WorldWideScience

Sample records for energetic electron transport

  1. Transport of energetic electrons in a fully ionized hydrogen plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, T.

    1982-01-01

    In order to study the behavior of energetic electrons in astrophysical plasmas, I derive relationships among the Coulomb energy loss, travel distance, and pitch angle deflection due to Coulomb collisions, which hold when the Coulomb energy loss is only a small fraction of the initial energy. By using these relationships, I develop a Monte Carlo method of calculating how the pitch angle and spatial distributions of the energetic electrons change in a uniformly magnetized plasma as these electrons lose energy by Coulomb collisions, including a scheme to include the effects of the nonuniformity of the ambient magnetic field. The resulting computational framework provides an efficient and flexible system for incroporating the effects of Coulomb collisions in realistic geometries. This method is applied to a beam of monoenergetic electrons released along the magnetic field lines. Implications of the present results and future applications of this Monte Carlo method are discussed. Subject headings: hydromagnetics: plasmas: Sun: flares

  2. Energetic Electron Acceleration, Injection, and Transport in Mercury's Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewey, R. M.; Slavin, J. A.; Raines, J. M.; Baker, D. N.; Lawrence, D. J.

    2018-05-01

    Electrons are accelerated in Mercury’s magnetotail by dipolarization events, flux ropes, and magnetic reconnection directly. Following energization, these electrons are injected close to Mercury where they drift eastward in Shabansky-like orbits.

  3. Energy transport by energetic electrons released during solar flares. I - Thermal versus nonthermal processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winglee, R. M.; Dulk, G. A.; Pritchett, P. L.

    1988-01-01

    The propagation of energetic electrons through a flaring flux tube is studied in an attempt to determine how the energy of the electrons is deposited in the flux tube. One-dimensional electrostatic particle simulations are used in the present investigation. As the energetic electrons propagate into the system, a return current of ambient plasma electrons and some of the energetic electrons is drawn into the energetic electron source. It is found that, as the ambient temperature relative to the ion temperature increases above about 3, the heated return-current electrons can excite ion-sound waves.

  4. The Role of Diffusion in the Transport of Energetic Electrons during Solar Flares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bian, Nicolas H.; Kontar, Eduard P. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ, Scotland (United Kingdom); Emslie, A. Gordon, E-mail: nicolas.bian@glasgow.gla.ac.uk, E-mail: emslieg@wku.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY 42101 (United States)

    2017-02-01

    The transport of the energy contained in suprathermal electrons in solar flares plays a key role in our understanding of many aspects of flare physics, from the spatial distributions of hard X-ray emission and energy deposition in the ambient atmosphere to global energetics. Historically the transport of these particles has been largely treated through a deterministic approach, in which first-order secular energy loss to electrons in the ambient target is treated as the dominant effect, with second-order diffusive terms (in both energy and angle) generally being either treated as a small correction or even neglected. Here, we critically analyze this approach, and we show that spatial diffusion through pitch-angle scattering necessarily plays a very significant role in the transport of electrons. We further show that a satisfactory treatment of the diffusion process requires consideration of non-local effects, so that the electron flux depends not just on the local gradient of the electron distribution function but on the value of this gradient within an extended region encompassing a significant fraction of a mean free path. Our analysis applies generally to pitch-angle scattering by a variety of mechanisms, from Coulomb collisions to turbulent scattering. We further show that the spatial transport of electrons along the magnetic field of a flaring loop can be modeled rather effectively as a Continuous Time Random Walk with velocity-dependent probability distribution functions of jump sizes and occurrences, both of which can be expressed in terms of the scattering mean free path.

  5. Altered expression of mitochondrial electron transport chain proteins and improved myocardial energetic state during late ischemic preconditioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Cabrera (Jesús); E.A. Ziemba (Elizabeth); L.H. Colbert (Lisa); L.B. Anderson (Lorraine); W.J. Sluiter (Wim); D.J.G.M. Duncker (Dirk); T.A. Butterick (Tammy); J. Sikora (Joseph); H.B. Ward (Herbert B.); R.F. Kelly (Rosemary); E.O. McFalls (Edward)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractAltered expression of mitochondrial electron transport proteins has been shown in early preconditioned myocardial tissue. We wished to determine whether these alterations persist in the Second Window of Protection (SWOP) and if so, whether a favorable energetic state is facilitated

  6. X-ray spectroscopic technique for energetic electron transport studies in short-pulse laser/plasma interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tutt, T.E.

    1994-12-01

    When a solid target is irradiated by a laser beam, the material is locally heated to a high temperature and a plasma forms. The interaction of the laser with plasma can produce energetic electrons. By observing the behavior of these {open_quotes}hot{close_quotes} electrons, we hope to obtain a better understanding of Laser/Plasma Interactions. In this work we employ a layered-fluorescer technique to study the transport, and therefore the energetics, of the electrons. The plasma forms on a thin foil of metallic Pd which is bonded to thin layer of metallic Sn. Electrons formed from the plasma penetrate first the Pd and then the Sn. In both layers the energetic electrons promote inner (K) shell ionization of the metallic atoms which leads to the emission of characteristic K{sub {alpha}} x-rays of the fluorescers. By recording the x-ray spectrum emitted by the two foils, we can estimate the energy-dependent range of the electrons and their numbers.

  7. The influence of preformed plasma on the surface-guided lateral transport of energetic electrons in ultraintense short laser–foil interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, X H; Zheng, J; Liu, J L; Fang, Y; Sheng, Z M; Carroll, D C; Gray, R J; Brenner, C M; Coury, M; Tresca, O; Neely, D; McKenna, P; Chen, L M; Li, Y T; Zielbauer, B; Kühl, T

    2014-01-01

    The lateral transport patterns of energetic electrons in thin foil targets irradiated with relativistically intense, picosecond laser pulses with different peak-to-pedestal intensity contrast ratios are reported. For ‘low contrast’ pulses, a large current of energetic electrons is found to be transported along the target front surface, due to the formation of strong quasi-static electric and magnetic fields. This is distinctly different from the case with ‘high contrast’ pulses, where energetic electrons are spatially confined. Although this lateral transport reduces the efficiency of the laser energy coupling into ion and radiation production in the region of the laser focus, it can play an important role in directing energy transport in advanced fast ignition schemes involving hollow cone targets and also in heating the target (to generate states of warm dense matter) in regions far from the drive laser focus. (paper)

  8. MULTI-SPACECRAFT OBSERVATIONS AND TRANSPORT MODELING OF ENERGETIC ELECTRONS FOR A SERIES OF SOLAR PARTICLE EVENTS IN AUGUST 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dröge, W.; Kartavykh, Y. Y. [Institut für Theoretische Physik und Astrophysik, Universität Würzburg, D-97074 Würzburg (Germany); Dresing, N.; Klassen, A. [Institut für Experimentelle und Angewandte Physik, Universität Kiel, D-24118 Kiel (Germany)

    2016-08-01

    During 2010 August a series of solar particle events was observed by the two STEREO spacecraft as well as near-Earth spacecraft. The events, occurring on August 7, 14, and 18, originated from active regions 11093 and 11099. We combine in situ and remote-sensing observations with predictions from our model of three-dimensional anisotropic particle propagation in order to investigate the physical processes that caused the large angular spreads of energetic electrons during these events. In particular, we address the effects of the lateral transport of the electrons in the solar corona that is due to diffusion perpendicular to the average magnetic field in the interplanetary medium. We also study the influence of two coronal mass ejections and associated shock waves on the electron propagation, and a possible time variation of the transport conditions during the above period. For the August 18 event we also utilize electron observations from the MESSENGER spacecraft at a distance of 0.31 au from the Sun for an attempt to separate between radial and longitudinal dependencies in the transport process. Our modelings show that the parallel and perpendicular diffusion mean free paths of electrons can vary significantly not only as a function of the radial distance, but also of the heliospheric longitude. Normalized to a distance of 1 au, we derive values of λ {sub ∥} in the range of 0.15–0.6 au, and values of λ {sub ⊥} in the range of 0.005–0.01 au. We discuss how our results relate to various theoretical models for perpendicular diffusion, and whether there might be a functional relationship between the perpendicular and the parallel mean free path.

  9. Transport of energetic electrons in a magnetically expanding helicon double layer plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Kazunori; Charles, Christine; Boswell, Rod; Cox, Wes; Hatakeyama, Rikizo

    2009-01-01

    Peripheral magnetic field lines extending from the plasma source into the diffusion chamber are found to separate two regions of Maxwellian electron energy probability functions: the central, ion-beam containing region with an electron temperature of 5 eV, and region near the chamber walls with electrons at 3 eV. Along the peripheral field lines a bi-Maxwellian population with a hot tail at 9 eV is shown to both originate from electrons in the source traveling downstream across the double layer and correspond to a local maximum in ion and electron densities.

  10. Inner Radiation Belt Representation of the Energetic Electron Environment: Model and Data Synthesis Using the Salammbo Radiation Belt Transport Code and Los Alamos Geosynchronous and GPS Energetic Particle Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedel, R. H. W.; Bourdarie, S.; Fennell, J.; Kanekal, S.; Cayton, T. E.

    2004-01-01

    The highly energetic electron environment in the inner magnetosphere (GEO inward) has received a lot of research attention in resent years, as the dynamics of relativistic electron acceleration and transport are not yet fully understood. These electrons can cause deep dielectric charging in any space hardware in the MEO to GEO region. We use a new and novel approach to obtain a global representation of the inner magnetospheric energetic electron environment, which can reproduce the absolute environment (flux) for any spacecraft orbit in that region to within a factor of 2 for the energy range of 100 KeV to 5 MeV electrons, for any levels of magnetospheric activity. We combine the extensive set of inner magnetospheric energetic electron observations available at Los Alamos with the physics based Salammbo transport code, using the data assimilation technique of "nudging". This in effect input in-situ data into the code and allows the diffusion mechanisms in the code to interpolate the data into regions and times of no data availability. We present here details of the methods used, both in the data assimilation process and in the necessary inter-calibration of the input data used. We will present sample runs of the model/data code and compare the results to test spacecraft data not used in the data assimilation process.

  11. Computational Model of D-Region Ion Production Caused by Energetic Electron Precipitations Based on General Monte Carlo Transport Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouznetsov, A.; Cully, C. M.

    2017-12-01

    During enhanced magnetic activities, large ejections of energetic electrons from radiation belts are deposited in the upper polar atmosphere where they play important roles in its physical and chemical processes, including VLF signals subionospheric propagation. Electron deposition can affect D-Region ionization, which are estimated based on ionization rates derived from energy depositions. We present a model of D-region ion production caused by an arbitrary (in energy and pitch angle) distribution of fast (10 keV - 1 MeV) electrons. The model relies on a set of pre-calculated results obtained using a general Monte Carlo approach with the latest version of the MCNP6 (Monte Carlo N-Particle) code for the explicit electron tracking in magnetic fields. By expressing those results using the ionization yield functions, the pre-calculated results are extended to cover arbitrary magnetic field inclinations and atmospheric density profiles, allowing ionization rate altitude profile computations in the range of 20 and 200 km at any geographic point of interest and date/time by adopting results from an external atmospheric density model (e.g. NRLMSISE-00). The pre-calculated MCNP6 results are stored in a CDF (Common Data Format) file, and IDL routines library is written to provide an end-user interface to the model.

  12. Problems Of Transport Energetics In Lithuania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambrazevicius, A.; Baublys, J.

    2001-01-01

    Lithuania has more than one million of transport means, the thermal capacity of which is about 50 mill. kW, i.e. 10 times more than the capacity of all thermal power stations. In the 21st century electrical energy will be used for transport means instead of petrol, and new capacities of electric stations in Lithuania will be necessary. All perspective transport means are described and conclusions for Lithuanian energetics are presented. (author)

  13. Electron energetics in the expanding solar wind via Helios observations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štverák, Štěpán; Trávníček, Pavel M.; Hellinger, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 120, č. 10 (2015), s. 8177-8193 ISSN 2169-9380 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP209/12/2041; GA ČR GA15-17490S Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : solar wind * electrons energetics * transport processes Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 3.318, year: 2015

  14. Turbulent transport of energetic ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dannert, Tilman; Hauff, Thilo; Jenko, Frank; Guenter, Sibylle

    2006-01-01

    Approaching ITER operation, the issue of anomalous transport of fast particles becomes more and more important. This is partly because the ITER heating and current drive system relies heavily on neutral beam injection. Moreover burning plasmas are heated by fast fusion α particles.Fusion α particles are characterised by a fixed energy and an isotropic velocity distribution. Therefore they have gyroradii one magnitude larger than the thermal ions. The dependency of the particle diffusion of α test particles on the Kubo number K = VExBτc/λc (VExB mean E x B velocity, τc, λc correlation time and length of the turbulent potential) is presented. For different turbulent regimes, different dependency of the diffusion on the gyroradius is found. For large Kubo numbers, the transport is found to remain constant for gyroradii up to the correlation length of the potential, whereas it is drastically reduced in the small Kubo number regime.In the second part, a model for beam ions injected along the equilibrium magnetic field is described. The beam ions are treated gyrokinetically in a self-consistent way with the equilibrium distribution function taken as a shifted Maxwellian. The implications of such a model for the Vlasov equation, the field equations, and the calculation of moments and fluxes are discussed. Linear and nonlinear results, obtained with the gyrokinetic flux tube code GENE show the existence of a new instability driven by fast beam ions. The instability has a maximum growth rate at perpendicular wave numbers of kyρs ∼ 0.15 and depends mainly on the beam velocity and the density gradient of the beam ions. This instability leads to a replacement of bulk ion particle transport by fast ion particle transport, connected to a strongly enhanced heat flux. In the presence of this instability, the turbulent particle and heat transport is dominated by fast ions

  15. The energetic alpha particle transport method EATM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirkpatrick, R.C.

    1998-02-01

    The EATM method is an evolving attempt to find an efficient method of treating the transport of energetic charged particles in a dynamic magnetized (MHD) plasma for which the mean free path of the particles and the Larmor radius may be long compared to the gradient lengths in the plasma. The intent is to span the range of parameter space with the efficiency and accuracy thought necessary for experimental analysis and design of magnetized fusion targets

  16. Field-Lines-Threaded Model for: (1) the Low Solar Corona; (2) Electrons in the Transition Region; and (3) Solar Energetic Particle Acceleration and Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolov, I.; van der Holst, B.; Jin, M.; Gombosi, T. I.; Taktakishvili, A.; Khazanov, G. V.

    2013-12-01

    In numerical simulations of the solar corona, both for the ambient state and especially for dynamical processes the most computational resources are spent for maintaining the numerical solution in the Low Solar Corona and in the transition region, where the temperature gradients are very sharp and the magnetic field has a complicated topology. The degraded computational efficiency is caused by the need in a highest resolution as well as the use of the fully three-dimensional implicit solver for electron heat conduction. On the other hand, the physical nature of the processes involved is rather simple (which still does not facilitate the numerical methods) as long as the heat fluxes as well as slow plasma motional velocities are aligned with the magnetic field. The Alfven wave turbulence, which is often believed to be the main driver of the solar wind and the main source of the coronal heating, is characterized by the Poynting flux of the waves, which is also aligned with the magnetic field. Therefore, the plasma state in any point of the three-dimensional grid in the Low Solar Corona can be found by solving a set of one-dimensional equations for the magnetic field line ('thread'), which passes through this point and connects it to the chromosphere and to the global Solar Corona. In the present paper we describe an innovative computational technology based upon the use of the magnetic-field-line-threads to find the local solution. We present the development of the AWSoM code of the University of Michigan with the field-lines-threaded Low Solar Corona. In the transition region, where the essentially kinetic description of the electron energy fluxes is required, we solve the Fokker-Plank equation on the system of threads, to achieve the physically consistent description of chromosphere evaporation. The third application for the field-lines-treaded model is the Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) acceleration and transport. Being the natural extension of the Field

  17. Non-Local Diffusion of Energetic Electrons during Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, N. H.; Emslie, G.; Kontar, E.

    2017-12-01

    The transport of the energy contained in suprathermal electrons in solar flares plays a key role in our understanding of many aspects of flare physics, from the spatial distributions of hard X-ray emission and energy deposition in the ambient atmosphere to global energetics. Historically the transport of these particles has been largely treated through a deterministic approach, in which first-order secular energy loss to electrons in the ambient target is treated as the dominant effect, with second-order diffusive terms (in both energy and angle) generally being either treated as a small correction or even neglected. Here, we critically analyze this approach, and we show that spatial diffusion through pitch-angle scattering necessarily plays a very significant role in the transport of electrons. We further show that a satisfactory treatment of the diffusion process requires consideration of non-local effects, so that the electron flux depends not just on the local gradient of the electron distribution function but on the value of this gradient within an extended region encompassing a significant fraction of a mean free path. Our analysis applies generally to pitch-angle scattering by a variety of mechanisms, from Coulomb collisions to turbulent scattering. We further show that the spatial transport of electrons along the magnetic field of a flaring loop can be modeled as a Continuous Time Random Walk with velocity-dependent probability distribution functions of jump sizes and occurrences, both of which can be expressed in terms of the scattering mean free path.

  18. Energetics of turbulent transport processes in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, F.A.; Thyagaraja, A.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of electromagnetic turbulence on electrons and ions under Tokamak conditions is considered using a kinetic description. Taking the magnetic fluctuation spectrum as given, the density fluctuation spectrum is self-consistently calculated taking account of quasi-neutrality. The calculation is valid for arbitrary collisionality and appropriate to low frequencies typical of experiment. In addition to the usual enhancement of the radial electron energy transport, it is found that the turbulent fluctuations can heat the plasma at rates comparable to ordinary ohmic heating under well-defined conditions. Interestingly, electromagnetic turbulence appears to imply only an insignificant correction to the toroidal resistance of the plasma as estimated from Spitzer resistivity. The scalings of anomalous transport, fluctuations and heating with temperature and plasma volume are investigated. The assumption that the magnetic fluctuation spectrum of the turbulence is invariant under a wide range of conditions is shown to result in interesting consequences for JET-like plasmas. (author)

  19. Monte Carlo Transport for Electron Thermal Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenhall, Jeffrey; Cao, Duc; Moses, Gregory

    2015-11-01

    The iSNB (implicit Schurtz Nicolai Busquet multigroup electron thermal transport method of Cao et al. is adapted into a Monte Carlo transport method in order to better model the effects of non-local behavior. The end goal is a hybrid transport-diffusion method that combines Monte Carlo Transport with a discrete diffusion Monte Carlo (DDMC). The hybrid method will combine the efficiency of a diffusion method in short mean free path regions with the accuracy of a transport method in long mean free path regions. The Monte Carlo nature of the approach allows the algorithm to be massively parallelized. Work to date on the method will be presented. This work was supported by Sandia National Laboratory - Albuquerque and the University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics.

  20. Internal Transport Barrier Driven by Redistribution of Energetic Ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, K.L.; Heidbrink, W.W.; Ruskov, E.; Petty, C.C.; Greenfield, C.M.; Nazikian, R.; Budny, R.

    2004-01-01

    Alfven instabilities excited by energetic ions are used as a means to reduce the central magnetic shear in a tokamak via redistribution of energetic ions. When the central magnetic shear is low enough, ballooning modes become stable for any plasma pressure gradient and an internal transport barrier (ITB) with a steep pressure gradient can exist. This mechanism can sustain a steady-state ITB as demonstrated by experimental data from the DIII-D tokamak. It can also produce a shear in toroidal and poloidal plasma rotation. Possible application of this technique to use the energetic alpha particles for improvement of burning plasma performance is discussed

  1. The source of multi spectral energy of solar energetic electron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herdiwijaya, Dhani [Astronomy Division and Bosscha Observatory, Faculty Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Intitute Technology of Bandung, Ganesha 10, Bandung, Indonesia 40132 dhani@as.itb.ac.id (Indonesia)

    2015-04-16

    We study the solar energetic electron distribution obtained from ACE and GOES satellites which have different altitudes and electron spectral energy during the year 1997 to 2011. The electron spectral energies were 0.038–0.315 MeV from EPAM instrument onboard ACE satellite and >2 MeV from GOES satellite. We found that the low electron energy has no correlation with high energy. In spite of we have corrected to the altitude differences. It implied that they originated from time dependent events with different sources and physical processes at the solar atmosphere. The sources of multi spectral energetic electron were related to flare and CME phenomena. However, we also found that high energetic electron comes from coronal hole.

  2. Paleoclassical electron heat transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callen, J.D.

    2005-01-01

    Radial electron heat transport in low collisionality, magnetically-confined toroidal plasmas is shown to result from paleoclassical Coulomb collision processes (parallel electron heat conduction and magnetic field diffusion). In such plasmas the electron temperature equilibrates along magnetic field lines a long length L, which is the minimum of the electron collision length and a maximum effective half length of helical field lines. Thus, the diffusing field lines induce a radial electron heat diffusivity M ≅ L/(πR 0q ) ∼ 10 >> 1 times the magnetic field diffusivity η/μ 0 ≅ ν e (c/ω p ) 2 . The paleoclassical electron heat flux model provides interpretations for many features of 'anomalous' electron heat transport: magnitude and radial profile of electron heat diffusivity (in tokamaks, STs, and RFPs), Alcator scaling in high density plasmas, transport barriers around low order rational surfaces and near a separatrix, and a natural heat pinch (or minimum temperature gradient) heat flux form. (author)

  3. Large enhancement of highly energetic electrons in the outer radiation belt and its transport into the inner radiation belt inferred from MDS-1 satellite observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obara, T.; Matsumoto, H.

    2016-03-01

    We have examined a large increase of relativistic electrons in the outer radiation belt and its penetration into the inner radiation belt over slot region using the MDS-1 satellite observations. Result of analyses demonstrates that a large increase took place in the spring and autumn seasons, and we have newly confirmed that the penetration of outer belt electrons to the inner radiation zone took place during the big magnetic storms by examining a pitch angle distribution of the penetrating electrons.

  4. ONSETS AND SPECTRA OF IMPULSIVE SOLAR ENERGETIC ELECTRON EVENTS OBSERVED NEAR THE EARTH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kontar, Eduard P.; Reid, Hamish A. S.

    2009-01-01

    Impulsive solar energetic electrons are often observed in the interplanetary space near the Earth and have an attractive diagnostic potential for poorly understood solar flare acceleration processes. We investigate the transport of solar flare energetic electrons in the heliospheric plasma to understand the role of transport to the observed onset and spectral properties of the impulsive solar electron events. The propagation of energetic electrons in solar wind plasma is simulated from the acceleration region at the Sun to the Earth, taking into account self-consistent generation and absorption of electrostatic electron plasma (Langmuir) waves, effects of nonuniform plasma, collisions, and Landau damping. The simulations suggest that the beam-driven plasma turbulence and the effects of solar wind density inhomogeneity play a crucial role and lead to the appearance of (1) a spectral break for a single power-law injected electron spectrum, with the spectrum flatter below the break, (2) apparent early onset of low-energy electron injection, and (3) the apparent late maximum of low-energy electron injection. We show that the observed onsets, spectral flattening at low energies, and formation of a break energy at tens of keV is the direct manifestation of wave-particle interactions in nonuniform plasma of a single accelerated electron population with an initial power-law spectrum.

  5. Improved electron transport layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    The present invention provides: a method of preparing a coating ink for forming a zinc oxide electron transport layer, comprising mixing zinc acetate and a wetting agent in water or methanol; a coating ink comprising zinc acetate and a wetting agent in aqueous solution or methanolic solution......; a method of preparing a zinc oxide electron transporting layer, which method comprises: i) coating a substrate with the coating ink of the present invention to form a film; ii) drying the film; and iii) heating the dry film to convert the zinc acetate substantially to ZnO; a method of preparing an organic...... photovoltaic device or an organic LED having a zinc oxide electron transport layer, the method comprising, in this order: a) providing a substrate bearing a first electrode layer; b) forming an electron transport layer according to the following method: i) coating a coating ink comprising an ink according...

  6. Structural, energetic and electronic properties of intercalated boron ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2National Institute for R&D of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, Cluj-Napoca 400 293, Romania. MS received 8 November 2010; revised 28 March 2012. Abstract. The effects of chirality and the intercalation of transitional metal atoms inside single walled BN nano- tubes on structural, energetic and electronic properties ...

  7. Electronic transport properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, W.H.

    1985-01-01

    The theory of the electron transport properties of liquid alkali metals is described. Conductivity coefficients, Boltzmann theory, Ziman theory, alkali form factors, Ziman theory and alkalis, Faber-Ziman alloy theory, Faber-Ziman theory and alkali-alkali methods, status of Ziman theory, and other transport properties, are all discussed. (UK)

  8. On energetic prerequisites of attracting electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundholm, Dage [Department of Chemistry, POB 55 (A.I. Virtanens plats 1), FIN-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland)

    2014-06-21

    The internal reorganization energy and the zero-point vibrational energy (ZPE) of fractionally charged molecules embedded in molecular materials are discussed. The theory for isolated open quantum systems is taken as the starting point. It is shown that for isolated molecules the internal reorganization-energy function and its slope, i.e., the chemical potential of an open molecular system are monotonically decreasing functions with respect to increasing amount of negative excess charge (q) in the range of q = [0, 1]. Calculations of the ZPE for fractionally charged molecules show that the ZPE may have a minimum for fractional occupation. The calculations show that the internal reorganization energy and changes in the ZPE are of the same order of magnitude with different behavior as a function of the excess charge. The sum of the contributions might favor molecules with fractional occupation of the molecular units and partial delocalization of the excess electrons in solid-state materials also when considering Coulomb repulsion between the excess electrons. The fractional electrons are then coherently distributed on many molecules of the solid-state material forming a condensate of attracting electrons, which is crucial for the superconducting state.

  9. On energetic prerequisites of attracting electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundholm, Dage

    2014-06-01

    The internal reorganization energy and the zero-point vibrational energy (ZPE) of fractionally charged molecules embedded in molecular materials are discussed. The theory for isolated open quantum systems is taken as the starting point. It is shown that for isolated molecules the internal reorganization-energy function and its slope, i.e., the chemical potential of an open molecular system are monotonically decreasing functions with respect to increasing amount of negative excess charge (q) in the range of q = [0, 1]. Calculations of the ZPE for fractionally charged molecules show that the ZPE may have a minimum for fractional occupation. The calculations show that the internal reorganization energy and changes in the ZPE are of the same order of magnitude with different behavior as a function of the excess charge. The sum of the contributions might favor molecules with fractional occupation of the molecular units and partial delocalization of the excess electrons in solid-state materials also when considering Coulomb repulsion between the excess electrons. The fractional electrons are then coherently distributed on many molecules of the solid-state material forming a condensate of attracting electrons, which is crucial for the superconducting state.

  10. On energetic prerequisites of attracting electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundholm, Dage

    2014-01-01

    The internal reorganization energy and the zero-point vibrational energy (ZPE) of fractionally charged molecules embedded in molecular materials are discussed. The theory for isolated open quantum systems is taken as the starting point. It is shown that for isolated molecules the internal reorganization-energy function and its slope, i.e., the chemical potential of an open molecular system are monotonically decreasing functions with respect to increasing amount of negative excess charge (q) in the range of q = [0, 1]. Calculations of the ZPE for fractionally charged molecules show that the ZPE may have a minimum for fractional occupation. The calculations show that the internal reorganization energy and changes in the ZPE are of the same order of magnitude with different behavior as a function of the excess charge. The sum of the contributions might favor molecules with fractional occupation of the molecular units and partial delocalization of the excess electrons in solid-state materials also when considering Coulomb repulsion between the excess electrons. The fractional electrons are then coherently distributed on many molecules of the solid-state material forming a condensate of attracting electrons, which is crucial for the superconducting state

  11. Gyrokinetics Simulation of Energetic Particle Turbulence and Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diamond, Patrick H.

    2011-09-21

    Progress in research during this year elucidated the physics of precession resonance and its interaction with radial scattering to form phase space density granulations. Momentum theorems for drift wave-zonal flow systems involving precession resonance were derived. These are directly generalizable to energetic particle modes. A novel nonlinear, subcritical growth mechanism was identified, which has now been verified by simulation. These results strengthen the foundation of our understanding of transport in burning plasmas

  12. Gyrokinetics Simulation of Energetic Particle Turbulence and Transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamond, Patrick H.

    2011-01-01

    Progress in research during this year elucidated the physics of precession resonance and its interaction with radial scattering to form phase space density granulations. Momentum theorems for drift wave-zonal flow systems involving precession resonance were derived. These are directly generalizable to energetic particle modes. A novel nonlinear, subcritical growth mechanism was identified, which has now been verified by simulation. These results strengthen the foundation of our understanding of transport in burning plasmas

  13. Pulsations of Energetic Electron Pulsations In Association With Substorm Onset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Åsnes, A.; Stadsnes, J.; Bjordal, J.; Østgaard, N.; Haaland, S.; Rosenberg, T. J.; Detrick, D. L.

    The Polar Ionospheric X-ray Imaging Experiment (PIXIE) is giving detailed images of the energetic electron precipitation when the POLAR satellite is near perigee over the Antarctica. In this area the PIXIE images have a spatial resolution of the order of 100 km, and a temporal resolution of 10 s can be obtained. In this paper we present the results of a study focusing on the onset and expansion of a substorm occuring on July 24, 1998. In this event we observe strong modulations of the energetic electron precipitation with period around 1 minute following substorm onset. The pulsations were restricted to a narrow magnetic local time sector in the pre-midnight region, about 0.5 hours wide, and showed movement towards higher latitudes and earlier lo- cal times. The event will be discussed in context of measurements from ground sta- tions and satellites in geosynchronous orbit. Precipitation of energetic electrons will be compared with VLF/ELF ground measurements. Features in the energetic elec- tron precipitation will be mapped to the magnetospheric equatorial plane by field line tracing.

  14. Neoclassical transport of energetic beam ions in the Large Helical Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Sadayoshi; Yamada, Hiroshi; Kaneko, Osamu

    2000-01-01

    The neoclassical (collisional) transport of energetic ions is investigated by the global neoclassical transport simulation in the Large Helical Device (LHD). The steady state distributions of energetic ions are evaluated assuming an energetic particle source by NBI heating (tangentally injected). Significant radial transport of energetic ions can be seen due to the radial motion of trapped particles in the velocity region below near critical velocity. Our simulation results show relatively good agreements with the experimental results of fast particle measurements in the LHD. This suggests an important role of neoclassical transport in the radial transport process of energetic ions in heliotrons. (author)

  15. Simulation of charge generation and transport in semi-conductors under energetic-particle bombardment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, R.C.

    1990-01-01

    The passage of energetic ions through semiconductor devices generates excess charge which can produce logic upset, memory change, and device damage. This single event upset (SEU) phenomenon is increasingly important for satellite communications. Experimental and numerical simulation of SEUs is difficult because of the subnanosecond times and large charge densities within the ion track. The objective of this work is twofold: (1) the determination of the track structure and electron-hole pair generation profiles following the passage of an energetic ion; (2) the development and application of a new numerical method for transient charge transport in semiconductor devices. A secondary electron generation and transport model, based on the Monte Carlo method, is developed and coupled to an ion transport code to simulate ion track formation in silicon. A new numerical method is developed for the study of transient charge transport. The numerical method combines an axisymmetric quadratic finite-element formulation for the solution of the potential with particle simulation methods for electron and hole transport. Carrier transport, recombination, and thermal generation of both majority and minority carriers are included. To assess the method, transient one-dimensional solutions for silicon diodes are compared to a fully iterative finite-element method. Simulations of charge collection from ion tracks in three-dimensional axisymmetric devices are presented and compared to previous work. The results of this work for transient current pulses following charged ion passage are in agreement with recent experimental data

  16. Transition to H-mode by energetic electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Kimitaka; Itoh, Sanae.

    1992-07-01

    Effect of the electron loss due to the toroidal ripple on an H-mode transition is studied. When energetic electrons exist in tokamaks, e.g., in the case of the current drive by lower hybrid (LH) waves, the edge electric field can show the bifurcation to the more positive value. In this state, both the electron loss and ion loss (such as loss cone loss) are reduced. The criterion for the transition is derived. Comparison with H-mode in JT-60 LH plasma shows a qualitative agreement. (author)

  17. Dual scattering foil design for poly-energetic electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kainz, K K; Antolak, J A; Almond, P R; Bloch, C D; Hogstrom, K R

    2005-01-01

    The laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) mechanism can accelerate electrons to energies within the 6-20 MeV range desired for therapy application. However, the energy spectrum of LWFA-generated electrons is broad, on the order of tens of MeV. Using existing laser technology, the therapeutic beam might require a significant energy spread to achieve clinically acceptable dose rates. The purpose of this work was to test the assumption that a scattering foil system designed for a mono-energetic beam would be suitable for a poly-energetic beam with a significant energy spread. Dual scattering foil systems were designed for mono-energetic beams using an existing analytical formalism based on Gaussian multiple-Coulomb scattering theory. The design criterion was to create a flat beam that would be suitable for fields up to 25 x 25 cm 2 at 100 cm from the primary scattering foil. Radial planar fluence profiles for poly-energetic beams with energy spreads ranging from 0.5 MeV to 6.5 MeV were calculated using two methods: (a) analytically by summing beam profiles for a range of mono-energetic beams through the scattering foil system, and (b) by Monte Carlo using the EGS/BEAM code. The analytic calculations facilitated fine adjustments to the foil design, and the Monte Carlo calculations enabled us to verify the results of the analytic calculation and to determine the phase-space characteristics of the broadened beam. Results showed that the flatness of the scattered beam is fairly insensitive to the width of the input energy spectrum. Also, results showed that dose calculated by the analytical and Monte Carlo methods agreed very well in the central portion of the beam. Outside the useable field area, the differences between the analytical and Monte Carlo results were small but significant, possibly due to the small angle approximation. However, these did not affect the conclusion that a scattering foil system designed for a mono-energetic beam will be suitable for a poly-energetic

  18. Fused electron deficient semiconducting polymers for air stable electron transport

    KAUST Repository

    Onwubiko, Ada

    2018-01-23

    Conventional semiconducting polymer synthesis typically involves transition metal-mediated coupling reactions that link aromatic units with single bonds along the backbone. Rotation around these bonds contributes to conformational and energetic disorder and therefore potentially limits charge delocalisation, whereas the use of transition metals presents difficulties for sustainability and application in biological environments. Here we show that a simple aldol condensation reaction can prepare polymers where double bonds lock-in a rigid backbone conformation, thus eliminating free rotation along the conjugated backbone. This polymerisation route requires neither organometallic monomers nor transition metal catalysts and offers a reliable design strategy to facilitate delocalisation of frontier molecular orbitals, elimination of energetic disorder arising from rotational torsion and allowing closer interchain electronic coupling. These characteristics are desirable for high charge carrier mobilities. Our polymers with a high electron affinity display long wavelength NIR absorption with air stable electron transport in solution processed organic thin film transistors.

  19. Fused electron deficient semiconducting polymers for air stable electron transport

    KAUST Repository

    Onwubiko, Ada; Yue, Wan; Jellett, Cameron; Xiao, Mingfei; Chen, Hung-Yang; Ravva, Mahesh Kumar; Hanifi, David A.; Knall, Astrid-Caroline; Purushothaman, Balaji; Nikolka, Mark; Flores, Jean-Charles; Salleo, Alberto; Bredas, Jean-Luc; Sirringhaus, Henning; Hayoz, Pascal; McCulloch, Iain

    2018-01-01

    Conventional semiconducting polymer synthesis typically involves transition metal-mediated coupling reactions that link aromatic units with single bonds along the backbone. Rotation around these bonds contributes to conformational and energetic disorder and therefore potentially limits charge delocalisation, whereas the use of transition metals presents difficulties for sustainability and application in biological environments. Here we show that a simple aldol condensation reaction can prepare polymers where double bonds lock-in a rigid backbone conformation, thus eliminating free rotation along the conjugated backbone. This polymerisation route requires neither organometallic monomers nor transition metal catalysts and offers a reliable design strategy to facilitate delocalisation of frontier molecular orbitals, elimination of energetic disorder arising from rotational torsion and allowing closer interchain electronic coupling. These characteristics are desirable for high charge carrier mobilities. Our polymers with a high electron affinity display long wavelength NIR absorption with air stable electron transport in solution processed organic thin film transistors.

  20. Fused electron deficient semiconducting polymers for air stable electron transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onwubiko, Ada; Yue, Wan; Jellett, Cameron; Xiao, Mingfei; Chen, Hung-Yang; Ravva, Mahesh Kumar; Hanifi, David A; Knall, Astrid-Caroline; Purushothaman, Balaji; Nikolka, Mark; Flores, Jean-Charles; Salleo, Alberto; Bredas, Jean-Luc; Sirringhaus, Henning; Hayoz, Pascal; McCulloch, Iain

    2018-01-29

    Conventional semiconducting polymer synthesis typically involves transition metal-mediated coupling reactions that link aromatic units with single bonds along the backbone. Rotation around these bonds contributes to conformational and energetic disorder and therefore potentially limits charge delocalisation, whereas the use of transition metals presents difficulties for sustainability and application in biological environments. Here we show that a simple aldol condensation reaction can prepare polymers where double bonds lock-in a rigid backbone conformation, thus eliminating free rotation along the conjugated backbone. This polymerisation route requires neither organometallic monomers nor transition metal catalysts and offers a reliable design strategy to facilitate delocalisation of frontier molecular orbitals, elimination of energetic disorder arising from rotational torsion and allowing closer interchain electronic coupling. These characteristics are desirable for high charge carrier mobilities. Our polymers with a high electron affinity display long wavelength NIR absorption with air stable electron transport in solution processed organic thin film transistors.

  1. Observation of enhanced radial transport of energetic ion due to energetic particle mode destabilized by helically-trapped energetic ion in the Large Helical Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, K.; Isobe, M.; Kawase, H.; Nishitani, T.; Seki, R.; Osakabe, M.; LHD Experiment Group

    2018-04-01

    A deuterium experiment was initiated to achieve higher-temperature and higher-density plasmas in March 2017 in the Large Helical Device (LHD). The central ion temperature notably increases compared with that in hydrogen experiments. However, an energetic particle mode called the helically-trapped energetic-ion-driven resistive interchange (EIC) mode is often excited by intensive perpendicular neutral beam injections on high ion-temperature discharges. The mode leads to significant decrease of the ion temperature or to limiting the sustainment of the high ion-temperature state. To understand the effect of EIC on the energetic ion confinement, the radial transport of energetic ions is studied by means of the neutron flux monitor and vertical neutron camera newly installed on the LHD. Decreases of the line-integrated neutron profile in core channels show that helically-trapped energetic ions are lost from the plasma.

  2. A new numerical technique to design satellite energetic electron detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Tuszewski, M G; Ingraham, J C

    2002-01-01

    Energetic charged particles trapped in the magnetosphere are routinely detected by satellite instruments. However, it is generally difficult to extract quantitative energy and angular information from such measurements because the interaction of energetic electrons with matter is rather complex. Beam calibrations and Monte-Carlo (MC) simulations are often used to evaluate a flight instrument once it is built. However, rules of thumb and past experience are common tools to design the instrument in the first place. Hence, we have developed a simple numerical procedure, based on analytical probabilities, suitable for instrumental design and evaluation. In addition to the geometrical response, the contributions of surface backscattering, edge penetration, and bremsstrahlung radiation are estimated. The new results are benchmarked against MC calculations for a simple test case. Complicated effects, such as the contribution of the satellite to the instrumental response, can be estimated with the new formalism.

  3. DRIFT-INDUCED PERPENDICULAR TRANSPORT OF SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsh, M. S.; Dalla, S.; Kelly, J.; Laitinen, T.

    2013-01-01

    Drifts are known to play a role in galactic cosmic ray transport within the heliosphere and are a standard component of cosmic ray propagation models. However, the current paradigm of solar energetic particle (SEP) propagation holds the effects of drifts to be negligible, and they are not accounted for in most current SEP modeling efforts. We present full-orbit test particle simulations of SEP propagation in a Parker spiral interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), which demonstrate that high-energy particle drifts cause significant asymmetric propagation perpendicular to the IMF. Thus in many cases the assumption of field-aligned propagation of SEPs may not be valid. We show that SEP drifts have dependencies on energy, heliographic latitude, and charge-to-mass ratio that are capable of transporting energetic particles perpendicular to the field over significant distances within interplanetary space, e.g., protons of initial energy 100 MeV propagate distances across the field on the order of 1 AU, over timescales typical of a gradual SEP event. Our results demonstrate the need for current models of SEP events to include the effects of particle drift. We show that the drift is considerably stronger for heavy ion SEPs due to their larger mass-to-charge ratio. This paradigm shift has important consequences for the modeling of SEP events and is crucial to the understanding and interpretation of in situ observations

  4. Energetic Ion and Electron Irradiation of the Icy Galilean Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, John F.; Johnson, Robert E.; Mauk, Barry H.; Garrett, Henry B.; Gehrels, Neil

    2001-01-01

    Galileo Orbiter measurements of energetic ions (20 keV to 100 MeV) and electrons (20-700 keV) in Jupiter's magnetosphere are used, in conjunction with the JPL electron model (less than 40 MeV), to compute irradiation effects in the surface layers of Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto. Significant elemental modifications are produced on unshielded surfaces to approximately centimeter depths in times of less than or equal to 10(exp 6) years, whereas micrometer depths on Europa are fully processed in approximately 10 years. Most observations of surface composition are limited to optical depths of approximately 1 mm, which are indirect contact with the space environment. Incident flux modeling includes Stormer deflection by the Ganymede dipole magnetic field, likely variable over that satellite's irradiation history. Delivered energy flux of approximately 8 x 10(exp 10) keV/square cm-s at Europa is comparable to total internal heat flux in the same units from tidal and radiogenic sources, while exceeding that for solar UV energies (greater than 6 eV) relevant to ice chemistry. Particle energy fluxes to Ganymede's equator and Callisto are similar at approximately 2-3 x 10(exp 8) keV/square cm-s with 5 x 10(exp 9) at Ganymede's polar cap, the latter being comparable to radiogenic energy input. Rates of change in optical reflectance and molecular composition on Europa, and on Ganymede's polar cap, are strongly driven by energy from irradiation, even in relatively young regions. Irradiation of nonice materials can produce SO2 and CO2, detected on Callisto and Europa, and simple to complex hydrocarbons. Iogenic neutral atoms and meteoroids deliver negligible energy approximately 10(exp 4-5) keV/square cm-s but impacts of the latter are important for burial or removal of irradiation products. Downward transport of radiation produced oxidants and hydrocarbons could deliver significant chemical energy into the satellite interiors for astrobiological evolution in putative sub

  5. Intense energetic electron flux enhancements in Mercury's magnetosphere: An integrated view with high-resolution observations from MESSENGER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Daniel N; Dewey, Ryan M; Lawrence, David J; Goldsten, John O; Peplowski, Patrick N; Korth, Haje; Slavin, James A; Krimigis, Stamatios M; Anderson, Brian J; Ho, George C; McNutt, Ralph L; Raines, Jim M; Schriver, David; Solomon, Sean C

    2016-03-01

    The MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) mission to Mercury has provided a wealth of new data about energetic particle phenomena. With observations from MESSENGER's Energetic Particle Spectrometer, as well as data arising from energetic electrons recorded by the X-Ray Spectrometer and Gamma-Ray and Neutron Spectrometer (GRNS) instruments, recent work greatly extends our record of the acceleration, transport, and loss of energetic electrons at Mercury. The combined data sets include measurements from a few keV up to several hundred keV in electron kinetic energy and have permitted relatively good spatial and temporal resolution for many events. We focus here on the detailed nature of energetic electron bursts measured by the GRNS system, and we place these events in the context of solar wind and magnetospheric forcing at Mercury. Our examination of data at high temporal resolution (10 ms) during the period March 2013 through October 2014 supports strongly the view that energetic electrons are accelerated in the near-tail region of Mercury's magnetosphere and are subsequently "injected" onto closed magnetic field lines on the planetary nightside. The electrons populate the plasma sheet and drift rapidly eastward toward the dawn and prenoon sectors, at times executing multiple complete drifts around the planet to form "quasi-trapped" populations.

  6. Model Comparison for Electron Thermal Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, Gregory; Chenhall, Jeffrey; Cao, Duc; Delettrez, Jacques

    2015-11-01

    Four electron thermal transport models are compared for their ability to accurately and efficiently model non-local behavior in ICF simulations. Goncharov's transport model has accurately predicted shock timing in implosion simulations but is computationally slow and limited to 1D. The iSNB (implicit Schurtz Nicolai Busquet electron thermal transport method of Cao et al. uses multigroup diffusion to speed up the calculation. Chenhall has expanded upon the iSNB diffusion model to a higher order simplified P3 approximation and a Monte Carlo transport model, to bridge the gap between the iSNB and Goncharov models while maintaining computational efficiency. Comparisons of the above models for several test problems will be presented. This work was supported by Sandia National Laboratory - Albuquerque and the University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics.

  7. Energetics and dynamics of excess electrons in simple fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Space, B.

    1992-01-01

    Excess electronic dynamical and equilibrium properties are modeled in both polarizable and nonpolarizable noble gas fluids. Explicit dynamical calculations are carried out for excess electrons in fluid helium, where excess electronic eigenstates are localized. Energetics and dynamics are considered for fluids which span the entire range of polarizability present in the rare gases. Excess electronic eigenstates and eigenvalues are calculated for fluids of helium, argon and xenon. Both equilibrium and dynamical information is obtained from the calculation of these wavefunctions. A surface hopping trajectory method for studying nonadiabatic excess electronic relaxation in condensed systems is used to explore the nonadiabatic relaxation after photoexciting an equilibrated excess electron in dense fluid helium. The different types on nonadiabatic phenomena which are important in excess electronic relaxation are surveyed. The same surface hopping trajectory method is also used to study the rapid nonadiabatic relaxation after an excess electron is injected into unperturbed fluid helium. Several distinctively different relaxation processes, characterized by their relative importance at different times during the relaxation to a localized equilibrium state, are detailed. Though the dynamical properties of excess electrons under the conditions considered here have never been studied before, the behavior is remarkably similar to that observed in both experimental and theoretical studies of electron hydration dynamics, indicating that the processes described may be very general relaxation mechanisms for localization and trapping in fluids. Additionally, ground state energies of an excess electron, e 0 , are computed as a function of solvent density using model electron-atom pseudopotentials in fluid helium, argon, and xenon. The nonuniqueness of the pseudopotential description of electron-molecule interactions is demonstrated

  8. Transport of energetic ions by low-n magnetic perturbations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mynick, H.E.

    1992-10-01

    The stochastic transport of MeV ions induced by low-n magnetic perturbations is studied, focussing chiefly on the stochastic mechanism operative for passing particles in low frequency perturbations. Beginning with a single-harmonic form for the perturbing field, it iii first shown numerically and analytically that the stochastic threshold of energetic particles can be much lower than that of the magnetic field, contrary to earlier expectations, so that MHD perturbations could cause appreciable loss of energetic ions without destroying the bulk confinement. The analytic theory is then extended in a number of directions, to darity the relation of the present stochaistic mechanism to instances already found, to allow for more complex perturbations, and to consider the more general relationship between the stochasticity of magnetic fields, and that of particles of differing energies (and pitch angles) moving in those fields. It is shown that the stochastic threshold is in general a nonmonotonic function of energy, whose form can to some extent be tailored to achieve desired goals (e.g., burn control or ash removal) by a judicious choice of the perturbation. Illustrative perturbations are exhibited which are stochastic for low but not for high-energy ions, for high but not for low-energy ions, and for intermediate-energy ions, but not for low or high energy. The second possibility is the behavior needed for burn control; the third provides a possible mechanism for ash removal

  9. Effects of energetic electrons on the electrodynamics in the ionosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Aksnes

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available From the observations by the PIXIE and UVI cameras on board the Polar satellite, we derive global maps of the precipitating electron energy spectra from less than 1keV to 100keV. Based on the electron spectra, we generate instantaneous global maps of Hall and Pedersen conductances. The UVI camera provides good coverage of the lower electron energies contributing most to the Pedersen conductance, while PIXIE captures the high energy component of the precipitating electrons affecting the Hall conductance. By characterizing the energetic electrons from some tens of keV and up to about 100keV using PIXIE X-ray measurements, we will, in most cases, calculate a larger electron flux at higher energies than estimated from a simple extrapolation of derived electron spectra from UVI alone. Instantaneous global conductance maps derived with and without inclusion of PIXIE data have been implemented in the Assimilative Mapping of Ionospheric Electrodynamics (AMIE procedure, to study the effects of energetic electrons on electrodynamical parameters in the ionosphere. We find that the improved electron spectral characterization using PIXIE data most often results in a larger Hall conductance and a smaller inferred electric field. In some localized regions the increase in the Hall conductance can exceed 100%. On the contrary, the Pedersen conductance remains more or less unaffected by the inclusion of the PIXIE data. The calculated polar cap potential drop may decrease more than 10%, resulting in a reduction of the estimated Joule heating integrated over the Northern Hemisphere by up to 20%. Locally, Joule heating may decrease more than 50% in some regions. We also find that the calculated energy flux by precipitating electrons increases around 5% when including the PIXIE data. Combined with the reduction of Joule heating, this results in a decrease in the ratio between Joule heating and energy flux, sometimes exceeding 25%. An investigation of the relationship

  10. Time-dependent Perpendicular Transport of Energetic Particles for Different Turbulence Configurations and Parallel Transport Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lasuik, J.; Shalchi, A., E-mail: andreasm4@yahoo.com [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB R3T 2N2 (Canada)

    2017-09-20

    Recently, a new theory for the transport of energetic particles across a mean magnetic field was presented. Compared to other nonlinear theories the new approach has the advantage that it provides a full time-dependent description of the transport. Furthermore, a diffusion approximation is no longer part of that theory. The purpose of this paper is to combine this new approach with a time-dependent model for parallel transport and different turbulence configurations in order to explore the parameter regimes for which we get ballistic transport, compound subdiffusion, and normal Markovian diffusion.

  11. Effect of energetic electrons on combustion of premixed burner flame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Koichi

    2011-10-01

    In many studies of plasma-assisted combustion, authors superpose discharges onto flames to control combustion reactions. This work is motivated by more fundamental point of view. The standpoint of this work is that flames themselves are already plasmas. We irradiated microwave power onto premixed burner flame with the intention of heating electrons in it. The microwave power was limited below the threshold for a discharge. We obtained the enhancement of burning velocity by the irradiation of the microwave power, which was understood by the shortening of the flame length. At the same time, we observed the increases in the optical emission intensities of OH and CH radicals. Despite the increases in the optical emission intensities, the optical emission spectra of OH and CH were not affected by the microwave irradiation, indicating that the enhancement of the burning velocity was not attributed to the increase in the gas temperature. On the other hand, we observed significant increase in the optical emission intensity of the second positive system of molecular nitrogen, which is a clear evidence for electron heating in the premixed burner flame. Therefore, it is considered that the enhancement of the burning velocity is obtained by nonequilibrium combustion chemistry which is driven by energetic electrons. By irradiating pulsed microwave power, we examined the time constants for the increases and decreases in the optical emission intensities of N2, OH, CH, and continuum radiation.

  12. ENERGETIC PARTICLE TRANSPORT ACROSS THE MEAN MAGNETIC FIELD: BEFORE DIFFUSION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laitinen, T.; Dalla, S.

    2017-01-01

    Current particle transport models describe the propagation of charged particles across the mean field direction in turbulent plasmas as diffusion. However, recent studies suggest that at short timescales, such as soon after solar energetic particle (SEP) injection, particles remain on turbulently meandering field lines, which results in nondiffusive initial propagation across the mean magnetic field. In this work, we use a new technique to investigate how the particles are displaced from their original field lines, and we quantify the parameters of the transition from field-aligned particle propagation along meandering field lines to particle diffusion across the mean magnetic field. We show that the initial decoupling of the particles from the field lines is slow, and particles remain within a Larmor radius from their initial meandering field lines for tens to hundreds of Larmor periods, for 0.1–10 MeV protons in turbulence conditions typical of the solar wind at 1 au. Subsequently, particles decouple from their initial field lines and after hundreds to thousands of Larmor periods reach time-asymptotic diffusive behavior consistent with particle diffusion across the mean field caused by the meandering of the field lines. We show that the typical duration of the prediffusive phase, hours to tens of hours for 10 MeV protons in 1 au solar wind turbulence conditions, is significant for SEP propagation to 1 au and must be taken into account when modeling SEP propagation in the interplanetary space.

  13. Solar energetic particle anisotropies and insights into particle transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leske, R. A., E-mail: ral@srl.caltech.edu; Cummings, A. C.; Cohen, C. M. S.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Labrador, A. W.; Stone, E. C. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Wiedenbeck, M. E. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Christian, E. R.; Rosenvinge, T. T. von [NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2016-03-25

    As solar energetic particles (SEPs) travel through interplanetary space, their pitch-angle distributions are shaped by the competing effects of magnetic focusing and scattering. Measurements of SEP anisotropies can therefore reveal information about interplanetary conditions such as magnetic field strength, topology, and turbulence levels at remote locations from the observer. Onboard each of the two STEREO spacecraft, the Low Energy Telescope (LET) measures pitch-angle distributions for protons and heavier ions up to iron at energies of about 2-12 MeV/nucleon. Anisotropies observed using LET include bidirectional flows within interplanetary coronal mass ejections, sunward-flowing particles when STEREO was magnetically connected to the back side of a shock, and loss-cone distributions in which particles with large pitch angles underwent magnetic mirroring at an interplanetary field enhancement that was too weak to reflect particles with the smallest pitch angles. Unusual oscillations in the width of a beamed distribution at the onset of the 23 July 2012 SEP event were also observed and remain puzzling. We report LET anisotropy observations at both STEREO spacecraft and discuss their implications for SEP transport, focusing exclusively on the extreme event of 23 July 2012 in which a large variety of anisotropies were present at various times during the event.

  14. ENERGETIC PARTICLE TRANSPORT ACROSS THE MEAN MAGNETIC FIELD: BEFORE DIFFUSION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laitinen, T.; Dalla, S., E-mail: tlmlaitinen@uclan.ac.uk [Jeremiah Horrocks Institute, University of Central Lancashire, Preston (United Kingdom)

    2017-01-10

    Current particle transport models describe the propagation of charged particles across the mean field direction in turbulent plasmas as diffusion. However, recent studies suggest that at short timescales, such as soon after solar energetic particle (SEP) injection, particles remain on turbulently meandering field lines, which results in nondiffusive initial propagation across the mean magnetic field. In this work, we use a new technique to investigate how the particles are displaced from their original field lines, and we quantify the parameters of the transition from field-aligned particle propagation along meandering field lines to particle diffusion across the mean magnetic field. We show that the initial decoupling of the particles from the field lines is slow, and particles remain within a Larmor radius from their initial meandering field lines for tens to hundreds of Larmor periods, for 0.1–10 MeV protons in turbulence conditions typical of the solar wind at 1 au. Subsequently, particles decouple from their initial field lines and after hundreds to thousands of Larmor periods reach time-asymptotic diffusive behavior consistent with particle diffusion across the mean field caused by the meandering of the field lines. We show that the typical duration of the prediffusive phase, hours to tens of hours for 10 MeV protons in 1 au solar wind turbulence conditions, is significant for SEP propagation to 1 au and must be taken into account when modeling SEP propagation in the interplanetary space.

  15. Solar energetic particle anisotropies and insights into particle transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leske, R. A.; Cummings, A. C.; Cohen, C. M. S.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Labrador, A. W.; Stone, E. C.; Wiedenbeck, M. E.; Christian, E. R.; Rosenvinge, T. T. von

    2016-03-01

    As solar energetic particles (SEPs) travel through interplanetary space, their pitch-angle distributions are shaped by the competing effects of magnetic focusing and scattering. Measurements of SEP anisotropies can therefore reveal information about interplanetary conditions such as magnetic field strength, topology, and turbulence levels at remote locations from the observer. Onboard each of the two STEREO spacecraft, the Low Energy Telescope (LET) measures pitch-angle distributions for protons and heavier ions up to iron at energies of about 2-12 MeV/nucleon. Anisotropies observed using LET include bidirectional flows within interplanetary coronal mass ejections, sunward-flowing particles when STEREO was magnetically connected to the back side of a shock, and loss-cone distributions in which particles with large pitch angles underwent magnetic mirroring at an interplanetary field enhancement that was too weak to reflect particles with the smallest pitch angles. Unusual oscillations in the width of a beamed distribution at the onset of the 23 July 2012 SEP event were also observed and remain puzzling. We report LET anisotropy observations at both STEREO spacecraft and discuss their implications for SEP transport, focusing exclusively on the extreme event of 23 July 2012 in which a large variety of anisotropies were present at various times during the event.

  16. Electron Energetics in the Martian Dayside Ionosphere: Model Comparisons with MAVEN Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Shotaro; Andersson, Laila; Cravens, Thomas E.; Mitchell, David L.; Mazelle, Christian; Rahmati, Ali; Fowler, Christopher M.; Bougher, Stephen W.; Thiemann, Edward M. B.; Epavier, Francis G.; hide

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a study of the energetics of the dayside ionosphere of Mars using models and data from several instruments on board the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN spacecraft. In particular, calculated photoelectron fluxes are compared with suprathermal electron fluxes measured by the Solar Wind Electron Analyzer, and calculated electron temperatures are compared with temperatures measured by the Langmuir Probe and Waves experiment. The major heat source for the thermal electrons is Coulomb heating from the suprathermal electron population, and cooling due to collisional rotational and vibrational CO2 dominates the energy loss. The models used in this study were largely able to reproduce the observed high topside ionosphere electron temperatures (e.g., 3000 K at 300 km altitude) without using a topside heat flux when magnetic field topologies consistent with the measured magnetic field were adopted. Magnetic topology affects both suprathermal electron transport and thermal electron heat conduction. The effects of using two different solar irradiance models were also investigated. In particular, photoelectron fluxes and electron temperatures found using the Heliospheric Environment Solar Spectrum Radiation irradiance were higher than those with the Flare Irradiance Spectrum Model-Mars. The electron temperature is shown to affect the O2(+) dissociative recombination rate coefficient, which in turn affects photochemical escape of oxygen from Mars.

  17. DROPOUT OF DIRECTIONAL ELECTRON INTENSITIES IN LARGE SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLE EVENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Lun C. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Reames, Donald V., E-mail: ltan@umd.edu [Institute for Physical Science and Technology, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

    2016-01-10

    In the “gradual” solar energetic particle (SEP) event during solar cycle 23 we have observed the dispersionless modulation (“dropout”) in directional intensities of nonrelativistic electrons. The average duration of dropout periods is ∼0.8 hr, which is consistent with the correlation scale of solar wind turbulence. During the dropout period electrons could display scatter-free transport in an intermittent way. Also, we have observed a decrease in the anisotropic index of incident electrons with increasing electron energy (E{sub e}), while the index of scattered/reflected electrons is nearly independent of E{sub e}. We hence perform an observational examination of the correlation between the anisotropic index of low-energy scattered/reflected electrons and the signature of the locally measured solar wind turbulence in the dissipation range, which is responsible for resonant scattering of nonrelativistic electrons. Since during the dropout period the slab turbulence fraction is dominant (0.8 ± 0.1), we pay close attention to the effect of slab fraction on the correlation examined. Our observation is consistent with the simulation result that in the dominance of the slab turbulence component there should exist a dispatched structure of magnetic flux tubes, along which electrons could be transported in a scatter-free manner. Since a similar phenomenon is exhibited in the “impulsive” SEP event, electron dropout should be a transport effect. Therefore, being different from most ion dropout events, which are due to a compact flare source, the dropout of directional electron intensities should be caused by the change of turbulence status in the solar wind.

  18. DROPOUT OF DIRECTIONAL ELECTRON INTENSITIES IN LARGE SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLE EVENTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, Lun C.; Reames, Donald V.

    2016-01-01

    In the “gradual” solar energetic particle (SEP) event during solar cycle 23 we have observed the dispersionless modulation (“dropout”) in directional intensities of nonrelativistic electrons. The average duration of dropout periods is ∼0.8 hr, which is consistent with the correlation scale of solar wind turbulence. During the dropout period electrons could display scatter-free transport in an intermittent way. Also, we have observed a decrease in the anisotropic index of incident electrons with increasing electron energy (E e ), while the index of scattered/reflected electrons is nearly independent of E e . We hence perform an observational examination of the correlation between the anisotropic index of low-energy scattered/reflected electrons and the signature of the locally measured solar wind turbulence in the dissipation range, which is responsible for resonant scattering of nonrelativistic electrons. Since during the dropout period the slab turbulence fraction is dominant (0.8 ± 0.1), we pay close attention to the effect of slab fraction on the correlation examined. Our observation is consistent with the simulation result that in the dominance of the slab turbulence component there should exist a dispatched structure of magnetic flux tubes, along which electrons could be transported in a scatter-free manner. Since a similar phenomenon is exhibited in the “impulsive” SEP event, electron dropout should be a transport effect. Therefore, being different from most ion dropout events, which are due to a compact flare source, the dropout of directional electron intensities should be caused by the change of turbulence status in the solar wind

  19. Energetic electron injections and dipolarization events in Mercury's magnetotail: Substorm dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewey, R. M.; Slavin, J. A.; Raines, J. M.; Imber, S.; Baker, D. N.; Lawrence, D. J.

    2017-12-01

    Despite its small size, Mercury's terrestrial-like magnetosphere experiences brief, yet intense, substorm intervals characterized by features similar to at Earth: loading/unloading of the tail lobes with open magnetic flux, dipolarization of the magnetic field at the inner edge of the plasma sheet, and, the focus of this presentation, energetic electron injection. We use the Gamma-Ray Spectrometer's high-time resolution (10 ms) energetic electron measurements to determine the relationship between substorm activity and energetic electron injections coincident with dipolarization fronts in the magnetotail. These dipolarizations were detected on the basis of their rapid ( 2 s) increase in the northward component of the tail magnetic field (ΔBz 30 nT), which typically persists for 10 s. We estimate the typical flow channel to be 0.15 RM, planetary convection speed of 750 km/s, cross-tail potential drop of 7 kV, and flux transport of 0.08 MWb for each dipolarization event, suggesting multiple simultaneous and sequential dipolarizations are required to unload the >1 MWb of magnetic flux typically returned to the dayside magnetosphere during a substorm interval. Indeed, while we observe most dipolarization-injections to be isolated or in small chains of events (i.e., 1-3 events), intervals of sawtooth-like injections with >20 sequential events are also present. The typical separation between dipolarization-injection events is 10 s. Magnetotail dipolarization, in addition to being a powerful source of electron acceleration, also plays a significant role in the substorm process at Mercury.

  20. Pitch Angle Scattering of Energetic Electrons by Plasmaspheric Hiss Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobita, M.; Omura, Y.; Summers, D.

    2017-12-01

    We study scattering of energetic electrons in pitch angles and kinetic energies through their resonance with plasmaspheric hiss emissions consisting of many coherent discrete whistler-mode wave packets with rising and falling frequencies [1,2,3]. Using test particle simulations, we evaluate the efficiency of scattering, which depends on the inhomogeneity ratio S of whistler mode wave-particle interaction [4]. The value of S is determined by the wave amplitude, frequency sweep rate, and the gradient of the background magnetic field. We first modulate those parameters and observe variations of pitch angles and kinetic energies of electrons with a single wave under various S values so as to obtain basic understanding. We then include many waves into the system to simulate plasmaspheric hiss emissions. As the wave packets propagate away from the magnetic equator, the nonlinear trapping potential at the resonance velocity is deformed, making a channel of gyrophase for untrapped electrons to cross the resonance velocity, and causing modulations in their pitch angles and kinetic energies. We find efficient scattering of pitch angles and kinetic energies because of coherent nonlinear wave-particle interaction, resulting in electron precipitations into the polar atmosphere. We compare the results with the bounce averaged pitch angle diffusion coefficient based on quasi-linear theory, and show that the nonlinear wave model with many coherent packets can cause scattering of resonant electrons much faster than the quasi-linear diffusion process. [1] Summers, D., Omura, Y., Nakamura, S., and C. A. Kletzing (2014), Fine structure of plasmaspheric hiss, J. Geophys. Res., 119, 9134-9149. [2] Omura, Y., Y. Miyashita, M. Yoshikawa, D. Summers, M. Hikishima, Y. Ebihara, and Y. Kubota (2015), Formation process of relativistic electron flux through interaction with chorus emissions in the Earth's inner magnetosphere, J. Geophys. Res. Space Physics, 120, 9545-9562. [3] Nakamura, S., Y

  1. Transport, Acceleration and Spatial Access of Solar Energetic Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borovikov, D.; Sokolov, I.; Effenberger, F.; Jin, M.; Gombosi, T. I.

    2017-12-01

    Solar Energetic Particles (SEPs) are a major branch of space weather. Often driven by Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs), SEPs have a very high destructive potential, which includes but is not limited to disrupting communication systems on Earth, inflicting harmful and potentially fatal radiation doses to crew members onboard spacecraft and, in extreme cases, to people aboard high altitude flights. However, currently the research community lacks efficient tools to predict such hazardous SEP events. Such a tool would serve as the first step towards improving humanity's preparedness for SEP events and ultimately its ability to mitigate their effects. The main goal of the presented research is to develop a computational tool that provides the said capabilities and meets the community's demand. Our model has the forecasting capability and can be the basis for operational system that will provide live information on the current potential threats posed by SEPs based on observations of the Sun. The tool comprises several numerical models, which are designed to simulate different physical aspects of SEPs. The background conditions in the interplanetary medium, in particular, the Coronal Mass Ejection driving the particle acceleration, play a defining role and are simulated with the state-of-the-art MHD solver, Block-Adaptive-Tree Solar-wind Roe-type Upwind Scheme (BATS-R-US). The newly developed particle code, Multiple-Field-Line-Advection Model for Particle Acceleration (M-FLAMPA), simulates the actual transport and acceleration of SEPs and is coupled to the MHD code. The special property of SEPs, the tendency to follow magnetic lines of force, is fully taken advantage of in the computational model, which substitutes a complicated 3-D model with a multitude of 1-D models. This approach significantly simplifies computations and improves the time performance of the overall model. Also, it plays an important role of mapping the affected region by connecting it with the origin of

  2. Molecular electronic junction transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solomon, Gemma C.; Herrmann, Carmen; Ratner, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Whenasinglemolecule,oracollectionofmolecules,isplacedbetween two electrodes and voltage is applied, one has a molecular transport junction. We discuss such junctions, their properties, their description, and some of their applications. The discussion is qualitative rather than quantitative, and f...

  3. Winter nightime ion temperatures and energetic electrons from 0go 6 plasma measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanatani, S.; Breig, E.L.

    1981-01-01

    This paper presents and discusses ion temperature and suprathermal electron flux data acquired with the retarding potential analyzer on board the ogo 6 satellite when it was in solar eclipse. Attention is directed to measurements in the 400- to 800-km height interval between midnight and predawn in the northern winter nonpolar ionosphere. Statistical analysis of data recorded during a 1-month time span permits a decoupling of horizontal and altitude effects. A distinct longitudinal variation is observed for ion temperature above 500 km, with a significant relative enhancement over the western North Altantic Altitude distributions of ion temperature are compatible with Millstone Hill profiles within the common region of this enhancement. Large fluxes of energetic electrons are observed and extend to mush lower geomagnetic latitudes in the same longitude sector. Both a direct correlation in magnitude and a strong similarity in spatial extent are demonstrated for these ion temperature and electron flux data. The location of the limiting low-altitude boundary for observation of the electron fluxes is variable, dependent on local time and season as well as longitude. Variations in this boundary are found to be consistent with a calculated conjugate solar zenith angle of 99 0 +- 2 0 describing photoproduction of energetic electrons in the southern hemisphere. The ogo 6 data are considered to be indicative of an energy source originating in the sunlit summer hemisphere and providing heat via transport of photoelectrons to a broad but preferential segment of the winter nighttime mid-latitude ionosphere. Ions at other longitudes are without access to this energy source and cool to near the neutral temperature at heights to above 800 km inthe predawn hours

  4. Two distinct energetic electron populations of different origin in the Earth's magnetotail: a Cluster case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. I. Vogiatzis

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Energetic electrons (E≥30 keV travelling along and perpendicular to the magnetic field lines have been observed in the magnetotail at L~17:00 and 22:00 MLT during the recovery phase of a storm-time substorm on 7 October 2002. Three-dimensional electron distributions of the full unit sphere obtained from the IES/RAPID sensor system demonstrated a rather complicated and random behavior of the energetic electrons. Occasionally these electrons were appearing to travel parallel, perpendicular, or in both directions, relative to the magnetic field direction, forming in this way bi-directional, perpendicular-peaked, and mixed distributions. The electron enhancements occurred while the Cluster spacecraft were on closed field lines in the central plasma sheet approaching the neutral sheet from the northern tail lobe. Magnetic field and energetic particle measurements have been used from geosynchronous and Cluster satellites, in order to describe the general context of the event and then give a possible interpretation regarding the occurrence of the electron anisotropies observed by the IES/RAPID spectrometer on board Cluster. According to geosynchronous measurements an electron dispersionless ejection is very well correlated with a dipolar re-configuration of the magnetic field. The latter fact supports the idea that electrons and, in general, particle ejections at geosynchronous altitude are directly related to electric fields arising from field dipolarization caused by current disruption. Also, having as a main objective the understanding of the way 3-D electron distributions are formed, we have analyzed electron energy spectra along and perpendicular to the magnetic field direction, demonstrating the fact that the electron population consists of two distinct components acting independently and in a random manner relative to each other. This leads to the conclusion that these two electron populations along and perpendicular to the field are

  5. Sunward-propagating Solar Energetic Electrons inside Multiple Interplanetary Flux Ropes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gómez-Herrero, Raúl; Hidalgo, Miguel A.; Carcaboso, Fernando; Blanco, Juan J. [Dpto. de Física y Matemáticas, Universidad de Alcalá, E-28871 Alcalá de Henares, Madrid (Spain); Dresing, Nina; Klassen, Andreas; Heber, Bernd [Institut für Experimentelle und Angewandte Physik, University of Kiel, D-24118, Kiel (Germany); Temmer, Manuela; Veronig, Astrid [Institute of Physics/Kanzelhöhe Observatory, University of Graz, A-8010 Graz (Austria); Bučík, Radoslav [Institut für Astrophysik, Georg-August-Universität Göttingen, D-37077, Göttingen (Germany); Lario, David, E-mail: raul.gomezh@uah.es [The Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, MD 20723 (United States)

    2017-05-10

    On 2013 December 2 and 3, the SEPT and STE instruments on board STEREO-A observed two solar energetic electron events with unusual sunward-directed fluxes. Both events occurred during a time interval showing typical signatures of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs). The electron timing and anisotropies, combined with extreme-ultraviolet solar imaging and radio wave spectral observations, are used to confirm the solar origin and the injection times of the energetic electrons. The solar source of the ICME is investigated using remote-sensing observations and a three-dimensional reconstruction technique. In situ plasma and magnetic field data combined with energetic electron observations and a flux-rope model are used to determine the ICME magnetic topology and the interplanetary electron propagation path from the Sun to 1 au. Two consecutive flux ropes crossed the STEREO-A location and each electron event occurred inside a different flux rope. In both cases, the electrons traveled from the solar source to 1 au along the longest legs of the flux ropes still connected to the Sun. During the December 2 event, energetic electrons propagated along the magnetic field, while during the December 3 event they were propagating against the field. As found by previous studies, the energetic electron propagation times are consistent with a low number of field line rotations N < 5 of the flux rope between the Sun and 1 au. The flux rope model used in this work suggests an even lower number of rotations.

  6. Excess electron transport in cryoobjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eshchenko, D.G.; Storchak, V.G.; Brewer, J.H.; Cottrell, S.P.; Cox, S.F.J.

    2003-01-01

    Experimental results on excess electron transport in solid and liquid phases of Ne, Ar, and solid N 2 -Ar mixture are presented and compared with those for He. Muon spin relaxation technique in frequently switching electric fields was used to study the phenomenon of delayed muonium formation: excess electrons liberated in the μ + ionization track converge upon the positive muons and form Mu (μ + e - ) atoms. This process is shown to be crucially dependent upon the electron's interaction with its environment (i.e., whether it occupies the conduction band or becomes localized in a bubble of tens of angstroms in radius) and upon its mobility in these states. The characteristic lengths involved are 10 -6 -10 -4 cm, the characteristic times range from nanoseconds to tens microseconds. Such a microscopic length scale sometimes enables the electron spend its entire free lifetime in a state which may not be detected by conventional macroscopic techniques. The electron transport processes are compared in: liquid and solid helium (where electron is localized in buble); liquid and solid neon (where electrons are delocalized in solid and the coexistence of localized and delocalized electrons states was found in liquid recently); liquid and solid argon (where electrons are delocalized in both phases); orientational glass systems (solid N 2 -Ar mixtures), where our results suggest that electrons are localized in orientational glass. This scaling from light to heavy rare gases enables us to reveal new features of excess electron localization on microscopic scale. Analysis of the experimental data makes it possible to formulate the following tendency of the muon end-of-track structure in condensed rare gases. The muon-self track interaction changes from the isolated pair (muon plus the nearest track electron) in helium to multi-pair (muon in the vicinity of tens track electrons and positive ions) in argon

  7. Dispersive electron transport in tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum (Alq3) probed by impedance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berleb, Stefan; Brütting, Wolfgang

    2002-12-31

    Electron transport in tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum (Alq3) is investigated by impedance spectroscopy under conditions of space-charge limited conduction (SCLC). Existing SCLC models are extended to include the field dependence of the charge carrier mobility and energetically distributed trap states. The dispersive nature of electron transport is revealed by a frequency-dependent mobility with a dispersion parameter alpha in the range 0.4-0.5, independent of temperature. This indicates that positional rather than energetic disorder is the dominant mechanism for the dispersive transport of electrons in Alq3.

  8. Energetics of Transport through the Nuclear Pore Complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Ghavami

    Full Text Available Molecular transport across the nuclear envelope in eukaryotic cells is solely controlled by the nuclear pore complex (NPC. The NPC provides two types of nucleocytoplasmic transport: passive diffusion of small molecules and active chaperon-mediated translocation of large molecules. It has been shown that the interaction between intrinsically disordered proteins that line the central channel of the NPC and the transporting cargoes is the determining factor, but the exact mechanism of transport is yet unknown. Here, we use coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations to quantify the energy barrier that has to be overcome for molecules to pass through the NPC. We focus on two aspects of transport. First, the passive transport of model cargo molecules with different sizes is studied and the size selectivity feature of the NPC is investigated. Our results show that the transport probability of cargoes is significantly reduced when they are larger than ∼5 nm in diameter. Secondly, we show that incorporating hydrophobic binding spots on the surface of the cargo effectively decreases the energy barrier of the pore. Finally, a simple transport model is proposed which characterizes the energy barrier of the NPC as a function of diameter and hydrophobicity of the transporting particles.

  9. Energetics of Transport through the Nuclear Pore Complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghavami, Ali; van der Giessen, Erik; Onck, Patrick R

    2016-01-01

    Molecular transport across the nuclear envelope in eukaryotic cells is solely controlled by the nuclear pore complex (NPC). The NPC provides two types of nucleocytoplasmic transport: passive diffusion of small molecules and active chaperon-mediated translocation of large molecules. It has been shown

  10. Ballistic transport and electronic structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schep, Kees M.; Kelly, Paul J.; Bauer, Gerrit E.W.

    1998-01-01

    The role of the electronic structure in determining the transport properties of ballistic point contacts is studied. The conductance in the ballistic regime is related to simple geometrical projections of the Fermi surface. The essential physics is first clarified for simple models. For real

  11. Electron transport code theoretical basis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubi, A.; Horowitz, Y.S.

    1978-04-01

    This report mainly describes the physical and mathematical considerations involved in the treatment of the multiple collision processes. A brief description is given of the traditional methods used in electron transport via Monte Carlo, and a somewhat more detailed description, of the approach to be used in the presently developed code

  12. Simulation study of energetic ion transport due to Alfven eigenmodes in LHD plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todo, Yasushi; Nakajima, Noriyoshi; Osakabe, Masaki; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Spong, Donald A.

    2008-01-01

    The creation of holes and clumps in an energetic ion energy spectrum associated with Alfven eigenmodes was examined using the neutral particle analyzer (NPA) on the LHD shot no.47645. The difference in slowing-down times between the holes and clumps suggested that the energetic ions were transported over 10% of the plasma minor radius. The spatial profile and frequency of the Alfven eigenmodes were analyzed with the AE3D code. The phase space structures of the energetic ions on the NPA line-of-sight were investigated with Poincare plots, where an oscillating Alfven eigenmode was employed for earth plot. The phase space regions trapped by the Alfven eigenmodes appeared as islands in the Poincare plots. The radial width of the islands corresponded to the transport distance of the energetic ions. Since island width depends on Alfven eigenmode amplitude, it was found that Alfven eigenmodes with amplitude δB r /B - 10 -3 transported energetic ions over 10% of the minor radius. (author)

  13. MESSENGER observations of transient bursts of energetic electrons in Mercury's magnetosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, George C; Krimigis, Stamatios M; Gold, Robert E; Baker, Daniel N; Slavin, James A; Anderson, Brian J; Korth, Haje; Starr, Richard D; Lawrence, David J; McNutt, Ralph L; Solomon, Sean C

    2011-09-30

    The MESSENGER spacecraft began detecting energetic electrons with energies greater than 30 kilo-electron volts (keV) shortly after its insertion into orbit about Mercury. In contrast, no energetic protons were observed. The energetic electrons arrive as bursts lasting from seconds to hours and are most intense close to the planet, distributed in latitude from the equator to the north pole, and present at most local times. Energies can exceed 200 keV but often exhibit cutoffs near 100 keV. Angular distributions of the electrons about the magnetic field suggest that they do not execute complete drift paths around the planet. This set of characteristics demonstrates that Mercury's weak magnetic field does not support Van Allen-type radiation belts, unlike all other planets in the solar system with internal magnetic fields.

  14. Effect of Neoclassical Transport Optimization on Energetic Ion Confinement in LHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, S.; Yamada, H.; Sasao, M.

    2004-01-01

    Confinement of energetic ions from neutral beam injection heating is investigated by changing the magnetic field configuration of the Large Helical Device from a classical heliotron configuration to an optimized neoclassical transport configuration to a level typical of ''advanced stellarators.'' The experimental results show the highest count rate of fast neutral particles not in the optimized configuration but in the inward-shifted one. The GNET simulation results show a relatively good agreement with the experimental results, and they also show a lower energy loss rate in the optimized configuration. This contradiction can be explained by the radial profile of the energetic ions. The relatively good agreement between experimental and simulation results suggest that ripple transport (neoclassical) dominates the energetic ion confinement and that the optimization process is effective in improving confinement in helical systems

  15. THE EFFECT OF EXTERNAL TRANSPORT ON ENERGETIC EFFICIENCY OF BIODIESEL PRODUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Anna Orynycz

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In several our publications energetic efficiency of biofuel production was defined as a ratio of the amount of energy obtained in a form of biofuel to the sum of energy contributions necessary to conduct production processes on all the production stages. It was also shown that such a definition enables subsequent inclusion of production steps due to additivity of reciprocals of energetic efficiency determined separately for each step. In the present work, several scenarios of the transport of biomass between plantation and industrial facility converting biomass into biofuel are considered, appropriate values of energetic efficiency are computed and compared. The analysis is confined to biodiesel production based on rapeseed. The results show substantial differences caused by various approaches to that stage of transport.

  16. Energetic Electron Acceleration and Injection During Dipolarization Events in Mercury's Magnetotail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewey, Ryan M.; Slavin, James A.; Raines, Jim M.; Baker, Daniel N.; Lawrence, David J.

    2017-12-01

    Energetic particle bursts associated with dipolarization events within Mercury's magnetosphere were first observed by Mariner 10. The events appear analogous to particle injections accompanying dipolarization events at Earth. The Energetic Particle Spectrometer (3 s resolution) aboard MESSENGER determined the particle bursts are composed entirely of electrons with energies ≳ 300 keV. Here we use the Gamma-Ray Spectrometer high-time-resolution (10 ms) energetic electron measurements to examine the relationship between energetic electron injections and magnetic field dipolarization in Mercury's magnetotail. Between March 2013 and April 2015, we identify 2,976 electron burst events within Mercury's magnetotail, 538 of which are closely associated with dipolarization events. These dipolarizations are detected on the basis of their rapid ( 2 s) increase in the northward component of the tail magnetic field (ΔBz 30 nT), which typically persists for 10 s. Similar to those at Earth, we find that these dipolarizations appear to be low-entropy, depleted flux tubes convecting planetward following the collapse of the inner magnetotail. We find that electrons experience brief, yet intense, betatron and Fermi acceleration during these dipolarizations, reaching energies 130 keV and contributing to nightside precipitation. Thermal protons experience only modest betatron acceleration. While only 25% of energetic electron events in Mercury's magnetotail are directly associated with dipolarization, the remaining events are consistent with the Near-Mercury Neutral Line model of magnetotail injection and eastward drift about Mercury, finding that electrons may participate in Shabansky-like closed drifts about the planet. Magnetotail dipolarization may be the dominant source of energetic electron acceleration in Mercury's magnetosphere.

  17. Solar Energetic Particle Transport Near a Heliospheric Current Sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Battarbee, Markus; Dalla, Silvia [Jeremiah Horrocks Institute, University of Central Lancashire, PR1 2HE (United Kingdom); Marsh, Mike S., E-mail: mbattarbee@uclan.ac.uk [Met Office, Exeter, EX1 3 PB (United Kingdom)

    2017-02-10

    Solar energetic particles (SEPs), a major component of space weather, propagate through the interplanetary medium strongly guided by the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). In this work, we analyze the implications that a flat Heliospheric Current Sheet (HCS) has on proton propagation from SEP release sites to the Earth. We simulate proton propagation by integrating fully 3D trajectories near an analytically defined flat current sheet, collecting comprehensive statistics into histograms, fluence maps, and virtual observer time profiles within an energy range of 1–800 MeV. We show that protons experience significant current sheet drift to distant longitudes, causing time profiles to exhibit multiple components, which are a potential source of confusing interpretations of observations. We find that variation of the current sheet thickness within a realistic parameter range has little effect on particle propagation. We show that the IMF configuration strongly affects the deceleration of protons. We show that in our model, the presence of a flat equatorial HCS in the inner heliosphere limits the crossing of protons into the opposite hemisphere.

  18. Dependence of Energetic Electron Precipitation on the Geomagnetic Index Kp and Electron Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi-Young Park

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available It has long been known that the magnetospheric particles can precipitate into the atmosphere of the Earth. In this paper we examine such precipitation of energetic electrons using the data obtained from low-altitude polar orbiting satellite observations. We analyze the precipitating electron flux data for many periods selected from a total of 84 storm events identified for 2001-2012. The analysis includes the dependence of precipitation on the Kp index and the electron energy, for which we use three energies E1 > 30 keV, E2 > 100 keV, E3 > 300 keV. We find that the precipitation is best correlated with Kp after a time delay of < 3 hours. Most importantly, the correlation with Kp is notably tighter for lower energy than for higher energy in the sense that the lower energy precipitation flux increases more rapidly with Kp than does the higher energy precipitation flux. Based on this we suggest that the Kp index reflects excitation of a wave that is responsible for scattering of preferably lower energy electrons. The role of waves of other types should become increasingly important for higher energy, for which we suggest to rely on other indicators than Kp if one can identify such an indicator.

  19. Strong non-radial propagation of energetic electrons in solar corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klassen, A.; Dresing, N.; Gómez-Herrero, R.; Heber, B.; Veronig, A.

    2018-06-01

    Analyzing the sequence of solar energetic electron events measured at both STEREO-A (STA) and STEREO-B (STB) spacecraft during 17-21 July 2014, when their orbital separation was 34°, we found evidence of a strong non-radial electron propagation in the solar corona below the solar wind source surface. The impulsive electron events were associated with recurrent flare and jet (hereafter flare/jet) activity at the border of an isolated coronal hole situated close to the solar equator. We have focused our study on the solar energetic particle (SEP) event on 17 July 2014, during which both spacecraft detected a similar impulsive and anisotropic energetic electron event suggesting optimal connection of both spacecraft to the parent particle source, despite the large angular separation between the parent flare and the nominal magnetic footpoints on the source surface of STA and STB of 68° and 90°, respectively. Combining the remote-sensing extreme ultraviolet (EUV) observations, in-situ plasma, magnetic field, and energetic particle data we investigated and discuss here the origin and the propagation trajectory of energetic electrons in the solar corona. We find that the energetic electrons in the energy range of 55-195 keV together with the associated EUV jet were injected from the flare site toward the spacecraft's magnetic footpoints and propagate along a strongly non-radial and inclined magnetic field below the source surface. From stereoscopic (EUV) observations we estimated the inclination angle of the jet trajectory and the respective magnetic field of 63° ± 11° relative to the radial direction. We show how the flare accelerated electrons reach very distant longitudes in the heliosphere, when the spacecraft are nominally not connected to the particle source. This example illustrates how ballistic backmapping can occasionally fail to characterize the magnetic connectivity during SEP events. This finding also provides an additional mechanism (one among others

  20. Excess electron transport in cryoobjects

    CERN Document Server

    Eshchenko, D G; Brewer, J H; Cottrell, S P; Cox, S F J

    2003-01-01

    Experimental results on excess electron transport in solid and liquid phases of Ne, Ar, and solid N sub 2 -Ar mixture are presented and compared with those for He. Muon spin relaxation technique in frequently switching electric fields was used to study the phenomenon of delayed muonium formation: excess electrons liberated in the mu sup + ionization track converge upon the positive muons and form Mu (mu sup + e sup -) atoms. This process is shown to be crucially dependent upon the electron's interaction with its environment (i.e., whether it occupies the conduction band or becomes localized in a bubble of tens of angstroms in radius) and upon its mobility in these states. The characteristic lengths involved are 10 sup - sup 6 -10 sup - sup 4 cm, the characteristic times range from nanoseconds to tens microseconds. Such a microscopic length scale sometimes enables the electron spend its entire free lifetime in a state which may not be detected by conventional macroscopic techniques. The electron transport proc...

  1. Electrons with continuous energy distribution from energetic heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berenyi, D.

    1984-01-01

    The properties and origin of continuous electron spectrum emitted in high energy heavy ion collisions are reviewed. The basic processes causing the characteristic regions of the continuous spectrum are described. The contribution of electrons ejected from the target and from the projectile are investigated in detail in the cases of light and heavy projectiles. The recently recognized mechanisms, electron-capture-to-continuum (ECC) and electron-loss-to-continuum (ELC), leading to a cusp in forward direction, and their theoretical interpretations are discussed. The importance of data from ion-atom collisions in the field of atomic physics and in applications are briefly summarized. (D.Gy)

  2. Quasilinear Line Broadened Model for Energetic Particle Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghantous, Katy; Gorelenkov, Nikolai; Berk, Herbert

    2011-10-01

    We present a self-consistent quasi-linear model that describes wave-particle interaction in toroidal geometry and computes fast ion transport during TAE mode evolution. The model bridges the gap between single mode resonances, where it predicts the analytically expected saturation levels, and the case of multiple modes overlapping, where particles diffuse across phase space. Results are presented in the large aspect ratio limit where analytic expressions are used for Fourier harmonics of the power exchange between waves and particles, . Implemention of a more realistic mode structure calculated by NOVAK code are also presented. This work is funded by DOE contract DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  3. Electron energetics in the expanding solar wind via Helios observations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štverák, Štěpán; Trávníček, Pavel M.; Hellinger, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 120, č. 10 (2015), s. 8177-8193 ISSN 2169-9380 Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : solar wind plasma * plasma energization * transport processes Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 3.318, year: 2015 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2015JA021368/abstract

  4. Electron transport and shock ignition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, A R; Tzoufras, M, E-mail: t.bell1@physics.ox.ac.uk [Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom)

    2011-04-15

    Inertial fusion energy (IFE) offers one possible route to commercial energy generation. In the proposed 'shock ignition' route to fusion, the target is compressed at a relatively low temperature and then ignited using high intensity laser irradiation which drives a strong converging shock into the centre of the fuel. With a series of idealized calculations we analyse the electron transport of energy into the target, which produces the pressure responsible for driving the shock. We show that transport in shock ignition lies near the boundary between ablative and heat front regimes. Moreover, simulations indicate that non-local effects are significant in the heat front regime and might lead to increased efficiency by driving the shock more effectively and reducing heat losses to the plasma corona.

  5. Test particle modeling of wave-induced energetic electron precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, H.C.; Inan, U.S.

    1985-01-01

    A test particle computer model of the precipitation of radiation belt electrons is extended to compute the dynamic energy spectrum of transient electron fluxes induced by short-duration VLF wave packets traveling along the geomagnetic field lines. The model is adapted to estimate the count rate and associated spectrum of precipitated electrons that would be observed by satellite-based particle detectors with given geometric factor and orientation with respect to the magnetic field. A constant-frequency wave pulse and a lightning-induced whistler wave packet are used as examples of the stimulating wave signals. The effects of asymmetry of particle mirror heights in the two hemispheres and the atmospheric backscatter of loss cone particles on the computed precipitated fluxes are discussed

  6. ENERGETIC PHOTON AND ELECTRON INTERACTIONS WITH POSITIVE IONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phaneuf, Ronald A. [UNR

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this research is a deeper understanding of the complex multi-electron interactions that govern inelastic processes involving positive ions in plasma environments, such as those occurring in stellar cares and atmospheres, x-ray lasers, thermonuclear fusion reactors and materials-processing discharges. In addition to precision data on ionic structure and transition probabilities, high resolution quantitative measurements of ionization test the theoretical methods that provide critical input to computer codes used for plasma modeling and photon opacity calculations. Steadily increasing computational power and a corresponding emphasis on simulations gives heightened relevance to precise and accurate benchmark data. Photons provide a highly selective probe of the internal electronic structure of atomic and molecular systems, and a powerful means to better understand more complex electron-ion interactions.

  7. The electron-furfural scattering dynamics for 63 energetically open electronic states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Romarly F. da; Varella, Márcio T. do N; Bettega, Márcio H. F.; Neves, Rafael F. C.; Lopes, Maria Cristina A.; Blanco, Francisco; García, Gustavo; Jones, Darryl B.

    2016-01-01

    We report on integral-, momentum transfer- and differential cross sections for elastic and electronically inelastic electron collisions with furfural (C 5 H 4 O 2 ). The calculations were performed with two different theoretical methodologies, the Schwinger multichannel method with pseudopotentials (SMCPP) and the independent atom method with screening corrected additivity rule (IAM-SCAR) that now incorporates a further interference (I) term. The SMCPP with N energetically open electronic states (N open ) at either the static-exchange (N open  ch-SE) or the static-exchange-plus-polarisation (N open  ch-SEP) approximation was employed to calculate the scattering amplitudes at impact energies lying between 5 eV and 50 eV, using a channel coupling scheme that ranges from the 1ch-SEP up to the 63ch-SE level of approximation depending on the energy considered. For elastic scattering, we found very good overall agreement at higher energies among our SMCPP cross sections, our IAM-SCAR+I cross sections and the experimental data for furan (a molecule that differs from furfural only by the substitution of a hydrogen atom in furan with an aldehyde functional group). This is a good indication that our elastic cross sections are converged with respect to the multichannel coupling effect for most of the investigated intermediate energies. However, although the present application represents the most sophisticated calculation performed with the SMCPP method thus far, the inelastic cross sections, even for the low lying energy states, are still not completely converged for intermediate and higher energies. We discuss possible reasons leading to this discrepancy and point out what further steps need to be undertaken in order to improve the agreement between the calculated and measured cross sections.

  8. The electron-furfural scattering dynamics for 63 energetically open electronic states

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa, Romarly F.; do N. Varella, Márcio T.; Bettega, Márcio H. F.; Neves, Rafael F. C.; Lopes, Maria Cristina A.; Blanco, Francisco; García, Gustavo; Jones, Darryl B.; Brunger, Michael J.; Lima, Marco A. P.

    2016-03-01

    We report on integral-, momentum transfer- and differential cross sections for elastic and electronically inelastic electron collisions with furfural (C5H4O2). The calculations were performed with two different theoretical methodologies, the Schwinger multichannel method with pseudopotentials (SMCPP) and the independent atom method with screening corrected additivity rule (IAM-SCAR) that now incorporates a further interference (I) term. The SMCPP with N energetically open electronic states (Nopen) at either the static-exchange (Nopen ch-SE) or the static-exchange-plus-polarisation (Nopen ch-SEP) approximation was employed to calculate the scattering amplitudes at impact energies lying between 5 eV and 50 eV, using a channel coupling scheme that ranges from the 1ch-SEP up to the 63ch-SE level of approximation depending on the energy considered. For elastic scattering, we found very good overall agreement at higher energies among our SMCPP cross sections, our IAM-SCAR+I cross sections and the experimental data for furan (a molecule that differs from furfural only by the substitution of a hydrogen atom in furan with an aldehyde functional group). This is a good indication that our elastic cross sections are converged with respect to the multichannel coupling effect for most of the investigated intermediate energies. However, although the present application represents the most sophisticated calculation performed with the SMCPP method thus far, the inelastic cross sections, even for the low lying energy states, are still not completely converged for intermediate and higher energies. We discuss possible reasons leading to this discrepancy and point out what further steps need to be undertaken in order to improve the agreement between the calculated and measured cross sections.

  9. The electron-furfural scattering dynamics for 63 energetically open electronic states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Romarly F. da [Instituto de Física “Gleb Wataghin,” Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas, São Paulo 13083-859 (Brazil); Centro de Ciências Naturais e Humanas, Universidade Federal do ABC, Santo André, São Paulo 09210-580 (Brazil); Varella, Márcio T. do N [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, CP 66318, São Paulo, São Paulo 05315-970 (Brazil); Bettega, Márcio H. F. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Paraná, CP 19044, Curitiba, Paraná 81531-990 (Brazil); Neves, Rafael F. C. [Instituto Federal do Sul de Minas Gerais, Campus Poços de Caldas, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, Juiz de Fora, MG 36036-900 (Brazil); Lopes, Maria Cristina A. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, Juiz de Fora, MG 36036-900 (Brazil); Blanco, Francisco [Departamento de Física Atómica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid E-28040 (Spain); García, Gustavo [Instituto de Física Fundamental, CSIC, Serrano 113-bis, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Jones, Darryl B. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, South Australia 5001 (Australia); and others

    2016-03-28

    We report on integral-, momentum transfer- and differential cross sections for elastic and electronically inelastic electron collisions with furfural (C{sub 5}H{sub 4}O{sub 2}). The calculations were performed with two different theoretical methodologies, the Schwinger multichannel method with pseudopotentials (SMCPP) and the independent atom method with screening corrected additivity rule (IAM-SCAR) that now incorporates a further interference (I) term. The SMCPP with N energetically open electronic states (N{sub open}) at either the static-exchange (N{sub open} ch-SE) or the static-exchange-plus-polarisation (N{sub open} ch-SEP) approximation was employed to calculate the scattering amplitudes at impact energies lying between 5 eV and 50 eV, using a channel coupling scheme that ranges from the 1ch-SEP up to the 63ch-SE level of approximation depending on the energy considered. For elastic scattering, we found very good overall agreement at higher energies among our SMCPP cross sections, our IAM-SCAR+I cross sections and the experimental data for furan (a molecule that differs from furfural only by the substitution of a hydrogen atom in furan with an aldehyde functional group). This is a good indication that our elastic cross sections are converged with respect to the multichannel coupling effect for most of the investigated intermediate energies. However, although the present application represents the most sophisticated calculation performed with the SMCPP method thus far, the inelastic cross sections, even for the low lying energy states, are still not completely converged for intermediate and higher energies. We discuss possible reasons leading to this discrepancy and point out what further steps need to be undertaken in order to improve the agreement between the calculated and measured cross sections.

  10. Hybrid transport and diffusion modeling using electron thermal transport Monte Carlo SNB in DRACO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenhall, Jeffrey; Moses, Gregory

    2017-10-01

    The iSNB (implicit Schurtz Nicolai Busquet) multigroup diffusion electron thermal transport method is adapted into an Electron Thermal Transport Monte Carlo (ETTMC) transport method to better model angular and long mean free path non-local effects. Previously, the ETTMC model had been implemented in the 2D DRACO multiphysics code and found to produce consistent results with the iSNB method. Current work is focused on a hybridization of the computationally slower but higher fidelity ETTMC transport method with the computationally faster iSNB diffusion method in order to maximize computational efficiency. Furthermore, effects on the energy distribution of the heat flux divergence are studied. Work to date on the hybrid method will be presented. This work was supported by Sandia National Laboratories and the Univ. of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics.

  11. Electron transport in quantum dots

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    When I was contacted by Kluwer Academic Publishers in the Fall of 200 I, inviting me to edit a volume of papers on the issue of electron transport in quantum dots, I was excited by what I saw as an ideal opportunity to provide an overview of a field of research that has made significant contributions in recent years, both to our understanding of fundamental physics, and to the development of novel nanoelectronic technologies. The need for such a volume seemed to be made more pressing by the fact that few comprehensive reviews of this topic have appeared in the literature, in spite of the vast activity in this area over the course of the last decade or so. With this motivation, I set out to try to compile a volume that would fairly reflect the wide range of opinions that has emerged in the study of electron transport in quantum dots. Indeed, there has been no effort on my part to ensure any consistency between the different chapters, since I would prefer that this volume instead serve as a useful forum for the...

  12. Energetic electron anisotropies in the magnetotail - Identification of open and closed field lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, D. N.; Stone, E. C.

    1976-01-01

    Unidirectional anisotropies in the energetic electron fluxes (E greater than or equal to about 200 keV) have been observed in the earth's magnetotail with the Caltech Electron/Isotope Spectrometer on IMP-8. The anisotropies occur during periods of enhanced fluxes and provide essential information on the topology (open or closed) of the magnetotail field lines which are associated with recently identified acceleration regions.

  13. Energetic electrons in the inner belt in 1968

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West, Jr, H I; Buck, R M [California Univ., Livermore (USA). Lawrence Livermore Lab.

    1976-07-01

    Pitch-angle data were obtained by the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory's scanning, magnetic electron spectrometer on OGO 5 during its traversals of the inner belt in 1968. Data from the five lowest-energy channels 79 to 822 keV, were analyzed. The inner-belt electron injection following two storm periods was observed; the first was the mild storm of 11 June and the second the more intense storms of 31 October and 1 November. Comparisons with other data indicate that only a small Starfish residual (at > 1 MeV) still remained in the heart of the inner belt; hence, the results are indicative of the normal inner belt. The data are discussed in terms of current ideas regarding the source and loss of particles in the inner belt.

  14. Energetic electron precipitation in the aurora as determined by x-ray imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werden, S.C.

    1988-01-01

    This work examines two aspects of energetic-particle dynamics in the Earth's magnetosphere through the use of an x-ray imager flown from a stratospheric balloon in the auroral zone. The design and theory of this instrument is completely described, including the technique of image formation using an on-board microprocessor and a statistical analysis of the imaging process. Day-side energetic-electron precipitation is examined in the context of global energy dissipation during the substorm process. It is found that the relationship between events on the night side and the day side are considerably more complex that can be modeled with just a simple picture of drifting particles that induced instabilities, wave growth, and pitch-angle diffusion into the loss cone. The driving force for precipitation is probably not the presence of the energetic electrons (>30 keV) alone, but is influenced either by local effects or the less energetic component. The presence of small-scale structure, including gradients and complex motions in the precipitation region in the morning sector, suggests a local process influencing the rate of electron precipitation. The spatial and temporal evolution of a classic 5-15 second pulsating aurora during the post-breakup phase is also examined with the x-ray imager

  15. Energetic ion driven Alfven eigenmodes in Large Helical Device plasmas with three-dimensional magnetic structure and their impact on energetic ion transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toi, K; Yamamoto, S; Nakajima, N; Ohdachi, S; Sakakibara, S; Osakabe, M; Murakami, S; Watanabe, K Y; Goto, M; Kawahata, K; Kolesnichenko, Ya I; Masuzaki, S; Morita, S; Narihara, K; Narushima, Y; Takeiri, Y; Tanaka, K; Tokuzawa, T; Yamada, H; Yamada, I; Yamazaki, K

    2004-01-01

    In the Large Helical Device (LHD), energetic ion driven Alfven eigenmodes (AEs) and their impact on energetic ion transport have been studied. The magnetic configuration of the LHD is three-dimensional and has negative magnetic shear over a whole plasma radius in the low beta regime. These features introduce the characteristic structures of the shear Alfven spectrum. In particular, a core-localized type of toroidicity-induced AE (TAE) is most likely because the TAE gap frequency rapidly increases towards the plasma edge. Moreover, helicity-induced AEs (HAEs) can be generated through a toroidal mode coupling as well as poloidal one in the three-dimensional configuration. The following experimental results have been obtained in LHD plasmas heated by tangential neutral beam injection: (1) observation of core-localized TAEs having odd as well as even parity, (2) eigenmode transition of the core-localized TAE to global AEs (GAEs), which phenomenon is very similar to that in a reversed shear tokamak, (3) observation of HAEs of which the frequency is about eight times higher than the TAE gap frequency, (4) enhanced radial transport/loss of energetic ions caused by bursting TAEs in a relatively high beta regime, and (5) seed formation of internal transport barriers induced by TAE-induced energetic ion transport. These results will be important and interesting information for AE physics in toroidal plasmas

  16. Statistical studies of energetic electrons in the outer radiation belt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnstone, A.D.; Rodgers, D.J.; Jones, G.H. E-mail: g.h.jones@ic.ac.uk

    1999-10-01

    The medium electron A (MEA) instrument aboard the CRRES spacecraft provided data on terrestrial radiation belt electrons in the energy range from 153 to 1582 keV, during 1990-91. These data have previously been used to produce an empirical model of the radiation belts from L=1.1 to 8.9, ordered according to 17 energy bands, 18 pitch angle bins, and 5 Kp ranges. Empirical models such as this are very valuable, but are prone to statistical fluctuations and gaps in coverage. In this study, in order to smooth the data and make it more easy to interpolate within data gaps, the pitch angle distribution at each energy in the model was fitted with a Bessel function. This provided a way to characterize the pitch angle in terms of only two parameters for each energy. It was not possible to model fluxes reliably within the loss cone because of poor statistics. The fitted distributions give an indication of the way in which pitch angle diffusion varies in the outer radiation belts. The two parameters of the Bessel function were found to vary systematically with L value, energy and Kp. Through the fitting of a simple function to these systematic variations, the number of parameters required to describe the model could be reduced drastically.

  17. Long-lasting injection of solar energetic electrons into the heliosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dresing, N.; Gómez-Herrero, R.; Heber, B.; Klassen, A.; Temmer, M.; Veronig, A.

    2018-05-01

    Context. The main sources of solar energetic particle (SEP) events are solar flares and shocks driven by coronal mass ejections (CMEs). While it is generally accepted that energetic protons can be accelerated by shocks, whether or not these shocks can also efficiently accelerate solar energetic electrons is still debated. In this study we present observations of the extremely widespread SEP event of 26 Dec 2013 To the knowledge of the authors, this is the widest longitudinal SEP distribution ever observed together with unusually long-lasting energetic electron anisotropies at all observer positions. Further striking features of the event are long-lasting SEP intensity increases, two distinct SEP components with the second component mainly consisting of high-energy particles, a complex associated coronal activity including a pronounced signature of a shock in radio type-II observations, and the interaction of two CMEs early in the event. Aims: The observations require a prolonged injection scenario not only for protons but also for electrons. We therefore analyze the data comprehensively to characterize the possible role of the shock for the electron event. Methods: Remote-sensing observations of the complex solar activity are combined with in situ measurements of the particle event. We also apply a graduated cylindrical shell (GCS) model to the coronagraph observations of the two associated CMEs to analyze their interaction. Results: We find that the shock alone is likely not responsible for this extremely wide SEP event. Therefore we propose a scenario of trapped energetic particles inside the CME-CME interaction region which undergo further acceleration due to the shock propagating through this region, stochastic acceleration, or ongoing reconnection processes inside the interaction region. The origin of the second component of the SEP event is likely caused by a sudden opening of the particle trap.

  18. A coordinated two-satellite study of energetic electron precipitation events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imhof, W.L.; Nakano, G.H.; Gaines, E.E.; Reagan, J.B.

    1975-01-01

    A new technique for studying the spatial/temporal variations of energetic electron precipitation events is investigated. Data are presented in which precipitating electrons were measured simultaneously on two coordinated polar-orbiting satellites and the bremsstrahlung produced by the electrons precipitating into the atmosphere was observed from one of the satellites. Two electron spectrometers measuring the intensities and energy spectra of electrons of >130 keV were located on the oriented satellite 1971-089A (altitude, approx. =800 km), whereas a single similar spectrometer measuring electrons of >160 keV was located on the spinning low-altitude (approx.750 km) satellite 1972-076B. The X rays of >50 keV were measured with a 50-cm 3 germanium spectrometer placed on the 1972-076B satellite. With the coordinated data a study is made of events in which large fluctuations were observed in the precipitating energetic electron intensities. In the examples presented the satellite X ray data alone demonstrate that the spatially integrated electron influx was constant in time, and when the X ray data are combined with the direct electron measurements from the two satellites, the resulting data suggest that the major features in the flux profiles were primarily spatial in nature. The combination of X ray and electron measurements from two satellites is shown to provide an important method for studying and attempting to resolve spatial and temporal effects

  19. Ground-based Observations and Atmospheric Modelling of Energetic Electron Precipitation Effects on Antarctic Mesospheric Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newnham, D.; Clilverd, M. A.; Horne, R. B.; Rodger, C. J.; Seppälä, A.; Verronen, P. T.; Andersson, M. E.; Marsh, D. R.; Hendrickx, K.; Megner, L. S.; Kovacs, T.; Feng, W.; Plane, J. M. C.

    2016-12-01

    The effect of energetic electron precipitation (EEP) on the seasonal and diurnal abundances of nitric oxide (NO) and ozone in the Antarctic middle atmosphere during March 2013 to July 2014 is investigated. Geomagnetic storm activity during this period, close to solar maximum, was driven primarily by impulsive coronal mass ejections. Near-continuous ground-based atmospheric measurements have been made by a passive millimetre-wave radiometer deployed at Halley station (75°37'S, 26°14'W, L = 4.6), Antarctica. This location is directly under the region of radiation-belt EEP, at the extremity of magnetospheric substorm-driven EEP, and deep within the polar vortex during Austral winter. Superposed epoch analyses of the ground based data, together with NO observations made by the Solar Occultation For Ice Experiment (SOFIE) onboard the Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere (AIM) satellite, show enhanced mesospheric NO following moderate geomagnetic storms (Dst ≤ -50 nT). Measurements by co-located 30 MHz riometers indicate simultaneous increases in ionisation at 75-90 km directly above Halley when Kp index ≥ 4. Direct NO production by EEP in the upper mesosphere, versus downward transport of NO from the lower thermosphere, is evaluated using a new version of the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model incorporating the full Sodankylä Ion Neutral Chemistry Model (WACCM SIC). Model ionization rates are derived from the Polar orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites (POES) second generation Space Environment Monitor (SEM 2) Medium Energy Proton and Electron Detector instrument (MEPED). The model data are compared with observations to quantify the impact of EEP on stratospheric and mesospheric odd nitrogen (NOx), odd hydrogen (HOx), and ozone.

  20. Paleoclassical transport explains electron transport barriers in RTP and TEXTOR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hogeweij, G. M. D.; Callen, J.D.

    2008-01-01

    The recently developed paleoclassical transport model sets the minimum level of electron thermal transport in a tokamak. This transport level has proven to be in good agreement with experimental observations in many cases when fluctuation-induced anomalous transport is small, i.e. in (near-) ohmic

  1. Locating the most energetic electrons in Cassiopeia A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grefenstette, Brian W.; Reynolds, Stephen P.; Harrison, Fiona A.

    2015-01-01

    We present deep (>2.4 Ms) observations of the Cassiopeia A supernova remnant with NuSTAR, which operates in the 3-79 keV bandpass and is the first instrument capable of spatially resolving the remnant above 15 keV. We find that the emission is not entirely dominated by the forward shock nor...... that of the radio emission nor that of the low energy (15 keV emission an open mystery. Even at the forward shock front we find less steepening of the spectrum than expected from an exponentially cut off electron distribution with a single cutoff energy. Finally, we find that the GeV emission is not associated...

  2. Energetic particles detected by the Electron Reflectometer instrument on the Mars Global Surveyor, 1999-2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Delory, Gregory T.; Luhmann, Janet G.; Brain, David

    2012-01-01

    events at Mars associated with solar flares and coronal mass ejections, which includes the identification of interplanetary shocks. MGS observations of energetic particles at varying geometries between the Earth and Mars that include shocks produced by halo, limb, and backsided events provide a unique......We report the observation of galactic cosmic rays and solar energetic particles by the Electron Reflectometer instrument aboard the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) spacecraft from May of 1999 to the mission conclusion in November 2006. Originally designed to detect low-energy electrons, the Electron...... recorded high energy galactic cosmic rays with similar to 45% efficiency. Comparisons of this data to galactic cosmic ray proton fluxes obtained from the Advanced Composition Explorer yield agreement to within 10% and reveal the expected solar cycle modulation as well as shorter timescale variations. Solar...

  3. Statistical analysis of MMS observations of energetic electron escape observed at/beyond the dayside magnetopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Ian J.; Mauk, Barry H.; Anderson, Brian J.; Westlake, Joseph H.; Sibeck, David G.; Turner, Drew L.; Fennell, Joseph F.; Blake, J. Bern; Jaynes, Allison N.; Leonard, Trevor W.; Baker, Daniel N.; Spence, Harlan E.; Reeves, Geoff D.; Giles, Barbara J.; Strangeway, Robert J.; Torbert, Roy B.; Burch, James L.

    2017-09-01

    Observations from the Energetic Particle Detector (EPD) instrument suite aboard the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) spacecraft show that energetic (greater than tens of keV) magnetospheric particle escape into the magnetosheath occurs commonly across the dayside. This includes the surprisingly frequent observation of magnetospheric electrons in the duskside magnetosheath, an unexpected result given assumptions regarding magnetic drift shadowing. The 238 events identified in the 40 keV electron energy channel during the first MMS dayside season that exhibit strongly anisotropic pitch angle distributions indicating monohemispheric field-aligned streaming away from the magnetopause. A review of the extremely rich literature of energetic electron observations beyond the magnetopause is provided to place these new observations into historical context. Despite the extensive history of such research, these new observations provide a more comprehensive data set that includes unprecedented magnetic local time (MLT) coverage of the dayside equatorial magnetopause/magnetosheath. These data clearly highlight the common escape of energetic electrons along magnetic field lines concluded to have been reconnected across the magnetopause. While these streaming escape events agree with prior studies which show strong correlation with geomagnetic activity (suggesting a magnetotail source) and occur most frequently during periods of southward IMF, the high number of duskside events is unexpected and previously unobserved. Although the lowest electron energy channel was the focus of this study, the events reported here exhibit pitch angle anisotropies indicative of streaming up to 200 keV, which could represent the magnetopause loss of >1 MeV electrons from the outer radiation belt.

  4. Statistical analysis of MMS observations of energetic electron escape observed at/beyond the dayside magnetopause

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, Ian J.; Mauk, Barry H.; Anderson, Brian J.; Westlake, Joseph H.; Sibeck, David G.

    2017-01-01

    Here, observations from the Energetic Particle Detector (EPD) instrument suite aboard the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) spacecraft show that energetic (greater than tens of keV) magnetospheric particle escape into the magnetosheath occurs commonly across the dayside. This includes the surprisingly frequent observation of magnetospheric electrons in the duskside magnetosheath, an unexpected result given assumptions regarding magnetic drift shadowing. The 238 events identified in the 40 keV electron energy channel during the first MMS dayside season that exhibit strongly anisotropic pitch angle distributions indicating monohemispheric field-aligned streaming away from the magnetopause. A review of the extremely rich literature of energetic electron observations beyond the magnetopause is provided to place these new observations into historical context. Despite the extensive history of such research, these new observations provide a more comprehensive data set that includes unprecedented magnetic local time (MLT) coverage of the dayside equatorial magnetopause/magnetosheath. These data clearly highlight the common escape of energetic electrons along magnetic field lines concluded to have been reconnected across the magnetopause. While these streaming escape events agree with prior studies which show strong correlation with geomagnetic activity (suggesting a magnetotail source) and occur most frequently during periods of southward IMF, the high number of duskside events is unexpected and previously unobserved. Although the lowest electron energy channel was the focus of this study, the events reported here exhibit pitch angle anisotropies indicative of streaming up to 200 keV, which could represent the magnetopause loss of >1 MeV electrons from the outer radiation belt.

  5. Electronic transport in bilayer graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koshino, Mikito

    2009-01-01

    We present theoretical studies on the transport properties and localization effects of bilayer graphene. We calculate the conductivity by using the effective mass model with the self-consistent Born approximation, in the presence and absence of an energy gap opened by the interlayer asymmetry. We find that, in the absence of the gap, the minimum conductivity approaches the universal value by increasing the disorder potential, and the value is robust in the strong disorder regime where mixing with high-energy states is considerable. The gap-opening suppresses the conductivity over a wide energy range, even in the region away from the gap.We also study the localization effects in the vicinity of zero energy in bilayer graphene. We find that the states are all localized in the absence of the gap, while the gap-opening causes a phase transition analogous to the quantum Hall transition, which is accompanied by electron delocalization.

  6. Streaming energetic electrons in earth's magnetotail - Evidence for substorm-associated magnetic reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieber, J. W.; Stone, E. C.

    1980-01-01

    This letter reports the results of a systematic study of streaming greater than 200 keV electrons observed in the magnetotail with the Caltech Electron/Isotope Spectrometers aboard IMP-7 and IMP-8. A clear statistical association of streaming events with southward magnetic fields, often of steep inclination, and with substorms as evidenced by the AE index is demonstrated. These results support the interpretation that streaming energetic electrons are indicative of substorm-associated magnetic reconnection in the near-earth plasma sheet.

  7. Plasma behavior during energetic electron streaming events: Further evidence for substorm-associated magnetic reconnection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bieber, J.W.; Stone, E.C.; Hones, E.W. Jr.; Baker, D.N.; Bame, S.J.

    1982-01-01

    A recent study showed that streaming energetic (>200 keV) electrons in Earth's magnetotail are statistically associated with southward magnetic fields and with enhancements of the AE index. It is shown here that the streaming electrons characteristically are preceded by aapprox.15 minute period of tailward plasma flow and followed by a dropout of the plasma sheet, thus demonstrating a clear statistical association between substorms and the classical signatures of magnetic reconnection and plasmoid formation. Additionally, a brief upward surge of mean electron energy preceded plasma dropout in several of the events studied, providing direct evidence of localized, reconnection-associated heating processes

  8. Electron transport in wurtzite InN

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    InN transport; mobility; energy and momentum relaxation; impurity scattering. ... future generation solar cell because the nitride alloys can cover the whole ... We apply the ensemble Monte Carlo method to investigate the electron transport in.

  9. Robustness and flexibility in compact quasiaxial stellarators: Global ideal MHD stability and energetic particle transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redi, M.H.; Diallo, A.; Cooper, W.A.; Fu, G.Y.

    2000-01-01

    Concerns about the flexibility and robustness of a compact quasiaxial stellarator design are addressed by studying the effects of varied pressure and rotational transform profiles on expected performance. For thirty, related, fully three-dimensional configurations the global, ideal magnetohydrodynamic stability is evaluated as well as energetic particle transport. It is found that tokamak intuition is relevant to understanding the magnetohydrodynamic stability, with pressure gradient driving terms and shear stabilization controlling both the periodicity preserving, N=0, and the non-periodicity preserving, N=1, unstable kink modes. Global kink modes are generated by steeply peaked pressure profiles near the half radius and edge localized kink modes are found for plasmas with steep pressure profiles at the edge as well as with edge rotational transform above 0.5. Energetic particle transport is not strongly dependent on these changes of pressure and current (or rotational transform) profiles, although a weak inverse dependence on pressure peaking through the corresponding Shafranov shift is found. While good transport and MHD stability are not anticorrelated in these equilibria, stability only results from a delicate balance of the pressure and shear stabilization forces. A range of interesting MHD behaviors is found for this large set of equilibria, exhibiting similar particle transport properties

  10. Transport of solar electrons in the turbulent interplanetary magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ablaßmayer, J.; Tautz, R. C., E-mail: robert.c.tautz@gmail.com [Zentrum für Astronomie und Astrophysik, Technische Universität Berlin, Hardenbergstraße 36, D-10623 Berlin (Germany); Dresing, N., E-mail: dresing@physik.uni-kiel.de [Institut für Experimentelle und Angewandte Physik, Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel, Leibnizstraße 11, D-24118 Kiel (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    The turbulent transport of solar energetic electrons in the interplanetary magnetic field is investigated by means of a test-particle Monte-Carlo simulation. The magnetic fields are modeled as a combination of the Parker field and a turbulent component. In combination with the direct calculation of diffusion coefficients via the mean-square displacements, this approach allows one to analyze the effect of the initial ballistic transport phase. In that sense, the model complements the main other approach in which a transport equation is solved. The major advancement is that, by recording the flux of particles arriving at virtual detectors, intensity and anisotropy-time profiles can be obtained. Observational indications for a longitudinal asymmetry can thus be explained by tracing the diffusive spread of the particle distribution. The approach may be of future help for the systematic interpretation of observations for instance by the solar terrestrial relations observatory (STEREO) and advanced composition explorer (ACE) spacecrafts.

  11. Understanding the Driver of Energetic Electron Precipitation Using Coordinated Multi-Satellite Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capannolo, L.; Li, W.; Ma, Q.

    2017-12-01

    Electron precipitation into the upper atmosphere is one of the important loss mechanisms in the Earth's inner magnetosphere. Various magnetospheric plasma waves (i.e., chorus, plasmaspheric hiss, electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves, etc.) play an important role in scattering energetic electrons into the loss cone, thus enhance ionization in the upper atmosphere and affect ring current and radiation belt dynamics. The present study evaluates conjunction events where low-earth-orbiting satellites (twin AeroCube-6) and near-equatorial satellites (twin Van Allen Probes) are located roughly along the same magnetic field line. By analyzing electron flux variation at various energies (> 35 keV) measured by AeroCube-6 and wave and electron measurements by Van Allen Probes, together with quasilinear diffusion theory and modeling, we determine the physical process of driving the observed energetic electron precipitation for the identified electron precipitation events. Moreover, the twin AeroCube-6 also helps us understand the spatiotemporal effect and constrain the coherent size of each electron precipitation event.

  12. Atomistic simulations of divacancy defects in armchair graphene nanoribbons: Stability, electronic structure, and electron transport properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Jun [College of Physical Science and Technology, Yangtze University, Jingzhou, Hubei 434023 (China); Zeng, Hui, E-mail: zenghui@yangtzeu.edu.cn [College of Physical Science and Technology, Yangtze University, Jingzhou, Hubei 434023 (China); Wei, Jianwei [College of Optoelectronic Information, Chongqing University of Technology, Chongqing 400054 (China); Li, Biao; Xu, Dahai [College of Physical Science and Technology, Yangtze University, Jingzhou, Hubei 434023 (China)

    2014-01-17

    Using the first principles calculations associated with nonequilibrium Green's function, we have studied the electronic structures and quantum transport properties of defective armchair graphene nanoribbon (AGNR) in the presence of divacancy defects. The triple pentagon–triple heptagon (555–777) defect in the defective AGNR is energetically more favorable than the pentagon–octagon–pentagon (5–8–5) defect. Our calculated results reveal that both 5–8–5-like defect and 555–777-like defect in AGNR could improve the electron transport. It is anticipated that defective AGNRs can exhibit large range variations in transport behaviors, which are strongly dependent on the distributions of the divacancy defect.

  13. Phonon limited electronic transport in Pb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittweger, F.; Hinsche, N. F.; Mertig, I.

    2017-09-01

    We present a fully ab initio based scheme to compute electronic transport properties, i.e. the electrical conductivity σ and thermopower S, in the presence of electron-phonon interaction. We explicitly investigate the \

  14. Stopping powers of energetic electrons penetrating condensed matter-theory and application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan Zhenyu; Xia Yueyuan

    2004-01-01

    In this review article, the motivation of studying inelastic energy loss for energetic electrons penetrating through matter and the corresponding technological importance have been outlined. The theoretical development and method for the calculation of stopping powers are described. The stopping power data tables for a group of polymers and bioorganic compounds are presented, and the application aspects of the stopping power data are briefly discussed. (authors)

  15. Analysis of detached recombining plasmas by collisonal-radiative model with energetic electron component

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohno, N.; Motoyama, M.; Takamura, S.

    2001-01-01

    Investigation of plasma detachment is still one of the most important subjects in the edge plasma of magnetically confined fusion devices. It was found that volumetric plasma recombination plays an essential role on reduction of particle flux in detached plasmas. The volumetric plasma recombination process has been confirmed in several diverted tokamaks and linear simulators by observing line emission from highly excited states due to three-body recombination process and continuum emission due to radiative recombination process. Electron temperature and density in the detached plasma were also evaluated from analysis of the light emission. To determine the electron temperature, the line emission spectrum is analyzed to calculate the population densities of excited levels. The population distribution among the highly excited states follows the Saha-Boltzmann distribution very closely. This implies that those states are in local thermal equilibrium (LTE) condition with free electrons in plasma so that the electron temperature can be obtained by using method of Boltzmann plot. Another method to determine the electron temperature is to compare the observed continuum spectrum with the theoretically calculated one. In our experiments using the linear diverter simulator, however, there is a clear difference for two evaluated values. One of the possible reasons is thought to be that there is a small amount of energetic electrons existing in detached recombining region. In order to evaluate the electron temperature more preciously, we need to investigate the influence of the energetic electrons on the evaluation of bulk electron temperature in a detached plasma. Collisonal-radiative (GR) model has been utilized for analyzing the light emission intensities from plasma. However, Maxwellian electron distribution function is usually assumed in the CR model. In this paper, we report a quantitative analysis of the line emission spectrum in the detached recombining plasmas by

  16. Electron and Phonon Transport in Molecular Junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Qian

    Molecular electronics provide the possibility to investigate electron and phonon transport at the smallest imaginable scale, where quantum effects can be investigated and exploited directly in the design. In this thesis, we study both electron transport and phonon transport in molecular junctions....... The system we are interested in here are π-stacked molecules connected with two semi-infinite leads. π-stacked aromatic rings, connected via π-π electronic coupling, provides a rather soft mechanical bridge while maintaining high electronic conductivity. We investigate electron transport...... transmission at the Fermi energy. We propose and analyze a way of using π   stacking to design molecular junctions to control heat transport. We develop a simple model system to identify optimal parameter regimes and then use density functional theory (DFT) to extract model parameters for a number of specific...

  17. Time-dependent transport of energetic particles in magnetic turbulence: computer simulations versus analytical theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arendt, V.; Shalchi, A.

    2018-06-01

    We explore numerically the transport of energetic particles in a turbulent magnetic field configuration. A test-particle code is employed to compute running diffusion coefficients as well as particle distribution functions in the different directions of space. Our numerical findings are compared with models commonly used in diffusion theory such as Gaussian distribution functions and solutions of the cosmic ray Fokker-Planck equation. Furthermore, we compare the running diffusion coefficients across the mean magnetic field with solutions obtained from the time-dependent version of the unified non-linear transport theory. In most cases we find that particle distribution functions are indeed of Gaussian form as long as a two-component turbulence model is employed. For turbulence setups with reduced dimensionality, however, the Gaussian distribution can no longer be obtained. It is also shown that the unified non-linear transport theory agrees with simulated perpendicular diffusion coefficients as long as the pure two-dimensional model is excluded.

  18. Energetic and frictional effects in the transport of ions in a cyclic peptide nanotube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Yongil; Song, Yeon Ho; Hwang, Hyeon Seok [Dept. of Chemistry and Institute for Molecular Science and Fusion Technology, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of); Schatz, George C. [Dept. of Chemistry, Northwestern University, Evanston (United States)

    2017-01-15

    The effects of geometric restraints and frictional parameters on the energetics and dynamics of ion transport through a synthetic ion channel are investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations for several different ions. To do so, potential of mean force profiles and position-dependent diffusion coefficients for Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, Ca{sup 2+}, and Cl{sup −} transport through a simple cyclic peptide nanotube, which is composed of 4× cyclo[−(D-Ala-Glu-D-Ala-Gln){sub 2−}] rings, are calculated via an adaptive biasing force MD simulation method and a Baysian inference/Monte Carlo algorithm. Among the restraints and parameters examined in this work, the radius parameter used in the flat-bottom half-harmonic restraint at the entrance and exit to channel has a great effect on the energetics of ion transport through the variation of entropy in the outside of the channel. The diffusivity profiles for the ions show a strong dependence on the damping coefficient, but the dependence on the coefficient becomes minimal inside the channel, indicating that the most important factor which affects the diffusivity of ions inside the channel is local interactions of ions with the structured channel water molecules through confinement.

  19. Modeling Solar Energetic Particle Transport near a Wavy Heliospheric Current Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battarbee, Markus; Dalla, Silvia; Marsh, Mike S.

    2018-02-01

    Understanding the transport of solar energetic particles (SEPs) from acceleration sites at the Sun into interplanetary space and to the Earth is an important question for forecasting space weather. The interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), with two distinct polarities and a complex structure, governs energetic particle transport and drifts. We analyze for the first time the effect of a wavy heliospheric current sheet (HCS) on the propagation of SEPs. We inject protons close to the Sun and propagate them by integrating fully 3D trajectories within the inner heliosphere in the presence of weak scattering. We model the HCS position using fits based on neutral lines of magnetic field source surface maps (SSMs). We map 1 au proton crossings, which show efficient transport in longitude via HCS, depending on the location of the injection region with respect to the HCS. For HCS tilt angles around 30°–40°, we find significant qualitative differences between A+ and A‑ configurations of the IMF, with stronger fluences along the HCS in the former case but with a distribution of particles across a wider range of longitudes and latitudes in the latter. We show how a wavy current sheet leads to longitudinally periodic enhancements in particle fluence. We show that for an A+ IMF configuration, a wavy HCS allows for more proton deceleration than a flat HCS. We find that A‑ IMF configurations result in larger average fluences than A+ IMF configurations, due to a radial drift component at the current sheet.

  20. Energetics of small electron acceleration episodes in the solar corona from radio noise storm observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Tomin; Subramanian, Prasad

    2018-05-01

    Observations of radio noise storms can act as sensitive probes of nonthermal electrons produced in small acceleration events in the solar corona. We use data from noise storm episodes observed jointly by the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) and the Nancay Radioheliograph (NRH) to study characteristics of the nonthermal electrons involved in the emission. We find that the electrons carry 1021 to 1024 erg/s, and that the energy contained in the electrons producing a representative noise storm burst ranges from 1020 to 1023 ergs. These results are a direct probe of the energetics involved in ubiquitous, small-scale electron acceleration episodes in the corona, and could be relevant to a nanoflare-like scenario for coronal heating.

  1. Measurement of electron emission due to energetic ion bombardment in plasma source ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamim, M. M.; Scheuer, J. T.; Fetherston, R. P.; Conrad, J. R.

    1991-11-01

    An experimental procedure has been developed to measure electron emission due to energetic ion bombardment during plasma source ion implantation. Spherical targets of copper, stainless steel, graphite, titanium alloy, and aluminum alloy were biased negatively to 20, 30, and 40 kV in argon and nitrogen plasmas. A Langmuir probe was used to detect the propagating sheath edge and a Rogowski transformer was used to measure the current to the target. The measurements of electron emission coefficients compare well with those measured under similar conditions.

  2. Aerosol particle charger and an SO2 reactor using energetic electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, R.H.

    1984-01-01

    Two properties of energetic electrons in gas, their high specific ionization and their production of radicals and other chemically active specie, have promising applications to the cleanup of flue gas from coal combustion. The copious ionization has been used in a test particle charger to electrically charge 1 and 3 μm particles for subsequent removal by electrostatic precipitation. Particle charge greater than 5 times the theoretical ionic charging value for 1 μm particles have been observed in a bi-electrode electron beam precharger in which the beam energy is matched with the electrode spacing. In another test device, pulsed streamer coronas have been used to release and to energize electrons which promote gas phase chemical reactions and remote sulfur dioxide from humid air with high efficiency. The energized electrons produce oxidant radicals and chemically active specie which convert the SO 2 into sulfuric acid mist. While reported separately here, the two applications of energetic electrons may be amenable to combination in an integrated system for the combined treatment of flue gas

  3. Effects of antidiuretic hormone on kinetic and energetic determinants of active sodium transport in frog skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Y T; Lang, M A; Essig, A

    1981-10-02

    The effects of antidiuretic hormone (ADH) on the rate of transepithelial active Na transport JaNa and the rate of suprabasal O2 consumption of Jsbr were studied in paired hemiskins of frog. Within some 30 min following administration of ADH both JaNa and Jsbr increased to near-maximal levels and then remained stable for at least an hour. On symmetric perturbation of the transepithelial electrical potential delta psi at 6-min intervals, the dependence of JaNa and Jsbr on delta psi was near-linear, both in control and experimental hemi-skins. The stability and near-linearity of the system permitted systematic analysis of the parameters of linear non-equilibrium thermodynamic (NET) and electrical equivalent circuit (EC) formulations. ADH (100 mU/ml) stimulated two of the three NET phenomenological L coefficients, as well as A, the affinity (negative Gibbs free energy) of a metabolic reaction driving transport. Observations at partially depressed levels of transport indicated that the effects of kinetic and energetic factors are to some extent discrete. EC analysis showed stimulation of the amiloride-sensitive conductance Ka, but not of the apparent electromitive force of Na transport 'ENa'. Similar effects were produced by 10 mU/ml of ADH or by 10 mM dibutyryl cyclic AMP, although less marked effects on the L coefficients were noted with the lower concentration of hormone. It is suggested that, in contrast to EC analysis, the NET formulation distinguishes between kinetic and energetic determinants of transport, supporting a dual mechanism of action of ADH.

  4. Coupled electron-photon radiation transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorence, L.; Kensek, R.P.; Valdez, G.D.; Drumm, C.R.; Fan, W.C.; Powell, J.L.

    2000-01-01

    Massively-parallel computers allow detailed 3D radiation transport simulations to be performed to analyze the response of complex systems to radiation. This has been recently been demonstrated with the coupled electron-photon Monte Carlo code, ITS. To enable such calculations, the combinatorial geometry capability of ITS was improved. For greater geometrical flexibility, a version of ITS is under development that can track particles in CAD geometries. Deterministic radiation transport codes that utilize an unstructured spatial mesh are also being devised. For electron transport, the authors are investigating second-order forms of the transport equations which, when discretized, yield symmetric positive definite matrices. A novel parallelization strategy, simultaneously solving for spatial and angular unknowns, has been applied to the even- and odd-parity forms of the transport equation on a 2D unstructured spatial mesh. Another second-order form, the self-adjoint angular flux transport equation, also shows promise for electron transport

  5. Radiation transport and energetics of laser-driven half-hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, A. S., E-mail: alastair.moore@physics.org; Graham, P.; Comley, A. J.; Foster, J. [Directorate Science and Technology, AWE Aldermaston, Reading RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Cooper, A. B. R.; Schneider, M. B.; MacLaren, S.; Lu, K.; Seugling, R.; Satcher, J.; Klingmann, J.; Marrs, R.; May, M.; Widmann, K.; Glendinning, G.; Castor, J.; Sain, J.; Baker, K.; Hsing, W. W.; Young, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551-0808 (United States); and others

    2014-06-15

    Experiments that characterize and develop a high energy-density half-hohlraum platform for use in benchmarking radiation hydrodynamics models have been conducted at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Results from the experiments are used to quantitatively compare with simulations of the radiation transported through an evolving plasma density structure, colloquially known as an N-wave. A half-hohlraum is heated by 80 NIF beams to a temperature of 240 eV. This creates a subsonic diffusive Marshak wave, which propagates into a high atomic number Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} aerogel. The subsequent radiation transport through the aerogel and through slots cut into the aerogel layer is investigated. We describe a set of experiments that test the hohlraum performance and report on a range of x-ray measurements that absolutely quantify the energetics and radiation partition inside the target.

  6. Energetic electron precipitation characteristics observed from Antarctica during a flux dropout event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clilverd, Mark A.; Cobbett, Neil; Rodger, Craig J.; Brundell, James B.; Denton, Michael H.; Hartley, David P.; Rodriguez, Juan V.; Danskin, Donald; Raita, Tero; Spanswick, Emma L.

    2013-11-01

    from two autonomous VLF radio receiver systems installed in a remote region of the Antarctic in 2012 is used to take advantage of the juxtaposition of the L = 4.6 contour, and the Hawaii-Halley, Antarctica, great circle path as it passes over thick Antarctic ice shelf. The ice sheet conductivity leads to high sensitivity to changing D region conditions, and the quasi constant L shell highlights outer radiation belt processes. The ground-based instruments observed several energetic electron precipitation events over a moderately active 24 h period, during which the outer radiation belt electron flux declined at most energies and subsequently recovered. Combining the ground-based data with low and geosynchronous orbiting satellite observations on 27 February 2012, different driving mechanisms were observed for three precipitation events with clear signatures in phase space density and electron anisotropy. Comparison between flux measurements made by Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites (POES) in low Earth orbit and by the Antarctic instrumentation provides evidence of different cases of weak and strong diffusion into the bounce loss cone, helping to understand the physical mechanisms controlling the precipitation of energetic electrons into the atmosphere. Strong diffusion events occurred as the bounce loss cone. Two events had a factor of about 3 to 10 times more >30 keV flux than was reported by POES, more consistent with strong diffusion conditions.

  7. Ballistic electron transport in mesoscopic samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaconescu, D.

    2000-01-01

    In the framework of this thesis, the electron transport in the ballistic regime has been studied. Ballistic means that the lateral sample dimensions are smaller than the mean free path of the electrons, i.e. the electrons can travel through the whole device without being scattered. This leads to transport characteristics that differ significantly from the diffusive regime which is realised in most experiments. Making use of samples with high mean free path, features of ballistic transport have been observed on samples with sizes up to 100 μm. The basic device used in ballistic electron transport is the point contact, from which a collimated beam of ballistic electrons can be injected. Such point contacts were realised with focused ion beam (FIB) implantation and the collimating properties were analysed using a two opposite point contact configuration. The typical angular width at half maximum is around 50 , which is comparable with that of point contacts defined by other methods. (orig.)

  8. Impulse approximation treatment of electron-electron excitation and ionization in energetic ion-atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zouros, T.J.M.; Lee, D.H.; Sanders, J.M.; Richard, P.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of electron-electron interactions between projectile and target electrons observed in recent measurements of projectile K-shell excitation and ionization using 0 projectile Auger electron spectroscopy are analysed within the framework of the impulse approximation (IA). The IA formulation is seen to give a good account of the threshold behavior of both ionization and excitation, while providing a remarkably simple intuitive picture of such electron-electron interactions in ion-atom collisions in general. Thus, the applicability of the IA treatment is extended to cover most known processes involving such interactions including resonance transfer excitation, binary encounter electron production, electron-electron excitation and ionization. (orig.)

  9. Polymer Solar Cells with Efficiency >10% Enabled via a Facile Solution-Processed Al-Doped ZnO Electron Transporting Layer

    KAUST Repository

    Jagadamma, Lethy Krishnan; Al-Senani, Mohammed; El Labban, Abdulrahman; Gereige, Issam; Ngongang Ndjawa, Guy Olivier; Faria, Jorge C D; Kim, Taesoo; Zhao, Kui; Cruciani, Federico; Anjum, Dalaver H.; McLachlan, Martyn A.; Beaujuge, Pierre; Amassian, Aram

    2015-01-01

    /reduces the native defects by nitrogen incorporation, making them good electron transporters and energetically matched with the fullerene acceptor. It is demonstrated that highly efficient solar cells can be achieved without the need for additional surface chemical

  10. Satellite observations of energetic electron precipitation during the 1979 solar eclipse and comparisons with rocket measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaines, E. E.; Imhof, W. L.; Voss, H. D.; Reagan, J. B.

    1983-07-01

    During the solar eclipse of 26 February 1979, the P78-1 satellite passed near Red Lake, Ontario, at an altitude of about 600 km. On two consecutive orbits spanning the time of total eclipse, energetic electrons were measured with two silicon solid state detector spectrometers having excellent energy and angular resolution. Significant fluxes of precipitating electrons were observed near the path of totality. Comparisons of flux intensities and energy spectra with those measured from a Nike Orion and two Nike Tomahawk rockets launched near Red Lake before and during total eclipse give good agreement and indicate that the electron precipitation was relatively uniform for more than an hour and over a broad geographical area.

  11. Satellite observations of energetic electron precipitation during the 1979 solar eclipse and comparisons with rocket measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaines, E.E.; Imhof, W.L.; Voss, H.D.; Reagan, J.B.

    1983-01-01

    During the solar eclipse of 26 February 1979, the P78-1 satellite passed near Red Lake, Ontario, at an altitude of approx. 600 km. On two consecutive orbits spanning the time of total eclipse, energetic electrons were measured with two silicon solid state detector spectrometers having excellent energy and angular resolution. Significant fluxes of precipitating electrons were observed near the path of totality. Comparisons of flux intensities and energy spectra with those measured from a Nike Orion and two Nike Tomahawk rockets launched near Red Lake before and during total eclipse give good agreement and indicate that the electron precipitation was relatively uniform for more than an hour and over a broad geographical area. (author)

  12. Energetic Electron Acceleration Observed by MMS in the Vicinity of an X-Line Crossing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaynes, A. N.; Turner, D. L.; Wilder, F. D.; Osmane, A.; Baker, D. N.; Blake, J. B.; Fennell, J. F.; Cohen, I. J.; Mauk, B. H.; Reeves, G. D.; hide

    2016-01-01

    During the first months of observations, the Magnetospheric Multiscale Fly's Eye Energetic Particle Spectrometer instrument has observed several instances of electron acceleration up to greater than 100 keV while in the vicinity of the dayside reconnection region. While particle acceleration associated with magnetic reconnection has been seen to occur up to these energies in the tail region, it had not yet been reported at the magnetopause. This study reports on observations of electron acceleration up to hundreds of keV that were recorded on 19 September 2015 around 1000 UT, in the midst of an X-line crossing. In the region surrounding the X-line, whistler-mode and broadband electrostatic waves were observed simultaneously with the appearance of highly energetic electrons which exhibited significant energization in the perpendicular direction. The mechanisms by which particles may be accelerated via reconnection-related processes are intrinsic to understanding particle dynamics among a wide range of spatial scales and plasma environments.

  13. Behaviour of superconductivity energetic characteristics in electron-doped cuprates. A simple model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kristoffel, N.; Rubin, P.

    2008-01-01

    A simple model to describe the energetic phase diagram of electron-doped cuprate superconductor is developed. Interband pairing operates between the UHB and the defect states created by doping and supplied by both extincting HB-s. Two defect subbands correspond to the (π,0) and (π/2,π/2) momentum regions. Extended doping quenches the bare normal state gaps (pseudogaps). Maximal transition temperature corresponds to overlapping bands ensemble intersected by the chemical potential. Illustrative results for T c , pseudo- and superconducting gaps are calculated on the whole doping scale. Major characteristic features on the phase diagram are reproduced. Anticipated manifestation of gaps doping dynamics is discussed

  14. Deflection type energy analyser for energetic electron beams in a beam-plasma system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michel, J.A.; Hogge, J.P.

    1988-11-01

    An energy analyser for the study of electron beam distribution functions in unmagnetized plasmas is described. This analyser is designed to avoid large electric fields which are created in multi-grid analysers and to measure directly the beam distribution function without differentiation. As an example of an application we present results on the propagation of an energetic beam (E b : 2.0 keV) in a plasma (n o : 1.10 10 cm -3 , T e : 1.4 eV) (author) 7 figs., 10 refs

  15. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy and energetics of flattened carbon nonoshells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourgeois, L.N.; Bursill, L.A.

    1998-01-01

    When examined under a high-resolution transmission electron microscope, carbon soot produced alongside buckytubes in an arc-discharge is found to contain a small percentage of flattened carbon shells. These objects are shown to be small graphite flakes which eliminated their dangling bonds by terminating their edges with highly curved junctions. Ideal models for these structures are presented, and their energy estimated. The calculations show that the establishment of highly curved junctions is energetically favourable for a graphite flake in an inert atmosphere. Flattened shells also appear more stable than their 'inflated' counterparts (fullerene 'onions' and buckytubes) when the shell dimensions obey specific criteria.(authors)

  16. Electron transport chains of lactic acid bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brooijmans, R.J.W.

    2008-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria are generally considered facultative anaerobic obligate fermentative bacteria. They are unable to synthesize heme. Some lactic acid bacteria are unable to form menaquinone as well. Both these components are cofactors of respiratory (electron transport) chains of prokaryotic

  17. Energetic O+ and H+ Ions in the Plasma Sheet: Implications for the Transport of Ionospheric Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtani, S.; Nose, M.; Christon, S. P.; Lui, A. T.

    2011-01-01

    The present study statistically examines the characteristics of energetic ions in the plasma sheet using the Geotail/Energetic Particle and Ion Composition data. An emphasis is placed on the O+ ions, and the characteristics of the H+ ions are used as references. The following is a summary of the results. (1) The average O+ energy is lower during solar maximum and higher during solar minimum. A similar tendency is also found for the average H+ energy, but only for geomagnetically active times; (2) The O+ -to -H+ ratios of number and energy densities are several times higher during solar maximum than during solar minimum; (3) The average H+ and O+ energies and the O+ -to -H+ ratios of number and energy densities all increase with geomagnetic activity. The differences among different solar phases not only persist but also increase with increasing geomagnetic activity; (4) Whereas the average H+ energy increases toward Earth, the average O+ energy decreases toward Earth. The average energy increases toward dusk for both the H+ and O+ ions; (5) The O+ -to -H+ ratios of number and energy densities increase toward Earth during all solar phases, but most clearly during solar maximum. These results suggest that the solar illumination enhances the ionospheric outflow more effectively with increasing geomagnetic activity and that a significant portion of the O+ ions is transported directly from the ionosphere to the near ]Earth region rather than through the distant tail.

  18. Hydrodynamic approach to electronic transport in graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narozhny, Boris N. [Institute for Theoretical Condensed Matter Physics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), Moscow (Russian Federation); Gornyi, Igor V. [Institute for Theoretical Condensed Matter Physics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany); Institute of Nanotechnology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany); Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Mirlin, Alexander D. [Institute for Theoretical Condensed Matter Physics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany); Institute of Nanotechnology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany); Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Schmalian, Joerg [Institute for Theoretical Condensed Matter Physics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany); Institute for Solid State Physics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2017-11-15

    The last few years have seen an explosion of interest in hydrodynamic effects in interacting electron systems in ultra-pure materials. In this paper we briefly review the recent advances, both theoretical and experimental, in the hydrodynamic approach to electronic transport in graphene, focusing on viscous phenomena, Coulomb drag, non-local transport measurements, and possibilities for observing nonlinear effects. (copyright 2017 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  19. Aromaticity and stability going in opposite directions: An energetic, structural, magnetic and electronic study of aminopyrimidines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro da Silva, Manuel A.V.; Galvão, Tiago L.P.; Rocha, Inês M.; Santos, Ana Filipa L.O.M.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Δ f H m o (cr) of 2,4-diaminopyrimidine and 2,4,6-triaminopyrimidine were obtained by combustion calorimetry. ► Sublimation thermodynamics of the compounds was studied by Knudsen effusion technique. ► Ab initio computational calculations were performed for mono-, di- and triaminopyrimidine isomers. ► Molecular energetics were correlated with several criteria of aromaticity. ► The influence of intramolecular hydrogen bonds was explored. - Abstract: The relation between molecular energetics and aromaticity was investigated for the interaction between the amino functional group and the nitrogen atoms of the pyridine and pyrimidine rings, using experimental thermodynamic techniques and computational geometries, enthalpies, chemical shifts, atomic charges and the Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules. 2,4-diaminopyrimidine and 2,4,6-triaminopyrimidine were studied by static bomb combustion calorimetry and Knudsen effusion technique. The derived gaseous-phase enthalpies of formation together with the enthalpies of formation of the three isomers of aminopyridine reported in the literature, were compared with the calculated computationally ones and extended to other diamino- and triaminopyrimidine isomers using the MP2/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory. The results were analyzed in terms of enthalpy of interaction between substituents and, due to the absence of meaningful stereochemical hindrance, strong inductive effects, or intramolecular hydrogen bonds according to QTAIM results, the resonance electron delocalization plays an almost exclusive role in the very exothermic enthalpies obtained. Therefore, this enthalpy of interaction was used as an experimental energetic measure of resonance effects and analyzed in terms of aromaticity. It was found that more conjugation between substituents means less aromaticity according to the magnetic (NICS) and electronic (Shannon) criteria, but more aromaticity according to the geometric (HOMA) criterion.

  20. Analysis of the Variation of Energetic Electron Flux with Respect to Longitude and Distance Normal to the Magnetic Equatorial Plane for Galileo Energetic Particle Detector Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swimm, R.; Garrett, H. B.; Jun, I.; Evans, R. W.

    2004-12-01

    In this study we examine ten-minute omni-directional averages of energetic electron data measured by the Galileo spacecraft Energetic Particle Detector (EPD). Count rates from electron channels B1, DC2, and DC3 are evaluated using a power law model to yield estimates of the differential electron fluxes from 1 MeV to 11 MeV at distances from the planet Jupiter from 8 to 28 Jupiter radii. Whereas the orbit of the Galileo spacecraft remained close to the rotational equatorial plane of Jupiter, the approximately 11 degree tilt of the magnetic axis of Jupiter relative to its rotational axis allowed the EPD instrument to sample high energy electrons at limited distances normal to the magnetic equatorial plane. We present a Fourier analysis of the semi-diurnal variation of electron radiation with longitude. We also develop a model of the electron flux with respect to distance normal to the magnetic equatorial plane as a function of the distance from Jupiter.

  1. The influence of the Kubo number on the transport of energetic particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shalchi, A

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the interaction between charged energetic particles and magnetized plasmas by using analytical theory. Based on the unified nonlinear transport (UNLT) theory we compute the diffusion coefficient across a large scale magnetic field. To achieve analytical tractability we use a simple Gaussian approach to model the turbulent magnetic fields. We show that the perpendicular diffusion coefficient depends only on two parameters, namely the Kubo number and the parallel mean free path. We combine the aforementioned turbulence model with the UNLT theory and we solve the corresponding integral equation numerically to show how these two parameters control the perpendicular diffusion coefficient. Furthermore, we consider two extreme cases, namely the case of strong and suppressed pitch-angle scattering, respectively. For each case we consider small and large Kubo numbers to achieve a further simplification. All our analytical findings are compared with formulas which are known in diffusion theory. (paper)

  2. Long-lasting solar energetic electron injection during the 26 Dec 2013 widespread SEP event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dresing, N.; Klassen, A.; Temmer, M.; Gomez-Herrero, R.; Heber, B.; Veronig, A.

    2017-12-01

    The solar energetic particle (SEP) event on 26 Dec 2013 was detected all around the Sun by the two STEREO spacecraft and close-to-Earth observers. While the two STEREOs were separated by 59 degrees and situated at the front side of the associated large coronal event, it was a backside-event for Earth. Nevertheless, significant and long-lasting solar energetic electron anisotropies together with long rise times were observed at all three viewpoints, pointing to an extended electron injection. Although the CME-driven shock appears to account for the SEP event at a first glance a more detailed view reveals a more complex scenario: A CME-CME interaction takes place during the very early phase of the SEP event. Furthermore, four hours after the onset of the event, a second component is measured at all three viewpoints on top of the first SEP increase, mainly consisting of high energy particles. We find that the CME-driven shock alone can hardly account for the observed SEP event in total but a trapping scenario together with ongoing particle acceleration is more likely.

  3. Fluxes of energetic protons and electrons measured on board the Oersted satellite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Cabrera

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available The Charged Particle Detector (CPD on board the Oersted satellite (649 km perigee, 865 km apogee and 96.48° inclination currently measures energetic protons and electrons. The measured peak fluxes of E>1 MeV electrons are found to confirm the predictions of AE8-MAX, though they occur at a geographical position relatively shifted in the SAA. The fluxes of protons are one order of magnitude higher than the predictions of AP8-MAX in the energy range 20-500 MeV. This huge discrepancy between AP8 and recent measurements in LEO was already noticed and modelled in SAMPEX/PSB97 and TPM-1 models. Nevertheless some other LEO measurements such as PROBA and CORONA-F result in flux values in good agreement with AP8 within a factor 2. The anisotropy of the low-altitude proton flux, combined with measurement performed on board three-axis stabilised satellites, has been suspected to be one possible source of the important discrepancies observed by different missions. In this paper, we evaluate the effect of anisotropy on flux measurements conducted using the CPD instruments. On the basis of the available data, we confirm the inaccuracy of AP8 at LEO and suggest methods to improve the analysis of data in future flux measurements of energetic protons at low altitudes.

  4. Electron transport effects in ion induced electron emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubus, A. [Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Service de Metrologie Nucleaire (CP 165/84), 50 av. FD Roosevelt, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium)]. E-mail: adubus@ulb.ac.be; Pauly, N. [Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Service de Metrologie Nucleaire (CP 165/84), 50 av. FD Roosevelt, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Roesler, M. [Karl-Pokern-Str. 12, D-12587 Berlin (Germany)

    2007-03-15

    Ion induced electron emission (IIEE) is usually described as a three-step process, i.e. electron excitation by the incident projectile, electron transport (and multiplication) and electron escape through the potential barrier at the surface. In many cases, the first step of the process has been carefully described. The second step of the process, i.e. electron transport and multiplication, has often been treated in a very rough way, a simple decreasing exponential law being sometimes used. It is precisely the aim of the present work to show the importance of a correct description of electron transport and multiplication in a theoretical calculation of IIEE. A short overview of the electron transport models developed for IIEE is given in this work. The so-called 'Infinite medium slowing-down model' often used in recent works is evaluated by means of Monte Carlo simulations. In particular, the importance of considering correctly the semi-infinite character of the medium and the boundary condition at the vacuum-medium interface is discussed. Quantities like the electron escape depth are also briefly discussed. This evaluation has been performed in the particular case of protons (25keV

  5. Solar cyclic behavior of trapped energetic electrons in Earth's inner radiation belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Bob; Thorne, Richard M.

    1994-10-01

    Magnetic electron spectrometer data from six satellites (OV3-3, OV1-14, OGO 5, S3-2, S3-3, and CRRES) have been used to study long-term (1966-1991) behavior of trapped energetic electrons in the inner radiation belt. Comparison of the observed energy spectra at L equal to or greater than 1.35 for different phases of the solar cycle reveals a clear trend toward enhanced fluxes during periods of solar maximum for energies below a few hundred keV; we suggest that this is caused by an increase in the rate of inward radial diffusion from a source at higher L. In contrast, for L less than 1.30, where atmospheric collisions become increasingly important, the electron flux is reduced during solar maximum; we attribute this to the expected increase in upper atmospheric densities. The electron flux above 1 MeV exhibits a systematic decay beyond 1979 to values well below the current NASA AE-8 model. This indicates that the natural background of high-energy electrons has previously been overestimated due to the long lasting presence of electrons produced by nuclear detonations in the upper atmosphere in the late 1950s and early 1960s.

  6. MMS FEEPS Energetic Electron Microinjection Observations During 2015 Through October 2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fennell, J. F.; Turner, D. L.; Lemon, C.; Kavosi, S.; Spence, H. E.; Jaynes, A. N.; Blake, J. B.; Clemmons, J. H.; Baker, D. N.; Mauk, B.; Burch, J. L.; Cohen, I. J.

    2017-12-01

    During MMS traversals of the midnight to dusk local time regions energetic electron data showed many clusters of electron injections we call microinjections because of their short duration signatures. These microinjections of 50-400 keV electrons have energy dispersion signatures indicating that they gradient and curvature drifted from earlier local times. Multiple clusters of microinjection occurred during these traversals. We show detailed results from some microinjections taken with burst mode data. These high temporal resolution data showed that the electrons in the microinjections were trapped and had bidirectional field-aligned angular distributions. Drift calculations constrained by the observed electron dispersion times indicate the electrons had drifted from near the magnetopause hours earlier in local time. They were not observed in the midnight through pre-noon regions in 2015-2016. The 2015-2016 observations were limited to altitudes of 9 to 12 Re because the MMS apogee was 12 Re then. In March 2017, the MMS apogee was raised to 25 Re and we will show how these later microinjection observations compare to the earlier ones. These injection clusters are a new phenomenon in this region of the magnetosphere and with the higher orbit we will observe how close to the magnetopause they exist and possibly traverse the source regions. We will provide statistics on the occurrence of the injections and discuss possible sources and implications.

  7. The Electron Transport Chain: An Interactive Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Chris; Choun, James

    2014-01-01

    This activity provides students an interactive demonstration of the electron transport chain and chemiosmosis during aerobic respiration. Students use simple, everyday objects as hydrogen ions and electrons and play the roles of the various proteins embedded in the inner mitochondrial membrane to show how this specific process in cellular…

  8. Phonon limited electronic transport in Pb

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rittweger, Florian; Hinsche, Nicki Frank; Mertig, Ingrid

    2017-01-01

    We present a fully ab initio based scheme to compute electronic transport properties, i.e. the electrical conductivity σ and thermopower S, in the presence of electron-phonon interaction. We explicitly investigate the k-dependent structure of the Éliashberg spectral function, the coupling strength...

  9. MONTE CARLO SIMULATION MODEL OF ENERGETIC PROTON TRANSPORT THROUGH SELF-GENERATED ALFVEN WAVES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afanasiev, A.; Vainio, R., E-mail: alexandr.afanasiev@helsinki.fi [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki (Finland)

    2013-08-15

    A new Monte Carlo simulation model for the transport of energetic protons through self-generated Alfven waves is presented. The key point of the model is that, unlike the previous ones, it employs the full form (i.e., includes the dependence on the pitch-angle cosine) of the resonance condition governing the scattering of particles off Alfven waves-the process that approximates the wave-particle interactions in the framework of quasilinear theory. This allows us to model the wave-particle interactions in weak turbulence more adequately, in particular, to implement anisotropic particle scattering instead of isotropic scattering, which the previous Monte Carlo models were based on. The developed model is applied to study the transport of flare-accelerated protons in an open magnetic flux tube. Simulation results for the transport of monoenergetic protons through the spectrum of Alfven waves reveal that the anisotropic scattering leads to spatially more distributed wave growth than isotropic scattering. This result can have important implications for diffusive shock acceleration, e.g., affect the scattering mean free path of the accelerated particles in and the size of the foreshock region.

  10. Effect of energetic electrons on dust charging in hot cathode filament discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakati, B.; Kausik, S. S.; Saikia, B. K.; Bandyopadhyay, M.

    2011-03-01

    The effect of energetic electrons on dust charging for different types of dust is studied in hydrogen plasma. The hydrogen plasma is produced by hot cathode filament discharge method in a dusty plasma device. A full line cusped magnetic field cage is used to confine the plasma elements. To study the plasma parameters for various discharge conditions, a cylindrical Langmuir probe having 0.15 mm diameter and 10.0 mm length is used. An electronically controlled dust dropper is used to drop the dust particles into the plasma. For different discharge conditions, the dust current is measured using a Faraday cup connected to an electrometer. The effect of secondary emission as well as discharge voltage on charging of dust grains in hydrogen plasma is studied with different dust.

  11. Effect of energetic electrons on dust charging in hot cathode filament discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakati, B.; Kausik, S. S.; Saikia, B. K.; Bandyopadhyay, M.

    2011-01-01

    The effect of energetic electrons on dust charging for different types of dust is studied in hydrogen plasma. The hydrogen plasma is produced by hot cathode filament discharge method in a dusty plasma device. A full line cusped magnetic field cage is used to confine the plasma elements. To study the plasma parameters for various discharge conditions, a cylindrical Langmuir probe having 0.15 mm diameter and 10.0 mm length is used. An electronically controlled dust dropper is used to drop the dust particles into the plasma. For different discharge conditions, the dust current is measured using a Faraday cup connected to an electrometer. The effect of secondary emission as well as discharge voltage on charging of dust grains in hydrogen plasma is studied with different dust.

  12. Monte Carlo electron/photon transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mack, J.M.; Morel, J.E.; Hughes, H.G.

    1985-01-01

    A review of nonplasma coupled electron/photon transport using Monte Carlo method is presented. Remarks are mainly restricted to linerarized formalisms at electron energies from 1 keV to 1000 MeV. Applications involving pulse-height estimation, transport in external magnetic fields, and optical Cerenkov production are discussed to underscore the importance of this branch of computational physics. Advances in electron multigroup cross-section generation is reported, and its impact on future code development assessed. Progress toward the transformation of MCNP into a generalized neutral/charged-particle Monte Carlo code is described. 48 refs

  13. Energetic electron precipitation in weak to moderate corotating interaction region-driven storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ødegaard, Linn-Kristine Glesnes; Tyssøy, Hilde Nesse; Søraas, Finn; Stadsnes, Johan; Sandanger, Marit Irene

    2017-03-01

    High-energy electron precipitation from the radiation belts can penetrate deep into the mesosphere and increase the production rate of NOx and HOx, which in turn will reduce ozone in catalytic processes. The mechanisms for acceleration and loss of electrons in the radiation belts are not fully understood, and most of the measurements of the precipitating flux into the atmosphere have been insufficient for estimating the loss cone flux. In the present study the electron flux measured by the NOAA POES Medium Energy Proton and Electron Detectors 0° and 90° detectors is combined together with theory of pitch angle diffusion by wave-particle interaction to quantify the electron flux lost below 120 km altitude. Using this method, 41 weak and moderate geomagnetic storms caused by corotating interaction regions during 2006-2010 are studied. The dependence of the energetic electron precipitation fluxes upon solar wind parameters and geomagnetic indices is investigated. Nine storms give increased precipitation of >˜750 keV electrons. Nineteen storms increase the precipitation of >˜300 keV electrons, but not the >˜750 keV population. Thirteen storms either do not change or deplete the fluxes at those energies. Storms that have an increase in the flux of electrons with energy >˜300 keV are characterized by an elevated solar wind velocity for a longer period compared to the storms that do not. Storms with increased precipitation of >˜750 keV flux are distinguished by higher-energy input from the solar wind quantified by the ɛ parameter and corresponding higher geomagnetic activity.

  14. Nonlinear electron transport in magnetized laser plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kho, T.H.; Haines, M.G.

    1986-01-01

    Electron transport in a magnetized plasma heated by inverse bremsstrahlung is studied numerically using a nonlinear Fokker--Planck model with self-consistent E and B fields. The numerical scheme is described. Nonlocal transport is found to alter many of the transport coefficients derived from linear transport theory, in particular, the Nernst and Righi--Leduc effects, in addition to the perpendicular heat flux q/sub perpendicular/, are substantially reduced near critical surface. The magnetic field, however, remains strongly coupled to the nonlinear q/sub perpendicular/ and, as has been found in hydrosimulations, convective amplification of the magnetic field occurs in the overdense plasma

  15. Electron transport in heterogeneous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falcao, Rossana Cavalieri

    1992-05-01

    In this work it is presented a model to calculate dose enhancement in the vicinity of plane interfaces irradiated by therapeutic electron beams. The proposed model is based on an approximation of the Boltzmann Equation. The solutions presented to the equation are exact on its angular dependency, making it possible to observe that at low Z/high Z interfaces the dose enhancement is due to an increase of the backscattering. For the inverse situation a decrease of the backscattering can be observed. Calculations have been made for some tissue-metal interfaces irradiated by 13 MeV electron beam. The dose perturbations in tissue were obtained and the results were compared with experimental data as well as Monte Carlo simulations. In both cases the agreement found was very good. (author)

  16. Low altitude observations of the energetic electrons in the outer radiation belt during isolated substorms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varga, L.; Venkatesan, D.; Johns Hopkins Univ., Laurel, MD; Meng, C.I.

    1985-01-01

    The low energy (1-20 keV) detector registering particles onboard the polar-orbiting low altitude (approx. 850 km) DMSP-F2 and -F3 satellites also records high energy electrons penetrating the detector walls. Thus the dynamics of this electron population at L=3.5 can be studied during isolated periods of magnetospheric substorms identified by the indices of auroral electrojet (AE), geomagnetic (Ksub(p)) and ring current (Dsub(st)). Temporal changes in the electron flux during the substorms are observed to be an additional contribution riding over the top of the pre-storm (or geomagnetically quiet-time) electron population; the duration of the interval of intensity variations is observed to be about the same as that of the enhancement of the AE index. This indicates the temporal response of the outer radiation belt to the substorm activity, since the observation was made in the ''horns'' of the outer radiation belt. The observed enhanced radiation at low altitude may associate with the instantaneous increase and/or dumping of the outer radiation belt energetic electrons during each isolated substorm activity. (author)

  17. An Energetic Electron Flux Dropout Due to Magnetopause Shadowing on 1 June 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Suk-Bin; Fok, Mei-Ching; Komar, Colin; Glocer, Alex; Li, Wen; Buzulukova, Natalia

    2018-02-01

    We examine the mechanisms responsible for the dropout of energetic electron flux during 31 May to 1 June 2013 using Van Allen Probe (Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP)) electron flux data and simulations with the Comprehensive Inner Magnetosphere-Ionosphere (CIMI) model. During the storm main phase, L-shells at RBSP locations are greater than 8, which are connected to open drift shells. Consequently, diminished electron fluxes were observed over a wide range of energies. The combination of drift shell splitting, magnetopause shadowing, and drift loss all results in butterfly electron pitch angle distributions (PADs) at the nightside. During storm sudden commencement, RBSP observations display electron butterfly PADs over a wide range of energies. However, it is difficult to determine whether there are butterfly PADs during the storm main phase since the maximum observable equatorial pitch angle from RBSP is not larger than 40° during this period. To investigate the causes of the dropout, the CIMI model is used as a global 4-D kinetic inner magnetosphere model. The CIMI model reproduces the dropout with very similar timing and flux levels and PADs along the RBSP trajectory for 593 keV. Furthermore, the CIMI simulation shows butterfly PADs for 593 keV during the storm main phase. Based on comparison of observations and simulations, we suggest that the dropout during this event mainly results from magnetopause shadowing.

  18. Observations of field-aligned energetic electron and ion distributions near the magnetopause at geosynchronous orbit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korth, A.; Kremser, G.; Daly, P.W.; Amata, E.

    1982-01-01

    On August 28, 1978, the dayside magnetopause crossed the geosynchronous satellite GEOS 2 several times during a geomagnetically disturbed period, and clear signatures of the interconnection of field lines through the magnetopause were observed. The MPAE particle spectrometer provided high time resolution observations of the distribution of energetic electrons (E>22 keV) and ions (E>27 keV). Magnetometer data were used to determine the location of GEOS 2 relative to the magnetopause. The pitch angle distributions of ions and electrons were found to be strongly asymmetric with respect to 90 0 , and the asymmetries have been interpreted in terms of field-aligned particle streaming. Evidence is provided for the first time for electron streaming inside the magnetopause which continues for many bounce periods. It is concluded that magnetospheric field lines opened, at least for brief time intervals, as a consequence of interconnection with magnetosheath field lines. Comparisons of electron spectra provide evidence that the streaming electrons observed in the magnetosheath originate in the magnetosphere

  19. Quantitative study of substorm-associated VLF phase anomalies and precipitating energetic electrons on November 13, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, T.; Evans, D.S.

    1983-01-01

    The phase anomalies associated with substorms are observed on VLF signals propagating on transauroral paths (transmitters at OMEGA-ALDRA (13.6 kHz), GBR (16.0 kHz), and OMEGA--NORTH DAKOTA (13.6 kHz)) which were continually received at Inubo, Japan, during the events on November 13, 1979. Detailed comparisons are made between these phase anomalies and geomagnetic bays, and quantitative relations are obtained with precipitating energetic electrons (E>30, E>100, and E>300 keV) detected on board the TIROS-N and NOAA 6 satellites. It is concluded that two types of VLF phase anomalies exist which, in turn, are associated with two phases in the history of energetic electron precipitation into the atmosphere. The first type of phase anomaly is associated with direct injection of energetic electrons into the outer magnetosphere and atmosphere which, in turn, is completely correlated in time with development of the auroral electrojet current system. The second type arises from energetic electrons which subsequently precipitate from a trapped electron population and has a delayed onset and prolonged duration. An excellent quantitative correlation is obtained between the logarithm of the electron flux and the magnitude of the phase anomaly on the OMEGA-ALDRA signal. From the local time characteristics of this quantitative relation it is deduced that the electrons with E>300 keV are the main source of D region ionization responsible for the VLF phase anomaly

  20. Plasma channels for electron beam transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, R.F.; Smith, J.R.; Moffatt, M.E.; Nguyen, K.T.; Uhm, H.S.

    1988-01-01

    In recent years, there has been much interest in transport of intense relativistic electron beams using plasma channels. These channels are formed by either: ionization of an organic gas by UV photoionization or electron impact ionization of a low pressure gas utilizing a low energy (typically several hundred volts) electron gun. The second method is discussed here. As their electron gun, the authors used a 12 volt lightbulb filament which is biased to -400 volts with respect to the grounded 15 cm diameter drift tube. The electrons emitted from the filament are confined by an axial magnetic field of --100 Gauss to create a plasma channel which is less than 1 cm in radius. The channel density has been determined with Langmuir probes and the resulting line densities were found to be 10 11 to 10 12 per cm. When a multi-kiloamp electron beam is injected onto this channel, the beam space charge will eject the plasma electrons leaving the ions behind to charge neutralize the electron beam, hence allowing the beam to propagate. In this work, the authors performed experimental studies on the dynamics of the plasma channel. These include Langmuir probe measurements of a steady state (DC) channel, as well as time-resolved Langmuir probe studies of pulsed channels. In addition they performed experimental studies of beam propagation in these plasma channels. Specifically, they observed the behavior of current transport in these channels. Detailed results of beam transport and channel studies are presented

  1. Innovative electron transport methods in EGS5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bielajew, A.F.; Wilderman, S.J.

    2000-01-01

    The initial formulation of a Monte Carlo scheme for the transport of high-energy (>≅ 100 keV) electrons was established by Berger in 1963. Calling his method the 'condensed history theory', Berger combined the theoretical results of the previous generation of research into developing approximate solutions of the Boltzmann transport equation with numerical algorithms for exploiting the power of computers to permit iterative, piece-wise solution of the transport equation in a computationally intensive but much less approximate fashion. The methods devised by Berger, with comparatively little modification, provide the foundation of all present day Monte Carlo electron transport simulation algorithms. Only in the last 15 years, beginning with the development and publication of the PRESTA algorithm, has there been a significant revisitation of the problem of simulating electron transport within the condensed history framework. Research in this area is ongoing, highly active, and far from complete. It presents an enormous challenge, demanding derivation of new analytical transport solutions based on underlying fundamental interaction mechanisms, intuitive insight in the development of computer algorithms, and state of the art computer science skills in order to permit deployment of these techniques in an efficient manner. The EGS5 project, a modern ground-up rewrite of the EGS4 code, is now in the design phase. EGS5 will take modern photon and electron transport algorithms and deploy them in an easy-to-maintain, modern computer language-ANSI-standard C ++. Moreover, the well-known difficulties of applying EGS4 to practical geometries (geometry code development, tally routine design) should be made easier and more intuitive through the use of a visual user interface being designed by Quantum Research, Inc., work that is presented elsewhere in this conference. This report commences with a historical review of electron transport models culminating with the proposal of a

  2. InP and InAs nanowires hetero- and homojunctions: energetic stability and electronic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionízio Moreira, M; Venezuela, P; Miwa, R H

    2010-07-16

    We performed an ab initio total energy investigation, within the density functional theory, of the energetic stability and the electronic properties of hydrogenated InAs/InP nanowire (NW) heterojunctions, as well as InAs and InP homojunctions composed of different structural arrangements, zinc-blend (zb) and wurtzite (w). For InAs/InP NW heterojunctions our results indicate that w and zb NW heterojunctions are quite similar, energetically, for thin NWs. We also examined the robustness of the abrupt interface through an atomic swap at the InAs/InP interface. Our results support the formation of abrupt (non-abrupt) interfaces in w (zb) InAs/InP heterojunctions. Concerning InAs/InP NW-SLs, our results indicate a type-I band alignment, with the energy barrier at the InP layers, in accordance with experimental works. For InAs or InP zb/w homojunctions, we also found a type-I band alignment for thin NWs, however, on increasing the NW diameter both InAs and InP homojunctions exhibit a type-II band alignment.

  3. InP and InAs nanowires hetero- and homojunctions: energetic stability and electronic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dionizio Moreira, M; Venezuela, P; Miwa, R H

    2010-01-01

    We performed an ab initio total energy investigation, within the density functional theory, of the energetic stability and the electronic properties of hydrogenated InAs/InP nanowire (NW) heterojunctions, as well as InAs and InP homojunctions composed of different structural arrangements, zinc-blend (zb) and wurtzite (w). For InAs/InP NW heterojunctions our results indicate that w and zb NW heterojunctions are quite similar, energetically, for thin NWs. We also examined the robustness of the abrupt interface through an atomic As↔P swap at the InAs/InP interface. Our results support the formation of abrupt (non-abrupt) interfaces in w (zb) InAs/InP heterojunctions. Concerning InAs/InP NW-SLs, our results indicate a type-I band alignment, with the energy barrier at the InP layers, in accordance with experimental works. For InAs or InP zb/w homojunctions, we also found a type-I band alignment for thin NWs, however, on increasing the NW diameter both InAs and InP homojunctions exhibit a type-II band alignment.

  4. SciDAC GSEP: Gyrokinetic Simulation of Energetic Particle Turbulence and Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Zhihong [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2017-12-30

    Energetic particle (EP) confinement is a key physics issue for burning plasma experiment ITER, the crucial next step in the quest for clean and abundant energy, since ignition relies on self-heating by energetic fusion products (α-particles). Due to the strong coupling of EP with burning thermal plasmas, plasma confinement property in the ignition regime is one of the most uncertain factors when extrapolating from existing fusion devices to the ITER tokamak. EP population in current tokamaks are mostly produced by auxiliary heating such as neutral beam injection (NBI) and radio frequency (RF) heating. Remarkable progress in developing comprehensive EP simulation codes and understanding basic EP physics has been made by two concurrent SciDAC EP projects GSEP funded by the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Fusion Energy Science (OFES), which have successfully established gyrokinetic turbulence simulation as a necessary paradigm shift for studying the EP confinement in burning plasmas. Verification and validation have rapidly advanced through close collaborations between simulation, theory, and experiment. Furthermore, productive collaborations with computational scientists have enabled EP simulation codes to effectively utilize current petascale computers and emerging exascale computers. We review here key physics progress in the GSEP projects regarding verification and validation of gyrokinetic simulations, nonlinear EP physics, EP coupling with thermal plasmas, and reduced EP transport models. Advances in high performance computing through collaborations with computational scientists that enable these large scale electromagnetic simulations are also highlighted. These results have been widely disseminated in numerous peer-reviewed publications including many Phys. Rev. Lett. papers and many invited presentations at prominent fusion conferences such as the biennial International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Fusion Energy Conference and the annual meeting of the

  5. Relevance of southward magnetic fields in the neutral sheet to anisotropic distribution of energetic electrons and substorm activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lui, A.T.Y.; Meng, C.

    1979-01-01

    The implications of southward magnetic fields at the magnetotail neutral sheet to the development of streaming anisotropy of energetic electrons and magnetospheric substorm activity are examined. Magnetic field and energetic particle measurements from the Imp 6 spacecraft, the AE index, and global auroral images from DMSP spacecraft are utilized in this study. Criteria are developed to identify events of southward magnetic fields at the neutral sheet which imply the presence of X-type magnetic neutral lines. Several features of the observations suggest that the southward magnetic fields and the implied X-type neutral lines are associated with magnetic bubbles in the neutral sheet region. It is found that the signatures of magnetic bubbles are sometimes detected in association with tailward streaming and flux enhancement of energetic electrons (47 keV< E<350keV). A cigar-shaped anisotropy in the energetic electron distribution is frequently but not always observed before the onset of tailward streaming of energetic electrons. The tailward streaming is magnetic field-aligned and occurs in the form of bursts, suggestic electrons. The tailward streaming is magnetic field-aligned and occurs in the form of bursts, suggesting that the generating process is activated somewhat quasi-periodically and is not in a steady state. Signatures of magnetic bubbles are also detected without any substantial enhancement or detectable tailward streaming of energetic electrons. By comparing Imp 6 observations with the AW index and global auroral images from DMSP spacecraft. It is found that signatures of magnetic bubbles in the neutral sheet are observed during substorms as well as during quiet geomagnetic conditions, indicating that magnetic bubbles are intrinsic features of the neutral sheet in the magnetotail regardless of substorm activity

  6. Paleoclassical transport explains electron transport barriers in RTP and TEXTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hogeweij, G M D [FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, Association EURATOM-FOM, PO Box 1207, NL-3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Callen, J D [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706-1609 (United States)

    2008-06-15

    The recently developed paleoclassical transport model sets the minimum level of electron thermal transport in a tokamak. This transport level has proven to be in good agreement with experimental observations in many cases when fluctuation-induced anomalous transport is small, i.e. in (near-)ohmic plasmas in small to medium size tokamaks, inside internal transport barriers (ITBs) or edge transport barriers (H-mode pedestal). In this paper predictions of the paleoclassical transport model are compared in detail with data from such kinds of discharges: ohmic discharges from the RTP tokamak, EC heated RTP discharges featuring both dynamic and shot-to-shot scans of the ECH power deposition radius and off-axis EC heated discharges from the TEXTOR tokamak. For ohmically heated RTP discharges the T{sub e} profiles predicted by the paleoclassical model are in reasonable agreement with the experimental observations, and various parametric dependences are captured satisfactorily. The electron thermal ITBs observed in steady state EC heated RTP discharges and transiently after switch-off of off-axis ECH in TEXTOR are predicted very well by the paleoclassical model.

  7. The quiet time structure of energetic (35--560 keV) radiation belt electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyons, L.R.; Williams, D.J.

    1975-01-01

    Detailed Explorer 45 equatorial observations of the quiet time structure of radiation belt electrons (35--560 keV) for 1.7approximately-less-thanLapproximately-less-than5.2 are presented. Throughout the slot region and outer regions of the plasmasphere the observed pitch angle distributions are found to agree with those expected from resonant interactions with the plasmaspheric whistler mode wave band. Coulomb collisions become the dominant loss mechanism within the inner zone. The overall two-zone structure of the observed radial profiles is found to agree with the equilibrium structure expected to result from a balance between pitch angle scattering losses and radial diffusion from an average outer zone source. This agreement suggests that the dominant quiet time source and loss mechanisms have been identified and evaluated for energetic radiation belt electrons within the plasmasphere. In the outer regions of the plasmasphere (Lapprox.5) the equilibrium structure is observed to be modified by daily flux variations associated with changes in the level of magnetic activity that occur even during relatively quiet times. Within the inner region of the plasmasphere (Lapproximately-less-than3.5), electron fluxes are decoupled from these magnetic activity variations by the long time scales (>10 days) required for pitch angle and radial diffusion. Consequently, fluxes of these electrons are observed to remain nearly constant at equilibrium levels throughout the quiet periods examined

  8. Formation, Energetics, and Electronic Properties of Graphene Monolayer and Bilayer Doped with Heteroatoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshitaka Fujimoto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Doping with heteroatoms is one of the most effective methods to tailor the electronic properties of carbon nanomaterials such as graphene and carbon nanotubes, and such nanomaterials doped with heteroatom dopants might therefore provide not only new physical and chemical properties but also novel nanoelectronics/optoelectronics device applications. The boron and nitrogen are neighboring elements to carbon in the periodic table, and they are considered to be good dopants for carbon nanomaterials. We here review the recent work of boron and nitrogen doping effects into graphene monolayer as well as bilayer on the basis of the first-principles electronic structure calculations in the framework of the density-functional theory. We show the energetics and the electronic properties of boron and nitrogen defects in graphene monolayer and bilayer. As for the nitrogen doping, we further discuss the stabilities, the growth processes, and the electronic properties associated with the plausible nitrogen defect formation in graphene which is suggested by experimental observations.

  9. Radio wave dissipation in turbulent auroral plasma during the precipitation of energetic electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishin, E.V.; Luk'ianova, L.N.; Makarenko, S.F.; Atamaniuk, B.M.

    1992-01-01

    The results of the theoretical analysis of anomalous (collisionless) radio wave absorption in the turbulent auroral ionosphere during the intrusion of energetic electrons (i.e., in aurorae) are presented. The implications of the plasma turbulent layer (PTL) theory are used. It is shown that the dissipation of radio waves with frequencies much higher than the plasma frequency is caused by the nonlinear (combined) scattering in turbulent plasma of the PTL. In the auroral electrojet layer the principal dissipative process for the radio waves with frequencies close to the plasma frequency is O-Z transformation on the field-aligned, small-scale density fluctuations. The typical dissipation decrements are estimated. 26 refs

  10. Electron transport through monovalent atomic wires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Y. J.; Brandbyge, Mads; Puska, M. J.

    2004-01-01

    at the chain determine the conductance. As a result, the conductance for noble-metal chains is close to one quantum of conductance, and it oscillates moderately so that an even number of chain atoms yields a higher value than an odd number. The conductance oscillations are large for alkali-metal chains......Using a first-principles density-functional method we model electron transport through linear chains of monovalent atoms between two bulk electrodes. For noble-metal chains the transport resembles that for free electrons over a potential barrier whereas for alkali-metal chains resonance states...... and their phase is opposite to that of noble-metal chains....

  11. Energetic-particle-driven instabilities and induced fast-ion transport in a reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, L.; Brower, D. L.; Ding, W. X.; Anderson, J. K.; Capecchi, W.; Eilerman, S.; Forest, C. B.; Koliner, J. J.; Nornberg, M. D.; Reusch, J.; Sarff, J. S.; Liu, D.

    2014-01-01

    Multiple bursty energetic-particle (EP) driven modes with fishbone-like structure are observed during 1 MW tangential neutral-beam injection in a reversed field pinch (RFP) device. The distinguishing features of the RFP, including large magnetic shear (tending to add stability) and weak toroidal magnetic field (leading to stronger drive), provide a complementary environment to tokamak and stellarator configurations for exploring basic understanding of EP instabilities. Detailed measurements of the EP mode characteristics and temporal-spatial dynamics reveal their influence on fast ion transport. Density fluctuations exhibit a dynamically evolving, inboard-outboard asymmetric spatial structure that peaks in the core where fast ions reside. The measured mode frequencies are close to the computed shear Alfvén frequency, a feature consistent with continuum modes destabilized by strong drive. The frequency pattern of the dominant mode depends on the fast-ion species. Multiple frequencies occur with deuterium fast ions compared to single frequency for hydrogen fast ions. Furthermore, as the safety factor (q) decreases, the toroidal mode number of the dominant EP mode transits from n=5 to n=6 while retaining the same poloidal mode number m=1. The transition occurs when the m=1, n=5 wave-particle resonance condition cannot be satisfied as the fast-ion safety factor (q fi ) decreases. The fast-ion temporal dynamics, measured by a neutral particle analyzer, resemble a classical predator-prey relaxation oscillation. It contains a slow-growth phase arising from the beam fueling followed by a rapid drop when the EP modes peak, indicating that the fluctuation-induced transport maintains a stiff fast-ion density profile. The inferred transport rate is strongly enhanced with the onset of multiple EP modes

  12. The Effects of Interplanetary Transport in the Event-intergrated Solar Energetic Particle Spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Lulu; Zhang, Ming; Rassoul, Hamid K., E-mail: lzhao@fit.edu [Physics and Space Sciences Department, Florida Institute of Technology, Melbourne, FL 32901 (United States)

    2017-02-10

    Previous investigations on the energy spectra of solar energetic particle (SEP) events revealed that the energy spectra observed at 1 au often show double power laws with break energies from one to tens of MeV/nuc. In order to determine whether the double power-law features result from the SEP source or the interplanetary transport process from the Sun to 1 au, we separately analyze the SEP spectra in the decay phase, during which the transport effect is minimum. In this paper, we reported three events observed by the Interplanetary Monitory Platform 8 spacecraft, which occurred on 1977 September 19, November 22, and 1979 March 1. For the first two events, the event-integrated spectra of protons possess double power-law profiles with break energies in a range of several MeV to tens of MeV, while the spectra integrated in the decay (reservoir) phase yield single power laws. Moreover, a general trend from a double power law at the rising phase to a single power law at the decay phase is observed. For the third event, both the event-integrated and the reservoir spectra show double power-law features. However, the difference between the low- and high-energy power-law indices is smaller for the reservoir spectrum than the event-integrated spectrum. These features were reproduced by solving the 1D diffusion equation analytically and we suggest that the transport process, especially the diffusion process, plays an important role in breaking the energy spectra.

  13. Epitaxial graphene electronic structure and transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Heer, Walt A; Berger, Claire; Wu Xiaosong; Sprinkle, Mike; Hu Yike; Ruan Ming; First, Phillip N; Stroscio, Joseph A; Haddon, Robert; Piot, Benjamin; Faugeras, Clement; Potemski, Marek; Moon, Jeong-Sun

    2010-01-01

    Since its inception in 2001, the science and technology of epitaxial graphene on hexagonal silicon carbide has matured into a major international effort and is poised to become the first carbon electronics platform. A historical perspective is presented and the unique electronic properties of single and multilayered epitaxial graphenes on electronics grade silicon carbide are reviewed. Early results on transport and the field effect in Si-face grown graphene monolayers provided proof-of-principle demonstrations. Besides monolayer epitaxial graphene, attention is given to C-face grown multilayer graphene, which consists of electronically decoupled graphene sheets. Production, structure and electronic structure are reviewed. The electronic properties, interrogated using a wide variety of surface, electrical and optical probes, are discussed. An overview is given of recent developments of several device prototypes including resistance standards based on epitaxial graphene quantum Hall devices and new ultrahigh frequency analogue epitaxial graphene amplifiers.

  14. Computational methods of electron/photon transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mack, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    A review of computational methods simulating the non-plasma transport of electrons and their attendant cascades is presented. Remarks are mainly restricted to linearized formalisms at electron energies above 1 keV. The effectiveness of various metods is discussed including moments, point-kernel, invariant imbedding, discrete-ordinates, and Monte Carlo. Future research directions and the potential impact on various aspects of science and engineering are indicated

  15. Low energy electron transport in furfural

    OpenAIRE

    Lozano, Ana I.; Krupa, K.; Ferreira da Silva, F.; Limao-Vieira, Paulo; Blanco, Francisco; Muñoz, Antonio; Jones, D. B.; Brunger, M. J.; García, Gustavo

    2017-01-01

    We report on an initial investigation into the transport of electrons through a gas cell containing 1 mTorr of gaseous furfural. Results from our Monte Carlo simulation are implicitly checked against those from a corresponding electron transmission measurement. To enable this simulation a self-consistent cross section data base was constructed. This data base is benchmarked through new total cross section measurements which are also described here. In addition, again to facilitate the simulat...

  16. Time dependent degradation of energetic electrons in gaseous and condensed media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dillon, M.; Kimura, M.

    1987-01-01

    A transport equation formulated by Spencer and Fano has been used to calculate initial yields of products formed by electron interactions under conditions of steady state irradiation. Since experimental observation of initial yields may now be possible it is desirable to generalize the treatment of Spencer and Fano to include transient effects explicitly. 6 refs., 2 figs

  17. Understanding charge transport in molecular electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushmerick, J J; Pollack, S K; Yang, J C; Naciri, J; Holt, D B; Ratner, M A; Shashidhar, R

    2003-12-01

    For molecular electronics to become a viable technology the factors that control charge transport across a metal-molecule-metal junction need to be elucidated. We use an experimentally simple crossed-wire tunnel junction to interrogate how factors such as metal-molecule coupling, molecular structure, and the choice of metal electrode influence the current-voltage characteristics of a molecular junction.

  18. Filamentous bacteria transport electrons over centimetre distances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfeffer, Christian; Larsen, Steffen; Song, Jie

    2012-01-01

    across centimetre-wide zones. Here we present evidence that the native conductors are long, filamentous bacteria. They abounded in sediment zones with electric currents and along their length they contained strings with distinct properties in accordance with a function as electron transporters. Living...

  19. Study on the creation and destruction of transport barriers via the effective safety factors for energetic particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Shun; Leoncini, Xavier; Dif-Pradalier, Guilhem; Garbet, Xavier

    2016-12-01

    Charged particles with low kinetic energy move along the magnetic field lines, but so do not the energetic particles. We investigate the topological structure changes in the phase space of energetic particles with respect to the magnetic one. For this study, cylindrical magnetic fields with non-monotonic safety factors that induce the magnetic internal transport barrier are considered. We show that the topological structure of the magnetic field line and of the particle trajectories can be quite different. We explain this difference using the concept of an effective particle q-profile. Using this notion, we can investigate the location and existence of resonances for particle orbits that are different from the magnetic ones. These are examined both numerically by integrating an equation of motion and theoretically by the use of Alfvén's guiding center theory and by the use of an effective reduced Hamiltonian for the integrable unperturbed system. It is clarified that, for the energetic particles, the grad B drift effect shifts the resonances and the drift induced by curvature of the magnetic field line leads to the vanishing of the resonances. As a result, we give two different mechanisms that lead to the creation of transport barriers for energetic particles in the region where the magnetic field line is chaotic.

  20. Electronic transport in torsional strained Weyl semimetals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-Garrido, Rodrigo; Muñoz, Enrique

    2018-05-01

    In a recent paper (Muñoz and Soto-Garrido 2017 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 29 445302) we have studied the effects of mechanical strain and magnetic field on the electronic transport properties in graphene. In this article we extended our work to Weyl semimetals (WSM). We show that although the WSM are 3D materials, most of the analysis done for graphene (2D material) can be carried out. In particular, we studied the electronic transport through a cylindrical region submitted to torsional strain and external magnetic field. We provide exact analytical expressions for the scattering cross section and the transmitted electronic current. In addition, we show the node-polarization effect on the current and propose a recipe to measure the torsion angle from transmission experiments.

  1. An Analysis of Conjugate Ground-based and Space-based Measurements of Energetic Electrons during Substorms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivadas, N.; Semeter, J. L.

    2015-12-01

    Substorms within the Earth's magnetosphere release energy in the form of energetic charged particles and several kinds of waves within the plasma. Depending on their strength, satellite-based navigation and communication systems are adversely affected by the energetic charged particles. Like many other natural phenomena, substorms can have a severe economic impact on a technology-driven society such as ours. Though energization of charged particles is known to occur in the magnetosphere during substorms, the source of this population and its relation to traditional acceleration region dynamics, are not completely understood. Combining measurements of energetic charged particles within the plasmasheet and that of charged particles precipitated in to the ionosphere will provide a better understanding of the role of processes that accelerate these charged particles. In the current work, we present energetic electron flux measured indirectly using data from ground-based Incoherent Scatter Radar and that measured directly at the plasmasheet by the THEMIS spacecraft. Instances of low-altitude-precipitation observed from ground suggest electrons of energy greater than 300 keV, possibly arising from particle injection events during substorms at the magnetically conjugate locations in the plasmasheet. The differences and similarities in the measurements at the plasmasheet and the ionosphere indicate the role different processes play in influencing the journey of these energetic particles form the magnetosphere to the ionosphere. Our observations suggest that there is a lot more to be understood of the link between magnetotail dynamics and energetic electron precipitation during substorms. Understanding this may open up novel and potentially invaluable ways of diagnosing the magnetosphere from the ground.

  2. Electron transport chains in organohalide-respiring bacteria and bioremediation implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shanquan; Qiu, Lan; Liu, Xiaowei; Xu, Guofang; Siegert, Michael; Lu, Qihong; Juneau, Philippe; Yu, Ling; Liang, Dawei; He, Zhili; Qiu, Rongliang

    2018-04-06

    In situ remediation employing organohalide-respiring bacteria represents a promising solution for cleanup of persistent organohalide pollutants. The organohalide-respiring bacteria conserve energy by utilizing H 2 or organic compounds as electron donors and organohalides as electron acceptors. Reductive dehalogenase (RDase), a terminal reductase of the electron transport chain in organohalide-respiring bacteria, is the key enzyme that catalyzes halogen removal. Accumulating experimental evidence thus far suggests that there are distinct models for respiratory electron transfer in organohalide-respirers of different lineages, e.g., Dehalococcoides, Dehalobacter, Desulfitobacterium and Sulfurospirillum. In this review, to connect the knowledge in organohalide-respiratory electron transport chains to bioremediation applications, we first comprehensively review molecular components and their organization, together with energetics of the organohalide-respiratory electron transport chains, as well as recent elucidation of intramolecular electron shuttling and halogen elimination mechanisms of RDases. We then highlight the implications of organohalide-respiratory electron transport chains in stimulated bioremediation. In addition, major challenges and further developments toward understanding the organohalide-respiratory electron transport chains and their bioremediation applications are identified and discussed. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Electron-Ion Intensity Dropouts in Gradual Solar Energetic Particle Events during Solar Cycle 23

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Lun C.

    2017-09-01

    Since the field-line mixing model of Giacalone et al. suggests that ion dropouts cannot happen in the “gradual” solar energetic particle (SEP) event because of the large size of the particle source region in the event, the observational evidence of ion dropouts in the gradual SEP event should challenge the model. We have searched for the presence of ion dropouts in the gradual SEP event during solar cycle 23. From 10 SEP events the synchronized occurrence of ion and electron dropouts is identified in 12 periods. Our main observational facts, including the mean width of electron-ion dropout periods being consistent with the solar wind correlation scale, during the dropout period the dominance of the slab turbulence component and the enhanced turbulence power parallel to the mean magnetic field, and the ion gyroradius dependence of the edge steepness in dropout periods, are all in support of the solar wind turbulence origin of dropout events. Also, our observation indicates that a wide longitude distribution of SEP events could be due to the increase of slab turbulence fraction with the increased longitude distance from the flare-associated active region.

  4. The effect of electron-electron interaction induced dephasing on electronic transport in graphene nanoribbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kahnoj, Sina Soleimani; Touski, Shoeib Babaee [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 14395-515, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Pourfath, Mahdi, E-mail: pourfath@ut.ac.ir, E-mail: pourfath@iue.tuwien.ac.at [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 14395-515, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute for Microelectronics, TU Wien, Gusshausstrasse 27–29/E360, 1040 Vienna (Austria)

    2014-09-08

    The effect of dephasing induced by electron-electron interaction on electronic transport in graphene nanoribbons is theoretically investigated. In the presence of disorder in graphene nanoribbons, wavefunction of electrons can set up standing waves along the channel and the conductance exponentially decreases with the ribbon's length. Employing the non-equilibrium Green's function formalism along with an accurate model for describing the dephasing induced by electron-electron interaction, we show that this kind of interaction prevents localization and transport of electrons remains in the diffusive regime where the conductance is inversely proportional to the ribbon's length.

  5. Transport theory for energetic alpha particles and tolerable magnitude of error fields in tokamaks with broken symmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaing, K.C.; Hsu, C.T.

    2014-01-01

    A transport theory for energetic fusion born alpha particles in tokamaks with broken symmetry has been developed. The theory is a generalization of the theory for neoclassical toroidal plasma viscosity for thermal particles in tokamaks. It is shown that the radial energy transport rate can be comparable to the slowing down rate for energetic alpha particles when the ratio of the typical magnitude of the perturbed magnetic field strength to that of the equilibrium magnetic field strength is of the order of 10 −4 or larger. This imposes a constraint on the magnitude of the error fields in thermonuclear fusion reactors. The implications on stellarators as potential fusion reactors are also discussed. (paper)

  6. Electronic Transport in Two-Dimensional Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangwan, Vinod K.; Hersam, Mark C.

    2018-04-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials have captured the attention of the scientific community due to the wide range of unique properties at nanometer-scale thicknesses. While significant exploratory research in 2D materials has been achieved, the understanding of 2D electronic transport and carrier dynamics remains in a nascent stage. Furthermore, because prior review articles have provided general overviews of 2D materials or specifically focused on charge transport in graphene, here we instead highlight charge transport mechanisms in post-graphene 2D materials, with particular emphasis on transition metal dichalcogenides and black phosphorus. For these systems, we delineate the intricacies of electronic transport, including band structure control with thickness and external fields, valley polarization, scattering mechanisms, electrical contacts, and doping. In addition, electronic interactions between 2D materials are considered in the form of van der Waals heterojunctions and composite films. This review concludes with a perspective on the most promising future directions in this fast-evolving field.

  7. Fast electron transport in shaped solid targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anle Lei; Cao, L.H.; He, X.T.; Zhang, W.Y.; Tanaka, K.A.; Kodama, R.; Mima, K.; Nakamura, T.; Normatsu, T.; Yu, W.

    2010-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The scheme of fast ignition fusion energy relies on the ultra-intense ultra-short (UIUS) laser energy transport into the compressed core plasma. One solution is to insert a hollow cone in the fuel shell to block the UIUS laser from the coronal plasma, thus allowing it to reach the core plasma. The cone not only can guide the UIUS laser to its tip, but can play important roles in the specific cone-in-shell target designed for FI. It was found in a PIC simulation that the cone can guide the fast electrons generated at the inner wall to propagate along the wall surface toward its tip, which would increase the energy density at the tip and might enhance the heating of the core plasma. Surface guiding of fast electrons with planar foil targets has been demonstrated experimentally. However, the guided fast electrons will mix the electrons generated ahead by the laser light with a planar target, and hence one cannot experimentally quantitatively validate the guide of the fast electrons. We investigate the cone guiding of fast electrons with an inverse cone target. We found a novel surface current of fast electrons propagating along the cone wall. The fast electrons generated at the planar outer tip of the inverse cone are guided and confined to propagate along the inverse cone wall to form a surface current by induced transient electric and magnetic fields associated with the current itself. Once departing from the source at the outer tip, this surface current of fast electrons is 'clean', neither experiencing the interacting laser light nor mixing fast electrons ahead, unlike those in cone or planar targets. This surface current in the inverse cone may explicitly give the capability of the guide of fast electron energy by the cone wall. The guiding and confinement of fast electrons is of important for fast ignition in inertial confinement fusion and several applications in high energy density science.

  8. Theoretical investigations of molecular wires: Electronic spectra and electron transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, Julio Leopoldo

    The results of theoretical and computational research are presented for two promising molecular wires, the Nanostar dendrimer, and a series of substituted azobenzene derivatives connected to aluminum electrodes. The electronic absorption spectra of the Nanostar (a phenylene-ethynylene dendrimer attached to an ethynylperylene chromophore) were calculated using a sequential Molecular Dynamics/Quantum Mechanics (MD/QM) method to perform an analysis of the temperature dependence of the electronic absorption process. We modeled the Nanostar as a series of connected units, and performed MD simulations for each chromophore at 10 K and 300 K to study how the temperature affected the structures and, consequently, the spectra. The absorption spectra of the Nanostar were computed using an ensemble of 8000 structures for each chromophore. Quantum Mechanical (QM) ZINDO/S calculations were performed for each conformation in the ensemble, including 16 excited states, for a total of 128,000 excitation energies. The spectral intensity was then scaled linearly with the number of conjugated units. Our calculations for both the individual chromophores and the Nanostar, are in good agreement with experiments. We explain in detail the effects of temperature and the consequences for the absorption process. The second part of this thesis presents a study of the effects of chemical substituents on the electron transport properties of the azobenzene molecule, which has been proposed recently as a component of a light-driven molecular switch. This molecule has two stable conformations (cis and trans) in its electronic ground state, with considerable differences in their conductance. The electron transport properties were calculated using first-principles methods combining non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) techniques with density functional theory (DFT). For the azobenzene studies, we included electron-donating groups and electron-withdrawing groups in meta- and ortho-positions with

  9. Charge transport through DNA based electronic barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Sunil R.; Chawda, Vivek; Qi, Jianqing; Anantram, M. P.; Sinha, Niraj

    2018-05-01

    We report charge transport in electronic 'barriers' constructed by sequence engineering in DNA. Considering the ionization potentials of Thymine-Adenine (AT) and Guanine-Cytosine (GC) base pairs, we treat AT as 'barriers'. The effect of DNA conformation (A and B form) on charge transport is also investigated. Particularly, the effect of width of 'barriers' on hole transport is investigated. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations are performed on energy minimized DNA structures to obtain the electronic Hamiltonian. The quantum transport calculations are performed using the Landauer-Buttiker framework. Our main findings are contrary to previous studies. We find that a longer A-DNA with more AT base pairs can conduct better than shorter A-DNA with a smaller number of AT base pairs. We also find that some sequences of A-DNA can conduct better than a corresponding B-DNA with the same sequence. The counterions mediated charge transport and long range interactions are speculated to be responsible for counter-intuitive length and AT content dependence of conductance of A-DNA.

  10. Kinetic Simulation of Fast Electron Transport with Ionization Effects and Ion Acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, A. P. L.; Bell, A. R.; Kingham, R. J.

    2005-01-01

    The generation of relativistic electrons and multi-MeV ions is central to ultra intense (> 1018Wcm-2) laser-solid interactions. The production of energetic particles by lasers has a number of potential applications ranging from Fast Ignition ICF to medicine. In terms of the relativistic (fast) electrons the areas of interest can be divided into three areas. Firstly there is the absorption of laser energy into fast electrons and MeV ions. Secondly there is the transport of fast electrons through the solid target. Finally there is a transduction stage, where the fast electron energy is imparted. This may range from being the electrostatic acceleration of ions at a plasma-vacuum interface, to the heating of a compressed core (as in Fast Ignitor ICF).We have used kinetic simulation codes to study the transport stage and electrostatic ion acceleration. (Author)

  11. Disorder and electronic transport in graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mucciolo, E R; Lewenkopf, C H

    2010-01-01

    In this review, we provide an account of the recent progress in understanding electronic transport in disordered graphene systems. Starting from a theoretical description that emphasizes the role played by band structure properties and lattice symmetries, we describe the nature of disorder in these systems and its relation to transport properties. While the focus is primarily on theoretical and conceptual aspects, connections to experiments are also included. Issues such as short- versus long-range disorder, localization (strong and weak), the carrier density dependence of the conductivity, and conductance fluctuations are considered and some open problems are pointed out. (topical review)

  12. Low energy electron transport in furfural

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano, Ana I.; Krupa, Kateryna; Ferreira da Silva, Filipe; Limão-Vieira, Paulo; Blanco, Francisco; Muñoz, Antonio; Jones, Darryl B.; Brunger, Michael J.; García, Gustavo

    2017-09-01

    We report on an initial investigation into the transport of electrons through a gas cell containing 1 mTorr of gaseous furfural. Results from our Monte Carlo simulation are implicitly checked against those from a corresponding electron transmission measurement. To enable this simulation a self-consistent cross section data base was constructed. This data base is benchmarked through new total cross section measurements which are also described here. In addition, again to facilitate the simulation, our preferred energy loss distribution function is presented and discussed.

  13. Sub-electron transport in single-electron-tunneling arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Daniel; Sverdlov, Viktor; Korotkov, Alexander; Likharev, Konstantin

    2002-03-01

    We have analyzed quasi-continuous charge transport in two-dimensional tunnel junction arrays with a special distribution of background charges, providing a complete suppression of Coulomb blockade thresholds of tunneling between any pair of islands. Numerical simulations show that at low currents the dc I-V curve is indeed linear, while the shot noise is strongly suppressed and approaches 1/N of the Schottky value (where N is the array length). Thus both conditions of quasi-continuous transport, formulated earlier by Matsuoka and Likharev (Phys. Rev. B, v57, 15613, 1998), are satisfied. At higher fields the electron-hole pair production begins, and shot noise grows sharply. At higher voltages still, the array enters the "plasma" regime (with nearly balanced number of electrons and holes) and the Fano factor drops to 1/N once again. We have studied the resulting shot noise peak in detail, and concluded that its physics is close to that of critical opalescence.

  14. SIMULATIONS OF LATERAL TRANSPORT AND DROPOUT STRUCTURE OF ENERGETIC PARTICLES FROM IMPULSIVE SOLAR FLARES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tooprakai, P. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Seripienlert, A.; Ruffolo, D.; Chuychai, P. [Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, CHE, Ministry of Education, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Matthaeus, W. H., E-mail: david.ruf@mahidol.ac.th [Bartol Research Institute and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States)

    2016-11-10

    We simulate trajectories of energetic particles from impulsive solar flares for 2D+slab models of magnetic turbulence in spherical geometry to study dropout features, i.e., sharp, repeated changes in the particle density. Among random-phase realizations of two-dimensional (2D) turbulence, a spherical harmonic expansion can generate homogeneous turbulence over a sphere, but a 2D fast Fourier transform (FFT) locally mapped onto the lateral coordinates in the region of interest is much faster computationally, and we show that the results are qualitatively similar. We then use the 2D FFT field as input to a 2D MHD simulation, which dynamically generates realistic features of turbulence such as coherent structures. The magnetic field lines and particles spread non-diffusively (ballistically) to a patchy distribution reaching up to 25° from the injection longitude and latitude at r ∼ 1 au. This dropout pattern in field line trajectories has sharper features in the case of the more realistic 2D MHD model, in better qualitative agreement with observations. The initial dropout pattern in particle trajectories is relatively insensitive to particle energy, though the energy affects the pattern’s evolution with time. We make predictions for future observations of solar particles near the Sun (e.g., at 0.25 au), for which we expect a sharp pulse of outgoing particles along the dropout pattern, followed by backscattering that first remains close to the dropout pattern and later exhibits cross-field transport to a distribution that is more diffusive, yet mostly contained within the dropout pattern found at greater distances.

  15. SIMULATIONS OF LATERAL TRANSPORT AND DROPOUT STRUCTURE OF ENERGETIC PARTICLES FROM IMPULSIVE SOLAR FLARES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tooprakai, P.; Seripienlert, A.; Ruffolo, D.; Chuychai, P.; Matthaeus, W. H.

    2016-01-01

    We simulate trajectories of energetic particles from impulsive solar flares for 2D+slab models of magnetic turbulence in spherical geometry to study dropout features, i.e., sharp, repeated changes in the particle density. Among random-phase realizations of two-dimensional (2D) turbulence, a spherical harmonic expansion can generate homogeneous turbulence over a sphere, but a 2D fast Fourier transform (FFT) locally mapped onto the lateral coordinates in the region of interest is much faster computationally, and we show that the results are qualitatively similar. We then use the 2D FFT field as input to a 2D MHD simulation, which dynamically generates realistic features of turbulence such as coherent structures. The magnetic field lines and particles spread non-diffusively (ballistically) to a patchy distribution reaching up to 25° from the injection longitude and latitude at r ∼ 1 au. This dropout pattern in field line trajectories has sharper features in the case of the more realistic 2D MHD model, in better qualitative agreement with observations. The initial dropout pattern in particle trajectories is relatively insensitive to particle energy, though the energy affects the pattern’s evolution with time. We make predictions for future observations of solar particles near the Sun (e.g., at 0.25 au), for which we expect a sharp pulse of outgoing particles along the dropout pattern, followed by backscattering that first remains close to the dropout pattern and later exhibits cross-field transport to a distribution that is more diffusive, yet mostly contained within the dropout pattern found at greater distances.

  16. Effects of Turbulent Magnetic Fields on the Transport and Acceleration of Energetic Charged Particles: Numerical Simulations with Application to Heliospheric Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Fan

    2012-11-01

    Turbulent magnetic fields are ubiquitous in space physics and astrophysics. The influence of magnetic turbulence on the motions of charged particles contains the essential physics of the transport and acceleration of energetic charged particles in the heliosphere, which is to be explored in this thesis. After a brief introduction on the energetic charged particles and magnetic fields in the heliosphere, the rest of this dissertation focuses on three specific topics: 1. the transport of energetic charged particles in the inner heliosphere, 2. the acceleration of ions at collisionless shocks, and 3. the acceleration of electrons at collisionless shocks. We utilize various numerical techniques to study these topics. In Chapter 2 we study the propagation of charged particles in turbulent magnetic fields similar to the propagation of solar energetic particles in the inner heliosphere. The trajectories of energetic charged particles in the turbulent magnetic field are numerically integrated. The turbulence model includes a Kolmogorov-like magnetic field power spectrum containing a broad range of scales from those that lead to large-scale field-line random walk to small scales leading to resonant pitch-angle scattering of energetic particles. We show that small-scale variations in particle intensities (the so-called "dropouts") and velocity dispersions observed by spacecraft can be reproduced using this method. Our study gives a new constraint on the error of "onset analysis", which is a technique commonly used to infer information about the initial release of energetic particles. We also find that the dropouts are rarely produced in the simulations using the so-called "two-component" magnetic turbulence model (Matthaeus et al., 1990). The result questions the validity of this model in studying particle transport. In the first part of Chapter 3 we study the acceleration of ions in the existence of turbulent magnetic fields. We use 3-D self-consistent hybrid simulations

  17. Electronic transport in methylated fragments of DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, M. L. de; Oliveira, J. I. N.; Lima Neto, J. X.; Gomes, C. E. M.; Fulco, U. L.; Albuquerque, E. L.; Freire, V. N.; Caetano, E. W. S.; Moura, F. A. B. F. de; Lyra, M. L.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the electronic transport properties of methylated deoxyribonucleic-acid (DNA) strands, a biological system in which methyl groups are added to DNA (a major epigenetic modification in gene expression), sandwiched between two metallic platinum electrodes. Our theoretical simulations apply an effective Hamiltonian based on a tight-binding model to obtain current-voltage curves related to the non-methylated/methylated DNA strands. The results suggest potential applications in the development of novel biosensors for molecular diagnostics

  18. Electronic transport in methylated fragments of DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, M. L. de; Oliveira, J. I. N.; Lima Neto, J. X.; Gomes, C. E. M.; Fulco, U. L., E-mail: umbertofulco@gmail.com; Albuquerque, E. L. [Departamento de Biofísica e Farmacologia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, 59072-970 Natal-RN (Brazil); Freire, V. N. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Ceará, 60455-760 Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Caetano, E. W. S. [Instituto Federal de Educação, Ciência e Tecnologia do Ceará, 60040-531 Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Moura, F. A. B. F. de; Lyra, M. L. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Alagoas, 57072-900 Maceió-AL (Brazil)

    2015-11-16

    We investigate the electronic transport properties of methylated deoxyribonucleic-acid (DNA) strands, a biological system in which methyl groups are added to DNA (a major epigenetic modification in gene expression), sandwiched between two metallic platinum electrodes. Our theoretical simulations apply an effective Hamiltonian based on a tight-binding model to obtain current-voltage curves related to the non-methylated/methylated DNA strands. The results suggest potential applications in the development of novel biosensors for molecular diagnostics.

  19. A positive correlation between energetic electron butterfly distributions and magnetosonic waves in the radiation belt slot region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Chang; Su, Z.; Xiao, F.; Zheng, H.

    2017-01-01

    Energetic (hundreds of keV) electrons in the radiation belt slot region have been found to exhibit the butterfly pitch angle distributions. Resonant interactions with magnetosonic and whistler-mode waves are two potential mechanisms for the formation of these peculiar distributions. Here we perform a statistical study of energetic electron pitch angle distribution characteristics measured by Van Allen Probes in the slot region during a three-year period from May 2013 to May 2016. Our results show that electron butterfly distributions are closely related to magnetosonic waves rather than to whistlermode waves. Both electron butterfly distributions and magnetosonic waves occur more frequently at the geomagnetically active times than at the quiet times. In a statistical sense, more distinct butterfly distributions usually correspond to magnetosonic waves with larger amplitudes and vice versa. The averaged magnetosonic wave amplitude is less than 5 pT in the case of normal and flat-top distributions with a butterfly index BI = 1 but reaches ~ 35–95 pT in the case of distinct butterfly distributions with BI > 1:3. For magnetosonic waves with amplitudes > 50 pT, the occurrence rate of butterfly distribution is above 80%. Our study suggests that energetic electron butterfly distributions in the slot region are primarily caused by magnetosonic waves.

  20. Electron stopping powers for transport calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, M.J.

    1988-01-01

    The reliability of radiation transport calculations depends on the accuracy of the input cross sections. Therefore, it is essential to review and update the cross sections from time to time. Even though the main interest of the author's group at NBS is in transport calculations and their applications, the group spends almost as much time on the analysis and preparation of cross sections as on the development of transport codes. Stopping powers, photon attenuation coefficients, bremsstrahlung cross sections, and elastic-scattering cross sections in recent years have claimed attention. This chapter deals with electron stopping powers (with emphasis on collision stopping powers), and reviews the state of the art as reflected by Report 37 of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements

  1. Energetic ions and electrons and their acceleration processes in the magnetotail

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scholer, M.

    1984-01-01

    Observations of energetic particle fluxes in the geomagnetic tail show that these particles exhibit a bursty appearance on all time scales. Often, however, the bursty appearance is merely due to multiple entries and exits of the spacecraft into and out of the plasma sheet which always contains varying fluxes of energetic particles. Observations of the suprathermal and high-energy component of the plasma sheet are discussed, and observations are presented of energetic particle bursts in the plasma sheet proper, which may be due to a locally ongoing acceleration process. Also discussed are energetic particle phenomena occurring near the edge of the plasma sheet, either during thinning or during recovery. Some recent results from the ISEE 3 deep tail mission bearing on energetic particle acceleration are presented, and the present status of the theory of particle acceleration within the magnetotail is briefly reviewed. 40 references

  2. Energetic electron measurements in the edge of a reversed-field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingraham, J.C.; Ellis, R.F.; Downing, J.N.; Munson, C.P.; Weber, P.G.; Wurden, G.A.

    1990-01-01

    The edge plasma of the ZT-40M [Fusion Technol. 8, 1571 (1985)] reversed-field pinch has been studied using a combination of three different plasma probes: a double-swept Langmuir probe, an electrostatic energy analyzer, and a calorimeter--Langmuir probe. The edge plasma has been measured both with and without a movable graphite tile limiter present nearby in the plasma. Without a limiter a fast nonthermal tail of electrons (T congruent 350 eV) is detected in the edge plasma with nearly unidirectional flow along B and having a density between 2% and 10% of the cold edge plasma (T congruent 20 eV). The toroidal sense of this fast electron flow is against the force of the applied electric field. A large power flux along B is measured flowing in the same direction as the fast electrons and is apparently carried by the fast electrons. With the limiter present the fast electrons are still detected in the plasma, but are strongly attenuated in the shadow of the limiter. The measured scrape-off lengths for both the fast electrons and the cold plasma indicate cross-field transport at the rate of, or less than, Bohm diffusion. Estimates indicate that the fast electrons could carry the reversed-field pinch current density at the edge and, from the measured transverse diffusion rates, could also account for the electron energy loss channel in ZT-40 M. The long mean-free-path kinetic nature of these fast electrons suggests that a kinetic process, rather than a magnetohydrodynamic process that is based upon a local Ohm's law formulation, is responsible for their generation

  3. Recent developments in discrete ordinates electron transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morel, J.E.; Lorence, L.J. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The discrete ordinates method is a deterministic method for numerically solving the Boltzmann equation. It was originally developed for neutron transport calculations, but is routinely used for photon and coupled neutron-photon transport calculations as well. The computational state of the art for coupled electron-photon transport (CEPT) calculations is not as developed as that for neutron transport calculations. The only production codes currently available for CEPT calculations are condensed-history Monte Carlo codes such as the ETRAN and ITS codes. A deterministic capability for production calculations is clearly needed. In response to this need, we have begun the development of a production discrete ordinates code for CEPT calculations. The purpose of this paper is to describe the basic approach we are taking, discuss the current status of the project, and present some new computational results. Although further characterization of the coupled electron-photon discrete ordinates method remains to be done, the results to date indicate that the discrete ordinates method can be just as accurate and from 10 to 100 times faster than the Monte Carlo method for a wide variety of problems. We stress that these results are obtained with standard discrete ordinates codes such as ONETRAN. It is clear that even greater efficiency can be obtained by developing a new generation of production discrete ordinates codes specifically designed to solve the Boltzmann-Fokker-Planck equation. However, the prospects for such development in the near future appear to be remote

  4. Status of electron transport in MCNP trademark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, H.G.

    1997-01-01

    The latest version of MCNP, the Los Alamos Monte Carlo transport code, has now been officially released. MCNP4B has been sent to the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC), in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, which is responsible for the further distribution of the code within the US. International distribution of MCNP is done by the Nuclear Energy Agency (ECD/NEA), in Paris, France. Readers with access to the World-Wide-Web should consult the MCNP distribution site http://www-xdiv.lanl.gov/XTM/mcnp/about.html for specific information about contacting RSICC and OECD/NEA. A variety of new features are available in MCNP4B. Among these are differential operator perturbations, cross-section plotting capabilities, enhanced diagnostics for transport in repeated structures and lattices, improved efficiency in distributed-memory multiprocessing, corrected particle lifetime and lifespan estimators, and expanded software quality assurance procedures and testing, including testing of the multigroup Boltzmann-Fokker-Planck capability. New and improved cross section sets in the form of ENDF/B-VI evaluations have also been recently released and can be used in MCNP4B. Perhaps most significant for the interests of this special session, the electron transport algorithm has been improved, especially in the collisional energy-loss straggling and the angular-deflection treatments. In this paper, the author concentrates on a fairly complete documentation of the current status of the electron transport methods in MCNP

  5. Neoclassical transport of energetic minority tail ions generated by ion-cyclotron resonance heating in tokamak geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, C.S.; Hammett, G.W.; Goldston, R.J.

    1990-01-01

    Neoclassical transport of energetic minority tail ions, which are generated by high powered electromagnetic waves of the Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF) at the fundamental harmonic resonance, is studied analytically in tokamak geometry. The effect of Coulomb collisions on the tail ion transport is investigated in the present work. The total tail ion transport will be the sum of the present collision-driven transport and the wave-driven transport, which is due to the ICRF-wave scattering of the tail particles as reported in the literature. The transport coefficients have been calculated kinetically, and it is found that the large tail ion viscosity, driven by the localized ICRF-heating and Coulomb slowing-down collisions, induces purely convective particle transport of the tail species, while the energy transport is both convective and diffusive. The rate of radial particle transport is shown to be usually small, but the rate of radial energy transport is larger and may not be negligible compared to the Coulomb slowing-down rate. 18 refs., 2 figs

  6. Electron Transport Properties of Ge nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanrath, Tobias; Khondaker, Saiful I.; Yao, Zhen; Korgel, Brian A.

    2003-03-01

    Electron Transport Properties of Ge nanowires Tobias Hanrath*, Saiful I. Khondaker, Zhen Yao, Brian A. Korgel* *Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Dept. of Physics, Texas Materials Institute, and Center for Nano- and Molecular Science and Technology University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712-1062 e-mail: korgel@mail.che.utexas.edu Germanium (Ge) nanowires with diameters ranging from 6 to 50 nm and several micrometer in length were grown via a supercritical fluid-liquid-solid synthesis. Parallel electron energy loss spectroscopy (PEELS) was employed to study the band structure and electron density in the Ge nanowires. The observed increase in plasmon peak energy and peak width with decreasing nanowire diameter is attributed to quantum confinement effects. For electrical characterization, Ge nanowires were deposited onto a patterned Si/SiO2 substrate. E-beam lithography was then used to form electrode contacts to individual nanowires. The influence of nanowire diameter, surface chemistry and crystallographic defects on electron transport properties were investigated and the comparison of Ge nanowire conductivity with respect to bulk, intrinsic Ge will be presented.

  7. The Role of Localized Compressional Ultra-low Frequency Waves in Energetic Electron Precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rae, I. Jonathan; Murphy, Kyle R.; Watt, Clare E. J.; Halford, Alexa J.; Mann, Ian R.; Ozeke, Louis G.; Sibeck, David G.; Clilverd, Mark A.; Rodger, Craig J.; Degeling, Alex W.; Forsyth, Colin; Singer, Howard J.

    2018-03-01

    Typically, ultra-low frequency (ULF) waves have historically been invoked for radial diffusive transport leading to acceleration and loss of outer radiation belt electrons. At higher frequencies, very low frequency waves are generally thought to provide a mechanism for localized acceleration and loss through precipitation into the ionosphere of radiation belt electrons. In this study we present a new mechanism for electron loss through precipitation into the ionosphere due to a direct modulation of the loss cone via localized compressional ULF waves. We present a case study of compressional wave activity in tandem with riometer and balloon-borne electron precipitation across keV-MeV energies to demonstrate that the experimental measurements can be explained by our new enhanced loss cone mechanism. Observational evidence is presented demonstrating that modulation of the equatorial loss cone can occur via localized compressional wave activity, which greatly exceeds the change in pitch angle through conservation of the first and second adiabatic invariants. The precipitation response can be a complex interplay between electron energy, the localization of the waves, the shape of the phase space density profile at low pitch angles, ionospheric decay time scales, and the time dependence of the electron source; we show that two pivotal components not usually considered are localized ULF wave fields and ionospheric decay time scales. We conclude that enhanced precipitation driven by compressional ULF wave modulation of the loss cone is a viable candidate for direct precipitation of radiation belt electrons without any additional requirement for gyroresonant wave-particle interaction. Additional mechanisms would be complementary and additive in providing means to precipitate electrons from the radiation belts during storm times.

  8. The role of localised Ultra-Low Frequency waves in energetic electron precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rae, J.; Murphy, K. R.; Watt, C.; Mann, I. R.; Ozeke, L.; Halford, A. J.; Sibeck, D. G.; Clilverd, M. A.; Rodger, C. J.; Degeling, A. W.; Singer, H. J.

    2016-12-01

    Electromagnetic waves play pivotal roles in radiation belt dynamics through a variety of different means. Typically, Ultra-Low Frequency (ULF) waves have historically been invoked for radial diffusive transport leading to both acceleration and loss of outer radiation belt electrons. Very-Low Frequency (VLF) and Extremely-Low Frequency (ELF) waves are generally thought to provide a mechanism for localized acceleration and loss through precipitation into the ionosphere. In this study we present a new mechanism for electron loss through precipitation into the ionosphere due to direct modulation of the loss cone via localized compressional ULF waves. Observational evidence is presented demonstrating that modulation of the equatorial loss cone can occur via localized compressional wave activity. We then perform statistical computations of the probability distribution to determine how likely a given magnetic perturbation would produce a given percentage change in the bounce loss-cone (BLC). We discuss the ramifications of the action of coherent, localized compressional ULF waves on drifting electron populations; their precipitation response can be a complex interplay between electron energy, the shape of the phase space density profile at pitch angles close to the loss cone, ionospheric decay timescales, and the time-dependence of the electron source. We present a case study of compressional wave activity in tandem with riometer and balloon-borne electron precipitation across keV-MeV energies to demonstrate that the experimental measurements can be explained by our new enhanced loss cone mechanism. We determine that the two pivotal components not usually considered are localized ULF wave fields and ionospheric decay timescales. We conclude that ULF wave modulation of the loss cone is a viable candidate for direct precipitation of radiation belt electrons without any additional requirement for gyroresonant wave-particle interaction. Additional mechanisms would be

  9. Fast Flows in the Magnetotail and Energetic Particle Transport: Multiscale Coupling in the Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Y.; Wang, X.; Fok, M. C. H.; Buzulukova, N.; Perez, J. D.; Chen, L. J.

    2017-12-01

    The interaction between the Earth's inner and outer magnetospheric regions associated with the tail fast flows is calculated by coupling the Auburn 3-D global hybrid simulation code (ANGIE3D) to the Comprehensive Inner Magnetosphere/Ionosphere (CIMI) model. The global hybrid code solves fully kinetic equations governing the ions and a fluid model for electrons in the self-consistent electromagnetic field of the dayside and night side outer magnetosphere. In the integrated computation model, the hybrid simulation provides the CIMI model with field data in the CIMI 3-D domain and particle data at its boundary, and the transport in the inner magnetosphere is calculated by the CIMI model. By joining the two existing codes, effects of the solar wind on particle transport through the outer magnetosphere into the inner magnetosphere are investigated. Our simulation shows that fast flows and flux ropes are localized transients in the magnetotail plasma sheet and their overall structures have a dawn-dusk asymmetry. Strong perpendicular ion heating is found at the fast flow braking, which affects the earthward transport of entropy-depleted bubbles. We report on the impacts from the temperature anisotropy and non-Maxwellian ion distributions associated with the fast flows on the ring current and the convection electric field.

  10. Electronic and transport properties of kinked graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jesper Toft; Gunst, Tue; Bøggild, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Local curvature, or bending, of a graphene sheet is known to increase the chemical reactivity presenting an opportunity for templated chemical functionalisation. Using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory (DFT), we investigate the reaction barrier reduction for the ads......Local curvature, or bending, of a graphene sheet is known to increase the chemical reactivity presenting an opportunity for templated chemical functionalisation. Using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory (DFT), we investigate the reaction barrier reduction...... for the adsorption of atomic hydrogen at linear bends in graphene. We find a significant barrier lowering (≈15%) for realistic radii of curvature (≈20 Å) and that adsorption along the linear bend leads to a stable linear kink. We compute the electronic transport properties of individual and multiple kink lines......, and demonstrate how these act as efficient barriers for electron transport. In particular, two parallel kink lines form a graphene pseudo-nanoribbon structure with a semimetallic/semiconducting electronic structure closely related to the corresponding isolated ribbons; the ribbon band gap translates...

  11. Replacing Electron Transport Cofactors with Hydrogenases

    KAUST Repository

    Laamarti, Rkia

    2016-12-01

    Enzymes have found applications in a broad range of industrial production processes. While high catalytic activity, selectivity and mild reaction conditions are attractive advantages of the biocatalysts, particularly costs arising from required cofactors pose a sever limitation. While cofactor-recycling systems are available, their use implies constraints for process set-up and conditions, which are a particular problem e.g. for solid-gas-phase reactions. Several oxidoreductases are able to directly exchange electrons with electrodes. Hence, the co-immobilization of both, an electron-utilizing and an electron-generating oxidoreductase on conductive nanoparticles should facilitate the direct electron flow from an enzymatic oxidation to a reduction reaction circumventing redox-cofactors requirements. In such a set-up, hydrogenases could generate and provide electrons directly form gaseous hydrogen. This thesis describes the co-immobilization of the oxygen tolerant hydrogenases from C. eutropha or C. metallidurans and cytochrome P450BM3 as test system. Conductive material in the form of carbon nanotubes (CNT) serves as a suitable support. A combination of the hydrogenase and the catalytic domain of P450BM3 immobilized on carbon nanotubes were tested for the oxidation of lauric acid in the presence of hydrogen instead of an electron-transport cofactor. The GC-MS analysis reveals the conversion of 4% of lauric acid (LA) into three products, which correspond to the hydroxylated lauric acid in three different positions with a total turnover (TON) of 34. The product distribution is similar to that obtained when using the wildtype P450BM3 with the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) cofactor. Such electronic coupling couldn’t be achieved for the conversion of other substrates such as propane and cyclohexane, probably due to the high uncoupling rate within the heme-domain of cytochrome P450BM3 when unnatural substrates are introduced.

  12. Research Update: The electronic structure of hybrid perovskite layers and their energetic alignment in devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selina Olthof

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the interest in hybrid organic–inorganic perovskites has increased at a rapid pace due to their tremendous success in the field of thin film solar cells. This area closely ties together fundamental solid state research and device application, as it is necessary to understand the basic material properties to optimize the performances and open up new areas of application. In this regard, the energy levels and their respective alignment with adjacent charge transport layers play a crucial role. Currently, we are lacking a detailed understanding about the electronic structure and are struggling to understand what influences the alignment, how it varies, or how it can be intentionally modified. This research update aims at giving an overview over recent results regarding measurements of the electronic structure of hybrid perovskites using photoelectron spectroscopy to summarize the present status.

  13. Simulating radial diffusion of energetic (MeV electrons through a model of fluctuating electric and magnetic fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Sarris

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, a test particle simulation is performed in a model of analytic Ultra Low Frequency, ULF, perturbations in the electric and magnetic fields of the Earth's magnetosphere. The goal of this work is to examine if the radial transport of energetic particles in quiet-time ULF magnetospheric perturbations of various azimuthal mode numbers can be described as a diffusive process and be approximated by theoretically derived radial diffusion coefficients. In the model realistic compressional electromagnetic field perturbations are constructed by a superposition of a large number of propagating electric and consistent magnetic pulses. The diffusion rates of the electrons under the effect of the fluctuating fields are calculated numerically through the test-particle simulation as a function of the radial coordinate L in a dipolar magnetosphere; these calculations are then compared to the symmetric, electromagnetic radial diffusion coefficients for compressional, poloidal perturbations in the Earth's magnetosphere. In the model the amplitude of the perturbation fields can be adjusted to represent realistic states of magnetospheric activity. Similarly, the azimuthal modulation of the fields can be adjusted to represent different azimuthal modes of fluctuations and the contribution to radial diffusion from each mode can be quantified. Two simulations of quiet-time magnetospheric variability are performed: in the first simulation, diffusion due to poloidal perturbations of mode number m=1 is calculated; in the second, the diffusion rates from multiple-mode (m=0 to m=8 perturbations are calculated. The numerical calculations of the diffusion coefficients derived from the particle orbits are found to agree with the corresponding theoretical estimates of the diffusion coefficient within a factor of two.

  14. Refined energetic ordering for sulphate-water (n = 3-6) clusters using high-level electronic structure calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambrecht, Daniel S.; McCaslin, Laura; Xantheas, Sotiris S.; Epifanovsky, Evgeny; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2012-10-01

    This work reports refinements of the energetic ordering of the known low-energy structures of sulphate-water clusters ? (n = 3-6) using high-level electronic structure methods. Coupled cluster singles and doubles with perturbative triples (CCSD(T)) is used in combination with an estimate of basis set effects up to the complete basis set limit using second-order Møller-Plesset theory. Harmonic zero-point energy (ZPE), included at the B3LYP/6-311 + + G(3df,3pd) level, was found to have a significant effect on the energetic ordering. In fact, we show that the energetic ordering is a result of a delicate balance between the electronic and vibrational energies. Limitations of the ZPE calculations, both due to electronic structure errors, and use of the harmonic approximation, probably constitute the largest remaining errors. Due to the often small energy differences between cluster isomers, and the significant role of ZPE, deuteration can alter the relative energies of low-lying structures, and, when it is applied in conjunction with calculated harmonic ZPEs, even alters the global minimum for n = 5. Experiments on deuterated clusters, as well as more sophisticated vibrational calculations, may therefore be quite interesting.

  15. Electron transport in doped fullerene molecular junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Milanpreet; Sawhney, Ravinder Singh; Engles, Derick

    The effect of doping on the electron transport of molecular junctions is analyzed in this paper. The doped fullerene molecules are stringed to two semi-infinite gold electrodes and analyzed at equilibrium and nonequilibrium conditions of these device configurations. The contemplation is done using nonequilibrium Green’s function (NEGF)-density functional theory (DFT) to evaluate its density of states (DOS), transmission coefficient, molecular orbitals, electron density, charge transfer, current, and conductance. We conclude from the elucidated results that Au-C16Li4-Au and Au-C16Ne4-Au devices behave as an ordinary p-n junction diode and a Zener diode, respectively. Moreover, these doped fullerene molecules do not lose their metallic nature when sandwiched between the pair of gold electrodes.

  16. Low energy electron transport in furfural

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lozano, A.I.; Garcia, G.; Krupa, K.; Ferreira da Silva, F.; Limao-Vieira, P.; Blanco, F.; Munoz, A.; Jones, D.B.; Brunger, M.J.

    2017-01-01

    The cyclic configuration of the furfural molecule is similar to the 5-membered ring structure constituting the sugar units of the DNA helix, hence its importance in biology. In this paper, we report on an initial investigation into the transport of electrons through a gas cell containing 1 mtorr of gaseous furfural. Results from our Monte Carlo simulation are implicitly checked against those from a corresponding electron transmission measurement. To enable this simulation a self-consistent cross section data base was constructed. This data base is benchmarked through new total cross section measurements which are also described here. In addition, again to facilitate the simulation, our preferred energy loss distribution function is presented and discussed

  17. Electronic transport properties of (fluorinated) metal phthalocyanine

    KAUST Repository

    Fadlallah, M M; Eckern, U; Romero, A H; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2015-01-01

    The magnetic and transport properties of the metal phthalocyanine (MPc) and F16MPc (M = Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn and Ag) families of molecules in contact with S–Au wires are investigated by density functional theory within the local density approximation, including local electronic correlations on the central metal atom. The magnetic moments are found to be considerably modified under fluorination. In addition, they do not depend exclusively on the configuration of the outer electronic shell of the central metal atom (as in isolated MPc and F16MPc) but also on the interaction with the leads. Good agreement between the calculated conductance and experimental results is obtained. For M = Ag, a high spin filter efficiency and conductance is observed, giving rise to a potentially high sensitivity for chemical sensor applications.

  18. Electronic transport properties of phenylacetylene molecular junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Wen; Cheng Jie; Yan Cui-Xia; Li Hai-Hong; Wang Yong-Juan; Liu De-Sheng

    2011-01-01

    Electronic transport properties of a kind of phenylacetylene compound— (4-mercaptophenyl)-phenylacetylene are calculated by the first-principles method in the framework of density functional theory and the nonequilibrium Green's function formalism. The molecular junction shows an obvious rectifying behaviour at a bias voltage larger than 1.0 V. The rectification effect is attributed to the asymmetry of the interface contacts. Moreover, at a bias voltage larger than 2.0 V, which is not referred to in a relevant experiment [Fang L, Park J Y, Ma H, Jen A K Y and Salmeron M 2007 Langmuir 23 11522], we find a negative differential resistance phenomenon. The negative differential resistance effect may originate from the change of the delocalization degree of the molecular orbitals induced by the bias. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  19. Conditioner for a helically transported electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Changbiao.

    1992-05-01

    The kinetic theory is developed to investigate a conditioner for a helically transported electron beam. Linear expressions for axial velocity spread are derived. Numerical simulation is used to check the theoretical results and examine nonlinear aspects of the conditioning process. The results show that in the linear regime the action of the beam conditioner on a pulsed beam mainly depends on the phase at which the beam enters the conditioner and depends only slightly on the operating wavelength. In the nonlinear regime, however, the action of the conditioner strongly depends on the operating wavelength and only slightly upon the entrance phase. For a properly chosen operating wavelength, a little less than the electron's relativistic cyclotron wavelength, the conditioner can decrease the axial velocity spread of a pulsed beam down to less than one-third of its initial value

  20. Electronic transport properties of (fluorinated) metal phthalocyanine

    KAUST Repository

    Fadlallah, M M

    2015-12-21

    The magnetic and transport properties of the metal phthalocyanine (MPc) and F16MPc (M = Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn and Ag) families of molecules in contact with S–Au wires are investigated by density functional theory within the local density approximation, including local electronic correlations on the central metal atom. The magnetic moments are found to be considerably modified under fluorination. In addition, they do not depend exclusively on the configuration of the outer electronic shell of the central metal atom (as in isolated MPc and F16MPc) but also on the interaction with the leads. Good agreement between the calculated conductance and experimental results is obtained. For M = Ag, a high spin filter efficiency and conductance is observed, giving rise to a potentially high sensitivity for chemical sensor applications.

  1. Propagation of energetic electrons in the solar corona observed with LOFAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitling, F.

    2017-06-01

    localized in the corona propagating in radial direction along magnetic field lines with an average velocity of 0.23c. A nonuniform propagation velocity is revealed. A new beam model is presented that explains the nonuniform motion of the radio source as a propagation effect of an electron ensemble with a spread velocity distribution and rules out a monoenergetic electron distribution. The coronal electron number density is derived in the region from 1.5 to 2.5 R⊙ and fitted with the newly developed density model. It determines the plasma density for the interplanetary space between Sun and Earth. The values correspond to a 1.25- and 5-fold Newkirk model for harmonic and fundamental emission, respectively. In comparison to data from other radio instruments the LOFAR data shows a high sensitivity and resolution in space, time and frequency. The new results from LOFAR's high resolution imaging spectroscopy are consistent with current theories of solar type III radio bursts and demonstrate its capability to track fast moving radio sources in the corona. LOFAR solar data is found to be a valuable source for solar radio physics and opens a new window for studying plasma processes associated with highly energetic electrons in the solar corona.

  2. Electron thermal transport in tokamak plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konings, J A

    1994-11-30

    The process of fusion of small nuclei thereby releasing energy, as it occurs continuously in the sun, is essential for the existence of mankind. The same process applied in a controlled way on earth would provide a clean and an abundant energy source, and be the long term solution of the energy problem. Nuclear fusion requires an extremely hot (10{sup 8} K) ionized gas, a plasma, that can only be maintained if it is kept insulated from any material wall. In the so called `tokamak` this is achieved by using magnetic fields. The termal insulation, which is essential if one wants to keep the plasma at the high `fusion` temperature, can be predicted using basic plasma therory. A comparison with experiments in tokamaks, however, showed that the electron enery losses are ten to hundred times larger than this theory predicts. This `anomalous transport` of thermal energy implies that, to reach the condition for nuclear fusion, a fusion reactor must have very large dimensions. This may put the economic feasibility of fusion power in jeopardy. Therefore, in a worldwide collaboration, physicists study tokamak plasmas in an attempt to understand and control the energy losses. From a scientific point of view, the mechanisms driving anomalous transport are one of the challenges in fudamental plasma physics. In Nieuwegein, a tokamak experiment (the Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project, RTP) is dedicated to the study of anomalous transport, in an international collaboration with other laboratories. (orig./WL).

  3. Electron Transport through Porphyrin Molecular Junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qi

    The goal of this work is to study the properties that would affect the electron transport through a porphyrin molecular junction. This work contributes to the field of electron transport in molecular junctions in the following 3 aspects. First of all, by carrying out experiments comparing the conductance of the iron (III) porphyrin (protected) and the free base porphyrin (protected), it is confirmed that the molecular energy level broadening and shifting occurs for porphyrin molecules when coupled with the metal electrodes, and this level broadening and shifting plays an important role in the electron transport through molecular junctions. Secondly, by carrying out an in-situ deprotection of the acetyl-protected free base porphyrin molecules, it is found out that the presence of acetyl groups reduces the conductance. Thirdly, by incorporating the Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) spectrum and the in-situ deprotection prior to formation of molecular junctions, it allows a more precise understanding of the molecules involved in the formation of molecular junctions, and therefore allows an accurate analysis of the conductance histogram. The molecules are prepared by self-assembly and the junctions are formed using a Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) molecular break junction technique. The porphyrin molecules are characterized by MALDI in solution before self-assembly to a gold/mica substrate. The self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of porphyrins on gold are characterized by Ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) reflection spectroscopy to confirm that the molecules are attached to the substrate. The SAMs are then characterized by Angle-Resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ARXPS) to determine the thickness and the average molecular orientation of the molecular layer. The electron transport is measured by conductance-displacement (G-S) experiments under a given bias (-0.4V). The conductance value of a single molecule is identified by a statistical analysis

  4. ECRH and electron heat transport in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou, X.L.; Giruzzi, G.; Dumont, R.J.

    2003-01-01

    It has been observed during the ECRH experiments in tokamaks that the shape of the electron temperature profile in stationary regimes is not very sensitive to the ECRH power deposition i.e. the temperature profile remains peaked at the center even though the ECRH power deposition is off-axis. Various models have been invoked for the interpretation of this profile resilience phenomenon: the inward heat pinch, the critical temperature gradient, the Self-Organized Criticality, etc. Except the pinch effect, all of these models need a specific form of the diffusivity in the heat transport equation. In this work, our approach is to solve a simplified time-dependent heat transport equation analytically in cylindrical geometry. The features of this analytical solution are analyzed, in particular the relationship between the temperature profile resilience and the Eigenmode of the physical system with respect to the heat transport phenomenon. Finally, applications of this analytical solution for the determination of the transport coefficient and the polarization of the EC waves are presented. It has been shown that the solution of the simplified transport equation in a finite cylinder is a Fourier-Bessel series. This series represents in fact a decomposition of the heat source in Eigenmode, which are characterized by the Bessel functions of order 0. The physical interpretation of the Eigenmodes is the following: when the heat source is given by a Bessel function of order 0, the temperature profile has exactly the same form as the source at every time. At the beginning of the power injection, the effectiveness of the temperature response is the same for each Eigenmode, and the response in temperature, having the same form as the source, is local. Conversely, in the later phase of the evolution, the effectiveness of the temperature response for each Eigenmode is different: the higher the order, the lower the effectiveness. In this case the response in temperature appears as

  5. Ion age transport: developing devices beyond electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demming, Anna

    2014-03-01

    There is more to current devices than conventional electronics. Increasingly research into the controlled movement of ions and molecules is enabling a range of new technologies. For example, as Weihua Guan, Sylvia Xin Li and Mark Reed at Yale University explain, 'It offers a unique opportunity to integrate wet ionics with dry electronics seamlessly'. In this issue they provide an overview of voltage-gated ion and molecule transport in engineered nanochannels. They cover the theory governing these systems and fabrication techniques, as well as applications, including biological and chemical analysis, and energy conversion [1]. Studying the movement of particles in nanochannels is not new. The transport of materials in rock pores led Klinkenberg to describe an analogy between diffusion and electrical conductivity in porous rocks back in 1951 [2]. And already in 1940, Harold Abramson and Manuel Gorin noted that 'When an electric current is applied across the living human skin, the skin may be considered to act like a system of pores through which transfer of substances like ragweed pollen extract may be achieved both by electrophoretic and by diffusion phenomena' [3]. Transport in living systems through pore structures on a much smaller scale has attracted a great deal of research in recent years as well. The selective transport of ions and small organic molecules across the cell membrane facilitates a number of functions including communication between cells, nerve conduction and signal transmission. Understanding these processes may benefit a wide range of potential applications such as selective separation, biochemical sensing, and controlled release and drug delivery processes. In Germany researchers have successfully demonstrated controlled ionic transport through nanopores functionalized with amine-terminated polymer brushes [4]. The polymer nanobrushes swell and shrink in response to changes in temperature, thus opening and closing the nanopore passage to ionic

  6. Mitochondrial Electron Transport and Plant Stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmusson, Allan G; Møller, Ian Max

    2011-01-01

    Due to the sessile nature of plants, it is crucial for their survival and growth that they can handle a constantly changing, and thus stressful, ambient environment by modifying their structure and metabolism. The central metabolism of plants is characterized by many alternative options...... for metabolic pathways, which allow a wide range of adjustments of metabolic processes in response to environmental variations. Many of the metabolic pathways in plants involve the processing of redox compounds and the use of adenylates. They converge at the mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) where...... redox compounds from carbon degradation are used for powering ATP synthesis. The standard ETC contains three sites of energy conservation in complexes I, III, and IV, which are in common with most other eukaryotes. However, the complexity of the plant metabolic system is mirrored in the ETC. In addition...

  7. Electronic transport study in PAMAM dendrimers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, Nirton C.S.; Soares, Demetrio A.W.; Fernandes, Edson G.R.; Queiroz, Alvaro A.A. de

    2005-01-01

    Dendrimers are nanomaterials that have many potential applications in medicine, including diagnosis and therapeutic procedures. Dendrimers are isomolecular polymers, with a very well controlled architecture and a thousand times smaller than cells. Dendrimers containing biocatalysts are of great interest for clinical applications in biosensors because of the way in which their chemical and electric conduction mechanism can be tailored. In this work, the polyamidoamine dendrimer (PAMAM) of generation 4 was synthesized by divergent route and characterized by NMR spectroscopy. The electronic transport properties of PAMAM in a metal-polymer type heterojunction were studied. The electrical conduction mechanism of PAMAM studied in the temperature range of 291-323 K indicates a conduction mechanism thermally activated. (author)

  8. Transport, charge exchange and loss of energetic heavy ions in the earth's radiation belts - Applicability and limitations of theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spjeldvik, W. N.

    1981-01-01

    Computer simulations of processes which control the relative abundances of ions in the trapping regions of geospace are compared with observations from discriminating ion detectors. Energy losses due to Coulomb collisions between ions and exospheric neutrals are considered, along with charge exchange losses and internal charge exchanges. The time evolution of energetic ion fluxes of equatorially mirroring ions under radial diffusion is modelled to include geomagnetic and geoelectric fluctutations. Limits to the validity of diffusion transport theory are discussed, and the simulation is noted to contain provisions for six ionic charge states and the source effect on the radiation belt oxygen ion distributions. Comparisons are made with ion flux data gathered on Explorer 45 and ISEE-1 spacecraft and results indicate that internal charge exchanges cause the radiation belt ion charge state to be independent of source charge rate characteristics, and relative charge state distribution is independent of the radially diffusive transport rate below the charge state redistribution zone.

  9. Electron scattering and transport in liquid argon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyle, G. J.; Cocks, D. G.; White, R. D.; McEachran, R. P.

    2015-01-01

    The transport of excess electrons in liquid argon driven out of equilibrium by an applied electric field is revisited using a multi-term solution of Boltzmann’s equation together with ab initio liquid phase cross-sections calculated using the Dirac-Fock scattering equations. The calculation of liquid phase cross-sections extends previous treatments to consider multipole polarisabilities and a non-local treatment of exchange, while the accuracy of the electron-argon potential is validated through comparison of the calculated gas phase cross-sections with experiment. The results presented highlight the inadequacy of local treatments of exchange that are commonly used in liquid and cluster phase cross-section calculations. The multi-term Boltzmann equation framework accounting for coherent scattering enables the inclusion of the full anisotropy in the differential cross-section arising from the interaction and the structure factor, without an a priori assumption of quasi-isotropy in the velocity distribution function. The model, which contains no free parameters and accounts for both coherent scattering and liquid phase screening effects, was found to reproduce well the experimental drift velocities and characteristic energies

  10. Electron scattering and transport in liquid argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyle, G. J.; Cocks, D. G.; White, R. D. [College of Science, Technology and Engineering, James Cook University, Townsville 4810 (Australia); McEachran, R. P. [Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2015-04-21

    The transport of excess electrons in liquid argon driven out of equilibrium by an applied electric field is revisited using a multi-term solution of Boltzmann’s equation together with ab initio liquid phase cross-sections calculated using the Dirac-Fock scattering equations. The calculation of liquid phase cross-sections extends previous treatments to consider multipole polarisabilities and a non-local treatment of exchange, while the accuracy of the electron-argon potential is validated through comparison of the calculated gas phase cross-sections with experiment. The results presented highlight the inadequacy of local treatments of exchange that are commonly used in liquid and cluster phase cross-section calculations. The multi-term Boltzmann equation framework accounting for coherent scattering enables the inclusion of the full anisotropy in the differential cross-section arising from the interaction and the structure factor, without an a priori assumption of quasi-isotropy in the velocity distribution function. The model, which contains no free parameters and accounts for both coherent scattering and liquid phase screening effects, was found to reproduce well the experimental drift velocities and characteristic energies.

  11. Numerically robust and efficient nonlocal electron transport in 2D DRACO simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Duc; Chenhall, Jeff; Moses, Greg; Delettrez, Jacques; Collins, Tim

    2013-10-01

    An improved implicit algorithm based on Schurtz, Nicolai and Busquet (SNB) algorithm for nonlocal electron transport is presented. Validation with direct drive shock timing experiments and verification with the Goncharov nonlocal model in 1D LILAC simulations demonstrate the viability of this efficient algorithm for producing 2D lagrangian radiation hydrodynamics direct drive simulations. Additionally, simulations provide strong incentive to further modify key parameters within the SNB theory, namely the ``mean free path.'' An example 2D polar drive simulation to study 2D effects of the nonlocal flux as well as mean free path modifications will also be presented. This research was supported by the University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics.

  12. Electronic Monitoring Of Storage And Transport Temperatures Of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Electronic Monitoring Of Storage And Transport Temperatures Of Thermostable Newcastle ... 22) were monitored during storage and transport from vaccine production laboratory in Temeke, Dar es ... EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT

  13. Replacing Electron Transport Cofactors with Hydrogenases

    KAUST Repository

    Laamarti, Rkia

    2016-01-01

    to directly exchange electrons with electrodes. Hence, the co-immobilization of both, an electron-utilizing and an electron-generating oxidoreductase on conductive nanoparticles should facilitate the direct electron flow from an enzymatic oxidation to a

  14. Power Electronics Packaging Reliability | Transportation Research | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packaging Reliability Power Electronics Packaging Reliability A photo of a piece of power electronics laboratory equipment. NREL power electronics packaging reliability research investigates the electronics packaging around a semiconductor switching device determines the electrical, thermal, and

  15. ITER Plasma at Electron Cyclotron Frequency Domain: Stimulated Raman Scattering off Gould-Trivelpiece Modes and Generation of Suprathermal Electrons and Energetic Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefan, V. Alexander

    2011-04-01

    Stimulated Raman scattering in the electron cyclotron frequency range of the X-Mode and O-Mode driver with the ITER plasma leads to the ``tail heating'' via the generation of suprathermal electrons and energetic ions. The scattering off Trivelpiece-Gould (T-G) modes is studied for the gyrotron frequency of 170GHz; X-Mode and O-Mode power of 24 MW CW; on-axis B-field of 10T. The synergy between the two-plasmon decay and Raman scattering is analyzed in reference to the bulk plasma heating. Supported in part by Nikola TESLA Labs, La Jolla, CA

  16. Electronic excitation of Ti atoms sputtered by energetic Ar+ and He+ from clean and monolayer oxygen covered surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellin, M.J.; Gruen, D.M.; Young, C.E.; Wiggins, M.D.; Argonne National Lab., IL

    1983-01-01

    Electronic excitation of Ti atoms ejected during energetic ion bombardment (Ar + , He + ) of well characterized clean and oxygen covered polycrystalline Ti metal surfaces has been determined. For states with 0 to 2 eV and 3 to 5.5 eV of electronic energy, static mode laser fluorescence spectroscopy (LFS) and static mode spontaneous fluorescence spectroscopy (SFS) were used respectively. These experiments which were carried out in a UHV ( -10 Torr) system equipped with an Auger spectrometer provide measurements of the correlation between oxygen coverage (0 to 3 monolayers) and the excited state distribution of sputtered Ti atoms. The experimentally determined electronic partition function of Ti atoms does not show an exponential dependence on energy (E) above the ground state but rather an E -2 or E -3 power law dependence. (orig.)

  17. On the interactions between energetic electrons and lightning whistler waves observed at high L-shells on Van Allen Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, H.; Holzworth, R. H., II; Brundell, J. B.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Jacobson, A. R.; Fennell, J. F.; Li, J.

    2017-12-01

    Lightning produces strong broadband radio waves, called "sferics", which propagate in the Earth-ionosphere waveguide and are detected thousands of kilometers away from their source. Global real-time detection of lightning strokes including their time, location and energy, is conducted with the World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN). In the ionosphere, these sferics couple into very low frequency (VLF) whistler waves which propagate obliquely to the Earth's magnetic field. A good match has previously been shown between WWLLN sferics and Van Allen Probes lightning whistler waves. It is well known that lightning whistler waves can modify the distribution of energetic electrons in the Van Allen belts by pitch angle scattering into the loss cone, especially at low L-Shells (referred to as LEP - Lightning-induced Electron Precipitation). It is an open question whether lightning whistler waves play an important role at high L-shells. The possible interactions between energetic electrons and lightning whistler waves at high L-shells are considered to be weak in the past. However, lightning is copious, and weak pitch angle scattering into the drift or bounce loss cone would have a significant influence on the radiation belt populations. In this work, we will analyze the continuous burst mode EMFISIS data from September 2012 to 2016, to find out lightning whistler waves above L = 3. Based on that, MAGEIS data are used to study the related possible wave-particle interactions. In this talk, both case study and statistical analysis results will be presented.

  18. Prediction of electronically nonadiabatic decomposition mechanisms of isolated gas phase nitrogen-rich energetic salt: Guanidium-triazolate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Jayanta; Bhattacharya, Atanu, E-mail: atanub@ipc.iisc.ernet.in

    2016-01-13

    Highlights: • Decomposition mechanisms of model energetic salt, guanidium triazolate, are explored. • Decomposition pathways are electronically nonadiabatic. • CASPT2, CASMP2 and CASSCF methodologies are employed. • N{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} are predicted to be the most possible initial decomposition products. - Abstract: Electronically nonadiabatic decomposition pathways of guanidium triazolate are explored theoretically. Nonadiabatically coupled potential energy surfaces are explored at the complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) level of theory. For better estimation of energies complete active space second order perturbation theories (CASPT2 and CASMP2) are also employed. Density functional theory (DFT) with B3LYP functional and MP2 level of theory are used to explore subsequent ground state decomposition pathways. In comparison with all possible stable decomposition products (such as, N{sub 2}, NH{sub 3}, HNC, HCN, NH{sub 2}CN and CH{sub 3}NC), only NH{sub 3} (with NH{sub 2}CN) and N{sub 2} are predicted to be energetically most accessible initial decomposition products. Furthermore, different conical intersections between the S{sub 1} and S{sub 0} surfaces, which are computed at the CASSCF(14,10)/6-31G(d) level of theory, are found to play an essential role in the excited state deactivation process of guanidium triazolate. This is the first report on the electronically nonadiabatic decomposition mechanisms of isolated guanidium triazolate salt.

  19. Electronic transport in graphene; Elektronischer Transport in Graphen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lohmann, Timm

    2010-06-08

    In 2004 graphene, a monolayer of carbon atoms, has been isolated as the first real two-dimensional solid by the group of A. Geim at the University of Manchester. Graphene's properties have been theoretically investigated since the 1950s. Until the successful preparation by Geim et al., graphene was suspected to be unstable under ambient conditions above 0 K (Mermin-Wagner theorem). Its two dimensionality and hexagonal lattice symmetry cause interesting novel properties and effects. At experimentally relevant energies, graphene has a linear band structure and charge carrier dynamics must be treated using Dirac's equation. Therefore charge carriers in graphene are called ''Dirac fermions''. Beside exotic effects like ''Klein tunneling'' an unconventional quantum Hall effect (QHE) can be observed with a Hall conductance quantized in units of 2e{sup 2}/h, 6e{sup 2}/h, 10e{sup 2}/h, 14e{sup 2}/h. As a starting point for in-depth transport measurements the processing of graphene field effect transistors (GFETs) has been developed and optimized, based on the pioneering work by Novoselov et al. The optimized process provides samples with carrier mobilities up to 16000 cm{sup 2}/Vs and a well defined Hall geometry. These samples are used to investigate external influences on the electronic properties of graphene. Among those influences molecular adsorbates are responsible for various effects of freshly prepared graphene samples e.g. an intrinsic p-doping, a mobility asymmetry of electrons and holes, the so called ''minimal conductivity'' and a field effect hysteresis at room temperature. In collaboration with the group of A. Yacoby (Harvard) density fluctuations in the vicinity of the Dirac point (''electron-hole puddles'') could be observed using a scanning single electron transistor (SSET). These fluctuations might be one reason for the ''minimal conductivity'' at

  20. Problems of linear electron (polaron) transport theory in semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Klinger, M I

    1979-01-01

    Problems of Linear Electron (Polaron) Transport Theory in Semiconductors summarizes and discusses the development of areas in electron transport theory in semiconductors, with emphasis on the fundamental aspects of the theory and the essential physical nature of the transport processes. The book is organized into three parts. Part I focuses on some general topics in the theory of transport phenomena: the general dynamical theory of linear transport in dissipative systems (Kubo formulae) and the phenomenological theory. Part II deals with the theory of polaron transport in a crystalline semicon

  1. Melatonin and the electron transport chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardeland, Rüdiger

    2017-11-01

    Melatonin protects the electron transport chain (ETC) in multiple ways. It reduces levels of ·NO by downregulating inducible and inhibiting neuronal nitric oxide synthases (iNOS, nNOS), thereby preventing excessive levels of peroxynitrite. Both ·NO and peroxynitrite-derived free radicals, such as ·NO 2 , hydroxyl (·OH) and carbonate radicals (CO 3 · - ) cause blockades or bottlenecks in the ETC, by ·NO binding to irons, protein nitrosation, nitration and oxidation, changes that lead to electron overflow or even backflow and, thus, increased formation of superoxide anions (O 2 · - ). Melatonin improves the intramitochondrial antioxidative defense by enhancing reduced glutathione levels and inducing glutathione peroxidase and Mn-superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD) in the matrix and Cu,Zn-SOD in the intermembrane space. An additional action concerns the inhibition of cardiolipin peroxidation. This oxidative change in the membrane does not only initiate apoptosis or mitophagy, as usually considered, but also seems to occur at low rate, e.g., in aging, and impairs the structural integrity of Complexes III and IV. Moreover, elevated levels of melatonin inhibit the opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore and shorten its duration. Additionally, high-affinity binding sites in mitochondria have been described. The assumption of direct binding to the amphipathic ramp of Complex I would require further substantiation. The mitochondrial presence of the melatonin receptor MT 1 offers the possibility that melatonin acts via an inhibitory G protein, soluble adenylyl cyclase, decreased cAMP and lowered protein kinase A activity, a signaling pathway shown to reduce Complex I activity in the case of a mitochondrial cannabinoid receptor.

  2. Energy-filtered cold electron transport at room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhadrachalam, Pradeep; Subramanian, Ramkumar; Ray, Vishva; Ma, Liang-Chieh; Wang, Weichao; Kim, Jiyoung; Cho, Kyeongjae; Koh, Seong Jin

    2014-09-10

    Fermi-Dirac electron thermal excitation is an intrinsic phenomenon that limits functionality of various electron systems. Efforts to manipulate electron thermal excitation have been successful when the entire system is cooled to cryogenic temperatures, typically distribution corresponds to an effective electron temperature of ~45 K, can be transported throughout device components without external cooling. This is accomplished using a discrete level of a quantum well, which filters out thermally excited electrons and permits only energy-suppressed electrons to participate in electron transport. The quantum well (~2 nm of Cr2O3) is formed between source (Cr) and tunnelling barrier (SiO2) in a double-barrier-tunnelling-junction structure having a quantum dot as the central island. Cold electron transport is detected from extremely narrow differential conductance peaks in electron tunnelling through CdSe quantum dots, with full widths at half maximum of only ~15 mV at room temperature.

  3. Power Electronics and Electric Machines Facilities | Transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research | NREL Facilities Power Electronics and Electric Machines Facilities NREL's power electronics and electric machines thermal management experimentation facilities feature a wide range of four researchers in discussion around a piece of laboratory equipment. Power electronics researchers

  4. Electron transport through a diatomic molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imran, Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    Electron transport through a diatomic molecular tunnel junction shows wave like interference phenomenon. By using Keldysh non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) theory, we have explicitly presented current and differential conductance calculation for a diatomic molecular and two isolated atoms (two atoms having zero hybridization between their energy orbitals) tunnel junctions. In case of a diatomic molecular tunnel junction, Green's function propagators entering into current and differential conductance formula interfere constructively for a molecular anti-bonding state and destructively for bonding state. Consequently, conductance through a molecular bonding state is suppressed, and to conserve current, conductance through anti-bonding state is enhanced. Therefore, current steps and differential conductance peaks amplitude show asymmetric correspondence between molecular bonding and anti-bonding states. Interestingly, for a diatomic molecule, comprising of two atoms of same energy level, these propagators interfere completely destructively for molecular bonding state and constructively for molecular anti-bonding state. Hence under such condition, a single step or a single peak is shown up in current versus voltage or differential conductance versus voltage studies.

  5. Thermophilic P-loop transport ATPases : Enzyme function and energetics at high temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pretz, Monika Gyöngyi

    2007-01-01

    Primary transport ATPases are divided into several superfamilies; amongst others including ATPases of the ABC transporter superfamily, the F-ATPase superfamily or the motor ATPases of the General Secretory (Sec) pathway. Motor proteins from these superfamilies show a low sequence similarity, except

  6. Role of nitrogen distribution in asymmetric stone-wales defects on electronic transport of graphene nanoribbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Hui; Zhao, Jun; Xu, Dahai [College of Physical Science and Technology, Yangtze University, Jingzhou, Hubei 434023 (China); Wei, Jianwei [College of Optoelectronic Information, Chongqing University of Technology, Chongqing 400054 (China)

    2012-01-15

    The authors performed first principles calculation to investigate the influences of nitrogen dopant distribution in the asymmetric Stone-Wales (SW) defect on the electronic transport of zigzag-edged graphene nanoribbon (ZGNR). The stability of doped configurations are evaluated in terms of total energies. It is found that the dopant placed near the edge of the ribbon is the most energetically favorable site. Our results reveal that the doped nanostructures can be substantially modulated as a result of modifications on electronic bands induced by substitutional dopant. Moreover, the individual dopant gives rise to one or two complete electron backscattering centers associated with impurity states in the doped configurations, and the location is determined by the dopant site. Schematics of the atomic structure after asymmetric Stone-Wales defects introduced and different nitrogen substitutional sites. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  7. Glucose transportation in the brain and its impairment in Huntington disease: one more shade of the energetic metabolism failure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morea, Veronica; Bidollari, Eris; Colotti, Gianni; Fiorillo, Annarita; Rosati, Jessica; De Filippis, Lidia; Squitieri, Ferdinando; Ilari, Andrea

    2017-07-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) or Huntington's chorea is the most common inherited, dominantly transmitted, neurodegenerative disorder. It is caused by increased CAG repeats number in the gene coding for huntingtin (Htt) and characterized by motor, behaviour and psychiatric symptoms, ultimately leading to death. HD patients also exhibit alterations in glucose and energetic metabolism, which result in pronounced weight loss despite sustained calorie intake. Glucose metabolism decreases in the striatum of all the subjects with mutated Htt, but affects symptom presentation only when it drops below a specific threshold. Recent evidence points at defects in glucose uptake by the brain, and especially by neurons, as a relevant component of central glucose hypometabolism in HD patients. Here we review the main features of glucose metabolism and transport in the brain in physiological conditions and how these processes are impaired in HD, and discuss the potential ability of strategies aimed at increasing intracellular energy levels to counteract neurological and motor degeneration in HD patients.

  8. Multi-spacecraft observations and transport simulations of solar energetic particles for the May 17th 2012 event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battarbee, M.; Guo, J.; Dalla, S.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R.; Swalwell, B.; Lawrence, D. J.

    2018-05-01

    Context. The injection, propagation and arrival of solar energetic particles (SEPs) during eruptive solar events is an important and current research topic of heliospheric physics. During the largest solar events, particles may have energies up to a few GeVs and sometimes even trigger ground-level enhancements (GLEs) at Earth. These large SEP events are best investigated through multi-spacecraft observations. Aims: We aim to study the first GLE-event of solar cycle 24, from 17th May 2012, using data from multiple spacecraft (SOHO, GOES, MSL, STEREO-A, STEREO-B and MESSENGER). These spacecraft are located throughout the inner heliosphere, at heliocentric distances between 0.34 and 1.5 astronomical units (au), covering nearly the whole range of heliospheric longitudes. Methods: We present and investigate sub-GeV proton time profiles for the event at several energy channels, obtained via different instruments aboard the above spacecraft. We investigated issues caused by magnetic connectivity, and present results of three-dimensional SEP propagation simulations. We gathered virtual time profiles and perform qualitative and quantitative comparisons with observations, assessed longitudinal injection and transport effects as well as peak intensities. Results: We distinguish different time profile shapes for well-connected and weakly connected observers, and find our onset time analysis to agree with this distinction. At select observers, we identify an additional low-energy component of Energetic Storm Particles (ESPs). Using well-connected observers for normalisation, our simulations are able to accurately recreate both time profile shapes and peak intensities at multiple observer locations. Conclusions: This synergetic approach combining numerical modelling with multi-spacecraft observations is crucial for understanding the propagation of SEPs within the interplanetary magnetic field. Our novel analysis provides valuable proof of the ability to simulate SEP propagation

  9. Electron transport and improved confinement on Tore Supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoang, G.T.; Bourdelle, C.; Garbet, X.; Aniel, T.; Giruzzi, G.; Ottaviani, M.; Horton, W.; Zhu, P.; Budny, R.V.

    2001-01-01

    Magnetic shear is found to play an important role for triggering various improved confinement regimes through the electron channel. A wide database of hot electron plasmas (T e >2T i ) heated by fast wave electron heating (FWEH) is analyzed for electron thermal transport. A critical gradient is clearly observed. It is found that the critical gradient linearly increases with the ratio between local magnetic shear (s) and safety factor (q). The Horton model, based on the electromagnetic turbulence driven by the electron temperature gradient (ETG) mode, is found to be a good candidate for electron transport modeling. (author)

  10. A computer code package for electron transport Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popescu, Lucretiu M.

    1999-01-01

    A computer code package was developed for solving various electron transport problems by Monte Carlo simulation. It is based on condensed history Monte Carlo algorithm. In order to get reliable results over wide ranges of electron energies and target atomic numbers, specific techniques of electron transport were implemented such as: Moliere multiscatter angular distributions, Blunck-Leisegang multiscatter energy distribution, sampling of electron-electron and Bremsstrahlung individual interactions. Path-length and lateral displacement corrections algorithms and the module for computing collision, radiative and total restricted stopping powers and ranges of electrons are also included. Comparisons of simulation results with experimental measurements are finally presented. (author)

  11. Power Electronics Thermal Management | Transportation Research | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power Electronics Thermal Management Power Electronics Thermal Management A photo of water boiling in liquid cooling lab equipment. Power electronics thermal management research aims to help lower the investigates and develops thermal management strategies for power electronics systems that use wide-bandgap

  12. Flare energetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, S. T.; Dejager, C.; Dennis, B. R.; Hudson, H. S.; Simnett, G. M.; Strong, K. T.; Bentley, R. D.; Bornmann, P. L.; Bruner, M. E.; Cargill, P. J.

    1986-01-01

    In this investigation of flare energetics, researchers sought to establish a comprehensive and self-consistent picture of the sources and transport of energy within a flare. To achieve this goal, they chose five flares in 1980 that were well observed with instruments on the Solar Maximum Mission, and with other space-borne and ground-based instruments. The events were chosen to represent various types of flares. Details of the observations available for them and the corresponding physical parameters derived from these data are presented. The flares were studied from two perspectives, the impulsive and gradual phases, and then the results were compared to obtain the overall picture of the energics of these flares. The role that modeling can play in estimating the total energy of a flare when the observationally determined parameters are used as the input to a numerical model is discussed. Finally, a critique of the current understanding of flare energetics and the methods used to determine various energetics terms is outlined, and possible future directions of research in this area are suggested.

  13. Nonequilibrium Transport and the Bernoulli Effect of Electrons in a Two-Dimensional Electron Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Ismet I.

    2013-02-01

    Nonequilibrium transport of charged carriers in a two-dimensional electron gas is summarized from an experimental point of view. The transport regime in which the electron-electron interactions are enhanced at high bias leads to a range of striking effects in a two-dimensional electron gas. This regime of transport is quite different than the ballistic transport in which particles propagate coherently with no intercarrier energy transfer and the diffusive transport in which the momentum of the electron system is lost with the involvement of the phonons. Quite a few hydrodynamic phenomena observed in classical gasses have the electrical analogs in the current flow. When intercarrier scattering events dominate the transport, the momentum sharing via narrow angle scattering among the hot and cold electrons lead to negative resistance and electron pumping which can be viewed as the analog of the Bernoulli-Venturi effect observed classical gasses. The recent experimental findings and the background work in the field are reviewed.

  14. Sausage and Kink EMHD Instabilities and Fast Electron transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, A.; Jain, N.; Kaw, P.; Sengupta, S.

    2005-01-01

    In the fast ignition concept of laser fusion it is desirable that the hot electron beam generated at the critical layer by the ignitor laser pulse propagates an adequate distance and deposits its energy to the compressed target core in a sufficiently localized region for the creation of hot spot. The mechanisms responsible for energy deposition can be due to (i) the classical coulomb collision cross section and (ii) collective interaction of the beam plasma system. The present work demonstrates a possible electromagnetic turbulence aided collective mechanism of stopping of the energetic electron flow in plasma. (Author)

  15. Magnetic turbulent electron transport in a reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoenberg, K.; Moses, R.

    1990-01-01

    A model of magnetic turbulent electron transport is presented. The model, based on the thermal conduction theory of Rechester and Rosenbluth, entails a Boltzmann description of electron dynamics in the long mean-free-path limit and quantitatively describes the salient features of superthermal electron measurements in the RFP edge plasma. Included are predictions of the mean superthermal electron energy, current density, and power flux asymmetry. A discussion of the transport model, the assumptions implicit in the model, and the relevance of this work to more general issue of magnetic turbulent transport in toroidal systems is presented. 32 refs., 3 figs

  16. Electron transport chain in a thermotolerant yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejía-Barajas, Jorge A; Martínez-Mora, José A; Salgado-Garciglia, Rafael; Noriega-Cisneros, Ruth; Ortiz-Avila, Omar; Cortés-Rojo, Christian; Saavedra-Molina, Alfredo

    2017-04-01

    Yeasts capable of growing and surviving at high temperatures are regarded as thermotolerant. For appropriate functioning of cellular processes and cell survival, the maintenance of an optimal redox state is critical of reducing and oxidizing species. We studied mitochondrial functions of the thermotolerant Kluyveromyces marxianus SLP1 and the mesophilic OFF1 yeasts, through the evaluation of its mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ m ), ATPase activity, electron transport chain (ETC) activities, alternative oxidase activity, lipid peroxidation. Mitochondrial membrane potential and the cytoplasmic free Ca 2+ ions (Ca 2+ cyt) increased in the SLP1 yeast when exposed to high temperature, compared with the mesophilic yeast OFF1. ATPase activity in the mesophilic yeast diminished 80% when exposed to 40° while the thermotolerant SLP1 showed no change, despite an increase in the mitochondrial lipid peroxidation. The SLP1 thermotolerant yeast exposed to high temperature showed a diminution of 33% of the oxygen consumption in state 4. The uncoupled state 3 of oxygen consumption did not change in the mesophilic yeast when it had an increase of temperature, whereas in the thermotolerant SLP1 yeast resulted in an increase of 2.5 times when yeast were grown at 30 o , while a decrease of 51% was observed when it was exposed to high temperature. The activities of the ETC complexes were diminished in the SLP1 when exposed to high temperature, but also it was distinguished an alternative oxidase activity. Our results suggest that the mitochondria state, particularly ETC state, is an important characteristic of the thermotolerance of the SLP1 yeast strain.

  17. Electron transport in the presence of a Coulomb field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgdoerfer, J.; Gibbons, J.

    1990-01-01

    We analyze the modifications of the transport behavior of electrons in dense media due to the presence of a strong Coulomb field generated by an ion moving initially in close phase-space correlation with the electrons. These modifications play a profound role in convoy electron emission in ion-solid collisions. The transport behavior is studied within the framework of a classical phase-space master equation. The nonseparable master equation is solved numerically using test-particle discretization and Monte Carlo sampling. In the limit of vanishing Coulomb forces the master equation becomes separable and can be reduced to standard one-dimensional kinetic equations for free-electron transport that can be solved exactly. The comparison to free-electron transport is used to gauge both the reliability of test-particle discretization and the significance of Coulomb distortion of the distribution functions. Applications to convoy-electron emission are discussed

  18. Rocket measurements of X-rays and energetic electrons through an auroral arc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aarsnes, K.; Stadsnes, J.; Soeraas, F.

    1976-01-01

    Preliminary results from rocket measurements on auroral electron precipitation are discussed as far as the spatial structure and time and space variations in the primary electron fluxes are concerned. The analysis demonstrates that there was a good overall correspondence between the X-ray and electron data. By using a well collimated X-ray detector on a spinning rocket, it was possible to get additional information on the overall electron precipitation pattern

  19. Energetic Systems

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Energetic Systems Division provides full-spectrum energetic engineering services (project management, design, analysis, production support, in-service support,...

  20. Plasma and energetic electron flux variations in the Mercury 1 C event: Evidence for a magnetospheric boundary layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christon, S.P.

    1989-01-01

    Near the outbound magnetopause crossing during the first encounter of Mariner 10 with the planet Mercury on March 29, 1974, large intensity, ∼ 6 s quasi-periodic variations in the intensity-time profile of the charged particle experiment's electron counting rate appeared as a series of peaks and valleys. The peaks have previously been interpreted as quasi-periodic burst sequences of mildly relativistic electrons, caused in one case by episodic ∼ 6-s magnetotail substorm reconnection events and in another case by multiple encounters with a substorm energized electron population drifting around Mercury with an ∼ 6 s drift period. In this paper, the authors offer a new and fundamentally different interpretation of the Mariner 10 energetic electron, plasma electron, and magnetic field data near the outbound magnetopause at Mercury 1. They show that magnetosheath-like boundary layer plasma was observed up to ∼ 360 km planetward of the dawn magnetopause crossing as sensed by the magnetometer. They show that observations of substorm enhanced > 35 keV electron flux (that previously interpreted as > 175 keV electrons) associated with the hot tenuous plasma sheet population were interleaved with ∼ 6 s period observations of a cold dense boundary layer plasma associated with a much lower > 35 keV electron flux. They argue that the ∼ 6 s temporal signature is due to variation of the thickness and/or position of the boundary layer plasma population. This explanation of the ∼ 6-s variations, based upon the analysis of the coincident responses of the magnetic field experiment and two independent charged particle instruments (at their highest temporal resolutions), finds a direct analogue in observations of Earth's magnetospheric boundary layer, although the time scales are significantly shorter at Mercury

  1. Resonant scattering of energetic electrons in the plasmasphere by monotonic whistler-mode waves artificially generated by ionospheric modification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Chang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Modulated high-frequency (HF heating of the ionosphere provides a feasible means of artificially generating extremely low-frequency (ELF/very low-frequency (VLF whistler waves, which can leak into the inner magnetosphere and contribute to resonant interactions with high-energy electrons in the plasmasphere. By ray tracing the magnetospheric propagation of ELF/VLF emissions artificially generated at low-invariant latitudes, we evaluate the relativistic electron resonant energies along the ray paths and show that propagating artificial ELF/VLF waves can resonate with electrons from ~ 100 keV to ~ 10 MeV. We further implement test particle simulations to investigate the effects of resonant scattering of energetic electrons due to triggered monotonic/single-frequency ELF/VLF waves. The results indicate that within the period of a resonance timescale, changes in electron pitch angle and kinetic energy are stochastic, and the overall effect is cumulative, that is, the changes averaged over all test electrons increase monotonically with time. The localized rates of wave-induced pitch-angle scattering and momentum diffusion in the plasmasphere are analyzed in detail for artificially generated ELF/VLF whistlers with an observable in situ amplitude of ~ 10 pT. While the local momentum diffusion of relativistic electrons is small, with a rate of −7 s−1, the local pitch-angle scattering can be intense near the loss cone with a rate of ~ 10−4 s−1. Our investigation further supports the feasibility of artificial triggering of ELF/VLF whistler waves for removal of high-energy electrons at lower L shells within the plasmasphere. Moreover, our test particle simulation results show quantitatively good agreement with quasi-linear diffusion coefficients, confirming the applicability of both methods to evaluate the resonant diffusion effect of artificial generated ELF/VLF whistlers.

  2. On the morphology of energetic (>= 30 keV) electron precipitation at the onset of negative magnetic bays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pytte, T.; Trefall, H.; Kremser, G.; Tanskanen, P.; Riedler, W.

    1976-01-01

    Recordings of Bremsstrahlung X-rays supported by recordings of cosmic noise absorption have been used to study in detail energetic (>= 30 keV) electron precipitation events occurring near local midnight at the onset of the expansion phase of magnetospheric substorms. This type of precipitation occurs during the first 5 to 10 min after bay onset and can usually be distinguished from the subsequent bay-associated precipitation by its characteristic time structure, variation in energy spectrum, and higher intensities. During this same interval, the poleward border of the precipitation region moves rapidly towards higher latitudes with speeds of typically 1 to 2 km/s, whereas the equatorward border seems to move slowly towards lower latitudes. The northward expansion starts just poleward of the lowest latitudes reached during the slow equatorward motion of the preceding growth-phase precipitation. The previous narrow precipitation region may thus expand to as much as 10 0 of invariant latitude within a few minutes. Within the expanding region there are additional intrinsic temporal variations. As the flux of precipitating electrons tends to be most intense and most energetic near the poleward border, recordings made northward of the latitude where the poleward motion started tend to give the appearance of an impulsive precipiation event. The bay-onset precipiation starts abruptly at the onset of Pi 2 magnetic pulsations. Associated with these pulsations there are modulations of the flux of precipitating electrons. An intensified westward electrojet appears to have its center in the equatorward part of the precipitation region. The results are discussed and a mechanism is proposed. (author)

  3. Power Electronics and Electric Machines Publications | Transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research | NREL and Electric Machines Publications Power Electronics and Electric Machines Publications NREL and its partners have produced many papers and presentations related to power electronics and from power electronics and electric machines research are available to the public. Photo by Pat Corkery

  4. Edge modulation of electronics and transport properties of cliff-edge phosphorene nanoribbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Caixia; Wang, Tianxing; Xia, Congxin; Liu, Yufang

    2017-12-01

    Based on the first-principles calculations, we study the electronic structures and transport properties of cliff-like edge phosphorene nanoribbons (CPNRs), considering different types of edge passivation. The band structures of bare CPNRs possess the metallic features; while hydrogen (H), fluorine (F), chlorine (Cl) and oxygen (O) atoms-passivated CPNRs are semiconductor materials, and the band gap values monotonically decrease when the ribbon width increases. Moreover, the H and F-passivated CPNRs exhibit the direct band gap characteristics, while the Cl and O-passivated cases show the features of indirect band gap. In addition, the edge passivated CPNRs are more energetically stable than bare edge case. Meanwhile, our results also show that the transport properties of the CPNRs can be obviously influenced by the different edge passivation.

  5. Time integrated x-ray measurments of the very energetic electron end loss profile in TMX-U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osher, J.E.; Fabyan, J.

    1984-01-01

    The time-integrated 2-D profile of the thick-target bremsstrahlung produced by energetic end loss electrons has been measured during ECRH operation of TMX-U. Sheets of x-ray film and/or arrays of thermoluminescent dosimeters were placed on the outside of the end tank end wall to measure the relative spatial x-ray profile, with locally added filters of Pb to determine the effective mean x-ray energy. The purpose of this simple survey diagnostic was to allow deduction of the gross features of the ECRH region. The electron source functions needed to fit the x-ray data were modeled for various anchor cell radial distributions mapped along magnetic field lines to the elliptical plasma potential control plates or the Al end walls. The data are generally consistent with (1) major ECR heating in the central 25-cm-diam core, (2) a mean ECRH electron loss energy of 420 keV, and (3) an ECRH coupling efficiency to these hot electrons of greater than or equal to 10%

  6. Radiation transport and energetics of laser-driven half-hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, A. S. [Directorate Science and Technology, AWE Aldermaston, Reading (United Kingdom); Cooper, A. B.R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Schneider, M. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); MacLaren, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Graham, P. [Directorate Science and Technology, AWE Aldermaston, Reading (United Kingdom); Lu, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Seugling, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Satcher, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Klingmann, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Comley, A. J. [Directorate Science and Technology, AWE Aldermaston, Reading (United Kingdom); Marrs, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); May, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Widmann, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Glendinning, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Castor, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sain, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Back, C. A. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Hund, J. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Baker, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hsing, W. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Foster, J. [Directorate Science and Technology, AWE Aldermaston, Reading (United Kingdom); Young, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Young, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Experiments that characterize and develop a high energy-density half-hohlraum platform for use in bench-marking radiation hydrodynamics models have been conducted at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Results from the experiments are used to quantitatively compare with simulations of the radiation transported through an evolving plasma density structure, colloquially known as an N-wave. A half-hohlraum is heated by 80 NIF beams to a temperature of 240 eV. This creates a subsonic di usive Marshak wave which propagates into a high atomic number Ta2O5 aerogel. The subsequent radiation transport through the aerogel and through slots cut into the aerogel layer is investigated. We describe a set of experiments that test the hohlraum performance and report on a range

  7. Conceptual Model for the Transport of Energetic Residues from Surface Soil to Groundwater by Range Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-11-01

    fluoranthenes are common products of diesel emissions (Hering et al. 1984). Benzo(a)pyrene is common in creosote and motor vehicle particulate emissions (Wild...military ranges are associated with on-site vegetative burning, diesel exhaust, and atmospheric deposi- tion. Metals Metal oxides and salts are...Hence, slow transport of TNT from the soil bed is a limiting fac- tor in the phytoremediation or bioremediation of TNT. Fluxes were, in de- creasing

  8. Comparison of the renewable transportation fuels, liquid hydrogen and methanol, with gasoline - energetic and economic aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Specht, M.; Staiss, F.; Bandi, A.; Weimer, T.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, the renewable energy vectors liquid hydrogen (LH 2 ) and methanol generated from atmospheric CO 2 are compared with the conventional crude oil-gasoline system. Both renewable concepts, liquid hydrogen and methanol, lead to a drastic CO 2 reduction compared to the fossil-based system. The comparison between the LH 2 and methanol vector for the transport sector shows nearly the same fuel cost and energy efficiency but strong infrastructure advantages for methanol. (author)

  9. Density and temperature of energetic electrons in the Earth's magnetotail derived from high-latitude GPS observations during the declining phase of the solar cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. Denton

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Single relativistic-Maxwellian fits are made to high-latitude GPS-satellite observations of energetic electrons for the period January 2006–November 2010; a constellation of 12 GPS space vehicles provides the observations. The derived fit parameters (for energies ~0.1–1.0 MeV, in combination with field-line mapping on the nightside of the magnetosphere, provide a survey of the energetic electron density and temperature distribution in the magnetotail between McIlwain L-values of L=6 and L=22. Analysis reveals the characteristics of the density-temperature distribution of energetic electrons and its variation as a function of solar wind speed and the Kp index. The density-temperature characteristics of the magnetotail energetic electrons are very similar to those found in the outer electron radiation belt as measured at geosynchronous orbit. The energetic electron density in the magnetotail is much greater during increased geomagnetic activity and during fast solar wind. The total electron density in the magnetotail is found to be strongly correlated with solar wind speed and is at least a factor of two greater for high-speed solar wind (VSW=500–1000 km s−1 compared to low-speed solar wind (VSW=100–400 km s−1. These results have important implications for understanding (a how the solar wind may modulate entry into the magnetosphere during fast and slow solar wind, and (b if the magnetotail is a source or a sink for the outer electron radiation belt.

  10. Void formation in pure aluminium irradiated with high-energetic electron beams and gamma-quanta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gan, V. V.; Ozhigou, L. S.; Yamnitsky, V. A.

    1983-01-01

    The spatial distribution of displaced atoms and helium atoms and also the spectra of damaging energies of primary displaced atoms in a thick aluminium target irradiated with electrons of 225 MeV energy were calculated. Pure aluminium (99.9999%) irradiated up to 0.04 dose was studied by electron...

  11. Extracellular Electron Transport Coupling Biogeochemical Processes Centimeters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Fossing, Henrik; Christensen, Peter Bondo

    2010-01-01

    of the oxygen uptake in laboratory incubations of initially homogenized and stabilized sediment. Using microsensors and process rate measurements we further investigated the effect of the electric currents on sediment biogeochemistry. Dissolved sulfide readily donated electrons to the networks and could...... confirmed the depth range of the electric communication and indicated donation of electrons directly from organotrophic bacteria. The separation of oxidation and reduction processes created steep pH gradients eventually causing carbonate precipitation at the surface. The results indicate that electron...... exchanging organisms have major biogeochemical importance as they allow widely separated electron donors and acceptors to react with one another....

  12. Molecular electronics: some views on transport junctions and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joachim, Christian; Ratner, Mark A

    2005-06-21

    The field of molecular electronics comprises a fundamental set of issues concerning the electronic response of molecules as parts of a mesoscopic structure and a technology-facing area of science. We will overview some important aspects of these subfields. The most advanced ideas in the field involve the use of molecules as individual logic or memory units and are broadly based on using the quantum state space of the molecule. Current work in molecular electronics usually addresses molecular junction transport, where the molecule acts as a barrier for incoming electrons: This is the fundamental Landauer idea of "conduction as scattering" generalized to molecular junction structures. Another point of view in terms of superexchange as a guiding mechanism for coherent electron transfer through the molecular bridge is discussed. Molecules generally exhibit relatively strong vibronic coupling. The last section of this overview focuses on vibronic effects, including inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy, hysteresis in junction charge transport, and negative differential resistance in molecular transport junctions.

  13. Chemical kinetics and relaxation of non-equilibrium air plasma generated by energetic photon and electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maulois, Melissa; Ribière, Maxime; Eichwald, Olivier; Yousfi, Mohammed; Azaïs, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    The comprehension of electromagnetic perturbations of electronic devices, due to air plasma-induced electromagnetic field, requires a thorough study on air plasma. In the aim to understand the phenomena at the origin of the formation of non-equilibrium air plasma, we simulate, using a volume average chemical kinetics model (0D model), the time evolution of a non-equilibrium air plasma generated by an energetic X-ray flash. The simulation is undertaken in synthetic air (80% N_2 and 20% O_2) at ambient temperature and atmospheric pressure. When the X-ray flash crosses the gas, non-relativistic Compton electrons (low energy) and a relativistic Compton electron beam (high energy) are simultaneously generated and interact with the gas. The considered chemical kinetics scheme involves 26 influent species (electrons, positive ions, negative ions, and neutral atoms and molecules in their ground or metastable excited states) reacting following 164 selected reactions. The kinetics model describing the plasma chemistry was coupled to the conservation equation of the electron mean energy, in order to calculate at each time step of the non-equilibrium plasma evolution, the coefficients of reactions involving electrons while the energy of the heavy species (positive and negative ions and neutral atoms and molecules) is assumed remaining close to ambient temperature. It has been shown that it is the relativistic Compton electron beam directly created by the X-ray flash which is mainly responsible for the non-equilibrium plasma formation. Indeed, the low energy electrons (i.e., the non-relativistic ones) directly ejected from molecules by Compton collisions contribute to less than 1% on the creation of electrons in the plasma. In our simulation conditions, a non-equilibrium plasma with a low electron mean energy close to 1 eV and a concentration of charged species close to 10"1"3" cm"−"3 is formed a few nanoseconds after the peak of X-ray flash intensity. 200 ns after the

  14. Electron Generation and Transport in Intense Relativistic Laser-Plasma Interactions Relevant to Fast Ignition ICF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Tammy Yee Wing [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2010-01-01

    The reentrant cone approach to Fast Ignition, an advanced Inertial Confinement Fusion scheme, remains one of the most attractive because of the potential to efficiently collect and guide the laser light into the cone tip and direct energetic electrons into the high density core of the fuel. However, in the presence of a preformed plasma, the laser energy is largely absorbed before it can reach the cone tip. Full scale fast ignition laser systems are envisioned to have prepulses ranging between 100 mJ to 1 J. A few of the imperative issues facing fast ignition, then, are the conversion efficiency with which the laser light is converted to hot electrons, the subsequent transport characteristics of those electrons, and requirements for maximum allowable prepulse this may put on the laser system. This dissertation examines the laser-to-fast electron conversion efficiency scaling with prepulse for cone-guided fast ignition. Work in developing an extreme ultraviolet imager diagnostic for the temperature measurements of electron-heated targets, as well as the validation of the use of a thin wire for simultaneous determination of electron number density and electron temperature will be discussed.

  15. Emission of low-energetic electrons in collisions of heavy ions with solid targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lineva, Natallia

    2008-07-01

    At the UNILAC accelerator, we have initiated a project with the objective to investigate lowenergy electrons, emitted from solid, electrically conductive targets after the impact of swift light and heavy ions. For this purposes, we have installed, optimized, and put into operation an electrostatic toroidal electron spectrometer. First, investigations of electrons, emitted from solid-state targets after the bombardment with a monochromatic electron beam from an electron gun, has been carried out. The proposed method combines the results of the measurements with the results of dedicated Monte Carlo simulations. The method has been elaborated in a case study for carbon targets. The findings have been instrumental for the interpretation of our measurements of electrons emitted in collisions of swift ions with the same carbon targets. Our investigations focused on following ion beams: protons and (H + 3 )-molecules of the same energy, as well as on carbon ions with two different energies. Thin carbon, nickel, argon and gold foils has been used as targets. Electrons in the energy range between 50 eV and 1 keV have been investigated. The measured electron distributions, both integral as well as differential with respect to the polar angle, have been compared to simple standard theories for gases as well as to the results of TRAX simulations, the latter being based on data from gaseous targets. Dedicated TRAX simulations have been performed only for the carbon targets, applying the method mentioned above. Within our experimental uncertainties, we observe a good agreement of the measured and TRAX simulated data. That leads us to the conclusion that - as a first order approximation - the electron emission pattern from ion-atom collisions in solid-state targets and the one from single collisions in gases are similar. (orig.)

  16. Fast electron generation and transport in a turbulent, magnetized plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoneking, W.R.

    1994-05-01

    The nature of fast electron generation and transport in the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) reversed field pinch (RFP) is investigated using two electron energy analyzer (EEA) probes and a thermocouple calorimeter. The parallel velocity distribution of the fast electron population is well fit by a drifted Maxwellian distribution with temperature of about 100 eV and drift velocity of about 2 x 10 6 m/s. Cross-calibration of the EEA with the calorimeter provides a measurement of the fast electron perpendicular temperature of 30 eV, much lower than the parallel temperature, and is evidence that the kinetic dynamo mechanism (KDT) is not operative in MST. The fast electron current is found to match to the parallel current at the edge, and the fast electron density is about 4 x 10 11 cm -3 independent of the ratio of the applied toroidal electric field to the critical electric field for runaways. First time measurements of magnetic fluctuation induced particle transport are reported. By correlating electron current fluctuations with radial magnetic fluctuations the transported flux of electrons is found to be negligible outside r/a∼0.9, but rises the level of the expected total particle losses inside r/a∼0.85. A comparison of the measured diffusion coefficient is made with the ausilinear stochastic diffusion coefficient. Evidence exists that the reduction of the transport is due to the presence of a radial ambipolar electric field of magnitude 500 V/m, that acts to equilibrate the ion and electron transport rates. The convective energy transport associated with the measured particle transport is large enough to account for the observed magnetic fluctuation induced energy transport in MST

  17. Calculation of effective atomic number and electron density of essential biomolecules for electron, proton, alpha particle and multi-energetic photon interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurudirek, Murat; Onaran, Tayfur

    2015-07-01

    Effective atomic numbers (Zeff) and electron densities (Ne) of some essential biomolecules have been calculated for total electron interaction, total proton interaction and total alpha particle interaction using an interpolation method in the energy region 10 keV-1 GeV. Also, the spectrum weighted Zeff for multi-energetic photons has been calculated using Auto-Zeff program. Biomolecules consist of fatty acids, amino acids, carbohydrates and basic nucleotides of DNA and RNA. Variations of Zeff and Ne with kinetic energy of ionizing charged particles and effective photon energies of heterogeneous sources have been studied for the given materials. Significant variations in Zeff and Ne have been observed through the entire energy region for electron, proton and alpha particle interactions. Non-uniform variation has been observed for protons and alpha particles in low and intermediate energy regions, respectively. The maximum values of Zeff have found to be in higher energies for total electron interaction whereas maximum values have found to be in relatively low energies for total proton and total alpha particle interactions. When it comes to the multi-energetic photon sources, it has to be noted that the highest Zeff values were found at low energy region where photoelectric absorption is the pre-dominant interaction process. The lowest values of Zeff have been shown in biomolecules such as stearic acid, leucine, mannitol and thymine, which have highest H content in their groups. Variation in Ne seems to be more or less the same with the variation in Zeff for the given materials as expected.

  18. Tunneling explains efficient electron transport via protein junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fereiro, Jerry A; Yu, Xi; Pecht, Israel; Sheves, Mordechai; Cuevas, Juan Carlos; Cahen, David

    2018-05-15

    Metalloproteins, proteins containing a transition metal ion cofactor, are electron transfer agents that perform key functions in cells. Inspired by this fact, electron transport across these proteins has been widely studied in solid-state settings, triggering the interest in examining potential use of proteins as building blocks in bioelectronic devices. Here, we report results of low-temperature (10 K) electron transport measurements via monolayer junctions based on the blue copper protein azurin (Az), which strongly suggest quantum tunneling of electrons as the dominant charge transport mechanism. Specifically, we show that, weakening the protein-electrode coupling by introducing a spacer, one can switch the electron transport from off-resonant to resonant tunneling. This is a consequence of reducing the electrode's perturbation of the Cu(II)-localized electronic state, a pattern that has not been observed before in protein-based junctions. Moreover, we identify vibronic features of the Cu(II) coordination sphere in transport characteristics that show directly the active role of the metal ion in resonance tunneling. Our results illustrate how quantum mechanical effects may dominate electron transport via protein-based junctions.

  19. Modeling of oxygen transport and cellular energetics explains observations on in vivo cardiac energy metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel A Beard

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Observations on the relationship between cardiac work rate and the levels of energy metabolites adenosine triphosphate (ATP, adenosine diphosphate (ADP, and phosphocreatine (CrP have not been satisfactorily explained by theoretical models of cardiac energy metabolism. Specifically, the in vivo stability of ATP, ADP, and CrP levels in response to changes in work and respiratory rate has eluded explanation. Here a previously developed model of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, which was developed based on data obtained from isolated cardiac mitochondria, is integrated with a spatially distributed model of oxygen transport in the myocardium to analyze data obtained from several laboratories over the past two decades. The model includes the components of the respiratory chain, the F0F1-ATPase, adenine nucleotide translocase, and the mitochondrial phosphate transporter at the mitochondrial level; adenylate kinase, creatine kinase, and ATP consumption in the cytoplasm; and oxygen transport between capillaries, interstitial fluid, and cardiomyocytes. The integrated model is able to reproduce experimental observations on ATP, ADP, CrP, and inorganic phosphate levels in canine hearts over a range of workload and during coronary hypoperfusion and predicts that cytoplasmic inorganic phosphate level is a key regulator of the rate of mitochondrial respiration at workloads for which the rate of cardiac oxygen consumption is less than or equal to approximately 12 mumol per minute per gram of tissue. At work rates corresponding to oxygen consumption higher than 12 mumol min(-1 g(-1, model predictions deviate from the experimental data, indicating that at high work rates, additional regulatory mechanisms that are not currently incorporated into the model may be important. Nevertheless, the integrated model explains metabolite levels observed at low to moderate workloads and the changes in metabolite levels and tissue oxygenation observed during graded

  20. Simulation and modeling of whistler-mode wave growth through cyclotron resonance with energetic electrons in the magnetosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, C.R.

    1987-01-01

    New models and simulations of wave growth experienced by electromagnetic waves propagating through the magnetosphere in the whistler mode are presented. For these waves, which have frequencies below the electron gyro and plasma frequencies, the magnetospheric plasma acts like a natural amplifier often amplifying the waves by ∼ 30 dB. The mechanism for growth is cyclotron resonance between the circularly polarized waves and the gyrating energetic electrons which make up the Van Allen radiation belts. The main emphasis is to simulate single-frequency wave pulses, in the 2-6 kHz range, that have been injected into the magnetosphere, near L ∼ 4, by the Stanford transmitting facility at Siple station, Antarctica. However, the results can also be applied to naturally occurring signals, signals from other transmitters, non-CW signals, and signals in other parts of the magnetosphere not probed by the Siple Station transmitter. Results show the importance of the transient aspects in the wave-growth process. The wave growth established as the wave propagates toward the equator, is given a spatially advancing wave phase structure by the geomagnetic inhomogeneity. Through the feedback of this radiation upon other electrons, conditions are set up that results in the linearly increasing output frequency with time

  1. High-resolution energetic particle measurements at 6.6 R/sub E/ 1. Electron micropulsations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higbie, P.R.; Belian, R.D.; Baker, D.N.

    1978-01-01

    The three papers dealing with data from satellites 1976--059A which we present in this issue represent the first publication of data from the new series of charged particle analyzer (CPA) instruments designed to measure energetic particle fluxes at geosynchronous altitudes. This first report presents new results on electron micropulsation phenomena and includes a concise description of the instrument. We often observe highly periodic modulations which persist for times as long as 2 hours in the spin-averaged counting rate data. These flux oscillations occur most frequently in the 30- to 300-keV electron data but are occasionally seen in higher-energy electron or low-energy proton data. The pitch angle distributions of the observed modulated fluxes may be either 'cigar-shaped' or 'pancake-shaped.' Oscillations at different energies are in phase, although the gross counting rate may be changing in an energy-time dispersive manner. The occurrence distribution of these modulations in local time suggests that they are related to Pc 5 geomagnetic micropulsations observed at ground stations

  2. Distribution characteristics of energetic electron according to data of Interkosmos-17 satellite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martynov, A.I.; Makhmutov, V.S.; Petrov, V.M.; Shurshakov, V.A.

    1990-01-01

    Distributions of quasi-captured and precipitating electrons with E=10-70 keV within L=3-15 by local time and local pitch-angle for different conditions of magnetic perturbation are studied using measurement data from Interkosmos-17 satellite (polar circular orbit, h∼500 km). Dependence of electron flows on local time obtained for K p >1 is close to corresponding dependence from AE-4 model, and level of magnetosphere perturbation affects character of this dependence. Electron distributions by invariant latitude in the Earth polar cap are calculated at different levels of geomagnetic perturbation; electron flows during strong magnetic perturbations (K p >4) increase by ∼2 times, in this case, space heterogeneity of their distribution is intensified

  3. The Magnetic Local Time Distribution of Energetic Electrons in the Radiation Belt Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, H. J.

    2017-12-01

    Using fourteen years of electron flux data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Polar Operational Environmental Satellites (POES), a statistical study of the magnetic local time (MLT) distribution of the electron population is performed across a range of activity levels, defined by AE, AE*, Kp, solar wind velocity (Vsw), and VswBz. Three electron energies (>30, >100, and >300 keV) are considered. Dawn-dusk flux asymmetries larger than order of magnitude were observed for >30 and >100 keV electrons. For >300 keV electrons, dawn-dusk asymmetries were primarily due to a decrease in the average dusk-side flux beyond L* ˜ 4.5 that arose with increasing activity. For the >30 keV population, substorm injections enhance the dawn-side flux, which may not reach the dusk-side as the electrons can be on open drift paths and lost to the magnetopause. The asymmetries in the >300 keV population are attributed to the combination of magnetopause shadowing and >300 keV electron injections by large electric fields. We suggest that 3D radiation belt models could set the minimum energy boundary (Emin) to 30 keV or above at L* ˜6 during periods of low activity. However, for more moderate conditions, Emin should be larger than 100 keV and, for very extreme activities, ˜300 keV. Our observations show the extent that in-situ electron flux readings may vary during active periods due to the MLT of the satellite and highlight the importance of 4D radiation belt models to fully understand radiation belt processes.

  4. Monitoring of energetic characteristics of electron beams during formation of high-power pulsed bremsstrahlung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivaschenko, D.M.; Mordasov, N.G.; Chlenov, A.M.

    2005-01-01

    A method and a device for monitoring the dynamic and integrated characteristics of high-power electron and bremsstrahlung beams of the pulse accelerators are proposed. The transfer functions for various types of a target in operating conditions of the pulse accelerator UIN-10 are presented. Possibilities if the integrated diagnostics of acceleration rate of the electron beams with simultaneous testing of the bremsstrahlung parameters as a local field point beyond the converting target are shown [ru

  5. Transport of runaway and thermal electrons due to magnetic microturbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mynick, H.E.; Strachan, J.D.

    1981-01-01

    The ratio of the runaway electron confinement to thermal electron energy confinement is derived for tokamaks where both processes are determined by free streaming along stochastic magnetic field lines. The runaway electron confinement is enhanced at high runaway electron energies due to phase averaging over the magnetic perturbations when the runaway electron drift surfaces are displaced from the magnetic surfaces. Comparison with experimental data from LT-3, Ormak, PLT, ST, and TM-3 indicates that magnetic stochasticity may explain the relative transport rates of runaways and thermal electron energy

  6. Temperature gradient driven electron transport in NSTX and Tore Supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horton, W.; Wong, H.V.; Morrison, P.J.; Wurm, A.; Kim, J.H.; Perez, J.C.; Pratt, J.; Hoang, G.T.; LeBlanc, B.P.; Ball, R.

    2005-01-01

    Electron thermal fluxes are derived from the power balance for Tore Supra (TS) and NSTX discharges with centrally deposited fast wave electron heating. Measurements of the electron temperature and density profiles, combined with ray tracing computations of the power absorption profiles, allow detailed interpretation of the thermal flux versus temperature gradient. Evidence supporting the occurrence of electron temperature gradient turbulent transport in the two confinement devices is found. With control of the magnetic rotational transform profile and the heating power, internal transport barriers are created in TS and NSTX discharges. These partial transport barriers are argued to be a universal feature of transport equations in the presence of invariant tori that are intrinsic to non-monotonic rotational transforms in dynamical systems

  7. Electronic and vibrational hopping transport in boron carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emin, D.

    1991-01-01

    General concepts of hopping-type transport and localization are reviewed. Disorder, electronic correlations and atomic displacements, effects ignored in electronic band structure calculations, foster localization of electronic charge carriers. Examples are given that illustrate the efficacy of these effects in producing localization. This introduction is followed by a brief discussion of the relation between hopping-type transport and localization. The fundamentals of the formation, localization, and hopping transport of small polarons and/or bipolarons is then described. Electronic transport in boron carbides is presented as an example of the adiabatic hopping of small bipolarons. Finally, the notion of vibrational hopping is introduced. The high-temperature thermal diffusion in boron carbides is presented as a potential application of this idea

  8. Nonequilibrium electron transport through quantum dots in the Kondo regime

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wölfle, Peter; Paaske, Jens; Rosch, Achim

    2005-01-01

    Electron transport at large bias voltage through quantum dots in the Kondo regime is described within the perturbative renormalization group extended to nonequilibrium. The conductance, local magnetization, dynamical spin susceptibility and local spectral function are calculated. We show how...

  9. Transport of electrons in lead oxide studied by CELIV technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semeniuk, O; Juska, G; Oelerich, J O; Jandieri, K; Baranovskii, S D; Reznik, A

    2017-01-01

    Although polycrystalline lead oxide (PbO) has a long history of application in optoelectronics and imaging, the transport mechanism for electrons in this material has not yet been clarified. Using the photo-generated charge extraction by linear increasing voltage (photo-CELIV) technique, we provide the temperature- and field-dependences of electron mobility in poly-PbO. It is found that electrons undergo dispersive transport, i.e. their mobility decreases in the course of time. Multiple trapping of electrons from the conduction band into the developed band tail is revealed as the dominant transport mechanism. This differs dramatically from the dispersive transport of holes in the same material, dominated by topological factors and not by energy disorder. (paper)

  10. Simulation of electron thermal transport in H-mode discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rafiq, T.; Pankin, A. Y.; Bateman, G.; Kritz, A. H.; Halpern, F. D.

    2009-01-01

    Electron thermal transport in DIII-D H-mode tokamak plasmas [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] is investigated by comparing predictive simulation results for the evolution of electron temperature profiles with experimental data. The comparison includes the entire profile from the magnetic axis to the bottom of the pedestal. In the simulations, carried out using the automated system for transport analysis (ASTRA) integrated modeling code, different combinations of electron thermal transport models are considered. The combinations include models for electron temperature gradient (ETG) anomalous transport and trapped electron mode (TEM) anomalous transport, as well as a model for paleoclassical transport [J. D. Callen, Nucl. Fusion 45, 1120 (2005)]. It is found that the electromagnetic limit of the Horton ETG model [W. Horton et al., Phys. Fluids 31, 2971 (1988)] provides an important contribution near the magnetic axis, which is a region where the ETG mode in the GLF23 model [R. E. Waltz et al., Phys. Plasmas 4, 2482 (1997)] is below threshold. In simulations of DIII-D discharges, the observed shape of the H-mode edge pedestal is produced when transport associated with the TEM component of the GLF23 model is suppressed and transport given by the paleoclassical model is included. In a study involving 15 DIII-D H-mode discharges, it is found that with a particular combination of electron thermal transport models, the average rms deviation of the predicted electron temperature profile from the experimental profile is reduced to 9% and the offset to -4%.

  11. Energetic electron precipitation and VLF phase disturbances at middle latitudes following the magnetic storm of December 6, 1971

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsen, T.R.; Potemra, T.A.; Imhof, W.L.; Reagan, J.B.

    1977-01-01

    Enhanced fluxes of electrons precipitating over middle latitudes (L approx. 3--4) were detected by the polar-orbiting satellite 1971-089A following a period of magnetic activity starting on December 16, 1971. The electron fluxes measured in 256 differential channels between 130 and 2800 keV have been coordinated with phase observations of VLF radio waves propagating in the earth-ionosphere waveguide. The VLF paths in question, NLK (near Seattle, Washington) and GBR (at Rugby, England) to APL (near Washington, D. C.), cover approx. =120 0 in longitude and range from L approx. 2.5 to L approx. 4.0 in invariant latitude. These paths showed marked daytime and nighttime phase advances from 1650 UT on December 17 (in excess of 10 μs during maximum disturbance). The phase values did not return to prestorm levels before December 22--23. The unusual presence of these daytime VLF disturbances is offered as evidence for the widespread precipitation at low L shell vales of nearly relativistic electrons (E/sub e/> approx.200 keV) which would be required to penetrate below approx.70-km altitude to affect the daytime VLF transmissions. Wave guide mode calculations using D region electron density profiles deduced from the satellite particle data predict phase advances which agree reasonably well with the observed values. It is concluded that the observed long-lived VLF phase disturbances can be explained by excess D region ionization caused by energetic electrons precipitating from the earth's radiation belt following their injection deep into the magnetosphere during the magnetic storm

  12. Measurements of the stability of energetic electron beams in the ionosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duprat, G.R.J.; Whalen, B.A.; McNamara, A.G.; Bernstein, W.

    1983-01-01

    A Nike Black Brant V rocket was launched from the Chruchill Research Range (Manitoba) on December 3, 1979, into a bright east-west oriented auroral arc. The rocket payload consisted of two separable sections, each containing its own telemetry and a full set of wave and charged particle detectors. An electron gun, carried in the main payload, produced a pulsed electron beam with energies of 1.9, 4, and 8 keV at 1, 10, and approximately 100 mA in a programmed format. Charged particle observations from the flight are used to define the spatial distribution of perturbed volume surrounding the accelerator during gun firing. The radial dimensions of the perturbation were found to scale with the primary electron beam gyroradius and current and were also dependent on the beam injection angle. On magnetic field lines near the gun, the induced return electron energy spectrum is characterized by a monotonically decreasing intensity with increasing energy out to the approximate beam energy. At increasing distances across field lines the energy spectrum takes on a monoenergetic appearance peaked near the beam energy. All beam-induced electron fluxes frop rapidly to background at the edge of the perturbed volume. The intense flux of low-energy electrons observed on field lines near the rocket are shown to be accelerated ambients, whereas the particles at or near the beam energy and at large radial distances are presumably beam primaries. The ambient thermal ion plasma was not measurably affected by the beam while the local electron temperature increased during gun pulses. Results from this flight are compared with the corresponding observations made in a large vacuum tank simulation, and it is concluded that certain features in the data are consistent with the beam-plasma instability observed in the laboratory

  13. Electron Transport in Quantum Dots and Heat Transport in Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirsanskas, Gediminas

    Since the invention of the transistor in 1947 and the development of integrated circuits in the late 1950’s, there was a rapid progress in the development and miniaturization of the solid state devices and electronic circuit components. This miniaturization raises a question “How small do we have...

  14. Neoclassical transport of energetic particles in asymmetric toroidal plasma. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cary, J.R.

    1997-10-01

    During the most recent funding period the authors obtained results important for helical confinement systems and in the use of modern computational methods for modeling of fusion systems. The most recent results include showing that the set of magnetic field functions that are omnigenous (i.e., the bounce-average drift lies within the flux surface) and, therefore, have good transport properties, is much larger than the set of quasihelical systems. This is important as quasihelical systems exist only for large aspect ratio. The authors have also carried out extensive earlier work on developing integrable three-dimensional magnetic fields, on trajectories in three-dimensional configurations, and on the existence of three-dimensional MHD equilibria close to vacuum integrable fields. At the same time they have been investigating the use of object oriented methods for scientific computing

  15. Electronic transport and lasing in microstructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lax, M.

    1992-01-01

    We consider the interaction of hot carriers with hot phonons in a quantum well. Transport is considered in the transverse direction and tunneling through the well barriers. Time-dependent transport effects down to the femto-second regime are included, as are strong and/or microwave fields, with negative resistance effects. Resonant tunneling assisted by phonon relaxation and infra-red radiation will be explored. The limitations on transmission of information due to partition noise, as influenced by the design of semiconductor feedback lasers will be considered. The use of light scattering and decision theory to detect shell-like aerosols is examined

  16. Energetic electron propagation in the decay phase of non-thermal flare emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Jing; Yan, Yihua [Key Laboratory of Solar Activities, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Tsap, Yuri T., E-mail: huangj@nao.cas.cn [Crimean Astrophysical Observatory of Kyiv National Taras Shevchenko University, 98409 Crimea, Nauchny (Ukraine)

    2014-06-01

    On the basis of the trap-plus-precipitation model, the peculiarities of non-thermal emission in the decay phase of solar flares have been considered. The calculation formulas for the escape rate of trapped electrons into the loss cone in terms of time profiles of hard X-ray (HXR) and microwave (MW) emission have been obtained. It has been found that the evolution of the spectral indices of non-thermal emission depend on the regimes of the pitch angle diffusion of trapped particles into the loss cone. The properties of non-thermal electrons related to the HXR and MW emission of the solar flare on 2004 November 3 are studied with Nobeyama Radioheliograph, Nobeyama Radio Polarimeters, RHESSI, and Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite observations. The spectral indices of non-thermal electrons related to MW and HXR emission remained constant or decreased, while the MW escape rate as distinguished from that of the HXRs increased. This may be associated with different diffusion regimes of trapped electrons into the loss cone. New arguments in favor of an important role of the superstrong diffusion for high-energy electrons in flare coronal loops have been obtained.

  17. Non-local electron transport validation using 2D DRACO simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Duc; Chenhall, Jeff; Moll, Eli; Prochaska, Alex; Moses, Gregory; Delettrez, Jacques; Collins, Tim

    2012-10-01

    Comparison of 2D DRACO simulations, using a modified versionfootnotetextprivate communications with M. Marinak and G. Zimmerman, LLNL. of the Schurtz, Nicolai and Busquet (SNB) algorithmfootnotetextSchurtz, Nicolai and Busquet, ``A nonlocal electron conduction model for multidimensional radiation hydrodynamics codes,'' Phys. Plasmas 7, 4238(2000). for non-local electron transport, with direct drive shock timing experimentsfootnotetextT. Boehly, et. al., ``Multiple spherically converging shock waves in liquid deuterium,'' Phys. Plasmas 18, 092706(2011). and with the Goncharov non-local modelfootnotetextV. Goncharov, et. al., ``Early stage of implosion in inertial confinement fusion: Shock timing and perturbation evolution,'' Phys. Plasmas 13, 012702(2006). in 1D LILAC will be presented. Addition of an improved SNB non-local electron transport algorithm in DRACO allows direct drive simulations with no need for an electron conduction flux limiter. Validation with shock timing experiments that mimic the laser pulse profile of direct drive ignition targets gives a higher confidence level in the predictive capability of the DRACO code. This research was supported by the University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics.

  18. Hot electrons in superlattices: quantum transport versus Boltzmann equation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wacker, Andreas; Jauho, Antti-Pekka; Rott, S.

    1999-01-01

    A self-consistent solution of the transport equation is presented for semiconductor superlattices within different approaches: (i) a full quantum transport model based on nonequilibrium Green functions, (ii) the semiclassical Boltzmann equation for electrons in a miniband, and (iii) Boltzmann...

  19. Heating of energetic electrons and ELMO ring formation in symmetric mirror facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quon, B.H.; Dandl, R.A.; Lazar, N.H.; Wuerker, R.F.

    1982-01-01

    The spatial structure of the high beta, hot-electron ECH plasma, (ELMO Ring), has been studied by using a Hall probe array diagnostic system which measures the diamagnetic field of the hot electron plasma in a large number of spatial locations. The steady state pressure profile obtained using a two-gaussian geometric model that best fits the measurements is found to peak at the mirror midplane near the vacuum field second harmonic resonant point. The radial width of the ring is typically 4 to 7 cm, and the axial length extends significantly beyond the second harmonic resonance zone of the total magnetic field. The radial thickness and the Ring beta are increased by multiple frequency ECH. The electron ring is observed to evolve from a sloshing-like turning point distribution which was observed in the early times following a microwave turnon, demonstrating stochastic processes involved in ELMO Ring formation

  20. Defect production and annihilation in metals through electronic excitation by energetic heavy ion bombardment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwase, Akihiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-03-01

    Defect production, radiation annealing and defect recovery are studied in Ni and Cu irradiated with low-energy ({approx}1-MeV) and high-energy ({approx}100-MeV) ions. Irradiation of Ni with {approx}100-MeV ions causes an anomalous reduction, or even a complete disappearance of the stage-I recovery. This result shows that the energy transferred from excited electrons to lattice atoms through the electron-lattice interaction contributes to the annihilation of the stage-I interstitials. This effect is also observed in Ni as a large radiation annealing during 100-MeV heavy ion irradiation. On the other hand, in Cu thin foils, we find the defect production process strongly associated with electron excitation, where the defect production cross section is nearly proportional to S{sub e}{sup 2}. (author)

  1. Energetic electron processes fluorescence effects for structured nanoparticles X-ray analysis and nuclear medicine applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taborda, A.; Desbrée, A. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN), PRP-HOM/SDI/LEDI, BP-17, 31, Avenue de la Division Leclerc, 92262 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Carvalho, A. [IEQUALTECS, Lda, Rua Dr. Francisco Sá Carneiro, 36, 2500-065 S. Gregório CLD (Portugal); Chaves, P.C. [C" 2TN, Campus Tecnológico e Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, EN10 km 139.7, 2685-066 Bobadela LRS (Portugal); Reis, M.A., E-mail: mareis@ctn.tecnico.ulisboa.pt [IEQUALTECS, Lda, Rua Dr. Francisco Sá Carneiro, 36, 2500-065 S. Gregório CLD (Portugal); C" 2TN, Campus Tecnológico e Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, EN10 km 139.7, 2685-066 Bobadela LRS (Portugal)

    2016-08-15

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles are widely used as contrast agents for nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and can be modified for improved imaging or to become tissue-specific or even protein-specific. The knowledge of their detailed elemental composition characterisation and potential use in nuclear medicine applications, is, therefore, an important issue. X-ray fluorescence techniques such as particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) or X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF), can be used for elemental characterisation even in problematic situations where very little sample volume is available. Still, the fluorescence coefficient of Fe is such that, during the decay of the inner-shell ionised atomic structure, keV Auger electrons are produced in excess to X-rays. Since cross-sections for ionisation induced by keV electrons, for low atomic number atoms, are of the order of 10{sup 3} barn, care should be taken to account for possible fluorescence effects caused by Auger electrons, which may lead to the wrong quantification of elements having atomic number lower than the atomic number of Fe. Furthermore, the same electron processes will occur in iron oxide nanoparticles containing {sup 57}Co, which may be used for nuclear medicine therapy purposes. In the present work, simple approximation algorithms are proposed for the quantitative description of radiative and non-radiative processes associated with Auger electrons cascades. The effects on analytical processes and nuclear medicine applications are quantified for the case of iron oxide nanoparticles, by calculating both electron fluorescence emissions and energy deposition on cell tissues where the nanoparticles may be embedded.

  2. The effect of energetic electron precipitation on the nitric oxide density in the lower thermosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saetre, Camilla

    2006-12-01

    The objective of this thesis has been the study of the chemical effects of the electron precipitation in the upper atmosphere, and mainly the increase of thermospheric nitric oxide (NO). NO plays an important role in the temperature balance for the mesosphere and thermosphere.In this project auroral electron precipitation data, derived from the Polar Ionospheric X-ray Imaging Experiment (PIXIE) and the Ultraviolet Imager (UVI) on board the Polar satellite, have been used together with NO density measurements from the Student Nitric Oxide Explorer (SNOE)

  3. Study of Electron Transport and Amplification in Diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Zvi, Ilan [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Muller, Erik [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States)

    2015-01-05

    The development of the Diamond Amplified Photocathode (DAP) has produced significant results under our previous HEP funded efforts both on the fabrication of working devices and the understanding of the underlying physics governing its performance. The results presented here substantiate the use of diamond as both a secondary electron amplifier for high-brightness, high-average-current electron sources and as a photon and particle detector in harsh radiation environments. Very high average current densities (>10A/cm2) have been transported through diamond material. The transport has been measured as a function of incident photon energy and found to be in good agreement with theoretical models. Measurements of the charge transport for photon energies near the carbon K-edge (290 eV for sp3 bonded carbon) have provided insight into carrier loss due to diffusion; modeling of this aspect of charge transport is underway. The response of diamond to nanosecond x-ray pulses has been measured; in this regime the charge transport is as expected. Electron emission from hydrogenated diamond has been measured using both electron and x-ray generated carriers; a gain of 178 has been observed for electron-generated carriers. The energy spectrum of the emitted electrons has been measured, providing insight into the electron affinity and ultimately the thermal emittance. The origin of charge trapping in diamond has been investigated for both bulk and surface trapping

  4. Charge transport in micas: The kinetics of FeII/III electron transfer in the octahedral sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosso, Kevin M.; Ilton, Eugene S.

    2003-01-01

    The two principal FeII/III electron exchange reactions underlying charge transport in the octahedral sheet of ideal end-member annite were modeled using a combination of ab initio calculations and Marcus electron transfer theory. A small polaron model was applied which yielded electron hopping activation energies that agree well with the limited available experimental data. A small ab initio cluster model successfully reproduced several important structural, energetic, and magnetic characteristics of the M1 and M2 Fe sites in the annite octahedral sheet. The cluster enabled calculation of the internal reorganization energy and electronic coupling matrix elements for the M2-M2 and M1-M2 electron transfer reactions. The M2-M2 electron transfer is symmetric with a predicted forward/reverse electron hopping rate of 106 s-1. The M1-M2 electron transfers are asymmetric due to the higher ionization potential by 0.46 eV of FeII in the M1 site. The electronic coupling matrix elements for these reactions are predicted to be small and of similar magnitude, suggesting the possibility that the coupling is essentially direction independent amongst hopping directions in the octahedral sheet. M1 Fe sites are predicted to be efficient electron traps and charge transport should occur by nearest-neighbor electron hops along the M2 Fe sublattice

  5. Safer energetic materials by a nanotechnological approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegert, Benny; Comet, Marc; Spitzer, Denis

    2011-09-01

    Energetic materials - explosives, thermites, populsive powders - are used in a variety of military and civilian applications. Their mechanical and electrostatic sensitivity is high in many cases, which can lead to accidents during handling and transport. These considerations limit the practical use of some energetic materials despite their good performance. For industrial applications, safety is one of the main criteria for selecting energetic materials. The sensitivity has been regarded as an intrinsic property of a substance for a long time. However, in recent years, several approaches to lower the sensitivity of a given substance, using nanotechnology and materials engineering, have been described. This feature article gives an overview over ways to prepare energetic (nano-)materials with a lower sensitivity.Energetic materials - explosives, thermites, populsive powders - are used in a variety of military and civilian applications. Their mechanical and electrostatic sensitivity is high in many cases, which can lead to accidents during handling and transport. These considerations limit the practical use of some energetic materials despite their good performance. For industrial applications, safety is one of the main criteria for selecting energetic materials. The sensitivity has been regarded as an intrinsic property of a substance for a long time. However, in recent years, several approaches to lower the sensitivity of a given substance, using nanotechnology and materials engineering, have been described. This feature article gives an overview over ways to prepare energetic (nano-)materials with a lower sensitivity. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details for the preparation of the V2O5@CNF/Al nanothermite; X-ray diffractogram of the V2O5@CNF/Al combustion residue; installation instructions and source code for the nt-timeline program. See DOI: 10.1039/c1nr10292c

  6. Acceleration, Transport, Forecasting and Impact of solar energetic particles in the framework of the 'HESPERIA' HORIZON 2020 project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malandraki, Olga; Klein, Karl-Ludwig; Vainio, Rami; Agueda, Neus; Nunez, Marlon; Heber, Bernd; Buetikofer, Rolf; Sarlanis, Christos; Crosby, Norma

    2017-04-01

    High-energy solar energetic particles (SEPs) emitted from the Sun are a major space weather hazard motivating the development of predictive capabilities. In this work, the current state of knowledge on the origin and forecasting of SEP events will be reviewed. Subsequently, we will present the EU HORIZON2020 HESPERIA (High Energy Solar Particle Events foRecastIng and Analysis) project, its structure, its main scientific objectives and forecasting operational tools, as well as the added value to SEP research both from the observational as well as the SEP modelling perspective. The project addresses through multi-frequency observations and simulations the chain of processes from particle acceleration in the corona, particle transport in the magnetically complex corona and interplanetary space to the detection near 1 AU. Furthermore, publicly available software to invert neutron monitor observations of relativistic SEPs to physical parameters that can be compared with space-borne measurements at lower energies is provided for the first time by HESPERIA. In order to achieve these goals, HESPERIA is exploiting already available large datasets stored in databases such as the neutron monitor database (NMDB) and SEPServer that were developed under EU FP7 projects from 2008 to 2013. Forecasting results of the two novel SEP operational forecasting tools published via the consortium server of 'HESPERIA' will be presented, as well as some scientific key results on the acceleration, transport and impact on Earth of high-energy particles. Acknowledgement: This project has received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 637324.

  7. A FOCUSED TRANSPORT APPROACH TO THE TIME-DEPENDENT SHOCK ACCELERATION OF SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLES AT A FAST TRAVELING SHOCK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Roux, J. A.; Webb, G. M.

    2012-01-01

    Some of the most sophisticated models for solar energetic particle (SEP) acceleration at coronal mass ejection driven shocks are based on standard diffusive shock acceleration theory. However, this theory, which only applies when SEP pitch-angle anisotropies are small, might have difficulty in describing first-order Fermi acceleration or the shock pre-heating and injection of SEPs into first-order Fermi acceleration accurately at lower SEP speeds where SEP pitch-angle anisotropies upstream near the shock can be large. To avoid this problem, we use a time-dependent focused transport model to reinvestigate first-order Fermi acceleration at planar parallel and quasi-parallel spherical traveling shocks between the Sun and Earth with high shock speeds associated with rare extreme gradual SEP events. The focused transport model is also used to investigate and compare three different shock pre-heating mechanisms associated with different aspects of the nonuniform cross-shock solar wind flow, namely, the convergence of the flow (adiabatic compression), the shear tensor of the flow, and the acceleration of the flow, and a fourth shock pre-heating mechanism associated with the cross-shock electric field, to determine which pre-heating mechanism contributes the most to injecting shock pre-heated source particles into the first-order Fermi acceleration process. The effects of variations in traveling shock conditions, such as increasing shock obliquity and shock slowdown, and variations in the SEP source with increasing shock distance from the Sun on the coupled processes of shock pre-heating, injection, and first-order Fermi acceleration are analyzed. Besides the finding that the cross-shock acceleration of the solar wind flow yields the dominant shock pre-heating mechanism at high shock speeds, we find that first-order Fermi acceleration at fast traveling shocks differs in a number of respects from the predictions and assumptions of standard steady-state diffusive shock

  8. Memory function formalism applied to electronic transport in disordered systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunha Lima, I.C. da

    1984-01-01

    Memory function formalism is briefly reviewed and applied to electronic transport using the projection operator technique. The resistivity of a disordered 2-D electron gas under strong magnetic field is obtained in terms of force-force correlation function. (Author) [pt

  9. Reconstruction of energetic electron spectra in the upper atmosphere: balloon observations of auroral X-rays coordinated with measurements from the EISCAT radar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olafsson, K.J.

    1990-08-01

    Energetic electron precipitation in the auroral zone has been studied using coordinated auroral X-ray measurements from balloons, altitude profiles of the ionospheric electron density measured by the EISCAT radar above the balloons, and cosmic noise absorption data from the Scandinavian riometer network. The data were obtained during the Coordinated EISCAT and Balloon Observations (CEBO) campaign in August 1984. The energy spectral variations of both the X-ray fluxes and the primary precipitating electrons were examined for two precipitation events in the morning sector. As far as reasonably can be concluded from observations of magnetic activity in the auroral zone, and from the temporal development of the energy spectra, the two precipitation events can be interpreted in the frame of present models of energetic electron precipitation on the mordning side of the auroral zone. 96 refs., 70 figs., 11 tabs

  10. Analysis of trends between solar wind velocity and energetic electron fluxes at geostationary orbit using the reverse arrangement test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryan, Homayon; Boynton, Richard J.; Walker, Simon N.

    2013-02-01

    A correlation between solar wind velocity (VSW) and energetic electron fluxes (EEF) at the geosynchronous orbit was first identified more than 30 years ago. However, recent studies have shown that the relation between VSW and EEF is considerably more complex than was previously suggested. The application of process identification technique to the evolution of electron fluxes in the range 1.8 - 3.5 MeV has also revealed peculiarities in the relation between VSW and EEF at the geosynchronous orbit. It has been revealed that for a constant solar wind density, EEF increase with VSW until a saturation velocity is reached. Beyond the saturation velocity, an increase in VSW is statistically not accompanied with EEF enhancement. The present study is devoted to the investigation of saturation velocity and its dependency upon solar wind density using the reverse arrangement test. In general, the results indicate that saturation velocity increases as solar wind density decreases. This implies that solar wind density plays an important role in defining the relationship between VSW and EEF at the geosynchronous orbit.

  11. Transport of secondary electrons and reactive species in ion tracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surdutovich, Eugene; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2015-08-01

    The transport of reactive species brought about by ions traversing tissue-like medium is analysed analytically. Secondary electrons ejected by ions are capable of ionizing other molecules; the transport of these generations of electrons is studied using the random walk approximation until these electrons remain ballistic. Then, the distribution of solvated electrons produced as a result of interaction of low-energy electrons with water molecules is obtained. The radial distribution of energy loss by ions and secondary electrons to the medium yields the initial radial dose distribution, which can be used as initial conditions for the predicted shock waves. The formation, diffusion, and chemical evolution of hydroxyl radicals in liquid water are studied as well. COST Action Nano-IBCT: Nano-scale Processes Behind Ion-Beam Cancer Therapy.

  12. Energetic Constraints on H-2-Dependent Terminal Electron Accepting Processes in Anoxic Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heimann, Axel Colin; Jakobsen, Rasmus; Blodau, C.

    2010-01-01

    and sulfate reduction are under direct thermodynamic control in soils and sediments and generally approach theoretical minimum energy thresholds. If H-2 concentrations are lowered by thermodynamically more potent TEAPs, these processes are inhibited. This principle is also valid for TEAPS providing more free......Microbially mediated terminal electron accepting processes (TEAPs) to a large extent control the fate of redox reactive elements and associated reactions in anoxic soils, sediments, and aquifers. This review focuses on thermodynamic controls and regulation of H-2-dependent TEAPs, case studies...... illustrating this concept and the quantitative description of thermodynamic controls in modeling. Other electron transfer processes are considered where appropriate. The work reviewed shows that thermodynamics and microbial kinetics are connected near thermodynamic equilibrium. Free energy thresholds...

  13. Energetic electrons at Uranus: Bimodal diffusion in a satellite limited radiation belt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selesnick, R.S.; Stone, E.C.

    1991-01-01

    The Voyager 2 cosmic ray experiment observed intense electron fluxes in the middle magnetosphere of Uranus. High counting rates in several of the solid-state detectors precluded in the normal multiple coincidence analysis used for cosmic ray observations, and the authors have therefore performed laboratory measurements of the single-detector response to electrons. These calibrations allow a deconvolution from the counting rate data of the electron energy spectrum between energies of about 0.7 and 2.5 MeV. They present model fits to the differential intensity spectra from observations between L values of 6 and 15. The spectra are well represented by power laws in kinetic energy with spectral indices between 5 and 7. The phase space density at fixed values of the first two adiabatic invariants generally increases with L, indicative of an external source. However, there are also local minima associated with the satellites Ariel and Umbriel, indicating either a local source or an effective source due to nonconservation of the first two adiabatic invariants. For electrons which mirror at the highest magnetic latitudes, the local minimum associated with Ariel is radically displaced from the minimum L of that satellite by ∼0.5. The latitude variation of the satellite absorption efficiency predicts that if satellite losses are replenished primarily by radial diffusion there should be an increasing pitch angle anisotropy with decreasing L. The uniformity in the observed anisotropy outside the absorption regions then suggests that it is maintained by pitch angle diffusion. The effective source due to pitch angle diffusion is insufficient to cause the phase space density minimum associated with Ariel. Model solutions of the simultaneous radial and pitch angle diffusion equation show that the displacement of the high-latitude Ariel signature is also consistent with a larger effective source

  14. Thermal Transport in Diamond Films for Electronics Thermal Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-01

    AFRL-RY-WP-TR-2017-0219 THERMAL TRANSPORT IN DIAMOND FILMS FOR ELECTRONICS THERMAL MANAGEMENT Samuel Graham Georgia Institute of Technology MARCH... ELECTRONICS THERMAL MANAGEMENT 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8650-15-C-7517 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 61101E 6. AUTHOR(S) Samuel...seeded sample (NRL 010516, Die A5). The NCD membrane and Al layer thicknesses, tNCD, were measured via transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The

  15. Kinetic Theory of Electronic Transport in Random Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Andrew

    2018-03-01

    We present the theory of quasiparticle transport in perturbatively small inhomogeneous magnetic fields across the ballistic-to-hydrodynamic crossover. In the hydrodynamic limit, the resistivity ρ generically grows proportionally to the rate of momentum-conserving electron-electron collisions at large enough temperatures T . In particular, the resulting flow of electrons provides a simple scenario where viscous effects suppress conductance below the ballistic value. This new mechanism for ρ ∝T2 resistivity in a Fermi liquid may describe low T transport in single-band SrTiO3 .

  16. Runaway electron transport studies in the HL-1M tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Yongzhen; Qi Changwei; Ding Xuantong; Li Wenzhong

    2002-01-01

    The transport of runaway electrons in a hot plasma has been studied in four experiments, which provide the runaway diffusivity D r The first experiment obtained runaway electrons using a steady state approach for values of the runaway confinement time τ r , deduced from hard X-ray bremsstrahlung spectra. In the second experiment, diffusion has been interpreted in terms of the magnetic fluctuation, from which a electron thermal diffusivity can be deduced. Runaway electro diffusion coefficient is determined by intrinsic magnetic fluctuations, rather than electrostatic fluctuations because of the high energy involved. The results presented here demonstrate the efficiency of using runaway transport techniques for determining intrinsic magnetic fluctuations

  17. Multidimensional electron-photon transport with standard discrete ordinates codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drumm, C.R.

    1995-01-01

    A method is described for generating electron cross sections that are compatible with standard discrete ordinates codes without modification. There are many advantages of using an established discrete ordinates solver, e.g. immediately available adjoint capability. Coupled electron-photon transport capability is needed for many applications, including the modeling of the response of electronics components to space and man-made radiation environments. The cross sections have been successfully used in the DORT, TWODANT and TORT discrete ordinates codes. The cross sections are shown to provide accurate and efficient solutions to certain multidimensional electronphoton transport problems

  18. An empirical determination of the production efficiency for auroral 6300 AA emmission by energetic electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winningham, J.D.; Bunn, F.E.; Thirkettle, F.W.; Shepherd, G.G.

    1979-06-01

    Auroral data from the Soft Particle Spectrometer and the Red Line Photometer on the ISIS-2 spacecraft have been selected to form an electron energy flux and optical auroral emission data base. The energy fluxes are stored as integrated fluxes over four energy bands, and the corresponding stored optical emission rates are corrected for airglow and for albedo. Because of the variety of electron energy spectra represented in the data base it was possible to perform a regression analysis that yielded the production efficiency for the production of emission for each of the four bands. While the results of this analysis are interesting to compare with theoretical predictions of 6300 AA excitation processes, these statistical results are not as precise as the comparisons of individual experiments where all parameters, such as the atmospheric composition and temperature profiles are measured. The significance of this approach is that it permits a multiparameter description of an electron energy spectrum, and its relationship to a specific optical emission, by purely empirical means. This is particularly useful in the interpretation of ISIS-2 data from the instruments which provided the results, but should find further application in optical-particle auroral studies. (author)

  19. A ballistic transport model for electronic excitation following particle impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanke, S.; Heuser, C.; Weidtmann, B.; Wucher, A.

    2018-01-01

    We present a ballistic model for the transport of electronic excitation energy induced by keV particle bombardment onto a solid surface. Starting from a free electron gas model, the Boltzmann transport equation (BTE) is employed to follow the evolution of the temporal and spatial distribution function f (r → , k → , t) describing the occupation probability of an electronic state k → at position r → and time t. Three different initializations of the distribution function are considered: i) a thermal distribution function with a locally and temporally elevated electron temperature, ii) a peak excitation at a specific energy above the Fermi level with a quasi-isotropic distribution in k-space and iii) an anisotropic peak excitation with k-vectors oriented in a specific transport direction. While the first initialization resembles a distribution function which may, for instance, result from electronic friction of moving atoms within an ion induced collision cascade, the peak excitation can in principle result from an autoionization process after excitation in close binary collisions. By numerically solving the BTE, we study the electronic energy exchange along a one dimensional transport direction to obtain a time and space resolved excitation energy distribution function, which is then analyzed in view of general transport characteristics of the chosen model system.

  20. The distribution of infered energetic electron loss with respect to plasmapause location: BARREL results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halford, A. J.; Malaspina, D.; Sibeck, D. G.

    2017-12-01

    One of the long outstanding challenges of understanding the inner magnetosphere is accurately describing radiation belt dynamics. This enterprise can seem daunting as many have stated: "if you've seen one storm you've seen one storm". And although much progress has been made over the last half century since the discovery of the radiation belts, there is still ongoing debate about the relative importance of different loss and source mechanisms. Here we will consider one part of radiation belt dynamics, the loss of electrons ( 30 keV to MeV) to the upper atmosphere and endeavor to identify the relative importance of the different loss mechanisms. As demonstrated in often used cartoon diagrams, and previous studies, many radiation belt loss mechanisms such as chorus, hiss, and EMIC waves are thought to have specific MLT and L dependencies as well as dependence on geomagnetic conditions. Many of these loss mechanisms are identifiable through the energies and time scales in which they precipitate electrons. Thus we expect that the observed electron precipiation should follow similar MLT and L patterns as what caused the loss and not show something completely unexpected such as Atlantis rising out of the Columbia River. Here we will examine the location and geomagnetic conditions under which the Balloon Array for Relativistic Radiation Belt Electron Loss (BARREL) inferred radiation belt electron precipitation. The BARREL mission consisted of 4 campaigns, two in Antarctica and 2 in Sweden, for a total of 55 launches. The flights conducted in Antarctica took advantage of the circumpolar winds allowing for the payloads to cross a range of L-values from L > 2.5 onto open field lines, while the Swedish campaigns were held during turn around where the balloons stayed near L = 5.8. We will present the distribution of precipitation with respect to L and MLT as well as with respect to the boundary of the plasmapause as new work has shown that this boundary clearly separates

  1. Unconventional aspects of electronic transport in delafossite oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daou, Ramzy; Frésard, Raymond; Eyert, Volker; Hébert, Sylvie; Maignan, Antoine

    2017-12-01

    The electronic transport properties of the delafossite oxides ? are usually understood in terms of two well-separated entities, namely the triangular ? and (? layers. Here, we review several cases among this extensive family of materials where the transport depends on the interlayer coupling and displays unconventional properties. We review the doped thermoelectrics based on ? and ?, which show a high-temperature recovery of Fermi-liquid transport exponents, as well as the highly anisotropic metals ?, ?, and ?, where the sheer simplicity of the Fermi surface leads to unconventional transport. We present some of the theoretical tools that have been used to investigate these transport properties and review what can and cannot be learned from the extensive set of electronic structure calculations that have been performed.

  2. Diffusion tensor in electron swarm transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makabe, T.; Mori, T.

    1983-01-01

    Expression for the diffusion tensor of the electron (or light ion) swarm is presented from the higher-order expansion of the velocity distribution in the Boltzmann equation in hydrodynamic stage. Derived diffusion coefficients for the transverse and longitudinal directions include the additional terms representative of the curvature effect under the action of an electric field with the usual-two-term expressions. Numerical analysis is given for the electron swarm in model gases having the momentum transfer cross section Qsub(m)(epsilon)=Q 0 epsilon sup(beta) (β=0, 1/2, 1) using the present theory. As the result, appreciable degree of discrepancy appears between the transverse diffusion coefficient defined here and the conventional expression with increasing of β in Qsub(m). (Author)

  3. Conditioner for a helically transported electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, C.

    1992-05-01

    The kinetic theory is developed to investigate a conditioner for a helically imported electron beam. Linear expressions for axial velocity spread are derived. Numerical simulation is used to check the theoretical results and examine nonlinear aspects of the conditioning process. The results show that in the linear regime the action of the beam conditioner on a pulsed beam mainly depends on the phase at which the beam enters the conditioner and depends only slightly on the operating wavelength. In the nonlinear regime, however, the action of the conditioner strongly depends on the operating wavelength and only slightly upon the entrance phase. For a properly chosen operating wavelength, a little less than the electron's relativistic cyclotron wavelength, the conditioner can decrease the axial velocity spread of a pulsed beam down to less than one-third of its initial value

  4. Time-dependent shock acceleration of energetic electrons including synchrotron losses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritz, K.; Webb, G.M.

    1990-01-01

    The present investigation of the time-dependent particle acceleration problem in strong shocks, including synchrotron radiation losses, solves the transport equation analytically by means of Laplace transforms. The particle distribution thus obtained is then transformed numerically into real space for the cases of continuous and impulsive injections of particles at the shock. While in the continuous case the steady-state spectrum undergoes evolution, impulsive injection is noted to yield such unpredicted features as a pile-up of high-energy particles or a steep power-law with time-dependent spectral index. The time-dependent calculations reveal varying spectral shapes and more complex features for the higher energies which may be useful in the interpretation of outburst spectra. 33 refs

  5. The Effects of Solar Wind Dynamic Pressure Changes on the Substorm Auroras and Energetic Electron Injections on 24 August 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L. Y.; Wang, Z. Q.

    2018-01-01

    After the passage of an interplanetary (IP) shock at 06:13 UT on 24 August 2005, the enhancement (>6 nPa) of solar wind dynamic pressure and the southward turning of interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) cause the earthward movement of dayside magnetopause and the drift loss of energetic particles near geosynchronous orbit. The persistent electron drift loss makes the geosynchronous satellites cannot observe the substorm electron injection phenomenon during the two substorm expansion phases (06:57-07:39 UT) on that day. Behind the IP shock, the fluctuations ( 0.5-3 nPa) of solar wind dynamic pressure not only alter the dayside auroral brightness but also cause the entire auroral oval to swing in the day-night direction. However, there is no Pi2 pulsation in the nightside auroral oval during the substorm growth phase from 06:13 to 06:57 UT. During the subsequent two substorm expansion phases, the substorm expansion activities cause the nightside aurora oval brightening from substorm onset site to higher latitudes, and meanwhile, the enhancement (decline) of solar wind dynamic pressure makes the nightside auroral oval move toward the magnetic equator (the magnetic pole). These observations demonstrate that solar wind dynamic pressure changes and substorm expansion activities can jointly control the luminosity and location of the nightside auroral oval when the internal and external disturbances occur simultaneously. During the impact of a strong IP shock, the earthward movement of dayside magnetopause probably causes the disappearance of the substorm electron injections near geosynchronous orbit.

  6. Effects of electron-electron interactions on electronic transport in disordered systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, Simon Timothy

    2002-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with the role of electron-electron interactions on electronic transport in disordered systems. We first consider a novel non-linear sigma model in order to microscopically treat the effects of disorder and electronic interaction. We successfully reproduce the perturbative results for the zero-bias anomaly and the interaction correction to the conductivity in a weakly disordered system, and discuss possible directions for future work. Secondly we consider the fluctuations of the dephasing rate for a closed diffusive and quantum dot system. Using the Keldysh technique we derive an expression for the inelastic scattering rate with which we self-consistently obtain the fluctuations in the dephasing rate. For the diffusive regime we find the relative fluctuations is given by F ∼ (L φ /L) 2 /g 2 , where g is the dimensionless conductance, L φ is the dephasing length and L is the sample size. For the quantum dot regime we find a perturbative divergence due to the presence of the zero mode. By mapping divergent diagrams to those for the two-level correlation function, we conjecture the existence of an exact relation between the two. Finally we discuss the consequences of this relation. (author)

  7. Gas adsorption, energetics and electronic properties of boron- and nitrogen-doped bilayer graphenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujimoto, Yoshitaka, E-mail: fujimoto@stat.phys.titech.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Oh-okayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Saito, Susumu [Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Oh-okayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); International Research Center for Nanoscience and Quantum Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Oh-okayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Materials Research Center for Element Strategy, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 226-8503 (Japan)

    2016-10-20

    We study stabilities and electronic properties of several environmental polluting or toxic gas molecules (CO, CO{sub 2}, NO, and NO{sub 2}) adsorbed on B and N atoms in bilayer graphene using first-principles electronic-structure calculations. We find that NO and NO{sub 2} molecules can be bound chemically on B-doped bilayer graphene with large adsorption energies, while CO and CO{sub 2} molecules are not adsorbed chemically on B-doped one. In the case of the N-doped graphene, all four gases do not bind with chemical bonds but adsorb rather physically with small adsorption energies at long distances between gases and graphene. The adsorptions of NO and NO{sub 2} molecules on B-doped bilayer graphene induce the acceptor states above the Fermi energy, and we also find that the charge transfer takes place when the NO and the NO{sub 2} molecules are adsorbed. Thereby, the B-doped bilayer graphene is expected to be useful for NO and NO{sub 2} gas sensor materials.

  8. Vibrationally coupled electron transport through single-molecule junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haertle, Rainer

    2012-04-26

    Single-molecule junctions are among the smallest electric circuits. They consist of a molecule that is bound to a left and a right electrode. With such a molecular nanocontact, the flow of electrical currents through a single molecule can be studied and controlled. Experiments on single-molecule junctions show that a single molecule carries electrical currents that can even be in the microampere regime. Thereby, a number of transport phenomena have been observed, such as, for example, diode- or transistor-like behavior, negative differential resistance and conductance switching. An objective of this field, which is commonly referred to as molecular electronics, is to relate these transport phenomena to the properties of the molecule in the contact. To this end, theoretical model calculations are employed, which facilitate an understanding of the underlying transport processes and mechanisms. Thereby, one has to take into account that molecules are flexible structures, which respond to a change of their charge state by a profound reorganization of their geometrical structure or may even dissociate. It is thus important to understand the interrelation between the vibrational degrees of freedom of a singlemolecule junction and the electrical current flowing through the contact. In this thesis, we investigate vibrational effects in electron transport through singlemolecule junctions. For these studies, we calculate and analyze transport characteristics of both generic and first-principles based model systems of a molecular contact. To this end, we employ a master equation and a nonequilibrium Green's function approach. Both methods are suitable to describe this nonequilibrium transport problem and treat the interactions of the tunneling electrons on the molecular bridge non-perturbatively. This is particularly important with respect to the vibrational degrees of freedom, which may strongly interact with the tunneling electrons. We show in detail that the resulting

  9. Modelling transport in single electron transistor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinh Sy Hien; Huynh Lam Thu Thao; Le Hoang Minh

    2009-01-01

    We introduce a model of single electron transistor (SET). Simulation programme of SET is used as the exploratory tool in order to gain better understanding of process and device physics. This simulator includes a graphic user interface (GUI) in Matlab. The SET was simulated using GUI in Matlab to get current-voltage (I-V) characteristics. In addition, effects of device capacitance, bias, temperature on the I-V characteristics were obtained. In this work, we review the capabilities of the simulator of the SET. Typical simulations of the obtained I-V characteristics of the SET are presented.

  10. Angular dependent transport of auroral electrons in the upper atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lummerzheim, D.; Rees, M.H.

    1989-01-01

    The transport of auroral electrons through the upper atmosphere is analyzed. The transport equation is solved using a discrete ordinate method including elastic and inelastic scattering of electrons resulting in changes of pitch angle, and degradation in energy as the electrons penetrate into the atmosphere. The transport equation is solved numerically for the electron intensity as a function of altitude, pitch angle, and energy. In situ measurements of the pitch angle and energy distribution of precipitating electrons over an auroral arc provide boundary conditions for the calculation. The electron spectra from various locations over the aurora present a variety of anisotropic pitch angle distributions and energy spectra. Good agreement is found between the observed backscattered electron energy spectra and model predictions. Differences occur at low energies (below 500 eV) in the structure of the pitch angle distribution. Model calculations were carried out with various different phase functions for elastic and inelastic collisions to attempt changing the angular scattering, but the observed pitch angle distributions remain unexplained. We suggest that mechanisms other than collisional scattering influence the angular distribution of auroral electrons at or below 300 km altitude in the low energy domain. (author)

  11. Fast electron transport study for inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Touati, Michael

    2015-01-01

    A new hybrid reduced model for relativistic electron beam transport in solids and dense plasmas is presented. It is based on the two first angular moments of the relativistic kinetic equation completed with the Minerbo maximum angular entropy closure. It takes into account collective effects with the self-generated electromagnetic fields as well as collisional effects with the slowing down of the electrons in collisions with plasmons, bound and free electrons and their angular scattering on both ions and electrons. This model allows for fast computations of relativistic electron beam transport while describing the kinetic distribution function evolution. Despite the loss of information concerning the angular distribution of the electron beam, the model reproduces analytical estimates in the academic case of a collimated and monoenergetic electron beam propagating through a warm and dense Hydrogen plasma and hybrid PIC simulation results in a realistic laser-generated electron beam transport in a solid target. The model is applied to the study of the emission of Kα photons in laser-solid experiments and to the generation of shock waves. (author) [fr

  12. Energetics of intrinsic point defects in uranium dioxide from electronic-structure calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nerikar, Pankaj; Watanabe, Taku; Tulenko, James S.; Phillpot, Simon R.; Sinnott, Susan B.

    2009-01-01

    The stability range of intrinsic point defects in uranium dioxide is determined as a function of temperature, oxygen partial pressure, and non-stoichiometry. The computational approach integrates high accuracy ab initio electronic-structure calculations and thermodynamic analysis supported by experimental data. In particular, the density functional theory calculations are performed at the level of the spin polarized, generalized gradient approximation and includes the Hubbard U term; as a result they predict the correct anti-ferromagnetic insulating ground state of uranium oxide. The thermodynamic calculations enable the effects of system temperature and partial pressure of oxygen on defect formation energy to be determined. The predicted equilibrium properties and defect formation energies for neutral defect complexes match trends in the experimental literature quite well. In contrast, the predicted values for charged complexes are lower than the measured values. The calculations predict that the formation of oxygen interstitials becomes increasingly difficult as higher temperatures and reducing conditions are approached

  13. ICF target 2D modeling using Monte Carlo SNB electron thermal transport in DRACO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenhall, Jeffrey; Cao, Duc; Moses, Gregory

    2016-10-01

    The iSNB (implicit Schurtz Nicolai Busquet multigroup diffusion electron thermal transport method is adapted into a Monte Carlo (MC) transport method to better model angular and long mean free path non-local effects. The MC model was first implemented in the 1D LILAC code to verify consistency with the iSNB model. Implementation of the MC SNB model in the 2D DRACO code enables higher fidelity non-local thermal transport modeling in 2D implosions such as polar drive experiments on NIF. The final step is to optimize the MC model by hybridizing it with a MC version of the iSNB diffusion method. The hybrid method will combine the efficiency of a diffusion method in intermediate mean free path regions with the accuracy of a transport method in long mean free path regions allowing for improved computational efficiency while maintaining accuracy. Work to date on the method will be presented. This work was supported by Sandia National Laboratories and the Univ. of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics.

  14. Energetic, structural and electronic properties of metal vacancies in strained AlN/GaN interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kioseoglou, J; Pontikis, V; Komninou, Ph; Pavloudis, Th; Chen, J; Karakostas, Th

    2015-04-01

    AlN/GaN heterostructures have been studied using density-functional pseudopotential calculations yielding the formation energies of metal vacancies under the influence of local interfacial strains, the associated charge distribution and the energies of vacancy-induced electronic states. Interfaces are built normal to the polar direction of the wurtzite structure by joining two single crystals of AlN and GaN that are a few atomic layers thick; thus, periodic boundary conditions generate two distinct heterophase interfaces. We show that the formation energy of vacancies is a function of their distance from the interfaces: the vacancy-interface interaction is found repulsive or attractive, depending on the type of the interface. When the interaction is attractive, the vacancy formation energy decreases with increasing the associated electric charge, and hence the equilibrium vacancy concentration at the interface is greater. This finding can reveal the well-known morphological differences existing between the two types of investigated interfaces. Moreover, we found that the electric charge is strongly localized around the Ga vacancy, while in the case of Al vacancies is almost uniformly distributed throughout the AlN/GaN heterostructure. Crucially, for the applications of heterostructures, metal vacancies introduce deep states in the calculated bandgap at energy levels from 0.5 to 1 eV above the valence band maximum (VBM). It is, therefore, predicted that vacancies could initiate 'green luminescence' i.e. light emission in the energy range of 2.5 eV stemming from electronic transitions between these extra levels, and the conduction band, or energy levels, due to shallow donors.

  15. Reconstruction of energetic electron spectra in the upper atmosphere: balloon observations of auroral X-rays coordinated with measurements from the Eiscat radar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olafsson, K.J.

    1990-01-01

    Energetic electron precipitation in the auroral zone has been studied using coordinated auroral X-ray measurements from balloons, altitude profiles of the ionospheric electron density measured by the EISCAT radar above the balloons, and cosmic noise absorption data from the Scandinavian riometer network. The data were obtained during the coordinated EISCAT and balloon observation campaign in August 1984. A method by which an estimate of the energy spectrum of precipitating energetic electrons can be obtained from balloon measurements of bremsstrahlung X-rays is described. The energy spectral variation of both the X-ray fluxes and the primary precipitating electrons were examined for two precipitation events in the morning sector. As far as reasonably can be concluded from observations of magnetic activity in the auroral zone, and from the temporal development of the energy spectra, the two precipitation events can be interpreted in the frame of present models of energetic electron precipitation on the morning side of the auroral zone. 96 refs

  16. Comparison between POES energetic electron precipitation observations and riometer absorptions: Implications for determining true precipitation fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodger, Craig J.; Kavanagh, Andrew J.; Clilverd, Mark A.; Marple, Steve R.

    2013-12-01

    electron precipitation (EEP) impacts the chemistry of the middle atmosphere with growing evidence of coupling to surface temperatures at high latitudes. To better understand this link, it is essential to have realistic observations to properly characterize precipitation and which can be incorporated into chemistry-climate models. The Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite (POES) detectors measure precipitating particles but only integral fluxes and only in a fraction of the bounce loss cone. Ground-based riometers respond to precipitation from the whole bounce loss cone; they measure the cosmic radio noise absorption (CNA), a qualitative proxy with scant direct information on the energy flux of EEP. POES observations should have a direct relationship with ΔCNA and comparing the two will clarify their utility in studies of atmospheric change. We determined ionospheric changes produced by the EEP measured by the POES spacecraft in ~250 overpasses of an imaging riometer in northern Finland. The ΔCNA modeled from the POES data is 10-15 times less than the observed ΔCNA when the >30 keV flux is reported as ground-based measurements. The discrepancy occurs mostly during periods of low geomagnetic activity, and we contend that weak diffusion is dominating the pitch angle scattering into the bounce loss cone at these times. A correction to the calculation using measurements of the trapped flux considerably reduces the discrepancy and provides further support to our hypothesis that weak diffusion leads to underestimates of the EEP.

  17. Auroral energy input from energetic electrons and Joule heating at Chatanika

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wickwar, V.B.; Baron, M.J.; Sears, R.D.

    1975-01-01

    With the incoherent scatter radar at Chatanika, Alaska, a wide variety of measurements can be made related to the ionosphere, magnetosphere, and neutral atmosphere. A significant parameter is the amount of energy transferred from the magnetosphere into the ionosphere and neutral atmosphere during periods of auroral activity. In this report a procedure is examined whereby the incident energy flux of auroral electrons is ascertained from radar measurements. As part of the process radar-determined fluxes are compared with those ascertained from simultaneous photometric observations at 4278 A. The fluxes obtained by both techniques had similar magnitudes and time variations. If it is assumed that the largest uncertainty in the radar/photometer comparison is the effective recombination coefficient, then that coefficient can also be deduced. A value 3times10 -7 cm 3 /s at about 105 km is found, which is in good agreement with other recent determinations during active auroral conditions. This technique is combined with one to ascertain the Joule heating to determine the energy input from the magnetosphere to the ionosphere in a region localized above the radar on March 22, 1973, in the midnight sector. The energy input is continuous at a significant level, i.e., greater than the 3 ergs/cm 2 that could be delivered by the sun, were it overhead. Moreover, at times, each of these inputs became as great as 30 ergs/cm 2 s

  18. Investigation of electronic transport properties of some liquid transition metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, H. P.; Sonvane, Y. A.; Thakor, P. B.

    2018-04-01

    We investigated electronic transport properties of some liquid transition metals (V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co and Pt) using Ziman formalism. Our parameter free model potential which is realized on ionic and atomic radius has been incorporated with the Hard Sphere Yukawa (HSY) reference system to study the electronic transport properties like electrical resistivity (ρ), thermal conductivity (σ) and thermo electrical power (Q). The screening effect on aforesaid properties has been studied by using different screening functions. The correlations of our results and others data with in addition experimental values are profoundly promising to the researchers working in this field. Also, we conclude that our newly constructed parameter free model potential is capable to explain the aforesaid electronic transport properties.

  19. Electron thermal transport in tokamak: ETG or TEM turbulences?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Z.; Chen, L.; Nishimura, Y.; Qu, H.; Hahm, T.S.; Lewandowski, J.; Rewoldt, G.; Wang, W.X.; Diamond, P.H.; Holland, C.; Zonca, F.; Li, Y.

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports progress on numerical and theoretical studies of electron transport in tokamak including: (1) electron temperature gradient turbulence; (2) trapped electron mode turbulence; and (3) a new finite element solver for global electromagnetic simulation. In particular, global gyrokinetic particle simulation and nonlinear gyrokinetic theory find that electron temperature gradient (ETG) instability saturates via nonlinear toroidal couplings, which transfer energy successively from unstable modes to damped modes preferably with longer poloidal wavelengths. The electrostatic ETG turbulence is dominated by nonlinearly generated radial streamers. The length of streamers scales with the device size and is much longer than the distance between mode rational surfaces or electron radial excursions. Both fluctuation intensity and transport level are independent of the streamer size. These simulations with realistic plasma parameters find that the electron heat conductivity is much smaller than the experimental value and in contrast with recent findings of flux-tube simulations that ETG turbulence is responsible for the anomalous electron thermal transport in fusion plasmas. The nonlinear toroidal couplings represent a new paradigm for the spectral cascade in plasma turbulence. (author)

  20. Study of electronic heat transport in plasma through diagnosis based on modulated electron cyclotron heating; Etudes de transport de la chaleur electronique par injection modulee d'ondes a la frequence cyclotronique electronique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clemencon, A.; Guivarch, C

    2003-07-01

    In order to make nuclear fusion energetically profitable, it is crucial to heat and confine the plasma efficiently. Studying the behavior of the heat diffusion coefficient is a key issue in this matter. The use of modulated electron cyclotron heating as a diagnostic has suggested the existence of a transport barrier under certain plasma conditions. We have determined the solution to the heat transport equation, for several heat diffusion coefficient profiles. By comparing the analytical solutions with experimental data; we are able to study the heat diffusion coefficient profile. Thus, in certain experiments, we can confirm that the heat diffusion coefficient switches from low to high values at the radius where the electron cyclotron heat deposition is made. (authors)

  1. Probing the chemistry, electronic structure and redox energetics in pentavalent organometallic actinide complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graves, Christopher R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Vaughn, Anthony E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Morris, David E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kiplinger, Jaqueline L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Complexes of the early actinides (Th-Pu) have gained considerable prominence in organometallic chemistry as they have been shown to undergo chemistries not observed with their transition- or lanthanide metal counterparts. Further, while bonding in f-element complexes has historically been considered to be ionic, the issue of covalence remains a subject of debate in the area of actinide science, and studies aimed at elucidating key bonding interactions with 5f-orbitals continue to garner attention. Towards this end, our interests have focused on the role that metal oxidation state plays in the structure, reactivity and spectral properties of organouranium complexes. We report our progress in the synthesis of substituted U{sup V}-imido complexes using various routes: (1) Direct oxidation of U{sup IV}-imido complexes with copper(I) salts; (2) Salt metathesis with U{sup V}-imido halides; (3) Protonolysis and insertion of an U{sup V}-imido alkyl or aryl complex with H-N{double_bond}CPh{sub 2} or N{triple_bond}C-Ph, respectively, to form a U{sup V}-imido ketimide complex. Further, we report and compare the crystallographic, electrochemical, spectroscopic and magnetic characterization of the pentavalent uranium (C{sub 5}Me{sub 5}){sub 2}U({double_bond}N-Ar)(Y) series (Y = OTf, SPh, C{triple_bond}C-Ph, NPh{sub 2}, OPh, N{double_bond}CPh{sub 2}) to further interrogate the molecular, electronic, and magnetic structures of this new class of uranium complexes.

  2. Role of electron-electron scattering on spin transport in single layer graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahniman Ghosh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the effect of electron-electron scattering on spin transport in single layer graphene is studied using semi-classical Monte Carlo simulation. The D’yakonov-P’erel mechanism is considered for spin relaxation. It is found that electron-electron scattering causes spin relaxation length to decrease by 35% at 300 K. The reason for this decrease in spin relaxation length is that the ensemble spin is modified upon an e-e collision and also e-e scattering rate is greater than phonon scattering rate at room temperature, which causes change in spin relaxation profile due to electron-electron scattering.

  3. Electron and impurity transport studies in the TCV Tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, D.

    2013-05-15

    In this thesis electron and impurity transport are studied in the Tokamak à Configuration Variable (TCV) located at CRPP-EPFL in Lausanne. Understanding particle transport is primordial for future nuclear fusion power plants. Modeling of experiments in many specific plasma scenarios can help to understand the common elements of the physics at play and to interpret apparently contradictory experiments on the same machine and across different machines. The first part of this thesis deals with electron transport in TCV high confinement mode plasmas. It was observed that the electron density profile in these plasmas flatten when intense electron heating is applied, in contrast to observations on other machines where the increase of the profile peakedness was reported. It is shown with quasi-linear gyrokinetic simulations that this effect, usually interpreted as collisionality dependence, stems from the combined effect of many plasma parameters. The influence of the collisionality, electron to ion temperature ratio, the ratio of temperature gradients, and the Ware-pinch are studied with detailed parameter scans. It is shown that the complex interdependence of the various plasma parameters is greatly simplified when the simulation results are interpreted as a function of the average frequency of the main modes contributing to radial transport. In this way the model is able to explain the experimental results. It was also shown that the same basic understanding is at play in L-modes, H-modes and electron internal transport barriers. The second part of the thesis is devoted to impurity transport. A multi-purpose gas injection system is developed, commissioned and calibrated. It is shown that the system is capable of massive gas injections to provoke disruptions and delivering small puffs of gaseous impurities for perturbative transport experiments. This flexible tool is exploited in a series of impurity transport measurements with argon and neon injections. The impurities

  4. Electron and impurity transport studies in the TCV Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, D.

    2013-05-01

    In this thesis electron and impurity transport are studied in the Tokamak à Configuration Variable (TCV) located at CRPP-EPFL in Lausanne. Understanding particle transport is primordial for future nuclear fusion power plants. Modeling of experiments in many specific plasma scenarios can help to understand the common elements of the physics at play and to interpret apparently contradictory experiments on the same machine and across different machines. The first part of this thesis deals with electron transport in TCV high confinement mode plasmas. It was observed that the electron density profile in these plasmas flatten when intense electron heating is applied, in contrast to observations on other machines where the increase of the profile peakedness was reported. It is shown with quasi-linear gyrokinetic simulations that this effect, usually interpreted as collisionality dependence, stems from the combined effect of many plasma parameters. The influence of the collisionality, electron to ion temperature ratio, the ratio of temperature gradients, and the Ware-pinch are studied with detailed parameter scans. It is shown that the complex interdependence of the various plasma parameters is greatly simplified when the simulation results are interpreted as a function of the average frequency of the main modes contributing to radial transport. In this way the model is able to explain the experimental results. It was also shown that the same basic understanding is at play in L-modes, H-modes and electron internal transport barriers. The second part of the thesis is devoted to impurity transport. A multi-purpose gas injection system is developed, commissioned and calibrated. It is shown that the system is capable of massive gas injections to provoke disruptions and delivering small puffs of gaseous impurities for perturbative transport experiments. This flexible tool is exploited in a series of impurity transport measurements with argon and neon injections. The impurities

  5. Increased expression of electron transport chain genes in uterine leiomyoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuncal, Akile; Aydin, Hikmet Hakan; Askar, Niyazi; Ozkaya, Ali Burak; Ergenoglu, Ahmet Mete; Yeniel, Ahmet Ozgur; Akdemir, Ali; Ak, Handan

    2014-01-01

    The etiology and pathophysiology of uterine leiomyomas, benign smooth muscle tumors of the uterus, are not well understood. To evaluate the role of mitochondria in uterine leiomyoma, we compared electron transport gene expressions of uterine leiomyoma tissue with myometrium tissue in six uterine leiomyoma patients by RT-PCR array. Our results showed an average of 1.562 (±0.445) fold increase in nuclear-encoded electron transport genes. These results might suggest an increase in size, number, or activity of mitochondria in uterine leiomyoma that, to our knowledge, has not been previously reported. © 2014 by the Association of Clinical Scientists, Inc.

  6. Coupled electron/photon transport in static external magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halbleib, J.A. Sr.; Vandevender, W.H.

    A model is presented which describes coupled electron/photon transport in the presence of static magnetic fields of arbitrary spatial dependence. The method combines state-of-the-art condensed-history electron collisional Monte Carlo and single-scattering photon Monte Carlo, including electron energy-loss straggling and the production and transport of all generations of secondaries, with numerical field integration via the best available variable-step-size Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg or variable-order/variable-step-size Adams PECE differential equation solvers. A three-dimensional cartesian system is employed in the description of particle trajectories. Although the present model is limited to multilayer material configurations, extension to more complex material geometries should not be difficult. Among the more important options are (1) a feature which permits the neglect of field effects in regions where transport is collision dominated and (2) a method for describing the transport in variable-density media where electron energies and material densities are sufficiently low that the density effect on electronic stopping powers may be neglected. (U.S.)

  7. Analytic approach to auroral electron transport and energy degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stamnes, K.

    1980-01-01

    The interaction of a beam of auroral electrons with the atmosphere is described by the linear transport equation, encompassing discrete energy loss, multiple scattering, and secondary electrons. A solution to the transport equation provides the electron intensity as a function of altitude, pitch angle (with respect to the geomagnetic field) and energy. A multi-stream (discrete ordinate) approximation to the transport equation is developed. An analytic solution is obtained in this approximation. The computational scheme obtained by combining the present transport code with the energy degradation method of Swartz (1979) conserves energy identically. The theory provides a framework within which angular distributions can be easily calculated and interpreted. Thus, a detailed study of the angular distributions of 'non-absorbed' electrons (i.e., electrons that have lost just a small fraction of their incident energy) reveals a systematic variation with incident angle and energy, and with penetration depth. The present approach also gives simple yet accurate solutions in low order multi-stream approximations. The accuracy of the four-stream approximation is generally within a few per cent, whereas two-stream results for backscattered mean intensities and fluxes are accurate to within 10-15%. (author)

  8. NMR studies of transmembrane electron transport in human erythrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennett, E.C.; Bubb, W.A.; Kuchel, P.W.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Electron transport systems exist in the plasma membranes of all cells. These systems appear to play a role in cell growth and proliferation, intracellular signalling, hormone responses, apoptotic events, cell defence and perhaps most importantly they enable the cell to respond to changes in the redox state of both the intra- and extracellular environments. Previously, 13 C NMR has been used to study transmembrane electron transport in human erythrocytes, specifically the reduction of extracellular 13 C-ferricyanide. NMR is a particularly useful tool for studying such systems as changes in the metabolic state of the cell can be observed concomitantly with extracellular reductase activity. We investigated the oxidation of extracellular NADH by human erythrocytes using 1 H and 31 P NMR spectroscopy. Recent results for glucose-starved human erythrocytes indicate that, under these conditions, extracellular NADH can be oxidised at the plasma membrane with the electron transfer across the membrane resulting in reduction of intracellular NAD + . The activity is inhibited by known trans-plasma membrane electron transport inhibitors (capsaicin and atebrin) and is unaffected by inhibition of the erythrocyte Band 3 anion transporter. These results suggest that electron import from extracellular NADH allows the cell to re-establish a reducing environment after the normal redox balance is disturbed

  9. Electron cyclotron waves, transport and instabilities in hot plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westerhof, E.

    1987-01-01

    A number of topics relevant to the magnetic confinement approach to the thermonuclear fusion is addressed. The absorption and emission of electron cyclotron waves in a thermal plasma with a small population of supra-thermal, streaming electrons is examined and the properties of electron cyclotron waves in a plasma with a pure loss-cone distribution are studied. A report is given on the 1-D transport code simulations that were performed to assist the interpretation of the electron cyclotron heating experiments on the TFR tokamak. Transport code simulations of sawteeth discharges in the T-10 tokamak are discussed in order to compare the predictions of different models for the sawtooth oscillations with the experimental findings. 149 refs.; 69 figs.; 7 tabs

  10. Nonequilibrium statistical operator in hot-electron transport theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing, D.Y.; Liu, M.

    1991-09-01

    The Nonequilibrium Statistical Operator method developed by Zubarev is generalized and applied to the study of hot-electron transport in semiconductors. The steady-state balance equations for momentum and energy are derived to the lowest order in the electron-lattice coupling. We show that the derived balance equations are exactly the same as those obtained by Lei and Ting. This equivalence stems from the fact that to the linear order in the electron-lattice coupling, two statistical density matrices have identical effect when they are used to calculate the average value of a dynamical operator. The application to the steady-state and transient hot-electron transport in multivalley semiconductors is also discussed. (author). 28 refs, 1 fig

  11. Intensity increase of energetic electrons in the outer radiation belt of the Earth in July 1972 according to data of the ''Prognoz-2'' artificial Earth satellite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blyudov, V.A.; Volodichev, N.N.; Nechaev, O.Yu.; Savenko, I.A.; Saraeva, M.A.; Shavrin, P.I.

    1979-01-01

    Carried out is the investigation of the 6-10 MeV electrons in the outer radiation belt of the Earth at the ''Prognoz-2'' artificial Earth satellite along the trajectory of the satellite motion according to the Mac Ilvain parameter L. With the help of a ternary coincidance telescope in Juny 1972, the formationand decay of the belt of energetic electrons with the maximum intensity in the L=3.7 region was recorded. The maximum fluxer of this belt electrons are estimated. It is supposed that the event recorded is the consequence of the magnetospherical disturbance that occured on 18.4.1972

  12. Electron transport in magnetic multilayers: effect of disorder

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Drchal, Václav; Kudrnovský, Josef; Bruno, P.; Dederichs, P. H.; Turek, Ilja; Weinberger, P.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 65, - (2002), s. 214414-1-214414-8 ISSN 0163-1829 R&D Projects: GA MŠk OC P5.30; GA ČR GA202/00/0122; GA AV ČR IAA1010829; GA AV ČR IBS2041105 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : electron transport * magnetic multilayers * ballistic transport * diffusive transport * disorder Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.327, year: 2002

  13. Electronic transport properties of nanostructured MnSi-films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeter, D.; Steinki, N.; Scarioni, A. Fernández; Schumacher, H. W.; Süllow, S.; Menzel, D.

    2018-05-01

    MnSi, which crystallizes in the cubic B20 structure, shows intriguing magnetic properties involving the existence of skyrmions in the magnetic phase diagram. Bulk MnSi has been intensively investigated and thoroughly characterized, in contrast to MnSi thin film, which exhibits widely varying properties in particular with respect to electronic transport. In this situation, we have set out to reinvestigate the transport properties in MnSi thin films by means of studying nanostructure samples. In particular, Hall geometry nanostructures were produced to determine the intrinsic transport properties.

  14. Electron transport in EBT in the low collision frequency limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hastings, D.E.

    1983-01-01

    A variational principle formulation is used to calculate the electron neoclassical transport coefficients in a bumpy torus for the low collisionality regime. The electron radial drift is calculated as a function of the plasma position and the poloidal electric field which is determined self-consistently. A bounce-averaged differential collision operator is used and the results are compared to previous treatments using a BGK operator

  15. Power electronics applied to industrial systems and transports

    CERN Document Server

    Patin, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    If the operation of electronic components switching scheme to reduce congestion and losses (in power converters in general and switching power supplies in particular), it also generates electromagnetic type of pollution in its immediate environment. Power Electronics for Industry and Transport, Volume 4 is devoted to electromagnetic compatibility. It presents the sources of disturbance and the square wave signal, spectral modeling generic perturbation. Disturbances propagation mechanisms called ""lumped"" by couplings such as a common impedance, a parasitic capacitance or a mutual and ""dis

  16. Microtearing Instabilities and Electron Transport in the NSTX Spherical Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, K.L.; Kaye, S.; Mikkelsen, D.R.; Krommes, J.A.; Hill, K.; Bell, R.; LeBlanc, B.

    2007-01-01

    We report a successful quantitative account of the experimentally determined electron thermal conductivity χ e in a beam-heated H mode plasma by the magnetic fluctuations from microtearing instabilities. The calculated χ e based on existing nonlinear theory agrees with the result from transport analysis of the experimental data. Without using any adjustable parameter, the good agreement spans the entire region where there is a steep electron temperature gradient to drive the instability

  17. Enhanced energy deposition symmetry by hot electron transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, D.; Mack, J.; Stover, E.; VanHulsteyn, D.; McCall, G.; Hauer, A.

    1981-01-01

    High energy electrons produced by resonance absorption carry the CO 2 laser energy absorbed in a laser fusion pellet. The symmetrization that can be achieved by lateral transport of the hot electrons as they deposit their energy is discussed. A K/sub α/ experiment shows a surprising symmetrization of energy deposition achieved by adding a thin layer of plastic to a copper sphere. Efforts to numerically model this effect are described

  18. Electron heat transport in shaped TCV L-mode plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camenen, Y; Pochelon, A; Bottino, A; Coda, S; Ryter, F; Sauter, O; Behn, R; Goodman, T P; Henderson, M A; Karpushov, A; Porte, L; Zhuang, G

    2005-01-01

    Electron heat transport experiments are performed in L-mode discharges at various plasma triangularities, using radially localized electron cyclotron heating to vary independently both the electron temperature T e and the normalized electron temperature gradient R/L T e over a large range. Local gyro-fluid (GLF23) and global collisionless gyro-kinetic (LORB5) linear simulations show that, in the present experiments, trapped electron mode (TEM) is the most unstable mode. Experimentally, the electron heat diffusivity χ e is shown to decrease with increasing collisionality, and no dependence of χ e on R/L T e is observed at high R/L T e values. These two observations are consistent with the predictions of TEM simulations, which supports the fact that TEM plays a crucial role in electron heat transport. In addition, over the broad range of positive and negative triangularities investigated, the electron heat diffusivity is observed to decrease with decreasing plasma triangularity, leading to a strong increase of plasma confinement at negative triangularity

  19. Self-consistent electron transport in collisional plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, R.J.

    1982-01-01

    A self-consistent scheme has been developed to model electron transport in evolving plasmas of arbitrary classical collisionality. The electrons and ions are treated as either multiple donor-cell fluids, or collisional particles-in-cell. Particle suprathermal electrons scatter off ions, and drag against fluid background thermal electrons. The background electrons undergo ion friction, thermal coupling, and bremsstrahlung. The components move in self-consistent advanced E-fields, obtained by the Implicit Moment Method, which permits Δt >> ω/sub p/ -1 and Δx >> lambda/sub D/ - offering a 10 2 - 10 3 -fold speed-up over older explicit techniques. The fluid description for the background plasma components permits the modeling of transport in systems spanning more than a 10 7 -fold change in density, and encompassing contiguous collisional and collisionless regions. Results are presented from application of the scheme to the modeling of CO 2 laser-generated suprathermal electron transport in expanding thin foils, and in multi-foil target configurations

  20. Electron-vibron coupling effects on electron transport via a single-molecule magnet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McCaskey, A.; Yamamoto, Y.; Warnock, M.; Burzuri, E.; Van der Zant, H.S.J.; Park, K.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate how the electron-vibron coupling influences electron transport via an anisotropic magnetic molecule, such as a single-molecule magnet (SMM) Fe4, by using a model Hamiltonian with parameter values obtained from density-functional theory (DFT). The magnetic anisotropy parameters,

  1. Nonequilibrium Electron Transport Through a Quantum Dot from Kubo Formula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lue Rong; Zhang Guangming

    2005-01-01

    Based on the Kubo formula for an electron tunneling junction, we revisit the nonequilibrium transport properties through a quantum dot. Since the Fermi level of the quantum dot is set by the conduction electrons of the leads, we calculate the electron current from the left side by assuming the quantum dot coupled to the right lead as another side of the tunneling junction, and the other way round is used to calculate the current from the right side. By symmetrizing these two currents, an effective local density states on the dot can be obtained, and is discussed at high and low temperatures, respectively.

  2. Role of hot electron transport in scintillators: A theoretical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Huihui [SZU-NUS Collaborative Innovation Center for Optoelectronic Science and Technology, Key Lab. of Optoelectronic Devices and Systems of Ministry of Education and Guangdong Province, College of Optoelectronic Engineering, Shenzhen Univ. (China); Li, Qi [Physical Sciences Division, IBM TJ Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, NY (United States); Department of Computer Science, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL (United States); Lu, Xinfu; Williams, R.T. [Department of Physics, Wake Forest University, Winston Salem, NC (United States); Qian, Yiyang [College of Engineering and Applied Science, Nanjing University (China); Wu, Yuntao [Scintillation Materials Research Center, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2016-10-15

    Despite recent intensive study on scintillators, several fundamental questions on scintillator properties are still unknown. In this work, we use ab-initio calculations to determine the energy dependent group velocity of the hot electrons from the electronic structures of several typical scintillators. Based on the calculated group velocities and optical phonon frequencies, a Monte-Carlo simulation of hot electron transport in scintillators is carried out to calculate the thermalization time and diffusion range in selected scintillators. Our simulations provide physical insights on a recent trend of improved proportionality and light yield from mixed halide scintillators. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  3. Anticancer Drugs Targeting the Mitochondrial Electron Transport Chain

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rohlena, Jakub; Dong, L.-F.; Ralph, S.J.; Neužil, Jiří

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 12 (2011), s. 2951-2974 ISSN 1523-0864 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) KAN200520703 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520701 Keywords : Targets for anticancer drugs * mitochondrial electron transport chain * mitocans Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 8.456, year: 2011

  4. Electron transport and coherence in semiconductor quantum dots and rings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Wiel, W.G.

    2002-01-01

    A number of experiments on electron transport and coherence in semiconductor vertical and lateral quantum dots and semiconductor rings is described. Quantum dots are often referred to as "artificial atoms", because of their similarities with real atoms. Examples of such atom-like properties that

  5. Electron spin transport in graphene and carbon nanotubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tombros, Nikolaos

    2008-01-01

    Electron spin transport in grafeen en in koolstof nanobuisjes Grafeen, is een kristaal laag van koolstof atomen die slechts één atoomlaag dik is. Een koolstof nanobuisje is te verkrijgen door een grafeen laag op te rollen. In dit proefschrift laten we zien, met behulp van experimenten, dat deze

  6. Defect engineering of the electronic transport through cuprous oxide interlayers

    KAUST Repository

    Fadlallah, Mohamed M.; Eckern, Ulrich; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2016-01-01

    The electronic transport through Au–(Cu2O)n–Au junctions is investigated using first-principles calculations and the nonequilibrium Green’s function method. The effect of varying the thickness (i.e., n) is studied as well as that of point defects

  7. Molecular electronics: insight from first-principles transport simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulsson, Magnus; Frederiksen, Thomas; Brandbyge, Mads

    2010-01-01

    Conduction properties of nanoscale contacts can be studied using first-principles simulations. Such calculations give insight into details behind the conductance that is not readily available in experiments. For example, we may learn how the bonding conditions of a molecule to the electrodes affect the electronic transport. Here we describe key computational ingredients and discuss these in relation to simulations for scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) experiments with C60 molecules where the experimental geometry is well characterized. We then show how molecular dynamics simulations may be combined with transport calculations to study more irregular situations, such as the evolution of a nanoscale contact with the mechanically controllable break-junction technique. Finally we discuss calculations of inelastic electron tunnelling spectroscopy as a characterization technique that reveals information about the atomic arrangement and transport channels.

  8. Flux and reactive contributions to electron transport in methane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ness, K.F.; Nolan, A.M.

    2000-01-01

    A previously developed theoretical analysis (Nolan et al. 1997) is applied to the study of electron transport in methane for reduced electric fields in the range 1 to 1000 Td. The technique of analysis identifies the flux and reactive components of the measurable transport, without resort to the two-term approximation. A comparison of the results of the Monte Carlo method with those of a multiterm Boltzmann equation analysis (Ness and Robson 1986) shows good agreement. The sensitivity of the modelled electron transport to post-ionisation energy partitioning is studied by comparison of three ionisation energy partitioning regimes at moderate (300 Td) and high (1000 Td) values of the reduced electric field. Copyright (2000) CSIRO Australia

  9. Electronic repository and standardization of processes and electronic documents in transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz DĘBICKI

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The article refers to the idea of the use of electronic repository to store standardised scheme of processes between a Logistics Service Provider and its business partners. Application of repository for automatic or semi-automatic configuration of interoperability in electronic data interchange between information systems of differentcompanies based on transport (road, rail, sea and combined related processes. Standardisation includes processes, scheme of cooperation and related to them, electronic messages.

  10. Achromatic and isochronous electron beam transport for tunable free electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bengtsson, J.; Kim, K.J.

    1991-09-01

    We have continued the study of a suitable electron beam transport line, which is both isochronous and achromatic, for the free electron laser being designed at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. A refined version of the beam transport optics is discussed that accommodates two different modes of FEL wavelength tuning. For the fine tuning involving a small change of the electron beam energy, sextupoles are added to cancel the leading nonlinear dispersion. For the main tuning involving the change of the undulator gap, a practical solution of maintaining the beam matching condition is presented. Calculation of the higher order aberrations is facilitated by a newly developed code. 11 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  11. Electron collision cross sections and transport parameters in Cl2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinhao, N.; Chouki, A.

    1995-01-01

    Molecular chlorine, Cl 2 , is a widely used gas with important application in gas discharge physics, namely in plasma etching, UV lasers and gas-filled particle detectors. However, due to experimental difficulties and to a complicated electronic spectrum, only some of the electron collision cross section have been measured and only recently the electronic structure has been resolved. This situation hampered the theoretical analysis of chlorine mixtures by a lack of relevant transport parameters. To our best knowledge there is only one published measurement of electron drift velocity and characteristic energy. Regrettably these data are considered of doubtful quality. There is also only one measurement of attachment and ionisation coefficients and one published set of cross sections. However those authors used the transport data from a He-Cl 2 mixture (80/20) where chlorine's effect can be hidden by the other component. Consequently that set is not completely consistent with the measurements in pure chlorine. This paper presents a new proposal of a consistent set of electron collision cross sections and the corresponding transport parameters and collision frequencies

  12. Power electronics for renewable energy systems, transportation and industrial applications

    CERN Document Server

    Malinowski, Mariusz; Al-Haddad, Kamal

    2014-01-01

    Power Electronics for Renewable Energy, Transportation, and Industrial Applications combines state-of-the-art global expertise to present the latest research on power electronics and its application in transportation, renewable energy, and different industrial applications. This timely book aims to facilitate the implementation of cutting-edge techniques to design problems offering innovative solutions to the growing power demands in small- and large-size industries. Application areas in the book range from smart homes and electric and plug-in hybrid electrical vehicles (PHEVs), to smart distribution and intelligence operation centers where significant energy efficiency improvements can be achieved through the appropriate use and design of power electronics and energy storage devices.

  13. A first principles study of energetics and electronic structural responses of uranium-based coordination polymers to Np incorporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saha, Saumitra; Becker, Udo

    2018-01-01

    Recently developed coordination polymers (CPs) and metal organic frameworks (MOFs) may find applications in areas such as catalysis, hydrogen storage, and heavy metal immobilization. Research on the potential application of actinide-based CPs (An-CP/MOFs) is not as advanced as transition metal-based MOFs. In order to modify their structures necessary for optimizing thermodynamic and electronic properties, here, we described how a specific topology of a particular actinide-based CP or MOF responds to the incorporation of other actinides considering their diverse coordination chemistry associated with the multiple valence states and charge-balancing mechanisms. In this study, we apply a recently developed DFT-based method to determine the relative stability of transuranium incorporated CPs in comparison to their uranium counterpart considering both solid and aqueous state sources and sinks to understand the mechanism and energetics of charge-balanced Np 5+ incorporation into three uranium-based CPs. The calculated Np 5+ + H + incorporation energies for these CPs range from 0.33 to 0.52 eV, depending on the organic linker, when using the solid oxide Np source Np 2 O 5 and U sink UO 3 . Incorporation energies of these CPs using aqueous sources and sinks increase to 2.85-3.14 eV. The thermodynamic and structural analysis in this study aides in determining, why certain MOF topologies and ligands are selective for some actinides and not for others. This means that once this method is extended across a variety of CPs with their respective linker molecules and different actinides, it can be used to identify certain CPs with certain organic ligands being specific for certain actinides. This information can be used to construct CPs for actinide separation. This is the first determination of the electronic structure (band structure, density of states) of these uranium- and transuranium-based CPs which may eventually lead to design CPs with certain optical or catalytic

  14. A first principles study of energetics and electronic structural responses of uranium-based coordination polymers to Np incorporation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saha, Saumitra [Melbourne Univ., VIC (Australia). Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Advanced Molecular Imaging; Becker, Udo [Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Earth and Environmental Sciences

    2018-04-01

    Recently developed coordination polymers (CPs) and metal organic frameworks (MOFs) may find applications in areas such as catalysis, hydrogen storage, and heavy metal immobilization. Research on the potential application of actinide-based CPs (An-CP/MOFs) is not as advanced as transition metal-based MOFs. In order to modify their structures necessary for optimizing thermodynamic and electronic properties, here, we described how a specific topology of a particular actinide-based CP or MOF responds to the incorporation of other actinides considering their diverse coordination chemistry associated with the multiple valence states and charge-balancing mechanisms. In this study, we apply a recently developed DFT-based method to determine the relative stability of transuranium incorporated CPs in comparison to their uranium counterpart considering both solid and aqueous state sources and sinks to understand the mechanism and energetics of charge-balanced Np{sup 5+} incorporation into three uranium-based CPs. The calculated Np{sup 5+} + H{sup +} incorporation energies for these CPs range from 0.33 to 0.52 eV, depending on the organic linker, when using the solid oxide Np source Np{sub 2}O{sub 5} and U sink UO{sub 3}. Incorporation energies of these CPs using aqueous sources and sinks increase to 2.85-3.14 eV. The thermodynamic and structural analysis in this study aides in determining, why certain MOF topologies and ligands are selective for some actinides and not for others. This means that once this method is extended across a variety of CPs with their respective linker molecules and different actinides, it can be used to identify certain CPs with certain organic ligands being specific for certain actinides. This information can be used to construct CPs for actinide separation. This is the first determination of the electronic structure (band structure, density of states) of these uranium- and transuranium-based CPs which may eventually lead to design CPs with certain

  15. Electron heat transport analysis of low-collisionality plasmas in the neoclassical-transport-optimized configuration of LHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Sadayoshi; Yamada, Hiroshi; Wakasa, Arimitsu

    2002-01-01

    Electron heat transport in low-collisionality LHD plasma is investigated in order to study the neoclassical transport optimization effect on thermal plasma transport with an optimization level typical of so-called ''advanced stellarators''. In the central region, a higher electron temperature is obtained in the optimized configuration, and transport analysis suggests the considerable effect of neoclassical transport on the electron heat transport assuming the ion-root level of radial electric field. The obtained experimental results support future reactor design in which the neoclassical and/or anomalous transports are reduced by magnetic field optimization in a non-axisymmetric configuration. (author)

  16. Modelling of electron transport and of sawtooth activity in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angioni, C.

    2001-10-01

    Transport phenomena in tokamak plasmas strongly limit the particle and energy confinement and represent a crucial obstacle to controlled thermonuclear fusion. Within the vast framework of transport studies, three topics have been tackled in the present thesis: first, the computation of neoclassical transport coefficients for general axisymmetric equilibria and arbitrary collisionality regime; second, the analysis of the electron temperature behaviour and transport modelling of plasma discharges in the Tokamak a configuration Variable (TCV); third, the modelling and simulation of the sawtooth activity with different plasma heating conditions. The work dedicated to neoclassical theory has been undertaken in order to first analytically identify a set of equations suited for implementation in existing Fokker-Planck codes. Modifications of these codes enabled us to compute the neoclassical transport coefficients considering different realistic magnetic equilibrium configurations and covering a large range of variation of three key parameters: aspect ratio, collisionality, and effective charge number. A comparison of the numerical results with an analytical limit has permitted the identification of two expressions for the trapped particle fraction, capable of encapsulating the geometrical effects and thus enabling each transport coefficient to be fitted with a single analytical function. This has allowed us to provide simple analytical formulae for all the neoclassical transport coefficients valid for arbitrary aspect ratio and collisionality in general realistic geometry. This work is particularly useful for a correct evaluation of the neoclassical contribution in tokamak scenarios with large bootstrap cur- rent fraction, or improved confinement regimes with low anomalous transport and for the determination of the plasma current density profile, since the plasma conductivity is usually assumed neoclassical. These results have been included in the plasma transport code

  17. Electron and ion beam transport to fusion targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman, J.R.; Baker, L.; Miller, P.A.; Mix, L.P.; Olsen, J.N.; Poukey, J.W.; Wright, T.P.

    1979-01-01

    ICF reactors have been proposed which incorporate a gas-filled chamber to reduce x-ray and debris loading of the first wall. Focused beams of either electrons or ions must be transported efficiently for 2-4 m to a centrally located fusion target. Laser-initiated current-carrying plasma discharge channels provide the guiding magnetic field and the charge- and current-neutralizing medium required for beam propagation. Computational studies of plasma channel formation in air using a 1-D MHD model with multigroup radiation diffusion have provided a good comparison with the expansions velocity and time dependent refractivity profile determined by holographic interferometry. Trajectory calculations have identified a beam expansion mechanism which combines with the usual ohmic dissipation to reduce somewhat the transported beam fluence for electrons. Additional trajectory calculations have been performed for both electrons and light ions to predict the limits on the particle current density which can be delivered to a central target by overlapping the many independently-generated beams. Critical features of the use of plasma channels for transport and overlap of charged particle beams are being tested experimentally with up to twelve electron beams from the Proto II accelerator

  18. Vibronic coupling effect on the electron transport through molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukada, Masaru; Mitsutake, Kunihiro

    2007-03-01

    Electron transport through molecular bridges or molecular layers connected to nano-electrodes is determined by the combination of coherent and dissipative processes, controlled by the electron-vibron coupling, transfer integrals between the molecular orbitals, applied electric field and temperature. We propose a novel theoretical approach, which combines ab initio molecular orbital method with analytical many-boson model. As a case study, the long chain model of the thiophene oligomer is solved by a variation approach. Mixed states of moderately extended molecular orbital states mediated and localised by dress of vibron cloud are found as eigen-states. All the excited states accompanied by multiple quanta of vibration can be solved, and the overall carrier transport properties including the conductance, mobility, dissipation spectra are analyzed by solving the master equation with the transition rates estimated by the golden rule. We clarify obtained in a uniform systematic way, how the transport mode changes from a dominantly coherent transport to the dissipative hopping transport.

  19. Semiclassical electronic transport in MnAs thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helman, C.; Milano, J.; Steren, L.; Llois, A.M.

    2008-01-01

    Magneto-transport experiments have been recently performed on MnAs thin films. Hall effect and transverse magnetoresistance measurements have shown interesting and, until now, unknown results. For instance, the transverse magnetoresistance shows no saturation in the presence of very high magnetic fields. In order to understand the contribution of the electronic band structure to the non-saturating magnetoresistance, we perform ab initio calculations, using the Wien2K code and analyze the magneto-transport properties within the semiclassical approximation. We show that non-saturation may be due to the presence of open orbits on the majority Fermi surface

  20. Semiclassical electronic transport in MnAs thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helman, C. [Dpto de Fisica, ' Juan Jose Giambiagi' , Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Unidad de Actividad Fisica, Centro Atomico Constituyentes, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Buenos Aires (Argentina)], E-mail: helman@tandar.cnea.gov.ar; Milano, J.; Steren, L. [Departamento de Fisica, Centro Atomico Bariloche, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, S.C. Bariloche (Argentina); Llois, A.M. [Dpto de Fisica, ' Juan Jose Giambiagi' , Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Unidad de Actividad Fisica, Centro Atomico Constituyentes, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2008-07-15

    Magneto-transport experiments have been recently performed on MnAs thin films. Hall effect and transverse magnetoresistance measurements have shown interesting and, until now, unknown results. For instance, the transverse magnetoresistance shows no saturation in the presence of very high magnetic fields. In order to understand the contribution of the electronic band structure to the non-saturating magnetoresistance, we perform ab initio calculations, using the Wien2K code and analyze the magneto-transport properties within the semiclassical approximation. We show that non-saturation may be due to the presence of open orbits on the majority Fermi surface.

  1. Discrete Diffusion Monte Carlo for Electron Thermal Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenhall, Jeffrey; Cao, Duc; Wollaeger, Ryan; Moses, Gregory

    2014-10-01

    The iSNB (implicit Schurtz Nicolai Busquet electron thermal transport method of Cao et al. is adapted to a Discrete Diffusion Monte Carlo (DDMC) solution method for eventual inclusion in a hybrid IMC-DDMC (Implicit Monte Carlo) method. The hybrid method will combine the efficiency of a diffusion method in short mean free path regions with the accuracy of a transport method in long mean free path regions. The Monte Carlo nature of the approach allows the algorithm to be massively parallelized. Work to date on the iSNB-DDMC method will be presented. This work was supported by Sandia National Laboratory - Albuquerque.

  2. Electronic transport behavior of diameter-graded Ag nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xuewei; Yuan Zhihao

    2010-01-01

    Ag nanowires with a graded diameter in anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes were fabricated by the direct-current electrodeposition. The Ag nanowires have a graded-change in diameter from 8 to 32 nm, which is matched with the graded-change of the AAO pore diameter. Electronic transport measurements show that there is a transport behavior similar to that of a metal-semiconductor junction along the axial direction in the diameter-graded Ag nanowires. Such a novel homogeneous nanojunction will be of great fundamental and practical significance.

  3. Electronic transport behavior of diameter-graded Ag nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xue Wei; Yuan, Zhi Hao

    2010-05-01

    Ag nanowires with a graded diameter in anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes were fabricated by the direct-current electrodeposition. The Ag nanowires have a graded-change in diameter from 8 to 32 nm, which is matched with the graded-change of the AAO pore diameter. Electronic transport measurements show that there is a transport behavior similar to that of a metal-semiconductor junction along the axial direction in the diameter-graded Ag nanowires. Such a novel homogeneous nanojunction will be of great fundamental and practical significance.

  4. Anomalous plasma transport due to electron temperature gradient instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokuda, Sinji; Ito, Hiroshi; Kamimura, Tetsuo.

    1979-01-01

    The collisionless drift wave instability driven by an electron temperature inhomogeneity (electron temperature gradient instability) and the enhanced transport processes associated with it are studied using a two-and-a-half dimensional particle simulation code. The simulation results show that quasilinear diffusion in phase space is an important mechanism for the saturation of the electron temperature gradient instability. Also, the instability yields particle fluxes toward the hot plasma regions. The heat conductivity of the electron temperature perpendicular to the magnetic field, T sub(e'), is not reduced by magnetic shear but remains high, whereas the heat conductivity of the parallel temperature, T sub(e''), is effectively reduced, and the instability stabilized. (author)

  5. Generation and transport of fast electrons in the interaction of high intensity laser with matter; Generation et transport des electrons rapides dans l'interaction laser-matiere a haut flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popescu, H

    2005-10-15

    The general context of this study is the Inertial Confinement for thermonuclear controlled fusion and, more precisely, the Fast Igniter (FI). In this context the knowledge of the generation and transport of fast electrons is crucial. This thesis is an experimental study of the generation and transport of fast electrons in the interaction of a high intensity laser ({>=} 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}) with a solid target. The main diagnostic used here is the transition radiation. This radiation depends on the electrons which produce it and thus it gives important information on the electrons: energy, temperature, propagation geometry, etc. The spectral, temporal and spatial analysis permitted to put in evidence the acceleration of periodic electron bunches which, in this case, emit a Coherent Transition Radiation (CTR). During this thesis we have developed some theoretical models in order to explain the experimental results. We find this way two kinds of electron bunches, emitted either at the laser frequency ({omega}{sub 0}), either at the double of this frequency (2{omega}{sub 0}), involving several acceleration mechanisms: vacuum heating / resonance absorption and Lorentz force, respectively. These bunches are also observed in the PIC (particle-in-cell) simulations. The electron temperature is of about 2 MeV in our experimental conditions. The electrons are emitted starting from a point source (which is the laser focal spot) and then propagate in a ballistic way through the target. In some cases they can be re-injected in the target by the electrostatic field from the target edges. This diagnostic is only sensitive to the coherent relativistic electrons, which explains the weak total energy that they contain (about a few mJ). The CTR signal emitted by those fast electrons is largely dominating the signal emitted by the less energetic electrons, even if they contain the major part of the energy (about 1 J). (author)

  6. Transition phenomena and thermal transport property in LHD plasmas with an electron internal transport barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimozuma, T.; Kubo, S.; Idei, H.

    2005-01-01

    Two kinds of improved core confinement were observed during centrally focused Electron Cyclotron Heating (ECH) into plasmas sustained by Counter (CNTR) and Co Neutral Beam Injections (NBI) in the Large Helical Device (LHD). One shows transition phenomena to the high-electron-temperature state and has a clear electron Internal Transport Barrier (eITB) in CNTR NBI plasma. Another has no clear transition and no ECH power threshold, but shows a broad high temperature profiles with moderate temperature gradient, which indicates the improved core confinement with additional ECH in Co NBI plasma. The electron heat transport characteristics of these plasmas were directly investigated by using the heat pulse propagation excited by Modulated ECH (MECH). The difference of the features could be caused by the existence of the m/n=2/1 rational surface or island determined by the direction of NBI beam-driven current. (author)

  7. Transition phenomena and thermal transport properties in LHD plasmas with an electron internal transport barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimozuma, T.; Kubo, S.; Idei, H.; Inagaki, S.; Tamura, N.; Tokuzawa, T.; Morisaki, T.; Watanabe, K.Y.; Ida, K.; Yamada, I.; Narihara, K.; Muto, S.; Yokoyama, M.; Yoshimura, Y.; Notake, T.; Ohkubo, K.; Seki, T.; Saito, K.; Kumazawa, R.; Mutoh, T.; Watari, T.; Komori, A.

    2005-01-01

    Two types of improved core confinement were observed during centrally focused electron cyclotron heating (ECH) into plasmas sustained by counter (CNTR) and Co neutral beam injections (NBI) in the Large Helical Device. The CNTR NBI plasma displayed transition phenomena to the high-electron-temperature state and had a clear electron internal transport barrier, while the Co NBI plasma did not show a clear transition or an ECH power threshold but showed broad high temperature profiles with moderate temperature gradient. This indicated that the Co NBI plasma with additional ECH also had an improved core confinement. The electron heat transport characteristics of these plasmas were directly investigated using heat pulse propagation excited by modulated ECH. These effects appear to be related to the m/n = 2/1 rational surface or the island induced by NBI beam-driven current

  8. Electron density measurements during ion beam transport on Gamble II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, B.V.; Hinshelwood, D.D.; Neri, J.M.; Ottinger, P.F.; Rose, D.V.; Stephanakis, S.J.; Young, F.C.

    1999-01-01

    High-sensitivity laser interferometry was used to measure the electron density created when an intense proton beam (100 kA, 1 MeV, 50 ns) from the Gamble II generator was transported through low-pressure gas as part of a project investigating Self-Pinched Transport (SPT) of intense ion beams. This measurement is non-perturbing and sufficiently quantitative to allow benchmarking of codes (particularly IPROP) used to model beam-gas interaction and ion-beam transport. Very high phase sensitivity is required for this measurement. For example, a 100-kA, 1-MeV, 10-cm-radius proton beam with uniform current density has a line-integrated proton density equal to n b L = 3 x 10 13 cm -2 . An equal electron line-density, n e L = n b L, (expected for transport in vacuum) will be detected as a phase shift of the 1.064 microm laser beam of only 0.05degree, or an optical path change of 1.4 x 10 -4 waves (about the size of a hydrogen atom). The time-history of the line-integrated electron density, measured across a diameter of the transport chamber at 43 cm from the input aperture, starts with the proton arrival time and decays differently depending on the gas pressure. The gas conditions included vacuum (10 -4 Torr air), 30 to 220 mTorr He, and 1 Torr air. The measured densities vary by three orders of magnitude, from 10 13 to 10 16 cm -2 for the range of gas pressures investigated. In vacuum, the measured electron densities indicate only co-moving electrons (n e L approximately n b L). In He, when the gas pressure is sufficient for ionization by beam particles and SPT is observed, n e L increases to about 10 n b L. At even higher pressures where electrons contribute to ionization, even higher electron densities are observed with an ionization fraction of about 2%. The diagnostic technique as used on the SPT experiment will be described and a summary of the results will be given. The measurements are in reasonable agreement with theoretical predictions from the IPROP code

  9. Fabrication and electronic transport studies of single nanocrystal systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, David Louis [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1997-05-01

    Semiconductor and metallic nanocrystals exhibit interesting electronic transport behavior as a result of electrostatic and quantum mechanical confinement effects. These effects can be studied to learn about the nature of electronic states in these systems. This thesis describes several techniques for the electronic study of nanocrystals. The primary focus is the development of novel methods to attach leads to prefabricated nanocrystals. This is because, while nanocrystals can be readily synthesized from a variety of materials with excellent size control, means to make electrical contact to these nanocrystals are limited. The first approach that will be described uses scanning probe microscopy to first image and then electrically probe surfaces. It is found that electronic investigations of nanocrystals by this technique are complicated by tip-sample interactions and environmental factors such as salvation and capillary forces. Next, an atomic force microscope technique for the catalytic patterning of the surface of a self assembled monolayer is described. In principle, this nano-fabrication technique can be used to create electronic devices which are based upon complex arrangements of nanocrystals. Finally, the fabrication and electrical characterization of a nanocrystal-based single electron transistor is presented. This device is fabricated using a hybrid scheme which combines electron beam lithography and wet chemistry to bind single nanocrystals in tunneling contact between closely spaced metallic leads. In these devices, both Au and CdSe nanocrystals show Coulomb blockade effects with characteristic energies of several tens of meV. Additional structure is seen the transport behavior of CdSe nanocrystals as a result of its electronic structure.

  10. Transport of a nonneutral electron plasma due to electron collisions with neutral atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Douglas, M.H.; O'Neil, T.M.

    1978-01-01

    Transport of a nonneutral electron plasma across a magnetic field is caused by electron scattering from ambient neutral atoms. A theoretical model of such transport is presented, assuming the plasma is quiescent and the scattering is elastic scattering from infinite mass scattering centers of constant momentum transfer cross section. This model is motivated by recent experiments. A reduced transport equation is obtained by expanding the Boltzmann equation for the electron distribution in inverse powers of the magnetic field. The equation together with Poisson's equation for the radial electric field, which must exist in a nonneutral column, determine the evolution of the system. When these two equations are properly scaled, they contain only a single parameter: the ratio of initial Debye length to initial column radius. For cases where this parameter is either large or small, analytical solutions, or at least partial solutions, are obtained. For intermediate values of the parameter, numerical solutions are obtained

  11. Experimental study of fast electron transport in dense plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaisseau, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    The framework of this PhD thesis is the inertial confinement fusion for energy production, in the context of the electron fast ignition scheme. The work consists in a characterization of the transport mechanisms of fast electrons, driven by intense laser pulses (10 19 - 10 20 W/cm 2 ) in both cold-solid and warm-dense matter. The first goal was to study the propagation of a fast electron beam, characterized by a current density ≥ 10 11 A/cm 2 , in aluminum targets initially heated close to the Fermi temperature by a counter-propagative planar shock. The planar compression geometry allowed us to discriminate the energy losses due to the resistive mechanisms from collisional ones by comparing solid and compressed targets of the same initial areal densities. We observed for the first time a significant increase of resistive energy losses in heated aluminum samples. The confrontation of the experimental data with the simulations, including a complete characterization of the electron source, of the target compression and of the fast electron transport, allowed us to study the time-evolution of the material resistivity. The estimated resistive electron stopping power in a warm-compressed target is of the same order as the collisional one. We studied the transport of the fast electrons generated in the interaction of a high-contrast laser pulse with a hollow copper cone, buried into a carbon layer, compressed by a counter-propagative planar shock. A X-ray imaging system allowed us to visualize the coupling of the laser pulse with the cone at different moments of the compression. This diagnostic, giving access to the fast electron spatial distribution, showed a fast electron generation in the entire volume of the cone for late times of compression, after shock breakout from the inner cone tip. For earlier times, the interaction at a high-contrast ensured that the source was contained within the cone tip, and the fast electron beam was collimated into the target depth by

  12. Does menaquinone participate in brain astrocyte electron transport?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovern, Douglas; Marbois, Beth

    2013-10-01

    Quinone compounds act as membrane resident carriers of electrons between components of the electron transport chain in the periplasmic space of prokaryotes and in the mitochondria of eukaryotes. Vitamin K is a quinone compound in the human body in a storage form as menaquinone (MK); distribution includes regulated amounts in mitochondrial membranes. The human brain, which has low amounts of typical vitamin K dependent function (e.g., gamma carboxylase) has relatively high levels of MK, and different regions of brain have different amounts. Coenzyme Q (Q), is a quinone synthesized de novo, and the levels of synthesis decline with age. The levels of MK are dependent on dietary intake and generally increase with age. MK has a characterized role in the transfer of electrons to fumarate in prokaryotes. A newly recognized fumarate cycle has been identified in brain astrocytes. The MK precursor menadione has been shown to donate electrons directly to mitochondrial complex III. Vitamin K compounds function in the electron transport chain of human brain astrocytes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Power electronics applied to industrial systems and transports

    CERN Document Server

    Patin, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive overview of power electronic converters (DC / DC, DC / AC, AC / DC and AC / AC) conventionally used in industrial and transportation applications, specifically for the supply of electric machines with variable speed drop off window. From the perspective of design and sizing, this book presents the different functions encountered in a modular way for power electronics.Power Converters and Their Control details less traditional topics such as matrix converters and multilevel converters. This book also features a case study design of an industrial controller, wh

  14. Electron transport in ethanol & methanol absorbed defected graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dandeliya, Sushmita; Srivastava, Anurag

    2018-05-01

    In the present paper, the sensitivity of ethanol and methanol molecules on surface of single vacancy defected graphene has been investigated using density functional theory (DFT). The changes in structural and electronic properties before and after adsorption of ethanol and methanol were analyzed and the obtained results show high adsorption energy and charge transfer. High adsorption happens at the active site with monovacancy defect on graphene surface. Present work confirms that the defected graphene increases the surface reactivity towards ethanol and methanol molecules. The presence of molecules near the active site affects the electronic and transport properties of defected graphene which makes it a promising choice for designing methanol and ethanol sensor.

  15. Power electronics applied to industrial systems and transports

    CERN Document Server

    Patin, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Some power electronic converters are specifically designed to power equipment under a smoothed DC voltage. Therefore, the filtering part necessarily involves the use of auxiliary passive components (inductors and capacitors). This book deals with technical aspects such as classical separation between isolated and non-isolated power supplies, and soft switching through a special converter. It addresses the problem of regulating the output voltage of the switching power supplies in terms of modeling and obtaining transfer of SMPS functions.Power Electronics for Industry and Transport, Volume 3,

  16. A DATABASE OF >20 keV ELECTRON GREEN'S FUNCTIONS OF INTERPLANETARY TRANSPORT AT 1 AU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agueda, N.; Sanahuja, B. [Departament d' Astronomia i Meteorologia, Institut de Ciencies del Cosmos, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Vainio, R. [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland)

    2012-10-15

    We use interplanetary transport simulations to compute a database of electron Green's functions, i.e., differential intensities resulting at the spacecraft position from an impulsive injection of energetic (>20 keV) electrons close to the Sun, for a large number of values of two standard interplanetary transport parameters: the scattering mean free path and the solar wind speed. The nominal energy channels of the ACE, STEREO, and Wind spacecraft have been used in the interplanetary transport simulations to conceive a unique tool for the study of near-relativistic electron events observed at 1 AU. In this paper, we quantify the characteristic times of the Green's functions (onset and peak time, rise and decay phase duration) as a function of the interplanetary transport conditions. We use the database to calculate the FWHM of the pitch-angle distributions at different times of the event and under different scattering conditions. This allows us to provide a first quantitative result that can be compared with observations, and to assess the validity of the frequently used term beam-like pitch-angle distribution.

  17. Electrode Cultivation and Interfacial Electron Transport in Subsurface Microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karbelkar, A. A.; Jangir, Y.; Reese, B. K.; Wanger, G.; Anderson, C.; El-Naggar, M.; Amend, J.

    2016-12-01

    Continental subsurface environments can present significant energetic challenges to the resident microorganisms. While these environments are geologically diverse, potentially allowing energy harvesting by microorganisms that catalyze redox reactions, many of the abundant electron donors and acceptors are insoluble and therefore not directly bioavailable. Microbes can use extracellular electron transfer (EET) as a metabolic strategy to interact with redox active surfaces. This process can be mimicked on electrode surfaces and hence can lead to enrichment and quantification of subsurface microorganisms A primary bioelectrochemical enrichment with different oxidizing and reducing potentials set up in a single bioreactor was applied in situ to subsurface microorganisms residing in iron oxide rich deposits in the Sanford Underground Research Facility. Secondary enrichment revealed a plethora of classified and unclassified subsurface microbiota on both oxidizing and reducing potentials. From this enrichment, we have isolated a Gram-positive Bacillus along with Gram-negative Cupriavidus and Anaerospora strains (as electrode reducers) and Comamonas (as an electrode oxidizer). The Bacillus and Comamonas isolates were subjected to a detailed electrochemical characterization in half-reactors at anodic and cathodic potentials, respectively. An increase in cathodic current upon inoculation and cyclic voltammetry measurements confirm the hypothesis that Comamonas is capable of electron uptake from electrodes. In addition, measurements of Bacillus on anodes hint towards novel mechanisms that allow EET from Gram-positive bacteria. This study suggests that electrochemical approaches are well positioned to dissect such extracellular interactions that may be prevalent in the subsurface, while using physical electrodes to emulate the microhabitats, redox and geochemical gradients, and the spatially dependent interspecies interactions encountered in the subsurface. Electrochemical

  18. Electronic transport for armchair graphene nanoribbons with a potential barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Hu, Zhou; Ben-Liang, Zhou; Guang-Hui, Zhou; Zi-Gang, Duan

    2010-01-01

    This paper studies the electronic transport property through a square potential barrier in armchair-edge graphene nanoribbon (AGNR). Using the Dirac equation with the continuity condition for wave functions at the interfaces between regions with and without a barrier, we calculate the mode-dependent transmission probability for both semiconducting and metallic AGNRs, respectively. It is shown that, by some numerical examples, the transmission probability is generally an oscillating function of the height and range of the barrier for both types of AGNRs. The main difference between the two types of systems is that the magnitude of oscillation for the semiconducting AGNR is larger than that for the metallic one. This fact implies that the electronic transport property for AGNRs depends sensitively on their widths and edge details due to the Dirac nature of fermions in the system

  19. Electron effects in the Neutralized Transport Experiment (NTX)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eylon, S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), MS47R 0112, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States) and Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory, Cyclotron Road, CA 94720 (United States)]. E-mail: S_Eylon@lbl.gov; Henestroza, E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), MS47R 0112, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory, Cyclotron Road, CA 94720 (United States); Roy, P.K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), MS47R 0112, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory, Cyclotron Road, CA 94720 (United States); Yu, S.S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), MS47R 0112, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory, Cyclotron Road, CA 94720 (United States)

    2005-05-21

    The Neutralized Transport Experiment (NTX) at the Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory is exploring the performance of neutralized final focus systems for high-perveance heavy ion beams. To focus a high-intensity beam to a small spot requires a high-brightness beam. In the NTX experiment, a potassium ion beam of up to 400 keV and 80 mA is generated in a Pierce-type diode. At the diode exit, an aperture with variable opening provides the capability to vary the beam perveance. The beam is transported through four quadrupole magnets to a distance of 2.5 m. The beam can be neutralized and focused using a MEVVA plasma plug and a RF plasma source. We shall report on the measurement of the electron effects and the ways to mitigate the effects. Furthermore, we shall present the results of EGUN calculations consistent with the measurements effects of the electrons.

  20. Electron effects in the Neutralized Transport Experiment (NTX)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eylon, S.; Henestroza, E.; Roy, P.K.; Yu, S.S.

    2005-01-01

    The Neutralized Transport Experiment (NTX) at the Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory is exploring the performance of neutralized final focus systems for high-perveance heavy ion beams. To focus a high-intensity beam to a small spot requires a high-brightness beam. In the NTX experiment, a potassium ion beam of up to 400 keV and 80 mA is generated in a Pierce-type diode. At the diode exit, an aperture with variable opening provides the capability to vary the beam perveance. The beam is transported through four quadrupole magnets to a distance of 2.5 m. The beam can be neutralized and focused using a MEVVA plasma plug and a RF plasma source. We shall report on the measurement of the electron effects and the ways to mitigate the effects. Furthermore, we shall present the results of EGUN calculations consistent with the measurements effects of the electrons

  1. Electron effects in the Neutralized Transport Experiment (NTX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eylon, S.; Henestroza, E.; Roy, P. K.; Yu, S. S.

    2005-05-01

    The Neutralized Transport Experiment (NTX) at the Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory is exploring the performance of neutralized final focus systems for high-perveance heavy ion beams. To focus a high-intensity beam to a small spot requires a high-brightness beam. In the NTX experiment, a potassium ion beam of up to 400 keV and 80 mA is generated in a Pierce-type diode. At the diode exit, an aperture with variable opening provides the capability to vary the beam perveance. The beam is transported through four quadrupole magnets to a distance of 2.5 m. The beam can be neutralized and focused using a MEVVA plasma plug and a RF plasma source. We shall report on the measurement of the electron effects and the ways to mitigate the effects. Furthermore, we shall present the results of EGUN calculations consistent with the measurements effects of the electrons.

  2. Nanoscale electron transport at the surface of a topological insulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Sebastian; Bobisch, Christian A.

    2016-04-01

    The use of three-dimensional topological insulators for disruptive technologies critically depends on the dissipationless transport of electrons at the surface, because of the suppression of backscattering at defects. However, in real devices, defects are unavoidable and scattering at angles other than 180° is allowed for such materials. Until now, this has been studied indirectly by bulk measurements and by the analysis of the local density of states in close vicinity to defect sites. Here, we directly measure the nanoscale voltage drop caused by the scattering at step edges, which occurs if a lateral current flows along a three-dimensional topological insulator. The experiments were performed using scanning tunnelling potentiometry for thin Bi2Se3 films. So far, the observed voltage drops are small because of large contributions of the bulk to the electronic transport. However, for the use of ideal topological insulating thin films in devices, these contributions would play a significant role.

  3. Two-point model for electron transport in EBT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiu, S.C.; Guest, G.E.

    1980-01-01

    The electron transport in EBT is simulated by a two-point model corresponding to the central plasma and the edge. The central plasma is assumed to obey neoclassical collisionless transport. The edge plasma is assumed turbulent and modeled by Bohm diffusion. The steady-state temperatures and densities in both regions are obtained as functions of neutral influx and microwave power. It is found that as the neutral influx decreases and power increases, the edge density decreases while the core density increases. We conclude that if ring instability is responsible for the T-M mode transition, and if stability is correlated with cold electron density at the edge, it will depend sensitively on ambient gas pressure and microwave power

  4. Temperature dependence of electronic transport property in ferroelectric polymer films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, X.L.; Wang, J.L., E-mail: jlwang@mail.sitp.ac.cn; Tian, B.B.; Liu, B.L.; Zou, Y.H.; Wang, X.D.; Sun, S.; Sun, J.L., E-mail: jlsun@mail.sitp.ac.cn; Meng, X.J.; Chu, J.H.

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • The ferroelectric polymer was fabricated by Langmuir–Blodgett method. • The electrons as the dominant injected carrier were conformed in the ferroelectric polymer films. • The leakage current conduction mechanisms in ferroelectric polymer were investigated. - Abstract: The leakage current mechanism of ferroelectric copolymer of polyvinylidene fluoride with trifluoroethylene prepared by Langmuir–Blodgett was investigated in the temperature range from 100 K to 350 K. The electron as the dominant injected carrier was observed in the ferroelectric copolymer films. The transport mechanisms in copolymer strongly depend on the temperature and applied voltage. From 100 K to 200 K, Schottky emission dominates the conduction. With temperature increasing, the Frenkel–Poole emission instead of the Schottky emission to conduct the carrier transport. When the temperature gets to 260 K, the leakage current becomes independent of temperature, and the space charge limited current conduction was observed.

  5. Nonlinear features of the electron temperature gradient mode and electron thermal transport in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaw, P.K.; Singh, R.; Weiland, J.G.

    2001-01-01

    Analytical investigations of several linear and nonlinear features of ETG turbulence are reported. The linear theory includes effects such as finite beta induced electromagnetic shielding, coupling to electron magnetohydrodynamic modes like whistlers etc. It is argued that nonlinearly, turbulence and transport are dominated by radially extended modes called 'streamers'. A nonlinear mechanism generating streamers based on a modulational instability theory of the ETG turbulence is also presented. The saturation levels of the streamers using a Kelvin Helmholtz secondary instability mechanism are calculated and levels of the electron thermal transport due to streamers are estimated. (author)

  6. Electron beam induced electronic transport in alkyl amine-intercalated VOx nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Dwyer, C.; Lavayen, V.; Clavijo-Cedeno, C.; Torres, C.M.S.

    2008-01-01

    The electron beam induced electronic transport in primary alkyl amine-intercalated V 2 O 5 nanotubes is investigated where the organic amine molecules are employed as molecular conductive wires to an aminosilanized substrate surface and contacted to Au interdigitated electrode contacts. The results demonstrate that the high conductivity of the nanotubes is related to the non-resonant tunnelling through the amine molecules and a reduced polaron hopping conduction through the vanadium oxide itself. Both nanotube networks and individual nanotubes exhibit similarly high conductivities where the minority carrier transport is bias dependent and nanotube diameter invariant. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  7. Improved non-local electron thermal transport model for two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Duc; Moses, Gregory; Delettrez, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    An implicit, non-local thermal conduction algorithm based on the algorithm developed by Schurtz, Nicolai, and Busquet (SNB) [Schurtz et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 4238 (2000)] for non-local electron transport is presented and has been implemented in the radiation-hydrodynamics code DRACO. To study the model's effect on DRACO's predictive capability, simulations of shot 60 303 from OMEGA are completed using the iSNB model, and the computed shock speed vs. time is compared to experiment. Temperature outputs from the iSNB model are compared with the non-local transport model of Goncharov et al. [Phys. Plasmas 13, 012702 (2006)]. Effects on adiabat are also examined in a polar drive surrogate simulation. Results show that the iSNB model is not only capable of flux-limitation but also preheat prediction while remaining numerically robust and sacrificing little computational speed. Additionally, the results provide strong incentive to further modify key parameters within the SNB theory, namely, the newly introduced non-local mean free path. This research was supported by the Laboratory for Laser Energetics of the University of Rochester

  8. Improved non-local electron thermal transport model for two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Duc; Moses, Gregory [University of Wisconsin—Madison, 1500 Engineering Drive, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Delettrez, Jacques [Laboratory for Laser Energetics of the University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    An implicit, non-local thermal conduction algorithm based on the algorithm developed by Schurtz, Nicolai, and Busquet (SNB) [Schurtz et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 4238 (2000)] for non-local electron transport is presented and has been implemented in the radiation-hydrodynamics code DRACO. To study the model's effect on DRACO's predictive capability, simulations of shot 60 303 from OMEGA are completed using the iSNB model, and the computed shock speed vs. time is compared to experiment. Temperature outputs from the iSNB model are compared with the non-local transport model of Goncharov et al. [Phys. Plasmas 13, 012702 (2006)]. Effects on adiabat are also examined in a polar drive surrogate simulation. Results show that the iSNB model is not only capable of flux-limitation but also preheat prediction while remaining numerically robust and sacrificing little computational speed. Additionally, the results provide strong incentive to further modify key parameters within the SNB theory, namely, the newly introduced non-local mean free path. This research was supported by the Laboratory for Laser Energetics of the University of Rochester.

  9. Improved non-local electron thermal transport model for two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Duc; Moses, Gregory; Delettrez, Jacques

    2015-08-01

    An implicit, non-local thermal conduction algorithm based on the algorithm developed by Schurtz, Nicolai, and Busquet (SNB) [Schurtz et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 4238 (2000)] for non-local electron transport is presented and has been implemented in the radiation-hydrodynamics code DRACO. To study the model's effect on DRACO's predictive capability, simulations of shot 60 303 from OMEGA are completed using the iSNB model, and the computed shock speed vs. time is compared to experiment. Temperature outputs from the iSNB model are compared with the non-local transport model of Goncharov et al. [Phys. Plasmas 13, 012702 (2006)]. Effects on adiabat are also examined in a polar drive surrogate simulation. Results show that the iSNB model is not only capable of flux-limitation but also preheat prediction while remaining numerically robust and sacrificing little computational speed. Additionally, the results provide strong incentive to further modify key parameters within the SNB theory, namely, the newly introduced non-local mean free path. This research was supported by the Laboratory for Laser Energetics of the University of Rochester.

  10. Stable solutions of nonlocal electron heat transport equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, M.K.; Kershaw, D.S.

    1991-01-01

    Electron heat transport equations with a nonlocal heat flux are in general ill-posed and intrinsically unstable, as proved by the present authors [Phys. Fluids B 1, 2430 (1989)]. A straightforward numerical solution of these equations will therefore lead to absurd results. It is shown here that by imposing a minimal set of constraints on the problem it is possible to arrive at a globally stable, consistent, and energy conserving numerical solution

  11. Discussion of electron cross sections for transport calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, M.J.

    1983-01-01

    This paper deals with selected aspects of the cross sections needed as input for transport calculations and for the modeling of radiation effects in biological materials. Attention is centered mainly on the cross sections for inelastic interactions between electrons and water molecules and the use of these cross sections for the calculation of energy degradation spectra and of ionization and excitation yields. 40 references, 3 figures, 1 table

  12. Enhanced long-distance transport of periodic electron beams in an advanced double layer cone-channel target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Yanling; Duan, Tao; Zhou, Weimin; Li, Boyuan; Wu, Fengjuan; Zhang, Zhimeng; Ye, Bin; Wang, Rong; Wu, Chunrong; Tang, Yongjian

    2018-02-01

    An enhanced long-distance transport of periodic electron beams in an advanced double layer cone-channel target is investigated using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. The target consists of a cone attached to a double-layer hollow channel with a near-critical-density inner layer. The periodic electron beams are generated by the combination of ponderomotive force and longitudinal laser electric field. Then a stable electron propagation is achieved in the double-layer channel over a much longer distance without evident divergency, compared with a normal cone-channel target. Detailed simulations show that the much better long-distance collimation and guidance of energetic electrons is attributed to the much stronger electromagnetic fields at the inner wall surfaces. Furthermore, a continuous electron acceleration is obtained by the more intense laser electric fields and extended electron acceleration length in the channel. Our investigation shows that by employing this advanced target, both the forward-going electron energy flux in the channel and the energy coupling efficiency from laser to electrons are about threefold increased in comparison with the normal case.

  13. Enhanced long-distance transport of periodic electron beams in an advanced double layer cone-channel target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanling Ji

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available An enhanced long-distance transport of periodic electron beams in an advanced double layer cone-channel target is investigated using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. The target consists of a cone attached to a double-layer hollow channel with a near-critical-density inner layer. The periodic electron beams are generated by the combination of ponderomotive force and longitudinal laser electric field. Then a stable electron propagation is achieved in the double-layer channel over a much longer distance without evident divergency, compared with a normal cone-channel target. Detailed simulations show that the much better long-distance collimation and guidance of energetic electrons is attributed to the much stronger electromagnetic fields at the inner wall surfaces. Furthermore, a continuous electron acceleration is obtained by the more intense laser electric fields and extended electron acceleration length in the channel. Our investigation shows that by employing this advanced target, both the forward-going electron energy flux in the channel and the energy coupling efficiency from laser to electrons are about threefold increased in comparison with the normal case.

  14. The role of electron-impact vibrational excitation in electron transport through gaseous tetrahydrofuran

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duque, H. V. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, South Australia 5001 (Australia); Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, 36036-330 Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Do, T. P. T. [School of Education, Can Tho University, Campus II, 3/2 Street, Xuan Khanh, Ninh Kieu, Can Tho City (Viet Nam); Lopes, M. C. A. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, 36036-330 Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Konovalov, D. A.; White, R. D. [College of Science, Technology and Engineering, James Cook University, Townsville (Australia); Brunger, M. J., E-mail: michael.brunger@flinders.edu.au, E-mail: darryl.jones@flinders.edu.au [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, South Australia 5001 (Australia); Institute of Mathematical Sciences, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Jones, D. B., E-mail: michael.brunger@flinders.edu.au, E-mail: darryl.jones@flinders.edu.au [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, South Australia 5001 (Australia)

    2015-03-28

    In this paper, we report newly derived integral cross sections (ICSs) for electron impact vibrational excitation of tetrahydrofuran (THF) at intermediate impact energies. These cross sections extend the currently available data from 20 to 50 eV. Further, they indicate that the previously recommended THF ICS set [Garland et al., Phys. Rev. A 88, 062712 (2013)] underestimated the strength of the electron-impact vibrational excitation processes. Thus, that recommended vibrational cross section set is revised to address those deficiencies. Electron swarm transport properties were calculated with the amended vibrational cross section set, to quantify the role of electron-driven vibrational excitation in describing the macroscopic swarm phenomena. Here, significant differences of up to 17% in the transport coefficients were observed between the calculations performed using the original and revised cross section sets for vibrational excitation.

  15. Electronic structure and charge transport in nonstoichiometric tantalum oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perevalov, T. V.; Gritsenko, V. A.; Gismatulin, A. A.; Voronkovskii, V. A.; Gerasimova, A. K.; Aliev, V. Sh; Prosvirin, I. A.

    2018-06-01

    The atomic and electronic structure of nonstoichiometric oxygen-deficient tantalum oxide TaO x<2.5 grown by ion beam sputtering deposition was studied. The TaO x film content was analyzed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and by quantum-chemistry simulation. TaO x is composed of Ta2O5, metallic tantalum clusters and tantalum suboxides. A method for evaluating the stoichiometry parameter of TaO x from the comparison of experimental and theoretical photoelectron valence band spectra is proposed. The charge transport properties of TaO x were experimentally studied and the transport mechanism was quantitatively analyzed with four theoretical dielectric conductivity models. It was found that the charge transport in almost stoichiometric and nonstoichiometric tantalum oxide can be consistently described by the phonon-assisted tunneling between traps.

  16. Landauer-Datta-Lundstrom Generalized Transport Model for Nano electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruglyak, Y.

    2014-01-01

    The Landauer-Datta-Lundstrom electron transport model is briefly summarized. If a band structure is given, the number of conduction modes can be evaluated and if a model for a mean-free-path for backscattering can be established, then the near-equilibrium thermoelectric transport coefficients can be calculated using the final expressions listed below for 1D, 2D, and 3D resistors in ballistic, quasi ballistic, and diffusive linear response regimes when there are differences in both voltage and temperature across the device. The final expressions of thermoelectric transport coefficients through the Fermi-Dirac integrals are collected for 1D, 2D, and 3D semiconductors with parabolic band structure and for 2D graphene linear dispersion in ballistic and diffusive regimes with the power law scattering.

  17. Radial transport of high-energy runaway electrons in ORMAK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zweben, S.J.; Swain, D.W.; Fleischmann, H.H.

    1978-01-01

    The transport of high-energy runaway electrons near the outside of a low-density ORMAK discharge is investigated by measuring the flux of runaways to the outer limiter during and after an inward shift of the plasma column. The experimental results are interpreted through a runaway confinement model which includes both the classical outward displacement of the runaway orbit with increasing energy and an additional runaway spatial diffusion coefficient which simulates an unspecified source of anomalous transport. Diffusion coefficients in the range D approximately equal to 10 2 -10 4 cms -1 are found under various discharge conditions indicating a significant non-collisional runaway transport near the outside of the discharge, particularly in the presence of MHD instability. (author)

  18. Nonlinear transport behavior of low dimensional electron systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingqiao

    The nonlinear behavior of low-dimensional electron systems attracts a great deal of attention for its fundamental interest as well as for potentially important applications in nanoelectronics. In response to microwave radiation and dc bias, strongly nonlinear electron transport that gives rise to unusual electron states has been reported in two-dimensional systems of electrons in high magnetic fields. There has also been great interest in the nonlinear response of quantum ballistic constrictions, where the effects of quantum interference, spatial dispersion and electron-electron interactions play crucial roles. In this thesis, experimental results of the research of low dimensional electron gas systems are presented. The first nonlinear phenomena were observed in samples of highly mobile two dimensional electrons in GaAs heavily doped quantum wells at different magnitudes of DC and AC (10 KHz to 20 GHz) excitations. We found that in the DC excitation regime the differential resistance oscillates with the DC current and external magnetic field, similar behavior was observed earlier in AlGaAs/GaAs heterostructures [C.L. Yang et al. ]. At external AC excitations the resistance is found to be also oscillating as a function of the magnetic field. However the form of the oscillations is considerably different from the DC case. We show that at frequencies below 100 KHz the difference is a result of a specific average of the DC differential resistance during the period of the external AC excitations. Secondly, in similar samples, strong suppression of the resistance by the electric field is observed in magnetic fields at which the Landau quantization of electron motion occurs. The phenomenon survives at high temperatures at which the Shubnikov de Haas oscillations are absent. The scale of the electric fields essential for the effect, is found to be proportional to temperature in the low temperature limit. We suggest that the strong reduction of the longitudinal resistance

  19. Detecting Electron Transport of Amino Acids by Using Conductance Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Qiong Li

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The single molecular conductance of amino acids was measured by a scanning tunneling microscope (STM break junction. Conductance measurement of alanine gives out two conductance values at 10−1.85 G0 (1095 nS and 10−3.7 G0 (15.5 nS, while similar conductance values are also observed for aspartic acid and glutamic acid, which have one more carboxylic acid group compared with alanine. This may show that the backbone of NH2–C–COOH is the primary means of electron transport in the molecular junction of aspartic acid and glutamic acid. However, NH2–C–COOH is not the primary means of electron transport in the methionine junction, which may be caused by the strong interaction of the Au–SMe (methyl sulfide bond for the methionine junction. The current work reveals the important role of the anchoring group in the electron transport in different amino acids junctions.

  20. Electron transport in gold colloidal nanoparticle-based strain gauges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Helena; Grisolia, Jérémie; Sangeetha, Neralagatta M.; Decorde, Nicolas; Farcau, Cosmin; Viallet, Benoit; Chen, Ke; Viau, Guillaume; Ressier, Laurence

    2013-03-01

    A systematic approach for understanding the electron transport mechanisms in resistive strain gauges based on assemblies of gold colloidal nanoparticles (NPs) protected by organic ligands is described. The strain gauges were fabricated from parallel micrometer wide wires made of 14 nm gold (Au) colloidal NPs on polyethylene terephthalate substrates, elaborated by convective self-assembly. Electron transport in such devices occurs by inter-particle electron tunneling through the tunnel barrier imposed by the organic ligands protecting the NPs. This tunnel barrier was varied by changing the nature of organic ligands coating the nanoparticles: citrate (CIT), phosphines (BSPP, TDSP) and thiols (MPA, MUDA). Electro-mechanical tests indicate that only the gold NPs protected by phosphine and thiol ligands yield high gauge sensitivity. Temperature-dependent resistance measurements are explained using the ‘regular island array model’ that extracts transport parameters, i.e., the tunneling decay constant β and the Coulomb charging energy EC. This reveals that the Au@CIT nanoparticle assemblies exhibit a behavior characteristic of a strong-coupling regime, whereas those of Au@BSPP, Au@TDSP, Au@MPA and Au@MUDA nanoparticles manifest a weak-coupling regime. A comparison of the parameters extracted from the two methods indicates that the most sensitive gauges in the weak-coupling regime feature the highest β. Moreover, the EC values of these 14 nm NPs cannot be neglected in determining the β values.

  1. Electron heat transport studies using transient phenomena in ASDEX Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacchia, A.; Angioni, C.; Manini, A.; Ryter, F.; Apostoliceanu, M.; Conway, G.; Fahrbach, H.-U.; Kirov, K.K.; Leuterer, F.; Reich, M.; Sutttrop, W.; Cirant, S.; Mantica, P.; De Luca, F.; Weiland, J.

    2005-01-01

    Experiments in tokamaks suggest that a critical gradient length may cause the resilient behavior of T e profiles, in the absence of ITBs. This agrees in general with ITG/TEM turbulence physics. Experiments in ASDEX Upgrade using modulation techniques with ECH and/or cold pulses demonstrate the existence of a threshold in R/L Te when T e >T i and T e ≤T i . For T e >T i linear stability analyses indicate that electron heat transport is dominated by TEM modes. They agree in the value of the threshold (both T e and n e ) and for the electron heat transport increase above the threshold. The stabilization of TEM modes by collisions yielded by gyro-kinetic calculations, which suggests a transition from TEM to ITG dominated transport at high collisionality, is experimentally demonstrated by comparing heat pulse and steady-state diffusivities. For the T e ∼T i discharges above the threshold the resilience, normalized by T e 3/2 , is similar to that of the TEM dominated cases, despite very different conditions. The heat pinch predicted by fluid modeling of ITG/TEM turbulence is investigated by perturbative transport in off-axis ECH-heated discharges. (author)

  2. Time dependence of microsecond intense electron beam transport in gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucey, R.F. Jr.; Gilgenback, R.M.; Tucker, J.E.; Brake, M.L.; Enloe, C.L.; Repetti, T.E.

    1987-01-01

    The authors present results of long-pulse (0.5 μs) electron beam propagation in the ion focused regime (IFR). Electron beam parameters are 800 kV with several hundred amperes injected current. For injection into air (from 0.7 mTorr to 75 mTorr) and helium (from 14 mTorr to 227 mTorr) the authors observe a ''time-dependent propagation window'' in which efficient (up to 100%) propagation starts at a time comparable to the electron impact ionization time needed to achieve n/sub i/ -- (1/γ/sup 2/)n/sub eb/. The transport goes abruptly to zero about 50-150 ns after this initial propagation. This is followed by erratic propagation often consisting of numerous narrower pulses 10-40 ns wide. In these pulses the transported current can be 100% of the injected current, but is generally lower. As the fill pressure is increased, there are differences in the propagated beam pulse, which can be summarized as follows: 1) the temporal occurrence of the beam propagation window shifts to earlier times, 2) the propagated beam current has much faster risetimes, 3) a larger portion of the injected beam is propagated. Similar results are observed when the electron beam is propagated in helium. However, at a given pressure, the beam transport window occurs at later times and exhibits a slower risetime. These effects are consistent with electron beam-induced ionization. Experiments are being performed to determine if the observed beam instability is due to the ion hose instability or streaming instability

  3. Multidimensional electron-photon transport with standard discrete ordinates codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drumm, C.R.

    1997-01-01

    A method is described for generating electron cross sections that are comparable with standard discrete ordinates codes without modification. There are many advantages of using an established discrete ordinates solver, e.g. immediately available adjoint capability. Coupled electron-photon transport capability is needed for many applications, including the modeling of the response of electronics components to space and man-made radiation environments. The cross sections have been successfully used in the DORT, TWODANT and TORT discrete ordinates codes. The cross sections are shown to provide accurate and efficient solutions to certain multidimensional electron-photon transport problems. The key to the method is a simultaneous solution of the continuous-slowing-down (CSD) portion and elastic-scattering portion of the scattering source by the Goudsmit-Saunderson theory. The resulting multigroup-Legendre cross sections are much smaller than the true scattering cross sections that they represent. Under certain conditions, the cross sections are guaranteed positive and converge with a low-order Legendre expansion

  4. Multidimensional electron-photon transport with standard discrete ordinates codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drumm, C.R.

    1997-01-01

    A method is described for generating electron cross sections that are compatible with standard discrete ordinates codes without modification. There are many advantages to using an established discrete ordinates solver, e.g., immediately available adjoint capability. Coupled electron-photon transport capability is needed for many applications, including the modeling of the response of electronics components to space and synthetic radiation environments. The cross sections have been successfully used in the DORT, TWODANT, and TORT discrete ordinates codes. The cross sections are shown to provide accurate and efficient solutions to certain multidimensional electron-photon transport problems. The key to the method is a simultaneous solution of the continuous-slowing-down and elastic-scattering portions of the scattering source by the Goudsmit-Saunderson theory. The resulting multigroup-Legendre cross sections are much smaller than the true scattering cross sections that they represent. Under certain conditions, the cross sections are guaranteed positive and converge with a low-order Legendre expansion

  5. Distribution of tunnelling times for quantum electron transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudge, Samuel L.; Kosov, Daniel S.

    2016-01-01

    In electron transport, the tunnelling time is the time taken for an electron to tunnel out of a system after it has tunnelled in. We define the tunnelling time distribution for quantum processes in a dissipative environment and develop a practical approach for calculating it, where the environment is described by the general Markovian master equation. We illustrate the theory by using the rate equation to compute the tunnelling time distribution for electron transport through a molecular junction. The tunnelling time distribution is exponential, which indicates that Markovian quantum tunnelling is a Poissonian statistical process. The tunnelling time distribution is used not only to study the quantum statistics of tunnelling along the average electric current but also to analyse extreme quantum events where an electron jumps against the applied voltage bias. The average tunnelling time shows distinctly different temperature dependence for p- and n-type molecular junctions and therefore provides a sensitive tool to probe the alignment of molecular orbitals relative to the electrode Fermi energy.

  6. Electronic transport in VO2—Experimentally calibrated Boltzmann transport modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinaci, Alper; Rosenmann, Daniel; Chan, Maria K. Y.; Kado, Motohisa; Ling, Chen; Zhu, Gaohua; Banerjee, Debasish

    2015-01-01

    Materials that undergo metal-insulator transitions (MITs) are under intense study, because the transition is scientifically fascinating and technologically promising for various applications. Among these materials, VO 2 has served as a prototype due to its favorable transition temperature. While the physical underpinnings of the transition have been heavily investigated experimentally and computationally, quantitative modeling of electronic transport in the two phases has yet to be undertaken. In this work, we establish a density-functional-theory (DFT)-based approach with Hubbard U correction (DFT + U) to model electronic transport properties in VO 2 in the semiconducting and metallic regimes, focusing on band transport using the Boltzmann transport equations. We synthesized high quality VO 2 films and measured the transport quantities across the transition, in order to calibrate the free parameters in the model. We find that the experimental calibration of the Hubbard correction term can efficiently and adequately model the metallic and semiconducting phases, allowing for further computational design of MIT materials for desirable transport properties

  7. Electronic transport in VO{sub 2}—Experimentally calibrated Boltzmann transport modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinaci, Alper; Rosenmann, Daniel; Chan, Maria K. Y., E-mail: debasish.banerjee@toyota.com, E-mail: mchan@anl.gov [Center for Nanoscale Materials, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Kado, Motohisa [Higashifuji Technical Center, Toyota Motor Corporation, Susono, Shizuoka 410-1193 (Japan); Ling, Chen; Zhu, Gaohua; Banerjee, Debasish, E-mail: debasish.banerjee@toyota.com, E-mail: mchan@anl.gov [Materials Research Department, Toyota Motor Engineering and Manufacturing North America, Inc., Ann Arbor, Michigan 48105 (United States)

    2015-12-28

    Materials that undergo metal-insulator transitions (MITs) are under intense study, because the transition is scientifically fascinating and technologically promising for various applications. Among these materials, VO{sub 2} has served as a prototype due to its favorable transition temperature. While the physical underpinnings of the transition have been heavily investigated experimentally and computationally, quantitative modeling of electronic transport in the two phases has yet to be undertaken. In this work, we establish a density-functional-theory (DFT)-based approach with Hubbard U correction (DFT + U) to model electronic transport properties in VO{sub 2} in the semiconducting and metallic regimes, focusing on band transport using the Boltzmann transport equations. We synthesized high quality VO{sub 2} films and measured the transport quantities across the transition, in order to calibrate the free parameters in the model. We find that the experimental calibration of the Hubbard correction term can efficiently and adequately model the metallic and semiconducting phases, allowing for further computational design of MIT materials for desirable transport properties.

  8. Theoretical modeling of electronic transport in molecular devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccinin, Simone

    In this thesis a novel approach for simulating electronic transport in nanoscale structures is introduced. We consider an open quantum system (the electrons of structure) accelerated by an external electromotive force and dissipating energy through inelastic scattering with a heat bath (phonons) acting on the electrons. This method can be regarded as a quantum-mechanical extension of the semi-classical Boltzmann transport equation. We use periodic boundary conditions and employ Density Functional Theory to recast the many-particle problem in an effective single-particle mean-field problem. By explicitly treating the dissipation in the electrodes, the behavior of the potential is an outcome of our method, at variance with the scattering approaches based on the Landauer formalism. We study the self-consistent steady-state solution, analyzing the out-of-equilibrium electron distribution, the electrical characteristics, the behavior of the self-consistent potential and the density of states of the system. We apply the method to the study of electronic transport in several molecular devices, consisting of small organic molecules or atomic wires sandwiched between gold surfaces. For gold wires we recover the experimental evidence that transport in short wires is ballistic, independent of the length of the wire and with conductance of one quantum. In benzene-1,4-dithiol we find that the delocalization of the frontier orbitals of the molecule is responsible for the high value of conductance and that, by inserting methylene groups to decouple the sulfur atoms from the carbon ring, the current is reduced, in agreement with the experimental measurements. We study the effect a geometrical distortion in a molecular device, namely the relative rotation of the carbon rings in a biphenyl-4,4'-dithiol molecule. We find that the reduced coupling between pi orbitals of the rings induced by the rotation leads to a reduction of the conductance and that this behavior is captured by a

  9. Transport of a relativistic electron beam through hydrogen gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haan, P. de.

    1981-01-01

    In this thesis the author describes the transport properties of an electron beam through vacuum and through hydrogen gas with pressure ranging from 25 to 1000 Pa. Maximum beam energy and current are 0.8 MeV and 6 kA, respectively. The pulse length is around 150 ns. A description is given of the experimental device. Also the diagnostics for probing the beam and the plasma, produced by the beam, are discussed, as well as the data acquisition system. The interaction between the beam and hydrogen gas with a pressure around 200 Pa is considered. A plasma with density around 10 19 m -3 is produced within a few nanoseconds. Measurements yield the atomic hydrogen temperature, electron density, beam energy loss, and induced plasma current and these are compared with the results of a model combining gas ionization and dissociation, and turbulent plasma heating. The angular distribution of the beam electrons about the magnetic field axis is discussed. (Auth.)

  10. Numerical shoves and countershoves in electron transport calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filippone, W.L.

    1986-01-01

    The justification for applying the relatively complex (compared to S/sub n/) streaming ray (SR) algorithm to electron transport problems is its potential for doing rapid and accurate calculations. Because of the Lagrangian treatment of the cell-uncollided electrons, the only significant sources of error are the numerical treatment of the scattering kernel and the spatial differencing scheme used for the cell-collided electrons. Considerable progress has been made in reducing the former source of error. If one is willing to pay the price, the latter source of error can be reduced to any desired level by refining the mesh size or by using high-order differencing schemes. Here the method of numerical shoves and countershoves is introduced, which reduces spatial differencing errors using relatively little additional computational effort

  11. Disruption of mitochondrial electron transport chain function potentiates the pro-apoptotic effects of MAPK inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotta, Andrew P; Gelles, Jesse D; Serasinghe, Madhavika N; Loi, Patrick; Arbiser, Jack L; Chipuk, Jerry E

    2017-07-14

    The mitochondrial network is a major site of ATP production through the coupled integration of the electron transport chain (ETC) with oxidative phosphorylation. In melanoma arising from the V600E mutation in the kinase v-RAF murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B (BRAF V600E ), oncogenic signaling enhances glucose-dependent metabolism while reducing mitochondrial ATP production. Likewise, when BRAF V600E is pharmacologically inhibited by targeted therapies ( e.g. PLX-4032/vemurafenib), glucose metabolism is reduced, and cells increase mitochondrial ATP production to sustain survival. Therefore, collateral inhibition of oncogenic signaling and mitochondrial respiration may help enhance the therapeutic benefit of targeted therapies. Honokiol (HKL) is a well tolerated small molecule that disrupts mitochondrial function; however, its underlying mechanisms and potential utility with targeted anticancer therapies remain unknown. Using wild-type BRAF and BRAF V600E melanoma model systems, we demonstrate here that HKL administration rapidly reduces mitochondrial respiration by broadly inhibiting ETC complexes I, II, and V, resulting in decreased ATP levels. The subsequent energetic crisis induced two cellular responses involving cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs). First, loss of CDK1-mediated phosphorylation of the mitochondrial division GTPase dynamin-related protein 1 promoted mitochondrial fusion, thus coupling mitochondrial energetic status and morphology. Second, HKL decreased CDK2 activity, leading to G 1 cell cycle arrest. Importantly, although pharmacological inhibition of oncogenic MAPK signaling increased ETC activity, co-treatment with HKL ablated this response and vastly enhanced the rate of apoptosis. Collectively, these findings integrate HKL action with mitochondrial respiration and shape and substantiate a pro-survival role of mitochondrial function in melanoma cells after oncogenic MAPK inhibition.

  12. Electron-vibron coupling effects on electron transport via a single-molecule magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaskey, Alexander; Yamamoto, Yoh; Warnock, Michael; Burzurí, Enrique; van der Zant, Herre S. J.; Park, Kyungwha

    2015-03-01

    We investigate how the electron-vibron coupling influences electron transport via an anisotropic magnetic molecule, such as a single-molecule magnet (SMM) Fe4, by using a model Hamiltonian with parameter values obtained from density-functional theory (DFT). The magnetic anisotropy parameters, vibrational energies, and electron-vibron coupling strengths of the Fe4 are computed using DFT. A giant spin model is applied to the Fe4 with only two charge states, specifically a neutral state with a total spin S =5 and a singly charged state with S =9 /2 , which is consistent with our DFT result and experiments on Fe4 single-molecule transistors. In sequential electron tunneling, we find that the magnetic anisotropy gives rise to new features in the conductance peaks arising from vibrational excitations. In particular, the peak height shows a strong, unusual dependence on the direction as well as magnitude of applied B field. The magnetic anisotropy also introduces vibrational satellite peaks whose position and height are modified with the direction and magnitude of applied B field. Furthermore, when multiple vibrational modes with considerable electron-vibron coupling have energies close to one another, a low-bias current is suppressed, independently of gate voltage and applied B field, although that is not the case for a single mode with a similar electron-vibron coupling. In the former case, the conductance peaks reveal a stronger B -field dependence than in the latter case. The new features appear because the magnetic anisotropy barrier is of the same order of magnitude as the energies of vibrational modes with significant electron-vibron coupling. Our findings clearly show the interesting interplay between magnetic anisotropy and electron-vibron coupling in electron transport via the Fe4. Similar behavior can be observed in transport via other anisotropic magnetic molecules.

  13. Development and validation of a critical gradient energetic particle driven Alfven eigenmode transport model for DIII-D tilted neutral beam experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waltz, R. E.; Bass, E. M.; Heidbrink, W. W.; VanZeeland, M. A.

    2015-11-01

    Recent experiments with the DIII-D tilted neutral beam injection (NBI) varying the beam energetic particle (EP) source profiles have provided strong evidence that unstable Alfven eigenmodes (AE) drive stiff EP transport at a critical EP density gradient [Heidbrink et al 2013 Nucl. Fusion 53 093006]. Here the critical gradient is identified by the local AE growth rate being equal to the local ITG/TEM growth rate at the same low toroidal mode number. The growth rates are taken from the gyrokinetic code GYRO. Simulation show that the slowing down beam-like EP distribution has a slightly lower critical gradient than the Maxwellian. The ALPHA EP density transport code [Waltz and Bass 2014 Nucl. Fusion 54 104006], used to validate the model, combines the low-n stiff EP critical density gradient AE mid-core transport with the Angioni et al (2009 Nucl. Fusion 49 055013) energy independent high-n ITG/TEM density transport model controling the central core EP density profile. For the on-axis NBI heated DIII-D shot 146102, while the net loss to the edge is small, about half the birth fast ions are transported from the central core r/a  <  0.5 and the central density is about half the slowing down density. These results are in good agreement with experimental fast ion pressure profiles inferred from MSE constrained EFIT equilibria.

  14. SUPRATHERMAL ELECTRONS IN THE SOLAR CORONA: CAN NONLOCAL TRANSPORT EXPLAIN HELIOSPHERIC CHARGE STATES?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cranmer, Steven R.

    2014-01-01

    There have been several ideas proposed to explain how the Sun's corona is heated and how the solar wind is accelerated. Some models assume that open magnetic field lines are heated by Alfvén waves driven by photospheric motions and dissipated after undergoing a turbulent cascade. Other models posit that much of the solar wind's mass and energy is injected via magnetic reconnection from closed coronal loops. The latter idea is motivated by observations of reconnecting jets and also by similarities of ion composition between closed loops and the slow wind. Wave/turbulence models have also succeeded in reproducing observed trends in ion composition signatures versus wind speed. However, the absolute values of the charge-state ratios predicted by those models tended to be too low in comparison with observations. This Letter refines these predictions by taking better account of weak Coulomb collisions for coronal electrons, whose thermodynamic properties determine the ion charge states in the low corona. A perturbative description of nonlocal electron transport is applied to an existing set of wave/turbulence models. The resulting electron velocity distributions in the low corona exhibit mild suprathermal tails characterized by ''kappa'' exponents between 10 and 25. These suprathermal electrons are found to be sufficiently energetic to enhance the charge states of oxygen ions, while maintaining the same relative trend with wind speed that was found when the distribution was assumed to be Maxwellian. The updated wave/turbulence models are in excellent agreement with solar wind ion composition measurements

  15. The nonlinear gyroresonance interaction between energetic electrons and coherent VLF waves propagating at an arbitrary angle with respect to the earth's magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, T. F.

    1984-01-01

    A theory is presented of the nonlinear gyroresonance interaction that takes place in the magnetosphere between energetic electrons and coherent VLF waves propagating in the whistler mode at an arbitrary angle psi with respect to the earth's magnetic field B-sub-0. Particularly examined is the phase trapping (PT) mechanism believed to be responsible for the generation of VLF emissions. It is concluded that near the magnetic equatorial plane gradients of psi may play a very important part in the PT process for nonducted waves. Predictions of a higher threshold value for PT for nonducted waves generally agree with experimental data concerning VLF emission triggering by nonducted waves.

  16. Taking an electron-magnon duality shortcut from electron to magnon transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mook, Alexander; Göbel, Börge; Henk, Jürgen; Mertig, Ingrid

    2018-04-01

    The quasiparticles in insulating magnets are the charge-neutral magnons, whose magnetic moments couple to electromagnetic fields. For collinear easy-axis magnets, this coupling can be mapped elegantly onto the scenario of charged particles in electromagnetic fields. From this mapping we obtain equations of motion for magnon wave packets equal to those of electron wave packets in metals. Thus, well-established electronic transport phenomena can be carried over to magnons: this duality shortcut facilitates the discussion of magnon transport. We identify the magnon versions of normal and anomalous Hall, Nernst, Ettingshausen, and Righi-Leduc effects. They are discussed for selected types of easy-axis magnets: ferromagnets, antiferromagnets, and ferrimagnets. Besides a magnon Wiedemann-Franz law and the magnon counterpart of the negative magnetoresistance of electrons in Weyl semimetals, we predict that certain low-symmetry ferrimagnets exhibit a nonlinear version of the anomalous magnon Hall-effect family.

  17. Electronic transport in narrow-gap semiconductor nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloemers, Christian

    2012-10-19

    Throughout this work the electronic transport properties of InAs, InN, and GaAs/InAs core/shell nanowires have been analyzed. This includes the analysis of specific resistivity at room temperature and low temperatures as well as the breakdown of resistivity by a contribution of mobility and carrier concentration using gate measurements. While the InN nanowires showed homogeneous transport properties, there was a large statistical spread in the properties of InAs nanowires. Differing crystal structures and the surface conditions are identified to be the main reasons for the statistical spread. Both quantities of influence have been pointed out by comparing the transport parameters before and after a surface treatment (electron irradiation and long time ambient air exposure), and by comparing the transport parameters of wires grown by different growth methods which exhibit different kinds of crystal structure. In particular, the temperature dependence of the conductivity revealed different activation energies in nanowires with differing crystal structures. An explanation has been suggested in terms of stacking fault induced potential barriers. A field-effect measurement setup has been utilized to determine the nanowire mobility and carrier concentration. Even though this method is widely used for nanowires, it is subject to a serious disadvantage concerning the influence of surface and interface states on the measurements. As an alternative method which does not suffer from this drawback, Hall measurements have been successfully performed on InAs nanowires for the first time. These measurements became possible because of the utilization of a new electron beam lithographic procedure with an alignment accuracy in the 5 nm range. Carrier concentration values could be determined and compared to the ones obtained from conventional field-effect measurements. The results of the Hall measurements revealed a methodical overestimation of the carrier concentrations obtained

  18. Electronic transport in narrow-gap semiconductor nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloemers, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Throughout this work the electronic transport properties of InAs, InN, and GaAs/InAs core/shell nanowires have been analyzed. This includes the analysis of specific resistivity at room temperature and low temperatures as well as the breakdown of resistivity by a contribution of mobility and carrier concentration using gate measurements. While the InN nanowires showed homogeneous transport properties, there was a large statistical spread in the properties of InAs nanowires. Differing crystal structures and the surface conditions are identified to be the main reasons for the statistical spread. Both quantities of influence have been pointed out by comparing the transport parameters before and after a surface treatment (electron irradiation and long time ambient air exposure), and by comparing the transport parameters of wires grown by different growth methods which exhibit different kinds of crystal structure. In particular, the temperature dependence of the conductivity revealed different activation energies in nanowires with differing crystal structures. An explanation has been suggested in terms of stacking fault induced potential barriers. A field-effect measurement setup has been utilized to determine the nanowire mobility and carrier concentration. Even though this method is widely used for nanowires, it is subject to a serious disadvantage concerning the influence of surface and interface states on the measurements. As an alternative method which does not suffer from this drawback, Hall measurements have been successfully performed on InAs nanowires for the first time. These measurements became possible because of the utilization of a new electron beam lithographic procedure with an alignment accuracy in the 5 nm range. Carrier concentration values could be determined and compared to the ones obtained from conventional field-effect measurements. The results of the Hall measurements revealed a methodical overestimation of the carrier concentrations obtained

  19. Electronic Structure and Transport in Solids from First Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, Jamal Ibrahim

    The focus of this dissertation is the determination of the electronic structure and trans- port properties of solids. We first review some of the theory and computational methodology used in the calculation of electronic structure and materials properties. Throughout the dissertation, we make extensive use of state-of-the-art software packages that implement density functional theory, density functional perturbation theory, and the GW approximation, in addition to specialized methods for interpolating matrix elements for extremely accurate results. The first application of the computational framework introduced is the determination of band offsets in semiconductor heterojunctions using a theory of quantum dipoles at the interface. This method is applied to the case of heterojunction formed between a new metastable phase of silicon, with a rhombohedral structure, and cubic silicon. Next, we introduce a novel method for the construction of localized Wannier functions, which we have named the optimized projection functions method (OPFM). We illustrate the method on a variety of systems and find that it can reliably construct localized Wannier functions with minimal user intervention. We further develop the OPFM to investigate a class of materials called topological insulators, which are insulating in the bulk but have conductive surface states. These properties are a result of a nontrivial topology in their band structure, which has interesting effects on the character of the Wannier functions. In the last sections of the main text, the noble metals are studied in great detail, including their electronic properties and carrier dynamics. In particular, we investigate, the Fermi surface properties of the noble metals, specifically electron-phonon scattering lifetimes, and subsequently the transport properties determined by carriers on the Fermi surface. To achieve this, a novel sampling technique is developed, with wide applicability to transport calculations

  20. Monte Carlo transport of electrons and positrons through thin foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legarda, F.; Idoeta, R.

    2000-01-01

    In the different measurements made with electrons traversing matter it becomes useful the knowledge of its transmission through that medium, their paths and their angular distribution through matter so as to process and get information about the traversed medium and to improve and innovate the techniques that employ electrons, as medical applications or materials irradiation. This work presents a simulation of the transport of beams of electrons and positrons through thin foils using an analog Monte Carlo code that simulates in a detailed way every electron movement or interaction in matter. As those particles penetrate thin absorbers it has been assumed that they interact with matter only through elastic scattering, with negligible energy loss. This type of interaction has been described quite precisely because its angular form influences very much the angular distribution of electrons and positrons in matter. With this code it has been calculated the number of particles, with energies between 100 and 3000 keV, that are transmitted through different media of various thicknesses as well as its angular distribution, showing a good agreement with experimental data. The discrepancies are less than 5% for thicknesses lower than about 30% of the corresponding range in the tested material. As elastic scattering is very anisotropic, angular distributions resemble a collimated incident beam for very thin foils becoming slowly more isotropic when absorber thickness is increased. (author)

  1. Electron and hole transport in ambipolar, thin film pentacene transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saudari, Sangameshwar R.; Kagan, Cherie R.

    2015-01-01

    Solution-processed, ambipolar, thin-film pentacene field-effect transistors were employed to study both electron and hole transport simultaneously in a single, organic solid-state device. Electron and hole mobilities were extracted from the respective unipolar saturation regimes and show thermally activated behavior and gate voltage dependence. We fit the gate voltage dependent saturation mobility to a power law to extract the characteristic Meyer-Neldel (MN) energy, a measure of the width of the exponential distribution of localized states extending into the energy gap of the organic semiconductor. The MN energy is ∼78 and ∼28 meV for electrons and holes, respectively, which reflects a greater density of localized tail states for electrons than holes. This is consistent with the lower measured electron than hole mobility. For holes, the well-behaved linear regime allows for four-point probe measurement of the contact resistance independent mobility and separate characterization of the width of the localized density of states, yielding a consistent MN energy of 28 meV

  2. Electron and hole transport in ambipolar, thin film pentacene transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saudari, Sangameshwar R. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Kagan, Cherie R. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Department of Electrical and Systems Engineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Department of Chemistry, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States)

    2015-01-21

    Solution-processed, ambipolar, thin-film pentacene field-effect transistors were employed to study both electron and hole transport simultaneously in a single, organic solid-state device. Electron and hole mobilities were extracted from the respective unipolar saturation regimes and show thermally activated behavior and gate voltage dependence. We fit the gate voltage dependent saturation mobility to a power law to extract the characteristic Meyer-Neldel (MN) energy, a measure of the width of the exponential distribution of localized states extending into the energy gap of the organic semiconductor. The MN energy is ∼78 and ∼28 meV for electrons and holes, respectively, which reflects a greater density of localized tail states for electrons than holes. This is consistent with the lower measured electron than hole mobility. For holes, the well-behaved linear regime allows for four-point probe measurement of the contact resistance independent mobility and separate characterization of the width of the localized density of states, yielding a consistent MN energy of 28 meV.

  3. Helium, iron and electron particle transport and energy transport studies on the TFTR tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synakowski, E.J.; Efthimion, P.C.; Rewoldt, G.; Stratton, B.C.; Tang, W.M.; Grek, B.; Hill, K.W.; Hulse, R.A.; Johnson, D.W.; Mansfield, D.K.; McCune, D.; Mikkelsen, D.R.; Park, H.K.; Ramsey, A.T.; Redi, M.H.; Scott, S.D.; Taylor, G.; Timberlake, J.; Zarnstorff, M.C.

    1993-03-01

    Results from helium, iron, and electron transport on TFTR in L-mode and Supershot deuterium plasmas with the same toroidal field, plasma current, and neutral beam heating power are presented. They are compared to results from thermal transport analysis based on power balance. Particle diffusivities and thermal conductivities are radially hollow and larger than neoclassical values, except possibly near the magnetic axis. The ion channel dominates over the electron channel in both particle and thermal diffusion. A peaked helium profile, supported by inward convection that is stronger than predicted by neoclassical theory, is measured in the Supershot The helium profile shape is consistent with predictions from quasilinear electrostatic drift-wave theory. While the perturbative particle diffusion coefficients of all three species are similar in the Supershot, differences are found in the L-Mode. Quasilinear theory calculations of the ratios of impurity diffusivities are in good accord with measurements. Theory estimates indicate that the ion heat flux should be larger than the electron heat flux, consistent with power balance analysis. However, theoretical values of the ratio of the ion to electron heat flux can be more than a factor of three larger than experimental values. A correlation between helium diffusion and ion thermal transport is observed and has favorable implications for sustained ignition of a tokamak fusion reactor

  4. Helium, Iron and Electron Particle Transport and Energy Transport Studies on the TFTR Tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Synakowski, E. J.; Efthimion, P. C.; Rewoldt, G.; Stratton, B. C.; Tang, W. M.; Grek, B.; Hill, K. W.; Hulse, R. A.; Johnson, D .W.; Mansfield, D. K.; McCune, D.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Park, H. K.; Ramsey, A. T.; Redi, M. H.; Scott, S. D.; Taylor, G.; Timberlake, J.; Zarnstorff, M. C. (Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.); Kissick, M. W. (Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States))

    1993-03-01

    Results from helium, iron, and electron transport on TFTR in L-mode and Supershot deuterium plasmas with the same toroidal field, plasma current, and neutral beam heating power are presented. They are compared to results from thermal transport analysis based on power balance. Particle diffusivities and thermal conductivities are radially hollow and larger than neoclassical values, except possibly near the magnetic axis. The ion channel dominates over the electron channel in both particle and thermal diffusion. A peaked helium profile, supported by inward convection that is stronger than predicted by neoclassical theory, is measured in the Supershot The helium profile shape is consistent with predictions from quasilinear electrostatic drift-wave theory. While the perturbative particle diffusion coefficients of all three species are similar in the Supershot, differences are found in the L-Mode. Quasilinear theory calculations of the ratios of impurity diffusivities are in good accord with measurements. Theory estimates indicate that the ion heat flux should be larger than the electron heat flux, consistent with power balance analysis. However, theoretical values of the ratio of the ion to electron heat flux can be more than a factor of three larger than experimental values. A correlation between helium diffusion and ion thermal transport is observed and has favorable implications for sustained ignition of a tokamak fusion reactor.

  5. Artemisinin inhibits chloroplast electron transport activity: mode of action.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adyasha Bharati

    Full Text Available Artemisinin, a secondary metabolite produced in Artemisia plant species, besides having antimalarial properties is also phytotoxic. Although, the phytotoxic activity of the compound has been long recognized, no information is available on the mechanism of action of the compound on photosynthetic activity of the plant. In this report, we have evaluated the effect of artemisinin on photoelectron transport activity of chloroplast thylakoid membrane. The inhibitory effect of the compound, under in vitro condition, was pronounced in loosely and fully coupled thylakoids; being strong in the former. The extent of inhibition was drastically reduced in the presence of uncouplers like ammonium chloride or gramicidin; a characteristic feature described for energy transfer inhibitors. The compound, on the other hand, when applied to plants (in vivo, behaved as a potent inhibitor of photosynthetic electron transport. The major site of its action was identified to be the Q(B; the secondary quinone moiety of photosystemII complex. Analysis of photoreduction kinetics of para-benzoquinone and duroquinone suggest that the inhibition leads to formation of low pool of plastoquinol, which becomes limiting for electron flow through photosystemI. Further it was ascertained that the in vivo inhibitory effect appeared as a consequence of the formation of an unidentified artemisinin-metabolite rather than by the interaction of the compound per se. The putative metabolite of artemisinin is highly reactive in instituting the inhibition of photosynthetic electron flow eventually reducing the plant growth.

  6. Elastic properties and electron transport in InAs nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Migunov, Vadim

    2013-02-22

    The electron transport and elastic properties of InAs nanowires grown by chemical vapor deposition on InAs (001) substrate were studied experimentally, in-situ in a transmission electron microscope (TEM). A TEM holder allowing the measurement of a nanoforce while simultaneous imaging nanowire bending was used. Diffraction images from local areas of the wire were recorded to correlate elastic properties with the atomic structure of the nanowires. Another TEM holder allowing the application of electrical bias between the nanowire and an apex of a metallic needle while simultaneous imaging the nanowire in TEM or performing electron holography was used to detect mechanical vibrations in mechanical study or holographical observation of the nanowire inner potential in the electron transport studies. The combination of the scanning probe methods with TEM allows to correlate the measured electric and elastic properties of the nanowires with direct identification of their atomic structure. It was found that the nanowires have different atomic structures and different stacking fault defect densities that impacts critically on the elastic properties and electric transport. The unique methods, that were applied in this work, allowed to obtain dependencies of resistivity and Young's modulus of left angle 111 right angle -oriented InAs nanowires on defect density and diameter. It was found that the higher is the defect density the higher are the resistivity and the Young's modulus. Regarding the resistivity, it was deduced that the stacking faults increase the scattering of the electrons in the nanowire. These findings are consistent with the literature, however, the effect described by the other groups is not so pronounced. This difference can be attributed to the significant incompleteness of the physical models used for the data analysis. Regarding the elastic modulus, there are several mechanisms affecting the elasticity of the nanowires discussed in the thesis. It

  7. Electronic transport and magnetization dynamics in magnetic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borlenghi, Simone

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to understand the mutual influence between electronic transport and magnetization dynamics in magnetic hybrid metallic nano-structures. At first, we have developed a theoretical model, based on random matrix theory, to describe at microscopic level spin dependent transport in a heterogeneous nano-structure. This model, called Continuous Random Matrix Theory (CRMT), has been implemented in a simulation code that allows one to compute local (spin torque, spin accumulation and spin current) and macroscopic (resistance) transport properties of spin valves. To validate this model, we have compared it with a quantum theory of transport based on the non equilibrium Green's functions formalism. Coupling the two models has allowed to perform a multi-scale description of metallic hybrid nano-structures, where ohmic parts are described using CRMT, while purely quantum parts are described using Green's functions. Then, we have coupled CRMT to a micro-magnetic simulation code, in order to describe the complex dynamics of the magnetization induced by spin transfer effect. The originality of this approach consists in modelling a spectroscopic experiment based on a mechanical detection of the ferromagnetic resonance, and performed on a spin torque nano-oscillator. This work has allowed us to obtain the dynamical phase diagram of the magnetization, and to detect the selection rules for spin waves induced by spin torque, as well as the competition between the Eigen-modes of the system when a dc current flows through the multilayer, in partial agreement with experimental data. (author)

  8. Relativistic electron-beam transport in curved channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vittitoe, C.N.; Morel, J.E.; Wright, T.P.

    1982-01-01

    Collisionless single particle trajectories are modeled for a single plasma channel having one section curved in a circular arc. The magnetic field is developed by superposition of straight and curved channel segments. The plasma density gives charge and beam-current neutralization. High transport efficiencies are found for turning a relativistic electron beam 90 0 under reasonable conditions of plasma current, beam energy, arc radius, channel radius, and injection distributions in velocity and in position at the channel entrance. Channel exit distributions in velocity and position are found consistent with those for a straight plasma channel of equivalent length. Such transport problems are important in any charged particle-beam application constrained by large diode-to-target distance or by requirements of maximum power deposition in a confined area

  9. Contacting nanowires and nanotubes with atomic precision for electronic transport

    KAUST Repository

    Qin, Shengyong; Hellstrom, Sondra; Bao, Zhenan; Boyanov, Boyan; Li, An-Ping

    2012-01-01

    Making contacts to nanostructures with atomic precision is an important process in the bottom-up fabrication and characterization of electronic nanodevices. Existing contacting techniques use top-down lithography and chemical etching, but lack atomic precision and introduce the possibility of contamination. Here, we report that a field-induced emission process can be used to make local contacts onto individual nanowires and nanotubes with atomic spatial precision. The gold nano-islands are deposited onto nanostructures precisely by using a scanning tunneling microscope tip, which provides a clean and controllable method to ensure both electrically conductive and mechanically reliable contacts. To demonstrate the wide applicability of the technique, nano-contacts are fabricated on silicide atomic wires, carbon nanotubes, and copper nanowires. The electrical transport measurements are performed in situ by utilizing the nanocontacts to bridge the nanostructures to the transport probes. © 2012 American Institute of Physics.

  10. Strain modification on electronic transport of the phosphorene nanoribbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yawen Yuan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate theoretically how local strains can be tailored to control quantum transport of carriers on monolayer armchair and zigzag phosphorene nanoribbon. We find that the electron tunneling is forbidden when the in-plane strain exceeds a critical value. The critical strain is different for different crystal orientation of the ribbons, widths, and incident energies. By tuning the Fermi energy and strain, the channels can be transited from opaque to transparent. Moreover, for the zigzag-phosphorene nanoribbon, the two-fold degenerate quasi-flat edge band splits completely under certain strain. These properties provide us an efficient way to control the transport of monolayer phosphorene-based microstructure.

  11. New Computational Approach to Electron Transport in Irregular Graphene Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Douglas; Heller, Eric; Prendergast, David; Neaton, Jeffrey

    2009-03-01

    For novel graphene devices of nanoscale-to-macroscopic scale, many aspects of their transport properties are not easily understood due to difficulties in fabricating devices with regular edges. Here we develop a framework to efficiently calculate and potentially screen electronic transport properties of arbitrary nanoscale graphene device structures. A generalization of the established recursive Green's function method is presented, providing access to arbitrary device and lead geometries with substantial computer-time savings. Using single-orbital nearest-neighbor tight-binding models and the Green's function-Landauer scattering formalism, we will explore the transmission function of irregular two-dimensional graphene-based nanostructures with arbitrary lead orientation. Prepared by LBNL under contract DE-AC02-05CH11231 and supported by the U.S. Dept. of Energy Computer Science Graduate Fellowship under grant DE-FG02-97ER25308.

  12. Discrete-ordinates electron transport calculations using standard neutron transport codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morel, J.E.

    1979-01-01

    The primary purpose of this work was to develop a method for using standard neutron transport codes to perform electron transport calculations. The method is to develop approximate electron cross sections which are sufficiently well-behaved to be treated with standard S/sub n/ methods, but which nonetheless yield flux solutions which are very similar to the exact solutions. The main advantage of this approach is that, once the approximate cross sections are constructed, their multigroup Legendre expansion coefficients can be calculated and input to any standard S/sub n/ code. Discrete-ordinates calculations were performed to determine the accuracy of the flux solutions for problems corresponding to 1.0-MeV electrons incident upon slabs of aluminum and gold. All S/sub n/ calculations were compared with similar calculations performed with an electron Monte Carlo code, considered to be exact. In all cases, the discrete-ordinates solutions for integral flux quantities (i.e., scalar flux, energy deposition profiles, etc.) are generally in agreement with the Monte Carlo solutions to within approximately 5% or less. The central conclusion is that integral electron flux quantities can be efficiently and accurately calculated using standard S/sub n/ codes in conjunction with approximate cross sections. Furthermore, if group structures and approximate cross section construction are optimized, accurate differential flux energy spectra may also be obtainable without having to use an inordinately large number of energy groups. 1 figure

  13. Energetic Particles: From Sun to Heliosphere - and vice versa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.; Rodriguez-Pacheco, J.; Boden, S.; Boettcher, S. I.; Cernuda, I.; Dresing, N.; Drews, C.; Droege, W.; Espinosa Lara, F.; Gomez-Herrero, R.; Heber, B.; Ho, G. C.; Klassen, A.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Mann, G. J.; Martin-Garcia, C.; Mason, G. M.; Panitzsch, L.; Prieto, M.; Sanchez, S.; Terasa, C.; Eldrum, S.

    2017-12-01

    Energetic particles in the heliosphere can be measured at their elevated energetic status after three processes: injection, acceleration, and transport. Suprathermal seed particles have speeds well above the fast magnetosonic speed in the solar wind frame of reference and can vary from location to location and within the solar activity cycle. Acceleration sites include reconnecting current sheets in solar flares or magnetspheric boundaries, shocks in the solar corona, heliosphere and a planetary obstacles, as well as planetary magnetospheres. Once accelerated, particles are transported from the acceleration site into and through the heliosphere. Thus, by investigating properties of energetic particles such as their composition, energy spectra, pitch-angle distribution, etc. one can attempt to distinguish their origin or injection and acceleration site. This in turn allows us to better understand transport effects whose underlying microphysics is also a key ingredient in the acceleration of particles. In this presentation we will present some clear examples which link energetic particles from their observing site to their source locations. These include Jupiter electrons, singly-charged He ions from CIRs, and 3He from solar flares. We will compare these examples with the measurement capabilities of the Energetic Particle Detector (EPD) on Solar Orbiter and consider implications for the key science goal of Solar Orbiter and Solar Proble Plus - How the Sun creates and controls the heliosphere.

  14. Effect of contact barrier on electron transport in graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yang-Bo; Han, Bing-Hong; Liao, Zhi-Min; Zhao, Qing; Xu, Jun; Yu, Da-Peng

    2010-01-14

    The influence of the barrier between metal electrodes and graphene on the electrical properties was studied on a two-electrode device. A classical barrier model was used to analyze the current-voltage characteristics. Primary parameters including barrier height and effective resistance were achieved. The electron transport properties under magnetic field were further investigated. An abnormal peak-valley-peak shape of voltage-magnetoresistance curve was observed. The underlying mechanisms were discussed under the consideration of the important influence of the contact barrier. Our results indicate electrical properties of graphene based devices are sensitive to the contact interface.

  15. Quantum oscillations and the electronic transport properties in multichain nanorings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Racolta, D.

    2009-01-01

    We consider a system of multichain nanorings in static electric and magnetic field. The magnetic field induces characteristic phase changes. These phase shifts produce interference phenomena in the case of nanosystems for which the coherence length is larger than the sample dimension. We obtain energy solutions that are dependent on the number of sites N α characterizing a chain, of phase on the phase φ α and on the applied voltage. We found rich oscillations structures exhibited by the magnetic flux and we established the transmission probability. This proceeds by applying Landauer conductance formulae which opens the way to study electronic transport properties. (authors)

  16. Monte Carlo methods in electron transport problems. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleri, F.

    1989-01-01

    The condensed-history Monte Carlo method for charged particles transport is reviewed and discussed starting from a general form of the Boltzmann equation (Part I). The physics of the electronic interactions, together with some pedagogic example will be introduced in the part II. The lecture is directed to potential users of the method, for which it can be a useful introduction to the subject matter, and wants to establish the basis of the work on the computer code RECORD, which is at present in a developing stage

  17. Electron transport in silicon nanowires having different cross-sections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muscato Orazio

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Transport phenomena in silicon nanowires with different cross-section are investigated using an Extended Hydrodynamic model, coupled to the Schrödinger-Poisson system. The model has been formulated by closing the moment system derived from the Boltzmann equation on the basis of the maximum entropy principle of Extended Thermodynamics, obtaining explicit closure relations for the high-order fluxes and the production terms. Scattering of electrons with acoustic and non polar optical phonons have been taken into account. The bulk mobility is evaluated for square and equilateral triangle cross-sections of the wire.

  18. Electronic transport for armchair graphene nanoribbons with a potential barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Benliang; Zhou Benhu; Liao Wenhu; Zhou Guanghui

    2010-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the electronic transport properties through a rectangular potential barrier embedded in armchair-edge graphene nanoribbons (AGNRs) of various widths. Using the Landauer formula and Dirac equation with the continuity conditions for all segments of wave functions at the interfaces between regions inside and outside the barrier, we calculate analytically the conductance and Fano factor for the both metallic and semiconducting AGNRs, respectively. It is shown that, by some numerical examples, at Dirac point the both types of AGNRs own a minimum conductance associated with the maximum Fano factor. The results are discussed and compared with the previous relevant works.

  19. Electronic transport properties in [n]cycloparaphenylenes molecular devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Lizhi; Guo, Yandong; Yan, Xiaohong; Zeng, Hongli; Zhou, Jie

    2017-07-01

    The electronic transport of [n]cycloparaphenylenes ([n]CPPs) is investigated based on nonequilibrium Green's function formalism in combination with the density-functional theory. Negative differential resistance (NDR) phenomenon is observed. Further analysis shows that the reduction of the transmission peak induced by the bias changing near Fermi energy results in the NDR effect. Replacing the electrode (from carbon chain to Au electrode), doping with N atom and changing the size of the nanohoop (n = 5, 6, 8, 10) have also been studied and the NDR still exists, suggesting the NDR behavior is the intrinsic feature of such [n]CPPs systems, which would be quite useful in future nanoelectronic devices.

  20. Electronic structure, transport, and collective effects in molecular layered systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torsten Hahn

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The great potential of organic heterostructures for organic device applications is exemplified by the targeted engineering of the electronic properties of phthalocyanine-based systems. The transport properties of two different phthalocyanine systems, a pure copper phthalocyanine (CoPc and a flourinated copper phthalocyanine–manganese phthalocyanine (F16CoPc/MnPc heterostructure, are investigated by means of density functional theory (DFT and the non-equilibrium Green’s function (NEGF approach. Furthermore, a master-equation-based approach is used to include electronic correlations beyond the mean-field-type approximation of DFT. We describe the essential theoretical tools to obtain the parameters needed for the master equation from DFT results. Finally, an interacting molecular monolayer is considered within a master-equation approach.

  1. Transport Characteristics of Mesoscopic Radio-Frequency Single Electron Transistor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, A. H.; Kirah, K.; Aly, N. A. I.; El-Sayes, H. E.

    2008-01-01

    The transport property of a quantum dot under the influence of external time-dependent field is investigated. The mesoscopic device is modelled as semiconductor quantum dot coupled weakly to superconducting leads via asymmetric double tunnel barriers of different heights. An expression for the current is deduced by using the Landauer–Buttiker formula, taking into consideration of both the Coulomb blockade effect and the magnetic field. It is found that the periodic oscillation of the current with the magnetic field is controlled by the ratio of the frequency of the applied ac-field to the electron cyclotron frequency. Our results show that the present device operates as a radio-frequency single electron transistor

  2. Fundamental models of electronic transport in amorphous semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emin, D.

    1982-01-01

    Significant fundamental questions lie at the heart of our understanding of the electronic and optical properties of semiconducting and insulating glasses. In this article the principal features of the Mott-CFO model and the small-polaron model are described. While the Mott-CFO model seems to apply to the high-mobility electron transport in glassy SiO 2 and Cd 2 As 3 it does not appear applicable to the most frequently studied chalocogenide glasses. Furthermore, the Mott-CFO model does not account for as basic a feature as the sign of the Hall effect. On the other hand, the small-polaron model accounts for the observed d.c. conductivity, Peltier heat and Hall mobility in a very simple and direct manner

  3. Electronic transport properties of carbon nanotube metal-semiconductor-metal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Khoeini

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available  In this work, we study electronic transport properties of a quasi-one dimensional pure semi-conducting Zigzag Carbon Nanotube (CNT attached to semi-infinite clean metallic Zigzag CNT leads, taking into account the influence of topological defect in junctions. This structure may behave like a field effect transistor. The calculations are based on the tight-binding model and Green’s function method, in which the local density of states(LDOS in the metallic section to semi-conducting section, and muli-channel conductance of the system are calculated in the coherent and linear response regime, numerically. Also we have introduced a circuit model for the system and investigated its current. The theoretical results obtained, can be a base, for developments in designing nano-electronic devices.

  4. Monte Carlo simulations of the Galileo energetic particle detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jun, I.; Ratliff, J.M.; Garrett, H.B.; McEntire, R.W.

    2002-01-01

    Monte Carlo radiation transport studies have been performed for the Galileo spacecraft energetic particle detector (EPD) in order to study its response to energetic electrons and protons. Three-dimensional Monte Carlo radiation transport codes, MCNP version 4B (for electrons) and MCNPX version 2.2.3 (for protons), were used throughout the study. The results are presented in the form of 'geometric factors' for the high-energy channels studied in this paper: B1, DC2, and DC3 for electrons and B0, DC0, and DC1 for protons. The geometric factor is the energy-dependent detector response function that relates the incident particle fluxes to instrument count rates. The trend of actual data measured by the EPD was successfully reproduced using the geometric factors obtained in this study

  5. Monte Carlo simulations of the Galileo energetic particle detector

    CERN Document Server

    Jun, I; Garrett, H B; McEntire, R W

    2002-01-01

    Monte Carlo radiation transport studies have been performed for the Galileo spacecraft energetic particle detector (EPD) in order to study its response to energetic electrons and protons. Three-dimensional Monte Carlo radiation transport codes, MCNP version 4B (for electrons) and MCNPX version 2.2.3 (for protons), were used throughout the study. The results are presented in the form of 'geometric factors' for the high-energy channels studied in this paper: B1, DC2, and DC3 for electrons and B0, DC0, and DC1 for protons. The geometric factor is the energy-dependent detector response function that relates the incident particle fluxes to instrument count rates. The trend of actual data measured by the EPD was successfully reproduced using the geometric factors obtained in this study.

  6. Control of electron internal transport barriers in TCV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henderson, M A; Behn, R; Coda, S; Condrea, I; Duval, B P; Goodman, T P; Karpushov, A; Martin, Y; Martynov, An; Moret, J-M; Nikkola, P; Porte, L; Sauter, O; Scarabosio, A; Zhuang, G [Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas, Association EURATOM-Confederation Suisse, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, CRPP-EPFL, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2004-05-01

    Current profile tailoring has been performed by application of electron cyclotron heating (ECH) and electron cyclotron current drive, leading to improved energy confinement in the plasma core of the TCV tokamak. The improved confinement is characterized by a substantial enhancement (H-factor) of the global electron energy confinement time relative to the prediction of the RLW scaling law (Rebut P H et al 1989 Proc. 12th Int. Conf. of Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion Research (Nice, 1988) vol 2 (Vienna: IAEA) p 191), which predicts well Ohmic and standard ECH discharges on TCV. The improved confinement is attributed to a hollow current density profile producing a reversed shear profile creating an electron internal transport barrier. We relate the strength of the barrier to the depth of the hollow current density profile and the volume enclosed by the radial location of the peak current density. The {rho}{sub T}{sup *} (Tresset G et al 2002 Nucl. Fusion 42 520) criterion is used to evaluate the performance of the barrier relative to changes in the ECH parameters or the addition of Ohmic current, which aid in identifying the control parameters available for improving either the strength or volume of the barrier for enhanced performance. A figure of merit for the global scaling factor is used that scales the confinement enhancement as the product of the barrier volume and strength.

  7. Electron transport in heavily doped GdN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, T.; Trodahl, H. J.; Natali, F.; Ruck, B. J.; Vézian, S.

    2018-01-01

    We report measurements of electron transport phenomena in the intrinsic ferromagnetic semiconductor GdN doped with 1.3 ×1021cm-3 electrons. The conductivity, carrier concentration, and thermoelectric power are compared with expectations based on an LSDA+U band structure. In the ferromagnetic state the carriers fill the majority-spin conduction band pockets to the bottom of the minority-spin band. The resistance implies an electron mobility of 18 cm2V-1s-1 at zero temperature, and in turn a mean-free path of 10-30 nm. Spin disorder scattering rapidly reduces the mobility near the 70 K Curie temperature (TC). The thermoelectric power is negative in the paramagnetic phase, as expected for a n -type conductor, with a magnitude that is in agreement with the Fermi energy implied by the band structure. The thermopower reverses sign to be positive in the ferromagnetic phase, which correlates with a strongly temperature-dependent electron diffusion from spin-disorder scattering that increases rapidly as the temperature rises toward TC.

  8. Control of electron internal transport barriers in TCV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henderson, M A; Behn, R; Coda, S; Condrea, I; Duval, B P; Goodman, T P; Karpushov, A; Martin, Y; Martynov, An; Moret, J-M; Nikkola, P; Porte, L; Sauter, O; Scarabosio, A; Zhuang, G

    2004-01-01

    Current profile tailoring has been performed by application of electron cyclotron heating (ECH) and electron cyclotron current drive, leading to improved energy confinement in the plasma core of the TCV tokamak. The improved confinement is characterized by a substantial enhancement (H-factor) of the global electron energy confinement time relative to the prediction of the RLW scaling law (Rebut P H et al 1989 Proc. 12th Int. Conf. of Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion Research (Nice, 1988) vol 2 (Vienna: IAEA) p 191), which predicts well Ohmic and standard ECH discharges on TCV. The improved confinement is attributed to a hollow current density profile producing a reversed shear profile creating an electron internal transport barrier. We relate the strength of the barrier to the depth of the hollow current density profile and the volume enclosed by the radial location of the peak current density. The ρ T * (Tresset G et al 2002 Nucl. Fusion 42 520) criterion is used to evaluate the performance of the barrier relative to changes in the ECH parameters or the addition of Ohmic current, which aid in identifying the control parameters available for improving either the strength or volume of the barrier for enhanced performance. A figure of merit for the global scaling factor is used that scales the confinement enhancement as the product of the barrier volume and strength

  9. Modified Monte Carlo method for study of electron transport in degenerate electron gas in the presence of electron-electron interactions, application to graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowik, Piotr; Thobel, Jean-Luc; Adamowicz, Leszek

    2017-07-01

    Standard computational methods used to take account of the Pauli Exclusion Principle into Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of electron transport in semiconductors may give unphysical results in low field regime, where obtained electron distribution function takes values exceeding unity. Modified algorithms were already proposed and allow to correctly account for electron scattering on phonons or impurities. Present paper extends this approach and proposes improved simulation scheme allowing including Pauli exclusion principle for electron-electron (e-e) scattering into MC simulations. Simulations with significantly reduced computational cost recreate correct values of the electron distribution function. Proposed algorithm is applied to study transport properties of degenerate electrons in graphene with e-e interactions. This required adapting the treatment of e-e scattering in the case of linear band dispersion relation. Hence, this part of the simulation algorithm is described in details.

  10. Identifying the molecular functions of electron transport proteins using radial basis function networks and biochemical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Nguyen-Quoc-Khanh; Nguyen, Trinh-Trung-Duong; Ou, Yu-Yen

    2017-05-01

    The electron transport proteins have an important role in storing and transferring electrons in cellular respiration, which is the most proficient process through which cells gather energy from consumed food. According to the molecular functions, the electron transport chain components could be formed with five complexes with several different electron carriers and functions. Therefore, identifying the molecular functions in the electron transport chain is vital for helping biologists understand the electron transport chain process and energy production in cells. This work includes two phases for discriminating electron transport proteins from transport proteins and classifying categories of five complexes in electron transport proteins. In the first phase, the performances from PSSM with AAIndex feature set were successful in identifying electron transport proteins in transport proteins with achieved sensitivity of 73.2%, specificity of 94.1%, and accuracy of 91.3%, with MCC of 0.64 for independent data set. With the second phase, our method can approach a precise model for identifying of five complexes with different molecular functions in electron transport proteins. The PSSM with AAIndex properties in five complexes achieved MCC of 0.51, 0.47, 0.42, 0.74, and 1.00 for independent data set, respectively. We suggest that our study could be a power model for determining new proteins that belongs into which molecular function of electron transport proteins. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Attosecond photoelectron spectroscopy of electron transport in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magerl, Elisabeth

    2011-01-01

    Time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of condensed matter systems in the attosecond regime promises new insights into excitation mechanisms and transient dynamics of electrons in solids. This timescale became accessible directly only recently with the development of the attosecond streak camera and of laser systems providing few-cycle, phase-controlled laser pulses in the near-infrared, which are used to generate isolated, sub-femtosecond extreme-ultraviolet pulses with a well-defined timing with respect to the near-infrared pulse. Employing these pulses, the attosecond streak camera offers time resolutions as short as a few 10 attoseconds. In the framework of this thesis, a new, versatile experimental apparatus combining attosecond pulse generation in gases with state of the art surface science techniques is designed, constructed, and commissioned. Employing this novel infrastructure and the technique of the attosecond transient recorder, we investigate transport phenomena occurring after photoexcitation of electrons in tungsten and rhenium single crystals and show that attosecond streaking is a unique method for resolving extremely fast electronic phenomena in solids. It is demonstrated that electrons originating from different energy levels, i.e. from the conduction band and the 4f core level, are emitted from the crystal surface at different times. The origin of this time delay, which is below 150 attoseconds for all studied systems, is investigated by a systematic variation of several experimental parameters, in particular the photon energy of the employed attosecond pulses. These experimental studies are complemented by theoretical studies of the group velocity of highly-excited electrons based on ab initio calculations. While the streaking technique applied on single crystals can provide only information about the relative time delay between two types of photoelectrons, the absolute transport time remains inaccessible. We introduce a scheme of a reference

  12. Attosecond photoelectron spectroscopy of electron transport in solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magerl, Elisabeth

    2011-03-31

    Time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of condensed matter systems in the attosecond regime promises new insights into excitation mechanisms and transient dynamics of electrons in solids. This timescale became accessible directly only recently with the development of the attosecond streak camera and of laser systems providing few-cycle, phase-controlled laser pulses in the near-infrared, which are used to generate isolated, sub-femtosecond extreme-ultraviolet pulses with a well-defined timing with respect to the near-infrared pulse. Employing these pulses, the attosecond streak camera offers time resolutions as short as a few 10 attoseconds. In the framework of this thesis, a new, versatile experimental apparatus combining attosecond pulse generation in gases with state of the art surface science techniques is designed, constructed, and commissioned. Employing this novel infrastructure and the technique of the attosecond transient recorder, we investigate transport phenomena occurring after photoexcitation of electrons in tungsten and rhenium single crystals and show that attosecond streaking is a unique method for resolving extremely fast electronic phenomena in solids. It is demonstrated that electrons originating from different energy levels, i.e. from the conduction band and the 4f core level, are emitted from the crystal surface at different times. The origin of this time delay, which is below 150 attoseconds for all studied systems, is investigated by a systematic variation of several experimental parameters, in particular the photon energy of the employed attosecond pulses. These experimental studies are complemented by theoretical studies of the group velocity of highly-excited electrons based on ab initio calculations. While the streaking technique applied on single crystals can provide only information about the relative time delay between two types of photoelectrons, the absolute transport time remains inaccessible. We introduce a scheme of a reference

  13. Electronic charge transfer in cobalt doped fullerene thin films and effect of energetic ion impacts by x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thakur, P.; Kumar, Amit; Gautam, S.; Chae, K.H.

    2011-01-01

    We report on the electronic charge transfer in cobalt doped fullerene thin films by means of near-edge x-ray-absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy measurement. Co-doped fullerene films were prepared by co-deposition technique and subjected to energetic ion irradiation (120 MeV Au) for possibly alignment or interconnect of randomly distributed metal particles. Polarization dependent NEXAFS spectra revealed the alignment of Co and C atoms along the irradiated ionic path. The structural changes in Co-doped as-deposited and ion irradiated fullerene films were investigated by means of Raman spectroscopy measurements. Downshift of pentagonal pinch mode A g (2) in Raman spectroscopy indicated the electronic charge transfer from Co atom to fullerene molecules, which is further confirmed by NEXAFS at C K-edge for Co-doped fullerene films.

  14. A pulsed, mono-energetic and angular-selective UV photo-electron source for the commissioning of the KATRIN experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behrens, J. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, WWU Muenster, Muenster (Germany); Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, IEKP, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Ranitzsch, P.C.O.; Hannen, V.; Ortjohann, H.W.; Rest, O.; Winzen, D.; Zacher, M.; Weinheimer, C. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, WWU Muenster, Muenster (Germany); Beck, M. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, WWU Muenster, Muenster (Germany); Johannes-Gutenberg Universitaet, Institut fuer Physik, Mainz (Germany); Beglarian, A. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, IPE, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Erhard, M.; Groh, S.; Kraus, M. [IEKP, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Schloesser, K.; Thuemmler, T. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, IKP, Karlsruhe (Germany); Valerius, K. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, WWU Muenster, Muenster (Germany); Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, IKP, Karlsruhe (Germany); Wierman, K.; Wilkerson, J.F. [University of North Carolina, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

    2017-06-15

    The KATRIN experiment aims to determine the neutrino mass scale with a sensitivity of 200 meV/c{sup 2} (90% C.L.) by a precision measurement of the shape of the tritium β-spectrum in the endpoint region. The energy analysis of the decay electrons is achieved by a MAC-E filter spectrometer. To determine the transmission properties of the KATRIN main spectrometer, a mono-energetic and angular-selective electron source has been developed. In preparation for the second commissioning phase of the main spectrometer, a measurement phase was carried out at the KATRIN monitor spectrometer where the device was operated in a MAC-E filter setup for testing. The results of these measurements are compared with simulations using the particle-tracking software ''Kassiopeia'', which was developed in the KATRIN collaboration over recent years. (orig.)

  15. Simulations of Electron Transport in Laser Hot Spots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunner, S.; Valeo, E.

    2001-01-01

    Simulations of electron transport are carried out by solving the Fokker-Planck equation in the diffusive approximation. The system of a single laser hot spot, with open boundary conditions, is systematically studied by performing a scan over a wide range of the two relevant parameters: (1) Ratio of the stopping length over the width of the hot spot. (2) Relative importance of the heating through inverse Bremsstrahlung compared to the thermalization through self-collisions. As for uniform illumination [J.P. Matte et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 30 (1988) 1665], the bulk of the velocity distribution functions (VDFs) present a super-Gaussian dependence. However, as a result of spatial transport, the tails are observed to be well represented by a Maxwellian. A similar dependence of the distributions is also found for multiple hot spot systems. For its relevance with respect to stimulated Raman scattering, the linear Landau damping of the electron plasma wave is estimated for such VD Fs. Finally, the nonlinear Fokker-Planck simulations of the single laser hot spot system are also compared to the results obtained with the linear non-local hydrodynamic approach [A.V. Brantov et al., Phys. Plasmas 5 (1998) 2742], thus providing a quantitative limit to the latter method: The hydrodynamic approach presents more than 10% inaccuracy in the presence of temperature variations of the order delta T/T greater than or equal to 1%, and similar levels of deformation of the Gaussian shape of the Maxwellian background

  16. Electronic transport properties of copper and gold at atomic scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammadzadeh, Saeideh

    2010-11-23

    The factors governing electronic transport properties of copper and gold atomic-size contacts are theoretically examined in the present work. A two-terminal conductor using crystalline electrodes is adopted. The non-equilibrium Green's function combined with the density functional tight-binding method is employed via gDFTB simulation tool to calculate the transport at both equilibrium and non-equilibrium conditions. The crystalline orientation, length, and arrangement of electrodes have very weak influence on the electronic characteristics of the considered atomic wires. The wire width is found to be the most effective geometric aspect determining the number of conduction channels. The obtained conductance oscillation and linear current-voltage curves are interpreted. To analyze the conduction mechanism in detail, the transmission channels and their decomposition to the atomic orbitals are calculated in copper and gold single point contacts. The presented results offer a possible explanation for the relation between conduction and geometric structure. Furthermore, the results are in good agreement with available experimental and theoretical studies. (orig.)

  17. One-Dimensional Electron Transport Layers for Perovskite Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ujwal K. Thakur

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The electron diffusion length (Ln is smaller than the hole diffusion length (Lp in many halide perovskite semiconductors meaning that the use of ordered one-dimensional (1D structures such as nanowires (NWs and nanotubes (NTs as electron transport layers (ETLs is a promising method of achieving high performance halide perovskite solar cells (HPSCs. ETLs consisting of oriented and aligned NWs and NTs offer the potential not merely for improved directional charge transport but also for the enhanced absorption of incoming light and thermodynamically efficient management of photogenerated carrier populations. The ordered architecture of NW/NT arrays affords superior infiltration of a deposited material making them ideal for use in HPSCs. Photoconversion efficiencies (PCEs as high as 18% have been demonstrated for HPSCs using 1D ETLs. Despite the advantages of 1D ETLs, there are still challenges that need to be overcome to achieve even higher PCEs, such as better methods to eliminate or passivate surface traps, improved understanding of the hetero-interface and optimization of the morphology (i.e., length, diameter, and spacing of NWs/NTs. This review introduces the general considerations of ETLs for HPSCs, deposition techniques used, and the current research and challenges in the field of 1D ETLs for perovskite solar cells.

  18. One-Dimensional Electron Transport Layers for Perovskite Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Ujwal K.; Kisslinger, Ryan; Shankar, Karthik

    2017-01-01

    The electron diffusion length (Ln) is smaller than the hole diffusion length (Lp) in many halide perovskite semiconductors meaning that the use of ordered one-dimensional (1D) structures such as nanowires (NWs) and nanotubes (NTs) as electron transport layers (ETLs) is a promising method of achieving high performance halide perovskite solar cells (HPSCs). ETLs consisting of oriented and aligned NWs and NTs offer the potential not merely for improved directional charge transport but also for the enhanced absorption of incoming light and thermodynamically efficient management of photogenerated carrier populations. The ordered architecture of NW/NT arrays affords superior infiltration of a deposited material making them ideal for use in HPSCs. Photoconversion efficiencies (PCEs) as high as 18% have been demonstrated for HPSCs using 1D ETLs. Despite the advantages of 1D ETLs, there are still challenges that need to be overcome to achieve even higher PCEs, such as better methods to eliminate or passivate surface traps, improved understanding of the hetero-interface and optimization of the morphology (i.e., length, diameter, and spacing of NWs/NTs). This review introduces the general considerations of ETLs for HPSCs, deposition techniques used, and the current research and challenges in the field of 1D ETLs for perovskite solar cells. PMID:28468280

  19. Electronic transport in bismuth selenide in the topological insulator regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dohun

    The 3D topological insulators (TIs) have an insulating bulk but spin-momentum coupled metallic surface states stemming from band inversion due to strong spin-orbit interaction, whose existence is guaranteed by the topology of the band structure of the insulator. While the STI surface state has been studied spectroscopically by e.g. photoemission and scanned probes, transport experiments have failed to demonstrate clear signature of the STI due to high level of bulk conduction. In this thesis, I present experimental results on the transport properties of TI material Bi2Se3 in the absence of bulk conduction (TI regime), achieved by applying novel p-type doping methods. Field effect transistors consisting of thin (thickness: 5-17 nm) Bi2Se3 are fabricated by mechanical exfoliation of single crystals, and a combination of conventional dielectric (300 nm thick SiO2) and electrochemical or chemical gating methods are used to move the Fermi energy through the surface Dirac point inside bulk band gap, revealing the ambipolar gapless nature of transport in the Bi2Se3 surface states. The minimum conductivity of the topological surface state is understood within the self-consistent theory of Dirac electrons in the presence of charged impurities. The intrinsic finite-temperature resistivity of the topological surface state due to electron-acoustic phonon scattering is measured to be 60 times larger than that of graphene largely due to the smaller Fermi and sound velocities in Bi2Se 3, which will have implications for topological electronic devices operating at room temperature. Along with semi-classical Boltzmann transport, I also discuss 2D weak anti-localization (WAL) behavior of the topological surface states. By investigating gate-tuned WAL behavior in thin (5-17 nm) TI films, I show that WAL in the TI regime is extraordinarily sensitive to the hybridization induced quantum mechanical tunneling between top and bottom topological surfaces, and interplay of phase coherence

  20. Self-amplified spontaneous emission free electron laser devices and nonideal electron beam transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. L. Lazzarino

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We have developed, at the SPARC test facility, a procedure for a real time self-amplified spontaneous emission free electron laser (FEL device performance control. We describe an actual FEL, including electron and optical beam transport, through a set of analytical formulas, allowing a fast and reliable on-line “simulation” of the experiment. The system is designed in such a way that the characteristics of the transport elements and the laser intensity are measured and adjusted, via a real time computation, during the experimental run, to obtain an on-line feedback of the laser performances. The detail of the procedure and the relevant experimental results are discussed.

  1. Initial mechanisms for the decomposition of electronically excited energetic materials: 1,5′-BT, 5,5′-BT, and AzTT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, Bing; Yu, Zijun; Bernstein, Elliot R.

    2015-01-01

    Decomposition of nitrogen-rich energetic materials 1,5′-BT, 5,5′-BT, and AzTT (1,5′-Bistetrazole, 5,5′-Bistetrazole, and 5-(5-azido-(1 or 4)H-1,2,4-triazol-3-yl)tetrazole, respectively), following electronic state excitation, is investigated both experimentally and theoretically. The N 2 molecule is observed as an initial decomposition product from the three materials, subsequent to UV excitation, with a cold rotational temperature (<30 K). Initial decomposition mechanisms for these three electronically excited materials are explored at the complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) level. Potential energy surface calculations at the CASSCF(12,8)/6-31G(d) level illustrate that conical intersections play an essential role in the decomposition mechanism. Electronically excited S 1 molecules can non-adiabatically relax to their ground electronic states through (S 1 /S 0 ) CI conical intersections. 1,5′-BT and 5,5′-BT materials have several (S 1 /S 0 ) CI conical intersections between S 1 and S 0 states, related to different tetrazole ring opening positions, all of which lead to N 2 product formation. The N 2 product for AzTT is formed primarily by N–N bond rupture of the –N 3 group. The observed rotational energy distributions for the N 2 products are consistent with the final structures of the respective transition states for each molecule on its S 0 potential energy surface. The theoretically derived vibrational temperature of the N 2 product is high, which is similar to that found for energetic salts and molecules studied previously

  2. Energetic map

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    This report explains the energetic map of Uruguay as well as the different systems that delimits political frontiers in the region. The electrical system importance is due to the electricity, oil and derived , natural gas, potential study, biofuels, wind and solar energy

  3. Electronic Interactions of n-Doped Perylene Diimide Groups Appended to Polynorbornene Chains: Implications for Electron Transport in Organic Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Minh T; Biberdorf, Joshua D; Holliday, Bradley J; Jones, Richard A

    2017-11-01

    A polymer consisting of a polynorbornene backbone with perylene diimide (PDI) pendant groups on each monomeric unit is synthesized via ring opening metathesis polymerization. The PDI pendant groups along the polymer backbone, studied by UV-vis absorption, fluorescence emission, and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy in addition to electrochemical methods, show evidence of molecular aggregation and corresponding electronic coupling with neighboring groups, which forms pathways for efficient electron transport from one group to another in a specific reduced form. When n-doped, the title polymer shows redox conductivity of 5.4 × 10 -3 S cm -1 , comparable with crystalline PDI materials, and is therefore a promising material for use in organic electronics. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Transport in a toroidally confined pure electron plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crooks, S.M.; ONeil, T.M.

    1996-01-01

    O close-quote Neil and Smith [T.M. O close-quote Neil and R.A. Smith, Phys. Plasmas 1, 8 (1994)] have argued that a pure electron plasma can be confined stably in a toroidal magnetic field configuration. This paper shows that the toroidal curvature of the magnetic field of necessity causes slow cross-field transport. The transport mechanism is similar to magnetic pumping and may be understood by considering a single flux tube of plasma. As the flux tube of plasma undergoes poloidal ExB drift rotation about the center of the plasma, the length of the flux tube and the magnetic field strength within the flux tube oscillate, and this produces corresponding oscillations in T parallel and T perpendicular . The collisional relaxation of T parallel toward T perpendicular produces a slow dissipation of electrostatic energy into heat and a consequent expansion (cross-field transport) of the plasma. In the limit where the cross section of the plasma is nearly circular the radial particle flux is given by Γ r =1/2ν perpendicular,parallel T(r/ρ 0 ) 2 n/(-e∂Φ/∂r), where ν perpendicular,parallel is the collisional equipartition rate, ρ 0 is the major radius at the center of the plasma, and r is the minor radius measured from the center of the plasma. The transport flux is first calculated using this simple physical picture and then is calculated by solving the drift-kinetic Boltzmann equation. This latter calculation is not limited to a plasma with a circular cross section. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  5. Cross sections for electron and photon processes required by electron-transport calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peek, J.M.

    1979-11-01

    Electron-transport calculations rely on a large collection of electron-atom and photon-atom cross-section data to represent the response characteristics of the target medium. These basic atomic-physics quantities, and certain qualities derived from them that are now commonly in use, are critically reviewed. Publications appearing after 1978 are not given consideration. Processes involving electron or photon energies less than 1 keV are ignored, while an attempt is made to exhaustively cover the remaining independent parameters and target possibilities. Cases for which data improvements can be made from existing information are identified. Ranges of parameters for which state-of-the-art data are not available are sought out, and recommendations for explicit measurements and/or calculations with presently available tools are presented. An attempt is made to identify the maturity of the atomic-physics data and to predict the possibilities for rapid changes in the quality of the data. Finally, weaknesses in the state-of-the-art atomic-physics data and in the conceptual usage of these data in the context of electron-transport theory are discussed. Brief attempts are made to weight the various aspects of these questions and to suggest possible remedies

  6. Density-dependent electron transport and precise modeling of GaN high electron mobility transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bajaj, Sanyam, E-mail: bajaj.10@osu.edu; Shoron, Omor F.; Park, Pil Sung; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Akyol, Fatih; Hung, Ting-Hsiang [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Reza, Shahed; Chumbes, Eduardo M. [Raytheon Integrated Defense Systems, Andover, Massachusetts 01810 (United States); Khurgin, Jacob [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Rajan, Siddharth [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Department of Material Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

    2015-10-12

    We report on the direct measurement of two-dimensional sheet charge density dependence of electron transport in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs). Pulsed IV measurements established increasing electron velocities with decreasing sheet charge densities, resulting in saturation velocity of 1.9 × 10{sup 7 }cm/s at a low sheet charge density of 7.8 × 10{sup 11 }cm{sup −2}. An optical phonon emission-based electron velocity model for GaN is also presented. It accommodates stimulated longitudinal optical (LO) phonon emission which clamps the electron velocity with strong electron-phonon interaction and long LO phonon lifetime in GaN. A comparison with the measured density-dependent saturation velocity shows that it captures the dependence rather well. Finally, the experimental result is applied in TCAD-based device simulator to predict DC and small signal characteristics of a reported GaN HEMT. Good agreement between the simulated and reported experimental results validated the measurement presented in this report and established accurate modeling of GaN HEMTs.

  7. Density-dependent electron transport and precise modeling of GaN high electron mobility transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bajaj, Sanyam; Shoron, Omor F.; Park, Pil Sung; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Akyol, Fatih; Hung, Ting-Hsiang; Reza, Shahed; Chumbes, Eduardo M.; Khurgin, Jacob; Rajan, Siddharth

    2015-01-01

    We report on the direct measurement of two-dimensional sheet charge density dependence of electron transport in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs). Pulsed IV measurements established increasing electron velocities with decreasing sheet charge densities, resulting in saturation velocity of 1.9 × 10 7  cm/s at a low sheet charge density of 7.8 × 10 11  cm −2 . An optical phonon emission-based electron velocity model for GaN is also presented. It accommodates stimulated longitudinal optical (LO) phonon emission which clamps the electron velocity with strong electron-phonon interaction and long LO phonon lifetime in GaN. A comparison with the measured density-dependent saturation velocity shows that it captures the dependence rather well. Finally, the experimental result is applied in TCAD-based device simulator to predict DC and small signal characteristics of a reported GaN HEMT. Good agreement between the simulated and reported experimental results validated the measurement presented in this report and established accurate modeling of GaN HEMTs

  8. Understanding processes controlling sediment transports at the mouth of a highly energetic inlet system (San Francisco Bay, CA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, Edwin P.L.; Hansen, Jeff E.; Barnard, P.L.; Jaffee, B.E.; Schoellhamer, D.H.

    2013-01-01

    San Francisco Bay is one of the largest estuaries along the U.S. West Coast and is linked to the Pacific Ocean through the Golden Gate, a 100 m deep bedrock inlet. A coupled wave, flow and sediment transport model is used to quantify the sediment linkages between San Francisco Bay, the Golden Gate, and the adjacent open coast. Flow and sediment transport processes are investigated using an ensemble average of 24 climatologically derived wave cases and a 24.8 h representative tidal cycle. The model simulations show that within the inlet, flow and sediment transport is tidally dominated and driven by asymmetry of the ebb and flood tides. Peak ebb velocities exceed the peak flood velocities in the narrow Golden Gate channel as a result of flow convergence and acceleration. Persistent flow and sediment gyres at the headland tips are formed that limit sediment transfer from the ebb-tidal delta to the inlet and into the bay. The residual transport pattern in the inlet is dominated by a lateral segregation with a large ebb-dominant sediment transport (and flow) prevailing along the deeper north side of the Golden Gate channel, and smaller flood dominant transports along the shallow southern margin. The seaward edge of the ebb-tidal delta largely corresponds to the seaward extent of strong tidal flows. On the ebb-tidal delta, both waves and tidal forcing govern flow and sediment transport. Wave focusing by the ebb-tidal delta leads to strong patterns of sediment convergence and divergence along the adjacent Ocean Beach.

  9. Transportation over long distance and thermal energy storage, coupling with energetic valuation processes from waste. State of art. Extended abstract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Megret, O.; Bequet, L.; Manificat, A.; Weber, C.

    2011-12-01

    This study aims, on one hand, to realize a state of art about over long distance transport and heat energy storage and, on the other hand, to examine their coupling with waste valuation systems. After reminding the adequate context of development with those solutions and too showing the importance of the stake linked to the current work, we first expose the introductive elements in terms of storage and heat energy transport. The second chapter deals with the description of some materials, equipment and systems concerning heat storage energy. Afterward, the over long distance heat transport systems are detailed in the third chapter. In the fourth chapter, it is about waste valuation techniques and heat energy potentials users. The fifth chapter sums up the different techniques of storage and heat transport that are applicable to waste field according to the appropriate sector. Finally, the sixth chapter goes about 3 case-works in 3 fields: housing/commercial, industrial laundry and high temperature industry (steel industry). The purpose is to determine the implementation feasibility of the different techniques of storage and waste heat transport. (authors)

  10. Enzymology of Electron Transport: Energy Generation with Geochemical Consequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dichristina, Thomas J.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.

    2005-12-20

    Dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria (DMRB) are important components of the microbial community residing in redox-stratified freshwater and marine environments. DMRB occupy a central position in the biogeochemical cycles of metals, metalloids and radionuclides, and serve as catalysts for a variety of other environmentally important processes including biomineralization, biocorrosion, bioremediation and mediators of ground water quality. DMRB are presented, however, with a unique physiological challenge: they are required to respire anaerobically on terminal electron acceptors which are either highly insoluble (e.g., Fe(III)- and Mn(IV)-oxides) and reduced to soluble end-products or highly soluble (e.g., U(VI) and Tc(VII)) and reduced to insoluble end-products. To overcome physiological problems associated with metal and radionuclide solubility, DMRB are postulated to employ a variety of novel respiratory strategies not found in other gram-negative bacteria which respire on soluble electron acceptors such as O2, NO3- and SO42-. The novel respiratory strategies include (1) direct enzymatic reduction at the outer membrane, (2) electron shuttling pathways and (3) metal solubilization by exogenous or bacterially-produced organic ligands followed by reduction of soluble organic-metal compounds. The first section of this chapter highlights the latest findings on the enzymatic mechanisms of metal and radionuclide reduction by two of the most extensively studied DMRB (Geobacter and Shewanella), with particular emphasis on electron transport chain enzymology. The second section emphasizes the geochemical consequences of DMRB activity, including the direct and indirect effects on metal solubility, the reductive transformation of Fe- and Mn-containing minerals, and the biogeochemical cycling of metals at redox interfaces in chemically stratified environments.

  11. Enzymology of Electron Transport: Energy Generation with Geochemical Consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dichristina, Thomas J.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.

    2005-01-01

    Dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria (DMRB) are important components of the microbial community residing in redox-stratified freshwater and marine environments. DMRB occupy a central position in the biogeochemical cycles of metals, metalloids and radionuclides, and serve as catalysts for a variety of other environmentally important processes including biomineralization, biocorrosion, bioremediation and mediators of ground water quality. DMRB are presented, however, with a unique physiological challenge: they are required to respire anaerobically on terminal electron acceptors which are either highly insoluble (e.g., Fe(III)- and Mn(IV)-oxides) and reduced to soluble end-products or highly soluble (e.g., U(VI) and Tc(VII)) and reduced to insoluble end-products. To overcome physiological problems associated with metal and radionuclide solubility, DMRB are postulated to employ a variety of novel respiratory strategies not found in other gram-negative bacteria which respire on soluble electron acceptors such as O2, NO3- and SO42-. The novel respiratory strategies include (1) direct enzymatic reduction at the outer membrane, (2) electron shuttling pathways and (3) metal solubilization by exogenous or bacterially-produced organic ligands followed by reduction of soluble organic-metal compounds. The first section of this chapter highlights the latest findings on the enzymatic mechanisms of metal and radionuclide reduction by two of the most extensively studied DMRB (Geobacter and Shewanella), with particular emphasis on electron transport chain enzymology. The second section emphasizes the geochemical consequences of DMRB activity, including the direct and indirect effects on metal solubility, the reductive transformation of Fe- and Mn-containing minerals, and the biogeochemical cycling of metals at redox interfaces in chemically stratified environments

  12. Electron cyclotron absorption in Tokamak plasmas in the presence of radial transport of particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosa, Paulo R. da S.; Ziebell, Luiz F.

    1998-01-01

    We use quasilinear theory to study effects of particle radial transport on the electron cyclotron absorption coefficient by a current carrying plasma, in a tokamak modelated as a plasma slab. Our numerical results indicate significant modification in the profile of the electron cyclotron absorption coefficient when transport is taken into account relative to the situation without transport. (author)

  13. Test of models for electron transport in laser produced plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colombant, D.G.; Manheimer, W.M.; Busquet, M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines five different models of electron thermal transport in laser produced spherical implosions. These are classical, classical with a flux limit f, delocalization, beam deposition model, and Fokker-Planck solutions. In small targets, the results are strongly dependent on f for flux limit models, with small f's generating very steep temperature gradients. Delocalization models are characterized by large preheat in the center of the target. The beam deposition model agrees reasonably well with the Fokker-Planck simulation results. For large, high gain fusion targets, the delocalization model shows the gain substantially reduced by the preheat. However, flux limitation models show gain largely independent of f, with the beam deposition model also showing the same high gain

  14. Transport and acceleration of low-emittance electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henke, H.

    1989-01-01

    Linear accelerators for colliders and for free-electron lasers require beams with both high brightness and low emittance. Their transport and acceleration is limited by single-particle effects originating from injection jitter, from the unavoidable position jitter of components, and from chromaticity. Collective phenomena, essentially due to wake fields acting within the bunch, are most severe in the case of high-frequency structures, i.e. a small aperture. Whilst, in the past, the transverse wake-field effects were believed to be most serious, we know that they can even be beneficial when inducing a corresponding spread in betatron oscillation either by an energy spread along the bunch or by an RF focusing system acting on the bunch scale. This paper evaluates the different effects by simple analytical means after making use of the smooth focusing approximation and the two-particle model. Numerical simulation results are used for verification. 14 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  15. Hot Electron Generation and Transport Using Kα Emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akli, K.U.; Stephens, R.B.; Key, M.H.; Bartal, T.; Beg, F.N.; Chawla, S.; Chen, C.D.; Fedosejevs, R.; Freeman, R.R.; Friesen, H.; Giraldez, E.; Green, J.S.; Hey, D.S.; Higginson, D.P.; Hund, J.; Jarrott, L.C.; Kemp, G.E.; King, J.A.; Kryger, A.; Lancaster, K.; LePape, S.; Link, A.; Ma, T.; Mackinnon, A.J.; MacPhee, A.G.; McLean, H.S.; Murphy, C.; Norreys, P.A.; Ovchinnikov, V.; Patel, P.K.; Ping, Y.; Sawada, H.; Schumacher, D.; Theobald, W.; Tsui, Y.Y.; Van Woerkom, L.D.; Wei, M.S.; Westover, B.; Yabuuchi, T.

    2010-01-01

    We have conducted experiments on both the Vulcan and Titan laser facilities to study hot electron generation and transport in the context of fast ignition. Cu wires attached to Al cones were used to investigate the effect on coupling efficiency of plasma surround and the pre-formed plasma inside the cone. We found that with thin cones 15% of laser energy is coupled to the 40(micro)m diameter wire emulating a 40(micro)m fast ignition spot. Thick cone walls, simulating plasma in fast ignition, reduce coupling by x4. An increase of prepulse level inside the cone by a factor of 50 reduces coupling by a factor of 3.

  16. Effect of doping on the electron transport in polyfluorene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bajpai, Manisha, E-mail: mansa83@gmail.com [Soft Materials Research Laboratory, Centre of Material Sciences, Institute of Interdisciplinary Studies, University of Allahabad, Allahabad, 211002 (India); Department of Physics, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi-221005 (India); Srivastava, Ritu [Physics for Energy Harvesting Division, National Physical Laboratory (Council of Scientific and Industrial Research), Dr K. S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110012 (India); Dhar, Ravindra [Soft Materials Research Laboratory, Centre of Material Sciences, Institute of Interdisciplinary Studies, University of Allahabad, Allahabad, 211002 (India); Tiwari, R. S. [Department of Physics, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi-221005 (India)

    2016-05-06

    In this paper, electron transport of pure and DMC doped polyfluorne (PF) films have been studied at various doping concentrations. Pure films show space charge limited conduction with field and temperature dependent mobility. The J–V characteristics of doped PF were ohmic at low voltages due to thermally released carriers from dopant states. At higher voltages the current density increases nonlinearly due to field dependent mobility and carrier concentration thereby filling of tail states of HOMO of the host. The conductivity of doped films were analyzed using the Unified Gaussian Disorder Model (UGDM). The carrier concentration obtained from the fitting show a non-linear dependence on doping concentration which may be due to a combined effect of thermally activated carrier generation and increased carrier mobility.

  17. Bias-dependent oscillatory electron transport of monatomic sulfur chains

    KAUST Repository

    Yu, Jing-Xin; Cheng, Yan; Sanvito, Stefano; Chen, Xiang-Rong

    2012-01-01

    The bias-dependent oscillatory electron transport of monatomic sulfur chains sandwiched between gold electrodes is investigated with density functional theory and non-equilibrium Green's function method. At zero bias, in contrast to the typical odd-even oscillations observed in most metallic chains, we find that the conductance oscillates with a period of four atoms. However, as the bias voltage is increased the current displays a two-atom periodicity. This emerges gradually, first for the longer chains and then, at voltages larger than 0.7 V, for lengths. The oscillatory behaviors are analyzed by the density of states and the energy-dependent and bias-dependent transmission coefficients. © 2012 American Institute of Physics.

  18. Bias-dependent oscillatory electron transport of monatomic sulfur chains

    KAUST Repository

    Yu, Jing-Xin

    2012-01-01

    The bias-dependent oscillatory electron transport of monatomic sulfur chains sandwiched between gold electrodes is investigated with density functional theory and non-equilibrium Green\\'s function method. At zero bias, in contrast to the typical odd-even oscillations observed in most metallic chains, we find that the conductance oscillates with a period of four atoms. However, as the bias voltage is increased the current displays a two-atom periodicity. This emerges gradually, first for the longer chains and then, at voltages larger than 0.7 V, for lengths. The oscillatory behaviors are analyzed by the density of states and the energy-dependent and bias-dependent transmission coefficients. © 2012 American Institute of Physics.

  19. Bi-layer structure of counterstreaming energetic electron fluxes: a diagnostic tool of the acceleration mechanism in the Earth's magnetotail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Sarafopoulos

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available For the first time we identify a bi-layer structure of energetic electron fluxes in the Earth's magnetotail and establish (using datasets mainly obtained by the Geotail Energetic Particles and Ion Composition (EPIC/ICS instrument that it actually provides strong evidence for a purely spatial structure. Each bi-layer event is composed of two distinct layers with counterstreaming energetic electron fluxes, parallel and antiparallel to the local ambient magnetic field lines; in particular, the tailward directed fluxes always occur in a region adjacent to the lobes. Adopting the X-line as a standard reconnection model, we determine the occurrence of bi-layer events relatively to the neutral point, in the substorm frame; four (out of the shown seven events are observed earthward and three tailward, a result implying that four events probably occurred with the substorm's local recovery phase. We discuss the bi-layer events in terms of the X-line model; they add more constraints for any candidate electron acceleration mechanism. It should be stressed that until this time, none proposed electron acceleration mechanism has discussed or predicted these layered structures with all their properties. Then we discuss the bi-layer events in terms of the much promising "akis model", as introduced by Sarafopoulos (2008. The akis magnetic field topology is embedded in a thinned plasma sheet and is potentially causing charge separation. We assume that as the Rc curvature radius of the magnetic field line tends to become equal to the ion gyroradius rg, then the ions become non-adiabatic. At the limit Rc=rg the demagnetization process is also under way and the frozen-in magnetic field condition is violated by strong wave turbulence; hence, the ion particles in this geometry are stochastically scattered. In addition, ion diffusion probably takes place across the magnetic field, since an

  20. Modeling Blazar Spectra by Solving an Electron Transport Equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Tiffany; Finke, Justin; Becker, Peter A.

    2018-01-01

    Blazars are luminous active galaxies across the entire electromagnetic spectrum, but the spectral formation mechanisms, especially the particle acceleration, in these sources are not well understood. We develop a new theoretical model for simulating blazar spectra using a self-consistent electron number distribution. Specifically, we solve the particle transport equation considering shock acceleration, adiabatic expansion, stochastic acceleration due to MHD waves, Bohm diffusive particle escape, synchrotron radiation, and Compton radiation, where we implement the full Compton cross-section for seed photons from the accretion disk, the dust torus, and 26 individual broad lines. We used a modified Runge-Kutta method to solve the 2nd order equation, including development of a new mathematical method for normalizing stiff steady-state ordinary differential equations. We show that our self-consistent, transport-based blazar model can qualitatively fit the IR through Fermi g-ray data for 3C 279, with a single-zone, leptonic configuration. We use the solution for the electron distribution to calculate multi-wavelength SED spectra for 3C 279. We calculate the particle and magnetic field energy densities, which suggest that the emitting region is not always in equipartition (a common assumption), but sometimes matter dominated. The stratified broad line region (based on ratios in quasar reverberation mapping, and thus adding no free parameters) improves our estimate of the location of the emitting region, increasing it by ~5x. Our model provides a novel view into the physics at play in blazar jets, especially the relative strength of the shock and stochastic acceleration, where our model is well suited to distinguish between these processes, and we find that the latter tends to dominate.