM format

  18. Energy Literacy and Agency of New Zealand Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre-Bielschowsky, I.; Lawson, R.; Stephenson, J.; Todd, S.

    2017-01-01

    The development of energy literacy (knowledge, attitudes, and intended behaviour) and agency of New Zealand children (age 9-10) were investigated through thematic and exploratory statistical analyses of interviews (October 2011-April 2012) with 26 children, their parents and teachers, focus groups and photo elicitation. The children knew that…

  19. International Energy Agency Solar Heating and Cooling Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, A. J.

    This trip was undertaken to participate in and represent the United States Industry at the International Energy Agency (IEA) Solar Heating and Cooling Program (SHCP) Task 14 Workshop. The meeting took place at the A1 Bani Hotel in Rome Italy.

  20. IAEA verification of weapon-origin fissile material in the Russian Federation and the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The Secretary of Energy of the United States, Spencer Abraham, Minister of the Russian Federation on Atomic Energy, Alexander Rumyantsev, and Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Mohamed ElBaradei, met in Vienna on 18 September 2001 to review progress on the Trilateral Initiative. The Initiative was launched in 1996 to develop a new IAEA verification system for weapon-origin material designated by the United States and the Russian Federation as released from their defence programmes. The removal of weapon-origin fissile material from the defence programmes of the Russian Federation and the United States is in furtherance of the commitment to disarmament undertaken by the two States pursuant to Article VI of the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT). IAEA verification under this Initiative is intended to promote international confidence that fissile material made subject by either of the two States to Agency verification remains irreversibly removed from nuclear weapon programmes

  1. Feasibility study on the establishment of the IAEA international nuclear university

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, E. J.; Kim, Y. T.; Nam, Y. M. and others

    2002-09-01

    The purpose of this project is to support 2002-2003 the IAEA project D.4.0.2, facilitating education, training and research in nuclear science and related fields, especially for a feasibility study on the establishment of the Agency sponsored International Nuclear University. Through this project, the abstract principle for a feasibility study on the establishment of the Agency sponsored International Nuclear university, which contains the new concepts and its objectives, principles to achieve the objectives, its curriculum outline and operation system, suggested project activities, was developed and submitted to the Agency. The Korean proposal were presented several times at the IAEA meetings and other international meetings related nuclear human resources development for understanding the necessity of a feasibility study on the establishment of the Agency sponsored international nuclear university with Member States. And the Korean proposal included such as the organization of a worldwide network using information and communication technology among Merber States' research institutes and training/education centers, curriculum outline and operation system of the INU will be produced. Also for further cooperation of the IAEA INU project implementation with the Agency, hosting IAEA INIS mirror site, establishment of the RCA region office, establishment of the INTEC at the Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute, and advanced curriculum of nuclear technology linked with NT, BT, ET, IT were made progress as a part of conceptualizing of the IAEA project

  2. Communication dated 18 May 2009 received from the Permanent Mission of Kazakhstan to the Agency enclosing a position paper regarding the establishment of IAEA nuclear fuel banks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The Secretariat has received a communication dated 18 May 2009 from the Permanent Mission of Kazakhstan, transmitting a position paper of Kazakhstan regarding the establishment of IAEA nuclear fuel banks. As requested in that communication, the attached position paper is herewith circulated for the information of all Member States

  3. Verification of a Fissile Material Cut-off Treaty (FMCT): The Potential Role of the IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Jin Ho

    2016-01-01

    The objective of a future verification of a FMCT(Fissile Material Cut-off Treaty) is to deter and detect non-compliance with treaty obligations in a timely and non-discriminatory manner with regard to banning the production of fissile material for nuclear weapons or other nuclear devices. Since the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has already established the IAEA safeguards as a verification system mainly for Non -Nuclear Weapon States (NNWSs), it is expected that the IAEA's experience and expertise in this field will make a significant contribution to setting up a future treaty's verification regime. This paper is designed to explore the potential role of the IAEA in verifying the future treaty by analyzing verification abilities of the Agency in terms of treaty verification and expected challenges. Furthermore, the concept of multilateral verification that could be facilitated by the IAEA will be examined as a measure of providing a credible assurance of compliance with a future treaty. In this circumstance, it is necessary for the IAEA to be prepared for playing a leading role in FMCT verifications as a form of multilateral verification by taking advantage of its existing verification concepts, methods, and tools. Also, several challenges that the Agency faces today need to be overcome, including dealing with sensitive and proliferative information, attribution of fissile materials, lack of verification experience in military fuel cycle facilities, and different attitude and culture towards verification between NWSs and NNWSs

  4. Verification of a Fissile Material Cut-off Treaty (FMCT): The Potential Role of the IAEA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Jin Ho [Korea Institute of Nuclear Nonproliferation and Control, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The objective of a future verification of a FMCT(Fissile Material Cut-off Treaty) is to deter and detect non-compliance with treaty obligations in a timely and non-discriminatory manner with regard to banning the production of fissile material for nuclear weapons or other nuclear devices. Since the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has already established the IAEA safeguards as a verification system mainly for Non -Nuclear Weapon States (NNWSs), it is expected that the IAEA's experience and expertise in this field will make a significant contribution to setting up a future treaty's verification regime. This paper is designed to explore the potential role of the IAEA in verifying the future treaty by analyzing verification abilities of the Agency in terms of treaty verification and expected challenges. Furthermore, the concept of multilateral verification that could be facilitated by the IAEA will be examined as a measure of providing a credible assurance of compliance with a future treaty. In this circumstance, it is necessary for the IAEA to be prepared for playing a leading role in FMCT verifications as a form of multilateral verification by taking advantage of its existing verification concepts, methods, and tools. Also, several challenges that the Agency faces today need to be overcome, including dealing with sensitive and proliferative information, attribution of fissile materials, lack of verification experience in military fuel cycle facilities, and different attitude and culture towards verification between NWSs and NNWSs.

  5. Quality assurance for IAEA inspection planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markin, J.T.

    1986-01-01

    Under the provisions of the Treaty on Nonproliferation of Nuclear Weapons and other agreements with states, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) conducts inspections at nuclear facilities to confirm that their operation is consistent with the peaceful use of nuclear material. The Department of Safeguards at the IAEA is considering a quality assurance program for activities related to the planning of these facility inspections. In this report, we summarize recent work in writing standards for planning inspections at the types of facilities inspected by the IAEA. The standards specify the sequence of steps in planning inspections, which are: (1) administrative functions, such as arrangements for visas and travel, and communications with the state to confirm facility operating schedules and the state's acceptance of the assigned inspectors; (2) technical functions including a specification of the required inspection activities, determination of personnel and equipment resources, and a schedule for implementing the inspection activities at the facility; and (3) management functions, such as pre- and post-inspection briefings, where the planned and implemented inspection activities are reviewed

  6. International Energy Agency Ocean Energy Systems Task 10 Wave Energy Converter Modeling Verification and Validation: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wendt, Fabian F [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Yu, Yi-Hsiang [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Nielsen, Kim [Ramboll, Copenhagen (Denmark); Ruehl, Kelley [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bunnik, Tim [MARIN (Netherlands); Touzon, Imanol [Tecnalia (Spain); Nam, Bo Woo [KRISO (Korea, Rep. of); Kim, Jeong Seok [KRISO (Korea, Rep. of); Janson, Carl Erik [Chalmers University (Sweden); Jakobsen, Ken-Robert [EDRMedeso (Norway); Crowley, Sarah [WavEC (Portugal); Vega, Luis [Hawaii Natural Energy Institute (United States); Rajagopalan, Krishnakimar [Hawaii Natural Energy Institute (United States); Mathai, Thomas [Glosten (United States); Greaves, Deborah [Plymouth University (United Kingdom); Ransley, Edward [Plymouth University (United Kingdom); Lamont-Kane, Paul [Queen' s University Belfast (United Kingdom); Sheng, Wanan [University College Cork (Ireland); Costello, Ronan [Wave Venture (United Kingdom); Kennedy, Ben [Wave Venture (United Kingdom); Thomas, Sarah [Floating Power Plant (Denmark); Heras, Pilar [Floating Power Plant (Denmark); Bingham, Harry [Technical University of Denmark (Denmark); Kurniawan, Adi [Aalborg University (Denmark); Kramer, Morten Mejlhede [Aalborg University (Denmark); Ogden, David [INNOSEA (France); Girardin, Samuel [INNOSEA (France); Babarit, Aurelien [EC Nantes (France); Wuillaume, Pierre-Yves [EC Nantes (France); Steinke, Dean [Dynamic Systems Analysis (Canada); Roy, Andre [Dynamic Systems Analysis (Canada); Beatty, Scott [Cascadia Coast Research (Canada); Schofield, Paul [ANSYS (United States); Kim, Kyong-Hwan [KRISO (Korea, Rep. of); Jansson, Johan [KTH Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); BCAM (Spain); Hoffman, Johan [KTH Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2017-10-16

    This is the first joint reference paper for the Ocean Energy Systems (OES) Task 10 Wave Energy Converter modeling verification and validation group. The group is established under the OES Energy Technology Network program under the International Energy Agency. OES was founded in 2001 and Task 10 was proposed by Bob Thresher (National Renewable Energy Laboratory) in 2015 and approved by the OES Executive Committee EXCO in 2016. The kickoff workshop took place in September 2016, wherein the initial baseline task was defined. Experience from similar offshore wind validation/verification projects (OC3-OC5 conducted within the International Energy Agency Wind Task 30) [1], [2] showed that a simple test case would help the initial cooperation to present results in a comparable way. A heaving sphere was chosen as the first test case. The team of project participants simulated different numerical experiments, such as heave decay tests and regular and irregular wave cases. The simulation results are presented and discussed in this paper.

  7. Third Non-Proliferation Treaty review conference and 29th regular session of the general conference of the International Atomic Energy Agency. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Energy, Nuclear Proliferation, and Government Processes of the Committee on Governmental Affairs, United States Senate, Ninety-Ninth Congress, First Session, November 20, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1985-01-01

    Ambassador Lewis A. Dunn of the US Arms Control and Disarmament Agency and Danny J. Boggs of DOE reported on two recent international conferences relating to non-proliferation of nuclear weapons and arms control. Dunn summarized the Non-Proliferation Treaty Review conference and its final declaration in which participants reaffirmed treaty principles and made recommendations for strengthening its efforts and enhancing its implementation. Boggs summarized the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) conference, and noted the significance of China's recent entry into IAEA. They stressed that energy security is a key factor in the success of IAEA safeguards because it affects trade and international cooperation. US contributions to the success of non-proliferation policies depend upon our ability to share technological information with less advanced nations. Questions and responses and an appendix with the final declaration of the Review Conference follow the testimony

  8. International Atomic Energy Agency Publications. Catalogue 1986-1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-07-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency issued from 1986 up to the end of 1999 and still available. Some earlier titles which form part of an established series or are still considered of importance have been included. Most Agency publications are issued in English, though some are also available in Chinese, French, Russian or Spanish. This is noted as C for Chinese, E for English, F for French, R for Russian and S for Spanish by the relevant ISBN number

  9. International Scavenging for First Responder Guidance and Tools: IAEA Products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stern, W. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Berthelot, L. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Bachner, K. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2017-05-05

    In fiscal years (FY) 2016 and 2017, with support from the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS), Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) examined the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) radiological emergency response and preparedness products (guidance and tools) to determine which of these products could be useful to U.S. first responders. The IAEA Incident and Emergency Centre (IEC), which is responsible for emergency preparedness and response, offers a range of tools and guidance documents for responders in recognizing, responding to, and recovering from radiation emergencies and incidents. In order to implement this project, BNL obtained all potentially relevant tools and products produced by the IAEA IEC and analyzed these materials to determine their relevance to first responders in the U.S. Subsequently, BNL organized and hosted a workshop at DHS National Urban Security Technology Laboratory (NUSTL) for U.S. first responders to examine and evaluate IAEA products to consider their applicability to the United States. This report documents and describes the First Responder Product Evaluation Workshop, and provides recommendations on potential steps the U.S. federal government could take to make IAEA guidance and tools useful to U.S. responders.

  10. Radiological accident in Panama - IAEA to send assistance team

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    Full text: The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is sending a team of six international experts to assist the authorities of Panama to deal with the aftermath of a radiological accident that occurred at Panama's National Oncology Institute. The Government of Panama informed the IAEA on 22 May about the accident, reported that 28 patients have been affected, and requested IAEA's assistance under the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency, to which Panama is a party. The assistance to be provided by the expert mission will include: ensuring that the radiation source(s) involved in the accident is (are) in a safe and secure condition; evaluating the doses incurred by the affected patients, inter alia, by analysing the treatment records and physical measurements; undertaking a medical evaluation of the affected patients' prognosis and treatment, taking into account, inter alia, the autopsy findings for those who died; and identifying issues on which the IAEA could offer to provide and/or co-ordinate assistance to minimize the consequences of the accident. The team, which includes senior experts in radiology, radiotherapy, radiopathology, radiation dosimetry and radiation protection from France, USA and Japan, and the IAEA itself, will leave for Panama tomorrow, 26 May

  11. Report realized on behalf of the Foreign Affairs Commission, of Defense and Armed Forces on the law project allowing the additional protocol ratification to the agreement between France, European Community of the atomic energy and the International Atomic Energy Agency relative to the guaranties application in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    In a first part the author presents the International Atomic Energy Agency and its missions in the nuclear non proliferation policy especially in the agreements with the states of the TNP (Treaty of Nuclear non Proliferation). the today position of France is then analyzed towards the IAEA and the novations added by the additional protocol. (A.L.B.)

  12. International Atomic Energy Agency Activities on Education and Training in Radiation Transport and Waste Safety: Strategic Approach for a Sustainable System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mrabit, K.; Sadagopan, G.

    2004-01-01

    The statutory safety functions of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) include the establishment of and provision for the application of safety standards for protection of health, life and property against ionizing radiation. The safety standards are based on the presumption that a national infrastructure is in place enabling the Government to discharge its responsibilities for protection and safety. Education and training is an essential element of the infrastructure. The IAEA education and training activities follows the resolutions of its General Conferences and reflects the latest IAEA standards and guidance. Several General Conference resolutions have emphasized the importance of education and training [e.g. GC(XXXV)/RES/552 in 1991; GC(XXXVI)/RES/584 in 1992; GC(43)/RES/13 in 1999 and more recently GC(44)/RES/13 in 2000]. In response to GC(44)/RES/13, the IAEA prepared a S trategic Approach to Education and Training in Radiation and Waste Safety ( Strategy on Education and Training) aiming at establishing, by 2010, sustainable education and training programmes in Member States. This Strategy was endorsed by the General Conference resolution GC(45)/RES/10C that, inter alia, urged the Secretariat to implement the Strategy on Education and Training, and to continue to strengthen, subject to available resources, its current effort in this area, and in particular to assist Member State' national, regional and collaborating centres in conducting such education and training activities in the relevant official languages of the IAEA. The General Conference resolutions GC(46)RES/9C in 2002 and GC(47)RES/7 in 2003 urged the Agency to continue its efforts to implement the Strategy. The purpose of this paper is to present the newly established Strategic Approach to Education and Training in Radiation, Transport and Waste Safety and its implementation. (Author)

  13. International Atomic Energy Agency Activities on Education and Training in Radiation, Transport and Waste Safety: Strategic Approach for a Sustainable System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marbit, K.; Sadagopan, G.

    2005-01-01

    The statutory safety functions of the international Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) include the establishment of and provision for the application of safety standards for protection of health, life and property against ionizing radiation. The safety standards are based on the presumption that a national infrastructure is in place enabling the government to discharge its responsibilities for protection and safety. Education and training is an essential element of the infrastructure. The IAEA education and training activities follows the the resolutions of its general conferences and reflects the latest IAEA standards and guidance. several general conference resolutions have emphasized the importance of education and training (e.g. GC (XXXV)/RES/552 in 1991,GC (XXXVI)/ RES/584 in 1992, GC (43)/RES/13 in 1999 and more recently GC (44)/RES/13 in 2000). In response to GC (44) /RES/13, the IAEA prepared a strategic approach to education and training in radiation and waste safety (strategy on education and training) aiming at establishing, by 2010 sustainable education and training programmes in member states. This strategy was endorsed by the general conference resolution GC(45)/RES/10C that, inter alia, urged the secretariat to implement the strategy on education and training, and to continue to strengthen, subject to available resources, its current effort in this area, and in particular to assist Member States national, regional and collaborating centres in conducting such education and training activities in the relevant official languages of the IAEA. The General Conference resolutions GC(46)RES/9C in 2002 and GC(47)RES/7 in 2003 urged the Agency to continue its efforts to implement the Strategy. The purpose of this paper is to present the newly established Strategic Approach to Education and Training in Radiation, Transport and Waste Safety and its implementation

  14. Industrial applications of radiotracer and sealed source technology promoted by IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joon-Ha Jin; Thereska, J.

    2004-01-01

    Great technical and economical benefits can be obtained by applying radioisotope technologies to various industries. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has contributed to the development of radiotracer and sealed source technology as applied to industry and environment through coordinated research projects (CRPs). The mature and competitive techniques have been transferred and implemented to developing countries through the Agency's technical co-operation (TC) projects. The paper presents the main achievements in radiotracer and sealed source technology promoted by IAEA as well as the perspective of the technology transfer to developing countries. (author)

  15. Adjustment of the Brazilian radioprotection standards to the safety principles of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Wagner de S.; Py Junior, Delcy de A.

    2013-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has a recommendation with 10 basic safety principles (Fundamental Safety Principles Safety Fundamentals series, number SF-1), which are: 1) Responsibility for safety; 2) Role for government; 3) Leadership and management for safety; 4) Justification of facilities and activities; 5) Optimization of protection; 6) Limitation of risk to individuals; 7) Protection of present and futures generations; 8) Prevention of accidents; 9) Emergency preparedness and response and 10) Protection actions to reduce existing or unregulated radiations risk. The aim of this study is to verify that the Brazilian standards of radiation protection meet the principles described above and how well suited to them. The analysis of the national radiation protection regulatory system, developed and deployed by the National Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN), showed that out of the ten items, two are covered partially, the number 2 and 10. The others are fully met. The item 2 the fact that the regulatory body (CNEN) be stock controller of a large company in the sector put in check its independence as a regulatory body. In item 10 the Brazilian standard of radiation protection does not provide explicit resolution of environmental liabilities

  16. Statement by Dr. Mohamed ElBaradei Director General elect of the IAEA on the Occasion of the approval of his appointment by the General Conference, 29 September 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    1997-01-01

    The document reproduces the text of the Statement of the Director General of the IAEA at the IAEA General Conference on 29 september 1997, on the occasion of the approval of his appointment by the General Conference. The Statement focuses on the challenging and complex tasks of the Agency for the safe and exclusively peaceful use of e nuclear energy to satisfy people's needs

  17. The IAEA intercomparison for individual monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffith, R.V.; Boehm, J.; Herrman, D.; Strachotinsky, C.; Thompson, I.M.G.

    1990-01-01

    In 1985 the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements introduced a new set of operational quantities for radiation protection purposes through Report 39. The International Atomic Energy Agency has been concerned with the impact of possible adoption of these quantities by its 113 Member States. Thus the Agency implemented a Coordinated Research Programme on Intercomparison for Individual Monitoring in 1987. The first phase completed with a Research Coordination meeting of the participants in April, 1989. Photon exposures were provided at 11 energies over a range from 18 keV to 1.25 MeV at three standards laboratories in Austria, the GDR and the UK. Technical coordination was provided by the PTB, Braunschweig. Twenty one laboratories from 19 countries participated with film, TLD of various types, and combination dosemeters. Irradiations were performed on the IAEA 30 cm cubic, water-filled phantom that is in use throughout its network of 61 Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratories. Conversion coefficients for the IAEA phantom were calculated by the PTB and confirmed through measurements at ASMW in the GDR. Preliminary results indicated that the type of dosemeter (film or TLD) had little effect on the quality of results. The most important factor appears to be the specific techniques used for data interpretation. (author)

  18. Beam quality dependence of IAEA TLDs irradiated in a standardized geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nystroem, H.; Bera, P.; Nette, P.

    1994-01-01

    Since 1968, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has operated a postal dose intercomparison service based on TLDs. This service has been giving dosimetric support to hospitals with 60 Co teletherapy units in developing countries. The increasing number of medical accelerators installed in developing countries prompted the IAEA to expand the service also to cover high energy X ray beams. For this purpose the energy dependence of the TLDs and a suitable correction procedure for their use were studied. This paper is a discussion of that study. 10 refs, 6 figs, 2 tabs

  19. Excerpts from the introductory statement by IAEA Director General. IAEA Board of Governors, Vienna, 9 December 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    1999-01-01

    The document contains excerpts from the Introductory Statement made by the Director General of the IAEA at the IAEA Board of Governors on 9 December 1999. The following aspects from the Agency's activity are briefly presented: IAEA's safeguards, physical protection of nuclear material, the status of Agency's involvement in safeguards verification in the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK), and Agency's actions in connection with Y2K possible problems

  20. The role of the International Atomic Energy Agency in technology transfer for the peaceful use of nuclear energy and the strengthening of the Safeguards system, Brasilia, 16 December 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    1998-01-01

    The document reproduces the text of the conference given by the Director General of the IAEA at the Diplomatic Academy of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Brazil in Brasilia on 16 December 1998. After a short presentation of Brazil's participation in all aspects of the work of the Agency, the conference focuses on the Agency's role in the following areas: verification and the strengthened safeguards system (including future prospects of verification), technology transfer (mainly through the Technical Co-operation Programme), and nuclear power and sustainable energy development, including nuclear safety aspects

  1. Life sciences. 1990-2001. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-09-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications of the IAEA dealing with life sciences: nuclear medicine, medical physics and radiation biology and issued during the period 1 January 1990 - 30 September 2001

  2. IAEA puts cyber security in focus for nuclear facilities in 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepherd, John [nuclear 24, Brighton (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-15

    Later in 2015 the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) will convene a special conference to discuss computer security, in the wake of cyber attacks on global financial institutions and government agencies that were increasingly in the news. According to the IAEA, the prevalence of IT security incidents in recent years involving the Stuxnet malware 'demonstrated that nuclear facilities can be susceptible to cyber attack'. The IAEA said this and other events have significantly raised global concerns over potential vulnerabilities and the possibility of a cyber attack, or a joint cyber-physical attack, that could impact on nuclear security. The IAEA has correctly identified that the use of computers and other digital electronic equipment in physical protection systems at nuclear facilities, as well as in facility safety systems, instrumentation, information processing and communication, 'continues to grow and presents an ever more likely target for cyber attack'. The agency's Vienna conference, to be held in June, will review emerging trends in computer security and areas that may still need to be addressed. The meeting follows a declaration of ministers of IAEA member states in 2013 that called on the agency to help raise awareness of the growing threat of cyber attacks and their potential impact on nuclear security. The conference is being organised 'to foster international cooperation in computer security as an essential element of nuclear security', the IAEA said. Details of the IAEA's 'International Conference on Computer Security in a Nuclear World: Expert Discussion and Exchange' are on the 'meetings' section of the agency's web site.

  3. Establishment of 'Japan Atomic Energy Agency'. Its role and expectation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakahara, Toru; Itakura, Shuichiro; Shiozawa, Shusaku; Hino, Ryutaro; Fujii, Yasuhiko; Sakurada, Michio; Kimura, Itsuro; Kikuyama, Kaoru

    2005-01-01

    In October 2005, the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) was established as an independent administrative institution with the integration of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) and the Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC). JAEA is the only institute in Japan dedicated to comprehensive research and development in the field of nuclear energy. This paper put together a special article on its role and expectation. Firstly the essentials of comprehensive nuclear research and its future perspective were discussed mainly based on 'Framework for Nuclear Energy Policy' of the Atomic Energy Commission of Japan. Eight articles were followed on specific items such as quantum beams utilization, hydrogen production with nuclear heat, neutron science and ITER project, and put stress on joint works and smooth transfer of related technology to the private sector. (T. Tanaka)

  4. Report on the intercomparison run IAEA-373: Determination of radionuclides in grass sample IAEA-373

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strachnov, V; Larosa, J; Dekner, R; Fajgelj, A; Zeisler, R

    1996-02-01

    Activities in environmental monitoring of radioactive substances require natural matrix reference materials for laboratory quality assessment and support of international compatibility. A grass sample collected in the Ukraine by the International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA's) programme on Analytical Quality Assurance Services (AQCS) has been prepared and distributed for a world-wide intercomparison on the determination of natural and man-made radionuclides and selected trace elements. The data from 110 laboratories representing 42 countries have been evaluated and allowed the establishment of recommended activity values for K-40, Sr-90, Cs-134 and Cs-137. Information values are given for the concentrations of Mn, Rb, Th and Zn. (author)

  5. New IAEA guidelines on environmental remediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fesenko, Sergey [International Atomic Energy Agency, A2444, Seibersdorf (Austria); Howard, Brenda [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Lancaster Environment Centre, LA1 4AP, Lancaster (United Kingdom); Kashparov, Valery [Ukrainian Institute of Agricultural Radiology, 08162, 7, Mashinobudivnykiv str., Chabany, Kyivo-Svyatoshin region, Kyiv (Ukraine); Sanzharova, Natalie [Russian Institute of Agricultural Radiology and Agroecology, Russian Federation, 249032, Obninsk (Russian Federation); Vidal, Miquel [Analytical Chemistry Department-Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2014-07-01

    In response to the needs of its Member States, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has published many documents covering different aspects of remediation of contaminated environments. These documents range from safety fundamentals and safety requirements to technical documents describing remedial technologies. Almost all the documents on environmental remediation are related to uranium mining areas and decommissioning of nuclear facilities. IAEA radiation safety standards on remediation of contaminated environments are largely based on these two types of remediation. The exception is a document related to accidents, namely the IAEA TRS No. 363 'Guidelines for Agricultural Countermeasures Following an Accidental Release of Radionuclides'. Since the publication of TRS 363, there has been a considerable increase in relevant information. In response, the IAEA initiated the development of a new document, which incorporated new knowledge obtained during last 20 years, lessons learned and subsequent changes in the regulatory framework. The new document covers all aspects related to the environmental remediation from site characterisation to a description of individual remedial actions and decision making frameworks, covering urban, agricultural, forest and freshwater environments. Decisions taken to commence remediation need to be based on an accurate assessment of the amount and extent of contamination in relevant environmental compartments and how they vary with time. Major aspects of site characterisation intended for remediation are described together with recommendations on effective sampling programmes and data compilation for decision making. Approaches for evaluation of remedial actions are given in the document alongside the factors and processes which affect their implementation for different environments. Lessons learned following severe radiation accidents indicate that remediation should be considered with respect to many different

  6. The future use of pathway analysis in IAEA safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budlong Sylvester, Kory; Pilat, J.; Murphy, Chantell

    2013-01-01

    Pathway analysis has the potential to play an important role in the development of a safeguards system that is more information driven, leveraging all the information available to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Pathway analysis should be seen as an extension of traditional hypothesis testing used by the Agency in the past. The most attractive pathways based on the assessed capabilities of a given state can be identified and used in the development of state-level safeguards approaches. This ranking of pathways can be revised based on evidence of pathway use, or preparations for use, allowing limited safeguards resources to flow to the areas of highest concern. The possible uses of pathway analysis in the implementation of the IAEA's state-level concept are described along with implementation issues that will likely arise. The paper is followed by the slides of the presentation. (authors)

  7. Status report on preparation of IAEA guidelines for qualification of research reactor fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snelgrove, J.L.

    2007-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency, through a consultancy, is preparing a document describing good practices for the qualification of research reactor fuel. The rationale for the preparation of the document and the document's organization and content are discussed. It is anticipated that the consultants will present a final draft to the IAEA by mid-December for editing and publication in 2008.

  8. Energy policy of the International Energy Agency (IEA) countries. General review of the year 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This book is a general review on energy policy leaded by Members countries of International Energy Agency (IEA) during the year 1990. This book describes also the trends and the recent events which have affected energy demand, energy conservation, energy efficiency, energy supply and energy source development. This annual review gives the IEA energy forecasting for the next years, till year 2001. A detailed study of energy policy in Federal Republic of Germany, Austria, Denmark, Greece, Ireland and Japan is given. The policy of fifteen another Members countries, which have been analyzed the previous years, is recapitulated and briefly brought up to date

  9. The next twenty years - IAEA's role

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tape, G.F.

    1977-01-01

    The twentieth anniversary of an institution is an appropriate time to look back and to ask what has been achieved. It is also an appropriate time to look ahead and to ask what should be the mission for the future. How can the strengths of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) be best utilized, what new opportunities should be seized upon, and what challenges should the IAEA be prepared to meet in the next twenty years? Forward planning is a very necessary activity in today's world. There are so many demands on national or institutional resources that careful analysis of options is necessary to establish priorities and ultimately to provide for implementation. But such planning must be done carefully with full appreciation for the validity and sensitivity of the input assumptions and data. Furthermore, today's plan, while setting goals and directions, cannot be so inflexible that it cannot be responsive to ever-changing political, economic and technical constraints or opportunities. Thus in looking ahead, the plan must contain provisions for flexibility to provide for further modifications in the light of ever-changing knowledge, attitudes, and world conditions. The experience of the past five years in the energy field, and especially in nuclear energy, underscores this need. In looking ahead for the next twenty years, we are attempting to describe the International Atomic Energy Agency and its role through the twentieth century. In doing so, we are automatically laying the base for the Agency's work going into the twenty-first century. In short, we are trying to visualize a programme that can serve the coming generation and, in doing so, creating a base from which the needs of the succeeding generation can be met. This is a large order and the crystal ball is less than clear. (author)

  10. Environment, 1986-1997. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-04-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with Environment and issued during the period of 1986-1997. Some earlier titles which form part of an established series or are still considered of importance have been included. Most publications are in English. Proceedings of conferences, symposia and panels of experts may contain papers in languages other than English, but all of these papers have abstracts in English

  11. Earth sciences. 1990-2001. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-05-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with Earth Sciences and issued during the period 1 January 1990 - 31 May 2001. Most publications are issued in English, though some are also available in other languages. This is noted as A for Arabic, C for Chinese, E for English, F for French, R for Russian and S for Spanish before the relevant ISBN number

  12. Analytical quality control services of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suschny, O.

    1986-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency provides quality control services to analytical laboratories. These services which include the provision of reference materials and the organisation of intercomparisons are rendered for the purpose of assisting laboratories in determining the accuracy of their analytical work. The following classes of materials are presently available: nuclear materials, environmental materials, animal and plant materials, materials for biomedical studies and materials of marine origin. (orig.) [de

  13. IAEA occupational radiation protection programme: current status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deboodt, P.; Mrabit, K.

    2006-01-01

    As stated in Art.III.A.6 of its Statute, the International Atomic Energy Agency (commonly referred to as the Agency) is authorized to establish or adopt, in consultation and, where appropriate, in collaboration with the competent organs of the United Nations and with the specialized agencies concerned, standards of safety for protection of health and minimization of danger to life and property (including such standards for labour conditions), and to provide for the application of these standards to its own operation as well as to the operations making use of materials, services, equipment, facilities, and information made available by the Agency or at its request or under its control or supervision. The Agency s Occupational Radiation Protection Programme aims at harmonizing infrastructures for the control of radiation exposure of workers and for optimizing radiation protection in situation s of exposures due to external radiation and intakes of radionuclides from both artificial and natural sources of radiation. Under its regular and technical cooperation programmes, the Agency has been assigning high priority to both the establishment of safety standards for labour conditions and for the application of these standards through, Interalia, direct assistance under its technical cooperation (TC) programme, the rendering of services, the promotion of education and training, the fostering of information exchange and the coordination of research and development. The purpose of this paper is to present the current status and future IAEA activities in support of occupational radiation protection. (authors)

  14. Recent IAEA activities to support advanced water cooled reactor technology development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, J.-H.; Bilbao y Leon, S.; Rao, A.S.

    2009-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is the world's center of cooperation in the nuclear field. The IAEA works with its Member States and multiple partners worldwide to promote safe, secure and peaceful nuclear technologies. To catalyse innovation in nuclear power technology in Member States, the IAEA coordinates cooperative research, promotes information exchange, and analyses technical data and results, with a focus on reducing capital costs and construction periods while further improving performance, safety and proliferation resistance. This paper summarizes the recent major IAEA activities to support technology development for water cooled reactors, which is the most common type of reactor design at present and will probably still be in the near future. (author)

  15. Correspondence of ISO 9001:2008 with IAEA GS-R-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kibrit, Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    This article identifies, characterises and analyses International Organisation for Standardisation (ISO) and International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) normative requirements for the development and implementation of quality management systems in nuclear organisations. The structures of the applicable standards, ISO 9001:2008 and IAEA GS-R-3, are characterised. The differences and similarities of objective, focus, scope, level of application, structure, vocabulary, management system, management responsibility, resource management, process implementation, measurement, assessment and improvement verified in the applicable standards are deeply reviewed. A correspondence of the applicable standards' requirements is presented topic by topic. A correlation of the applicable standards' requirements is made, showing IAEA GS-R-3 topics that have no correlation with ISO 9001:2008 and ISO 9001:2008 topics that have no correlation with IAEA GS-R-3. Conclusive remarks advise the pros and cons of using one of the applicable standards or the other. (author)

  16. Long-term storage of radioactive waste: IAEA perspectives on safety and sustainability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowat, J.H.; Louvat, D.; Metcalf, P.E.

    2006-01-01

    As the amounts of radioactive waste in surface storage have increased, concern has grown over the safety and sustainability of storage in the long term. In response to increasing concerns, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has included an action to address the safety implications of the long-term storage (LTS) of radioactive waste in its action plan for waste safety; the action plan was endorsed by the IAEA's Member States in 2001. In 2003, the IAEA published a position paper on the safety and sustainability of LTS as part fulfilment of the action in question. A key theme of the position paper is the contrast of safety and sustainability implications of LTS with those of disposal. The present paper provides a summary of the position paper, describes current IAEA activities that deal with the subject of LTS, and discusses findings from the 2004 Cordoba symposium on disposal of low activity radioactive waste that pertain to LTS. (author)

  17. Global nuclear developments and the IAEA Director General Mohamed ElBaradei reviews achievements, challenges at IAEA General Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    In a statement to the 44th regular session of the Agency's General Conference (18 - 22 September 2000, Austria Center Vienna), the IAEA Director General reviewed nuclear developments from the IAEA perspectives. In this connection, the Director General signalled the IAEA's achievements and its readiness to provide its services as may be requested in response to global developments. He also underlined present and future challenges shaping the IAEA agenda, including financial challenges

  18. TU-AB-BRC-07: Efficiency of An IAEA Phase-Space Source for a Low Energy X-Ray Tube Using Egs++

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, PGF; Renaud, MA; Seuntjens, J [McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To extend the capability of the EGSnrc C++ class library (egs++) to write and read IAEA phase-space files as a particle source, and to assess the relative efficiency gain in dose calculation using an IAEA phase-space source for modelling a miniature low energy x-ray source. Methods: We created a new ausgab object to score particles exiting a user-defined geometry and write them to an IAEA phase-space file. A new particle source was created to read from IAEA phase-space data. With these tools, a phase-space file was generated for particles exiting a miniature 50 kVp x-ray tube (The INTRABEAM System, Carl Zeiss). The phase-space source was validated by comparing calculated PDDs with a full electron source simulation of the INTRABEAM. The dose calculation efficiency gain of the phase-space source was determined relative to the full simulation. The efficiency gain as a function of i) depth in water, and ii) job parallelization was investigated. Results: The phase-space and electron source PDDs were found to agree to 0.5% RMS, comparable to statistical uncertainties. The use of a phase-space source for the INTRABEAM led to a relative efficiency gain of greater than 20 over the full electron source simulation, with an increase of up to a factor of 196. The efficiency gain was found to decrease with depth in water, due to the influence of scattering. Job parallelization (across 2 to 256 cores) was not found to have any detrimental effect on efficiency gain. Conclusion: A set of tools has been developed for writing and reading IAEA phase-space files, which can be used with any egs++ user code. For simulation of a low energy x-ray tube, the use of a phase-space source was found to increase the relative dose calculation efficiency by factor of up to 196. The authors acknowledge partial support by the CREATE Medical Physics Research Training Network grant of the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (Grant No. 432290).

  19. Recent experience in the use of IAEA planning methodologies for energy, electricity and nuclear power planning among Member States of Europe, the Middle East and North Africa. Proceedings of a workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    This report contains the proceedings of a workshop held in Budapest, Hungary, from 18 to 22 July 1994. The workshop had, as a basic objective, the promotion of the regional exchange of experience in the use of the IAEA`s planning tools and of providing a forum for further co-operation among participating countries. This report is intended to serve as a useful guide for the users of the IAEA planning models, as well as energy and electricity planners in general. Refs, figs, tabs.

  20. ORNL results for Test Case 1 of the International Atomic Energy Agency's research program on the safety assessment of Near-Surface Radioactive Waste Disposal Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorne, D.J.; McDowell-Boyer, L.M.; Kocher, D.C.; Little, C.A.; Roemer, E.K.

    1993-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) started the Coordinated Research Program entitled '''The Safety Assessment of Near-Surface Radioactive Waste Disposal Facilities.'' The program is aimed at improving the confidence in the modeling results for safety assessments of waste disposal facilities. The program has been given the acronym NSARS (Near-Surface Radioactive Waste Disposal Safety Assessment Reliability Study) for ease of reference. The purpose of this report is to present the ORNL modeling results for the first test case (i.e., Test Case 1) of the IAEA NSARS program. Test Case 1 is based on near-surface disposal of radionuclides that are subsequently leached to a saturated-sand aquifer. Exposure to radionuclides results from use of a well screened in the aquifer and from intrusion into the repository. Two repository concepts were defined in Test Case 1: a simple earth trench and an engineered vault

  1. The IAEA's high level radioactive waste management programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saire, D.E.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents the different activities that are performed under the International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA) high level radioactive waste management programme. The Agency's programme is composed of five main activities (information exchange, international safety standards, R ampersand D activities, advisory services and special projects) which are described in the paper. Special emphasis is placed on the RADioactive WAste Safety Standards (RADWASS) programme which was implemented in 1991 to document international consensus that exists on the safe management of radioactive waste. The paper also raises the question about the need for regional repositories to serve certain countries that do not have the resources or infrastructure to construct a national repository

  2. Report realized on the behalf of the Foreign Affairs Commission on the law project, adopted by the Senate, authorizing the added protocol ratification to the agreement between France, the European Atomic Energy Community and the International Atomic Energy Agency relative to the guaranties application in France; Rapport fait au nom de la Commission des Affaires Etrangeres sur le projet de Loi, adopte par le Senat, autorisant la ratification du protocole additionnel a l'accord entre la France, la Communaute europeenne de l'energie atomique et l'Agence internationale de l'energie atomique relatif a l'application de garanties en France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-02-01

    This document presents the analyse of the law project, adopted by the Senate, authorizing the added protocol ratification to the agreement between France, the Atomic Energy European Community and the International Atomic Energy Agency relative to the guaranties application in France. It deals with the nuclear proliferation fight in France and the the program of enhancement of guaranties in the framework of the IAEA. (A.L.B.)

  3. The Strategic Plan of the Nuclear Energy Agency, 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The OECD has been engaged in the past few years in a process of reform to take account of the impact of globalization on its Members' economies, and to allow for proper refocusing of its work, notably on the subject of sustainable development. These developments are having an impact on the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA). The group on the future role of the NEA delivered its report at the end of January 1998 and one key recommendation is the elaboration of a strategic plan for the Agency. The recommendations made in the report served to stimulate a review of NEA goals, priorities, methods of work and products. This review has taken account of the recommendations in the report. The review served as the basis for this Strategic Plan for the NEA, which has been developed to provide guidance to the Agency in planning its activities and implementing its programmes over a five-year period. The report contains detailed description of the following topics:Mission of NEA: Strategic arenas of work, including sectorial arenas, Data bank, Information and communication; Interactions; Relations with non-member countries; Role of the Steering Committee for Nuclear Energy; Working methods; Resources. (R.P.)

  4. IAEA yearbook 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The IAEA Yearbook 1991 contains the following 6 chapters: Transfer of Nuclear Technology; Applications of Nuclear Techniques and Research (Also published separately as Part B of the IAEA Yearbook 1991); Nuclear Power, Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Waste Management (Also published separately as Part C of the IAEA Yearbook 1991); Nuclear Safety Review (Also published separately as Part D of the IAEA Yearbook 1991); IAEA Safeguards; The IAEA (operating framework and functions). A separate abstract and indexing was provided for each chapter. Refs, figs and tabs

  5. International Atomic Energy Agency Publications. Catalogue 1980-1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency issued from 1980 up to the end of 1995 an still available. Some earlier titles which form part of an established series or are still considered of importance have been included. Most Agency publications are issued in English, though some are also available in Chinese, French, Russian or Spanish. This is noted as C for Chinese, E for English, F for French, R for Russian and S For Spanish by the relevant ISBN number. Proceedings of conferences, symposia, seminars and panels, of experts contain papers in their original language (English, French, Russian or Spanish) with abstracts in English and in the original language.

  6. International Atomic Energy Agency Publications. Catalogue 1980-1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-08-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency issued from 1980 up to the end of 1995 an still available. Some earlier titles which form part of an established series or are still considered of importance have been included. Most Agency publications are issued in English, though some are also available in Chinese, French, Russian or Spanish. This is noted as C for Chinese, E for English, F for French, R for Russian and S For Spanish by the relevant ISBN number. Proceedings of conferences, symposia, seminars and panels, of experts contain papers in their original language (English, French, Russian or Spanish) with abstracts in English and in the original language

  7. IAEA and EC to Strengthen Cooperation in Nuclear Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    Full text: The International Atomic Energy Agency and the European Commission today signed a Memorandum of Understanding on Nuclear Safety, establishing a framework for cooperation to help improve nuclear safety in Europe. The Memorandum, signed by IAEA Director General Yukiya Amano and the European Commissioner for Energy, Guenther Oettinger, is the first concrete result of an enhanced dialogue between the IAEA and the EU, launched in January 2013 at their first Senior Officials Meeting in Brussels. Cooperation has been rapidly growing in recent years between the IAEA and the EU, which, together with its Member States, is one of the biggest donors to the IAEA, both in financial terms and in provision of technical expertise. Cooperation in the field of nuclear safeguards is already well-established and formalised, but in other areas it is less structured. ''The EU is one of our most important partners, providing practical and financial assistance, as well as expertise, in many areas of our work,'' Mr. Amano said. ''This Memorandum of Understanding is further evidence that EU countries take very seriously the need to strengthen nuclear safety in the aftermath of the Fukushima Daiichi accident.'' Mr. Oettinger highlighted that such intensified cooperation is important to ensure that nuclear energy is produced safely all over the world. He added that the EU nuclear stress tests set a global benchmark and contribute to the IAEA's Action Plan on Nuclear Safety , which was endorsed unanimously by the IAEA's Member States in September 2011. ''Under the new Memorandum, all this experience will be made available to the international community. I hope that the European safety approach leads to a global initiative,'' said the Commissioner. The Memorandum creates an enhanced framework for planning and reviewing various forms of cooperation in nuclear safety, such as expert peer reviews and strengthening emergency preparedness and response capabilities. It will allow both

  8. The IAEA at a crossroads: An Israeli perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank, G.

    1997-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency has always been a distinguished member of the family of United Nations organizations. From Israel's perspective, as one of the founding members of the Agency, it has been gratifying to reflect on the first 40 years of the IAEA and to recognize it as a profession organization, distinguished by its commitment and contribution to all facets of the peaceful uses of nuclear energy. My long association with the Agency has given me the opportunity to observe its evolution over the past three decades. During the period the IAEA has demonstrated, and has in fact led, the development of one of the most important aspects of nuclear energy: the amalgam of science, technology, statesmanship and diplomacy. Recent years have witnessed many changed affecting the Agency's functions in such areas as nuclear safety and related environmental questions, and safeguards and verification, to mention only a few. This year will also be noted by a change at the helm of the Agency. After 16 years of distinguished service marked by many widely recognized achievements, the Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency, Dr. Hans Blix, will be stepping down. Looking to the future, the Agency must continue to evolve in a manner that will best prepared it to meet the challenges of the 21st century. In doing so it will hopefully benefit from opportunities that come its way and avoid the pitfalls that will naturally confront it. In this article I would like to address briefly, from an Israeli perspective, some of the issues which may influence the Agency's future course. (author)

  9. Agreement Between the International Atomic Energy Agency, the Government of Jamaica and the Government of the United States of America for Assistance in Securing Low Enriched Uranium for a Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The text of the Agreement between the International Atomic Energy Agency, the Government of Jamaica and the Government of the United States of America for Assistance in Securing Low Enriched Uranium for a Research Reactor is reproduced in this document for the information of all Members of the Agency. The Agency's Board of Governors approved the text of the Agreement on 6 March 2013. The Agreement was signed by the authorized representatives of Jamaica on 25 November 2013, the United States on 2 May 2013 and the Director General of the IAEA on 16 December 2013. Pursuant to the Article XI of the Agreement, the Agreement entered into force on 16 December 2013, upon signature by the Director General of the IAEA and by the authorized representatives of Jamaica and the United States [fr

  10. Agreement among the Government of the Republic of Poland, the Government of the United States of America and the International Atomic Energy Agency for assistance in securing nuclear fuel for a research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The text of the Project and Supply Agreement among the Government of the Republic of Poland, the Government of the United States of America and the International Atomic Energy Agency for Assistance in Securing Nuclear Fuel for a Research Reactor is reproduced in this document for the information of all Members of the Agency. The Agency's Board of Governors approved the above mentioned Project and Supply Agreement on 14 June 2006. The Agreement was signed by the authorized representatives of Poland on 8 January 2007, the United States on 12 January 2007 and by the Director General of the IAEA on 16 January 2007. Pursuant to the Article XII of the Agreement, the Agreement entered into force on 16 January 2007, upon signature by the representatives of Poland, the United States and the Director General of the IAEA

  11. Agreement Between the International Atomic Energy Agency, the Government of Jamaica and the Government of the United States of America for Assistance in Securing Low Enriched Uranium for a Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The text of the Agreement between the International Atomic Energy Agency, the Government of Jamaica and the Government of the United States of America for Assistance in Securing Low Enriched Uranium for a Research Reactor is reproduced in this document for the information of all Members of the Agency. The Agency's Board of Governors approved the text of the Agreement on 6 March 2013. The Agreement was signed by the authorized representatives of Jamaica on 25 November 2013, the United States on 2 May 2013 and the Director General of the IAEA on 16 December 2013. Pursuant to the Article XI of the Agreement, the Agreement entered into force on 16 December 2013, upon signature by the Director General of the IAEA and by the authorized representatives of Jamaica and the United States

  12. Agreement Between the International Atomic Energy Agency, the Government of Jamaica and the Government of the United States of America for Assistance in Securing Low Enriched Uranium for a Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The text of the Agreement between the International Atomic Energy Agency, the Government of Jamaica and the Government of the United States of America for Assistance in Securing Low Enriched Uranium for a Research Reactor is reproduced in this document for the information of all Members of the Agency. The Agency's Board of Governors approved the text of the Agreement on 6 March 2013. The Agreement was signed by the authorized representatives of Jamaica on 25 November 2013, the United States on 2 May 2013 and the Director General of the IAEA on 16 December 2013. Pursuant to the Article XI of the Agreement, the Agreement entered into force on 16 December 2013, upon signature by the Director General of the IAEA and by the authorized representatives of Jamaica and the United States [es

  13. The nuclear power safety programme of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, M.

    1981-01-01

    The role of the International Atomic Energy Agency in the field of nuclear power safety is growing. In the period since the Three Mile Island accident, a significant expansion in its nuclear safety programme has taken place. To assure an acceptable safety level world-wide, new emphasis is being placed on the major effort to establish and foster the use of a comprehensive set of internationally agreed safety standards for nuclear power plants. New initiatives are in progress to intensify international co-operative safety efforts through the exchange of information on safety-related operating occurrences, and through a more open sharing of safety research results. Emergency accident assistance lends itself to international co-operation and steps are being taken to establish an emergency assistance programme so the Agency can aid in co-ordinating a timely response to provide, at short notice, help and advice in case of a nuclear power accident. There has been some strengthening of those advisory services which involve missions of international experts primarily to countries with less developed nuclear power programmes, and in conjunction with the Technical Assistance Programme there is a co-ordinated programme for developing countries, involving safety training courses and assistance aimed at promoting an effective national regulatory programme in all countries using nuclear power. This paper discusses the major features of the IAEA activities in nuclear power plant safety. An understanding of the programme and its limitations is essential to its more effective use. Additional initiatives may still be proposed, but the possibilities for international and regional co-operation to assure an adequate level of safety world-wide already exist. (author)

  14. Tumor radiosensitizers-current status of development of various approaches: Report of an International Atomic Energy Agency meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horsman, Michael R.; Bohm, Lothar; Margison, Geoffrey P.; Milas, Luka; Rosier, Jean-Francois; Safrany, Geza; Selzer, Edgar; Verheij, Marcel; Hendry, Jolyon H.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) held a Technical Meeting of Consultants to (1) discuss a selection of relatively new agents, not those well-established in clinical practice, that operated through a variety of mechanisms to sensitize tumors to radiation and (2) to compare and contrast their tumor efficacy, normal tissue toxicity, and status of development regarding clinical application. The aim was to advise the IAEA as to which developing agent or class of agents would be worth promoting further, by supporting additional laboratory research or clinical trials, with the eventual goal of improving cancer control rates using radiotherapy, in developing countries in particular. Results: The agents under discussion included a wide, but not complete, range of different types of drugs, and antibodies that interfered with molecules in cell signaling pathways. These were contrasted with new molecular antisense and gene therapy strategies. All the drugs discussed have previously been shown to act as tumor cell radiosensitizers or to kill hypoxic cells present in tumors. Conclusion: Specific recommendations were made for more preclinical studies with certain of the agents and for clinical trials that would be suitable for industrialized countries, as well as trials that were considered more appropriate for developing countries

  15. DOE, IAEA collaborate to put decades of nuclear research online

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Decades of nuclear research supported by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessor agencies are being made searchable on the World Wide Web, as part of a collaborative effort between the DOE and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The project aims to give researchers, academics, and the general public access to vast volumes of valuable nuclear-related research over the internet. As part of its knowledge preservation mandate, the IAEA' s International Nuclear Information System(INIS) works to preserve nuclear knowledge by digitizing historic nuclear energy research documents dating from 1970 through the early 1990s. Collections from over 29 countries are now digitally available and several additional digital preservation projects are ongoing or are being established, particularly in the Latin America and Caribbean regions. ''Thanks to the collaborative work of the IAEA and its Member States, scientists and students in the nuclear field now have instant access to important research and technical information over the internet,'' said IAEA Deputy Director General for Nuclear Energy Yury Sokolov. ''Our INIS programme continues to work to preserve and provide access to publications and documents on the peaceful applications of nuclear technology.'' The DOE project is one of the larger programmes in the INIS project, and includes more than 180,000 documents from the DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI). OSTI is the U.S. representative to INIS and has had its own digitization focus in recent years. The novel partnership highlights the longstanding mutual benefits of DOE participation in INIS. In essence, it opens up previous research on the safe and peaceful uses of nuclear energy by making it freely and quickly available to scientists and engineers. By making scientific data electronically available, the INIS database helps scientists and students to attain volumes of data that are otherwise inaccessible

  16. Protocol to suspend the application of safeguards pursuant to the Agreement of 26 February 1976 between the Agency, the Government of the Federative Republic of Brazil and the Government of the Federal Republic of Germany in the light of the provisions for the application of safeguards pursuant to the Quadripartite Safeguards Agreement between Argentina, Brazil, the Brazilian-Argentine Agency for the Accounting and Control of Nuclear Materials and the IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The document reproduces the text of the Protocol of 16 October 1998 suspending the application of safeguards under the Safeguards Agreement (INFCIRC/237) of 26 February 1976 between the Agency, Brazil and the Federal Republic of Germany in the light of the provisions for the application of safeguards pursuant to the Quadripartite Safeguards Agreement between the Agency, Brazil, the Brazilian-Argentine Agency for the Accounting and Control of Nuclear Materials and the IAEA. The Protocol entered into force on 21 October 1999

  17. Staying one step ahead: An IAEA inspector fits the picture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohannon, J.

    2006-01-01

    At 29, Nangonya, an engineer, is the nuclear inspector at the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Like any scientific research discipline, nuclear inspection requires a blend of science and technical knowledge and a sceptical mindset. But a career in nuclear inspection also demands detective and diplomatic skills sharp enough to handle sensitive political issues. Nangonya joined the IAEA in 2002 by taking the Agency's Safeguards Traineeship Programme, a foundation course on nuclear technology open only to nationals from developing countries. After finishing the year-long programme, Nangonya applied for an IAEA nuclear inspector position-he got it-and then undertook the three-month training course that all newly hired inspectors complete. Most of Nangonya's training covered the subjects that might be expected: the ins and outs of the nuclear fuel cycle, how to verify that each and every reported gram of plutonium and uranium are where they are supposed to be, and how to spot signs of illicit activity. Every year, IAEA hires 15 to 30 nuclear inspectors, typically in their 30s, many with backgrounds far removed from nuclear physics. An inspection team needs a combination of backgrounds. Inspectors come with a range of expertise, from physics, engineering, and chemistry to computer science and even biology; samples from plants and animals often play a role in detecting unreported nuclear materials. But apart from technical expertise, there are also crucial social and psychological skills to be learned, and this is where nuclear inspection diverges most from academic science. Nuclear inspectors must learn to trust their colleagues, but during their training they must learn not to trust others. Careful diplomacy, not covert intrigue, is the modus operandi. Even when nuclear inspectors turn up bad news, such as the recent discovery of what may be a secret nuclear programme in Iran, inspectors are not enforcers. When findings have been confirmed, the IAEA Director

  18. Safety Culture Implementation in Indonesian Nuclear Energy Regulatory Agency (BAPETEN)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nurwidi Astuti, Y.H.; Dewanto, P.

    2016-01-01

    The Indonesia Nuclear Energy Act no. 10 of 1997 clearly stated that Nuclear Energy Regulatory Agency (BAPETEN) is the Nuclear Regulatory Body. This is the legal basis of BAPETEN to perform regulatory functions on the use of nuclear energy in Indonesia, including regulation, authorisation, inspection and enforcement. The Independent regulatory functions are stipulated in Article 4 and Article 14 of the Nuclear Energy Act no. 10 (1997) which require the government to establish regulatory body that is reporting directly to the president and has responsibility to control of the use of nuclear energy. BAPETEN has been start fully its functioning on January 4, 1999. In it roles as a regulatory body, the main aspect that continues and always to be developed is the safety culture. One of the objectives of regulatory functions is “to increase legal awareness of nuclear energy of the user to develop safety culture” (Article 15, point d), while in the elucidation of article 15 it is stipulated that “safety culture is that of characteristics and attitudes in organizations and individual that emphasise the importance of safety”.

  19. China boosts support for IAEA development and security initiatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Marking 20 years of cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), China announced today that it would donate US$1 million to IAEA's special funds for technical cooperation and enhanced nuclear security. Welcoming the contribution, IAEA Director General Mohamed ElBaradei said, 'The IAEA is grateful for China's continuing generosity in supporting our technical cooperation and security programmes in the nuclear field. The IAEA has forged an excellent partnership with China over the past two decades - one of the most far-reaching partnerships we have with any Member State, extending across the spectrum of IAEA work from safety and security, to safeguards and verification, to technical cooperation in food, energy, water and health. China has been both a major recipient and contributor to IAEA special funds since it joined the IAEA in 1984. China has been an active participant in the IAEA Technical Cooperation (TC) programme, receiving more than US$22 million in assistance through 103 TC projects, in particular in the fields of nuclear safety, engineering and technology. China has also been a major contributor to the TC Fund, with some $11 million in cash and $400,000 of in-kind support. The IAEA's TC Programme disburses more than US$75 million worth of expert services, fellowships, equipment and training workshops per year in approximately 110 countries and territories. The Agency works in partnership with project counterparts in the recipient Member States, typically in the government's atomic energy authority as well as with health, food and agriculture, environment and water authorities. In addition, The Agency collaborates with the World Bank and other UN organizations to plan and execute projects in harmony with Member States' needs. In March 2002, the IAEA launched a 'Plan of Activities to Protect Against Nuclear Terrorism,' which enhanced and integrated the Agency's existing nuclear security-related activities. These activities

  20. Safeguards and legal matters 1996. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-03-01

    This catalogue lists all currently valid sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with Safeguards and Legal Matters. Most publications are published in English. Proceedings of conferences, symposia and panels of experts may contain some papers in languages other than English (French, Russian or Spanish), but all of these papers have abstracts in English. It should be noted that prices of books are quoted in Austrian Schillings. The prices do not include local taxes and are subject to change without notice. All books in this catalogue are 16 x 24 cm, paper-bound, unless otherwise stated

  1. Earth sciences 1980-1994. International Atomic Energy Agency Publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-04-01

    This catalogue lists sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with Earth Sciences issued during the period 1969-1994. Most publications are published in English. Proceedings of conferences, symposia and panels of experts may contain some papers in languages other than English (French, Russian or Spanish), but all these papers have abstracts in English. It should be noted that prices of books are quoted in Austrian Schillings. The prices do not include local taxes and are subject to change without notice. All books in this catalogue are 16 x 24 cm, paper-bound, unless otherwise stated

  2. R and D programs of the International Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyne, P.J.

    1989-01-01

    This paper provides a description of the collaborative research program of the International Energy Agency. Focusing on the organization of the program, rather than attempting to cover the technical content of the research, the discussion conveys how its operation is facilitated through a framework that takes account of the interests of participating governments as well as technical objectives. Some Canadian activities in the IEA program are briefly described as illustration and a list of current IEA Research Agreements and associated activities is presented in an Appendix

  3. IAEA Completes Nuclear Security Review Mission in Hungary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    Full text: A team of International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) experts today completed a mission to review nuclear security practices in Hungary. At the request of the Government of Hungary, the IAEA conducted the two-week International Physical Protection Advisory Service (IPPAS) mission that reviewed the nation's nuclear security-related legislative and regulatory framework, physical protection systems at Hungarian nuclear facilities, and security arrangements applied to the transport of nuclear and radioactive materials. The IAEA team was led by Stephen Ortiz of the United States and included nine experts from six nations and the IAEA. The team met in Budapest with officials from the Hungarian Atomic Energy Authority, Hungarian Police Headquarters, National Security Authority and other relevant agencies. They also conducted site visits to the Paks Nuclear Power Plant, the Interim Spent Fuel Storage Facility, the Budapest Research Reactor, the Budapest Training Reactor, the Radioactive Waste Treatment and Disposal Facility and several other locations where high activity radioactive sources are used for different applications. ''At a time where development of a nuclear power programme is more than ever recognised as necessitating a strong commitment to safety, security and sustainability, the example given today by Hungary strengthens the message about the value of applying the IAEA Security Guidance,'' said IAEA Deputy Director General for Nuclear Safety and Security, Denis Flory, who opened the mission. ''Indeed, IPPAS missions, carried out at the appropriate time in the development of a nuclear power programme, provide valuable insights into how best to reach that goal.'' The IPPAS team concluded that nuclear security within Hungary has been significantly enhanced in recent years. The team also identified a number of good practices at the nation's nuclear facilities, and provided some recommendations and suggestions to assist Hungary in the continuing

  4. Validating dose rate calibration of radiotherapy photon beams through IAEA/WHO postal audit dosimetry service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jangda, A.Q.; Hussein, S.

    2012-01-01

    In external beam radiation therapy (EBRT), the quality assurance (QA) of the radiation beam is crucial to the accurate delivery of the prescribed dose to the patient. One of the dosimetric parameters that require monitoring is the beam output, specified as the dose rate on the central axis under reference conditions. The aim of this project was to validate dose rate calibration of megavoltage photon beams using the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)/World Health Organisation (WHO) postal audit dosimetry service. Three photon beams were audited: a 6 MV beam from the low-energy linac and 6 and 18 MV beams from a dual high-energy linac. The agreement between our stated doses and the IAEA results was within 1% for the two 6 MV beams and within 2% for the 18 MV beam. The IAEA/WHO postal audit dosimetry service provides an independent verification of dose rate calibration protocol by an international facility. (author)

  5. Validating dose rate calibration of radiotherapy photon beams through IAEA/WHO postal audit dosimetry service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jangda, Abdul Qadir; Hussein, Sherali

    2012-05-01

    In external beam radiation therapy (EBRT), the quality assurance (QA) of the radiation beam is crucial to the accurate delivery of the prescribed dose to the patient. One of the dosimetric parameters that require monitoring is the beam output, specified as the dose rate on the central axis under reference conditions. The aim of this project was to validate dose rate calibration of megavoltage photon beams using the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)/World Health Organisation (WHO) postal audit dosimetry service. Three photon beams were audited: a 6 MV beam from the low-energy linac and 6 and 18 MV beams from a dual high-energy linac. The agreement between our stated doses and the IAEA results was within 1% for the two 6 MV beams and within 2% for the 18 MV beam. The IAEA/WHO postal audit dosimetry service provides an independent verification of dose rate calibration protocol by an international facility.

  6. IAEA Safeguards Information System (ISIS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-10-01

    Publication of this technical document should serve for better understanding of the technical and functional features of the IAEA Safeguards Information System (ISIS) within the Agency, as well as in the National Systems of accounting for and control of nuclear material. It will also serve as a foundation for further development and improvement of the design and modifications of the Safeguards Information System and its services as a function of Safeguards implementation

  7. IAEA to Cooperate with Japan on Nuclear Security at 2020 Olympic Games in Tokyo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2018-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the Government of Japan signed an agreement today aimed at enhancing nuclear security measures for the summer Olympic Games and Paralympic Games in Tokyo in 2020. The agreement follows previous IAEA support to major public events, including the 2016 Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro and the 2012 European soccer championship in Poland and Ukraine. IAEA Director General Yukiya Amano and Japanese Foreign Minister Taro Kono presided over the signing ceremony at the Agency’s headquarters in Vienna. Practical Arrangements outlining the planned cooperation were signed by IAEA Deputy Director General Juan Carlos Lentijo, head of the Department of Nuclear Safety and Security, and H.E. Mitsuru Kitano, Japan’s Ambassador to the International Organizations in Vienna. “The IAEA has extensive experience in supporting Member States on nuclear security for major public events,” Amano said at the ceremony. “The Agency welcomes the cooperation to support the Olympic and Paralympic Games in Tokyo, and is already cooperating with Japan by sharing the experiences of Member States which previously hosted the Olympics.” The details of the cooperation will be decided in due course, but the possible areas of cooperation include the IAEA offering Japanese authorities training courses, workshops, technical visits and exercises related to nuclear security, hosting preparatory technical meetings and lending supplementary radiation detection equipment. The IAEA and Japan may also exchange information related to nuclear security events as appropriate and through the cooperation, the IAEA will also benefit from Japan’s good practices on nuclear security.

  8. Assessment of the requirements for placing and maintaining Savannah River Site spent fuel storage basins under International Atomic Energy Agency safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amacker, O.P. Jr.; Curtis, M.M.; Delegard, C.H.; Hsue, S.T.; Whitesel, R.N.

    1997-03-01

    The United States is considering the offer of irradiated research reactor spent fuel (RRSF) for international safeguards applied by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The offer would be to add one or more spent fuel storage basins to the list of facilities eligible for IAEA safeguards. The fuel to be safeguarded would be stored in basins on the Savannah River Site (SRS). This RRSF potentially can include returns of Material Test Reactor (MTR) VAX fuel from Argentina, Brazil, and Chile (ABC); returns from other foreign research reactors; and fuel from domestic research reactors. Basins on the SRS being considered for this fuel storage are the Receiving Basin for Offsite Fuel (RBOF) and the L-Area Disassembly Basin (L-Basin). A working group of SRS, U.S. Department of Energy International Safeguards Division (NN-44), and National Laboratory personnel with experience in IAEA safeguards was convened to consider the requirements for applying the safeguards to this material. The working group projected the safeguards requirements and described alternatives

  9. The IAEA Safety Regime for Decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, M.J.

    2002-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The International Atomic Energy Agency is developing an international framework for decommissioning of nuclear facilities that consists of the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management, and a hierarchy of Safety Standards applicable to decommissioning. The Joint Convention entered into force on 18 June 2001 and as of December 2001 had been ratified by 27 IAEA Member States. The Joint Convention contains a number of articles dealing with planning for, financing, staffing and record keeping for decommissioning. The Joint Convention requires Contracting Parties to apply the same operational radiation protection criteria, discharge limits and criteria for controlling unplanned releases during decommissioning that are applied during operations. The IAEA has issued Safety Requirements document and three Safety Guides applicable to decommissioning of facilities. The Safety Requirements document, WS-R-2, Pre-disposal Management of Radioactive Waste, including Decommissioning, contains requirements applicable to regulatory control, planning and funding, management of radioactive waste, quality assurance, and environmental and safety assessment of the decommissioning process. The three Safety Guides are WS-G-2.1, Decommissioning of Nuclear Power Plants and Research Reactors, WS-G-2.2, Decommissioning of Medical, Industrial and Research Facilities, an WS-G-2.4, Decommissioning of Nuclear Fuel Cycle Facilities. They contain guidance on how to meet the requirements of WS-R-2 applicable to decommissioning of specific types of facilities. These Standards contain only general requirements and guidance relative to safety assessment and do not contain details regarding the content of the safety case. More detailed guidance will be published in future Safety Reports currently in preparation within the Waste Safety Section of the IAEA. Because much material arising during the decommissioning

  10. Programmatic activities of IAEA in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padhy, A.K.

    2004-01-01

    Nuclear medicine is high-tech medicine. Nevertheless, it is essential for addressing important health problems of people living in developing countries also. Not only is it sometimes expensive to start with, it also involves a lot of technical know-how, requiring transfer of technology from developed to the developing countries. The rapid development of nuclear medicine, of sophisticated instrumentation and radiopharmaceuticals has resulted in an enormous increase in costs and in the need for maintaining quality. These constitute a challenge and a venture when promoting nuclear medicine globally and particularly in developing countries. No other international organization except IAEA has any specific mandate for application of nuclear energy in the area of human health. WHO has no specific programin nuclear medicine, hence the importance of IAEA's involvement. The IAEA has, ever since its inception, given high priority to enhancing the awareness and capabilities of developing member states to employ nuclear technology for health care and medical research. Much of the Agency promoted research in nuclear medicine is delivered through the so called co-ordinated research projects (CRPs). The CRPs are normally organised as multi-center, prospective studies so that large volume of scientific data could be generated in a short period of 18-24 months. The research is normally done within an operational frame work, established and co-ordinated by the IAEA. The reason for this is that the results can be compared despite site or country specific differences. The methods and materials used for such studies usually conform to a predetermined standard. The protocols for various investigations, criteria for patient selection, mode of arriving at a final diagnosis and analysis of data from these multi-center studies are normally agreed upon by the Chief Scientific Investigators from each participating institution and the IAEA prior to the start of the actual work programme. The

  11. IAEA TECDOC 055 Outline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shull, Doug [Gregg Protection Services, Palm Beach Gardens, FL (United States)

    2015-07-13

    An outline of suggestions for updating a version of IAEA-TECDOC-1276 is provided. This update will become IAEA-TECDOC-055, titled ''IAEA handbook for designing and implementing physical protection systems for nuclear material and nuclear facilities.''

  12. Optimizing IAEA Safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varjoranta, Tero

    2016-01-01

    IAEA safeguards make a vital contribution to international security. Through safeguards, the IAEA deters the spread of nuclear weapons and provides credible assurance that States are honouring their international obligations to use nuclear material only for peaceful purposes. Its independent verification work allows the IAEA to facilitate building international confidence and strengthening collective security for all.

  13. IAEA safeguard system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pontes, B.C.

    1987-01-01

    The intents of IAEA safeguards, analysing into the IAEA statutes, are presented. The different types of safeguard agreements; the measurements of accounting, containment and caution used by the operator and; the information to be provided and the verification to be developed by IAEA are described. (M.C.K.) [pt

  14. Proposal for the International Atomic Energy Agency Training Course

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarthy, T.L.

    1994-06-01

    The Hanford Site has hosted similar activities, including both Hanford Summits I and II. The Hanford Summits were two-day televised events to discuss the commitment of the current Presidential administration to the environmental restoration of the Hanford Site. Public involvement and strategic issues established from Hanford Summit I include: Regulatory issues, training and education, economic development and partnership, and technology transfer. Hanford Summit II provided a summary of how Secretary of Energy O'Leary is proceeding on the above strategic issues. The DOE and Westinghouse School for Environmental Excellence frequently offers a six-week course for environmental professionals and workers. Approximately thirty to forty individuals attend the training course, which provides training in environmental regulation compliance. The Hanford Site has hosted two previous International Atomic Energy Agency training courses. The courses lasted two weeks and had approximately eight to ten participants. Nuclear Material Management and Neutron Monitoring were the courses hosted by the Hanford Site

  15. IAEA to Help West African Countries Diagnose Ebola

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    Full text: The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) will provide specialized diagnostic equipment to help Sierra Leone in its efforts to combat an ongoing Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) outbreak, IAEA Director General Yukiya Amano announced today. Later, the support is planned to be extended to Liberia and Guinea. The support is in line with a UN Security Council appeal and responds to a request from Sierra Leone. The IAEA assistance will supplement the country's ability to diagnose EVD quickly using a diagnostic technology known as Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR). The assistance, expected to be delivered in the coming weeks, initiates broader IAEA support to African Member States to strengthen their technological abilities to detect diseases transmitted from animals to humans - zoonotic diseases. The IAEA and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations have been at the forefront of developing RT-PCR, a nuclear-derived technology which allows EVD to be detected within a few hours, while other methods require growing on a cell culture for several days before a diagnosis is determined. Early diagnosis of EVD, if combined with appropriate medical care, increases the victims' chance of survival and helps curtail the spread of the disease by making it possible to isolate and treat the patients earlier. Health authorities in Sierra Leone and other affected countries are already applying RT-PCR, but their diagnostic capability is limited; there is a shortage of the diagnostic kits and other materials needed for the process and backup equipment is needed to avoid diagnostic downtime in case of equipment failure. The IAEA will support the most affected countries' sustained ability to detect the disease in cooperation with the World Health Organization (WHO) and the United Nations Mission for Ebola Emergency Response. The IAEA, as part of its ongoing work, has helped 32 African countries and several other Member States develop skills

  16. IAEA Fellowship Program, 1997 report on United States participants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Fellowship Program began in April 1958 as a part of the Agency's Technical Cooperation (TC) Program. Through the TC Program, the IAEA provides technical assistance to meet the needs of recipient countries and to bring about a substantial transfer of technology. This is done by providing experts, equipment, fellowships, and training courses. This report addresses the US component of the fellowship program. These fellowships provide opportunities for research and training of scientists, engineers and physicians from developing countries in the peaceful application of nuclear energy. The fellowships are awarded to persons who are, or soon will be, trusted with responsibilities that are important to the development of their countries. Fellowship awards are classified into two groups, those financed by the IAEA General Fund or the UNDP Fund (Type 1 Fellowships and Scientific Visits), and those offered by Member States (Type 2 Fellowships). In placing individuals, preference is given to applicants from countries that are signatories to the Treaty on Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons or to the Treaty for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in Latin America

  17. IAEA Fellowship Program, 1996 report on United States participants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Fellowship Program began in April 1958 as a part of the Agency's Technical Cooperation (TC) Program. Through the TC Program, the IAEA provides technical assistance to meet the needs of recipient countries and to bring about a substantial transfer of technology. This is done by providing experts, equipment, fellowships, and training courses. This report addresses the US component of the fellowship program. These fellowships provide opportunities for research and training of scientists, engineers and physicians from developing countries in the peaceful application of nuclear energy. The fellowships are awarded to persons who are, or soon will be, trusted with responsibilities that are important to the development of their countries. Fellowship awards are classified into two groups, those financed by the IAEA General Fund or the UNDP Fund (Type 1 Fellowships and Scientific Visits), and those offered by Member States (Type 2 Fellowships). In placing individuals, preference is given to applicants from countries that are signatories to the Treaty on Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons or to the Treaty for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in Latin America

  18. IAEA '77: between politics and factual constraints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freytag, A.

    1976-01-01

    The IAEA's organization of its 20th General Conference at Rio de Janeiro clearly underlined the importance of a comprehensive international transfer of nuclear technology. Despite all efforts to keep the Agency out of general political confrontations, the Conference was tinged politically by the PLO and South Africa problems. Besides the next five year program, which was agreed upon in the light of existing factual constraints, the support and control functions of the IAEA and next year's Salzburg Fuel Cycle Conference were other main topics of discussion. The 1977 IAEA budget was approved at a level of 43.5 million, the General Fund at 6.5 million. (orig.) [de

  19. Energies and media Nr 38 - Always improving safety: the intervention of 'peers'; IAEA, its OSART, etc.; WANO must be known

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baschwitz, Robert

    2012-06-01

    The first part of this issue comments the 'peer review' as a promising approach to avoid nuclear accidents and incidents to occur again. Such a review or inspection could be performed by international experts at regular intervals. In order to outline the interest of this approach, the authors describe who used to be in charge of safety before 2010-2011, i.e. what was the mission of the operator, what was the role of the national nuclear safety authority, what were the missions of the IAEA. It notably addresses the role of its OSARTs (Operational Safety Review Teams) by briefly describing how these teams were built up and operated. It also describes the role of WANO (World Association of Nuclear Operators) and its 'peer reviews'. It evokes the activities of this association (number of studied events, of inspection missions, of published reports). Then, the authors describe the evolution since 2010 and Fukushima (March 2011): planned evolutions within WANO by 2015, evolutions within the IAEA and its OSARTs (notably design reviews), and within the safety authorities

  20. IAEA Issues Report on Mission to Review Japan's Nuclear Power Plant Safety Assessment Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    Full text: A team of international nuclear safety experts has delivered its report on a mission it conducted from 21-31 January 2012 to review Japan's process for assessing nuclear safety at the nation's nuclear power plants. International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) officials delivered the IAEA Mission Report to Japanese officials yesterday and made it publicly available today. Following the 11 March 2011 accident at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station, Japan's Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency (NISA) announced the development of a revised safety assessment process for the nation's nuclear power reactors. At the request of the Government of Japan, the IAEA organized a team of five IAEA and three international nuclear safety experts and visited Japan to review NISA's approach to the Comprehensive Assessments for the Safety of Existing Power Reactor Facilities and how NISA examines the results submitted by nuclear operators. A Preliminary Summary Report was issued on 31 January. 'The mission report provides additional information regarding the team's recommendations and overall finding that NISA's instructions to power plants and its review process for the Comprehensive Safety Assessments are generally consistent with IAEA Safety Standards', said team leader James Lyons, Director of the IAEA's Nuclear Installation Safety Division. National safety assessments and their peer review by the IAEA are a key component of the IAEA Action Plan on Nuclear Safety, which was approved by the Agency's Member States following last year's nuclear accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station. The IAEA safety review mission held meetings in Tokyo with officials from NISA, the Japanese Nuclear Energy Safety Organization (JNES), and the Kansai Electric Power Company (KEPCO), and the team visited the Ohi Nuclear Power Station to see an example of how Japan's Comprehensive Safety Assessment is being implemented by nuclear operators. In its report delivered today

  1. Typical IAEA inspection procedures for model plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theis, W.

    1984-01-01

    This session briefly refers to the legal basis for IAEA inspections and to their objectives. It describes in detail the planning and performance of IAEA inspections, including the examination of records, the comparison of facility records with State reports, flow and inventory verifications, the design of statistical sampling plans, and Agency's independent verification measurements. In addition, the session addresses the principles of Material Balance and MUF evaluation, as well as the content and format of summary statements and related problems

  2. Non-proliferation and international safeguards. [Booklet by IAEA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-01-01

    This booklet consists of 13 separate, brief analyses related to the subject title, namely: The International Scope of IAEA Safeguards; Application of Safeguards Procedures; Computer-Based Safeguards Information and Accounting System; IAEA Training Activities Related to State Systems of Nuclear Materials Accountancy and Control; Surveillance and Containment Measures to Support IAEA Safeguards; International Plutonium Management; Safeguards for Reprocessing and Enrichment Plants; Non-Destructive Assay: Instruments and Techniques for Agency Safeguards; The Safeguards Analytical Laboratory: Its Functions and Analytical Facilities; Resolution of the UN General Assembly on the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons of 12 June 1968; The Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons; Final Declaration of the Review Conference of the Parties to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons, May 1975; Resolutions on the IAEA's Work in the Field of the Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy, adopted by the UN General Assembly on 8 and 12 December, 1977; and a Map on the NPT situation in the world (with explanations).

  3. IAEA verification experiment at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, D.M.; Subudhi, M.; Calvert, O.L.; Bonner, T.N.; Cherry, R.C.; Whiting, N.E.

    1998-01-01

    In April 1996, the United States (US) added the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant to the list of facilities eligible for the application of International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards. At that time, the US proposed that the IAEA carry out a Verification Experiment at the plant with respect to the downblending of about 13 metric tons of highly enriched uranium (HEU) in the form of UF 6 . This material is part of the 226 metric tons of fissile material that President Clinton has declared to be excess to US national-security needs and which will be permanently withdrawn from the US nuclear stockpile. In September 1997, the IAEA agreed to carry out this experiment, and during the first three weeks of December 1997, the IAEA verified the design information concerning the downblending process. The plant has been subject to short-notice random inspections since December 17, 1997. This paper provides an overview of the Verification Experiment, the monitoring technologies used in the verification approach, and some of the experience gained to date

  4. IAEA and the world summit on sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, JoAnne

    2002-03-01

    Nuclear technology offers unique tools in the quest for sustainable development. Such technology is often the best to gather information and provide solutions that would not otherwise be possible or practical: to diagnose and treat disease, to breed better crops and fight insect pests; to assess new sources of fresh water; and to monitor pollution. While many may only think of energy, nuclear technology has a much larger role to play in human development. Where it can make a difference, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) provides support to 133 Member States for using this technology to solve the important challenges they face

  5. IAEA and the world summit on sustainable development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ford, JoAnne [ed.

    2002-03-01

    Nuclear technology offers unique tools in the quest for sustainable development. Such technology is often the best to gather information and provide solutions that would not otherwise be possible or practical: to diagnose and treat disease, to breed better crops and fight insect pests; to assess new sources of fresh water; and to monitor pollution. While many may only think of energy, nuclear technology has a much larger role to play in human development. Where it can make a difference, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) provides support to 133 Member States for using this technology to solve the important challenges they face.

  6. Report realized on the behalf of the Foreign Affairs Commission on the law project, adopted by the Senate, authorizing the added protocol ratification to the agreement between France, the European Atomic Energy Community and the International Atomic Energy Agency relative to the guaranties application in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-02-01

    This document presents the analyse of the law project, adopted by the Senate, authorizing the added protocol ratification to the agreement between France, the Atomic Energy European Community and the International Atomic Energy Agency relative to the guaranties application in France. It deals with the nuclear proliferation fight in France and the the program of enhancement of guaranties in the framework of the IAEA. (A.L.B.)

  7. IAEA To Launch Centre On Ocean Acidification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    Full text: The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is to launch a new centre this summer to address the growing problem of ocean acidification. Operated by the Agency's Monaco Environmental Laboratories, the Ocean Acidification International Coordination Centre will serve the scientific community - as well as policymakers, universities, media and the general public - by facilitating, promoting and communicating global actions on ocean acidification. Growing amounts of carbon dioxide in the Earth's atmosphere are being absorbed in the planet's oceans which increases their acidity. According to the experts, ocean acidification may render most regions of the ocean inhospitable to coral reefs by 2050 if atmospheric carbon dioxide levels continue to increase. This could lead to substantial changes in commercial fish stocks, threatening food security for millions of people as well as the multi-billion dollar fishing industry. International scientists have been studying the effect and possible responses, and the new centre will help coordinate their efforts. ''During the past five years, numerous multinational and national research projects on ocean acidification have emerged and significant research advances have been made,'' said Daud bin Mohamad, IAEA Deputy Director General for Nuclear Sciences and Applications. ''The time is now ripe to provide international coordination to gain the greatest value from national efforts and research investments.'' The centre will be supported by several IAEA Member States and through the Peaceful Uses Initiative, and it will be overseen by an Advisory Board consisting of leading institutions, including the U.N. Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission, the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization, the Fondation Prince Albert II de Monaco, the OA-Reference User Group, as well as leading scientists and economists in the field. The new centre will focus on international

  8. Report realized on behalf of the Foreign Affairs Commission, of Defense and Armed Forces on the law project allowing the additional protocol ratification to the agreement between France, European Community of the atomic energy and the International Atomic Energy Agency relative to the guaranties application in France; Rapport fait au nom de la commission des affaires etrangeres, de la defense et des forces armees sur le projet de loi autorisant la ratification du protocole additionnel a l'accord entre la France, la Communaute europeenne de l'energie atomique et l'Agence internationale de l'energie atomique relatif a l'application de garanties en France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    In a first part the author presents the International Atomic Energy Agency and its missions in the nuclear non proliferation policy especially in the agreements with the states of the TNP (Treaty of Nuclear non Proliferation). the today position of France is then analyzed towards the IAEA and the novations added by the additional protocol. (A.L.B.)

  9. Computer Programme Library at Ispra: Service to IAEA Member States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-01-01

    In 1964, in view of the increasingly important role of computers in atomic energy, the Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development established a Computer Programme Library (CPL) at Ispra, Italy. The original purpose of this Library, then consisting chiefly of programmes for reactor calculations, was to improve communication between the originators of the computer programmes and the scientists and engineers in Member States of the OECD who used them, thus furthering the efficient and economic use of the many large and expensive computers in the countries concerned. During the first few years of the Library's operation, a growing interest in its activities became evident in countries which were not members of the OECD. The Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency, aware that such countries which were Member States of the IAEA could benefit from the Library's services, concluded an agreement with the Nuclear Energy Agency in 1967 to the effect that these services would be extended to all IAEA Member States. In March 1968, the Director General announced by circular letter that these services were available, and requested the governments of Member States that were not members of OECD to nominate establishments to participate in the activities of the Computer Programme Library. By August 1973, 32 such establishments were regularly using the services of the CPL

  10. End user needs for enhanced IAEA Safeguards Information Management Capabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badalamente, R. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Anzelon, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Deland, S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Whiteson, R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1994-07-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency is undertaking a program for strengthening its safeguards on the recognition that safeguards must give assurance not only of the non-diversion of declared material or that declared facilities are not being misused, but also of the absence of any undeclared nuclear activities in States which have signed comprehensive safeguards agreements with the Agency. The IAEA has determined that the detection of undeclared nuclear activities and the creation of confidence in the continuing peaceful use of declared material and facilities is largely dependent on more information being made available to the Agency and on the capability of the Agency to make more effective use of this additional information, as well as existing information.

  11. End user needs for enhanced IAEA Safeguards Information Management Capabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badalamente, R.; Anzelon, G.; Deland, S.; Whiteson, R.

    1994-07-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency is undertaking a program for strengthening its safeguards on the recognition that safeguards must give assurance not only of the non-diversion of declared material or that declared facilities are not being misused, but also of the absence of any undeclared nuclear activities in States which have signed comprehensive safeguards agreements with the Agency. The IAEA has determined that the detection of undeclared nuclear activities and the creation of confidence in the continuing peaceful use of declared material and facilities is largely dependent on more information being made available to the Agency and on the capability of the Agency to make more effective use of this additional information, as well as existing information

  12. IAEA and food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machi, Sueo

    1995-01-01

    IAEA was founded in 1957. 122 countries take part in it. It is operated with the yearly ordinary budget of about 20 billion yen and the technical cooperation budget of about 6 billion yen and by 2200 personnel. Its two important roles are the promotion of the peaceful utilization of atomic energy and the prevention of nuclear proliferation. The activities of IAEA are shown. The cooperation with developing countries and the international research cooperation program are the important activities. The securing of foods is an urgent subject, and the utilization of radiation and isotopes has been promoted, aiming at sustaining agriculture. The necessity of food irradiation is explained, and at present, commercial food irradiation is carried out in 28 countries including Japan. The irradiation less than 10 kGy does not cause poisonous effect in any food, according to JECFI. The new international agreement is expected to be useful for promoting the international trade of irradiated foods. The international cooperation for the spread of food irradiation and the public acceptance of food irradiation are reported. (K.I.)

  13. Thermohydraulic relationships for advanced water cooled reactors and the role of the IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badulescu, A.; Groeneveld, D.C.

    2000-01-01

    Under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) a Coordinated Research Program (CRP) on Thermohydraulic Relationships for Advanced Water-Cooled Reactors was carried out from 1995-1998. It was included into the IAEA's Programme following endorsement in 1995 by the International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Water Cooled Reactors. The overall goal was to promote International Information exchange and cooperation in establishing a consistent set of thermohydraulic relationships that are appropriate for use in analyzing the performance and safety of advanced water-cooled reactors. (authors)

  14. Calibration and performance testing of the IAEA Aquila Active Well Coincidence Counter (Unit 1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menlove, H.O..; Siebelist, R.; Wenz, T.R.

    1996-01-01

    An Active Well Coincidence Counter (AWCC) and a portable shift register (PSR-B) produced by Aquila Technologies Group, Inc., have been tested and cross-calibrated with existing AWCCs used by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). This report summarizes the results of these tests and the cross-calibration of the detector. In addition, updated tables summarizing the cross-calibration of existing AWCCs and AmLi sources are also included. Using the Aquila PSR-B with existing IAEA software requires secondary software also supplied by Aquila to set up the PSR-B with the appropriate measurement parameters

  15. IAEA workshop and field trial at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hembree, D.M. Jr.; Ross, H.H.; Carter, J.A.

    1995-03-01

    In March 1994, members of the International Safeguards Department in the National Security Program Office (NSPO) hosted an environmental monitoring field trial workshop for International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) inspectors. The workshop was held at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site and its primary purpose was to train the inspectors in the techniques needed for effective environmental sample collection and handling. The workshop emphasized both sampling theory and practice. First, detailed techniques for swipe, vegetation, soil, biota, and water-associated sampling were covered in the classroom. Subsequently, the inspectors were divided into three groups for actual sample collection in and around the K-25 locale. The collected samples were processed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Network of Analytical Laboratories using established analytical techniques. This activity is part of the IAEA ''Programme 93+2 in. assessment of measures to enhance IAEA safeguards

  16. Third IAEA nuclear accident intercomparison experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miric, I; Ubovic, Z

    1974-05-15

    The purpose of this report is to present the results of the International Atomic Energy Agency intercomparison experiments held at the 'Boris Kidric' Institute, Vinca, in May 1973. The experiments are parts of a multilaboratory intercomparison programme sponsored by the IAEA for the evaluation of nuclear accident dosimetry systems and eventually recommendation of dosimetry systems that will provide adequate informations in the event of a criticality accident. The previous two studies were held at the Valduc Centre near Dijon (France) in June 1970 and at the ORNL in Oak Ridge (USA), in May 1971. Parts of the intercomparison studies were coordination meetings. The topics and conclusions of the Third coordination meeting are given in the Chairman's Report of F.F. Haywood. This paper will deal, therefore, only with data concerning the Third intercomparison experiments in which the RB reactor at Vinca was used as a source of mixed radiation. (author)

  17. Reference dosimeter system of the IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehta, Kishor; Girzikowsky, Reinhard

    1995-01-01

    Quality assurance programmes must be in operation at radiation facilities to satisfy national and international Standards. Since dosimetry has a vital function in these QA programmes, it is imperative that the dosimetry systems in use at these facilities are well calibrated with a traceability to a Primary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory. As a service to the Member States, the International Atomic Energy Agency operates the International Dose Assurance Service (IDAS) to assist in this process. The transfer standard dosimetry system that is used for this service is based on ESR spectrometry. The paper describes the activities undertaken at the IAEA Dosimetry Laboratory to establish the QA programme for its reference dosimetry system. There are four key elements of such a programme: quality assurance manual; calibration that is traceable to a Primary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory; a clear and detailed statement of uncertainty in the dose measurement; and, periodic quality audit. (Author)

  18. Reference dosimeter system of the iaea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Kishor; Girzikowsky, Reinhard

    1995-09-01

    Quality assurance programmes must be in operation at radiation processing facilities to satisfy national and international Standards. Since dosimetry has a vital function in these QA programmes, it is imperative that the dosimetry systems in use at these facilities are well calibrated with a traceability to a Primary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory. As a service to the Member States, the International Atomic Energy Agency operates the International Dose Assurance Service (IDAS) to assist in this process. The transfer standard dosimetry system that is used for this service is based on ESR spectrometry. The paper describes the activities undertaken at the IAEA Dosimetry Laboratory to establish the QA programme for its reference dosimetry system. There are four key elements of such a programme: quality assurance manual; calibration that is traceable to a Primary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory; a clear and detailed statement of uncertainty in the dose measurement; and, periodic quality audit.

  19. Reference dosimeter system of the IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehta, K.; Girzikowsky, R.

    1995-01-01

    Quality assurance programmes must be in operation at radiation processing facilities to satisfy national and international standards. Since dosimetry has a vital function in these QA programmes, it is imperative that the dosimetry systems in use at these facilities are well calibrated with a traceability to a Primary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory. As a service to the Member States, the International Atomic Energy Agency operates the International Dose Assurance Service (IDAS) to assist in this process. The transfer standard dosimetry system that is used for this service is based on ESR spectrometry. The paper describes the activities undertaken at the IAEA Dosimetry Laboratory to establish the QA programme for its reference dosimetry system. There are four key elements of such a programme: quality assurance manual; calibration that is traceable to a Primary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory; a clear and detailed statement of uncertainty in the dose measurement; and, periodic quality audit. (author)

  20. Nuclear Fuel Supply Arrangements through the IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phuong, Ha-Vinh

    1981-10-01

    By virtue of its statutory functions, the International Atomic Energy Agency may be the depositary and also the supplier of nuclear materials made available to it by Member States, and these may then be stored in facilities it has acquired or which it has established under its control. However, this possibility did not materialize, mainly because the supplying states -few in number- do not want an international organization to become directly involved in bilateral transactions in that field. This paper analyses in particular the provisions of supply agreements concluded with the United Kingdom, the USA and the USSR. The Annex contains a Table of Agreements on supply of nuclear fuel and equipment concluded between supplying and consumer states through the IAEA. (NEA) [fr

  1. Third IAEA nuclear accident intercomparison experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miric, I.; Ubovic, Z.

    1974-05-01

    The purpose of this report is to present the results of the International Atomic Energy Agency intercomparison experiments held at the 'Boris Kidric' Institute, Vinca, in May 1973. The experiments are parts of a multilaboratory intercomparison programme sponsored by the IAEA for the evaluation of nuclear accident dosimetry systems and eventually recommendation of dosimetry systems that will provide adequate informations in the event of a criticality accident. The previous two studies were held at the Valduc Centre near Dijon (France) in June 1970 and at the ORNL in Oak Ridge (USA), in May 1971. Parts of the intercomparison studies were coordination meetings. The topics and conclusions of the Third coordination meeting are given in the Chairman's Report of F.F. Haywood. This paper will deal, therefore, only with data concerning the Third intercomparison experiments in which the RB reactor at Vinca was used as a source of mixed radiation. (author)

  2. IAEA activities in nuclear reactor simulation for educational purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyon, R.B.

    2001-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has established a programme in nuclear reactor simulation computer programs to assist its Member States in education and training. The objective is to provide, for a variety of advanced reactor types, insight and practice in their operational characteristics and their response to perturbations and accident situations. To achieve this, the IAEA arranges for the supply or development of simulation programs and training material, sponsors training courses and workshops, and distributes documentation and computer programs. Two simulation programs are presented at this workshop: the Classroom-based Advanced Reactor Demonstrators package, and the Advanced Reactor Simulator. Both packages simulate the behaviour of BWR, PWR and HWR reactor types. For each package, the modeling approach and assumptions are broadly described, together with a general description of the operation of the computer programs. (author)

  3. An overview of the IAEA action team activities in Iraq

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dillon, G.; Baute, J. [International Atomic Energy Agency IAEA, Vienna (Austria)

    2001-07-01

    Following Iraq withdrawal from Kuwait, the United Nations Security Council adopted its resolution 687 (1991), setting out the terms of the cease fire agreement. Those terms, inter alia, requested the Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to carry out immediate on-site inspection of Iraq nuclear capabilities, to prepare and carry out a plan for the destruction, removal and rendering harmless of all assets relevant to the design and production of nuclear weapons, and to design and eventually implement a plan for the ongoing monitoring and verification of Iraq compliance with its related obligations under Security Council resolutions. This paper summarises the work of the IAEA Iraq Action Team, established by the Director General to carry out the practical tasks necessary to implement the requests of the Security Council. It also highlights the lessons learned from a unique regime of disarmament and verification. (author)

  4. An overview of the IAEA action team activities in Iraq

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dillon, G.; Baute, J.

    2001-01-01

    Following Iraq withdrawal from Kuwait, the United Nations Security Council adopted its resolution 687 (1991), setting out the terms of the cease fire agreement. Those terms, inter alia, requested the Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to carry out immediate on-site inspection of Iraq nuclear capabilities, to prepare and carry out a plan for the destruction, removal and rendering harmless of all assets relevant to the design and production of nuclear weapons, and to design and eventually implement a plan for the ongoing monitoring and verification of Iraq compliance with its related obligations under Security Council resolutions. This paper summarises the work of the IAEA Iraq Action Team, established by the Director General to carry out the practical tasks necessary to implement the requests of the Security Council. It also highlights the lessons learned from a unique regime of disarmament and verification. (author)

  5. Radiation shielding activities at the OECD/Nuclear Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sartori, Enrico; Vaz, Pedro

    2000-01-01

    The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) has devoted considerable effort over the years to radiation shielding issues. The issues are addressed through international working groups. These activities are carried out in close co-ordination and co-operation with the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC). The areas of work include: basic nuclear data activities in support of radiation shielding, computer codes, shipping cask shielding applications, reactor pressure vessel dosimetry, shielding experiments database. The method of work includes organising international code comparison exercises and benchmark studies. Training courses on radiation shielding computer codes are organised regularly including hands-on experience in modelling skills. The scope of the activity covers mainly reactor shields and spent fuel transportation packages, but also fusion neutronics and in particular shielding of accelerators and irradiation facilities. (author)

  6. Safeguards and legal matters 1994. International Atomic Energy Agency Publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with Safeguards and Legal Matters issued during the period 1970-1994. Most publications are published in English, through some are also available in French, Russian and Spanish. Proceedings of conferences, symposia and panels of experts may contain some papers in languages other than English (French, Russian or Spanish), but all of these papers have abstracts in English. If publications are also available in other languages than English, this is noted as C for Chinese, F for French, R for Russian and S for Spanish by the relevant ISBN number. It should be noted that prices of books are quoted in Austrian Schillings. The prices do not include local taxes and are subject to change without notice. All books in this catalogue are 16 x 24 cm, paper-bound, unless otherwise stated

  7. IAEA safeguards in new nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catton, A. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Durbin, K. [United States Department of Energy, Washington, D.C. (United States); Hamilton, A. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Martikka, E. [STUK, Helsinki (Finland); Poirier, S.; Sprinkle, J. K.; Stevens, R. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Whitlock, J. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, ON (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    The inclusion of international safeguards early in the design of nuclear facilities offers an opportunity to reduce project risk. It also has the potential to minimize the impact of safeguards activities on facility operations. Safeguards by design (SBD) encourages stakeholders to become familiar with the requirements of their safeguards agreements and to decide when and how they will fulfil those requirements. As one example, modular reactors are at a design stage where SBD can have a useful impact. Modular reactors might be turnkey projects where the operator takes ownership after commissioning. This comes with a legal obligation to comply with International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards requirements. Some of the newcomer countries entering the reactor market have little experience with IAEA safeguards and the associated non-proliferation obligations. To reduce delays or cost increments, one can embed safeguards considerations in the bid and design phases of the project, along with the safety and security considerations. SBD does not introduce any new requirements - it is a process whereby facility designers facilitate the implementation of the existing safeguards requirements. In short, safeguards experts share their expertise with the designers and vice versa. Once all parties understand the fundamentals of all of the operational constraints, they are better able to decide how best to address them. This presentation will provide an overview of SBD activities. (author)

  8. IAEA decadal activities in the field of radioactive gaseous waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plumb, G.R.

    1991-01-01

    The IAEA has long recognized that gaseous waste management is vital in the design and safe operation of all nuclear facilities such that in the decade of the 1980's the IAEA program covered the important aspects of the entire field. The activities reviewed in this paper were marked at the outset by a comprehensive international symposium on the subject in February 1980 organized by the IAEA jointly with the Nuclear Energy Agency of the OECD when the detailed state-of-the-art was established in 43 papers. In the interim, experts have been convened in IAEA sponsored meetings to result in sixteen technical documents which included summaries of three substantial Co-ordinated Research Programs. Early IAEA activities paid particular attention to management of gas radionuclides which from a matured nuclear industry, could be judged to build-up to long-term sources of irradiation for regional and global populations. Mid-term ongoing activities in handling and retention of gaseous radionuclides arising from abnormal operations in nuclear power plants were given much emphasis following the Chernobyl accident. In the latter years the IAEA activities included detailed examinations of the design and operation of gas cleaning systems for the range of nuclear facilities. Technical reports on gaseous waste management were issued relating to high-level liquid waste conditioning plants (including control of semi-volatiles), nuclear power plants, low- and intermediate-level radioactive materials handling facilities and radioactive waste incinerators

  9. IAEA Helps Remove Highly Radioactive Material from Five South American Countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2018-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has helped remove 27 disused highly radioactive sources from five South American countries in a significant step forward for nuclear safety and security in the region. It was the largest such project ever facilitated by the IAEA. The material, mainly used for medical purposes such as treating cancer and sterilizing instruments, was transported to Germany and the United States for recycling. Canada, where some of the sources were manufactured, funded the project upon requests for IAEA support from Bolivia, Ecuador, Paraguay, Peru and Uruguay. The sealed Cobalt-60 and Caesium-137 sources pose safety and security risks when no longer in use, according to Raja Adnan, Director of the IAEA’s Division of Nuclear Security. “The removal of this large number of radioactive sources has significantly reduced those risks in the five countries,” Adnan said. In recent years, the IAEA has assisted Bosnia and Herzegovina, Cameroon, Costa Rica, Honduras, Lebanon, Morocco, Tunisia and Uzbekistan in the removal of disused sources. The South American operation was the largest the IAEA has so far coordinated in terms of both the number of highly radioactive sources and countries involved. While nuclear safety and security are national responsibilities, the IAEA helps Member States upon request to meet these responsibilities through training, technical advice, peer reviews and other advisory services. Such efforts may include support for Member States in implementing the safe and cost-effective recovery, conditioning, storage, disposal or transportation of disused sealed radioactive sources (DSRS).

  10. IAEA Leads Operational Safety Mission to Muehleberg Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    Full text: An international team of nuclear safety experts led by the International Atomic Energy Agency today concluded a review of the safety practices at the Muehleberg Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) near Bern in Switzerland. The team noted a series of good practices and made recommendations and suggestions to reinforce them. The IAEA assembled the Operational Safety Review Team at the request of the Swiss government. The team, led by the IAEA's Division of Nuclear Installation Safety, performed an in-depth operational safety review from 8 to 25 October 2012. The team comprised experts from Belgium, the Czech Republic, Finland, Germany, Hungary, Slovakia, Sweden, the United Kingdom and the United States as well as experts from the IAEA. The team conducted an in-depth review of the aspects essential to the safe operation of the Muehleberg NPP. The conclusions of the review are based on the IAEA's Safety Standards and proven good international practices. The review covered the areas of Management, Organization and Administration; Training; Operations; Maintenance; Technical Support; Operating Experience; Radiation Protection; Chemistry, Emergency Planning and Preparedness, Severe Accident Management and Long-Term Operation. The OSART team made 10 recommendations and 11 suggestions related to areas where operations of Muehleberg NPP could be further improved, for example: - Plant management could improve the operating experience program and methods throughout the plant to ensure corrective actions are taken in a timely manner; - In the area of Long-Term Operation, the ageing management review for some systems and components is not complete and the environmental qualification of originally installed safety cables has not yet been revalidated for long-term operation; and - The plant provisions for the protection of persons on the site during an emergency with radioactive release can be improved to minimize health risks to plant personnel. The team also identified 10 good

  11. Senior expert group for the review of the Agency`s programme of activities. Opening remarks by the Director General

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ElBaradei, M [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

    1998-03-23

    The document reproduces the opening remarks made by the Director General of the IAEA on 23 March 1998 at the first meeting of the Senior Expert Group for the review of the Agency`s programme and activities. The Director General explains his considerations in establishing the group, and the major challenges facing the safe use of nuclear energy and technologies

  12. IAEA/NEA incident reporting system (IRS). Reporting guidelines. Feedback from safety related operating experience for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The Incident Reporting System (IRS) is an international system jointly operated by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD/NEA). The fundamental objective of the IRS is to contribute to improving the safety of commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs) which are operated worldwide. This objective can be achieved by providing timely and detailed information on both technical and human factors related to events of safety significance which occur at these plants. The purpose of these guidelines, which supersede the previous IAEA Safety Series No. 93 (Part II) and the NEA IRS guidelines, is to describe the system and to give users the necessary background and guidance to enable them to produce IRS reports meeting a high standard of quality while retaining the high efficiency of the system expected by all Member States operating nuclear power plants. These guidelines have been jointly developed and approved by the NEA/IAEA

  13. Canadian safeguards research and development in support of the IAEA program document outlining the various tasks which comprise the program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-12-01

    Canada has established a safeguards research and development program, the purpose of which is to supplement the resources of the International Atomic Energy Agency. The program of support is a coordinated effort for the development and application of safeguards techniques and instruments to facilities safeguarded by the IAEA. This document sets forth those tasks which comprise the program

  14. IAEA perspectives on geological repositories. Address at the international conference on geological repositories, Denver, 1 November 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    1999-01-01

    In his address at the International Conference on Geological Repositories (Denver, 1 November 1999), the Director General of the IAEA gave a general presentation of the problem of disposal of high-level radioactive waste, and described the current situation in the countries using nuclear energy including present and future Agency's activities

  15. IAEA Patient Protection Effort Reaches Key Milestone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    Full text: An International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) effort to help people track their radiation exposure from medical procedures achieved a significant milestone this week. The Agency received the final approval from a group of medical oversight organizations for the 'Joint Position Statement on the IAEA Patient Radiation Exposure Tracking', a set of principles to guide patient protection efforts at the sub-national, national, and international level. The joint statement endorses the IAEA's three-year-old Smart Card/SmartRadTrack project, which aims to help nations develop systems to track medical radiation procedures and radiation doses. The statement has been agreed by the World Health Organization (WHO), the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the European Society of Radiology (ESR), the International Organization for Medical Physics (IOMP), the International Society of Radiographers and Radiological Technologists (ISRRT), and the Conference of Radiation Control Program Directors, USA (CRCPD). 'This system is critical if the medical community is going to keep patients safe when they are being referred for more and more diagnostic scans. These scans, over the years, are made using more and more powerful machines', said Madan Rehani, Radiation Safety Specialist in the IAEA's Radiation Protection of Patients Unit. 'The tracking system will draw doctors' attention to previous radiological examinations, both in terms of clinical information and radiation dose and thus help them assess whether the 11th or 20th CT scan is really appropriate, whether it will do more good than harm.' Advances in radiation-based diagnostic technologies, such as the CT scan, have led to patients receiving such procedures more frequently. The convenience of CT with the added advantage of increased information has resulted in increased usage to the point that there are instances of patients getting tens of CT scans in a few years, not all of which may be justified, or getting CT

  16. IAEA Completes Nuclear Security Review Mission in United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    Full text: A team of nuclear security experts led by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) today completed a mission to review nuclear security practices of civil nuclear facilities licensed by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Conducted at the U.S. Government's request, the two-week International Physical Protection Advisory Service (IPPAS) mission reviewed the United States' nuclear security-related legislative and regulatory framework. As part of this work, the IPPAS team, led by John O'Dacre of Canada and comprising nine experts from eight IAEA Member States, met with NRC officials and reviewed the physical protection systems at the Center for Neutron Research (NCNR) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology. The IPPAS team concluded that nuclear security within the U.S. civil nuclear sector is robust and sustainable and has been significantly enhanced in recent years. The team identified a number of good practices in the nation's nuclear security regime and at the NCNR. The IPPAS team also made a recommendation and some suggestions for the continuing improvement of nuclear security overall. The mission in the United States was the 60th IPPAS mission organized by the IAEA. 'Independent international peer reviews such as IAEA IPPAS missions are increasingly being recognized for their value as a key component for exchanges of views and advice on nuclear security measures', said Khammar Mrabit, Director of the IAEA Office of Nuclear Security. 'The good practices identified during this mission will contribute to the continuous improvements of nuclear security in other Member States'. The IPPAS team provided a draft report to the NRC and will submit a final report soon. Because it contains security-related information about a specific nuclear site, IPPAS reports are not made public. 'The IPPAS programme gives us a chance to learn from the experience and perspective of our international partners', said NRC Chairman Allison M

  17. Oil substitution and energy saving - A research and development strategy of the International Energy Agency /IEA/

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rath-Nagel, S.

    1981-03-01

    Systems analyses were carried out by the International Energy Agency for the participating 15 countries in order to work out strategies and scenarios for lessening the dependence on imported oil and for developing new energy technologies. MARKAL model computations show the technology and energy mixes necessary for achieving a reduction of oil imports by two thirds over the next 40 years. The scenario 'high social security' examines the projected rise in energy consumption, the development of oil substitutes, the increase in alternative heating sources, the development of markets for liquid energy products, the demand for gas, and the relative usage of various energy generation methods. The recommended strategy involves as the most important points an increase in coal consumption, greater nuclear energy reliance and development of alternative technologies.

  18. Role of IAEA in introduction of nuclear power in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skjoeldebrand, R.; Csik, B.J.; Bennett, L.L.; Charpentier, J.P.

    1986-10-01

    The planning of nuclear power programmes in developing countries must be seen as an integral part of a rational and coherent long-term energy and general development policy. Consequently decisions to be taken by a country and the formulation of appropriate development programmes must be based on detailed comparative energy demand and supply analyses, economic optimizations of electricity supply systems, assessments of the infrastructure requirements, identification of possible constraints to nuclear power development in the country, and consideration of its alternatives. Since many years the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has had a broad programme for assistance in nuclear power planning and implementation in developing countries, and the individual elements of a comprehensive programme have been developed. The IAEA's demand model MAED and generating system optimization model WASP, which have been widely adopted around the world, are basic planning methodologies used in the IAEA's assistance in this field, supplemented by the IAEA's long-standing experience in nuclear power planning and infrastructure development. The IAEA's assistance in infrastructure assessment and development focusses on subjects which are not normally covered in bilateral agreements, i.e., planning activities before bilateral agreements and contracts, pre-contract activities and project supervision and control activities (e.g.: project management and QA). Manpower development work, usually a high priority in developing countries, includes interregional training courses and also the establishment of training nationally under technical co-operation and UNDP projects which increasingly have broader scopes within coherent national manpower development programmes. (author)

  19. Physical protection of nuclear facilities and materials. Safeguards and the role of the IAEA in physical protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smolej, M.

    1999-01-01

    The physical protection and security of nuclear facilities and materials concerns utilities, manufactures, the general public, and those who are responsible for licensing and regulating such facilities. The requirements and process to ensure an acceptable physical protection and security system have been evolutionary in nature. This paper reviews the first step of such process: the State's safeguards system and the international safeguards system of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), including the relationship between these two safeguards systems. The elements of these systems that are reviewed include the State System of Accounting for and Control of Nuclear Material, physical protection measures, and containment and surveillance measures. In addition, the interactions between the State, the facility operator, and the IAEA are described. The paper addresses the IAEA safeguards system, including material accountancy and containment and surveillance; the State safeguards system, including material control and accountancy, and physical protection; the role of the IAEA in physical protection; a summary of safeguards system interactions.(author)

  20. The Mailbox Computer System for the IAEA verification experiment on HEU downblending at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aronson, A.L.; Gordon, D.M.

    2000-01-01

    IN APRIL 1996, THE UNITED STATES (US) ADDED THE PORTSMOUTH GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANT TO THE LIST OF FACILITIES ELIGIBLE FOR THE APPLICATION OF INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY (IAEA) SAFEGUARDS. AT THAT TIME, THE US PROPOSED THAT THE IAEA CARRY OUT A ''VERIFICATION EXPERIMENT'' AT THE PLANT WITH RESPECT TO DOOWNBLENDING OF ABOUT 13 METRIC TONS OF HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM (HEU) IN THE FORM OF URANIUM HEXAFLUROIDE (UF6). DURING THE PERIOD DECEMBER 1997 THROUGH JULY 1998, THE IAEA CARRIED OUT THE REQUESTED VERIFICATION EXPERIMENT. THE VERIFICATION APPROACH USED FOR THIS EXPERIMENT INCLUDED, AMONG OTHER MEASURES, THE ENTRY OF PROCESS-OPERATIONAL DATA BY THE FACILITY OPERATOR ON A NEAR-REAL-TIME BASIS INTO A ''MAILBOX'' COMPUTER LOCATED WITHIN A TAMPER-INDICATING ENCLOSURE SEALED BY THE IAEA

  1. Texts of the Agency's Agreements with the Republic of Austria. A further supplemental agreement to the Headquarters Agreement. Supplemental Agreement pursuant to Section 4(b) of the Agreement between the Republic of Austria and the International Atomic Energy Agency regarding the Headquarters of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The text of the exchange of Notes, dated 6 July 1995 and 29 September 1995 respectively, between the IAEA and the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Austria regarding Section 4(b) of the Headquarters Agreement which allows the IAEA 'to establish and operate such additional radio and other telecommunications facilities as may be specified by supplemental agreement ....' is reproduced in this document for the information of all Members of the Agency

  2. Knowledge Management Implementation In Indonesia Nuclear Energy Regulatory Agency (BAPETEN)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nurwidi Astuti, Y.H.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: Indonesian Nuclear Energy Regulatory Agency (BAPETEN) acquires the task and function to control the safety, security and safeguards in the field of nuclear energy through the development of legislation, licensing services, inspection and enforcement. Which is supported by review and assessment, emergency preparedness. Knowledge Management (KM) is importance for BAPETEN to achieve the Regulatory body effectiveness and product innovation. The Chairman of BAPETEN has set policies statement for KM implementation. To implement a knowledge management program, BAPETEN creates KM guidelines that includes blueprint and roadmap KM programme based on a KM readiness survey. The KM readiness survey involves 20% of staff who represent each unit and discussions with the senior manager of BAPETEN, and the result of readiness survey produce 13 KM BAPETEN initiatives strategic. After the initiative strategic has been obtained, BAPETEN creates the Roadmap of BAPETEN Knowledge Management for 2015–2019 programme for KM People with the activity sozialization of KM Guidebook, workshop SMART knowledge worker, nurture Community of practices (COP) and develop social network analysis (SNE). KM Process with activity focus group discussion, KM Readyness survey, KM Statement, KM Bapeten Guidebook, knowledge mapping, knowledge harvesting. KM Technology with activity develop knowledge system or portal, e-learning. (author

  3. Correlation study among the International Atomic Energy Agency standards and market standards on management system applicable to a UF{sub 6} conversion plant operation; Estudo da correlacao entre normas da Agencia Internacional de Energia Atomica e de mercado sobre sistema de gestao aplicavel a operacao de planta de conversao de UF{sub 6}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Dirceu Paulo de

    2008-07-01

    The Agency - International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), following the market trend of the management system integration, has decided to revise the quality assurance standards - IAEA 50-C/SG-Q publishing, in 2006, the standard on Management System (MS). IAEA GS-R-3 and its IAEA GS-G-3.1 guide. Also, the IAEA is about to publish a supplementary guide - IAEA DS349, which consider the integration of several functions involved in management of nuclear facilities, such as: safety, health, environmental and quality, ensuring that nuclear safety is not compromised. Conversion plants of 'Yellowcake' in UF{sub 6} use and process radioactive materials, as well as other substances normally found in the chemical conventional industry, inserting themselves in the organization profile that require a high pattern of definition, implementation and continuous improvement of their MS and, therefore, should consider an approach of management integrated system (MIS). Taking a UF{sub 6} conversion plant as focus, the correlation was performed among the Agency MS standards and those of the market - ISO 9001, ISO 14001 and OHSAS 18001, as well as with the Agency drafts standards on safety (DS316 and DS344), concluding that, in structuring an MIS, in compliance with the Agency MS standards, except for some adjustments, the ISO 9001, ISO 14001, and OHSAS 18001 are going to be met. On the other hand, the structuring of MIS should identify other requirements on safety, health and environmental, which also consider the conventional chemical and industrial characteristics that are out of the scope (ionizing radiation) of the safety standards of the Agency. The research proposes a documental procedure for a MIS applicable to this plant, providing elements for rationalization and contents of the identified documentation, for the promotion of the integration of the considered MS functions. (author)

  4. IAEA Clarification on Syria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Full text: Director General Amano has been quoted in a news story as saying today that a site in Syria allegedly destroyed by Israel was a nuclear reactor under construction. The Director General did not say that the IAEA has reached the conclusion that the site was definitely a nuclear reactor. The IAEA continues to seek further information on the nature of the Dair Alzour site. (IAEA)

  5. The annual report for 1997. International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-07-01

    Article VI.J of the Agency's Statute requires the Board of Governors to submit 'an annual report to the General Conference concerning the affairs of the Agency and any projects approved by the Agency'. This report covers the period 1 January to 31 December 1997

  6. The annual report for 1994[International Atomic Energy Agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    Article VI.J of the Agency's Statute requires the Board of Governors to submit 'an annual report to the General Conference concerning the affairs of the Agency and any projects approved by the Agency'. This report covers the period 1 January to 31 December 1994.

  7. The annual report for 1997. International Atomic Energy Agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-07-01

    Article VI.J of the Agency's Statute requires the Board of Governors to submit 'an annual report to the General Conference concerning the affairs of the Agency and any projects approved by the Agency'. This report covers the period 1 January to 31 December 1997.

  8. The annual report for 1996[International Atomic Energy Agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-07-01

    Article VI.J of the Agency's Statute requires the Board of Governors to submit 'an annual report to the General Conference concerning the affairs of the Agency and any projects approved by the Agency'. This report covers the period 1 January to 31 December 1996.

  9. The annual report for 1999. International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    Article VI.J of the Agency's Statute requires the Board of Governors to submit 'an annual report to the General Conference concerning the affairs of the Agency and any projects approved by the Agency'. This report covers the period 1 January to 31 December 1999

  10. International Atomic Energy Agency Annual Report 2014. Additional Annex Information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    This annex contains information on: • Coordinated research projects completed in 2014; • Publications issued in 2014; • Training courses, seminars and workshops held in 2014; • Relevant Agency web sites; • Number and types of facilities under Agency safeguards by State as of 31 December 2014 and • Facilities under Agency safeguards or containing safeguarded nuclear material on 31 December 2014

  11. The annual report for 1999. International Atomic Energy Agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    Article VI.J of the Agency's Statute requires the Board of Governors to submit 'an annual report to the General Conference concerning the affairs of the Agency and any projects approved by the Agency'. This report covers the period 1 January to 31 December 1999.

  12. The annual report for 1998. International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-07-01

    Article VI.J of the Agency's Statute requires the Board of Governors to submit 'an annual report to the General Conference concerning the affairs of the Agency and any projects approved by the Agency'. This report covers the period 1 January to 31 December 1998

  13. The annual report for 1998. International Atomic Energy Agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-07-01

    Article VI.J of the Agency's Statute requires the Board of Governors to submit 'an annual report to the General Conference concerning the affairs of the Agency and any projects approved by the Agency'. This report covers the period 1 January to 31 December 1998.

  14. The annual report for 1995[International Atomic Energy Agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-07-01

    Article VI.J of the Agency's Statute requires the Board of Governors to submit 'an annual report to the General Conference concerning the affairs of the Agency and any projects approved by the Agency'. This report covers the period 1 January to 31 December 1995.

  15. Scientific forum - The future role of the IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The nature and scope of the IAEA's programme to 2020 and beyond was the theme of the Scientific Forum 2008. The theme was chosen to reflect on the challenges and issues facing the IAEA and the resources and requirements needed to meet them. During the opening speech, IAEA Director General Mohamed ElBaradei described the magnitude of the issues lying ahead in the areas of nuclear safeguards, security, safety, and peaceful development. 'We need to look at the big picture, where we are and where we wish to go. This is not only about the IAEA but the kind of world we want to live in, in terms of development and security and the links between those two areas,' he said. Referring to a report completed early this year by an international group of eminent persons, ElBaradei stressed the fact that under present conditions the IAEA is not entirely able to cope with the dramatic changes underway around the world because its financial resources and legal authority are insufficient to fulfill the task. Former Prime Minister of Holland and Scientific Forum Chairman Ruud Lubbers then took the podium. He called for the competence, capacity and capability of the IAEA to be strengthened. 'I hope that in this Scientific Forum we reach some common denominator among the IAEA and Member States.' Former US Senator and Nuclear Threat Initiative (NTI) Co-Chairman Sam Nunn, also a keynote speaker, pointed to the issue of scarcity of resources at a time when the world seems to be heading toward a dangerous direction. 'There is a large and growing gap between the IAEA's resources and the job needed to be done... It is my hope we give the IAEA the tools it needs to protect us all,' he said. The Scientific Forum featured four sessions dedicated to nuclear energy, meeting development needs, nuclear safety and security, and IAEA safeguards and verification. From the discussions it was evident hat the Agency has over half a century of its existence assumed recognisable roles along well defined

  16. EURATOM safeguards implementation in France and cooperation with the IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oddou, J.

    2013-01-01

    International safeguards in France are applied both by: -) the European Commission (EC), through the Chapter 7 of the EURATOM Treaty; -) the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) as France is a party to the NPT and has concluded a safeguards agreement with IAEA. With the exception of mining, France has a complete nuclear fuel cycle from ore concentrates to waste. Based on the legal framework of the EURATOM Treaty, all civil nuclear facilities and all civil nuclear materials are safeguarded by EURATOM wherever they are in France. Therefore the two conversion plants, the two enrichment plants, the three fuel fabrication plants, the 59 nuclear power plants including the EPR of Flamanville under construction, the 2 reprocessing plants in La Hague, the five facilities for waste treatment and numerous research centers and reactors of CEA are declared and controlled by the European Commission. The activities of the EURATOM inspectors are of various kind depending of the facility and the type of inspection. The most common checks are: identification and counting of the nuclear material, verification of accountancy declaration vs. physical follow-up of the nuclear material, non-destructive analysis and destructive analysis after sampling in large bulk handling facilities. There is a strong cooperation between IAEA and EC: the majority of IAEA inspections in France are joint team inspections with the EC. This pooling of equipment and teams can save money and human resources. Equipment for containment and surveillance are paid whether by the EC or by the IAEA and can be used by both bodies of inspectors. With the principle of 'One Job One Person', verification activities are done only once and it saves time for the inspectors and the operators. The paper is followed by the slides of the presentation. (A.C.)

  17. Management system - correlation study between new IAEA standards and the market standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Dirceu Paulo de [Centro Tecnologico da Marinha em Sao Paulo (CTMSP), Ipero, SP (Brazil)], e-mail: dirceupo@hotmail.com; Zouain, Desiree Moraes [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)], e-mail: dmzouain@ipen.br

    2009-07-01

    In order to answer the growing concern of society with respect of the aspects that affect the quality of life, international and national regulatory bodies have developed standards that enable organizations to establish management systems for quality, environment and sustainable development, health, safety and social responsibility, among other functions. Within this context it is necessary to structure an integrated management system that promotes interests compatibility of several distinct and complementary functions involved. Considering this vision of the management system integration, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) decided to review the structure of safety standards on Quality Assurance - code and guides 50-C/SGQ1/ 14:1996, publishing, in 2006, IAEA GS-R-3 and IAEA GS-G-3.1 standards, enlarging the management approach of the previous standards, including the possibility of integrating the functions foremost mentioned. This paper presents the results about a correlation study between IAEA management system standards - IAEA GS-R-3: 2006, IAEA GS-G-3.1: 2006 and IAEA DS349 rev. 2007, this latter still a draft standard, with those market management system standards on quality - ISO 9001:2008, environmental - ISO 14001:2004, and occupational health and safety - BS OHSAS 18001:2007, identifying gaps, redundancies and complementarities among their requirements and guidances. The purpose of the study is to provide subsidies that could contribute to the structuring of a management system to nuclear facilities that satisfies, in an integrated manner, the common and complementary requirements and guidances of IAEA and market standards. (author)

  18. Management system - correlation study between new IAEA standards and the market standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Dirceu Paulo de; Zouain, Desiree Moraes

    2009-01-01

    In order to answer the growing concern of society with respect of the aspects that affect the quality of life, international and national regulatory bodies have developed standards that enable organizations to establish management systems for quality, environment and sustainable development, health, safety and social responsibility, among other functions. Within this context it is necessary to structure an integrated management system that promotes interests compatibility of several distinct and complementary functions involved. Considering this vision of the management system integration, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) decided to review the structure of safety standards on Quality Assurance - code and guides 50-C/SGQ1/ 14:1996, publishing, in 2006, IAEA GS-R-3 and IAEA GS-G-3.1 standards, enlarging the management approach of the previous standards, including the possibility of integrating the functions foremost mentioned. This paper presents the results about a correlation study between IAEA management system standards - IAEA GS-R-3: 2006, IAEA GS-G-3.1: 2006 and IAEA DS349 rev. 2007, this latter still a draft standard, with those market management system standards on quality - ISO 9001:2008, environmental - ISO 14001:2004, and occupational health and safety - BS OHSAS 18001:2007, identifying gaps, redundancies and complementarities among their requirements and guidances. The purpose of the study is to provide subsidies that could contribute to the structuring of a management system to nuclear facilities that satisfies, in an integrated manner, the common and complementary requirements and guidances of IAEA and market standards. (author)

  19. What is the IAEA? Programmes and activities that maximize the contribution of nuclear technology to society, while verifying its peaceful use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) serves as the world's foremost international governmental forum for scientific and technical co-operation in the peaceful use of nuclear technology. Established as an autonomous organization under the United Nations (UN) in 1957, the IAEA represents the culmination of international efforts to make a reality of US President Eisenhower's proposal in his 'Atoms for Peace' speech to the UN General Assembly in 1953. He envisioned the creation of an international body to control and develop the use of atomic energy. Today, the Agency's broad spectrum of services, programmes, and activities is based on the needs of its 130 Member States

  20. Kepentingan Indonesia Bergabung dengan Irena (International Renewable Energy Agency) Tahun 2014

    OpenAIRE

    Harto, Syafri; ", Zulfadli

    2016-01-01

    This research will explain about Indonesia interest joined with IRENA ( International Renewable Energy Agency). Nowadays energy condition is so far from standart of energy endurance. Indonesia energy needs still dominated by fossil energy. In 2013, Fossil Energy produces 93,4% of energy consumtion, 5,7% by renewable energy. 7% oil, 20,1% gas, 24,5% from coal. With Indonesia energy endurance and global market that affected domestic energy condition, Indonesia need to comply the national intere...