WorldWideScience

Sample records for energy agency hydrogen

  1. Hydrogen energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-03-01

    This book consists of seven chapters, which deals with hydrogen energy with discover and using of hydrogen, Korean plan for hydrogen economy and background, manufacturing technique on hydrogen like classification and hydrogen manufacture by water splitting, hydrogen storage technique with need and method, hydrogen using technique like fuel cell, hydrogen engine, international trend on involving hydrogen economy, technical current for infrastructure such as hydrogen station and price, regulation, standard, prospect and education for hydrogen safety and system. It has an appendix on related organization with hydrogen and fuel cell.

  2. Case Studies of integrated hydrogen systems. International Energy Agency Hydrogen Implementing Agreement, Final report for Subtask A of task 11 - Integrated Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schucan, T. [Paul Scherrer Inst., Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    1999-12-31

    Within the framework of the International Energy Agency Hydrogen Implementing Agreement, Task 11 was undertaken to develop tools to assist in the design and evaluation of existing and potential hydrogen demonstration projects. Emphasis was placed on integrated systems, from input energy to hydrogen end use. Included in the PDF document are the Executive Summary of the final report and the various case studies. The activities of task 11 were focused on near- and mid-term applications, with consideration for the transition from fossil-based systems to sustainable hydrogen energy systems. The participating countries were Canada, Italy, Japan, the Netherlands, Spain, Switzerland and the United States. In order for hydrogen to become a competitive energy carrier, experience and operating data need to be generated and collected through demonstration projects. A framework of scientific principles, technical expertise, and analytical evaluation and assessment needed to be developed to aid in the design and optimization of hydrogen demonstration projects to promote implementation. The task participants undertook research within the framework of three highly coordinated subtasks that focused on the collection and critical evaluation of data from existing demonstration projects around the world, the development and testing of computer models of hydrogen components and integrated systems, and the evaluation and comparison of hydrogen systems. While the Executive Summary reflects work on all three subtasks, this collection of chapters refers only to the work performed under Subtask A. Ten projects were analyzed and evaluated in detail as part of Subtask A, Case Studies. The projects and the project partners were: Solar Hydrogen Demonstration Project, Solar-Wasserstoff-Bayern, Bayernwerk, BMW, Linde, Siemens (Germany); Solar Hydrogen Plant on Residential House, M. Friedli (Switzerland); A.T. Stuart Renewable Energy Test Site; Stuart Energy Systems (Canada); PHOEBUS Juelich

  3. Energy infrastructure: hydrogen energy system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veziroglu, T N

    1979-02-01

    In a hydrogen system, hydrogen is not a primary source of energy, but an intermediary, an energy carrier between the primary energy sources and the user. The new unconventional energy sources, such as nuclear breeder reactors, fusion reactors, direct solar radiation, wind energy, ocean thermal energy, and geothermal energy have their shortcomings. These shortcomings of the new sources point out to the need for an intermediary energy system to form the link between the primary energy sources and the user. In such a system, the intermediary energy form must be transportable and storable; economical to produce; and if possible renewable and pollution-free. The above prerequisites are best met by hydrogen. Hydrogen is plentiful in the form of water. It is the cheapest synthetic fuel to manufacture per unit of energy stored in it. It is the least polluting of all of the fuels, and is the lightest and recyclable. In the proposed system, hydrogen would be produced in large plants located away from the consumption centers at the sites where primary new energy sources and water are available. Hydrogen would then be transported to energy consumption centers where it would be used in every application where fossil fuels are being used today. Once such a system is established, it will never be necessary to change to any other energy system.

  4. Hydrogen energy systems studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogden, J.M.; Kreutz, T.G.; Steinbugler, M. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)] [and others

    1996-10-01

    In this report the authors describe results from technical and economic assessments carried out during the past year with support from the USDOE Hydrogen R&D Program. (1) Assessment of technologies for small scale production of hydrogen from natural gas. Because of the cost and logistics of transporting and storing hydrogen, it may be preferable to produce hydrogen at the point of use from more readily available energy carriers such as natural gas or electricity. In this task the authors assess near term technologies for producing hydrogen from natural gas at small scale including steam reforming, partial oxidation and autothermal reforming. (2) Case study of developing a hydrogen vehicle refueling infrastructure in Southern California. Many analysts suggest that the first widespread use of hydrogen energy is likely to be in zero emission vehicles in Southern California. Several hundred thousand zero emission automobiles are projected for the Los Angeles Basin alone by 2010, if mandated levels are implemented. Assuming that hydrogen vehicles capture a significant fraction of this market, a large demand for hydrogen fuel could evolve over the next few decades. Refueling a large number of hydrogen vehicles poses significant challenges. In this task the authors assess near term options for producing and delivering gaseous hydrogen transportation fuel to users in Southern California including: (1) hydrogen produced from natural gas in a large, centralized steam reforming plant, and delivered to refueling stations via liquid hydrogen truck or small scale hydrogen gas pipeline, (2) hydrogen produced at the refueling station via small scale steam reforming of natural gas, (3) hydrogen produced via small scale electrolysis at the refueling station, and (4) hydrogen from low cost chemical industry sources (e.g. excess capacity in refineries which have recently upgraded their hydrogen production capacity, etc.).

  5. Hydrogen energy assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salzano, F J; Braun, C [eds.

    1977-09-01

    The purpose of this assessment is to define the near term and long term prospects for the use of hydrogen as an energy delivery medium. Possible applications of hydrogen are defined along with the associated technologies required for implementation. A major focus in the near term is on industrial uses of hydrogen for special applications. The major source of hydrogen in the near term is expected to be from coal, with hydrogen from electric sources supplying a smaller fraction. A number of potential applications for hydrogen in the long term are identified and the level of demand estimated. The results of a cost benefit study for R and D work on coal gasification to hydrogen and electrolytic production of hydrogen are presented in order to aid in defining approximate levels of R and D funding. A considerable amount of data is presented on the cost of producing hydrogen from various energy resources. A key conclusion of the study is that in time hydrogen is likely to play a role in the energy system; however, hydrogen is not yet competitive for most applications when compared to the cost of energy from petroleum and natural gas.

  6. The energy carrier hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    The potential of hydrogen to be used as a clean fuel for the production of heat and power, as well as for the propulsion of aeroplanes and vehicles, is described, in particular for Germany. First, attention is paid to the application of hydrogen as a basic material for the (petro)chemical industry, as an indirect energy source for (petro)chemical processes, and as a direct energy source for several purposes. Than the importance of hydrogen as an energy carrier in a large-scale application of renewable energy sources is discussed. Next an overview is given of new and old hydrogen production techniques from fossil fuels, biomass, or the electrolysis of water. Energetic applications of hydrogen in the transportation sector and the production of electric power and heat are mentioned. Brief descriptions are given of techniques to store hydrogen safely. Finally attention is paid to hydrogen research in Germany. Two hydrogen projects, in which Germany participates, are briefly dealt with: the Euro-Quebec project (production of hydrogen by means of hydropower), and the HYSOLAR project (hydrogen production by means of solar energy). 18 figs., 1 tab., 7 refs

  7. Canada's hydrogen energy sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimmel, T.B.

    2009-01-01

    Canada produces the most hydrogen per capita of any Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) country. The majority of this hydrogen is produced by steam methane reforming for industrial use (predominantly oil upgrading and fertilizer production). Canada also has a world leading hydrogen and fuel cell sector. This sector is seeking new methods for making hydrogen for its future energy needs. The paper will discuss Canada's hydrogen and fuel cell sector in the context of its capabilities, its demonstration and commercialization activities and its stature on the world stage. (author)

  8. National hydrogen energy roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2002-11-01

    This report was unveiled by Energy Secretary Spencer Abraham in November 2002 and provides a blueprint for the coordinated, long-term, public and private efforts required for hydrogen energy development. Based on the results of the government-industry National Hydrogen Energy Roadmap Workshop, held in Washington, DC on April 2-3, 2002, it displays the development of a roadmap for America's clean energy future and outlines the key barriers and needs to achieve the hydrogen vision goals defined in

  9. Hydrogen energy for beginners

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    This book highlights the outstanding role of hydrogen in energy processes, where it is the most functional element due to its unique peculiarities that are highlighted and emphasized in the book. The first half of the book covers the great natural hydrogen processes in biology, chemistry, and physics, showing that hydrogen is a trend that can unite all natural sciences. The second half of the book is devoted to the technological hydrogen processes that are under research and development with the aim to create the infrastructure for hydrogen energetics. The book describes the main features of hydrogen that make it inalienable player in processes such as fusion, photosynthesis, and metabolism. It also covers the methods of hydrogen production and storage, highlighting at the same time the exclusive importance of nanotechnologies in those processes.

  10. Hydrogen energy applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okken, P.A.

    1992-10-01

    For the Energy and Material consumption Scenarios (EMS), by which emission reduction of CO 2 and other greenhouse gases can be calculated, calculations are executed by means of the MARKAL model (MARket ALlocation, a process-oriented dynamic linear programming model to minimize the costs of the energy system) for the Netherlands energy economy in the period 2000-2040, using a variable CO 2 emission limit. The results of these calculations are published in a separate report (ECN-C--92-066). The use of hydrogen can play an important part in the above-mentioned period. An overview of several options to produce or use hydrogen is given and added to the MARKAL model. In this report techno-economical data and estimates were compiled for several H 2 -application options, which subsequently also are added to the MARKAL model. After a brief chapter on hydrogen and the impact on the reduction of CO 2 emission attention is paid to stationary and mobile applications. The stationary options concern the mixing of natural gas with 10% hydrogen, a 100% substitution of natural gas by hydrogen, the use of a direct steam generator (combustion of hydrogen by means of pure oxygen, followed by steam injection to produce steam), and the use of fuel cells. The mobile options concern the use of hydrogen in the transportation sector. In brief, attention is paid to a hydrogen passenger car with an Otto engine, and a hydrogen passenger car with a fuel cell, a hybrid (metal)-hydride car, a hydrogen truck, a truck with a methanol fuel cell, a hydrogen bus, an inland canal boat with a hydrogen fuel cell, and finally a hydrogen airplane. 2 figs., 15 tabs., 1 app., 26 refs

  11. Hydrogen energy systems studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogden, J.M.; Steinbugler, M.; Dennis, E. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    For several years, researchers at Princeton University`s Center for Energy and Environmental Studies have carried out technical and economic assessments of hydrogen energy systems. Initially, we focussed on the long term potential of renewable hydrogen. More recently we have explored how a transition to renewable hydrogen might begin. The goal of our current work is to identify promising strategies leading from near term hydrogen markets and technologies toward eventual large scale use of renewable hydrogen as an energy carrier. Our approach has been to assess the entire hydrogen energy system from production through end-use considering technical performance, economics, infrastructure and environmental issues. This work is part of the systems analysis activity of the DOE Hydrogen Program. In this paper we first summarize the results of three tasks which were completed during the past year under NREL Contract No. XR-11265-2: in Task 1, we carried out assessments of near term options for supplying hydrogen transportation fuel from natural gas; in Task 2, we assessed the feasibility of using the existing natural gas system with hydrogen and hydrogen blends; and in Task 3, we carried out a study of PEM fuel cells for residential cogeneration applications, a market which might have less stringent cost requirements than transportation. We then give preliminary results for two other tasks which are ongoing under DOE Contract No. DE-FG04-94AL85803: In Task 1 we are assessing the technical options for low cost small scale production of hydrogen from natural gas, considering (a) steam reforming, (b) partial oxidation and (c) autothermal reforming, and in Task 2 we are assessing potential markets for hydrogen in Southern California.

  12. Hydrogen in energy transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-02-01

    This publication proposes a rather brief overview of challenges related to the use of hydrogen as an energy vector in the fields of transports and of energy storage to valorise renewable energies. Processes (steam reforming of natural gas or bio-gas, alkaline or membrane electrolysis, biological production), installation types (centralised or decentralised), raw materials and/or energy (natural gas, water, bio-gas, electricity, light), and their respective industrial maturity are indicated. The role of hydrogen to de-carbonate different types of transports is described (complementary energy for internal combustion as well as electrical vehicles) as well as its role in the valorisation and integration of renewable energies. The main challenges faced by the hydrogen sector are identified and discussed, and actions undertaken by the ADEME are indicated

  13. Hydrogen energy technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morovic, T.; Pilhar, R.; Witt, B.

    1988-01-01

    A comprehensive assessment of different energy systems from the economic point of view has to be based on data showing all relevant costs incurred and benefits drawn by the society from the use of such energy systems, i.e. internal costs and benefits visible to the energy consumer as prices paid for power supplied, as well as external costs and benefits. External costs or benefits of energy systems cover among other items employment or wage standard effects, energy-induced environmental impacts, public expenditure for pollution abatement and mitigation of risks and effects of accidents, and the user costs connected with the exploitation of reserves, which are not rated high enough to really reflect and demonstrate the factor of depletion of non-renewable energy sources, as e.g. fossil reserves. Damage to the natural and social environment induced by anthropogenous air pollutants up to about 90% counts among external costs of energy conversion and utilisation. Such damage is considered to be the main factor of external energy costs, while the external benefits of energy systems currently are rated to be relatively unsignificant. This means that an internalisation of external costs would drive up current prices of non-renewable energy sources, which in turn would boost up the economics of renewable energy sources, and the hydrogen produced with their energy. Other advantages attributed to most of the renewable energy sources and to hydrogen energy systems are better environmental compatibility, and no user costs. (orig.) [de

  14. Hydrogen fuel - Universal energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, A. G.; Burg, J. A.

    The technology for the production, storage, transmission, and consumption of hydrogen as a fuel is surveyed, with the physical and chemical properties of hydrogen examined as they affect its use as a fuel. Sources of hydrogen production are described including synthesis from coal or natural gas, biomass conversion, thermochemical decomposition of water, and electrolysis of water, of these only electrolysis is considered economicially and technologically feasible in the near future. Methods of production of the large quantities of electricity required for the electrolysis of sea water are explored: fossil fuels, hydroelectric plants, nuclear fission, solar energy, wind power, geothermal energy, tidal power, wave motion, electrochemical concentration cells, and finally ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC). The wind power and OTEC are considered in detail as the most feasible approaches. Techniques for transmission (by railcar or pipeline), storage (as liquid in underwater or underground tanks, as granular metal hydride, or as cryogenic liquid), and consumption (in fuel cells in conventional power plants, for home usage, for industrial furnaces, and for cars and aircraft) are analyzed. The safety problems of hydrogen as a universal fuel are discussed, noting that they are no greater than those for conventional fuels.

  15. Hydrogen Production Using Nuclear Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verfondern, K. [Research Centre Juelich (Germany)

    2013-03-15

    world. In recent years, the scope of the IAEA's programme has been widened to include other more promising applications such as nuclear hydrogen production and higher temperature process heat applications. The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency, Euratom and the Generation IV International Forum have also shown interest in the non-electric applications of nuclear power based on future generation advanced and innovative nuclear reactors. This report was developed under an IAEA project with the objective of providing updated, balanced and objective information on the current status of hydrogen production processes using nuclear energy. It documents the state of the art of the development of hydrogen as an energy carrier in many Member States, as well as its corresponding production through the use of nuclear power. The report includes an introduction to the technology of nuclear process heat reactors as a means of producing hydrogen or other upgraded fuels, with a focus on high temperature reactor technology to achieve simultaneous generation of electricity and high temperature process heat and steam. Special emphasis is placed on the safety aspects of nuclear hydrogen production systems.

  16. Hydrogen and nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duffey, R.B.; Miller, A.I.; Hancox, W.T.; Pendergast, D.R.

    1999-01-01

    The current world-wide emphasis on reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions provides an opportunity to revisit how energy is produced and used, consistent with the need for human and economic growth. Both the scale of the problem and the efforts needed for its resolution are extremely large. We argue that GHG reduction strategies must include a greater penetration of electricity into areas, such as transportation, that have been the almost exclusive domain of fossil fuels. An opportunity for electricity to displace fossil fuel use is through electrolytic production of hydrogen. Nuclear power is the only large-scale commercially proven non-carbon electricity generation source, and it must play a key role. As a non-carbon power source, it can also provide the high-capacity base needed to stabilize electricity grids so that they can accommodate other non-carbon sources, namely low-capacity factor renewables such as wind and solar. Electricity can be used directly to power standalone hydrogen production facilities. In the special case of CANDU reactors, the hydrogen streams can be preprocessed to recover the trace concentrations of deuterium that can be re-oxidized to heavy water. World-wide experience shows that nuclear power can achieve high standards of public safety, environmental protection and commercially competitive economics, and must . be an integral part of future energy systems. (author)

  17. Hydrogen - From hydrogen to energy production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klotz, Gregory

    2005-01-01

    More than a century ago, Jules Verne wrote in 'The Mysterious Island' that water would one day be employed as fuel: 'Hydrogen and oxygen, which constitute it, used singly or together, will furnish an inexhaustible source of heat and light'. Today, the 'water motor' is not entirely the dream of a writer. Fiction is about to become fact thanks to hydrogen, which can be produced from water and when burned in air itself produces water. Hydrogen is now at the heart of international research. So why do we have such great expectations of hydrogen? 'Hydrogen as an energy system is now a major challenge, both scientifically and from an environmental and economic point of view'. Dominated as it is by fossil fuels (oil, gas and coal), our current energy system has left a dual threat hovering over our environment, exposing the planet to the exhaustion of its natural reserves and contributing to the greenhouse effect. If we want sustainable development for future generations, it is becoming necessary to diversify our methods of producing energy. Hydrogen is not, of course, a source of energy, because first it has to be produced. But it has the twofold advantage of being both inexhaustible and non-polluting. So in the future, it should have a very important role to play. (author)

  18. Hydrogen energy based on nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-06-01

    A concept to produce hydrogen of an energy carrier using nuclear energy was proposed since 1970s, and a number of process based on thermochemical method has been investigated after petroleum shock. As this method is used high temperature based on nuclear reactors, these researches are mainly carried out as a part of application of high temperature reactors, which has been carried out at an aim of the high temperature reactor application in the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. On October, 2000, the 'First International Conference for Information Exchange on Hydrogen Production based on Nuclear Energy' was held by auspice of OECD/NEA, where hydrogen energy at energy view in the 21st Century, technology on hydrogen production using nuclear energy, and so on, were published. This commentary was summarized surveys and researches on hydrogen production using nuclear energy carried out by the Nuclear Hydrogen Research Group established on January, 2001 for one year. They contains, views on energy and hydrogen/nuclear energy, hydrogen production using nuclear energy and already finished researches, methods of hydrogen production using nuclear energy and their present conditions, concepts on production plants of nuclear hydrogen, resources on nuclear hydrogen production and effect on global environment, requests from market and acceptability of society, and its future process. (G.K.)

  19. Hydrogen, energy of the future?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alleau, Th.

    2007-01-01

    A cheap, non-polluting energy with no greenhouse gas emissions and unlimited resources? This is towards this fantastic future that this book brings us, analyzing the complex but promising question of hydrogen. The scientific and technical aspects of production, transport, storage and distribution raised by hydrogen are thoroughly reviewed. Content: I) Energy, which solutions?: 1 - hydrogen, a future; 2 - hydrogen, a foreseeable solution?; II) Hydrogen, an energy vector: 3 - characteristics of hydrogen (physical data, quality and drawbacks); 4 - hydrogen production (from fossil fuels, from water, from biomass, bio-hydrogen generation); 5 - transport, storage and distribution of hydrogen; 6 - hydrogen cost (production, storage, transport and distribution costs); III) Fuel cells and ITER, utopias?: 7 - molecular hydrogen uses (thermal engines and fuel cells); 8 - hydrogen and fusion (hydrogen isotopes, thermonuclear reaction, ITER project, fusion and wastes); IV) Hydrogen acceptability: 9 - risk acceptability; 10 - standards and regulations; 11 - national, European and international policies about hydrogen; 12 - big demonstration projects in France and in the rest of the world; conclusion. (J.S.)

  20. Handbook of hydrogen energy

    CERN Document Server

    Sherif, SA; Stefanakos, EK; Steinfeld, Aldo

    2014-01-01

    ""This book provides an excellent overview of the hydrogen economy and a thorough and comprehensive presentation of hydrogen production and storage methods.""-Scott E. Grasman, Rochester Institute of Technology, New York, USA

  1. Hydrogen Production from Nuclear Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Leon; Wade, Dave

    2003-07-01

    During the past decade the interest in hydrogen as transportation fuel has greatly escalated. This heighten interest is partly related to concerns surrounding local and regional air pollution from the combustion of fossil fuels along with carbon dioxide emissions adding to the enhanced greenhouse effect. More recently there has been a great sensitivity to the vulnerability of our oil supply. Thus, energy security and environmental concerns have driven the interest in hydrogen as the clean and secure alternative to fossil fuels. Remarkable advances in fuel-cell technology have made hydrogen fueled transportation a near-term possibility. However, copious quantities of hydrogen must be generated in a manner independent of fossil fuels if environmental benefits and energy security are to be achieved. The renewable technologies, wind, solar, and geothermal, although important contributors, simply do not comprise the energy density required to deliver enough hydrogen to displace much of the fossil transportation fuels. Nuclear energy is the only primary energy source that can generate enough hydrogen in an energy secure and environmentally benign fashion. Methods of production of hydrogen from nuclear energy, the relative cost of hydrogen, and possible transition schemes to a nuclear-hydrogen economy will be presented.

  2. Hydrogen production from solar energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenstadt, M. M.; Cox, K. E.

    1975-01-01

    Three alternatives for hydrogen production from solar energy have been analyzed on both efficiency and economic grounds. The analysis shows that the alternative using solar energy followed by thermochemical decomposition of water to produce hydrogen is the optimum one. The other schemes considered were the direct conversion of solar energy to electricity by silicon cells and water electrolysis, and the use of solar energy to power a vapor cycle followed by electrical generation and electrolysis. The capital cost of hydrogen via the thermochemical alternative was estimated at $575/kW of hydrogen output or $3.15/million Btu. Although this cost appears high when compared with hydrogen from other primary energy sources or from fossil fuel, environmental and social costs which favor solar energy may prove this scheme feasible in the future.

  3. Hydrogen - A new green energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnu, Franck

    2013-01-01

    A set of articles proposes an overview of the role hydrogen might have as energy in the energy transition policy, a review of different areas of research related to the hydrogen sector, and presentations of some remarkable innovations in different specific fields. Hydrogen might be an asset in energy transition because production modes (like electrolysis) result in an almost carbon-free or at least low-carbon hydrogen production. Challenges and perspectives are evoked: energy storage for intermittent energies (the MYRTE platform), the use of a hydrogen-natural mix (GRHYD program), the development of fuel cells for transport applications, and co-generation (Japan is the leader). Different French research organisations are working on different aspects and areas: the H2E program by Air Liquide, fuel cell technologies by GDF Suez, power electrolyzers and cells by Areva. Some aspects and research areas are more specifically detailed: high temperature electrolysis (higher efficiencies, synthesis of methane from hydrogen), fuel cells (using less platinum, and using ceramics for high temperatures), the perspective of solid storage solutions (hydrogen bottles in composite materials, development of 'hydrogen sponges', search for new hydrides). Innovations concern a project car, storage and production (Greenergy Box), the McPhy Energy storage system, an electric bicycle with fuel cell, easy to transport storage means by Air Liquide and Composites Aquitaine, development of energy autonomy, fuel cells for cars, electrolyzers using the Proton Exchange Membrane or PEM technology

  4. Hydrogen: energy transition under way

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franc, Pierre-Etienne; Mateo, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Written by a representative of Air Liquide with the help of a free lance journalist, this book proposes an overview of the technological developments for the use of hydrogen as a clean energy with its ability to store primary energy (notably that produced by renewable sources), and its capacity of energy restitution in combination with a fuel cell with many different applications (notably mobility-related applications). The authors outline that these developments are very important in a context of energy transition. They also outline what is left to be done, notably economically and financially, for hydrogen to play its role in the energy revolution which is now under way

  5. Electrocatalysts for hydrogen energy

    CERN Document Server

    Losiewicz, Bozena

    2015-01-01

    This special topic volume deals with the development of novel solid state electrocatalysts of a high performance to enhance the rates of the hydrogen or oxygen evolution. It contains a description of various types of metals, alloys and composites which have been obtained using electrodeposition in aqueous solutions that has been identified to be a technologically feasible and economically superior technique for the production of the porous electrodes. The goal was to produce papers that would be useful to both the novice and the expert in hydrogen technologies. This volume is intended to be us

  6. Renewable energy sources: Energy Efficiency Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulgarensky, Mihael

    2004-01-01

    The paper presents the activities of the Energy Efficiency Agency, its main functions, as well as the new legislation stimulating the use of RES, stipulated in the new Energy Law of Bulgaria. The second part of the paper describes the potential of renewable energy in i.e. wind energy; solar energy; biomass energy; hydro energy; geothermal energy; draft of a National Program on RES 2005-2015. The third part describes the main issues of the new ENERGY EFFICIENCY LAW and the established Energy efficiency fund. (Author)

  7. Industrial view of Hydrogen Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francois Jackow

    2006-01-01

    Industrial Gases Companies have been mastering Hydrogen production, distribution, safe handling and applications for several decades for a wide range of gas applications. This unique industrial background positioned these companies to play a key role in the emerging Hydrogen Energy market, which can rely, at early stage of development, on already existing infrastructure, logistics and technical know-how. Nevertheless, it is important to acknowledge that Hydrogen Energy raised specific challenges which are not totally addressed by industrial gas activities. The main difference is obviously in the final customer profile, which differs significantly from the qualified professional our industry is used to serve. A non professional end-user, operating with Hydrogen at home or on board of his family car, has to be served with intrinsically safe and user-friendly solutions that exceed by far the industrial specifications already in place. Another significant challenge is that we will need breakthroughs both in terms of products and infrastructure, with development time frame that may require several decades. The aim of this presentation is to review how a company like Air Liquide, worldwide leader already operating more than 200 large hydrogen production sites, is approaching this new Hydrogen Energy market, all along the complete supply chain from production to end-users. Our contributions to the analysis, understanding and deployment of this new Energy market, will be illustrated by the presentation of Air Liquide internal development's as well as our participation in several national and European projects. (author)

  8. Fusion Energy for Hydrogen Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fillo, J. A.; Powell, J. R.; Steinberg, M.; Salzano, F.; Benenati, R.; Dang, V.; Fogelson, S.; Isaacs, H.; Kouts, H.; Kushner, M.; Lazareth, O.; Majeski, S.; Makowitz, H.; Sheehan, T. V.

    1978-09-01

    The decreasing availability of fossil fuels emphasizes the need to develop systems which will produce synthetic fuel to substitute for and supplement the natural supply. An important first step in the synthesis of liquid and gaseous fuels is the production of hydrogen. Thermonuclear fusion offers an inexhaustible source of energy for the production of hydrogen from water. Depending on design, electric generation efficiencies of approximately 40 to 60% and hydrogen production efficiencies by high temperature electrolysis of approximately 50 to 70% are projected for fusion reactors using high temperature blankets.

  9. Hydrogen from solar energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-04-01

    The long-range options of energy sources are the breeding reactor, nuclear fusion, and solar energy. Concerning solar energy three systems are being developed: First the photovoltaic cells which are almost ready for industrial production, but which are still too expensive - at least today. Secondly the thermal utilization of solar radiation. Compared to these, thirdly, the photobiological and photochemical possibilities of solar energy utilization have been somewhat neglected so far. However, the photolysis of water by solar energy is a very promising option for future energy demands. This can be done by making use of the photo-synthetic splitting of water in technical facilities or with semiconductors.

  10. US energy agency making progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    The Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E) has the ability to make significant contributions to energy research but must be allowed time to do so, according to a report by the US National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine.

  11. Energy: the solar hydrogen alternative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bocheris, J O.M.

    1977-01-01

    The author argues that nuclear and solar energy should begin replacing conventional fossil sources as soon as possible because oil, gas and even coal supplies will be depleted within decades. A hydrogen economy would introduce major technical problems but its chief benefits are that it permits energy storage in a post fossil fuel era when electricity is expected to play a major role. It can be converted to electricity, cleanly and efficiently with fuel cells and in liquid form can be burnt as jet fuel. Hydrogen can also be burnt in internal combustion engines although less efficiently in fuel cells. However, although hydrogen is clean and efficient, technical development is still needed to reduce its cost and to cope with safety problems. The book contains a wealth of technical information and is a valuable reference on a topic of growing importance.

  12. 21st Century's energy: Hydrogen energy system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veziroglu, T. Nejat; Sahin, Suemer

    2008-01-01

    Fossil fuels (i.e., petroleum, natural gas and coal), which meet most of the world's energy demand today, are being depleted fast. Also, their combustion products are causing the global problems, such as the greenhouse effect, ozone layer depletion, acid rains and pollution, which are posing great danger for our environment and eventually for the life in our planet. Many engineers and scientists agree that the solution to these global problems would be to replace the existing fossil fuel system by the hydrogen energy system. Hydrogen is a very efficient and clean fuel. Its combustion will produce no greenhouse gases, no ozone layer depleting chemicals, little or no acid rain ingredients and pollution. Hydrogen, produced from renewable energy (e.g., solar) sources, would result in a permanent energy system, which we would never have to change. However, there are other energy systems proposed for the post-petroleum era, such as a synthetic fossil fuel system. In this system, synthetic gasoline and synthetic natural gas will be produced using abundant deposits of coal. In a way, this will ensure the continuation of the present fossil fuel system. The two possible energy systems for the post-fossil fuel era (i.e., the solar-hydrogen energy system and the synthetic fossil fuel system) are compared with the present fossil fuel system by taking into consideration production costs, environmental damages and utilization efficiencies. The results indicate that the solar-hydrogen energy system is the best energy system to ascertain a sustainable future, and it should replace the fossil fuel system before the end of the 21st century

  13. 21st century's energy: hydrogen energy system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veziroglu, T. N.

    2007-01-01

    Fossil fuels (i.e., petroleum, natural gas and coal), which meet most of the world's energy demand today, are being depleted fast. Also, their combustion products are causing the global problems, such as the greenhouse effect, ozone layer depletion, acid rains and pollution, which are posing great danger for our environment and eventually for the life in our planet. Many engineers and scientists agree that the solution to these global problems would be to replace the existing fossil fuel system by the Hydrogen Energy System. Hydrogen is a very efficient and clean fuel. Its combustion will produce no greenhouse gases, no ozone layer depleting chemicals, little or no acid rain ingredients and pollution. Hydrogen, produced from renewable energy (e.g., solar) sources, would result in a permanent energy system, which we would never have to change. However, there are other energy systems proposed for the post-petroleum era, such as a synthetic fossil fuel system. In this system, synthetic gasoline and synthetic natural gas will be produced using abundant deposits of coal. In a way, this will ensure the continuation of the present fossil fuel system. The two possible energy systems for the post-fossil fuel era (i.e., the solar hydrogen energy system and the synthetic fossil fuel system) are compared with the present fossil fuel system by taking into consideration production costs, environmental damages and utilization efficiencies. The results indicate that the solar hydrogen energy system is the best energy system to ascertain a sustainable future, and it should replace the fossil fuel system before the end of the 21st Century

  14. Energy Accumulation by Hydrogen Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiřina Čermáková

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Photovoltaic power plants as a renewable energy source have been receiving rapidly growing attention in the Czech Republic and in the other EU countries. This rapid development of photovoltaic sources is having a negative effect on the electricity power system control, because they depend on the weather conditions and provide a variable and unreliable supply of electric power. One way to reduce this effect is by accumulating electricity in hydrogen. The aim of this paper is to introduce hydrogen as a tool for regulating photovoltaic energy in island mode. A configuration has been designed for connecting households with the photovoltaic hybrid system, and a simulation model has been made in order to check the validity of this system. The simulation results provide energy flows and have been used for optimal sizing of real devices. An appropriate system can deliver energy in a stand-alone installation.

  15. Hydrogen and energy utilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hustadt, Daniel [Vattenfall Europe Innovation GmbH (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Renewable electricity generation plays one major role with the biggest share being wind energy. At the end of the year 2009 a wind power plant capacity of around 26 GW was installed in Germany. Several outlooks come to the conclusion that this capacity can be doubled in ten years (compare Figure 1). Additionally the German government has set a target of 26 GW installed off-shore capacity in North and Baltic Sea until 2030. At Vattenfall only a minor percentage of the electricity production comes from wind power today. This share will be increased up to 12% until 2030 following Vattenfall's strategy 'Making Electricity Clean'. This rapid development of wind power offers several opportunities but also means some challenges to Utilities. (orig.)

  16. Storing Renewable Energy in the Hydrogen Cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Züttel, Andreas; Callini, Elsa; Kato, Shunsuke; Atakli, Züleyha Özlem Kocabas

    2015-01-01

    An energy economy based on renewable energy requires massive energy storage, approx. half of the annual energy consumption. Therefore, the production of a synthetic energy carrier, e.g. hydrogen, is necessary. The hydrogen cycle, i.e. production of hydrogen from water by renewable energy, storage and use of hydrogen in fuel cells, combustion engines or turbines is a closed cycle. Electrolysis splits water into hydrogen and oxygen and represents a mature technology in the power range up to 100 kW. However, the major technological challenge is to build electrolyzers in the power range of several MW producing high purity hydrogen with a high efficiency. After the production of hydrogen, large scale and safe hydrogen storage is required. Hydrogen is stored either as a molecule or as an atom in the case of hydrides. The maximum volumetric hydrogen density of a molecular hydrogen storage is limited to the density of liquid hydrogen. In a complex hydride the hydrogen density is limited to 20 mass% and 150 kg/m(3) which corresponds to twice the density of liquid hydrogen. Current research focuses on the investigation of new storage materials based on combinations of complex hydrides with amides and the understanding of the hydrogen sorption mechanism in order to better control the reaction for the hydrogen storage applications.

  17. Renewable based hydrogen energy projects in remote and island communities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miles, S.; Gillie, M.

    2009-01-01

    Task 18 working group of the International Energy Agency's Hydrogen Implementing Agreement has been evaluating and documenting experiences with renewable based hydrogen energy projects in remote and island communities in the United Kingdom, Canada, Norway, Iceland, Gran Canaria, Spain and New Zealand. The objective was to examine the lessons learned from existing projects and provide recommendations regarding the effective development of hydrogen systems. In order to accomplish this task, some of the drivers behind the niche markets where hydrogen systems have already been developed, or are in the development stages, were studied in order to determine how these could be expanded and modified to reach new markets. Renewable based hydrogen energy projects for remote and island communities are currently a key niche market. This paper compared various aspects of these projects and discussed the benefits, objectives and barriers facing the development of a hydrogen-based economy

  18. The prospects for hydrogen as an energy carrier: an overview of hydrogen energy and hydrogen energy systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosen, Marc A.; Koohi-Fayegh, Seama [Ontario Univ., Oshawa, ON (Canada). Inst. of Technology

    2016-02-15

    Hydrogen is expected to play a key role as an energy carrier in future energy systems of the world. As fossil-fuel supplies become scarcer and environmental concerns increase, hydrogen is likely to become an increasingly important chemical energy carrier and eventually may become the principal chemical energy carrier. When most of the world's energy sources become non-fossil based, hydrogen and electricity are expected to be the two dominant energy carriers for the provision of end-use services. In such a ''hydrogen economy,'' the two complementary energy carriers, hydrogen and electricity, are used to satisfy most of the requirements of energy consumers. A transition era will bridge the gap between today's fossil-fuel economy and a hydrogen economy, in which non-fossil-derived hydrogen will be used to extend the lifetime of the world's fossil fuels - by upgrading heavy oils, for instance - and the infrastructure needed to support a hydrogen economy is gradually developed. In this paper, the role of hydrogen as an energy carrier and hydrogen energy systems' technologies and their economics are described. Also, the social and political implications of hydrogen energy are examined, and the questions of when and where hydrogen is likely to become important are addressed. Examples are provided to illustrate key points. (orig.)

  19. The prospects for hydrogen as an energy carrier: an overview of hydrogen energy and hydrogen energy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, Marc A.; Koohi-Fayegh, Seama

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen is expected to play a key role as an energy carrier in future energy systems of the world. As fossil-fuel supplies become scarcer and environmental concerns increase, hydrogen is likely to become an increasingly important chemical energy carrier and eventually may become the principal chemical energy carrier. When most of the world's energy sources become non-fossil based, hydrogen and electricity are expected to be the two dominant energy carriers for the provision of end-use services. In such a ''hydrogen economy,'' the two complementary energy carriers, hydrogen and electricity, are used to satisfy most of the requirements of energy consumers. A transition era will bridge the gap between today's fossil-fuel economy and a hydrogen economy, in which non-fossil-derived hydrogen will be used to extend the lifetime of the world's fossil fuels - by upgrading heavy oils, for instance - and the infrastructure needed to support a hydrogen economy is gradually developed. In this paper, the role of hydrogen as an energy carrier and hydrogen energy systems' technologies and their economics are described. Also, the social and political implications of hydrogen energy are examined, and the questions of when and where hydrogen is likely to become important are addressed. Examples are provided to illustrate key points. (orig.)

  20. Establishment of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okazaki, Toshio

    2006-01-01

    A goal of the 21. century is for society to pursue 'sustainable economic development and prosperous life by recycling resources', thus rejecting 'development based on the waste of resources'. For Japan, which has limited energy resources, it is important to secure safe, inexpensive, environmentally friendly energy resources having long-term availability. To contribute to long-term energy security and solve global environmental issues, and to create advanced competitive science and technology, the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) was established by integrating the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) and the Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) in October 2005. JAEA is endeavoring to establish nuclear fuel cycles, to contribute to social improvement through hydrogen production initiated by atomic energy, and to pursue research and development of thermonuclear fusion and quantum beam technology. This paper reviews the main R and D activities of JAEA. The structure of the paper is the following: 1. Introduction; 2. Japan Atomic Energy Agency; 3. Efforts to Commercialize the Fast Reactor Cycle; 4. Monju Progress; 5. Geological Disposal of High-Level Radioactive Waste R and D; 6. High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor System R and D; 7. Fusion Research and Development; 8. LWR Spent Fuel Reprocessing Technology; 9. Quantum Beam Technologies; 10. Nuclear Safety Research and Regulatory Applications; 11. Basic Science and Engineering Research; 12. Contribution to the Enhanced International Nonproliferation Regimes; 13. Conclusions. To summarize, JAEA will promote the above R and D activities, addressing the following commitments: - On problems that atomic energy faces, we shall extend technical assistance in response to the government and the industrial sectors. - We shall produce technical options to attain political goals to secure medium to long-term stable energy supplies and to solve global environmental issues. - With the high potentials of atomic

  1. The Energy Efficiency of Onboard Hydrogen Storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jens Oluf; Vestbø, Andreas Peter; Li, Qingfeng

    2007-01-01

    A number of the most common ways of storing hydrogen are reviewed in terms of energy efficiency. Distinction is made between energy losses during regeneration and during hydrogen liberation. In the latter case, the energy might have to be provided by part of the released hydrogen, and the true...

  2. Hydrogen economy and nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knapp, V.

    2004-01-01

    Global energy outlooks based on present trends, such as WETO study, give little optimism about fulfilling Kyoto commitments in controlling CO2 emissions and avoiding unwanted climate consequences. Whilst the problem of radioactive waste has a prominence in public, in spite of already adequate technical solutions of safe storage for future hundreds and thousands of years, there s generally much less concern with influence of fossil fuels on global climate. In addition to electricity production, process heat and transportation are approximately equal contributors to CO2 emission. Fossil fuels in transportation present also a local pollution problem in congested regions. Backed by extensive R and D, hydrogen economy is seen as the solution, however, often without much thought where from the hydrogen in required very large quantities may come. With welcome contributions from alternative sources, nuclear energy is the only source of energy capable of producing hydrogen in very large amounts, without parallel production of CO2. Future high temperature reactors could do this most efficiently. In view of the fact that nuclear weapon proliferation is not under control, extrapolation from the present level of nuclear power to the future level required by serious attempts to reduce global CO2 emission is a matter of justified concern. Finding the sites for many hundreds of new reactors would, alone, be a formidable problem in developed regions with high population density. What is generally less well understood and not validated is that the production of nuclear hydrogen allows the required large increases of nuclear power without the accompanied increase of proliferation risks. Unlike electricity, hydrogen can be economically shipped or transported by pipelines to places very far from the place of production. Thus, nuclear production of hydrogen can be located and concentrated at few remote, controllable sites, far from the population centers and consumption regions. At such

  3. Nuclear energy in the hydrogen economy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertel, E.; Lee, K.S.; Nordborg, C.

    2004-01-01

    In the framework of a sustainable development, the hydrogen economy is envisaged as an alternative scenario in substitution to the fossil fuels. After a presentation of the hydrogen economy advantages, the author analyzes the nuclear energy a a possible energy source for hydrogen production since nuclear reactors can produce both the heat and electricity required for it. (A.L.B.)

  4. The fusion-hydrogen energy system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, L.O.

    1994-01-01

    This paper will describe the structure of the system, from energy generation and hydrogen production through distribution to the end users. It will show how stationary energy users will convert to hydrogen and will outline ancillary uses of hydrogen to aid in reducing other forms of pollution. It will show that the adoption of the fusion hydrogen energy system will facilitate the use of renewable energy such as wind and solar. The development of highly efficient fuel cells for production of electricity near the user and for transportation will be outlined. The safety of the hydrogen fusion energy system is addressed. This paper will show that the combination of fusion generation combined with hydrogen distribution will provide a system capable of virtually eliminating the negative impact on the environment from the use of energy by humanity. In addition, implementation of the energy system will provide techniques and tools that can ameliorate environmental problems unrelated to energy use. (Author)

  5. Hydrogen energy stations: along the roadside to the hydrogen economy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, W.W.; Rifkin, J.; O'Connor, T.; Swisher, J.; Lipman, T.; Rambach, G.

    2005-01-01

    Hydrogen has become more than an international topic of discussion within government and among industry. With the public announcements from the European Union and American governments and an Executive Order from the Governor of California, hydrogen has become a ''paradigm change'' targeted toward changing decades of economic and societal behaviours. The public demand for clean and green energy as well as being ''independent'' or not located in political or societal conflict areas, has become paramount. The key issues are the commitment of governments through public policies along with corporations. Above all, secondly, the advancement of hydrogen is regional as it depends upon infrastructure and fuel resources. Hence, the hydrogen economy, to which the hydrogen highway is the main component, will be regional and creative. New jobs, businesses and opportunities are already emerging. And finally, the costs for the hydrogen economy are critical. The debate as to hydrogen being 5 years away from being commercial and available in the marketplace versus needing more research and development contradicts the historical development and deployment of any new technology be it bio-science, flat panel displays, computers or mobile phones. The market drivers are government regulations and standards soon thereafter matched by market forces and mass production. Hydrogen is no different. What this paper does is describes is how the hydrogen highway is the backbone to the hydrogen economy by becoming, with the next five years, both regional and commercial through supplying stationary power to communities. Soon thereafter, within five to ten years, these same hydrogen stations will be serving hundreds and then thousands of hydrogen fuel powered vehicles. Hydrogen is the fuel for distributed energy generation and hence positively impacts the future of public and private power generators. The paradigm has already changed. (author)

  6. Stuart Energy's experiences in developing 'Hydrogen Energy Station' infrastructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crilly, B.

    2004-01-01

    'Full text:' With over 50 years experience, Stuart Energy is the global leader in the development, manufacture and integration of multi-use hydrogen infrastructure products that use the Company's proprietary IMET hydrogen generation water electrolysis technology. Stuart Energy offers its customers the power of hydrogen through its integrated Hydrogen Energy Station (HES) that provides clean, secure and distributed hydrogen. The HES can be comprised of five modules: hydrogen generation, compression, storage, fuel dispensing and / or power generation. This paper discusses Stuart Energy's involvement with over 10 stations installed in recent years throughout North America, Asia and Europe while examining the economic and environmental benefits of these systems. (author)

  7. Nuclear energy for sustainable Hydrogen production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gyoshev, G.

    2004-01-01

    There is general agreement that hydrogen as an universal energy carrier could play increasingly important role in energy future as part of a set of solutions to a variety of energy and environmental problems. Given its abundant nature, hydrogen has been an important raw material in the organic chemical industry. At recent years strong competition has emerged between nations as diverse as the U.S., Japan, Germany, China and Iceland in the race to commercialize hydrogen energy vehicles in the beginning of 21st Century. Any form of energy - fossil, renewable or nuclear - can be used to generate hydrogen. The hydrogen production by nuclear electricity is considered as a sustainable method. By our presentation we are trying to evaluate possibilities for sustainable hydrogen production by nuclear energy at near, medium and long term on EC strategic documents basis. The main EC documents enter water electrolysis by nuclear electricity as only sustainable technology for hydrogen production in early stage of hydrogen economy. In long term as sustainable method is considered the splitting of water by thermochemical technology using heat from high temperature reactors too. We consider that at medium stage of hydrogen economy it is possible to optimize the sustainable hydrogen production by high temperature and high pressure water electrolysis by using a nuclear-solar energy system. (author)

  8. Integrating hydrogen into Canada's energy future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivard, P.

    2006-01-01

    This presentation outlines the steps in integrating of hydrogen into Canada's energy future. Canada's hydrogen and fuel cell investment is primarily driven by two government commitments - climate change commitments and innovation leadership commitments. Canada's leading hydrogen and fuel cell industry is viewed as a long-term player in meeting the above commitments. A hydrogen and fuel cell national strategy is being jointly developed to create 'Win-Wins' with industry

  9. Energy Policy is Technology Politics The Hydrogen Energy Case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carl-Jochen Winter

    2006-01-01

    Germany's energy supply status shows both an accumulation of unsatisfactory sustainabilities putting the nation's energy security at risk, and a hopeful sign: The nation's supply dependency on foreign sources and the accordingly unavoidable price dictate the nation suffers under is almost life risking; the technological skill, however, of the nation's researchers, engineers, and industry materializes in a good percentage of the indigenous and the world's energy conversion technology market. Exemplified with the up and coming hydrogen energy economy this paper tries to advocate the 21. century energy credo: energy policy is energy technology politics! Energy source thinking and acting is 19. and 20. century, energy efficient conversion technology thinking and acting is 21. century. Hydrogen energy is on the verge of becoming the centre-field of world energy interest. Hydrogen energy is key for the de-carbonization and, thus, sustainabilization of fossil fuels, and as a storage and transport means for the introduction of so far un-operational huge renewable sources into the world energy market. - What is most important is hydrogen's thermodynamic ability to exergize the energy scheme: hydrogen makes more technical work (exergy) out of less primary energy! Hydrogen adds value. Hydrogen energy and, in particular, hydrogen energy technologies, are to become part of Germany's national energy identity; accordingly, national energy policy as energy technology politics needs to grow in the nation's awareness as common sense! Otherwise Germany seems ill-equipped energetically, and its well-being hangs in the balance. (author)

  10. Clean energy and the hydrogen economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandon, N P; Kurban, Z

    2017-07-28

    In recent years, new-found interest in the hydrogen economy from both industry and academia has helped to shed light on its potential. Hydrogen can enable an energy revolution by providing much needed flexibility in renewable energy systems. As a clean energy carrier, hydrogen offers a range of benefits for simultaneously decarbonizing the transport, residential, commercial and industrial sectors. Hydrogen is shown here to have synergies with other low-carbon alternatives, and can enable a more cost-effective transition to de-carbonized and cleaner energy systems. This paper presents the opportunities for the use of hydrogen in key sectors of the economy and identifies the benefits and challenges within the hydrogen supply chain for power-to-gas, power-to-power and gas-to-gas supply pathways. While industry players have already started the market introduction of hydrogen fuel cell systems, including fuel cell electric vehicles and micro-combined heat and power devices, the use of hydrogen at grid scale requires the challenges of clean hydrogen production, bulk storage and distribution to be resolved. Ultimately, greater government support, in partnership with industry and academia, is still needed to realize hydrogen's potential across all economic sectors.This article is part of the themed issue 'The challenges of hydrogen and metals'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  11. Hydrogen energy system in California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zweig, R.M.

    1995-01-01

    Results of experiences on the use of hydrogen as a clean burning fuel in California and results of the South Coast Air Quality Management district tests using hydrogen as a clean burning environmentally safe fuel are given. The results of Solar Hydrogen Projects in California and recent medical data documentation of human lung damage of patients living in air polluted urban areas are summarized

  12. Nuclear energy for hydrogen production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verfondern, K.

    2007-01-01

    In the long term, H 2 production technologies will be strongly focusing on CO 2 -neutral or CO 2 -free methods. Nuclear with its virtually no air-borne pollutants emissions appears to be an ideal option for large-scale centralized H 2 production. It will be driven by major factors such as production rates of fossil fuels, political decisions on greenhouse gas emissions, energy security and independence of foreign oil uncertainties, or the economics of large-scale hydrogen production and transmission. A nuclear reactor operated in the heat and power cogeneration mode must be located in close vicinity to the consumer's site, i.e., it must have a convincing safety concept of the combined nuclear/ chemical production plant. A near-term option of nuclear hydrogen production which is readily available is conventional low temperature electrolysis using cheap off-peak electricity from present nuclear power plants. This, however, is available only if the share of nuclear in power production is large. But as fossil fuel prices will increase, the use of nuclear outside base-load becomes more attractive. Nuclear steam reforming is another important near-term option for both the industrial and the transportation sector, since principal technologies were developed, with a saving potential of some 35 % of methane feedstock. Competitiveness will benefit from increasing cost level of natural gas. The HTGR heated steam reforming process which was simulated in pilot plants both in Germany and Japan, appears to be feasible for industrial application around 2015. A CO 2 emission free option is high temperature electrolysis which reduces the electricity needs up to about 30 % and could make use of high temperature heat and steam from an HTGR. With respect to thermochemical water splitting cycles, the processes which are receiving presently most attention are the sulfur-iodine, the Westinghouse hybrid, and the calcium-bromine (UT-3) cycles. Efficiencies of the S-I process are in the

  13. Intergovernmental organisation activities: European Atomic Energy Community, International Atomic Energy Agency, OECD Nuclear Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2012-01-01

    European Atomic Energy Community: Proposed legislative instruments, Adopted legislative instruments, Non-legislative instruments, Other activities (meetings). International Atomic Energy Agency: IAEA Action Plan on Nuclear Safety. OECD Nuclear Energy Agency: The Russian Federation to join the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency; Participation by the regulatory authorities of India and the United Arab Emirates in the Multinational Design Evaluation Programme (MDEP); NEA International Workshop on Crisis Communication, 9-10 May 2012; International School of Nuclear Law: 2013; Next NEA International Nuclear Law Essentials Course

  14. Hydrogen energy from renewable resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    To asses the economic viability of an integrated energy production system, a multi-stage cash flow analysis framework is utilized. This framework relies on standard cash flow models using an electronic spreadsheet program (Lotus 1-2-3) as the modeling environment. The purpose of the program is to evaluate the life-cycle economics of the various component technologies using common assumptions about the economic and financial environment in which these would operate. A schematic diagram of the multi-stage model is shown in the entire integrated production system. The details of the financial model are explained below. In its most complex form, the integrated system consists of three production stages. The first is the production of electricity. At this first stage, the model can and does accommodate any type of production technology, e.g., wind energy conversion systems, solar thermal devices, and geothermal electricity. The second stage of the model is the production of hydrogen using a specific assumed production methodology. In this case, it is a high-temperature electrolysis facility using production and economic characteristics data provided by the Florida Solar Energy Center. The third stage of the model represents the production of methanol assuming a biomass gasifier technology with operating and economic characteristics data based on studied by Fluor and Southern California Edison. At each stage of the model, there are three components: a data input portion that is used to define the techno-economic characteristics of the technology; the cash flow analysis based on financial assumptions; and an output summary section that reports the economic characteristics of the technology

  15. Hydrogen based global renewable energy network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akai, Makoto [Mechanical Engineering Laboratory, AIST, MITI, Namiki, Tsukuba (Japan)

    1993-12-31

    In the last quarter of this century, global environmental problem has emerged as a major scientific, political and social issue. Specific Problems include: depletion of ozone layer by chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), acid rain, destruction of tropical forests and desertification, pollution of the sea and global wanning due to the greenhouse effect by carbon dioxide and others. Among these problems, particular attention of the world has been focused on the global warming because it has direct linkage to energy consumption which our economic development depends on so far. On the other hand, the future program of The Sunshine Project for alternative energy technology R&D, The Moonlight Project for energy conservation technology R&D, and The Global Environmental Technology Program for environmental problem mitigating technology R&D which are Japan`s national projects being promoted by their Agency of Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) in the Ministry of International Trade and Industry have been reexamined in view of recent changes in the situations surrounding new energy technology. In this regard, The New Sunshine Program will be established by integrating these three activities to accelerate R&D in the field of energy and environmental technologies. In the reexamination, additional stress has been laid on the contribution to solving global environmental problem through development of clean renewable energies which constitute a major part of the {open_quotes}New Earth 21{close_quotes}, a comprehensive, long-term and international cooperative program proposed by MITI. The present paper discusses the results of feasibility study on hydrogen energy system leading to the concept of WE-NET following a brief summary on R&D status on solar and wind energy in Japan.

  16. Hydrogen, energy vector of the future?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrin, J.; Deschamps, J.F.

    2004-01-01

    In the framework of a sustainable development with a reduction of the greenhouse gases emissions, the hydrogen seems a good solution because its combustion produces only water. From the today hydrogen industrial market, the authors examine the technological challenges and stakes of the hydrogen-energy. They detail the hydrogen production, distribution and storage and compare with the petrol and the natural gas. Then they explain the fuel cells specificity and realize a classification of the energy efficiency of many associations production-storage-distribution-use. a scenario of transition is proposed. (A.L.B.)

  17. International Atomic Energy Agency and Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd Rahim Mohd Nor

    1985-01-01

    A review on IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency) and its relation with Malaysia is given. This article also discusses the background history of IAEA, its organization and functions in the field of nuclear energy

  18. 76 FR 69714 - International Energy Agency Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-09

    ...: Notice of Meetings. SUMMARY: The Industry Advisory Board (IAB) to the International Energy Agency (IEA... Industry Advisory Board (IAB) to the International Energy Agency (IEA) will be held at the headquarters of... of Switzerland --Questionnaire Response of The Netherlands 5. Emergency Response Exercises...

  19. Hydrogen Storage Technologies for Future Energy Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preuster, Patrick; Alekseev, Alexander; Wasserscheid, Peter

    2017-06-07

    Future energy systems will be determined by the increasing relevance of solar and wind energy. Crude oil and gas prices are expected to increase in the long run, and penalties for CO 2 emissions will become a relevant economic factor. Solar- and wind-powered electricity will become significantly cheaper, such that hydrogen produced from electrolysis will be competitively priced against hydrogen manufactured from natural gas. However, to handle the unsteadiness of system input from fluctuating energy sources, energy storage technologies that cover the full scale of power (in megawatts) and energy storage amounts (in megawatt hours) are required. Hydrogen, in particular, is a promising secondary energy vector for storing, transporting, and distributing large and very large amounts of energy at the gigawatt-hour and terawatt-hour scales. However, we also discuss energy storage at the 120-200-kWh scale, for example, for onboard hydrogen storage in fuel cell vehicles using compressed hydrogen storage. This article focuses on the characteristics and development potential of hydrogen storage technologies in light of such a changing energy system and its related challenges. Technological factors that influence the dynamics, flexibility, and operating costs of unsteady operation are therefore highlighted in particular. Moreover, the potential for using renewable hydrogen in the mobility sector, industrial production, and the heat market is discussed, as this potential may determine to a significant extent the future economic value of hydrogen storage technology as it applies to other industries. This evaluation elucidates known and well-established options for hydrogen storage and may guide the development and direction of newer, less developed technologies.

  20. Hydrogen-based electrochemical energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Lin Jay

    2013-08-06

    An energy storage device (100) providing high storage densities via hydrogen storage. The device (100) includes a counter electrode (110), a storage electrode (130), and an ion conducting membrane (120) positioned between the counter electrode (110) and the storage electrode (130). The counter electrode (110) is formed of one or more materials with an affinity for hydrogen and includes an exchange matrix for elements/materials selected from the non-noble materials that have an affinity for hydrogen. The storage electrode (130) is loaded with hydrogen such as atomic or mono-hydrogen that is adsorbed by a hydrogen storage material such that the hydrogen (132, 134) may be stored with low chemical bonding. The hydrogen storage material is typically formed of a lightweight material such as carbon or boron with a network of passage-ways or intercalants for storing and conducting mono-hydrogen, protons, or the like. The hydrogen storage material may store at least ten percent by weight hydrogen (132, 134) at ambient temperature and pressure.

  1. Energy conversion using hydrogen PEM fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoenescu, D.; Patularu, L.; Culcer, M.; Lazar, R.; Mirica, D.; Varlam, M.; Carcadea, E.; Stefanescu, I.

    2004-01-01

    It is well known that hydrogen is the most promising solution of future energy, both for long and medium term strategies. Hydrogen can be produced using many primary sources (naphthalene, natural gas, methanol, coal, biomass), solar cells power, etc. It can be burned or chemically reacted having a high yield of energy conversion and is a non-polluted fuel. This paper presents the results obtained by ICSI Rm. Valcea in an experimental-demonstrative conversion energy system consisting in a catalytic methane reforming plant for hydrogen production and three synthesis gas purification units in order to get pure hydrogen with a CO level lower than 10 ppm that finally feeds a hydrogen fuel stock. (authors)

  2. Primary energy sources for hydrogen production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassmann, K.; Kuehne, H.M.

    1993-01-01

    The costs for hydrogen production through water electrolysis are estimated, assuming the electricity is produced from solar, hydro-, fossil, or nuclear power. The costs for hydrogen end-use in the power generation, heat and transportation sectors are also calculated, based on a state of the art technology and a more advanced technology expected to represent the state by the year 2010. The costs for hydrogen utilization (without energy taxes) are shown to be higher than current prices for fossil fuels (including taxes). Without restrictions imposed on fossil fuel consumption, hydrogen shall not gain a significant market share in either of the cases discussed. 2 figs., 3 tabs., 4 refs

  3. Primary energy sources for hydrogen production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassmann, K.; Kuehne, H.-M.

    1993-01-01

    The cost of hydrogen from water electrolysis is estimated, assuming that the electricity was produced from solar, hydro-, fossil, or nuclear power. The costs for hydrogen end-use in the sectors of power generation, heat and transportation are calculated, based on a state-of-the-art technology and a more advanced technology expected to represent the state by the year 2010. The cost of hydrogen utilization (without energy taxes) is higher than the current price of fossil fuels (including taxes). Without restrictions imposed on fossil fuel consumption, hydrogen will not gain a significant market share in either of the cases discussed. (Author)

  4. Hydrogen: a clean energy for tomorrow?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artero, V.; Guillet, N.; Fruchart, D.; Fontecave, M.

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogen has a strong energetic potential. In order to exploit this potential and transform this energy into electricity, two chemical reactions could be used which do not release any greenhouse effect gas: hydrogen can be produced by water electrolysis, and then hydrogen and oxygen can be combined to produce water and release heat and electricity. Hydrogen can therefore be used to store energy. In Norway, the exceeding electricity produced by wind turbines in thus stored in fuel cells, and the energy of which is used when the wind weakens. About ten dwellings are thus supplied with only renewable energy. Similar projects are being tested in Corsica and in the Reunion Island. The main challenges for this technology are its cost, its compactness and its durability. The article gives an overview of the various concepts, apparatus and systems involved in hydrogen and energy production. Some researches are inspired by bacteria which produce hydrogen with enzymes. The objective is to elaborate better catalysts. Another explored perspective is the storage of solid hydrogen

  5. Energy Levels of Hydrogen and Deuterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 142 NIST Energy Levels of Hydrogen and Deuterium (Web, free access)   This database provides theoretical values of energy levels of hydrogen and deuterium for principle quantum numbers n = 1 to 200 and all allowed orbital angular momenta l and total angular momenta j. The values are based on current knowledge of the revelant theoretical contributions including relativistic, quantum electrodynamic, recoil, and nuclear size effects.

  6. The International Atomic Energy Agency's safeguards system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, W.

    2000-01-01

    A system of international safeguards has been established to provide assurance that nuclear materials in civilian use are not diverted from their peaceful purpose. The safeguards system is administered by the International Atomic Energy Agency/Department of Safeguards and devolves from treaties and other international agreements. Inspectors from the Agency verify reports from States about nuclear facilities by audits, observation, and measurements. (author)

  7. Risø energy report 3. Hydrogen and its competitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Hans Hvidtfeldt; Sønderberg Petersen, Leif

    2004-01-01

    Interest in the hydrogen economy has grown rapidly in recent years. Those countries with long traditions of activity in hydrogen research and development have now been joined by a large number of newcomers. The main reason for this surge of interest isthat the hydrogen economy may be an answer to...... and international organisations including the European Union, the International Energy Agency and the United Nations...... to the two main challenges facing the world in the years to come: climate change and the need for security of energy supplies. Both these challenges require the development of new, highly-efficient energytechnologies that are either carbon-neutral or low emitting technologies. Alternative fuels could serve...

  8. Hydrogen energy economy: More than utopia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, R.

    1992-01-01

    Under the pressure of increasing climate changes in the last years the attitude towards hydrogen technology has changed. Germany has taken a leading position in hydrogen research. Above all there is not only government-sponsored research but also industrial research. It is even assumed that an energy economy on the basis of solar energy as well as of hydrogen is technically possible. If the fact that the total power of all cars in the FRG amounts to 200.000 MW - twice as much as all power stations - is taken into consideration it should be possible to produce in large-scale production decentralized solar or hydrogen energy converters at similar kilowatt rates. (BWI) [de

  9. Hydrogen: Its Future Role in the Nation's Energy Economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winsche, W E; Hoffman, K C; Salzano, F J

    1973-06-29

    electrolysis, from coal, and directly from thermal energy could be found that are less expensive than those now available; inexpensive fuel cells could be developed, and high-temperature turbines could be used for the efficient conversion of hydrogen (and oxygen) to electricity. The use of hydrogen as an automotive fuel would be a key factor in the development of a hydrogen energy economy, and safe storage techniques for carrying sufficient quantities of hydrogen in automotive systems can certainly be developed. The use of hydrogen in automobiles would significantly reduce urban pollution because the dispersed fossil fuel emissions would be replaced by radioactive wastes generated at large central stations. The conversion of internal or external combustion engines for combustion of hydrogen fuel would probably have less economic impact on the automotive industry than the mass introduction of electric automobiles. However, this is a subject that requires more detailed study. All of the safety aspects of hydrogen utilization will have to be examined, especially the problems of safety in the domestic use and the long distance transport of hydrogen in pipelines at high pressures. It is our opinion that the various energy planning agencies should now begin to outline the mode of implementing hydrogen energy delivery systems in the energy economy. The initial transition to hydrogen energy derived from available fossil fuels such as coal should be considered together with the long range view of all the hydrogen being derived eventually from nuclear energy. By the year 1985 when petroleum imports may be in excess of the domestic supply, these plans could set the stage for the transition period from fossil to a predominantly nuclear energy economy able to supply abundant synthetic fuels such as hydrogen. Synthetic fuels will obviously be more expensive than fuels now derived from petroleum; however, there may be no other viable choice. Thus, it is essential that the analysis and

  10. The International Energy Agency's world energy outlook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Dell, S.

    1996-01-01

    The 1996 edition of the World Energy Outlook to 2010 was reviewed. An overview of the energy projections was provided based on assumptions about economic growth and energy prices, geological potential, technological developments, the availability of traditional fuels outside the OECD and the future preferences of energy users. Demand vs. price movements were modelled, based on 'capacity constraints' and 'energy saving ' scenarios. Three major conclusions derived from the projections were: (1) world primary energy demand will grow steadily as it has over the past two decades, (2) fossil fuels will account for 90 per cent of total primary energy demand in 2010, and (3) a structural shift in the shares of different regions in world energy demand is likely to occur, i.e., the OECD share will fall in favor of the share of the ROW (rest of the world). 4 tabs., 9 figs

  11. Energy and environment policies. International Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    An analysis is made of how energy policies can be adapted to environmental concerns. The efficiency of measures solving environmental problems is investigated, in particular measures substituting energy carriers, improving energy efficiency rates, postfitting pollution control devices, and applying clean energy technologies. In connection with methods of state control the report deals with questions of taxation and regularization which are to induce the private sector to actively to something for the protection of the environment. (orig.) [de

  12. The hydrogen: a clean and durable energy; L'hydrogene: une energie propre et durable

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alleau, Th. [Association Francaise de l' Hydrogene (France); Nejat Veziroglu, T. [Clean Energy Research Institute, University of Miami (United States); Lequeux, G. [Commission europeenne, DG de la Recherche, Bruxelles (Belgium)

    2000-07-01

    All the scientific experts agree, the hydrogen will be the energy vector of the future. During this conference day on the hydrogen, the authors recalled the actual economic context of the energy policy with the importance of the environmental policy and the decrease of the fossil fuels. The research programs and the attitudes of the France and the other countries facing the hydrogen are also discussed, showing the great interest for this clean and durable energy. They underline the importance of an appropriate government policy, necessary to develop the technology of the hydrogen production, storage and use. (A.L.B.)

  13. Hydrogen energy - the end of the beginning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuart, A. K.

    1997-01-01

    Financial barriers to the widespread use of hydrogen energy were the principal messages contained in this banquet address. These barriers include the cost for the hydrogen, cost for the supply infrastructure and the cost of developing and building the special vehicles and appliances to use hydrogen. Some hopeful signs that hydrogen energy is emerging include Ballard's buses, early fuel cell private vehicle refueling station and remote energy systems which will be commercialized within the next ten years. The optimism is based on the effects of deregulation of the electric utility industry in the US now spreading to Canada and other countries, the appearance of effective direct hydrogen fuel cell vehicles under strong industrial sponsorship, and the near-term availability of electrolysis for hydrogen production at a fraction of present capital cost. Each of these reasons for optimism were elaborated in some detail. However, the main force behind the hydrogen solution for transportation is the environmental benefit, i.e. the potential of some one billion automobiles around the world running on an environmentally benign fuel, and the potential effect of that fact on global warming. The likely effects of continuing as before is no longer considered a viable option even by the greatest of skeptics of greenhouse gas emissions, a fact that will make the demand for 'clean' vehicles progressively more pressing with the passage of time. By increasing the hydrogen-to-carbon ratio in upgrading heavy hydrocarbons, the petroleum industry itself is showing the way to factor global warming issues into process choices. By going one step further and obtaining the hydrogen from non-fossil sources, the environmental benefits will be multiplied several fold

  14. Hydrogen, an energy carrier with a future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmer, K.H.

    1975-01-01

    The inefficient use, associated with pollutants, of the fossil energy carriers coal, crude oil and natural gas, will deplete resources, if the energy demand increases exponentially, in the not-too-distant future. That is the reason why the hydrogen-energy concept gains in importance. This requires drastic changes in structure in a lot of technological fields. This task is only to be mastered if there is cooperation between all special fields, in order to facilitate the economical production, distribution and utilization of hydrogen. (orig.) [de

  15. Hydrogen: an energy vector for the future?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    His, St.

    2004-01-01

    Used today in various industrial sectors including refining and chemicals, hydrogen is often presented as a promising energy vector for the transport sector. However, its balance sheet presents disadvantages as well as advantages. For instance, some of its physical characteristics are not very well adapted to transport use and hydrogen does not exist in pure form. Hydrogen technologies can offer satisfactory environmental performance in certain respects, but remain handicapped by costs too high for large-scale development. A great deal of research will be required to develop mass transport application. (author)

  16. Hydrogen: an energy vector for the future?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    His, St

    2004-07-01

    Used today in various industrial sectors including refining and chemicals, hydrogen is often presented as a promising energy vector for the transport sector. However, its balance sheet presents disadvantages as well as advantages. For instance, some of its physical characteristics are not very well adapted to transport use and hydrogen does not exist in pure form. Hydrogen technologies can offer satisfactory environmental performance in certain respects, but remain handicapped by costs too high for large-scale development. A great deal of research will be required to develop mass transport application. (author)

  17. Formic Acid as a Hydrogen Energy Carrier

    KAUST Repository

    Eppinger, Jö rg; Huang, Kuo-Wei

    2016-01-01

    The high volumetric capacity (S3 g H-2/L) and its low toxicity and flammability under ambient conditions make formic acid a promising hydrogen energy carrier. Particularly, in the past decade, significant advancements have been achieved in catalyst development for selective hydrogen generation from formic acid. This Perspective highlights the advantages of this approach with discussions focused on potential applications in the transportation sector together with analysis of technical requirements, limitations, and costs.

  18. Formic Acid as a Hydrogen Energy Carrier

    KAUST Repository

    Eppinger, Jorg

    2016-12-15

    The high volumetric capacity (S3 g H-2/L) and its low toxicity and flammability under ambient conditions make formic acid a promising hydrogen energy carrier. Particularly, in the past decade, significant advancements have been achieved in catalyst development for selective hydrogen generation from formic acid. This Perspective highlights the advantages of this approach with discussions focused on potential applications in the transportation sector together with analysis of technical requirements, limitations, and costs.

  19. Very High Energy Neutron Scattering from Hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowley, R A; Stock, C; Bennington, S M; Taylor, J; Gidopoulos, N I

    2010-01-01

    The neutron scattering from hydrogen in polythene has been measured with the direct time-of flight spectrometer, MARI, at the ISIS facility of the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory with incident neutron energies between 0.5 eV and 600 eV. The results of experiments using the spectrometer, VESUVIO, have given intensities from hydrogen containing materials that were about 60% of the intensity expected from hydrogen. Since VESUVIO is the only instrument in the world that routinely operates with incident neutron energies in the eV range we have chosen to measure the scattering from hydrogen at high incident neutron energies with a different type of instrument. The MARI, direct time-of-flight, instrument was chosen for the experiment and we have studied the scattering for several different incident neutron energies. We have learnt how to subtract the gamma ray background, how to calibrate the incident energy and how to convert the spectra to an energy plot . The intensity of the hydrogen scattering was independent of the scattering angle for scattering angles from about 5 degrees up to 70 degrees for at least 3 different incident neutron energies between 20 eV and 100 eV. When the data was put on an absolute scale, by measuring the scattering from 5 metal foils with known thicknesses under the same conditions we found that the absolute intensity of the scattering from the hydrogen was in agreement with that expected to an accuracy of ± 5.0% over a wide range of wave-vector transfers between 1 and 250 A -1 . These measurements show that it is possible to measure the neutron scattering with incident neutron energies up to at least 100 eV with a direct geometry time-of-flight spectrometer and that the results are in agreement with conventional scattering theory.

  20. Characterizations of Hydrogen Energy Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Energetics Inc

    2003-04-01

    In 1996, Dr. Ed Skolnik of Energetics, Incorporated, began a series of visits to the locations of various projects that were part of the DOE Hydrogen Program. The site visits/evaluations were initiated to help the DOE Program Management, which had limited time and limited travel budgets, to get a detailed snapshot of each project. The evaluations were soon found to have other uses as well: they provided reviewers on the annual Hydrogen Program Peer Review Team with an in-depth look at a project--something that is lacking in a short presentation--and also provided a means for hydrogen stakeholders to learn about the R&D that the Hydrogen Program is sponsoring. The visits were conducted under several different contract mechanisms, at project locations specified by DOE Headquarters Program Management, Golden Field Office Contract Managers, or Energetics, Inc., or through discussion by some or all of the above. The methodology for these site-visit-evaluations changed slightly over the years, but was fundamentally as follows: Contact the Principal Investigator (PI) and arrange a time for the visit; Conduct a literature review. This would include a review of the last two or three years of Annual Operating Plan submittals, monthly reports, the paper submitted with the last two or three Annual Peer Review, published reviewers' consensus comments from the past few years, publications in journals, and journal publications on the same or similar topics by other researchers; Send the PI a list of questions/topics about a week ahead of time, which we would discuss during the visit. The types of questions vary depending on the project, but include some detailed technical questions that delve into some fundamental scientific and engineering issues, and also include some economic and goal-oriented topics; Conduct the site-visit itself including--Presentations by the PI and/or his staff. This would be formal in some cases, informal in others, and merely a &apos

  1. Establishment of 'Japan Atomic Energy Agency'. Its role and expectation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakahara, Toru; Itakura, Shuichiro; Shiozawa, Shusaku; Hino, Ryutaro; Fujii, Yasuhiko; Sakurada, Michio; Kimura, Itsuro; Kikuyama, Kaoru

    2005-01-01

    In October 2005, the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) was established as an independent administrative institution with the integration of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) and the Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC). JAEA is the only institute in Japan dedicated to comprehensive research and development in the field of nuclear energy. This paper put together a special article on its role and expectation. Firstly the essentials of comprehensive nuclear research and its future perspective were discussed mainly based on 'Framework for Nuclear Energy Policy' of the Atomic Energy Commission of Japan. Eight articles were followed on specific items such as quantum beams utilization, hydrogen production with nuclear heat, neutron science and ITER project, and put stress on joint works and smooth transfer of related technology to the private sector. (T. Tanaka)

  2. Hybrid Hydrogen and Mechanical Distributed Energy Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Ubertini

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Effective energy storage technologies represent one of the key elements to solving the growing challenges of electrical energy supply of the 21st century. Several energy storage systems are available, from ones that are technologically mature to others still at a research stage. Each technology has its inherent limitations that make its use economically or practically feasible only for specific applications. The present paper aims at integrating hydrogen generation into compressed air energy storage systems to avoid natural gas combustion or thermal energy storage. A proper design of such a hybrid storage system could provide high roundtrip efficiencies together with enhanced flexibility thanks to the possibility of providing additional energy outputs (heat, cooling, and hydrogen as a fuel, in a distributed energy storage framework. Such a system could be directly connected to the power grid at the distribution level to reduce power and energy intermittence problems related to renewable energy generation. Similarly, it could be located close to the user (e.g., office buildings, commercial centers, industrial plants, hospitals, etc.. Finally, it could be integrated in decentralized energy generation systems to reduce the peak electricity demand charges and energy costs, to increase power generation efficiency, to enhance the security of electrical energy supply, and to facilitate the market penetration of small renewable energy systems. Different configurations have been investigated (simple hybrid storage system, regenerate system, multistage system demonstrating the compressed air and hydrogen storage systems effectiveness in improving energy source flexibility and efficiency, and possibly in reducing the costs of energy supply. Round-trip efficiency up to 65% can be easily reached. The analysis is conducted through a mixed theoretical-numerical approach, which allows the definition of the most relevant physical parameters affecting the system

  3. Green energy and hydrogen research at University of Waterloo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, M.

    2006-01-01

    This paper summarises Green Energy and Hydrogen Research at the University of Waterloo in Canada. Green energy includes solar, wind, bio fuels, hydrogen economy and conventional energy sources with carbon dioxide sequestration

  4. Hydrogen energy network start-up scenario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weingartner, S.; Ellerbrock, H.

    1994-01-01

    Hydrogen is widely discussed as future fuel and energy storage medium either to replace conventional fuels for automobiles, aircrafts and ships or to avoid the necessity of bulky battery systems for electricity storage, especially in connection with solar power systems. These discussions however started more than 25 years ago and up to now hydrogen has failed to achieve a major break-through towards wider application as energy storage medium in civil markets. The main reason is that other fuels are cheaper and very well implemented in our daily life. A study has been performed at Deutsche Aerospace in order to evaluate the boundary conditions, either political or economical, which would give hydrogen the necessary push, i.e. advantage over conventional fuels. The main goal of this study was to identify critical influence factors and specific start-up scenarios which would allow an economical and practically realistic use of hydrogen as fuel and energy medium in certain niche markets outside the space industry. Method and major results of this study are presented in detail in the paper. Certain niche markets could be identified, where with little initial governmental support, either by funding, tax laws or legislation, hydrogen can compete with conventional fuels. This however requires a scenario where a lot of small actions have to be taken by a high variety of institutions and industries which today are not interconnected with each other, i.e. it requires a new cooperative and proactive network between e.g. energy utilities, car industries, those who have a sound experience with hydrogen (space industry, chemical industry) and last, but certainly not the least, the government. Based on the developed scenario precise recommendations are drawn as conclusions

  5. Nuclear energy - basis for hydrogen economy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gyoshev, G.

    2004-01-01

    The development of human civilization in general as well as that of every country in particular is in direct relation to the assurance of a cost effective energy balance encompassing all industrial spheres and everyday activities. Unfortunately, the uncontrolled utilization of Earth's energy resources is already causing irreversible damage to various components of the eco-system of the Earth. Nuclear energy used for electricity and hydrogen production has the biggest technological potential for solving of the main energy outstanding issues of the new century: increasing of energy dependence; global warming. Because of good market position the political basis is assured for fast development of new generation nuclear reactors and fuel cycles which can satisfy vigorously increasing needs of affordable and clean energy. Political conditions are created for adequate participation of nuclear energy in the future global energy mix. They must give chance to the nuclear industry to take adequate part in the new energy generation capacity.(author)

  6. Reactors Save Energy, Costs for Hydrogen Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    While examining fuel-reforming technology for fuel cells onboard aircraft, Glenn Research Center partnered with Garrettsville, Ohio-based Catacel Corporation through the Glenn Alliance Technology Exchange program and a Space Act Agreement. Catacel developed a stackable structural reactor that is now employed for commercial hydrogen production and results in energy savings of about 20 percent.

  7. On the International Atomic Energy Agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eklund, S [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

    1963-07-15

    The main concepts motivating the decision to establish an international agency for peaceful uses of atomic energy are presented in the paper. They consists of: 1) co-ordination in the fields of safety field, legal liability and safeguards; 2) ensuring that scientific and technical data are made freely accessible on a worldwide scale and 3) assisting the developing countries in benefiting from this new science and technology and use the atomic energy for economic and social development

  8. International Atomic Energy Agency. Highlights of activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillen, V.A.

    1991-09-01

    This document provides a brief, well-illustrated summary of the activities of the International Atomic Energy Agency in the months up to September 1991. Especially mentioned are the programmes to enhance the safety of nuclear power, from the study of nuclear reactors to assessing the radiological consequences of reactor accidents, and the areas of non-proliferation and safeguards

  9. International Atomic Energy Agency: Highlights of activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillen, A.

    1992-09-01

    This document provides a brief, well-illustrated summary of the activities of the International Atomic Energy Agency in the months up to September 1992. Especially mentioned are the programmes to enhance the safety of nuclear power, from the study of nuclear reactors to assessing the radiological consequences of reactor accidents, and the areas of non-proliferation and safeguards

  10. 77 FR 61583 - International Energy Agency Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-10

    ...) will meet on October 17 and 18, 2012, at the headquarters of the IEA in Paris, France in connection... the International Energy Agency (IEA) will be held at the headquarters of the IEA, 9, rue de la F... October 18. The purpose of this notice is to permit attendance by representatives of U.S. company members...

  11. Economic Dispatch of Hydrogen Systems in Energy Spot Markets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    You, Shi; Nørgård, Per Bromand

    2015-01-01

    of energy spot markets. The generic hydrogen system is comprised of an electrolysis for hydrogen production, a hydrogen storage tank and a fuel cell system for cogeneration of electricity and heat. A case study is presented with information from practical hydrogen systems and the Nordic energy markets...

  12. Wind-To-Hydrogen Energy Pilot Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ron Rebenitsch; Randall Bush; Allen Boushee; Brad G. Stevens; Kirk D. Williams; Jeremy Woeste; Ronda Peters; Keith Bennett

    2009-04-24

    WIND-TO-HYDROGEN ENERGY PILOT PROJECT: BASIN ELECTRIC POWER COOPERATIVE In an effort to address the hurdles of wind-generated electricity (specifically wind's intermittency and transmission capacity limitations) and support development of electrolysis technology, Basin Electric Power Cooperative (BEPC) conducted a research project involving a wind-to-hydrogen system. Through this effort, BEPC, with the support of the Energy & Environmental Research Center at the University of North Dakota, evaluated the feasibility of dynamically scheduling wind energy to power an electrolysis-based hydrogen production system. The goal of this project was to research the application of hydrogen production from wind energy, allowing for continued wind energy development in remote wind-rich areas and mitigating the necessity for electrical transmission expansion. Prior to expending significant funding on equipment and site development, a feasibility study was performed. The primary objective of the feasibility study was to provide BEPC and The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) with sufficient information to make a determination whether or not to proceed with Phase II of the project, which was equipment procurement, installation, and operation. Four modes of operation were considered in the feasibility report to evaluate technical and economic merits. Mode 1 - scaled wind, Mode 2 - scaled wind with off-peak, Mode 3 - full wind, and Mode 4 - full wind with off-peak In summary, the feasibility report, completed on August 11, 2005, found that the proposed hydrogen production system would produce between 8000 and 20,000 kg of hydrogen annually depending on the mode of operation. This estimate was based on actual wind energy production from one of the North Dakota (ND) wind farms of which BEPC is the electrical off-taker. The cost of the hydrogen produced ranged from $20 to $10 per kg (depending on the mode of operation). The economic sensitivity analysis performed as part of the

  13. First high energy hydrogen cluster beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaillard, M.J.; Genre, R.; Hadinger, G.; Martin, J.

    1993-03-01

    The hydrogen cluster accelerator of the Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon (IPN Lyon) has been upgraded by adding a Variable Energy Post-accelerator of RFQ type (VERFQ). This operation has been performed in the frame of a collaboration between KfK Karlsruhe, IAP Frankfurt and IPN Lyon. The facility has been designed to deliver beams of mass selected Hn + clusters, n chosen between 3 and 49, in the energy range 65-100 keV/u. For the first time, hydrogen clusters have been accelerated at energies as high as 2 MeV. This facility opens new fields for experiments which will greatly benefit from a velocity range never available until now for such exotic projectiles. (author) 13 refs.; 1 fig

  14. Hydrogen energy and sustainability: overview and the role for nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses the role of nuclear power in hydrogen energy and sustainability. Hydrogen economy is based on hydrogen production, packaging (compression, liquefaction, hydrides), distribution (pipelines, road, rail, ship), storage (pressure and cryogenic containers), transfer and finally hydrogen use

  15. Annual report 2001[International Atomic Energy Agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    Article VI.J of the Agency's Statute requires the Board of Governors to submit 'an annual report to the General Conference concerning the affairs of the Agency and any projects approved by the Agency'. This report covers the period 1 January to 31 December 2001. The report outlines the IAEA activities in the following fields: nuclear power, nuclear fuel cycle and waste management technology, comparative assessment for sustainable energy development; food and agriculture, human health, marine environment and water resources, applications of physical and chemical sciences, nuclear safety, radiation safety, radioactive waste safety, co-ordination of safety activities, safeguards, security of material, verification in Iraq pursuant to UNSC resolutions, management of technical co-operation for development, policy-making, management and support.

  16. French local agencies of energy control; Agences locales francaise de maitrise de l'energie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    In the framework of the SAVE program, the European Commission brings financial assistance to the creation of local or regional agencies of energy control in municipalities and regions. The main criteria are the impacts on the energy demand, the reinforcement of the economic and social cohesion, the environmental quality and the contribution to the economic development and the employment creation. In this document, realized by Energie-Cites, the Ademe objective is to present a state of the art of french local agencies. Ten agencies are presented as case study. Each case deals with the following topics: the main context of the action which details the energy and the environmental policy of the municipality, the creation and the description of the agency, the implemented actions and the perspectives. (A.L.B.)

  17. French local agencies of energy control; Agences locales francaise de maitrise de l'energie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    In the framework of the SAVE program, the European Commission brings financial assistance to the creation of local or regional agencies of energy control in municipalities and regions. The main criteria are the impacts on the energy demand, the reinforcement of the economic and social cohesion, the environmental quality and the contribution to the economic development and the employment creation. In this document, realized by Energie-Cites, the Ademe objective is to present a state of the art of french local agencies. Ten agencies are presented as case study. Each case deals with the following topics: the main context of the action which details the energy and the environmental policy of the municipality, the creation and the description of the agency, the implemented actions and the perspectives. (A.L.B.)

  18. Hydrogen energy for the transportation sector in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zong Qiangmao

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen is a promising energy carrier for providing a clean, reliable and affordable energy supply. This paper provides a blueprint for the hydrogen energy in the transportation sector in the future of China. This paper is divided into three parts. The first part answers this question: why is China interested in hydrogen energy? The second part describes the possibility of a hydrogen fuel cell engine and a hydrogen internal-combustion engine in the transportation in China in the near future. The final part describes the production of hydrogen in China. (author)

  19. Use of nuclear energy for hydrogen production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axente, Damian

    2006-01-01

    Full text: The potentials of three hydrogen production processes under development for the industrial production of hydrogen using nuclear energy, namely the advanced electrolysis the steam reforming, the sulfur-iodine water splitting cycle, are compared and evaluated in this paper. Water electrolysis and steam reforming of methane are proven and used extensively today for the production of hydrogen. The overall thermal efficiency of the electrolysis includes the efficiency of the electrical power generation and of the electrolysis itself. The electrolysis process efficiency is about 75 % and of electrical power generation is only about 30 %, the overall thermal efficiency for H 2 generation being about 25 %. Steam reforming process consists of reacting methane (or natural gas) and steam in a chemical reactor at 800-900 deg. C, with a thermal efficiency of about 70 %. In a reforming process, with heat supplied by nuclear reactor, the heat must be supplied by a secondary loop from the nuclear side and be transferred to the methane/steam mixture, via a heat exchanger type reactor. The sulfur-iodine cycle, a thermochemical water splitting, is of particular interest because it produces hydrogen efficiently with no CO 2 as byproduct. If heated with a nuclear source it could prove to be an ideal environmental solution to hydrogen production. Steam reforming remains the cheapest hydrogen production method based on the latest estimates, even when implemented with nuclear reactor. The S-I cycle offers a close second solution and the electrolysis is the most expensive of the options for industrial H 2 production. The nuclear plant could power electrolysis operations right away; steam reforming with nuclear power is a little bit further off into the future, the first operation with nuclear facility is expected to have place in Japan in 2008. The S-I cycle implementation is still over the horizon, it will be more than 10 years until we will see that cycle in full scale

  20. Hydrogen research and development in Hawaii: Hawaii natural energy institute's hydrogen from renewable resources research program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinley, K.R.; Rocheleau, R.E.; Takahashi, P.K.; Jensen, C.M.

    1993-01-01

    Hawaii, an energy-vulnerable state, has launched a Renewable Resources Research Program, focusing on hydrogen production and storage; the main tasks of this effort are: photoelectrochemical production of hydrogen through the use of coated silicon electrodes; solar conversion and the production of hydrogen with cyanobacteria; improved hydrogen storage through the use of nonclassical poly-hydride metal complexes. 10 refs

  1. Intramolecular Energy Transfer, Charge Transfer & Hydrogen Bond

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ultrafast Dynamics of Chemical Reactions in Condensed Phase: Intramolecular Energy Transfer, Charge Transfer & Hydrogen Bond · PowerPoint Presentation · Slide 3 · Slide 4 · Slide 5 · Slide 6 · Slide 7 · Slide 8 · Slide 9 · Slide 10 · Slide 11 · Slide 12 · Slide 13 · Slide 14 · Slide 15 · Slide 16 · Slide 17 · Slide 18 · Slide 19.

  2. Hydrogen based energy storage for solar energy systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanhanen, J.P.; Hagstroem, M.T.; Lund, P.H. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Otaniemi (Finland). Dept. of Engineering Physics and Mathematics; Leppaenen, J.R.; Nieminen, J.P. [Neste Oy (Finland)

    1998-12-31

    Hydrogen based energy storage options for solar energy systems was studied in order to improve their overall performance. A 1 kW photovoltaic hydrogen (PV-H2) pilot-plant and commercial prototype were constructed and a numerical simulation program H2PHOTO for system design and optimisation was developed. Furthermore, a comprehensive understanding of conversion (electrolysers and fuel cells) and storage (metal hydrides) technologies was acquired by the project partners. The PV-H{sub 2} power system provides a self-sufficient solution for applications in remote locations far from electric grids and maintenance services. (orig.)

  3. Position Of Hydrogen Energy In Latvian Economics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanags, M.; Kleperis, J.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: World energy resources are based on fossil fuels mostly (coal, oil, gas) which don't regenerate and will be run low after 30-80 years. Therefore it is necessary to elaborate alternative energy sources today. Also Latvia's energy balance is based mostly on the burning of fossil fuels and importing it from neighbor countries. One from much outstanding alternative energy sources is hydrogen. Hydrogen itself is a very important and most common element in the universe. Only hydrogen obtained from water and burnt in fuel cell back to water will be the renewed and sustainable fuel. There are hundred years old history of hydrogen related researches in Latvia, and there are researchers nowadays here trying to incorporate Latvia in the Hydrogen Society. The power supply in Latvia is based on local resources - water, wind, biogas (partly from waste), wood, peat, and on imported resources (natural gas, natural liquid gas, oil products (including heavy black oil) and coal. Total demand for electricity in Latvia only partly (63% in 2002) is covered with that produced on the site. If energy for heating in Latvia is produced from fossil fuels mostly (natural gas and heavy oil), than more than half of electricity produced in Latvia are based on local renewable resources. The water resources for the production of electricity in Latvia are almost exhausted - there are 3 large HEPS on Daugava River and more than 100 small HEPS on different rivers all over the Latvia. The building of small power stations in Latvia was accelerated very much after introduction of 'double tariff' for electricity from renewable, but from 2003 this time is over. Unfortunately directly power stations on small rivers made very big ecological distress on country side and no more expansion is welcome. The landfill gas in Latvia is a new resource and would result in additional capacity of 50 MW energy. Nowadays two projects started to realize for gas extraction from Getlini (Riga) and Grobina (Liepaja

  4. International Atomic Energy Agency activities in decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reisenweaver, D W.; )

    2005-01-01

    Full text: The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has been addressing the safety and technical issues of decommissioning for over 20 years, but their focus has been primarily on planning. Up to know, the activities have been on an ad hoc basis and sometimes, important issues have been missed. A new Action Plan on the Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities has recently been approved by the Agency's board of Governors which will focus the Agency's efforts and ensure that our Member States' concerns are addressed. The new initiatives associated with this Action Plan will help ensure that decommissioning activities in the future are performed in a safe and coherent manner. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has been preparing safety and technical documents concerning decommissioning since the mid-1980's. There have been over 30 documents prepared that provide safety requirements, guidance and supporting technical information. Many of these documents are over 10 years old and need updating. The main focus in the past has been on planning for decommissioning. During the past five years, a set of Safety Standards have been prepared and issued to provide safety requirements and guidance to Member States. However, decommissioning was never a real priority with the Agency, but was something that had to be addressed. To illustrate this point, the first requirements documents on decommissioning were issued as part of a Safety Requirements [1] on pre-disposal management of radioactive waste. It was felt that decommissioning did not deserve its own document because it was just part of the normal waste management process. The focus was mostly on waste management. The Agency has assisted Member States with the planning process for decommissioning. Most of these activities have been focused on nuclear power plants and research reactors. Now, support for the decommissioning of other types of facilities is being requested. The Agency is currently providing technical

  5. HYDROGEN ENERGY: TERCEIRA ISLAND DEMONSTRATION FACILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARIO ALVES

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The present paper gives a general perspective of the efforts going on at Terceira Island in Azores, Portugal, concerning the implementation of an Hydrogen Economy demonstration campus. The major motivation for such a geographical location choice was the abundance of renewable resources like wind, sea waves and geothermal enthalpy, which are of fundamental importance for the demonstration of renewable hydrogen economy sustainability. Three main campus will be implemented: one at Cume Hill, where the majority of renewable hydrogen production will take place using the wind as the primary energy source, a second one at Angra do Heroismo Industrial park, where a cogen electrical – heat power station will be installed, mainly to feed a Municipal Solid Waste processing plant and a third one, the Praia da Vitoria Hydrogenopolis, where several final consumer demonstrators will be installed both for public awareness and intensive study of economic sustainability and optimization. Some of these units are already under construction, particularly the renewable hydrogen generation facilities.

  6. International Atomic Energy Agency annual report 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The Annual Report reviews the results of the Agency's programme according to the three pillars of technology, safety and verification. The main part of the report generally follows the programme structure as given in The Agency's Programme and Budget 2006-2007 (GC(49)/2). The introductory chapter seeks to provide a thematic analysis, based on the three pillars, of the Agency's activities within the overall context of notable developments during the year. More detailed information can be found in the latest editions of the Agency's Nuclear Safety Review, Nuclear Technology Review, Technical Cooperation Report and the Safeguards Statement for 2006 and Background to the Safeguards Statement. For the convenience of readers, these documents are available on the CD-ROM attached to the inside back cover of this report. Additional information covering various aspects of the Agency's programme is provided on the attached CD-ROM, and is also available on the Agency's web site at http://www.iaea.org/Worldatom/Documents/Anrep/Anrep2006/. Except where indicated, all sums of money are expressed in United States dollars. The designations employed and the presentation of material in this document do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the Secretariat concerning the legal status of any country or territory or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers. The topics covered in the chapter related to technology are: nuclear power; nuclear fuel cycle and materials technologies; capacity building and nuclear knowledge maintenance for sustainable energy development; nuclear science; food and agriculture; human health; water resources; assessment and management of marine and terrestrial environments; radioisotope production and radiation technology; safety and security; incident and emergency preparedness and response; safety of nuclear installations; radiation and transport safety; management of radioactive waste; nuclear security

  7. Seasonal energy storage - PV-hydrogen systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leppaenen, J. [Neste Oy/NAPS (Finland)

    1998-10-01

    PV systems are widely used in remote areas e.g. in telecommunication systems. Typically lead acid batteries are used as energy storage. In northern locations seasonal storage is needed, which however is too expensive and difficult to realise with batteries. Therefore, a PV- battery system with a diesel backup is sometimes used. The disadvantages of this kind of system for very remote applications are the need of maintenance and the need to supply the fuel. To overcome these problems, it has been suggested to use hydrogen technologies to make a closed loop autonomous energy storage system

  8. Energy scenarios for hydrogen production in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortega V, E.; Francois L, J. L.

    2009-10-01

    The hydrogen is a clean and very efficient fuel, its combustion does not produce gases of greenhouse effect, ozone precursors and residual acids. Also the hydrogen produced by friendly energy sources with the environment like nuclear energy could help to solve the global problems that it confronts the energy at present time. Presently work fuel cycles of hydrogen production technologies in Mexico are judged, by means of a structured methodology in the concept of sustainable development in its social, economic and environmental dimensions. The methodology is divided in three scenarios: base, Outlook 2030 and capture of CO 2 . The first scenario makes reference to cycles analysis in a current context for Mexico, the second taking in account the demand projections reported by the IAEA in its report Outlook and the third scenario, capture of CO 2 , the technologies are analyzed supposing a reduction in capture costs of 75%. Each scenario also has four cases (base, social, environmental and economic) by means of which the cycles are analyzed in the dimensions of sustainable development. For scenarios base and capture, results show that combination nuclear energy- reformed of gas it is the best alternative for cases base and economic. For social case, the evaluated better technology is the hydraulics, and for environmental case, the best option is represented by the regenerative thermochemistry cycles. The scenario Outlook 2030 show a favorable tendency of growth of renewable sources, being the aeolian energy the best technology evaluated in the cases base and environmental, the hydraulics technology in the social case and in the economic case the reformed of natural gas that uses nuclear heat. (Author)

  9. Life cycle assessment of hydrogen energy pattern

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aissani, Lynda; Bourgois, Jacques; Rousseaux, Patrick; Jabouille, Florent; Loget, Sebastien; Perier Camby, Laurent; Sessiecq, Philippe

    2007-01-01

    In the last decades transportation sector is a priority for environmental research. Indeed, it is the most impacting sector because it involves greenhouse emissions and fossil resources exhaustion. The Group of 'Ecole des Mines' (GEM), in France, carries out studies concerning clean and renewable energies for this sector with the 'H2-PAC' project. The GEM with four teams performs studies concerning energy systems for transportation sector and more particularly the hydrogen system. The four teams of the GEM work each one on a process of this system. More precisely, the team of Albi studies biomass gasification in order to produce synthesis gas. The team of Nantes studies purification of this gas to obtain pure hydrogen and hydrogen storage on activated carbon. The team of Paris studies fuel cell use and especially Polymer Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell. Finally, the team of St Etienne evaluates this system along its life cycle from an environmental point of view. This paper presents this environmental evaluation witch is realized according to Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) methodology. (authors)

  10. WE-NET Hydrogen Energy Symposium proceedings; WE-NET suiso energy symposium koen yokoshu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-02-24

    The research and development of WE-NET (World Energy Network) was started in 1993 as a NEDO (New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization) project in the New Sunshine Program of Agency of Industrial Science and Technology, Ministry of International Trade and Industry, and aims to contribute to the improvement of global environment and to ease the difficult energy supply/demand situation. The ultimate goal of WE-NET is the construction of a global-scale clean energy network in which hydrogen will be produced from renewable energies such as water and sunshine for distribution to energy consuming locations. Experts are invited to the Symposium from the United States, Germany, and Canada. Information is collected from the participants on hydrogen energy technology development in the three countries, the result of the Phase I program of WE-NET is presented to hydrogen energy scientists in Japan, and views and opinions on the project are collected from them. Accommodated in the above-named publication are 30 essays and three special lectures delivered at the Symposium. (NEDO)

  11. A feasibility study of conceptual design for international clean energy network using hydrogen conversion technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Takashi; Hamada, Akiyoshi; Kitamura, Kazuhiro

    1998-01-01

    Clean energy is more and more required worldwide in proportion to actualization of global environmental issues including global warming. Therefore, it is an urgent task to realize promotion of worldwide introduction of clean energy which exists abundantly and is widely distributed in the world, such as hydropower and solar energy, while reducing the dependence on fossil fuel. However, since the renewable energy, differing from so called fossil fuel, is impossible to transport for long distance and store as it is, its utilization is subject to be limited. As one possible resolution of this kind of issues, 'International clean energy network using hydrogen conversion technology' which enables conversion of renewable energy from low cost hydropower into hydrogen energy and also into the transportable and storable form, is a meaningful concept. This system technology enables dealing of this hydrogen energy in international market as in the same manner as fossil fuel. It is considered to enable promotion of international and large scale introduction of such clean energy, along with the contribution to diversified and stabilized international energy supply. In this study, based upon the above-mentioned point of view and assumption of two sites, one on supply side and another on demand side of hydrogen energy, three systems are presumed. One of the systems consists of liquid hydrogen as transportation and storage medium of hydrogen, and the others intermediately convert hydrogen into methanol or ammonia as an energy carrier. A overall conceptual design of each system spanning from hydrogen production to its utilization, is conducted in practical way in order to review the general technical aspects and economical aspects through cost analysis. This study is administrated through the New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO) as a part of the International Clean Energy Network Using Hydrogen Conversion (so-called WE-NET) Program with funding from

  12. The OEEC European Nuclear Energy Agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1961-07-15

    The European Nuclear Energy Agency (ENEA) was set up in December 1957 as part of the OEEC to develop nuclear collaboration in Western Europe. The promotion of joint undertakings is one of the most important functions of ENEA, and why one of the first committees of the Agency to be set up was its Top Level Group on Co-operation in the Reactor Field. International collaboration in joint undertakings enables resources in effort, equipment and money to be pooled for the maximum benefit of the countries participating, and is the only way whereby a sufficiently wide range of research possibilities can be covered in a reasonable time. Examples fro such projects are: 1) Halden project - a joint three-year project to exploit the boiling heavy water reactor built by the Norwegian Institute for Atom energy at Halden; 2) Dragon Project - to investigate the possibilities of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors centered on the construction and operation, by an international team, of an experimental 20 MWt high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (Dragon) at the UK Atomic Energy Establishment at Winfrith; 3) Eurochemic - with a principle objective to construct an experimental plant for the treatment of used uranium fuel from reactors in the participating countries; 4) Nuclear Shops. In addition to promoting joint undertakings, a function of ENEA is to encourage scientific and technical collaboration between national research organizations. Co-operation has been facilitated in the areas od nuclear data, food irradiation, environment radioactivity, training, information and nuclear legislation.

  13. The OEEC European Nuclear Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1961-01-01

    The European Nuclear Energy Agency (ENEA) was set up in December 1957 as part of the OEEC to develop nuclear collaboration in Western Europe. The promotion of joint undertakings is one of the most important functions of ENEA, and why one of the first committees of the Agency to be set up was its Top Level Group on Co-operation in the Reactor Field. International collaboration in joint undertakings enables resources in effort, equipment and money to be pooled for the maximum benefit of the countries participating, and is the only way whereby a sufficiently wide range of research possibilities can be covered in a reasonable time. Examples fro such projects are: 1) Halden project - a joint three-year project to exploit the boiling heavy water reactor built by the Norwegian Institute for Atom energy at Halden; 2) Dragon Project - to investigate the possibilities of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors centered on the construction and operation, by an international team, of an experimental 20 MWt high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (Dragon) at the UK Atomic Energy Establishment at Winfrith; 3) Eurochemic - with a principle objective to construct an experimental plant for the treatment of used uranium fuel from reactors in the participating countries; 4) Nuclear Shops. In addition to promoting joint undertakings, a function of ENEA is to encourage scientific and technical collaboration between national research organizations. Co-operation has been facilitated in the areas od nuclear data, food irradiation, environment radioactivity, training, information and nuclear legislation

  14. Report to the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woznicka, U.

    1986-07-01

    The results of research done under the International Atomic Energy Agency Contract no 4121/RB: 'Measurement of the thermal neutron macroscopic absorption cross-section on small samples' at the Institut of Nuclear Physics during the period from July 1, 1985 to June 30, 1986 are presented. The research was based on the Plexiglass thermal neutron diffusion parameters and on the method of preparation of the rock samples for the measurements according to the INP method. Three rock samples delivered by the IAEA: Ottawa Sand, Royer Dolomite and Dunite Sand have been measured. (author)

  15. Annual report 2003[International Atomic Energy Agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    The Annual Report reviews the results of the Agency's programme according to the three 'pillars' of technology, safety and verification. The main part of the report, starting on page 9, generally follows the programme structure as it applied in 2003. The introductory chapter, seeks to provide a thematic analysis, based on the three pillars, of the Agency's activities within the overall context of notable developments during the year. Additional information on specific issues can be found in the latest editions of the Agency's Nuclear Safety Review, Nuclear Technology Review and Technical Co-operation Report. This material is also available on the Agency's WorldAtom web site (http://www.iaea.org/Worldatom/Documents/Anrep/Anrep2003/). All sums of money are expressed in United States dollars. The designations employed and the presentation of material in this document do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the Secretariat concerning the legal status of any country or territory or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers. The topics covered in the chapter related to Technology are: Nuclear Power; Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Material Technologies; Analysis for Sustainable Energy Development; Nuclear Science; Food and Agriculture; Human Health; Water Resources; Protection of the Marine and Terrestrial Environments; Physical and Chemical Applications. Topics related to safety discussed in this report are: Safety of Nuclear Installations; Radiation Safety; Management of Radioactive Waste; Security of Material. Topics related to Verification are Safeguards and Verification in Iraq Pursuant to UNSC Resolutions. A separate chapter is devoted to Management of Technical Cooperation for Development.

  16. Prospects for hydrogen in the German energy system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hake, J.-F.; Linssen, J.; Walbeck, M.

    2006-01-01

    The focus of the paper concerns the current discussion on the contribution of the hydrogen economy to a 'sustainable energy system'. It considers whether advantages for the environmental situation and energy carrier supply can be expected from the already visible future characteristics of hydrogen as a new secondary energy carrier. Possible production paths for hydrogen from hydrocarbon-based, renewable or carbon-reduced/-free primary energy carriers are evaluated with respect to primary energy use and CO 2 emissions from the fuel cycle. Hydrogen has to be packaged by compression or liquefaction, transported by surface vehicles or pipelines, stored and transferred to the end user. Whether generated by electrolysis or by reforming, and even if produced locally at filling stations, the gaseous or liquid hydrogen has to undergo these market processes before it can be used by the customer. In order to provide an idea of possible markets with special emphasis on the German energy sector, a technical systems analysis of possible hydrogen applications is performed for the stationary, mobile and portable sector. Furthermore, different 'business as usual' scenarios are analysed for Germany, Europe and the World concerning end energy use in different sectors. The very small assumed penetration of hydrogen in the analysed scenarios up to the year 2050 indicates that the hydrogen economy is a long-term option. With reference to the assumed supply paths and analysed application possibilities, hydrogen can be an option for clean energy use if hydrogen can be produced with carbon-reduced or -free primary energy carriers like renewable energy or biomass. However, the energetic use of hydrogen competes with the direct use of clean primary energy and/or with the use of electric energy based on renewable primary energy. As a substitution product for other secondary energy carriers hydrogen is therefore under pressure of costs and/or must have advantages in comparison to the use of

  17. Fiscal 1974 research report. General research on hydrogen energy subsystems; 1974 nendo suiso riyo subsystem sogoteki kento hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1975-03-01

    Based on the contract research 'General research on hydrogen energy subsystems and their peripheral technologies' with Agency of Industrial Science and Technology, each of 7 organizations including Denki Kagaku Kyokai (Electrochemical Association) promoted the research on hydrogen energy subsystem, combustion, fuel cell, car engine, aircraft engine, gas turbine and chemical energy, respectively. This report summarizes the research result on the former of 2 committees on hydrogen energy and peripheral technologies promoted by Denki Kagaku Kyokai. The first part describes the merit, demerit, domestic and overseas R and D states, technical problems, and future research issue for every use form of hydrogen. This part also outlines the short-, medium- and long-term prospects for use of hydrogen and oxygen energy, and describes the whole future research issue. The second part summarizes the content of each committee report. Although on details the original reports of each committee should be lead, this report is useful for obtaining the outline of utilization of hydrogen energy. (NEDO)

  18. Hydrogen energy and fuel cells. Strategic Roadmap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moran, Pascal; Gernot, Eric; Masset, Franck; Pierre, Helene; Hody, Stephane; Julien, Marianne; Bouchard, Patrick; Lima, Alexandre; Aubree, Marc; Declerck, Bernard; Jehan, Michel; Mulard, Philippe; Le Breton, Daniel; Grouset, Didier; Lucoq, Samuel; Maio, Patrick; Lanoix, Jean-Christophe; Tisserand, Perrine; Beuzit, Pierre; Junker, Michel; Meslin, Frederic; Derive, Claude; Altman, Matthias; Vandenborre, Hugo; Pastor, Jean-Marc; Biasotto, Jerome; SOLBES, Frederic; Lucchese, Paul; Le Duigou, Alain; Lamy, Claude; Petit, Florent; Rojey, Alexandre; Strang, Axel; Frois, Bernard; Clement, Daniel; Filmon, Karine; Antoine, Loic; Bodineau, Luc; Gioria, Michel; Barbier, Cecile

    2011-04-01

    Since 2010, the ADEME (The French Environment and Energy Management Agency) has been managing four programmes within the scope of 'Future Investments'. Groups of experts from research from various industrial fields, research organisms and research programming and financing agencies are responsible, within the scope of collective works, for producing strategic road-maps. These are used to launch Calls for Expressions of Interest (CEI). The purpose of these road-maps is to: - highlight the industrial, technological, environmental and societal issues; - draw up coherent, shared visions of technologies and the socio-technical system in question; - identify the technological, organisational and socio-economic locks to be overcome; - associate time-based objectives with the priority research topics in terms of technological availability and deployment; - prioritise needs of the industrial research, research demonstrator, pre-industrial experimentation and technology test platform, which then act as a basis for: - drawing up CEIs; - programming research within the ADEME and other institutions such as the French National Research Agency (ANR), the French national strategic committee for energy research (Comite strategique national sur la recherche energie) or the French national alliance for the coordination of energy research (ANCRE). These research and experimentation priorities originate from the junction of the visions and locks, and they also take into account French capacities in the fields of research and industry. Road-maps can also refer to exemplary experiments conducted abroad and make recommendations in terms of industrial policy. This road-map shall be regularly updated. In order to draw up this road-map, the ADEME consulted with a group of experts from major private contractors, a contaminated wasteland developer, stakeholders involved in pollution control and public research and finally the ADEME

  19. Proceedings of the DOE chemical energy storage and hydrogen energy systems contracts review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-02-01

    Sessions were held on electrolysis-based hydrogen storage systems, hydrogen production, hydrogen storage systems, hydrogen storage materials, end-use applications and system studies, chemical heat pump/chemical energy storage systems, systems studies and assessment, thermochemical hydrogen production cycles, advanced production concepts, and containment materials. (LHK)

  20. Fiscal 1976 Sunshine Project research report. Interim report (hydrogen energy); 1976 nendo chukan hokokushoshu. Suiso energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1976-11-01

    This report summarizes the Sunshine Project research interim reports on hydrogen energy of every organizations. The report includes research items, laboratories, institutes and enterprises concerned, research targets, research plans, and progress conditions. The research items are as follows. (1) Hydrogen production technology (electrolysis, high- temperature high-pressure water electrolysis, 4 kinds of thermochemical techniques, direct thermolysis). (2) Hydrogen transport and storage technology (2 kinds of solidification techniques). (3) Hydrogen use technology (combustion technology, fuel cell, solid electrolyte fuel cell, fuel cell power system, hydrogen fuel engine). (4) Hydrogen safety measures technology (disaster preventive technology for gaseous and liquid hydrogen, preventing materials from embrittlement due to hydrogen, hydrogen refining, transport and storage systems, their safety technology). (5) Hydrogen energy system (hydrogen energy system, hydrogen use subsystems, peripheral technologies). (NEDO)

  1. Present status of research on hydrogen energy and perspective of HTGR hydrogen production system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyamoto, Yoshiaki; Ogawa, Masuro; Akino, Norio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment] [and others

    2001-03-01

    A study was performed to make a clear positioning of research and development on hydrogen production systems with a High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) under currently promoting at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute through a grasp of the present status of hydrogen energy, focussing on its production and utilization as an energy in future. The study made clear that introduction of safe distance concept for hydrogen fire and explosion was practicable for a HTGR hydrogen production system, including hydrogen properties and need to provide regulations applying to handle hydrogen. And also generalization of hydrogen production processes showed technical issues of the HTGR system. Hydrogen with HTGR was competitive to one with fossil fired system due to evaluation of production cost. Hydrogen is expected to be used as promising fuel of fuel cell cars in future. In addition, the study indicated that there were a large amount of energy demand alternative to high efficiency power generation and fossil fuel with nuclear energy through the structure of energy demand and supply in Japan. Assuming that hydrogen with HTGR meets all demand of fuel cell cars, an estimation would show introduction of the maximum number of about 30 HTGRs with capacity of 100 MWt from 2020 to 2030. (author)

  2. 78 FR 43870 - Hydrogen Energy California's Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Project; Preliminary Staff...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-22

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Notice of Availability Hydrogen Energy California's Integrated Gasification... Energy (DOE) announces the availability of the Hydrogen Energy California's Integrated Gasification... potential environmental impacts associated with the Hydrogen Energy California's (HECA) Integrated...

  3. Hydrogen Technology and Energy Curriculum (HyTEC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagle, Barbara

    2013-02-28

    The Lawrence Hall of Science of the University of California, Berkeley has collaborated with scientists and engineers, a local transit agency, school districts, and a commercial curriculum publisher to develop, field-test nationally, and publish a two-week curriculum module on hydrogen and fuel cells for high school science. Key partners in this project are the Schatz Energy Research Center (SERC) of Humboldt State University, the Alameda-Contra Costa Transit District (AC Transit), FilmSight Productions, Lab-Aids, Inc., and 32 teachers and 2,370 students in field-test classrooms in California, Connecticut, Ohio, New York, South Carolina, and Washington. Field-test teachers received two to three days of professional development before teaching the curriculum and providing feedback used for revision of the curriculum. The curriculum, titled Investigating Alternative Energy: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells and published by Lab-Aids, Inc., includes a teachers guide (with lesson plans, resources, and student handout pages), two interactive computer animations, a video, a website, and a laboratory materials kit. The project has been disseminated to over 950 teachers through awareness workshops at state, regional, and national science teacher conferences.

  4. A global survey of hydrogen energy research, development and policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solomon, Barry D.; Banerjee, Abhijit

    2006-01-01

    Several factors have led to growing interest in a hydrogen energy economy, especially for transportation. A successful transition to a major role for hydrogen will require much greater cost-effectiveness, fueling infrastructure, consumer acceptance, and a strategy for its basis in renewable energy feedstocks. Despite modest attention to the need for a sustainable hydrogen energy system in several countries, in most cases in the short to mid term hydrogen will be produced from fossil fuels. This paper surveys the global status of hydrogen energy research and development (R and D) and public policy, along with the likely energy mix for making it. The current state of hydrogen energy R and D among auto, energy and fuel-cell companies is also briefly reviewed. Just two major auto companies and two nations have specific targets and timetables for hydrogen fuel cells or vehicle production, although the EU also has an aggressive, less specific strategy. Iceland and Brazil are the only nations where renewable energy feedstocks are envisioned as the major or sole future source of hydrogen. None of these plans, however, are very certain. Thus, serious questions about the sustainability of a hydrogen economy can be raised

  5. New perspectives on renewable energy systems based on hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bose, T. K.; Agbossou, K.; Benard, P.; St-Arnaud, J-M.

    1999-01-01

    Current hydrocarbon-based energy systems, current energy consumption and the push towards the utilization of renewable energy sources, fuelled by global warming and the need to reduce atmospheric pollution are discussed. The consequences of climatic change and the obligation of Annex B countries to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions in terms of the Kyoto Protocols are reviewed. The role that renewable energy sources such as hydrogen, solar and wind energy could play in avoiding the most catastrophic consequences of rapidly growing energy consumption and atmospheric pollution in the face of diminishing conventional fossil fuel resources are examined. The focus is on hydrogen energy as a means of storing and transporting primary energy. Some favorable characteristics of hydrogen is its abundance, the fact that it can be produced utilizing renewable or non-renewable sources, and the further fact that its combustion produces three times more energy per unit of mass than oil, and six times more than coal. The technology of converting hydrogen into energy, storing energy in the form of hydrogen, and its utilization, for example in the stabilization of wind energy by way of electrolytic conversion to hydrogen, are described. Development at Hydro-Quebec's Institute of Research of a hydrogen-based autonomous wind energy system to produce electricity is also discussed. 2 tabs., 11 refs

  6. Nuclear Energy Agency. 6. activity report. 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    NEA has, as a primary objective, to ensure through international co-operation that the nuclear option is available for consideration in its true worth. The safety and regulatory aspects of nulear development have represented in 1977 about two thirds of NEA's total effort; and a high degree of priority was given to questions of nuclear safety and of radioactive waste management. Similarly, the growing need of Member countries for an integrated appraisal of technical, economic, safety, environmental and political questions influencing the nuclear fuel cycle was increasingly taken into account. Finally, a general effort was made to achieve greater visibility for the positive results of the NEA programme, as a contribution to improved public understanding of the factors underlying nuclear power programmes. As in previous years, the NEA programme continued to involve close collaboration with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the Commission of the European Communities. Within the OECD, close collaboration was maintained with the Combined Energy Staff and the Environment Directorate

  7. Annual report 2000[International Atomic Energy Agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    Article VI.J of the Agency's Statute requires the Board of Governors to submit 'an annual report to the General Conference concerning the affairs of the Agency and any projects approved by the Agency'. This report covers the period 1 January to 31 December 2000.

  8. Hydrogen Production Costs of Various Primary Energy Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jae Hyuk; Tak, Nam Il; Kim, Yong Hee; Park, Won Seok

    2005-01-01

    The limited resource and environmental impacts of fossil fuels are becoming more and more serious problems in the world. Consequently, hydrogen is in the limelight as a future alternative energy due to its clean combustion and inexhaustibility and a transition from the traditional fossil fuel system to a hydrogen-based energy system is under considerations. Several countries are already gearing the industries to the hydrogen economy to cope with the limitations of the current fossil fuels. Unfortunately, hydrogen has to be chemically separated from the hydrogen compounds in nature such as water by using some energy sources. In this paper, the hydrogen production costs of major primary energy sources are compared in consideration of the Korean situations. The evaluation methodology is based on the report of the National Academy of Science (NAS) of U.S

  9. The International Energy Agency`s role in world-wide wind energy development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rangi, R. [Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Ancona, D. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Wind energy is now being deployed world-wide at a rapidly increasing rate and the International Energy Agency (IEA) has a changing role in its growth. IEA was founded in 1974 within the framework of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) to collaborate on comprehensive international energy programs. IEA membership consists of eighteen parties from sixteen countries and the European Commission. Recently there has been increasing interest in IEA participation from both OECD and non-OECD countries. Non-OECD countries participating in various IEA Agreements include: China, India, Israel, Korea, and Russia. Because of its diverse international makeup, the IEA is viewed as a source of reliable technical and economic information. The World Bank has approached the Executive Committee for Wind Energy R & D, through the IEA Renewable Energy Working Party, to assist in the expansion of wind deployment. In addition, IEA is moving from R & D programs to include tracking of implementation incentives offered by its members.

  10. Surface Passivation and Junction Formation Using Low Energy Hydrogen Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonash, S. J.

    1985-01-01

    New applications for high current, low energy hydrogen ion implants on single crystal and polycrystal silicon grain boundaries are discussed. The effects of low energy hydrogen ion beams on crystalline Si surfaces are considered. The effect of these beams on bulk defects in crystalline Si is addressed. Specific applications of H+ implants to crystalline Si processing are discussed. In all of the situations reported on, the hydrogen beams were produced using a high current Kaufman ion source.

  11. About connection between atomic and hydrogen energy power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avdeeva, M.Zh.; Vecher, A.A.; Pan'kov, V.V.

    2008-01-01

    Possible interaction between atomic and hydrogen energy power has been discussed. The analysis of the result held shows that the electrical energy produced by the atomic reactor during the of-load hours can be involved into the process of obtaining hydrogen by electrolysis. In order to optimize the transportation and storage of hydrogen it is proposed to convert it into ammonia. The direct uses of ammonia as a fuel into the internal combustion engine and fuel cells are examined. (authors)

  12. Conference on hydrogen-energy in France and Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodineau, Luc; Menzen, Georg; Arnold, Peter Erich; Mauberger, Pascal; Roentzsch, Lars; Poggi, Philippe; Gervais, Thierry; Schneider, Guenther; Colomar, David; Buenger, Ulrich; Nieder, Babette; Zimmer, Rene; Jeanne, Fabrice; Le Grand, Jean-Francois

    2014-01-01

    The French-German office for Renewable energies (OFAEnR) organised a conference on hydrogen-energy in France and Germany. In the framework of this French-German exchange of experience, about 200 participants exchanged views on the different perspectives for use of hydrogen, in particular in transportation and energy storage applications. The technical production, transport and storage means were addressed too, as well as the technological models and the conditions for a large-scale industrial deployment. The economic prospects of hydrogen-energy in tomorrow's energy mix were also considered during the conference. This document brings together the available presentations (slides) made during this event: 1 - Hydrogen energy and Fuel Cells in France Today, and prospective (Luc Bodineau); 2 - The situation of energy Policy in Germany and the challenges for the Hydrogen Technology (Georg Menzen); 3 - Unlocking the Hydrogen Potential for Transport and Industry (Peter Erich Arnold); 4 - Hydrogen, a new energy for our planet - Hydrogen storage possibilities: example of solid storage (Pascal Mauberger); 5 - Innovative Materials and Manufacturing Technologies for H 2 Production and H 2 Storage (Lars Roentzsch); 6 - Scientific development and industrial strategy: experience feedback from the Myrte platform and energy transition-related perspectives (Philippe Poggi, Thierry Gervais); 7 - 'Power to Gas' - Important partner for renewables with big impact potential (Guenther Schneider) 8 - Developing a Hydrogen Infrastructure for Transport in France and Germany - A Comparison (David Colomar, Ulrich Buenger); 9 - H 2 and Fuel-Cells as Key Technologies for the Transition to Renewable energies - The example of Herten (Babette Nieder); 10 - Social acceptance of hydrogen mobility in Germany (Rene Zimmer); 11 - Hydrogen - A development opportunity for regions? (Fabrice Jeanne)

  13. The International Energy Agency collaboration in wind energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beurskens, H.J.M.; Pershagen, B.

    1991-07-01

    The International Energy Agency (IEA) wind energy agreements have provided a useful framework for international cooperative efforts during more than thirteen years. Nine comprehensive research Tasks have been successfully completed and three Tasks are currently in progress. The sharing of research and information has clearly contributed to the development of wind technology, has eliminated unnecessary redundancy in national programmes, has encouraged utilization of the most efficient approaches to solve common problems, and has created a cooperative spirit among the professional groups that seems to be unique. After a brief introduction on the activities of the IEA on wind energy an overview is given of the ongoing tasks and other current activities with regard to the subject. 1 fig., 5 tabs., 9 refs

  14. Use of regenerative energy sources and hydrogen technology 2006. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehmann, J.; Luschtinetz, T.

    2006-01-01

    This volume contains 25 contributions, which were held on the 13th symposium ''Use of regenerative energy sources and hydrogen technology'' in Stralsund (Germany). Separate documentation items analysing 16 of the contributions have been prepared for the ENERGY database

  15. 78 FR 29749 - Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy; Agency Information Collection Extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-21

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy; Agency Information Collection Extension AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE..., DC 20503 And to Mr. Dana O'Hara, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EE- 2G), U.S...

  16. Is there room for hydrogen in energy transition?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beeker, Etienne

    2014-08-01

    As Germany decided to use hydrogen to store huge quantities of renewable energies, this report aims at assessing the opportunities associated with hydrogen in the context of energy transition. The author addresses the various techniques and technologies of hydrogen production, and proposes a prospective economic analysis of these processes: steam reforming, alkaline electrolysis, polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) electrolysis, and other processes still at R and D level. He gives an overview of existing and potential uses of hydrogen in industry, in energy storage (power-to-gas, power-to-power, methanation) and in mobility (hydrogen-mobility could be a response to hydrocarbon shortage, but the cost is still very high, and issues like hydrogen distribution must be addressed), and also evokes their emergence potential

  17. LARGE-SCALE PRODUCTION OF HYDROGEN BY NUCLEAR ENERGY FOR THE HYDROGEN ECONOMY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SCHULTZ, K.R.; BROWN, L.C.; BESENBRUCH, G.E.; HAMILTON, C.J.

    2003-01-01

    OAK B202 LARGE-SCALE PRODUCTION OF HYDROGEN BY NUCLEAR ENERGY FOR THE HYDROGEN ECONOMY. The ''Hydrogen Economy'' will reduce petroleum imports and greenhouse gas emissions. However, current commercial hydrogen production processes use fossil fuels and releases carbon dioxide. Hydrogen produced from nuclear energy could avoid these concerns. The authors have recently completed a three-year project for the US Department of Energy whose objective was to ''define an economically feasible concept for production of hydrogen, by nuclear means, using an advanced high-temperature nuclear reactor as the energy source''. Thermochemical water-splitting, a chemical process that accomplishes the decomposition of water into hydrogen and oxygen, met this objective. The goal of the first phase of this study was to evaluate thermochemical processes which offer the potential for efficient, cost-effective, large-scale production of hydrogen and to select one for further detailed consideration. The authors selected the Sulfur-Iodine cycle, In the second phase, they reviewed all the basic reactor types for suitability to provide the high temperature heat needed by the selected thermochemical water splitting cycle and chose the helium gas-cooled reactor. In the third phase they designed the chemical flowsheet for the thermochemical process and estimated the efficiency and cost of the process and the projected cost of producing hydrogen. These results are summarized in this paper

  18. Geothermal energy in Denmark. The Committee for Geothermal Energy of the Danish Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-06-01

    The Danish Energy Agency has prepared a report on the Danish geothermal resources and their contribution to the national energy potential.Environmental and socio-economic consequences of geothermal power systems implementation are reviewed. Organizational models and financing of geothermal-seismic research are discussed, and the Committee of the Energy Agency for Geothermal Energy recommends financing of a pilot plant as well as a prompt elucidation of concession/licensing problems. (EG)

  19. Hydrogen as Future Energy Carrier: The ENEA Point of View on Technology and Application Prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Ronchetti

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen and fuel cells should reduce costs and increase reliability and durability to compete in the energy market. A considerable long term effort is necessary for research, development and demonstration of adequate solutions; important programs in this sense are carried out in the main industrialized countries, with the involvement of many industries, research structures and stakeholders. In such framework a relevant role is played in Italy by ENEA (Italian Agency for New Technologies, Energy and Environment. In the paper the main aspects related to the possible hydrogen role in the future society are addressed, according to ENEA perspectives.

  20. A new type of hydrogen generator-HHEG (high-compressed hydrogen energy generator)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harada, H.; Tojima, K.; Takeda, M.; Nakazawa, T.

    2004-01-01

    'Full text:' We have developed a new type of hydrogen generator named HHEG (High-compressed Hydrogen Energy Generator). HHEG can produce 35 MPa high-compressed hydrogen for fuel cell vehicle without any mechanical compressor. HHEG is a kind of PEM(proton exchange membrane)electrolysis. It was well known that compressed hydrogen could be generated by water electrolysis. However, the conventional electrolysis could not generate 35 MPa or higher pressure that is required for fuel cell vehicle, because electrolysis cell stack is destroyed in such high pressure. In HHEG, the cell stack is put in high-pressure vessel and the pressure difference of oxygen and hydrogen that is generated by the cell stack is always kept at nearly zero by an automatic compensator invented by Mitsubishi Corporation. The cell stack of HHEG is not so special one, but it is not broken under such high pressure, because the automatic compensator always offsets the force acting on the cell stack. Hydrogen for fuel cell vehicle must be produce by no emission energy such as solar and atomic power. These energies are available as electricity. So, water electrolysis is the only way of producing hydrogen fuel. Hydrogen fuel is also 35 MPa high-compressed hydrogen and will become 70 MPa in near future. But conventional mechanical compressor is not useful for such high pressure hydrogen fuel, because of the short lifetime and high power consumption. Construction of hydrogen station network is indispensable in order to come into wide use of fuel cell vehicles. For such network contraction, an on-site type hydrogen generator is required. HHEG can satisfy above these requirements. So we can conclude that HHEG is the only way of realizing the hydrogen economy. (author)

  1. Energy conversion, storage and transportation by means of hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedlmeier, G; Mateos, P; Bolcich, J.C.

    1988-01-01

    Data concerning the present consumption of energy indicate that the industrialized countries (representing 25% of the world's population) consume almost 75% of the world's energy production, while the need for energy aimed at maintaining the growth of non-industrialized countries increases day after day. Since estimations indicate that the fossil reverses will exhaust within frightening terms, the production of hydrogen from fossil fuels and, fundamentally, from renewable sources constitute a response to future energy demand. The production of hydrogen from water is performed by four different methods: direct thermal, thermochemical, electrolysis and photolysis. Finally, different ways of storaging and using hydrogen are proposed. (Author)

  2. Hydrolysis Batteries: Generating Electrical Energy during Hydrogen Absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Rui; Chen, Jun; Fu, Kai; Zheng, Xinyao; Wang, Teng; Zheng, Jie; Li, Xingguo

    2018-02-19

    The hydrolysis reaction of aluminum can be decoupled into a battery by pairing an Al foil with a Pd-capped yttrium dihydride (YH 2 -Pd) electrode. This hydrolysis battery generates a voltage around 0.45 V and leads to hydrogen absorption into the YH 2 layer. This represents a new hydrogen absorption mechanism featuring electrical energy generation during hydrogen absorption. The hydrolysis battery converts 8-15 % of the thermal energy of the hydrolysis reaction into usable electrical energy, leading to much higher energy efficiency compared to that of direct hydrolysis. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. A renewable energy based hydrogen demonstration park in Turkey. HYDEPARK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilhan, Niluefer; Ersoez, Atilla [TUEBITAK Marmara Research Center Energy Institute, Gebze Kocaeli (Turkey); Cubukcu, Mete [Ege Univ., Bornova, Izmir (Turkey). Solar Energy Inst.

    2010-07-01

    The main goal of this national project is to research hydrogen technologies and renewable energy applications. Solar and wind energy are utilized to obtain hydrogen via electrolysis, which can either be used in the fuel cell or stored in cylinders for further use. The management of all project work packages was carried by TUeBITAK Marmara Research Center (MRC) Energy Institute (EI) with the support of the collaborators. The aim of this paper is to present the units of the renewable energy based hydrogen demonstration park, which is in the demonstration phase now and share the experimental results. (orig.)

  4. International Atomic Energy Agency Annual Report 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The IAEA Annual Report 2011 aims to summarize only the significant activities of the Agency during the year in question. This report covers the period 1 January to 31 December 2011. The main part of the report, starting on page 21, generally follows the programme structure as given in The Agency's Programme and Budget 2010-2011 (GC(53)/5). The introductory chapter, 'The Year in Review', seeks to provide a thematic analysis of the Agency's activities within the context of notable developments during the year. More detailed information can be found in the latest editions of the Agency's Nuclear Safety Review, Nuclear Technology Review, Technical Cooperation Report and the Safeguards Statement for 2011 and Background to the Safeguards Statement. Additional information covering various aspects of the Agency's programme is available in electronic form only on iaea.org, along with the Annual Report.

  5. Hydrogen - the energy source of the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aakervik, Anne-Lise

    2001-01-01

    The use of hydrogen is an excellent way of reducing the emission of greenhouse gases. It causes no emission when used in fuel cells. Iceland has set itself the goal of becoming the world's first hydrogen society without emission of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases. In the USA, California has decided to concentrate on cars that do not pollute. Hydrogen power is then an interesting alternative. Germany, Japan and the USA are all concentrating on hydrogen. The world production of hydrogen is 50 million tons, 90 per cent of which is made from fossil material, 4 per cent by electrolysis of water. The largest consumers of hydrogen are the petroleum industry and the fertilizer industry. The sale of hydrogen in the refining industry has increased recently and is expected to rise substantially when the fuel cell technology is commercialized. At present, storage of hydrogen is the major problem. Gas storage at atmospheric pressure is inconvenient because of the large volumes required. Alternatives are storage as compressed gas under high pressure, liquid gas at low temperature, storage in metal hydrides or carbon materials, or chemically bound in methanol or ammonia

  6. Risoe energy report 3. Hydrogen and its competitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, H; Feidenhans' l, R; Soenderberg Petersen, L [eds.

    2004-10-01

    Interest in the hydrogen economy has grown rapidly in recent years. Countries with long traditions of activity in hydrogen research and development have now been joined by a large number of newcomers. The main reason for this surge of interest is that the hydrogen economy may be an answer to the two main challenges facing the world in the years to come: climate change and the need for security of energy supplies. Both these challenges require the development of new, highly-efficient energy technologies that are either carbon-neutral or low emitting technologies. Another reason for the growing interest in hydrogen is the strong need for alternative fuels, especially in the transport sector. Alternative fuels could serve as links between the power system and the transport sector, to facilitate the uptake of emerging technologies and increase the flexibility and robustness of the energy system as a whole. This Risoe Energy Report provides a perspective on energy issues at global, regional and national levels. The following pages provide a critical examination of the hydrogen economy and its alternatives. The report explains the current R and D situation addresses the challenges facing the large-scale use of hydrogen, and makes some predictions for the future. The current and future role of hydrogen in energy systems is explored at Danish, European and global levels. The report discusses the technologies for producing, storing and converting hydrogen, the role of hydrogen in the transport sector and in portable electronics, hydrogen infrastructure and distribution systems, and environmental and safety aspects of the hydrogen economy. (BA)

  7. Hydrogen and fuel cells. Towards a sustainable energy future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, P.P.; Kuznetsov, V.L.; David, W.I.F.; Brandon, N.P.

    2008-01-01

    A major challenge - some would argue, the major challenge facing our planet today - relates to the problem of anthropogenic-driven climate change and its inextricable link to our global society's present and future energy needs [King, D.A., 2004. Environment - climate change science: adapt, mitigate, or ignore? Science 303, 176-177]. Hydrogen and fuel cells are now widely regarded as one of the key energy solutions for the 21st century. These technologies will contribute significantly to a reduction in environmental impact, enhanced energy security (and diversity) and creation of new energy industries. Hydrogen and fuel cells can be utilised in transportation, distributed heat and power generation, and energy storage systems. However, the transition from a carbon-based (fossil fuel) energy system to a hydrogen-based economy involves significant scientific, technological and socioeconomic barriers to the implementation of hydrogen and fuel cells as clean energy technologies of the future. This paper aims to capture, in brief, the current status, key scientific and technical challenges and projection of hydrogen and fuel cells within a sustainable energy vision of the future. We offer no comments here on energy policy and strategy. Rather, we identify challenges facing hydrogen and fuel cell technologies that must be overcome before these technologies can make a significant contribution to cleaner and more efficient energy production processes. (author)

  8. International Atomic Energy Agency Annual Report 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    Article VI.J of the Agency's Statute requires the Board of Governors to submit 'an annual report to the General Conference concerning the affairs of the Agency and any projects approved by the Agency'. This report covers the period 1 January to 31 December 2013. The IAEA Annual Report 2013 aims to summarize only the significant activities of the Agency during the year in question. The main part of the report, starting on page 15, generally follows the programme structure as given in The Agency's Programme and Budget 2012-2013 (GC(55)/5). The introductory chapter, 'The Year in Review', seeks to provide a thematic analysis of the Agency's activities within the context of notable developments during the year. More detailed information can be found in the latest editions of the Agency's Nuclear Safety Review, Nuclear Technology Review, Technical Cooperation Report and the Safeguards Statement for 2013 and Background to the Safeguards Statement. Additional information covering various aspects of the Agency's programme is available, in electronic form only, on iaea.org, along with the Annual Report. Except where indicated, all sums of money are expressed in United States dollars. The designations employed and the presentation of material in this document do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the Secretariat concerning the legal status of any country or territory or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers. The mention of names of specific companies or products (whether or not indicated as registered) does not imply any intention to infringe proprietary rights, nor should it be construed as an endorsement or recommendation on the part of the Agency. The term 'non-nuclear-weapon State' is used as in the Final Document of the 1968 Conference of Non-Nuclear- Weapon States (United Nations document A/7277) and in the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT). The term 'nuclear-weapon State' is as used in

  9. International Atomic Energy Agency Annual Report 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    Article VI.J of the Agency's Statute requires the Board of Governors to submit 'an annual report to the General Conference concerning the affairs of the Agency and any projects approved by the Agency'. This report covers the period 1 January to 31 December 2012. - The IAEA Annual Report 2012 aims to summarize only the significant activities of the Agency during the year in question. The main part of the report, starting on page 17, generally follows the programme structure as given in The Agency's Programme and Budget 2012-2013 (GC(55)/5). - The introductory chapter, 'Overview', seeks to provide a thematic analysis of the Agency's activities within the context of notable developments during the year. More detailed information can be found in the latest editions of the Agency's Nuclear Safety Review, Nuclear Technology Review, Technical Cooperation Report and the Safeguards Statement for 2012 and Background to the Safeguards Statement. - Additional information covering various aspects of the Agency's programme is available, in electronic form only, on iaea.org, along with the Annual Report. - Except where indicated, all sums of money are expressed in United States dollars. - The designations employed and the presentation of material in this document do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the Secretariat concerning the legal status of any country or territory or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers. - The mention of names of specific companies or products (whether or not indicated as registered) does not imply any intention to infringe proprietary rights, nor should it be construed as an endorsement or recommendation on the part of the Agency. - The term 'non-nuclear-weapon State' is used as in the Final Document of the 1968 Conference of Non- Nuclear-Weapon States (United Nations document A/7277) and in the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT). The term 'nuclear-weapon State' is as used

  10. The potential impact of hydrogen energy use on the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ruijven, B. J.; Lamarque, J. F.; van Vuuren, D. P.; Kram, T.; Eerens, H.

    2009-04-01

    Energy models show very different trajectories for future energy systems (partly as function of future climate policy). One possible option is a transition towards a hydrogen-based energy system. The potential impact of such hydrogen economy on atmospheric emissions is highly uncertain. On the one hand, application of hydrogen in clean fuel cells reduces emissions of local air pollutants, like SOx and NOx. On the other hand, emissions of hydrogen from system leakages are expected to change the atmospheric concentrations and behaviour (see also Price et al., 2007; Sanderson et al., 2003; Schultz et al., 2003; Tromp et al., 2003). The uncertainty arises from several sources: the expected use of hydrogen, the intensity of leakages and emissions, and the atmospheric chemical behaviour of hydrogen. Existing studies to the potential impacts of a hydrogen economy on the atmosphere mostly use hydrogen emission scenarios that are based on simple assumptions. This research combines two different modelling efforts to explore the range of impacts of hydrogen on atmospheric chemistry. First, the potential role of hydrogen in the global energy system and the related emissions of hydrogen and other air pollutants are derived from the global energy system simulation model TIMER (van Vuuren, 2007). A set of dedicated scenarios on hydrogen technology development explores the most pessimistic and optimistic cases for hydrogen deployment (van Ruijven et al., 2008; van Ruijven et al., 2007). These scenarios are combined with different assumptions on hydrogen emission factors. Second, the emissions from the TIMER model are linked to the NCAR atmospheric model (Lamarque et al., 2005; Lamarque et al., 2008), in order to determine the impacts on atmospheric chemistry. By combining an energy system model and an atmospheric model, we are able to consistently explore the boundaries of both hydrogen use, emissions and impacts on atmospheric chemistry. References: Lamarque, J.-F., Kiehl, J. T

  11. International Energy Agency Ocean Energy Systems Task 10 Wave Energy Converter Modeling Verification and Validation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wendt, Fabian F.; Yu, Yi-Hsiang; Nielsen, Kim

    2017-01-01

    This is the first joint reference paper for the Ocean Energy Systems (OES) Task 10 Wave Energy Converter modeling verification and validation group. The group is established under the OES Energy Technology Network program under the International Energy Agency. OES was founded in 2001 and Task 10 ...

  12. OTEC to hydrogen fuel cells - A solar energy breakthrough

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roney, J. R.

    Recent advances in fuel cell technology and development are discussed, which will enhance the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)-hydrogen-fuel cell mode of energy utilization. Hydrogen obtained from the ocean solar thermal resources can either be liquified or converted to ammonia, thus providing a convenient mode of transport, similar to that of liquid petroleum. The hydrogen fuel cell can convert hydrogen to electric power at a wide range of scale, feeding either centralized or distributed systems. Although this system of hydrogen energy production and delivery has been examined with respect to the U.S.A., the international market, and especially developing countries, may represent the greatest opportunity for these future generating units.

  13. Public understanding of hydrogen energy: A theoretical approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherry-Brennan, Fionnguala; Devine-Wright, Hannah; Devine-Wright, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to investigate public understanding of hydrogen energy using a particular social-psychological theory, namely, the theory of social representations to explore how processes of understanding generated lay knowledge of hydrogen energy. Using a free association method for data collection and multidimensional scaling for analysis, the results enabled the identification of themes in the data such as energy, environment, community, science, and technology, and people and place, around which understanding was based. Processes of representation, such as anchoring to pre-existing knowledge, were seen as essential in guiding understanding. The results indicated that there were diverse influences involved in understanding and, although risk perception of hydrogen was acknowledged, community concerns were seen to override any negative effect of focussing on risk. The role of emotion in decision-making was highlighted as positive emotional responses to the Promoting Unst's Renewable Energy (PURE), a local hydrogen storage project, resulted in hydrogen energy generally being positively evaluated despite acknowledged risks posed by hydrogen such as its explosiveness and flammability. Recommendations for policy include recognising that the combination of expert and lay knowledge plays an important role in public acceptance or rejection of hydrogen energy.

  14. Public understanding of hydrogen energy. A theoretical approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherry-Brennan, Fionnguala; Devine-Wright, Hannah; Devine-Wright, Patrick [Manchester Architecture Research Centre (MARC), University of Manchester, Humanities Bridgeford Street, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2010-10-15

    The aim of this paper was to investigate public understanding of hydrogen energy using a particular social-psychological theory, namely, the theory of social representations to explore how processes of understanding generated lay knowledge of hydrogen energy. Using a free association method for data collection and multidimensional scaling for analysis, the results enabled the identification of themes in the data such as energy, environment, community, science, and technology, and people and place, around which understanding was based. Processes of representation, such as anchoring to pre-existing knowledge, were seen as essential in guiding understanding. The results indicated that there were diverse influences involved in understanding and, although risk perception of hydrogen was acknowledged, community concerns were seen to override any negative effect of focussing on risk. The role of emotion in decision-making was highlighted as positive emotional responses to the Promoting Unst's Renewable Energy (PURE), a local hydrogen storage project, resulted in hydrogen energy generally being positively evaluated despite acknowledged risks posed by hydrogen such as its explosiveness and flammability. Recommendations for policy include recognising that the combination of expert and lay knowledge plays an important role in public acceptance or rejection of hydrogen energy. (author)

  15. Public understanding of hydrogen energy: A theoretical approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherry-Brennan, Fionnguala, E-mail: fionnguala@manchester.ac.u [Manchester Architecture Research Centre (MARC), University of Manchester, Humanities Bridgeford Street, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Devine-Wright, Hannah; Devine-Wright, Patrick [Manchester Architecture Research Centre (MARC), University of Manchester, Humanities Bridgeford Street, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2010-10-15

    The aim of this paper was to investigate public understanding of hydrogen energy using a particular social-psychological theory, namely, the theory of social representations to explore how processes of understanding generated lay knowledge of hydrogen energy. Using a free association method for data collection and multidimensional scaling for analysis, the results enabled the identification of themes in the data such as energy, environment, community, science, and technology, and people and place, around which understanding was based. Processes of representation, such as anchoring to pre-existing knowledge, were seen as essential in guiding understanding. The results indicated that there were diverse influences involved in understanding and, although risk perception of hydrogen was acknowledged, community concerns were seen to override any negative effect of focussing on risk. The role of emotion in decision-making was highlighted as positive emotional responses to the Promoting Unst's Renewable Energy (PURE), a local hydrogen storage project, resulted in hydrogen energy generally being positively evaluated despite acknowledged risks posed by hydrogen such as its explosiveness and flammability. Recommendations for policy include recognising that the combination of expert and lay knowledge plays an important role in public acceptance or rejection of hydrogen energy.

  16. The US Department of Energy hydrogen baseline survey: assessing knowledge and opinions about hydrogen technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christy Cooper; Tykey Truett; R L Schmoyer

    2006-01-01

    To design and maintain its education program, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program conducted a statistically-valid national survey to measure knowledge and opinions of hydrogen among key target audiences. The Hydrogen Baseline Knowledge Survey provides a reference for designing the DOE hydrogen education strategy and will be used in comparisons with future surveys to measure changes in knowledge and opinions over time. The survey sampled four U.S. populations: (1) public; (2) students; (3) state and local government officials; and (4) potential large-scale hydrogen end-users in three business categories. Questions measured technical understanding of hydrogen and opinions about hydrogen safety. Other questions assessed visions of the likelihood of future hydrogen applications and sources of energy information. Several important findings were discovered, including a striking lack of technical understanding across all survey groups, as well as a strong correlation between technical knowledge and opinions about safety: those who demonstrated an understanding of hydrogen technologies expressed the least fear of its safe use. (authors)

  17. International Atomic Energy Agency Annual Report 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    The Annual Report 2010 aims to summarize only the significant activities of the Agency during the year in question The main part of the report, starting on page 17, generally follows the programme structure as given in The Agency's Programme and Budget 2010-2011 (GC(53)/5). The introductory chapter, 'Overview', seeks to provide a thematic analysis of the Agency's activities within the context of notable developments during the year More detailed information can be found in the latest editions of the Agency's Nuclear Safety Review, Nuclear Technology Review, Technical Cooperation Report and the Safeguards Statement and Background to the Safeguards Statement and Summary. For the convenience of readers, these documents are available on the CD-ROM attached to the inside back cover of this report. Additional information covering various aspects of the Agency's programme is provided on the attached CD-ROM and is also available on the Agency's web site at http://www.iaea.org./Publications/ Reports/index.html. Except where indicated, all sums of money are expressed in United States dollars. The designations employed and the presentation of material in this report do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the Secretariat concerning the legal status of any country or territory or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers. The mention of names of specific companies or products (whether or not indicated as registered) does not imply any intention to infringe proprietary rights, nor should it be construed as an endorsement or recommendation on the part of the Agency. The term 'non-nuclear-weapon State' is used as in the Final Document of the 1968 Conference of Non-Nuclear-Weapon States (United Nations document A/7277) and in the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) The term 'nuclear weapon State' is as used in the NPT.

  18. International Atomic Energy Agency Annual Report 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The Annual Report 2010 aims to summarize only the significant activities of the Agency during the year in question The main part of the report, starting on page 17, generally follows the programme structure as given in The Agency's Programme and Budget 2010-2011 (GC(53)/5). The introductory chapter, 'Overview', seeks to provide a thematic analysis of the Agency's activities within the context of notable developments during the year More detailed information can be found in the latest editions of the Agency's Nuclear Safety Review, Nuclear Technology Review, Technical Cooperation Report and the Safeguards Statement and Background to the Safeguards Statement and Summary. For the convenience of readers, these documents are available on the CD-ROM attached to the inside back cover of this report. Additional information covering various aspects of the Agency's programme is provided on the attached CD-ROM and is also available on the Agency's web site at http://www.iaea.org./Publications/ Reports/index.html. Except where indicated, all sums of money are expressed in United States dollars. The designations employed and the presentation of material in this report do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the Secretariat concerning the legal status of any country or territory or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers. The mention of names of specific companies or products (whether or not indicated as registered) does not imply any intention to infringe proprietary rights, nor should it be construed as an endorsement or recommendation on the part of the Agency. The term 'non-nuclear-weapon State' is used as in the Final Document of the 1968 Conference of Non-Nuclear-Weapon States (United Nations document A/7277) and in the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) The term 'nuclear weapon State' is as used in the NPT.

  19. International Atomic Energy Agency Annual Report 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The Annual Report 2009 aims to summarize only the significant activities of the Agency during the year in question. The main part of the report generally follows the programme structure as given in The Agency's Programme and Budget 2008-2009 (GC(51)/2). The introductory chapter, '2009 in Perspective', seeks to provide a thematic analysis of the Agency's activities within the context of notable developments during the year. More detailed information can be found in the latest editions of the Agency's Nuclear Safety Review, Nuclear Technology Review, Technical Cooperation Report and the Safeguards Statement for 2009 and Background to the Safeguards Statement. For the convenience of readers, these documents are available on the CD-ROM attached to the inside back cover of this report. Additional infomation covering various aspects of the Agency's programme is provided on the attached CD-ROM, and is also available on the Agency's web site at http://www.iaea.org/Publications/Reports/Anrep2009/index.html. Except where indicated, all sums of money are expressed in United States dollars. The designations employed and the presentation of material in this document do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the Secretariat concerning the legal status of any country or territory or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers. The mention of names of specific companies or products (whether or not indicated as registered) does not imply any intention to infringe proprietary rights, nor should it be construed as an endorsement or recommendation on the part of the Agency. The term 'non-nuclear-weapon State' is used as in the Final Document of the 1968 Conference of Non-Nuclear-Weapon States (United Natinos document A/7277) and in the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT). The term 'nuclear weapon State' is as used in the NPT

  20. International Atomic Energy Agency Annual Report 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-07-01

    The Annual Report 2009 aims to summarize only the significant activities of the Agency during the year in question. The main part of the report generally follows the programme structure as given in The Agency's Programme and Budget 2008-2009 (GC(51)/2). The introductory chapter, '2009 in Perspective', seeks to provide a thematic analysis of the Agency's activities within the context of notable developments during the year. More detailed information can be found in the latest editions of the Agency's Nuclear Safety Review, Nuclear Technology Review, Technical Cooperation Report and the Safeguards Statement for 2009 and Background to the Safeguards Statement. For the convenience of readers, these documents are available on the CD-ROM attached to the inside back cover of this report. Additional infomation covering various aspects of the Agency's programme is provided on the attached CD-ROM, and is also available on the Agency's web site at http://www.iaea.org/Publications/Reports/Anrep2009/index.html. Except where indicated, all sums of money are expressed in United States dollars. The designations employed and the presentation of material in this document do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the Secretariat concerning the legal status of any country or territory or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers. The mention of names of specific companies or products (whether or not indicated as registered) does not imply any intention to infringe proprietary rights, nor should it be construed as an endorsement or recommendation on the part of the Agency. The term 'non-nuclear-weapon State' is used as in the Final Document of the 1968 Conference of Non-Nuclear-Weapon States (United Natinos document A/7277) and in the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT). The term 'nuclear weapon State' is as used in the NPT

  1. Meeting report - Which role for hydrogen in the energy system?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupre La Tour, Stephane; Raimondo, E.

    2015-01-01

    Before giving some general information about the activities of the SFEN, about some events regarding the energy sector, and about meetings to come, a contribution is proposed on the role of hydrogen in the energy system. The author recalls the industrial methods used to produce hydrogen (water electrolysis, reforming of fossil fuels), indicates the main applications (fuel cells, power-to-gas, industrial applications, fuel for transport). He discusses the potential of hydrogen as a good energy vector for the future. Required technical advances are identified, as well as potential industrial applications. The competitiveness of the different hydrogen production technologies is discussed, and the different uses are more precisely described and discussed (principle of fuel cell, French researches on hybrid vehicle, application to heavy vehicles, perspectives for air transport). Other technological issues are briefly addressed: direct injection of hydrogen in gas distribution network or production of synthetic methane, combined hydrolysis of CO 2 and H 2 O, hydrogen storage. After having outlined some remaining questions about the exploitation of hydrogen as energy vector, the author proposes some guidelines for the future: development of tools to analyse the competitiveness of hydrogen uses, improvement of existing technologies in terms of performance and costs, development of breakthrough technologies

  2. Hydrogen peroxide as a sustainable energy carrier: Electrocatalytic production of hydrogen peroxide and the fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Yamada, Yusuke; Karlin, Kenneth D.

    2012-01-01

    This review describes homogeneous and heterogeneous catalytic reduction of dioxygen with metal complexes focusing on the catalytic two-electron reduction of dioxygen to produce hydrogen peroxide. Whether two-electron reduction of dioxygen to produce hydrogen peroxide or four-electron O 2 -reduction to produce water occurs depends on the types of metals and ligands that are utilized. Those factors controlling the two processes are discussed in terms of metal–oxygen intermediates involved in the catalysis. Metal complexes acting as catalysts for selective two-electron reduction of oxygen can be utilized as metal complex-modified electrodes in the electrocatalytic reduction to produce hydrogen peroxide. Hydrogen peroxide thus produced can be used as a fuel in a hydrogen peroxide fuel cell. A hydrogen peroxide fuel cell can be operated with a one-compartment structure without a membrane, which is certainly more promising for the development of low-cost fuel cells as compared with two compartment hydrogen fuel cells that require membranes. Hydrogen peroxide is regarded as an environmentally benign energy carrier because it can be produced by the electrocatalytic two-electron reduction of O 2 , which is abundant in air, using solar cells; the hydrogen peroxide thus produced could then be readily stored and then used as needed to generate electricity through the use of hydrogen peroxide fuel cells.

  3. Hydrogen Peroxide as a Sustainable Energy Carrier: Electrocatalytic Production of Hydrogen Peroxide and the Fuel Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Yamada, Yusuke; Karlin, Kenneth D

    2012-11-01

    This review describes homogeneous and heterogeneous catalytic reduction of dioxygen with metal complexes focusing on the catalytic two-electron reduction of dioxygen to produce hydrogen peroxide. Whether two-electron reduction of dioxygen to produce hydrogen peroxide or four-electron O 2 -reduction to produce water occurs depends on the types of metals and ligands that are utilized. Those factors controlling the two processes are discussed in terms of metal-oxygen intermediates involved in the catalysis. Metal complexes acting as catalysts for selective two-electron reduction of oxygen can be utilized as metal complex-modified electrodes in the electrocatalytic reduction to produce hydrogen peroxide. Hydrogen peroxide thus produced can be used as a fuel in a hydrogen peroxide fuel cell. A hydrogen peroxide fuel cell can be operated with a one-compartment structure without a membrane, which is certainly more promising for the development of low-cost fuel cells as compared with two compartment hydrogen fuel cells that require membranes. Hydrogen peroxide is regarded as an environmentally benign energy carrier because it can be produced by the electrocatalytic two-electron reduction of O 2 , which is abundant in air, using solar cells; the hydrogen peroxide thus produced could then be readily stored and then used as needed to generate electricity through the use of hydrogen peroxide fuel cells.

  4. Research at the service of energy transition - Hydrogen and fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodineau, Luc; Antoine, Loic; Tonnet, Nicolas; Theobald, Olivier; Tappero, Denis

    2018-03-01

    This brochure brings together 22 hydrogen-energy and fuel cell projects selected and supported by the French agency of environment and energy management (Ademe) since 2012 through its call for research projects TITEC (industrial tests and transfers in real conditions) and Sustainable Energy: 1 - BHYKE: electric-hydrogen bike experiment; 2 - CHYMENE: innovative hydrogen compressor for mobile applications; 3 - COMBIPOL 3: bipolar plates assembly technology and gasketing process for PEMFC; 4 - CRONOS: high temperature SOFC for domestic micro-cogeneration; 5 - EPILOG: natural gas fuel cell on the way to commercialization; 6 - EXALAME: polyfunctional catalytic complexes for membranes-electrodes assembly without Nafion for PEMFC; 7 - HYCABIOME: H 2 and CO 2 conversion by biological methanation; 8 - HYLOAD: hydrogen-fueled airport vehicle experiment with on-site supply chain; 9 - HYSPSC: Pressurized hydrogen without Compressor; 10 - HYWAY: hydrogen mobility cluster demonstrator (electric-powered Kangoo cars fleet with range extender) at Lyon and Grenoble; 11 - MHYEL: Pre-industrialization of composite hybrid Membranes for PEM electrolyzer; 12 - NAVHYBUS: Design and experimentation of an electric-hydrogen river shuttle for passengers transportation at Nantes; 13 - PACMONT: fuel cells integration and adaptation for high mountain and polar applications; 14 - PREMHYOME: fabrication process of hybrid membranes for PEMFC; 15 - PRODIG: lifetime prediction and warranty for fuel cell systems; 16 - REHYDRO: fuel cell integration in the circular economy principle; 17 - SPHYNX and Co: optimizing renewable energy integration and self-consumption in buildings; 18 - THEMIS: design and experimentation of an autonomous on-site power supply system; 19 - VABHYOGAZ: biogas valorization through renewable hydrogen generation, design and experimentation of a 5 Nm 3 /h demonstrator at a waste disposal site; 20 - VALORPAC: Integration and experimentation of a high-temperature SOFC system that use

  5. Hydrogen: an energy carrier of the future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamerak, K

    1977-02-01

    Some advantages and fields of application of hydrogen are outlined in the introduction. Hydrogen production by conventional water electrolysis, by the thermochemical iron-chlorine cycle process, and by a new water electrolysis method still in the laboratory stage are dealt with in which the electrolysis voltage is considerably reduced by the action of solar UV light on an anode consisting of p-conducting material.

  6. The Nuclear Energy Agency of the OECD through its history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Echavarri, L.

    2008-01-01

    This year, 2008, marks the 50th Anniversary of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA). During these years the Agency has adapted to the evolution of the world energy situation. At the beginning the Agency launches international collaboration projects to establish the technological bases required for nuclear energy, then helps member countries in the construction of nuclear power plants and later analyzes the safety criteria as a consequence of the Three Miles Island and Chernobyl accidents. Based on this experience, the NEA faces the X XI Century prepared to contribute, even more, to a better international collaboration for a safe, environmentally friendly and economical use of the nuclear energy. (Author)

  7. Early forest fire detection using low-energy hydrogen sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Nörthemann

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Most huge forest fires start in partial combustion. In the beginning of a smouldering fire, emission of hydrogen in low concentration occurs. Therefore, hydrogen can be used to detect forest fires before open flames are visible and high temperatures are generated. We have developed a hydrogen sensor comprising of a metal/solid electrolyte/insulator/semiconductor (MEIS structure which allows an economical production. Due to the low energy consumption, an autarkic working unit in the forest was established. In this contribution, first experiments are shown demonstrating the possibility to detect forest fires at a very early stage using the hydrogen sensor.

  8. Hydrogen Production from Optimal Wind-PV Energies Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tafticht, T.; Agbossou, K. [Institut de recherche sur l hydrogene, Universite du Quebec - Trois-Rivieres, C.P. 500, Trois-Rivieres, (Ciheam), G9A 5H7, (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    Electrolytic hydrogen offers a promising alternative for long-term energy storage of renewable energies (RE). A stand-alone RE system based on hydrogen production has been developed at the Hydrogen Research Institute and successfully tested for automatic operation with designed control devices. The system is composed of a wind turbine, a photovoltaic (PV) array, an electrolyser, batteries for buffer energy storage, hydrogen and oxygen storage tanks, a fuel cell, AC and DC loads, power conditioning devices and different sensors. The long-term excess energy with respect to load demand has been sent to the electrolyser for hydrogen production and then the fuel cell has utilised this stored hydrogen to produce electricity when there were insufficient wind and solar energies with respect to load requirements. The RE system components have substantially different voltage-current characteristics and they are integrated on the DC bus through power conditioning devices for optimal operation by using the developed Maximum Power Point Tracking (MPPT) control method. The experimental results show that the power gain obtained by this method clearly increases the hydrogen production and storage rate from wind-PV systems. (authors)

  9. Hydrogen Production from Optimal Wind-PV Energies Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    T Tafticht; K Agbossou

    2006-01-01

    Electrolytic hydrogen offers a promising alternative for long-term energy storage of renewable energies (RE). A stand-alone RE system based on hydrogen production has been developed at the Hydrogen Research Institute and successfully tested for automatic operation with designed control devices. The system is composed of a wind turbine, a photovoltaic (PV) array, an electrolyzer, batteries for buffer energy storage, hydrogen and oxygen storage tanks, a fuel cell, AC and DC loads, power conditioning devices and different sensors. The long-term excess energy with respect to load demand has been sent to the electrolyser for hydrogen production and then the fuel cell has utilised this stored hydrogen to produce electricity when there were insufficient wind and solar energies with respect to load requirements. The RE system components have substantially different voltage-current characteristics and they are integrated on the DC bus through power conditioning devices for optimal operation by using the developed Maximum Power Point Tracking (MPPT) control method. The experimental results show that the power gain obtained by this method clearly increases the hydrogen production and storage rate from wind-PV systems. (authors)

  10. Hydrogen Production from Optimal Wind-PV Energies Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tafticht, T.; Agbossou, K.

    2006-01-01

    Electrolytic hydrogen offers a promising alternative for long-term energy storage of renewable energies (RE). A stand-alone RE system based on hydrogen production has been developed at the Hydrogen Research Institute and successfully tested for automatic operation with designed control devices. The system is composed of a wind turbine, a photovoltaic (PV) array, an electrolyser, batteries for buffer energy storage, hydrogen and oxygen storage tanks, a fuel cell, AC and DC loads, power conditioning devices and different sensors. The long-term excess energy with respect to load demand has been sent to the electrolyser for hydrogen production and then the fuel cell has utilised this stored hydrogen to produce electricity when there were insufficient wind and solar energies with respect to load requirements. The RE system components have substantially different voltage-current characteristics and they are integrated on the DC bus through power conditioning devices for optimal operation by using the developed Maximum Power Point Tracking (MPPT) control method. The experimental results show that the power gain obtained by this method clearly increases the hydrogen production and storage rate from wind-PV systems. (authors)

  11. Hydrogen Production from Optimal Wind-PV Energies Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T Tafticht; K Agbossou [Institut de recherche sur l hydrogene, Universite du Quebec - Trois-Rivieres, C.P. 500, Trois-Rivieres, (Ciheam), G9A 5H7, (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    Electrolytic hydrogen offers a promising alternative for long-term energy storage of renewable energies (RE). A stand-alone RE system based on hydrogen production has been developed at the Hydrogen Research Institute and successfully tested for automatic operation with designed control devices. The system is composed of a wind turbine, a photovoltaic (PV) array, an electrolyzer, batteries for buffer energy storage, hydrogen and oxygen storage tanks, a fuel cell, AC and DC loads, power conditioning devices and different sensors. The long-term excess energy with respect to load demand has been sent to the electrolyser for hydrogen production and then the fuel cell has utilised this stored hydrogen to produce electricity when there were insufficient wind and solar energies with respect to load requirements. The RE system components have substantially different voltage-current characteristics and they are integrated on the DC bus through power conditioning devices for optimal operation by using the developed Maximum Power Point Tracking (MPPT) control method. The experimental results show that the power gain obtained by this method clearly increases the hydrogen production and storage rate from wind-PV systems. (authors)

  12. Hydrogen from nuclear energy and the impact on climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duffey, R.B.; Miller, A.I.; Poehnell, T.G.

    2001-01-01

    The two major candidates for hydrogen production include nuclear power and other renewable energy sources. However, hydrogen produced by steam reforming of natural gas offers little advantage in total cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions over hybrid internal combustion engine (ICE) technology. Only nuclear power offers the possibility of cutting GHG emissions significantly and to economically provide electricity for traditional applications and by producing hydrogen for its widespread use in the transportation sector. Using nuclear energy to produce hydrogen for transportation fuel, doubles or triples nuclear's capacity to reduce GHG emissions. An analysis at the Atomic Energy of Canada shows that a combination of hydrogen fuel and nuclear energy can stabilize GHG emissions and climate change for a wide range of the latest scenarios presented by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. The technology for replacing hydrocarbon fuels with non-polluting hydrogen exists with nuclear power, electrolysis and fuel cells, using electric power grids for distribution. It was emphasized that a move toward total emissions-free transportation will be a move towards solving the negative effects of climate change. This paper illustrated the trends between global economic and atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations. Low carbon dioxide emission energy alternatives were discussed along with the sources of hydrogen and the full cycle assessment results in reduced emissions. It was shown that deploying 20 CANDU NPPs (of 690 MW (e) net each) would fuel 13 million vehicles with the effect of levelling of carbon dioxide emissions from transportation between 2020 to 2030. 13 refs., 2 tabs., 3 figs

  13. A renewable energy and hydrogen scenario for northern Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Bent

    2008-01-01

    renewable energy supply system is demonstrated with the use of the seasonal reservoir-based hydrocomponents in the northern parts of the region. The outcome of the competition between biofuels and hydrogen in the transportation sector is dependent on the development of viable fuel cells and on efficient......A scenario based entirely on renewable energy with possible use of hydrogen as an energy carrier is constructed for a group of North European countries. Temporal simulation of the demand-supply matching is carried out for various system configurations. The role of hydrogen technologies for energy...... of energy trade between the countries, due to the different endowments of different countries with particular renewable energy sources, and to the particular benefit that intermittent energy sources, such as wind and solar, can derive from exchange of power. The establishment of a smoothly functioning...

  14. Optical and thermal energy discharge from tritiated solid hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnotta, F.; Mapoles, E.R.; Collins, G.W.; Souers, P.C.

    1991-01-01

    The authors are investigating mechanisms of energy storage and release in tritiated solid hydrogens, by a variety of techniques including ESR, NMR and thermal and optical emission. The nuclear decay of a triton in solid hydrogen initiates the conversion of nuclear energy into stored chemical energy by producing unpaired hydrogen atoms which are trapped within the molecular lattice. The ability to store large quantities of atoms in this manner has been demonstrated and can serve as a basis for new forms of high energy density materials. This paper presents preliminary results of a study of the optical emission from solid hydrogen containing tritium over the visible and near infrared (NIR) spectral regions. Specifically, they have studied optical emission from DT and T 2 using CCD, silicon diode and germanium diode arrays. 8 refs., 6 figs

  15. Hydrogen role in a carbon-free energy mix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-02-01

    Among the energy storage technologies under development today, there is today an increasing interest towards the hydrogen-based ones. Hydrogen generation allows to store electricity, while its combustion can supply electrical, mechanical or heat energy. The French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) started to work on hydrogen technologies at the end of the 1990's in order to reinforce its economical interest. The development of these technologies is one of the 34 French industrial programs presented in September 2013 by the French Minister of productive recovery. This paper aims at identifying the hydrogen stakes in a carbon-free energy mix and at highlighting the remaining technological challenges to be met before reaching an industrial development level

  16. The International Atomic Energy Agency Flag Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The document reproduces the text of the IAEA Flag Code which was promulgated by the Director General on 15 September 1999, pursuant to the decision of the Board of Governors on 10 June 1999 to adopt an Agency flag as described in document GOV/1999/41 and its use in accordance with a flag code to be promulgated by the Director General

  17. Australia and the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    Australia's support for the IAEA's safeguards program is described. Through a program of bilateral assistance to the Agency, Austrlia has developed and sponsored special programs of assistance to the IAEA's Safeguards over the period 1980 to 1986. The speech by the Minister for Foreign Affairs and Trade, Mr Bill Hayden, to the IAEA Thirtieth Anniversary Conference in Vienna on 21 September 1987 is included

  18. The International Atomic Energy Agency Flag Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-11-17

    The document reproduces the text of the IAEA Flag Code which was promulgated by the Director General on 15 September 1999, pursuant to the decision of the Board of Governors on 10 June 1999 to adopt an Agency flag as described in document GOV/1999/41 and its use in accordance with a flag code to be promulgated by the Director General.

  19. Photoproduction of hydrogen - A potential system of solar energy bioconversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, V S.R.

    1979-10-01

    The photoproduction of hydrogen from water utilizing the photosynthetic capacity of green plants is discussed as a possible means of solar energy conversion. Advantages of the biological production of H/sub 2/ over various physical and chemical processes are pointed out, and the system used for the production of hydrogen by biological agents, which comprises the photosynthetic electron transport chain, ferredoxin and hydrogenase, is examined in detail. The various types of biological hydrogen production systems in bacteria, algae, symbiotic systems and isolated chloroplast-ferredoxin-hydrogenase systems are reviewed. The limitations and the scope for further improvement of the promising symbiotic Azolli-Anabena azollae and chloroplast-ferredoxin-hydrogenase are discussed, and it is concluded that future research should concern itself with the identification of the environmental conditions that would maximize solar energy conversion efficiency, the elimination of the oxygen inhibition of biological hydrogen production, and the definition of the metabolic state for the maximal production of hydrogen.

  20. A manual of recommended practices for hydrogen energy systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoagland, W.; Leach, S. [W. Hoagland and Associates, Boulder, CO (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Technologies for the production, distribution, and use of hydrogen are rapidly maturing and the number and size of demonstration programs designed to showcase emerging hydrogen energy systems is expanding. The success of these programs is key to hydrogen commercialization. Currently there is no comprehensive set of widely-accepted codes or standards covering the installation and operation of hydrogen energy systems. This lack of codes or standards is a major obstacle to future hydrogen demonstrations in obtaining the requisite licenses, permits, insurance, and public acceptance. In a project begun in late 1996 to address this problem, W. Hoagland and Associates has been developing a Manual of Recommended Practices for Hydrogen Systems intended to serve as an interim document for the design and operation of hydrogen demonstration projects. It will also serve as a starting point for some of the needed standard-setting processes. The Manual will include design guidelines for hydrogen procedures, case studies of experience at existing hydrogen demonstration projects, a bibliography of information sources, and a compilation of suppliers of hydrogen equipment and hardware. Following extensive professional review, final publication will occur later in 1997. The primary goal is to develop a draft document in the shortest possible time frame. To accomplish this, the input and guidance of technology developers, industrial organizations, government R and D and regulatory organizations and others will be sought to define the organization and content of the draft Manual, gather and evaluate available information, develop a draft document, coordinate reviews and revisions, and develop recommendations for publication, distribution, and update of the final document. The workshop, Development of a Manual of Recommended Practices for Hydrogen Energy Systems, conducted on March 11, 1997 in Alexandria, Virginia, was a first step.

  1. Proceedings of the 14. world hydrogen energy conference 2002 : The hydrogen planet. CD-ROM ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venter, R.D.; Bose, T.K. [Quebec Univ., Trois-Rivieres, PQ (Canada). Institut de recherche sur l' hydrogene; Veziroglu, N. [International Association for Hydrogen Energy, Coral Gables, FL (United States)] (eds.)

    2002-07-01

    Hydrogen has often been named as the ultimate fuel because it can be generated from a variety of renewable and non-renewable fuels and its direct conversion to electricity in fuel cells is efficient and results in no emissions other than water vapour. The opportunities and issues associated with the use of hydrogen as the energy carrier of the future were presented at this conference which addressed all aspects of hydrogen and fuel cell development including hydrogen production, storage, hydrogen-fuelled internal combustion engines, hydrogen infrastructure, economics, and the environment. Hydrogen is currently used as a chemical feedstock and a space fuel, but it is receiving considerable attention for bring renewable energy into the transportation and power generation sectors with little or no environmental impact at the point of end use. Canada leads the way in innovative ideas for a hydrogen infrastructure, one of the most challenging tasks for the transportation sector along with hydrogen storage. Major vehicle manufacturers have announced that they will have hydrogen-fueled cars and buses on the market beginning in 2003 and 2004. Solid oxide fuel cells will be used for generating electricity with efficiencies of 70 per cent, and proton exchange membrane (PEM) and other fuel cells are being tested for residential power supply with efficiencies of 85 per cent. The conference included an industrial exposition which demonstrated the latest developments in hydrogen and fuel cell research. More than 300 papers were presented at various oral and poster sessions, of which 172 papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the database.

  2. A local energy market for electricity and hydrogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiao, Yunpeng; Wang, Xifan; Pinson, Pierre

    2017-01-01

    The proliferation of distributed energy resources entails efficient market mechanisms in distribution-level networks. This paper establishes a local energy market (LEM) framework in which electricity and hydrogen are traded. Players in the LEM consist of renewable distributed generators (DGs......), loads, hydrogen vehicles (HVs), and a hydrogen storage system (HSS) operated by a HSS agent (HSSA). An iterative LEM clearing method is proposed based on the merit order principle. Players submit offers/bids with consideration of their own preferences and profiles according to the utility functions...

  3. Development and characterization of a solar-hydrogen energy system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sebastian, P.J.; Vejar, S.; Gonzalez, E.; Perez, M.; Gamboa, S.A.

    2009-01-01

    'Full text': The details of the development of a PV-hydrogen hybrid energy system are presented. An arrangement of photovoltaic modules (125 W/module) was established to provide 9 kW installed power in a three-phase configuration at 127 Vrms/phase. A 5 kW fuel cell system (hydrogen/oxygen) operates as a dynamic backup of the photovoltaic system. The autonomous operation of the hybrid power system implies the production of hydrogen by electrolysis. The hydrogen is produced by water electrolysis using an electrolyzer of 1 kW of power. The electrical energy used to produce hydrogen is supplied from solar panels by using 1 kW of photovoltaic modules. The photovoltaic modules are installed in a sun-tracker arrangement for increasing the energy conversion efficiency. The hydrogen is stored in solar to electric commercial metal hydride based containers and supplied to the fuel cell. The hybrid system is monitored by internet, and some dynamic characteristics such as demanding power, energy and power factor could be analyzed independently from the system. Some energy saving recommendations have been implemented as a pilot program at CIE-UNAM to improve the efficient use of clean energy in normal operating conditions in offices and laboratories. (author)

  4. Development of a solar-hydrogen hybrid energy system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sebastian, P.J.; Gamboa, S.A.; Vejar, Set; Campos, J.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: The details of the development of a PV-hydrogen hybrid energy system is presented. An arrangement of photovoltaic modules (125 W/module) was established to provide 9 kW installed power in a three-phase configuration at 127 Vrms/phase. A 5 kW fuel cell system (hydrogen/oxygen) operate as a dynamic backup of the photovoltaic system. The autonomous operation of the hybrid power system implies the production of hydrogen by electrolysis. The hydrogen is produced by water electrolysis using an electrolyzer of 1 kW power. The electrical energy used to produce hydrogen is supplied from solar panels by using 1kW of photovoltaic modules. The photovoltaic modules are installed in a sun-tracker arrangement for increasing the energy conversion efficiency. The hydrogen is stored in solar to electric commercial metal hydride based containers and supplied to the fuel cell. The hybrid system is monitored by internet and some dynamic characteristics such as demanding power, energy and power factor could be analyzed independently from the system. Some energy saving recommendations has been implemented as a pilot program at CIE-UNAM to improve the efficient use of clean energy in normal operating conditions in offices and laboratories. (author)

  5. Role of nuclear produced hydrogen for global environment and energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tashimo, M.; Kurosawa, A.; Ikeda, K.

    2004-01-01

    Sustainability on economical growth, energy supply and environment are major issues for the 21. century. Within this context, one of the promising concepts is the possibility of nuclear-produced hydrogen. In this study, the effect of nuclear-produced hydrogen on the environment is discussed, based on the output of the computer code 'Grape', which simulates the effects of the energy, environment and economy in 21. century. Five cases are assumed in this study. The first case is 'Business as usual by Internal Combustion Engine (ICE)', the second 'CO 2 limited to 550 ppm by ICE', the third 'CO 2 limited to 550 ppm by Hybrid Car', the fourth 'CO 2 limited to 550 ppm by Fuel Cell Vehicle (FCV) with Hydrogen produced by conventional Steam Methane Reforming (SMR)' and the fifth 'CO 2 limited to 550 ppm by FCV with Nuclear Produced-Hydrogen'. The energy used for transportation is at present about 25% of the total energy consumption in the world and is expected to be the same in the future, if there is no improvement of energy efficiency for transportation. On this point, the hybrid car shows the much better efficiency, about 2 times better than traditional internal combustion engines. Fuel Cell powered Vehicles are expected to be a key to resolving the combined issue of the environment and energy in this century. The nuclear-produced hydrogen is a better solution than conventional hydrogen production method using steam methane reforming. (author)

  6. Hydrogen as an energy carrier. 2. rev. and enlarged ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winter, C.J.; Nitsch, J.

    1991-01-01

    This book deals with the possibilities of an energetic utilisation of hydrogen. This energy carrier can be produced from the unlimited energy sources - solar energy, wind energy and hydropower - and from nuclear energy. It is also capable of one day supplementing or superseding the fossil energy carriers oil, coal and gas. What is special about the book is that it goes beyond a mere physical/technical description to discuss the economic and political aspects and ecological effects and requirements that are an essential part of sound energy planning today. Thus, the authors and editors outline the step-by-step development of a hydrogen economy, mainly based on solar energy, providing a solution to both the pollution problems caused by the use of fossil energy carriers and the energy requirements of the third world. (orig.) With 197 figs., 71 tabs

  7. Solar Hydrogen Energy Systems Science and Technology for the Hydrogen Economy

    CERN Document Server

    Zini, Gabriele

    2012-01-01

    It is just a matter of time when fossil fuels will become unavailable or uneconomical to retrieve. On top of that, their environmental impact is already too severe. Renewable energy sources can be considered as the most important substitute to fossil energy, since they are inexhaustible and have a very low, if none, impact on the environment. Still, their unevenness and unpredictability are drawbacks that must be dealt with in order to guarantee a reliable and steady energy supply to the final user. Hydrogen can be the answer to these problems. This book presents the readers with the modeling, functioning and implementation of solar hydrogen energy systems, which efficiently combine different technologies to convert, store and use renewable energy. Sources like solar photovoltaic or wind, technologies like electrolysis, fuel cells, traditional and advanced hydrogen storage are discussed and evaluated together with system management and output performance. Examples are also given to show how these systems are ...

  8. 18th world hydrogen energy conference 2010. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    This CD-ROM contains lectures, power points slides and posters presented on the 18th World Hydrogen Energy Conference. The topics of the conference are: (A). Fuel Cell Basics: 1. Electrochemistry of PEM Fuell Cells; 2. PEM/HT-PEM Fuel Cells: Electrolytes, Stack Components; 3. Direct Fuel Cells; 4. High-Temperature Fuel Cells; 5. Advanced Modelling (B). Existing and Emerging Markets: 1. Off-Grid Power Supply and Premium Power Generation; 2. Space and Aeronautic Applications; 3. APUs for LDV, Trucks, Ships and Airplanes; 4. Portable Applications and Light Traction. (C). Stationary Applications: 1. High-Temperature Fuel Cells; 2. Fuell Cells for Buildings. (D). Transportation Applications: 1. Fuel-Cell Power Trains; 3. Hydrogen Internal Combustion Engines; 4. Systems Analysis and Well-to-Wheel Studies; 5. Demonstration Projects, Costs and Market Introduction; 6 Electrification in Transportation Systems. (E). Fuel Infrastructures: 1. Hydrogen Distribution Technologies; 2. Hydrogen Deployment; 3. Fuel Provision for Early Market Applications. (G). Hydrogen Production Technologies: 1a. Photobiological Hydrogen Production; 1b. Fermentative Hydrogen Production; 1c. The HYVOLUTION Project. (H). Thermochemical Cycles: 3a. Hydrogen from Renewable Electricity; 3b. High-Temperature Electrolysis; 3c Alcaline Electrolysis; 3d PEM Electrolysis; 4a Reforming and Gasification-Fossil Energy Carriers; 4b Reforming and Gasification-Biomass; 5. Hydrogen-Separation Membranes; 6. Hydrogen Systems Assessment;.7. Photocatalysis (I). Storages: 1. Physical Hydrogen Storage; 2a. Metal Hydrides; 2b. Complex Hydrides; 3. Adsorption Technologies; (J). Strategic Analyses: 1. Research + Development Target and Priorities; 2. Life-Cycle Assessment and Economic Impact; 3. Socio-Economic Studies; 4. Education and Public Awareness; 5. Market Introduction; 7. Regional Activities; 8. The Zero Regio Project. (K). Safety Issues: 1. Vehicle and Infrastructural Safety; 2. Regulations, Codes, Standards and Test

  9. 18th world hydrogen energy conference 2010. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    This CD-ROM contains lectures, power points slides and posters presented on the 18th World Hydrogen Energy Conference. The topics of the conference are: (A). Fuel Cell Basics: 1. Electrochemistry of PEM Fuell Cells; 2. PEM/HT-PEM Fuel Cells: Electrolytes, Stack Components; 3. Direct Fuel Cells; 4. High-Temperature Fuel Cells; 5. Advanced Modelling (B). Existing and Emerging Markets: 1. Off-Grid Power Supply and Premium Power Generation; 2. Space and Aeronautic Applications; 3. APUs for LDV, Trucks, Ships and Airplanes; 4. Portable Applications and Light Traction. (C). Stationary Applications: 1. High-Temperature Fuel Cells; 2. Fuell Cells for Buildings. (D). Transportation Applications: 1. Fuel-Cell Power Trains; 3. Hydrogen Internal Combustion Engines; 4. Systems Analysis and Well-to-Wheel Studies; 5. Demonstration Projects, Costs and Market Introduction; 6 Electrification in Transportation Systems. (E). Fuel Infrastructures: 1. Hydrogen Distribution Technologies; 2. Hydrogen Deployment; 3. Fuel Provision for Early Market Applications. (G). Hydrogen Production Technologies: 1a. Photobiological Hydrogen Production; 1b. Fermentative Hydrogen Production; 1c. The HYVOLUTION Project. (H). Thermochemical Cycles: 3a. Hydrogen from Renewable Electricity; 3b. High-Temperature Electrolysis; 3c Alcaline Electrolysis; 3d PEM Electrolysis; 4a Reforming and Gasification-Fossil Energy Carriers; 4b Reforming and Gasification-Biomass; 5. Hydrogen-Separation Membranes; 6. Hydrogen Systems Assessment;.7. Photocatalysis (I). Storages: 1. Physical Hydrogen Storage; 2a. Metal Hydrides; 2b. Complex Hydrides; 3. Adsorption Technologies; (J). Strategic Analyses: 1. Research + Development Target and Priorities; 2. Life-Cycle Assessment and Economic Impact; 3. Socio-Economic Studies; 4. Education and Public Awareness; 5. Market Introduction; 7. Regional Activities; 8. The Zero Regio Project. (K). Safety Issues: 1. Vehicle and Infrastructural Safety; 2. Regulations, Codes, Standards and Test

  10. Hydrogen and the materials of a sustainable energy future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zalbowitz, M. [ed.

    1997-02-01

    The National Educator`s Workshop (NEW): Update 96 was held October 27--30, 1996, and was hosted by Los Alamos National Laboratory. This was the 11th annual conference aimed at improving the teaching of material science, engineering and technology by updating educators and providing laboratory experiments on emerging technology for teaching fundamental and newly evolving materials concepts. The Hydrogen Education Outreach Activity at Los Alamos National Laboratory organized a special conference theme: Hydrogen and the Materials of a Sustainable Energy Future. The hydrogen component of the NEW:Update 96 offered the opportunity for educators to have direct communication with scientists in laboratory settings, develop mentor relationship with laboratory staff, and bring leading edge materials/technologies into the classroom to upgrade educational curricula. Lack of public education and understanding about hydrogen is a major barrier for initial implementation of hydrogen energy technologies and is an important prerequisite for acceptance of hydrogen outside the scientific/technical research communities. The following materials contain the papers and view graphs from the conference presentations. In addition, supplemental reference articles are also included: a general overview of hydrogen and an article on handling hydrogen safely. A resource list containing a curriculum outline, bibliography, Internet resources, and a list of periodicals often publishing relevant research articles can be found in the last section.

  11. Hydrogen evolution from water using solid carbon and light energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawai, T; Sakata, T

    1979-11-15

    Hydrogen is produced from water vapour and solid carbon when mixed powders of TiO2, RuO2 and active carbon exposed to water vapor at room temperature, or up to 80 C, are illuminated. At 80 C, the rate of CO and COat2 formation increased. Therefore solar energy would be useful here as a combination of light energy and heat energy. Oxygen produced on the surface of the photocatalyst has a strong oxidising effect on the carbon. It is suggested that this process could be used for coal gasification and hydrogen production from water, accompanied by storage of solar energy.

  12. Hydrogen energy strategies and global stability and unrest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Midilli, A.; Dincer, I.; Rosen, M.A.

    2004-01-01

    This paper focuses on hydrogen energy strategies and global stability and unrest. In order to investigate the strategic relationship between these concepts, two empirical relations that describe the effects of fossil fuels on global stability and global unrest are developed. These relations incorporate predicted utilization ratios for hydrogen energy from non-fossil fuels, and are used to investigate whether hydrogen utilization can reduce the negative global effects related to fossil fuel use, eliminate or reduce the possibilities of global energy conflicts, and contribute to achieving world stability. It is determined that, if utilization of hydrogen from non-fossil fuels increases, for a fixed usage of petroleum, coal and natural gas, the level of global unrest decreases. However, if the utilization ratio of hydrogen energy from non-fossil fuels is lower than 100%, the level of global stability decreases as the symptoms of global unrest increase. It is suggested that, to reduce the causes of global unrest and increase the likelihood of global stability in the future, hydrogen energy should be widely and efficiently used, as one component of plans for sustainable development. (author)

  13. Technology selection for hydrogen production using nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siti Alimah; Erlan Dewita

    2008-01-01

    The NPP can either be used to produce electricity, or as heat source for non-electric applications (cogeneration). High Temperature Reactor (HTR) with high outlet coolant temperature around 900~1000 o C, is a reactor type potential for cogeneration purposes such as hydrogen production and other chemical industry processes that need high heat. Considering the national energy policy that a balanced arrangement of renewable and unrenewable natural resources has to be made to keep environmental conservation for the sake of society prosperity in the future, hydrogen gas production using nuclear heat is an appropriate choice. Hydrogen gas is a new energy which is environmentally friendly that it is a prospecting alternative energy source in the future. Within the study, a comparison of three processes of hydrogen gas production covering electrolysis, steam reforming and sulfur-iodine cycle, have been conducted. The parameters that considered are the production cost, capital cost and energy cost, technological status, the independence of fossil fuel, the environmental friendly aspect, as well as the efficiency and the independence of corrosion-resistance material. The study result showed that hydrogen gas production by steam reforming is a better process compared to electrolysis and sulfur-iodine process. Therefore, steam reforming process can be a good choice for hydrogen gas production using nuclear energy in Indonesia. (author)

  14. Hydrogen Production Costs of Various Primary Energy Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jae Hyuk; Tak, Nam Il; Kim, Yong Hee; Park, Won Seok

    2005-11-01

    Many studies on the economical aspects of hydrogen energy technologies have been conducted with the increase of the technical and socioeconomic importance of the hydrogen energy. However, there is still no research which evaluates the economy of hydrogen production from the primary energy sources in consideration of Korean situations. In this study, the hydrogen production costs of major primary energy sources are compared in consideration of the Korean situations such as feedstock price, electricity rate, and load factor. The evaluation methodology is based on the report of the National Academy of Science (NAS) of U.S. The present study focuses on the possible future technology scenario defined by NAS. The scenario assumes technological improvement that may be achieved if present research and development (R and D) programs are successful. The production costs by the coal and natural gas are 1.1 $/kgH 2 and 1.36 $/kgH 2 , respectively. However, the fossil fuels are susceptible to the price variation depending on the oil and the raw material prices, and the hydrogen production cost also depends on the carbon tax. The economic competitiveness of the renewable energy sources such as the wind, solar, and biomass are relatively low when compared with that of the other energy sources. The estimated hydrogen production costs from the renewable energy sources range from 2.35 $/kgH 2 to 6.03 $/kgH 2 . On the other hand, the production cost by nuclear energy is lower than that of natural gas or coal when the prices of the oil and soft coal are above $50/barrel and 138 $/ton, respectively. Taking into consideration the recent rapid increase of the oil and soft coal prices and the limited fossil resource, the nuclear-hydrogen option appears to be the most economical way in the future

  15. Towards sustainable energy systems: The related role of hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hennicke, Peter; Fischedick, Manfred

    2006-01-01

    The role of hydrogen in long run sustainable energy scenarios for the world and for the case of Germany is analysed, based on key criteria for sustainable energy systems. The possible range of hydrogen within long-term energy scenarios is broad and uncertain depending on assumptions on used primary energy, technology mix, rate of energy efficiency increase and costs degression ('learning effects'). In any case, sustainable energy strategies must give energy efficiency highest priority combined with an accelerated market introduction of renewables ('integrated strategy'). Under these conditions hydrogen will play a major role not before 2030 using natural gas as a bridge to renewable hydrogen. Against the background of an ambitious CO 2 -reduction goal which is under discussion in Germany the potentials for efficiency increase, the necessary structural change of the power plant system (corresponding to the decision to phase out nuclear energy, the transformation of the transportation sector and the market implementation order of renewable energies ('following efficiency guidelines first for electricity generation purposes, than for heat generation and than for the transportation sector')) are analysed based on latest sustainable energy scenarios

  16. OECD Nuclear Energy Agency. 3. Activity report, 1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    The main activities of the Agency are reviewed: study of nuclear power trends; regulatory aspects of nuclear power; technical developments: Eurochemic, Halden, Dragon, food irradiation, gas-cooled fast reactors, direct conversion, isotopic batteries; nuclear energy information

  17. The US department of energy programme on hydrogen production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paster, M.D.

    2004-01-01

    Clean forms of energy are needed to support sustainable global economic growth while mitigating greenhouse gas emissions and impacts on air quality. To address these challenges, the U.S. President's National Energy Policy and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Strategic Plan call for expanding the development of diverse domestic energy supplies. Working with industry, the Department developed a national vision for moving toward a hydrogen economy - a solution that holds the potential to provide sustainable clean, safe, secure, affordable, and reliable energy. In February 2003, President George W. Bush announced a new Hydrogen Fuel Initiative to achieve this vision. To realize this vision, the U.S. must develop and demonstrate advanced technologies for hydrogen production, delivery, storage, conversion, and applications. Toward this end, the DOE has worked with public and private organizations to develop a National Hydrogen Energy Technology Road-map. The Road-map identifies the technological research, development, and demonstration steps required to make a successful transition to a hydrogen economy. One of the advantages of hydrogen is that it can utilize a variety of feedstocks and a variety of production technologies. Feedstock options include fossil resources such as coal, natural gas, and oil, and non-fossil resources such as biomass and water. Production technologies include thermochemical, biological, electrolytic and photolytic processes. Energy needed for these processes can be supplied through fossil, renewable, or nuclear sources. Hydrogen can be produced in large central facilities and distributed to its point of use or it can be produced in a distributed manner in small volumes at the point of use such as a refueling station or stationary power facility. In the shorter term, distributed production will play an important role in initiating the use of hydrogen due to its lower capital investment. In the longer term, it is likely that centralized

  18. Resource Assessment for Hydrogen Production: Hydrogen Production Potential from Fossil and Renewable Energy Resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melaina, M. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Penev, M. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Heimiller, D. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2013-09-01

    This study examines the energy resources required to produce 4-10 million metric tonnes of domestic, low-carbon hydrogen in order to fuel approximately 20-50 million fuel cell electric vehicles. These projected energy resource requirements are compared to current consumption levels, projected 2040 business as usual consumptions levels, and projected 2040 consumption levels within a carbonconstrained future for the following energy resources: coal (assuming carbon capture and storage), natural gas, nuclear (uranium), biomass, wind (on- and offshore), and solar (photovoltaics and concentrating solar power). The analysis framework builds upon previous analysis results estimating hydrogen production potentials and drawing comparisons with economy-wide resource production projections

  19. Nuclear power issue as seen by the International Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, P.

    1976-01-01

    An account is given of the work of the International Energy Agency towards reducing the dependence of member states on imported oil. Forecasts of energy consumption are discussed, and the contributions that could be made by various energy sources, and by energy conservation, are examined. It is concluded that nuclear power is essential to a reduced dependence policy. The constraints on full realization of national nuclear programmes are stated as follows: licensing delays, waste disposal, financing, uranium supply, and fuel services. Ways in which these could be overcome by national and international action are suggested. Reference is made to the work of other atomic energy agencies: IAEA and OECD Nuclear Energy Agency. (U.K.)

  20. Hydrogen Storage Experiments for an Undergraduate Laboratory Course--Clean Energy: Hydrogen/Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Alla; Andrews, Lisa; Khot, Ameya; Rubin, Lea; Young, Jun; Allston, Thomas D.; Takacs, Gerald A.

    2015-01-01

    Global interest in both renewable energies and reduction in emission levels has placed increasing attention on hydrogen-based fuel cells that avoid harm to the environment by releasing only water as a byproduct. Therefore, there is a critical need for education and workforce development in clean energy technologies. A new undergraduate laboratory…

  1. The International Atomic Energy Agency - IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pezzutti, A.A.C.

    1980-01-01

    The origens, functions and objectives of the IAEA are analysed. The application of safeguards to avoid military uses of nuclear energy is discussed. In the final section the agrement between Brazil and Germany regarding IAEA safeguards, as well as the competence for executing the brazilian program are explained. It is, then, an informative study dealing with nuclear energy and its peaceful path, the creation of International Fuel Cycle Evaluation and nonproliferation [pt

  2. Utilization of solar and nuclear energy for hydrogen production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, M.

    1987-01-01

    Although the world-wide energy supply situation appears to have eased at present, non-fossil primary energy sources and hydrogen as a secondary energy carrier will have to take over a long-term and increasing portion of the energy supply system. The only non-fossil energy sources which are available in relevant quantities, are nuclear energy, solar energy and hydropower. The potential of H 2 for the extensive utilization of solar energy is of particular importance. Status, progress and development potential of the electrolytic H 2 production with photovoltaic generators, solar-thermal power plants and nuclear power plants are studied and discussed. The joint German-Saudi Arabian Research, Development and Demonstration Program HYSOLAR for the solar hydrogen production and utilization is summarized. (orig.)

  3. Energy Systems With Renewable Hydrogen Compared to Direct Use of Renewable Energy in Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerfried Jungmeier; Kurt Konighofer; Josef Spitzer; R Haas; A Ajanovic

    2006-01-01

    The current Austrian energy system has a renewable energy share of 20% - 11% hydropower and 9 % biomass - of total primary energy consumption. Whereas a possible future introduction of renewable hydrogen must be seen in the context of current energy policies in Austria e.g. increase of energy efficiency and use of renewable energy, reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. The aim of the research project is a life cycle based comparison of energy systems with renewable hydrogen from hydropower, wind, photovoltaic and biomass compared to the direct use of renewable energy for combined heat and power applications and transportation services. In particular this paper focuses on the main question, if renewable energy should be used directly or indirectly via renewable hydrogen. The assessment is based on a life cycle approach to analyse the energy efficiency, the material demand, the greenhouse gas emissions and economic aspects e.g. energy costs and some qualitative aspects e.g. energy service. The overall comparison of the considered energy systems for transportation service and combined heat and electricity application shows, that renewable hydrogen might be beneficial mainly for transportation services, if the electric vehicle will not be further developed to a feasibly wide-spread application for transportation service in future. For combined heat and electricity production there is no advantage of renewable hydrogen versus the direct use of renewable energy. Conclusions for Austria are therefore: 1) renewable hydrogen is an interesting energy carrier and might play an important role in a future sustainable Austrian energy system; 2) renewable hydrogen applications look most promising in the transportation sector; 3) renewable hydrogen applications will be of low importance for combined heat and electricity applications, as existing technologies for direct use of renewable energy for heat and electricity are well developed and very efficient; 4) In a future '100

  4. Hydrogen production through nuclear energy, a sustainable scenario in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortega V, E.; Francois L, J.L.

    2007-01-01

    The energy is a key point in the social and economic development of a country, for such motive to assure the energy supply in Mexico it is of vital importance. The hydrogen it is without a doubt some one of the alternating promising fuels before the visible one necessity to decentralize the energy production based on hydrocarbons. The versatility of their applications, it high heating power and having with the more clean fuel cycle of the energy basket with which count at the moment, they are only some examples of their development potential. However the more abundant element of the universe it is not in their elementary form in our planet, it forms molecules like in the hydrocarbons or water and it stops their use it should be extracted. At the present time different methods are known for the extraction of hydrogen, there is thermal, electric, chemical, photovoltaic among others. The election of the extraction method and the primary energy source to carry out it are decisive to judge the sustainability of the hydrogen production. The sustainable development is defined as development that covers the present necessities without committing the necessity to cover the necessities of the future generations, and in the mark of this definition four indicators of the sustainable development of the different cycles of fuel were evaluated in the hydrogen production in Mexico. These indicators take in consideration the emissions of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere (environment), the readiness of the energy resources (technology), the impacts in the floor use (social) and the production costs of the cycles (economy). In this work the processes were studied at the moment available for the generation of hydrogen, those that use coal, natural gas, hydraulic, eolic energy, biomass and nuclear, as primary energy sources. These processes were evaluated with energy references of Mexico to obtain the best alternative for hydrogen production. (Author)

  5. Role of executive agencies for energy efficiency with a view on activities of Serbian Energy Efficiency Agency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovačić Bojan J.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Many countries, particularly in Europe, have executive energy efficiency agencies at national, regional and local levels that are organized in different ways. For all of them, it is common that there are existing strategic needs in their countries for enhancement of conditions and measures for rational use of energy and fuels. Serbian Energy Efficiency Agency was established in 2002 within the reform of the energy sector in Serbia and its current status was defined in 2004 by the Energy Law. It contributes to the improvement of social responsibility towards energy in all structures of the state and society, by proposing energy efficiency incentives, promoting importance of energy efficiency, as well as by managing energy efficiency and renewable energy programs and projects.

  6. Perspectives of a hydrogen-based energy economy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czakainski, M.

    1989-06-01

    In view of the depletion of fossil fuel resources, and of their environmental effects, research is going on worldwide to find alternative energy sources. Hydrogen has been raising high hopes in recent years and has made a career as a candidate substitute for fossil fuels. There is hydropower or solar energy for electrolytic production of hydrogen which by a catalytic, environmentally friendly process is re-convertable into water. Experimental facilities exist for testing the hydrogen technology, but it is too early now to give any prognosis on the data of technical maturity and commercial feasibility of the technology. The et team invited some experts for a discussion on the pros and cons of hydrogen technology, and on questions such as siting of installations, infrastructure, and economics. (orig./UA).

  7. Some practical progress of hydrogen energy in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deyou, B.

    1995-01-01

    Research and development of hydrogen energy in China was described. Recent progress included hydrogen production with a two reactor method that consumes less than 3.0/KWh/Nm 3 . Development of a Hydrogen Hydride Rechargeable Battery (HHRB) was summarized. More than 1,000,000 AA type HHRB batteries were produced in 1994. A 150-200 AH battery for use in electric vehicles has also been manufactured, and research into proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) was continuing. 6 refs., 2 figs

  8. The energy efficiency of onboard hydrogen storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jens Oluf; Li, Qingfeng; Bjerrum, Niels

    2010-01-01

    Global warming resulting from the use of fossil fuels is threatening the environment and energy efficiency is one of the most important ways to reduce this threat. Industry, transport and buildings are all high energy-using sectors in the world and even in the most technologically optimistic...... perspectives energy use is projected to increase in the next 50 years. How and when energy is used determines society's ability to create long-term sustainable energy systems. This is why this book, focusing on energy efficiency in these sectors and from different perspectives, is sharp and also important...

  9. International Energy Agency 2013 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-03-01

    The IEA Executive Director's Annual Report 2013 is the second of a regular annual series reporting on the IEA’s operational and organisational achievements, as well as challenges and events over the year. It was presented to the IEA Governing Board and is also released publicly to ensure transparency and to take stock of the organisation's activities from a strategic perspective. 2013 was a banner year for the IEA, given continued changes in the global energy economy as well as the IEA Ministerial meeting in November which brought together Energy Ministers from all 28 IEA member countries, accession countries Chile and Estonia, seven key partner countries - Brazil, China, India, Indonesia, Mexico, Russian Federation and South Africa - as well as more that 30 top-level executives from the energy industry. Key Ministerial outcomes included the first IEA Ministers' Joint Statement on Climate Change and a declaration of association by six key partner countries to build multilateral cooperation with the IEA.

  10. The Utilization of Solar Energy by Way of Hydrogen Production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broda, E.

    1977-01-01

    It is suggested to produce hydrogen gas by photolytic splitting of water, and to feed it into a hydrogen economy. One approach to obtain good yields in photolysis consist in the application of asymmetric membranes that release the different, reactive, primary products of the photochemical reaction on opposite sides of the membranes so that a back reaction is prevented. Through this solar-chemical option a very large part of the energy needs of mankind could be covered in the long run. (author)

  11. Hydrogen energy and fuel cells. A vision of our future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    This document presents the possibilities of energy systems based on the hydrogen, in the world and more specially in Europe in the context of an environmental and energy strategy. It proposes then the necessary structures and actions to implement at a commercial feasibility. (A.L.B.)

  12. Hydrogen energy and fuel cells. A vision of our future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    This document presents the possibilities of energy systems based on the hydrogen, in the world and more specially in Europe in the context of an environmental and energy strategy. It proposes then the necessary structures and actions to implement at a commercial feasibility. (A.L.B.)

  13. Positron impact ionization of atomic hydrogen at low energies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The study of low energy ionization of atomic hydrogen has undergone a rapid ... Three distinct theories for describing low energy ionization can now .... clear evidence that the backward peak for ΘЅѕ = 180° is due to positron-nucleus scat-.

  14. Hydrogen tube vehicle for supersonic transport: 2. Speed and energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Arnold R. [Vehicle Projects Inc and Supersonic Tubevehicle LLC, 200 Violet St, Suite 100, Golden, CO 80401 (United States)

    2010-06-15

    The central concept of a new idea in high-speed transport is that operation of a vehicle in a hydrogen atmosphere, because of the low density of hydrogen, would increase sonic speed by a factor of 3.8 and decrease drag by 15 relative to air. A hydrogen atmosphere requires that the vehicle operate within a hydrogen-filled tube or pipeline, which serves as a phase separator. The supersonic tube vehicle (STV) can be supersonic with respect to air outside the tube while remaining subsonic inside. It breathes hydrogen fuel for its propulsion fuel cells from the tube itself. This paper, second in a series on the scientific foundations of the supersonic tube vehicle, tests the hypothesis that the STV will be simultaneously fast and energy efficient by comparing its predicted speed and energy consumption with that of four long-haul passenger transport modes: road, rail, maglev, and air. The study establishes the speed ranking STV >> airplane > maglev > train > coach (intercity bus) and the normalized energy consumption ranking Airplane >> coach > maglev > train > STV. Consistent with the hypothesis, the concept vehicle is both the fastest and lowest energy consuming mode. In theory, the vehicle can cruise at Mach 2.8 while consuming less than half the energy per passenger of a Boeing 747 at a cruise speed of Mach 0.81. (author)

  15. 78 FR 16665 - International Energy Agency Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-18

    ... this notice is to permit attendance by representatives of U.S. company members of the IAB at a meeting... meeting among company representatives at the same location at 8:30 a.m. on March 26. The agenda for this... Refining Crisis 8. Middle East Energy Exports and the Arab Spring 9. The Turmoil in North Africa and the...

  16. 75 FR 67711 - International Energy Agency Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-03

    .... Opening Session Address. 3. Introduction to IEA Emergency Response Policies and Objectives. 4. How the Global Oil Market Works. 5. Natural Gas Market. 6. IEA Energy Statistics and Oil Data Systems. 7. The.... Discussion (Plenary). Day 2 6. Introduction (Plenary). 7. Simulation (Breakout Groups). 8. Discussion...

  17. 77 FR 69613 - International Energy Agency Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-20

    ... Policy and Conservation Act (42 U.S.C. 6272(c)(1)(A)(i)) (EPCA), the following notice of meeting is... the IEA 2. IEA Emergency Response Policies, Market Assessment, Industry Perspective 3. IEA Oil Data...)(A)(ii) of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act (42 U.S.C. 6272(c)(1)(A)(ii)), the meeting of the...

  18. 76 FR 14003 - International Energy Agency Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-15

    ... Hub? 9. Workshop Scene Setter --Commodity Derivatives Market and Recent Regulatory Trends 10. Other... Financial Market Participants on Energy Futures Markets 1. How do the investment strategies of financial... the Oil Market (SOM) on March 22; and on March 23 and March 24 in connection with a meeting of the SEQ...

  19. Comparative study of hydrogen and methanol as energy carriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansson, Anna

    1998-06-01

    This report has been written with the purpose to compare hydrogen and methanol, with gasoline, as energy carriers for new energy systems in the future. This energy system must satisfy the demands for sustainable development. The report focuses on motor vehicle applications. A few different criteria has been developed to help form the characterisation method. The criteria proposed in this thesis are developed for an environmental comparison mainly based on emissions from combustion. The criteria concerns the following areas: Renewable resources, The ozone layer, The greenhouse effect, The acidification, and Toxic substances. In many ways, hydrogen may seem as a very good alternative compared with gasoline and diesel oil. Combustion of hydrogen in air results in water and small amounts of oxides of nitrogen. In this report, hydrogen produced from renewable resources is investigated. This is necessary to fulfill the demands for sustainable development. Today, however, steam reforming of fossil fuels represent 99% of the hydrogen production market. Problem areas connected with hydrogen use are for instance storage and distribution. Methanol has many advantages, while comparing methanol and gasoline, like lower emissions of nitrogen oxides and hydrocarbons, limited emissions of carbon dioxide and no sulphur content. Methanol can be produced from many different resources, for example natural gas, naphtha, oil, coal or peat, and biomass. To meet demands for sustainable production, methanol has to be produced from biomass Examination paper. 32 refs, 20 figs, 13 tabs

  20. Hydrogen Energy by Means of Proton Conductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jens Oluf

    If we dare to take serious what we know today about climate issues the challenges to our energy systems are immense. If we really chose - also in practice - to phase out the fossil fuels major changes to the way we handle energy are required. The renewable energy resources are by far sufficient, ...

  1. Hydrogen energy in changing environmental scenario: Indian context

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leo Hudson, M. Sterlin; Dubey, P.K.; Pukazhselvan, D.; Pandey, Sunil Kumar; Singh, Rajesh Kumar; Raghubanshi, Himanshu; Shahi, Rohit R.; Srivastava, O.N.

    2009-01-01

    This paper deals with how the Hydrogen Energy may play a crucial role in taking care of the environmental scenario/climate change. The R and D efforts, at the Hydrogen Energy Center, Banaras Hindu University have been described and discussed to elucidate that hydrogen is the best option for taking care of the environmental/climate changes. All three important ingredients for hydrogen economy, i.e., production, storage and application of hydrogen have been dealt with. As regards hydrogen production, solar routes consisting of photoelectrochemical electrolysis of water have been described and discussed. Nanostructured TiO 2 films used as photoanodes have been synthesized through hydrolysis of Ti[OCH(CH 3 ) 2 ] 4 . Modular designs of TiO 2 photoelectrode-based PEC cells have been fabricated to get high hydrogen production rate (∝10.35 lh -1 m -2 ). However, hydrogen storage is a key issue in the success and realization of hydrogen technology and economy. Metal hydrides are the promising candidates due to their safety advantage with high volume efficient storage capacity for on-board applications. As regards storage, we have discussed the storage of hydrogen in intermetallics as well as lightweight complex hydride systems. For intermetallic systems, we have dealt with material tailoring of LaNi 5 through Fe substitution. The La(Ni l-x Fe x ) 5 (x = 0.16) has been found to yield a high storage capacity of ∝2.40 wt%. We have also discussed how CNT admixing helps to improve the hydrogen desorption rate of NaAlH 4 . CNT (8 mol%) admixed NaAlH 4 is found to be optimum for faster desorption (∝3.3 wt% H 2 within 2 h). From an applications point of view, we have focused on the use of hydrogen (stored in intermetallic La-Ni-Fe system) as fuel for Internal Combustion (IC) engine-based vehicular transport, particularly two and three-wheelers. It is shown that hydrogen used as a fuel is the most effective alternative fuel for circumventing climate change. (author)

  2. International Energy Agency 2013 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-03-01

    The IEA Executive Director's Annual Report 2013 is the second of a regular annual series reporting on the IEA’s operational and organisational achievements, as well as challenges and events over the year. It was presented to the IEA Governing Board and is also released publicly to ensure transparency and to take stock of the organisation's activities from a strategic perspective. 2013 was a banner year for the IEA, given continued changes in the global energy economy as well as the IEA Ministerial meeting in November which brought together Energy Ministers from all 28 IEA member countries, accession countries Chile and Estonia, seven key partner countries - Brazil, China, India, Indonesia, Mexico, Russian Federation and South Africa - as well as more that 30 top-level executives from the energy industry. Key Ministerial outcomes included the first IEA Ministers' Joint Statement on Climate Change and a declaration of association by six key partner countries to build multilateral cooperation with the IEA.

  3. Hydrogen, fuel cells and renewable energy integration in islands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauen, A.; Hart, D.; Foradini, F.; Hart, D.

    2002-01-01

    Remote areas such as islands rely on costly and highly polluting diesel and heavy fuel oil for their electricity supply. This paper explored the opportunities for exploiting economically and environmentally viable renewable energy sources, in particular hydrogen storage, on such islands. In particular, this study focused on addressing the challenge of matching energy supply with demand and with technical issues regarding weak grids that are hindered with high steady state voltage levels and voltage fluctuations. The main technical characteristics of integrated renewable energy and hydrogen systems were determined by modelling a case study for the island of El Hierro (Canary Islands). The paper referred to the challenges regarding the technical and economic viability of such systems and their contribution to the economic development of remote communities. It was noted that energy storage plays an important role in addressing supply and demand issues by offering a way to control voltage and using surplus electricity at times of low load. Electrical energy can be stored in the form of potential or chemical energy. New decentralized generation technologies have also played a role in improving the energy efficiency of renewable energy sources. The feasibility of using hydrogen for energy storage was examined with particular reference to fuel-cell based energy supply in isolated island communities. 4 refs., 5 figs

  4. A hydrogen economy - an answer to future energy problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifritz, W.

    1975-01-01

    ''The Theme was THEME''. This was the headline of The Hydrogen Economy Miami Energy Conference which was the first international conference of this type and which took place in Miami, March 18-20, 1974. For the first time, about 700 participants from all over the western world discussed all the ramifications and aspects of a hydrogen based economy. Non-fossil hydrogen, produced from water by either electrolysis or by direct use of process heat from a nuclear source is a clean, all-synthetic, automatically recyclable, and inexhaustible fuel. It may support the World's future energy requirements beyond the present self limited fossil-fuel era. A large number of papers and news were presented on this conference reflecting this effort. The following article is intended to report on the highlights of the conference and to give a survey on the present state of the art in the hydrogen field. Furthermore, the author includes his own ideas and conclusions predominantly by taking into account the trends in the development of future nuclear reactor systems and symbiotic high-temperature-reactor/breeder strategies being the primary energy input of a hydrogen economy and providing a most promising avenue for solving both the World's energy and environmental (entropy) problems. (Auth.)

  5. Hydrogen energy and fuel cells. A vision of our future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    Hydrogen and fuel cells are seen by many as key solutions for the 21 century, enabling clean efficient production of power and heat from a range of primary energy sources. The High Level Group for Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Technologies was initiated in October 2002 by the Vice President of the European Commission, Loyola de Palacio, Commissioner for Energy and Transport, and Mr Philippe Busquin, Commissioner for Research. The group was invited to formulate a collective vision on the contribution that hydrogen and fuel cells could make to the realisation of sustainable energy systems in future. The report highlights the need for strategic planning and increased effort on research, development and deployment of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies. It also makes wide-ranging recommendations for a more structured approach to European Energy policy and research, for education and training, and for developing political and public awareness. Foremost amongst its recommendations is the establishment of a European Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technology Partnership and Advisory Council to guide the process. (author)

  6. Hydrogen energy and fuel cells. A vision of our future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    Hydrogen and fuel cells are seen by many as key solutions for the 21 century, enabling clean efficient production of power and heat from a range of primary energy sources. The High Level Group for Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Technologies was initiated in October 2002 by the Vice President of the European Commission, Loyola de Palacio, Commissioner for Energy and Transport, and Mr Philippe Busquin, Commissioner for Research. The group was invited to formulate a collective vision on the contribution that hydrogen and fuel cells could make to the realisation of sustainable energy systems in future. The report highlights the need for strategic planning and increased effort on research, development and deployment of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies. It also makes wide-ranging recommendations for a more structured approach to European Energy policy and research, for education and training, and for developing political and public awareness. Foremost amongst its recommendations is the establishment of a European Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technology Partnership and Advisory Council to guide the process. (author)

  7. Assessment of MHR-based hydrogen energy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richards, Matthew; Shenoy, Arkal; Schultz, Kenneth; Brown, Lloyd; Besenbruch, Gottfried; Handa, Norihiko; Das, Jadu

    2004-01-01

    Process heat from a high-temperature nuclear reactor can be used to drive a set of chemical reactions, with the net result of splitting water into hydrogen and oxygen. For example, process heat at temperatures in the range 850degC to 950degC can drive the sulfur-iodine (SI) thermochemical process to produce hydrogen with high efficiency. The SI process produces highly pure hydrogen and oxygen, with formation, decomposition, regeneration, and recycle of the intermediate chemical reagents and low-temperature heat as the only waste product. Electricity can also be used directly to split water, using conventional, low-temperature electrolysis (LTE). Hydrogen can also be produced with hybrid processes that use both process heat and electricity to generate hydrogen. An example of a hybrid process is high-temperature electrolysis (HTE), in which process heat is used to generate steam, which is then supplied to an electrolyzer to generate hydrogen. This process is of interest because the efficiency of electrolysis increases with temperature. Because of its high-temperature capability, advanced of development relative to other high-temperature reactor concepts, and passive-safety features, the Modular Helium Reactor (MHR) is well suited for producing hydrogen using nuclear energy. In this paper we investigate concepts for coupling the MHR to the SI process, LTE, and HTE. These concepts are referred to as the H2-MHR. (author)

  8. Community Energy: Analysis of Hydrogen Distributed Energy Systems with Photovoltaics for Load Leveling and Vehicle Refueling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steward, D.; Zuboy, J.

    2014-10-01

    Energy storage could complement PV electricity generation at the community level. Because PV generation is intermittent, strategies must be implemented to integrate it into the electricity system. Hydrogen and fuel cell technologies offer possible PV integration strategies, including the community-level approaches analyzed in this report: (1) using hydrogen production, storage, and reconversion to electricity to level PV generation and grid loads (reconversion scenario); (2) using hydrogen production and storage to capture peak PV generation and refuel hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) (hydrogen fueling scenario); and (3) a comparison scenario using a battery system to store electricity for EV nighttime charging (electric charging scenario).

  9. In vitro hydrogen production--using energy from the sun.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krassen, Henning; Ott, Sascha; Heberle, Joachim

    2011-01-07

    Using solar energy to produce molecular hydrogen is a promising way to supply the civilization with clean energy. Nature provides the key components to collect solar energy as well as to reduce protons, scientists have developed mimics of these enzymatic centers and also found new ways to catalyze the same reactions. This perspective article surveys the different components and in particular the various coupling possibilities of a light sensitizer and catalyst. Pros and cons are discussed.

  10. Predicted energy densitites for nickel-hydrogen and silver-hydrogen cells embodying metallic hydrides for hydrogen storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easter, R. W.

    1974-01-01

    Simplified design concepts were used to estimate gravimetric and volumetric energy densities for metal hydrogen battery cells for assessing the characteristics of cells containing metal hydrides as compared to gaseous storage cells, and for comparing nickel cathode and silver cathode systems. The silver cathode was found to yield superior energy densities in all cases considered. The inclusion of hydride forming materials yields cells with very high volumetric energy densities that also retain gravimetric energy densities nearly as high as those of gaseous storage cells.

  11. Antiproton-hydrogen scattering at low-eV energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan Jr., D.L.

    1993-01-01

    In the scattering of negative particles other than the electron by atoms at lab-frame energies around 10 eV, an elastic process termed 'brickwall scattering' might lead to a high probability for scattering angles around 180deg. For an antiproton slowing in hydrogen, this backward scattering would result in the loss of nearly all of its energy in a single collision, since it and a hydrogen atom have nearly the same mass. Such energy loss would have a significant effect on the energy distribution of antiprotons at energies where capture by the protons of hydrogen is possible and might, thereby, affect the capture rate and the distribution of capture states. In the semiclassical treatment of the problem with an adiabatic potential energy, brickwall scattering is indeed present, and with a substantial cross section. However, this model appears to underestimate inelastic processes. Based on calculations for negative muons on hydrogen atoms, these processes appear to occur for about the same impact parameters as brickwall scattering and thus substantially reduce its effect. (orig.)

  12. Preface: photosynthesis and hydrogen energy research for sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomo, Tatsuya; Allakhverdiev, Suleyman I

    2017-09-01

    Energy supply, climate change, and global food security are among the main chalenges facing humanity in the twenty-first century. Despite global energy demand is continuing to increase, the availability of low cost energy is decreasing. Together with the urgent problem of climate change due to CO 2 release from the combustion of fossil fuels, there is a strong requirement of developing the clean and renewable energy system for the hydrogen production. Solar fuel, biofuel, and hydrogen energy production gained unlimited possibility and feasibility due to understanding of the detailed photosynthetic system structures. This special issue contains selected papers on photosynthetic and biomimetic hydrogen production presented at the International Conference "Photosynthesis Research for Sustainability-2016", that was held in Pushchino (Russia), during June 19-25, 2016, with the sponsorship of the International Society of Photosynthesis Research (ISPR) and of the International Association for Hydrogen Energy (IAHE). This issue is intended to provide recent information on the photosynthetic and biohydrogen production to our readers.

  13. International Energy Agency 2012 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-06-01

    The IEA Executive Director’s Annual Report 2012 is the first of a regular annual series reporting on the IEA’s operational and organisational achievements, as well as challenges and events over the year. It is presented to the IEA Governing Board and released publicly to ensure transparency and also to take stock of the organisation’s activities from a strategic perspective. 2012 was a transitional year for the IEA, given fundamental changes in the global energy economy as well as internal management and budget issues. At the same time demand for IEA products set new records, and the public and political impact of IEA work through effective communication was measured as high.

  14. Complex Metal Hydrides for Hydrogen, Thermal and Electrochemical Energy Storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moller, Kasper T.; Sheppard, Drew; Ravnsbaek, Dorthe B.

    2017-01-01

    Hydrogen has a very diverse chemistry and reacts with most other elements to form compounds, which have fascinating structures, compositions and properties. Complex metal hydrides are a rapidly expanding class of materials, approaching multi-functionality, in particular within the energy storage...... inspiration to solve the great challenge of our time: efficient conversion and large-scale storage of renewable energy....... field. This review illustrates that complex metal hydrides may store hydrogen in the solid state, act as novel battery materials, both as electrolytes and electrode materials, or store solar heat in a more efficient manner as compared to traditional heat storage materials. Furthermore, it is highlighted...

  15. Hydrogen production as a promising nuclear energy application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanek, V.

    2003-01-01

    Hydrogen production from nuclear is a field of application which eventually can outweigh power production by nuclear power plants. There are two feasible routes of hydrogen production. The one uses heat to obtain hydrogen from natural gas through steam reforming of methane. This is an highly energy-consuming process requiring temperatures up to 900 deg C and producing carbon dioxide as a by-product. The other method includes direct thermochemical processes to obtain hydrogen, using sulfuric acid for instance. Sulfuric acid is decomposed thermally by the reaction: H 2 SO 4 -> H 2 O = SO 2 + (1/2) O 2 , followed by the processes I 2 + SO 2 + 2H O -> 2HI + H 2 SO 4 and 2HI -> H 2 + I 2 . The use of nuclear for this purpose is currently examined in Japan and in the US. (P.A.)

  16. International Atomic Energy Agency Annual Report 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    Along with an examination of the state of worldwide nuclear-related developments last year, the IAEA Annual Report 2014 provides a comprehensive look at the Agency’s activities over the course of the year. From coordinating 125 research projects to conducting 2114 nuclear verification inspections worldwide, the IAEA’s 2560 employees continued to work on a wide range of areas to meet the evolving needs of Member States. The Annual Report, published in August, will be discussed and endorsed at the IAEA’s General Conference in September. Serving 162 Member States, two more than the year before, the IAEA’s activities in 2014 focused on the following areas, in line with its mandate: • Nuclear Energy: The IAEA assisted Member States in the introduction of nuclear power programmes and in the efficient and safe use of nuclear energy, fostering innovation and building capability in energy planning, analysis, and nuclear information and knowledge management. • Nuclear Sciences and Applications: The IAEA continued to assist Member States in building, strengthening and maintaining capacities in the safe, peaceful and secure use of nuclear technology. • Nuclear Safety and Security: The IAEA and its Member States continued to strengthen nuclear safety worldwide, including through the implementation of the Action Plan on Nuclear Safety, which had been endorsed by the General Conference in 2011 after the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant earlier that year. The IAEA also supported States, upon request, in their efforts to achieve effective security wherever nuclear and other radioactive materials are in use. • Nuclear Verification: The IAEA implemented safeguards in 180 States and as at the end of every year, it drew conclusions for each State for which safeguards were applied. • Technical Cooperation: The IAEA assisted Member States in their efforts to achieve the Millennium Development Goals and in preparation for the post-2015 Sustainable

  17. Renewable energy for hydrogen production and sustainable urban mobility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briguglio, N.; Andaloro, L.; Ferraro, M.; Di Blasi, A.; Dispenza, G.; Antonucci, V.; Matteucci, F.; Breedveld, L.

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, the number of power plants based on renewable energy (RWE) has been increasing and hydrogen as an energy carrier has become a suitable medium-to-long term storage solution as well as a ''fuel'' for FCEV's because of its CO 2 -free potential. In this context, the aim of the present study is to carry out both an economic and environmental analysis of a start-up RWE plant using a simulation code developed in previous work and a Life Cycle Assessment (LCA). The plant will be located in the South of Italy (Puglia) and will consist of different RWE sources (Wind Power, Photovoltaic, Biomass). RWE will be used to produce hydrogen from an electrolyzer, which will feed a fleet of buses using different fuels (methane, hydrogen, or a mixture of these). In particular, a wind turbine of 850 kW will feed a hydrogen production plant and a biomass plant will produce methane. Preliminary studies have shown that it is possible to obtain hydrogen at a competitive cost (DOE target) and that components (wind turbine, electrolyzer, vessel, etc.) influence the final price. In addition, LCA results have permitted a comparison of different minibuses using either fossil fuels or renewable energy sources. (author)

  18. Renewable energy for hydrogen production and sustainable urban mobility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briguglio, N.; Andaloro, L.; Ferraro, M.; Di Blasi, A.; Dispenza, G.; Antonucci, V. [Istituto di Tecnologie avanzate per l' Energia ' ' Nicola Giordano' ' Salita S, Lucia sopra Contesse, 5, 98126 Messina (Italy); Matteucci, F. [TRE SpA Tozzi Renewable Energy, Via Zuccherificio, 10, 48100 Mezzano (RA) (Italy); Breedveld, L. [2B Via della Chiesa Campocroce, 4, 31021 Mogliano Veneto (TV) (Italy)

    2010-09-15

    In recent years, the number of power plants based on renewable energy (RWE) has been increasing and hydrogen as an energy carrier has become a suitable medium-to-long term storage solution as well as a ''fuel'' for FCEV's because of its CO{sub 2}-free potential. In this context, the aim of the present study is to carry out both an economic and environmental analysis of a start-up RWE plant using a simulation code developed in previous work and a Life Cycle Assessment (LCA). The plant will be located in the South of Italy (Puglia) and will consist of different RWE sources (Wind Power, Photovoltaic, Biomass). RWE will be used to produce hydrogen from an electrolyzer, which will feed a fleet of buses using different fuels (methane, hydrogen, or a mixture of these). In particular, a wind turbine of 850 kW will feed a hydrogen production plant and a biomass plant will produce methane. Preliminary studies have shown that it is possible to obtain hydrogen at a competitive cost (DOE target) and that components (wind turbine, electrolyzer, vessel, etc.) influence the final price. In addition, LCA results have permitted a comparison of different minibuses using either fossil fuels or renewable energy sources. (author)

  19. Correlation energy generating potentials for molecular hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, B.S.; Thakkar, A.J.

    1985-01-01

    A variety of local correlation energy functionals are currently in use. All of them depend, to some extent, on modeling the correlation energy of a homogeneous electron fluid. Since atomic and molecular charge densities are neither uniform nor slowly varying, it is important to attempt to use known high accuracy wave functions to learn about correlation energy functionals appropriate to such systems. We have extended the definition of the correlation energy generating potentials V/sub c/ introduced by Ros. A charge density response to correlation has been allowed for by inclusion of an electron--nuclear component V/sup e/n/sub c/ in addition to the electron--electron component V/sup e/e/sub c/. Two different definitions of V/sup e/n/sub c/ are given. We present the first calculations of V/sub c/ for a molecular system: H 2 . The results show that V/sup e/n/sub c/, in either definition, is by no means negligible. Moreover, V/sup e/e/sub c/ and both forms of V/sup e/n/sub c/ show significant nonlocal dependence on the charge density. Calculations with ten different model correlation energy functionals show that none of them is particularly sensitive to the charge density. However, they are quite sensitive to the parametrization of the electron fluid correlation energy. The schemes which include self-interaction corrections (SIC) are found to be superior to those of Kohn--Sham type. The correlation energy generating potentials implied by the SIC type and empirical correlation energy functionals are found to correspond roughly to averages of one of the accurate potentials

  20. Hydrogen energy - Abundant, efficient, clean: A debate over the energy-system-of-change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winter, Carl-Jochen [International Association for Hydrogen Energy (IAHE), c/o ENERGON Carl-Jochen Winter e.K., Obere St.-Leonhardstr. 9, 88662 Ueberlingen (Germany)

    2009-07-15

    Both secondary energies, electricity and hydrogen, have much in common: they are technology driven; both are produced from any available primary energy; once produced both are environmentally and climatically clean over the entire length of their respective conversion chains, from production to utilization; they are electrochemically interchangeable via electrolyses and fuel cells; both rely on each other, e.g., when electrolyzers and liquefiers need electricity or when electricity-providing low temperature fuel cells need hydrogen; in cases of secondary energy transport over longer distances they compete with each other; in combined fossil fuel cycles both hydrogen and electricity are produced in parallel exergetically highly efficiently; hydrogen in addition to electricity helps exergizing the energy system and, thus, maximizing the available technical work. There are dissimilarities, too: electricity transports information, hydrogen does not; hydrogen stores and transports energy, electricity does not (in macroeconomic terms). The most obvious dissimilarity is their market presence, both in capacities and in availability: Electricity is globally ubiquitous (almost), whilst hydrogen energy is still used in only selected industrial areas and in much smaller capacities. The article describes in 15 chapters, 33 figures, 3 tables, and 2 Annexes the up-and-coming hydrogen energy economy, its environmental and climatic relevance, its exergizing influence on the energy system, its effect on decarbonizing fossil fueled power plants, the introduction of the novel non-heat-engine-related electrochemical energy converter fuel cell in portable electronics, in stationary and mobile applications. Hydrogen guarantees environmentally and climatically clean transportation on land, in air and space, and at sea. Hydrogen facilitates the electrification of vehicles with practically no range limits. (author)

  1. Potential of hydrogen production from wind energy in Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uqaili, M. A.; Harijan, K.; Memon, M.

    2007-01-01

    The transport sector consumes about 34% of the total commercial energy consumption in Pakistan. About 97% of fuel used in this sector is oil and the remaining 3% is CNG and electricity. The indigenous reserves of oil and gas are limited and the country is heavily dependent on the import of oil. The oil import bill is serious strain on the country's economy. The production, transportation and consumption of fossil fuels also degrade the environment. Therefore, it is important to explore the opportunities for clean renewable energy for long-term energy supply in the transport sector. Sindh, the second largest province of Pakistan, has about 250 km long coastline. The estimated average annual wind speed at 50 m height at almost all sites is about 6-7 m/s, indicating that Sindh has the potential to effectively utilize wind energy source for power generation and hydrogen production. A system consisting of wind turbines coupled with electrolyzers is a promising design to produce hydrogen. This paper presents an assessment of the potential of hydrogen production from wind energy in the coastal area of Sindh, Pakistan. The estimated technical potential of wind power is 386 TWh per year. If the wind electricity is used to power electrolyzers, 347.4 TWh hydrogen can be produced annually, which is about 1.2 times the total energy consumption in the transport sector of Pakistan in 2005. The substitution of oil with renewable hydrogen is essential to increase energy independence, improve domestic economies, and reduce greenhouse gas and other harmful emissions

  2. Transportable Hydrogen Research Plant Based on Renewable Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikel Fernandez; Carlos Madina; Asier Gil de Muro; Jose Angel Alzolab; Iker Marino; Javier Garcia-Tejedor; Juan Carlos Mugica; Inaki Azkkrate; Jose Angel Alzola

    2006-01-01

    Efficiency and cost are nowadays the most important barriers for the penetration of systems based on hydrogen and renewable energies. According to this background, TECNALIA Corporation has started in 2004 the HIDROTEC project: 'Hydrogen Technologies for Renewable Energy Applications'. The ultimate aim of this project is the implementation of a multipurpose demonstration and research plant in order to explore diverse options for sustainable energetic solutions based on hydrogen. The plant is conceived as an independent system that can be easily transported and assembled. Research and demonstration activities can thus be carried out at very different locations, including commercial renewable facilities. Modularity and scalability have also been taken into account for an optimised exploitation. (authors)

  3. Hydrogen like energy and materials for fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez V, S. M.

    2010-01-01

    The researches on the production, storage and the use of hydrogen like fuel or energy carrying are carried out in several laboratories around the world. In the Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ), from the year of 1993 they are carried out researches about the synthesis of electro-catalysts materials than can serve in the hydrogen production starting from the electrolysis of the water, or in fuel cells, as well as of semiconductor materials for the photo-electrolysis of the water. Recently, in collaboration with other Departments of the ININ, the hydrogen production has been approached starting from fruit and vegetable wastes, with the purpose of evaluating the possibility that this residuals can be utilized for the energy obtaining and that they are not only garbage that causes problems of environmental pollution, generate toxic gases and pollute the soil with the organic acids that take place during their fermentation. (Author)

  4. Atomistic Modelling of Materials for Clean Energy Applications : hydrogen generation, hydrogen storage, and Li-ion battery

    OpenAIRE

    Qian, Zhao

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis, a number of clean-energy materials for hydrogen generation, hydrogen storage, and Li-ion battery energy storage applications have been investigated through state-of-the-art density functional theory. As an alternative fuel, hydrogen has been regarded as one of the promising clean energies with the advantage of abundance (generated through water splitting) and pollution-free emission if used in fuel cell systems. However, some key problems such as finding efficient ways to prod...

  5. The origins of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldschmidt, B [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, International Relations (France)

    1977-08-15

    On 23 October 1956 in New York, 81 member countries of the United Nations Organization or of its specialized agencies adopted the Statute of the International Atomic Energy Agency, which was to go into formal operation before the end of 1957. A major step towards world-wide control of nuclear energy thus came to be taken more than ten years after the idea of establishing such control had been launched - the first tentative efforts, from 1946 to 1948, having ended in failure. The account follows in an attempt to retrace this 'prehistory' of the IAEA.

  6. The origins of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldschmidt, B.

    1977-01-01

    On 23 October 1956 in New York, 81 member countries of the United Nations Organization or of its specialized agencies adopted the Statute of the International Atomic Energy Agency, which was to go into formal operation before the end of 1957. A major step towards world-wide control of nuclear energy thus came to be taken more than ten years after the idea of establishing such control had been launched - the first tentative efforts, from 1946 to 1948, having ended in failure. The account follows in an attempt to retrace this 'prehistory' of the IAEA

  7. The prepossession of international institutions for energy. The example International Energy Agency (IEA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fell, H.J.

    2007-01-01

    In the contribution under consideration, the author reports on the fact that large international energy agencies, which are advisory active in energy questions active, affect the world-wide policy. In particular, these are the International Atomic Energy Authority in Vienna (Austria) and the International Energy Agency in Paris (France). The International Energy Agency is considered world-wide as the most important institution for all energy questions. Nearly annually, it publishes the World Energy Outlook by summarizing the most important current energy data of the world, prognoses the future power supply and makes future energy prices. The reality of the International Energy Agency looks completely differently: It performs no own sciences, but consists of statisticians, who gather only statistical data without scientific analysis. The author of this contribution summarizes the work of the International Energy Agency in three points: (a) Promotion of the interests of companies in mineral oil, natural gas, coal and atomic energy; (b) Hindering the world-wide conversion of renewable energy; (c) Endangerment of the world economy and prevention of an effective climate protection. The International Energy Agency does not justice to its own goal of a reliable, economical and pollution free power supply

  8. Autonomous hydrogen power plants with renewable energy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popel', O.S.; Frid, S.E.; Shpil'rajn, Eh.Eh.; Izosimov, D.B.; Tumanov, V.L.

    2006-01-01

    One studies the principles to design independent hydrogen power plants (IHPP) operating on renewable energy sources and the approaches to design a pilot IHP plant. One worded tasks of mathematical simulation and of calculations to substantiate the optimal configuration of the mentioned plants depending on the ambient conditions of operation and on peculiar features of a consumer [ru

  9. Economic and ordinal benefits of Hydrogen Energy Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giannantoni, C.; Zoli, M.

    2009-01-01

    A method for assessing economic, environmental and energy investments is particularly suited for hydrogen technologies, because it makes it possible to calculate business returns, negative externalities and, above all, the economic benefits to the citizens: the monetizable positive externalities and the ordinal benefits, i.e. those which cannot be reduced to a simple monetary value. [it

  10. Quantum yield and translational energy of hydrogen atoms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TECS

    erage kinetic energy of H atoms calculated from Doppler profiles was found to be ET(lab) = (50 ± 3) kJ/mol. The ... in this wavelength range H atoms are produced by ... tral hydrogen. 1,9 ... a spectral window of molecular oxygen, solar radia-.

  11. Alternative Energetics DC Microgrid With Hydrogen Energy Storage System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaļeskis Genadijs

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper is related to an alternative energetics microgrid with a wind generator and a hydrogen energy storage system. The main aim of this research is the development of solutions for effective use of the wind generators in alternative energetics devices, at the same time providing uninterrupted power supply of the critical loads. In this research, it was accepted that the alternative energetics microgrid operates in an autonomous mode and the connection to the conventional power grid is not used. In the case when wind speed is low, the necessary power is provided by the energy storage system, which includes a fuel cell and a tank with stored hydrogen. The theoretical analysis of the storage system operation is made. The possible usage time of the stored hydrogen depends on the available amount of hydrogen and the consumption of the hydrogen by the fuel cell. The consumption, in turn, depends on used fuel cell power. The experimental results suggest that if the wind generator can provide only a part of the needed power, the abiding power can be provided by the fuel cell. In this case, a load filter is necessary to decrease the fuel cell current pulsations.

  12. Energy taxation policy in the European Union: the hydrogen case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernyavs'ka, L.; Gulli, F.; Lanfranconi, C.

    2006-01-01

    The paper proceeds as follows. Section 2 describes the state of art of the taxation policy on hydrogen in EU Countries. Section 3 describes the methodology used in this paper. Section 4 compares the external costs of the different motor fuel cycles. Section 5 deals with the problem of energy taxation describing a proposal for European energy tax harmonisation based on the internalisation of external costs. Finally, section 6 resumes the main results of the analysis

  13. Positron scattering by atomic hydrogen at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgins, K.; Burke, P.G.; Walters, H.R.J.

    1990-01-01

    Results of an accurate calculation based upon the intermediate energy R-matrix theory are reported for elastic scattering of positrons by atomic hydrogen. T-matrix elements for both low and intermediate energy scattering are evaluated for the S e , P o , D e and F o partial wave symmetries. The low-energy elastic phaseshifts are found to be in good agreement with previous accurate variational calculations. Using an optical potential approach to include the effect of the higher partial waves, elastic and total cross sections are presented for energies ranging from near threshold to 3.7 Rydbergs. (author)

  14. Comparative assessment of hydrogen storage and international electricity trade for a Danish energy system with wind power and hydrogen/fuel cell technologies. Final project report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soerensen, Bent (Roskilde University, Energy, Environment and Climate Group, Dept. of Environmental, Social and Spatial Change (ENSPAC) (DK)); Meibom, P.; Nielsen, Lars Henrik; Karlsson, K. (Technical Univ. of Denmark, Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Systems Analysis Dept., Roskilde (DK)); Hauge Pedersen, A. (DONG Energy, Copenhagen (DK)); Lindboe, H.H.; Bregnebaek, L. (ea Energy Analysis, Copenhagen (DK))

    2008-02-15

    This report is the final outcome of a project carried out under the Danish Energy Agency's Energy Research Programme. The aims of the project can be summarized as follows: 1) Simulation of an energy system with a large share of wind power and possibly hydrogen, including economic optimization through trade at the Nordic power pool (exchange market) and/or use of hydrogen storage. The time horizon is 50 years. 2) Formulating new scenarios for situations with and without development of viable fuel cell technologies. 3) Updating software to solve the abovementioned problems. The project has identified a range of scenarios for all parts of the energy system, including most visions of possible future developments. (BA)

  15. 77 FR 61592 - Arkansas Electric Cooperative Corporation; Mississippi Delta Energy Agency; Clarksdale Public...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-10

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket No. EL12-110-000] Arkansas Electric Cooperative Corporation; Mississippi Delta Energy Agency; Clarksdale Public Utilities Commission.... 825(h), Arkansas Electric Cooperative Corporation, Mississippi Delta Energy Agency, and its two...

  16. Hydrogen-antihydrogen interactions at low energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armour, E.A.G.; Carr, J.M.; Zeman, V.

    1999-01-01

    The main cause of loss of trapped AH is due to collisions with H 2 and He. As a first step towards treating these reactions we are studying the interaction of AH with H. We have carried out variational calculations to determine an upper bound to the smallest internuclear distance at which the light particles are still bound to the nuclei. We are currently in the process of taking into account the motion of the nuclei. This will enable us to calculate cross-sections for low energy H-AH scattering

  17. Application of hydrogen isotopes and metal hydrides in future energy source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guoqiang, Jiang [Sichuan Inst. of Materials and Technology, Chengdu, SC (China)

    1994-12-01

    The probable application of hydrogen isotopes and metal hydrides to future energy source is reviewed. Starting from existing state of China`s energy source, the importance for developing hydrogen energy and fusion energy is explained. It is suggested that the application investigation of hydrogen energy and hydrogen storage materials should be spurred and encouraged; keeping track of the development on tritium technology for fusion reactor is stressed.

  18. Application of hydrogen isotopes and metal hydrides in future energy source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Guoqiang

    1994-12-01

    The probable application of hydrogen isotopes and metal hydrides to future energy source is reviewed. Starting from existing state of China's energy source, the importance for developing hydrogen energy and fusion energy is explained. It is suggested that the application investigation of hydrogen energy and hydrogen storage materials should be spurred and encouraged; keeping track of the development on tritium technology for fusion reactor is stressed

  19. Wind energy-hydrogen storage hybrid power generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wenjei Yang; Orhan Aydin [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics

    2001-07-01

    In this theoretical investigation, a hybrid power generation system utilizing wind energy and hydrogen storage is presented. Firstly, the available wind energy is determined, which is followed by evaluating the efficiency of the wind energy conversion system. A revised model of windmill is proposed from which wind power density and electric power output are determined. When the load demand is less than the output of the generation, the excess electric power is relayed to the electrolytic cell where it is used to electrolyse the de-ionized water. Hydrogen thus produced can be stored as hydrogen compressed gas or liquid. Once the hydrogen is stored in an appropriate high-pressure vessel, it can be used in a combustion engine, fuel cell, or burned in a water-cooled burner to produce a very high-quality steam for space heating, or to drive a turbine to generate electric power. It can also be combined with organic materials to produce synthetic fuels. The conclusion is that the system produces no harmful waste and depletes no resources. Note that this system also works well with a solar collector instead of a windmill. (author)

  20. Hydrogen is an energy source for hydrothermal vent symbioses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Jillian M; Zielinski, Frank U; Pape, Thomas; Seifert, Richard; Moraru, Cristina; Amann, Rudolf; Hourdez, Stephane; Girguis, Peter R; Wankel, Scott D; Barbe, Valerie; Pelletier, Eric; Fink, Dennis; Borowski, Christian; Bach, Wolfgang; Dubilier, Nicole

    2011-08-10

    The discovery of deep-sea hydrothermal vents in 1977 revolutionized our understanding of the energy sources that fuel primary productivity on Earth. Hydrothermal vent ecosystems are dominated by animals that live in symbiosis with chemosynthetic bacteria. So far, only two energy sources have been shown to power chemosynthetic symbioses: reduced sulphur compounds and methane. Using metagenome sequencing, single-gene fluorescence in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry, shipboard incubations and in situ mass spectrometry, we show here that the symbionts of the hydrothermal vent mussel Bathymodiolus from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge use hydrogen to power primary production. In addition, we show that the symbionts of Bathymodiolus mussels from Pacific vents have hupL, the key gene for hydrogen oxidation. Furthermore, the symbionts of other vent animals such as the tubeworm Riftia pachyptila and the shrimp Rimicaris exoculata also have hupL. We propose that the ability to use hydrogen as an energy source is widespread in hydrothermal vent symbioses, particularly at sites where hydrogen is abundant.

  1. Smooth feeding-in of wind energy via hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehmann, J.; Sponholz, C.; Luschtinetz, O.U.T.; Miege, A.; Sandlass, H.

    2006-01-01

    For the northern part of Germany the harvest of wind energy became characteristic. 1,018 GW have been installed by 2004. A higher electricity production with re-powered wind parks on shore and new off shore parks is planned. The estimated production could reach 50 GW by 2020. On the other hand, more than 20 30 % discontinuous electricity related to the demand could bring instabilities of the net. Unfortunately the demand in North-Germany is a relatively small one and the net is weak. There are three possibilities to protect the net: 1. Reconstruction of the net, especially net extension 2. Improvement of the prognosis of wind and electricity consumption as well 3. A net management, which shuts up wind parks during less demand periods Point 2 and 3 are related with the stand by of back-up power, power delivered by conventional power stations or storage power stations (for example storage by water pumping). The proposal is as follows: Wind parks should be connected with a loop from electrolysis, gas storage and reconversion of hydrogen into electricity. In this way a park will be able to feed electricity into the net according to the actual demand and controlled by the demand. Going into detail a wind farm can run according to four scenarios. The first one is the conventional wind park, which causes the problems mentioned above. The electrical energy output follows the natural wind yield and the grid has to be adapted to the wind power feed-in. One solution for a temporal decoupling of wind yield and electricity output is a combination of windmills with a storage loop as shown in scenario II and IV. The system of scenario II de-couples the fluctuating input (wind) and the constant output (electricity). The advantage of this system is that the electrical output is constant and independent of the actual wind speed. For this reason this wind park acts as a constant power plant within the grid. Scenario Ill, the grid adapted feed-in, extends the former scenario with a

  2. Environment. 1980-1994. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-06-01

    The catalogue lists all publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with the Environment issued during the period 1980-1993. The major subjects covered include: effect of agrochemical residues on soils and aquatic ecosystems, application of radioisotopes in conservation of the environment, siting of nuclear power plants, environmental isotope data and environmental contamination due to nuclear accidents

  3. Radiation therapy. 1990-2001. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-04-01

    This catalog lists all sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with Radiation Therapy, and issued during the period 1 January 1990 - 30 April 2001. Most publications are issued in English, though some are also available in other languages. These are noted in the catalogue

  4. Environment. 1990-2001. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-05-01

    This catalog lists all sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with the Environment, and issued during the period 1 January 1990 - 30 April 2001. Most publications are issued in English, though some are also available in other languages. These are noted in the catalogue

  5. International Atomic Energy Agency Publications. Catalogue 1986-1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-11-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency issued from 1986 up to the end of 1999 and still available. Some earlier titles which form part of an established series or are still considered important have also been included. The catalogue is in CD-ROM format

  6. Energy Literacy and Agency of New Zealand Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre-Bielschowsky, I.; Lawson, R.; Stephenson, J.; Todd, S.

    2017-01-01

    The development of energy literacy (knowledge, attitudes, and intended behaviour) and agency of New Zealand children (age 9-10) were investigated through thematic and exploratory statistical analyses of interviews (October 2011-April 2012) with 26 children, their parents and teachers, focus groups and photo elicitation. The children knew that…

  7. International Energy Agency Solar Heating and Cooling Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, A. J.

    This trip was undertaken to participate in and represent the United States Industry at the International Energy Agency (IEA) Solar Heating and Cooling Program (SHCP) Task 14 Workshop. The meeting took place at the A1 Bani Hotel in Rome Italy.

  8. Kinetics with deactivation of methylcyclohexane dehydrogenation for hydrogen energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maria, G; Marin, A; Wyss, C; Mueller, S; Newson, E [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    The methylcyclohexane dehydrogenation step to recycle toluene and release hydrogen is being studied as part of a hydrogen energy storage project. The reaction is performed catalytically in a fixed bed reactor, and the efficiency of this step significantly determines overall system economics. The fresh catalyst kinetics and the deactivation of the catalyst by coke play an important role in the process analysis. The main reaction kinetics were determined from isothermal experiments using a parameter sensitivity analysis for model discrimination. An activation energy for the main reaction of 220{+-}11 kJ/mol was obtained from a two-parameter model. From non-isothermal deactivation in PC-controlled integral reactors, an activation energy for deactivation of 160 kJ/mol was estimated. A model for catalyst coke content of 3-17 weight% was compared with experimental data. (author) 3 figs., 6 refs.

  9. Energy distribution and transfer in flowing hydrogen microwave plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    This thesis is an experimental investigation of the physical and chemical properties of a hydrogen discharge in a flowing microwave plasma system. The plasma system is the mechanisms utilized in an electrothermal propulsion concept to convert electromagnetic energy into the kinetic energy of flowing hydrogen gas. The plasmas are generated inside a 20-cm ID resonant cavity at a driving frequency of 2.45 GHz. The flowing gas is contained in a coaxially positioned 22-mm ID quartz discharge tube. The physical and chemical properties are examined for absorbed powers of 20-100 W, pressures of 0.5-10 torr, and flow rates of 0-10,000 μ-moles/sec. A calorimetry system enclosing the plasma system to accurately measure the energy inputs and outputs has been developed. The rate of energy that is transferred to the hydrogen gas as it flows through the plasma system is determined as a function of absorbed power, pressure, and flow rate to +/-1.8 W from an energy balance around the system. The percentage of power that is transferred to the gas is found to increase with increasing flow rate, decrease with increasing pressure, and to be independent of absorbed power

  10. U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen Storage Cost Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Law, Karen; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey; Han, Vickie; Chan, Michael; Chiang, Helena; Leonard, Jon

    2013-03-11

    The overall objective of this project is to conduct cost analyses and estimate costs for on- and off-board hydrogen storage technologies under development by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) on a consistent, independent basis. This can help guide DOE and stakeholders toward the most-promising research, development and commercialization pathways for hydrogen-fueled vehicles. A specific focus of the project is to estimate hydrogen storage system cost in high-volume production scenarios relative to the DOE target that was in place when this cost analysis was initiated. This report and its results reflect work conducted by TIAX between 2004 and 2012, including recent refinements and updates. The report provides a system-level evaluation of costs and performance for four broad categories of on-board hydrogen storage: (1) reversible on-board metal hydrides (e.g., magnesium hydride, sodium alanate); (2) regenerable off-board chemical hydrogen storage materials(e.g., hydrolysis of sodium borohydride, ammonia borane); (3) high surface area sorbents (e.g., carbon-based materials); and 4) advanced physical storage (e.g., 700-bar compressed, cryo-compressed and liquid hydrogen). Additionally, the off-board efficiency and processing costs of several hydrogen storage systems were evaluated and reported, including: (1) liquid carrier, (2) sodium borohydride, (3) ammonia borane, and (4) magnesium hydride. TIAX applied a bottom-up costing methodology customized to analyze and quantify the processes used in the manufacture of hydrogen storage systems. This methodology, used in conjunction with ® software and other tools, developed costs for all major tank components, balance-of-tank, tank assembly, and system assembly. Based on this methodology, the figure below shows the projected on-board high-volume factory costs of the various analyzed hydrogen storage systems, as designed. Reductions in the key cost drivers may bring hydrogen storage system costs closer to this DOE target

  11. Hydrogen generator characteristics for storage of renewably-generated energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotowicz, Janusz; Bartela, Łukasz; Węcel, Daniel; Dubiel, Klaudia

    2017-01-01

    The paper presents a methodology for determining the efficiency of a hydrogen generator taking the power requirements of its auxiliary systems into account. Authors present results of laboratory experiments conducted on a hydrogen generator containing a PEM water electrolyzer for a wide range of device loads. On the basis of measurements, the efficiency characteristics of electrolyzers were determined, including that of an entire hydrogen generator using a monitored power supply for its auxiliary devices. Based on the results of the experimental tests, the authors have proposed generalized characteristics of hydrogen generator efficiency. These characteristics were used for analyses of a Power-to-Gas system cooperating with a 40 MW wind farm with a known yearly power distribution. It was assumed that nightly-produced hydrogen is injected into the natural gas transmission system. An algorithm for determining the thermodynamic and economic characteristics of a Power-to-Gas installation is proposed. These characteristics were determined as a function of the degree of storage of the energy produced in a Renewable Energy Sources (RES) installation, defined as the ratio of the amount of electricity directed to storage to the annual amount of electricity generated in the RES installation. Depending on the degree of storage, several quantities were determined. - Highlights: • The efficiency characteristics of PEM electrolyzer are determined. • Generalized characteristics of hydrogen generator efficiency are proposed. • Method of choice of electrolyser nominal power for Power-to-Gas system was proposed. • Development of Power-to-Gas systems requires implementation of support mechanisms.

  12. Photobiological production of hydrogen: a solar energy conversion option

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, P.; Lien, S.; Seibert, M.

    1979-01-01

    This literature survey of photobiological hydrogen production covers the period from its discovery in relatively pure cultures during the early 1930s to the present. The focus is hydrogen production by phototrophic organisms (and their components) which occurs at the expense of light energy and electron-donating substrates. The survey covers the major contributions in the area; however, in many cases, space has limited the degree of detail provided. Among the topics included is a brief historical overview of hydrogen metabolism in photosynthetic bacteria, eucaryotic algae, and cyanobacteria (blue--green algae). The primary enzyme systems, including hydrogenase and nitrogenase, are discussed along with the manner in which they are coupled to electron transport and the primary photochemistry of photosynthesis. A number of in vivo and in vitro photobiological hydrogen evolving schemes including photosynthetic bacterial, green algal, cyanobacterial, two-stage, and cell-free systems are examined in some detail. The remainder of the review discusses specific technical problem areas that currently limit the yield and duration of many of the systems and research that might lead to progress in these specific areas. The final section outlines, in broadest terms, future research directions necessary to develop practical photobiological hydrogen-producing systems. Both whole cell (near- to mid-term) and cell-free (long-term) systems should be emphasized. Photosynthetic bacteria currently show the most promise for near-term applied systems.

  13. A comparison of hydrogen with alternate energy forms from coal and nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, K.E.

    1976-01-01

    Alternate energy forms that can be produced from coal and nuclear energy have been analyzed on efficiency, economic and end-use grounds. These forms include hydrogen, methane, electricity, and EVA-ADAM, a 'chemical heat pipe' approach to energy transmission. The EVA-ADAM system for nuclear heat appears to be economically competitive with the other energy carriers except over very large distances. The cost of hydrogen derived from coal is approximately equal to that of methane derived from the same source when compared on an equal BTU basis. Thermochemically derived hydrogen from nuclear energy shows a break-even range with hydrogen derived from coal at coal costs of from Pound33 to 80/ton depending on the cost of nuclear heat. Electricity and electrolytically derived hydrogen are the most expensive energy carriers and electricity's use should be limited to applications involving work rather than heat. Continued work in thermochemical hydrogen production schemes should be supported as an energy option for the future. (author)

  14. Japan's New Sunshine Project. 1998 Annual summary of hydrogen energy R and D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-07-01

    Summarized herein are the reports on R and D efforts on hydrogen energy, as part of the FY 1998 New Sunshine Project. For production of hydrogen, characteristics related to transport number were investigated for steam electrolysis at high temperature, in which a sintered ceramic powder was used as the electrolyte and the cell was equipped with platinum electrodes. For utilization of hydrogen, energy conversion techniques were investigated using hydrogen occluding alloys for testing methods for alloy microstructures and hydrogenation characteristics, and preparation of and performance testing methods for the cathodes charged with the aid of hydrogen gas. For analysis/assessment for development of hydrogen-related techniques, the investigated items included water electrolysis with solid polymer electrolytes, hydrogen transport techniques using metal hydrides, hydrogen storing techniques using metal hydrides, hydrogen engines, and techniques for preventing hydrogen embrittlement. Analysis/assessment for development of hydrogen turbines was also investigated as one of the 12 R and D themes reported herein. (NEDO)

  15. International Energy Agency Ocean Energy Systems Task 10 Wave Energy Converter Modeling Verification and Validation: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wendt, Fabian F [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Yu, Yi-Hsiang [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Nielsen, Kim [Ramboll, Copenhagen (Denmark); Ruehl, Kelley [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bunnik, Tim [MARIN (Netherlands); Touzon, Imanol [Tecnalia (Spain); Nam, Bo Woo [KRISO (Korea, Rep. of); Kim, Jeong Seok [KRISO (Korea, Rep. of); Janson, Carl Erik [Chalmers University (Sweden); Jakobsen, Ken-Robert [EDRMedeso (Norway); Crowley, Sarah [WavEC (Portugal); Vega, Luis [Hawaii Natural Energy Institute (United States); Rajagopalan, Krishnakimar [Hawaii Natural Energy Institute (United States); Mathai, Thomas [Glosten (United States); Greaves, Deborah [Plymouth University (United Kingdom); Ransley, Edward [Plymouth University (United Kingdom); Lamont-Kane, Paul [Queen' s University Belfast (United Kingdom); Sheng, Wanan [University College Cork (Ireland); Costello, Ronan [Wave Venture (United Kingdom); Kennedy, Ben [Wave Venture (United Kingdom); Thomas, Sarah [Floating Power Plant (Denmark); Heras, Pilar [Floating Power Plant (Denmark); Bingham, Harry [Technical University of Denmark (Denmark); Kurniawan, Adi [Aalborg University (Denmark); Kramer, Morten Mejlhede [Aalborg University (Denmark); Ogden, David [INNOSEA (France); Girardin, Samuel [INNOSEA (France); Babarit, Aurelien [EC Nantes (France); Wuillaume, Pierre-Yves [EC Nantes (France); Steinke, Dean [Dynamic Systems Analysis (Canada); Roy, Andre [Dynamic Systems Analysis (Canada); Beatty, Scott [Cascadia Coast Research (Canada); Schofield, Paul [ANSYS (United States); Kim, Kyong-Hwan [KRISO (Korea, Rep. of); Jansson, Johan [KTH Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); BCAM (Spain); Hoffman, Johan [KTH Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2017-10-16

    This is the first joint reference paper for the Ocean Energy Systems (OES) Task 10 Wave Energy Converter modeling verification and validation group. The group is established under the OES Energy Technology Network program under the International Energy Agency. OES was founded in 2001 and Task 10 was proposed by Bob Thresher (National Renewable Energy Laboratory) in 2015 and approved by the OES Executive Committee EXCO in 2016. The kickoff workshop took place in September 2016, wherein the initial baseline task was defined. Experience from similar offshore wind validation/verification projects (OC3-OC5 conducted within the International Energy Agency Wind Task 30) [1], [2] showed that a simple test case would help the initial cooperation to present results in a comparable way. A heaving sphere was chosen as the first test case. The team of project participants simulated different numerical experiments, such as heave decay tests and regular and irregular wave cases. The simulation results are presented and discussed in this paper.

  16. Hydrogen-Bromine Flow Battery: Hydrogen Bromine Flow Batteries for Grid Scale Energy Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2010-10-01

    GRIDS Project: LBNL is designing a flow battery for grid storage that relies on a hydrogen-bromine chemistry which could be more efficient, last longer and cost less than today’s lead-acid batteries. Flow batteries are fundamentally different from traditional lead-acid batteries because the chemical reactants that provide their energy are stored in external tanks instead of inside the battery. A flow battery can provide more energy because all that is required to increase its storage capacity is to increase the size of the external tanks. The hydrogen-bromine reactants used by LBNL in its flow battery are inexpensive, long lasting, and provide power quickly. The cost of the design could be well below $100 per kilowatt hour, which would rival conventional grid-scale battery technologies.

  17. International Atomic Energy Agency Safeguards: Challenge and response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spector, Leonard S.

    2017-11-01

    This article provides a critical review of the nuclear accounting and inspection system of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), known as "IAEA safeguards." The article focuses on the multiple challenges the Agency confronts in verifying that all nuclear activities in the countries under its safeguards system are being pursued for exclusively peaceful purposes. The principal challenges noted are those posed by: undeclared facilities, the development of enrichment and reprocessing capabilities, illicit procurement activities, denial of inspector access, difficulties in verifying absence of weaponization activities, and difficulties in establishing that all nuclear-relevant activities in a state are peaceful. The article is in the form of annotated PowerPoint briefing slides.

  18. International Atomic Energy Agency Publications. Catalogue 1986-1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-07-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency issued from 1986 up to the end of 1999 and still available. Some earlier titles which form part of an established series or are still considered of importance have been included. Most Agency publications are issued in English, though some are also available in Chinese, French, Russian or Spanish. This is noted as C for Chinese, E for English, F for French, R for Russian and S for Spanish by the relevant ISBN number

  19. Status of photoelectrochemical production of hydrogen and electrical energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byvik, C. E.; Walker, G. H.

    1976-01-01

    The efficiency for conversion of electromagnetic energy to chemical and electrical energy utilizing semiconductor single crystals as photoanodes in electrochemical cells was investigated. Efficiencies as high as 20 percent were achieved for the conversion of 330 nm radiation to chemical energy in the form of hydrogen by the photoelectrolysis of water in a SrTiO3 based cell. The SrTiO3 photoanodes were shown to be stable in 9.5 M NaOH solutions for periods up to 48 hours. Efficiencies of 9 percent were measured for the conversion of broadband visible radiation to hydrogen using n-type GaAs crystals as photoanodes. Crystals of GaAs coated with 500 nm of gold, silver, or tin for surface passivation show no significant change in efficiency. By suppressing the production of hydrogen in a CdSe-based photogalvanic cell, an efficiency of 9 percent was obtained in conversion of 633 nm light to electrical energy. A CdS-based photogalvanic cell produced a conversion efficiency of 5 percent for 500 nm radiation.

  20. Hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockris, John O'M

    2011-11-30

    The idea of a "Hydrogen Economy" is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO₂ in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H₂ from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO₂ from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan). Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs) by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech.

  1. Energy storage applications of activated carbons: supercapacitors and hydrogen storage

    OpenAIRE

    Sevilla Solís, Marta; Mokaya, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Porous carbons have several advantageous properties with respect to their use in energy applications that require constrained space such as in electrode materials for supercapacitors and as solid state hydrogen stores. The attractive properties of porous carbons include, ready abundance, chemical and thermal stability, ease of processability and low framework density. Activated carbons, which are perhaps the most explored class of porous carbons, have been traditionally employed as catalyst s...

  2. Integrated energy systems for hydrogen and electricity supply

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muradov, N. [Univ. of Central Florida, Cocoa, FL (United States). Florida Solar Energy Center; Manikowski, A.; Noland, G. [Procyon Power Systems Inc., Alameda, CA (United States)

    2002-07-01

    The United States will soon need an increase in electric generating capacity along with an increase in the distribution capacity of the electricity grid. The cost and time required to build additional electrical distribution and transmission systems can be avoided by using distributed power generation. This paper examines the development of an integrated stand-alone energy system that can produce hydrogen, electricity and heat. The concept is based on integrated operation of a thermocatalytic pyrolysis (TCP) reactor and a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). The benefits include high overall energy efficiency, the production of high quality hydrogen (90 to 95 per cent free of carbon oxides), low emissions, and fuel flexibility. Experimental data is presented regarding the thermocatalytic pyrolysis of methane compared with an iron-based catalyst (which is sulfur resistant) and gasification of the resulting carbon with steam and carbon dioxide. With distributed generation, additional electrical generating capacity can be added in small increments distributed over the grid. An integrated energy system will be applicable to any type of hydrocarbon fuel, such as natural gas, liquid propane gas, gasoline, kerosene, jet fuel, diesel fuel and sulfurous residual oils. The suitable range of operating parameters needed to decoke a catalyst bed using steam and carbon dioxide as a degasifying agent was also determined. The Fe-catalyst was efficient in both methane pyrolysis and steam/CO{sub 2} gasification of carbon. It was shown that the TCP and SOFC complement each other in may ways. With the IES, high quality hydrogen is delivered to the end user. IES can also operate as either a hydrogen production unit or as an electrical power generator. The energy efficiency of the IES is estimated at 45-55 per cent. 6 refs., 8 figs.

  3. Overview of Light Hydrogen-Based Low Energy Nuclear Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miley, George H.; Shrestha, Prajakti J.

    This paper reviews light water and hydrogen-based low-energy nuclear reactions (LENRs) including the different methodologies used to study these reactions and the results obtained. Reports of excess heat production, transmutation reactions, and nuclear radiation emission are cited. An aim of this review is to present a summary of the present status of light water LENR research and provide some insight into where this research is heading.

  4. Hydrogen-Oxygen PEM Regenerative Fuel Cell Energy Storage System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bents, David J.; Scullin, Vincent J.; Chang, Bei-Jiann; Johnson, Donald W.; Garcia, Christopher P.

    2005-01-01

    An introduction to the closed cycle hydrogen-oxygen polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) regenerative fuel cell (RFC), recently constructed at NASA Glenn Research Center, is presented. Illustrated with explanatory graphics and figures, this report outlines the engineering motivations for the RFC as a solar energy storage device, the system requirements, layout and hardware detail of the RFC unit at NASA Glenn, the construction history, and test experience accumulated to date with this unit.

  5. Nordic hydrogen energy foresight - challenges of managing the interactive process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eerola, A.; Loikkanen, T.; Koljonen, T.

    2005-01-01

    The paper discusses the managerial challenges of the Nordic Hydrogen Energy Foresight, a joint effort of the five Nordic countries (Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, Sweden). Interaction between research, industry and government, and combination ofjudgmental and formal procedures, were essential...... of the project in the light of a dynamic model ofshared knowledge creation. In particular, the ways in which the design and the methodological tools facilitated the process and its management are discussed. Some suggestions for forthcoming foresight exercises are also presented....

  6. Renewable energy carriers: Hydrogen or liquid air/nitrogen?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yongliang; Chen Haisheng; Zhang Xinjing; Tan Chunqing; Ding Yulong

    2010-01-01

    The world's energy demand is met mainly by the fossil fuels today. The use of such fuels, however, causes serious environmental issues, including global warming, ozone layer depletion and acid rains. A sustainable solution to the issues is to replace the fossil fuels with renewable ones. Implementing such a solution, however, requires overcoming a number of technological barriers including low energy density, intermittent supply and mobility of the renewable energy sources. A potential approach to overcoming these barriers is to use an appropriate energy carrier, which can store, transport and distribute energy. The work to be reported in this paper aims to assess and compare a chemical energy carrier, hydrogen, with a physical energy carrier, liquid air/nitrogen, and discuss potential applications of the physical carrier. The ocean energy is used as an example of the renewable energy sources in the work. The assessment and comparison are carried out in terms of the overall efficiency, including production, storage/transportation and energy extraction. The environmental impact, waste heat recovery and safety issues are also considered. It is found that the physical energy carrier may be a better alternative to the chemical energy carrier under some circumstances, particularly when there are waste heat sources.

  7. Hydrogen based energy storage for solar energy systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanhanen, J.; Hagstroem, M.; Lund, P. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Otaniemi (Finland). Advanced Energy Systems

    1998-10-01

    The main technical constraint in solar energy systems which operate around the year is the lack of suitable long-term energy storage. Conventional solutions to overcome the problem of seasonal storage in PV power systems are to use oversized batteries as a seasonal energy storage, or to use a diesel back-up generator. However, affordable lead-acid batteries are not very suitable for seasonal energy storage because of a high self-discharge rate and enhanced deterioration and divergence of the single cells during prolonged periods of low state of charge in times of low irradiation. These disadvantages can be avoided by a back-up system, e.g. a diesel generator, which car supply energy to the loads and charge the battery to the full state of charge to avoid the above mentioned disadvantages. Unfortunately, diesel generators have several disadvantages, e.g. poor starting reliability, frequent need for maintenance and noise

  8. European Hydrogen Energy Road-map (HyWays) - First Results from Simulation, Stakeholder Discussion and Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinhold Wurster; Ulrich Bunger; Jean-Marc Agator; Martin Wietschel; Harm Jeeninga

    2006-01-01

    HyWays is an integrated project, co-funded by research institutes, industry, national agencies and by the European Commission under the 6. Framework Programme. HyWays aims to develop a validated and well accepted Road-map for the introduction of hydrogen in the European energy system. The main characteristic of this Road-map is that it reflects real life conditions by taking into account not only technological but also country specific institutional, geographic and socio/economic barriers and opportunities. Both stationary and mobile applications are addressed, including possible synergies ('spill over effects') between these applications. HyWays will systematically describe the future steps to be taken for large-scale introduction of hydrogen as an energy carrier in the power market and transport sector and as a storage medium for renewable energy. An Action Plan for the support of the introduction of hydrogen technologies will be derived from this Road-map. (authors)

  9. Energy policy of the International Energy Agency (IEA) countries. General review of the year 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This book is a general review on energy policy leaded by Members countries of International Energy Agency (IEA) during the year 1990. This book describes also the trends and the recent events which have affected energy demand, energy conservation, energy efficiency, energy supply and energy source development. This annual review gives the IEA energy forecasting for the next years, till year 2001. A detailed study of energy policy in Federal Republic of Germany, Austria, Denmark, Greece, Ireland and Japan is given. The policy of fifteen another Members countries, which have been analyzed the previous years, is recapitulated and briefly brought up to date

  10. Environment, 1986-1997. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-04-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with Environment and issued during the period of 1986-1997. Some earlier titles which form part of an established series or are still considered of importance have been included. Most publications are in English. Proceedings of conferences, symposia and panels of experts may contain papers in languages other than English, but all of these papers have abstracts in English

  11. Earth sciences. 1990-2001. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-05-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with Earth Sciences and issued during the period 1 January 1990 - 31 May 2001. Most publications are issued in English, though some are also available in other languages. This is noted as A for Arabic, C for Chinese, E for English, F for French, R for Russian and S for Spanish before the relevant ISBN number

  12. Analytical quality control services of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suschny, O.

    1986-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency provides quality control services to analytical laboratories. These services which include the provision of reference materials and the organisation of intercomparisons are rendered for the purpose of assisting laboratories in determining the accuracy of their analytical work. The following classes of materials are presently available: nuclear materials, environmental materials, animal and plant materials, materials for biomedical studies and materials of marine origin. (orig.) [de

  13. Current radiation protection activities of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, G.A.M.

    1996-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) program of the Radiation Safety Section is described in this paper. The Section has two main components: (1) the development of consensus safety documentation and (2) the use of that documentation as the basis for assisting countries to deal safely with their applications of radiation and radioactivity. Main activities of the section are listed for each of these components. Activities include documentation, coordinated research programs, and assistance to developing countries. 14 tabs

  14. From solar energy to hydrogen via magnesium: a challenging approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Aal, H.K.

    2006-01-01

    In the proposed scheme, solar energy is used first to vaporize a dynamic stream of sea water flowing along an inclined Preferential Salt Separator (P S S). Magnesium chloride salts - soluble in seawater - will separate as end products. Once obtained, anhydrous magnesium chloride is to be electrolysed to produce magnesium metal, a reliable source of stored energy. When shipped to remote locations, it is used as electrode to construct a 'galvanic - electrolytic' cell, in which water is electrolysed producing hydrogen as end product. Small scale experimental results are presented. Reference to the work reported by Pacheco is made. (authors)

  15. Some aspects of hydrogen as a long-term energy carrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quakernaat, J.; De Jong, K.P.; Van Wechem, H.M.H.; Okken, P.A.; Lako, P.; Ybema, J.R.

    1994-11-01

    Hydrogen as a secondary energy carrier received extensive and worldwide attention some ten to fifteen years ago. The developments in the energy market since then have reduced the interest in hydrogen. However, the increased concern for the environment and new technical options have brought hydrogen to the centre of attention once again. These considerations led to the organization of the National Hydrogen Seminar, held on 19 November 1993 at ECN, Petten, Netherlands. Eight experts in the field of hydrogen illustrated the possibilities and prospects of the production, storage and use of hydrogen as an energy carrier. In this report three of these contributions are presented, for which separate abstracts have been prepared. The first paper is on hydrogen in a global long-term perspective, in the second paper carbon is considered as a hydrogen carrier or as a disappearing skeleton, and in the third paper attention is paid to the cost effective integration of hydrogen in energy systems with CO 2 constraints

  16. Annual report 2005[International Atomic Energy Agency]; Informe anual 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    The Annual Report reviews the results of the Agency's programme according to the three 'pillars' of technology, safety and verification. The main part of the report, starting on page 13, generally follows the programme structure as it applied in 2005. The introductory chapter, 'The Year in Review', seeks to provide a thematic analysis, based on the three pillars, of the Agency's activities within the overall context of notable developments during the year. Information on specific issues can be found in the latest editions of the Agency's Nuclear Safety Review, Nuclear Technology Review and Technical Cooperation Report. For the convenience of readers, these documents are available on the CD-ROM attached to the inside back cover of this report. Additional information covering various aspects of the Agency's programme is also provided on the attached CD-ROM, and is also available on the Agency?s iaea.org web site (http://www.iaea.org/Worldatom/Documents/Anrep/Anrep2005/). All sums of money are expressed in United States dollars. The designations employed and the presentation of material in this document do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the Secretariat concerning the legal status of any country or territory or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers. The topics covered in the chapter related to Technology are: Nuclear Power; Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Materials Technologies; Capacity Building and Nuclear Knowledge Maintenance for Sustainable Energy Development; Nuclear Science; Food and Agriculture; Human Health; Water Resources; Protection of the Marine and Terrestrial Environment; Physical and Chemical Applications. Topics related to Safety and Security discussed in this report are: Safety of Nuclear Installations; Radiation and Transport Safety; Management of Radioactive Waste; Nuclear Security. Topics related to Verification are Safeguards and Verification in Iraq Pursuant to UNSC Resolutions. A separate

  17. Nuclear Energy - Hydrogen Production - Fuel Cell: A Road Towards Future China's Sustainable Energy Strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhiwei Zhou

    2006-01-01

    Sustainable development of Chinese economy in 21. century will mainly rely on self-supply of clean energy with indigenous natural resources. The burden of current coal-dominant energy mix and the environmental stress due to energy consumptions has led nuclear power to be an indispensable choice for further expanding electricity generation capacity in China and for reducing greenhouse effect gases emission. The application of nuclear energy in producing substitutive fuels for road transportation vehicles will also be of importance in future China's sustainable energy strategy. This paper illustrates the current status of China's energy supply and the energy demand required for establishing a harmonic and prosperous society in China. In fact China's energy market faces following three major challenges, namely (1) gaps between energy supply and demand; (2) low efficiency in energy utilization, and (3) severe environmental pollution. This study emphasizes that China should implement sustainable energy development policy and pay great attention to the construction of energy saving recycle economy. Based on current forecast, the nuclear energy development in China will encounter a high-speed track. The demand for crude oil will reach 400-450 million tons in 2020 in which Chinese indigenous production will remain 180 million tons. The increase of the expected crude oil will be about 150 million tons on the basis of 117 million tons of imported oil in 2004 with the time span of 15 years. This demand increase of crude oil certainly will influence China's energy supply security and to find the substitution will be a big challenge to Chinese energy industry. This study illustrates an analysis of the market demands to future hydrogen economy of China. Based on current status of technology development of HTGR in China, this study describes a road of hydrogen production with nuclear energy. The possible technology choices in relation to a number of types of nuclear reactors are

  18. Design of a photovoltaic-hydrogen-fuel cell energy system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehman, P A; Chamberlin, C E [Humboldt State Univ., Arcata, CA (US). Dept. of Environmental Resources Engineering

    1991-01-01

    The design of a stand-alone renewable energy system using hydrogen (H{sub 2}) as the energy storage medium and a fuel cell as the regeneration technology is reported. The system being installed at the Humboldt State University Telonicher Marine Laboratory consists of a 9.2 kW photovoltaic (PV) array coupled to a high pressure, bipolar alkaline electrolyser. The array powers the Laboratory's air compressor system whenever possible; excess power is shunted to the electrolyser for hydrogen and oxygen (O{sub 2}) production. When the array cannot provide sufficient power, stored hydrogen and oxygen are furnished to a proton exchange membrane fuel cell which, smoothly and without interruption, supplies the load. In reporting the design, details of component selection, sizing, and integration, control system logic and implementation, and safety considerations are discussed. Plans for a monitoring network to chronicle system performance are presented, questions that will be addressed through the monitoring program are included, and the present status of the project is reported. (Author).

  19. Hydrogen and renewable energy sources integrated system for greenhouse heating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ileana Blanco

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A research is under development at the Department of Agro- Environmental Sciences of the University of Bari “Aldo Moro” in order to investigate the suitable solutions of a power system based on solar energy (photovoltaic and hydrogen, integrated with a geothermal heat pump for powering a self sustained heated greenhouse. The electrical energy for heat pump operation is provided by a purpose-built array of solar photovoltaic modules, which supplies also a water electrolyser system controlled by embedded pc; the generated dry hydrogen gas is conserved in suitable pressured storage tank. The hydrogen is used to produce electricity in a fuel cell in order to meet the above mentioned heat pump power demand when the photovoltaic system is inactive during winter night-time or the solar radiation level is insufficient to meet the electrical demand. The present work reports some theoretical and observed data about the electrolyzer operation. Indeed the electrolyzer has required particular attention because during the experimental tests it did not show a stable operation and it was registered a performance not properly consistent with the predicted performance by means of the theoretical study.

  20. Energy and exergy analyses of electrolytic hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosen, M A [Ryerson Polytechnic Univ., Toronto, ON (Canada). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1995-07-01

    The thermodynamic performance is investigated of a water-electrolysis process for producing hydrogen, based on current-technology equipment. Both energy and exergy analyses are used. Three cases are considered in which the principal driving energy inputs are (i) electricity, (ii) the high-temperature heat used to generate the electricity, and (iii) the heat source used to produce the high-temperature heat. The nature of the heat source (e.g.) fossil fuel, nuclear fuel, solar energy, (etc.) is left as general as possible. The analyses indicate that, when the main driving input is the hypothetical heat source, the principal thermodynamic losses are associated with water splitting, electricity generation and heat production; the losses are mainly due to the irreversibilities associated with converting a heat source to heat, and heat transfer across large temperature differences. The losses associated with the waste heat in used cooling water, because of its low quality, are not as significant as energy analysis indicates. (Author)

  1. Hydrogen Energy Storage: Grid and Transportation Services (Technical Report)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melaina, M. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Eichman, J. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Proceedings of an expert workshop convened by the U.S. Department of Energy and Industry Canada, and hosted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and the California Air Resources Board, May 14-15, 2014, in Sacramento, California, to address the topic of hydrogen energy storage (HES). HES systems provide multiple opportunities to increase the resilience and improve the economics of energy sup supply systems underlying the electric grid, gas pipeline systems, and transportation fuels. This is especially the case when considering particular social goals and market drivers, such as reducing carbon emissions, increasing reliability of supply, and reducing consumption of conventional petroleum fuels. This report compiles feedback collected during the workshop, which focused on policy and regulatory issues related to HES systems. Report sections include an introduction to HES pathways, market demand, and the "smart gas" concept; an overview of the workshop structure; and summary results from panel presentations and breakout groups.

  2. 12. symposium for the use of regenerative energy sources and hydrogen technology. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehmann, J.

    2005-01-01

    Topics of the conference were: renewable energy sources, wind energy, wood fueled space and water heating systems, SOFC fuel cell, storage of wind energy in the form of hydrogen, geothermal energy, usage of waste heat in low-temperature Rankine cycle engines, emissions trading, energy policy, solar hydrogen economy. (uke)

  3. Viability of Hydrogen Pathways that Enhance Energy Security: A Comparison of China and Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ren, Jingzheng; Andreasen, Kristian Peter; Sovacool, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    When designed and built properly, hydrogen energy systems can enhance energy security through technological diversification and minimizing dependence on foreign imports of energy fuels. However, hydrogen can be produced from different feedstocks according to separate pathways, and these different...... pathways create particular consequences on a nation's overall energy security. The objective of this study is to investigate the superiorities and inferiorities of hydrogen pathways from the perspective of China and Denmark, and to determine which pathways best contribute to national energy security...

  4. The Strategic Plan of the Nuclear Energy Agency, 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The OECD has been engaged in the past few years in a process of reform to take account of the impact of globalization on its Members' economies, and to allow for proper refocusing of its work, notably on the subject of sustainable development. These developments are having an impact on the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA). The group on the future role of the NEA delivered its report at the end of January 1998 and one key recommendation is the elaboration of a strategic plan for the Agency. The recommendations made in the report served to stimulate a review of NEA goals, priorities, methods of work and products. This review has taken account of the recommendations in the report. The review served as the basis for this Strategic Plan for the NEA, which has been developed to provide guidance to the Agency in planning its activities and implementing its programmes over a five-year period. The report contains detailed description of the following topics:Mission of NEA: Strategic arenas of work, including sectorial arenas, Data bank, Information and communication; Interactions; Relations with non-member countries; Role of the Steering Committee for Nuclear Energy; Working methods; Resources. (R.P.)

  5. Hydrogen desorption reactions of Li-N-H hydrogen storage system: Estimation of activation free energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Mitsuru; Haga, Tetsuya; Kawai, Yasuaki; Kojima, Yoshitsugu

    2007-01-01

    The dehydrogenation reactions of the mixtures of lithium amide (LiNH 2 ) and lithium hydride (LiH) were studied under an Ar atmosphere by means of temperature programmed desorption (TPD) technique. The dehydrogenation reaction of the LiNH 2 /LiH mixture was accelerated by addition of 1 mol% Ti(III) species (k = 3.1 x 10 -4 s -1 at 493 K), and prolonged ball-milling time (16 h) further enhanced reaction rate (k = 1.1 x 10 -3 s -1 at 493 K). For the hydrogen desorption reaction of Ti(III) doped samples, the activation energies estimated by Kissinger plot (95 kJ mol -1 ) and Arrhenius plot (110 kJ mol -1 ) were in reasonable agreement. The LiNH 2 /LiH mixture without Ti(III) species, exhibited slower hydrogen desorption process and the kinetic traces deviated from single exponential behavior. The results indicated the Ti(III) additives change the hydrogen desorption reaction mechanism of the LiNH 2 /LiH mixture

  6. Feasibility study on recovering hydrogen energy from industrial wastewater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ming Der Bai; Chia-Jung Hsiao

    2006-01-01

    Three wastewater obtained from different industries were evaluated for the feasibility of hydrogen fermentation. Because of the various components of the wastewater, the characteristics of the hydrogen accumulation were different. Several stages with different hydrogen producing rate were observed during the batch hydrogen fermentation of each wastewater. The obvious hydrogen consumption was observed in the last phase of hydrogen fermentation of the wastewater from the winery. It is similar to the reported hydrogen fermentation characteristic of starch. The wastewater coming from the fructose manufactory has the greatest hydrogen potential nearly 150 L-H 2 /kg-COD. The wastewater from food industry has the lower hydrogen potential of 65 L-H 2 /kg-COD. Some of its compounds were not suitable for hydrogen production. The lowest hydrogen potential was observed in the fermentation of the wastewater from the winery, because hydrogen consumption affects the hydrogen recovery from the wastewater from winery. (authors)

  7. Feasibility study on recovering hydrogen energy from industrial wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ming Der Bai; Chia-Jung Hsiao [Energy and Resource Laboratories, Industrial Technology Research Institute, 195, sec. 4 Chung Hsing Rd., Chutung, Hsinchu, Taiwan, 301 R.O.C. (China)

    2006-07-01

    Three wastewater obtained from different industries were evaluated for the feasibility of hydrogen fermentation. Because of the various components of the wastewater, the characteristics of the hydrogen accumulation were different. Several stages with different hydrogen producing rate were observed during the batch hydrogen fermentation of each wastewater. The obvious hydrogen consumption was observed in the last phase of hydrogen fermentation of the wastewater from the winery. It is similar to the reported hydrogen fermentation characteristic of starch. The wastewater coming from the fructose manufactory has the greatest hydrogen potential nearly 150 L-H{sub 2}/kg-COD. The wastewater from food industry has the lower hydrogen potential of 65 L-H{sub 2}/kg-COD. Some of its compounds were not suitable for hydrogen production. The lowest hydrogen potential was observed in the fermentation of the wastewater from the winery, because hydrogen consumption affects the hydrogen recovery from the wastewater from winery. (authors)

  8. Hydrogen and fuel cell research: Institute for Integrated Energy Systems (IESVic)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitt, L.

    2006-01-01

    Vision: IESVic's mission is to chart feasible paths to sustainable energy. Current research areas of investigation: 1. Energy system analysis 2. Computational fuel cell engineering; Fuel cell parameter measurement; Microscale fuel cells 3. Hydrogen dispersion studies for safety codes 4. Active magnetic refrigeration for hydrogen liquifaction and heat transfer in metal hydrides 5. Hydrogen and fuel cell system integration (author)

  9. The US department of energy's research and development plans for the use of nuclear energy for hydrogen production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henderson, A.D.; Pickard, P.S.; Park, C.V.; Kotek, J.F.

    2004-01-01

    The potential of hydrogen as a transportation fuel and for stationary power applications has generated significant interest in the United States. President George W. Bush has set the transition to a 'hydrogen economy' as one of the Administration's highest priorities. A key element of an environmentally-conscious transition to hydrogen is the development of hydrogen production technologies that do not emit greenhouse gases or other air pollutants. The Administration is investing in the development of several technologies, including hydrogen production through the use of renewable fuels, fossil fuels with carbon sequestration, and nuclear energy. The US Department of Energy's Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology initiated the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative to develop hydrogen production cycles that use nuclear energy. The Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative has completed a Nuclear Hydrogen R and D Plan to identify candidate technologies, assess their viability, and define the R and D required to enable the demonstration of nuclear hydrogen production by 2016. This paper gives a brief overview of the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative, describes the purposes of the Nuclear Hydrogen R and D Plan, explains the methodology followed to prepared the plan, presents the results, and discusses the path forward for the US programme to develop technologies which use nuclear energy to produce hydrogen. (author)

  10. International Atomic Energy Agency thirty-third general conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    A brief account is given of the 33rd session of IAEA General Conference held in Vienna from 25 to 29 September 1989. The Minister for Primary Industry and Energy, Mr John Kerin, led the Australian delegation. His statement to the General Conference highlighted Australia's role as a major uranium exporter, its committment to the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapon Treaty and support for the role which the Agency plays in it. The major Australian policy initiatives in environmental areas were also outlined. Australia continues to make a substantial extra-budgetary contribution to the Regional Cooperation Agreement for Asia and Pacific (RCA), and it has recently expanded its committment by agreeing to support a series of new RCA projects. In this context, the role played by the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization for the provision of technical assistance and cooperation in many areas of the Agency's activities is discussed. ills

  11. International Atomic Energy Agency Publications. Catalogue 1980-1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency issued from 1980 up to the end of 1995 an still available. Some earlier titles which form part of an established series or are still considered of importance have been included. Most Agency publications are issued in English, though some are also available in Chinese, French, Russian or Spanish. This is noted as C for Chinese, E for English, F for French, R for Russian and S For Spanish by the relevant ISBN number. Proceedings of conferences, symposia, seminars and panels, of experts contain papers in their original language (English, French, Russian or Spanish) with abstracts in English and in the original language.

  12. International Atomic Energy Agency Publications. Catalogue 1980-1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-08-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency issued from 1980 up to the end of 1995 an still available. Some earlier titles which form part of an established series or are still considered of importance have been included. Most Agency publications are issued in English, though some are also available in Chinese, French, Russian or Spanish. This is noted as C for Chinese, E for English, F for French, R for Russian and S For Spanish by the relevant ISBN number. Proceedings of conferences, symposia, seminars and panels, of experts contain papers in their original language (English, French, Russian or Spanish) with abstracts in English and in the original language

  13. French perspectives for production of hydrogen using nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitart, Xavier; Yvon, Pascal; Carles, Philippe; Naour, Francois Le

    2009-01-01

    The demand for hydrogen, driven by classical applications such as fertilizers or oil refining a well as new applications (synthetic fuels, fuel cells ... ) is growing significantly. Presently, most of the hydrogen produced in the world uses methane or another fossil feedstock, which is not a sustainable option, given the limited fossil resources and need to reduce CO 2 emissions. This stimulates the need to develop alternative processes of production which do not suffer from these drawbacks. Water decomposition combined with nuclear energy appears to be an attractive option. Low temperature electrolysis, even if it is used currently for limited amounts is a mature technology which can be generalized in the near future. However, this technology, which requires about 4 kWh of electricity per Nm 3 of hydrogen produced, is energy intensive and presents a low efficiency. Therefore the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) launched an extensive research and development program in 2001 in order to investigate advanced processes which could use directly the nuclear heat and present better economic potential. In the frame of this program, high temperature steam electrolysis along with several thermochemical cycles has been extensively studied. HTSE offers the advantage of reducing the electrical energy needed by substituting thermal energy, which promises to be cheaper. The need for electricity is also greatly reduced for the leading thermochemical cycles, the iodine-sulfur and the hybrid sulfur cycles, but they require high temperatures and hence coupling to a gas cooled reactor. Therefore interest is also paid to other processes such as the copper-chlorine cycle which operates at lower temperatures and could be coupled to other generation IV nuclear systems. The technical development of these processes involved acquisition of basic thermodynamic data, optimization of flowsheets, design and test of components and lab scale experiments in the kW range. This will demonstrate

  14. Development of a Hydrogen Energy System as a Grid Frequency Management Tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ewan, Mitch [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States); Rocheleau, Richard [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States); Swider-Lyons, Karen [U.S. Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States); Virji, Meheboob [GRandalytics, Honolulu, HI (United States); Randolph, Guenter [Hydrogen Renewable Energy System Analysis, Pickering, ON (Canada)

    2016-07-15

    The Hawai‘i Natural Energy Institute (HNEI) is conducting research to assess the technical potential of using an electrolyzer-based hydrogen (H2) production and storage system as a grid demand response tool using battery data from a 200 MW grid to show the kind of response required. The hydrogen produced by the electrolyzer is used for transportation. A 65 kg/day hydrogen energy system (HES) consisting of a PEM electrolyzer, 35 bar buffer tank, 450 bar compressor, and associated chiller systems was purchased and installed at the Hawaii Natural Energy Laboratory Hawaii Authority (NELHA) to demonstrate long-term durability of the electrolyzer under cyclic operation required for frequency regulation on an island grid system. The excess hydrogen was stored for use by three fuel-cell buses to be operated at Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park (HAVO) and by the County of Hawai‘i Mass Transit Agency (MTA). This paper describes the site selection and equipment commissioning, plus a comprehensive test plan that was developed to characterize the performance and durability of the electrolyzer under dynamic load conditions. The controls were modified for the operating envelope and dynamic limits of the electrolyzer. While the data showed these modifications significantly improved the system response time, it is not fast enough to match a BESS response time for grid frequency management. The electrolyzer can only be used for slower acting changes (1 to 0.5 Hz). A potential solution is to design an electrolyzer/BESS hybrid system and develop a modeling program to find the optimum mix of battery and electrolyzer to provide the maximum grid regulation services at minimum cost.

  15. Hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John O’M. Bockris

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The idea of a “Hydrogen Economy” is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO2 in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H2 from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO2 from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan. Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech.

  16. Sensitivity to temperature of nuclear energy generation by hydrogen burning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitalas, R.

    1981-01-01

    The sensitivity to temperature of nuclear energy generation by hydrogen burning is discussed. The complexity of the sensitivity is due to the different equilibration time-scales of the constituents of the p-p chain and CN cycle and the dependence of their abundances and time-scales on temperature. The time-scale of the temperature perturbation, compared to the equilibrium time-scale of a constituent, determines whether the constituent is in equilibrium and affects the sensitivity. The temperature sensitivity of the p-p chain for different values of hydrogen abundance, when different constituents come into equilibrium is presented, as well as its variation with 3 He abundance. The temperature sensitivity is drastically different from n 11 , the temperature sensitivity of the proton-proton reaction, unless the time-scale of temperature perturbation is long enough for 3 He to remain in equilibrium. Even in this case the sensitivity of the p-p chain differs significantly from n 11 , unless the temperature is so low that PP II and PP III chains can be neglected. The variation of the sensitivity of CN energy generation is small for different time-scales of temperature variation, because the temperature sensitivities of individual reactions are so similar. The combined sensitivity to temperature of energy generation by hydrogen burning is presented and shown to have a maximum of 16.4 at T 6 = 24.5. For T 6 > 25 the temperature sensitivity is given by the sensitivity of 14 N + p reaction. (author)

  17. Plasma screening effects on the energies of hydrogen atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soylu, A.

    2012-01-01

    A more general exponential cosine screened Coulomb potential is used for the first time to investigate the screening effects on the hydrogen atom in plasmas. This potential is examined for four different cases that correspond to four different type potentials when the different parameters are used in the potential within the framework of the well-known asymptotic iteration method. By solving the corresponding the radial Schrödinger equation with the screened and exponential cosine screened Coulomb potentials and comparing the obtained energy eigenvalues with the results of other studies, the applicability of the method to this kind of plasma physics problem is shown. The energy values of more general exponential cosine screened Coulomb potential are presented for various parameters in the potential. One of the advantages of the present potential is that it exhibits stronger screening effect than that of the exponential cosine screened Coulomb potential and it is also reduced to screened Coulomb and exponential cosine screened Coulomb as well as Coulomb potentials for special values of parameters. The parameters in the potential would be useful to model screening effects which cause an increase or decrease in the energy values of hydrogen atom in both Debye and quantum plasmas and in this manner this potential would be useful for the investigations of the atomic structure and collisions in plasmas.

  18. Biological conversion of hydrogen to electricity for energy storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karamanev, Dimitre; Pupkevich, Victor; Penev, Kalin; Glibin, Vassili; Gohil, Jay; Vajihinejad, Vahid

    2017-01-01

    Energy storage is currently one of the most significant problems associated with mass-scale usage of renewable (i.e. wind and solar) power sources. The use of hydrogen as an energy storage medium is very promising, but is hampered by the lack of commercially available hydrogen-to-electricity (H2e) converters. Here we are presenting the first commercially viable, biologically based technology for H2e conversion named the BioGenerator. It is a microbial fuel cell based on electron consumption resulting from the respiration of chemolithoautotrophic microorganisms. The results obtained during the scale-up study of the BioGenerator showed a maximum specific current of 1.35 A/cm 2 , maximum power density of 1800 W/m 2 and stable electricity generation over a period spanning longer than four years. The largest unit studied so far has a volume of 600 L and a power output of 0.3 kW. - Highlights: • A commercially viable biological convertor of H 2 to electricity (BioGenerator) is proposed. • It has a short-term commercial potential and its economic analysis is quite promising. • The BioGenerator is the first commercially viable bio-technology for energy storage. • It is a power generation technology of which has a negative CO 2 emission.

  19. Rydberg phases of Hydrogen and low energy nuclear reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olafsson, Sveinn; Holmlid, Leif

    2016-03-01

    For over the last 26 years the science of cold fusion/LENR has been researched around the world with slow pace of progress. Modest quantity of excess heat and signatures of nuclear transmutation and helium production have been confirmed in experiments and theoretical work has only resulted in a large flora of inadequate theoretical scenarios. Here we review current state of research in Rydberg matter of Hydrogen that is showing strong signature of nuclear processes. In the presentation experimental behavior of Rydberg matter of hydrogen is described. An extensive collaboration effort of surface physics, catalysis, atomic physics, solid state physics, nuclear physics and quantum information is need to tackle the surprising experimental results that have so far been obtained. Rydberg matter of Hydrogen is the only known state of matter that is able to bring huge collection of protons to so short distances and for so long time that tunneling becomes a reasonable process for making low energy nuclear reactions. Nuclear quantum entanglement can also become realistic process at theses conditions.

  20. Early Forest Fire Detection Using Low Energy Hydrogen Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürgen Müller

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The North-east German Lowlands is a region with one of the highest forest fire risks in Europe. In order to keep damage levels as low as possible, it is important to have an effective early warning system. Such a system is being developed on the basis of a hydrogen sensor, which makes it possible to detect a smouldering forest fire before the development of open flames. The prototype hydrogen sensor produced at the Humboldt University Berlin has a metal/ solid electrolyte/insulator/ semiconductor (MEIS structure, which allows cost-effective production. Due to the low energy consumption, an autarchic working unit could be installed in the forest. Field trials have shown that it is possible to identify a forest fire in its early stages when hydrogen concentrations are still low. A significant change in the signal due to a fire was measured at a distance of about 100m. In view of the potential impacts of climate change, the innovative pre-ignition warning system is an important early diagnosis and monitoring module for the protection of the forests.

  1. International Atomic Energy Agency. Highlights of activities. September 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillen, V.A.

    1993-09-01

    This document describes the most important activities of the International Atomic Energy Agency during the period September 1992 - September 1993, in particular in the following areas: (i) nuclear power; (ii) nuclear fuel cycle; (iii) radioactive waste management; (iv) comparative assessment of energy sources; (v) IAEA laboratory activities; (vi) nuclear applications in the food industry and in agriculture; (vii) human health applications of nuclear techniques, especially in the treatment and prevention of diseases and in the analysis of health problems related to the environment; (viii) industry and earth sciences; (ix) physical and chemical sciences; (x) radiation protection; (xi) safety of nuclear installations; (xii) safeguards and non-proliferation activities; (xiii) activities in the area of public and technical information such as the International Nuclear Information System (INIS) and other IAEA computerized databases and reference systems, the publication Nuclear Fusion, a monthly scientific journal of articles on thermonuclear fusion research and development, and the organization of meetings on atomic energy; and (xiv) a description of the Agency's technical assistance activities, including financial data

  2. Safety Culture Implementation in Indonesian Nuclear Energy Regulatory Agency (BAPETEN)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nurwidi Astuti, Y.H.; Dewanto, P.

    2016-01-01

    The Indonesia Nuclear Energy Act no. 10 of 1997 clearly stated that Nuclear Energy Regulatory Agency (BAPETEN) is the Nuclear Regulatory Body. This is the legal basis of BAPETEN to perform regulatory functions on the use of nuclear energy in Indonesia, including regulation, authorisation, inspection and enforcement. The Independent regulatory functions are stipulated in Article 4 and Article 14 of the Nuclear Energy Act no. 10 (1997) which require the government to establish regulatory body that is reporting directly to the president and has responsibility to control of the use of nuclear energy. BAPETEN has been start fully its functioning on January 4, 1999. In it roles as a regulatory body, the main aspect that continues and always to be developed is the safety culture. One of the objectives of regulatory functions is “to increase legal awareness of nuclear energy of the user to develop safety culture” (Article 15, point d), while in the elucidation of article 15 it is stipulated that “safety culture is that of characteristics and attitudes in organizations and individual that emphasise the importance of safety”.

  3. Safeguards and legal matters 1996. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-03-01

    This catalogue lists all currently valid sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with Safeguards and Legal Matters. Most publications are published in English. Proceedings of conferences, symposia and panels of experts may contain some papers in languages other than English (French, Russian or Spanish), but all of these papers have abstracts in English. It should be noted that prices of books are quoted in Austrian Schillings. The prices do not include local taxes and are subject to change without notice. All books in this catalogue are 16 x 24 cm, paper-bound, unless otherwise stated

  4. Earth sciences 1980-1994. International Atomic Energy Agency Publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-04-01

    This catalogue lists sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with Earth Sciences issued during the period 1969-1994. Most publications are published in English. Proceedings of conferences, symposia and panels of experts may contain some papers in languages other than English (French, Russian or Spanish), but all these papers have abstracts in English. It should be noted that prices of books are quoted in Austrian Schillings. The prices do not include local taxes and are subject to change without notice. All books in this catalogue are 16 x 24 cm, paper-bound, unless otherwise stated

  5. R and D programs of the International Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyne, P.J.

    1989-01-01

    This paper provides a description of the collaborative research program of the International Energy Agency. Focusing on the organization of the program, rather than attempting to cover the technical content of the research, the discussion conveys how its operation is facilitated through a framework that takes account of the interests of participating governments as well as technical objectives. Some Canadian activities in the IEA program are briefly described as illustration and a list of current IEA Research Agreements and associated activities is presented in an Appendix

  6. Applications of Nuclear Energy to Oil Sands and Hydrogen Production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duffey, R.B.; Miller, A.; Kuran, S.

    2011-01-01

    Many novel and needed applications of nuclear energy arise in today's energy-hungry, economically challenged world, and in solving tomorrow's search for a globally carbon-constrained and sustainable energy supply. Not only can nuclear power produce low cost electricity, it can provide co-generation of process heat, desalinated water, and hydrogen with negligible greenhouse gas emissions. In each of these new applications, nuclear energy is competing against, or displacing conventional and established use of natural gas or coal in thermal power plants and boilers. Therefore, there must be a compelling case, in terms of supply certainty, stability, safety, security, and acceptability. In addition, a synergistic relation must exist or be created with the existing power and energy markets, the use of windpower, and the needs for low-cost supply with negligible greenhouse gas emissions and carbon 'footprint'. The development of Canada's oil sands resource depends on a substantial energy input for extraction and upgrading. So far, this input has been supplied by natural gas, a resource that (a) is a premium fuel; (b) has constrained availability; and (c) produces significant CO 2 emissions. For the oil sands extraction process, natural gas is the current energy source used to generate the steam for in-situ heating, the power to drive the separation equipment, and the hydrogen for varying degrees of upgrading before piping. Nothwithstanding the current imbalance between supply and demand for gas within North America, the very demand of the oil sands for prodigious amounts of natural gas has itself the potential to force higher prices and create supply constraints for natural gas. Rooted in the energy equivalence of oil and gas, there is a long-established link between American gas prices whereby one bbl of oil is worth 7 GJ of natural gas. Temporary supply/demand imbalances apart, only cheap oil can maintain cheap gas. Only the improbability of cheap oil will maintain low

  7. Achievement report for fiscal 1982 on Sunshine Program-entrusted research and development. Survey on patent and information (Hydrogen energy); 1982 nendo tokkyo joho chosa kenkyu seika hokokokusho. Suiso energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1983-03-01

    Patents related to the research under the Sunshine Program are surveyed so as to ensure that the program be promoted smoothly and efficiently. Since the scope of the hydrogen energy technology is extensive, branches supposed to be relatively important only are surveyed, which include the production of hydrogen (thermochemical process, photochemical process, and electrolysis), storage and transportation of hydrogen, safety of hydrogen, hydrogen fuel cells, hydrogen-fueled engines, and hydrogen combustion devices. The basic policy to follow in the extraction of necessary patents is that all related to the hydrogen energy technology be collected from as many fields as possible. However, it is impossible to read all the laid-open patents. Under such circumstances, out of the items in IPC (International Patent Classification) used by the Patent Agency, those deemed to be closely related to the hydrogen energy technology are designated and, when the classification item attached to the official gazette matches one of the IPC classification items, it is extracted as a desired item after deliberation of its relationship with the hydrogen energy technology. (NEDO)

  8. Japan's Sunshine Project. 1991 Annual Summary of Hydrogen Energy R and D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1992-07-01

    In the study of hydrogen production, tests and experiments were conducted concerning electrolysis of water in solid polymer electrolytes and electrolysis of high-temperature steam. In the study of hydrogen storage and transportation, use of metal hydrides for these purposes was tested with attention paid to CaNi{sub 5} degradation and metal element substitution in ZrMn{sub 2}. In the study of hydrogen application, electrodes in hydrogen storage alloy-aided energy conversion were investigated and hydrogen-oxygen combustion systems were experimented. In the study of hydrogen safety, a fracture in a heat affected weld and fatigue crack propagation therein were simulated, and the effect of hydrogen on the episode was investigated. Investigated in the study of a hydrogen-fired turbine were hydrogen combustion, hydrogen-fired power generation thermal efficiency, fuel cost, power generation cost, etc. (NEDO)

  9. Proposal for the International Atomic Energy Agency Training Course

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarthy, T.L.

    1994-06-01

    The Hanford Site has hosted similar activities, including both Hanford Summits I and II. The Hanford Summits were two-day televised events to discuss the commitment of the current Presidential administration to the environmental restoration of the Hanford Site. Public involvement and strategic issues established from Hanford Summit I include: Regulatory issues, training and education, economic development and partnership, and technology transfer. Hanford Summit II provided a summary of how Secretary of Energy O'Leary is proceeding on the above strategic issues. The DOE and Westinghouse School for Environmental Excellence frequently offers a six-week course for environmental professionals and workers. Approximately thirty to forty individuals attend the training course, which provides training in environmental regulation compliance. The Hanford Site has hosted two previous International Atomic Energy Agency training courses. The courses lasted two weeks and had approximately eight to ten participants. Nuclear Material Management and Neutron Monitoring were the courses hosted by the Hanford Site

  10. The International Atomic Energy Agency: activities and relationship with Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abud Osuna, Javier.

    1987-01-01

    Legal and political studies on the activities of the IAEA infer that the pacific uses of nuclear energy become more significant every day in the ambit of international relationships. The studies analyze as a whole relationships among member states. The first part is divided into four chapters, starting with the background and creation of the agency, its structure, statutes, amendments and the performance of its main organisms. It continues to describe mechanisms and programmes carried out, including cooperation agreements between the IAEA and other specialized organizations in the United Nations. It ends up with the IAEA performance resulting from different treaties. The second part examines Mexican norms on nuclear matter as well as relationships between Mexico and the IAEA. It demonstrates that achievements in the Agency have been possible because of the establishment of an international cooperation basis, which avoids duplicity of actions. The conclusions recommend joint efforts from both the developed and the developing countries in the following: a) to imbue public opinion with the goodness of nuclear energy; b) to discourage the construction and operation of nuclear installations; c) to unify national standards on nuclear safety and control; d) to decrease export restrictions, based on safeguards; e) to promote internal nuclear research in Mexico or throught regional integration agreements, with technical assistance and support from the IAEA. (author)

  11. Stabilization of Wind Energy Conversion System with Hydrogen Generator by Using EDLC Energy Storage System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishido, Seiji; Takahashi, Rion; Murata, Toshiaki; Tamura, Junji; Sugimasa, Masatoshi; Komura, Akiyoshi; Futami, Motoo; Ichinose, Masaya; Ide, Kazumasa

    The spread of wind power generation is progressed hugely in recent years from a viewpoint of environmental problems including global warming. Though wind power is considered as a very prospective energy source, wind power fluctuation due to the random fluctuation of wind speed has still created some problems. Therefore, research has been performed how to smooth the wind power fluctuation. This paper proposes Energy Capacitor System (ECS) for the smoothing of wind power which consists of Electric Double-Layer Capacitor (EDLC) and power electronics devices and works as an electric power storage system. Moreover, hydrogen has received much attention in recent years from a viewpoint of exhaustion problem of fossil fuel. Therefore it is also proposed that a hydrogen generator is installed at the wind farm to generate hydrogen. In this paper, the effectiveness of the proposed system is verified by the simulation analyses using PSCAD/EMTDC.

  12. Integrated photoelectrochemical energy storage: solar hydrogen generation and supercapacitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Xinhui; Luo, Jingshan; Zeng, Zhiyuan; Guan, Cao; Zhang, Yongqi; Tu, Jiangping; Zhang, Hua; Fan, Hong Jin

    2012-01-01

    Current solar energy harvest and storage are so far realized by independent technologies (such as solar cell and batteries), by which only a fraction of solar energy is utilized. It is highly desirable to improve the utilization efficiency of solar energy. Here, we construct an integrated photoelectrochemical device with simultaneous supercapacitor and hydrogen evolution functions based on TiO2/transition metal hydroxides/oxides core/shell nanorod arrays. The feasibility of solar-driven pseudocapacitance is clearly demonstrated, and the charge/discharge is indicated by reversible color changes (photochromism). In such an integrated device, the photogenerated electrons are utilized for H2 generation and holes for pseudocapacitive charging, so that both the reductive and oxidative energies are captured and converted. Specific capacitances of 482 F g−1 at 0.5 A g−1 and 287 F g−1 at 1 A g−1 are obtained with TiO2/Ni(OH)2 nanorod arrays. This study provides a new research strategy for integrated pseudocapacitor and solar energy application. PMID:23248745

  13. Integrated photoelectrochemical energy storage: solar hydrogen generation and supercapacitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Xinhui; Luo, Jingshan; Zeng, Zhiyuan; Guan, Cao; Zhang, Yongqi; Tu, Jiangping; Zhang, Hua; Fan, Hong Jin

    2012-01-01

    Current solar energy harvest and storage are so far realized by independent technologies (such as solar cell and batteries), by which only a fraction of solar energy is utilized. It is highly desirable to improve the utilization efficiency of solar energy. Here, we construct an integrated photoelectrochemical device with simultaneous supercapacitor and hydrogen evolution functions based on TiO(2)/transition metal hydroxides/oxides core/shell nanorod arrays. The feasibility of solar-driven pseudocapacitance is clearly demonstrated, and the charge/discharge is indicated by reversible color changes (photochromism). In such an integrated device, the photogenerated electrons are utilized for H(2) generation and holes for pseudocapacitive charging, so that both the reductive and oxidative energies are captured and converted. Specific capacitances of 482 F g(-1) at 0.5 A g(-1) and 287 F g(-1) at 1 A g(-1) are obtained with TiO(2)/Ni(OH)(2) nanorod arrays. This study provides a new research strategy for integrated pseudocapacitor and solar energy application.

  14. Analysis of economic and infrastructure issues associated with hydrogen production from nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Summers, W.A.; Gorensek, M.B.; Danko, E.; Schultz, K.R.; Richards, M.B.; Brown, L.C.

    2004-01-01

    Consideration is being given to the large-scale transition of the world's energy system from one based on carbon fuels to one based on the use of hydrogen as the carrier. This transition is necessitated by the declining resource base of conventional oil and gas, air quality concerns, and the threat of global climate change linked to greenhouse gas emissions. Since hydrogen can be produced from water using non-carbon primary energy sources, it is the ideal sustainable fuel. The options for producing the hydrogen include renewables (e.g. solar and wind), fossil fuels with carbon sequestration, and nuclear energy. A comprehensive study has been initiated to define economically feasible concepts and to determine estimates of efficiency and cost for hydrogen production using next generation nuclear reactors. A unique aspect of the study is the assessment of the integration of a nuclear plant, a hydrogen production process and the broader infrastructure requirements. Hydrogen infrastructure issues directly related to nuclear hydrogen production are being addressed, and the projected cost, value and end-use market for hydrogen will be determined. The infrastructure issues are critical, since the combined cost of storing, transporting, distributing, and retailing the hydrogen product could well exceed the cost of hydrogen production measured at the plant gate. The results are expected to be useful in establishing the potential role that nuclear hydrogen can play in the future hydrogen economy. Approximately half of the three-year study has been completed. Results to date indicate that nuclear produced hydrogen can be competitive with hydrogen produced from natural gas for use at oil refineries or ammonia plants, indicating a potential early market opportunity for large-scale centralized hydrogen production. Extension of the hydrogen infrastructure from these large industrial users to distributed hydrogen users such as refueling stations and fuel cell generators could

  15. H2 at Scale: Benefitting our Future Energy System - Update for the Hydrogen Technical Advisory Committee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruth, Mark

    2016-12-06

    Hydrogen is a flexible, clean energy carrying intermediate that enables aggressive market penetration of renewables while deeply decarbonizing our energy system. H2 at Scale is a concept that supports the electricity grid by utilizing energy without other demands at any given time and also supports transportation and industry by providing low-priced hydrogen to them. This presentation is an update to the Hydrogen Technical Advisory Committee (HTAC).

  16. Conclusions and recommendations. [for problems in energy situation, air transportation, and hydrogen fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    Conclusions and recommendations are presented for an analysis of the total energy situation; the effect of the energy problem on air transportation; and hydrogen fuel for aircraft. Properties and production costs of fuels, future prediction for energy and transportation, and economic aspects of hydrogen production are appended.

  17. The potential role of hydrogen energy in India and Western Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ruijven, B.J.; Lakshmikanth, H.D.; van Vuuren, D.P.; de Vries, B.

    2008-01-01

    We used the TIMER energy model to explore the potential role of hydrogen in the energy systems of India and Western Europe, looking at the impacts on its main incentives: climate policy, energy security and urban air pollution. We found that hydrogen will not play a major role in both regions

  18. Combined heat and power (cogeneration) plant based on renewable energy sources and electrochemical hydrogen systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigor'ev, S. A.; Grigor'ev, A. S.; Kuleshov, N. V.; Fateev, V. N.; Kuleshov, V. N.

    2015-02-01

    The layout of a combined heat and power (cogeneration) plant based on renewable energy sources (RESs) and hydrogen electrochemical systems for the accumulation of energy via the direct and inverse conversion of the electrical energy from RESs into the chemical energy of hydrogen with the storage of the latter is described. Some efficient technical solutions on the use of electrochemical hydrogen systems in power engineering for the storage of energy with a cyclic energy conversion efficiency of more than 40% are proposed. It is shown that the storage of energy in the form of hydrogen is environmentally safe and considerably surpasses traditional accumulator batteries by its capacitance characteristics, being especially topical in the prolonged absence of energy supply from RESs, e.g., under the conditions of polar night and breathless weather. To provide the required heat consumption of an object during the peak period, it is proposed to burn some hydrogen in a boiler house.

  19. The potential role of hydrogen energy in India and Western Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruijven, Bas van; Hari, Lakshmikanth; Vuuren, Detlef P. van; Vries, Bert de

    2008-01-01

    We used the TIMER energy model to explore the potential role of hydrogen in the energy systems of India and Western Europe, looking at the impacts on its main incentives: climate policy, energy security and urban air pollution. We found that hydrogen will not play a major role in both regions without considerable cost reductions, mainly in fuel cell technology. Also, energy taxation policy is essential for hydrogen penetration and India's lower energy taxes limit India's capacity to favour hydrogen. Once available to the (European) energy system, hydrogen can decrease the cost of CO 2 emission reduction by increasing the potential for carbon capture technology. However, climate policy alone is insufficient to speed up the transition. Hydrogen diversifies energy imports; especially for Europe it decreases oil imports, while increasing imports of coal and natural gas. For India, it provides an opportunity to decrease oil imports and use indigenous coal resources in the transport sector. Hydrogen improves urban air quality by shifting emissions from urban transport to hydrogen production facilities. However, for total net emissions we found a sensitive trade-off between lower emissions at end-use (in transport) and higher emissions from hydrogen production, depending on local policy for hydrogen production facilities

  20. Microalgal hydrogen production: prospects of an essential technology for a clean and sustainable energy economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayro-Kaiser, Vinzenz; Nelson, Nathan

    2017-09-01

    Modern energy production is required to undergo a dramatic transformation. It will have to replace fossil fuel use by a sustainable and clean energy economy while meeting the growing world energy needs. This review analyzes the current energy sector, available energy sources, and energy conversion technologies. Solar energy is the only energy source with the potential to fully replace fossil fuels, and hydrogen is a crucial energy carrier for ensuring energy availability across the globe. The importance of photosynthetic hydrogen production for a solar-powered hydrogen economy is highlighted and the development and potential of this technology are discussed. Much successful research for improved photosynthetic hydrogen production under laboratory conditions has been reported, and attempts are underway to develop upscale systems. We suggest that a process of integrating these achievements into one system to strive for efficient sustainable energy conversion is already justified. Pursuing this goal may lead to a mature technology for industrial deployment.

  1. Scenarios for total utilisation of hydrogen as an energy carrier in the future Danish energy system. Final report; Scenarier for samlet udnyttelse af brint som energibaerer i Danmarks fremtidige energisystem. Slutrapport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauge Petersen, A; Engberg Pedersen, T; Joergensen, K [and others

    2001-04-01

    This is the final report from a project performed for the Danish Energy Agency under its Hydrogen Programme. The project, which within the project group goes by the abbreviated title 'Hydrogen as an energy carrier', constructs and analyses different total energy scenarios for introducing hydrogen as an energy carrier, as energy storage medium and as a fuel in the future Danish energy system. The primary aim of the project is to study ways of handling the large deficits and surpluses of electricity from wind energy expected in the future Danish energy system. System-wide aspects of the choice of hydrogen production technologies, distribution methods, infrastructure requirements and conversion technologies are studied. Particularly, the possibility of using in the future the existing Danish natural gas distribution grid for carrying hydrogen will be assessed. For the year 2030, two scenarios are constructed: One using hydrogen primarily in the transportation sector, the other using it as a storage option for the centralised power plants still in operation by this year. For the year 2050, where the existing fossil power plants are expected to have been phased out completely, the scenarios for two possible developments are investigated: Either, there is a complete decentralisation of the use of hydrogen, converting and storing electricity surpluses into hydrogen in individual buildings, for later use in vehicles or regeneration of power and heat. Or, some centralised infrastructure is retained, such as hydrogen cavern stores and a network of vehicle hydrogen filling stations. The analysis is used to identify the components in an implementation strategy, for the most interesting scenarios, including a time sequence of necessary decisions and technology readiness. The report is in Danish, because it is part of the dissemination effort of the Hydrogen Committee, directed at the Danish population in general and the Danish professional community in particular. (au)

  2. Scenarios for total utilisation of hydrogen as an energy carrier in the future Danish energy system. Final report; Scenarier for samlet udnyttelse af brint som energibaerer i Danmarks fremtidige energisystem. Slutrapport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauge Petersen, A.; Engberg Pedersen, T.; Joergensen, K. (and others)

    2001-04-01

    This is the final report from a project performed for the Danish Energy Agency under its Hydrogen Programme. The project, which within the project group goes by the abbreviated title 'Hydrogen as an energy carrier', constructs and analyses different total energy scenarios for introducing hydrogen as an energy carrier, as energy storage medium and as a fuel in the future Danish energy system. The primary aim of the project is to study ways of handling the large deficits and surpluses of electricity from wind energy expected in the future Danish energy system. System-wide aspects of the choice of hydrogen production technologies, distribution methods, infrastructure requirements and conversion technologies are studied. Particularly, the possibility of using in the future the existing Danish natural gas distribution grid for carrying hydrogen will be assessed. For the year 2030, two scenarios are constructed: One using hydrogen primarily in the transportation sector, the other using it as a storage option for the centralised power plants still in operation by this year. For the year 2050, where the existing fossil power plants are expected to have been phased out completely, the scenarios for two possible developments are investigated: Either, there is a complete decentralisation of the use of hydrogen, converting and storing electricity surpluses into hydrogen in individual buildings, for later use in vehicles or regeneration of power and heat. Or, some centralised infrastructure is retained, such as hydrogen cavern stores and a network of vehicle hydrogen filling stations. The analysis is used to identify the components in an implementation strategy, for the most interesting scenarios, including a time sequence of necessary decisions and technology readiness. The report is in Danish, because it is part of the dissemination effort of the Hydrogen Committee, directed at the Danish population in general and the Danish professional community in particular. (au)

  3. Hydrogen-induced delayed cracking: 1. Strain energy effects on hydrogen solubility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puls, M.P.

    1978-08-01

    Based on Li, Oriani and Darken's derivation of the chemical potential of a solute in a stressed solid and Eshelby's method for obtaining the strain energy of solids containing coherent inhomogeneous inclusions, we have carried out a detailed theoretical analysis of the factors governing hydrogen solubility in stressed and unstressed zirconium and its alloys. Specifically, the analysis demonstrates the strong influence hydride self-stresses may have on the terminal solid solubility of hydrogen in zirconium. The self-energy arises due to the misfit strains between matrix and precipitate. We have calculated the total molal self-strain energy of some commonly observed δ and γ-hydride shapes and orientations. The magnitude of this energy is substantial. Thus for γ-hydride plates lying on basal planes, it is 4912 J/mol, while for γ-hydride needles with the needle axis parallel to the directions of the α-zirconium matrix, it is 2662 J/mol. This self-strain energy causes a shift in the terminal solid solubility. For example, at 77 o C, assuming fully constrained basal plane δ-hydride plates, the terminal solid solubility is increased 5.4 times over the stress-free case. We have also calculated the effect of external stress on the terminal solid solubility. This is governed by the interaction energy arising from the interaction of the applied stresses with the precipitate's misfit strain components. The interaction energy has been calculated for δ and γ-hydride plates and needles, taking full account of the anisotropy of the misfit. The interaction energy is negative for tensile applied stresses and, as a result of the anisotropic misfit, is texture-dependent. Its magnitude is small for most applied stresses but can achieve values of the order of the self-strain energy in the plastic zone of a plane-strain crack. We have also carried out a careful analysis of the solubility data of Kearns and Erickson and Hardie. This analysis is based partly on the theoretical

  4. Hydrogen and Biofuels - A Modeling Analysis of Competing Energy Carriers for Western Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guel, Timur; Kypreos, Socrates; Barreto, Leonardo

    2007-07-01

    This paper deals with the prospects of hydrogen and biofuels as energy carriers in the Western European transportation sector. The assessment is done by combining the US hydrogen analysis H2A models for the design of hydrogen production and delivery chains, and the Western European Hydrogen Markal Model EHM with a detailed representation of biofuels, and the European electricity and transportation sector. The paper derives policy recommendations to support the market penetration of hydrogen and biofuels, and investigates learning interactions between the different energy carriers. (auth)

  5. Radiation shielding activities at the OECD/Nuclear Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sartori, Enrico; Vaz, Pedro

    2000-01-01

    The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) has devoted considerable effort over the years to radiation shielding issues. The issues are addressed through international working groups. These activities are carried out in close co-ordination and co-operation with the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC). The areas of work include: basic nuclear data activities in support of radiation shielding, computer codes, shipping cask shielding applications, reactor pressure vessel dosimetry, shielding experiments database. The method of work includes organising international code comparison exercises and benchmark studies. Training courses on radiation shielding computer codes are organised regularly including hands-on experience in modelling skills. The scope of the activity covers mainly reactor shields and spent fuel transportation packages, but also fusion neutronics and in particular shielding of accelerators and irradiation facilities. (author)

  6. The International Atomic Energy Agency's program on decontamination and decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feraday, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    The International Atomic energy Agency (IAEA) is developing an integrated information base that will systematically cover the technical, regulatory, radiation protection, planning, and economic aspects related to the decontamination and decommissioning (D/D) of nuclear facilities. The object of this program is to assist member states in developing the required expertise, equipment, and programs so that they can decommission their nuclear facilities in a safe, timely, and cost-effective manner. In addition to providing information, the IAEA encourages research and provides technical assistance in the form of expert missions, equipment design and procurement, etc., to assist member states in implementing their D/D programs. The technology contained in some recent IAEA reports is reviewed, including the decontamination, segmentation, and demolition of concrete and steel; the recycle/reuse of components from decommissioning; and the reduction of occupational exposures in D/D and the regulatory process in decommissioning. The IAEA's future program is briefly reviewed

  7. Optimal allocation of International Atomic Energy Agency inspection resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markin, J.T.

    1987-12-01

    The Safeguards Department of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) conducts inspections to assure the peaceful use of a state's nuclear materials and facilities. Because of limited resources for conducting inspections, the careful disposition of inspection effort among these facilities is essential if the IAEA is to attain its safeguards goals. This report describes an optimization procedure for assigning an inspection effort to maximize attainment of IAEA goals. The procedure does not require quantitative estimates of safeguards effectiveness, material value, or facility importance. Instead, the optimization is based on qualitative, relative prioritizations of inspection activities and materials to be safeguarded. This allocation framework is applicable to an arbitrary group of facilities such as a state's fuel cycle, the facilities inspected by an operations division, or all of the facilities inspected by the IAEA

  8. Safeguards and legal matters 1994. International Atomic Energy Agency Publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with Safeguards and Legal Matters issued during the period 1970-1994. Most publications are published in English, through some are also available in French, Russian and Spanish. Proceedings of conferences, symposia and panels of experts may contain some papers in languages other than English (French, Russian or Spanish), but all of these papers have abstracts in English. If publications are also available in other languages than English, this is noted as C for Chinese, F for French, R for Russian and S for Spanish by the relevant ISBN number. It should be noted that prices of books are quoted in Austrian Schillings. The prices do not include local taxes and are subject to change without notice. All books in this catalogue are 16 x 24 cm, paper-bound, unless otherwise stated

  9. Very low-energy hydrogen-antihydrogen scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armour, E.A.G.; Chamberlain, C.W.

    2003-01-01

    In view of current interest in the trapping of antihydrogen (H-bar) atoms at very low temperatures, we have carried out a calculation of s-wave hydrogen-antihydrogen scattering at very low energies, using the Kohn variational method, taking into account rearrangement scattering into the three channels that contain positronium in its ground state and lie closest to threshold. We find that our values for the elastic cross section are in good agreement with the values obtained by Jonsell et al. [2001 Phys. Rev. A 64 052712] using a distorted wave approximation. However, our values for the total rearrangement cross section are much larger than their values and we predict that cooling of H-bar by cold H would be considerably less efficient than was found to be the case by Jonsell et al.. (author)

  10. FY 2000 Project of international clean energy network using hydrogen conversion (WE-NET)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    Described herein are the FY 2000 results of the research and development project aimed at construction of the international clean energy network using hydrogen conversion (WE-NET). The projects include 12 tasks; system evaluation for, e.g., optimum scenario for introduction of hydrogen energy; experiments for hydrogen safety; study on the international cooperation for WE-NET; development of power generation technology using a 100kW cogeneration system including hydrogen-firing diesel engine; developmental research on vehicles driven by a hydrogen fuel cell system; developmental research on the basic technologies for PEFC utilizing pure hydrogen; developmental research on a 30Nm{sup 3}/hour hydrogen refueling station for vehicles; developmental research on hydrogen production technology; developmental research on hydrogen transportation and storage technology, e.g., liquid hydrogen pump; research and development of the databases of and processing technology for cryogenic materials exposed to liquid hydrogen; developmental research on hydrogen absorbing alloys for small-scale hydrogen transportation and storage systems; and study on innovative and leading technologies. (NEDO)

  11. Hydrogen-Based Energy Conservation System, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA and many others often rely on delivery of cryogenic hydrogen to meet their facility needs. NASA's Stennis Space Center is one of the largest users of hydrogen,...

  12. Monte Carlo simulation of energy deposition by low-energy electrons in molecular hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaps, M. G.; Furman, D. R.; Green, A. E. S.

    1975-01-01

    A set of detailed atomic cross sections has been used to obtain the spatial deposition of energy by 1-20-eV electrons in molecular hydrogen by a Monte Carlo simulation of the actual trajectories. The energy deposition curve (energy per distance traversed) is quite peaked in the forward direction about the entry point for electrons with energies above the threshold of the electronic states, but the peak decreases and broadens noticeably as the electron energy decreases below 10 eV (threshold for the lowest excitable electronic state of H2). The curve also assumes a very symmetrical shape for energies below 10 eV, indicating the increasing importance of elastic collisions in determining the shape of the curve, although not the mode of energy deposition.

  13. Hydrogen Production from Nuclear Energy via High Temperature Electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James E. O'Brien; Carl M. Stoots; J. Stephen Herring; Grant L. Hawkes

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the technical case for high-temperature nuclear hydrogen production. A general thermodynamic analysis of hydrogen production based on high-temperature thermal water splitting processes is presented. Specific details of hydrogen production based on high-temperature electrolysis are also provided, including results of recent experiments performed at the Idaho National Laboratory. Based on these results, high-temperature electrolysis appears to be a promising technology for efficient large-scale hydrogen production

  14. Summary of the FY 1988 Sunshine Project results. Hydrogen energy; 1988 nendo sunshine keikaku seika hokokusho gaiyoshu. Suiso energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1989-04-01

    Outlined herein are the results of researches on hydrogen energy as part of the FY 1988 Sunshine Project results. Researches on the techniques for producing hydrogen by electrolysis of water using a polymer electrolyte include development of power-supplying materials for electrolysis at high current density, and basic studies on the electrolysis using an OH ion conducting type polymer electrolyte. Researches on the techniques for producing hydrogen by electrolysis with hot steam include development of the materials, techniques for processing these materials, and electrolysis performance tests. Researches on the techniques for transporting hydrogen by metal hydrides include development of hydrogen-occluding alloys of high bulk density, and techniques for evaluating characteristics of metal hydrides. Researches on the techniques for storing hydrogen include those on alloy molding/processing techniques, hydrogen-storing metallic materials, and new hydrogen-storing materials. Researches on the techniques for utilizing hydrogen include those on energy conversion techniques using hydrogen-occluding alloys, and hydrogen-fueled motors. Researches on the techniques for safety-related measures include those on prevention of embrittlement of the system materials by hydrogen. (NEDO)

  15. Summary of the FY 1989 Sunshine Project results. Hydrogen energy; 1989 nendo sunshine keikaku seika hokokusho gaiyoshu. Suiso energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1990-04-01

    Outlined herein are the results of researches on hydrogen energy as part of the FY 1989 Sunshine Project results. Researches on the techniques for producing hydrogen by electrolysis of water using a polymer electrolyte include those on the SPE electrolysis at high temperature and current density, and basic studies on the electrolysis using an OH ion conducting type polymer electrolyte. Researches on the techniques for producing hydrogen by electrolysis with hot steam include development of the materials, techniques for processing these materials, and electrolysis performance tests. Researches on the techniques for transporting hydrogen by metal hydrides include development of hydrogen-occluding alloys of high bulk density, and techniques for evaluating characteristics of metal hydrides. Researches on the techniques for storing hydrogen include those on hydrogen-storing metallic materials, alloy molding/processing techniques, and new hydrogen-storing materials. Researches on the techniques for utilizing hydrogen include those on energy conversion techniques using hydrogen-occluding alloys, and hydrogen-fueled motors. Researches on the techniques for safety-related measures include those on prevention of embrittlement of the system materials by hydrogen. (NEDO)

  16. Oil substitution and energy saving - A research and development strategy of the International Energy Agency /IEA/

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rath-Nagel, S.

    1981-03-01

    Systems analyses were carried out by the International Energy Agency for the participating 15 countries in order to work out strategies and scenarios for lessening the dependence on imported oil and for developing new energy technologies. MARKAL model computations show the technology and energy mixes necessary for achieving a reduction of oil imports by two thirds over the next 40 years. The scenario 'high social security' examines the projected rise in energy consumption, the development of oil substitutes, the increase in alternative heating sources, the development of markets for liquid energy products, the demand for gas, and the relative usage of various energy generation methods. The recommended strategy involves as the most important points an increase in coal consumption, greater nuclear energy reliance and development of alternative technologies.

  17. Data on inelastic processes in low-energy potassium-hydrogen and rubidium-hydrogen collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakovleva, S. A.; Barklem, P. S.; Belyaev, A. K.

    2018-01-01

    Two sets of rate coefficients for low-energy inelastic potassium-hydrogen and rubidium-hydrogen collisions were computed for each collisional system based on two model electronic structure calculations, performed by the quantum asymptotic semi-empirical and the quantum asymptotic linear combinations of atomic orbitals (LCAO) approaches, followed by quantum multichannel calculations for the non-adiabatic nuclear dynamics. The rate coefficients for the charge transfer (mutual neutralization, ion-pair formation), excitation and de-excitation processes are calculated for all transitions between the five lowest lying covalent states and the ionic states for each collisional system for the temperature range 1000-10 000 K. The processes involving higher lying states have extremely low rate coefficients and, hence, are neglected. The two model calculations both single out the same partial processes as having large and moderate rate coefficients. The largest rate coefficients correspond to the mutual neutralization processes into the K(5s 2S) and Rb(4d 2D) final states and at temperature 6000 K have values exceeding 3 × 10-8 cm3 s-1 and 4 × 10-8 cm3 s-1, respectively. It is shown that both the semi-empirical and the LCAO approaches perform equally well on average and that both sets of atomic data have roughly the same accuracy. The processes with large and moderate rate coefficients are likely to be important for non-LTE modelling in atmospheres of F, G and K-stars, especially metal-poor stars.

  18. Heat of solution and site energies of hydrogen in disordered transition-metal alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brouwer, R.C.; Griessen, R.

    1989-01-01

    Site energies, long-range effective hydrogen-hydrogen interactions, and the enthalpy of solution in transition-metal alloys are calculated by means of an embedded-cluster model. The energy of a hydrogen atom is assumed to be predominantly determined by the first shell of neighboring metal atoms. The semiempirical local band-structure model is used to calculate the energy of the hydrogen atoms in the cluster, taking into account local deviations from the average lattice constant. The increase in the solubility limit and the weak dependence of the enthalpy of solution on hydrogen concentration in disordered alloys are discussed. Calculated site energies and enthalpies of solution in the alloys are compared with experimental data, and good agreement is found. Due to the strong interactions with the nearest-neighbor metal atoms, hydrogen atoms can be used to determine local lattice separations and the extent of short-range order in ''disordered'' alloys

  19. Knowledge Management Implementation In Indonesia Nuclear Energy Regulatory Agency (BAPETEN)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nurwidi Astuti, Y.H.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: Indonesian Nuclear Energy Regulatory Agency (BAPETEN) acquires the task and function to control the safety, security and safeguards in the field of nuclear energy through the development of legislation, licensing services, inspection and enforcement. Which is supported by review and assessment, emergency preparedness. Knowledge Management (KM) is importance for BAPETEN to achieve the Regulatory body effectiveness and product innovation. The Chairman of BAPETEN has set policies statement for KM implementation. To implement a knowledge management program, BAPETEN creates KM guidelines that includes blueprint and roadmap KM programme based on a KM readiness survey. The KM readiness survey involves 20% of staff who represent each unit and discussions with the senior manager of BAPETEN, and the result of readiness survey produce 13 KM BAPETEN initiatives strategic. After the initiative strategic has been obtained, BAPETEN creates the Roadmap of BAPETEN Knowledge Management for 2015–2019 programme for KM People with the activity sozialization of KM Guidebook, workshop SMART knowledge worker, nurture Community of practices (COP) and develop social network analysis (SNE). KM Process with activity focus group discussion, KM Readyness survey, KM Statement, KM Bapeten Guidebook, knowledge mapping, knowledge harvesting. KM Technology with activity develop knowledge system or portal, e-learning. (author

  20. Experimental-demonstrative system for energy conversion using hydrogen fuel cell - preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoenescu, D.; Stefanescu, I.; Patularu, I.; Culcer, M.; Lazar, R.E.; Carcadea, E.; Mirica, D. . E-mail address of corresponding author: daniela@icsi.ro; Stoenescu, D.)

    2005-01-01

    It is well known that hydrogen is the most promising solution of future energy, both for long and medium term strategies. Hydrogen can be produced using many primary sources (natural gas, methane, biomass, etc.), it can be burned or chemically react having a high yield of energy conversion, being a non-polluted fuel. This paper presents the preliminary results obtained by ICSI Rm. Valcea in an experimental-demonstrative conversion energy system made by a sequence of hydrogen purification units and a CO removing reactors until a CO level lower than 10ppm, that finally feeds a hydrogen fuel stack. (author)

  1. Final Technical Report: Hydrogen Energy in Engineering Education (H2E3)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehman, Peter A.; Cashman, Eileen; Lipman, Timothy; Engel, Richard A.

    2011-09-15

    Schatz Energy Research Center's Hydrogen Energy in Engineering Education curriculum development project delivered hydrogen energy and fuel cell learning experiences to over 1,000 undergraduate engineering students at five California universities, provided follow-on internships for students at a fuel cell company; and developed commercializable hydrogen teaching tools including a fuel cell test station and a fuel cell/electrolyzer experiment kit. Monitoring and evaluation tracked student learning and faculty and student opinions of the curriculum, showing that use of the curriculum did advance student comprehension of hydrogen fundamentals. The project web site (hydrogencurriculum.org) provides more information.

  2. Multi-objective technico-economic optimization of energy conversion systems: hydrogen and electricity cogeneration from Generation IV nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez, A.

    2008-01-01

    With the increase in environmental considerations, such as the control of greenhouse emissions, and with the decrease in the fossil energy resources, hydrogen is currently considered as a promising energy vector. One of the main technological challenges of a future hydrogen economy is its large scale production without fossil fuel emissions. Under this context, nuclear energy is particularly adapted for hydrogen massive production by thermochemical cycles or high temperature electrolysis. One of the selected nuclear systems is the Very High Temperature Reactor (950 C/1200 C), cooled with helium, and dedicated to hydrogen production or to hydrogen electricity cogeneration. The main objective of this investigation, within the framework of a collaboration between CEA, French Atomic Agency (Cadarache) and LGC (Toulouse), consists in defining a technico-economic optimization methodology of electricity-hydrogen cogeneration systems, in order to identify and propose promising development strategies. Among the massive production processes of hydrogen, the thermochemical cycle Iodine-Sulphur has been considered. Taking into account the diversity of the used energies (i.e., heat and electricity) on the one hand and of the produced energies (hydrogen and electricity) on the other hand of the studied cogeneration system, an exergetic approach has been developed due to its ability to consider various energy forms on the same thermodynamical basis. The CYCLOP software tool (CEA) is used for the thermodynamic modelling of these systems. The economic criterion, calculated using the SEMER software tool (CEA), is based on the minimization of the total production site cost over its lifespan i.e., investment, operating costs and nuclear fuel cost. Capital investment involves the development of cost functions adapted to specific technologies and their specific operating conditions. The resulting optimization problems consist in maximizing the energy production, while minimizing the

  3. The annual report for 1997. International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-07-01

    Article VI.J of the Agency's Statute requires the Board of Governors to submit 'an annual report to the General Conference concerning the affairs of the Agency and any projects approved by the Agency'. This report covers the period 1 January to 31 December 1997

  4. The annual report for 1994[International Atomic Energy Agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    Article VI.J of the Agency's Statute requires the Board of Governors to submit 'an annual report to the General Conference concerning the affairs of the Agency and any projects approved by the Agency'. This report covers the period 1 January to 31 December 1994.

  5. The annual report for 1997. International Atomic Energy Agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-07-01

    Article VI.J of the Agency's Statute requires the Board of Governors to submit 'an annual report to the General Conference concerning the affairs of the Agency and any projects approved by the Agency'. This report covers the period 1 January to 31 December 1997.

  6. The annual report for 1996[International Atomic Energy Agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-07-01

    Article VI.J of the Agency's Statute requires the Board of Governors to submit 'an annual report to the General Conference concerning the affairs of the Agency and any projects approved by the Agency'. This report covers the period 1 January to 31 December 1996.

  7. The annual report for 1999. International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    Article VI.J of the Agency's Statute requires the Board of Governors to submit 'an annual report to the General Conference concerning the affairs of the Agency and any projects approved by the Agency'. This report covers the period 1 January to 31 December 1999

  8. International Atomic Energy Agency Annual Report 2014. Additional Annex Information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    This annex contains information on: • Coordinated research projects completed in 2014; • Publications issued in 2014; • Training courses, seminars and workshops held in 2014; • Relevant Agency web sites; • Number and types of facilities under Agency safeguards by State as of 31 December 2014 and • Facilities under Agency safeguards or containing safeguarded nuclear material on 31 December 2014

  9. The annual report for 1999. International Atomic Energy Agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    Article VI.J of the Agency's Statute requires the Board of Governors to submit 'an annual report to the General Conference concerning the affairs of the Agency and any projects approved by the Agency'. This report covers the period 1 January to 31 December 1999.

  10. The annual report for 1998. International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-07-01

    Article VI.J of the Agency's Statute requires the Board of Governors to submit 'an annual report to the General Conference concerning the affairs of the Agency and any projects approved by the Agency'. This report covers the period 1 January to 31 December 1998

  11. The annual report for 1998. International Atomic Energy Agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-07-01

    Article VI.J of the Agency's Statute requires the Board of Governors to submit 'an annual report to the General Conference concerning the affairs of the Agency and any projects approved by the Agency'. This report covers the period 1 January to 31 December 1998.

  12. The annual report for 1995[International Atomic Energy Agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-07-01

    Article VI.J of the Agency's Statute requires the Board of Governors to submit 'an annual report to the General Conference concerning the affairs of the Agency and any projects approved by the Agency'. This report covers the period 1 January to 31 December 1995.

  13. 1999 annual summary report on results. International clean energy network using hydrogen conversion (WE-NET)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    The R and D were conducted on the international clean network (WE-NET) which aims at producing hydrogen by using renewable energy, converting it in a form suitable for transportation and supplying the hydrogen to places of quantity consumption of energy. The FY 1999 results were summed up. In the system evaluation, study was made on sodium carbonate electrolysis by-producing hydrogen, the supply amount by coke oven by-producing hydrogen and the economical efficiency, etc. As to the safety, study was made on the design of hydrogen supply stand model. Concerning the power generation technology, study was conducted on element technologies of injection valve, exhaust gas condenser, gas/liquid separator, etc. Relating to the hydrogen fueled vehicle system, the shock destructive testing, etc. were conducted on the hydrogen tank and hydrogen storage alloys. Besides, a lot of R and D were carried out of pure water use solid polymer fuel cells, hydrogen stand, hydrogen production technology, hydrogen transportation/storage technology, low temperature materials, transportation/storage using hydrogen storage alloys, innovative advanced technology, etc. (NEDO)

  14. Hydrogen: the great debate. 'Power to Gas - how to cope with the challenge of electricity storage?; Hydrogen in energy transition: which challenges to be faced?; Hydrogen, essential today, indispensable tomorrow; Electrolytic hydrogen, a solution for energy transition?; Development of high power electrolysis systems: need and approach; Hydrogen as energy vector, Potential and stakes: a perspective; The Toyota Fuel Cell System: a new era for the automotive industry; Three key factors: production, applications to mobility, and public acceptance; Hydrogen, benevolent fairy or tempting demon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauet, Jean-Pierre; Boucly, Philippe; Beeker, Etienne; Mauberger, Pascal; Quint, Aliette; Pierre, Helene; Lucchese, Paul; Bouillon-Delporte, Valerie; Chauvet, Bertrand; Brisse, Annabelle; Gautier, Ludmila; Hercberg, Sylvain; De Volder, Marc; Gruson, Jean-Francois; Marion, Pierre; Grellier, Sebastien; Devezeaux, Jean-Guy; Mansilla, Christine; Le Net, Elisabeth; Le Duigou, Alain; Maire, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    This publication proposes a set of contributions which address various issues related to the development of the use of hydrogen as an energy source. More precisely, these contributions discuss how to face the challenge of electricity storage by using the Power-to-Gas technology, the challenges to be faced regarding the role of hydrogen in energy transition, the essential current role of hydrogen and its indispensable role for tomorrow, the possible role of electrolytic hydrogen as a solution for energy transition, the need of and the approach to a development of high power electrolysis systems, the potential and stakes of hydrogen as an energy vector, the Toyota fuel cell system as a sign for new era for automotive industry, the three main factors (production, applications to mobility, and public acceptance) for the use of hydrogen in energy transition, and the role of hydrogen perceived either as a benevolent fairy or a tempting demon

  15. Novel optimization technique of isolated microgrid with hydrogen energy storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beshr, Eman Hassan; Abdelghany, Hazem; Eteiba, Mahmoud

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents a novel optimization technique for energy management studies of an isolated microgrid. The system is supplied by various Distributed Energy Resources (DERs), Diesel Generator (DG), a Wind Turbine Generator (WTG), Photovoltaic (PV) arrays and supported by fuel cell/electrolyzer Hydrogen storage system for short term storage. Multi-objective optimization is used through non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm to suit the load requirements under the given constraints. A novel multi-objective flower pollination algorithm is utilized to check the results. The Pros and cons of the two optimization techniques are compared and evaluated. An isolated microgrid is modelled using MATLAB software package, dispatch of active/reactive power, optimal load flow analysis with slack bus selection are carried out to be able to minimize fuel cost and line losses under realistic constraints. The performance of the system is studied and analyzed during both summer and winter conditions and three case studies are presented for each condition. The modified IEEE 15 bus system is used to validate the proposed algorithm.

  16. Novel optimization technique of isolated microgrid with hydrogen energy storage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eman Hassan Beshr

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel optimization technique for energy management studies of an isolated microgrid. The system is supplied by various Distributed Energy Resources (DERs, Diesel Generator (DG, a Wind Turbine Generator (WTG, Photovoltaic (PV arrays and supported by fuel cell/electrolyzer Hydrogen storage system for short term storage. Multi-objective optimization is used through non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm to suit the load requirements under the given constraints. A novel multi-objective flower pollination algorithm is utilized to check the results. The Pros and cons of the two optimization techniques are compared and evaluated. An isolated microgrid is modelled using MATLAB software package, dispatch of active/reactive power, optimal load flow analysis with slack bus selection are carried out to be able to minimize fuel cost and line losses under realistic constraints. The performance of the system is studied and analyzed during both summer and winter conditions and three case studies are presented for each condition. The modified IEEE 15 bus system is used to validate the proposed algorithm.

  17. Proceedings of the DOE chemical/hydrogen energy systems contractor review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-05-01

    This volume contains 45 papers as well as overviews of the two main project areas: the NASA Hydrogen Energy Storage Technology Project and Brookhaven National Laboratory's program on Electrolysis-Based Hydrogen Storage Systems. Forty-six project summaries are included. Individual papers were processed for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

  18. Calculations for very low energy scattering of positrons by molecular hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, J.N. [School of Mathematical Sciences, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)], E-mail: james.cooper@maths.nottingham.ac.uk; Armour, E.A.G. [School of Mathematical Sciences, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)

    2008-02-15

    We give a progress report on ongoing calculations of phase shifts for very low energy elastic scattering of positrons by molecular hydrogen, using the generalised Kohn variational method. Further, provisional calculations of Z{sub eff} for molecular hydrogen at low energies are presented and discussed. The preliminary nature of the work is emphasised throughout.

  19. Kepentingan Indonesia Bergabung dengan Irena (International Renewable Energy Agency) Tahun 2014

    OpenAIRE

    Harto, Syafri; ", Zulfadli

    2016-01-01

    This research will explain about Indonesia interest joined with IRENA ( International Renewable Energy Agency). Nowadays energy condition is so far from standart of energy endurance. Indonesia energy needs still dominated by fossil energy. In 2013, Fossil Energy produces 93,4% of energy consumtion, 5,7% by renewable energy. 7% oil, 20,1% gas, 24,5% from coal. With Indonesia energy endurance and global market that affected domestic energy condition, Indonesia need to comply the national intere...

  20. A rationale plan for conversion of Malaysia for solar hydrogen energy system and its benefits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludin, N.A.; Kamaruddin, W.N.; Kamaruzzaman Sopian; Verizoglu, T.N.

    2006-01-01

    It expected that early in the next century, Malaysia production of petroleum and natural gas will peak, and thereafter production will decline. In parallel with this production decline, Malaysia income from fossil fuels will start to decline, which would hurt the economy. One possible solution for Malaysia is the of Malaysia is the conversion to a hydrogen energy system. In order to move towards a sustainable hydrogen energy system, a future strategy must be outlined, followed, and continually revised. This paper will underline the available hydrogen technologies for production, storage, delivery, conversion, transportation and end use energy applications for the implementation of hydrogen energy system. Therefore, this paper will also emphasis the key success factors to drive the rationale plan for conversion to hydrogen energy system for Malaysia

  1. Demonstration of Hydrogen Energy Network and Fuel Cells in Residential Homes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirohisa Aki; Tetsuhiko Maeda; Itaru Tamura; Akeshi Kegasa; Yoshiro Ishikawa; Ichiro Sugimoto; Itaru Ishii

    2006-01-01

    The authors proposed the setting up of an energy interchange system by establishing energy networks of electricity, hot water, and hydrogen in residential homes. In such networks, some homes are equipped with fuel cell stacks, fuel processors, hydrogen storage devices, and large storage tanks for hot water. The energy network enables the flexible operation of the fuel cell stacks and fuel processors. A demonstration project has been planned in existing residential homes to evaluate the proposal. The demonstration will be presented in a small apartment building. The building will be renovated and will be equipped with a hydrogen production facility, a hydrogen interchange pipe, and fuel cell stacks with a heat recovery device. The energy flow process from hydrogen production to consumption in the homes will be demonstrated. This paper presents the proposed energy interchange system and demonstration project. (authors)

  2. Fiscal 1996 achievement report. International Clean Energy Network Using Hydrogen Conversion (WE-NET) technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    Research and development was performed for the WE-NET (World Energy Network) project which aims to carry out hydrogen production, transportation, and supply to consumers, by the use of renewable energy. Under subtask 1, the whole WE-NET project was subjected to evaluation, which included coordination between the respective tasks. Under subtask 2, information exchange and research cooperation were carried out with research institutes overseas. Under subtask 3, a conceptual design was prepared of a total system using ammonia as the medium for hydrogen transportation, accident data were collected and screened, and safety measures and evaluation techniques were developed and improved. Under subtask 4, the hot press method and the electroless plating method were selected as better electrode bonding methods. Under subtask 5, hydrogen liquefaction cycle processes, liquid hydrogen tankers, storage facilities, etc., were studied. Under subtasks 6-9, furthermore, investigations were conducted about low-temperature substance technology, hydrogen energy, hydrogen combustion turbine, etc. (NEDO)

  3. Measurements of energy distribution and thrust for microwave plasma coupling of electrical energy to hydrogen for propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, T.; Chapman, R.; Filpus, J.; Hawley, M.; Kerber, R.; Asmussen, J.; Nakanishi, S.

    1982-01-01

    A microwave plasma system for transfer of electrical energy to hydrogen flowing through the system has potential application for coupling energy to a flowing gas in the electrothermal propulsion concept. Experimental systems have been designed and built for determination of the energy inputs and outputs and thrust for the microwave coupling of energy to hydrogen. Results for experiments with pressure in the range 100 microns-6 torr, hydrogen flow rate up to 1000 micronmoles/s, and total absorbed power to 700 w are presented.

  4. Demonstration technology development of new hydrogen energy; Shinsuiso energy jissho gijutsu kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    A phenomenon of excess heat generation through the electrolysis of heavy water using palladium metals as electrode can be recognized as new hydrogen energy. Its mechanism has been investigated for four years since FY 1993. In FY 1993, the New Hydrogen Energy Demonstration Research Center and the New Hydrogen Energy Demonstration Laboratory were organized, and the research was initiated. For the excess heat generation demonstration model tests, two types of electrolysis experimental units were constructed, and the Pd/D-based electrolysis experiments were initiated. For the measurements of excess heat using an open type electrolysis cell, there were rather large errors ranging from -13% to +7%. It is necessary to improve the accuracy. For the measurements using a fuel cell type electrolysis cell, generation of the excess heat ranging from 0% to 6% was observed. For the validity of this, it is required to confirm the long-term stability of calibration and cell components. For the correlation between the increase in absorbing rate and the generation of excess heat, results of 2 to 3% lower were obtained. 28 refs., 89 figs., 26 tabs.

  5. A fuzzy analytic hierarchy/data envelopment analysis approach for measuring the relative efficiency of hydrogen R and D programs in the sector of developing hydrogen energy technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seongkon; Kim, Jongwook [Korea Institute of Energy Research (Korea, Republic of). Energy Policy Research Center; Mogi, Gento [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Graduate School of Engineering; Hui, K.S. [Hong Kong City Univ. (China). Manufacturing Engineering and Engineering Management

    2010-07-01

    Korea takes 10th place of largest energy consuming nations in the world since it spends 222 million ton of oil equivalent per year and depends on the most amount of consumed energy resources, which account for 96% import in 2008 with the 5.6% selfsufficiency ratio of energy resources. The interest of energy technology development has increased due to its poor energy environments. Specifically, the fluctuation of oil prices has been easily affecting Korean energy environments and economy. Considering its energy environments, energy technology development can be one of the optimal solution and breakthrough to solve Korea's energy circumstances, energy security, and the low carbon green growth with Korea's sustainable development. Moreover, energy and environment issues are the key factors for leading the future sustainable competitive advantage and green growth of one nation over the others nations. Lots of advanced nations have been trying to develop the energy technologies with the establishment of the strategic energy technology R and D programs for creating and maintain a competitive advantage and leading the global energy market. In 2005, we established strategic hydrogen energy technology roadmap in the sector of developing hydrogen energy technologies for coping with next 10 years from 2006 to 2015 as an aspect of hydrogen energy technology development. Hydrogen energy technologies are environmentally sound and friendly comparing with conventional energy technologies. Hydrogen energy technologies can play a key role and is the one of the best alternatives getting much attentions coping with UNFCCC and the hydrogen economy. Hydrogen energy technology roadmap shows meaningful guidelines for implementing the low carbon green growth society. We analyzed the world energy outlook to make hydrogen ETRM and provide energy policy directions in 2005. It focuses on developing hydrogen energy technology considering Korea's energy circumstance. We make a

  6. OECD Nuclear Energy Agency activities on PTS evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, A.

    1997-01-01

    The Safety Division of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency provides the secretariat for the Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI), which deals with technological aspects, and for the Committee for Nuclear Regulatory Activities (CNRA) dealing with regulatory aspects. Under these committees, activities are carried out through five Principal Working Groups (PWGs). The relevant group for PTS is PWG-3 on the integrity of structures and components. There is also PWG-2 on coolant system behavior, but the thermal hydraulic aspects of PTS have not been considered by PWG-2. PWG-3 carries out it work in a similar manner to the IAEA IWG LMNPP, by preparing reports and organizing round robins, Specialists Meetings and Workshops. The general context of RPV PTS has been considered in several workshops: on the 'Complementary roles of Fracture Mechanics and Non-Destructive Examination in the Safety Assessment of Components' in Wuerenlingen in 1988; on the 'Safety Assessment of RPVs' in Espoo in 1990; and on 'Fracture Mechanics Verification by Large Scale Testing' (joint with IAEA) at Oak Ridge in 1992. Activities specific to PTS have been an international survey on regulatory practices on PTS carried out in 1991, and a series of fracture round robins addressing PTS conditions organized by GRS in Germany and ORNL in the USA. 3 refs, 5 tabs

  7. Optimal allocation of international atomic energy agency inspection resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markin, J.T.

    1987-01-01

    Each year the Department of Safeguards of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) conducts inspections to confirm that nuclear materials and facilities are employed for peaceful purposes. Because of limited inspection resources, however, the IAEA cannot fully attain its safeguards goals either quantitatively as measured by the inspection effort negotiated in the facility attachments or qualitatively as measured by the IAEA criteria for evaluating attainment of safeguards goals. Under current IAEA procedures the allocation of inspection resources assigns essentially equal inspection effort to facilities of the same type. An alternative approach would incorporate consideration of all material categories and facilities to be assigned inspection resources when allocating effort to a particular facility. One such method for allocating inspection resources is based on the IAEA criteria. The criteria provide a framework for allocating inspection effort that includes a ranking of material types according to their safeguards importance, an implicit definition of inspection activities for each material and facility type, and criteria for judging the attainment of safeguards goals in terms of the quality and frequency of these inspection activities. This framework is applicable to resource allocation for an arbitrary group of facilities such as a state's fuel cycle, the facilities inspected by an operations division, or all of the facilities inspected by the IAEA

  8. OECD Nuclear Energy Agency activities on PTS evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, A [NEA Nuclear Safety Div., Issy-les-Moulineaux (France)

    1997-09-01

    The Safety Division of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency provides the secretariat for the Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI), which deals with technological aspects, and for the Committee for Nuclear Regulatory Activities (CNRA) dealing with regulatory aspects. Under these committees, activities are carried out through five Principal Working Groups (PWGs). The relevant group for PTS is PWG-3 on the integrity of structures and components. There is also PWG-2 on coolant system behavior, but the thermal hydraulic aspects of PTS have not been considered by PWG-2. PWG-3 carries out it work in a similar manner to the IAEA IWG LMNPP, by preparing reports and organizing round robins, Specialists Meetings and Workshops. The general context of RPV PTS has been considered in several workshops: on the `Complementary roles of Fracture Mechanics and Non-Destructive Examination in the Safety Assessment of Components` in Wuerenlingen in 1988; on the `Safety Assessment of RPVs` in Espoo in 1990; and on `Fracture Mechanics Verification by Large Scale Testing` (joint with IAEA) at Oak Ridge in 1992. Activities specific to PTS have been an international survey on regulatory practices on PTS carried out in 1991, and a series of fracture round robins addressing PTS conditions organized by GRS in Germany and ORNL in the USA. 3 refs, 5 tabs.

  9. Technical Analysis of the Hydrogen Energy Station Concept, Phase I and Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TIAX, LLC

    2005-05-04

    Phase I Due to the growing interest in establishing a domestic hydrogen infrastructure, several hydrogen fueling stations already have been established around the country as demonstration units. While these stations help build familiarity with hydrogen fuel in their respective communities, hydrogen vehicles are still several years from mass production. This limited number of hydrogen vehicles translates to a limited demand for hydrogen fuel, a significant hurdle for the near-term establishment of commercially viable hydrogen fueling stations. By incorporating a fuel cell and cogeneration system with a hydrogen fueling station, the resulting energy station can compensate for low hydrogen demand by providing both hydrogen dispensing and combined heat and power (CHP) generation. The electrical power generated by the energy station can be fed back into the power grid or a nearby facility, which in turn helps offset station costs. Hydrogen production capacity not used by vehicles can be used to support building heat and power loads. In this way, an energy station can experience greater station utility while more rapidly recovering capital costs, providing an increased market potential relative to a hydrogen fueling station. At an energy station, hydrogen is generated on-site. Part of the hydrogen is used for vehicle refueling and part of the hydrogen is consumed by a fuel cell. As the fuel cell generates electricity and sends it to the power grid, excess heat is reclaimed through a cogeneration system for use in a nearby facility. Both the electrical generation and heat reclamation serve to offset the cost of purchasing the equivalent amount of energy for nearby facilities and the energy station itself. This two-phase project assessed the costs and feasibility of developing a hydrogen vehicle fueling station in conjunction with electricity and cogenerative heat generation for nearby Federal buildings. In order to determine which system configurations and operational

  10. Key Factors in Planning a Sustainable Energy Future Including Hydrogen and Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedstrom, Lars; Saxe, Maria; Folkesson, Anders; Wallmark, Cecilia; Haraldsson, Kristina; Bryngelsson, Marten; Alvfors, Per

    2006-01-01

    In this article, a number of future energy visions, especially those basing the energy systems on hydrogen, are discussed. Some often missing comparisons between alternatives, from a sustainability perspective, are identified and then performed for energy storage, energy transportation, and energy use in vehicles. It is shown that it is important…

  11. Journal Of The Korean Hydrogen Energy Society 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-11-01

    This book deals with studies such as new ball-milled metal hydride electrode for rechargeable batteries by Noh, Haki; Park, Chung Nyeon, hydrogen absorption by laves phase related BCC solid solution alloys by Etsuo Akiba. The hydrogen absorption kinetics in very thin pd film by Cho, Young Sin; Lee, Jong Suk; Kim, Chang Won. The effect of the ceramic precipitates on the hydrogen solubility in pd alloys by Koh, Je Mann; Lee, Kil Hong; Bada, Seung Nam; Noh, Hak, and AC impedance study of the electrochemical behavior of hydrogen, Oxygen gas mixture at nafion, catalyst electrode interface by Song, S. M and Lee, W. M.

  12. Cryogenic hydrogen data pertinent to magnetic fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souers, P.C.

    1979-01-01

    To aid future hydrogen fusion researchers, I have correlated the measured physical and chemical properties of the hydrogens below 30 0 K. I have further estimated these properties for deuterium--deuterium tritide--tritium (D 2 --DT--T 2 ) fusion fuel. My resulting synthesis offers a timely view and review of cryogenic hydrogen properties, plus some hydrogen data to room temperature. My general thrust is for workers new to the field, although my discussion of the scientific background of the material would suit specialists

  13. Integrating global energy and climate governance: The changing role of the International Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heubaum, Harald; Biermann, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Despite the long-recognized interlinkages between global energy consumption and climate change, there has historically been only limited policy interaction, let alone integration, between the two fields. This compartmentalization is mirrored in scholarship, where much research has focused on the fragmentation of, respectively, global energy and global climate governance, but only little has been said about how these fields might be integrated. Our analysis of the International Energy Agency’s (IEA) changing activities in recent years shows that governance integration – both within global energy governance and between global energy and climate governance – is now happening. The IEA has broadened its portfolio to embrace the full spectrum of energy issues, including renewable energy and climate change; it has built and is expanding key partnerships with both the UN climate convention and the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA); and it has become an authoritative advocate for the inter-related goals of a low-carbon transition and climate change mitigation. We show that these developments are not the result of a top-down plan, but have rather emerged through the Agency’s various efforts to pursue its energy-centric mandate in a fast-changing global policy environment. - Highlights: • Assesses integration between global energy and global climate governance. • Analyzes organizational change in the IEA and its impact on governance integration. • Discusses recent activities and advocacy by the IEA in relation to climate change.

  14. Hydrogen in the making: how an energy company organises under uncertainty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koefoed, Anne Louise

    2011-07-01

    This thesis combines an analytical interest in innovation process studies with an empirical interest in clean energy development. My work concentrates on innovation processes from initiation to realisation in a company setting focusing on hydrogen as an energy carrier. A Norwegian energy company, Norsk Hydro, is used as a case to explore the intraorganisational processes involved in business building. This is relevant to the research question - how hydrogen energy takes on reality and relevance for business activity? Further, a concrete hydrogen demonstration project involving research and development of a new technology combination, in collaboration with partners, has also been studied.(Author)

  15. Application of Liquid Hydrogen with SMES for Efficient Use of Renewable Energy in the Energy Internet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Wang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Considering that generally frequency instability problems occur due to abrupt variations in load demand growth and power variations generated by different renewable energy sources (RESs, the application of superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES may become crucial due to its rapid response features. In this paper, liquid hydrogen with SMES (LIQHYSMES is proposed to play a role in the future energy internet in terms of its combination of the SMES and the liquid hydrogen storage unit, which can help to overcome the capacity limit and high investment cost disadvantages of SMES. The generalized predictive control (GPC algorithm is presented to be appreciatively used to eliminate the frequency deviations of the isolated micro energy grid including the LIQHYSMES and RESs. A benchmark micro energy grid with distributed generators (DGs, electrical vehicle (EV stations, smart loads and a LIQHYSMES unit is modeled in the Matlab/Simulink environment. The simulation results show that the proposed GPC strategy can reschedule the active power output of each component to maintain the stability of the grid. In addition, in order to improve the performance of the SMES, a detailed optimization design of the superconducting coil is conducted, and the optimized SMES unit can offer better technical advantages in damping the frequency fluctuations.

  16. Alternate Funding Sources for the International Atomic Energy Agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toomey, Christopher; Wyse, Evan T.; Kurzrok, Andrew J.; Swarthout, Jordan M.

    2012-09-04

    Since 1957, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has worked to ensure the safe and responsible promotion of nuclear technology throughout the world. The IAEA operates at the intersection of the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty’s (NPT) fourth and third articles, which guarantee Parties to the Treaty the right to peaceful uses of nuclear technology, provided those activities are placed under safeguards verified by the IAEA. However, while the IAEA has enjoyed substantial success and prestige in the international community, there is a concern that its resources are being stretched to a point where it may no longer be possible to execute its multifaceted mission in its entirety. As noted by the Director General (DG) in 2008, demographics suggest that every aspect of the IAEA’s operations will be in higher demand due to increasing reliance on non-carbon-based energy and the concomitant nonproliferation, safety, and security risks that growth entails. In addition to these nuclear energy concerns, the demand for technical developmental assistance in the fields of food security, resource conservation, and human health is also predicted to increase as the rest of the world develops. Even with a 100% value-for-money rating by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB) and being described as an “extraordinary bargain” by the United Nations Secretary-General’s High-level Panel on Threats, Challenges and Change, real budget growth at the Agency has been limited to zero-real growth for a better part of the last two decades. Although the 2012 regular budget (RB) received a small increase for most programs, the 2013 RB has been set at zero-real growth. As a result, the IAEA has had to defer infrastructure investments, which has hindered its ability to provide the public goods its Members seek, decreased global security and development opportunities, and functionally transformed the IAEA into a charity, dependent on extrabudgetary (EB) contributions to sustain

  17. Fiscal 1995 achievement report. International Clean Energy Network Using Hydrogen Conversion (WE-NET) technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    Research and development was performed for the WE-NET (World Energy Network) project which aims to carry out hydrogen production, transportation, and supply to consumers, by the use of renewable energy. Under subtask 1, besides investigation of a pilot plant of phase 2, the WE-NET image as a whole was studied. Under subtask 2, technical information was exchanged at an international symposium and a long-term vision of the international network was discussed. Under subtask 3, for the evaluation of the effect of hydrogen energy introduction on the global level, national level, and city level, simulation models were discussed and improved. Under subtask 4, tests and studies were made concerning electrode bonding methods. Under subtask 5, the Neon Brayton cycle process was surveyed and studied as a hydrogen liquefaction cycle. Under subtasks 6-9, furthermore, surveys and studies were made about techniques relating to low-temperature substances, hydrogen energy, hydrogen combustion turbines, and so forth. (NEDO)

  18. Heat energy from hydrogen-metal nuclear interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadjichristos, John [Defkalion GT SA, 1140 Homer Street, Suite 250, Vancouver BC V682X6 (Canada); Gluck, Peter [Retired from INCDTIM Cluj-Napoca in 1999 (Romania)

    2013-11-13

    The discovery of the Fleischmann-Pons Effect in 1989, a promise of an abundant, cheap and clean energy source was premature in the sense that theoretical knowledge, relative technologies and the experimental tools necessary for understanding and for scale-up still were not available. Therefore the field, despite efforts and diversification remained quasi-stagnant, the effect (a scientific certainty) being of low intensity leading to mainstream science to reject the phenomenon and not supporting its study. Recently however, the situation has changed, a new paradigm is in statunascendi and the obstacles are systematically removed by innovative approaches. Defkalion, a Greek company (that recently moved in Canada for faster progress) has elaborated an original technology for the Ni-H system [1-3]. It is about the activation of hydrogen and creation of nuclear active nano-cavities in the metal through a multi-stage interaction, materializing some recent breakthrough announcements in nanotechnology, superconductivity, plasma physics, astrophysics and material science. A pre-industrial generator and a novel mass-spectrometry instrumentations were created. Simultaneously, a meta-theory of phenomena was sketched in collaboration with Prof. Y. Kim (Purdue U)

  19. Heat energy from hydrogen-metal nuclear interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadjichristos, John; Gluck, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of the Fleischmann-Pons Effect in 1989, a promise of an abundant, cheap and clean energy source was premature in the sense that theoretical knowledge, relative technologies and the experimental tools necessary for understanding and for scale-up still were not available. Therefore the field, despite efforts and diversification remained quasi-stagnant, the effect (a scientific certainty) being of low intensity leading to mainstream science to reject the phenomenon and not supporting its study. Recently however, the situation has changed, a new paradigm is in statunascendi and the obstacles are systematically removed by innovative approaches. Defkalion, a Greek company (that recently moved in Canada for faster progress) has elaborated an original technology for the Ni-H system [1-3]. It is about the activation of hydrogen and creation of nuclear active nano-cavities in the metal through a multi-stage interaction, materializing some recent breakthrough announcements in nanotechnology, superconductivity, plasma physics, astrophysics and material science. A pre-industrial generator and a novel mass-spectrometry instrumentations were created. Simultaneously, a meta-theory of phenomena was sketched in collaboration with Prof. Y. Kim (Purdue U)

  20. System-level energy efficiency is the greatest barrier to development of the hydrogen economy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Page, Shannon; Krumdieck, Susan

    2009-01-01

    Current energy research investment policy in New Zealand is based on assumed benefits of transitioning to hydrogen as a transport fuel and as storage for electricity from renewable resources. The hydrogen economy concept, as set out in recent commissioned research investment policy advice documents, includes a range of hydrogen energy supply and consumption chains for transport and residential energy services. The benefits of research and development investments in these advice documents were not fully analyzed by cost or improvements in energy efficiency or green house gas emissions reduction. This paper sets out a straightforward method to quantify the system-level efficiency of these energy chains. The method was applied to transportation and stationary heat and power, with hydrogen generated from wind energy, natural gas and coal. The system-level efficiencies for the hydrogen chains were compared to direct use of conventionally generated electricity, and with internal combustion engines operating on gas- or coal-derived fuel. The hydrogen energy chains were shown to provide little or no system-level efficiency improvement over conventional technology. The current research investment policy is aimed at enabling a hydrogen economy without considering the dramatic loss of efficiency that would result from using this energy carrier.

  1. Hydrogen as an energy storage; Wasserstoff als Energiespeicher

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wulf, Christina [Technische Univ. Hamburg-Harburg, Hamburg (Germany). Inst. fuer Umwelttechnik und Energiewirtschaft; Hustadt, Daniel; Weinmann, Oliver [Vattenfall Europe Innovation GmbH, Hamburg (Germany)

    2013-05-15

    In order to investigate hydrogen in everyday life, its utilization will be tested and optimized in different scenarios in demonstration facilities. Currently, the excess current for example from wind power plants is not yet sufficient in order to refinance the high investment costs for electrolyzers. Under what conditions do economic potentials exist for the use of hydrogen?.

  2. Nuclear energy and non proliferation. The role of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooley, J.; Rauf, T.

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses the role of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in the prevention of the spread of nuclear weapons. The IAEA verifies States compliance with their non-proliferation commitments through the application of safeguards on their civilian nuclear programmes to ensure that they are being used solely for peaceful purposes. The IAEA safeguards have evolved in the course of five decades and have become an integral part of the international non-proliferation regime and the global security system. To continue to serve the international community, they need to continue to move with the times, especially in light of the renewed interest in nuclear energy. (Author)

  3. International Atomic Energy Agency Annual Report 2011 (Chinese Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The IAEA Annual Report 2011 aims to summarize only the significant activities of the Agency during the year in question. This report covers the period 1 January to 31 December 2011. The main part of the report, starting on page 21, generally follows the programme structure as given in The Agency's Programme and Budget 2010-2011 (GC(53)/5). The introductory chapter, 'The Year in Review', seeks to provide a thematic analysis of the Agency's activities within the context of notable developments during the year. More detailed information can be found in the latest editions of the Agency's Nuclear Safety Review, Nuclear Technology Review, Technical Cooperation Report and the Safeguards Statement for 2011 and Background to the Safeguards Statement. Additional information covering various aspects of the Agency's programme is available in electronic form only on iaea.org, along with the Annual Report.

  4. International Atomic Energy Agency Annual Report 2011 (Russian Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The IAEA Annual Report 2011 aims to summarize only the significant activities of the Agency during the year in question. This report covers the period 1 January to 31 December 2011. The main part of the report, starting on page 21, generally follows the programme structure as given in The Agency's Programme and Budget 2010-2011 (GC(53)/5). The introductory chapter, 'The Year in Review', seeks to provide a thematic analysis of the Agency's activities within the context of notable developments during the year. More detailed information can be found in the latest editions of the Agency's Nuclear Safety Review, Nuclear Technology Review, Technical Cooperation Report and the Safeguards Statement for 2011 and Background to the Safeguards Statement. Additional information covering various aspects of the Agency's programme is available in electronic form only on iaea.org, along with the Annual Report.

  5. International Atomic Energy Agency Annual Report 2011 (French Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The IAEA Annual Report 2011 aims to summarize only the significant activities of the Agency during the year in question. This report covers the period 1 January to 31 December 2011. The main part of the report, starting on page 21, generally follows the programme structure as given in The Agency's Programme and Budget 2010-2011 (GC(53)/5). The introductory chapter, 'The Year in Review', seeks to provide a thematic analysis of the Agency's activities within the context of notable developments during the year. More detailed information can be found in the latest editions of the Agency's Nuclear Safety Review, Nuclear Technology Review, Technical Cooperation Report and the Safeguards Statement for 2011 and Background to the Safeguards Statement. Additional information covering various aspects of the Agency's programme is available in electronic form only on iaea.org, along with the Annual Report.

  6. International Atomic Energy Agency Annual Report 2011 (Arabic Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The IAEA Annual Report 2011 aims to summarize only the significant activities of the Agency during the year in question. This report covers the period 1 January to 31 December 2011. The main part of the report, starting on page 21, generally follows the programme structure as given in The Agency's Programme and Budget 2010-2011 (GC(53)/5). The introductory chapter, 'The Year in Review', seeks to provide a thematic analysis of the Agency's activities within the context of notable developments during the year. More detailed information can be found in the latest editions of the Agency's Nuclear Safety Review, Nuclear Technology Review, Technical Cooperation Report and the Safeguards Statement for 2011 and Background to the Safeguards Statement. Additional information covering various aspects of the Agency's programme is available in electronic form only on iaea.org, along with the Annual Report.

  7. International Atomic Energy Agency Annual Report 2011 (Spanish Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The IAEA Annual Report 2011 aims to summarize only the significant activities of the Agency during the year in question. This report covers the period 1 January to 31 December 2011. The main part of the report, starting on page 21, generally follows the programme structure as given in The Agency's Programme and Budget 2010-2011 (GC(53)/5). The introductory chapter, 'The Year in Review', seeks to provide a thematic analysis of the Agency's activities within the context of notable developments during the year. More detailed information can be found in the latest editions of the Agency's Nuclear Safety Review, Nuclear Technology Review, Technical Cooperation Report and the Safeguards Statement for 2011 and Background to the Safeguards Statement. Additional information covering various aspects of the Agency's programme is available in electronic form only on iaea.org, along with the Annual Report.

  8. Generation IV nuclear energy systems and hydrogen economy. New progress in the energy field in the 21st century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zang Mingchang

    2004-01-01

    The concept of hydrogen economy was initiated by the United States and other developed countries in the turn of the century to mitigate anxiety of national security due to growing dependence on foreign sources of energy and impacts on air quality and the potential effects of greenhouse gas emissions. Hydrogen economy integrates the primary energy used to produce hydrogen as a future energy carrier, hydrogen technologies including production, delivery and storage, and various fuel cells for transportation and stationary applications. A new hydrogen-based energy system would created as an important solution in the 21st century, flexible, affordable, safe, domestically produced, used in all sectors of the economy and in all regions of the country, if all the R and D plans and the demonstration come to be successful in 20-30 years. Among options of primary energy. Generation IV nuclear energy under development is particularly well suited to hydrogen production, offering the competitive position of large-scale hydrogen production with near-zero emissions. (author)

  9. The International Atomic Energy Agency Nuclear Security Education Strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BRAUNEGGER-GUELICH, A.; RUKHLO, V.; GREGORIC, M.; COLGAN, P.

    2011-01-01

    The threat of nuclear terrorism has not diminished. In response to the concerns of States, an international nuclear security framework has emerged through the establishment of a number of legally binding and non-binding international instruments which obligates or commits States to carry out a number of actions to protect against nuclear terrorism. In this context, the need for human resource development programmes in nuclear security was underscored at several International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) General Conferences and Board of Governors' Meetings. In the pursuit of this need, the IAEA provides a comprehensive nuclear security training programme to States on a regular basis, and has developed a concept that seeks to effectively pass ownership of nuclear security knowledge and skills to States through the establishment of a Nuclear Security Support Centre. In addition, the IAEA has developed a technical guidance titled IAEA Nuclear Security Series No. 12 - Educational Programme in Nuclear Security that consists of a model of a Master of Science (M.Sc.) and assists educational institutions to provide nuclear security education. The article sets out IAEA efforts in the area of nuclear security training and education, including the assistance to States for establishing a Nuclear Security Support Centre. It underlines the objective and content of the IAEA Nuclear Security Series No. 12, discusses different concepts on how to establish nuclear security at universities and, emphasizes on the IAEA efforts to assist educational and research institutions, and other stake holders to enhance global nuclear security by developing, sharing and promoting excellence in nuclear security education. (author)

  10. Effect of Tempering and Baking on the Charpy Impact Energy of Hydrogen-Charged 4340 Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, K.; Lee, E. W.; Frazier, W. E.; Niji, K.; Battel, G.; Tran, A.; Iriarte, E.; Perez, O.; Ruiz, H.; Choi, T.; Stoyanov, P.; Ogren, J.; Alrashaid, J.; Es-Said, O. S.

    2015-01-01

    Tempered AISI 4340 steel was hydrogen charged and tested for impact energy. It was found that samples tempered above 468 °C (875 °F) and subjected to hydrogen charging exhibited lower impact energy values when compared to uncharged samples. No significant difference between charged and uncharged samples tempered below 468 °C (875 °F) was observed. Neither exposure nor bake time had any significant effect on impact energy within the tested ranges.

  11. The role of electricity storage and hydrogen technologies in enabling global low-carbon energy transitions

    OpenAIRE

    McPherson, M.; Johnson, N.; Strubegger, M.

    2018-01-01

    Previous studies have noted the importance of electricity storage and hydrogen technologies for enabling large-scale variable renewable energy (VRE) deployment in long-term climate change mitigation scenarios. However, global studies, which typically use integrated assessment models, assume a fixed cost trajectory for storage and hydrogen technologies; thereby ignoring the sensitivity of VRE deployment and/or mitigation costs to uncertainties in future storage and hydrogen technology costs. Y...

  12. Analysis of an Improved Solar-Powered Hydrogen Generation System for Sustained Renewable Energy Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    hydrogen gas by electrolysis. In LT Aviles’ design , distilled water was collected from the ambient air using Peltier dehumidifiers, manufactured by...Figure 13 shows the shelfing along with the entire system. Figure 13. Reconfigured Hydrogen Production Facility Because the system was designed for...POWERED HYDROGEN GENERATION SYSTEM FOR SUSTAINED RENEWABLE ENERGY PRODUCTION by Sen Feng Yu December 2017 Thesis Advisor: Garth V. Hobson Co

  13. Hydrogen Energy Coordinating Committee annual report: Summary of DOE hydrogen programs for FY 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The FY 1988 Summary is the eleventh consecutive yearly report providing an overview of the hydrogen-related programs of the DOE offices represented on the HECC. A historical summary of the hydrogen budgets of these offices is given. The distribution by mission-related program element for FY 1988, and the non-mission-related activities are given. Total DOE funding in FY 1988 for mission-related hydrogen research was $5.2 million; DOE non-mission-related hydrogen research funding totaled $30.0 million. The individual program elements are described in the body of this report, and more specific program information is given in the Technology Summary Forms in Appendix A. 2 tabs

  14. Japan's New Sunshine Project. 1998 annual summary of hydrogen energy R and D; New sunshine keikaku 1998 nendo seika hokokusho gaiyoshu. Suiso energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-04-01

    Summarized herein are the reports on R and D efforts on hydrogen energy, as part of the FY 1998 New Sunshine Project. For production of hydrogen, characteristics related to transport number were investigated for steam electrolysis at high temperature, in which a sintered ceramic powder was used as the electrolyte and the cell was equipped with platinum electrodes. For utilization of hydrogen, energy conversion techniques were investigated using hydrogen occluding alloys for testing methods for alloy microstructures and hydrogenation characteristics, and preparation of and performance testing methods for the cathodes charged with the aid of hydrogen gas. For analysis/assessment for development of hydrogen-related techniques, the investigated items included water electrolysis with solid polymer electrolytes, hydrogen transport techniques using metal hydrides, hydrogen storing techniques using metal hydrides, hydrogen engines, and techniques for preventing hydrogen embrittlement. Analysis/assessment for development of hydrogen turbines was also investigated as one of the 12 R and D themes reported herein. (NEDO)

  15. Hydrogen Gas from Serpentinite, Ophiolites and the Modern Ocean Floor as a Source of Green Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coveney, R. M.

    2008-12-01

    Hydrogen gas is emitted by springs associated with serpentinites and extensive carbonate deposits in Oman, The Philippines, the USA and other continental locations. The hydrogen springs contain unusually alkaline fluids with pH values between 11 and 12.5. Other workers have described off-ridge submarine springs with comparably alkaline fluid compositions, serpentinite, abundant free hydrogen gas, and associated carbonate edifices such as Lost City on the Atlantis Massif 15 km west of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (D.S. Kelley and associates, Science 2005). The association of hydrogen gas with ultramafites is a consistent one that has been attributed to a redox couple involving oxidation of divalent iron to the trivalent state during serpentinization, although other possibilities exist. Some of the hydrogen springs on land are widespread. For example in Oman dozens of alkaline springs (Neal and Stanger, EPSL 1983) can be found over thousands of sq km of outcropping ophiolite. While the deposits in Oman and the Philippines are well-known to much of the geochemical community, little interest seems to have been displayed toward either the ophiolitic occurrences or the submarine deposits for energy production. This may be a mistake as the showings because they could lead to an important source of green energy. Widespread skepticism currently exists about hydrogen as a primary energy source. It is commonly said that free hydrogen does not occur on earth and that it is therefore necessary to use other sources of energy to produce hydrogen, obviating the general environmental benefit. However the existence of numerous occurrences of hydrogen gas associated with ophiolites and submarine occurrences of hydrogen suggests the likelihood that natural hydrogen gas may be an important source of clean energy for modern society remaining to be tapped. Calculations in progress should establish whether or not this is likely to be the case.

  16. OECD Nuclear Energy Agency. 5 activity report. 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    The main activities of the Agency are reviewed: nuclear power trends; regulatory aspects of nuclear power; technical developments: Eurochemic, Halden, Dragon, food irradiation; gas-cooled fast reactors, isotopic batteries; nuclear data Centers

  17. Highlights 96. International Atomic Energy Agency annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinley, D H [ed.

    1997-12-31

    The past year saw a process of strengthening in some important areas of the work of the Agency with the aim of improving the impact and efficiency of its activities. The activities in these areas are described.

  18. Highlights 96. International Atomic Energy Agency annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinley, D.H.

    1996-01-01

    The past year saw a process of strengthening in some important areas of the work of the Agency with the aim of improving the impact and efficiency of its activities. The activities in these areas are described

  19. From water to water, hydrogen as a renewable energy vector for the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillet, A.C.

    2000-01-01

    The most important property of hydrogen is that it is the cleanest fuel. Its combustion produces only water and a small amount of NO x . No acid rain, no greenhouse effect, no ozone layer depletion, no particulates aerosols. It seems then ideally suited for the conversion to renewable energy. Hydrogen has now established it self as a clean choice for an environmentally compatible energy system. It can provide a sustainable future for building, industrial and transport sectors of human activities. On average, it has about 20-30% higher combustion efficiency than fossil fuels and can produce electricity directly in fuel cells. In combination with solar PV- and hydro-electrolysis, it is compatible with land area requirements on a worldwide basis. If fossil fuels combustion environmental damage is taken into account, the hydrogen energy system is already cost effective. The question is thus no longer , but, and soon, will hydrogen energy become a practical solution to sustainable energy development. (Author)

  20. 75 FR 4836 - Renewal of Agency Information Collection for Tribal Energy Resource Agreements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-29

    ... ``Tribal Energy Resource Agreements (TERAs)'' to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for renewal... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Indian Affairs Renewal of Agency Information Collection for Tribal Energy Resource Agreements AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of request...

  1. Solar-hydrogen energy as an alternative energy source for mobile robots and the new-age car

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulaiman, A; Inambao, F; Bright, G

    2014-01-01

    The disastrous effects of climate change as witnessed in recent violent storms, and the stark reality that fossil fuels are not going to last forever, is certain to create renewed demands for alternative energy sources. One such alternative source, namely solar energy, although unreliable because of its dependence on available sunlight, can nevertheless be utilised to generate a secondary source of energy, namely hydrogen, which can be stored and thereby provide a constant and reliable source of energy. The only draw-back with hydrogen, though, is finding efficient means for its storage. This study demonstrates how this problem can be overcome by the use of metal hydrides which offers a very compact and safe way of storing hydrogen. It also provides a case study of how solar and hydrogen energy can be combined in an energy system to provide an efficient source of energy that can be applied for modern technologies such as a mobile robot. Hydrogen energy holds out the most promise amongst the various alternative energy sources, so much so that it is proving to be the energy source of choice for automobile manufacturers in their quest for alternative fuels to power their cars of the future

  2. Solar-hydrogen energy as an alternative energy source for mobile robots and the new-age car

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaiman, A.; Inambao, F.; Bright, G.

    2014-07-01

    The disastrous effects of climate change as witnessed in recent violent storms, and the stark reality that fossil fuels are not going to last forever, is certain to create renewed demands for alternative energy sources. One such alternative source, namely solar energy, although unreliable because of its dependence on available sunlight, can nevertheless be utilised to generate a secondary source of energy, namely hydrogen, which can be stored and thereby provide a constant and reliable source of energy. The only draw-back with hydrogen, though, is finding efficient means for its storage. This study demonstrates how this problem can be overcome by the use of metal hydrides which offers a very compact and safe way of storing hydrogen. It also provides a case study of how solar and hydrogen energy can be combined in an energy system to provide an efficient source of energy that can be applied for modern technologies such as a mobile robot. Hydrogen energy holds out the most promise amongst the various alternative energy sources, so much so that it is proving to be the energy source of choice for automobile manufacturers in their quest for alternative fuels to power their cars of the future.

  3. Use of regenerative energy sources and hydrogen technology 2014. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luschtinetz, Thomas; Lehmann, Jochen

    2014-01-01

    This proceedings contains 38 papers with the following main topics: wind and hydrogen technology, developments in the use of bioenergy, fuel cells, photovoltaics. Two contributions were recorded separately for this database. [de

  4. Competition of electrolytic hydrogen as secondary energy source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lartigue G, J.

    1993-01-01

    The hydrogen obtained by thermal dissociation of water and natural gas has been used, in general, by chemical industry since XIX Century. On the other hand, electrolytic hydrogen has only be used in the big scale, in the oil industry and, recently, in small scale, in the fuel cells. In spite of its great advantages with respect to electricity, the easiness for storage and inexpensive transportation, its massive use has been postponed own to the risky handle and the high cost. Nevertheless, this last inconvenient is being overcome in the recent design of electrolytic cells and with the use thermoelectric methods that use nuclear heat. In this work, some factors that influence the cost of electrolytic hydrogen and the value of the efficiency of the electrolytic cell which allows to match up the cost of hydrogen with electricity, as heat source, are presented. It is shown how, when the cost of the whole heat systems are considered (starting from electricity, hydrogen or natural gas), hydrogen can compete against with electricity if is obtained in cells with 83% of efficiency, which design is already available. In exchange, if apparent costs are compared (based only in the fares) without consider the prices of the kilns and its availability factors and maintenance, the efficiency of the cell should be greater than 93%, with technology still not available. (Author)

  5. Strategy for a sustainable development in the UAE through hydrogen energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazim, Ayoub [Dubai Knowledge Village, P.O. Box 73000 Dubai (United Arab Emirates)

    2010-10-15

    Recently, it has been reported that United Arab Emirates is considered one of the highest energy consumers per capita in the world. Consequently, environmental pollution and carbon emission has been a major challenge facing the country over the past several years due to unprecedented high economic growth rate and abnormal population increase. Utilization of hydrogen energy to fulfill UAE's energy needs would be one of the key measures that the country could undertake to achieve a sustainable development and without any major environmental consequences. Hydrogen energy, which is an energy carrier, is consider by many scientists and researchers a major player in fulfilling the global energy demand due to its attractive features such as being environmentally clean, storable, transportable and inexhaustible. It can be used as a fuel in the proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell, which is an electrochemical device that generates electric power and it can be utilized in various applications. Production of hydrogen energy can be carried out either through utilizing conventional resources or by renewable resources. Conventional resources such as crude oil and natural gas can produce hydrogen by steam-reformation while hydrogen can be produced from coal through gasification. On the other hand, hydrogen production through renewable resources can be achieved through biomass gasification, solar-hydrogen, wind-hydrogen and hydropower electrolysis process. Other renewable resources such as geothermal, wave, tidal and ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) can also contribute into hydrogen production but at a marginal level. In this report, a roadmap to achieve a sustainable development in the UAE through utilization of hydrogen energy is presented. The report highlights the potentials of energy resources that the country possesses with respect to both conventional and non-conventional energy and determines major resources that could significantly contribute to production

  6. Potential and costs of electrolytical hydrogen production by secondary energy in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, S. N. M. de; Silva, E. P. da

    1998-01-01

    This paper makes a description of the availability supply secondary hydroelectric power (secondary energy) in the Brazilian interconnected hydroelectric systems, then with the data attained it is made an estimation of electrolytical hydrogen that can be produced by means of Brazilian secondary hydroelectric power. Also are determined the costs of electrolytical hydrogen production, by way of utilisation of the secondary hydroelectric power availability in the hydroelectric system of the South and Southeastern regions, with the variation of hydrogen plant capacity that allow identify the cases where hydrogen can be produced at a lower costs. (author)

  7. Determination of activation energy of hydrogen diffusion in Zr-2.5%Nb alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandra, Komal; Kulkarni, A.S.; Ramanjaneyulu, P.S.; Yadav, C.S.; Saxena, M.K.; Tomar, B.S.; Ramakumar, K.L.; Sunil, Sourav; Singh, R.N.

    2013-01-01

    The present paper describes the study on the determination of diffusion coefficient of hydrogen in Zr-2.5%Nb alloy. Hydrogen was charged on Zr-2.5% Nb alloy electrolytically. After annealing at required temperature, hydrogen concentration at various depths from the charged end was determined employing hot vacuum extraction-quadrupole mass spectrometer (HVE-QMS). The depth profile was used to obtain the diffusion coefficient employing Fick's second law of diffusion. From the Arrhenius relation between diffusion coefficient and temperature, activation energy of hydrogen diffusion was calculated. (author)

  8. Defect generation/passivation by low energy hydrogen implant for silicon solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sopori, B.L.; Zhou, T.Q.; Rozgonyi, G.A.

    1990-01-01

    Low energy ion implant is shown to produce defects in silicon. These defects include surface damage, hydrogen agglomeration, formation of platelets with (111) habit plane and decoration of dislocations. Hydrogen also produces an inversion type of surface on boron doped silicon. These effects indicate that a preferred approach for passivation is to incorporate hydrogen from the back side of the cell. A backside H + implant technique is described. The results show that degree of passivation differs for various devices. A comparison of the defect structures of hydrogenated devices indicates that the structure and the distribution of defects in the bulk of the material plays a significant role in determining the degree of passivation

  9. International Atomic Energy Agency Annual Report 2010 [Russian Version

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The Annual Report 2010 aims to summarize only the significant activities of the Agency during the year in question The main part of the report, starting on page 17, generally follows the programme structure as given in The Agency's Programme and Budget 2010-2011 (GC(53)/5). The introductory chapter, 'Overview', seeks to provide a thematic analysis of the Agency's activities within the context of notable developments during the year More detailed information can be found in the latest editions of the Agency's Nuclear Safety Review, Nuclear Technology Review, Technical Cooperation Report and the Safeguards Statement and Background to the Safeguards Statement and Summary. For the convenience of readers, these documents are available on the CD-ROM attached to the inside back cover of this report. Additional information covering various aspects of the Agency's programme is provided on the attached CD-ROM and is also available on the Agency's web site at http://www.iaea.org./Publications/ Reports/index.html. Except where indicated, all sums of money are expressed in United States dollars. The designations employed and the presentation of material in this report do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the Secretariat concerning the legal status of any country or territory or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers. The mention of names of specific companies or products (whether or not indicated as registered) does not imply any intention to infringe proprietary rights, nor should it be construed as an endorsement or recommendation on the part of the Agency. The term 'non-nuclear-weapon State' is used as in the Final Document of the 1968 Conference of Non-Nuclear-Weapon States (United Nations document A/7277) and in the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) The term 'nuclear weapon State' is as used in the NPT.

  10. International Atomic Energy Agency Annual Report 2010 [French Version

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The Annual Report 2010 aims to summarize only the significant activities of the Agency during the year in question The main part of the report, starting on page 17, generally follows the programme structure as given in The Agency's Programme and Budget 2010-2011 (GC(53)/5). The introductory chapter, 'Overview', seeks to provide a thematic analysis of the Agency's activities within the context of notable developments during the year More detailed information can be found in the latest editions of the Agency's Nuclear Safety Review, Nuclear Technology Review, Technical Cooperation Report and the Safeguards Statement and Background to the Safeguards Statement and Summary. For the convenience of readers, these documents are available on the CD-ROM attached to the inside back cover of this report. Additional information covering various aspects of the Agency's programme is provided on the attached CD-ROM and is also available on the Agency's web site at http://www.iaea.org./Publications/ Reports/index.html. Except where indicated, all sums of money are expressed in United States dollars. The designations employed and the presentation of material in this report do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the Secretariat concerning the legal status of any country or territory or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers. The mention of names of specific companies or products (whether or not indicated as registered) does not imply any intention to infringe proprietary rights, nor should it be construed as an endorsement or recommendation on the part of the Agency. The term 'non-nuclear-weapon State' is used as in the Final Document of the 1968 Conference of Non-Nuclear-Weapon States (United Nations document A/7277) and in the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) The term 'nuclear weapon State' is as used in the NPT.

  11. International Atomic Energy Agency Annual Report 2010 [Chinese Version

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The Annual Report 2010 aims to summarize only the significant activities of the Agency during the year in question The main part of the report, starting on page 17, generally follows the programme structure as given in The Agency's Programme and Budget 2010-2011 (GC(53)/5). The introductory chapter, 'Overview', seeks to provide a thematic analysis of the Agency's activities within the context of notable developments during the year More detailed information can be found in the latest editions of the Agency's Nuclear Safety Review, Nuclear Technology Review, Technical Cooperation Report and the Safeguards Statement and Background to the Safeguards Statement and Summary. For the convenience of readers, these documents are available on the CD-ROM attached to the inside back cover of this report. Additional information covering various aspects of the Agency's programme is provided on the attached CD-ROM and is also available on the Agency's web site at http://www.iaea.org./Publications/ Reports/index.html. Except where indicated, all sums of money are expressed in United States dollars. The designations employed and the presentation of material in this report do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the Secretariat concerning the legal status of any country or territory or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers. The mention of names of specific companies or products (whether or not indicated as registered) does not imply any intention to infringe proprietary rights, nor should it be construed as an endorsement or recommendation on the part of the Agency. The term 'non-nuclear-weapon State' is used as in the Final Document of the 1968 Conference of Non-Nuclear-Weapon States (United Nations document A/7277) and in the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) The term 'nuclear weapon State' is as used in the NPT.

  12. International Atomic Energy Agency Annual Report 2010 [Chinese Version

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    The Annual Report 2010 aims to summarize only the significant activities of the Agency during the year in question The main part of the report, starting on page 17, generally follows the programme structure as given in The Agency's Programme and Budget 2010-2011 (GC(53)/5). The introductory chapter, 'Overview', seeks to provide a thematic analysis of the Agency's activities within the context of notable developments during the year More detailed information can be found in the latest editions of the Agency's Nuclear Safety Review, Nuclear Technology Review, Technical Cooperation Report and the Safeguards Statement and Background to the Safeguards Statement and Summary. For the convenience of readers, these documents are available on the CD-ROM attached to the inside back cover of this report. Additional information covering various aspects of the Agency's programme is provided on the attached CD-ROM and is also available on the Agency's web site at http://www.iaea.org./Publications/ Reports/index.html. Except where indicated, all sums of money are expressed in United States dollars. The designations employed and the presentation of material in this report do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the Secretariat concerning the legal status of any country or territory or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers. The mention of names of specific companies or products (whether or not indicated as registered) does not imply any intention to infringe proprietary rights, nor should it be construed as an endorsement or recommendation on the part of the Agency. The term 'non-nuclear-weapon State' is used as in the Final Document of the 1968 Conference of Non-Nuclear-Weapon States (United Nations document A/7277) and in the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) The term 'nuclear weapon State' is as used in the NPT.

  13. International Atomic Energy Agency Annual Report 2010 [Spanish Version

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The Annual Report 2010 aims to summarize only the significant activities of the Agency during the year in question The main part of the report, starting on page 17, generally follows the programme structure as given in The Agency's Programme and Budget 2010-2011 (GC(53)/5). The introductory chapter, 'Overview', seeks to provide a thematic analysis of the Agency's activities within the context of notable developments during the year More detailed information can be found in the latest editions of the Agency's Nuclear Safety Review, Nuclear Technology Review, Technical Cooperation Report and the Safeguards Statement and Background to the Safeguards Statement and Summary. For the convenience of readers, these documents are available on the CD-ROM attached to the inside back cover of this report. Additional information covering various aspects of the Agency's programme is provided on the attached CD-ROM and is also available on the Agency's web site at http://www.iaea.org./Publications/ Reports/index.html. Except where indicated, all sums of money are expressed in United States dollars. The designations employed and the presentation of material in this report do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the Secretariat concerning the legal status of any country or territory or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers. The mention of names of specific companies or products (whether or not indicated as registered) does not imply any intention to infringe proprietary rights, nor should it be construed as an endorsement or recommendation on the part of the Agency. The term 'non-nuclear-weapon State' is used as in the Final Document of the 1968 Conference of Non-Nuclear-Weapon States (United Nations document A/7277) and in the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) The term 'nuclear weapon State' is as used in the NPT.

  14. Economics of producing hydrogen as transportation fuel using offshore wind energy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathur, Jyotirmay; Agarwal, Nalin; Swaroop, Rakesh; Shah, Nikhar

    2008-01-01

    Over the past few years, hydrogen has been recognized as a suitable substitute for present vehicular fuels. This paper covers the economic analysis of one of the most promising hydrogen production methods-using wind energy for producing hydrogen through electrolysis of seawater-with a concentration on the Indian transport sector. The analysis provides insights about several questions such as the advantages of offshore plants over coastal installations, economics of large wind-machine clusters, and comparison of cost of producing hydrogen with competing gasoline. Robustness of results has been checked by developing several scenarios such as fast/slow learning rates for wind systems for determining future trends. Results of this analysis show that use of hydrogen for transportation is not likely to be attractive before 2012, and that too with considerable learning in wind, electrolyzer and hydrogen storage technology

  15. Fiscal 1998 research report on International Clean Energy Network using Hydrogen Conversion (WE-NET). Subtask 2. Research on promotion of international cooperation (research on standardization of hydrogen energy technologies); 1998 nendo suiso riyo kokusai clean energy system gijutsu (WE-NET) sub task. 2. Kokusai kyoryoku suishin no tame no chosa kento (suiso energy gijutsu hyojunka ni kansuru chosa kento)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    This report summarizes the fiscal 1998 research result on the basic research on standardization of hydrogen energy technologies, and ISO/TC197. As for the standardization, in relation to the hydrogen station in the WE-NET second phase research, the laws related to handling of gaseous hydrogen, and the basic issues on facility and safe handling were studied. As for ISO/TC197, the following draft standards were examined: Fuel supply system interface for liquid hydrogen vehicles, fuel tank for liquid hydrogen vehicles, container for liquid hydrogen transport, specification of hydrogen fuel, hydrogen fuel supply facility for air ports, gaseous hydrogen and hydrogen mixture fuel system for vehicles, gaseous hydrogen fuel connector for vehicles, gaseous hydrogen fuel tank for vehicles, and basic items for hydrogen system safety. Final examination of the fuel supply system interface for liquid hydrogen vehicles, and the specification of hydrogen fuel was finished, and these are scheduled to be registered for ISO. (NEDO)

  16. Workshop on Hydrogen Storage and Generation for Medium-Power and -Energy Applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Matthews, Michael

    1998-01-01

    This report summarizes the Workshop on Hydrogen Storage and Generation Technologies for Medium-Power and -Energy Applications which was held on April 8-10, 1997 at the Radisson Hotel Orlando Airport in Orlando, Florida...

  17. Simple and Efficient System for Combined Solar Energy Harvesting and Reversible Hydrogen Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lu; Mu, Xiaoyue; Liu, Wenbo; Mi, Zetian; Li, Chao-Jun

    2015-06-24

    Solar energy harvesting and hydrogen economy are the two most important green energy endeavors for the future. However, a critical hurdle to the latter is how to safely and densely store and transfer hydrogen. Herein, we developed a reversible hydrogen storage system based on low-cost liquid organic cyclic hydrocarbons at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. A facile switch of hydrogen addition (>97% conversion) and release (>99% conversion) with superior capacity of 7.1 H2 wt % can be quickly achieved over a rationally optimized platinum catalyst with high electron density, simply regulated by dark/light conditions. Furthermore, the photodriven dehydrogenation of cyclic alkanes gave an excellent apparent quantum efficiency of 6.0% under visible light illumination (420-600 nm) without any other energy input, which provides an alternative route to artificial photosynthesis for directly harvesting and storing solar energy in the form of chemical fuel.

  18. Abstracts of the 1. National congress of hydrogen and sustainable energy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The First Argentine National Congress of Hydrogen and Sustainable Energy Sources was organized by the Instituto of Sustainable Energy and Development CNEA, in San Carlos de Bariloche, between the 8th and 10th of June of 2005. In this event 88 papers were presented in the following sessions, on these subjects: 1.-Hydrogen-Materials Interaction. 2.-Materials Damage. 3.-Production and Purification. 4.-Storage and Transportation. 5.-Fuel Cells. 6.-Prototypes and Demonstration Plants. 7.-Eolic Energy. 8.-Solar Energy. 9.-Biomass. 10.-Small Hydroelectric Plants. 11.-Other Activities. 12.-Hybrid Fuels. 13.- Reforming, Materials, Catalysis, Processes. 14.-Projections and Energy Prospective

  19. On the connection between the hydrogen atom and the harmonic oscillator: the zero-energy case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kibler, M.; Negali, T.

    1983-09-01

    The connection between the three-dimensional hydrogen atom and a four-dimensional harmonic oscillator obtained in previous works, from an hybridization of the infinitesimal Pauli approach to the hydrogen system with the Schwinger approach to spherical and hyperbolical angular momenta, is worked out in the case of the zero-energy point of the hydrogen atom. This leads to the equivalence of the three-dimensional hydrogen problem with a four-dimensional free-particle problem involving a constraint condition. For completeness, the latter results is also derived by using the Kustaanheimo-Stiefel transformation introduced in celestial mechanics. Finally, it is shown how the Lie algebra of SO(4,2) quite naturally arises for the whole spectrum (discrete + continuum + zero-energy point) of the three-dimensional hydrogen atom from the introduction of the constraint condition into the Lie algebra of Sp(8,R) associated to the four-dimensional harmonic oscillator

  20. Metrology for hydrogen energy applications: a project to address normative requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haloua, Frédérique; Bacquart, Thomas; Arrhenius, Karine; Delobelle, Benoît; Ent, Hugo

    2018-03-01

    Hydrogen represents a clean and storable energy solution that could meet worldwide energy demands and reduce greenhouse gases emission. The joint research project (JRP) ‘Metrology for sustainable hydrogen energy applications’ addresses standardisation needs through pre- and co-normative metrology research in the fast emerging sector of hydrogen fuel that meet the requirements of the European Directive 2014/94/EU by supplementing the revision of two ISO standards that are currently too generic to enable a sustainable implementation of hydrogen. The hydrogen purity dispensed at refueling points should comply with the technical specifications of ISO 14687-2 for fuel cell electric vehicles. The rapid progress of fuel cell technology now requires revising this standard towards less constraining limits for the 13 gaseous impurities. In parallel, optimized validated analytical methods are proposed to reduce the number of analyses. The study aims also at developing and validating traceable methods to assess accurately the hydrogen mass absorbed and stored in metal hydride tanks; this is a research axis for the revision of the ISO 16111 standard to develop this safe storage technique for hydrogen. The probability of hydrogen impurity presence affecting fuel cells and analytical techniques for traceable measurements of hydrogen impurities will be assessed and new data of maximum concentrations of impurities based on degradation studies will be proposed. Novel validated methods for measuring the hydrogen mass absorbed in hydrides tanks AB, AB2 and AB5 types referenced to ISO 16111 will be determined, as the methods currently available do not provide accurate results. The outputs here will have a direct impact on the standardisation works for ISO 16111 and ISO 14687-2 revisions in the relevant working groups of ISO/TC 197 ‘Hydrogen technologies’.

  1. 78 FR 29364 - Seminole Electric Cooperative, Inc., and Florida Municipal Power Agency v. Duke Energy Florida...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-20

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket No. EL13-63-000] Seminole Electric Cooperative, Inc., and Florida Municipal Power Agency v. Duke Energy Florida, Inc.; Notice of... of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (Commission), 18 CFR 385.206 and sections 206, 306, and...

  2. 78 FR 50409 - Kansas Municipal Energy Agency v. Sunflower Electric Power Corporation, Mid-Kansas Electric...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-19

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket Nos. EL13-84-000] Kansas Municipal Energy Agency v. Sunflower Electric Power Corporation, Mid-Kansas Electric Company, LLC, Southwest... 306 of the Federal Power Act, 16 U.S.C. 824e and 825e and Rule 206 of the Federal Energy Regulatory...

  3. Sunlight to hydrogen conversion: Design optimization and energy management of concentrated photovoltaic (CPV-Hydrogen) system using micro genetic algorithm

    KAUST Repository

    Burhan, Muhammad

    2016-02-14

    Owing to the intermittent solar irradiance from cloud cover in the diurnal period and unavailability at night time, the practical design of a solar system requires energy backup storage for an uninterrupted supply or for off-grid operation. However, for highly efficient CPV (concentrated photovoltaic) system, the literature is lacking for energy management and optimization algorithm and tool for standalone operation. In this paper, a system with CPV and electrolyser is presented where beam irradiance of sunlight is harnessed to convert the instantaneously generated electricity into useful Hydrogen/Oxygen gas, where they can be stored and re-used for downstream applications such as the fuel cells, etc. The multi-variable design and multi-objective optimization strategies are proposed and presented for a standalone operation of the CPV-Hydrogen system as well as their system performances, particularly electrical rating of CPV based upon the real weather data of Singapore. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Hydrogen production from wind energy in Western Canada for upgrading bitumen from oil sands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olateju, Babatunde; Kumar, Amit

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogen is produced via steam methane reforming (SMR) for bitumen upgrading which results in significant greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Wind energy based hydrogen can reduce the GHG footprint of the bitumen upgrading industry. This paper is aimed at developing a detailed data-intensive techno-economic model for assessment of hydrogen production from wind energy via the electrolysis of water. The proposed wind/hydrogen plant is based on an expansion of an existing wind farm with unit wind turbine size of 1.8 MW and with a dual functionality of hydrogen production and electricity generation. An electrolyser size of 240 kW (50 Nm 3 H 2 /h) and 360 kW (90 Nm 3 H 2 /h) proved to be the optimal sizes for constant and variable flow rate electrolysers, respectively. The electrolyser sizes aforementioned yielded a minimum hydrogen production price at base case conditions of $10.15/kg H 2 and $7.55/kg H 2 . The inclusion of a Feed-in-Tariff (FIT) of $0.13/kWh renders the production price of hydrogen equal to SMR i.e. $0.96/kg H 2, with an internal rate of return (IRR) of 24%. The minimum hydrogen delivery cost was $4.96/kg H 2 at base case conditions. The life cycle CO 2 emissions is 6.35 kg CO 2 /kg H 2 including hydrogen delivery to the upgrader via compressed gas trucks. -- Highlights: ► This study involves development of a data intensive techno-economic model for estimation cost of hydrogen production from wind energy. ► Wind energy based electricity is used for electrolysis to produce hydrogen in Western Canada for bitumen upgrading for oil sands. ► Several scenarios were developed to study the electricity generation and hydrogen production from wind energy. ► The cost of production of hydrogen is significantly higher than natural based hydrogen in Western Canada.

  5. H2@Scale: Technical and Economic Potential of Hydrogen as an Energy Intermediate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruth, Mark F [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Jadun, Paige [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Pivovar, Bryan S [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-11-09

    The H2@Scale concept is focused on developing hydrogen as an energy carrier and using hydrogen's properties to improve the national energy system. Specifically hydrogen has the abilities to (1) supply a clean energy source for industry and transportation and (2) increase the profitability of variable renewable electricity generators such as wind turbines and solar photovoltaic (PV) farms by providing value for otherwise potentially-curtailed electricity. Thus the concept also has the potential to reduce oil dependency by providing a low-carbon fuel for fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs), reduce emissions of carbon dioxide and pollutants such as NOx, and support domestic energy production, manufacturing, and U.S. economic competitiveness. The analysis reported here focuses on the potential market size and value proposition for the H2@Scale concept. It involves three analysis phases: 1. Initial phase estimating the technical potential for hydrogen markets and the resources required to meet them; 2. National-scale analysis of the economic potential for hydrogen and the interactions between willingness to pay by hydrogen users and the cost to produce hydrogen from various sources; and 3. In-depth analysis of spatial and economic issues impacting hydrogen production and utilization and the markets. Preliminary analysis of the technical potential indicates that the technical potential for hydrogen use is approximately 60 million metric tons (MMT) annually for light duty FCEVs, heavy duty vehicles, ammonia production, oil refining, biofuel hydrotreating, metals refining, and injection into the natural gas system. The technical potential of utility-scale PV and wind generation independently are much greater than that necessary to produce 60 MMT / year hydrogen. Uranium, natural gas, and coal reserves are each sufficient to produce 60 MMT / year hydrogen in addition to their current uses for decades to centuries. National estimates of the economic potential of

  6. Hydrogen production from biomass by thermochemical recuperative energy conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fushimi, C.; Araki, K.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Tsutsumi, A. [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Chemical System Engineering

    2002-07-01

    The authors conducted, using a thermogravimetric reactor, a kinetic study of production of thermochemical recuperative hydrogen from biomass. The four different biomass materials used were: cellulose, lignin, metroxylon stem, and coconut husk. Under both rapid heating and slow heating conditions, the weight changes of the biomass samples during the steam gasification or pyrolysis were measured at 973 Kelvin. Simultaneously, measurements of the evolution rates of low-molecular-weight gas products such as hydrogen, methane, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide were taken with the help of a mass spectrometer and a micro gas chromatograph (GC). The steam gasification of char significantly increased the amount of hydrogen and carbon dioxide production. The results also indicated that at higher heating rate, the cold gas efficiency of steam gasification was increased. This can be explained by the suppression of the tar production at lower temperature. 25 refs., 2 tabs., 10 figs.

  7. Optimization of stand-alone photovoltaic systems with hydrogen storage for total energy self-sufficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lund, P D [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Espoo (Finland). Dept. of Technical Physics

    1991-01-01

    A new method for optimization of stand-alone photovoltaic-hydrogen energy systems is presented. The methodology gives the optimum values for the solar array and hydrogen storage size for any given system configuration and geographical site. Sensitivity analyses have been performed to study the effect of subsystem efficiencies on the total system performance and sizing, and also to identify possibilities for further improvements. Optimum system configurations have also been derived. The results indicate that a solar-hydrogen energy system is a very promising potential alternative for low power applications requiring a total electricity self-sufficiency. (Author).

  8. IHCE '95. International Hydrogen and Clean Energy Symposium '95. (February 6-8, 1995)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-02-06

    This is a collection of speeches and lectures delivered at the above-named symposium that took place in Tokyo. Three speakers from Japan, Germany, and the U.S. made remarks about the future energy systems and the role of hydrogen; the hydrogen energy development status and plans in Europe; and the role of hydrogen in meeting southern California's air quality goals, respectively. Technical lectures numbering 22 in total included the photocatalytic reactions - water splitting and environmental applications; realization and operation of SWB's (Solar-Wasserstof-Bayern GmBH) development assembling major industrial-scale components of solar hydrogen technology; hydrogen production by UT-3 (University of Tokyo-3) thermochemical water decomposition cycle; energy and environmental technology in Japan - the New Sunshine Program; and research and development plans for WE-NET (World Energy Network). In the poster session, there were 45 exhibitions, which included development on solid polymer electrolyte water electrolysis in Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd.; development of environmentally friendly technology for the production of hydrogen; and recent progress of hydrogen storage and transportation technologies in North America. (NEDO)

  9. IHCE '95. International Hydrogen and Clean Energy Symposium '95. (February 6-8, 1995)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-02-06

    This is a collection of speeches and lectures delivered at the above-named symposium that took place in Tokyo. Three speakers from Japan, Germany, and the U.S. made remarks about the future energy systems and the role of hydrogen; the hydrogen energy development status and plans in Europe; and the role of hydrogen in meeting southern California's air quality goals, respectively. Technical lectures numbering 22 in total included the photocatalytic reactions - water splitting and environmental applications; realization and operation of SWB's (Solar-Wasserstof-Bayern GmBH) development assembling major industrial-scale components of solar hydrogen technology; hydrogen production by UT-3 (University of Tokyo-3) thermochemical water decomposition cycle; energy and environmental technology in Japan - the New Sunshine Program; and research and development plans for WE-NET (World Energy Network). In the poster session, there were 45 exhibitions, which included development on solid polymer electrolyte water electrolysis in Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd.; development of environmentally friendly technology for the production of hydrogen; and recent progress of hydrogen storage and transportation technologies in North America. (NEDO)

  10. Hourly energy management for grid-connected wind-hydrogen systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernal-Agustin, Jose L.; Dufo-Lopez, Rodolfo

    2008-01-01

    This paper is a complete technical-economic analysis of the hourly energy management of the energy generated in wind-hydrogen systems. Wind power generation depends on the unpredictable nature of the wind. If the wind-power penetration becomes high in the Spanish electrical grid, energy management will be necessary for some wind farms. A method is proposed in this paper to adjust the generation curve to the demand curve, consisting of the generation of hydrogen and storing it in a hydrogen tank during off-peak (low demand) hours, while during the rest of the hours (peak hours, high demand) the stored hydrogen can be used to generate electricity. After revising the results obtained in this paper, for the current values of efficiency of the electricity-hydrogen-electricity conversion (approximately 30%) and due to the high cost of the hydrogen components, for a wind-hydrogen system to be economically viable the price of the sale of the energy generated by the fuel cell would be very high (approximately 171 cEUR/kWh). (author)

  11. United States Energy Association Final Report International Partnership for the Hydrogen Economy Ministerial Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William L. Polen

    2006-04-05

    This report summarizes the activities of the United States Energy Association as it conducted the initial Ministerial Meeting of the International Partnership for the Hydrogen Economy in Washington, DC on November 18-21, 2003. The report summarizes the results of the meeting and subsequent support to the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy in its role as IPHE Secretariat.

  12. World Energy Outlook 2004. The new report of the International Energy Agency; World Energy Outlook 2004. Le nouveau rapport de l'Agence Internationale de l'Energie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2004-12-01

    Here is given the complete text of the summary of the World Energy Outlook report of the International Energy Agency. This report includes an alternative scenario which gives the image of an energy future more efficient and more respectful of the environment than those of the reference scenario. (O.M.)

  13. The nuclear energy outlook--a new book from the OECD nuclear energy agency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Uichiro

    2011-01-01

    This paper summarizes the key points of a report titled Nuclear Energy Outlook, published in 2008 by the Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, which has 30 member nations. The report discusses the commitment of many nations to increase nuclear power generating capacity and the potential rate of building new electricity-generating nuclear plants by 2030 to 2050. The resulting decrease in carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuel combustion resulting from an increase in nuclear power sources is described. Other topics that are discussed include the need to develop non-proliferative nuclear fuels, the importance of developing geological disposal facilities or reprocessing capabilities for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste materials, and the requirements for a larger nuclear workforce and greater cost competitiveness for nuclear power generation. Copyright © 2010 Health Physics Society

  14. Sunlight to hydrogen conversion: Design optimization and energy management of concentrated photovoltaic (CPV-Hydrogen) system using micro genetic algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burhan, Muhammad; Chua, Kian Jon Ernest; Ng, Kim Choon

    2016-01-01

    Owing to the intermittent solar irradiance from cloud cover in the diurnal period and unavailability at night time, the practical design of a solar system requires energy backup storage for an uninterrupted supply or for off-grid operation. However, for highly efficient CPV (concentrated photovoltaic) system, the literature is lacking for energy management and optimization algorithm and tool for standalone operation. In this paper, a system with CPV and electrolyser is presented where beam irradiance of sunlight is harnessed to convert the instantaneously generated electricity into useful Hydrogen/Oxygen gas, where they can be stored and re-used for downstream applications such as the fuel cells, etc. The multi-variable design and multi-objective optimization strategies are proposed and presented for a standalone operation of the CPV-Hydrogen system as well as their system performances, particularly electrical rating of CPV based upon the real weather data of Singapore. - Highlights: • Design modelling and energy management strategy is proposed for CPV-Hydrogen system. • Micro GA does multi-variable and multi-objective optimization for standalone operation. • Design is verified and analysed for minimum cost, zero PSFT and optimal storage. • Performance of each component is presented for different real weather data conditions. • Proposed design approach is applicable in all regions with low and high DNI.

  15. Ground state energy of an hydrogen atom confined in carbon nano-structures: a diffusion quantum Monte Carlo study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molayem, M.; Tayebi-Rad, Gh.; Esmaeli, L.; Namiranian, A.; Fouladvand, M. E.; Neek-Amal, M.

    2006-01-01

    Using the diffusion quantum monte Carlo method, the ground state energy of an Hydrogen atom confined in a carbon nano tube and a C60 molecule is calculated. For Hydrogen atom confined in small diameter tubes, the ground state energy shows significant deviation from a free Hydrogen atom, while with increasing the diameter this deviation tends to zero.

  16. Study of a molten carbonate fuel cell combined heat, hydrogen and power system: Energy analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agll, Abdulhakim Amer A.; Hamad, Yousif M.; Hamad, Tarek A.; Thomas, Mathew; Bapat, Sushrut; Martin, Kevin B.; Sheffield, John W.

    2013-01-01

    Countries around the world are trying to use alternative fuels and renewable energy to reduce the energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions. Biogas contains methane is considered a potential source of clean renewable energy. This paper discusses the design of a combined heat, hydrogen and power system, which generated by methane with use of Fuelcell, for the campus of Missouri University of Science and Technology located in Rolla, Missouri, USA. An energy flow and resource availability study was performed to identify sustainable type and source of feedstock needed to run the Fuelcell at its maximum capacity. FuelCell Energy's DFC1500 unit (a molten carbonate Fuelcell) was selected as the Fuelcell for the tri-generation (heat, hydrogen and electric power) system. This tri-generation system provides electric power to the campus, thermal energy for heating the anaerobic digester, and hydrogen for transportation, backup power and other applications on the campus. In conclusion, the combined heat, hydrogen and power system reduces fossil fuel usage, and greenhouse gas emissions at the university campus. -- Highlights: • Combined heat, hydrogen and power (CHHP) using a molten carbonate fuel cell. • Energy saving and alternative fuel of the products are determined. • Energy saving is increased when CHHP technology is implemented. • CHHP system reduces the greenhouse gas emissions and fuel consumption

  17. The Euratom supply agency. A small ENERGY UNION?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blohm-Hieber, Ute [European Commission, Luxembourg (Luxembourg). Unit - Nuclear Fuel Market Operations

    2015-11-15

    In the 1950s, when the European Communities were founded the ECSC (Treaty establishing the European Coal and Steel Community), concluded for 50 years and the EURATOM Treaty (Treaty establishing the European Atomic Energy Community), with unlimited validity, were signed. On the present political agenda of the European Union, energy supply security has a high priority. The Juncker Commission therefore focusses on the concept of an Energy Union. The Euratom Treaty provides one successful example of a ''small sectorial Energy Union'' and may serve as stimulation for reflections for the Energy Union in other sectors.

  18. High temperature electrolysis for hydrogen production using nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herring, J. Stephen; O'brien, James E.; Stoots, Carl M.; Hawkes, Grant L.; Hartvigsen, Joseph J.

    2005-01-01

    High-temperature nuclear reactors have the potential for substantially increasing the efficiency of hydrogen production from water splitting, which can be accomplished via high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) or thermochemical processes. In order to achieve competitive efficiencies, both processes require high-temperature operation (∼850degC). High-temperature electrolytic water splitting supported by nuclear process heat and electricity has the potential to produce hydrogen with overall system efficiencies of 45 to 55%. At the Idaho National Laboratory, we are developing solid-oxide cells to operate in the steam electrolysis mode. The research program includes both experimental and modeling activities. Experimental results were obtained from ten-cell and 22-cell planar electrolysis stacks, fabricated by Ceramatec, Inc. The electrolysis cells are electrolyte-supported, with scandia-stabilized zirconia electrolytes (∼200 μm thick, 64 cm 2 active area), nickel-cermet steam/hydrogen electrodes, and manganite air-side electrodes. The metallic interconnect plates are fabricated from ferritic stainless steel. The experiments were performed over a range of steam inlet mole fractions, gas glow rates, and current densities. Hydrogen production rates greater than 100 normal liters per hour for 196 hours have been demonstrated. In order to evaluate the performance of large-scale HTE operations, we have developed single-cell models, based on FLUENT, and a process model, using the systems-analysis code HYSYS. (author)

  19. Applied hydrogen storage research and development: A perspective from the U.S. Department of Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O’Malley, Kathleen; Ordaz, Grace; Adams, Jesse; Randolph, Katie; Ahn, Channing C.; Stetson, Ned T.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Overview of U.S. DOE-supported hydrogen storage technology development efforts. • Physical and materials-based strategy for developing hydrogen storage systems. • Materials requirements for automotive storage systems. • Key R&D developments. - Abstract: To enable the wide-spread commercialization of hydrogen fuel cell technologies, the U.S. Department of Energy, through the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy’s Fuel Cell Technology Office, maintains a comprehensive portfolio of R&D activities to develop advanced hydrogen storage technologies. The primary focus of the Hydrogen Storage Program is development of technologies to meet the challenging onboard storage requirements for hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) to meet vehicle performance that consumers have come to expect. Performance targets have also been established for materials handling equipment (e.g., forklifts) and low-power, portable fuel cell applications. With the imminent release of commercial FCEVs by automobile manufacturers in regional markets, a dual strategy is being pursued to (a) lower the cost and improve performance of high-pressure compressed hydrogen storage systems while (b) continuing efforts on advanced storage technologies that have potential to surpass the performance of ambient compressed hydrogen storage

  20. Applied hydrogen storage research and development: A perspective from the U.S. Department of Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O’Malley, Kathleen [SRA International, Inc., Fairfax, VA 22033 (United States); Ordaz, Grace; Adams, Jesse; Randolph, Katie [U.S. Department of Energy, 1000 Independence Ave., SW, EE-3F, Washington, DC 20585 (United States); Ahn, Channing C. [U.S. Department of Energy, 1000 Independence Ave., SW, EE-3F, Washington, DC 20585 (United States); California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Stetson, Ned T., E-mail: Ned.Stetson@ee.doe.gov [U.S. Department of Energy, 1000 Independence Ave., SW, EE-3F, Washington, DC 20585 (United States)

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • Overview of U.S. DOE-supported hydrogen storage technology development efforts. • Physical and materials-based strategy for developing hydrogen storage systems. • Materials requirements for automotive storage systems. • Key R&D developments. - Abstract: To enable the wide-spread commercialization of hydrogen fuel cell technologies, the U.S. Department of Energy, through the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy’s Fuel Cell Technology Office, maintains a comprehensive portfolio of R&D activities to develop advanced hydrogen storage technologies. The primary focus of the Hydrogen Storage Program is development of technologies to meet the challenging onboard storage requirements for hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) to meet vehicle performance that consumers have come to expect. Performance targets have also been established for materials handling equipment (e.g., forklifts) and low-power, portable fuel cell applications. With the imminent release of commercial FCEVs by automobile manufacturers in regional markets, a dual strategy is being pursued to (a) lower the cost and improve performance of high-pressure compressed hydrogen storage systems while (b) continuing efforts on advanced storage technologies that have potential to surpass the performance of ambient compressed hydrogen storage.

  1. Socio-cultural barriers to the development of a sustainable energy system - the case of hydrogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Lars Kjerulf; Andersen, Anne Holst

    Any transition to a more sustainable energy system, radically reducing greenhouse gas emissions, is bound to run in to a host of different barriers - technological and economic, but also socio-cultural. This will also be the case for any large-scale application of hydrogen as energy carrier......, especially if the system is going to be based on renewable energy sources. The aim of these research notes is to review and discuss major socio-cultural barriers to new forms of energy supply in general and to hydrogen specifically. Reaching sufficient reductions in greenhouse gas emissions may require more...

  2. Thermal energy distribution analysis for hydrogen production in RGTT200K conceptual design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumpal Pandiangan; Ign Djoko Irianto

    2011-01-01

    RGTT200K is a high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) which conceptually designed for power generation, hydrogen production and desalination. Hydrogen production process in this design uses thermochemical method of Iodine-Sulphur. To increase the thermal conversion efficiency in hydrogen production installations, it needs to design a thermal energy distribution and temperature associated with the process of thermo-chemical processes in the method of Iodine-Sulphur. In this method there are 7 kinds of processes: (i) H 2 SO4 decomposition reaction (ii) treatment of vaporization (iii) treatment of pre vaporizer (iv) treatment of flash 4 (v) treatment of decomposition of HI (vi) treatment of the flash 1-3 and (vii) Bunsen reaction. To regulate the distribution of energy and temperature appropriate to the needs of each process used 3 pieces of heat exchanger (HE). Calculation of energy distribution through the distribution of helium gas flow has been done with Scilab application programs, so that can know the distribution of thermal energy for production of 1 mole of hydrogen. From this model, it can calculate the thermal energy requirement for production of hydrogen at the desired capacity. In the conceptual design of RGTT200K, helium discharge has been designed by 20 kg/s, so that an efficient hydrogen production capacity needed to produce 15347.8 for 21.74 mole of H 2 . (author)

  3. Quantum mechanical electronic structure calculation reveals orientation dependence of hydrogen bond energy in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Abhisek; Datta, Saumen

    2017-06-01

    Hydrogen bond plays a unique role in governing macromolecular interactions with exquisite specificity. These interactions govern the fundamental biological processes like protein folding, enzymatic catalysis, molecular recognition. Despite extensive research work, till date there is no proper report available about the hydrogen bond's energy surface with respect to its geometric parameters, directly derived from proteins. Herein, we have deciphered the potential energy landscape of hydrogen bond directly from the macromolecular coordinates obtained from Protein Data Bank using quantum mechanical electronic structure calculations. The findings unravel the hydrogen bonding energies of proteins in parametric space. These data can be used to understand the energies of such directional interactions involved in biological molecules. Quantitative characterization has also been performed using Shannon entropic calculations for atoms participating in hydrogen bond. Collectively, our results constitute an improved way of understanding hydrogen bond energies in case of proteins and complement the knowledge-based potential. Proteins 2017; 85:1046-1055. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. International Atomic Energy Agency publications. New publications Autumn 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    This Publications Catalogue lists all sales publications of the IAEA issued and forthcoming for the period Autumn 2003 - early 2004. Most Agency publications are issued in English, though some are also available in Arabic, Chinese, French, Russian or Spanish. This is indicated at the bottom of the book entry. A complete listing of all IAEA priced publications is available on the IAEA's web site: http://www.iaea.org/books

  5. International Atomic Energy Agency publications. New publications Spring 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    This Publications Catalogue lists all sales publications of the IAEA issued and forthcoming during the period Spring 2003. Most Agency publications are issued in English, though some are also available in Arabic, Chinese, French, Russian or Spanish. This is indicated at the bottom of the book entry. A complete listing of all IAEA priced publications is available on the IAEA's web site: http://www.iaea.org/books

  6. Agreements registered with the International Atomic Energy Agency. 11 ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The eleventh edition of Legal Series No. 3 contains agreements registered up to 31 December 1993. The book is divided into three parts. Part I consists of a chronological list, by date of entry into force, of all agreements registered with the Agency. Part II of the booked is devoted to six major multilateral agreements for which the Agency is depository. All these agreements are listed in Part I in the appropriate chronological order, but information relating to signatories and parties appears in Part II. Since this listing reflects the current, not historical, situations, it does not reflect countries which are no longer parties. Part III is the Country Annex, with an additional section including international organizations and other parties with whom the Agency has agreements. It gives a tabular, alphabetical presentation of information set out in Parts I and II, which may serve as an index to specific agreements and an overview of the types of agreements to which particular countries are party. For historical purposes, Part III reflects all countries, even those no longer existing, which were or are party to a specific agreement

  7. Fiscal 2000 collection of manuscripts for technology development committee on hydrogen energy and the like; 2000 nendo suiso energy nado kanren gijutsu kaihatsu iinkai yokoshu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-07

    The subjects listed in the collection are (1) the research and development of international clean energy system technology utilizing hydrogen (WE-NET - World Energy Network), including the outline of the project as a whole; research on system evaluation; research and development of safety measures; development of technologies for liquid hydrogen transportation and storage; research on low-temperature materials; development of hydrogen supply station and hydrogen-driven automobile system; development of supply station for hydrogen produced by electrolysis of water; development of hydrogen fuel system; development of hydrogen production technology; development of hydrogen absorbing alloys for dispersed hydrogen transportation and storage; development of polymer electrolyte fuel cell fed with pure hydrogen; and the development of power generation technology, (2) the development of closed type high-efficiency turbine technology capable of carbon dioxide recovery, and (3) the development of frontier technology of carburation using sensible heat in coke oven gas. (NEDO)

  8. Hydrogen Energy Coordinating Committee annual report: Summary of DOE hydrogen programs for FY 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-07-01

    The HECC was established over 13 years ago to ensure that the many varied aspects of hydrogen technology within the Department are coordinated. Each year the committee brings together technical representative within the Department to coordinate activities, share research results and discuss future priorities and directions. This FY 1990 summary is the thirteenth consecutive yearly report. It provides an overview of the hydrogen-related programs of the DOE offices represented in the HECC for the fiscal year. For the purposes of this report, the research projects within each division have been organized into two categories: Fuels-related Research and Non-fuels-related Research. An historical summary of the hydrogen budgets of the several divisions is given. Total DOE funding in FY 1990 was $6.8 million for fuels-related research and $32.9 million for non-fuels-related research. The individual program elements are described in the body of this report, and more specific program information can be found in the Technology Summary Forms in Appendix A

  9. Agreement on the Privileges and Immunities of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1959-01-01

    The text of the Agreement on the Privileges and Immunities of the International Atomic Energy Agency, as approved by the Board of Governors on 1 July 1959, is re produced in this document for the information of all Members of the Agency. As required by section 38 of the Agreement, the Director General will transmit certified copies, in the Agency's four working languages, to the Government of each Member State

  10. Agreement on the Privileges and Immunities of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1959-08-17

    The text of the Agreement on the Privileges and Immunities of the International Atomic Energy Agency, as approved by the Board of Governors on 1 July 1959, is re produced in this document for the information of all Members of the Agency. As required by section 38 of the Agreement, the Director General will transmit certified copies, in the Agency's four working languages, to the Government of each Member State.

  11. The U.S. department of energy program on hydrogen production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henderson, David; Paster, Mark

    2003-01-01

    Clean forms of energy are needed to support sustainable global economics growth while mitigating greenhouse gas emissions and impacts on air quality. To address these challenges, the U.S. President's National Energy Policy and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Strategic Plan call for expanding the development of diverse domestic energy supplies. Working with industry, the Department developed a national vision roadmap for moving toward a hydrogen economy-a solution that holds the potential to provide sustainable clean, safe, secure, affordable, and reliable energy. DOE has examined and organized its hydrogen activities in pursuit of this national vision. This includes the development of fossil and renewable sources, as well as nuclear technologies capable of economically producing large quantities of hydrogen. (author)

  12. Application of solar concentrators for combined production of hydrogen and electrical energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotevski, Darko

    2008-01-01

    New specific concept is application of solar dish concentrators in a process which allows solar energy to be used for splitting water in hydrogen and oxygen, with electrical energy as a byproduct. This is performed in two stages: The first stage uses highly concentrated solar energy to split CO 2 Into CO and O 2 . The second stage uses water-gas shifts reaction to cause the CO to react with water and produced hydrogen and CO 2 , Carbon dioxide is then recycled back into the system, and the waste heat is used to produce electricity in a steam turbine, Efficiency of the process is 45% , totaling 20% in chemical energy (H 2 ), and 25% electricity. This solar system is 80% more efficient than other solar technologies which make energy much cheaper. The environmentally friendly and low cost hydrogen can become a prime mover of fuel cell development especially in automotive application. (Author)

  13. The Assessment of Hydrogen Energy Systems for Fuel Cell Vehicles Using Principal Componenet Analysis and Cluster Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ren, Jingzheng; Tan, Shiyu; Dong, Lichun

    2012-01-01

    and analysis of the hydrogen systems is meaningful for decision makers to select the best scenario. principal component analysis (PCA) has been used to evaluate the integrated performance of different hydrogen energy systems and select the best scenario, and hierarchical cluster analysis (CA) has been used...... for transportation of hydrogen, hydrogen gas tank for the storage of hydrogen at refueling stations, and gaseous hydrogen as power energy for fuel cell vehicles has been recognized as the best scenario. Also, the clustering results calculated by CA are consistent with those determined by PCA, denoting...

  14. Summarized achievement report on the Sunshine Project in fiscal 1980 (Hydrogen energy); 1980 nendo seika hokokusho gaiyoshu. Suiso energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1981-04-01

    This paper summarizes the achievement report on the Sunshine Project in fiscal 1980 for hydrogen energy research. In hydrogen manufacturing using the electrolytic process, improvements were made on membranes and electrodes. Solid electrolyte electrolysis is also under research. Researches are continued on reaction, separating operation, and device materials for the iodine system cycle in the thermo-chemical method. In the iron system cycle, a reaction experimenting equipment was fabricated on the trial basis, and tests and evaluation were performed on the material and heat balances. In the mixed system cycle, researches on the light irradiation electrolytic process were continued, whereas the light collecting rate was raised by using a lens to increase light intensity, having enhanced successfully the reaction rate to 60 to 80%. A heat diffusion column for HI decomposition and separation (hydrogen acquisition) was discussed in terms of chemical engineering. Development works are continued on metal hydrides for hydrogen transportation, and durability tests are also being performed. Same applies to hydrogen storage. A model burner was fabricated on the trial basis, and catalytic combustion was studied as development of a combustion technology that matches the requirements for safe hydrogen combustion and suppression of NOx emission. Searches were continued on catalysts and solid electrolyte materials for fuel cells. Thin film sold electrolyte fuel cells constructed by using the evaporation process are also being studied. The paper also describes measures for hydrogen safety assurance and researches on energy systems. (NEDO)

  15. 78 FR 23290 - Renewal of Agency Information Collection for Energy Resource Development Program Grants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-18

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Indian Affairs [DR.5B813.IA001113] Renewal of Agency Information Collection for Energy Resource Development Program Grants AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs... 1995, the Assistant Secretary--Indian Affairs is seeking comments on the renewal of Office of...

  16. 78 FR 19005 - Renewal of Agency Information Collection for Tribal Energy Resource Agreements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-28

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Indian Affairs Renewal of Agency Information Collection for Tribal Energy Resource Agreements AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of request...--Indian Affairs is seeking comments on the renewal of Office of Management and Budget (OMB) approval for...

  17. 78 FR 37567 - Renewal of Agency Information Collection for Tribal Energy Resource Agreements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-21

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Indian Affairs [DR.5B811.IA000913] Renewal of Agency Information Collection for Tribal Energy Resource Agreements AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior... Assistant Secretary--Indian Affairs is seeking comments on the renewal of Office of Management and Budget...

  18. 78 FR 4867 - Renewal of Agency Information Collection for Energy Resource Development Program Grants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-23

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Indian Affairs Renewal of Agency Information Collection for Energy Resource Development Program Grants AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of... Secretary--Indian Affairs is seeking comments on the renewal of Office of Management and Budget (OMB...

  19. Quasi-particle energies and optical excitations of hydrogenated and fluorinated germanene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Huabing; Li, Yunhai; Wang, Shudong; Wang, Jinlan

    2015-02-14

    Using density functional theory, the G0W0 method and Bethe-Salpeter equation calculations, we systematically explore the structural, electronic and optical properties of hydrogenated and fluorinated germanene. The hydrogenated/fluorinated germanene tends to form chair and zigzag-line configurations and its electronic and optical properties show close geometry dependence. The chair hydrogenated/fluorinated and zigzag-line fluorinated germanene are direct band-gap semiconductors, while the zigzag-line hydrogenated germanene owns an indirect band-gap. Moreover, the quasi-particle corrections are significant and strong excitonic effects with large exciton binding energies are observed. Moreover, the zigzag-line hydrogenated/fluorinated germanene shows highly anisotropic optical responses, which may be used as a good optical linear polarizer.

  20. Performance requirements of an inertial-fusion-energy source for hydrogen production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hovingh, J.

    1983-01-01

    Performance of an inertial fusion system for the production of hydrogen is compared to a tandem-mirror-system hydrogen producer. Both systems use the General Atomic sulfur-iodine hydrogen-production cycle and produce no net electric power to the grid. An ICF-driven hydrogen producer will have higher system gains and lower electrical-consumption ratios than the design point for the tandem-mirror system if the inertial-fusion-energy gain eta Q > 8.8. For the ICF system to have a higher hydrogen production rate per unit fusion power than the tandem-mirror system requires that eta Q > 17. These can be achieved utilizing realistic laser and pellet performances

  1. Multi-unit Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) plants producing hydrogen fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logan, B.G.

    1993-12-01

    A quantitative energy pathway comparison is made between a modern oil refinery and genetic fusion hydrogen plant supporting hybrid-electric cars powered by gasoline and hydrogen-optimized internal combustion engines, respectively, both meeting President Clinton's goal for advanced car goal of 80 mpg gasoline equivalent. The comparison shows that a fusion electric plant producing hydrogen by water electrolysis at 80% efficiency must have an electric capacity of 10 GWe to support as many hydrogen-powered hybrid cars as one modern 200,000 bbl/day-capacity oil refinery could support in gasoline-powered hybrid cars. A 10 GWe fusion electric plant capital cost is limited to 12.5 B$ to produce electricity at 2.3 cents/kWehr, and hydrogen production by electrolysis at 8 $/GJ, for equal consumer fuel cost per passenger mile as in the oil-gasoline-hybrid pathway

  2. The 25th anniversary of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osztrovszki, Gy.

    1982-01-01

    The leader of the Hungarian delegation at the 26th General Assembly of the International Atomic Energy (IAEA) held in Vienna in September, 1982, on the occasion of the IAEA's 25th anniversary, presented a short review of the IAEA's activities during its existence, the Hungarian participation in them and Hungary's efforts in the peaceful uses of the nuclear energy. (A.L.)

  3. The role of hydrogen in high wind energy penetration electricity systems: the Irish case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, A.; McKeogh, E.; Gallachoir, B.O.

    2004-01-01

    The deployment of wind energy is constrained by wind uncontrollability, which poses operational problems on the electricity supply system at high penetration levels, lessening the value of wind-generated electricity to a significant extent. This paper studies the viability of hydrogen production via electrolysis using wind power that cannot be easily accommodated on the system. The potential benefits of hydrogen and its role in enabling a large penetration of wind energy are assessed, within the context of the enormous wind energy resource in Ireland. The exploitation of this wind resource may in the future give rise to significant amounts of surplus wind electricity, which could be used to produce hydrogen, the zero-emissions fuel that many experts believe will eventually replace fossil fuels in the transport sector. In this paper the operation of a wind powered hydrogen production system is simulated and optimised. The results reveal that, even allowing for significant cost-reductions in electrolyser and associated balance-of-plant equipment, low average surplus wind electricity cost and a high hydrogen market price are also necessary to achieve the economic viability of the technology. These conditions would facilitate the installation of electrolysis units of sufficient capacity to allow an appreciable increase in installed wind power in Ireland. The simulation model was also used to determine the CO 2 abatement potential associated with the wind energy/hydrogen production. (author)

  4. Wind energy, electricity, and hydrogen in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schenk, Niels J.; Moll, Henri C.; Potting, José; Benders, René M.J.

    2007-01-01

    The curbing of greenhouse gases (GHG) is an important issue on the international political agenda. The substitution of fossil fuels by renewable energy sources is an often-advocated mitigation strategy. Wind energy is a potential renewable energy source. However, wind energy is not reliable since

  5. HIGH-TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS FOR HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FROM NUCLEAR ENERGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James E. O& #39; Brien; Carl M. Stoots; J. Stephen Herring; Joseph J. Hartvigsen

    2005-10-01

    An experimental study is under way to assess the performance of solid-oxide cells operating in the steam electrolysis mode for hydrogen production over a temperature range of 800 to 900ºC. Results presented in this paper were obtained from a ten-cell planar electrolysis stack, with an active area of 64 cm2 per cell. The electrolysis cells are electrolyte-supported, with scandia-stabilized zirconia electrolytes (~140 µm thick), nickel-cermet steam/hydrogen electrodes, and manganite air-side electrodes. The metallic interconnect plates are fabricated from ferritic stainless steel. The experiments were performed over a range of steam inlet mole fractions (0.1 - 0.6), gas flow rates (1000 - 4000 sccm), and current densities (0 to 0.38 A/cm2). Steam consumption rates associated with electrolysis were measured directly using inlet and outlet dewpoint instrumentation. Cell operating potentials and cell current were varied using a programmable power supply. Hydrogen production rates up to 90 Normal liters per hour were demonstrated. Values of area-specific resistance and stack internal temperatures are presented as a function of current density. Stack performance is shown to be dependent on inlet steam flow rate.

  6. Wave, Tidal, and In-Stream Energy Projects: Which Federal Agency Has the Lead?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lane, Nic

    2007-01-01

    .... The Department of the Interior's Minerals Management Service (MMS) indicates that the Energy Policy Act of 2005, 388, gave it authority as the lead agency for projects proposed on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS...

  7. Wave, Tidal, and In-Stream Energy Projects: Which Federal Agency Has the Lead

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lane, Nic

    2008-01-01

    .... The Department of the Interior's Minerals Management Service (MMS) indicates that the Energy Policy Act of 2005, and 388, gave it authority as the lead agency for projects proposed on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS...

  8. Assessment of the potential future market in Sweden for hydrogen as an energy carrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carleson, G.

    Future hydrogen markets for the period 1980-2025 are projected, the probable range of hydrogen production costs for various manufacturing methods is estimated, and expected market shares in competition with alternative energy carriers are evaluated. A general scenario for economic and industrial development in Sweden for the given period was evaluated, showing the average increase in gross national product to become 1.6% per year. Three different energy scenarios were then developed: alternatives were based on nuclear energy, renewable indigenous energy sources, and the present energy situation with free access to imported natural or synthetic fuels. An analysis was made within each scenario of the competitiveness of hydrogen on both the demand and the supply of the following sectors: chemical industry, steel industry, peak power production, residential and commercial heating, and transportation. Costs were calculated for the production, storage and transmission of hydrogen according to technically feasible methods and were compared to those of alternative energy carriers. Health, environmental and societal implications were also considered. The market penetration of hydrogen in each sector was estimated, and the required investment capital was shown to be less than 4% of the national gross investment sum.

  9. Agreement on the Privileges and Immunities of the International Atomic Energy Agency; Accord sur les Privileges et Immunites ee 'Agence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1967-10-31

    The Agreement on the Privileges and Immunities of the International Atomic Energy Agency, the text of which is reproduced herein, was approved by the Board of Governors on 1 July 1959. As required by section 38, the Director General has transmitted a certified copy of the Agreement to the Government of each Member of the Agency, and will transmit such a copy to the Government of every State that becomes a Member hereafter [French] Le texte de l'Accord sur les privileges et immunites de l'Agence internationale de l'energie atomique, qui a ete approuve par le Conseil des gouverneurs le 1er juillet 1959, est reproduit dans le present document pour l'information de tous les Etats Membres. Conformment aux dispositions de la section 38 de l'Accord, le Directeur general a adresse au gouvernement de chaque Etat Membre une copie certifiee conforme de l'Accord et en enverra une auv gouvernement de chaque nouvel Etat Membre.

  10. Hydrogen transport in solids with traps in the case of continuum distribution of detrapping energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasheninnikov, S I; Smirnov, R D; Marenkov, E D; Pisarev, A A

    2014-01-01

    Tritium retention in the first wall material is one of the key issues in the performance of future fusion reactors. Transport of hydrogenic species in these materials is most commonly treated as diffusion affected by trapping/detrapping processes. Usually only several trap types differing in their activation energies of hydrogen release are considered (up to three types in the TMAP7 code). We suggest that in some cases (e.g. highly damaged or disordered media) the hydrogen trapping/detrapping process is better characterized by a continuum distribution of traps over their detrapping energies. Within a random walk model we show that this assumption leads to qualitative changes in hydrogen transport in solids. Using this model we explain experimental findings on temporal dependence of deuterium outgassing from tokamaks, first wall. (paper)

  11. Can aqueous hydrogen peroxide be used as a stand-alone energy source?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Disselkamp, Robert S.

    2010-01-01

    A novel electrochemical scheme to convert a stand-alone supply of aqueous hydrogen peroxide into a fuel cell-ready stream of hydrogen gas plus aqueous hydrogen peroxide is described. The electrochemical cell, consisting of a solid base and solid acid electrocatalyst, together with a proton exchange membrane, comprise the system that converts aqueous hydrogen peroxide into separate gas streams of oxygen and hydrogen. Aqueous hydrogen peroxide is contained in the anode compartment only and exists in the region where oxygen gas is formed, whereas the cathode compartment is where hydrogen gas is generated and therefore exists in a reduced state. A near zero theoretical over-potential can be achieved by the choice of basicity and acidity of the electrode materials. The primary cost of the electrochemical cell is electrode construction and the aqueous hydrogen peroxide energy storage compound. Additional research effort is required to experimentally validate the concept and explore the full economic impact should initial studies, based on the design presented here, prove promising. (author)

  12. Japan sunshine project 1987 annual summary of Hydrogen energy R and D

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-04-01

    This paper presents the findings of the researches on hydrogen energy in sunshine project in FY87. A duration test of the electrolyte membrane of solid polymer fabricated by bonding Pt and Ir catalyst layers was made for seven months to produce hydrogen by the electrolysis of water. The result indicates that the electrolysis will be able to be made at high current density. The sensitivity to stress corrosion cracking of stainless steel for electrolysis of water was evaluated. Since a thin film of stabilized zirconia fabricated by sintering at a temperature of 1500 C or higher is dense and conductive, it is a promising solid electrolyte. Since an inert phase to hydrogen is developed in a high-density metallic alloy for hydrogen storage produced by sintering and partially melting Mg7Zn3-Ni, it must be improved. A heating module of hydrogenated material monolithically coated on copper tube was investigated. The application of metallic alloy for hydrogen storage to the hydrogen electrode is studied. A hydrogen-fueled prime mover system circulating an inert gas is being developed. Since the low alloy steel part is extremely embrittled by heating, the intergranular face of coarse crystal affected by the cycle of welding heat is a problem.

  13. The Vision of the Role of Hydrogen in Energy Supply in the Future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbir, F.

    2008-01-01

    Europe is in a very difficult situation regarding the future of energy supply because it is highly dependent on import of oil and natural gas. In addition, because of environmental pollution, global climate changes, ?nite World reserves of fossil fuels and geo-political implications of distribution of those reserves, such an energy system is not sustainable. The need for inevitable changes in energy supply is becoming more and more obvious. This includes not only a change of the energy sources, but also in energy carriers and technologies for their conversion into useful forms of energy, as well as a change in the ways energy is used today. Based on present knowledge, the only energy sources that satisfy the sustainability requirements are the renewable energy sources - direct solar insolation and its consequences (wind, hydro, biomass). As the renewable energy sources cannot be utilized directly in most of applications there is a need for such energy carriers which can be produced from renewable energy sources and which can satisfy all the energy needs at the end use, again satisfying the sustainability requirements. Electricity is one of such energy carrier which may be used in most but not in all applications. There is a need for other energy carriers in the form of fuels which can be stored and used, for example, in the transportation sector. This is a role that hydrogen can fulfill in a future energy system - hydrogen satisfies the conditions of sustainability, can be produced from renewable energy sources and together with electricity can satisfy all energy needs. Although the role of hydrogen in a future energy system can be envisioned with some certainty, the problem is the transition, i.e. switching from the present energy system based on fossil fuels to the future energy system based on renewable energy sources. Of course, such transition cannot happen overnight, but the question is where and how to start and at which pace to proceed. Insistence on short

  14. One million ton of hydrogen is the key piece in the Danish renewable energy puzzle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grandal, Rune Duban; Mathiesen, Brian Vad; Connolly, David

    2013-01-01

    Designing a 100 % renewable energy system (RES) for Denmark, the availability of a sustainable biomass resource potential is found to be a limiting factor. The biomass demand derives from specific needs in the system, i.e. 1) storable fuel for energy for balancing fluctuating power production, 2...... storage, i.e. storing wind power through electrolysis and further reaction of hydrogen to hydrocarbons with carbon feedstock from biomass. This involves biomass gasification and hydrogenation of the syngas or hydrogenation of recycled CO2. The advantage of hydro storage is a superior energy efficiency......) carbon feedstock for materials and chemicals and 3) energy dense fuels for the more demanding branches of the transportation sector such as aviation, ship freight and long distance road transportation. The challenge of balancing electricity over different timeslots comprise a short term balancing...

  15. The Regional Biomass-Energy Agency (ERBE): an opportunity for the biomass-energy development in Wallonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemaire, P.; Menu, J.F.; Belle, J.F. van; Schenkel, Y.

    1997-01-01

    In 1995, the European Commission (Directorate-General for Energy) and the Walloon government set up a biomass-energy agency (ERBE), to promote and build biomass-energy projects in Wallonia (Belgium). A survey of biomass-energy potential indicates that wood-energy seems to offer the best utilization opportunities. Forest and logging residues, sawmills' and joineries' off-cuts, pallets residues, etc. could be burnt in wood district heating units with a significant social benefit. Consequently, the ERBE Agency is trying to set up projects in this way in Austria (+/- 100 wood heating systems) or in Sweden. It serves to inform industries and municipalities about biomass-energy, to advise them in the building of biomass-energy projects, to identify their energy needs and their biomass resources, to carry out prefeasibility studies, to inform them about financing opportunities, and so on. (author)

  16. Analytic Methods for Benchmarking Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melaina, Marc; Saur, Genevieve; Ramsden, Todd; Eichman, Joshua

    2015-05-28

    This presentation summarizes NREL's hydrogen and fuel cell analysis work in three areas: resource potential, greenhouse gas emissions and cost of delivered energy, and influence of auxiliary revenue streams. NREL's hydrogen and fuel cell analysis projects focus on low-­carbon and economic transportation and stationary fuel cell applications. Analysis tools developed by the lab provide insight into the degree to which bridging markets can strengthen the business case for fuel cell applications.

  17. Renewable Hydrogen: Technology Review and Policy Recommendations for State-Level Sustainable Energy Futures

    OpenAIRE

    Lipman, Timothy; Edwards, Jennifer Lynn; Brooks, Cameron

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen is emerging beyond its conventional role as an additive component for gasoline production, chemical and fertilizer manufacture, and food production to become a promising fuel for transportation and stationary power. Hydrogen offers a potentially unmatched ability to deliver a de-carbonized energy system, thereby addressing global climate change concerns, while simultaneously improving local air quality and reducing dependence on imported fossil fuels. This "trifecta" of potential ben...

  18. A two-stage bio hydrogen process for energy generation from municipal solid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acevedo-Benitez, J. a.; Poggi-Varaldo, H. M.

    2009-01-01

    Energy supply and disposal of solid wastes are two big challenges that great cities face at the present time. Several experts have shown that hydrogen is the fuel of the future, due to their high energy content (three times more than that of the gasoline) and its clean combustion. (Author)

  19. Hydrogen Gas Recycling for Energy Efficient Ammonia Recovery in Electrochemical Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuntke, Philipp; Rodríguez Arredondo, Mariana; Widyakristi, Laksminarastri; Heijne, ter Annemiek; Sleutels, Tom H.J.A.; Hamelers, Hubertus V.M.; Buisman, Cees J.N.

    2017-01-01

    Recycling of hydrogen gas (H2) produced at the cathode to the anode in an electrochemical system allows for energy efficient TAN (Total Ammonia Nitrogen) recovery. Using a H2 recycling electrochemical system (HRES) we achieved high TAN transport rates at low energy input. At

  20. Hope over fear. The establishment of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forland, A.

    1995-01-01

    President Eisenhower's ''Atoms for Peace'' speech in 1953 started a process that led to the establishment of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). This study analyses the negotiations of the Statute of the Agency. It focuses on how the Agency's scope of action regarding safeguards was negotiated. The Statute is seen as a reflection of the dual purpose of the new Agency to promote peaceful uses of nuclear energy, and to control that peaceful nuclear activities receiving IAEA assistance are not diverted to military purposes. On one hand, the countries receiving assistance from the Agency accepted a degree of international control that represented a breakthrough in international relations. On the other hand, many countries strongly resented controls. Consequently, compromises had to be made in the course of the negotiations in order to reach a consensus. Thus, although the IAEA was established as a competent and technical body, the underlying compromises meant that its scope of actions was restricted. 6 refs