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Sample records for energetic electron precipitation

  1. Dependence of Energetic Electron Precipitation on the Geomagnetic Index Kp and Electron Energy

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    Mi-Young Park

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available It has long been known that the magnetospheric particles can precipitate into the atmosphere of the Earth. In this paper we examine such precipitation of energetic electrons using the data obtained from low-altitude polar orbiting satellite observations. We analyze the precipitating electron flux data for many periods selected from a total of 84 storm events identified for 2001-2012. The analysis includes the dependence of precipitation on the Kp index and the electron energy, for which we use three energies E1 > 30 keV, E2 > 100 keV, E3 > 300 keV. We find that the precipitation is best correlated with Kp after a time delay of < 3 hours. Most importantly, the correlation with Kp is notably tighter for lower energy than for higher energy in the sense that the lower energy precipitation flux increases more rapidly with Kp than does the higher energy precipitation flux. Based on this we suggest that the Kp index reflects excitation of a wave that is responsible for scattering of preferably lower energy electrons. The role of waves of other types should become increasingly important for higher energy, for which we suggest to rely on other indicators than Kp if one can identify such an indicator.

  2. Energetic electron precipitation into the middle atmosphere - Constructing the loss cone fluxes from MEPED POES

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    Tyssøy, H Nesse; Ødegaard, L -K G; Stadsnes, J; Aasnes, A; Zawedde, A E

    2016-01-01

    The impact of energetic electron precipitation (EEP) on the chemistry of the middle atmosphere (50-90 km) is still an outstanding question as accurate quantification of EEP is lacking due to instrumental challenges and insufficient pitch angle coverage of current particle detectors. The Medium Energy Proton and Electron Detectors (MEPED) instrument on board the NOAA/Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellites(POES) and MetOp spacecraft has two sets of electron and proton telescopes pointing close to zenith ($0\\,^{\\circ}$) and in the horizontal plane ($90\\,^{\\circ}$). Using measurements from either the $0\\,^{\\circ}$ or $90\\,^{\\circ}$ telescope will underestimate or overestimate the bounce loss cone flux, respectively, as the energetic electron fluxes are often strongly anisotropic with decreasing fluxes toward the center of the loss cone. By combining the measurements from both telescopes with electron pitch angle distributions from theory of wave-particle interactions in the magnetosphere, a complete bounce loss ...

  3. Energetic electron precipitation in weak to moderate corotating interaction region-driven storms

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    Ødegaard, Linn-Kristine Glesnes; Tyssøy, Hilde Nesse; Søraas, Finn; Stadsnes, Johan; Sandanger, Marit Irene

    2017-03-01

    High-energy electron precipitation from the radiation belts can penetrate deep into the mesosphere and increase the production rate of NOx and HOx, which in turn will reduce ozone in catalytic processes. The mechanisms for acceleration and loss of electrons in the radiation belts are not fully understood, and most of the measurements of the precipitating flux into the atmosphere have been insufficient for estimating the loss cone flux. In the present study the electron flux measured by the NOAA POES Medium Energy Proton and Electron Detectors 0° and 90° detectors is combined together with theory of pitch angle diffusion by wave-particle interaction to quantify the electron flux lost below 120 km altitude. Using this method, 41 weak and moderate geomagnetic storms caused by corotating interaction regions during 2006-2010 are studied. The dependence of the energetic electron precipitation fluxes upon solar wind parameters and geomagnetic indices is investigated. Nine storms give increased precipitation of >˜750 keV electrons. Nineteen storms increase the precipitation of >˜300 keV electrons, but not the >˜750 keV population. Thirteen storms either do not change or deplete the fluxes at those energies. Storms that have an increase in the flux of electrons with energy >˜300 keV are characterized by an elevated solar wind velocity for a longer period compared to the storms that do not. Storms with increased precipitation of >˜750 keV flux are distinguished by higher-energy input from the solar wind quantified by the ɛ parameter and corresponding higher geomagnetic activity.

  4. Characteristics of energetic electron precipitation into the earth's polar atmosphere and geomagnetic conditions

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    Makhmutov, V. S.; Bazilevskaya, G. A.; Krainev, M. B.

    A number of energetic electron precipitation events (EPEs) were observed in the Earth's polar atmosphere (Murmansk region, geographical coordinates 68.57 N, 33.03 E and Mirny, Antarctica, 66.34 S, 92.55 E) during the long-term cosmic ray balloon experiment from 1957 up to now. During geomagnetic storms significant X-ray fluxes caused by precipitating electrons at the top of the atmosphere sometimes penetrated to the atmospheric depth of 60 gcm-2. We show that (1) there is a quasi-11-year cycle in EPE occurrence shifted with respect to solar activity cycle, and (2) the yearly rate of EPE occurrence has an ascending trend during the period 1965-1999. The EPE characteristics evaluated from the balloon experiment are compared with the available data on geomagnetic activity and the possible relations between the features of EPE events and geomagnetic conditions are discussed.

  5. Energetic electron precipitation into the middle atmosphere -- Constructing the loss cone fluxes from MEPED POES

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    Nesse Tyssøy, H.; Sandanger, M. I.; Ødegaard, L.-K. G.; Stadsnes, J.; Aasnes, A.; Zawedde, A. E.

    2016-06-01

    The impact of energetic electron precipitation (EEP) on the chemistry of the middle atmosphere (50-90 km) is still an outstanding question as accurate quantification of EEP is lacking due to instrumental challenges and insufficient pitch angle coverage of current particle detectors. The Medium Energy Proton and Electron Detectors (MEPED) instrument on board the NOAA/Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellites (POES) and MetOp spacecraft has two sets of electron and proton telescopes pointing close to zenith (0°) and in the horizontal plane (90°). Using measurements from either the 0° or 90° telescope will underestimate or overestimate the bounce loss cone flux, respectively, as the energetic electron fluxes are often strongly anisotropic with decreasing fluxes toward the center of the loss cone. By combining the measurements from both telescopes with electron pitch angle distributions from theory of wave-particle interactions in the magnetosphere, a complete bounce loss cone flux is constructed for each of the electron energy channels >50 keV, >100 keV, and >300 keV. We apply a correction method to remove proton contamination in the electron counts. We also account for the relativistic (>1000 keV) electrons contaminating the proton detector at subauroral latitudes. This gives us full range coverage of electron energies that will be deposited in the middle atmosphere. Finally, we demonstrate the method's applicability on strongly anisotropic pitch angle distributions during a weak geomagnetic storm in February 2008. We compare the electron fluxes and subsequent energy deposition estimates to OH observations from the Microwave Limb Sounder on the Aura satellite substantiating that the estimated fluxes are representative for the true precipitating fluxes impacting the atmosphere.

  6. Nitric Oxide Produced by Energetic Electron Precipitation During a Geomagnetic Storm in April 2010

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    Smith-Johnsen, C.; Nesse, T. H.; Glesnes Ødegaard, L. K.; Orsolini, Y.; Stordal, F.; Hendrickx, K.; Megner, L. S.

    2015-12-01

    In April 2010 a relativistic electron precipitation (REP) event occurred. A coronal mass ejection (CME) caused the Dst-index to reach -80nT, followed by solar wind speeds of over 600 km/s lasting for three days. Electron fluxes measured by the NOAA POES satellites were increased by an order of magnitude and stayed elevated for three days. We investigate the atmospheric nitric oxide (NO) response to these incoming energetic electrons. By combining the low and medium energy electron fluxes from the Total Energy Detector (TED) and Medium Energy Proton and Electron Detector (MEPED) on the NOAA POES satellites we get a continuous energy spectrum ranging from 1-1100 keV, which corresponds to atmospheric altitudes of 50-150km. The multiple NOAA satellites enables us to construct global maps of the precipitating electrons. The energy spectra of the incoming electron fluxes are compared to NO measurements from The Solar Occultation for Ice Experiment (SOFIE) on board the Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere (AIM) satellite and NO from Sub-Millimeter Radiometer (SMR) on the Odin satellite. The correlation between the incoming electrons and the increase of NO is strongly affected by NO's long lifetime when not exposed to sunlight. Winds from Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM) and the empirical wind model HWM07 are used to take into account the transport of NO in order to understand the total impact of the incoming electrons.

  7. Statistical characteristics of potentially chorus-driven energetic electron precipitation from POES observations

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    Li, Haimeng; Yuan, Zhigang; Wang, Dedong; Huang, Shiyong; Qiao, Zheng; Yu, Xiongdong

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, using the Polar Orbiting Environment Satellites (POES) in the year 2011, we present global distributions of energetic electron precipitation (EEP) events that may be driven by lower band chorus waves. Since the footprint of plasmapause in the ionospheric height can basically be equal to midlatitude trough minimum, it can be identified through the global total electron content map. Then we distinguish events perhaps driven by chorus waves outside the plasmapause or those driven by hiss waves inside the plasmapause. Based on the simultaneous observations of EEP in the E1 0° (>30 keV) and E2 0° (>100 keV) channels from POES satellites, a total of 4455 potentially chorus-driven events are identified. The potentially chorus-driven events are mainly distributed from midnight to noon which is similar to the distribution of lower band chorus waves. As the level of geomagnetic substorm activity increases, the occurrence rate is higher, which could be due to excitation of chorus waves associated with substorm electron injection. During higher level of substorm, a large number of events occur in lower L shells. Besides, since the magnetosphere on the dayside is compressed and strong chorus waves are limited to the region where the ratio between the plasma frequency and electron gyrofrequency is less than 5, under the strong substorm, the events on the nightside are confined to lower L shells due to smaller electron gyrofrequencies relative to those on the dayside. The occurrence rate of the events on the dayside also increases with enhancement of solar wind dynamic pressure, which suggests that the solar wind dynamic pressure can contribute to the excitation of events on the dayside. The statistics of potentially chorus-driven events are helpful to analyze the distribution of lower band chorus waves and their contributions to the loss of energetic electrons in the inner magnetosphere.

  8. Energetic electron precipitation and auroral morphology at the substorm recovery phase

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    Oyama, S.; Kero, A.; Rodger, C. J.; Clilverd, M. A.; Miyoshi, Y.; Partamies, N.; Turunen, E.; Raita, T.; Verronen, P. T.; Saito, S.

    2017-06-01

    It is well known that auroral patterns at the substorm recovery phase are characterized by diffuse or patch structures with intensity pulsation. According to satellite measurements and simulation studies, the precipitating electrons associated with these aurorae can reach or exceed energies of a few hundreds of keV through resonant wave-particle interactions in the magnetosphere. However, because of difficulty of simultaneous measurements, the dependency of energetic electron precipitation (EEP) on auroral morphological changes in the mesoscale has not been investigated to date. In order to study this dependency, we have analyzed data from the European Incoherent Scatter (EISCAT) radar, the Kilpisjärvi Atmospheric Imaging Receiver Array (KAIRA) riometer, collocated cameras, ground-based magnetometers, the Van Allen Probe satellites, Polar Operational Environmental Satellites (POES), and the Antarctic-Arctic Radiation-belt (Dynamic) Deposition-VLF Atmospheric Research Konsortium (AARDDVARK). Here we undertake a detailed examination of two case studies. The selected two events suggest that the highest energy of EEP on those days occurred with auroral patch formation from postmidnight to dawn, coinciding with the substorm onset at local midnight. Measurements of the EISCAT radar showed ionization as low as 65 km altitude, corresponding to EEP with energies of about 500 keV.Plain Language SummaryAurora is emission of the atmospheric particles excited by electrons coming from the magnetosphere. The electrons have energies of 1-10 keV or higher. In particular, it is known that the energy can increase more than 100 keV in association with the pulsating aurora and that morphology of the pulsating aurora changes with time. However, relationships between the energy increase and the morphological change have not been studied well. This study analyzed the ionospheric density and auroral images and found that significant increases of the energy coincides with evolution of the

  9. Ground-based Observations and Atmospheric Modelling of Energetic Electron Precipitation Effects on Antarctic Mesospheric Chemistry

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    Newnham, D.; Clilverd, M. A.; Horne, R. B.; Rodger, C. J.; Seppälä, A.; Verronen, P. T.; Andersson, M. E.; Marsh, D. R.; Hendrickx, K.; Megner, L. S.; Kovacs, T.; Feng, W.; Plane, J. M. C.

    2016-12-01

    The effect of energetic electron precipitation (EEP) on the seasonal and diurnal abundances of nitric oxide (NO) and ozone in the Antarctic middle atmosphere during March 2013 to July 2014 is investigated. Geomagnetic storm activity during this period, close to solar maximum, was driven primarily by impulsive coronal mass ejections. Near-continuous ground-based atmospheric measurements have been made by a passive millimetre-wave radiometer deployed at Halley station (75°37'S, 26°14'W, L = 4.6), Antarctica. This location is directly under the region of radiation-belt EEP, at the extremity of magnetospheric substorm-driven EEP, and deep within the polar vortex during Austral winter. Superposed epoch analyses of the ground based data, together with NO observations made by the Solar Occultation For Ice Experiment (SOFIE) onboard the Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere (AIM) satellite, show enhanced mesospheric NO following moderate geomagnetic storms (Dst ≤ -50 nT). Measurements by co-located 30 MHz riometers indicate simultaneous increases in ionisation at 75-90 km directly above Halley when Kp index ≥ 4. Direct NO production by EEP in the upper mesosphere, versus downward transport of NO from the lower thermosphere, is evaluated using a new version of the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model incorporating the full Sodankylä Ion Neutral Chemistry Model (WACCM SIC). Model ionization rates are derived from the Polar orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites (POES) second generation Space Environment Monitor (SEM 2) Medium Energy Proton and Electron Detector instrument (MEPED). The model data are compared with observations to quantify the impact of EEP on stratospheric and mesospheric odd nitrogen (NOx), odd hydrogen (HOx), and ozone.

  10. The role of localised Ultra-Low Frequency waves in energetic electron precipitation

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    Rae, J.; Murphy, K. R.; Watt, C.; Mann, I. R.; Ozeke, L.; Halford, A. J.; Sibeck, D. G.; Clilverd, M. A.; Rodger, C. J.; Degeling, A. W.; Singer, H. J.

    2016-12-01

    Electromagnetic waves play pivotal roles in radiation belt dynamics through a variety of different means. Typically, Ultra-Low Frequency (ULF) waves have historically been invoked for radial diffusive transport leading to both acceleration and loss of outer radiation belt electrons. Very-Low Frequency (VLF) and Extremely-Low Frequency (ELF) waves are generally thought to provide a mechanism for localized acceleration and loss through precipitation into the ionosphere. In this study we present a new mechanism for electron loss through precipitation into the ionosphere due to direct modulation of the loss cone via localized compressional ULF waves. Observational evidence is presented demonstrating that modulation of the equatorial loss cone can occur via localized compressional wave activity. We then perform statistical computations of the probability distribution to determine how likely a given magnetic perturbation would produce a given percentage change in the bounce loss-cone (BLC). We discuss the ramifications of the action of coherent, localized compressional ULF waves on drifting electron populations; their precipitation response can be a complex interplay between electron energy, the shape of the phase space density profile at pitch angles close to the loss cone, ionospheric decay timescales, and the time-dependence of the electron source. We present a case study of compressional wave activity in tandem with riometer and balloon-borne electron precipitation across keV-MeV energies to demonstrate that the experimental measurements can be explained by our new enhanced loss cone mechanism. We determine that the two pivotal components not usually considered are localized ULF wave fields and ionospheric decay timescales. We conclude that ULF wave modulation of the loss cone is a viable candidate for direct precipitation of radiation belt electrons without any additional requirement for gyroresonant wave-particle interaction. Additional mechanisms would be

  11. Using BARREL as part of the Heliophysics System Observatory to Probe the Microphysics and Global Properties of Energetic Electron Precipitation

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    Millan, R. M.

    2015-12-01

    In the inner magnetosphere where the plasmasphere, ring current and radiation belts co-exist, energy and momentum are exchanged between different plasma populations by plasma waves. Resonant interaction with these waves can lead to rapid loss of radiation belt and ring current electrons to the atmosphere. Recent work is rapidly expanding our understanding of energetic (~20 keV - 10 MeV) electron precipitation. In particular, the combination of BARREL multi-point balloon measurements with measurements from equatorial spacecraft (e.g. Van Allen Probes, LANL, THEMIS, GOES), LEO spacecraft (e.g. POES, CSSWE), and ground-based instruments (e.g. riometer, VLF) is providing a unique opportunity to study wave-particle interactions, and to quantify the spatial scale of energetic precipitation. We present a summary of recent results from BARREL combined with in situ measurements to quantitatively test models of wave-particle interactions. We also show combined BARREL and ground-based data that probes the spatial structure and evolution of relativistic precipitation.

  12. Semiannual Variation in the Number of Energetic Electron Precipitation Events Recorded in the Polar Atmosphere

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    Stozhkov, Y. Ivanovich; Makhmutov, V. S.; Bazilevskaya, G. A.; Krainev, M. B.; Svirkhevskaya, A. K.; Svirzhevsky, N. S.; Mailin, S. Y.

    2003-07-01

    The analysis of the monthly numbers of Electron Precipitation Events (EPEs) recorded at Olenya station (Murmansk region) during 1970-1987, shows the semiannual variation with two maxima centered on April and September. We analyse the interplanetary plasma and geomagnetic indices data sets associated with the EPEs recorded. The possible relationship of this variation and RusselMcPherron, Equino ctial and Axial effects is discussed.

  13. Long-Term cosmic ray experiment in the atmosphere: Energetic electron precipitation events during the 20-23 solar activity cycles.

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    Makhmutov, V. S.; Bazilevskaya, G. A.; Krainev, M. B.; Storini, M.

    2001-08-01

    More than 400 energetic electron precipitation events (EPEs) were observed in the Earth's Northern polar atmosphere (Murmansk region, 68°57'N, 33°03'E) during a long-term cosmic ray balloon experiment (from 1957 up to now). It is shown that the significant X-ray fluxes, caused by precipitating electrons at the top of the atmosphere, sometimes penetrated down to the atmospheric depth of ~60 g· cm-2 (about 20 km). It means that primary energy of precipitating electrons was more than ~ 6 10 MeV. Here we summarize only the characteristics of the energetic electron precipitation events recorded during solar activity cycles 20 to 23. We dis cuss results from the analyses of the interplanetary and geomagnetic conditions related to these events in the atmosphere.

  14. Jovian X-Ray Aurora and Energetic Oxygen Ion Precipitation

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    Liu, Weihong; Schultz, D. R.

    1999-11-20

    The X-ray line spectra of highly charged oxygen ions excited by charge transfer interaction with the molecular hydrogen in the auroral atmosphere of Jupiter are calculated. The calculations utilize our calculated cross sections of state-selective charge transfer and the available cross-section data of ionization and stripping. Comparison of these spectra with high-resolution spectral observations may provide a sensitive probe of the characteristics of the heavy ions precipitating into the Jovian auroral atmosphere. On the basis of the much higher X-ray efficiency of heavy ions than of electrons, it is concluded that the Jovian aurora may be accounted for by a combination of energetic heavy-ion precipitation and energetic electron precipitation, which produces the auroral X-ray and ultraviolet emissions, respectively. (c) (c) 1999. The American Astronomical Society.

  15. Are variations in PMSE intensity affected by energetic particle precipitation?

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    V. Barabash

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available The correlation between variations in Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes (PMSE and variations in energetic particle precipitation is examined. PMSE were observed by the Esrange VHF MST Radar (ESRAD at 67°53' N, 21°06' E. The 30 MHz riometer in Abisko (68°24' N, 18°54' E registered radio wave absorption caused by ionization changes in response to energetic particle precipitation. The relationship between the linear PMSE intensity and the square of absorption has been estimated using the Pearson linear correlation and the Spearman rank correlation. The mean diurnal variation of the square of absorption and the linear PMSE intensity are highly correlated. However, their day-to-day variations show significant correlation only during the late evening hours. The correlation in late evening does not exceed 0.6. This indicates that varying ionization cannot be considered as a primary source of varying PMSE, and the high correlation found when mean diurnal variations are compared is likely a by-product of daily variations caused by other factors.Key words. Ionosphere (particle precipitation Magnetospheric physics (energetic particles, precipitating Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (precipitation

  16. Are variations in PMSE intensity affected by energetic particle precipitation?

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    V. Barabash

    Full Text Available The correlation between variations in Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes (PMSE and variations in energetic particle precipitation is examined. PMSE were observed by the Esrange VHF MST Radar (ESRAD at 67°53' N, 21°06' E. The 30 MHz riometer in Abisko (68°24' N, 18°54' E registered radio wave absorption caused by ionization changes in response to energetic particle precipitation. The relationship between the linear PMSE intensity and the square of absorption has been estimated using the Pearson linear correlation and the Spearman rank correlation. The mean diurnal variation of the square of absorption and the linear PMSE intensity are highly correlated. However, their day-to-day variations show significant correlation only during the late evening hours. The correlation in late evening does not exceed 0.6. This indicates that varying ionization cannot be considered as a primary source of varying PMSE, and the high correlation found when mean diurnal variations are compared is likely a by-product of daily variations caused by other factors.

    Key words. Ionosphere (particle precipitation Magnetospheric physics (energetic particles, precipitating Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (precipitation

  17. The Jovian aurora: Electron or ion precipitation

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    Waite, J. H., Jr.; Clarke, J. T.; Cravens, T. E.

    1986-01-01

    High signal-to-noise spectra of the Jovian aurora at UV wavelengths obtained using the International Ultraviolet Explorer Observatory (including the brightest Jovian aurora observed to date) set strigent upper limits for sulfur and oxygen emissions, which would be associated with the precipitation of energetic heavy ions in the upper Jovian atmosphere if they were solely responsible for Jovian auroral processes. Model calculations of heavy ion precipitation and corresponding estimates of the associated sulfur and oxygen UV emissions previously carried out suggest emission values for 1304 A OI emission that are at least 30 times larger than the upper limit values set by the IUE observations reported. On the other hand the observed (feature of SII at 1256 A of 2 kR) is quite comparable to the theoretically predicted emission intensity. Taken together these observations and calculations suggest that electron as well as ion precipitation play a role in Jovian auroral processes. In light of earlier X-ray observations and in-situ plasma observations that suggest energetic heavy ion precipitation in the Jovian auroral zone, a scenario is suggested where heavy ion auroral energy deposition is concentrated at altitudes below the homopause. Electrons with energies of 10 to 30 keV are responsible for the bulk of the observable UV and EUV emissions since they deposit their energy above the methane absorbing layer defined by the homopause.

  18. Jovian aurora: electron or ion precipitation

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    Waite, J.H. Jr.; Clarke, J.T.; Cravens, T.E.

    1986-01-01

    High signal-to-noise spectra of the Jovian aurora at UV wavelengths obtained using the International Ultraviolet Explorer Observatory (including the brightest Jovian aurora observed to date) set strigent upper limits for sulfur and oxygen emissions, which would be associated with the precipitation of energetic heavy ions in the upper Jovian atmosphere if they were solely responsible for Jovian auroral processes. Model calculations of heavy ion precipitation and corresponding estimates of the associated sulfur and oxygen UV emissions previously carried out suggest emission values for 1304 A OI emission that are at least 30 times larger than the upper limit values set by the IUE observations reported. On the other hand the observed (feature of SII at 1256 A of 2 kR) is quite comparable to the theoretically predicted emission intensity. Taken together these observations and calculations suggest that electron as well as ion precipitation play a role in Jovian auroral processes. In light of earlier X-ray observations and in-situ plasma observations that suggest energetic heavy ion precipitation in the Jovian auroral zone, a scenario is suggested where heavy ion auroral energy deposition is concentrated at altitudes below the homopause. Electrons with energies of 10 to 30 keV are responsible for the bulk of the observable UV and EUV emissions since they deposit their energy above the methane absorbing layer defined by the homopause.

  19. The Jovian aurora: Electron or ion precipitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waite, J.H., Jr. (NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL (USA)); Clarke, J.T. (NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (USA)); Cravens, T.E. (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor (USA)); Hammond, C.M. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles (USA))

    1988-07-01

    High signal-to-noise spectra of the Jovian aurora at UV wavelengths obtained using the International Ultraviolet Explorer Observatory (including the brightest Jovian aurora observed to date) are used to study the existence of sulfur and oxygen emissions which would be associated with the precipitation of energetic heavy ions in the upper Jovian atmosphere. Model calculations of heavy ion precipitation and corresponding estimates of the associated sulfur and oxygen UV emissions carried out in the preceding companion paper of Horanyi et al. suggest emission values for 1,304-{angstrom} O I emission that are at least 50 times larger than the upper limit values set by the IUE observations reported here. On the other hand a possible emission feature of S II at 1,256 {angstrom} is comparable to the theoretically predicted emission intensity. Earlier X ray observations and in situ plasma observations have indicated the existence of energetic heavy ion precipitation in the Jovian auroral zone. Based on the IUE observations reported here, the authors suggest a scenario where heavy ion auroral energy deposition is concentrated at altitudes below the homopause (i.e. > 300 keV/nucleon) and electrons with energies of 10 to 30 keV are responsible for the bulk of the observable UV and EUV emissions since they deposit their energy above the methane-absorbing layer defined by the homopause.

  20. Processing energetic materials with supercritical fluid precipitation techniques

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    Essel, Jonathan

    Research has shown that nano-sized particles of explosives have a reduced sensitivity to impact and shock. Nano-sized energetic particles have also shown promise in improving the performance of propellants and explosives. Therefore, a method to produce nano-sized explosive particles could be ideal for sensitivity and performance reasons. Supercritical fluid precipitation has been shown to produce nano-sized explosive particles effectively. This research explores the feasibility of processing energetic materials using three different supercritical fluid precipitation techniques. The first technique is called the Rapid Expansion of a Supercritical Solution (RESS). The RESS process dissolves a solute in a supercritical fluid and then rapidly expands the resulting solution through a nozzle to produce small (nano-sized) and uniform particles from a high degree of supersaturation. The second technique is the Rapid Expansion of a Supercritical Solution into a Liquid Solvent (RESOLV) Process. This process is similar to the RESS process except the supercritical solution is expanded into a liquid and dispersant solution to reduce particle agglomeration and to reduce the size of the particles further. The final technique investigated is the Rapid Expansion of a Supercritical Solution with a Nonsolute (RESS-N) process in which the precipitating solute is used to encapsulate or coat a nonsoluble substance by heterogeneous nucleation. This works takes both a theoretical an empirical approach. On the theoretical side, a numerical code that accounts for nucleation and condensation in the RESS process was written in FORTRAN to predict how altering pre-expansion pressures and pre-expansion temperatures in the RESS process could affect the final particle size of the produced RDX. It was determined that pre-expansion temperature had a marginal impact on final particle size but higher pre-expansion pressures were beneficial in forming smaller particles. Also, a software program called

  1. Strong localized variations of the low-altitude energetic electron fluxes in the evening sector near the plasmapause

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    E. E. Titova

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Specific type of energetic electron precipitation accompanied by a sharp increase in trapped energetic electron flux are found in the data obtained from low-altitude NOAA satellites. These strongly localized variations of the trapped and precipitated energetic electron flux have been observed in the evening sector near the plasmapause during recovery phase of magnetic storms. Statistical characteristics of these structures as well as the results of comparison with proton precipitation are described. We demonstrate the spatial coincidence of localized electron precipitation with cold plasma gradient and whistler wave intensification measured on board the DE-1 and Aureol-3 satellites. A simultaneous localized sharp increase in both trapped and precipitating electron flux could be a result of significant pitch-angle isotropization of drifting electrons due to their interaction via cyclotron instability with the region of sharp increase in background plasma density.Key words. Ionosphere (particle precipitation; wave-particle interaction Magnetospheric Physics (plasmasphere

  2. Relativistic electron precipitation as seen by NOAA POES

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    Yahnin, A. G.; Yahnina, T. A.; Semenova, N. V.; Gvozdevsky, B. B.; Pashin, A. B.

    2016-09-01

    We performed a survey of relativistic electron precipitation (REP) events revealed by the Medium Energy Proton and Electron Detector instrument on board NOAA Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites during a 38 day interval. We have divided the observed REP events into three groups with respect to the simultaneous observations of energetic (>30 keV) electron and proton precipitation. The first group consists of REP enhancements forming the isotropy zone at the poleward edge of trapped relativistic electron fluxes. These REP events are observed on the nightside, and they are, apparently, produced by isotropization process related to nonadiabatic motion of particles in the stretched magnetic field. The second group are the REP events related to simultaneous enhancements of energetic >30-300 keV electrons. These events have a wider magnetic local time range of occurrence with a maximum in the premidnight sector. They can be related to the interaction of electrons with waves whose possible nature is briefly discussed on the basis of comparison with the cold plasma density in the conjugated region of the equatorial plane. The third group consists of the REP events correlated with the burst-like precipitation of >30-keV protons within an anisotropy zone, where the trapped flux dominates. These events are found in the dusk sector in association with enhanced cold plasma density in the conjugate equatorial magnetosphere. As is known, proton bursts within the anisotropy zone indicate the location of the electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) wave source. Such REP events can be due to scattering of the relativistic electrons by EMIC waves. However, we noted that some of these REP events are associated with precipitation of energetic electrons with low-energy cutoff below 100 keV. We suggest that in such cases the electrons within a wide energy range are precipitated by other waves (probably, by plasmaspheric hiss).

  3. Effects of energetic electrons on the electrodynamics in the ionosphere

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    A. Aksnes

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available From the observations by the PIXIE and UVI cameras on board the Polar satellite, we derive global maps of the precipitating electron energy spectra from less than 1keV to 100keV. Based on the electron spectra, we generate instantaneous global maps of Hall and Pedersen conductances. The UVI camera provides good coverage of the lower electron energies contributing most to the Pedersen conductance, while PIXIE captures the high energy component of the precipitating electrons affecting the Hall conductance. By characterizing the energetic electrons from some tens of keV and up to about 100keV using PIXIE X-ray measurements, we will, in most cases, calculate a larger electron flux at higher energies than estimated from a simple extrapolation of derived electron spectra from UVI alone. Instantaneous global conductance maps derived with and without inclusion of PIXIE data have been implemented in the Assimilative Mapping of Ionospheric Electrodynamics (AMIE procedure, to study the effects of energetic electrons on electrodynamical parameters in the ionosphere. We find that the improved electron spectral characterization using PIXIE data most often results in a larger Hall conductance and a smaller inferred electric field. In some localized regions the increase in the Hall conductance can exceed 100%. On the contrary, the Pedersen conductance remains more or less unaffected by the inclusion of the PIXIE data. The calculated polar cap potential drop may decrease more than 10%, resulting in a reduction of the estimated Joule heating integrated over the Northern Hemisphere by up to 20%. Locally, Joule heating may decrease more than 50% in some regions. We also find that the calculated energy flux by precipitating electrons increases around 5% when including the PIXIE data. Combined with the reduction of Joule heating, this results in a decrease in the ratio between Joule heating and energy flux, sometimes exceeding 25%. An investigation of the relationship

  4. D region HF radar echoes associated with energetic particle precipitation and pulsating aurora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Milan

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Milan et al. (2001 identified a class of narrow, slow-moving HF radar backscatter echoes which originate between altitudes of 80 and 100 km, the ionospheric D- and lower E-regions. These echoes appeared to be associated with the occurrence of pulsating aurora, which are known to be created by energetic electrons capable of penetrating to D region altitudes. In this study we show that these echoes are observed in tandem with enhancements in cosmic noise absorption (auroral absorption, additional evidence that energetic (>30 keV particle precipitation is responsible for generating the irregularities from which a radar can scatter. In addition, we show that the D region backscatter echoes occur predominantly in the post-midnight sector during substorm recovery phase, in common with auroral absorption events and pulsating aurora.

  5. Improved Electronic Control for Electrostatic Precipitators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, D. F.

    1986-01-01

    Electrostatic precipitators remove particulate matter from smoke created by burning refuse. Smoke exposed to electrostatic field, and particles become electrically charged and migrate to electrically charged collecting surfaces. New microprocessor-based electronic control maintains precipitator power at maximum particulate-collection level. Control automatically senses changes in smoke composition due to variations in fuel or combustion and adjusts precipitator voltage and current accordingly. Also, sensitive yet stable fault detection provided.

  6. Modeling the impact of energetic particle precipitation on stratospheric nitric acid polar enhancements using WACCM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsolini, Yvan; Kvissel, Ole Kristian; Stordal, Frode

    The wintertime abundance of nitric acid (HNO3) in the polar upper stratosphere displays a strong inter-annual variability. It is known to be strongly influenced by energetic particle precipitation, not only on a fast time scale by solar proton events, but also on a slower time scale by descent of mesospheric air enriched in NOx by precipitating electrons. Measurements by SMR aboard the Odin satellite, by MIPAS aboard the ENVISAT satellite, or by MLS aboard the Aura satellite, have shown occasional enhancements in excess of 10 ppb, leading to a double-peaked HNO3 profile with a secondary maximum descending from the upper stratosphere. N2O5 heterogeneous conversion upon hydrated ion clusters has long been proposed as the likely mechanism for the slower effect. Here we introduce this predominantly wintertime source of HNO3 in the NCAR Whole Atmo-sphere Community Climate Model (WACCM version 3.1.9) as a pseudo first-order reaction, assuming a simple, temporarily fixed, meridional distribution of hydrated ion clusters. The 4-year simulation is compared to a control one, with the new reaction omitted. Realistic enhancements of HNO3 are produced when air masses with high level of NOx descend into the stratosphere during the long polar night. As HNO3 is a key component influencing the stratospheric ozone distribution, complex chemical but also radiative and dynamical feedbacks appear, which impact in particular the ozone depletion in the southern hemisphere spring, and the NOx distribution in summer high latitudes.

  7. Upper hybrid waves and energetic electrons in the radiation belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Peter H.; Kim, Sunjung; Hwang, Junga; Shin, Dae-Kyu

    2017-05-01

    Van Allen radiation belt is characterized by energetic electrons and ions trapped in the Earth's dipolar magnetic field lines and persisting for long periods. It is also permeated by high-frequency electrostatic fluctuations whose peak intensity occurs near the upper hybrid frequency. Such a phenomenon can be understood in terms of spontaneous emission of electrostatic multiple harmonic electron cyclotron waves by thermal plasmas. In the literature, the upper hybrid fluctuations are used as a proxy for determining the electron number density, but they also contain important information concerning the energetic electrons in the radiation belt and possibly the ring current electrons. The companion paper analyzes sample quiet time events and demonstrates that the upper hybrid fluctuations are predominantly emitted by tenuous population of energetic electrons. The present paper supplements detailed formalism of spontaneous thermal emission of multiple-harmonic cyclotron waves that include upper hybrid fluctuations.

  8. Global distribution of energetic proton precipitations equatorward of the boundary of isotropic fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenova, N. V.; Yahnina, T. A.; Yahnin, A. G.; Demekhov, A. G.

    2017-07-01

    Based on data of the NOAA POES satellite, the global distribution of the occurrence rate of precipitations of energetic protons ( E > 30 keV) equatorward of the boundary of isotropic fluxes has been constructed for the first time. It has been shown that the occurrence rate of proton precipitations inside the zone of anisotropic fluxes is maximum in daytime hours (1100-1600 MLT) at latitudes L = 6-9 and decreases in evening and morning hours. Comparison of the obtained results about proton precipitations with the spatial distribution of the occurrence rate of electromagnetic ion-cyclotron (EMIC) waves in the equatorial magnetosphere according to results of satellite observations demonstrates a close relationship between them. This corroborates that precipitations of energetic protons equatorward of the boundary of isotropic fluxes are a consequence of the development of the ion-cyclotron instability in the equatorial magnetosphere.

  9. Energetic Electron Acceleration and Injection During Dipolarization Events in Mercury's Magnetotail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewey, Ryan M.; Slavin, James A.; Raines, Jim M.; Baker, Daniel N.; Lawrence, David J.

    2017-12-01

    Energetic particle bursts associated with dipolarization events within Mercury's magnetosphere were first observed by Mariner 10. The events appear analogous to particle injections accompanying dipolarization events at Earth. The Energetic Particle Spectrometer (3 s resolution) aboard MESSENGER determined the particle bursts are composed entirely of electrons with energies ≳ 300 keV. Here we use the Gamma-Ray Spectrometer high-time-resolution (10 ms) energetic electron measurements to examine the relationship between energetic electron injections and magnetic field dipolarization in Mercury's magnetotail. Between March 2013 and April 2015, we identify 2,976 electron burst events within Mercury's magnetotail, 538 of which are closely associated with dipolarization events. These dipolarizations are detected on the basis of their rapid ( 2 s) increase in the northward component of the tail magnetic field (ΔBz 30 nT), which typically persists for 10 s. Similar to those at Earth, we find that these dipolarizations appear to be low-entropy, depleted flux tubes convecting planetward following the collapse of the inner magnetotail. We find that electrons experience brief, yet intense, betatron and Fermi acceleration during these dipolarizations, reaching energies 130 keV and contributing to nightside precipitation. Thermal protons experience only modest betatron acceleration. While only 25% of energetic electron events in Mercury's magnetotail are directly associated with dipolarization, the remaining events are consistent with the Near-Mercury Neutral Line model of magnetotail injection and eastward drift about Mercury, finding that electrons may participate in Shabansky-like closed drifts about the planet. Magnetotail dipolarization may be the dominant source of energetic electron acceleration in Mercury's magnetosphere.

  10. Structural, energetic and electronic properties of intercalated boron ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The effects of chirality and the intercalation of transitional metal atoms inside single walled BN nano- tubes on structural, energetic and electronic properties have been considered in this paper. The thermodynamic stability of BN nanotubes can be improved by the intercalation of cobalt or nickel. BN nanotubes can ...

  11. Structural, energetic and electronic properties of intercalated boron ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The effects of chirality and the intercalation of transitional metal atoms inside single walled BN nanotubes on structural, energetic and electronic properties have been considered in this paper. The thermodynamic stability of BN nanotubes can be improved by the intercalation of cobalt or nickel. BN nanotubes can behave ...

  12. Energetic-electron-driven instability in the helically symmetric experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, C B; Brower, D L; Breizman, B N; Spong, D A; Almagri, A F; Anderson, D T; Anderson, F S B; Ding, W X; Guttenfelder, W; Likin, K M; Talmadge, J N

    2009-07-10

    Energetic electrons generated by electron cyclotron resonance heating are observed to drive instabilities in the quasihelically symmetric stellarator device. The coherent, global fluctuations peak in the plasma core and are measured in the frequency range of 20-120 kHz. Mode propagation is in the diamagnetic drift direction of the driving species. When quasihelical symmetry is broken, the mode is no longer observed. Experimental observations indicate that the unstable mode is acoustic rather than Alfvénic.

  13. Energetic electron fluxes at Saturn from Cassini observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Rongxin; Summers, Danny

    2012-06-01

    Energetic electron fluxes (18 keV-21 MeV) observed by the MIMI/LEMMS instrument on the Cassini mission during 2004 to 2008 are analyzed. We consider all 101 orbits and we select portions of the orbits that lie within 0.5 RS of the magnetic equatorial plane, where RS is Saturn's radius. We determine the average electron differential flux and integral flux at specified L-shells in the range 4.5 Kennel-Petschek theory. We find that at lower L-shells, L Kennel-Petschek limit; and at larger L-shells, 7 Kennel-Petschek limit.

  14. Mesospheric ozone destruction by high-energy electron precipitation associated with pulsating aurora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turunen, Esa; Kero, Antti; Verronen, Pekka T.; Miyoshi, Yoshizumi; Oyama, Shin-Ichiro; Saito, Shinji

    2016-10-01

    Energetic particle precipitation into the upper atmosphere creates excess amounts of odd nitrogen and odd hydrogen. These destroy mesospheric and upper stratospheric ozone in catalytic reaction chains, either in situ at the altitude of the energy deposition or indirectly due to transport to other altitudes and latitudes. Recent statistical analysis of satellite data on mesospheric ozone reveals that the variations during energetic electron precipitation from Earth's radiation belts can be tens of percent. Here we report model calculations of ozone destruction due to a single event of pulsating aurora early in the morning on 17 November 2012. The presence of high-energy component in the precipitating electron flux (>200 keV) was detected as ionization down to 68 km altitude, by the VHF incoherent scatter radar of European Incoherent Scatter (EISCAT) Scientific Association (EISCAT VHF) in Tromsø, Norway. Observations by the Van Allen Probes satellite B showed the occurrence of rising tone lower band chorus waves, which cause the precipitation. We model the effect of high-energy electron precipitation on ozone concentration using a detailed coupled ion and neutral chemistry model. Due to a 30 min, recorded electron precipitation event we find 14% odd oxygen depletion at 75 km altitude. The uncertainty of the higher-energy electron fluxes leads to different possible energy deposition estimates during the pulsating aurora event. We find depletion of odd oxygen by several tens of percent, depending on the precipitation characteristics used in modeling. The effect is notably maximized at the sunset time following the occurrence of the precipitation.

  15. Interfacial structures and energetics of the strengthening precipitate phase in creep-resistant Mg-Nd-based alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhuri, D; Banerjee, R; Srinivasan, S G

    2017-01-17

    The extraordinary creep-resistance of Mg-Nd-based alloys can be correlated to the formation of nanoscale-platelets of β1-Mg3Nd precipitates, that grow along 〈110〉Mg in bulk hcp-Mg and on dislocation lines. The growth kinetics of β1 is sluggish even at high temperatures, and presumably occurs via vacancy migration. However, the rationale for the high-temperature stability of precipitate-matrix interfaces and observed growth direction is unknown, and may likely be related to the interfacial structure and excess energy. Therefore, we study two interfaces- {112}β1/{100}Mg and {111}β1/{110}Mg- that are commensurate with β1/hcp-Mg orientation relationship via first principles calculations. We find that β1 acquires plate-like morphology to reduce small lattice strain via the formation of energetically favorable {112}β1/{100}Mg interfaces, and predict that β1 grows along 〈110〉Mg on dislocation lines due to the migration of metastable {111}β1/{110}Mg. Furthermore, electronic charge distribution of the two interfaces studied here indicated that interfacial-energy of coherent precipitates is sensitive to the population of distorted lattice sites, and their spatial extent in the vicinity of interfaces. Our results have implications for alloy design as they suggest that formation of β1-like precipitates in the hcp-Mg matrix will require well-bonded coherent interface along precipitate broad-faces, while simultaneously destabilizing other interfaces.

  16. A new numerical technique to design satellite energetic electron detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Tuszewski, M G; Ingraham, J C

    2002-01-01

    Energetic charged particles trapped in the magnetosphere are routinely detected by satellite instruments. However, it is generally difficult to extract quantitative energy and angular information from such measurements because the interaction of energetic electrons with matter is rather complex. Beam calibrations and Monte-Carlo (MC) simulations are often used to evaluate a flight instrument once it is built. However, rules of thumb and past experience are common tools to design the instrument in the first place. Hence, we have developed a simple numerical procedure, based on analytical probabilities, suitable for instrumental design and evaluation. In addition to the geometrical response, the contributions of surface backscattering, edge penetration, and bremsstrahlung radiation are estimated. The new results are benchmarked against MC calculations for a simple test case. Complicated effects, such as the contribution of the satellite to the instrumental response, can be estimated with the new formalism.

  17. The Jovian Aurora - Electron or ion precipitation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, J. H., Jr.; Clarke, J. T.; Cravens, T. E.; Hammond, C. M.

    1988-01-01

    High signal-to-noise spectra of the Jovian aurora obtained at 1200 to 1500 A by the IUE Observatory were examined for the existence of sulfur and oxygen emissions that would be expected if the UV emissions were produced by precipitating heavy ions. The results of these measurements and subsequent spectral modeling, using a model of heavy aurora constructed by Horanyi et al. (1988), showed mixed evidence of the oxygen and sulfur emissions. It was noted that only the UV emissions which are produced above the UV absorbing hydrocarbon layer were observed by the IUE and Voyager UV spectrometers. This fact, combined with the recent observations of the longitudinal distribution of the Jovian UV aurora, indicates that electrons as well as ions play a role in Jovian auroral processes. Based on the observations, it is suggested that heavy-ion auroral energy deposition is concentrated at altitudes below the homopause, while electrons with energies of 10 to 30 keV are responsible for the bulk of the observable UV and EUV emissions.

  18. Study of wave-particle interaction between fast Magnetosonic and energetic electrons based on numerical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, S.

    2015-12-01

    There are many energetic electrons in the radiation belt of Earth. When the geomagnetic activity becomes stronger, the energy flux of energetic electrons will increase to more than ten times in the outer radiation belt, therefore it is very important to study how the energetic electrons generate and the lifetime of energetic electrons for space weather research. The acceleration of electrons in radiation belt is mainly depending on wave-particle interaction: the whistler mode chorus is the main driver for local acceleration mechanism, which could accelerate and loss energetic electrons; the geomagnetic pulsation ULF wave will cause energetic electron inward radial diffusion which will charge the electrons; recently observation results show us that the fast magnetosonic waves may also accelerate energetic electrons. For the reason that we try to study the wave-particle interaction between fast Magnetosonic and energetic electrons based on numerical simulation, in which the most important past is at the storm time the combination of highly warped Earth magnetic field and fast magnetosonic wave field will be applied for the electromagnetic environment of moving test particles. The energy, pitch angle and cross diffusion coefficients will be calculated respectively in this simulation to study how the electrons receive energy from fast magnetosonic wave. The diffusion coefficients within different dipole Earth magnetic field and non-dipole storm magnetic field are compared, while dynamics of electrons at selected initial energys are shown in our study.

  19. Energetic Electron Periodicities During the Cassini Grand Finale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbary, J. F.; Mitchell, D. G.; Kollmann, P.; Krupp, N.; Roussos, E.

    2017-12-01

    The Cassini F ring and Proximal orbits took the spacecraft closer to Saturn than any previous mission and allowed determination of energetic charged particles (E > 20 keV) in the inner magnetosphere of the planet. The periodicities of the energetic electrons show a remarkable consistency when analyzed using Lomb periodograms. From the beginning of the F ring orbits in October 2016 to the end of the mission in September 2017, the particles manifest a strong main period of 10.79 h ± 0.01 h, with small Doppler-related signals slightly above and below this period. The signal-to-noise ratio of the main period indicates one of the strongest periods ever seen in Saturn's magnetosphere. As implied by latitude separation, the main period seems to be associated with the northern hemisphere. The 10.79 h period is exactly the same as the single period observed during the early part of the Cassini mission in 2005-6 when Saturn experienced southern summer. A simple rotating searchlight model can simulate the periodograms.

  20. Radiolytic Impacts of Energetic Electron Irradiation on Enceladus and Mimas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, J. F.; Sittler, E. C.; Sturner, S. J.

    2011-01-01

    Episodic overturn of the south polar terrain on Enceladus would convey radio lytic oxidants from surface irradiation by Saturn's inner magnetospheric electrons to the putative underlying polar sea and contribute to CO2 and other gas production driving the visibly active cryovolcanism. Low duty cycle of active episodes below 1 - 10 percent would raise the relative importance of the continuous radiolytic chemical energy input for mass and heat outflow, e.g. as compared to heating by gravitational tides. The "Pac-Man" thermal anomaly on Mimas most likely arises from leading-trailing asymmetry of electron irradiation and resultant radio lytic processing of the moon ice to a few centimeters of depth. The Mimas thermal anomaly distribution suggests a relatively stable surface unmodified by Enceladus-like geologic overturn or cryovolcanic activity. In both cases, the heavily irradiated skin depth corresponds to the sensible thermal layer probed by Cassini infrared measurements. Neutral gas and dust emissions from Enceladus limit energetic ion and plasma electron fluxes in the inner magnetosphere, thereby governing the irradiation of Mimas and other Saturn moons.

  1. A Monte Carlo model of crustal field influences on solar energetic particle precipitation into the Martian atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolitz, R. D.; Dong, C. F.; Lee, C. O.; Lillis, R. J.; Brain, D. A.; Curry, S. M.; Bougher, S.; Parkinson, C. D.; Jakosky, B. M.

    2017-05-01

    Solar energetic particles (SEPs) can precipitate directly into the atmospheres of weakly magnetized planets, causing increased ionization, heating, and altered neutral chemistry. However, strong localized crustal magnetism at Mars can deflect energetic charged particles and reduce precipitation. In order to quantify these effects, we have developed a model of proton transport and energy deposition in spatially varying magnetic fields, called Atmospheric Scattering of Protons and Energetic Neutrals. We benchmark the model's particle tracing algorithm, collisional physics, and heating rates, comparing against previously published work in the latter two cases. We find that energetic nonrelativistic protons precipitating in proximity to a crustal field anomaly will primarily deposit energy at either their stopping altitude or magnetic reflection altitude. We compared atmospheric ionization in the presence and absence of crustal magnetic fields at 50°S and 182°E during the peak flux of the 29 October 2003 "Halloween storm" SEP event. The presence of crustal magnetic fields reduced total ionization by 30% but caused ionization to occur over a wider geographic area.

  2. Precipitation and Release of Solar Energetic Particles from the Solar Coronal Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ming; Zhao, Lulu

    2017-09-01

    Most solar energetic particles (SEPs) are produced in the corona. They propagate through complex coronal magnetic fields subject to scattering and diffusion across the averaged field lines by turbulence. We examine the behaviors of particle transport using a stochastic 3D focused transport simulation in a potential field source surface model of coronal magnetic field. The model is applied to an SEP event on 2010 February 7. We study three scenarios of particle injection at (I) the compact solar flare site, (II) the coronal mass ejection (CME) shock, and (III) the EUV wave near the surface. The majority of particles injected on open field lines are able to escape the corona. We found that none of our models can explain the observations of wide longitudinal SEP spread without perpendicular diffusion. If the perpendicular diffusion is about 10% of what is derived from the random walk of field lines at the rate of supergranular diffusion, particles injected at the compact solar flare site can spread to a wide range of longitude and latitude, very similar to the behavior of particles injected at a large CME shock. Stronger pitch-angle scattering results in a little more lateral spread by holding the particles in the corona for longer periods of time. Some injected particles eventually end up precipitating onto the solar surface. Even with a very small perpendicular diffusion, the pattern of the particle precipitation can be quite complicated depending on the detailed small-scale coronal magnetic field structures, which could be seen with future sensitive gamma-ray telescopes.

  3. Energetic Electrons in Dipolarization Events: Spatial Properties and Anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birn, J.; Runov, A.; Hesse, M.

    2014-01-01

    Using the electromagnetic fields of an MHD simulation of magnetotail reconnection, flow bursts, and dipolarization, we further investigate the acceleration of electrons to suprathermal energies. Particular emphasis is on spatial properties and anisotropies as functions of energy and time. The simulation results are compared with Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms observations. The test particle approach successfully reproduces several observed injection features and puts them into a context of spatial maps of the injection region(s): a dominance of perpendicular anisotropies farther down the tail and closer to the equatorial plane, an increasing importance of parallel anisotropy closer to Earth and at higher latitudes, a drop in energy fluxes at energies below approximately 10 keV, coinciding with the plasma density drop, together with increases at higher energy, a triple peak structure of flux increases near 0 deg, 90 deg, and 180 deg, and a tendency of flux increases to extend to higher energy closer to Earth and at lower latitudes. We identified the plasma sheet boundary layers and adjacent lobes as a main source region for both increased and decreased energetic electron fluxes, related to the different effects of adiabatic acceleration at high and low energies. The simulated anisotropies tend to exceed the observed ones, particularly for perpendicular fluxes at high energies. The most plausible reason is that the MHD simulation lacks the effects of anisotropy-driven microinstabilities and waves, which would reduce anisotropies.

  4. Are Energetic Electrons in the Solar Wind the Source of the Outer Radiation Belt?

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Xinlin; Baker, D. N.; Temerin, M.; Larson, D.; Lin, R. P.; Reeves, G. D.; Looper, M.; Kanekal, S. G.; Mewaldt, R. A.

    1997-01-01

    Using data from WIND, SAMPEX (Solar Anomalous, and Magnetospheric Particle Explorer), and the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) sensors onboard geostationary satellites, we investigate the correlation of energetic electrons in the 20–200 keV range in the solar wind and of high speed solar wind streams with relativistic electrons in the magnetosphere to determine whether energetic electrons in the solar wind are the source of the outer relativistic electron radiation belt. Though there is ...

  5. Atmospheric Effects of Energetic Particle Precipitation in the Arctic Winter 1978-1979 Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, L. A.; Randall, C. E.; Harvey, V. L.; Remsberg, E. E.; Stiller, G. P.; Funke, B.; Bernath, P. F.; Walker, K. A.

    2012-01-01

    The Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere (LIMS) measured polar stratospheric enhancements of NO2 mixing ratios due to energetic particle precipitation (EPP) in the Arctic winter of 1978-1979. Recently reprocessed LIMS data are compared to more recent measurements from the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS) and the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier transform spectrometer (ACE-FTS) to place the LIMS measurements in the context of current observations. The amount of NOx (NO + NO2) entering the stratosphere that has been created by EPP in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (EPP-NOx) has been quantified for the 1978-1979 and 2002-2003 through 2008-2009 Arctic winters. The NO2 enhancements in the LIMS data are similar to those in MIPAS and ACE-FTS data in the Arctic winters of 2002-2003, 2004-2005, 2006-2007, and 2007-2008. The largest enhancement by far is in 2003-2004 (approximately 2.2 Gmol at 1500 K), which is attributed to a combination of elevated EPP and unusual dynamics that led to strong descent in the upper stratosphere/lower mesosphere in late winter. The enhancements in 2005-2006 and 2008-2009, during which large stratospheric NOx enhancements were caused by a dynamical situation similar to that in 2003 2004, are larger than in all the other years (except 2003-2004) at 3000 K. However, by 2000 K the enhancements in 2005-2006 (2008-2009) are on the same order of magnitude as (smaller than) all other years. These results highlight the importance of the timing of the descent in determining the potential of EPP-NOx for reaching the middle stratosphere.

  6. Diffusive transport of energetic electrons in the solar corona: X-ray and radio diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musset, S.; Kontar, E. P.; Vilmer, N.

    2018-02-01

    Context. Imaging spectroscopy in X-rays with RHESSI provides the possibility to investigate the spatial evolution of X-ray emitting electron distribution and therefore, to study transport effects on energetic electrons during solar flares. Aims: We study the energy dependence of the scattering mean free path of energetic electrons in the solar corona. Methods: We used imaging spectroscopy with RHESSI to study the evolution of energetic electrons distribution in various parts of the magnetic loop during the 2004 May 21 flare. We compared these observations with the radio observations of the gyrosynchrotron radiation of the same flare and with the predictions of a diffusive transport model. Results: X-ray analysis shows a trapping of energetic electrons in the corona and a spectral hardening of the energetic electron distribution between the top of the loop and the footpoints. Coronal trapping of electrons is stronger for radio-emitting electrons than for X-ray-emitting electrons. These observations can be explained by a diffusive transport model. Conclusions: We show that the combination of X-ray and radio diagnostics is a powerful tool to study electron transport in the solar corona in different energy domains. We show that the diffusive transport model can explain our observations, and in the range 25-500 keV, the scattering mean free path of electrons decreases with electron energy. We can estimate for the first time the scattering mean free path dependence on energy in the corona.

  7. Energetic Ion and Electron Irradiation of the Icy Galilean Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, John F.; Johnson, Robert E.; Mauk, Barry H.; Garrett, Henry B.; Gehrels, Neil

    2001-01-01

    Galileo Orbiter measurements of energetic ions (20 keV to 100 MeV) and electrons (20-700 keV) in Jupiter's magnetosphere are used, in conjunction with the JPL electron model (less than 40 MeV), to compute irradiation effects in the surface layers of Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto. Significant elemental modifications are produced on unshielded surfaces to approximately centimeter depths in times of less than or equal to 10(exp 6) years, whereas micrometer depths on Europa are fully processed in approximately 10 years. Most observations of surface composition are limited to optical depths of approximately 1 mm, which are indirect contact with the space environment. Incident flux modeling includes Stormer deflection by the Ganymede dipole magnetic field, likely variable over that satellite's irradiation history. Delivered energy flux of approximately 8 x 10(exp 10) keV/square cm-s at Europa is comparable to total internal heat flux in the same units from tidal and radiogenic sources, while exceeding that for solar UV energies (greater than 6 eV) relevant to ice chemistry. Particle energy fluxes to Ganymede's equator and Callisto are similar at approximately 2-3 x 10(exp 8) keV/square cm-s with 5 x 10(exp 9) at Ganymede's polar cap, the latter being comparable to radiogenic energy input. Rates of change in optical reflectance and molecular composition on Europa, and on Ganymede's polar cap, are strongly driven by energy from irradiation, even in relatively young regions. Irradiation of nonice materials can produce SO2 and CO2, detected on Callisto and Europa, and simple to complex hydrocarbons. Iogenic neutral atoms and meteoroids deliver negligible energy approximately 10(exp 4-5) keV/square cm-s but impacts of the latter are important for burial or removal of irradiation products. Downward transport of radiation produced oxidants and hydrocarbons could deliver significant chemical energy into the satellite interiors for astrobiological evolution in putative sub

  8. Convection electric field effects on outer radiation belt electron precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelpi, C.; Benbrook, J. R.; Sheldon, W. R.

    1986-01-01

    A model is presented for the possible diurnal modulation of outer radiation belt electron precipitation by considering the effect of the convection electric field on geomagnetically trapped electrons. The modulation flux is the flux due to electrons in the drift loss cone, i.e., those which drift into the bounce loss cone. The electron flux in the drift loss cone is related to the time allowable for diffusion from the stably trapped population to the drift loss cone for precipitation at a specific geographic location. This time, which is termed the maximum L-shell lifetime, is obtained by computing electron trajectories, using a realistic magnetic field model and a simple model for the electric field. The maximum L-shell lifetimes are taken to be the times between successive entries into the bounce loss cone. Conservation of the first two adiabatic invariants, as electrons are slowly energized by the convection electric field, leads to variations in pitch angle, maximum L-shell lifetimes, and, consequently, to changes in the electron flux in the drift loss cone. These results are compared with observations of precipitating electrons made with sounding rocket payloads.

  9. Sunward-propagating Solar Energetic Electrons inside Multiple Interplanetary Flux Ropes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gómez-Herrero, Raúl; Hidalgo, Miguel A.; Carcaboso, Fernando; Blanco, Juan J. [Dpto. de Física y Matemáticas, Universidad de Alcalá, E-28871 Alcalá de Henares, Madrid (Spain); Dresing, Nina; Klassen, Andreas; Heber, Bernd [Institut für Experimentelle und Angewandte Physik, University of Kiel, D-24118, Kiel (Germany); Temmer, Manuela; Veronig, Astrid [Institute of Physics/Kanzelhöhe Observatory, University of Graz, A-8010 Graz (Austria); Bučík, Radoslav [Institut für Astrophysik, Georg-August-Universität Göttingen, D-37077, Göttingen (Germany); Lario, David, E-mail: raul.gomezh@uah.es [The Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, MD 20723 (United States)

    2017-05-10

    On 2013 December 2 and 3, the SEPT and STE instruments on board STEREO-A observed two solar energetic electron events with unusual sunward-directed fluxes. Both events occurred during a time interval showing typical signatures of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs). The electron timing and anisotropies, combined with extreme-ultraviolet solar imaging and radio wave spectral observations, are used to confirm the solar origin and the injection times of the energetic electrons. The solar source of the ICME is investigated using remote-sensing observations and a three-dimensional reconstruction technique. In situ plasma and magnetic field data combined with energetic electron observations and a flux-rope model are used to determine the ICME magnetic topology and the interplanetary electron propagation path from the Sun to 1 au. Two consecutive flux ropes crossed the STEREO-A location and each electron event occurred inside a different flux rope. In both cases, the electrons traveled from the solar source to 1 au along the longest legs of the flux ropes still connected to the Sun. During the December 2 event, energetic electrons propagated along the magnetic field, while during the December 3 event they were propagating against the field. As found by previous studies, the energetic electron propagation times are consistent with a low number of field line rotations N < 5 of the flux rope between the Sun and 1 au. The flux rope model used in this work suggests an even lower number of rotations.

  10. Sunward-propagating Solar Energetic Electrons inside Multiple Interplanetary Flux Ropes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Herrero, Raúl; Dresing, Nina; Klassen, Andreas; Heber, Bernd; Temmer, Manuela; Veronig, Astrid; Bučík, Radoslav; Hidalgo, Miguel A.; Carcaboso, Fernando; Blanco, Juan J.; Lario, David

    2017-05-01

    On 2013 December 2 and 3, the SEPT and STE instruments on board STEREO-A observed two solar energetic electron events with unusual sunward-directed fluxes. Both events occurred during a time interval showing typical signatures of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs). The electron timing and anisotropies, combined with extreme-ultraviolet solar imaging and radio wave spectral observations, are used to confirm the solar origin and the injection times of the energetic electrons. The solar source of the ICME is investigated using remote-sensing observations and a three-dimensional reconstruction technique. In situ plasma and magnetic field data combined with energetic electron observations and a flux-rope model are used to determine the ICME magnetic topology and the interplanetary electron propagation path from the Sun to 1 au. Two consecutive flux ropes crossed the STEREO-A location and each electron event occurred inside a different flux rope. In both cases, the electrons traveled from the solar source to 1 au along the longest legs of the flux ropes still connected to the Sun. During the December 2 event, energetic electrons propagated along the magnetic field, while during the December 3 event they were propagating against the field. As found by previous studies, the energetic electron propagation times are consistent with a low number of field line rotations N model used in this work suggests an even lower number of rotations.

  11. Changes in the Martian atmosphere induced by auroral electron precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shematovich, V. I.; Bisikalo, D. V.; Gérard, J.-C.; Hubert, B.

    2017-09-01

    Typical auroral events in the Martian atmosphere, such as discrete and diffuse auroral emissions detected by UV spectrometers onboard ESA Mars Express and NASA MAVEN, are investigated. Auroral electron kinetic energy distribution functions and energy spectra of the upward and downward electron fluxes are obtained by electron transport calculations using the kinetic Monte Carlo model. These characteristics of auroral electron fluxes make it possible to calculate both the precipitation-induced changes in the atmosphere and the observed manifestations of auroral events on Mars. In particular, intensities of discrete and diffuse auroral emissions in the UV and visible wavelength ranges (Soret et al., 2016; Bisikalo et al., 2017; Gérard et al., 2017). For these conditions of auroral events, the analysis is carried out, and the contribution of the fluxes of precipitating electrons to the heating and ionization of the Martian atmosphere is estimated. Numerical calculations show that in the case of discrete auroral events the effect of the residual crustal magnetic field leads to a significant increase in the upward fluxes of electrons, which causes a decrease in the rates of heating and ionization of the atmospheric gas in comparison with the calculations without taking into account the residual magnetic field. It is shown that all the above-mentioned impact factors of auroral electron precipitation processes should be taken into account both in the photochemical models of the Martian atmosphere and in the interpretation of observations of the chemical composition and its variations using the ACS instrument onboard ExoMars.

  12. Energetic particle precipitation in ECHAM5/MESSy – Part 2: Solar proton events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. G. Baumgaertner

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The atmospheric chemistry general circulation model ECHAM5/MESSy (EMAC has been extended by processes that parameterize particle precipitation. Several types of particle precipitation that directly affect NOy and HOx concentrations in the middle atmosphere are accounted for and discussed in a series of papers. In part 1, the EMAC parameterization for NOx produced in the upper atmosphere by low-energy electrons is presented. Here, we discuss production of NOy and HOx associated with Solar Proton Events (SPEs. A submodel that parameterizes the effects of precipitating protons, based on flux measurements by instruments on the IMP or GOES satellites, was added to the EMAC model. Production and transport of NOy and HOx, as well as effects on other chemical species and dynamics during the 2003 Halloween SPEs are presented. Comparisons with MIPAS/ENVISAT measurements of a number of species affected by the SPE are shown and discussed. There is good agreement for NO2, but a severe disagreement is found for N2O similar to other studies. We discuss the effects of an altitude dependence of the N/NO production rate on the N2O and NOy changes during the SPE. This yields a modified parameterization that shows mostly good agreement between MIPAS and model results for NO2, N2O, O3, and HOCl. With the ability of EMAC to relax the model meteorology to observations, accurate assessment of total column ozone loss is also possible, yielding a loss of approximately 10 DU at the end of November. Discrepancies remain for HNO3, N2O5, and ClONO2, which are likely a consequence from the missing cluster ion chemistry and ion-ion recombination in the EMAC model as well as known issues with the model's NOy partitioning.

  13. Energetic particles detected by the Electron Reflectometer instrument on the Mars Global Surveyor, 1999-2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Delory, Gregory T.; Luhmann, Janet G.; Brain, David

    2012-01-01

    We report the observation of galactic cosmic rays and solar energetic particles by the Electron Reflectometer instrument aboard the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) spacecraft from May of 1999 to the mission conclusion in November 2006. Originally designed to detect low-energy electrons, the Electron...... recorded high energy galactic cosmic rays with similar to 45% efficiency. Comparisons of this data to galactic cosmic ray proton fluxes obtained from the Advanced Composition Explorer yield agreement to within 10% and reveal the expected solar cycle modulation as well as shorter timescale variations. Solar...... energetic particles were detected by the same mechanism as galactic cosmic rays; however, their flux levels are far more uncertain due to shielding effects and the energy-dependent response of the microchannel plates. Using the solar energetic particle data, we have developed a catalog of energetic particle...

  14. Multipoint Measurements of Energetic Electron Deep Penetration into the Low L Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, H.; Baker, D. N.; Jaynes, A. N.; Li, X.; Kanekal, S. G.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Fennell, J. F.; Blake, J. B.; Turner, D. L.; Spence, H. E.; Califf, S.; Leonard, T. W.

    2016-12-01

    Energetic electrons in the inner magnetosphere are distributed into two regions: the inner radiation belt and the outer radiation belt, while the slot region in between separating the two belts. The deep penetration of energetic electrons into the slot region and inner belt has attracted a lot of attention recently. It has been reported that the deep penetrations of tens to hundreds of keV electrons into low L region occur frequently, and the penetration frequency and depth are energy dependent. However, the actual physical causes are still under debate. To gain more insight into the underlying physical processes, an energetic electron deep penetration event is studied in detail using conjunctive measurements from the two Van Allen Probes. Simultaneous observations of the two probes at similar L shells but different magnetic local times (MLT) during an electron penetration event are shown. Detailed electron energy spectra and pitch angle distributions are also investigated. Timing and MLT dependence of energetic electron deep penetration are revealed and the underlying physical processes are discussed. The multipoint measurements from the Van Allen Probes shed lights on the physical processes responsible for the energetic electron penetration into the low L region.

  15. Conjugate Observations of EMIC Waves and Precipitation of Relativistic Electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dedong; Shprits, Yuri; Yuan, Zhigang; Yu, Xiongdong; Huang, Shiyong

    2017-04-01

    Utilizing data from NOAA Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES)-12 and low-altitude Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellites (POES)-15, a well-conjugate observation of Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron (EMIC) waves and precipitation of ring current ions and relativistic electrons is reported. This event took place in periods without geomagnetic storms at near 21:30 on June 19, 2008. During this interval, GOES-12 observed EMIC waves at geosynchronous orbit in dusk Magnetic Local Time (MLT) sector. Conjugately, low-altitude NOAA POES-15 observed precipitation of ring current ions and relativistic electrons. To our knowledge, this is the best conjugated observation from satellites to illustrate EMIC wave-driven Relativistic Electron Precipitation (REP) in the MLT dusk sector during non-storm periods. The REP was observed by POES-15 at the same L (the radial distance in the equatorial plane under dipolar geomagnetic model) and MLT as where EMIC waves were observed by GOES-12, and the projections along the geomagnetic field line of NOAA GOES-12 and POES-15 at the altitude of 100 km above the Earth are nearly at the same geomagnetic latitude and longitude (△MLAT 0.7°, △MLong 0.6°). The diffusion coefficients of relativistic electrons by the EMIC waves are also calculated. This event suggests that, during the periods without geomagnetic storms, EMIC waves can also cause the loss of ring current ions and relativistic electrons through pitch-angle scattering in the dusk sector.

  16. Estimation of the characteristic energy of electron precipitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. F. del Pozo

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Data from simultaneous observations (on 13 February 1996, 9 November 1998, and 12 February 1999 with the IRIS, DASI and EISCAT systems are employed in the study of the energy distribution of the electron precipitation during substorm activity. The estimation of the characteristic energy of the electron precipitation over the common field of view of IRIS and DASI is discussed. In particular, we look closely at the physical basis of the correspondence between the characteristic energy, the flux-averaged energy, as defined below, and the logarithm of the ratio of the green-light intensity to the square of absorption. This study expands and corrects results presented in the paper by Kosch et al. (2001. It is noticed, moreover, that acceleration associated with diffusion processes in the magnetosphere long before precipitation may be controlling the shape of the energy spectrum. We propose and test a "mixed" distribution for the energy-flux spectrum, exponential at the lower energies and Maxwellian or modified power-law at the higher energies, with a threshold energy separating these two regimes. The energy-flux spectrum at Tromsø, in the 1–320 keV range, is derived from EISCAT electron density profiles in the 70–140 km altitude range and is applied in the "calibration" of the optical intensity and absorption distributions, in order to extrapolate the flux and characteristic energy maps.Key words. Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere; particle precipitation; particle acceleration

  17. A BATSE investigation of radiation belt electrons precipitated by VLF waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datlowe, Dayton W.

    1995-01-01

    The Compton Observatory commonly encounters fluxes of energetic electrons which have been scattered from the inner radiation belt to the path of the satellite by resonant interactions with VLF waves from powerful man-made transmitters. The present investigation was motivated by the fact that in the Fall of 1993, the Gamma Ray Observatory was boosted from a 650 km altitude circular orbit to a 750 km altitude circular orbit. This was an opportunity, for the first time, to make observations at two different altitudes using the same instrument. We have examined DISCLA data from the Burst & Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) experiment from 1 Sep. 1993 to 29 Jan. 1994. During the period of study we identified 48 instances of the satellite encountering a cloud of energetic electrons which had been scattered by VLF transmitters. We find that boosting the altitude of the circular orbit from 650 km to 750 km increased the intensity of cyclotron resonance scattered electrons by a factor of two. To search for long term changes in the cyclotron resonance precipitation, we have compared the approx. 750 km altitude data from 106 days at the end of 1993 with data at the same altitudes and time of year in 1991. The cyclotron resonance events in 1991 were three times more frequent and 25% of those cases were more intense than any seen in the 1993 data. We attribute this difference to increased level of geomagnetic activity in 1991 near the Solar Maximum.

  18. Electronic structure study of screw dislocation core energetics in Aluminum and core energetics informed forces in a dislocation aggregate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sambit; Gavini, Vikram

    2017-07-01

    We use a real-space formulation of orbital-free DFT to study the core energetics and core structure of an isolated screw dislocation in Aluminum. Using a direct energetics based approach, we estimate the core size of a perfect screw dislocation to be ≈ 7 |b|, which is considerably larger than previous estimates of 1-3 |b| based on displacement fields. The perfect screw upon structural relaxation dissociates into two Shockley partials with partial separation distances of 8.2 Å and 6.6 Å measured from the screw and edge component differential displacement plots, respectively. Similar to a previous electronic structure study on edge dislocation, we find that the core energy of the relaxed screw dislocation is not a constant, but strongly dependent on macroscopic deformations. Next, we use the edge and screw dislocation core energetics data with physically reasonable assumptions to develop a continuum energetics model for an aggregate of dislocations that accounts for the core energy dependence on macroscopic deformations. Further, we use this energetics model in a discrete dislocation network, and from the variations of the core energy with respect to the nodal positions of the network, we obtain the nodal core force which can directly be incorporated into discrete dislocation dynamics frameworks. We analyze and classify the nodal core force into three different contributions based on their decay behavior. Two of these contributions to the core force, both arising from the core energy dependence on macroscopic deformations, are not accounted for in currently used discrete dislocation dynamics models which assume the core energy to be a constant excepting for its dependence on the dislocation line orientation. Using case studies involving simple dislocation structures, we demonstrate that the contribution to the core force from the core energy dependence on macroscopic deformations can be significant in comparison to the elastic Peach-Koehler force even up to

  19. Development and performance of a suprathermal electron spectrometer to study auroral precipitations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogasawara, Keiichi, E-mail: kogasawara@swri.edu; Stange, Jason L.; Trevino, John A.; Webster, James [Southwest Research Institute, 6220 Culebra Road, San Antonio, Texas 78238 (United States); Grubbs, Guy [University of Texas at San Antonio, One UTSA circle, San Antonio, Texas 78249 (United States); Goddard Space Flight Center, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 8800 Greenbelt Rd, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States); Michell, Robert G.; Samara, Marilia [Goddard Space Flight Center, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 8800 Greenbelt Rd, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States); Jahn, Jörg-Micha [Southwest Research Institute, 6220 Culebra Road, San Antonio, Texas 78238 (United States); University of Texas at San Antonio, One UTSA circle, San Antonio, Texas 78249 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    The design, development, and performance of Medium-energy Electron SPectrometer (MESP), dedicated to the in situ observation of suprathermal electrons in the auroral ionosphere, are summarized in this paper. MESP employs a permanent magnet filter with a light tight structure to select electrons with proper energies guided to the detectors. A combination of two avalanche photodiodes and a large area solid-state detector (SSD) provided 46 total energy bins (1 keV resolution for 3−20 keV range for APDs, and 7 keV resolution for >20 keV range for SSDs). Multi-channel ultra-low power application-specific integrated circuits are also verified for the flight operation to read-out and analyze the detector signals. MESP was launched from Poker Flat Research Range on 3 March 2014 as a part of ground-to-rocket electrodynamics-electrons correlative experiment (GREECE) mission. MESP successfully measured the precipitating electrons from 3 to 120 keV in 120-ms time resolution and characterized the features of suprathermal distributions associated with auroral arcs throughout the flight. The measured electrons were showing the inverted-V type spectra, consistent with the past measurements. In addition, investigations of the suprathermal electron population indicated the existence of the energetic non-thermal distribution corresponding to the brightest aurora.

  20. Burst increases of precipitating electrons recorded by the DEMETER satellite before strong earthquakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This case study developed a method for data processing over six years, from 2004 to 2010, of 70 keV–2.3 MeV electrons recorded by the DEMETER (Detection of Electro-Magnetic Emissions Transmitted from Earthquake Regions satellite. Short time increases in electron counting rates, having 99% probabilities of not being Poisson fluctuations, were statistically selected using geomagnetic invariant space and called electron bursts. Temporal series were analysed confirming the seasonal variations in low energy bands of 70–450 keV. Differently from previous results, the DEMETER results exhibited two peaks of electron bursts: one in the period June–August and one in the period December–February annually. Specifically, six earthquake cases are presented in detail having increases in electron burst number prior to events. Moreover, electron burst precipitation occurring before each strong earthquake of the entire period over the life of the satellite with M ≥ 7.0 was verified as having a probability greater than 97% of not being of a statistical origin. Low energetic electrons in 70–330 keV resulted occurring more frequently near seismic activity than those observed in 330 keV–2.34 MeV energy bands at the satellite altitude in the ionosphere.

  1. Study of electric fields parallel to the magnetic lines of force using artificially injected energetic electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, K.; Bernstein, W.; Whalen, B. A.

    1980-01-01

    Electron beam experiments using rocket-borne instrumentation will be discussed. The observations indicate that reflections of energetic electrons may occur at possible electric field configurations parallel to the direction of the magnetic lines of force in an altitude range of several thousand kilometers above the ionosphere.

  2. Short-duration Electron Precipitation Studied by Test Particle Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaejin Lee

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Energy spectra of electron microbursts from 170 keV to 340 keV have been measured by the solid-state detectors aboard the low-altitude (680 km polar-orbiting Korean STSAT-1 (Science and Technology SATellite. These measurements have revealed two important characteristics unique to the microbursts: (1 They are produced by a fast-loss cone-filling process in which the interaction time for pitch-angle scattering is less than 50 ms and (2 The e-folding energy of the perpendicular component is larger than that of the parallel component, and the loss cone is not completely filled by electrons. To understand how wave-particle interactions could generate microbursts, we performed a test particle simulation and investigated how the waves scattered electron pitch angles within the timescale required for microburst precipitation. The application of rising-frequency whistler-mode waves to electrons of different energies moving in a dipole magnetic field showed that chorus magnetic wave fields, rather than electric fields, were the main cause of microburst events, which implied that microbursts could be produced by a quasi-adiabatic process. In addition, the simulation results showed that high-energy electrons could resonate with chorus waves at high magnetic latitudes where the loss cone was larger, which might explain the decreased e-folding energy of precipitated microbursts compared to that of trapped electrons.

  3. Diffusive transport of energetic electrons in the solar corona: X-ray and radio diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musset, Sophie; Kontar, Eduard; Vilmer, Nicole

    2017-08-01

    Solar flares are associated with efficient particle acceleration. In particular, energetic electrons are diagnosed through X-ray and radio emissions produced as they interact with the solar atmosphere. Particle transport from the acceleration region to the emission sites remains one of the challenging topics in the field of high energy solar physics and has a crucial impact on the interpretation of particles emissions in the context of acceleration models.In order to address the transport of flare associated energetic electrons in the low corona, we used the imaging spectroscopy capabilities of the RHESSI spacecraft to analyze the X-ray emission during the 2004 May 21 solar flare. We show that non-thermal X-ray emitting energetic electrons are trapped in the coronal part of the flaring loop. In the hypothesis of turbulent pitch-angle scattering of energetic electrons (Kontar et al. 2014), diffusive transport can lead to a confinement of energetic electrons in the coronal part of the loop. We show that this model can explain the X-ray observations with a scattering mean free path of the order of 10^8 cm, much smaller than the length of the loop itself.Such results are compared with the study by Kuznetsov and Kontar (2015) of the gyrosynchrotron emission of the same flare. The diffusive transport model can explain the radio observations with a scattering mean free path of the order of 10^7 cm. This combination of X-ray and radio observations during a flare leads to the first estimate of the energy dependence of the scattering mean free path of energetic electrons in the low corona. This result is comparable with studies of the energy dependence of the scattering mean free path of electrons in the interplanetary medium.

  4. Respiratory electron transfer in Escherichia coli : components, energetics and regulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekker, M.

    2009-01-01

    The respiratory chain that is housed in the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane, generally transfers electrons from NADH to oxygen; in the absence of oxygen it can use several alternative electron acceptors, such as nitrate and fumarate. Transfer of electrons through this chain is usually coupled to the

  5. Short energetic electron bunches from laser wakefield accelerator with orthogonally polarized perpendicularly crossed laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horný, Vojtěch; Petržílka, Václav; Klimo, Ondřej; Krůs, Miroslav

    2017-05-01

    Electron acceleration with optical injection by a perpendicularly propagating and orthogonally polarized low intensity laser pulse into a nonlinear plasma wave driven by a short intense laser pulse was explored by particle- in-cell simulations. The scheme presented here provides an energetic electron bunch in the first ion cavity with a low energy spread. The electron bunch short and compact, with the mean energy about 400 MeV and a low energy spread about 10 MeV in time of 6 ps of acceleration. The injected charge is several tens of pC for the low intensity of the injection pulse. Initial positions of electrons forming the energetic bunch are shown and then these electrons are followed during the simulation in order to understand the injection process and determine electron bunch properties.

  6. RELEC Mission: Relativistic Electron Precipitation and TLE study on-board small spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svertilov, Sergey

    The main goal of RELEC mission is studying of magnetosphere relativistic electron precipitation and its acting on the upper Atmosphere as well as transient luminous events (TLE) observation in wide range of electromagnetic spectrum. The RELEC set of instruments includes two identical detectors of X- and gamma-rays of high temporal resolution and sensitivity (DRGE-1 & DRGE-2), three axe directed detectors of energetic electrons and protons DRGE-3, UV TLE imager MTEL, UV detector DUV, low-frequency analyser LFA, radio-frequency analyser RFA, module of electronics intended for commands and data collection BE. During the RELEC mission following experiments will be provided: - simultaneous observations of energetic electron & proton flux (energy range ~0.1-10.0 MeV and low-frequency (~0.1-10 kHz) electromagnetic wave field intensity variations with high temporal resolution (~1 ms); - fine time structure (~1 mcs) measurements of transient atmospheric events in UV, X- and gamma rays with a possibility of optical imaging with resolution of ~km in wide FOV; - measurements of electron flux pitch-angle distribution in dynamical range from ~0.1 up to 105 part/cm2s; - monitoring of charge and neutral background particles in different areas of near-Earth space. Now the all RELEC instruments are installed on-board small spacecraft manufactured by Lavochkin space corporation. The launch is scheduled on May, 2014 as by-pass mission with Meteor spacecraft. The RELEC mission orbit is planned to be quasi-circular solar-synchronous with about 700 km height. The total volume of transmitted data is about 1.2 Gbyte per day.

  7. TEC Enhancement due to Energetic Electrons Above Taiwan and the West Pacific

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alla V. Suvorova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The energetic electrons of the inner radiation belt during a geomagnetic disturbance can penetrate in the forbidden range of drift shells located at the heights of the topside equatorial ionosphere (< 1000 km. A good correlation was previously revealed between positive ionospheric storms and intense fluxes of quasi-trapped 30-keV electrons at ~900 km height in the forbidden zone. In the present work, we use statistics to validate an assumption that the intense electron fluxes in the topside equatorial ionosphere can be an important source of the ionization in the low-latitude ionosphere. The data on the energetic electrons were obtained from polar orbiting satellites over the periods of the 62 strong geomagnetic storms from 1999 to 2006. Ionospheric response to the selected storms was determined using global ionospheric maps of vertical total electron content (VTEC. A case-event study of a major storm on 9 November 2004 provided experimental evidence in support to the substantial ionization effect of energetic electrons during positive ionospheric storms at the low latitudes. Statistical analysis of nine magnetic storms indicated that the VTEC increases coincided with and coexisted with intense 30-keV electron fluxes irrespective of local time and phase of geomagnetic storm. We concluded that extremely intense fluxes of the 30-keV electrons in the topside low-latitude ionosphere can contribute ~ 10 - 30 TECU to the localized positive ionospheric storms.

  8. Parameterization of ionization rate by auroral electron precipitation in Jupiter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Hiraki

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available We simulate auroral electron precipitation into the Jovian atmosphere in which electron multi-directional scattering and energy degradation processes are treated exactly with a Monte Carlo technique. We make a parameterization of the calculated ionization rate of the neutral gas by electron impact in a similar way as used for the Earth's aurora. Our method allows the altitude distribution of the ionization rate to be obtained as a function of an arbitrary initial energy spectrum in the range of 1–200 keV. It also includes incident angle dependence and an arbitrary density distribution of molecular hydrogen. We show that there is little dependence of the estimated ionospheric conductance on atomic species such as H and He. We compare our results with those of recent studies with different electron transport schemes by adapting our parameterization to their atmospheric conditions. We discuss the intrinsic problem of their simplified assumption. The ionospheric conductance, which is important for Jupiter's magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling system, is estimated to vary by a factor depending on the electron energy spectrum based on recent observation and modeling. We discuss this difference through the relation with field-aligned current and electron spectrum.

  9. Parameterization of ionization rate by auroral electron precipitation in Jupiter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Hiraki

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available We simulate auroral electron precipitation into the Jovian atmosphere in which electron multi-directional scattering and energy degradation processes are treated exactly with a Monte Carlo technique. We make a parameterization of the calculated ionization rate of the neutral gas by electron impact in a similar way as used for the Earth's aurora. Our method allows the altitude distribution of the ionization rate to be obtained as a function of an arbitrary initial energy spectrum in the range of 1–200 keV. It also includes incident angle dependence and an arbitrary density distribution of molecular hydrogen. We show that there is little dependence of the estimated ionospheric conductance on atomic species such as H and He. We compare our results with those of recent studies with different electron transport schemes by adapting our parameterization to their atmospheric conditions. We discuss the intrinsic problem of their simplified assumption. The ionospheric conductance, which is important for Jupiter's magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling system, is estimated to vary by a factor depending on the electron energy spectrum based on recent observation and modeling. We discuss this difference through the relation with field-aligned current and electron spectrum.

  10. ENERGETIC PHOTON AND ELECTRON INTERACTIONS WITH POSITIVE IONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phaneuf, Ronald A. [UNR

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this research is a deeper understanding of the complex multi-electron interactions that govern inelastic processes involving positive ions in plasma environments, such as those occurring in stellar cares and atmospheres, x-ray lasers, thermonuclear fusion reactors and materials-processing discharges. In addition to precision data on ionic structure and transition probabilities, high resolution quantitative measurements of ionization test the theoretical methods that provide critical input to computer codes used for plasma modeling and photon opacity calculations. Steadily increasing computational power and a corresponding emphasis on simulations gives heightened relevance to precise and accurate benchmark data. Photons provide a highly selective probe of the internal electronic structure of atomic and molecular systems, and a powerful means to better understand more complex electron-ion interactions.

  11. Ultraviolet aurora on outer planets: morphology and remote sensing of electron precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerard, Jean-Claude; Bisikalo, Dmitry; Shematovich, Valery; Soret, Lauriane

    2016-07-01

    The aurora is the result of the interaction between energetic particles and the upper atmosphere of a planet. Generally, energetic particles from the magnetosphere penetrate the atmosphere, partly deposit their energy and are partly reflected. Their collisional interactions with the atmospheric atoms and molecules heat the atmosphere and produce auroral emissions. Consequently, the aurora then bears the signature of both the acceleration mechanism and the atmospheric structure and composition. Jupiter's UV auroral H2 and H emissions are generally divided into several components. The main auroral emission at Jupiter is associated with the giant current loop connecting the region of co-rotation breakdown in the middle magnetosphere with the ionosphere. The polar emissions observed inside the main emission are very variable over short timescales. The observed diffuse emission equatorward of the main emission is most likely related to precipitation resulting from wave-particle interactions. Finally, the satellite magnetic footprints are created by accelerated electrons resulting from the interaction between the Galilean moons and the plasma in the Jovian magnetosphere. Saturn's magnetosphere and its aurorae appear to be both solar wind driven as the terrestrial magnetosphere and rotationally dominated, similarly to Jupiter. In addition to the main auroral ring, transient features have been recently identified. Uranus displays aurorae quite different from the other two with faint small-size structures appearing following solar storm activity. These different processes are probably associated with different energy spectra of the precipitated electrons. We present an overview of recent results concerning the relation between morphology, variability and remote sensing of the auroral electron energy in the different components. We show that mapping the UV color ratio is a powerful tool to globally characterize the electron precipitation and the flux-energy relation

  12. Mechanisms of Interactions of Energetic Electrons with Epoxy Resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, A.; Coulter, D. R.; Tsay, F. D.; Moacanin, J.

    1982-01-01

    The mechanism of deactivation of energy of excitation in a resin system was investigated on optical excitation as well as excitation by high energy electrons. This mechanism involves formation of excited state complexes, known as exciplexes which have a considerable charge transfer character. This mechanism will be used to develop a degradation model for epoxy matrix materials deployed in a space environment.

  13. Energetics and Electronic Structures of Inclusion Compounds of Large Fullerenes and Cycloparaphenylenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagasawa, Yuya; Okada, Susumu

    2017-10-01

    The energetics and electronic structures of large fullerenes included within [n]cycloparaphenylenes ([n]CPPs) are investigated using density functional theory. We observe that the large fullerenes included within [n]CPP ([n]CPP ⊃ Cn, where n = 76 and 78) are energetically stable and the inclusion reactions are exothermic for the [n]CPP with a diameter of 1.49 nm or larger. Owing to the electronic states of the guest fullerene molecules and the host [n]CPP, [n]CPP ⊃ C60 possesses a staggered electronic structure near the energy gap between the highest occupied and lowest unoccupied states, leading to a narrower energy gap than that of fullerenes and CPP. We also demonstrate that the electron states associated with the fullerene exhibit an upward shift upon inclusion owing to the quantum confinement effect on the π states of fullerenes by the CPP.

  14. Energetics and electronic structure of nanoscale rotors consisting of triptycene and hydrocarbon molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiba, Miki; Okada, Susumu

    2017-10-01

    Using the density functional theory with generalized gradient approximation, we studied the energetics and electronic structures of nanoscale rotors consisting of tryptycene and hydrocarbon molecules with respect to their mutual orientation. Energy barriers for the rotational motion of an attached hydrocarbon molecule range from 40 to 200 meV, depending on the attached molecular species and arrangements. The electronic structure of the nanoscale molecular rotors does not depend on the rotational angle of the attached hydrocarbon molecules.

  15. Will climate change increase ozone depletion from low-energy-electron precipitation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. G. Baumgaertner

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the effects of a strengthened stratospheric/mesospheric residual circulation on the transport of nitric oxide (NO produced by energetic particle precipitation. During periods of high geomagnetic activity, energetic electron precipitation (EEP is responsible for winter time ozone loss in the polar middle atmosphere between 1 and 6 hPa. However, as climate change is expected to increase the strength of the Brewer-Dobson circulation including extratropical downwelling, the enhancements of EEP NOx concentrations are expected to be transported to lower altitudes in extratropical regions, becoming more significant in the ozone budget. Changes in the mesospheric residual circulation are also considered. We use simulations with the chemistry climate model system EMAC to compare present day effects of EEP NOx with expected effects in a climate change scenario for the year 2100. In years of strong geomagnetic activity, similar to that observed in 2003, an additional polar ozone loss of up to 0.4 μmol/mol at 5 hPa is found in the Southern Hemisphere. However, this would be approximately compensated by an ozone enhancement originating from a stronger poleward transport of ozone from lower latitudes caused by a strengthened Brewer-Dobson circulation, as well as by slower photochemical ozone loss reactions in a stratosphere cooled by risen greenhouse gas concentrations. In the Northern Hemisphere the EEP NOx effect appears to lose importance due to the different nature of the climate-change induced circulation changes.

  16. Threshold of auroral intensification reduced by electron precipitation effect

    CERN Document Server

    Hiraki, Yasutaka

    2016-01-01

    It has been known that discrete aurora suddenly intensifies and deforms from an arc-like to a variety of wavy/vortex structures, especially during a substorm period. The instability of Alfv$\\acute{\\rm e}$n waves reflected from the ionosphere has been analyzed in order to comprehend the ignition process of auroral intensification. It was presented that the prime key is an enhancement of plasma convection, and the convection electric field has a threshold. This study examined effects of auroral electron precipitation, causing the ionization of neutral atmosphere, on the linear instability of Alfv$\\acute{\\rm e}$n waves. It was found that the threshold of convection electric fields is significantly reduced by increasing the ionization rate, the realistic range of which could be estimated from observed electron energy spectra.

  17. NOy production, ozone loss and changes in net radiative heating due to energetic particle precipitation in 2002–2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sinnhuber

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We analyze the impact of energetic particle precipitation on the stratospheric nitrogen budget, ozone abundances and net radiative heating using results from three global chemistry-climate models considering solar protons and geomagnetic forcing due to auroral or radiation belt electrons. Two of the models cover the atmosphere up to the lower thermosphere, the source region of auroral NO production. Geomagnetic forcing in these models is included by prescribed ionization rates. One model reaches up to about 80 km, and geomagnetic forcing is included by applying an upper boundary condition of auroral NO mixing ratios parameterized as a function of geomagnetic activity. Despite the differences in the implementation of the particle effect, the resulting modeled NOy in the upper mesosphere agrees well between all three models, demonstrating that geomagnetic forcing is represented in a consistent way either by prescribing ionization rates or by prescribing NOy at the model top.Compared with observations of stratospheric and mesospheric NOy from the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS instrument for the years 2002–2010, the model simulations reproduce the spatial pattern and temporal evolution well. However, after strong sudden stratospheric warmings, particle-induced NOy is underestimated by both high-top models, and after the solar proton event in October 2003, NOy is overestimated by all three models. Model results indicate that the large solar proton event in October 2003 contributed about 1–2 Gmol (109 mol NOy per hemisphere to the stratospheric NOy budget, while downwelling of auroral NOx from the upper mesosphere and lower thermosphere contributes up to 4 Gmol NOy. Accumulation over time leads to a constant particle-induced background of about 0.5–1 Gmol per hemisphere during solar minimum, and up to 2 Gmol per hemisphere during solar maximum. Related negative anomalies of ozone are predicted by

  18. New DMSP Database of Precipitating Auroral Electrons and Ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmon, Robert J; Denig, William F; Kilcommons, Liam M; Knipp, Delores J

    2017-08-01

    Since the mid 1970's, the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) spacecraft have operated instruments for monitoring the space environment from low earth orbit. As the program evolved, so to have the measurement capabilities such that modern DMSP spacecraft include a comprehensive suite of instruments providing estimates of precipitating electron and ion fluxes, cold/bulk plasma composition and moments, the geomagnetic field, and optical emissions in the far and extreme ultraviolet. We describe the creation of a new public database of precipitating electrons and ions from the Special Sensor J (SSJ) instrument, complete with original counts, calibrated differential fluxes adjusted for penetrating radiation, estimates of the total kinetic energy flux and characteristic energy, uncertainty estimates, and accurate ephemerides. These are provided in a common and self-describing format that covers 30+ years of DMSP spacecraft from F06 (launched in 1982) through F18 (launched in 2009). This new database is accessible at the National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) and the Coordinated Data Analysis Web (CDAWeb). We describe how the new database is being applied to high latitude studies of: the co-location of kinetic and electromagnetic energy inputs, ionospheric conductivity variability, field aligned currents and auroral boundary identification. We anticipate that this new database will support a broad range of space science endeavors from single observatory studies to coordinated system science investigations.

  19. New DMSP database of precipitating auroral electrons and ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmon, Robert J.; Denig, William F.; Kilcommons, Liam M.; Knipp, Delores J.

    2017-08-01

    Since the mid-1970s, the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) spacecraft have operated instruments for monitoring the space environment from low Earth orbit. As the program evolved, so have the measurement capabilities such that modern DMSP spacecraft include a comprehensive suite of instruments providing estimates of precipitating electron and ion fluxes, cold/bulk plasma composition and moments, the geomagnetic field, and optical emissions in the far and extreme ultraviolet. We describe the creation of a new public database of precipitating electrons and ions from the Special Sensor J (SSJ) instrument, complete with original counts, calibrated differential fluxes adjusted for penetrating radiation, estimates of the total kinetic energy flux and characteristic energy, uncertainty estimates, and accurate ephemerides. These are provided in a common and self-describing format that covers 30+ years of DMSP spacecraft from F06 (launched in 1982) to F18 (launched in 2009). This new database is accessible at the National Centers for Environmental Information and the Coordinated Data Analysis Web. We describe how the new database is being applied to high-latitude studies of the colocation of kinetic and electromagnetic energy inputs, ionospheric conductivity variability, field-aligned currents, and auroral boundary identification. We anticipate that this new database will support a broad range of space science endeavors from single observatory studies to coordinated system science investigations.

  20. New homogeneous composite of energetic electron fluxes from NOAA/POES satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asikainen, Timo; Ruopsa, Miro

    2017-04-01

    One of the most widely popular datasets of energetic particles used in, e.g., long-term radiation belt studies and in atmospheric/climate studies is perhaps the NOAA/POES (Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellites) dataset, which is unique in its length extending nearly continuously from 1979 to present. However, it has been long recognized that the energetic particle measurements by the MEPED instrument (Medium Energy Proton and Electron Detector) onboard the POES satellites has numerous instrumental problems, which have made quantitative estimates of energetic particle fluxes somewhat difficult. In the recent years a lot of effort has been put in understanding and correcting these instrumental deficiencies, and as a result we have produced a dataset, which corrects instrumental degradation, electronic noise and various sensitivity and contamination issues. However, here we show that there are also other remaining factors, not related to instrument construction, which still cause the 37 year POES dataset to be significantly inhomogeneous. One inhomogeneity is caused by the drift in the orientation of the satellite orbital planes over long periods of time. Another, even more serious issue, is the difference in the orientation of the particle telescopes between the satellites flown before mid-1998 (SEM-1 era) and after that (SEM-2 era). Here we discuss these effects and how the data can be corrected for them. We present a new homogenized composite data series, which yields the latitudinal distribution of energetic electrons from 1979 to present with daily time resolution.

  1. Statistical analysis of MMS observations of energetic electron escape observed at/beyond the dayside magnetopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Ian J.; Mauk, Barry H.; Anderson, Brian J.; Westlake, Joseph H.; Sibeck, David G.; Turner, Drew L.; Fennell, Joseph F.; Blake, J. Bern; Jaynes, Allison N.; Leonard, Trevor W.; Baker, Daniel N.; Spence, Harlan E.; Reeves, Geoff D.; Giles, Barbara J.; Strangeway, Robert J.; Torbert, Roy B.; Burch, James L.

    2017-09-01

    Observations from the Energetic Particle Detector (EPD) instrument suite aboard the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) spacecraft show that energetic (greater than tens of keV) magnetospheric particle escape into the magnetosheath occurs commonly across the dayside. This includes the surprisingly frequent observation of magnetospheric electrons in the duskside magnetosheath, an unexpected result given assumptions regarding magnetic drift shadowing. The 238 events identified in the 40 keV electron energy channel during the first MMS dayside season that exhibit strongly anisotropic pitch angle distributions indicating monohemispheric field-aligned streaming away from the magnetopause. A review of the extremely rich literature of energetic electron observations beyond the magnetopause is provided to place these new observations into historical context. Despite the extensive history of such research, these new observations provide a more comprehensive data set that includes unprecedented magnetic local time (MLT) coverage of the dayside equatorial magnetopause/magnetosheath. These data clearly highlight the common escape of energetic electrons along magnetic field lines concluded to have been reconnected across the magnetopause. While these streaming escape events agree with prior studies which show strong correlation with geomagnetic activity (suggesting a magnetotail source) and occur most frequently during periods of southward IMF, the high number of duskside events is unexpected and previously unobserved. Although the lowest electron energy channel was the focus of this study, the events reported here exhibit pitch angle anisotropies indicative of streaming up to 200 keV, which could represent the magnetopause loss of >1 MeV electrons from the outer radiation belt.

  2. Pc5 modulation of high energy electron precipitation: particle interaction regions and scattering efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Spanswick

    2005-07-01

    (from CRRES and all magnetic Pc5 activity. A superposed epoch analysis revealed that the elevated electron flux needed to produce a riometer pulsation is most likely provided by substorm injections on the nightside. We also find that the amplitude of modulated precipitation correlates well with the product of the background absorption and the magnetic pulsation amplitude, again leading to the idea that a riometer pulsation needs both favorable magnetospheric electron flux conditions and large enough magnetic Pc5 wave activity. We further separate our pulsations into field line resonances (FLRs, and non-field line resonances (non-FLRs, as identified in the Baker et al. (2003 survey. We find that FLRs are more efficient at modulating particle precipitation, and non-FLRs display an amplitude cutoff below which they do not interact with the high energy electron population. We conclude that the high energy electron precipitation associated with Pc5 pulsations is caused by pitch angle scattering (diffusion rather than parallel acceleration. We suggest two future studies that are natural extensions of this one. Keywords. Energetic Particles/Precipitating; Wave-Particle Interactions; Auroral Phenomena

  3. Pc5 modulation of high energy electron precipitation: particle interaction regions and scattering efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Spanswick

    2005-07-01

    -energy electron fluxes on the dawn side (from CRRES and all magnetic Pc5 activity. A superposed epoch analysis revealed that the elevated electron flux needed to produce a riometer pulsation is most likely provided by substorm injections on the nightside. We also find that the amplitude of modulated precipitation correlates well with the product of the background absorption and the magnetic pulsation amplitude, again leading to the idea that a riometer pulsation needs both favorable magnetospheric electron flux conditions and large enough magnetic Pc5 wave activity. We further separate our pulsations into field line resonances (FLRs, and non-field line resonances (non-FLRs, as identified in the Baker et al. (2003 survey. We find that FLRs are more efficient at modulating particle precipitation, and non-FLRs display an amplitude cutoff below which they do not interact with the high energy electron population. We conclude that the high energy electron precipitation associated with Pc5 pulsations is caused by pitch angle scattering (diffusion rather than parallel acceleration. We suggest two future studies that are natural extensions of this one.

    Keywords. Energetic Particles/Precipitating; Wave-Particle Interactions; Auroral Phenomena

  4. Direct measurement of energetic electrons coupling to an imploding low-adiabat inertial confinement fusion capsule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Döppner, T; Thomas, C A; Divol, L; Dewald, E L; Celliers, P M; Bradley, D K; Callahan, D A; Dixit, S N; Harte, J A; Glenn, S M; Haan, S W; Izumi, N; Kyrala, G A; LaCaille, G; Kline, J K; Kruer, W L; Ma, T; MacKinnon, A J; McNaney, J M; Meezan, N B; Robey, H F; Salmonson, J D; Suter, L J; Zimmerman, G B; Edwards, M J; MacGowan, B J; Kilkenny, J D; Lindl, J D; Van Wonterghem, B M; Atherton, L J; Moses, E I; Glenzer, S H; Landen, O L

    2012-03-30

    We have imaged hard x-ray (>100 keV) bremsstrahlung emission from energetic electrons slowing in a plastic ablator shell during indirectly driven implosions at the National Ignition Facility. We measure 570 J in electrons with E>100 keV impinging on the fusion capsule under ignition drive conditions. This translates into an acceptable increase in the adiabat α, defined as the ratio of total deuterium-tritium fuel pressure to Fermi pressure, of 3.5%. The hard x-ray observables are consistent with detailed radiative-hydrodynamics simulations, including the sourcing and transport of these high energy electrons.

  5. Enhanced electron field emission from carbon nanotubes irradiated by energetic C ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Peng-Cheng; Deng, Jian-Hua; Cheng, Guo-An; Zheng, Rui-Ting; Ping, Zhao-Xia

    2012-08-01

    The field emission performance and structure of the vertically aligned multi-walled carbon nanotube arrays irradiated by energetic C ion with average energy of 40 keV have been investigated. During energetic C ion irradiation, the curves of emission current density versus the applied field of samples shift firstly to low applied fields when the irradiation doses are less than 9.6 x 10(16) cm(-2), and further increase of dose makes the curves reversing to a high applied field, which shows that high dose irradiation in carbon nanotube arrays makes their field emission performance worse. After energetic ion irradiation with a dose of 9.6 x 1016 cm(-2), the turn-on electric field and the threshold electric field of samples decreased from 0.80 and 1.13 V/microm to 0.67 and 0.98 V/microm respectively. Structural analysis of scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy indicates that the amorphous carbon nanowire/carbon nanotube hetero nano-structures have been fabricated in the C ion irradiated carbon nanotubes. The enhancement of electron field emission is due to the formation of amorphous carbon nanowires at the tip of carbon nanotube arrays, which is an electron emitting material with low work function.

  6. Multipoint observations of energetic electron injections with MMS and Van Allen Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, D. L.; Fennell, J. F.; Blake, J. B.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Jaynes, A. N.; Baker, D. N.; Reeves, G. D.; Cohen, I. J.; Mauk, B.; Li, W.; Kletzing, C.; Torbert, R. B.; Burch, J. L.

    2016-12-01

    Between March and September of 2016, the orbits of NASA's Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) and Van Allen Probes missions overlapped on the dawn side of the near-equatorial magnetosphere, a region ideal for studying injections of 10s to 100s of keV electrons from the plasma sheet into the inner magnetosphere. During this period, the four MMS spacecraft also underwent a series of conjunctions with both Van Allen Probes, including several in which all six spacecraft were within 1 Earth radii of each other. From such multipoint observations, we investigate the connection between Earth's magnetotail and inner magnetosphere via dipolarization events and the energetic particle injections associated with them. Using the multipoint MMS data, we show how dipolarization fronts surge earthwards through the tail at 100s of kilometers per second, corresponding to strong electric fields that accelerate energetic particles and transport them earthward. Combining MMS with Van Allen Probes, we are able to estimate the transport of particles over larger spatial scales (macroscopic view) and multipoint observations of wave activity during close conjunctions (microscopic view). With such observations, we examine and report on new perspectives concerning the role of energetic electron injections as the seed populations of Earth's outer radiation belt electrons as well as the relationship between freshly injected electrons and chorus and ultra-low frequency (ULF) wave activity.

  7. Generation of Z mode radiation by diffuse auroral electron precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusenbery, P. B.; Lyons, L. R.

    1985-01-01

    The generation of Z mode waves by diffuse auroral electron precipitation is investigated assuming that a loss cone exists in the upgoing portion of the distribution due to electron interactions with the atmosphere. The waves are generated at frequencies above, but very near, the local electron cyclotron frequency omega(e) and at wave normal angles larger than 90 deg. In agreement with Hewitt et al. (1983), the group velocity is directed downward in regions where the ratio of the upper hybrid frequency omega(pe) to Omega(e) is less than 0.5, so that Z mode waves excited above a satellite propagate toward it and away from the upper hybrid resonance. Z mode waves are excited in a frequency band between Omega(e) and about 1.02 Omega(e), and with maximum growth rates of about 0.001 Omega(e). The amplification length is about 100 km, which allows Z mode waves to grow to the intensities observed by high-altitude satellites.

  8. Electrostatic upper-hybrid waves and energetic electrons in the Earth's radiation belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, J.; Shin, D. K.; Yoon, P. H.

    2016-12-01

    Electrostatic fluctuations near upper-hybrid frequency, which are sometimes accompanied by multiple-harmonic electron cyclotron frequencies above and below the upper-hybrid frequency, are common occurrences in the Earth's radiation belt, as revealed through Van Allen Probe observations. Such a feature is analogous to the quasi-thermal noise, or enhanced Langmuir frequency fluctuations, detected in the solar wind. Generally upper-hybrid emissions are used for estimating the background electron density, but the physical mechanism for generating such fluctuations or their possible influence on the energetic electrons has not been discussed in detail. The present paper carries out detailed analyses of data from the Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) suite onboard Van Allen Probes, as well as theoretical calculation of spontaneous thermal emission. It is found that peak intensity associated with the upper-hybrid fluctuations is determined largely by tenuous energetic electrons, and that dense background electrons do not contribute much to the peak intensity. This finding implies that upper-hybrid fluctuations may not only be useful for electron density measurement, but also such a spectrum of electrostatic fluctuations may contribute to the steady-state energy spectrum of radiation belt electrons via wave-particle resonant interaction.

  9. Resonant scattering of energetic electrons by unusual low-frequency hiss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Binbin; Li, Wen; Thorne, Richard M.; Bortnik, Jacob; Ma, Qianli; Chen, Lunjin; Kletzing, Craig A.; Kurth, William S.; Hospodarsky, George B.; Reeves, Geoffrey D.; Spence, Harlan E.; Bernard Blake, J.; Fennell, Joseph F.; Claudepierre, Seth G.

    2014-03-01

    We quantify the resonant scattering effects of the unusual low-frequency dawnside plasmaspheric hiss observed on 30 September 2012 by the Van Allen Probes. In contrast to normal (~100-2000 Hz) hiss emissions, this unusual hiss event contained most of its wave power at ~20-200 Hz. Compared to the scattering by normal hiss, the unusual hiss scattering speeds up the loss of ~50-200 keV electrons and produces more pronounced pancake distributions of ~50-100 keV electrons. It is demonstrated that such unusual low-frequency hiss, even with a duration of a couple of hours, plays a particularly important role in the decay and loss process of energetic electrons, resulting in shorter electron lifetimes for ~50-400 keV electrons than normal hiss, and should be carefully incorporated into global modeling of radiation belt electron dynamics during periods of intense injections.

  10. Electron Bifurcation Makes the Puzzle Pieces Fall Energetically into Place in Methanogenic Energy Conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubner, Carolyn E; Peters, John W

    2017-10-06

    Elaborate arrays of iron-sulfur clusters link active sites via a flavin that bifurcates electrons through two energetically independent paths. The structure of the heterodisulfide reductase provides insight into how methanogens conserve energy through coupling hydrogen oxidation to coordinated exergonic heterodisulfide and endergonic ferredoxin reduction in an overall thermodynamically favorable reaction. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Modeling inward diffusion and slow decay of energetic electrons in the Earth's outer radiation belt

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Q; Li, W; Thorne, RM; Ni, B; Kletzing, CA; Kurth, WS; Hospodarsky, GB; Reeves, GD; Henderson, MG; Spence, HE; Baker, DN; Blake, JB; Fennell, JF; Claudepierre, SG; Angelopoulos, V

    2015-01-01

    ©2015. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved. A new 3-D diffusion code is used to investigate the inward intrusion and slow decay of energetic radiation belt electrons ( > 0.5MeV) observed by the Van Allen Probes during a 10day quiet period on March 2013. During the inward transport, the peak differential electron fluxes decreased by approximately an order of magnitude at various energies. Our 3-D radiation belt simulation including radial diffusion and pitch angle and energy diffus...

  12. TEC enhancement due to energetic electrons above Taiwan and the West Pacific

    CERN Document Server

    Suvorova, A V; Dmitriev, A V

    2013-01-01

    The energetic electrons of the inner radiation belt during a geomagnetic disturbance can penetrate in the forbidden range of drift shells located at the heights of the topside equatorial ionosphere (<1000 km). A good correlation was previously revealed between positive ionospheric storms and intense fluxes of quasi-trapped 30-keV electrons at ~900 km height in the forbidden zone. In the present work, we use statistics to validate an assumption that the intense electron fluxes in the topside equatorial ionosphere can be an important source of the ionization in the low-latitude ionosphere. The data on the energetic electrons were obtained from polar orbiting satellites over the periods of the 62 strong geomagnetic storms from 1999 to 2006. Ionospheric response to the selected storms was determined using global ionospheric maps of vertical total electron content (VTEC). A case-event study of a major storm on 9 November 2004 provided experimental evidence in support to the substantial ionization effect of ener...

  13. Observations at geosynchronous orbit of a persistent Pc5 geomagnetic pulsation and energetic electron flux modulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. E. Sarris

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available A long lasting narrow-band (4–7 mHz Pc5 fluctuation event at geosynchronous orbit is presented through measurements from GOES-8 and GOES-10 and the response of energetic electrons with drift frequencies close to the narrow-band pulsation frequency is monitored through a spectral analysis of flux data from the LANL-SOPA energetic electron instrument. This analysis shows electron flux modulations at the magnetospheric pulsation's frequency as well as at various other frequencies in the Pc5 range, related to the particles' drift-frequencies and their harmonics. A drift resonance effect can be seen, with electron flux modulation becoming more evident in the energy channels of electrons with drift frequencies closer to the wave frequency; however no net increase or decrease in energetic electron flux is observed, indicating that the net energy transfer and transport of electrons is not significant. This Pc5 event has a long duration, being observed for more than a couple of days at geosynchronous orbit over several traversals of the two GOES satellites, and is localized in azimuthal extent. Spectral analysis shows that most of the power is in the transverse components. The frequency of the narrow-band event, as observed at geosynchronous orbit shifts during the time of the event from 7±0.5 mHz to about 4±0.5 mHz. On the ground, CARISMA magnetometers record no distinct narrow-band fluctuation in the magnetic field, and neither does Geotail, which is traversing the outer magnetosphere a few RE further out from geosynchronous orbit, at the same UT and LT that GOES-8 and -10 observe the pulsations, suggesting that that there is no connection to external fluctuations originating in the solar wind. An internal generation mechanism is suggested, such as could be provided by energetic ring current particles, even though conclusive evidence could not be provided for this particular event. Through a statistical study, it is

  14. Transport of energetic electrons in solids computer simulation with applications to materials analysis and characterization

    CERN Document Server

    Dapor, Maurizio

    2017-01-01

    This new edition describes all the mechanisms of elastic and inelastic scattering of electrons with the atoms of the target as simple as possible. The use of techniques of quantum mechanics is described in detail for the investigation of interaction processes of electrons with matter. It presents the strategies of the Monte Carlo method, as well as numerous comparisons among the results of the simulations and the experimental data available in the literature. New in this edition is the description of the Mermin theory, a comparison between Mermin theory and Drude theory, a discussion about the dispersion laws, and details about the calculation of the phase shifts that are used in the relativistic partial wave expansion method. The role of secondary electrons in proton cancer therapy is discussed in the chapter devoted to applications. In this context, Monte Carlo results about the radial distribution of the energy deposited in PMMA by secondary electrons generated by energetic proton beams are presented.

  15. Constraint-Based Modeling of Carbon Fixation and the Energetics of Electron Transfer in Geobacter metallireducens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feist, AM; Nagarajan, H; Rotaru, AE; Tremblay, PL; Zhang, T; Nevin, KP; Lovley, DR; Zengler, K

    2014-04-24

    Geobacter species are of great interest for environmental and biotechnology applications as they can carry out direct electron transfer to insoluble metals or other microorganisms and have the ability to assimilate inorganic carbon. Here, we report on the capability and key enabling metabolic machinery of Geobacter metallireducens GS-15 to carry out CO2 fixation and direct electron transfer to iron. An updated metabolic reconstruction was generated, growth screens on targeted conditions of interest were performed, and constraint-based analysis was utilized to characterize and evaluate critical pathways and reactions in G. metallireducens. The novel capability of G. metallireducens to grow autotrophically with formate and Fe(III) was predicted and subsequently validated in vivo. Additionally, the energetic cost of transferring electrons to an external electron acceptor was determined through analysis of growth experiments carried out using three different electron acceptors (Fe(III), nitrate, and fumarate) by systematically isolating and examining different parts of the electron transport chain. The updated reconstruction will serve as a knowledgebase for understanding and engineering Geobacter and similar species. Author Summary The ability of microorganisms to exchange electrons directly with their environment has large implications for our knowledge of industrial and environmental processes. For decades, it has been known that microbes can use electrodes as electron acceptors in microbial fuel cell settings. Geobacter metallireducens has been one of the model organisms for characterizing microbe-electrode interactions as well as environmental processes such as bioremediation. Here, we significantly expand the knowledge of metabolism and energetics of this model organism by employing constraint-based metabolic modeling. Through this analysis, we build the metabolic pathways necessary for carbon fixation, a desirable property for industrial chemical production. We

  16. Ground pulsation magnetometer observations conjugated with relativistic electron precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahnin, A. G.; Yahnina, T. A.; Raita, T.; Manninen, J.

    2017-09-01

    In this report, we investigate the role of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves in production of relativistic electron precipitation (REP). Over a thousand REP events were detected from four NOAA Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites in July-December 2005. Of these, a total of 112 events were conjugated with a ground-based network of six Finnish induction coil magnetometers and one in Lovozero observatory at Kola Peninsula, Russia. The observation of geomagnetic pulsations during the conjugated events showed that about one third of them were accompanied by pulsations in the Pc1 range, which are the signature of EMIC waves. In fact, the sources of some of these EMIC waves were well outside the location of the REP event. This means that in such cases the REP events were not originated from scattering by EMIC waves. Finally, it is concluded that for this limited set of conjugated events only a quarter might be related to scattering by EMIC waves. The majority of the events are not correlated with EMIC wave signatures in ground-based observations; they were associated with either no pulsations or noise-like pulsations PiB and PiC.

  17. Azole energetic materials: Initial mechanisms for the energy release from electronical excited nitropyrazoles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Bing; Yu, Zijun; Bernstein, Elliot R., E-mail: erb@lamar.Colostate.edu [Department of Chemistry, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523-1872 (United States)

    2014-01-21

    Decomposition of energetic material 3,4-dinitropyrazole (DNP) and two model molecules 4-nitropyrazole and 1-nitropyrazole is investigated both theoretically and experimentally. The initial decomposition mechanisms for these three nitropyrazoles are explored with complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) level. The NO molecule is observed as an initial decomposition product from all three materials subsequent to UV excitation. Observed NO products are rotationally cold (<50 K) for all three systems. The vibrational temperature of the NO product from DNP is (3850 ± 50) K, 1350 K hotter than that of the two model species. Potential energy surface calculations at the CASSCF(12,8)/6-31+G(d) level illustrate that conical intersections plays an essential role in the decomposition mechanism. Electronically excited S{sub 2} nitropyraozles can nonradiatively relax to lower electronic states through (S{sub 2}/S{sub 1}){sub CI} and (S{sub 1}/S{sub 0}){sub CI} conical intersection and undergo a nitro-nitrite isomerization to generate NO product either in the S{sub 1} state or S{sub 0} state. In model systems, NO is generated in the S{sub 1} state, while in the energetic material DNP, NO is produced on the ground state surface, as the S{sub 1} decomposition pathway is energetically unavailable. The theoretically predicted mechanism is consistent with the experimental results, as DNP decomposes in a lower electronic state than do the model systems and thus the vibrational energy in the NO product from DNP should be hotter than from the model systems. The observed rotational energy distributions for NO are consistent with the final structures of the respective transition states for each molecule.

  18. Energetic electron-bunch generation in a phase-locked longitudinal laser electric field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, K D; Huang, T W; Ju, L B; Li, R; Yang, S L; Yang, Y C; Wu, S Z; Zhang, H; Qiao, B; Ruan, S C; Zhou, C T; He, X T

    2016-04-01

    Energetic electron acceleration processes in a plasma hollow tube irradiated by an ultraintense laser pulse are investigated. It is found that the longitudinal component of the laser field is much enhanced when a linear polarized Gaussian laser pulse propagates through the plasma tube. This longitudinal field is of π/2 phase shift relative to the transverse electric field and has a π phase interval between its upper and lower parts. The electrons in the plasma tube are first pulled out by the transverse electric field and then trapped by the longitudinal electric field. The trapped electrons can further be accelerated to higher energy in the presence of the longitudinal electric field. This acceleration mechanism is clearly illustrated by both particle-in-cell simulations and single particle modelings.

  19. The quiet time structure of energetic /35-560 keV/ radiation belt electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, L. R.; Williams, D. J.

    1975-01-01

    Detailed Explorer 45 observations of quiet time pitch angle distributions and equatorial radial profiles of energetic radiation belt electrons are presented. The observed pitch angle distributions in the slot region and the outer regions of the plasmasphere are found to agree with the values expected from resonant interactions with the plasmaspheric whistler mode wave band, and Coulomb collisions are found to be the dominant electron loss mechanism in the inner zone. The overall structure of quiet time radial profiles is shown to agree with the equilibrium structure expected to result from a balance between pitch angle scattering losses and radial diffusion from an outer zone source, and this agreement suggests that the dominant quiet time source and loss mechanisms have been correctly identified. Electron fluxes in the inner plasmasphere are found to remain nearly constant during the quiet periods due to their decoupling from magnetic activity variations in the outer plasmasphere.

  20. Energetic Electron Acceleration Observed by MMS in the Vicinity of an X-Line Crossing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaynes, A. N.; Turner, D. L.; Wilder, F. D.; Osmane, A.; Baker, D. N.; Blake, J. B.; Fennell, J. F.; Cohen, I. J.; Mauk, B. H.; Reeves, G. D.; hide

    2016-01-01

    During the first months of observations, the Magnetospheric Multiscale Fly's Eye Energetic Particle Spectrometer instrument has observed several instances of electron acceleration up to greater than 100 keV while in the vicinity of the dayside reconnection region. While particle acceleration associated with magnetic reconnection has been seen to occur up to these energies in the tail region, it had not yet been reported at the magnetopause. This study reports on observations of electron acceleration up to hundreds of keV that were recorded on 19 September 2015 around 1000 UT, in the midst of an X-line crossing. In the region surrounding the X-line, whistler-mode and broadband electrostatic waves were observed simultaneously with the appearance of highly energetic electrons which exhibited significant energization in the perpendicular direction. The mechanisms by which particles may be accelerated via reconnection-related processes are intrinsic to understanding particle dynamics among a wide range of spatial scales and plasma environments.

  1. Two distinct energetic electron populations of different origin in the Earth's magnetotail: a Cluster case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. I. Vogiatzis

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Energetic electrons (E≥30 keV travelling along and perpendicular to the magnetic field lines have been observed in the magnetotail at L~17:00 and 22:00 MLT during the recovery phase of a storm-time substorm on 7 October 2002. Three-dimensional electron distributions of the full unit sphere obtained from the IES/RAPID sensor system demonstrated a rather complicated and random behavior of the energetic electrons. Occasionally these electrons were appearing to travel parallel, perpendicular, or in both directions, relative to the magnetic field direction, forming in this way bi-directional, perpendicular-peaked, and mixed distributions. The electron enhancements occurred while the Cluster spacecraft were on closed field lines in the central plasma sheet approaching the neutral sheet from the northern tail lobe. Magnetic field and energetic particle measurements have been used from geosynchronous and Cluster satellites, in order to describe the general context of the event and then give a possible interpretation regarding the occurrence of the electron anisotropies observed by the IES/RAPID spectrometer on board Cluster. According to geosynchronous measurements an electron dispersionless ejection is very well correlated with a dipolar re-configuration of the magnetic field. The latter fact supports the idea that electrons and, in general, particle ejections at geosynchronous altitude are directly related to electric fields arising from field dipolarization caused by current disruption. Also, having as a main objective the understanding of the way 3-D electron distributions are formed, we have analyzed electron energy spectra along and perpendicular to the magnetic field direction, demonstrating the fact that the electron population consists of two distinct components acting independently and in a random manner relative to each other. This leads to the conclusion that these two electron populations along and perpendicular to the field are

  2. Impact of energetic particle precipitation on stratospheric polar constituents: an assessment using monitoring and assimilation of operational MIPAS data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Robichaud

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available In 2003, strong energetic particle precipitation (EPP events occurred producing massive amounts of ionization which affected the polar region significantly perturbing its chemical state down to the middle stratosphere. These events and their effects are generally left unaccounted for in current models of stratospheric chemistry and large differences between observations and models are then noted. In this study, we use a coupled 3-D stratospheric dynamical-chemical model and assimilation system to ingest MIPAS temperature and chemical observations. The goal is to gain further understanding of assimilation and monitoring processes during EPP events and their impacts on the stratospheric polar chemistry. Moreover, we investigate the feasibility of assimilating valid "outlier" observations associated with such events. We use OmF (Observation minus Forecast residuals as they filter out phenomena well reproduced by the model (such as gas phase chemistry, transport, diurnal and seasonal cycles thus revealing a clear trace of the EPP. Inspection of OmF statistics in both passive (without chemical assimilation and active (with chemical assimilation cases altogether provides a powerful diagnostic tool to assess the model and assimilation system. We also show that passive OmF can permit a satisfactory evaluation of the ozone partial column loss due to EPP effects. Results suggest a small but significant loss of 5–6 DU (Dobson Units during an EPP-IE (EPP Indirect Effects event in the Antarctic winter of 2003, and about only 1 DU for the SPE (Solar Proton Event of October/November 2003. Despite large differences between the model and MIPAS chemical observations (NO2, HNO3, CH4 and O3, we demonstrate that a careful assimilation with only gas phase chemistry included in the model (i.e. no provision for EPP and with relaxed quality control nearly eliminated the short-term bias and significantly

  3. Fluxes of energetic protons and electrons measured on board the Oersted satellite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Cabrera

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available The Charged Particle Detector (CPD on board the Oersted satellite (649 km perigee, 865 km apogee and 96.48° inclination currently measures energetic protons and electrons. The measured peak fluxes of E>1 MeV electrons are found to confirm the predictions of AE8-MAX, though they occur at a geographical position relatively shifted in the SAA. The fluxes of protons are one order of magnitude higher than the predictions of AP8-MAX in the energy range 20-500 MeV. This huge discrepancy between AP8 and recent measurements in LEO was already noticed and modelled in SAMPEX/PSB97 and TPM-1 models. Nevertheless some other LEO measurements such as PROBA and CORONA-F result in flux values in good agreement with AP8 within a factor 2. The anisotropy of the low-altitude proton flux, combined with measurement performed on board three-axis stabilised satellites, has been suspected to be one possible source of the important discrepancies observed by different missions. In this paper, we evaluate the effect of anisotropy on flux measurements conducted using the CPD instruments. On the basis of the available data, we confirm the inaccuracy of AP8 at LEO and suggest methods to improve the analysis of data in future flux measurements of energetic protons at low altitudes.

  4. Constraint-based modeling of carbon fixation and the energetics of electron transfer in Geobacter metallireducens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feist, Adam M; Nagarajan, Harish; Rotaru, Amelia-Elena; Tremblay, Pier-Luc; Zhang, Tian; Nevin, Kelly P; Lovley, Derek R; Zengler, Karsten

    2014-04-01

    Geobacter species are of great interest for environmental and biotechnology applications as they can carry out direct electron transfer to insoluble metals or other microorganisms and have the ability to assimilate inorganic carbon. Here, we report on the capability and key enabling metabolic machinery of Geobacter metallireducens GS-15 to carry out CO2 fixation and direct electron transfer to iron. An updated metabolic reconstruction was generated, growth screens on targeted conditions of interest were performed, and constraint-based analysis was utilized to characterize and evaluate critical pathways and reactions in G. metallireducens. The novel capability of G. metallireducens to grow autotrophically with formate and Fe(III) was predicted and subsequently validated in vivo. Additionally, the energetic cost of transferring electrons to an external electron acceptor was determined through analysis of growth experiments carried out using three different electron acceptors (Fe(III), nitrate, and fumarate) by systematically isolating and examining different parts of the electron transport chain. The updated reconstruction will serve as a knowledgebase for understanding and engineering Geobacter and similar species.

  5. Constraint-based modeling of carbon fixation and the energetics of electron transfer in Geobacter metallireducens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam M Feist

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Geobacter species are of great interest for environmental and biotechnology applications as they can carry out direct electron transfer to insoluble metals or other microorganisms and have the ability to assimilate inorganic carbon. Here, we report on the capability and key enabling metabolic machinery of Geobacter metallireducens GS-15 to carry out CO2 fixation and direct electron transfer to iron. An updated metabolic reconstruction was generated, growth screens on targeted conditions of interest were performed, and constraint-based analysis was utilized to characterize and evaluate critical pathways and reactions in G. metallireducens. The novel capability of G. metallireducens to grow autotrophically with formate and Fe(III was predicted and subsequently validated in vivo. Additionally, the energetic cost of transferring electrons to an external electron acceptor was determined through analysis of growth experiments carried out using three different electron acceptors (Fe(III, nitrate, and fumarate by systematically isolating and examining different parts of the electron transport chain. The updated reconstruction will serve as a knowledgebase for understanding and engineering Geobacter and similar species.

  6. Solar cyclic behavior of trapped energetic electrons in Earth's inner radiation belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Bob; Thorne, Richard M.

    1994-01-01

    Magnetic electron spectrometer data from six satellites (OV3-3, OV1-14, OGO 5, S3-2, S3-3, and CRRES) have been used to study long-term (1966-1991) behavior of trapped energetic electrons in the inner radiation belt. Comparison of the observed energy spectra at L equal to or greater than 1.35 for different phases of the solar cycle reveals a clear trend toward enhanced fluxes during periods of solar maximum for energies below a few hundred keV; we suggest that this is caused by an increase in the rate of inward radial diffusion from a source at higher L. In contrast, for L less than 1.30, where atmospheric collisions become increasingly important, the electron flux is reduced during solar maximum; we attribute this to the expected increase in upper atmospheric densities. The electron flux above 1 MeV exhibits a systematic decay beyond 1979 to values well below the current NASA AE-8 model. This indicates that the natural background of high-energy electrons has previously been overestimated due to the long lasting presence of electrons produced by nuclear detonations in the upper atmosphere in the late 1950s and early 1960s.

  7. MMS Super-Conjunction Studies of Chorus Wave Properties and Their Effects on Energetic Electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaynes, A. N.; Baker, D.; Blake, J. B.; Kletzing, C.; Zhao, H.; Leonard, T. W.; Turner, D. L.; Fennell, J. F.; Wilder, F. D.; Kanekal, S. G.; Schiller, Q.; Mauk, B.; Cohen, I.

    2016-12-01

    During the first full sweep of NASA's MMS mission through the Earth's magnetotail, referred to as Phase 1x, the active state of the geomagnetic environment allowed many opportunities for new insights into inner magnetospheric dynamics. Of particular interest is the local generation of whistler-mode chorus waves and their subsequent effect on energetic electrons. In this study, we take advantage of conjunctions between MMS and the rest of the Heliospheric System Observatory satellites, including one super-conjunction event on 01 May 2016, when both Van Allen Probes and MMS were all within 1 Re of each other at the same time. Using multipoint measurements, we examine the properties and effects of chorus in fine detail. This concentration of observation points in the chorus generation region unveils new understanding of the wave-particle interactions that accelerate electrons and form the Earth's radiation belts.

  8. PRECIPITATION REACTION OF CLAVULANIC ACID: THERMODYNAMIC AND ELECTRONIC STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana C. Granato

    Full Text Available In the present article the theoretical calculation of thermodynamic parameters for the two main precipitation agents, potassium 2-ethylhexanoate and t-octylamine, employed by the pharmaceutical industry to obtain potassium clavulanate for clinical use, is described. The results obtained using the standard thermochemistry calculation in the Gaussian package and by calculation of the reactivity indexes of the reagents and products are compared. The calculated thermodynamic parameters indicate that the reactivity indexes present a better correlation with the experimentally obtained percentage yield. In addition, a series of additional precipitation agents that are also used in industrial procedures to obtain potassium clavulanate for clinical use, were compared. This was done to verify if any present, a priori, better properties than potassium 2-ethylhexanoate or t-octylamine. The consistency of the reactivity indexes calculated clearly suggests that the methodology employed can be used to screen future precipitation agents for possible use in the production of potassium clavulanate.

  9. Electron tomographic analysis reveals ultrastructural features of mitochondrial cristae architecture which reflect energetic state and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yi-Fan; Lin, Shao-Syuan; Chen, Jing-Min; Tsai, Han-Zen; Hsieh, Tao-Shih; Fu, Chi-Yu

    2017-03-30

    Within mitochondria, the ability to produce energy relies upon the architectural hallmarks of double membranes and cristae invaginations. Herein, we describe novel features of mitochondrial cristae structure, which correspond to the energetic state of the organelle. In concordance with high-energy demand, mitochondria of Drosophila indirect flight muscle exhibited extensive intra-mitochondrial membrane switches between densely packed lamellar cristae that resulted in a spiral-like cristae network and allowed for bidirectional matrix confluency. This highly interconnected architecture is expected to allow rapid equilibration of membrane potential and biomolecules across integrated regions. In addition, mutant flies with mtDNA replication defect and an accelerated aging phenotype accumulated mitochondria that contained subsections of swirling membrane alongside normal cristae. The swirling membrane had impaired energy production capacity as measured by protein composition and function. Furthermore, mitochondrial fusion and fission dynamics were affected in the prematurely aged flies. Interestingly, the normal cristae that remained in the mitochondria with swirling membranes maintained acceptable function that camouflaged them from quality control elimination. Overall, structural features of mitochondrial cristae were described in three-dimension from serial section electron tomographic analysis which reflect energetic state and mtDNA-mediated aging.

  10. Formation, Energetics, and Electronic Properties of Graphene Monolayer and Bilayer Doped with Heteroatoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshitaka Fujimoto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Doping with heteroatoms is one of the most effective methods to tailor the electronic properties of carbon nanomaterials such as graphene and carbon nanotubes, and such nanomaterials doped with heteroatom dopants might therefore provide not only new physical and chemical properties but also novel nanoelectronics/optoelectronics device applications. The boron and nitrogen are neighboring elements to carbon in the periodic table, and they are considered to be good dopants for carbon nanomaterials. We here review the recent work of boron and nitrogen doping effects into graphene monolayer as well as bilayer on the basis of the first-principles electronic structure calculations in the framework of the density-functional theory. We show the energetics and the electronic properties of boron and nitrogen defects in graphene monolayer and bilayer. As for the nitrogen doping, we further discuss the stabilities, the growth processes, and the electronic properties associated with the plausible nitrogen defect formation in graphene which is suggested by experimental observations.

  11. A case study of electron precipitation fluxes due to plasmaspheric hiss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardman, Rachael; Clilverd, Mark A.; Rodger, Craig J.; Brundell, James B.; Duthie, Roger; Holzworth, Robert H.; Mann, Ian R.; Milling, David K.; Macusova, Eva

    2015-08-01

    We find that during a large geomagnetic storm in October 2011 the trapped fluxes of >30, >100, and >300 keV outer radiation belt electrons were enhanced at L = 3-4 during the storm main phase. A gradual decay of the trapped fluxes was observed over the following 5-7 days, even though no significant precipitation fluxes could be observed in the Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellite (POES) electron precipitation detectors. We use the Antarctic-Arctic Radiation-belt (Dynamic) Deposition-VLF Atmospheric Research Konsortium receiver network to investigate the characteristics of the electron precipitation throughout the storm period. Weak electron precipitation was observed on the dayside for 5-7 days, consistent with being driven by plasmaspheric hiss. Using a previously published plasmaspheric hiss-induced electron energy e-folding spectrum of E0 = 365 keV, the observed radio wave perturbation levels at L = 3-4 were found to be caused by >30 keV electron precipitation with flux ~100 el cm-2 s-1 sr-1. The low levels of precipitation explain the lack of response of the POES telescopes to the flux, because of the effect of the POES lower sensitivity limit and ability to measure weak diffusion-driven precipitation. The detection of dayside, inner plasmasphere electron precipitation during the recovery phase of the storm is consistent with plasmaspheric hiss wave-particle interactions and shows that the waves can be a significant influence on the evolution of the outer radiation belt trapped flux that resides inside the plasmapause.

  12. Transition metal oxides for organic electronics: energetics, device physics and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Jens; Hamwi, Sami; Kröger, Michael; Kowalsky, Wolfgang; Riedl, Thomas; Kahn, Antoine

    2012-10-23

    During the last few years, transition metal oxides (TMO) such as molybdenum tri-oxide (MoO(3) ), vanadium pent-oxide (V(2) O(5) ) or tungsten tri-oxide (WO(3) ) have been extensively studied because of their exceptional electronic properties for charge injection and extraction in organic electronic devices. These unique properties have led to the performance enhancement of several types of devices and to a variety of novel applications. TMOs have been used to realize efficient and long-term stable p-type doping of wide band gap organic materials, charge-generation junctions for stacked organic light emitting diodes (OLED), sputtering buffer layers for semi-transparent devices, and organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells with improved charge extraction, enhanced power conversion efficiency and substantially improved long term stability. Energetics in general play a key role in advancing device structure and performance in organic electronics; however, the literature provides a very inconsistent picture of the electronic structure of TMOs and the resulting interpretation of their role as functional constituents in organic electronics. With this review we intend to clarify some of the existing misconceptions. An overview of TMO-based device architectures ranging from transparent OLEDs to tandem OPV cells is also given. Various TMO film deposition methods are reviewed, addressing vacuum evaporation and recent approaches for solution-based processing. The specific properties of the resulting materials and their role as functional layers in organic devices are discussed. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Study the Precipitation of Radiation Belt Electrons during the Rapid Dropout Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, W.; Cunningham, G.; Li, X.; Chen, Y.

    2015-12-01

    During the main phase of storms, the relativistic electron flux in the radiation belt can drop by orders of magnitude on timescales of a few hours. Where do the electrons go? This is one of the most important outstanding questions in radiation belt studies. Radiation belt electrons can be lost either by transport across the magnetopause into interplanetary space or by precipitation into the atmosphere. In this work we first conduct a survey of the MeV electron dropouts using the Van Allen Probes data in conjunction with the low-altitude measurements of precipitating electrons by 6 NOAA/POES satellites. The dropout events are categorized into three types: precipitation-loss dominant, outward radial diffusion dominant, or with contributions from both mechanisms. The survey results suggest the relative importance of precipitation and outward radial diffusion to the fast dropouts of radiation belt electrons, and their extent in L-shell and electron energy. Then, for specific events identified as dominated by precipitation loss, we use the Drift-Diffusion model, which includes the effects of azimuthal drift and pitch angle diffusion, to simulate both the electron dropout observed by Van Allen Probes and the distributions of drift-loss-cone electrons observed by multiple low-earth-orbit satellites (6 POES and the Colorado Student Space Weather Experiment). The model quantifies the electron precipitation loss and pitch angle diffusion coefficient, Dxx, with high temporal and spatial resolution. Finally, by comparing the Dxx derived from the model with those estimated from the quasi-linear theory using wave data from Van Allen Probes and other event-specific wave models, we are able to test the validity of quasi-linear theory and seek direct evidence of the wave-particle interactions during the dropouts.

  14. Altered expression of mitochondrial electron transport chain proteins and improved myocardial energetic state during late ischemic preconditioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Cabrera (Jesús); E.A. Ziemba (Elizabeth); L.H. Colbert (Lisa); L.B. Anderson (Lorraine); W.J. Sluiter (Wim); D.J.G.M. Duncker (Dirk); T.A. Butterick (Tammy); J. Sikora (Joseph); H.B. Ward (Herbert B.); R.F. Kelly (Rosemary); E.O. McFalls (Edward)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractAltered expression of mitochondrial electron transport proteins has been shown in early preconditioned myocardial tissue. We wished to determine whether these alterations persist in the Second Window of Protection (SWOP) and if so, whether a favorable energetic state is facilitated

  15. Electron Impact Ionization/Dissociation of Molecules: Production of Energetic Radical Ions and Anions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feil, S.; Sulzer, P.; Mauracher, A.; Beikircher, M.; Wendt, N.; Aleem, A.; Denifl, S.; Zappa, F.; Matt-Leubner, S.; Bacher, A.; Matejcik, S.; Probst, M.; Scheier, P.; Märk, T. D.

    2007-10-01

    In order to provide quantitative information on electron collision processes involving various plasma constituents (in particular hydrocarbons) and to elucidate the properties of cations and anions produced we have carried out the past years a series of studies with a variety of techniques in our laboratory in Innsbruck. In the present review we will present some recent results on electron impact ionization and attachment in order to illustrate recent progress in this field in particular concerning the production of energetic fragment cations for hydrocarbons and differences in the attachment of isomers for nitro-organics. Using a Nier type electron impact ion source in combination with a double focusing two sector field mass spectrometer, partial cross sections for electron impact ionization of acetylene, propene and other hydrocarbons have been measured for electron energies up to 1000 eV. Discrimination factors for ions have been determined using the deflection field method in combination with a three-dimensional ion trajectory simulation of ions produced in the ion source. Analysis of the ion yield curves obtained by scanning the deflectors allows the assignment of ions with the same mass-to-charge ratio to specific production channels on the basis of their different kinetic energy distributions. This analysis also allows to determine, besides kinetic energy distributions of fragment ions, partial cross sections differential in kinetic energy. Moreover charge separation reactions (for instance in case of acetylene the Coulomb explosion of the doubly-charged parent ions C2H2++ into the fragment ions C2H+ and H+) are investigated by means of a number of metastable mass spectrometry methods and the associated mean kinetic energy release is deduced. Free electron attachment to the three different isomers of mono-nitrotoluene molecules in the gas phase is studied using two different crossed electron-molecule beams technique. In contrast to previous studies for a

  16. On the Radiolysis of Ethylene Ices by Energetic Electrons and Implications to the Extraterrestrial Hydrocarbon Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Li; Maity, Surajit; Abplanalp, Matt; Turner, Andrew; Kaiser, Ralf I.

    2014-07-01

    The chemical processing of ethylene ices (C2H4) by energetic electrons was investigated at 11 K to simulate the energy transfer processes and synthesis of new molecules induced by secondary electrons generated in the track of galactic cosmic ray particles. A combination of Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (solid state) and quadrupole mass spectrometry (gas phase) resulted in the identification of six hydrocarbon molecules: methane (CH4), the C2 species acetylene (C2H2), ethane (C2H6), the ethyl radical (C2H5), and—for the very first time in ethylene irradiation experiments—the C4 hydrocarbons 1-butene (C4H8) and n-butane (C4H10). By tracing the temporal evolution of the newly formed molecules spectroscopically online and in situ, we were also able to fit the kinetic profiles with a system of coupled differential equations, eventually providing mechanistic information, reaction pathways, and rate constants on the radiolysis of ethylene ices and the inherent formation of smaller (C1) and more complex (C2, C4) hydrocarbons involving carbon-hydrogen bond ruptures, atomic hydrogen addition processes, and radical-radical recombination pathways. We also discuss the implications of these results on the hydrocarbon chemistry on Titan's surface and on ice-coated, methane-bearing interstellar grains as present in cold molecular clouds such as TMC-1.

  17. The heating of the thermal plasma with energetic electrons in small solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, H. A.; Lin, R. P.

    1986-01-01

    The energetic electrons deduced from hard X-rays in the thick target model may be responsible for heating of soft X-ray plasma in solar flares. It is shown from OSO-7 studies that if a cutoff of 10 keV is assumed, the total electron is comparable to the thermal plasma energy. However, (1) the soft X-ray emission often appears to begin before the hard X-ray burst, (2) in about one-third of flares there is no detectable hard X-ray emission, and (3) for most events the energy content (assuming constant density) of soft X-ray plasma continues to rise after the end of the hard X-ray burst. To understand these problems we have analyzed the temporal relationship between soft X-rays and hard X-rays for 20 small events observed by ISEE-3 during 1980. One example is shown. The start of soft X-ray and hard X-ray bursts is defined as the time when the counting rates of the 4.8 to 5. keV and 25.8 to 43.2 keV channels, respectively, exceed the background by one standard deviation.

  18. Comparison between EGSnrc, Geant4, MCNP5 and Penelope for mono-energetic electron beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archambault, John Paul; Mainegra-Hing, Ernesto

    2015-07-01

    A simple geometry is chosen to highlight similarities and differences of current electron transport algorithms implemented in four Monte Carlo codes commonly used in radiation physics. Energy deposited in a water-filled sphere by mono-energetic electron beams was calculated using EGSnrc, Geant4, MCNP5 and Penelope as the radius of the sphere varied from 0.25 cm to 4.5 cm for beam energies of 0.5 MeV, 1.0 MeV and 5.0 MeV. The calculations were performed in single-scattering mode (where applicable) and in condensed history mode. A good agreement is found for the single-scattering calculations except for the in-air case at 0.5 MeV where differences increase with decreasing radius up to 5% between EGSnrc and Penelope. Differences between results calculated with the default user settings when compared to their own single-scattering modes are under 5% for all codes when the sphere is surrounded by vacuum, however, large differences occur for Geant4, MCNP5 and Penelope when air is introduced around the sphere. Finally, the parameters associated with the multiple scattering algorithms were tuned reducing these differences below 10% for these codes at the expense of increased computation time.

  19. Simultaneous measurements of waves and precipitating electrons near the equator in the outer radiation belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imhof, W. L.; Robinson, R. M.; Collin, H. L.; Wygant, J. R.; Anderson, R. R.

    1994-01-01

    An investigation of wave-particle interactions is made using several simultaneous electron and wave measurements performed at near-equatorial positions from the Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) satellite. Bursts of electron precipitation were observed, most frequently at local times near dawn. Examples of bursts are presented in which the fluxes of the precipitating electrons and the wave intensities are correlated with coefficients as high as 0.7. During bursts the frequencies of the enhanced waves spanned a wide range from 311 Hz to 3.11 kHz, and the energies of the enhanced electrons were in the range 1.7 keV to 288 keV. The changes of the precipitating fluxes were generally less pronounced at the lowest energies. On the basis of electron-cyclotron resonant calculations using the cold plasma densities and ambient magnetic fields taken from the CRRES measurements it was found that the wave frequencies and precipitating electron energies were generally consistent with those expected from electron resonance with parallel propagating whistler waves. The electron data of principal concern here were acquired in and about the loss cone with narrow angular resolution spectrometers covering the energy range 340 eV to 5 MeV. The wave data included electric field measurements spanning frequencies from 5 Hz to 400 kHz and magnetic field measurements from 5 Hz to 10 kHz.

  20. Precipitation of radiation belt electrons by EMIC waves, observed from ground and space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordanova, Vania K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Miyoski, Y [NAGOYA UNIV; Sakaguchi, K [NAGOYA UNIV; Shiokawa, K [NAGOYA UNIV; Evans, D S [NOAA, BOULDER; Albert, Jay [AFRL; Connors, M [UNIV OF ATHABASCA

    2008-01-01

    We show evidence that left-hand polarised electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) plasma waves can cause the loss of relativistic electrons into the atmosphere. Our unique set of ground and satellite observations shows coincident precipitation of ions with energies of tens of keY and of relativistic electrons into an isolated proton aurora. The coincident precipitation was produced by wave-particle interactions with EMIC waves near the plasmapause. The estimation of pitch angle diffusion coefficients supports that the observed EMIC waves caused coincident precipitation ofboth ions and relativistic electrons. This study clarifies that ions with energies of tens of ke V affect the evolution of relativistic electrons in the radiation belts via cyclotron resonance with EMIC waves, an effect that was first theoretically predicted in the early 1970's.

  1. Evaluating the Role and Effects of Precipitation on Relativistic Electron Losses during Storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y.; Fu, X.

    2016-12-01

    Theoretic studies have suggested that during storm times various waves (e.g., whistler-mode chorus and electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves) can cause significant precipitation of relativistic ( MeV) electrons that are originally trapped inside the outer radiation belt. However, the role of precipitation and its quantitative contribution to the losses of outer-belt electrons remain open questions. In this study, we tackle these questions by systemically examining the latest wave and electron in-situ, simultaneous observations made at different altitudes by Van Allen Probes from near equator, NOAA POES at low Earth orbits near/across electron loss cone, and BARREL under the mesosphere. After calibrating with DEMTER observations, we first confirm and quantify the response of POES MEPED proton channels to MeV electrons. Next, we identify a list of precipitation events from BARREL and POES measurements, examine the temporal adn spatial relation between the two data sets, and estimate the intensities of electron precipitation with ascertained uncertainties. Then, from Van Allen Probes data, we select another list of dropout events during storms. By cross checking the above two lists, we are able to determine the causal relation between precipitation and dropouts through individual case as well as statistical studies so as to quantify the contributions from precipitation. This study mainly focuses on the relatively small L-shells with positive phase space density radial gradient in order to alleviate the impacts from outward radial diffusion and adiabatic effects. Based upon the recent discovery of cross-energy cross-pitch angle coherence, we pay particular attention to the cross-term diffusions which may account for the extra "loss" needed by observed MeV electron dropouts. Results from this observational study will advance our knowledge on the loss mechanism of outer-belt electrons, and thus lay down another stepping stone towards high-fidelity physics-based models for

  2. A statistical study over Europe of the relative locations of lightning and associated energetic burst of electrons from the radiation belt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Bourriez

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The DEMETER (Detection of Electro-Magnetic Emissions Transmitted from Earthquake Regions spacecraft detects short bursts of lightning-induced electron precipitation (LEP simultaneously with newly injected upgoing whistlers. The LEP occurs within < 1 s of the causative lightning discharge. First in situ observations of the size and location of the region affected by the LEP precipitation are presented on the basis of a statistical study made over Europe using the DEMETER energetic particle detector, wave electric field experiment, and networks of lightning detection (Météorage, the UK Met Office Arrival Time Difference network (ATDnet, and the World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN. The LEP is shown to occur significantly north of the initial lightning and extends over some 1000 km on each side of the longitude of the lightning. In agreement with models of electron interaction with obliquely propagating lightning-generated whistlers, the distance from the LEP to the lightning decreases as lightning proceed to higher latitudes.

  3. Dynamics of energetic electrons interacting with sub-packet chorus emissions in the magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiraga, R.; Omura, Y.

    2016-12-01

    The recent study has revealed RTA and URA processes, the acceleration of relativistic electrons by interaction with chorus emissions. The wave model, however, is found to require some updates based on the recent observations. We develop a new wave model compatible with the observations and study the particle motion under the influence of this new wave model. The most distinctive feature of the new model is its amplitude growth manner. The wave is excited near the equator and grows in amplitude as an absolute instability as a function of time. This amplitude growth is bounded by the optimum and threshold amplitudes. When the amplitude grows to reach the optimum amplitude, it drops down to the threshold value and repeats the growth with a saw-like shape defined as sub-packet wave. The sub-packet wave generated near the equator experiences the convective amplitude growth propagating to the higher latitude region. Since the group velocity of the wave propagation is a function of its frequency, a wave source generated and released from the equator at a certain time and a group velocity could be overtaken by another wave released at a later timing and hence a faster group velocity. In sub-packet case, this frequency value is further affected by the sub-packet amplitude wave form to make the process more complex. Into this new wave form, energetic electrons are inserted and their motions are examined. For example, a resonant electron can be entrapped by the wave, being accelerated and normally detrapped after a certain period of time, but there can be a possibility that the following sub-packet wave in a complex propagation manner coincidently entraps the electron to provide multiple accelerations. We injected a large number of electrons over a wide energy range from 10kev to 10Mev into the sub-packet wave to simulate the nonlinear dynamics of RTA and URA. The electrons motion or more precisely entrapping and detrapping processes are examined under various conditions.

  4. Quantifying the Precipitation Loss of Radiation Belt Electrons During a Rapid Dropout Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, K. H.; Tu, W.; Xiang, Z.

    2017-10-01

    Relativistic electron flux in the radiation belt can drop by orders of magnitude within the timespan of hours. In this study, we used the drift-diffusion model that includes azimuthal drift and pitch angle diffusion of electrons to simulate low-altitude electron distribution observed by POES/MetOp satellites for rapid radiation belt electron dropout event occurring on 1 May 2013. The event shows fast dropout of MeV energy electrons at L > 4 over a few hours, observed by the Van Allen Probes mission. By simulating the electron distributions observed by multiple POES satellites, we resolve the precipitation loss with both high spatial and temporal resolutions and a range of energies. We estimate the pitch angle diffusion coefficients as a function of energy, pitch angle, and L-shell and calculate corresponding electron lifetimes during the event. The simulation results show fast electron precipitation loss at L > 4 during the electron dropout, with estimated electron lifetimes on the order of half an hour for MeV energies. The electron loss rate shows strong energy dependence with faster loss at higher energies, which suggest that this dropout event is dominated by quick and localized scattering process that prefers higher energy electrons. The improved temporal and spatial resolutions of electron precipitation rates provided by multiple low-altitude observations can resolve fast-varying electron loss during rapid electron dropouts (over a few hours), which occur too fast for a single low-altitude satellite. The capability of estimating the fast-varying electron lifetimes during rapid dropout events is an important step in improving radiation belt model accuracy.

  5. Energetic electrons, hard x-ray emission and MHD activity studies in the IR-T1 tokamak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agah, K Mikaili; Ghoranneviss, M; Elahi, A Salar

    2015-01-01

    Determinations of plasma parameters as well as the Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) activity, energetic electrons energy and energy confinement time are essential for future fusion reactors experiments and optimized operation. Also some of the plasma information can be deduced from these parameters, such as plasma equilibrium, stability, and MHD instabilities. In this contribution we investigated the relation between energetic electrons, hard x-ray emission and MHD activity in the IR-T1 Tokamak. For this purpose we used the magnetic diagnostics and a hard x-ray spectroscopy in IR-T1 tokamak. A hard x-ray emission is produced by collision of the runaway electrons with the plasma particles or limiters. The mean energy was calculated from the slope of the energy spectrum of hard x-ray photons.

  6. Generation of banded chorus by a two-component energetic electron distribution in an inhomogeneous magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, H.; Wang, Z. B.; Tao, X.; Wang, X. G.

    2017-10-01

    The generation of banded chorus by a two-component energetic electron distribution in a mirror-like inhomogeneous magnetic field is investigated in this work by a 1D hybrid code DAWN. A previous study by Liu et al. [Geophys. Res. Lett. 38, L14108 (2011)] suggested that banded chorus waves can be independently generated by two energetic electron populations. In this work, we first conduct a series of simulations to confirm that the starting frequency of chorus elements is close to the frequency of maximum linear growth rate. With carefully chosen simulation parameters, we then successfully generate banded chorus with a gap near half the electron gyrofrequency. By expanding the parameter range, however, we demonstrate that the gap can be located at frequencies other than the half electron gyrofrequency. We conclude that though the previous mechanism proposed by Liu et al. [Geophys. Res. Lett. 38, L14108 (2011)] can explain the relative independence of upper band and lower band chorus, further work is needed to explain why the linear properties of energetic electrons in the magnetosphere should produce a gap at 0.5Ωe0.

  7. A positive correlation between energetic electron butterfly distributions and magnetosonic waves in the radiation belt slot region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chang; Su, Zhenpeng; Xiao, Fuliang; Zheng, Huinan; Wang, Yuming; Wang, Shui; Spence, H. E.; Reeves, G. D.; Baker, D. N.; Blake, J. B.; Funsten, H. O.

    2017-05-01

    Energetic (hundreds of keV) electrons in the radiation belt slot region have been found to exhibit the butterfly pitch angle distributions. Resonant interactions with magnetosonic and whistler-mode waves are two potential mechanisms for the formation of these peculiar distributions. Here we perform a statistical study of energetic electron pitch angle distribution characteristics measured by Van Allen Probes in the slot region during a 3 year period from May 2013 to May 2016. Our results show that electron butterfly distributions are closely related to magnetosonic waves rather than to whistler-mode waves. Both electron butterfly distributions and magnetosonic waves occur more frequently at the geomagnetically active times than at the quiet times. In a statistical sense, more distinct butterfly distributions usually correspond to magnetosonic waves with larger amplitudes and vice versa. The averaged magnetosonic wave amplitude is less than 5 pT in the case of normal and flat-top distributions with a butterfly index BI =1 but reaches ˜50-95 pT in the case of distinct butterfly distributions with BI >1.3. For magnetosonic waves with amplitudes >50 pT, the occurrence rate of butterfly distribution is above 80%. Our study suggests that energetic electron butterfly distributions in the slot region are primarily caused by magnetosonic waves.

  8. Fast Acceleration of ``Killer'' Electrons and Energetic Ions by Interplanetary Shock Stimulated ULF Waves in the Inner Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Q.

    2010-12-01

    Energetic electrons and ions in the Van Allen radiation belt are the number one space weather threat. How the energetic particles are accelerated in the Van Allen radiation belts is one of major problems in the space physics. Very Low Frequency (VLF) wave-particle interaction has been considered as one of primary electron acceleration mechanisms because electron cyclotron resonances can easily occur in the VLF frequency range. However, recently, by using four Cluster spacecraft observations, we have found that after interplanetary shocks impact on the Earth’s magnetosphere, the acceleration of the energetic electrons in the radiation belt started nearly immediately and lasted for a few hours. The time scale (a few days) for traditional acceleration mechanism of VLF wave-particle interaction, as proposed by Horne et al. [1], to accelerate electrons to relativistic energies is too long to explain the observations. It is further found that interplanetary shocks or solar wind pressure pulses with even small dynamic pressure change can play a non-negligible role in the radiation belt dynamics. Interplanetary shocks interact with and the Earth’s magnetosphere manifests many fundamental important space physics phenomena including energetic particle acceleration. The mechanism of fast acceleration of energetic electrons in the radiation belt response to interplanetary shock impact contains three contributing parts: (1) the initial adiabatic acceleration due to the strong shock-related magnetic field compression; (2) then followed by the drift-resonant acceleration with poloidal ULF waves excited at different L-shells; and (3) particle acceleration due to fast damping electric fields associated with ULF waves. Particles will have a net acceleration since particles in the second half circle will not lose all of the energy gained in the first half cycle. The results reported in this paper cast new lights on understanding the acceleration of energetic particles in the

  9. On the radiolysis of ethylene ices by energetic electrons and implications to the extraterrestrial hydrocarbon chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Li [Department of Chemistry, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330031 (China); Maity, Surajit; Abplanalp, Matt; Turner, Andrew; Kaiser, Ralf I., E-mail: ralfk@hawaii.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)

    2014-07-20

    The chemical processing of ethylene ices (C{sub 2}H{sub 4}) by energetic electrons was investigated at 11 K to simulate the energy transfer processes and synthesis of new molecules induced by secondary electrons generated in the track of galactic cosmic ray particles. A combination of Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (solid state) and quadrupole mass spectrometry (gas phase) resulted in the identification of six hydrocarbon molecules: methane (CH{sub 4}), the C2 species acetylene (C{sub 2}H{sub 2}), ethane (C{sub 2}H{sub 6}), the ethyl radical (C{sub 2}H{sub 5}), and—for the very first time in ethylene irradiation experiments—the C4 hydrocarbons 1-butene (C{sub 4}H{sub 8}) and n-butane (C{sub 4}H{sub 10}). By tracing the temporal evolution of the newly formed molecules spectroscopically online and in situ, we were also able to fit the kinetic profiles with a system of coupled differential equations, eventually providing mechanistic information, reaction pathways, and rate constants on the radiolysis of ethylene ices and the inherent formation of smaller (C1) and more complex (C2, C4) hydrocarbons involving carbon-hydrogen bond ruptures, atomic hydrogen addition processes, and radical-radical recombination pathways. We also discuss the implications of these results on the hydrocarbon chemistry on Titan's surface and on ice-coated, methane-bearing interstellar grains as present in cold molecular clouds such as TMC-1.

  10. New insight into nanoparticle precipitation by electron beams in borosilicate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabri, M.M.; Moebus, G. [University of Sheffield, Department of Materials Science and Engineering (United Kingdom)

    2017-06-15

    Nanoprecipitation in different oxide glasses by means of electron irradiation in transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been compared in this study. Upon irradiation, groups or patterns of nanoparticles with various morphologies and sizes were formed in borosilicate glasses, loaded with zinc, copper, and silver. The study successfully includes loading ranges for the target metal from doping level (1%) over medium level (20%) to majority phase (60%). It is found that particle patterning resolution is affected by parallel processes of amorphous phase separation, glass ablation, and delocalised precipitation. In addition, via an in-situ study, it is confirmed that by heating alone without irradiation, no precipitate nanoparticles form. (orig.)

  11. Determining the Effects of EMIC Waves on Precipitating MeV Electrons during Strom Main Phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Theoretic studies have suggested that electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves can cause significant precipitation of ~MeV electrons, supposedly accounting for the fast dropouts of outer-belt electrons during storm main phases. Usually the resonance between left-hand polarized EMIC with electrons with moderate energy is unlikely due to their opposite polarizations, while resonance with highly relativistic electrons do occur and cause electrons to precipitate into the atmosphere through pitch-angle scattering. Several previous studies on observations find a close relation between the two phenomena, e.g., Cliverd et al. [2007], Sandanger et al. [2007], and Miyoshi et al. [2008], while others find otherwise, e.g., Meredith et al. [2011]; recently, more observational evidence supporting the connection has been reported (e.g., Li et al. [2014] and Blum et al. [2015]). However, whether and under what favoring conditions EMIC waves cause rapid dropouts of relativistic electrons during storm main phases remain unresolved questions. Here, using latest wave and electron data from multiple missions including Van Allen Probes, BARREL, and NOAA POES, we systemically examine the relation between EMIC waves and MeV electron precipitation. We first construct two independent event lists for intensified EMIC waves and enhancements of MeV electron precipitation, respectively. Then we cross check the two lists to identify if any significant correlation exists in between, and further characterize the wave effectiveness in terms of L-shell, MLT, resonance energy, as well as the background plasma conditions. Results from this study will advance our knowledge about the loss mechanism of outer-belt electrons, thus laying down another stepping stone towards high-fidelity physics-based models for radiation belts.

  12. Global auroral conductance distribution due to electron and proton precipitation from IMAGE-FUV observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Coumans

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available The Far Ultraviolet (FUV imaging system on board the IMAGE satellite provides a global view of the north auroral region in three spectral channels, including the SI12 camera sensitive to Doppler shifted Lyman-α emission. FUV images are used to produce instantaneous maps of electron mean energy and energy fluxes for precipitated protons and electrons. We describe a method to calculate ionospheric Hall and Pedersen conductivities induced by auroral proton and electron ionization based on a model of interaction of auroral particles with the atmosphere. Different assumptions on the energy spectral distribution for electrons and protons are compared. Global maps of ionospheric conductances due to instantaneous observation of precipitating protons are calculated. The contribution of auroral protons in the total conductance induced by both types of auroral particles is also evaluated and the importance of proton precipitation is evaluated. This method is well adapted to analyze the time evolution of ionospheric conductances due to precipitating particles over the auroral region or in particular sectors. Results are illustrated with conductance maps of the north polar region obtained during four periods with different activity levels. It is found that the proton contribution to conductance is relatively higher during quiet periods than during substorms. The proton contribution is higher in the period before the onset and strongly decreases during the expansion phase of substorms. During a substorm which occurred on 28 April 2001, a region of strong proton precipitation is observed with SI12 around 14:00MLT at ~75° MLAT. Calculation of conductances in this sector shows that neglecting the protons contribution would produce a large error. We discuss possible effects of the proton precipitation on electron precipitation in auroral arcs. The increase in the ionospheric conductivity, induced by a former proton precipitation can reduce the potential drop

  13. Global auroral conductance distribution due to electron and proton precipitation from IMAGE-FUV observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Coumans

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available The Far Ultraviolet (FUV imaging system on board the IMAGE satellite provides a global view of the north auroral region in three spectral channels, including the SI12 camera sensitive to Doppler shifted Lyman-α emission. FUV images are used to produce instantaneous maps of electron mean energy and energy fluxes for precipitated protons and electrons. We describe a method to calculate ionospheric Hall and Pedersen conductivities induced by auroral proton and electron ionization based on a model of interaction of auroral particles with the atmosphere. Different assumptions on the energy spectral distribution for electrons and protons are compared. Global maps of ionospheric conductances due to instantaneous observation of precipitating protons are calculated. The contribution of auroral protons in the total conductance induced by both types of auroral particles is also evaluated and the importance of proton precipitation is evaluated. This method is well adapted to analyze the time evolution of ionospheric conductances due to precipitating particles over the auroral region or in particular sectors. Results are illustrated with conductance maps of the north polar region obtained during four periods with different activity levels. It is found that the proton contribution to conductance is relatively higher during quiet periods than during substorms. The proton contribution is higher in the period before the onset and strongly decreases during the expansion phase of substorms. During a substorm which occurred on 28 April 2001, a region of strong proton precipitation is observed with SI12 around 14:00MLT at ~75° MLAT. Calculation of conductances in this sector shows that neglecting the protons contribution would produce a large error. We discuss possible effects of the proton precipitation on electron precipitation in auroral arcs. The increase in the ionospheric conductivity, induced by a former proton precipitation can reduce the potential drop

  14. Conjugate Observations of EMIC Waves and Precipitation of Relativistic Electrons by GOES and NOAA POES Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, D.

    2016-12-01

    Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron (EMIC) waves are believed to be able to pitch-angle scatter ring current ions and relativistic electrons leading to the precipitation of them. Utilizing data from GOES and NOAA Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellites (POES), a conjugate observation of EMIC waves and precipitation of ring current ions and relativistic electrons is found. This event took place under quiet geomagnetic conditions. During this interval, GOES satellite observed EMIC waves at geosynchronous orbit in dusk MLT sector. Conjugately, during this interval, low-altitude NOAA POES satellite observed precipitation of ring current ions and relativistic electrons. To our knowledge, this is the best conjugated observation by satellites to illustrate EMIC wave-driven Relativistic Electron Precipitation (REP) in the Magnetic Local Time (MLT) dusk sector. The REP was observed by NOAA POES at the same L and MLT as where EMIC wave was observed by GOES, and the projections of GOES and NOAA POES on the Earth along the geomagnetic field line are nearly at the same geomagnetic latitude and longitude (△MLAT 0.7°, △MLong 0.6°). This event suggests that, during the quiet geomagnetic conditions, EMIC waves can also cause the loss of ring current ions and relativistic electrons through pitch-angle scattering in the dusk sector.

  15. Radiation by energetic electrons accelerated by wave-particle interaction: a plausible mechanism for X-ray emission from the Venus mantle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bingham, R. [STFC Rutherford Appleton Lab., Didcot, Oxon (United Kingdom). Space Science and Technology Dept.; Strathclyde Univ., Glasgow (United Kingdom). Physics Dept.; Quest, K.B. [California Univ., San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States). ECE Dept.; Shapiro, V.D. [California Univ., San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States). Physics Dept.; Kellett, B.J. [STFC Rutherford Appleton Lab., Didcot, Oxon (United Kingdom). Space Science and Technology Dept.

    2008-07-01

    In this paper it is argued that recently observed X-ray emission from non-magnetic planets (Dennerl et al., 2002) can be explained as a combination of bremsstrahlung and line K-shell radiation produced by the interaction of energetic electrons with the neutral atmosphere. Numerical simulations show that the modified two stream instability can generate energetic 100 eV electrons that are observed and these electrons can produce X-ray emission. (orig.)

  16. Radiation by energetic electrons accelerated by wave-particle interaction: a plausible mechanism for x-ray emission from the Venus mantle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Bingham

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper it is argued that recently observed x-ray emission from non-magnetic planets (Dennerl et al., 2002 can be explained as a combination of bremsstrahlung and line K-shell radiation produced by the interaction of energetic electrons with the neutral atmosphere. Numerical simulations show that the modified two stream instability can generate energetic 100 eV electrons that are observed and these electrons can produce x-ray emission.

  17. Contribution of proton and electron precipitation to the observed electron concentration in October-November 2003 and September 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verronen, P.T.; Andersson, M.E.; Kauristie, K.; Palmroth, M. [Finnish Meteorological Institute, Helsinki (Finland). Earth Observation; Kero, A. [Oulu Univ., Sodankylae (Finland). Sodankylae Geophysical Observatory; Enell, C.F. [EISCAT Scientific Association, Kiruna (Sweden); Wissing, J.M. [Osnabrueck Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Environmental Systems Research; Talaat, E.R. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Laurel, MD (United States). Applied Physics Lab.; Sarris, T.E. [Democritus Univ. of Thrace, Xanthi (Greece). Space Research Lab.; Armandillo, E. [European Space Agency, Nordwijk (Netherlands). ESTEC

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the altitude distribution of particle precipitation forcing is vital for the assessment of its atmospheric and climate impacts. However, the proportion of electron and proton forcing around the mesopause region during solar proton events is not always clear due to uncertainties in satellite-based flux observations. Here we use electron concentration observations of the European Incoherent Scatter Scientific Association (EISCAT) incoherent scatter radars located at Tromsoe (69.58 N, 19.23 E) to investigate the contribution of proton and electron precipitation to the changes taking place during two solar proton events. The EISCAT measurements are compared to the results from the SodankylaeIon and Neutral Chemistry Model (SIC). The proton ionization rates are calculated by two different methods - a simple energy deposition calculation and the Atmospheric Ionization Model Osnabrueck (AIMOS v1.2), the latter providing also the electron ionization rates. Our results show that in general the combination of AIMOS and SIC is able to reproduce the observed electron concentration within 50% when both electron and proton forcing is included. Electron contribution is dominant above 90 km, and can contribute significantly also in the upper mesosphere especially during low or moderate proton forcing. In the case of strong proton forcing, the AIMOS electron ionization rates seem to suffer from proton contamination of satellite-based flux data. This leads to overestimation of modelled electron concentrations by up to 90% between 75-90 km and up to 100-150% at 70-75 km. Above 90 km, the model bias varies significantly between the events. Although we cannot completely rule out EISCAT data issues, the difference is most likely a result of the spatio-temporal fine structure of electron precipitation during individual events that cannot be fully captured by sparse in situ flux (point) measurements, nor by the statistical AIMOS model which is based upon these observations

  18. Excited Electronic and Vibrational State Decomposition of Energetic Materials and Model Systems on Both Nanosecond and Femtosecond Time Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-22

    The Journal of Chemical Physics , ( 2012): 0. doi: 10.1063/1.4752654 Atanu Bhattacharya, Yuanqing Guo, Elliot R. Bernstein. A comparison of the decomposition of electronically excited nitro-containing molecules with energetic moieties C–NO2, N–NO2, and O–NO2, The Journal of Chemical Physics , ( 2012): 0. doi: 10.1063/1.3668139 Yuanqing Guo, Atanu Bhattacharya, Elliot R. Bernstein. Ultrafast S1 to S0 Internal Conversion Dynamics for Dimethylnitramine through a Conical

  19. Perpendicular Diffusion of Solar Energetic Particles: Model Results and Implications for Electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, R. Du Toit; Dresing, Nina; Engelbrecht, N. Eugene

    2017-03-01

    The processes responsible for the effective longitudinal transport of solar energetic particles (SEPs) are still not completely understood. We address this issue by simulating SEP electron propagation using a spatially 2D transport model that includes perpendicular diffusion. By implementing, as far as possible, the most reasonable estimates of the transport (diffusion) coefficients, we compare our results, in a qualitative manner, to recent observations at energies of 55-105 keV, focusing on the longitudinal distribution of the peak intensity, the maximum anisotropy, and the onset time. By using transport coefficients that are derived from first principles, we limit the number of free parameters in the model to (i) the probability of SEPs following diffusing magnetic field lines, quantified by a\\in [0,1], and (ii) the broadness of the Gaussian injection function. It is found that the model solutions are extremely sensitive to the magnitude of the perpendicular diffusion coefficient and relatively insensitive to the form of the injection function as long as a reasonable value of a = 0.2 is used. We illustrate the effects of perpendicular diffusion on the model solutions and discuss the viability of this process as a dominant mechanism by which SEPs are transported in longitude. Lastly, we try to quantity the effectiveness of perpendicular diffusion as an interplay between the magnitude of the relevant diffusion coefficient and the SEP intensity gradient driving the diffusion process. It follows that perpendicular diffusion is extremely effective early in an SEP event when large intensity gradients are present, while the effectiveness quickly decreases with time thereafter.

  20. A Survey of Electron Cyclotron Waves in the Magnetosphere and the Diffuse Auroral Electron Precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-03-09

    nature of these waves. Based on the cases examined in detail using the methods presented in Figures 1-6, we have found that the majority of emis- sions...precipitation can be identified, it will be difficult to access quantitatively its effects on the magnetospheric system. It seems that the only method of solving...REFERENCES Ashour-Abdalla, H., and C. F. Kennel, Diffuse auroral precipitation, J. Geomag. Geoelectr ., 30, 239-255, 1978. Barbosa, D. D., On the convective

  1. Energetic Electron Enhancements below the Radiation Belt and X-Ray Contamination at Low-Orbiting Satellites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alla V. Suvorova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The work concerns a problem of electron-induced contaminant at relatively low latitudes to high-energy astrophysical measurements on board the low-orbiting satellites. We show the results of a statistical analysis of the energetic electron enhancements in energy range 30–300 keV observed by a fleet of NOAA/POES low-orbiting satellites over the time period from 1999 to 2012. We demonstrate geographical distributions of great and moderate long-lasting enhancements caused by different type of the solar wind drivers.

  2. A Statistical Study of the Spatial Extent of Relativistic Electron Precipitation With Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekhar, Sapna; Millan, Robyn; Smith, David

    2017-11-01

    Relativistic electron precipitation (REP) in the atmosphere can contribute significantly to electron loss from the outer radiation belts. In order to estimate the contribution to this loss, it is important to estimate the spatial extent of the precipitation region. We observed REP with the zenith pointing (0°) Medium Energy Proton Electron Detector (MEPED) on board Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellites (POES), for 15 years (2000-2014) and used both single-satellite and multisatellite measurements to estimate an average extent of the region of precipitation in L shell and magnetic local time (MLT). In the duration of 15 years (2000-2014), 31,035 REP events were found in this study. Events were found to split into two classes; one class of events coincided with proton precipitation in the P1 channel (30-80 keV), were located in the dusk and early morning sector, and were more localized in L shell (dL < 0.5), whereas the other class of events did not coincide with proton precipitation, were located mostly in the midnight sector, and were wider in L shell (dL ˜ 1-2.5). Both classes were highly localized in MLT (dMLT ≤ 3 h), occurring mostly during the declining phase of the solar cycle and geomagnetically active times. The events located in the midnight sector for both classes were found to be associated with tail magnetic field stretching which could be due to the fact that they tend to occur mostly during geomagnetically active times or could imply that precipitation is caused by current sheet scattering.

  3. Precipitation of relativistic electrons of the Van Allen belts into the proton aurora

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordanova, Vania K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Miyoshi, Y [NAGOYA UNIV; Sakaguchi, K [NAGOYA UNIV; Shiokawa, K [NAGOYA UNIV; Evans, D S [SEC/NOAA; Albert, Jay [AFRL; Connors, M [UNIV OF ATHABASCA

    2008-01-01

    The Van Allen electron belts consist of two regions encircling the earth in which relativistic electrons are trapped in the earth's magnetic field. Populations of relativistic electrons in the Van Allen belts vary greatly with geomagnetic disturbance and they are a major source of damage to space vehicles. In order to know when and by how much these populations of relativistic electrons increase, it is important to elucidate not only the cause of acceleration of relativistic electrons but also the cause of their loss from the Van Allen belts. Here we show the first evidence that left-hand polarized electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) plasma waves can cause the loss of relativistic electrons into the atmosphere, on the basis of results of an excellent set of ground and satellite observations showing coincident precipitation of ions with energies of tens of keV and of relativistic electrons into an isolated proton aurora. The proton aurora was produced by precipitation of ions with energies of tens of keV due to EMIC waves near the plasma pause, which is a manifestation of wave-particle interactions. These observations clarify that ions with energies of tens of keV affect the evolution of relativistic electrons in the Van Allen belts via parasitic resonance with EMIC waves, an effect that was first theoretically predicted in the early 1970's.

  4. Electron precipitation from EMIC waves: A case study from 31 May 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clilverd, Mark A.; Duthie, Roger; Hardman, Rachael; Hendry, Aaron T.; Rodger, Craig J.; Raita, Tero; Engebretson, Mark; Lessard, Marc R.; Danskin, Donald; Milling, David K.

    2015-05-01

    On 31 May 2013 several rising tone electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves with intervals of pulsations of diminishing periods were observed in the magnetic local time afternoon and evening sectors during the onset of a moderate/large geomagnetic storm. The waves were sequentially observed in Finland, Antarctica, and western Canada. Coincident electron precipitation by a network of ground-based Antarctic Arctic Radiation-belt Dynamic Deposition VLF Atmospheric Research Konsortia and riometer instruments, as well as the Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite (POES) electron telescopes, was also observed. At the same time, POES detected 30-80 keV proton precipitation drifting westward at locations that were consistent with the ground-based observations, indicating substorm injection. Through detailed modeling of the combination of ground and satellite observations, the characteristics of the EMIC-induced electron precipitation were identified as latitudinal width of 2-3° or ΔL = 1 Re, longitudinal width ~50° or 3 h magnetic local time, lower cutoff energy 280 keV, typical flux 1 × 104 el cm-2 sr-1 s-1 > 300 keV. The lower cutoff energy of the most clearly defined EMIC rising tone in this study confirms the identification of a class of EMIC-induced precipitation events with unexpectedly low-energy cutoffs of <400 keV.

  5. Sawtooth control using electron cyclotron current drive in the presence of energetic particles in high performance ASDEX Upgrade plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Chapman, I T; Maraschek, M; McCarthy, P J; Tardini, G

    2013-01-01

    Sawtooth control using steerable electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) has been demonstrated in ASDEX Upgrade plasmas with a significant population of energetic ions in the plasma core and long uncontrolled sawtooth periods. The sawtooth period is found to be minimised when the ECCD resonance is swept to just inside the q = 1 surface. By utilising ECCD inside q = 1 for sawtooth control, it is possible to avoid the triggering of neoclassical tearing modes, even at significnatly higher pressure than anticipated in the ITER baseline scenario. Operation at 25% higher normalised pressure has been achieved when only modest ECCD power is used for sawtooth control compared to identical discharges without sawtooth control when neo-classical tearing modes are triggered by the sawteeth. Modelling suggests that the destabilisation arising from the change in the local magnetic shear caused by the ECCD is able to compete with the stabilising influence of the energetic particles inside the q = 1 surface.

  6. Relativistic electron precipitation enhancements near the outer edge of the radiation belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, R.; Baker, N. D.; Blake, J. B.; Kanekal, S.; Klecker, B.; Hovestadt, D.

    1995-01-01

    Characteristics of relativistic electron precipitation bursts observed by the Heavy Ion Large Telescope (HILT) experiment onboard the Solar, Anomalous, and Magnetospheric Partical Explorer (SAMPEX) satellite were examined. Relatively narrow, persitent, latitudinal bands of precipitation with time scales of 10 to approximately 30 sec near the outer edge of the radiation belt which develop and decay with a time scale of a few hours are reported. Acceleration processes more effective than the usual radial diffusion process or scattering process would be needed to explain this strong precipitation band phenomenon. Another prominent signature is microbursts with a time scale down to a few hundred milliseconds. It is suggested that these microbursts are due to wave-particle interaction involving a relaxation-oscillator type of mechanism.

  7. Energetics of protein fluctuations: Ligand binding to myoglobin and electron transfer in reaction center

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Benjamin Hamilton

    We have measured the temperature dependent kinetics of two different protein reactions: Psp+Qsbsp{A}{-}-> PQsb{A} electron transfer (ET) in the photosynthetic reaction (RC), and recombination of carbonmonoxide (CO) to myoglobin (Mb) after flash photolysis. The ET reaction allows determination of the temperature dependence of energy dissipation as RC adapts to charge transfer on the 100 ms, 10sp3 and 10sp4 s time scales at temperatures from 5 to 300 K. The adaptation, or conformational relaxation, of RC is observed in four distinct tiers of conformational substrates, with average apparent Arrhenius activation enthalpies of 17, 50, 78, and 110 kJ/mol and pre-exponential factors of 10sp{13},\\ 10sp{15},\\ 10sp{21}, and 10sp{25}\\ ssp{-1}, respectively. This parameterization provides a prediction of the time course of relaxations at all temperatures. At 300 K, relaxations are expected to occur from 1 ps to 1 ms; at lower temperatures the distribution of relaxation times broaden. We extend this study to samples of different pH, viscosity, and salt composition. We observe kinetics of CO recombination to horse heart myoglobin between 10 ns and 100 s at temperatures from 80 to 320 K. Essentially all recombination is visible in this time window, allowing the effect of relaxations to be observed on the nanosecond time scale at high temperatures, as well as microsecond to second time scales at lower temperatures. Variation of the solvent pH from 5.1 to 8.0 changes the average low temperature enthalpy barrier to recombination from 6 to 13 kJ/mol, shifting the time scale probed by the recombination reaction by an order of magnitude. Addition of 500 mM KCl, KSCN, or (NHsb4)sb2SOsb4 significantly changes the probability of geminate recombination without affecting either the enthalpy barrier to recombination or the energetics of CO entry to and exit from the heme pocket of the protein. We present a model of recombination which emphasizes the role of protein fluctuations in

  8. PRECIPITATES ANALYSIS BY SCANNING ELECTRON AND TRANSMISSION MICROSCOPY IN A BORON STEEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cássio Aurélio Suski

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We studied the carbides precipitation of low carbon steel with boron austenitized at 870°C, 1,050°C and 1,200°C, oil-hardened by scanning electron microscopy (SEM and transmission (TEM. We evaluated the nucleation sites and size of the precipitates, in addition to the microstructure obtained. The precipitates by TEM analysis was performed using the replica and carbon thin films. It was observed the presence of cementite, Fe3 C, and borocarbides, M23(C,B6 at all test conditions. The cementite showed approximately equal sizes in all austenitizing temperatures, which was attributed to solubilization and reprecipitation during cooling tempering. It was observed the presence of borocarbides in all austenitizing temperatures, and at a temperature of 870°C the precipitation was coarser. This size distribution was not attributed to solubilization and coarsening of borocarbides to 870°C and the solubilization and reprecipitation during cooling tempering the other two temperatures. There was also a lesser precipitation in the grain boundary borocarbides to 1,050°C compared to 1,200°C.

  9. Bi-layer structure of counterstreaming energetic electron fluxes: a diagnostic tool of the acceleration mechanism in the Earth's magnetotail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Sarafopoulos

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available For the first time we identify a bi-layer structure of energetic electron fluxes in the Earth's magnetotail and establish (using datasets mainly obtained by the Geotail Energetic Particles and Ion Composition (EPIC/ICS instrument that it actually provides strong evidence for a purely spatial structure. Each bi-layer event is composed of two distinct layers with counterstreaming energetic electron fluxes, parallel and antiparallel to the local ambient magnetic field lines; in particular, the tailward directed fluxes always occur in a region adjacent to the lobes. Adopting the X-line as a standard reconnection model, we determine the occurrence of bi-layer events relatively to the neutral point, in the substorm frame; four (out of the shown seven events are observed earthward and three tailward, a result implying that four events probably occurred with the substorm's local recovery phase. We discuss the bi-layer events in terms of the X-line model; they add more constraints for any candidate electron acceleration mechanism. It should be stressed that until this time, none proposed electron acceleration mechanism has discussed or predicted these layered structures with all their properties. Then we discuss the bi-layer events in terms of the much promising "akis model", as introduced by Sarafopoulos (2008. The akis magnetic field topology is embedded in a thinned plasma sheet and is potentially causing charge separation. We assume that as the Rc curvature radius of the magnetic field line tends to become equal to the ion gyroradius rg, then the ions become non-adiabatic. At the limit Rc=rg the demagnetization process is also under way and the frozen-in magnetic field condition is violated by strong wave turbulence; hence, the ion particles in this geometry are stochastically scattered. In addition, ion diffusion probably takes place across the magnetic field, since an intense pressure gradient is directed earthward; hence, ions are ejected tailward

  10. ITER Plasma at Electron Cyclotron Frequency Domain: Stimulated Raman Scattering off Gould-Trivelpiece Modes and Generation of Suprathermal Electrons and Energetic Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefan, V. Alexander

    2011-04-01

    Stimulated Raman scattering in the electron cyclotron frequency range of the X-Mode and O-Mode driver with the ITER plasma leads to the ``tail heating'' via the generation of suprathermal electrons and energetic ions. The scattering off Trivelpiece-Gould (T-G) modes is studied for the gyrotron frequency of 170GHz; X-Mode and O-Mode power of 24 MW CW; on-axis B-field of 10T. The synergy between the two-plasmon decay and Raman scattering is analyzed in reference to the bulk plasma heating. Supported in part by Nikola TESLA Labs, La Jolla, CA

  11. Characteristics of flux-time profiles, temporal evolution, and spatial distribution of radiation-belt electron precipitation bursts in the upper ionosphere before great and giant earthquakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey Pulinets

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available

    The analysis of energetic electron observations made by the DEMETER satellite reveals that radiation belt electron precipitation (RBEP bursts are observed in general several (~1-6 days before a large (M > 6.5 earthquake (EQ in the presence of broad band (~1-20 kHz VLF waves. The EBs show in general a relative peak-to-background flux increase usually < 100, they have a time duration of ~0.5 – 3 min, and their energy spectrum reach up to energies <~500 keV. The RBEP activity is observed as one, two or three EBs throughout a semi-orbit, depended on the magnetic field structure above the EQ epicenter. A statistical analysis has been made for earthquakes in Japan, which reveals a standard temporal variation of the number of EBs, which begins with an incremental rate several days before major earthquakes, and after a maximum, decreases so that the electron precipitation ceases above the epicenter. Some earthquake induced EBs were observed not only in the nightside ionosphere, but also in the dayside ionosphere.

     

  12. Dynamic-Stark-effect-induced coherent mixture of virtual paths in laser-dressed helium: energetic electron impact excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agueny, Hicham; Makhoute, Abdelkader; Dubois, Alain

    2017-06-01

    We theoretically investigate quantum virtual path interference caused by the dynamic Stark effect in bound-bound electronic transitions. The effect is studied in an intermediate resonant region and in connection with the energetic electron impact excitation of a helium atom embedded in a weak low-frequency laser field. The process under investigation is dealt with via a Born-Floquet approach. Numerical calculations show a resonant feature in laser-assisted cross sections. The latter is found to be sensitive to the intensity of the laser field dressing. We show that this feature is a signature of quantum beats which result from the coherent mixture of different quantum virtual pathways, and that excitation may follow in order to end up with a common final channel. This mixture arises from the dynamic Stark effect, which produces a set of avoided crossings in laser-dressed states. The effect allows one to coherently control quantum virtual path interference by varying the intensity of the laser field dressing. Our findings suggest that the combination of an energetic electron and a weak laser field is a useful tool for the coherent control of nonadiabatic transitions in an intermediate resonant region.

  13. RECOVERY OF GOLD (Au) AND SILVER (Ag) METALS IN THE ELECTRONIC WASTE THROUGH MULTILEVEL PRECIPITATION PROCESS

    OpenAIRE

    Siti Marwati; Regina Tutik Padmaningrum; Sunarto Sunarto

    2016-01-01

    This research aims to determine the percent recovery of gold (Au) and silver (Ag) in the electronic waste such as CD-RW and determine the purity of gold and silver metals in the electronic waste such as CD-RW that through multilevel precipitation process. The first step was the optimization of the concentration of thiourea and time dissolution of gold and silver in the sample. The concentration of thiourea and the time dissolution optimum obtained from conentration of gold and silver maximum....

  14. Evidence that pitch angle scattering is an important loss mechanism for energetic electrons in the inner radiation belt of Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillius, W.; Mcilwain, C.; Mogro-Campero, A.; Steinberg, G.

    1976-01-01

    Analysis of data from the Pioneer 10 flyby discloses that pitch angle scattering plays an important part in determining the distribution of energetic electrons in the inner magnetosphere of Jupiter. Angular distributions measured by a Cerenkov detector reveal that redistribution takes place in pitch angle. Additionally, the radial profile of phase space density along the equator demands simultaneous particle losses. The loss rates are too high to be accounted for by synchrotron radiation loss, but are reasonably attributed to pitch angle scattering into the planetary loss cone.

  15. Two distinct energetic electron populations of different origin in the Earth's magnetotail: a Cluster case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. I. Vogiatzis

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Energetic electrons (E≥30 keV travelling along and perpendicular to the magnetic field lines have been observed in the magnetotail at L~17:00 and 22:00 MLT during the recovery phase of a storm-time substorm on 7 October 2002. Three-dimensional electron distributions of the full unit sphere obtained from the IES/RAPID sensor system demonstrated a rather complicated and random behavior of the energetic electrons. Occasionally these electrons were appearing to travel parallel, perpendicular, or in both directions, relative to the magnetic field direction, forming in this way bi-directional, perpendicular-peaked, and mixed distributions. The electron enhancements occurred while the Cluster spacecraft were on closed field lines in the central plasma sheet approaching the neutral sheet from the northern tail lobe. Magnetic field and energetic particle measurements have been used from geosynchronous and Cluster satellites, in order to describe the general context of the event and then give a possible interpretation regarding the occurrence of the electron anisotropies observed by the IES/RAPID spectrometer on board Cluster. According to geosynchronous measurements an electron dispersionless ejection is very well correlated with a dipolar re-configuration of the magnetic field. The latter fact supports the idea that electrons and, in general, particle ejections at geosynchronous altitude are directly related to electric fields arising from field dipolarization caused by current disruption. Also, having as a main objective the understanding of the way 3-D electron distributions are formed, we have analyzed electron energy spectra along and perpendicular to the magnetic field direction, demonstrating the fact that the electron population consists of two distinct components acting independently and in a random manner relative to each other. This leads to the conclusion that these two electron populations along and perpendicular to the field are

  16. Simultaneous equatorial measurements of waves and precipitating electrons in the outer radiation belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imhof, W. L.; Robinson, R. M.; Collin, H. L.; Wygant, J. R.; Anderson, R. R.

    1992-01-01

    Simultaneous wave and precipitating electron measurements near the equator in the outer radiation belt have been made from the CRRES satellite. The electron data of principal concern here were acquired in and about the loss cone with narrow angular resolution spectrometers covering the energy range 340 eV to 5 MeV. The wave data included electric field measurements spanning frequencies from 5 Hz to 400 kHz and magnetic field measurements from 5 Hz to 10 kHz. This paper presents examples in which the variations in electron fluxes in the loss cone and the wave intensities were correlated. These variations in electron flux were confined to pitch angles less than about 30 deg. The association between the flux enhancements and the waves is consistent with wave-induced pitch angle diffusion processes.

  17. Inner Radiation Belt Representation of the Energetic Electron Environment: Model and Data Synthesis Using the Salammbo Radiation Belt Transport Code and Los Alamos Geosynchronous and GPS Energetic Particle Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedel, R. H. W.; Bourdarie, S.; Fennell, J.; Kanekal, S.; Cayton, T. E.

    2004-01-01

    The highly energetic electron environment in the inner magnetosphere (GEO inward) has received a lot of research attention in resent years, as the dynamics of relativistic electron acceleration and transport are not yet fully understood. These electrons can cause deep dielectric charging in any space hardware in the MEO to GEO region. We use a new and novel approach to obtain a global representation of the inner magnetospheric energetic electron environment, which can reproduce the absolute environment (flux) for any spacecraft orbit in that region to within a factor of 2 for the energy range of 100 KeV to 5 MeV electrons, for any levels of magnetospheric activity. We combine the extensive set of inner magnetospheric energetic electron observations available at Los Alamos with the physics based Salammbo transport code, using the data assimilation technique of "nudging". This in effect input in-situ data into the code and allows the diffusion mechanisms in the code to interpolate the data into regions and times of no data availability. We present here details of the methods used, both in the data assimilation process and in the necessary inter-calibration of the input data used. We will present sample runs of the model/data code and compare the results to test spacecraft data not used in the data assimilation process.

  18. Formation of stratospheric nitric acid by a hydrated ion cluster reaction: chemical and dynamical effects of energetic particle precipitation on the middle atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvissel, O. K.; Orsolini, Y. J.; Stordal, F.

    2012-04-01

    In order to Improve our understanding of the effects of energetic particle precipitation upon the nitrogen family (NOy) and ozone (O3), we have modelled the chemical and dynamical middle atmosphere response to the introduction of a chemical pathway that produces nitric acid (HNO3) by conversion of dinitrogen pentoxide (N2O5) upon hydrated water clusters H+•(H2O)n. We have used an ensemble of simulations with the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Whole-Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM) chemistry-climate model. The introduced chemical pathway alters the internal partitioning of NOy during winter months in both hemispheres, and ultimately triggers statistically significant changes in the climatological distributions of constituents including: i) a cold season production of HNO3 with a corresponding loss of N2O5, and ii) a cold season decrease in NOx/NOy-ratio and an increase of O3, in polar regions. We see an improved seasonal evolution of modelled HNO3 compared to satellite observations from Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS), albeit not enough HNO3 is produced at high altitudes. Through O3 changes, both temperature and dynamics are affected, allowing for complex chemical-dynamical feedbacks beyond the cold season when the introduced pathway is active. Hence, we also find a NOx polar increase in spring-to-summer in the SH, and in spring in the NH. The springtime NOx increase arises from anomalously strong poleward transport associated with a weaker polar vortex. In the southern hemisphere, a statistical significant weakening of the stratospheric jet is altered down to the lower stratosphere, and we argue that it is caused by strengthened planetary waves induced by mid-latitude zonal asymmetries in O3 and short-wave heating.

  19. Formation of stratospheric nitric acid by a hydrated ion cluster reaction: Implications for the effect of energetic particle precipitation on the middle atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvissel, O.-K.; Orsolini, Y. J.; Stordal, F.; Isaksen, I. S. A.; Santee, M. L.

    2012-08-01

    In order to improve our understanding of the effects of energetic particle precipitation on the middle atmosphere and in particular upon the nitrogen family and ozone, we have modeled the chemical and dynamical middle atmosphere response to the introduction of a chemical pathway that produces HNO3 by conversion of N2O5 upon hydrated water clusters H+·(H2O)n. We have used an ensemble of simulations with the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Whole-Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM) chemistry-climate model. The chemical pathway alters the internal partitioning of the NOy family during winter months in both hemispheres, and ultimately triggers statistically significant changes in the climatological distributions of constituents including: i) a cold season production and loss of HNO3 and N2O5, respectively, and ii) a cold season decrease and increase in NOx/NOy-ratio and O3, respectively, in the polar regions of both hemispheres. We see an improved seasonal evolution of modeled HNO3 compared to satellite observations from Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS), albeit not enough HNO3 is produced at high altitudes. Through O3changes, both temperature and dynamics are affected, allowing for complex chemical-dynamical feedbacks beyond the cold season when the pathway is active. Hence, we also find a NOxpolar increase in spring-to-summer in the southern hemisphere, and in spring in the northern hemisphere. The springtime NOxincrease arises from anomalously strong poleward transport associated with a weaker polar vortex. We argue that the weakening of zonal-mean polar winds down to the lower stratosphere, which is statistically significant at the 0.90 level in spring months in the southern hemisphere, is caused by strengthened planetary waves induced by the middle and sub-polar latitude zonal asymmetries in O3and short-wave heating.

  20. Positive and negative linear compressibility and electronic properties of energetic and porous hybrid crystals with nitrate anions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korabel'nikov, D V; Zhuravlev, Yu N

    2016-12-07

    The structural and electronic properties of energetic nitrates with organic cations (uronium and 3,3'-diamino-4,4'-azo-1,2,4-triazole) and a metal-organic framework crystal [Ag(ethylenediamine)]NO3 have been investigated using density functional theory including van der Waals interactions. It is found that the linear compressibility of urea nitrate is positive and anisotropic (a ≈ b nitrate and [Ag(ethylenediamine)]NO3 show both positive and negative linear compressibility along the b, c and a-axes, respectively. Negative linear compressibility is correlated with the expansion of hydrogen bonds. The band gaps of considered crystals are different, which is related to the difference in the nature (anionic, cationic or mixed) of upper valence and lower unoccupied electronic states. The band gap of 3,3'-diamino-4,4'-azo-1,2,4-triazole nitrate is the smallest and nonlinearly decreases with pressure.

  1. Electron Bifurcation Makes the Puzzle Pieces Fall Energetically into Place in Methanogenic Energy Conservation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, John W. [Washington State University, Institute of Biological Chemistry, 287 Clark Hall 99164 Pullman UNITED STATES; Lubner, Carolyn

    2017-10-06

    Microbial life has evolved a wide range of metabolisms exploiting in many cases unanticipated suites of oxidation-reduction reactions to generate energy. Although many of these suites of reactions don't allow these microbes to enjoy the same quality of energetic life that we enjoy via respiration/oxidative phosphorylation, it has conferred the ability for life to exploit almost any oxidation-reduction reaction. In many of these cases when energy is sparing, the difference between life and death may be conserving the maximal amount of energy and minimizing loss of free energy through heat.

  2. Energetic electron pitch angle distribution parameters at 6.6 Re, as deduced from GOES X-ray observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, H. A.

    1996-05-01

    X-ray sensors that measure the Sun's radiant output in two soft X-ray channels, 1-8 and 0.5-4 Å, are carried on all GOES geostationary equatorial weather satellites. A comparison of X-ray measurements from two co-operational GOES reveals a systematic difference signal that shows periodic diurnal and seasonal variations. These effects are seen during geomagnetically quiet times as well as disturbed times and are most noticeable when solar activity is low to moderate. The GOES orbit lies just above the main outer electron belt of the van Allen radiation belts but it falls inside the region containing >2MeV trapped electrons; thus the local particle environment includes electrons of sufficient energy to cause significant Bremsstrahlung on the walls of the ion chamber as well as direct deposition of energy through the entrance aperture. These background effects occur despite passive shielding of the ion chambers and in-orbit electronic suppression of the spurious particle contribution. However, because of the regularity of the difference signal it is possible to exploit this X-ray contaminant to infer certain properties of the energetic electron pitch angle distribution in anisotropy and in local time, on the assumption that these energetic electrons are responsible for the spurious X-ray detector response. The basic attributes of the observed diurnal and seasonal effects can be re-created in a model that incorporates a tilted dipole magnetosphere and local-time-dependent, generic pitch angle distributions. It is possible to infer the anisotropy index, n, for dayside sin n(α) distributions and the anisotropy index, m, for nightside sin m(2α) butterfly distributions as well as the local times where these distributions convert from normal loss-cone to butterfly in the afternoon and return to normal loss-cone in the morning. Examples of the diurnal and seasonal variations in the observed X-ray difference signal are shown, and these waveforms are re-created by a model

  3. Influence of electron motion in target atom on stopping power for low-energetic ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stevanović Nenad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the stopping power was calculated, representing the electrons of the target atom as an assembly of quantum oscillators. It was considered that the electrons in the atoms have some velocity before interaction with the projectile, which is the main contribution of this paper. The influence of electron velocity on stopping power for different projectiles and targets was investigated. It was found that the velocity of the electron stopping power has the greatest influence at low energies of the projectile.

  4. Electron Emission from Amorphous Solid Water Induced by Passage of Energetic Protons and Fluorine Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toburen, L. H.; McLawhorn, S. L.; McLawhorn, R. A.; Carnes, K. D.; Dingfelder, M.; Shinpaugh, J. L.

    2013-01-01

    Absolute doubly differential electron emission yields were measured from thin films of amorphous solid water (ASW) after the transmission of 6 MeV protons and 19 MeV (1 MeV/nucleon) fluorine ions. The ASW films were frozen on thin (1-μm) copper foils cooled to approximately 50 K. Electrons emitted from the films were detected as a function of angle in both the forward and backward direction and as a function of the film thickness. Electron energies were determined by measuring the ejected electron time of flight, a technique that optimizes the accuracy of measuring low-energy electron yields, where the effects of molecular environment on electron transport are expected to be most evident. Relative electron emission yields were normalized to an absolute scale by comparison of the integrated total yields for proton-induced electron emission from the copper substrate to values published previously. The absolute doubly differential yields from ASW are presented along with integrated values, providing single differential and total electron emission yields. These data may provide benchmark tests of Monte Carlo track structure codes commonly used for assessing the effects of radiation quality on biological effectiveness. PMID:20681805

  5. Density and temperature of energetic electrons in the Earth's magnetotail derived from high-latitude GPS observations during the declining phase of the solar cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. Denton

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Single relativistic-Maxwellian fits are made to high-latitude GPS-satellite observations of energetic electrons for the period January 2006–November 2010; a constellation of 12 GPS space vehicles provides the observations. The derived fit parameters (for energies ~0.1–1.0 MeV, in combination with field-line mapping on the nightside of the magnetosphere, provide a survey of the energetic electron density and temperature distribution in the magnetotail between McIlwain L-values of L=6 and L=22. Analysis reveals the characteristics of the density-temperature distribution of energetic electrons and its variation as a function of solar wind speed and the Kp index. The density-temperature characteristics of the magnetotail energetic electrons are very similar to those found in the outer electron radiation belt as measured at geosynchronous orbit. The energetic electron density in the magnetotail is much greater during increased geomagnetic activity and during fast solar wind. The total electron density in the magnetotail is found to be strongly correlated with solar wind speed and is at least a factor of two greater for high-speed solar wind (VSW=500–1000 km s−1 compared to low-speed solar wind (VSW=100–400 km s−1. These results have important implications for understanding (a how the solar wind may modulate entry into the magnetosphere during fast and slow solar wind, and (b if the magnetotail is a source or a sink for the outer electron radiation belt.

  6. Density and temperature of energetic electrons in the Earth's magnetotail derived from high-latitude GPS observations during the declining phase of the solar cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. Denton

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Single relativistic-Maxwellian fits are made to high-latitude GPS-satellite observations of energetic electrons for the period January 2006–November 2010; a constellation of 12 GPS space vehicles provides the observations. The derived fit parameters (for energies ~0.1–1.0 MeV, in combination with field-line mapping on the nightside of the magnetosphere, provide a survey of the energetic electron density and temperature distribution in the magnetotail between McIlwain L-values of L=6 and L=22. Analysis reveals the characteristics of the density-temperature distribution of energetic electrons and its variation as a function of solar wind speed and the Kp index. The density-temperature characteristics of the magnetotail energetic electrons are very similar to those found in the outer electron radiation belt as measured at geosynchronous orbit. The energetic electron density in the magnetotail is much greater during increased geomagnetic activity and during fast solar wind. The total electron density in the magnetotail is found to be strongly correlated with solar wind speed and is at least a factor of two greater for high-speed solar wind (VSW=500–1000 km s−1 compared to low-speed solar wind (VSW=100–400 km s−1. These results have important implications for understanding (a how the solar wind may modulate entry into the magnetosphere during fast and slow solar wind, and (b if the magnetotail is a source or a sink for the outer electron radiation belt.

  7. Energetics and electronic properties of Pt wires of different topologies on monolayer MoSe{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamdagni, Pooja, E-mail: j.poojaa1228@gmail.com; Ahluwalia, P. K. [Physics Department, Himachal Pradesh University, Shimla, Himachal Pradesh, India 171005 (India); Kumar, Ashok [Centre for Physical Sciences, School of Basic and Applied Sciences, Central University of Panjab, Bathinda, India, 151001 (India); Thakur, Anil [Physics Department, Govt. Collage Solan, Himachal Pradesh, India, 173212 (India); Pandey, Ravindra [Physics Department, Michigan Technological University, Houghton (United States)

    2016-05-23

    The energetics and electronic properties of different topology of Pt wires including linear, zigzag and ladder structures on MoSe{sub 2} monolayer have been investigated in the framework of density functional theory (DFT). The predicted order of stability of Pt wire on MoSe{sub 2} monolayer is found to be: linear > ladder > zigzag. Pt wires induce states near the Fermi level of MoSe{sub 2} that results into metallic characteristics of Pt-wire/MoSe{sub 2} assembled system. Valence band charge density signifies most of the contribution from Pt atoms near the Fermi energy of assembled wire/MoSe{sub 2} system. These findings are expected to be important for the fabrication of devices based on MoSe{sub 2} layers for flexible nanoelectronics.

  8. Energetic Systems

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Energetic Systems Division provides full-spectrum energetic engineering services (project management, design, analysis, production support, in-service support,...

  9. Electron transfer in bacterial reaction centers with an energetically raised primary acceptor: ultrafast spectroscopy and ENDOR/TRIPLE studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachtveitl, J.; Huber, H.; Feick, R.; Rautter, J.; Müh, F.; Lubitz, W.

    1998-08-01

    Femtosecond time resolved absorbance changes in the near infrared spectral region were recorded in photosynthetic reaction centers (RCs) of Rhodobacter ( Rb.) sphaeroides and Chloroflexus aurantiacus. For Rb. sphaeroides, wild type and site directed mutant RCs, where the tyrosine at the M210 position was replaced by phenylalanine and leucine, were investigated. In the mutant RCs the decay of the stimulated emission signal was drastically slower and displayed strong multiexponentiality. In the spectral range between 1000 and 1100 nm, the existence of a fast kinetic component with a time constant of 1 ps could be demonstrated. Based on the spectral and dichroic characteristics of the data, we suggest a weakly populated P +B A- state as first electron transfer intermediate in these mutants. The results indicate that primary electron transfer follows a stepwise mechanism, even in the case of an energetically increased primary acceptor. Investigations of the electronic structure of the photooxidized primary donor using ENDOR/TRIPLE spectroscopy demonstrated that changes at the position M210 mainly affect B A and not P.

  10. The potential, limitations, and challenges of divide and conquer quantum electronic structure calculations on energetic materials.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tucker, Jon R.; Magyar, Rudolph J.

    2012-02-01

    High explosives are an important class of energetic materials used in many weapons applications. Even with modern computers, the simulation of the dynamic chemical reactions and energy release is exceedingly challenging. While the scale of the detonation process may be macroscopic, the dynamic bond breaking responsible for the explosive release of energy is fundamentally quantum mechanical. Thus, any method that does not adequately describe bonding is destined to lack predictive capability on some level. Performing quantum mechanics calculations on systems with more than dozens of atoms is a gargantuan task, and severe approximation schemes must be employed in practical calculations. We have developed and tested a divide and conquer (DnC) scheme to obtain total energies, forces, and harmonic frequencies within semi-empirical quantum mechanics. The method is intended as an approximate but faster solution to the full problem and is possible due to the sparsity of the density matrix in many applications. The resulting total energy calculation scales linearly as the number of subsystems, and the method provides a path-forward to quantum mechanical simulations of millions of atoms.

  11. Detailed characteristics of radiation belt electrons revealed by CSSWE/REPTile measurements: Geomagnetic activity response and precipitation observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, K.; Li, X.; Schiller, Q.; Gerhardt, D.; Zhao, H.; Millan, R.

    2017-08-01

    Earth's outer radiation belt electrons are highly dynamic. We study the detailed characteristics of relativistic electrons in the outer belt using measurements from the Colorado Student Space Weather Experiment (CSSWE) mission, a low Earth orbit (LEO) CubeSat, which traverses the radiation belt four times in one orbit ( 1.5 h) and has the advantage of measuring the dynamic activities of the electrons including their rapid precipitation. We focus on the measured electron response to geomagnetic activity for different energies to show that there are abundant sub-MeV electrons in the inner belt and slot region. These electrons are further enhanced during active times, while there is a lack of >1.63 MeV electrons in these regions. We also show that the variation of measured electron flux at LEO is strongly dependent on the local magnetic field strength, which is far from a dipole approximation. Moreover, a specific precipitation band, which happened on 19 January 2013, is investigated based on the conjunctive measurement of CSSWE, the Balloon Array for Radiation belt Relativistic Electron Losses, and one of the Polar Operational Environmental Satellites. In this precipitation band event, the net loss of the 0.58-1.63 MeV electrons (L = 3.5-6) is estimated to account for 6.8% of the total electron content.

  12. The magnetic local time distribution of energetic electrons in the radiation belt region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Hayley J.; Horne, Richard B.; Glauert, Sarah A.; Zanna, Giulio Del

    2017-08-01

    Using 14 years of electron flux data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Polar Operational Environmental Satellites, a statistical study of the magnetic local time (MLT) distribution of the electron population is performed across a range of activity levels, defined by AE, AE*, Kp, solar wind velocity (Vsw), and VswBz. Three electron energies (>30, >100, and >300 keV) are considered. Dawn-dusk flux asymmetries larger than order of magnitude were observed for >30 and >100 keV electrons. For >300 keV electrons, dawn-dusk asymmetries were primarily due to a decrease in the average duskside flux beyond L* ˜ 4.5 that arose with increasing activity. For the >30 keV population, substorm injections enhance the dawnside flux, which may not reach the duskside as the electrons can be on open drift paths and lost to the magnetopause. The asymmetries in the >300 keV population are attributed to the combination of magnetopause shadowing and >300 keV electron injections by large electric fields. We suggest that 3-D radiation belt models could set the minimum energy boundary (Emin) to 30 keV or above at L* ˜ 6 during periods of low activity. However, for more moderate conditions, Emin should be larger than 100 keV and, for very extreme activities, ˜300 keV. Our observations show the extent that in situ electron flux readings may vary during active periods due to the MLT of the satellite and highlight the importance of 4-D radiation belt models to fully understand radiation belt processes.

  13. Void formation in pure aluminium irradiated with high-energetic electron beams and gamma-quanta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gan, V. V.; Ozhigou, L. S.; Yamnitsky, V. A.

    1983-01-01

    The spatial distribution of displaced atoms and helium atoms and also the spectra of damaging energies of primary displaced atoms in a thick aluminium target irradiated with electrons of 225 MeV energy were calculated. Pure aluminium (99.9999%) irradiated up to 0.04 dose was studied by electron-m......-microscopy. Voids of size 5 to 40 nm were obtained and their vacancy nature was estimated. The dislocation structure of the material was studied...

  14. Quantifying Precipitation Loss of Radiation Belt Electrons during Storm-time and Non-Storm-Time Dropouts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, K. H.; Tu, W.

    2016-12-01

    Relativistic electron flux in the radiation belt can drop by orders of magnitude within the timespan of a few hours. Studies of dropout events during geomagnetic storms are popular but relativistic electron flux dropouts are not always coupled to geomagnetic storms and can occur without the presence of one. In this study, we will be using a Drift-Diffusion model to simulate two contrasting radiation belt dropout events, both of which are GEM challenge events. The first event during 24 September 2013 is a non-storm time dropout event that has a Dst electron flux dropout occurs across all energies. Unlike the first event, the second event during 01 June 2013 has a Dst electrons that are less than 700 keV saw an enhancement while MeV electrons saw strong depletion. We use the Drift-Diffusion model, which includes the effects of azimuthal drift and pitch angle diffusion, to quantify the electron precipitation loss for both of these events. By simulating the low-altitude electron distributions observed by 6 NOAA/POES satellites, we resolve the precipitation loss with both high spatial and temporal resolution and at a range of energies. The estimated pitch angle diffusion rates from the model are then compared with in situ wave measurements from Van Allen Probes to uncover the underlying wave-particle-interaction mechanisms that are responsible for the fast electron precipitation. Comparing the resolved precipitation loss with the observed electron dropouts at high altitudes, our results will suggest the relative role of electron precipitation loss and outward radial diffusion to the radiation belt dropouts during storm and non-storm times, in addition to its energy and L dependence.

  15. Defect production and annihilation in metals through electronic excitation by energetic heavy ion bombardment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwase, Akihiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-03-01

    Defect production, radiation annealing and defect recovery are studied in Ni and Cu irradiated with low-energy ({approx}1-MeV) and high-energy ({approx}100-MeV) ions. Irradiation of Ni with {approx}100-MeV ions causes an anomalous reduction, or even a complete disappearance of the stage-I recovery. This result shows that the energy transferred from excited electrons to lattice atoms through the electron-lattice interaction contributes to the annihilation of the stage-I interstitials. This effect is also observed in Ni as a large radiation annealing during 100-MeV heavy ion irradiation. On the other hand, in Cu thin foils, we find the defect production process strongly associated with electron excitation, where the defect production cross section is nearly proportional to S{sub e}{sup 2}. (author)

  16. Variations in Cathodoluminescent Intensity of Spacecraft Materials Exposed to Energetic Electron Bombardment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekany, Justin; Christensen, Justin; Dennison, J. R.; Jensen, Amberly Evans; Wilson, Gregory; Schneider, Todd; Bowers, Charles W.; Meloy, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Many contemporary spacecraft materials exhibit cathodoluminescence when exposed to electron flux from the space plasma environment. A quantitative, physics-based model has been developed to predict the intensity of the total glow as a function of incident electron current density and energy, temperature, and intrinsic material properties. We present a comparative study of the absolute spectral radiance for more than 20 types of dielectric and composite materials based on this model which spans more than three orders of magnitude. Variations in intensity are contrasted for different electron environments, different sizes of samples and sample sets, different testing and analysis methods, and data acquired at different test facilities. Together, these results allow us to estimate the accuracy and precision to which laboratory studies may be able to determine the response of spacecraft materials in the actual space environment. It also provides guidance as to the distribution of emissions that may be expected for sets of similar flight hardware under similar environmental conditions.

  17. Energetic electron processes fluorescence effects for structured nanoparticles X-ray analysis and nuclear medicine applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taborda, A.; Desbrée, A. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN), PRP-HOM/SDI/LEDI, BP-17, 31, Avenue de la Division Leclerc, 92262 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Carvalho, A. [IEQUALTECS, Lda, Rua Dr. Francisco Sá Carneiro, 36, 2500-065 S. Gregório CLD (Portugal); Chaves, P.C. [C" 2TN, Campus Tecnológico e Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, EN10 km 139.7, 2685-066 Bobadela LRS (Portugal); Reis, M.A., E-mail: mareis@ctn.tecnico.ulisboa.pt [IEQUALTECS, Lda, Rua Dr. Francisco Sá Carneiro, 36, 2500-065 S. Gregório CLD (Portugal); C" 2TN, Campus Tecnológico e Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, EN10 km 139.7, 2685-066 Bobadela LRS (Portugal)

    2016-08-15

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles are widely used as contrast agents for nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and can be modified for improved imaging or to become tissue-specific or even protein-specific. The knowledge of their detailed elemental composition characterisation and potential use in nuclear medicine applications, is, therefore, an important issue. X-ray fluorescence techniques such as particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) or X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF), can be used for elemental characterisation even in problematic situations where very little sample volume is available. Still, the fluorescence coefficient of Fe is such that, during the decay of the inner-shell ionised atomic structure, keV Auger electrons are produced in excess to X-rays. Since cross-sections for ionisation induced by keV electrons, for low atomic number atoms, are of the order of 10{sup 3} barn, care should be taken to account for possible fluorescence effects caused by Auger electrons, which may lead to the wrong quantification of elements having atomic number lower than the atomic number of Fe. Furthermore, the same electron processes will occur in iron oxide nanoparticles containing {sup 57}Co, which may be used for nuclear medicine therapy purposes. In the present work, simple approximation algorithms are proposed for the quantitative description of radiative and non-radiative processes associated with Auger electrons cascades. The effects on analytical processes and nuclear medicine applications are quantified for the case of iron oxide nanoparticles, by calculating both electron fluorescence emissions and energy deposition on cell tissues where the nanoparticles may be embedded.

  18. Calculated ionization rates, ion densities, and airglow emission rates due to precipitating electrons in the nightside ionosphere of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, S. A.; Kim, J.; Nagy, A. F.; Keller, C. N.; Verigin, M. I.; Gringauz, K. I.; Shutte, N. M.; Szego, K.; Kiraly, P.

    1992-01-01

    The calculations presented in this paper clearly establish that the electron fluxes measured by the HARP instrument, carried on board Phobos 2, could cause significant electron impact ionization and excitation in the nightside atmosphere of Mars, if these electrons actually do precipitate. The calculated peak electron densities were found to be about a factor of 2 larger than the mean observed nightside densities, indicating that if a significant fraction of the measured electrons actually precipitate, they could be the dominant mechanism responsible for maintaining the nightside ionosphere. The calculated zenith column emission rates of the O I 5577-A and 6300-A and CO Cameron band emissions, due to electron impact and dissociative recombination mechanisms, were found to be significant.

  19. Observations of the spatial structure of electron precipitation pulsations using an imaging riometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Senior

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Electron precipitation can be modulated by geomagnetic pulsation activity. This can be observed as pulsation of cosmic noise absorption as measured by riometers. Observations of such pulsations exhibiting field-line resonance and particle-driven characteristics using an imaging riometer are presented and the capability of the instrument to map their spatial structure is demonstrated. It is shown that for the events studied, the spatial variation of pulsation phase as measured by the riometer agrees with that inferred from ground-based magnetometers, whereas the spatial variation of pulsation amplitude may show a different structure. It is suggested that this is consistent with the mechanism proposed by Coroniti and Kennel (1970 where one would expect a fixed phase relationship between magnetic and absorption pulsations, but where the amplitude of the absorption pulsation can depend on several factors other than the amplitude of the magnetic pulsation.Key words. Ionosphere (ionosphere–magnetosphere interactions; particle precipitation – Magnetospheric physics (MHD waves and instabilities

  20. Observations of the spatial structure of electron precipitation pulsations using an imaging riometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Senior

    Full Text Available Electron precipitation can be modulated by geomagnetic pulsation activity. This can be observed as pulsation of cosmic noise absorption as measured by riometers. Observations of such pulsations exhibiting field-line resonance and particle-driven characteristics using an imaging riometer are presented and the capability of the instrument to map their spatial structure is demonstrated. It is shown that for the events studied, the spatial variation of pulsation phase as measured by the riometer agrees with that inferred from ground-based magnetometers, whereas the spatial variation of pulsation amplitude may show a different structure. It is suggested that this is consistent with the mechanism proposed by Coroniti and Kennel (1970 where one would expect a fixed phase relationship between magnetic and absorption pulsations, but where the amplitude of the absorption pulsation can depend on several factors other than the amplitude of the magnetic pulsation.

    Key words. Ionosphere (ionosphere–magnetosphere interactions; particle precipitation – Magnetospheric physics (MHD waves and instabilities

  1. Research Update: The electronic structure of hybrid perovskite layers and their energetic alignment in devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selina Olthof

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the interest in hybrid organic–inorganic perovskites has increased at a rapid pace due to their tremendous success in the field of thin film solar cells. This area closely ties together fundamental solid state research and device application, as it is necessary to understand the basic material properties to optimize the performances and open up new areas of application. In this regard, the energy levels and their respective alignment with adjacent charge transport layers play a crucial role. Currently, we are lacking a detailed understanding about the electronic structure and are struggling to understand what influences the alignment, how it varies, or how it can be intentionally modified. This research update aims at giving an overview over recent results regarding measurements of the electronic structure of hybrid perovskites using photoelectron spectroscopy to summarize the present status.

  2. Production of low kinetic energy electrons and energetic ion pairs by Intermolecular Coulombic Decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hergenhahn, Uwe

    2012-12-01

    The paper gives an introduction into Interatomic and Intermolecular Coulombic Decay (ICD). ICD is an autoionization process, which contrary to Auger decay involves neighbouring sites of the initial vacancy as an integral part of the decay transition. As a result of ICD, slow electrons are produced which generally are known to be active in radiation damage. The author summarizes the properties of ICD and reviews a number of important experiments performed in recent years. Intermolecular Coulombic Decay can generally take place in weakly bonded aggregates in the presence of ionizing particles or ionizing radiation. Examples collected here mostly use soft X-rays produced by synchrotron radiation to ionize, and use rare-gas clusters, water clusters or solutes in a liquid jet to observe ICD after irradiation. Intermolecular Coulombic Decay is initiated by single ionization into an excited state. The subsequent relaxation proceeds via an ultra-fast energy transfer to a neighbouring site, where a second ionization occurs. Secondary electrons from ICD have clearly been identified in numerous systems. ICD can take place after primary ionization, as the second step of a decay cascade which also involves Auger decay, or after resonant excitation with an energy which exceeds the ionization potential of the system. ICD is expected to play a role whenever particles or radiation with photon energies above the ionization energies for inner valence electrons are present in weakly bonded matter, e.g., biological tissue. The process produces at the same time a slow electron and two charged atomic or molecular fragments, which will lead to structural changes around the ionized site.

  3. New global loss model of energetic and relativistic electrons based on Van Allen Probes measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Ksenia Orlova; Yuri Shprits; Maria Spasojevic

    2016-01-01

    The Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) instrument on the Van Allen Probes provides a vast quantity of fully resolved wave measurements below L = 5.5, a critical region for radiation belt acceleration and loss. EMFISIS data show that plasmaspheric hiss waves can be observed at frequencies as low as 20 Hz and provide three-component magnetic field measurements that can be directly used for electron scattering calculations. Updated models of hiss proper...

  4. Recollections on Sixty Years of NBS Ionizing Radiation Programs for Energetic X Rays and Electrons1

    OpenAIRE

    Koch, H. William

    2006-01-01

    These recollections are on ionizing radiation programs at the National Bureau of Standards (NBS) that started in 1928 and ended in 1988 when NBS became the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The independent Council on Ionizing Radiation Measurements and Standards (CIRMS) was formed in 1992. This article focuses on how measurements and standards for x rays, gamma rays, and electrons with energies above 1 MeV began at NBS and how they progressed. It also suggests how the rad...

  5. Extreme energetic electron fluxes in low Earth orbit: Analysis of POES E > 30, E > 100, and E > 300 keV electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, Nigel P.; Horne, Richard B.; Isles, John D.; Green, Janet C.

    2016-02-01

    Energetic electrons are an important space weather hazard. Electrons with energies less than about 100 keV cause surface charging, while higher-energy electrons can penetrate materials and cause internal charging. In this study we conduct an extreme value analysis of the maximum 3-hourly flux of E > 30 keV, E > 100 keV, and E > 300 keV electrons in low Earth orbit as a function of L∗, for geomagnetic field lines that map to the outer radiation belt, using data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Polar Operational Environmental Satellites (POES) from July 1998 to June 2014. The 1 in 10 year flux of E > 30 keV electrons shows a general increasing trend with distance ranging from 1.8 × 107 cm-2 s-1 sr-1 at L∗=3.0 to 6.6 × 107 cm-2 s-1 sr-1 at L∗=8.0. The 1 in 10 year flux of E > 100 keV electrons peaks at L∗=4.5-5.0 at 1.9 × 107 cm-2 s-1 sr-1 decreasing to minima of 7.1 × 106 and 8.7 × 106 cm-2 s-1 sr-1 at L∗=3.0 and 8.0, respectively. In contrast to the E > 30 keV electrons, the 1 in 10 year flux of E > 300 keV electrons shows a general decreasing trend with distance, ranging from 2.4 × 106 cm-2 s-1 sr-1 at L∗=3.0 to 1.2 × 105 cm-2 s-1 sr-1 at L∗=8.0. Our analysis suggests that there is a limit to the E > 30 keV electrons with an upper bound in the range 5.1 × 107 to 8.8 × 107 cm-2 s-1 sr-1. However, the results suggest that there is no upper bound for the E > 100 keV and E > 300 keV electrons.

  6. Magnetic vector rotation in response to the energetic electron beam during a flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yan; Cao, Wenda; Kwangsu, Ahn; Jing, Ju; Liu, Chang; Chae, Jongchul; Huang, Nengyi; Deng, Na; Gary, Dale E.; Wang, Haimin

    2017-08-01

    As one of the most violent forms of eruption on the Sun, flares are believed to be powered by magnetic reconnection, by which stored magnetic energy is released. The fundamental physical processes involving the release, transfer and deposition of energy in multiple layers of the solar atmosphere have been studied extensively with significant progress. Taking advantage of recent developments in observing facilities, new phenomena are continually revealed, bringing new understanding of solar flares. Here we report the discovery of a transient rotation of vector magnetic fields associated with a flare observed by the 1.6-m New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory. After ruling out the possibility that the rotation is caused by line profile changes due to flare heating, our observation shows that the transverse field rotateded by about 12-20 degrees counterclockwise, and returned quickly to previous values after the flare ribbons swept through. More importantly, as a consequence of the rotation, the flare loops untwisted and became more potential. The vector magnetograms were obtained in the near infrared at 1560 nm, which is minimally affected by flare emission and no intensity profile change was detected. Therefore, we believe that these transient changes are real, and conclude the high energy electron beams play an crucial role in the field changes. A straightforward and instructive explanation is that the induced magnetic field of the electron beam superimposed on the pre-flare field leads to a transient rotation of the overall field.

  7. Energetic Constraints on H-2-Dependent Terminal Electron Accepting Processes in Anoxic Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heimann, Axel Colin; Jakobsen, Rasmus; Blodau, C.

    2010-01-01

    for terminal respiration are physiologically based and often near -20 W mol(-1), depending on the mechanism of ATP generation; more positive free energy values have been reported under "starvation conditions" for methanogenesis and lower values for TEAPs that provide more energy. H-2-dependent methanogenesis...... illustrating this concept and the quantitative description of thermodynamic controls in modeling. Other electron transfer processes are considered where appropriate. The work reviewed shows that thermodynamics and microbial kinetics are connected near thermodynamic equilibrium. Free energy thresholds...... and sulfate reduction are under direct thermodynamic control in soils and sediments and generally approach theoretical minimum energy thresholds. If H-2 concentrations are lowered by thermodynamically more potent TEAPs, these processes are inhibited. This principle is also valid for TEAPS providing more free...

  8. Energetics of intrinsic point defects in uranium dioxide from electronic-structure calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nerikar, Pankaj; Watanabe, Taku [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Tulenko, James S. [Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Phillpot, Simon R. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Sinnott, Susan B. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)], E-mail: ssinn@mse.ufl.edu

    2009-01-31

    The stability range of intrinsic point defects in uranium dioxide is determined as a function of temperature, oxygen partial pressure, and non-stoichiometry. The computational approach integrates high accuracy ab initio electronic-structure calculations and thermodynamic analysis supported by experimental data. In particular, the density functional theory calculations are performed at the level of the spin polarized, generalized gradient approximation and includes the Hubbard U term; as a result they predict the correct anti-ferromagnetic insulating ground state of uranium oxide. The thermodynamic calculations enable the effects of system temperature and partial pressure of oxygen on defect formation energy to be determined. The predicted equilibrium properties and defect formation energies for neutral defect complexes match trends in the experimental literature quite well. In contrast, the predicted values for charged complexes are lower than the measured values. The calculations predict that the formation of oxygen interstitials becomes increasingly difficult as higher temperatures and reducing conditions are approached.

  9. Singlet Fission Involves an Interplay between Energetic Driving Force and Electronic Coupling in Perylenediimide Films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Justin C [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Arias, Dylan H [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Le, Aaron K. [University of Texas, Austin; Bender, Jon A. [University of Texas, Austin; Cotton, Daniel E. [University of Texas, Austin; Roberts, Sean T. [University of Texas, Austin

    2017-12-14

    Due to its ability to offset thermalization losses in photoharvesting systems, singlet fission has become a topic of research interest. During singlet fission, a high energy spin-singlet state in an organic semiconductor divides its energy to form two lower energy spin-triplet excitations on neighboring chromophores. While key insights into mechanisms leading to singlet fission have been gained recently, developing photostable compounds that undergo quantitative singlet fission remains a key challenge. In this report, we explore triplet exciton production via singlet fission in films of perylenediimides, a class of compounds with a long history of use as industrial dyes and pigments due to their photostability. As singlet fission necessitates electron transfer between neighboring molecules, its rate and yield depend sensitively on their local arrangement. By adding different functional groups at their imide positions, we control how perylenediimides pack in the solid state.

  10. Kinetics and energetics of electron transfer in reaction centers of the photosynthetic bacterium Roseiflexus castenholzii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Aaron M; Kirmaier, Christine; Holten, Dewey; Blankenship, Robert E

    2011-03-01

    The kinetics and thermodynamics of the photochemical reactions of the purified reaction center (RC)-cytochrome (Cyt) complex from the chlorosome-lacking, filamentous anoxygenic phototroph, Roseiflexus castenholzii are presented. The RC consists of L- and M-polypeptides containing three bacteriochlorophyll (BChl), three bacteriopheophytin (BPh) and two quinones (Q(A) and Q(B)), and the Cyt is a tetraheme subunit. Two of the BChls form a dimer P that is the primary electron donor. At 285K, the lifetimes of the excited singlet state, P*, and the charge-separated state P(+)H(A)(-) (where H(A) is the photoactive BPh) were found to be 3.2±0.3 ps and 200±20 ps, respectively. Overall charge separation P*→→ P(+)Q(A)(-) occurred with ≥90% yield at 285K. At 77K, the P* lifetime was somewhat shorter and the P(+)H(A)(-) lifetime was essentially unchanged. Poteniometric titrations gave a P(865)/P(865)(+) midpoint potential of +390mV vs. SHE. For the tetraheme Cyt two distinct midpoint potentials of +85 and +265mV were measured, likely reflecting a pair of low-potential hemes and a pair of high-potential hemes, respectively. The time course of electron transfer from reduced Cyt to P(+) suggests an arrangement where the highest potential heme is not located immediately adjacent to P. Comparisons of these and other properties of isolated Roseiflexus castenholzii RCs to those from its close relative Chloroflexus aurantiacus and to RCs from the purple bacteria are made. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Initial mechanisms for the decomposition of electronically excited energetic salts: TKX-50 and MAD-X1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Bing; Yu, Zijun; Bernstein, Elliot R

    2015-03-26

    Decomposition of energetic salts TKX-50 and MAD-X1 (dihydroxylammonium 5,5'-bistetrazole-1,1'-diolate and dihydroxylammonium 3,3'-dinitro-5,5'-bis-1,2,4-triazole-1,1'-diol, respectively), following electronic state excitation, is investigated both experimentally and theoretically. The NO and N2 molecules are observed as initial decomposition products from the two materials subsequent to UV excitation. Observed NO products are rotationally cold (hot (>1500 K). The vibrational temperature of the NO product from TKX-50 is (2600 ± 250) K, (1100 ± 250) K hotter than that produced from MAD-X1. Observed N2 products of these two species are both rotationally cold (forming N2 and NO products. N2 products are released by the opening of the tetrazole or triazole rings of TKX-50 and MAD-X1. NO products are released from the amine N-oxide moiety of TKX-50, and for MAD-X1, they are produced through nitro-nitrite isomerizations. The observed rotational energy distributions for NO and N2 products are consistent with the final structures of the respective transition states for each molecule on its S0 potential energy surface.

  12. Ionization of molecular hydrogen and stripping of oxygen atoms and ions in collisions of Oq++H2 (q = 0- 8): Data for secondary electron production from ion precipitation at Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, D. R.; Ozak, N.; Cravens, T. E.; Gharibnejad, H.

    2017-01-01

    Energetic oxygen and sulfur ion precipitation into the atmosphere of Jupiter is thought to produce an X-ray aurora as well as to contribute to ionization, heating, and dissociation of the molecules of the atmosphere. At high energy, stripping of electrons from these ions by atmospheric gas molecules results in the production of high charge states throughout a portion of this passage through the atmosphere. Therefore, to enable modeling of the effects of secondary electrons produced by this ion precipitation, from either the solar wind or magnetospheric sources such as the Galilean moons, a large range of ionization and stripping data is calculated and tabulated here that otherwise is not available. The present data are for the abundant precipitating species, oxygen, colliding with the dominant upper atmosphere gas, molecular hydrogen, and cover the principal reaction channels leading to secondary electron production (single and double ionization, transfer ionization, and double capture followed by autoionization, and single and double stripping of electrons from the projectile). Since the ions possess initial energies at the upper atmosphere in the keV to MeV range, and are then slowed as they pass through the atmosphere, results are calculated for 1-2000 keV/u Oq++H2 (q =0-8). In addition to the total cross sections for ionization and stripping processes, models require the distribution in energy and angle of the ejected electrons, so cross sections differential in these parameters are also calculated. The data may be used to model the energy deposited by ion precipitation in Jupiter's atmosphere and thereby contribute to the elucidation of the ionosphere-atmosphere coupling.

  13. The Mushroom: A half-sky energetic ion and electron detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, M. E.; Mitchell, D. G.; Andrews, G. B.; Cooper, S. A.; Gurnee, R. S.; Hayes, J. R.; Layman, R. S.; McNutt, R. L.; Nelson, K. S.; Parker, C. W.; Schlemm, C. E.; Stokes, M. R.; Begley, S. M.; Boyle, M. P.; Burgum, J. M.; Do, D. H.; Dupont, A. R.; Gold, R. E.; Haggerty, D. K.; Hoffer, E. M.; Hutcheson, J. C.; Jaskulek, S. E.; Krimigis, S. M.; Liang, S. X.; London, S. M.; Noble, M. W.; Roelof, E. C.; Seifert, H.; Strohbehn, K.; Vandegriff, J. D.; Westlake, J. H.

    2017-02-01

    We present a time-of-flight mass spectrometer design for the measurement of ions in the 30 keV to 10 MeV range for protons (up to 40 MeV and 150 MeV for He and heavy ions, respectively) and 30 keV to 1 MeV range for electrons, covering half of the sky with 80 apertures. The instrument, known as the "Mushroom," owing to its shape, solves the field of view problem for magnetospheric and heliospheric missions that employ three-axis stabilized spacecraft, yet still require extended angular coverage; the Mushroom is also compatible with a spinning spacecraft. The most important new feature of the Mushroom is the method through which uncomplicated electrostatic optics and clean position sensing combine to permit many apertures to fit into a compact, low-mass sensor head (or wedge), several of which (ideally eight) compose a full instrument. Most of the sensor head's volume is an empty, equipotential region, resulting in the modest 250 g mass of each 10-aperture wedge. The Mushroom is capable of separating ion species across most of its energy range and angular field of view. For example, separation of the neighboring 3He and 4He isotopes is excellent; the full width at half maximum mass resolution has been measured to be 0.24 amu to 0.32 amu, respectively. Converting this to a Gaussian width σm in mass m, this represents a σm/m mass resolution better than 0.04. This separation is highly desirable for the flight program for which the first Mushroom was built, the Solar Probe Plus mission. More generally, we estimate the mass resolution to be σm/m ≈ 0.1, but this is energy, mass, and angularly dependent. We also discuss the solid-state detector stack capability, which extends the energy range of protons and helium, with composition, to 100 MeV.

  14. Probing the chemistry, electronic structure and redox energetics in pentavalent organometallic actinide complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graves, Christopher R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Vaughn, Anthony E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Morris, David E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kiplinger, Jaqueline L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Complexes of the early actinides (Th-Pu) have gained considerable prominence in organometallic chemistry as they have been shown to undergo chemistries not observed with their transition- or lanthanide metal counterparts. Further, while bonding in f-element complexes has historically been considered to be ionic, the issue of covalence remains a subject of debate in the area of actinide science, and studies aimed at elucidating key bonding interactions with 5f-orbitals continue to garner attention. Towards this end, our interests have focused on the role that metal oxidation state plays in the structure, reactivity and spectral properties of organouranium complexes. We report our progress in the synthesis of substituted U{sup V}-imido complexes using various routes: (1) Direct oxidation of U{sup IV}-imido complexes with copper(I) salts; (2) Salt metathesis with U{sup V}-imido halides; (3) Protonolysis and insertion of an U{sup V}-imido alkyl or aryl complex with H-N{double_bond}CPh{sub 2} or N{triple_bond}C-Ph, respectively, to form a U{sup V}-imido ketimide complex. Further, we report and compare the crystallographic, electrochemical, spectroscopic and magnetic characterization of the pentavalent uranium (C{sub 5}Me{sub 5}){sub 2}U({double_bond}N-Ar)(Y) series (Y = OTf, SPh, C{triple_bond}C-Ph, NPh{sub 2}, OPh, N{double_bond}CPh{sub 2}) to further interrogate the molecular, electronic, and magnetic structures of this new class of uranium complexes.

  15. Kinetics and energetics of intramolecular electron transfer in yeast cytochrome c peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, P S; Hoffman, B M; Solomon, N; Kang, C H; Margoliash, E

    1984-08-28

    The oxidation of ferric cytochrome c peroxidase by hydrogen peroxide yields a product, compound ES [Yonetani, T., Schleyer, H., Chance, B., & Ehrenberg, A. (1967) in Hemes and Hemoproteins (Chance, B., Estabrook, R. W., & Yonetani, T., Eds.) p 293, Academic Press, New York], containing an oxyferryl heme and a protein free radical [Dolphin, D., Forman, A., Borg, D. C., Fajer, J., & Felton, R. H. (1971) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 68, 614-618]. The same oxidant takes the ferrous form of the enzyme to a stable Fe(IV) peroxidase [Ho, P. S., Hoffman, B. M., Kang, C. H., & Margoliash, E. (1983) J. Biol. Chem. 258, 4356-4363]. It is 1 equiv more highly oxidized than the ferric protein, contains the oxyferryl heme, but leaves the radical site unoxidized. Addition of sodium fluoride to Fe(IV) peroxidase gives a product with an optical spectrum similar to that of the fluoride complex of the ferric enzyme. However, reductive titration and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) data demonstrate that the oxidizing equivalent has not been lost but rather transferred to the radical site. The EPR spectrum for the radical species in the presence of Fe(III) heme is identical with that of compound ES, indicating that the unusual characteristics of the radical EPR signal do not result from coupling to the heme site. By stopped-flow measurements, the oxidizing equivalent transfer process between heme and radical site is first order, with a rate constant of 0.115 s-1 at room temperature, which is independent of either ligand or protein concentration.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Precipitation of radiation belt electrons by man-made waves A comparison between theory and measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inan, U. S.; Chang, H. C.; Helliwell, R. A.; Imhof, W. L.; Reagan, J. B.; Walt, M.

    1985-01-01

    The temporal and spectral shape and the absolute flux level of particle pulses precipitated by a VLF transmitter are examined from a theoretical point of view. A test-particle model of the gyroresonant wave-particle interaction is applied to the parameters of the observed cases for calculating the precipitation characteristics. The temporal shapes of the precipitation pulses are found to be controlled (1) by the pitch angle dependence of the particle distribution near the edge of the loss cone and (2) by the multiple interaction of the particles with the waves due to significant atmospheric backscatter.

  17. Ku/Ka/W-band Antenna for Electronically-Scanned Cloud and Precipitation Radar Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Development of the key antenna technologies for Tri-band (Ku/Ka/W), scanning precipitation and cloud radar is a required milestone in preparation for one or more...

  18. The influence of electron discharge and magnetic field on calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Putro, Triswantoro, E-mail: tris@physics.its.ac.id; Endarko, E-mail: endarko@physics.its.ac.id [Physics Department, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Science Institut Teknologi Sepuluh Nopember (ITS), Surabaya 60111 (Indonesia)

    2016-04-19

    The influences of electron discharge and magnetic field on calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation in water have been successfully investigated. The study used three pairs of magnetic field 0.1 T whilst the electron discharge was generated from television flyback transformer type BW00607 and stainless steel SUS 304 as an electrode. The water sample with an initial condition of 230 mg/L placed in the reactor with flow rate 375 mL/minutes, result showed that the electron discharge can be reduced contain of calcium carbonate the water sample around 17.39% within 2 hours. Meanwhile for the same long period of treatment and flow rate, around 56.69% from initial condition of 520 mg/L of calcium carbonate in the water sample can be achieved by three pairs of magnetic field 0.1 T. When the combination of three pairs of magnetic field 0.1 T and the electron discharge used for treatment, the result showed that the combination of electron discharge and magnetic field methods can be used to precipitate calcium carbonate in the water sample 300 mg/L around 76.66% for 2 hours of treatment. The study then investigated the influence of the polar position of the magnetic field on calcium carbonate precipitation. Two positions of magnetic field were tested namely the system with alternated polar magnetics and the system without inversion of the polar magnetics. The influence of the polar position showed that the percentage reduction in levels of calcium carbonate in the water sample (360 mg/L) is significant different. Result showed that the system without inversion of the polar magnetics is generally lower than the system with alternated polar magnetics, with reduction level at 30.55 and 57.69%, respectively.

  19. Strengthening effect of nano-scaled precipitates in Ta alloying layer induced by high current pulsed electron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Guangze; Luo, Dian; Fan, Guohua [School of Material Science & Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Ma, Xinxin, E-mail: maxin@hit.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding and Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Wang, Liqin [School of Mechatronics Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2017-05-01

    Highlights: • Ta alloying layer are fabricated by magnetron sputtering and high current pulsed electron beam. • Nano-scaled TaC precipitates forms within the δ-Fe grain after tempering treatment. • The mean diameter of TaC particles is about 5–8 nm. • The hardness of alloying layer increased by over 50% after formation of nano-scaled TaC particle. - Abstract: In this study, the combination of magnetron sputtering and high current pulsed electron beam are used for surface alloying treatment of Ta film on high speed steel. And the Ta alloying layer is about 6 μm. After tempering treatment, TaC phase forms in Ta alloying layer when the treated temperature is over 823 K. Through the TEM and HRTEM observation, a large amount of nano-scaled precipitates (mean diameter 5–8 nm) form within the δ-Fe grain in Ta alloying layer after tempering treatment and these nano-scaled precipitates are confirmed as TaC particles, which contribute to the strengthening effect of the surface alloying layer. The hardness of tempered alloying layer can reach to 18.1 GPa when the treated temperature is 823 K which increase by 50% comparing with the untreated steel sample before surface alloying treatment.

  20. Strengthening effect of nano-scaled precipitates in Ta alloying layer induced by high current pulsed electron beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Guangze; Luo, Dian; Fan, Guohua; Ma, Xinxin; Wang, Liqin

    2017-05-01

    In this study, the combination of magnetron sputtering and high current pulsed electron beam are used for surface alloying treatment of Ta film on high speed steel. And the Ta alloying layer is about 6 μm. After tempering treatment, TaC phase forms in Ta alloying layer when the treated temperature is over 823 K. Through the TEM and HRTEM observation, a large amount of nano-scaled precipitates (mean diameter 5-8 nm) form within the δ-Fe grain in Ta alloying layer after tempering treatment and these nano-scaled precipitates are confirmed as TaC particles, which contribute to the strengthening effect of the surface alloying layer. The hardness of tempered alloying layer can reach to 18.1 GPa when the treated temperature is 823 K which increase by 50% comparing with the untreated steel sample before surface alloying treatment.

  1. Quantitative investigation of precipitate growth during ageing of Al-(Mg,Si) alloys by energy-filtered electron diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wollgarten, M.; Chang, C. S. T.; Duchstein, Linus Daniel Leonhard

    2011-01-01

    precipitation sequence of these phases is well studied [1,2], there remains an effect which is not fully understood up to now. Strengthening upon annealing, e.g. during paint baking of car body sheets, strongly depends on the storage duration at room temperature of the semi-finished parts [3,4]. It is commonly......, Germany) that have been solution heat treated for one hour at 540°C, ice water quenched and subsequently artificially aged for various durations at 180°C. Samples for transmission electron microscopy have been prepared by electropolishing of thinly cut sections. Experiments were carried out in a Zeiss...

  2. Predicting Atmospheric Ionization and Excitation by Precipitating SEP and Solar Wind Protons Measured By MAVEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolitz, Rebecca; Dong, Chuanfei; Lee, Christina; Lillis, Rob; Brain, David; Curry, Shannon; Halekas, Jasper; Bougher, Stephen W.; Jakosky, Bruce

    2017-10-01

    Precipitating energetic particles ionize and excite planetary atmospheres, increasing electron content and producing aurora. At Mars, the solar wind and solar energetic particles (SEPs) can precipitate directly into the atmosphere because solar wind protons can charge exchange to become neutral and pass the magnetosheath, and SEPs are sufficiently energetic to cross the magnetosheath unchanged. We will compare ionization and Lyman alpha emission rates for solar wind and SEP protons during nominal solar activity and a CME shock front impact event on May 16 2016. We will use the Atmospheric Scattering of Protons and Energetic Neutrals (ASPEN) model to compare excitation and ionization rates by SEPs and solar wind protons currently measured by the SWIA (Solar Wind Ion Analyzer) and SEP instruments aboard the MAVEN spacecraft. Results will help quantify how SEP and solar wind protons influence atmospheric energy deposition during solar minimum.

  3. Prediction and characterization of variant electron diffraction patterns for {gamma}{double_prime} and {delta} precipitates in an Inconel 718 alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rong, Y.; Chen, S.; Hu, G. [Shanghai Jiao Tong Univ. (China). School of Materials Science and Engineering; Gao, M.; Wei, R.P. [Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics

    1999-09-01

    A universal theoretical method has been developed in this article to predict and characterize electron diffraction patterns (EDPs) which contain various variants of precipitate(s) with a matrix. The plane and direction transition matrices for three {gamma}{double_prime}-phase variants and 12 {delta}-phase variants precipitated from a {gamma} matrix in the Inconel 718 alloy were deduced, from which the EDPs for seven low-index zones of {gamma} matrix containing {gamma}{double_prime} precipitates were predicted by plotting and were found to be consistent with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations, showing that some of the results reported by Quist et al. should be corrected. Meanwhile, three variants of {delta} phase, precipitated from any one of four {l_brace}111{r_brace} matrices in 12 possible orientational variants, were also predicted and confirmed by EDPs. Different from Paulonis` conclusion, the theoretical calculations indicated that the {l_brace}1/2 1 0{r_brace}-type superlattice reflections in the <100> zone of the {gamma} matrix permitted detection of both {gamma}{double_prime}- and {sigma}-phase precipitates, but not of {gamma}{double_prime}-phase precipitates. Therefore, the precipitates shown in dark-field images using these superlattice reflections cannot be unambiguously determined to be {gamma}{double_prime} phase. A unique approach for identification of {gamma}{double_prime} precipitates in the alloy has been proposed.

  4. A pulsed, mono-energetic and angular-selective UV photo-electron source for the commissioning of the KATRIN experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, J.; Ranitzsch, P. C.-O.; Beck, M.; Beglarian, A.; Erhard, M.; Groh, S.; Hannen, V.; Kraus, M.; Ortjohann, H.-W.; Rest, O.; Schlösser, K.; Thümmler, T.; Valerius, K.; Wierman, K.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Winzen, D.; Zacher, M.; Weinheimer, C.

    2017-06-01

    The KATRIN experiment aims to determine the neutrino mass scale with a sensitivity of 200 {meV/c^2} (90% C. L.) by a precision measurement of the shape of the tritium β -spectrum in the endpoint region. The energy analysis of the decay electrons is achieved by a MAC-E filter spectrometer. To determine the transmission properties of the KATRIN main spectrometer, a mono-energetic and angular-selective electron source has been developed. In preparation for the second commissioning phase of the main spectrometer, a measurement phase was carried out at the KATRIN monitor spectrometer where the device was operated in a MAC-E filter setup for testing. The results of these measurements are compared with simulations using the particle-tracking software "Kassiopeia", which was developed in the KATRIN collaboration over recent years.

  5. A pulsed, mono-energetic and angular-selective UV photo-electron source for the commissioning of the KATRIN experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behrens, J. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, WWU Muenster, Muenster (Germany); Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, IEKP, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Ranitzsch, P.C.O.; Hannen, V.; Ortjohann, H.W.; Rest, O.; Winzen, D.; Zacher, M.; Weinheimer, C. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, WWU Muenster, Muenster (Germany); Beck, M. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, WWU Muenster, Muenster (Germany); Johannes-Gutenberg Universitaet, Institut fuer Physik, Mainz (Germany); Beglarian, A. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, IPE, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Erhard, M.; Groh, S.; Kraus, M. [IEKP, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Schloesser, K.; Thuemmler, T. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, IKP, Karlsruhe (Germany); Valerius, K. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, WWU Muenster, Muenster (Germany); Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, IKP, Karlsruhe (Germany); Wierman, K.; Wilkerson, J.F. [University of North Carolina, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

    2017-06-15

    The KATRIN experiment aims to determine the neutrino mass scale with a sensitivity of 200 meV/c{sup 2} (90% C.L.) by a precision measurement of the shape of the tritium β-spectrum in the endpoint region. The energy analysis of the decay electrons is achieved by a MAC-E filter spectrometer. To determine the transmission properties of the KATRIN main spectrometer, a mono-energetic and angular-selective electron source has been developed. In preparation for the second commissioning phase of the main spectrometer, a measurement phase was carried out at the KATRIN monitor spectrometer where the device was operated in a MAC-E filter setup for testing. The results of these measurements are compared with simulations using the particle-tracking software ''Kassiopeia'', which was developed in the KATRIN collaboration over recent years. (orig.)

  6. Deleterious phases precipitation on superduplex stainless steel UNS S32750: characterization by light optical and scanning electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Manuel Pardal

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Deleterious phases precipitation in superduplex stainless steels is the main concern in fabrication by welding and hot forming of this class of material. Sigma, chi and secondary austenite phases are considered deleterious phases because they produce negative effects on corrosion resistance. Besides, sigma and chi phases also promote strong decrease of toughness. In the present work, the precipitations of sigma, chi and secondary austenite under aging in the 800-950 °C interval were studied in two UNS S32750 steels with different grain sizes. The deleterious phases could be quantified by light optical microscopy, with no distinction between them. Scanning electron microscopy was used to distinguish the individual phases in various aging conditions. The results elucidate the influence of the aging temperature and grain size on the kinetics precipitation and morphology of deleterious phases. The kinetics of deleterious phases is higher in the fine grained material in the initial stage of aging, but the maximum amount of deleterious phases is higher in the coarse grained steel.

  7. Outward radial transport and drift loss due to ULF waves during an energetic electron dropout during the storm on 1 June 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, S. B.; Fok, M. C. H.; Li, W.; Komar, C. M.; Engebretson, M. J.; Glocer, A.; Buzulukova, N.

    2016-12-01

    A flux dropout is a sudden and considerable decrease in the relativistic electron population of the outer radiation belt occurring over timescales of a few hours. A significant dropout of electrons with energies ranging from 0.1 to 7MeV was observed by Van Allen Probes during the storm on June 1, 2013. To understand the physical mechanisms of this dropout, we simulate flux and phase space density of energetic electrons with event specific plasma waves using the Comprehensive Inner Magnetosphere and Ionosphere (CIMI) model. We update the magnetic field configuration every 30 seconds using the Tsyganenko 2004 empirical magnetic field model. Likewise, the electric field is updated every 10 seconds using a self-consistent convection potential from ring current pressure to reproduce fluctuations comparable to ultralow frequency (ULF) waves. CIMI reproduces the significant dropout with the last closed drift shell estimated to be L* electrons. We conclude that outward radial transport results from electric and magnetic fluctuations and the Dst effect. These effects combine together and result in electron losses for a wide range of energies to the magnetopause and are the primary driver of the deep dropout over a large range of L values.

  8. Comparison of the characteristic energy of precipitating electrons derived from ground-based and DMSP satellite data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ashrafi

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Energy maps are important for ionosphere-magnetosphere coupling studies, because quantitative determination of field-aligned currents requires knowledge of the conductances and their spatial gradients. By combining imaging riometer absorption and all-sky auroral optical data it is possible to produce high temporal and spatial resolution maps of the Maxwellian characteristic energy of precipitating electrons within a 240240 common field of view. These data have been calibrated by inverting EISCAT electron density profiles into equivalent energy spectra. In this paper energy maps produced by ground-based instruments (optical and riometer are compared with DMSP satellite data during geomagnetic conjunctions. For the period 1995-2002, twelve satellite passes over the ground-based instruments' field of view for the cloud-free conditions have been considered. Four of the satellite conjunctions occurred during moderate geomagnetic, steady-state conditions and without any ion precipitation. In these cases with Maxwellian satellite spectra, there is 71% agreement between the characteristic energies derived from the satellite and the ground-based energy map method.

  9. Energetic Properties and Electronic Structure of [C,N,O,P] and [C,N,S,P] Isomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finney, Brian; Thanthiriwatte, K Sahan; Francisco, Joseph S; Dixon, David A

    2017-03-16

    Correlated molecular orbital theory at the coupled cluster CCSD(T) level with augmented correlation consistent basis sets including F12 explicit correlation has been used to predict the structure and energetic properties of the isomers of [C,N,O,P] and [C,N,S,P]. The predicted ground states are the species derived from a trivalent P with a P═O or P═S bond and a cyano group bonded to the P. The other low energy isomers are the isonitriles and they are 1.4 kcal/mol and 6.6 less stable than the ground state for P═O and P═S, respectively. An analysis of the bond energies is provided and the values are compared to the corresponding [N,N,C,O] isomers. Data are provided for searching for these species in interstellar regions.

  10. Bi-layer structure of counterstreaming energetic electron fluxes: a diagnostic tool of the acceleration mechanism in the Earth's magnetotail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Sarafopoulos

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available For the first time we identify a bi-layer structure of energetic electron fluxes in the Earth's magnetotail and establish (using datasets mainly obtained by the Geotail Energetic Particles and Ion Composition (EPIC/ICS instrument that it actually provides strong evidence for a purely spatial structure. Each bi-layer event is composed of two distinct layers with counterstreaming energetic electron fluxes, parallel and antiparallel to the local ambient magnetic field lines; in particular, the tailward directed fluxes always occur in a region adjacent to the lobes. Adopting the X-line as a standard reconnection model, we determine the occurrence of bi-layer events relatively to the neutral point, in the substorm frame; four (out of the shown seven events are observed earthward and three tailward, a result implying that four events probably occurred with the substorm's local recovery phase. We discuss the bi-layer events in terms of the X-line model; they add more constraints for any candidate electron acceleration mechanism. It should be stressed that until this time, none proposed electron acceleration mechanism has discussed or predicted these layered structures with all their properties. Then we discuss the bi-layer events in terms of the much promising "akis model", as introduced by Sarafopoulos (2008. The akis magnetic field topology is embedded in a thinned plasma sheet and is potentially causing charge separation. We assume that as the Rc curvature radius of the magnetic field line tends to become equal to the ion gyroradius rg, then the ions become non-adiabatic. At the limit Rc=rg the demagnetization process is also under way and the frozen-in magnetic field condition is violated by strong wave turbulence; hence, the ion particles in this geometry are stochastically scattered. In addition, ion diffusion probably takes place across the magnetic field, since an

  11. Modeling Relativistic Electron Precipitation Bremsstrahlung X-Ray Intensities at 10-100 km Manned Vehicle Altitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habash Krause, L.; Gilchrist, B. E.; Nishikawa, K.; Williams, A.

    2013-12-01

    Relativistic electron precipitation (REP) events occur when beams or bunches of relativistic electrons of magnetospheric origin enter the Earth's atmosphere, typically at auroral latitudes. REP events are associated with a variety of space weather effects, including production of transitional and bremsstrahlung radiation, catalytic depletion of stratospheric ozone, and scintillation of transionospheric radio waves. This study examines the intensities of x-rays produced at airliner, manned balloon, and suborbital Reusable Launch Vehicle (sRLV) altitudes. The monoenergetic beam is modeled in cylindrical symmetry using the paraxial ray equation. Bremsstrahlung photon production is calculated using the traditional Sauter-Elwert cross-section, providing x-ray emission spectra differential in energy and angle. Attenuation is computed for a plane-stratified standard atmosphere, and the loss processes include photoionization, Rayleigh and Compton scattering, electron-positron pair production, and photonuclear interaction. Peak altitudes of electron energy deposition and bremsstrahlung x-ray production were calculated for beams of energies from 1 MeV through 100 MeV. The altitude peak of bremsstrahlung deposition was consistently and significantly lower that that of the electron deposition due to the longer mean free paths of x-rays compared to electrons within the atmosphere. For example, for a nadir-directed monoenergetic 5 MeV beam, the peak deposition altitude was calculated to be 42 km, but the resulting bremmstrahlung deposition peaked at 25 km. This has implications for crew and passenger safety, especially with the growth of the space tourism industry that relies on sRLVs with a nominal apogee of 100 km. A survey of results covering the 1-100 MeV spectrum for the three altitude ranges of interest will be presented.

  12. Modeling Relativistic Electron Precipitation Bremsstrahlung X-Ray Intensities at 10-100 km Manned Vehicle Altitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, L. Habsh; Gilchrist, B. E.; Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi

    2013-01-01

    Relativisitic electron precipitation (REP) events occur when beams or bunches of relativistic electrons of magnetospheric origin enter the Earth's atmosphere, typically at auroral latitudes. REP events are associated with a variety of space weather effects, including production of transitional and bremsstrahlung radiation, catalytic depletion of stratospheric ozone, and scintillation of transionospheric radio waves. This study examines the intensities of x-rays produced at airliner, manned balloon, and space reuseable launch vehicles (sRLVs). The monoenergetic beam is modeled in cylindrical symetry using the paraxial ray equation. Bremsstrahlung photon production is calculated using the traditional Sauter-Elwert cross-section, providing x-ray emission spectra differential in energy and angle. Attenuation is computed for a plane-stratified standard atmosphere, and the loss processes include photoionization, Rayleigh and Compton scattering, electron-positron pair production, and photonuclear interaction. Peak altitudes of electron energy deposition and bremsstrahlung x-ray production were calculated for beams of energies from 1 MeV through 100 MeV. The altitude peak of bremsstrahlung deposition was consistently and significantly lower that that of the electron deposition due to the longer mean free paths of x-rays compared to electrons within the atmosphere. For example, for a nadir-directed monoenergetic 5 MeV beam, the peak deposition altitude was calculated to be 42 km, but the resulting bremsstrahlung deposition peaked at 25 km. This has implications for crew and passenger safety, especially with the growth of the space tourism industry. A survey of results covering the 1-100 MeV spectrum for the three altitude ranges of interest will be presented.

  13. On the Solution of the Continuity Equation for Precipitating Electrons in Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emslie, A. Gordon; Holman, Gordon D.; Litvinenko, Yuri E.

    2014-01-01

    Electrons accelerated in solar flares are injected into the surrounding plasma, where they are subjected to the influence of collisional (Coulomb) energy losses. Their evolution is modeled by a partial differential equation describing continuity of electron number. In a recent paper, Dobranskis & Zharkova claim to have found an "updated exact analytical solution" to this continuity equation. Their solution contains an additional term that drives an exponential decrease in electron density with depth, leading them to assert that the well-known solution derived by Brown, Syrovatskii & Shmeleva, and many others is invalid. We show that the solution of Dobranskis & Zharkova results from a fundamental error in the application of the method of characteristics and is hence incorrect. Further, their comparison of the "new" analytical solution with numerical solutions of the Fokker-Planck equation fails to lend support to their result.We conclude that Dobranskis & Zharkova's solution of the universally accepted and well-established continuity equation is incorrect, and that their criticism of the correct solution is unfounded. We also demonstrate the formal equivalence of the approaches of Syrovatskii & Shmeleva and Brown, with particular reference to the evolution of the electron flux and number density (both differential in energy) in a collisional thick target. We strongly urge use of these long-established, correct solutions in future works.

  14. Effect of the combination of sodium hypochlorite and chlorhexidine on dentinal permeability and scanning electron microscopy precipitate observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akisue, Eduardo; Tomita, Viviane S; Gavini, Giulio; Poli de Figueiredo, Jose Antonio

    2010-05-01

    This study compared the combined use of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) and chlorhexidine (CXH) with citric acid and CXH on dentinal permeability and precipitate formation. Thirty-four upper anterior teeth were prepared by rotary instrumentation and NaOCl. The root canal surfaces were conditioned for smear layer removal using 15% citric acid solution under ultrasonic activation and a final wash with distilled water. All teeth were dried, and 30 specimens were randomly divided into three equal groups as follows: positive control group (PC), no irrigation; 15% citric acid + 2% CHX group (CA + CHX); and 1% NaOCl + 2% CHX group (NaOCl + CHX). All roots were immersed in a 0.2% Rhodamine B solution for 24 hours. One-millimeter-thick slices from the cementum-enamel junction were scanned at 400 dpi and analyzed using the software ImageLab (LIDO-USP, Sao Paulo, Brazil) for the assessment of leakage in percentage. For scanning electron microscopy analysis, four teeth, irrigated for NaOCl + CHX samples, were split in half, and each third was evaluated at 1,000x and 5,000x (at the precipitate). Using the analysis of variance test followed by the Bonferroni comparison method, no statistical differences between groups were found when analyzed at the cervical and medium thirds. At the apical third, differences between the PC and NaOCl + CHX (p < 0.05) and CA + CHX and NaOCl + CHX could be seen (p < 0.05). The combination of 1% NaOCl and 2% CHX solutions results in the formation of a flocculate precipitate that acts as a chemical smear layer reducing the dentinal permeability in the apical third. Copyright (c) 2010 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. High-resolution electron microscopy studies of the precipitation of copper under neutron irradiation in an Fe-1.3WT % Cu alloy.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicol, A. C.

    1998-12-21

    We have studied by electron microscopy the copper-rich precipitates in an Fe-1.3wt%Cu model alloy irradiated with neutrons to doses of 8.61 x 10{sup {minus}3} dpa and 6.3 x 10{sup {minus}2} dpa at a temperature of {approximately}270 C. In the lower dose material a majority (ca. 60%)of the precipitates visible in high-resolution electron microscopy were timed 9R precipitates of size {approximately}2-4 nm, while ca. 40% were untwinned. In the higher dose material, a majority (ca. 75%) of visible precipitates were untwinned although many still seemed to have a 9R structure. The average angle {alpha} between the herring-bone fringes in the twin variants was measured as 125{degree}, not the 129{degree} characteristic of precipitates in thermally-aged and electron-irradiated material immediately after the bcc{r_arrow}9R martensitic transformation. We argue that these results imply that the bcc{r_arrow}9R transformation of small (<4 nm) precipitates under neutron irradiation takes place at the irradiation temperature of 270 C rather than after subsequent cooling. Preliminary measurements showed that precipitate sizes did not depend strongly on dose, with a mean diameter of 3.4 {+-} 0.7 nm for the lower dose material, and 3.0 {+-} 0.5 nm for the higher dose material. This result agrees with the previous assumption that the lack of coarsening in precipitates formed under neutron irradiation is a consequence of the partial dissolution of larger precipitates by high-energy cascades.

  16. Generating energetic electrons through staged acceleration in the two-plasmon-decay instability in inertial confinement fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, R; Ren, C; Li, J; Maximov, A V; Mori, W B; Sheng, Z-M; Tsung, F S

    2012-04-27

    A new hot-electron generation mechanism in two-plasmon-decay instabilities is described based on a series of 2D, long-term (~10 ps) particle-in-cell and fluid simulations under parameters relevant to inertial confinement fusion. The simulations show that significant laser absorption and hot-electron generation occur in the nonlinear stage. The hot electrons are stage accelerated from the low-density region to the high-density region. New modes with small phase velocities develop in the low-density region in the nonlinear stage and form the first stage for electron acceleration. Electron-ion collisions are shown to significantly reduce the efficiency of this acceleration mechanism.

  17. Study of calcium carbonate and sulfate co-precipitation

    KAUST Repository

    Zarga, Y.

    2013-06-01

    Co-precipitation of mineral based salts in scaling is still not well understood and/or thermodynamically well defined in the water industry. This study focuses on investigating calcium carbonate (CaCO3) and sulfate mixed precipitation in scaling which is commonly observed in industrial water treatment processes including seawater desalination either by thermal-based or membrane-based processes. Co-precipitation kinetics were studied carefully by monitoring several parameters simultaneously measured, including: pH, calcium and alkalinity concentrations as well as quartz microbalance responses. The CaCO3 germination in mixed precipitation was found to be different than that of simple precipitation. Indeed, the co-precipitation of CaCO3 germination time was not anymore related to supersaturation as in a simple homogenous precipitation, but was significantly reduced when the gypsum crystals appeared first. On the other hand, the calcium sulfate crystals appear to reduce the energetic barrier of CaCO3 nucleation and lead to its precipitation by activating heterogeneous germination. However, the presence of CaCO3 crystals does not seem to have any significant effect on gypsum precipitation. IR spectroscopy and the Scanning Electronic Microscopy (SEM) were used to identify the nature of scales structures. Gypsum was found to be the dominant precipitate while calcite and especially vaterite were found at lower proportions. These analyses showed also that gypsum crystals promote calcite crystallization to the detriment of other forms. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Quantitative characterization of agglomerates and aggregates of pyrogenic and precipitated amorphous silica nanomaterials by transmission electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Temmerman Pieter-Jan

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The interaction of a nanomaterial (NM with a biological system depends not only on the size of its primary particles but also on the size, shape and surface topology of its aggregates and agglomerates. A method based on transmission electron microscopy (TEM, to visualize the NM and on image analysis, to measure detected features quantitatively, was assessed for its capacity to characterize the aggregates and agglomerates of precipitated and pyrogenic synthetic amorphous silicon dioxide (SAS, or silica, NM. Results Bright field (BF TEM combined with systematic random imaging and semi-automatic image analysis allows measuring the properties of SAS NM quantitatively. Automation allows measuring multiple and arithmetically complex parameters simultaneously on high numbers of detected particles. This reduces operator-induced bias and assures a statistically relevant number of measurements, avoiding the tedious repetitive task of manual measurements. Access to multiple parameters further allows selecting the optimal parameter in function of a specific purpose. Using principle component analysis (PCA, twenty-three measured parameters were classified into three classes containing measures for size, shape and surface topology of the NM. Conclusion The presented method allows a detailed quantitative characterization of NM, like dispersions of precipitated and pyrogenic SAS based on the number-based distributions of their mean diameter, sphericity and shape factor.

  19. Characterization of Precipitation in Al-Li Alloy AA2195 by means of Atom Probe Tomography and Transmission Electron Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Khushaim, Muna

    2015-05-19

    The microstructure of the commercial alloy AA2195 was investigated on the nanoscale after conducting T8 tempering. This particular thermomechanical treatment of the specimen resulted in the formation of platelet-shaped T 1 Al 2 CuLi / θ ′ Al 2 Cu precipitates within the Al matrix. The electrochemically prepared samples were analyzed by scanning transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography for chemical mapping. The θ ′ platelets, which are less than 2 nm thick, have the stoichiometric composition consistent with the expected Al 2 Cu equilibrium composition. Additionally, the Li distribution inside the θ ′ platelets was found to equal the same value as in the matrix. The equally thin T 1 platelet deviates from the formula (Al 2 CuLi) in its stoichiometry and shows Mg enrichment inside the platelet without any indication of a higher segregation level at the precipitate/matrix interface. The deviation from the (Al 2 CuLi) stoichiometry cannot be simply interpreted as a consequence of artifacts when measuring the Cu and Li concentrations inside the T 1 platelet. The results show rather a strong hint for a true lower Li and Cu contents, hence supporting reasonably the hypothesis that the real chemical composition for the thin T 1 platelet in the T8 tempering condition differs from the equilibrium composition of the thermodynamic stable bulk phase.

  20. Quantitative characterization of agglomerates and aggregates of pyrogenic and precipitated amorphous silica nanomaterials by transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Temmerman, Pieter-Jan; Van Doren, Elke; Verleysen, Eveline; Van der Stede, Yves; Francisco, Michel Abi Daoud; Mast, Jan

    2012-06-18

    The interaction of a nanomaterial (NM) with a biological system depends not only on the size of its primary particles but also on the size, shape and surface topology of its aggregates and agglomerates. A method based on transmission electron microscopy (TEM), to visualize the NM and on image analysis, to measure detected features quantitatively, was assessed for its capacity to characterize the aggregates and agglomerates of precipitated and pyrogenic synthetic amorphous silicon dioxide (SAS), or silica, NM. Bright field (BF) TEM combined with systematic random imaging and semi-automatic image analysis allows measuring the properties of SAS NM quantitatively. Automation allows measuring multiple and arithmetically complex parameters simultaneously on high numbers of detected particles. This reduces operator-induced bias and assures a statistically relevant number of measurements, avoiding the tedious repetitive task of manual measurements. Access to multiple parameters further allows selecting the optimal parameter in function of a specific purpose.Using principle component analysis (PCA), twenty-three measured parameters were classified into three classes containing measures for size, shape and surface topology of the NM. The presented method allows a detailed quantitative characterization of NM, like dispersions of precipitated and pyrogenic SAS based on the number-based distributions of their mean diameter, sphericity and shape factor.

  1. Characterization of Precipitation in Al-Li Alloy AA2195 by means of Atom Probe Tomography and Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muna Khushaim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The microstructure of the commercial alloy AA2195 was investigated on the nanoscale after conducting T8 tempering. This particular thermomechanical treatment of the specimen resulted in the formation of platelet-shaped T1Al2CuLi/θ′Al2Cu precipitates within the Al matrix. The electrochemically prepared samples were analyzed by scanning transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography for chemical mapping. The θ′ platelets, which are less than 2 nm thick, have the stoichiometric composition consistent with the expected Al2Cu equilibrium composition. Additionally, the Li distribution inside the θ′ platelets was found to equal the same value as in the matrix. The equally thin T1 platelet deviates from the formula (Al2CuLi in its stoichiometry and shows Mg enrichment inside the platelet without any indication of a higher segregation level at the precipitate/matrix interface. The deviation from the (Al2CuLi stoichiometry cannot be simply interpreted as a consequence of artifacts when measuring the Cu and Li concentrations inside the T1 platelet. The results show rather a strong hint for a true lower Li and Cu contents, hence supporting reasonably the hypothesis that the real chemical composition for the thin T1 platelet in the T8 tempering condition differs from the equilibrium composition of the thermodynamic stable bulk phase.

  2. WC/Co composite surface structure and nano graphite precipitate induced by high current pulsed electron beam irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, S. Z.; Zhang, Y.; Xu, Y.; Gey, N.; Grosdidier, T.; Dong, C.

    2013-11-01

    High current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB) irradiation was conducted on a WC-6% Co hard alloy with accelerating voltage of 27 kV and pulse duration of 2.5 μs. The surface phase structure was examined by using glancing-angle X-ray diffraction (GAXRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) methods. The surface tribological properties were measured. It was found that after 20 pulses of HCPEB irradiation, the surface structure of WC/Co hard alloy was modified dramatically and composed of a mixture of nano-grained WC1-x, Co3W9C4, Co3W3C phases and graphite precipitate domains ˜50 nm. The friction coefficient of modified surface decreased to ˜0.38 from 0.6 of the initial state, and the wear rate reduced from 8.4 × 10-5 mm3/min to 6.3 × 10-6 mm3/min, showing a significant self-lubricating effect.

  3. WC/Co composite surface structure and nano graphite precipitate induced by high current pulsed electron beam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hao, S.Z., E-mail: ebeam@dlut.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification and School of Physics and Optoelectronics Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Zhang, Y. [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification and School of Physics and Optoelectronics Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shenyang University of Technology, Shenyang 110870 (China); Xu, Y. [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification and School of Physics and Optoelectronics Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); College of Materials Science and Engineering, Liaoning Technical University, Fuxin 123000 (China); Gey, N.; Grosdidier, T. [Université de Lorraine, Laboratoire d’Etude des Microstructures et de Mécanique des Matériaux (LEM3), CNRS UMR 7239, Ile du Saulcy, 57045 Metz (France); Université de Lorraine, Laboratoire d’Excellence on Design of Alloy Metals for Low-Mass Structure (DAMAS), Ile du Saulcy, 57045 Metz (France); Dong, C. [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification and School of Physics and Optoelectronics Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Université de Lorraine, Laboratoire d’Excellence on Design of Alloy Metals for Low-Mass Structure (DAMAS), Ile du Saulcy, 57045 Metz (France)

    2013-11-15

    High current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB) irradiation was conducted on a WC-6% Co hard alloy with accelerating voltage of 27 kV and pulse duration of 2.5 μs. The surface phase structure was examined by using glancing-angle X-ray diffraction (GAXRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) methods. The surface tribological properties were measured. It was found that after 20 pulses of HCPEB irradiation, the surface structure of WC/Co hard alloy was modified dramatically and composed of a mixture of nano-grained WC{sub 1−x}, Co{sub 3}W{sub 9}C{sub 4}, Co{sub 3}W{sub 3}C phases and graphite precipitate domains ∼50 nm. The friction coefficient of modified surface decreased to ∼0.38 from 0.6 of the initial state, and the wear rate reduced from 8.4 × 10{sup −5} mm{sup 3}/min to 6.3 × 10{sup −6} mm{sup 3}/min, showing a significant self-lubricating effect.

  4. Science Highlights from the Balloon Array for Radiation belt Electron Losses (BARREL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millan, R. M.

    2016-12-01

    In the inner magnetosphere where the plasmasphere, ring current and radiation belts overlap, energy and momentum are exchanged between different plasma populations by plasma waves. Resonant interaction with these waves can lead to rapid loss of radiation belt and ring current electrons to the atmosphere. Over the past four years, more than 50 BARREL balloons have been launched, making observations of energetic ( 20 keV - 10 MeV) electron precipitation in both hemispheres. The combination of BARREL multi-point balloon measurements with measurements from equatorial spacecraft (e.g. Van Allen Probes, LANL, THEMIS, GOES), LEO spacecraft (POES, CSSWE, FIREBIRD, AC-6), and ground-based instruments is providing a unique opportunity to quantify the spatial scale of energetic precipitation and to study the wave-particle interactions that cause precipitation. This presentation will focus on science results from recent BARREL campaigns, shedding light on outstanding questions about energetic electron precipitation.

  5. Excitation of high-frequency electromagnetic waves by energetic electrons with a loss cone distribution in a field-aligned potential drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Shing F.; Vinas, Adolfo F.

    1994-01-01

    The electron cyclotron maser instability (CMI) driven by momentum space anisotropy (df/dp (sub perpendicular) greater than 0) has been invoked to explain many aspects, such as the modes of propagation, harmonic emissions, and the source characteristics of the auroral kilometric radiation (AKR). Recent satellite observations of AKR sources indicate that the source regions are often imbedded within the auroral acceleration region characterized by the presence of a field-aligned potential drop. In this paper we investigate the excitation of the fundamental extraordinary mode radiation due to the accelerated electrons. The momentum space distribution of these energetic electrons is modeled by a realistic upward loss cone as modified by the presence of a parallel potential drop below the observation point. On the basis of linear growth rate calculations we present the emission characteristics, such as the frequency spectrum and the emission angular distribution as functions of the plasma parameters. We will discuss the implication of our results on the generation of the AKR from the edges of the auroral density cavities.

  6. Excitation of high-frequency electromagnetic waves by energetic electrons with a loss cone distribution in a field-aligned potential drop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fung, S.F.; Vinas, A.F. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States)

    1994-05-01

    The electron cyclotron maser instability (CMI) driven by momentum space anisotropy, {partial_derivative}f/{partial_derivative}p{perpendicular} > 0, has been invoked to explain many aspects, such as the modes of propagation, harmonic emissions, and the source characteristics of the auroral kilometric radiation (AKR). Recent satellite observations of AKR sources indicate that the source regions are often imbedded within the auroral acceleration region characterized by the presence of a field-aligned potential drop. In this paper the authors investigate the excitation of the fundamental extraordinary mode radiation due to the accelerated electrons. The momentum space distribution of these energetic electrons is modeled by a realistic upward loss cone as modified by the presence of a parallel potential drop below the observation point. On the basis of linear growth rate calculations the authors present the emission characteristics, such as the frequency spectrum and the emission angular distribution as functions of the plasma parameters. They will discuss the implication of their results on the generation of the AKR from the edges of the auroral density cavities. 31 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  7. The storm and poststorm evolution of energetic /35-560 keV/ radiation belt electron distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, L. R.; Williams, D. J.

    1975-01-01

    Detailed Explorer 45 equatorial observations of the storm and poststorm structure of radiation-belt electrons (35 to 560 keV) for L values between 1.7 and 5.2 are presented. Injection during major storms results in electron pitch-angle distributions and radial profiles that are greatly distorted from their quiet-time equilibrium structure. Following storms, the pitch-angle distributions return to their prestorm shape over a period of several days. This shape is maintained as electron fluxes decay back to the quiet-time levels. The equatorial radial profiles slowly return to their prestorm equilibrium structure over a period of a few weeks and then maintain that structure.

  8. Signature energetic analysis of accelerate electron beam after first acceleration station by accelerating stand of Joint Institute for Nuclear Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sledneva, A. S.; Kobets, V. V.

    2017-06-01

    The linear electron accelerator based on the LINAC - 800 accelerator imported from the Netherland is created at Joint Institute for Nuclear Research in the framework of the project on creation of the Testbed with an electron beam of a linear accelerator with an energy up to 250 MV. Currently two accelerator stations with a 60 MV energy of a beam are put in operation and the work is to put the beam through accelerating section of the third accelerator station. The electron beam with an energy of 23 MeV is used for testing the crystals (BaF2, CsI (native), and LYSO) in order to explore the opportunity to use them in particle detectors in experiments: Muon g-2, Mu2e, Comet, whose preparation requires a detailed study of the detectors properties such as their irradiation by the accelerator beams.

  9. STABILITY OF EXTRATERRESTRIAL GLYCINE UNDER ENERGETIC PARTICLE RADIATION ESTIMATED FROM 2 keV ELECTRON BOMBARDMENT EXPERIMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maté, B.; Tanarro, I.; Escribano, R.; Moreno, M. A.; Herrero, V. J. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia (IEM-CSIC), Serrano 123, E-28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-06-20

    The destruction of solid glycine under irradiation with 2 keV electrons has been investigated by means of IR spectroscopy. Destruction cross sections, radiolysis yields, and half-life doses were determined for samples at 20, 40, 90, and 300 K. The thickness of the irradiated samples was kept below the estimated penetration depth of the electrons. No significant differences were obtained in the experiments below 90 K, but the destruction cross section at 300 K was larger by a factor of 2. The radiolysis yields and half-life doses are in good accordance with recent MeV proton experiments, which confirms that electrons in the keV range can be used to simulate the effects of cosmic rays if the whole sample is effectively irradiated. In the low temperature experiments, electron irradiation leads to the formation of residues. IR absorptions of these residues are assigned to the presence CO{sub 2}, CO, OCN{sup −}, and CN{sup −} and possibly to amide bands I to III. The protection of glycine by water ice is also studied. A water ice film of ∼150 nm is found to provide efficient shielding against the bombardment of 2 keV electrons. The results of this study show also that current Monte Carlo predictions provide a good global description of electron penetration depths. The lifetimes estimated in this work for various environments ranging from the diffuse interstellar medium to the inner solar system, show that the survival of hypothetical primeval glycine from the solar nebula in present solar system bodies is not very likely.

  10. Electron precipitation events in the lower ionosphere and the geospace conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Henrique Fernandez

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We present an analysis of localized ionospheric perturbations detected at Comandante Ferraz Brazilian Antarctic Station (McIlwain parameter L~2.25 as fast-amplitude variations of very low frequency (VLF signals transmitted from Hawaii (NPM, at 21.4 kHz, also known as Trimpi events. The study covers the first six months of 2007, during the period of minimum activity in the 23rd solar cycle. The occurrence of Trimpi events in the Antarctica peninsula region was studied in association with solar-wind parameters in the neighborhood of the Earth (geospace, along with the geomagnetic activity level (Ap, Dst indices. The analysis shows that the Trimpi events occurred predominantly during geomagnetically disturbed periods, but they have a more intricate association with the geospace regimes. The events achieve higher occurrence during the recovery phase of some geomagnetic storms, and also show a close association with electron flux enhancements in the belt region, especially those with higher energy. The higher event incidence occurred a few hours after what we call the 'angle bracket' phenomenon: when the solar wind velocity rises simultaneous with a decrease in its density.

  11. Simulation of the electron diffraction patterns from needle/rod-like precipitates in Al-Mg-Si alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Kai [State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Song Min, E-mail: Min.Song.Th05@Alum.Dartmouth.ORG [State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Du Yong [State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Zhang Hong [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China)

    2011-09-15

    The origin of the selected area electron diffraction (SAED) patterns from needle/rod-like metastable precipitates embedded in {alpha}-Al matrix in Al-Mg-Si alloys have been studied via an example of {beta}'' phase. In addition, the SAED pattern from {beta}'' phase has been simulated with significant improvement in comparison with the previous simulations. Three important factors, i.e. the 12 crystallographically equivalent variants of {beta}'' phase in the {alpha}-Al matrix due to the highly symmetric f.c.c. structure of {alpha}-Al, the coherence between {beta}'' phase and the {alpha}-Al matrix, and the double diffractions from the {alpha}-Al matrix and {beta}'' phase, are proved to contribute to the special square-shaped features in the SAED patterns from {beta}'' phase and thus fully taken into account in the simulation. An improved but simplified method for simulating the SAED patterns from needle/rod-like metastable precipitates has been developed. This method is further verified by simulating the SAED pattern from Q phase. The simulated SAED patterns from both {beta}'' and Q phases fit the experimentally determined patterns very well. - Highlights: {yields}An improved method has been developed to simulate the SADPs of Al alloys. {yields}The formation mechanism of SADPs of Al alloys has been systemically studied. {yields}Double diffraction contributes to the formation of the SADPs of Al alloys.

  12. Determining the statistical significance of particle precipitation related to EMIC waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, D. K.; Lee, D. Y.; Noh, S. J.; Hwang, J.; Lee, J.

    2016-12-01

    One of the particle loss processes in the magnetosphere is precipitation into the Earth's atmosphere caused by electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves through pitch angle scattering. These particle precipitations can affect the dynamics of ring current protons ( tens of keV) and radiation belt electrons ( MeV) in the inner magnetosphere. Although there have been many reports to support the precipitation by EMIC waves, its effectiveness has not been demonstrated statistically. In this study, we use Van Allen Probes observations to identify a large number of EMIC waves for which we then determine their association with relativistic electron and energetic (30-80 keV) proton precipitation observed at NOAA low earth orbit satellites. We find that the detection rates of precipitation given EMIC waves in space strongly depends on the number of available low-altitude satellites: The average detection rates by one low-altitude satellite are 8.4 % for electrons and 22.2 % for protons, and they increase by a factor of > 2 if one uses observations from five NOAA satellites. This implies a strong MLT dependence of precipitation given EMIC wave in space. To demonstrate this we determine the MLT distribution of precipitations as a function of MLT of identified EMIC wave location. Finally we determine the relationship between precipitations of electrons and protons, and dependence of EMIC waves and precipitations on the solar phase years.

  13. Hydroxycinnamic acids used as external acceptors of electrons: an energetic advantage for strictly heterofermentative lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filannino, Pasquale; Gobbetti, Marco; De Angelis, Maria; Di Cagno, Raffaella

    2014-12-01

    The metabolism of hydroxycinnamic acids by strictly heterofermentative lactic acid bacteria (19 strains) was investigated as a potential alternative energy route. Lactobacillus curvatus PE5 was the most tolerant to hydroxycinnamic acids, followed by strains of Weissella spp., Lactobacillus brevis, Lactobacillus fermentum, and Leuconostoc mesenteroides, for which the MIC values were the same. The highest sensitivity was found for Lactobacillus rossiae strains. During growth in MRS broth, lactic acid bacteria reduced caffeic, p-coumaric, and ferulic acids into dihydrocaffeic, phloretic, and dihydroferulic acids, respectively, or decarboxylated hydroxycinnamic acids into the corresponding vinyl derivatives and then reduced the latter compounds to ethyl compounds. Reductase activities mainly emerged, and the activities of selected strains were further investigated in chemically defined basal medium (CDM) under anaerobic conditions. The end products of carbon metabolism were quantified, as were the levels of intracellular ATP and the NAD(+)/NADH ratio. Electron and carbon balances and theoretical ATP/glucose yields were also estimated. When CDM was supplemented with hydroxycinnamic acids, the synthesis of ethanol decreased and the concentration of acetic acid increased. The levels of these metabolites reflected on the alcohol dehydrogenase and acetate kinase activities. Overall, some biochemical traits distinguished the common metabolism of strictly heterofermentative strains: main reductase activity toward hydroxycinnamic acids, a shift from alcohol dehydrogenase to acetate kinase activities, an increase in the NAD(+)/NADH ratio, and the accumulation of supplementary intracellular ATP. Taken together, the above-described metabolic responses suggest that strictly heterofermentative lactic acid bacteria mainly use hydroxycinnamic acids as external acceptors of electrons. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  14. Statistical Study of the Occurrence of POES Relativistic Electron Precipitation (REP) in Correlation with Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron (EMIC) Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hembeck, J.; Lessard, M.; Engebretson, M. J.; Rodger, C. J.; Hendry, A.

    2016-12-01

    Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron (EMIC) waves are phenomena that exist within the Earth's magnetosphere caused by an ion temperature anisotropy. The ideal conditions for EMIC wave growth occur during solar storms. In this statistical study, Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellites (POES) relativistic electron precipitation (REP) data are compared to EMIC wave data from Halley Bay in the years ranging from 2008-2010. This statistical study considers a specific type of EMIC wave events known as Intervals of Pulsations of Diminishing Periods (IPDP) to see whether this type of EMIC wave causes a statistically greater occurrence of REP. In this study, different types of IPDP are characterized based on the increase in frequency over time of each wave form. Another considered characteristic of the IPDP waves is whether the wave is continuous or appears as discrete packets, which may actually be separate events. IPDP events are cataloged and then compared to REP events from the POES data set, forming a study that is complementary to that of Hendry et al. [2016], who compared REP from POES data to the presence of EMIC waves at Halley Bay.

  15. In situ electron microscopy studies of calcium carbonate precipitation from aqueous solution with and without organic additives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verch, Andreas; Morrison, Ian E G; Locht, Renee van de; Kröger, Roland

    2013-08-01

    For the understanding of mineral formation processes from solution it is important to obtain a deeper insight into the dynamics of crystal growth. In this study we applied for this purpose a novel atmospheric scanning electron microscope that allows the investigation of CaCO3 particle formation in solution under atmospheric conditions with a resolution of approximately 10nm. Furthermore it permits the in situ observation of the dynamics of crystal evolution. With this tool the precipitation of CaCO3 was studied in the absence and presence of additives, namely poly(acrylic acid) and poly(styrene sulfonate-co-maleic acid) which are known to influence the crystal growth rate and morphology. We determined particle growth rates and investigated the formation and dissolution dynamics of an observed transient phase, believed to be amorphous calcium carbonate. This technique also enabled us to study the depletion zones, areas of lower intensity due to reduced ion concentrations. Ion flux rates were obtained from the depletion zone width, which amounted to several μm assuming the formation and dissolution dynamics of amorphous calcium carbonate being the rate determining process. This assumption was confirmed since the obtained fluxes were found to be in good agreement with fluxes derived from the experimentally observed crystal growth rates. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Theoretical insights into the energetics and electronic properties of MPt12 (M = Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, and Pd) nanoparticles supported by N-doped defective graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qing; Tian, Yu; Chen, Guangju; Zhao, Jingxiang

    2017-03-01

    Enhancing the catalytic activity and decreasing the usage of Pt catalysts has been a major target in widening their applications for developing proton-exchange membrane fuel cells. In this work, the adsorption energetics, structural features, and electronic properties of several MPt12 (M = Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, and Pd) nanoparticles (NPs) deposited on N-doped defective graphene were systemically explored by means of comprehensive density functional theory (DFT) computations. The computations revealed that the defective N-doped graphene substrate can provide anchoring site for these Pt-based alloying NPs due to their strong hybridization with the sp2 dangling bonds at the defect sites of substrate. Especially, these deposited MPt12 NPs exhibit reduced magnetic moment and their average d-band centers are shifted away from the Fermi level, as compared with the freestanding NPs, leading to the reduction of the adsorption energies of the O species. Thus, the defective N-doped graphene substrate not only enhances the stability of the deposited MPt12 NPs, but also endows them higher catalytic performance for the oxygen reduction reaction.

  17. Manipulating the Energetics and Rates of Electron Transfer in Rhodobacter capsulatus Reaction Centers with Asymmetric Pigment Content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faries, Kaitlyn M; Dylla, Nicholas P; Hanson, Deborah K; Holten, Dewey; Laible, Philip D; Kirmaier, Christine

    2017-07-27

    Seemingly redundant parallel pathways for electron transfer (ET), composed of identical sets of cofactors, are a cornerstone feature of photosynthetic reaction centers (RCs) involved in light-energy conversion. In native bacterial RCs, both A and B branches house one bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) and one bacteriopheophytin (BPh), but the A branch is used exclusively. Described herein are the results obtained for two Rhodobacter capsulatus RCs with an unnaturally high degree of cofactor asymmetry, two BPh on the RC's B side and two BChl on the A side. These pigment changes derive, respectively, from the His(M180)Leu mutation [a BPh (Φ B ) replaces the B-side BChl (B B )], and the Leu(M212)His mutation [a BChl (β A ) replaces the A-side BPh (H A )]. Additionally, Tyr(M208)Phe was employed to disfavor ET to the A branch; in one mutant, Val(M131)Glu creates a hydrogen bond to H B to enhance ET to H B . In both Φ B mutants, the decay kinetics of the excited primary ET donor (P*) resolve three populations with lifetimes of ∼9 ps (50-60%), ∼40 ps (10-20%), and ∼200 ps (20-30%), with P + Φ B - formed predominantly from the 9 ps fraction. The 50-60% yield of P + Φ B - is the highest yet observed for a Φ B -containing RC. The results provide insight into factors needed for efficient multistep ET.

  18. Substorm Injected Energetic Electrons and Ions Deeply into the Inner Magnetosphere Observed by BD-IES and Van Allan Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Qiugang

    2017-04-01

    When substorm injections are observed simultaneously with multiple spacecraft, they help elucidate potential mechanisms for particle transport and energization, a topic of great importance for understanding and modeling the magnetosphere. In the present paper, by using the data return from the BeiDa- IES (BD-IES) instrument onboard an inclined (55◦) geosynchronous orbit (IGSO) satellite together with geo-transfer orbit (GTO) Van Allen Probe A&B satellite, we analysis a substorm injection event occurred on Oct 16, 2015. During the substorm injection, the IES onboard IGSO is outbound while both Van Allen Probe A&B satellites are inbound. This configuration of multiple satellite trajectories provides a unique opportunity to investigate the inward and outward radial propagation of the substorm injection simultaneously. This substorm as indicated by AE/AL indices is closely related an IMF/solar wind discontinuity with a sharp change in the IMF Bz direction (northward turning). The innermost signature of this substorm injection has been detected by the Van Allen Probes A & B at L 3.7. The outermost signature, observed by the BD-IES, is found to be at L 10. This indicated that this substorm have a rather global effect rather than just a local effect. Further, we suggest that the electric fields carried by fast-mode compressional waves around the substorm injection are the most likely mechanism candidate for the injection signatures of electrons observed in the innermost and outermost inner magnetosphere.

  19. Radial Propagation of Magnetospheric Substorm Injected Energetic Electrons Observed by BD-IES and Van Allan Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Q.

    2016-12-01

    When substorm injections are observed simultaneously with multiple spacecraft, they help elucidate potential mechanisms for particle transport and energization, a topic of great importance for understanding and modeling the magnetosphere. In the present paper, by using the data return from the BeiDa- IES (BD-IES) instrument onboard an inclined (55°) geosynchronous orbit (IGSO) satellite together with geo-transfer orbit (GTO) Van Allen Probe A&B satellite, we analysis a substorm injection event occurred on Oct 16, 2015. During the substorm injection, the IES onboard IGSO is outbound while both Van Allen Probe A&B satellites are inbound. This configuration of multiple satellite trajectories provides a unique opportunity to investigate the inward and outward radial propagation of the substorm injection simultaneously. This substorm as indicated by AE/AL indices is closely related an IMF/solar wind discontinuity with a sharp change in the IMF Bz direction (northward turning). The innermost signature of this substorm injection has been detected by the Van Allen Probes A & B at L 3.7. The outermost signature, observed by the BD-IES, is found to be at L 10. This indicated that this substorm have a rather global effect rather than just a local effect. Further, we suggest that the electric fields carried by fast-mode compressional waves around the substorm injection are the most likely mechanism candidate for the injection signatures of electrons observed in the innermost and outermost inner magnetosphere.

  20. Comparison Studies of Interfacial Electronic and Energetic Properties of LaAlO3/TiO2 and TiO2/LaAlO3 Heterostructures from First-Principles Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jianli; Luo, Jian; Yang, Kesong

    2017-03-01

    By using first-principles electronic structure calculations, we studied electronic and energetic properties of perovskite oxide heterostructures with different epitaxial growth order between anatase TiO2 and LaAlO3. Two types of heterostructures, i.e., TiO2 film grown on LaAlO3 substrate (TiO2/LaAlO3) and LaAlO3 film grown on TiO2 substrate (LaAlO3/TiO2), were modeled. The TiO2/LaAlO3 model is intrinsically metallic and thus does not exhibit an insulator-to-metal transition as TiO2 film thickness increases; in contrast, the LaAlO3/TiO2 model shows an insulator-to-metal transition as the LaAlO3 film thickness increases up to 4 unit cells. The former model has a larger interfacial charge carrier density (n ∼ 1014 cm-2) and smaller electron effective mass (0.47me) than the later one (n ∼ 1013 cm-2, and 0.70me). The interfacial energetics calculations indicate that the TiO2/LaAlO3 model is energetically more favorable than the LaAlO3/TiO2 model, and the former has a stronger interface cohesion than the later model. This research provides fundamental insights into the different interfacial electronic and energetic properties of TiO2/LaAlO3 and LaAlO3/TiO2 heterostructures.

  1. Precipitation of subrelativistic-energy electrons near the polar boundary of the Earth radiation belt according to the data of measurements on the Vernov and Lomonosov satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogomolov, A. V.; Myagkova, I. N.; Kalegaev, V. V.; Svertilov, S. I.; Bogomolov, V. V.; Panasyuk, M. I.; Petrov, V. L.; Yashin, I. V.

    2017-11-01

    The work is devoted to observations of sharp growths of magnetospheric electron fluxes in the vicinity of the polar boundary of the outer radiation belt of the Earth according to the data of measurements on the Vernov and Lomonosov satellites. This precipitation was observed at the high-latitude boundary of the outer radiation belt toward the equator from the isotropization boundary, and can be caused by scattering waves of various physical natures, including electromagnetic and electrostatic waves.

  2. Ultraviolet Emission from Oxygen Precipitating into Jovian Aurora

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Weihong; Schultz, D. R.

    2000-02-10

    The ultraviolet emission-line spectra of precipitating oxygen atoms and ions excited by charge transfer interaction with the molecular hydrogen in the auroral atmosphere of Jupiter are calculated using our computed cross sections of state-selective charge transfer. The charge transfer processes preferentially populate the ground states of neutral oxygen and low-charge ions and the highly excited states of high-charge ions, yielding low UV and high X-ray efficiencies, respectively. Much weaker than the underlying emission spectrum of H2 excited by energetic electron precipitation, the UV emission from oxygen is not expected to be discernible in the Jovian auroral spectrum. This reconciles the absence of UV emission with the presence of X-ray emission from the heavy ions precipitating in the Jovian aurora. (c) (c) 2000. The American Astronomical Society.

  3. About the contrast of δ' precipitates in bulk Al-Cu-Li alloys in reflection mode with a field-emission scanning electron microscope at low accelerating voltage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodusch, Nicolas; Voisard, Frédéric; Gauvin, Raynald

    2017-11-01

    Characterising the impact of lithium additions in the precipitation sequence in Al-Li-Cu alloys is important to control the strengthening of the final material. Since now, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) at high beam voltage has been the technique of choice to monitor the size and spatial distribution of δ' precipitates (Al3 Li). Here we report on the imaging of the δ' phase in such alloys using backscattered electrons (BSE) and low accelerating voltage in a high-resolution field-emission scanning electron microscope. By applying low-energy Ar+ ion milling to the surface after mechanical polishing (MP), the MP-induced corroded layers were efficiently removed and permitted the δ's to be visible with a limited impact on the observed microstructure. The resulting BSE contrast between the δ's and the Al matrix was compared with that obtained using Monte Carlo modelling. The artefacts possibly resulting from the sample preparation procedure were reviewed and discussed and permitted to confirm that these precipitates were effectively the metastable δ's. The method described in this report necessitates less intensive sample preparation than that required for TEM and provides a much larger field of view and an easily interpretable contrast compared to the transmission techniques. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2017 Royal Microscopical Society.

  4. The physical chemistry of coordinated aqua-, ammine-, and mixed-ligand Co2+ complexes: DFT studies on the structure, energetics, and topological properties of the electron density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varadwaj, Pradeep R; Marques, Helder M

    2010-03-07

    Spin-unrestricted DFT-X3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) calculations have been performed on a series of complexes of the form [Co(H(2)O)(6-n)(NH(3))(n)](2+) (n = 0-6) to examine their equilibrium gas-phase structures, energetics, and electronic properties in their quartet electronic ground states. In all cases Co(2+) in the energy-minimised structures is in a pseudo-octahedral environment. The calculations overestimate the Co-O and Co-N bond lengths by 0.04 and 0.08 A, respectively, compared to the crystallographically observed mean values. There is a very small Jahn-Teller distortion in the structure of [Co(H(2)O)(6)](2+) which is in contrast to the very marked distortions observed in most (but not all) structures of this cation that have been observed experimentally. The successive replacement of ligated H(2)O by NH(3) leads to an increase in complex stability by 6 +/- 1 kcal mol(-1) per additional NH(3) ligand. Calculations using UB3LYP give stabilisation energies of the complexes about 5 kcal mol(-1) smaller and metal-ligand bond lengths about 0.005 A longer than the X3LYP values since the X3LYP level accounts for the London dispersion energy contribution to the overall stabilisation energy whilst it is largely missing at the B3LYP level. From a natural population analysis (NPA) it is shown that the formation of these complexes is accompanied by ligand-to-metal charge transfer the extent of which increases with the number of NH(3) ligands in the coordination sphere of Co(2+). From an examination of the topological properties of the electron charge density using Bader's quantum theory of atoms in molecules it is shown that the electron density rho(c) at the Co-O bond critical points is generally smaller than that at the Co-N bond critical points. Hence Co-O bonds are weaker than Co-N bonds in these complexes and the stability increases as NH(3) replaces H(2)O in the metal's coordination sphere. Several indicators, including the sign and magnitude of the Laplacian of the

  5. Energetic particle observations at the subsolar magnetopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Eccles

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available The pitch-angle distributions (PAD of energetic particles are examined as the ISEE-1 satellite crosses the Earth’s magnetopause near the subsolar point. The investigation focuses on the possible existence of a particular type of distribution that would be associated with a source of energetic particles in the high-latitude magnetosphere. PADs, demonstrating broad, persistent field-aligned fluxes filling a single hemisphere (upper/northern or lower/southern, were observed just sunward of the magnetopause current layer for an extended period of many minutes. These distributions are a direct prediction of a possible source of energetic particles located in the high altitude dayside cusp and we present five examples in detail of the three-dimensional particle distributions to demonstrate their existence. From these results, other possible causes of such PADs are examined.Key words. Magnetospheric physics (energetic particles, precipitating; magnetopause, cusp and boundary layers; magnetospheric configuration and dynamics

  6. Energetics Conditioning Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Energetics Conditioning Facility is used for long term and short term aging studies of energetic materials. The facility has 10 conditioning chambers of which 2...

  7. Determining the spectra of radiation belt electron losses: Fitting DEMETER electron flux observations for typical and storm times

    OpenAIRE

    Whittaker, Ian C.; Gamble, Rory J.; Rodger, Craig J.; Clilverd, Mark A.; Sauvaud, Jean-André

    2013-01-01

    The energy spectra of energetic electron precipitation from the radiation belts are studied in order to improve our understanding of the influence of radiation belt processes. The Detection of Electromagnetic Emissions Transmitted from Earthquake Regions (DEMETER) microsatellite electron flux instrument is comparatively unusual in that it has very high energy resolution (128 channels with 17.9 keV widths in normal survey mode), which lends itself to this type of spectral analysis. Here electr...

  8. Energetics of the midlatitude thermosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolarski, R. S.

    1976-01-01

    Thermospheric energetics is examined from the point of view of atomic and molecular processes which convert solar EUV radiative energy into kinetic energy of the ambient electron, ion, and neutral gases. The energy flow from photon to photoelectron-ion pair through energy loss and ion-molecule transfer to eventual electron-ion recombination is traced in detail. Upper and lower bounds are placed on the efficiency of conversion of radiative to thermal energy. Implications for the question of consistency of measured solar EUV fluxes and ionospheric models are discussed.

  9. Polymorphism in Energetic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    the classic cases of polymorphism at ambient conditions in the energetic field are TNT, HMX , and CL20 (Fig. 1). TNT [2,4,6-trinitrotoluene] is known...2008 NRL REVIEW 71 Polymorphism in Energetic Materials J.R. Deschamps,1 D.A. Parrish,1 and R.J. Butcher2 1Laboratory for Structure of Matter...2Department of Chemistry, Howard University Polymorphism often occurs in energetic materials. Differences in the forms range from conformational changes in

  10. Storm-time electron flux precipitation in the inner radiation belt caused by wave-particle interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Tadokoro

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available It has been believed that electrons in the inner belt do not show the dynamical variation during magnetic storms except for great magnetic storms. However, Tadokoro et al. (2007 recently disclosed that low-altitude electrons in the inner belt frequently show flux variations during storms (Storm Time inner belt Electron Enhancement at the Low altitude (STEEL. This paper investigates a possible mechanism explaining STEEL during small and moderate storms, and shows that it is caused not by radial transport processes but by pitch angle scattering through wave-particle interactions. The waves related to wave-particle interactions are attributed to be banded whistler mode waves around 30 kHz observed in the inner magnetosphere by the Akebono satellite. The estimated pitch angle distribution based on a numerical calculation is roughly consistent with the observed results.

  11. The driving mechanisms of particle precipitation during the moderate geomagnetic storm of 7 January 2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Longden

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The arrival of an interplanetary coronal mass ejection (ICME triggered a sudden storm commencement (SSC at ~09:22 UT on the 7 January 2005. The ICME followed a quiet period in the solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF. We present global scale observations of energetic electron precipitation during the moderate geomagnetic storm driven by the ICME. Energetic electron precipitation is inferred from increases in cosmic noise absorption (CNA recorded by stations in the Global Riometer Array (GLORIA. No evidence of CNA was observed during the first four hours of passage of the ICME or following the sudden commencement (SC of the storm. This is consistent with the findings of Osepian and Kirkwood (2004 that SCs will only trigger precipitation during periods of geomagnetic activity or when the magnetic perturbation in the magnetosphere is substantial. CNA was only observed following enhanced coupling between the IMF and the magnetosphere, resulting from southward oriented IMF. Precipitation was observed due to substorm activity, as a result of the initial injection and particles drifting from the injection region. During the recovery phase of the storm, when substorm activity diminished, precipitation due to density driven increases in the solar wind dynamic pressure (Pdyn were identified. A number of increases in Pdyn were shown to drive sudden impulses (SIs in the geomagnetic field. While many of these SIs appear coincident with CNA, SIs without CNA were also observed. During this period, the threshold of geomagnetic activity required for SC driven precipitation was exceeded. This implies that solar wind density driven SIs occurring during storm recovery can drive a different response in particle precipitation to typical SCs.

  12. Measurement of neutron energy spectra for Eg=23.1 and 26.6 MeV mono-energetic photon induced reaction on natC using laser electron photon beam at NewSUBARU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itoga Toshiro

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Photo-neutron energy spectra for Eg=23.1 and 26.6 MeV mono-energetic photons on natC were measured using laser Compton scattering facility at NewSUBARU BL01. The photon energy spectra were evaluated through measurements and simulations with collimator sizes and arrangements for the laser electron photon. The neutron energy spectra for the natC(g,xn reaction were measured at 60 degrees in horizontal and 90 degrees in horizontal and vertical with respect to incident photon. The spectra show almost isotropic angular distribution and flat energy distribution from detection threshold to upper limit defined by reaction Q-value.

  13. Emission of low-energetic electrons in collisions of heavy ions with solid targets; Emission niederenergetischer Elektronen in Stoessen von schweren Ionen mit Festkoerpertargets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lineva, Natallia

    2008-07-15

    At the UNILAC accelerator, we have initiated a project with the objective to investigate lowenergy electrons, emitted from solid, electrically conductive targets after the impact of swift light and heavy ions. For this purposes, we have installed, optimized, and put into operation an electrostatic toroidal electron spectrometer. First, investigations of electrons, emitted from solid-state targets after the bombardment with a monochromatic electron beam from an electron gun, has been carried out. The proposed method combines the results of the measurements with the results of dedicated Monte Carlo simulations. The method has been elaborated in a case study for carbon targets. The findings have been instrumental for the interpretation of our measurements of electrons emitted in collisions of swift ions with the same carbon targets. Our investigations focused on following ion beams: protons and (H{sup +}{sub 3})-molecules of the same energy, as well as on carbon ions with two different energies. Thin carbon, nickel, argon and gold foils has been used as targets. Electrons in the energy range between 50 eV and 1 keV have been investigated. The measured electron distributions, both integral as well as differential with respect to the polar angle, have been compared to simple standard theories for gases as well as to the results of TRAX simulations, the latter being based on data from gaseous targets. Dedicated TRAX simulations have been performed only for the carbon targets, applying the method mentioned above. Within our experimental uncertainties, we observe a good agreement of the measured and TRAX simulated data. That leads us to the conclusion that - as a first order approximation - the electron emission pattern from ion-atom collisions in solid-state targets and the one from single collisions in gases are similar. (orig.)

  14. Energetic deposition of thin metal films

    CERN Document Server

    Al-Busaidy, M S K

    2001-01-01

    deposited films. The primary aim of this thesis was to study the physical effect of energetic deposition metal thin films. The secondary aim is to enhance the quality of the films produced to a desired quality. Grazing incidence X-ray reflectivity (GIXR) measurements from a high-energy synchrotron radiation source were carried out to study and characterise the samples. Optical Profilers Interferometery, Atomic Force Microscope (AFM), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), Medium energy ion spectroscopy (MEIS), and the Electron microscope studies were the other main structural characterisation tools used. AI/Fe trilayers, as well as multilayers were deposited using a Nordico planar D.C. magnetron deposition system at different voltage biases and pressures. The films were calibrated and investigated. The relation between energetic deposition variation and structural properties was intensely researched. Energetic deposition refers to the method in which the deposited species possess higher kinetic energy and impact ...

  15. Time Variations of Observed Hα Line Profiles and Precipitation Depths of Nonthermal Electrons in a Solar Flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falewicz, Robert; Radziszewski, Krzysztof; Rudawy, Paweł; Berlicki, Arkadiusz

    2017-10-01

    We compare time variations of the Hα and X-ray emissions observed during the pre-impulsive and impulsive phases of the C1.1-class solar flare on 2013 June 21 with those of plasma parameters and synthesized X-ray emission from a 1D hydrodynamic numerical model of the flare. The numerical model was calculated assuming that the external energy is delivered to the flaring loop by nonthermal electrons (NTEs). The Hα spectra and images were obtained using the Multi-channel Subtractive Double Pass spectrograph with a time resolution of 50 ms. The X-ray fluxes and spectra were recorded by RHESSI. Pre-flare geometric and thermodynamic parameters of the model and the delivered energy were estimated using RHESSI data. The time variations of the X-ray light curves in various energy bands and those of the Hα intensities and line profiles were well correlated. The timescales of the observed variations agree with the calculated variations of the plasma parameters in the flaring loop footpoints, reflecting the time variations of the vertical extent of the energy deposition layer. Our result shows that the fast time variations of the Hα emission of the flaring kernels can be explained by momentary changes of the deposited energy flux and the variations of the penetration depths of the NTEs.

  16. Characterization of wet precipitation by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in the metropolitan area of Porto Alegre, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montanari Migliavacca, Daniela [Instituto de Biociencias, Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ecologia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Bento Goncalves 9500, 91509-900 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Fundacao Estadual de Protecao Ambiental Henrique Luis Roessler, RS. Rua Carlos Chagas 55/802, 90030-020 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Calesso Teixeira, Elba, E-mail: gerpro.pesquisa@fepam.rs.gov.br [Fundacao Estadual de Protecao Ambiental Henrique Luis Roessler, RS. Rua Carlos Chagas 55/802, 90030-020 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Gervasoni, Fernanda; Vieira Conceicao, Rommulo [Instituto de Geociencias, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Bento Goncalves 9500, 91509-900 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Raya Rodriguez, Maria Teresa [Instituto de Biociencias, Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ecologia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Bento Goncalves 9500, 91509-900 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2009-11-15

    The purpose of this study is to assess the composition of wet precipitation in three sites of the metropolitan area of Porto Alegre. Besides the variables usually considered, such as pH, conductivity, major ions (Cl{sup -}, NO{sub 3}{sup -}, F{sup -}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, Mg{sup 2+}, NH{sub 4}{sup +} and Ca{sup 2+}) and metallic elements (Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn and Ni), the suspended matter was examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), with energy dispersive system (EDS), for better identification of possible anthropogenic material in this wet precipitation. Results showed an alkaline pH in the samples analyzed and higher concentrations for Na{sup +}, Cl{sup -} and SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}. The acidification and neutralization potential between anions (SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} + NO{sub 3}{sup -}) and cations (Ca{sup 2+} + Mg{sup 2+} + K{sup +} + NH{sub 4}{sup +}) showed a good correlation (0.922). The metallic elements with highest values were Zn, Fe and Mn. Results of XRD identified the presence of some minerals such as quartz, feldspar, mica, clay, carbonates and sulfates. In samples analyzed with SEM, we detected pyroxene, biotite, amphibole and oxides. Cluster analysis (CA) was applied to the data matrix to identify potential pollution sources of metals (natural or anthropogenic) and the association with minerals found in the analysis of SEM.

  17. The role of EUV/X-ray solar activity and electron precipitations from radiation belts in the climate changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avakyan, Sergey; Voronin, Nikolai; Baranova, Lubov

    The authors associate the recently observed climate warming and carbon dioxide concentration growth in lower atmospheric layers with variations of the solar-geomagnetic activity contribution to global cloud formation and with significant decrease of carbon dioxide accumulation in forests in the process of photosynthesis. The contribution of the greenhouse effect of carbon-bearing gases to global warming turns out to be insignificant. We consider the impact of microwave emissions of the ionosphere disturbed by solar flares and magnetic storms on the troposphere and suggest the radio-optical trigger mechanism of the solar influence on weather and climate of the Earth, which consists of the following three stages: - the ionosphere absorbs the ionizing solar radiation and corpuscles from the radiation belts and transforms these into microwaves through the excitation of Rydberg states by electron impact (ionospheric photoelectron, secondary and Auger electrons); - the rates of formation and destruction of water cluster ions in the troposphere are regulated by the microwave radiation; - the clusters contribute to formation of clouds, which affects the energy flux of solar radiation through the troposphere and the flux of outgoing heat from the underlying surface. All stages of the proposed mechanism were strictly confirmed: amplification of ionospheric microwave radiation during solar flares and magnetic storms was detected; the regulation of humidity at altitude above 2 km by solar microwave emission during solar flares was registered; an influence of solar flares and magnetic storms on the cloudiness is distinctly registered at least in some geographic areas; a direct influence of solar-geomagnetic activity on the global total cloud cover in latest maximum of secular variability (in 1985 - in electromagnetic solar activity, and in 2003 - in geomagnetic activity) was discovered. Basing on analysis of satellite data on global cloud cover and radiation balance the

  18. Energetics Laboratory Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — These energetic materials laboratories are equipped with explosion proof hoods with blow out walls for added safety, that are certified for safe handling of primary...

  19. Catalyzed precipitation in aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitlin, David

    The work reported in Chapter 1 concerned the influence of Si on the precipitation of theta' (metastable Al2Cu) during the isothermal aging of Al-2Cu-1Si (wt. %). The binary alloys Al-2Cu and Al-1Si were studied for comparison. Only two precipitate phases were detected: pure Si in Al-Si and Al-Cu-Si, and theta' (metastable Al 2Cu) in Al-Cu and Al-Cu-Si. On aging the ternary, Si precipitates first, and provides heterogeneous sites to nucleate theta'. As a consequence, the density of theta' precipitates in Al-Cu-Si is much higher than in the binary Al-Cu. Also, the theta ' precipitates in the ternary alloy have lower aspect ratio (at given particle size) and lose coherence on their broad faces at a slower rate. The principal focus of Chapter 2 is to explain precipitation in Al-lat.%Si-lat%Ge. The microstructure is characterized using conventional and high resolution transmission electron microscopy, as well as energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The first precipitates to come out of solid solution have a cube-cube orientation relationship with the matrix. High resolution TEM demonstrated that all the precipitates start out, and remain multiply twinned throughout the aging treatment. There is a variation in the stoichiometry of the precipitates, with the mean composition being Si-44.5at%Ge. It is also shown that in Al-Si-Ge it is not possible to achieve satisfactory hardness through a conventional heat treatment. This result is explained in terms of sluggish precipitation of the diamond-cubic Si-Ge phase coupled with particle coarsening. The purpose of Chapters 3 and 4 is to explain these properties in terms of the role that the Si-Ge additions have on modifying the conventional Al-Cu aging sequence. In both AlCu and AlCuSiGe the room temperature microstructure consists of both GP zones and theta″ precipitates. Upon aging at 190°C Al-Cu displays the well known precipitation sequence; the slow dissolution of GP zones and theta″ and the gradual formation of theta

  20. Mapping travelling convection vortex events with respect to energetic particle boundaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Moretto

    1998-08-01

    Full Text Available Thirteen events of high-latitude ionospheric travelling convection vortices during very quiet conditions were identified in the Greenland magnetometer data during 1990 and 1991. The latitudes of the vortex centres for these events are compared to the energetic electron trapping boundaries as identified by the particle measurements of the NOAA 10 satellite. In addition, for all events at least one close DMSP overpass was available. All but one of the 13 cases agree to an exceptional degree that: the TCV centres are located within the region of trapped, high energy electrons close to the trapping boundary for the population of electrons with energy greater than >100 keV. Correspondingly, from the DMSP data they are located within the region of plasmasheet-type precipitation close to the CPS/BPS precipitation boundary. That is, the TCV centres map to deep inside the magnetosphere and not to the magnetopause.Key Words. Ionosphere (Electric fields and currents; Particle precipitation · Magnetospheric physics (Magnetosphere-ionosphere interaction

  1. Precipitous Birth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Yee

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Audience: This scenario was developed to educate emergency medicine residents on the management of a precipitous birth in the emergency department (ED. The case is also appropriate for teaching of medical students and advanced practice providers, as well as reviewing the principles of crisis resource management, teamwork, and communication. Introduction: Patients with precipitous birth require providers to manage two patients simultaneously with limited time and resources. Crisis resource management skills will be tested once baby is delivered, and the neonate will require assessment for potential neonatal resuscitation. Objectives: At the conclusion of the simulation session, learners will be able to manage women who have precipitous deliveries, as well as perform neonatal assessment and management. Method: This session was conducted using high-fidelity simulation, followed by a debriefing session and lecture on precipitous birth management and neonatal evaluation.

  2. Benchmark Energetic Data in a Model System for Grubbs II Metathesis Catalysis and Their Use for the Development, Assessment, and Validation of Electronic Structure Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Yan; Truhlar, Donald G.

    2009-01-31

    We present benchmark relative energetics in the catalytic cycle of a model system for Grubbs second-generation olefin metathesis catalysts. The benchmark data were determined by a composite approach based on CCSD(T) calculations, and they were used as a training set to develop a new spin-component-scaled MP2 method optimized for catalysis, which is called SCSC-MP2. The SCSC-MP2 method has improved performance for modeling Grubbs II olefin metathesis catalysts as compared to canonical MP2 or SCS-MP2. We also employed the benchmark data to test 17 WFT methods and 39 density functionals. Among the tested density functionals, M06 is the best performing functional. M06/TZQS gives an MUE of only 1.06 kcal/mol, and it is a much more affordable method than the SCSC-MP2 method or any other correlated WFT methods. The best performing meta-GGA is M06-L, and M06-L/DZQ gives an MUE of 1.77 kcal/mol. PBEh is the best performing hybrid GGA, with an MUE of 3.01 kcal/mol; however, it does not perform well for the larger, real Grubbs II catalyst. B3LYP and many other functionals containing the LYP correlation functional perform poorly, and B3LYP underestimates the stability of stationary points for the cis-pathway of the model system by a large margin. From the assessments, we recommend the M06, M06-L, and MPW1B95 functionals for modeling Grubbs II olefin metathesis catalysts. The local M06-L method is especially efficient for calculations on large systems.

  3. TCA precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koontz, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Trichloroacetic acid (TCA) precipitation of proteins is commonly used to concentrate protein samples or remove contaminants, including salts and detergents, prior to downstream applications such as SDS-PAGE or 2D-gels. TCA precipitation denatures the protein, so it should not be used if the protein must remain in its folded state (e.g., if you want to measure a biochemical activity of the protein). © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. STRONTIUM PRECIPITATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, T.R.

    1960-09-13

    A process is given for improving the precipitation of strontium from an aqueous phosphoric-acid-containing solution with nickel or cobalt ferrocyanide by simultaneously precipitating strontium or calcium phosphate. This is accomplished by adding to the ferrocyanide-containing solution calcium or strontium nitrate in a quantity to yield a concentration of from 0.004 to 0.03 and adjusting the pH of the solution to a value of above 8.

  5. Relation between fine structure of energy spectra for pulsating aurora electrons and frequency spectra of whistler mode chorus waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, Y.; Saito, S.; Seki, K.; Nishiyama, T.; Kataoka, R.; Asamura, K.; Katoh, Y.; Ebihara, Y.; Sakanoi, T.; Hirahara, M.; Oyama, S.; Kurita, S.; Santolik, O.

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the origin of the fine structure of the energy spectrum of precipitating electrons for the pulsating aurora (PsA) observed by the low-altitude Reimei satellite. The Reimei satellite achieved simultaneous observations of the optical images and precipitating electrons of the PsA from satellite altitude (~620 km) with resolution of 40 ms. The main modulation of precipitation, with a few seconds, and the internal modulations, with a few hertz, that are embedded inside the main modulations are identified above ~3 keV. Moreover, stable precipitations at ~1 keV are found for the PsA. A "precipitation gap" is discovered between two energy bands. We identify the origin of the fine structure of the energy spectrum for the precipitating electrons using the computer simulation on the wave-particle interaction between electrons and chorus waves. The lower band chorus (LBC) bursts cause the main modulation of energetic electrons, and the generation and collapse of the LBC bursts determines on-off switching of the PsA. A train of rising tone elements embedded in the LBC bursts drives the internal modulations. A close set of upper band chorus (UBC) waves causes the stable precipitations at ~1 keV. We show that a wave power gap around the half gyrofrequency at the equatorial plane in the magnetosphere between LBC and UBC reduces the loss rate of electrons at the intermediate energy range, forming a gap of precipitating electrons in the ionosphere.

  6. The Noble Gas Dimers as a Probe of the Energetic Contributions of Dispersion and Short-Range Electron Correlation in Weakly-Bound Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Housden, Michael Philip; Pyper, Nicholas Charles

    2008-01-01

    Abstract The binding of the noble gas dimers is examined using a theory in which the Hartree-Fock interaction energy is augmented with both a short-range correlation term derived from the theory of a uniform electron-gas plus a dispersion energy damped according to the theory of Jabobi and Csanak. The good agreement between the predicted and experimental binding energies and equilibrium inter-nuclear separations confirms that this approach captures the essential physics of the int...

  7. Photoactive energetic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chavez, David E.; Hanson, Susan Kloek; Scharff, Robert Jason; Veauthier, Jacqueline Marie; Myers, Thomas Winfield

    2018-02-27

    Energetic materials that are photoactive or believed to be photoactive may include a conventional explosive (e.g. PETN, nitroglycerine) derivatized with an energetic UV-absorbing and/or VIS-absorbing chromophore such as 1,2,4,5-tetrazine or 1,3,5-triazine. Absorption of laser light having a suitably chosen wavelength may result in photodissociation, decomposition, and explosive release of energy. These materials may be used as ligands to form complexes. Coordination compounds include such complexes with counterions. Some having the formula M(L).sub.n.sup.2+ were synthesized, wherein M is a transition metal and L is a ligand and n is 2 or 3. These may be photoactive upon exposure to a laser light beam having an appropriate wavelength of UV light, near-IR and/or visible light. Photoactive materials also include coordination compounds bearing non-energetic ligands; in this case, the counterion may be an oxidant such as perchlorate.

  8. INTENSE ENERGETIC GAS DISCHARGE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luce, J.S.

    1960-03-01

    A method and apparatus for initiating and sustaining an energetic gas arc discharge are described. A hollow cathode and a hollow anode are provided. By regulating the rate of gas flow into the interior of the cathode, the arc discharge is caused to run from the inner surface of the cathode with the result that adequate space-charge neutralization is provided inside the cathode but not in the main arc volume. Thus, the gas fed to the cathode is substantially completely ionized before it leaves the cathode, with the result that an energetic arc discharge can be maintained at lower operating pressures.

  9. Calculation of the energetics of chemical reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunning, T.H. Jr.; Harding, L.B.; Shepard, R.L.; Harrison, R.J.

    1988-01-01

    To calculate the energetics of chemical reactions we must solve the electronic Schroedinger equation for the molecular conformations of importance for the reactive encounter. Substantial changes occur in the electronic structure of a molecular system as the reaction progresses from reactants through the transition state to products. To describe these changes, our approach includes the following three elements: the use of multiconfiguration self-consistent field wave functions to provide a consistent zero-order description of the electronic structure of the reactants, transition state, and products; the use of configuration interaction techniques to describe electron correlation effects needed to provide quantitative predictions of the reaction energetics; and the use of large, optimized basis sets to provide the flexibility needed to describe the variations in the electronic distributions. With this approach we are able to study reactions involving as many as 5--6 atoms with errors of just a few kcal/mol in the predicted reaction energetics. Predictions to chemical accuracy, i.e., to 1 kcal/mol or less, are not yet feasible, although continuing improvements in both the theoretical methodology and computer technology suggest that this will soon be possible, at least for reactions involving small polyatomic species. 4 figs.

  10. Nanostructured Energetic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-11-01

    Microencapsulation of energetic nanoparticles Microencapsulated Nanoparticles granules Microencapsulated granulesNanoparticles Encapsulation MIC MATERIAL...PRESSURE MEASUREMENTS IN MILLIMETER SCALE CELL Experimental Setup MIC Material Powder Loaded into MilliCell Hot Wire for Powder Initiation MIC Powder...Loaded into MilliCell Pressure Sensor Pressure measurements on lexane millicell 20mg of each material. Volume of the cell 30 cubic mm. HMT

  11. Tunable optical sensitivity of composite energetic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashkeev, Sergey; Wang, Fenggong; Tsyshevskiy, Roman; Kuklja, Maija; University of Maryland College Park Team

    Optical initiation to detonation of energetic materials is compelling because it opens up new ways for safe handling, storage, and use of high explosives. Despite this, laser irradiation has been mainly perceived as a source of heat for vibrational excitation rather than viable means of photo-stimulated initiation of energy release. Limitations of our knowledge on photo-stimulated energy release from high energy density materials hampers progress in design and manufacturing of efficient optical devices for energy storage and conversion. Here we show how electronic and optical properties of interfaces formed between nitro energetic materials and various metal oxides can be effectively tuned to achieve highly controllable surface chemistry. We discuss mechanisms of photo stimulated reactions triggered by defects on these interfaces. We demonstrate that the key in achieving tunable sensitivity is the proper alignment of the filled and vacant electronic states of oxide defects and energetic materials and provide guidelines for design composite energetic materials suitable for optical initiation. Research is supported by the US ONR (Grants N00014-16-1-2069 and N00014-16-1-2346) and NSF. We used NERSC, XSEDE and MARCC computational resources.

  12. A dielectric response study of the electronic stopping power of liquid water for energetic protons and a new I-value for water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emfietzoglou, D; Garcia-Molina, R; Kyriakou, I; Abril, I; Nikjoo, H

    2009-06-07

    The electronic stopping power of liquid water for protons over the 50 keV to 10 MeV energy range is studied using an improved dielectric response model which is in good agreement with the best available experimental data. The mean excitation energy (I) of stopping power theory is calculated to be 77.8 eV. Shell corrections are accounted for in a self-consistent manner through analytic dispersion relations for the momentum dependence of the dielectric function. It is shown that widely used dispersion schemes based on the random-phase approximation (RPA) can result in sizeable errors due to the neglect of damping and local field effects that lead to a momentum broadening and shifting of the energy-loss function. Low-energy Born corrections for the Barkas, Bloch and charge-state effects practically cancel out down to 100 keV proton energies. Differences with ICRU Report 49 stopping power values and earlier calculations are found to be at the approximately 20% level in the region of the stopping maximum. The present work overcomes the limitations of the Bethe formula below 1 MeV and improves the accuracy of previous calculations through a more consistent account of the dielectric response properties of liquid water.

  13. Multiscale measurement of cardiac energetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goo, Soyeon; Pham, Toan; Han, Jun-Chiew; Nielsen, Poul; Taberner, Andrew; Hickey, Anthony; Loiselle, Denis

    2013-09-01

    Herein we describe our laboratories' experimental methods for interrogating cardiac energetics at the organ (whole heart), tissue (trabecula) and perforated fibre (mitochondrial) levels. In whole heart and trabecula experiments, we focus on measuring pressure-volume (force-length) work and oxygen consumption (heat production) from which mechanical efficiency is derived. In both preparations (i.e. across scales differing by three orders of magnitude) we find efficiency values of 10%-15%. Mitochondrial experiments invoke a trio of titration protocols to yield information on oxygen consumption, ATP flux, membrane potential, electron leak and reactive oxygen species production, the latter two of which index energy transfer inefficiencies. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  14. Manipulating the Energetics and Rates of Electron Transfer in Rhodobacter capsulatus Reaction Centers with Asymmetric Pigment Content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faries, Kaitlyn M. [Department; Dylla, Nicholas P. [Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, Illinois 60439, United States; Hanson, Deborah K. [Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, Illinois 60439, United States; Holten, Dewey [Department; Laible, Philip D. [Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, Illinois 60439, United States; Kirmaier, Christine [Department

    2017-07-17

    Seemingly redundant parallel pathways for electron transfer (ET), composed of identical sets of cofactors, are a cornerstone feature of photosynthetic reaction centers (RCs) involved in light-energy conversion. In native bacterial RCs, both A and B branches house one bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) and one bacteriopheophytin (BPh), but the A branch is used exclusively. Described herein are the results-obtained for two Rhodobacter capsulatus RCs with an unnaturally high degree of cofactor asymmetry, two BPh on the RC's B side and two BChl on the A side. These pigment changes derive, respectively, from the His(M180)Leu mutation [a BPh ((Phi(B)) replaces the B-side BChl (BB)], and the Leu(M212)His mutation [a BChl (beta(A))) replaces the A-side BPh (H-A)]. Additionally, Tyr(M208)Phe was employed to disfavor ET to the A branch; in one mutant, Val(M131)Glu creates a hydrogen bond to H-B to enhance ET to H-B. In both Phi(B) mutants, the decay kinetics of the excited primary ET donor (P*) resolve three populations with lifetimes of similar to 9 ps (50-60%), similar to 40 ps (10-20%), and similar to 200 ps (20-30%), with P+Phi(-)(B) formed predominantly from the 9 ps fraction. The 50-60% yield of P+Phi(B)- is the highest yet observed for a Phi(B)-containing RC. The results provide insight into factors needed for efficient multistep ET.

  15. Nitroamino and Nitro Energetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-13

    strongly recommend using 59 immediately after synthesis and avoiding storage. Based on our calculations using the Gaussian 03 (Revision D.01) suite...Azolylacetic acids give trinitromethyl-substituted compounds in one - pot reactions.220 5-Amino- l,2,4-triazolyl-5-acetic acid (49) was prepared by...Parrish, D. " Synthesis of an energetic nitrate ester ," Angew. Chem. Int. Ed., 2008, 47, 8307-8309; (d) Liu, W.-G.; Zybin, S. V.; Dasgupta, S.; Klapötke

  16. VLF Remote -Sensing of the Lower Ionosphere with AWESOME Receivers: Solar Flares, Lightning-induced Electron Precipitation, Sudden Ionospheric Disturbances, Sprites, Gravity Waves and Gamma-ray Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inan, U. S.; Cohen, M.; Scherrer, P.; Scherrer, D.

    2006-11-01

    Stanford University Very Low Frequency (VLF) radio receivers have been used extensively for remote sensing of the ionosphere and the magnetosphere. Among the phenomena that can be uniquely measured via VLF receivers are radio atmospherics, whistlers, electron precipitation, solar flares, sudden ionospheric disturbances, gravity waves, sprites, and cosmic gamma-ray flares. With the use of simple square air-core magnetic loop antennas of a couple of meters in size, the sensitivity of these instruments allows the measurement of magnetic fields as low as several tens of femtoTesla per root Hz, in the frequency range of ~300 Hz to 50 kHz. This sensitivity well exceeds that required to detect any event above the ambient atmospheric noise floor, determined by the totality of lightning activity on this planet. In recent years, as cost of production, timing accuracy (due to low cost GPS cards), and data handling flexibility of the systems has improved, it has become possible to distribute many of these instruments in the form of arrays, to perform interferometric and holographic imaging of the lower ionosphere. These goals can be achieved using the newest version of the Stanford VLF receiver, known as AWESOME: Atmospheric Weather Educational System for Observation and Modeling of Electromagnetics. In the context of the IHY/UNBSS program for 2007, the AWESOME receivers can be used extensively as part of the United Nations initiative to place scientific instruments in developing countries. Drawing on the Stanford experiences from setting up arrays of VLF receivers, including an interferometer in Alaska, the Holographic Array for Ionospheric and Lightning research (HAIL) consisting of instruments at 13 different high schools in mid-western United States, a broader set of ELF/VLF receivers in Alaska, and various receivers abroad, including in France, Japan, Greece, Turkey, and India, a global network of ELF/VLF receivers offer possibilities for a wide range of scientific topics

  17. Scientific Objectives of Electron Losses and Fields INvestigation Onboard Lomonosov Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shprits, Y. Y.; Angelopoulos, V.; Russell, C. T.; Strangeway, R. J.; Runov, A.; Turner, D.; Caron, R.; Cruce, P.; Leneman, D.; Michaelis, I.; Petrov, V.; Panasyuk, M.; Yashin, I.; Drozdov, A.; Russell, C. L.; Kalegaev, V.; Nazarkov, I.; Clemmons, J. H.

    2018-02-01

    The objective of the Electron Losses and Fields INvestigation on board the Lomonosov satellite (ELFIN-L) project is to determine the energy spectrum of precipitating energetic electrons and ions and, together with other polar-orbiting and equatorial missions, to better understand the mechanisms responsible for scattering these particles into the atmosphere. This mission will provide detailed measurements of the radiation environment at low altitudes. The 400-500 km sun-synchronous orbit of Lomonosov is ideal for observing electrons and ions precipitating into the atmosphere. This mission provides a unique opportunity to test the instruments. Similar suite of instruments will be flown in the future NSF- and NASA-supported spinning CubeSat ELFIN satellites which will augment current measurements by providing detailed information on pitch-angle distributions of precipitating and trapped particles.

  18. Energetics Manufacturing Technology Center (EMTC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Energetics Manufacturing Technology Center (EMTC), established in 1994 by the Office of Naval Research (ONR) Manufacturing Technology (ManTech) Program, is Navy...

  19. Multi‐instrument observations from Svalbard of a traveling convection vortex, electromagnetic ion cyclotron wave burst, and proton precipitation associated with a bow shock instability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engebretson, M. J.; Yeoman, T. K.; Oksavik, K.

    2013-01-01

    An isolated burst of 0.35 Hz electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves was observed at four sites on Svalbard from 0947 to 0954 UT 2 January 2011, roughly 1 h after local noon. This burst was associated with one of a series of ~50 nT magnetic impulses observed at the northernmost stations......-based observations of the Hα line at Longyearbyen indicated proton precipitation at the same time as the EMIC wave burst, and NOAA-19, which passed over the west coast of Svalbard between 0951 and 0952, observed a clear enhancement of ring current protons at the same latitude. Electron precipitation from this same...... satellite indicated that the EMIC burst was located on closed field lines, but near to the polar cap boundary. We believe these are the first simultaneous observations of EMIC waves and precipitating energetic protons so near to the boundary of the dayside magnetosphere. Although several spacecraft upstream...

  20. Simultaneous Measurements of Substorm-Related Electron Energization in the Ionosphere and the Plasma Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivadas, N.; Semeter, J.; Nishimura, Y.; Kero, A.

    2017-10-01

    On 26 March 2008, simultaneous measurements of a large substorm were made using the Poker Flat Incoherent Scatter Radar, Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorm (THEMIS) spacecraft, and all sky cameras. After the onset, electron precipitation reached energies ≳100 keV leading to intense D region ionization. Identifying the source of energetic precipitation has been a challenge because of lack of quantitative and magnetically conjugate measurements of loss cone electrons. In this study, we use the maximum entropy inversion technique to invert altitude profiles of ionization measured by the radar to estimate the loss cone energy spectra of primary electrons. By comparing them with magnetically conjugate measurements from THEMIS-D spacecraft in the nightside plasma sheet, we constrain the source location and acceleration mechanism of precipitating electrons of different energy ranges. Our analysis suggests that the observed electrons ≳100 keV are a result of pitch angle scattering of electrons originating from or tailward of the inner plasma sheet at 9RE, possibly through interaction with electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves. The electrons of energy 10-100 keV are produced by pitch angle scattering due to a potential drop of ≲10 kV in the auroral acceleration region (AAR) as well as wave-particle interactions in and tailward of the AAR. This work demonstrates the utility of magnetically conjugate ground- and space-based measurements in constraining the source of energetic electron precipitation. Unlike in situ spacecraft measurements, ground-based incoherent scatter radars combined with an appropriate inversion technique can be used to provide remote and continuous-time estimates of loss cone electrons in the plasma sheet.

  1. Energetic particle investigation using the ERNE instrument

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Torsti

    1996-05-01

    Full Text Available During solar flares and coronal mass ejections, nuclei and electrons accelerated to high energies are injected into interplanetary space. These accelerated particles can be detected at the SOHO satellite by the ERNE instrument. From the data produced by the instrument, it is possible to identify the particles and to calculate their energy and direction of propagation. Depending on variable coronal/interplanetary conditions, different kinds of effects on the energetic particle transport can be predicted. The problems of interest include, for example, the effects of particle properties (mass, charge, energy, and propagation direction on the particle transport, the particle energy changes in the transport process, and the effects the energetic particles have on the solar-wind plasma. The evolution of the distribution function of the energetic particles can be measured with ERNE to a better accuracy than ever before. This gives us the opportunity to contribute significantly to the modeling of interplanetary transport and acceleration. Once the acceleration/transport bias has been removed, the acceleration-site abundance of elements and their isotopes can be studied in detail and compared with spectroscopic observations.

  2. Electrical initiation of an energetic nanolaminate film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tringe, Joseph W.; Gash, Alexander E.; Barbee, Jr., Troy W.

    2010-03-30

    A heating apparatus comprising an energetic nanolaminate film that produces heat when initiated, a power source that provides an electric current, and a control that initiates the energetic nanolaminate film by directing the electric current to the energetic nanolaminate film and joule heating the energetic nanolaminate film to an initiation temperature. Also a method of heating comprising providing an energetic nanolaminate film that produces heat when initiated, and initiating the energetic nanolaminate film by directing an electric current to the energetic nanolaminate film and joule heating the energetic nanolaminate film to an initiation temperature.

  3. Subauroral polarization stream on the outer boundary of the ring current during an energetic ion injection event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Zhigang; Qiao, Zheng; Li, Haimeng; Huang, Shiyong; Wang, Dedong; Yu, Xiongdong; Yu, Tao

    2017-04-01

    Subauroral polarization stream (SAPS) electric field can play an important role in the coupling between the inner magnetosphere and ionosphere; however, the production mechanism of SAPS has not been yet solved. During an energetic ion injection event on 26 March 2004, at latitudes lower than the equatorward boundaries of precipitating plasma sheet electrons and ions, the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) F13 satellite simultaneously observed a strong SAPS with the peak velocity of 1294 m/s and downward flowing field-aligned currents (FACs). Conjugate observations of DMSP F13 and NOAA 15 satellites have shown that FACs flowing into the ionosphere just lie in the outer boundary of the ring current (RC). The downward flowing FACs were observed in a region of positive latitudinal gradients of the ion energy density, implying that the downward flowing FACs are more likely linked to the azimuthal gradient than the radial gradient of the RC ion pressure. Our result demonstrates that RC ion pressure gradients on the outer boundary of the RC in the evening sector during energetic ion injection events can lead to downward flowing FACs so as to cause strong SAPS in condition of low ionospheric conductivities.Plain Language SummaryThis paper provides a good case that the SAPS and FAC occurred in the outer boundary of the ring current during an energetic ion injection event. Our result demonstrates that RC ion pressure gradients on the outer boundary of the RC in the evening sector during energetic ion injection events can lead to downward flowing FACs so as to cause strong SAPS in condition of low ionospheric conductivities.

  4. Juno/JEDI observations of 0.01 to >10 MeV energetic ions in the Jovian auroral regions: Anticipating a source for polar X-ray emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haggerty, D. K.; Mauk, B. H.; Paranicas, C. P.; Clark, G.; Kollmann, P.; Rymer, A. M.; Bolton, S. J.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Levin, S. M.

    2017-07-01

    After a successful orbit insertion, the Juno spacecraft completed its first 53.5 day orbit and entered a very low altitude perijove with the full scientific payload operational for the first time on 27 August 2016. The Jupiter Energetic particle Detector Instrument measured ions and electrons over the auroral regions and through closest approach, with ions measured from 0.01 to >10 MeV, depending on species. This report focuses on the composition of the energetic ions observed during the first perijove of the Juno mission. Of particular interest are the ions that precipitate from the magnetosphere onto the polar atmosphere and ions that are accelerated locally by Jupiter's powerful auroral processes. We report preliminary findings on the spatial variations, species, including energy and pitch angle distributions throughout the prime science region during the first orbit of the Juno mission. The prime motivation for this work was to examine the heavy ions that are thought to be responsible for the observed polar X-rays. Jupiter Energetic particle Detector Instrument (JEDI) did observe precipitating heavy ions with energies >10 MeV, but for this perijove the intensities were far below those needed to account for previously observed polar X-ray emissions. During this survey we also found an unusual signal of ions between oxygen and sulfur. We include here a report on what appears to be a transitory observation of magnesium, or possibly sodium, at MeV energies through closest approach.

  5. Energetic particle counterparts for geomagnetic pulsations of Pc1 and IPDP types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Yahnina

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Using the low-altitude NOAA satellite particle data, we study two kinds of localised variations of energetic proton fluxes at low altitude within the anisotropic zone equatorward of the isotropy boundary. These flux variation types have a common feature, i.e. the presence of precipitating protons measured by the MEPED instrument at energies more than 30 keV, but they are distinguished by the fact of the presence or absence of the lower-energy component as measured by the TED detector on board the NOAA satellite. The localised proton precipitating without a low-energy component occurs mostly in the morning-day sector, during quiet geomagnetic conditions, without substorm injections at geosynchronous orbit, and without any signatures of plasmaspheric plasma expansion to the geosynchronous distance. This precipitation pattern closely correlates with ground-based observations of continuous narrow-band Pc1 pulsations in the frequency range 0.1–2 Hz (hereafter Pc1. The precipitation pattern containing the low energy component occurs mostly in the evening sector, under disturbed geomagnetic conditions, and in association with energetic proton injections and significant increases of cold plasma density at geosynchronous orbit. This precipitation pattern is associated with geomagnetic pulsations called Intervals of Pulsations with Diminishing Periods (IPDP, but some minor part of the events is also related to narrow-band Pc1. Both Pc1 and IPDP pulsations are believed to be the electromagnetic ion-cyclotron waves generated by the ion-cyclotron instability in the equatorial plane. These waves scatter energetic protons in pitch angles, so we conclude that the precipitation patterns studied here are the particle counterparts of the ion-cyclotron waves.Key words. Ionosphere (particle precipitation – Magnetospheric physics (energetic particles, precipitating – Space plasma physics (wave-particle interactions

  6. Very energetic protons in Saturn's radiation belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillius, W.; Mcilwain, C.

    1980-01-01

    Very energetic protons are trapped in the inner Saturnian radiation belt. The University of California at San Diego instrument on Pioneer 11 has definitely identified protons of energy greater than 80 MeV on channel M3 and has tentatively detected protons of energy greater than 600 MeV on channel C3. The spatial distribution of the protons is distinct from that of the trapped electrons, the main difference being that the protons are strongly absorbed by the innermost moons and that the electrons are not. The source strength for injecting protons by the decay of cosmic ray albedo neutrons generated in the rings of Saturn has been estimated. The required proton lifetime is approximately 20 years.

  7. Space-charge electrostatic precipitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Middleton, C.E.

    1977-05-01

    An improved electrostatic precipitator called a space charge precipitator was tested and studied. A space charge precipitator differs from a conventional model in that the fields necessary to move the particles from the gas to the collecting surfaces are provided by a cloud of charged innocuous drops, such as glycerine or water, rather than by a charged electrode system. The flow conditions, electrical equipment, and physical dimensions of the test precipitator are typical of industrial applications. Experiments using water fog at a velocity of 10 ft/sec and a residence time of 0.6 sec, for a system charged at 25 kV, show a removal of iron oxide particles of approximately 52 percent. Theoretical calculations, assuming 2 micron particles, predict a removal of 50 percent. The results with glycerine fog are comparable. Experiments at various flowrates for both water fog and glycerine fog show a trend of decreasing particle removal for increasing flowrate. An identical trend is predicted by the space charge theory. Electron micrographs verify that only particles smaller than two microns are present in the laboratory precipitator.

  8. The role of proton precipitation in Jovian aurora: Theory and observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, J. H., Jr.; Curran, D. B.; Cravens, T. E.; Clarke, J. T.

    1992-01-01

    It was proposed that the Jovian auroral emissions observed by Voyager spacecraft could be explained by energetic protons precipitating into the upper atmosphere of Jupiter. Such precipitation of energetic protons results in Doppler-shifted Lyman alpha emission that can be quantitatively analyzed to determine the energy flux and energy distribution of the incoming particle beam. Modeling of the expected emission from a reasonably chosen Voyager energetic proton spectrum can be used in conjunction with International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) observations, which show a relative lack of red-shifted Lyman alpha emission, to set upper limits on the amount of proton precipitation taking place in the Jovian aurora. Such calculations indicate that less than 10 percent of the ultraviolet auroral emissions at Jupiter can be explained by proton precipitation.

  9. Electron dynamics during substorm dipolarization in Mercury's magnetosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. C. Delcourt

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available We examine the nonlinear dynamics of electrons during the expansion phase of substorms at Mercury using test particle simulations. A simple model of magnetic field line dipolarization is designed by rescaling a magnetic field model of the Earth's magnetosphere. The results of the simulations demonstrate that electrons may be subjected to significant energization on the time scale (several seconds of the magnetic field reconfiguration. In a similar manner to ions in the near-Earth's magnetosphere, it is shown that low-energy (up to several tens of eV electrons may not conserve the second adiabatic invariant during dipolarization, which leads to clusters of bouncing particles in the innermost magnetotail. On the other hand, it is found that, because of the stretching of the magnetic field lines, high-energy electrons (several keVs and above do not behave adiabatically and possibly experience meandering (Speiser-type motion around the midplane. We show that dipolarization of the magnetic field lines may be responsible for significant, though transient, (a few seconds precipitation of energetic (several keVs electrons onto the planet's surface. Prominent injections of energetic trapped electrons toward the planet are also obtained as a result of dipolarization. These injections, however, do not exhibit short-lived temporal modulations, as observed by Mariner-10, which thus appear to follow from a different mechanism than a simple convection surge.

  10. Kinetic Simulation and Energetic Neutral Atom Imaging of the Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fok, Mei-Ching H.

    2011-01-01

    Advanced simulation tools and measurement techniques have been developed to study the dynamic magnetosphere and its response to drivers in the solar wind. The Comprehensive Ring Current Model (CRCM) is a kinetic code that solves the 3D distribution in space, energy and pitch-angle information of energetic ions and electrons. Energetic Neutral Atom (ENA) imagers have been carried in past and current satellite missions. Global morphology of energetic ions were revealed by the observed ENA images. We have combined simulation and ENA analysis techniques to study the development of ring current ions during magnetic storms and substorms. We identify the timing and location of particle injection and loss. We examine the evolution of ion energy and pitch-angle distribution during different phases of a storm. In this talk we will discuss the findings from our ring current studies and how our simulation and ENA analysis tools can be applied to the upcoming TRIO-CINAMA mission.

  11. The Principle of Energetic Consistency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, Stephen E.

    2009-01-01

    A basic result in estimation theory is that the minimum variance estimate of the dynamical state, given the observations, is the conditional mean estimate. This result holds independently of the specifics of any dynamical or observation nonlinearity or stochasticity, requiring only that the probability density function of the state, conditioned on the observations, has two moments. For nonlinear dynamics that conserve a total energy, this general result implies the principle of energetic consistency: if the dynamical variables are taken to be the natural energy variables, then the sum of the total energy of the conditional mean and the trace of the conditional covariance matrix (the total variance) is constant between observations. Ensemble Kalman filtering methods are designed to approximate the evolution of the conditional mean and covariance matrix. For them the principle of energetic consistency holds independently of ensemble size, even with covariance localization. However, full Kalman filter experiments with advection dynamics have shown that a small amount of numerical dissipation can cause a large, state-dependent loss of total variance, to the detriment of filter performance. The principle of energetic consistency offers a simple way to test whether this spurious loss of variance limits ensemble filter performance in full-blown applications. The classical second-moment closure (third-moment discard) equations also satisfy the principle of energetic consistency, independently of the rank of the conditional covariance matrix. Low-rank approximation of these equations offers an energetically consistent, computationally viable alternative to ensemble filtering. Current formulations of long-window, weak-constraint, four-dimensional variational methods are designed to approximate the conditional mode rather than the conditional mean. Thus they neglect the nonlinear bias term in the second-moment closure equation for the conditional mean. The principle of

  12. Short-term forecasting of solar energetic ions on board LISA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimani, C [Istituto di Fisica Universita degli Studi di Urbino ' Carlo Bo' , Urbino (PU) and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Florence (Italy); Araujo, H M; Shaul, D N A; Sumner, T J [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Fabi, M [Istituto di Fisica Universita degli studi di Urbino ' Carlo Bo' (Italy); Finetti, N [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi dell' Aquila and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Gruppo collegato dell' Aquila, L' Aquila (Italy); Lobo, A; Mateos, I, E-mail: catia.grimani@uniurb.i [Institut d' Estudis Espacials de Catalunya (IEEC), Barcelona (Spain)

    2010-05-01

    LISA (Laser Interferometer Space Antenna) and LISA Pathfinder (LISA-PF) free-falling test-masses are charged by galactic and solar energetic particles. This process generates spurious forces on the test masses which appear as noise in the experiments. It was shown that relativistic solar electron detection can be used for up-to-one-hour forecasting of incoming energetic ions at 1 AU. Warning of incoming solar energetic particle events could allow us to optimize the test-mass discharging. The current LISA-PF radiation monitor design needs to be upgraded if solar electron detection is to be implemented in LISA.

  13. Modelled Precipitation Over Greenland

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set includes the annual total precipitation from 1985 to 1999 and monthly total precipitation from January 1985 to December 1999. The data is derived from...

  14. Highly energetic compositions based on functionalized carbon nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Qi-Long; Gozin, Michael; Zhao, Feng-Qi; Cohen, Adva; Pang, Si-Ping

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, research in the field of carbon nanomaterials (CNMs), such as fullerenes, expanded graphite (EG), carbon nanotubes (CNTs), graphene, and graphene oxide (GO), has been widely used in energy storage, electronics, catalysts, and biomaterials, as well as medical applications. Regarding energy storage, one of the most important research directions is the development of CNMs as carriers of energetic components by coating or encapsulation, thus forming safer advanced nanostructures with better performances. Moreover, some CNMs can also be functionalized to become energetic additives. This review article covers updated preparation methods for the aforementioned CNMs, with a more specific orientation towards the use of these nanomaterials in energetic compositions. The effects of these functionalized CNMs on thermal decomposition, ignition, combustion and the reactivity properties of energetic compositions are significant and are discussed in detail. It has been shown that the use of functionalized CNMs in energetic compositions greatly improves their combustion performances, thermal stability and sensitivity. In particular, functionalized fullerenes, CNTs and GO are the most appropriate candidate components in nanothermites, solid propellants and gas generators, due to their superior catalytic properties as well as facile preparation methods.

  15. Energetic condensation growth of Nb thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Krishnan

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes energetic condensation growth of Nb films using a cathodic arc plasma, whose 60–120 eV ions penetrate a few monolayers into the substrate and enable sufficient surface mobility to ensure that the lowest energy state (crystalline structure with minimal defects is accessible to the film. Heteroepitaxial films of Nb were grown on a-plane sapphire and MgO crystals with good superconducting properties and crystal size (10  mm×20  mm limited only by substrate size. The substrates were heated to temperatures of up to 700°C and coated at 125°C, 300°C, 500°C, and 700°C. Film thickness was varied from ∼0.25  μm to >3  μm. Residual resistivity ratio (⟨RRR⟩ values (up to a record ⟨RRR⟩=587 on MgO and ⟨RRR⟩=328 on a-sapphire depend strongly on substrate annealing and deposition temperatures. X-ray diffraction spectra and pole figures reveal that RRR increases as the crystal structure of the Nb film becomes more ordered, consistent with fewer defects and, hence, longer electron mean-free path. A transition from Nb(110 to Nb(100 orientation on the MgO(100 lattice occurs at higher temperatures. This transition is discussed in light of substrate heating and energetic condensation physics. Electron backscattered diffraction and scanning electron microscope images complement the XRD data.

  16. Monte Carlo simulations of the Galileo energetic particle detector

    CERN Document Server

    Jun, I; Garrett, H B; McEntire, R W

    2002-01-01

    Monte Carlo radiation transport studies have been performed for the Galileo spacecraft energetic particle detector (EPD) in order to study its response to energetic electrons and protons. Three-dimensional Monte Carlo radiation transport codes, MCNP version 4B (for electrons) and MCNPX version 2.2.3 (for protons), were used throughout the study. The results are presented in the form of 'geometric factors' for the high-energy channels studied in this paper: B1, DC2, and DC3 for electrons and B0, DC0, and DC1 for protons. The geometric factor is the energy-dependent detector response function that relates the incident particle fluxes to instrument count rates. The trend of actual data measured by the EPD was successfully reproduced using the geometric factors obtained in this study.

  17. Recent Developments on Discontinuous Precipitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zięba P.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The discontinuous precipitation (DP belongs to a group of diffusive solid state phase transformations during which the formation of a new phase is heterogeneous and limited to a migrating reaction front (RF. The use of analytical electron microscopy provided reliable information that there is no differences in the diffusion rate at the stationary grain boundary and moving RF of DP reaction. On the other hand, the use of “in situ” transmission electron microscopy observations indicated the importance of stop-go motion or oscillatory movement of the RF.

  18. A substorm in midnight auroral precipitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. G. Vorobjev

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available DMSP F7 spacecraft observations for the whole of 1986 were used to construct the empirical model of the midnight auroral precipitation during a substorm. The model includes the dynamics of different auroral precipitation boundaries and simultaneous changes in average electron precipitation energy and energy flux in different precipitation regions during all substorm phases, as well as the IMF and solar wind plasma signatures during a substorm. The analysis of the model shows a few important features of precipitation. (1 During the magnetic quietness and just before the beginning of the substorm expansive phase the latitudinal width of the auroral precipitation in the nightside sector is about 5 – 6° CGL, while that of the auroral oval is about 2 – 3° CGL during such periods. (2 For about 5 min before the substorm onset a decrease in the average precipitating electron energy in the equatorward part of auroral zone was observed simultaneously, with an increase in both the average electron energy and energy flux of electron precipitation in the poleward part of the auroral zone. (3 The isotropy boundary position in the beginning of the substorm expansive phase coincides well with the inner edge of the central plasma sheet. The analysis of interplanetary medium parameters shows that, on average, during the substorm development, the solar wind dynamic pressure was about 1.5 times that of the magnetic quietness period. Substorms occurred predominantly during the southward IMF orientation, suggesting that substorm onset often was not associated with the northern turn or decrease in the southward interplanetary Bz . The Northern Hemisphere’s substorms occurred generally during the positive interplanetary By in winter, and they were observed when the interplanetary By was negative in summer.Key words. Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere; particle precipitation – Magnetospheric physics (storm and substorm; magnetosphere-ionosphere interaction

  19. Resonant enhancement of relativistic electron fluxes during geomagnetically active periods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Roth

    Full Text Available The strong increase in the flux of relativistic electrons during the recovery phase of magnetic storms and during other active periods is investigated with the help of Hamiltonian formalism and simulations of test electrons which interact with whistler waves. The intensity of the whistler waves is enhanced significantly due to injection of 10-100 keV electrons during the substorm. Electrons which drift in the gradient and curvature of the magnetic field generate the rising tones of VLF whistler chorus. The seed population of relativistic electrons which bounce along the inhomogeneous magnetic field, interacts resonantly with the whistler waves. Whistler wave propagating obliquely to the magnetic field can interact with energetic electrons through Landau, cyclotron, and higher harmonic resonant interactions when the Doppler-shifted wave frequency equals any (positive or negative integer multiple of the local relativistic gyrofrequency. Because the gyroradius of a relativistic electron may be the order of or greater than the perpendicular wavelength, numerous cyclotron, harmonics can contribute to the resonant interaction which breaks down the adiabatic invariant. A similar process diffuses the pitch angle leading to electron precipitation. The irreversible changes in the adiabatic invariant depend on the relative phase between the wave and the electron, and successive resonant interactions result in electrons undergoing a random walk in energy and pitch angle. This resonant process may contribute to the 10-100 fold increase of the relativistic electron flux in the outer radiation belt, and constitute an interesting relation between substorm-generated waves and enhancements in fluxes of relativistic electrons during geomagnetic storms and other active periods.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (energetic particles · trapped; plasma waves and instabilities; storms and substorms

  20. ENERGETIC REQUIREMENTS FOR GROWTH AND ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ENERGETICS OF CAPE GANNET. 311. TABLE 1. Mean food and energy intake, guano and energy excreted, metabolized energy and assimilation efficiency in hand-reared Cape gannet chicks. Food. Food. Energy. Guano. Energy. Age intake dry mas&! content. Energy excreted content. Ener8Y Metabolized Assimilation.

  1. Acceleration and Propagation of Solar Energetic Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Karl-Ludwig; Dalla, Silvia

    2017-11-01

    Solar Energetic Particles (SEPs) are an important component of Space Weather, including radiation hazard to humans and electronic equipment, and the ionisation of the Earth's atmosphere. We review the key observations of SEPs, our current understanding of their acceleration and transport, and discuss how this knowledge is incorporated within Space Weather forecasting tools. Mechanisms for acceleration during solar flares and at shocks driven by Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) are discussed, as well as the timing relationships between signatures of solar eruptive events and the detection of SEPs in interplanetary space. Evidence on how the parameters of SEP events are related to those of the parent solar activity is reviewed and transport effects influencing SEP propagation to near-Earth locations are examined. Finally, the approaches to forecasting Space Weather SEP effects are discussed. We conclude that both flare and CME shock acceleration contribute to Space Weather relevant SEP populations and need to be considered within forecasting tools.

  2. The location of energetic compartments affects energetic communication in cardiomyocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rikke eBirkedal

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The heart relies on accurate regulation of mitochondrial energy supply to match energy demand. The main regulators are Ca2+ and feedback of ADP and Pi. Regulation via feedback has intrigued for decades. First, the heart exhibits a remarkable metabolic stability. Second, diffusion of ADP and other molecules is restricted specifically in heart and red muscle, where a fast feedback is needed the most. To explain the regulation by feedback, compartmentalization must be taken into account. Experiments and theoretical approaches suggest that cardiomyocyte energetic compartmentalization is elaborate with barriers obstructing diffusion in the cytosol and at the level of the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM. A recent study suggests the barriers are organized in a lattice with dimensions in agreement with those of intracellular structures. Here, we discuss the possible location of these barriers. The more plausible scenario includes a barrier at the level of MOM. Much research has focused on how the permeability of MOM itself is regulated, and the importance of the creatine kinase system to facilitate energetic communication. We hypothesize that at least part of the diffusion restriction at the MOM level is not by MOM itself, but due to the close physical association between the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR and mitochondria. This will explain why animals with a disabled creatine kinase system exhibit rather mild phenotype modifications. Mitochondria are hubs of energetics, but also ROS production and signaling. The close association between SR and mitochondria may form a diffusion barrier to ADP added outside a permeabilised cardiomyocyte. But in vivo, it is the structural basis for the mitochondrial-SR coupling that is crucial for the regulation of mitochondrial Ca2+-transients to regulate energetics, and for avoiding Ca2+-overload and irreversible opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore.

  3. Energetic costs of calcification under ocean acidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalding, Christopher; Finnegan, Seth; Fischer, Woodward W.

    2017-05-01

    Anthropogenic ocean acidification threatens to negatively impact marine organisms that precipitate calcium carbonate skeletons. Past geological events, such as the Permian-Triassic Mass Extinction, together with modern experiments generally support these concerns. However, the physiological costs of producing a calcium carbonate skeleton under different acidification scenarios remain poorly understood. Here we present an idealized mathematical model to quantify whole-skeleton costs, concluding that they rise only modestly (up to ˜10%) under acidification expected for 2100. The modest magnitude of this effect reflects in part the low energetic cost of inorganic, calcium carbonate relative to the proteinaceous organic matrix component of skeletons. Our analysis does, however, point to an important kinetic constraint that depends on seawater carbonate chemistry, and we hypothesize that the impact of acidification is more likely to cause extinctions within groups where the timescale of larval development is tightly constrained. The cheapness of carbonate skeletons compared to organic materials also helps explain the widespread evolutionary convergence upon calcification within the metazoa.

  4. Science Results from Colorado Student Space Weather Experiment (CSSWE): Energetic Particle Distribution in Near Earth Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinlin

    2013-04-01

    The Colorado Student Space Weather Experiment (CSSWE) is a 3-unit (10cm x 10cm x 30cm) CubeSat mission funded by the National Science Foundation, launched into a low-Earth, polar orbit on 13 September 2012 as a secondary payload under NASA's Educational Launch of Nanosatellites (ELaNa) program. The science objectives of CSSWE are to investigate the relationship of the location, magnitude, and frequency of solar flares to the timing, duration, and energy spectrum of solar energetic particles reaching Earth, and to determine the precipitation loss and the evolution of the energy spectrum of trapped radiation belt electrons. CSSWE contains a single science payload, the Relativistic Electron and Proton Telescope integrated little experiment (REPTile), which is a miniaturization of the Relativistic Electron and Proton Telescope (REPT) built at the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics for NASA/Van Allen Probes mission, which consists of two identical spacecraft, launched 30 August 2012, that traverse the heart of the radiation belts in a low inclination orbit. CSSWE's REPTile is designed to measure the directional differential flux of protons ranging from 10 to 40 MeV and electrons from 0.5 to >3.3 MeV. The commissioning phase was completed and REPTile was activated on 4 October 2012. The data are very clean, far exceeding expectations! A number of engineering challenges had to be overcome to achieve such clean measurements under the mass and power limits of a CubeSat. The CSSWE is also an ideal class project, providing training for the next generation of engineers and scientists over the full life-cycle of a satellite project.

  5. The energetic significance of cooking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmody, Rachel N; Wrangham, Richard W

    2009-10-01

    While cooking has long been argued to improve the diet, the nature of the improvement has not been well defined. As a result, the evolutionary significance of cooking has variously been proposed as being substantial or relatively trivial. In this paper, we evaluate the hypothesis that an important and consistent effect of cooking food is a rise in its net energy value. The pathways by which cooking influences net energy value differ for starch, protein, and lipid, and we therefore consider plant and animal foods separately. Evidence of compromised physiological performance among individuals on raw diets supports the hypothesis that cooked diets tend to provide energy. Mechanisms contributing to energy being gained from cooking include increased digestibility of starch and protein, reduced costs of digestion for cooked versus raw meat, and reduced energetic costs of detoxification and defence against pathogens. If cooking consistently improves the energetic value of foods through such mechanisms, its evolutionary impact depends partly on the relative energetic benefits of non-thermal processing methods used prior to cooking. We suggest that if non-thermal processing methods such as pounding were used by Lower Palaeolithic Homo, they likely provided an important increase in energy gain over unprocessed raw diets. However, cooking has critical effects not easily achievable by non-thermal processing, including the relatively complete gelatinisation of starch, efficient denaturing of proteins, and killing of food borne pathogens. This means that however sophisticated the non-thermal processing methods were, cooking would have conferred incremental energetic benefits. While much remains to be discovered, we conclude that the adoption of cooking would have led to an important rise in energy availability. For this reason, we predict that cooking had substantial evolutionary significance.

  6. Computational Studies of Energetic Nitramines

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-09-11

    not readily be treated by means of the electrostatic potential because the effects of the nuclei are so strong that they often mask local maxima that...Results", Technical Report Submitted to ONR, March 1987. 2. P. Politzer, J. S. Murray, M. E. Grice and P. Sjoberg, in Chemistr of Energetic Materials...S. Murray, Trans Amer. Cryst. Assoc. 26, in press. 44. J. S. Murray, T. Brinck, M. E. Grice and P. Politzer, J. Mol. Struct. (Theochem), in press

  7. Stochastic Energetics of Quantum Transport

    OpenAIRE

    Ghosh, Pulak Kumar; Ray, Deb Shankar

    2006-01-01

    We examine the stochastic energetics of directed quantum transport due to rectification of non-equilibrium thermal fluctuations. We calculate the quantum efficiency of a ratchet device both in presence and absence of an external load to characterize two quantifiers of efficiency. It has been shown that the quantum current as well as efficiency in absence of load (Stokes efficiency) is higher as compared to classical current and efficiency, respectively, at low temperature. The conventional ef...

  8. Nano Engineered Energetic Materials (NEEM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-12

    assembly of nano-engineered energetic materials (NEEMs), which will also provide concurrent improvement in performance and managed energy release while...thermodynamic reaction limit. These results were corroborated by tandem XPS measurements on similar systems. Depositions carried out an elevated...degree of supersaturation and the seeded particles should act as a nucleation catalysis . Therefore, the metastable RDX wants to nucleate onto anything in

  9. Process for preparing energetic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Randall L [Livermore, CA; Lee, Ronald S [Livermore, CA; Tillotson, Thomas M [Tracy, CA; Hrubesh, Lawrence W [Pleasanton, CA; Swansiger, Rosalind W [Livermore, CA; Fox, Glenn A [Livermore, CA

    2011-12-13

    Sol-gel chemistry is used for the preparation of energetic materials (explosives, propellants and pyrotechnics) with improved homogeneity, and/or which can be cast to near-net shape, and/or made into precision molding powders. The sol-gel method is a synthetic chemical process where reactive monomers are mixed into a solution, polymerization occurs leading to a highly cross-linked three dimensional solid network resulting in a gel. The energetic materials can be incorporated during the formation of the solution or during the gel stage of the process. The composition, pore, and primary particle sizes, gel time, surface areas, and density may be tailored and controlled by the solution chemistry. The gel is then dried using supercritical extraction to produce a highly porous low density aerogel or by controlled slow evaporation to produce a xerogel. Applying stress during the extraction phase can result in high density materials. Thus, the sol-gel method can be used for precision detonator explosive manufacturing as well as producing precision explosives, propellants, and pyrotechnics, along with high power composite energetic materials.

  10. Simultaneous measurements of X-rays and electrons during a pulsating aurora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Østgaard

    1998-02-01

    Full Text Available The PULSAUR II rocket was launched from Andøya Rocket Range at 23.43 UT on 9 February 1994 into a pulsating aurora. In this paper we focus on the observations of precipitating electrons and auroral X-rays. By using models it is possible to deduce the electron energy spectrum from X-ray measurements. Comparisons are made between the deduced electron fluxes and the directly measured electron fluxes on the rocket. We found the shape of the observed and the deduced electron spectra to fit very well, with almost identical e-folding energies in the energy range from 10 ke V to ~60–80 ke V. For the integrated fluxes from 10.8 to 250 ke V, we found a discrepancy of 30% . By combining two models, we have found a good method of deducing the electron precipitation from X-ray measurements. The discrepancies between calculations and measurements are in the range of the uncertainties in the measurements.Key words. Ionospheric particle precipitation · Magnetospheric physics · Annual phenomena · Energetic particle

  11. New Energetic Particle Data and Products from the GOES Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onsager, Terrance; Rodriguez, Juan

    The NOAA Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) program has provided continuous, real-time measurements of the near-Earth space environment for decades. In addition to their scientific value, the GOES energetic particle measurements are the basis for a variety of space weather products and services, including the forecasting of elevated energetic particle levels, real-time knowledge of the satellite environment at geostationary orbit, and data to allow post-event analyses when satellite anomalies occur. The GOES satellites have traditionally provided measurements of high-energy electrons, protons, and alpha particles (100s of keV to 100s of MeV). Beginning with the launch of GOES-13 in 2006, the measurement capabilities were expanded to include medium-energy electrons and protons (10s to 100s of keV) with pitch angle resolution. The next generation of GOES satellites, starting with GOES-R in 2016, will include low-energy electrons and ions (10s of eV to 10s of keV) as well as energetic heavy ions. In this presentation, we will overview the GOES particle measurements available now and in the future and describe the space weather services and scientific investigations that these data support.

  12. Density functional calculations of (55)Mn, (14)N and (13)C electron paramagnetic resonance parameters support an energetically feasible model system for the S(2) state of the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schinzel, Sandra; Schraut, Johannes; Arbuznikov, Alexei V; Siegbahn, Per E M; Kaupp, Martin

    2010-09-10

    Metal and ligand hyperfine couplings of a previously suggested, energetically feasible Mn(4)Ca model cluster (SG2009(-1)) for the S(2) state of the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II (PSII) have been studied by broken-symmetry density functional methods and compared with other suggested structural and spectroscopic models. This was carried out explicitly for different spin-coupling patterns of the S=1/2 ground state of the Mn(III)(Mn(IV))(3) cluster. By applying spin-projection techniques and a scaling of the manganese hyperfine couplings, computation of the hyperfine and nuclear quadrupole coupling parameters allows a direct evaluation of the proposed models in comparison with data obtained from the simulation of EPR, ENDOR, and ESEEM spectra. The computation of (55)Mn hyperfine couplings (HFCs) for SG2009(-1) gives excellent agreement with experiment. However, at the current level of spin projection, the (55)Mn HFCs do not appear sufficiently accurate to distinguish between different structural models. Yet, of all the models studied, SG2009(-1) is the only one with the Mn(III) site at the Mn(C) center, which is coordinated by histidine (D1-His332). The computed histidine (14)N HFC anisotropy for SG2009(-1) gives much better agreement with ESEEM data than the other models, in which Mn(C) is an Mn(IV) site, thus supporting the validity of the model. The (13)C HFCs of various carboxylates have been compared with (13)C ENDOR data for PSII preparations with (13)C-labelled alanine.

  13. Relativistic Electron Precipitation: An Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    dissertation of Leopold Joseph Andreoli is approved. Charles F. Kennel Margaret G. Kivelson Ge rge’ LZSiscoe I S. S. V. Venkateswaran Richard-M Thorne...friendship. Dr. George L. Siscoe has added significant breadth to my knowledge of the space sciences. Conver- sations with Drs. Charles F. Kennel and... Kennel , 1971). 68 Figure 2.5a Flux (counts/sec, every fourth data point) versus L value of low altitude (700 kW) outer zone pass near local evening

  14. Global Precipitation Measurement Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azarbarzin, Art

    2010-01-01

    This poster presents an overview of the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) constellation of satellites which are designed to measure the Earth's precipitation. It includes the schedule of launches for the various satellites in the constellation, and the coverage of the constellation, It also reviews the mission capabilities, and the mission science objectives.

  15. Tuning the particle size and morphology of high energetic material nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raj Kumar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Morphology controlled synthesis of nanoparticles of powerful high energetic compounds (HECs such as 1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazinane (RDX and 1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocane (HMX were achieved by a simple solvent–antisolvent interaction (SAI method at 70 °C. The effects of different solvents on particle size and morphology of the prepared nano-HECs were studied systematically. Particle size and morphology of the nano-HECs was characterized using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM imaging. X-ray diffraction (XRD and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy studies revealed that RDX and HMX were precipitated in their most stable polymorphic forms, i.e. α and β, respectively. Thermogravimetric analysis coupled with differential scanning calorimetry (TGA-DSC studies showed that the thermal response of the nanoparticles was similar to the respective raw-HECs. HEC nanoparticles with spherical and rod shaped morphology were observed under different solvent conditions. The mean particle size also varied considerably with the use of different solvents.

  16. High Nitrogen Austenitic Stainless Steel Precipitation During Isothermal Annealing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Domankova

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The time-temperature-precipitation in high-nitrogen austenitic stainless steel was investigated using light optical microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, selected area diffraction and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The isothermal precipitation kinetics curves and the corresponding precipitation activation energy were obtained. The diffusion activation energy of M2N precipitation is 129 kJ/mol. The results show that critical temperature for M2N precipitation is about 825°C with the corresponding incubation period 2.5 min.

  17. A comparison of outer electron radiation belt dropouts during solar wind stream interface and magnetic cloud driven storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunjobi, O.; Sivakumar, V.; Mtumela, Z.

    2017-06-01

    Energetic electrons are trapped in the Earth's radiation belts which occupy a toroidal region between 3 and 7 \\hbox {R}E above the Earth's surface. Rapid loss of electrons from the radiation belts is known as dropouts. The source and loss mechanisms regulating the radiation belts population are not yet understood entirely, particularly during geomagnetic storm times. Nevertheless, the dominant loss mechanism may require an event based study to be better observed. Utilizing multiple data sources from the year 1997-2007, this study identifies radiation belt electron dropouts which are ultimately triggered when solar wind stream interfaces (SI) arrived at Earth, or when magnetic clouds (MC) arrived. Using superposed epoch analysis (SEA) technique, a synthesis of multiple observations is performed to reveal loss mechanism which might, perhaps, be a major contributor to radiation belt losses under SI and MC driven storms. Results show an abrupt slower decaying precipitation of electron peak (about 3000 counts/sec) on SI arrival within 5.05 < L < 6.05, which persist till 0.5 day before gradual recovery. This pattern is interpreted as an indication of depleted electrons from bounce lost cone via precipitating mechanism known as relativistic electron microburst. On the other hand, MC shows a pancake precipitating peak extending to lower L (Plasmapause); indicating a combination of electron cyclotron harmonic (ECH) and whistler mode waves as the contributing mechanisms.

  18. Precipitation Kinetics in a Nb-stabilized Ferritic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labonne, M.; Graux, A.; Cazottes, S.; Danoix, F.; Cuvilly, F.; Chassagne, F.; Perez, M.; Massardier, V.

    2017-08-01

    The precipitation occurring in a Nb-stabilized ferritic stainless steel, containing initially Nb(C, N) carbonitrides and Fe3Nb3X precipitates, was investigated during aging treatments performed between 923 K and 1163 K (650 °C and 890 °C) by combining different techniques, (thermoelectric power (TEP), scanning/transmission electron microscopy (SEM/TEM), and atom probe tomography (APT)), in order to determine the precipitation kinetics, the nature and morphology of the newly formed precipitates as well as the chemistry of the initial Fe3Nb3X precipitates, where X stands for C or N. The following composition was proposed for these precipitates: (Fe0.81 Cr0.19)3 (Nb0.85 Si0.08 Mo0.07)3 (N0.8 C0.2), highlighting the simultaneous presence of N and C in the precipitates. With regard to the precipitation in the investigated temperature range, two main phenomena, associated with a hardness decrease, were clearly identified: (i) the precipitation of Fe2Nb precipitates from the niobium initially present in solution or coming from the progressive dissolution of the Fe3Nb3X precipitates and (ii) the precipitation of the χ-phase at grain boundaries for longer aging times. From the TEP kinetics, a time-temperature-precipitation diagram has been proposed.

  19. Precipitation in a lead calcium tin anode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Gonzalez, Francisco A., E-mail: fco.aurelio@inbox.com [Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon (Mexico); Centro de Innovacion, Investigacion y Desarrollo en Ingenieria y Tecnologia, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon (Mexico); Camurri, Carlos G., E-mail: ccamurri@udec.cl [Departamento de Ingenieria de Materiales, Universidad de Concepcion (Chile); Carrasco, Claudia A., E-mail: ccarrascoc@udec.cl [Departamento de Ingenieria de Materiales, Universidad de Concepcion (Chile); Colas, Rafael, E-mail: rafael.colas@uanl.edu.mx [Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon (Mexico); Centro de Innovacion, Investigacion y Desarrollo en Ingenieria y Tecnologia, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon (Mexico)

    2012-02-15

    Samples from a hot rolled sheet of a tin and calcium bearing lead alloy were solution heat treated at 300 Degree-Sign C and cooled down to room temperature at different rates; these samples were left at room temperature to study natural precipitation of CaSn{sub 3} particles. The samples were aged for 45 days before analysing their microstructure, which was carried out in a scanning electron microscope using secondary and backscattered electron detectors. Selected X-ray spectra analyses were conducted to verify the nature of the precipitates. Images were taken at different magnifications in both modes of observation to locate the precipitates and record their position within the images and calculate the distance between them. Differential scanning calorimeter analyses were conducted on selected samples. It was found that the mechanical properties of the material correlate with the minimum average distance between precipitates, which is related to the average cooling rate from solution heat treatment. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The distance between precipitates in a lead alloy is recorded. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The relationship between the distance and the cooling rate is established. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It is found that the strengthening of the alloy depends on the distance between precipitates.

  20. Energetics, physiology and vertebrate ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasov, W H

    1986-10-01

    The magnitude of energy flow through individual animals and their populations is potentially limited by several physiological factors. These include thermal constraints affecting the time available for foraging, physiological design constraints affecting foraging mode and the rate of prey capture, and digestive constraints on how much food can be processed per day. Over short periods (hours or less), maximal rates of metabolism may determine survival during exposure to cold or when fleeing predators. Energetics, physiology and ecology can be usefully integrated within the context of the concept of maximum rate of energy flow. Copyright © 1986. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Energetic particles in the heliosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Simnett, George M

    2017-01-01

    This monograph traces the development of our understanding of how and where energetic particles are accelerated in the heliosphere and how they may reach the Earth. Detailed data sets are presented which address these topics. The bulk of the observations are from spacecraft in or near the ecliptic plane. It is timely to present this subject now that Voyager-1 has entered the true interstellar medium. Since it seems unlikely that there will be a follow-on to the Voyager programme any time soon, the data we already have regarding the outer heliosphere are not going to be enhanced for at least 40 years.

  2. Laser-shocked energetic materials for laboratory-scale characterization and model validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottfried, Jennifer

    The development of laboratory-scale methods for characterizing the properties of energetic materials, i.e., using only milligram quantities of material, is essential for the development of new types of explosives and propellants for use in military applications. Laser-based excitation methods for initiating or exciting the energetic material offer several advantages for investigating the response of energetic materials to various stimuli: 1) very small quantities of material can be studied prior to scale-up synthesis, 2) no detonation of bulk energetic material is required, eliminating the need for expensive safety precautions, and 3) extensive diagnostics can be incorporated into the experimental setup to provide as much information as possible per shot. In this presentation, progress in our laboratory developing three laser-based methods for characterizing energetic materials will be discussed. Direct excitation of a sample residue using a focused nanosecond laser pulse enables estimation of the performance of the energetic material based on the measured shock wave velocity with a technique called laser-induced air shock from energetic materials (LASEM); recent LASEM results on novel energetic materials will be presented. Impact ignition of energetic materials has also been investigated using laser-driven flyer plates. High-speed schlieren imaging of the flyer plate launch has demonstrated that late-time emission from the impacted energetic material is caused by the reaction of particles ejected off the sample surface with the flyer plate launch products. Finally, the role of a rapid temperature jump (1014 K/s) in the initiation of the explosive cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine (RDX) has been investigated by indirect ultrafast laser heating. Although the temperature jump was insufficient to decompose the RDX, it did induce a temporary electronic excitation of the heated explosive molecules. These results are being used to validate multiscale models in order to

  3. Electron dynamics during substorm dipolarization in Mercury's magnetosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. C. Delcourt

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available We examine the nonlinear dynamics of electrons during the expansion phase of substorms at Mercury using test particle simulations. A simple model of magnetic field line dipolarization is designed by rescaling a magnetic field model of the Earth's magnetosphere. The results of the simulations demonstrate that electrons may be subjected to significant energization on the time scale (several seconds of the magnetic field reconfiguration. In a similar manner to ions in the near-Earth's magnetosphere, it is shown that low-energy (up to several tens of eV electrons may not conserve the second adiabatic invariant during dipolarization, which leads to clusters of bouncing particles in the innermost magnetotail. On the other hand, it is found that, because of the stretching of the magnetic field lines, high-energy electrons (several keVs and above do not behave adiabatically and possibly experience meandering (Speiser-type motion around the midplane. We show that dipolarization of the magnetic field lines may be responsible for significant, though transient, (a few seconds precipitation of energetic (several keVs electrons onto the planet's surface. Prominent injections of energetic trapped electrons toward the planet are also obtained as a result of dipolarization. These injections, however, do not exhibit short-lived temporal modulations, as observed by Mariner-10, which thus appear to follow from a different mechanism than a simple convection surge.

  4. Protein-Mediated Precipitation of Calcium Carbonate

    OpenAIRE

    Izabela Polowczyk; Anna Bastrzyk; Marta Fiedot

    2016-01-01

    Calcium carbonate is an important component in exoskeletons of many organisms. The synthesis of calcium carbonate was performed by mixing dimethyl carbonate and an aqueous solution of calcium chloride dihydrate. The precipitation product was characterized by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) measurements. In addition, the turbidity of the reaction solution was acquire...

  5. WPA Precipitation Tabulations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Hourly precipitation data tabulated under the Work Projects Administration (WPA), a New Deal program created to reduce unemployment during the Great Depression....

  6. Is extreme precipitation changing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papalexiou, Simon Michael

    2015-04-01

    For most of the scientists climate change is a fact. Climate change implies changes not only on the behavior of the temperature but also on other climatic variables like the precipitation. The question raised in this study is whether or not the annual daily maximum precipitation has changed. In order to evaluate if this question can be answered, several thousands of precipitation records are analyzed from all over the globe. Initially the annual daily maxima time series are carefully formed and sequentially all possible trends are estimated in a moving window framework and for several interannual periods, e.g., from 10 years to 100 years. The aim is to estimate the difference between the percentage of increasing and decreasing trends in the annual daily maximum precipitation and assess if this difference indicates any specific pattern.

  7. Storage Gage Precipitation Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A storage gage is a precipitation gage that requires reading and maintenance only monthly or seasonal intervals. This library includes reports from such gages,...

  8. Short Resistant Collecting Cells for Electrostatic Precipitators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-11-30

    Precipitator Designs 5. Trion, Inc. Invention Disclosure No. 49 dated May 17, 1982 " Smoke Control Electronic Air Cleaner" 6. Trion, Inc. Invention...development work was to be provided including recommendations for future efforts to develop a I commercially practicable shipboard smoke control system. 2

  9. Energetic materials and methods of tailoring electrostatic discharge sensitivity of energetic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniels, Michael A.; Heaps, Ronald J.; Wallace, Ronald S.; Pantoya, Michelle L.; Collins, Eric S.

    2016-11-01

    An energetic material comprising an elemental fuel, an oxidizer or other element, and a carbon nanofiller or carbon fiber rods, where the carbon nanofiller or carbon fiber rods are substantially homogeneously dispersed in the energetic material. Methods of tailoring the electrostatic discharge sensitivity of an energetic material are also disclosed.

  10. The Energetic Particle Detector (EPD) Investigation and the Energetic Ion Spectrometer (EIS) for the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauk, B. H.; Blake, J. B.; Baker, D. N.; Clemmons, J. H.; Reeves, G. D.; Spence, H. E.; Jaskulek, S. E.; Schlemm, C. E.; Brown, L. E.; Cooper, S. A.; Craft, J. V.; Fennell, J. F.; Gurnee, R. S.; Hammock, C. M.; Hayes, J. R.; Hill, P. A.; Ho, G. C.; Hutcheson, J. C.; Jacques, A. D.; Kerem, S.; Mitchell, D. G.; Nelson, K. S.; Paschalidis, N. P.; Rossano, E.; Stokes, M. R.; Westlake, J. H.

    2016-03-01

    The Energetic Particle Detector (EPD) Investigation is one of 5 fields-and-particles investigations on the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission. MMS comprises 4 spacecraft flying in close formation in highly elliptical, near-Earth-equatorial orbits targeting understanding of the fundamental physics of the important physical process called magnetic reconnection using Earth's magnetosphere as a plasma laboratory. EPD comprises two sensor types, the Energetic Ion Spectrometer (EIS) with one instrument on each of the 4 spacecraft, and the Fly's Eye Energetic Particle Spectrometer (FEEPS) with 2 instruments on each of the 4 spacecraft. EIS measures energetic ion energy, angle and elemental compositional distributions from a required low energy limit of 20 keV for protons and 45 keV for oxygen ions, up to >0.5 MeV (with capabilities to measure up to >1 MeV). FEEPS measures instantaneous all sky images of energetic electrons from 25 keV to >0.5 MeV, and also measures total ion energy distributions from 45 keV to >0.5 MeV to be used in conjunction with EIS to measure all sky ion distributions. In this report we describe the EPD investigation and the details of the EIS sensor. Specifically we describe EPD-level science objectives, the science and measurement requirements, and the challenges that the EPD team had in meeting these requirements. Here we also describe the design and operation of the EIS instruments, their calibrated performances, and the EIS in-flight and ground operations. Blake et al. (The Flys Eye Energetic Particle Spectrometer (FEEPS) contribution to the Energetic Particle Detector (EPD) investigation of the Magnetospheric Magnetoscale (MMS) Mission, this issue) describe the design and operation of the FEEPS instruments, their calibrated performances, and the FEEPS in-flight and ground operations. The MMS spacecraft will launch in early 2015, and over its 2-year mission will provide comprehensive measurements of magnetic reconnection at Earth

  11. Flow bouncing and electron injection observed by Cluster: FLOW BOUNCING AND ELECTRON INJECTION OBSERVED BY CLUSTER

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nakamura, R; Baumjohann, W; Panov, E; Volwerk, M; Birn, J; Artemyev, A; Petrukovich, A. A; Amm, O; Juusola, L; Kubyshkina, M. V; Apatenkov, S; Kronberg, E. A; Daly, P. W; Fillingim, M; Weygand, J. M; Fazakerley, A; Khotyaintsev, Y

    2013-01-01

    ... accompanied by enhanced flux of energetic electrons were observed before the flow bouncing. The sequence of events started with a localized dipolarization front and ended with a large scale (>10RE) dipolarization front accompanied by a major increase in energetic electrons at all spacecraft and immediately followed by flow bouncing. Multiple dipolariz...

  12. Apparatus and method for extracting power from energetic ions produced in nuclear fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisch, Nathaniel J.; Rax, Jean M.

    1994-01-01

    An apparatus and method of extracting power from energetic ions produced by nuclear fusion in a toroidal plasma to enhance respectively the toroidal plasma current and fusion reactivity. By injecting waves of predetermined frequency and phase traveling substantially in a selected poloidal direction within the plasma, the energetic ions become diffused in energy and space such that the energetic ions lose energy and amplify the waves. The amplified waves are further adapted to travel substantially in a selected toroidal direction to increase preferentially the energy of electrons traveling in one toroidal direction which, in turn, enhances or generates a toroidal plasma current. In an further adaptation, the amplified waves can be made to preferentially increase the energy of fuel ions within the plasma to enhance the fusion reactivity of the fuel ions. The described direct, or in situ, conversion of the energetic ion energy provides an efficient and economical means of delivering power to a fusion reactor.

  13. Fluid Mud in Energetic Systems: FLUMES II

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    FINAL REPORT Fluid Mud in Energetic Systems: FLUMES II Gail C. Kineke Dept of...the dynamics of fluid mud and its role in the transport and deposition of sediment in coastal environments. In particular, we sought greater...understanding of the processes that influence the formation and maintenance of fluid mud in energetic environments. OBJECTIVES The research is a process

  14. Energetic model of metal hardening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignatova O.N.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on Bailey hypothesis on the link between strain hardening and elastic lattice defect energy this paper suggests a shear strength energetic model that takes into consideration plastic strain intensity and rate as well as softening related to temperature annealing and dislocation annihilation. Metal strain hardening was demonstrated to be determined only by elastic strain energy related to the energy of accumulated defects. It is anticipated that accumulation of the elastic energy of defects is governed by plastic work. The suggested model has a reasonable agreement with the available experimental data for copper up to P = 70 GPa , for aluminum up to P = 10 GPa and for tantalum up to P = 20 GPa.

  15. Cosmic Ray Energetics and Mass

    CERN Multimedia

    Baylon cardiel, J L; Wallace, K C; Anderson, T B; Copley, M

    The cosmic-ray energetics and mass (CREAM) investigation is designed to measure cosmic-ray composition to the supernova energy scale of 10$^{15}$ eV in a series of ultra long duration balloon (ULDB) flights. The first flight is planned to be launched from Antarctica in December 2004. The goal is to observe cosmic-ray spectral features and/or abundance changes that might signify a limit to supernova acceleration. The particle ($\\{Z}$) measurements will be made with a timing-based charge detector and a pixelated silicon charge detector to minimize the effect of backscatter from the calorimeter. The particle energy measurements will be made with a transition radiation detector (TRD) for $\\{Z}$ > 3 and a sampling tungsten/scintillator calorimeter for $\\{Z}$ $\\geq$1 particles, allowing inflight cross calibration of the two detectors. The status of the payload construction and flight preparation are reported in this paper.

  16. Contribution of backscattered electrons to the total electron yield ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    It is shown experimentally that under energetic electron bombardment the backscattered electrons from solid targets contribute significantly (∼ 80%) to the observed total electron yield, even for targets of high backscattering coefficients. It is further found that for tungsten ( = 74) with a backscattering coefficient of about 0.50 ...

  17. Magnetospheric source region of discrete auroras inferred from their relationship with isotropy boundaries of energetic particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Yahnin

    1997-08-01

    Full Text Available According to observations, the discrete auroral arcs can sometimes be found, either deep inside the auroral oval or at the poleward border of the wide (so-called double auroral oval, which map to very different regions of the magnetotail. To find common physical conditions for the auroral-arc generation in these magnetotail regions, we study the spatial relationship between the diffuse and discrete auroras and the isotropic boundaries (IBs of the precipitating energetic particles which can be used to characterise locally the equatorial magnetic field in the tail. From comparison of ground observation of auroral forms with meridional profiles of particle flux measured simultaneously by the low-altitude NOAA satellites above the ground observation region, we found that (1 discrete auroral arcs are always situated polewards from (or very close to the IB of >30-keV electrons, whereas (2 the IB of the >30-keV protons is often seen inside the diffuse aurora. These relationships hold true for both quiet and active (substorm conditions in the premidnight-nightside (18-01-h MLT sector considered. In some events the auroral arcs occupy a wide latitudinal range. The most equatorial of these arcs was found at the poleward edge of the diffuse auroras (but anyway in the vicinity of the electron IB, the most poleward arcs were simultaneously observed on the closed field lines near the polar-cap boundary. These observations disagree with the notion that the discrete aurora originate exclusively in the near-Earth portion of plasma sheet or exclusively on the PSBL field lines. Result (1 may imply a fundamental feature of auroral-arc formation: they originate in the current-sheet regions having very curved and tailward-stretched magnetic field lines.

  18. Energetic particle acceleration in spherically symmetric accretion flows and shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, G. M.; Bogdan, T. J.

    1987-01-01

    Steady state, spherically symmetric solutions of the cosmic-ray transport equation describing the acceleration of energetic particles in galactic accretion flows onto neutron stars, black holes, white dwarfs, and protostars are studied. The results indicate that astrophysical accretion flows can be partitioned into distinct classes depending upon whether the accretion rate lies above or below a critical value of a few times 10 to the -7th stellar masses/yr. When the particle transport is convection-dominated, both classes of accretion flows exhibit a spectral index appropriate for first-order Fermi acceleration at a plane shock in the absence of losses. As the particle transport becomes diffusion-dominated, both classes show a break and precipitous falloff in the particle spectrum due to the escape of these particles from the accretion flow. The precise nature of the spectrum depends on the relationship between the particle momentum and the spatial diffusion coefficient.

  19. Nonadiabatic electron heat pump

    OpenAIRE

    Rey, Miguel; Strass, Michael; Kohler, Sigmund; Hänggi, Peter; Sols, Fernando

    2006-01-01

    We investigate a mechanism for extracting heat from metallic conductors based on the energy-selective transmission of electrons through a spatially asymmetric resonant structure subject to ac driving. This quantum refrigerator can operate at zero net electronic current as it replaces hot by cold electrons through two energetically symmetric inelastic channels. We present numerical results for a specific heterostructure and discuss general trends. We also explore the conditions under which the...

  20. Electron kinetics in capacitively coupled plasmas modulated by electron injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ya; Peng, Yanli; Innocenti, Maria Elena; Jiang, Wei; Wang, Hong-yu; Lapenta, Giovanni

    2017-09-01

    The controlling effect of an electron injection on the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) and on the energetic electron flux, in a capacitive radio-frequency argon plasma, is studied using a one-dimensional particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo collisions model. The input power of the electron beam is as small as several tens of Watts with laboratory achievable emission currents and energies. With the electron injection, the electron temperature decreases but with a significant high energy tail. The electron density, electron temperature in the sheath, and electron heating rate increase with the increasing emission energy. This is attributed to the extra heating of the energetic electrons in the EEDF tail. The non-equilibrium EEDF is obtained for strong non-local distributions of the electric field, electron heating rate, excitation, and ionization rate, indicating the discharge has transited from a volume heating (α-mode dominated) into a sheath heating (γ-mode dominated) type. In addition, the electron injection not only modifies the self-bias voltage, but also enhances the electron flux that can reach the electrodes. Moreover, the relative population of energetic electrons significantly increases with the electron injection compared to that without the electron injection, relevant for modifying the gas and surface chemistry reactions.

  1. Revisiting the beryllium bonding interactions from energetic and wavefunction perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Aiguo; Chen, Dan; Li, Rongrong

    2015-07-01

    Not too much is known about the beryllium bonding interactions. Here, the total energy partition schemes as well as DFT-SAPT are used to explore the origin and nature of the beryllium bonds from an energetic point of view. In addition, Shannon entropy and Fisher information, which are based upon the electron probability density, rather than the shape function, are adopted to dissect the impact resulted from a wavefunction perspective. Results reveal that the electrostatic potential largely causes the formation of beryllium bonds. Moreover, there are strong linear relationships between atomic Shannon entropy and Fisher information of Be atoms, which can aid to distinguish the different sources of noncovalent weak interactions.

  2. The Global Precipitation Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Scott; Kummerow, Christian

    2000-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Mission (GPM), expected to begin around 2006, is a follow-up to the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM). Unlike TRMM, which primarily samples the tropics, GPM will sample both the tropics and mid-latitudes. The primary, or core, satellite will be a single, enhanced TRMM satellite that can quantify the 3-D spatial distributions of precipitation and its associated latent heat release. The core satellite will be complemented by a constellation of very small and inexpensive drones with passive microwave instruments that will sample the rainfall with sufficient frequency to be not only of climate interest, but also have local, short-term impacts by providing global rainfall coverage at approx. 3 h intervals. The data is expected to have substantial impact upon quantitative precipitation estimation/forecasting and data assimilation into global and mesoscale numerical models. Based upon previous studies of rainfall data assimilation, GPM is expected to lead to significant improvements in forecasts of extratropical and tropical cyclones. For example, GPM rainfall data can provide improved initialization of frontal systems over the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans. The purpose of this talk is to provide information about GPM to the USWRP (U.S. Weather Research Program) community and to discuss impacts on quantitative precipitation estimation/forecasting and data assimilation.

  3. Precipitation Reconstruction (PREC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The PREC data set is an analysis of monthly precipitation constructed on a 2.5(o)lat/lon grid over the global for the period from 1948 to the present. The land...

  4. Global Positioning System (GPS) Energetic Particle Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Energetic particle data from the CXD and BDD instrument on the GPS constellation are available to the space weather research community. The release of these data...

  5. Energetic salt of trinitrophloroglucinol and melamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowden, Patrick R.; Leonard, Philip W.; Lichthardt, Joseph P.; Tappan, Bryce C.; Ramos, Kyle J.

    2017-01-01

    We hope to harness the field of energetic co-crystals for development of insensitive, high-performing explosives. As demonstrated by other groups, co-crystals of energetic materials are diverse in their resultant properties versus the native materials. Herein, we discuss the synthesis, characterization, and testing of an energetic co-crystal of trinitrophloroglucinol (1,3,5-trihydroxy-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene) and melamine. Although melamine is not an energetic material, high nitrogen content and insensitivity can be of benefit in a co-crystal. Currently, trinitrophloroglucinol (TNPG) and melamine have been found to exist as a 1:1 ionic co-crystal. Characterization by NMR, IR, small-scale sensitivity, thermal stability and powder X-ray diffraction have all been used to characterize the individual compounds as well as the co-crystals developed.

  6. Energy Harvesting from Energetic Porous Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    wafers backed with platinum are patterned into 2- mm devices with bridge wires (Fig. 1 [left]). Using a silicon nitride layer as a mask, the silicon is...ARL-TR-7719 ● JULY 2016 US Army Research Laboratory Energy Harvesting from Energetic Porous Silicon by Louis B Levine, Matthew...Harvesting from Energetic Porous Silicon by Louis B Levine Academy of Applied Science, Concord, NH Matthew H Ervin and Wayne A Churaman Sensors and

  7. Photoactive energetic materials: linear and nonlinear photochemistry of chromophore linked energetic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenfield, Margo; McGrane, Shawn; Bolme, Cindy; Chavez, David; Veauthier, Jacqueline; Hanson, Susan; Myers, Thomas; Scharff, Jason

    2015-06-01

    In general, conventional molecular explosives are white to off-white in color and only absorb ultraviolet light. A novel approach to synthetically link optically active energetic chromophores to existing molecular energetic materials has resulted in increased photoactivity in the visible (532 nm) region of the electromagnetic spectrum. Tetrazine, an energetic optically active chromophore, which absorbs around 532 nm, has been derivatized with various energetic materials including pentaeythritol tetranitrate (PETN), nitroglycerine (NG) and dinitroazetidine (DNAZ). We report the corresponding photochemistry and photochemical quantum yields of these new materials under various wavelength and intensity regimes.

  8. The Cosmic Ray Energetics And Mass Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Eun-Suk; Iss-Cream Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The balloon-borne Cosmic Ray Energetics And Mass (CREAM) experiment was flown for 161 days in six flights over Antarctica, the longest known exposure for a single balloon project. Elemental spectra were measured for Z = 1- 26 nuclei over a wide energy range from 1010 to >1014 eV. Building on the success of those balloon flights, one of the two balloon payloads was transformed for exposure on the International Space Station (ISS) Japanese Experiment Module Exposed Facility (JEM-EF). This ISS-CREAM instrument is configured with redundant and complementary particle detectors. The four layers of its finely segmented Silicon Charge Detector provide precise charge measurements, and its ionization calorimeter provides energy measurements. In addition, scintillator-based Top and Bottom Counting Detectors and the Boronated Scintillator Detector distinguish electrons from nuclei. An order of magnitude increase in data collecting power is expected to reach the highest energies practical with direct measurements. Following completion of its qualification tests at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, the ISS-CREAM payload was delivered to NASA Kennedy Space Center in August 2015 to await its launch to the ISS. While waiting for ISS-CREAM to launch, the other balloon payload including a Transition Radiation Detector, which is too large for the JEM-EF envelope, has been prepared for another Antarctic balloon flight in 2016. This so-called Boron And Carbon Cosmic rays in the Upper Stratosphere (BACCUS) payload will investigate cosmic ray propagation history. The overall project status and future plans will be presented.

  9. On the possibility of phosphenes being generated by the energetic radiation from lightning flashes and thunderstorms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooray, Vernon, E-mail: Vernon.Cooray@angstrom.uu.se [Division for Electricity, Department of Engineering Sciences, Uppsala University, Box 534, 751 21 Uppsala (Sweden); Cooray, Gerald [Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden); Dwyer, Joseph [Florida Institute of Technology, Melbourne, FL (United States)

    2011-10-03

    After the first report of this phenomenon by Apollo 11 astronauts, experiments conducted in space and on the ground confirmed the creation of phosphenes by the interaction of energetic radiation with the human visual system. The aim of this Letter is to show that the energetic radiation generated in the form of X-rays, gamma rays, electrons and neutrons by thunderstorms and lightning is strong enough for the creation of phosphenes in humans. It is also pointed out that some of the visual observations reported during thunderstorms might be attributable to phosphenes excited by this energetic radiation. -- Highlights: → Radiation in space consists of X-rays, γ-rays, protons, neutrons and electrons. → Studies of NASA confirm creation of phosphene in humans by such energetic radiation. → Energetic radiation also exists in the vicinity of thunderstorms and lightning. → It is shown that this radiation is strong enough to generate phosphene in humans. → Some of these visual experiences could be misinterpreted as ball lightning.

  10. Mapping travelling convection vortex events with respect to energetic particle boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moretto, T.; Yahnin, A.

    1998-01-01

    Thirteen events of high-latitude ionospheric travelling convection vortices during very quiet conditions were identified in the Greenland magnetometer data during 1990 and 1991. The latitudes of the vortex centres for these events are compared to the energetic electron trapping boundaries...

  11. Multi-scale modelling of Suzuki segregation in γ′ precipitates in Ni and Co-base superalloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srimannarayana P.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The high temperature strength of alloys with (γ + γ′ microstructure is primarily due to the resistance of the ordered precipitate to cutting by matrix dislocations. Such shearing requires higher stresses since it involves the creation of a planar fault. Planar fault energy is known to be dependent on composition. This implies that the composition on the fault may be different from that in the bulk for energetic reasons. Such segregation (or desegregation of specific alloying elements to the fault may result in Suzuki strengthening which has not been explored extensively in these systems. In this work, segregation (or desegregation of alloying elements to planar faults was studied computationally in Ni3(Al,Ti and Co3(W,Al type γ′ precipitates. The composition dependence of APB energy and heat of mixing were evaluated from first principle electronic structure calculations. A phase field model incorporating the first principles results, was used to simulate the motion of an extended superdislocation under stress concurrently with composition evolution. Results reveal that in both systems, significant (desegregation occurs on equilibration. On application of stress, solutes were dragged along with the APB in some cases. Additionally, it was also noted the velocity of the superdislocation under an applied stress is strongly dependent on atomic mobility (i.e. diffusivity.

  12. Energetic Limitations on Microbial Respiration of Organic Compounds using Aqueous Fe(III) Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naughton, H.; Fendorf, S. E.

    2015-12-01

    Soil organic matter constitutes up to 75% of the terrestrial carbon stock. Microorganisms mediate the breakdown of organic compounds and the return of carbon to the atmosphere, predominantly through respiration. Microbial respiration requires an electron acceptor and an electron donor such as small fatty acids, organic acids, alcohols, sugars, and other molecules that differ in oxidation state of carbon. Carbon redox state affects how much energy is required to oxidize a molecule through respiration. Therefore, different organic compounds should offer a spectrum of energies to respiring microorganisms. However, microbial respiration has traditionally focused on the availability and reduction potential of electron acceptors, ignoring the organic electron donor. We found through incubation experiments that the organic compound serving as electron donor determined how rapidly Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 respires organic substrate and the extent of reduction of the electron acceptor. We simulated a range of energetically favorable to unfavorable electron acceptors using organic chelators bound to Fe(III) with equilibrium stability constants ranging from log(K) of 11.5 to 25.0 for the 1:1 complex, where more stable complexes are less favorable for microbial respiration. Organic substrates varied in nominal oxidation state of carbon from +2 to -2. The most energetically favorable substrate, lactate, promoted up to 30x more rapid increase in percent Fe(II) compared to less favorable substrates such as formate. This increased respiration on lactate was more substantial with less stable Fe(III)-chelate complexes. Intriguingly, this pattern contradicts respiration rate predicted by nominal oxidation state of carbon. Our results suggest that organic substrates will be consumed so long as the energetic toll corresponding to the electron donor half reaction is counterbalanced by the energy available from the electron accepting half reaction. We propose using the chemical

  13. Precipitates and boundaries interaction in ferritic ODS steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sallez, Nicolas, E-mail: nicolas.sallez@simap.grenoble-inp.fr [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, SIMAP, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Hatzoglou, Constantinos [Groupe de Physique des Matériaux, Université et INSA de Rouen, UMR CNRS 6634, Normandie Université (France); Delabrouille, Fredéric [EDF–EDF R& D, Les Renardières, 77818 Moret-sur-Loing (France); Sornin, Denis; Chaffron, Laurent [CEA, DEN, Service de Recherches Métallurgiques Appliqué, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Blat-Yrieix, Martine [EDF–EDF R& D, Les Renardières, 77818 Moret-sur-Loing (France); Radiguet, Bertrand; Pareige, Philippe [Groupe de Physique des Matériaux, Université et INSA de Rouen, UMR CNRS 6634, Normandie Université (France); Donnadieu, Patricia; Bréchet, Yves [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, SIMAP, F-38000 Grenoble (France)

    2016-04-15

    In the course of a recrystallization study of Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels during extrusion, particular interest was paid to the (GB) Grain Boundaries interaction with precipitates. Complementary and corresponding characterization experiments using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Energy Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and Atom Probe Tomography (APT) have been carried out on a voluntarily interrupted extrusion or extruded samples. Microscopic observations of Precipitate Free Zones (PFZ) and precipitates alignments suggest precipitate interaction with migrating GB involving dissolution and Oswald ripening of the precipitates. This is consistent with the local chemical information gathered by EDX and APT. This original mechanism for ODS steels is similar to what had been proposed in the late 80s for similar observation made on Ti alloys reinforced by nanosized yttrium oxides: An interaction mechanism between grain boundaries and precipitates involving a diffusion controlled process of precipitates dissolution at grain boundaries. It is believed that this mechanism can be of primary importance to explain the mechanical behaviour of such steels. - Highlights: • To study the microstructural evolution of a ferritic ODS steel during its extrusion, observations have been carried on samples resulting from a voluntarily interrupted extrusion and extruded materials. • A highly heterogeneous precipitate population have been observed. Nanosized coherent precipitates (2–5 nm) on both sides of the grain boundaries despite grain boundary migration after precipitation due to further thermo-mechanical processing as well as coarse precipitates (10–40 nm) alignments are observed on the grain boundaries and within the grains, parallel to the grain boundaries. • Asymmetrical PFZs can be observed around precipitates alignments and grain boundaries. Using TEM with EDX and APT we have been able to ensure that the PFZs are chemically depleted.

  14. Airborne particle monitoring by electrostatic precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, J. C.; Stoneback, I. T.

    1977-01-01

    For qualitative analysis of atmospheric particulates by microscopy, the sampling device should preserve the particles in the state existing at the moment of capture. A collector is described that uses electrostatic precipitation to capture and disperse specimens on various substrates for direct insertion into microscopes. Sampling runs in various atmospheres are described. Micrographs are presented to show particle morphology and distribution on the substrates. Chemical identification by X-ray energy probe and electron diffraction is illustrated.

  15. Hourly Precipitation Data (HPD) Publication

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Hourly Precipitation Data (HPD) Publication is archived and available from the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC). This publication contains hourly precipitation...

  16. Jupiter's distant magnetic equator region in energetic charged particle data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paranicas, C.; Mauk, B.; Haggerty, D. K.; Clark, G. B.; Kollmann, P.; Rymer, A. M.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Bagenal, F.; Bolton, S. J.; Levin, S.

    2016-12-01

    The Juno spacecraft entered Jupiter orbit in July 2016. The first two orbits are unique, lasting 53.5 days each. Subsequent planned orbits are 14 days long. The large orbits have their apoapses close to the Jovian spin equator whereas in the later, shorter orbits, the apoapses move south away from it. The Jupiter Energetic Particle Detector Instrument (JEDI) Investigation on Juno measures ions and electrons in the tens of keV to tens of MeV energy range. JEDI is three separate instruments each with a fan of detectors. Two of the JEDI's are mounted with all their fields-of-view nearly perpendicular to the spacecraft spin axis. The third JEDI is mounted so that the FOVs usually capture directions between those toward and those away from the sun. Together with the spin rate of 2 rpm, the instruments regularly obtain a nearly complete view of the sky. In this talk, we will present the first results of a several-day campaign that will collect data near the distant magnetic equator. Juno magnetometer data is used primarily to determine charged particle pitch angles. We will also discuss the relationship between the magnetic equator and the high latitude magnetosphere in that region. JEDI data contain good diagnostic indicators that characterize magnetospheric regions; for example, times inside and outside the magnetopause are frequently apparent in energetic electron data. The data presented here will be the first of many to characterize Jupiter's complex magnetodisk.

  17. Preliminary Breakdown: Physical Mechanisms and Potential for Energetic Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, D.; Beasley, W. H.

    2014-12-01

    Observations and analysis of the preliminary breakdown phase of virgin negative cloud-to-ground (-CG) lightning strokes will be presented. Of primary interest are the physical processes responsible for the fast electric field "characteristic" pulses that are often observed during this phase. The pulse widths of characteristic pulses are shown to occur as a superposed bimodal distribution, with the short and long modes having characteristic timescales on the order of 1 microsecond and 10 microseconds, respectively. Analysis of these pulses is based on comparison with laboratory observations of long spark discharge processes and with recently acquired high-speed video observations of a single -CG event. It will be argued that the fast electric field bimodal distribution is the result of conventional discharge processes operating in an extensive strong ambient electric field environment. An important related topic will also be discussed, where it will be argued that preliminary breakdown discharges are capable of generating energetic electrons and may therefore seed relativistic electron avalanches that go on to produce pulsed energetic photon emissions.

  18. A new class of Cu/ZnO catalysts derived from zincian georgeite precursors prepared by co-precipitation? ?Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6sc04130b Click here for additional data file.

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Paul John; Kondrat, Simon A.; Chater, Philip A.; Yeo, Ben; Shaw, Greg; LU, LI; Bartley, Jonathan Keith; Taylor, Stuart Hamilton; Spencer, Michael; Kiely, Christopher John; Kelly, Gordon; Park, Colin; Hutchings, Graham John

    2017-01-01

    Zincian georgeite, an amorphous copper-zinc hydroxycarbonate, has been prepared by co-precipitation using acetate salts and ammonium carbonate. Incorporation of zinc into the georgeite phase and mild ageing conditions inhibits crystallisation into zincian malachite or aurichalcite. This zincian georgeite precursor was used to prepare a Cu/ZnO catalyst, which exhibits a superior performance to a zincian malachite derived catalyst for methanol synthesis and the low temperature water-gas shift (...

  19. VLF emission triggering by a highly anisotropic energetic electron plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Nunn

    Full Text Available One of the objectives of the Cluster mission is to study sources of various electromagnetic waves using the four satellites. This paper describes the methods we have applied to data recorded from the STAFF spectrum analyser. This instrument provides the cross spectral matrix of three magnetic and two electric field components. This spectral matrix is analysed to determine, for each satellite, the direction of the wave normal relative to the Earth’s magnetic field as a function of frequency and of time. Due to the Cluster orbit, chorus emissions are often observed close to perigee, and the data analysis determines the direction of these waves. Three events observed during different levels of magnetic activity are reported. It is shown that the component of the Poynting vector parallel to the magnetic field changes its sense when the satellites cross the magnetic equator, which indicates that the chorus waves propagate away from the equator. Detailed analysis indicates that the source is located in close vicinity of the plane of the geomagnetic equator.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (plasma waves and instabilities; storms and substorms; Space plasma physics (waves and instabilities

  20. Electronic State Decomposition of Energetic Materials and Model Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-17

    Rocca, and E. R. Bernstein, " Photochemistry of Sugars: Extreme Ultraviolet Photoionization of Aldoses and Ketoses," In preparation. A. Bhattacharya and...J. -W. Shin, F. Dong, J. J. Rocca, and E. R. Bernstein, " Photochemistry of Sugars: Extreme Ultraviolet Photoionization of Aldoses and Ketoses," In

  1. Locating the most energetic electrons in Cassiopeia A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grefenstette, Brian W.; Reynolds, Stephen P.; Harrison, Fiona A.

    2015-01-01

    We present deep (>2.4 Ms) observations of the Cassiopeia A supernova remnant with NuSTAR, which operates in the 3-79 keV bandpass and is the first instrument capable of spatially resolving the remnant above 15 keV. We find that the emission is not entirely dominated by the forward shock nor...

  2. Precipitation Indices Low Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Engelen, A. F. V.; Ynsen, F.; Buisman, J.; van der Schrier, G.

    2009-09-01

    Since 1995, KNMI published a series of books(1), presenting an annual reconstruction of weather and climate in the Low Countries, covering the period AD 763-present, or roughly, the last millennium. The reconstructions are based on the interpretation of documentary sources predominantly and comparison with other proxies and instrumental observations. The series also comprises a number of classifications. Amongst them annual classifications for winter and summer temperature and for winter and summer dryness-wetness. The classification of temperature have been reworked into peer reviewed (2) series (AD 1000-present) of seasonal temperatures and temperature indices, the so called LCT (Low Countries Temperature) series, now incorporated in the Millennium databases. Recently we started a study to convert the dryness-wetness classifications into a series of precipitation; the so called LCP (Low Countries Precipitation) series. A brief outline is given here of the applied methodology and preliminary results. The WMO definition for meteorological drought has been followed being that a period is called wet respectively dry when the amount of precipitation is considerable more respectively less than usual (normal). To gain a more quantitative insight for four locations, geographically spread over the Low Countries area (De Bilt, Vlissingen, Maastricht and Uccle), we analysed the statistics of daily precipitation series, covering the period 1900-present. This brought us to the following definition, valid for the Low Countries: A period is considered as (very) dry respectively (very) wet if over a continuous period of at least 60 days (~two months) cq 90 days (~three months) on at least two out of the four locations 50% less resp. 50% more than the normal amount for the location (based on the 1961-1990 normal period) has been measured. This results into the following classification into five drought classes hat could be applied to non instrumental observations: Very wet period

  3. Modeling investigation of the stability and irradiation-induced evolution of nanoscale precipitates in advanced structural materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wirth, Brian [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2015-04-08

    Materials used in extremely hostile environment such as nuclear reactors are subject to a high flux of neutron irradiation, and thus vast concentrations of vacancy and interstitial point defects are produced because of collisions of energetic neutrons with host lattice atoms. The fate of these defects depends on various reaction mechanisms which occur immediately following the displacement cascade evolution and during the longer-time kinetically dominated evolution such as annihilation, recombination, clustering or trapping at sinks of vacancies, interstitials and their clusters. The long-range diffusional transport and evolution of point defects and self-defect clusters drive a microstructural and microchemical evolution that are known to produce degradation of mechanical properties including the creep rate, yield strength, ductility, or fracture toughness, and correspondingly affect material serviceability and lifetimes in nuclear applications. Therefore, a detailed understanding of microstructural evolution in materials at different time and length scales is of significant importance. The primary objective of this work is to utilize a hierarchical computational modeling approach i) to evaluate the potential for nanoscale precipitates to enhance point defect recombination rates and thereby the self-healing ability of advanced structural materials, and ii) to evaluate the stability and irradiation-induced evolution of such nanoscale precipitates resulting from enhanced point defect transport to and annihilation at precipitate interfaces. This project will utilize, and as necessary develop, computational materials modeling techniques within a hierarchical computational modeling approach, principally including molecular dynamics, kinetic Monte Carlo and spatially-dependent cluster dynamics modeling, to identify and understand the most important physical processes relevant to promoting the “selfhealing” or radiation resistance in advanced materials containing

  4. Electron Beam Materials Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Donald E.

    2012-06-01

    In electron beam processing, a well-defined beam of relatively energetic electrons produced by a high voltage acceleration gap is used to transmit thermal energy into a material in a precise manner. This controlled deposition of heat is employed in a wide variety of industrial applications for precision cutting, drilling, and welding of materials as well as annealing, glazing, and surface hardening. This chapter will describe the equipment used and the most prominent industrial applications for this process.

  5. Metal silicides with energetic pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Anna, E.; Leggieri, G.; Luches, A.; Majni, G.; Nava, F.; Ottaviani, G.

    1986-07-01

    Samples formed of a thin metal film deposited on silicon single crystal were annealed with electron and laser (ruby and excimer) pulses over a wide range of fluences. From a comparison of the experimental results with the temperature profiles of the irradiated samples, it turns out that suicide formation starts when the metal/silicon interface reaches the lowest eutectic temperature of the binary metal/silicon system. The growth rate of reacted layers is of the order of 1 m/s.

  6. The Reactivity of Energetic Materials At Extreme Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fried, L E

    2006-10-23

    Energetic materials are unique for having a strong exothermic reactivity, which has made them desirable for both military and commercial applications. Energetic materials are commonly divided into high explosives, propellants, and pyrotechnics. We will focus on high explosive (HE) materials here, although there is a great deal of commonality between the classes of energetic materials. Although the history of HE materials is long, their condensed-phase properties are poorly understood. Understanding the condensed-phase properties of HE materials is important for determining stability and performance. Information regarding HE material properties (for example, the physical, chemical, and mechanical behaviors of the constituents in plastic-bonded explosive, or PBX, formulations) is necessary for efficiently building the next generation of explosives as the quest for more powerful energetic materials (in terms of energy per volume) moves forward. In modeling HE materials there is a need to better understand the physical, chemical, and mechanical behaviors from fundamental theoretical principles. Among the quantities of interest in plastic-bonded explosives (PBXs), for example, are thermodynamic stabilities, reaction kinetics, equilibrium transport coefficients, mechanical moduli, and interfacial properties between HE materials and the polymeric binders. These properties are needed (as functions of stress state and temperature) for the development of improved micro-mechanical models, which represent the composite at the level of grains and binder. Improved micro-mechanical models are needed to describe the responses of PBXs to dynamic stress or thermal loading, thus yielding information for use in developing continuum models. Detailed descriptions of the chemical reaction mechanisms of condensed energetic materials at high densities and temperatures are essential for understanding events that occur at the reactive front under combustion or detonation conditions. Under

  7. CHARACTERIZATION OF PRECIPITATES IN CUBIC SILICON CARBIDE IMPLANTED WITH 25Mg+ IONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Weilin; Spurgeon, Steven R.; Liu, Jia; Edwards, Danny J.; Schreiber, Daniel K.; Henager, Charles H.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Wang, Yongqiang

    2016-09-26

    The aim of this study is to characterize precipitates in Mg+ ion implanted and high-temperature annealed cubic silicon carbide using scanning transmission electron microscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy and atom probe tomography.

  8. DISSOLUTION OF LANTHANUM FLUORIDE PRECIPITATES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, B.A.

    1959-11-10

    A plutonium separatory ore concentration procedure involving the use of a fluoride type of carrier is presented. An improvement is given in the derivation step in the process for plutonium recovery by carrier precipitation of plutonium values from solution with a lanthanum fluoride carrier precipitate and subsequent derivation from the resulting plutonium bearing carrier precipitate of an aqueous acidic plutonium-containing solution. The carrier precipitate is contacted with a concentrated aqueous solution of potassium carbonate to effect dissolution therein of at least a part of the precipitate, including the plutonium values. Any remaining precipitate is separated from the resulting solution and dissolves in an aqueous solution containing at least 20% by weight of potassium carbonate. The reacting solutions are combined, and an alkali metal hydroxide added to a concentration of at least 2N to precipitate lanthanum hydroxide concomitantly carrying plutonium values.

  9. Clinical significance of precipitous labor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Shunji

    2015-03-01

    Precipitous labor is defined as expulsion of the fetus within less than 3 hours of commencement of regular contractions. We retrospectively examined our cases of precipitous labor to identify the clinical significance and perinatal outcomes following precipitous labor in singleton vertex deliveries. A retrospective population-based study was conducted comparing women with singleton precipitous labor and those with labor of normal duration. We examined the clinical characteristics and outcomes by comparing patients with precipitous labor and those with labor of normal duration in 0 and two-parous singleton pregnant women. Using a multivariate analysis, precipitous labor in nulliparous women was independently associated with teenagers (adjusted OR: 1.71, 95% CI: 0.99 - 2.95, P = 0.049), preterm delivery (adjusted OR: 1.77, 95% CI: 1.16 - 2.70, P precipitous labor was associated with hypertensive disorders in singleton vertex deliveries, it was not associated with maternal or neonatal outcomes.

  10. High-power electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Kapitsa, Petr Leonidovich

    1966-01-01

    High-Power Electronics, Volume 2 presents the electronic processes in devices of the magnetron type and electromagnetic oscillations in different systems. This book explores the problems of electronic energetics.Organized into 11 chapters, this volume begins with an overview of the motion of electrons in a flat model of the magnetron, taking into account the in-phase wave and the reverse wave. This text then examines the processes of transmission of electromagnetic waves of various polarization and the wave reflection from grids made of periodically distributed infinite metal conductors. Other

  11. Magnetospheric particle precipitation at Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, Emilie; Esposito, Larry; Crary, Frank; Wahlund, Jan-Erik

    2017-04-01

    Although solar XUV radiation is known to be the main source of ionization in Titan's upper atmosphere around 1100 km of altitude, magnetospheric particle precipitation can also account for about 10% of the ionization process. Magnetospheric particle precipitation is expected to be the most intense on the nightside of the satelllite and when Titan's orbital position around Saturn is the closest to Noon Saturn Local Time (SLT). In addition, on several occasion throughout the Cassini mission, Titan has been observed while in the magnetosheath. We are reporting here Ultraviolet (UV) observations of Titan airglow enhancements correlated to these magnetospheric changing conditions occurring while the spacecraft, and thus Titan, are known to have crossed Saturn's magnetopause and have been exposed to the magnetosheath environnment. Using Cassini-Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) observations of Titan around 12PM SLT as our primary set of data, we present evidence of Titan's upper atmosphere response to a fluctuating magnetospheric environment. Pattern recognition software based on 2D UVIS detector images has been used to retrieve observations of interest, looking for airglow enhancement of a factor of 2. A 2D UVIS detector image, created for each UVIS observation of Titan, displays the spatial dimension of the UVIS slit on the x-axis and the time on the y-axis. In addition, data from the T32 flyby and from April 17, 2005 from in-situ Cassini instruments are used. Correlations with data from simultaneous observations of in-situ Cassini instruments (CAPS, RPWS and MIMI) has been possible on few occasions and events such as electron burst and reconnections can be associated with unusual behaviors of the Titan airglow. CAPS in-situ measurements acquired during the T32 flyby are consistent with an electron burst observed at the spacecraft as the cause of the UV emission. Moreover, on April 17, 2005 the UVIS observation displays feature similar to what could be a

  12. High performance multicrystalline silicon: Grain structure and iron precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autruffe, Antoine; M'hamdi, Mohammed; Schindler, Florian; Heinz, Friedemann D.; Ekstrøm, Kai Erik; Schubert, Martin C.; Di Sabatino, Marisa; Stokkan, Gaute

    2017-10-01

    A study of the spatial occurrence of iron precipitation in a high performance multicrystalline silicon (HPMC-Si) sample is presented. The separated effects of grain-boundaries, sparse intra-granular dislocations, and dislocation clusters are investigated by combining the Fei imaging method with glow discharge mass spectroscopy, electron backscatter diffraction, and two iron precipitation models. While the area-averaged precipitation at grain boundaries is relatively minor, almost the whole iron precipitation occurs within the grains, despite the very low intra-granular dislocation density. The fraction of non-precipitated iron in the studied HPMC-Si material was found to be one to two orders of magnitude higher than that reported previously for standard materials.

  13. Heat flows and energetic behavior of a telecommunication radio base station

    CERN Document Server

    Petraglia, Antonio; Vetromile, Carmela; D'Onofrio, Antonio; Lubritto, Carmine

    2015-01-01

    This paper shows a study on energetic consumption of BTSs (Base Transceiver Stations) for mobile communication, related to conditioning functions. An energetic "thermal model" of a telecommunication station is proposed and studied. The results have been validated with a BTS in central Italy, showing good agreement. Findings show a substantial high internal-external temperature difference in the containing shelter, particularly during daytime and warm months, due to sources of heat (equipment, external temperature and sun radiation) and to the difficulty in spread the warmth out. The necessity to keep the operating temperatures within a given range for the correct functioning of the electronic equipment requires the use of conditioning setups, and this significantly increases the energetic demand of the whole system. The analysis of thermal flows across the shelter can help to gather further data on its temperature behavior and to devise practical measures to lower the power demand, while keeping the operating...

  14. Proceedings of the 6th IAEA Technical Committee meeting on energetic particles in magnetic confinement systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    The sixth IAEA Technical Committee Meeting was organized by Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. It was held at Naka, JAERI during October 12-14, 1999. The previous meetings of this series, formerly entitled 'Alpha Particles in Fusion Research', were held biennially in Kiev (1989), Aspenas (1991), Trieste (1993), Princeton (1995), and Abingdon (1997). The scope of the meeting covered theoretical and experimental work on alpha particle physics, transport of energetic particles, effects of energetic particles on fusion plasma, related collective phenomena, runaway electrons in disruption and diagnostics on energetic particles. The TCM was attended by over 60 participants. Twenty seven papers were presented orally and 19 papers as posters. This proceedings include 37 contributed papers in the meeting. (J.P.N.)

  15. A diagnostic study of monsoon energetics for two contrasting years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishna, S. S. V. S.; Brahmananda Rao, V.; Sravani, A.; Vijaya Saradhi, N.; Harikishan, G.

    2010-12-01

    In the present study we made an attempt to explain the behavior of the southwest monsoon for two contrasting years, from the view point of energetics. As a test case we selected 2002 and 2003, which were weak and strong monsoon years, respectively, based on rainfall. The energy terms Kψ, Kχ and APE and the conversion terms f∇ψ. ∇χ, -ω'T' are calculated at 850 hPa level and also vertically integrated from 1000 hPa to 100 hPa. The results indicate that, the year of high energy (both KΨ, Kχ) i.e. 2002, does not give a good amount of rainfall compared to the good year i.e. 2003. The break period during the year 2002 has been clearly explained using the block diagrams. Periods of highest rainfall coincide with the positive conversions of f∇ψ. ∇χ and -ω'T'. Vertically integrated moisture fluxes during the break period of 2002, 2003 are also analyzed. The main reservoirs (sources and sinks) for the monsoon energy are also identified using block diagrams. Negative correlation between daily rainfall and energy terms in the year 2002 indicates its unusual behavior both in terms of energetics as well as precipitation. Positive correlations in the year 2003 represent strong monsoonal behavior. We calculated the climatology of the total kinetic energy at 850 hPa, vertically integrated (1000-100 hPa) for 30 years (1980-2009) and rainfall for 103 years (1901-2003) which clearly indicates that the monsoon is indeed a season of high energy for the South Asian region. Also the east- west direct thermal circulations are strongly related to the good and bad monsoon years.

  16. A diagnostic study of monsoon energetics for two contrasting years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. V. S. Ramakrishna

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present study we made an attempt to explain the behavior of the southwest monsoon for two contrasting years, from the view point of energetics. As a test case we selected 2002 and 2003, which were weak and strong monsoon years, respectively, based on rainfall. The energy terms Kψ, Kχ and APE and the conversion terms f∇ψ. ∇χ, −ω'T' are calculated at 850 hPa level and also vertically integrated from 1000 hPa to 100 hPa. The results indicate that, the year of high energy (both KΨ, Kχ i.e. 2002, does not give a good amount of rainfall compared to the good year i.e. 2003. The break period during the year 2002 has been clearly explained using the block diagrams. Periods of highest rainfall coincide with the positive conversions of f∇ψ. ∇χ and −ω'T'. Vertically integrated moisture fluxes during the break period of 2002, 2003 are also analyzed. The main reservoirs (sources and sinks for the monsoon energy are also identified using block diagrams. Negative correlation between daily rainfall and energy terms in the year 2002 indicates its unusual behavior both in terms of energetics as well as precipitation. Positive correlations in the year 2003 represent strong monsoonal behavior. We calculated the climatology of the total kinetic energy at 850 hPa, vertically integrated (1000–100 hPa for 30 years (1980–2009 and rainfall for 103 years (1901–2003 which clearly indicates that the monsoon is indeed a season of high energy for the South Asian region. Also the east- west direct thermal circulations are strongly related to the good and bad monsoon years.

  17. The "Puck" Energetic Charged Particle Detector: Design, Heritage, and Advancements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, G.; Cohen, I.; Westlake, J. H.; Andrews, G. B.; Brandt, P.; Gold, R. E.; Gkioulidou, M. A.; Hacala, R.; Haggerty, D.; Hill, M. E.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Energetic charged particle detectors characterize a portion of the plasma distribution function that plays critical roles in some physical processes, from carrying the currents in planetary ring currents to weathering the surfaces of planetary objects. For several low-resource missions in the past, the need was recognized for a low-resource but highly capable, mass-species-discriminating energetic particle sensor that could also obtain angular distributions without motors or mechanical articulation. This need led to the development of a compact Energetic Particle Detector (EPD), known as the "Puck" EPD (short for hockey puck), that is capable of determining the flux, angular distribution, and composition of incident ions between an energy range of approximately 10 kiloelectronvolts to several megaelectronvolts. This sensor makes simultaneous angular measurements of electron fluxes from the tens of kiloelectronvolts to about 1 megaelectronvolt. The same measurements can be extended down to approximately 1 kiloelectronvolt per nucleon,with some composition ambiguity. These sensors have a proven flight heritage record that includes missions such as MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) and New Horizons, with multiple sensors on each of Juno, Van Allen Probes, and Magnetospheric Multiscale. In this review paper we discuss the Puck EPD design, its heritage, unexpected results from these past missions and future advancements. We also discuss high-voltage anomalies that are thought to be associated with the use of curved foils, which is a new foil manufacturing processes utilized on recent Puck EPD designs. Finally, we discuss the important role Puck EPDs can potentially play in upcoming missions.

  18. Reapplication of energetic materials at fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baxter, L.; Sinquefield, S.; Huey, S.; Lipkin, J.; Shah, D.; Ross, J.; Sclippa, G. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Davis, K. [Reaction Engineering Internaional, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    1995-05-01

    This investigation addresses the combustion-related aspects of the reapplication of energetic materials as fuels in boilers as an economically viable and environmentally acceptable use of excess energetic materials. The economics of this approach indicate that the revenues from power generation and chemical recovery approximately equal the costs of boiler modification and changes in operation. The primary tradeoff is the cost of desensitizing the fuels against the cost of open burn/open detonation (OB/OD) or other disposal techniques. Two principal combustion-related obstacles to the use of energetic-material-derived fuels are NO{sub x} generation and the behavior of metals. NO{sub x} measurements obtained in this investigation indicate that the nitrated components (nitrocellulose, nitroglycerin, etc.) of energetic materials decompose with NO{sub x} as the primary product. This can lead to high uncontrolled NO{sub x} levels (as high as 2600 ppM on a 3% O{sub 2} basis for a 5% blend of energetic material in the fuel). NO{sub x} levels are sensitive to local stoichiometry and temperature. The observed trends resemble those common during the combustion of other nitrogen containing fuels. Implications for NO{sub x} control strategies are discussed. The behavior of inorganic components in energetic materials tested in this investigation could lead to boiler maintenance problems such as deposition, grate failure, and bed agglomeration. The root cause of the problem is the potentially extreme temperature generated during metal combustion. Implications for furnace selection and operation are discussed.

  19. The Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) Combined Precipitation Dataset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, George J.; Adler, Robert F.; Arkin, Philip; Chang, Alfred; Ferraro, Ralph; Gruber, Arnold; Janowiak, John; McNab, Alan; Rudolf, Bruno; Schneider, Udo

    1997-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) has released the GPCP Version 1 Combined Precipitation Data Set, a global, monthly precipitation dataset covering the period July 1987 through December 1995. The primary product in the dataset is a merged analysis incorporating precipitation estimates from low-orbit-satellite microwave data, geosynchronous-orbit -satellite infrared data, and rain gauge observations. The dataset also contains the individual input fields, a combination of the microwave and infrared satellite estimates, and error estimates for each field. The data are provided on 2.5 deg x 2.5 deg latitude-longitude global grids. Preliminary analyses show general agreement with prior studies of global precipitation and extends prior studies of El Nino-Southern Oscillation precipitation patterns. At the regional scale there are systematic differences with standard climatologies.

  20. NANOSTRUCTURE PATTERNING UNDER ENERGETIC PARTICLE BEAM IRRADIATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lumin [Regents of the University of Michigan; Lu, Wei [Regents of the University of Michigan

    2013-01-31

    Energetic ion bombardment can lead to the development of complex and diverse nanostructures on or beneath the material surface through induced self-organization processes. These self-organized structures have received particular interest recently as promising candidates as simple, inexpensive, and large area patterns, whose optical, electronic and magnetic properties are different from those in the bulk materials [1-5]. Compared to the low mass efficiency production rate of lithographic methods, these self-organized approaches display new routes for the fabrication of nanostructures over large areas in a short processing time at the nanoscale, beyond the limits of lithography [1,4]. Although it is believed that surface nanostructure formation is based on the morphological instability of the sputtered surface, driven by a kinetic balance between roughening and smoothing actions [6,7], the fundamental mechanisms and experimental conditions for the formation of these nanostructures has still not been well established, the formation of the 3-D naopatterns beneath the irradiated surface especially needs more exploration. During the last funding period, we have focused our efforts on irradiation-induced nanostructures in a broad range of materials. These structures have been studied primarily through in situ electron microscopy during electron or ion irradiation. In particular, we have performed studies on 3-D void/bubble lattices (in metals and CaF2), embedded sponge-like porous structure with uniform nanofibers in irradiated semiconductors (Ge, GaSb, and InSb), 2-D highly ordered pattern of nanodroplets (on the surface of GaAs), hexagonally ordered nanoholes (on the surface of Ge), and 1-D highly ordered ripple and periodic arrays (of Cu nanoparticles) [3,8-11]. The amazing common feature in those nanopatterns is the uniformity of the size of nanoelements (nanoripples, nanodots, nanovoids or nanofibers) and the distance separating them. Our research focuses on the

  1. On the Connection Between Microbursts and Nonlinear Electronic Structures in Planetary Radiation Belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osmane, Adnane; Wilson, Lynn B., III; Blum, Lauren; Pulkkinen, Tuija I.

    2016-01-01

    Using a dynamical-system approach, we have investigated the efficiency of large-amplitude whistler waves for causing microburst precipitation in planetary radiation belts by modeling the microburst energy and particle fluxes produced as a result of nonlinear wave-particle interactions. We show that wave parameters, consistent with large amplitude oblique whistlers, can commonly generate microbursts of electrons with hundreds of keV-energies as a result of Landau trapping. Relativistic microbursts (greater than 1 MeV) can also be generated by a similar mechanism, but require waves with large propagation angles Theta (sub k)B greater than 50 degrees and phase-speeds v(sub phi) greater than or equal to c/9. Using our result for precipitating density and energy fluxes, we argue that holes in the distribution function of electrons near the magnetic mirror point can result in the generation of double layers and electron solitary holes consistent in scales (of the order of Debye lengths) to nonlinear structures observed in the radiation belts by the Van Allen Probes. Our results indicate a relationship between nonlinear electrostatic and electromagnetic structures in the dynamics of planetary radiation belts and their role in the cyclical production of energetic electrons (E greater than or equal to 100 keV) on kinetic timescales, which is much faster than previously inferred.

  2. ISLSCP II Global Precipitation Climatology Centre (GPCC) Monthly Precipitation

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: The Global Precipitation Climatology Centre (GPCC), which is operated by the Deutscher Wetterdienst (National Meteorological Service of Germany), is a...

  3. ISLSCP II Global Precipitation Climatology Centre (GPCC) Monthly Precipitation

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Global Precipitation Climatology Centre (GPCC), which is operated by the Deutscher Wetterdienst (National Meteorological Service of Germany), is a component of...

  4. Prediction of Solar Energetic Particle Trapping in the Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, M.; Larsen, B. A.

    2012-12-01

    Solar energetic particles (SEPs) are protons, electrons, and heavy ions emitted from the Sun with energies spanning tens of keV to GeV. They are episodic and associated with energetic events at the Sun such as coronal mass ejections. Importantly, they can be injected into and trapped by the Earth's magnetosphere, forming transient new, intense radiation belts in the L=3 to L=4 range. These belts can severely damage components of our space infrastructure and cause significant backgrounds in instruments on national security and scientific payloads. The main questions we address here are, what is the difference between an event which causes a new belt to form and one that doesn't? And is the formation of new belts predictable in any way? Using both POES and ACE data we examine the overall likelihood of an event becoming trapped and relate it to various parameters from the data. Here we discuss the trapping criteria used and the categorization of each event, along with the parameters that were compared and their significance. And finally we provide a probabilistic measure of the trapping likelihood of a given event, thus answering, at least in part, our questions.

  5. On the complex conductivity signatures of calcite precipitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Yuxin; Hubbard, Susan; Williams, Kenneth Hurst; Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan

    2009-11-01

    Calcite is a mineral phase that frequently precipitates during subsurface remediation or geotechnical engineering processes. This precipitation can lead to changes in the overall behavior of the system, such as flow alternation and soil strengthening. Because induced calcite precipitation is typically quite variable in space and time, monitoring its distribution in the subsurface is a challenge. In this research, we conducted a laboratory column experiment to investigate the potential of complex conductivity as a mean to remotely monitor calcite precipitation. Calcite precipitation was induced in a glass bead (3 mm) packed column through abiotic mixing of CaCl{sub 2} and Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} solutions. The experiment continued for 12 days with a constant precipitation rate of {approx}0.6 milimole/d. Visual observations and scanning electron microscopy imaging revealed two distinct phases of precipitation: an earlier phase dominated by well distributed, discrete precipitates and a later phase characterized by localized precipitate aggregation and associated pore clogging. Complex conductivity measurements exhibited polarization signals that were characteristic of both phases of calcite precipitation, with the precipitation volume and crystal size controlling the overall polarization magnitude and relaxation time constant. We attribute the observed responses to polarization at the electrical double layer surrounding calcite crystals. Our experiment illustrates the potential of electrical methods for characterizing the distribution and aggregation state of nonconductive minerals like calcite. Advancing our ability to quantify geochemical transformations using such noninvasive methods is expected to facilitate our understanding of complex processes associated with natural subsurface systems as well as processes induced through engineered treatments (such as environmental remediation and carbon sequestration).

  6. Precipitation-Based ENSO Indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Robert; Curtis, Scott

    1998-01-01

    In this study gridded observed precipitation data sets are used to construct rainfall-based ENSO indices. The monthly El Nino and La Nina Indices (EI and LI) measure the steepest zonal gradient of precipitation anomalies between the equatorial Pacific and the Maritime Continent. This is accomplished by spatially averaging precipitation anomalies using a spatial boxcar filter, finding the maximum and minimum averages within a Pacific and Maritime Continent domain for each month, and taking differences. EI and LI can be examined separately or combined to produce one ENSO Precipitation Index (ESPI). ESPI is well correlated with traditional sea surface temperature and pressure indices, leading Nino 3.4. One advantage precipitation indices have over more conventional indices, is describing the strength and position of the Walker circulation. Examples are given of tracking the impact of ENSO events on the tropical precipitation fields.

  7. Energetic materials standards – Chemical compatibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuukkanen, I.M.; Bouma, R.H.B.

    2014-01-01

    Subgroup A Energetic Materials Team, SG/A (EMT), develops and maintains standards that are relevant to all life-cycle phases of ammunition/weapon systems. STANAG 4147 is the standard regarding chemical compatibility of explosives with munition components, and is a document of prime importance.

  8. Error propagation in energetic carrying capacity models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearse, Aaron T.; Stafford, Joshua D.

    2014-01-01

    Conservation objectives derived from carrying capacity models have been used to inform management of landscapes for wildlife populations. Energetic carrying capacity models are particularly useful in conservation planning for wildlife; these models use estimates of food abundance and energetic requirements of wildlife to target conservation actions. We provide a general method for incorporating a foraging threshold (i.e., density of food at which foraging becomes unprofitable) when estimating food availability with energetic carrying capacity models. We use a hypothetical example to describe how past methods for adjustment of foraging thresholds biased results of energetic carrying capacity models in certain instances. Adjusting foraging thresholds at the patch level of the species of interest provides results consistent with ecological foraging theory. Presentation of two case studies suggest variation in bias which, in certain instances, created large errors in conservation objectives and may have led to inefficient allocation of limited resources. Our results also illustrate how small errors or biases in application of input parameters, when extrapolated to large spatial extents, propagate errors in conservation planning and can have negative implications for target populations.

  9. Estimating Instantaneous Energetic Cost During Gait Adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-31

    energetic penalties imposed by various gait disabilities, and the 30   evaluation of the effectiveness of rehabilitation interventions at mitigating...of level walking with powered ankle 410   exoskeletons . Journal of Experimental Biology 211: 1402–1413, 2008. 411   25. Schmalz T, Blumentritt S

  10. Energetic utilization of dietary fiber in pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijnen, M.M.J.A.

    2003-01-01

    The energetic utilization of fermentable dietary fiber (fDF) of different fiber sources and its relation to physical activity and housing conditions was studied in three experiments. In all experiments the daily intake of digestible nutrients, nitrogen and energy balances, heat production, and

  11. Energetic particle instabilities in fusion plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sharapov, S. E.; Alper, B.; Berk, H. L.; Borba, D. N.; Breizman, B. N.; Challis, C. D.; Classen, I.G.J.; Edlund, E. M.; Eriksson, J.; Fasoli, A.; Fredrickson, E. D.; Fu, G. Y.; M. García-Muñoz,; Gassner, T.; Ghantous, K.; Goloborodko, V.; Gorelenkov, N. N.; Gryaznevich, M. P.; Hacquin, S.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Hellesen, C.; Kiptily, V. G.; Kramer, G. J.; Lauber, P.; Lilley, M. K.; Lisak, M.; Nabais, F.; Nazikian, R.; Nyqvist, R.; Osakabe, M.; C. Perez von Thun,; Pinches, S. D.; Podesta, M.; Porkolab, M.; Shinohara, K.; Schoepf, K.; Todo, Y.; Toi, K.; VanZeeland, M. A.; Voitsekhovich, I.; White, R. B.; Yavorskij, V.; ITPA EP TG Contributors,; JET-EFDA Contributors,

    2013-01-01

    Remarkable progress has been made in diagnosing energetic particle instabilities on present-day machines and in establishing a theoretical framework for describing them. This overview describes the much improved diagnostics of Alfvén instabilities and modelling tools developed world-wide, and

  12. Electrical operation of electrostatic precipitators

    CERN Document Server

    Parker, Ken

    2003-01-01

    The electrostatic precipitator remains on of the most cost effective means of controlling the emission of particulates from most industrial processes. This book will be of interest to both users and suppliers of electrostatic precipitators as well as advanced students on environmental based courses. The author identifies the physical and engineering basis for the development of electrical equipment for electrostatic precipitators and thoroughly explores the technological factors which optimize the efficiency of the precipitator and hence minimize emissions, as well as future developments in th

  13. Precipitation Measurement Missions Data Access

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) data products are currently available from 1998 to the present. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission data...

  14. Measuring precipitation with a geolysimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Craig D.; van der Kamp, Garth; Arnold, Lauren; Schmidt, Randy

    2017-10-01

    Using the relationship between measured groundwater pressures in deep observation wells and total surface loading, a geological weighing lysimeter (geolysimeter) has the capability of measuring precipitation event totals independently of conventional precipitation gauge observations. Correlations between groundwater pressure change and event precipitation were observed at a co-located site near Duck Lake, SK, over a multi-year and multi-season period. Correlation coefficients (r2) varied from 0.99 for rainfall to 0.94 for snowfall. The geolysimeter was shown to underestimate rainfall by 7 % while overestimating snowfall by 9 % as compared to the unadjusted gauge precipitation. It is speculated that the underestimation of rainfall is due to unmeasured run-off and evapotranspiration within the response area of the geolysimeter during larger rainfall events, while the overestimation of snow is at least partially due to the systematic undercatch common to most precipitation gauges due to wind. Using recently developed transfer functions from the World Meteorological Organization's (WMO) Solid Precipitation Intercomparison Experiment (SPICE), bias adjustments were applied to the Alter-shielded, Geonor T-200B precipitation gauge measurements of snowfall to mitigate wind-induced errors. The bias between the gauge and geolysimeter measurements was reduced to 3 %. This suggests that the geolysimeter is capable of accurately measuring solid precipitation and can be used as an independent and representative reference of true precipitation.

  15. Measuring precipitation with a geolysimeter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. D. Smith

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Using the relationship between measured groundwater pressures in deep observation wells and total surface loading, a geological weighing lysimeter (geolysimeter has the capability of measuring precipitation event totals independently of conventional precipitation gauge observations. Correlations between groundwater pressure change and event precipitation were observed at a co-located site near Duck Lake, SK, over a multi-year and multi-season period. Correlation coefficients (r2 varied from 0.99 for rainfall to 0.94 for snowfall. The geolysimeter was shown to underestimate rainfall by 7 % while overestimating snowfall by 9 % as compared to the unadjusted gauge precipitation. It is speculated that the underestimation of rainfall is due to unmeasured run-off and evapotranspiration within the response area of the geolysimeter during larger rainfall events, while the overestimation of snow is at least partially due to the systematic undercatch common to most precipitation gauges due to wind. Using recently developed transfer functions from the World Meteorological Organization's (WMO Solid Precipitation Intercomparison Experiment (SPICE, bias adjustments were applied to the Alter-shielded, Geonor T-200B precipitation gauge measurements of snowfall to mitigate wind-induced errors. The bias between the gauge and geolysimeter measurements was reduced to 3 %. This suggests that the geolysimeter is capable of accurately measuring solid precipitation and can be used as an independent and representative reference of true precipitation.

  16. Final Report: "Energetics of Nanomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navrotsky, Alexandra [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Ross, Nancy [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Woodfield, Brian [Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States)

    2015-02-14

    Nanomaterials, solids with very small particle size, form the basis of new technologies that are revolutionizing fields such as energy, lighting, electronics, medical diagnostics, and drug delivery. These nanoparticles are different from conventional bulk materials in many ways we do not yet fully understand. This project focused on their structure and thermodynamics and emphasized the role of water in nanoparticle surfaces. Using a unique and synergistic combination of high-tech techniques—namely oxide melt solution calorimetry, cryogenic heat capacity measurements, and inelastic neutron scattering—this work has identified differences in structure, thermodynamic stability, and water behavior on nanoparticles as a function of composition and particle size. The systematics obtained increase the fundamental understanding needed to synthesize, retain, and apply these technologically important nanomaterials and to predict and tailor new materials for enhanced functionality, eventually leading to a more sustainable way of life. Highlights are reported on the following topics: surface energies, thermochemistry of nanoparticles, and changes in stability at the nanoscale; heat capacity models and the gapped phonon spectrum; control of pore structure, acid sites, and thermal stability in synthetic γ-aluminas; the lattice contribution is the same for bulk and nanomaterials; and inelastic neutron scattering studies of water on nanoparticle surfaces.

  17. Ultrastructure study of hydroxyapatite precipitation on ceramic surfaces in dog model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xin Renlong [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Hong Kong (China); Leng Yang [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Hong Kong (China)], E-mail: meleng@ust.hk; Wang Ning [Department of Physics, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Hong Kong (China)

    2008-12-01

    Calcium phosphate (Ca-P) minerals were precipitated on porous alpha-tricalcium phosphate ({alpha}-TCP) after implantation in dog muscles for four weeks. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) examinations indicated that the Ca-P precipitates exhibited flattened-hexagonal rod shapes. Electron diffraction revealed that the rod-like precipitates were hydroxyapatite (HA) elongated in the c-axis. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) was used to analyze the ultrastructures of the precipitates. We found the evidence of octacalcium phosphate (OCP) structure embedding in a few rod-like HA precipitates. The orientation relationship of OCP/HA revealed in the precipitates was consistent with observations of the solid-state OCP/HA transformation in synthetic specimens, i.e., OCP (010)//HA (01-bar 0) and OCP (001)//HA (001-bar )

  18. Integrated Science Investigation of the Sun (ISIS): Design of the Energetic Particle Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McComas, D. J.; Alexander, N.; Angold, N.; Bale, S.; Beebe, C.; Birdwell, B.; Boyle, M.; Burgum, J. M.; Burnham, J. A.; Christian, E. R.; Cook, W. R.; Cooper, S. A.; Cummings, A. C.; Davis, A. J.; Desai, M. I.; Dickinson, J.; Dirks, G.; Do, D. H.; Fox, N.; Giacalone, J.; Gold, R. E.; Gurnee, R. S.; Hayes, J. R.; Hill, M. E.; Kasper, J. C.; Kecman, B.; Klemic, J.; Krimigis, S. M.; Labrador, A. W.; Layman, R. S.; Leske, R. A.; Livi, S.; Matthaeus, W. H.; McNutt, R. L.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Mitchell, D. G.; Nelson, K. S.; Parker, C.; Rankin, J. S.; Roelof, E. C.; Schwadron, N. A.; Seifert, H.; Shuman, S.; Stokes, M. R.; Stone, E. C.; Vandegriff, J. D.; Velli, M.; von Rosenvinge, T. T.; Weidner, S. E.; Wiedenbeck, M. E.; Wilson, P.

    2016-12-01

    The Integrated Science Investigation of the Sun (ISIS) is a complete science investigation on the Solar Probe Plus (SPP) mission, which flies to within nine solar radii of the Sun's surface. ISIS comprises a two-instrument suite to measure energetic particles over a very broad energy range, as well as coordinated management, science operations, data processing, and scientific analysis. Together, ISIS observations allow us to explore the mechanisms of energetic particles dynamics, including their: (1) Origins—defining the seed populations and physical conditions necessary for energetic particle acceleration; (2) Acceleration—determining the roles of shocks, reconnection, waves, and turbulence in accelerating energetic particles; and (3) Transport—revealing how energetic particles propagate from the corona out into the heliosphere. The two ISIS Energetic Particle Instruments measure lower (EPI-Lo) and higher (EPI-Hi) energy particles. EPI-Lo measures ions and ion composition from ˜20 keV/nucleon-15 MeV total energy and electrons from ˜25-1000 keV. EPI-Hi measures ions from ˜1-200 MeV/nucleon and electrons from ˜0.5-6 MeV. EPI-Lo comprises 80 tiny apertures with fields-of-view (FOVs) that sample over nearly a complete hemisphere, while EPI-Hi combines three telescopes that together provide five large-FOV apertures. ISIS observes continuously inside of 0.25 AU with a high data collection rate and burst data (EPI-Lo) coordinated with the rest of the SPP payload; outside of 0.25 AU, ISIS runs in low-rate science mode whenever feasible to capture as complete a record as possible of the solar energetic particle environment and provide calibration and continuity for measurements closer in to the Sun. The ISIS Science Operations Center plans and executes commanding, receives and analyzes all ISIS data, and coordinates science observations and analyses with the rest of the SPP science investigations. Together, ISIS' unique observations on SPP will enable the

  19. Rising Precipitation Extremes across Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramchandra Karki

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available As a mountainous country, Nepal is most susceptible to precipitation extremes and related hazards, including severe floods, landslides and droughts that cause huge losses of life and property, impact the Himalayan environment, and hinder the socioeconomic development of the country. Given that the countrywide assessment of such extremes is still lacking, we present a comprehensive picture of prevailing precipitation extremes observed across Nepal. First, we present the spatial distribution of daily extreme precipitation indices as defined by the Expert Team on Climate Change Detection, Monitoring and Indices (ETCCDMI from 210 stations over the period of 1981–2010. Then, we analyze the temporal changes in the computed extremes from 76 stations, featuring long-term continuous records for the period of 1970–2012, by applying a non-parametric Mann−Kendall test to identify the existence of a trend and Sen’s slope method to calculate the true magnitude of this trend. Further, the local trends in precipitation extremes have been tested for their field significance over the distinct physio-geographical regions of Nepal, such as the lowlands, middle mountains and hills and high mountains in the west (WL, WM and WH, respectively, and likewise, in central (CL, CM and CH and eastern (EL, EM and EH Nepal. Our results suggest that the spatial patterns of high-intensity precipitation extremes are quite different to that of annual or monsoonal precipitation. Lowlands (Terai and Siwaliks that feature relatively low precipitation and less wet days (rainy days are exposed to high-intensity precipitation extremes. Our trend analysis suggests that the pre-monsoonal precipitation is significantly increasing over the lowlands and CH, while monsoonal precipitation is increasing in WM and CH and decreasing in CM, CL and EL. On the other hand, post-monsoonal precipitation is significantly decreasing across all of Nepal while winter precipitation is decreasing

  20. Energetic Particle Loss Estimates in W7-X

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazerson, Samuel; Akaslompolo, Simppa; Drevlak, Micheal; Wolf, Robert; Darrow, Douglass; Gates, David; W7-X Team

    2017-10-01

    The collisionless loss of high energy H+ and D+ ions in the W7-X device are examined using the BEAMS3D code. Simulations of collisionless losses are performed for a large ensemble of particles distributed over various flux surfaces. A clear loss cone of particles is present in the distribution for all particles. These simulations are compared against slowing down simulations in which electron impact, ion impact, and pitch angle scattering are considered. Full device simulations allow tracing of particle trajectories to the first wall components. These simulations provide estimates for placement of a novel set of energetic particle detectors. Recent performance upgrades to the code are allowing simulations with > 1000 processors providing high fidelity simulations. Speedup and future works are discussed. DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  1. Chemical Dynamics, Molecular Energetics, and Kinetics at the Synchrotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leone, Stephen R.; Ahmed, Musahid; Wilson, Kevin R.

    2010-03-14

    Scientists at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline of the Advanced Light Source in Berkeley are continuously reinventing synchrotron investigations of physical chemistry and chemical physics with vacuum ultraviolet light. One of the unique aspects of a synchrotron for chemical physics research is the widely tunable vacuum ultraviolet light that permits threshold ionization of large molecules with minimal fragmentation. This provides novel opportunities to assess molecular energetics and reaction mechanisms, even beyond simple gas phase molecules. In this perspective, significant new directions utilizing the capabilities at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline are presented, along with an outlook for future synchrotron and free electron laser science in chemical dynamics. Among the established and emerging fields of investigations are cluster and biological molecule spectroscopy and structure, combustion flame chemistry mechanisms, radical kinetics and product isomer dynamics, aerosol heterogeneous chemistry, planetary and interstellar chemistry, and secondary neutral ion-beam desorption imaging of biological matter and materials chemistry.

  2. Multipoint Observations of Energetic Particle Injections and Substorm Activity During a Conjunction Between Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) and Van Allen Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, D. L.; Fennell, J. F.; Blake, J. B.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Clemmons, J. H.; Jaynes, A. N.; Leonard, T.; Baker, D. N.; Cohen, I. J.; Gkioulidou, M.; Ukhorskiy, A. Y.; Mauk, B. H.; Gabrielse, C.; Angelopoulos, V.; Strangeway, R. J.; Kletzing, C. A.; Le Contel, O.; Spence, H. E.; Torbert, R. B.; Burch, J. L.; Reeves, G. D.

    2017-11-01

    This study examines multipoint observations during a conjunction between Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) and Van Allen Probes on 7 April 2016 in which a series of energetic particle injections occurred. With complementary data from Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms, Geotail, and Los Alamos National Laboratory spacecraft in geosynchronous orbit (16 spacecraft in total), we develop new insights on the nature of energetic particle injections associated with substorm activity. Despite this case involving only weak substorm activity (maximum AE electron injections was observed throughout the system. Intriguingly, only one corresponding ion injection was clearly observed. All ion and electron injections were observed at electron injection. A relationship between injected electrons with energy injection boundary locations as a function of universal time, magnetic local time, and L shell. The analysis reveals that at least five electron injections, which were localized in magnetic local time, preceded a larger injection of both electrons and ions across nearly the entire nightside of the magnetosphere near geosynchronous orbit. The larger ion and electron injection did not penetrate to L electron injections penetrated to L electron versus ion injections, this event presents challenges to the current conceptual models of energetic particle injections.

  3. Observation of the Energetic Radiation Associated with Winter Lightning Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torii, T.; Sugita, T.; Muraki, Y.

    2006-12-01

    Gamma-ray dose-rate increase associated with thunderstorm activities was observed on the ground at the west coast of Japan in winter. To investigate the fluctuation profile during thunderstorms, the energetic radiation was measured by using two radiation detectors which consist of four long proportional counters (2.5 m in length; 10 cm in diameter) respectively. It was also compared with the result measured at the same time by the environmental radiation monitors adopting an NaI scintillator / ionization chamber as a detector. Moreover, the electric field was measured at the same site by using a field mill. In the observation from December, 2005 to January, 2006, the count-rate fluctuation which seem to originate from thunderstorm activity observed four times by the proportional counters. The features obtained by the measurement and the analysis of the counters are as follows: (1) It was observed that the radiation intensity began to increase from before several 10 seconds in which the radiation burst is generated. In addition, this radiation burst and a transient fluctuation of electric field showing lightning discharge were generated simultaneously. (2) The radiation fluctuation was not observed in every thunderstorm activity, even if lightning discharges were arising in the vicinity. (3) In all events that showed a count-rate increase detected by the proportional counters, the count-rate returned to former level at the same time as producing a lightning discharge. (4) From sensitivity experiments of the proportional counters by using RI radiation sources and the Monte Carlo analysis of these particle/energy response functions, the sensitivity of these counters for electrons with energy over 3 MeV has been an order of magnitude higher than that for gamma-rays. From the above mentioned results of the proportional counters and the other radiation monitors data, the transient increase of radiation is most likely caused by the incidence of the high energy electrons

  4. Energetic particle showers over Mars from comet Siding-Spring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Cano, B.; Witasse, O.; Lester, M.; Rahmati, A.; Cowley, S. W. H.; Ambrosi, R.; Costa, M.; Espley, J.; Guo, J.; Leblanc, F.; Lillis, R.; Plaut, J. J.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.

    2017-09-01

    On October 19th 2014, Mars experienced a close encounter with Comet C/2013 A1 (Siding Spring), at a distance of only 141,000 km, or one third the Earth Moon distance. The gaseous coma washed over Mars and Mars passed directly through the cometary debris stream [1]. As a close encounter of this type is predicted only once in 100,000 years, this is likely the only opportunity for measurements associated with planetary/cometary encounters. Additionally, the encounter was masked by the transit of a powerful Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) 44 hours before [2]. Thus, the comet flyby took place when the Martian plasma system was still recovering from the CME impact, whilst the solar wind passing Mars remained significantly disturbed. In this study, we investigate the interaction of the comet with the solar wind, and their effects on the shock-accelerated energetic particles that precipitate into the Mars' atmosphere. The study is based on data from MAVEN, Mars Odyssey, MSL and Mars Express missions.

  5. Resistivity Problems in Electrostatic Precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Harry J.

    1974-01-01

    The process of electrostatic precipitation has ever-increasing application in more efficient collection of fine particles from industrial air emissions. This article details a large number of new developments in the field. The emphasis is on high resistivity particles which are a common cause of poor precipitator performance. (LS)

  6. Acid precipitation and forest soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    C. O. Tamm

    1976-01-01

    Many soil processes and properties may be affected by a change in chemical climate such as that caused by acidification of precipitation. The effect of additions of acid precipitation depends at first on the extent to which this acid is really absorbed by the soil and on the changes in substances with actual or potential acidity leaving the soil. There is for instance...

  7. Precipitation in the Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Gordon

    2007-01-01

    As an astronomy instructor, I am always looking for commonly observed Earthly experiences to help my students and me understand and appreciate similar occurrences elsewhere in the solar system. Recently I wrote a short TPT article on frost. This paper is on the related phenomena of precipitation. Precipitation, so common on most of the Earth's…

  8. Energetic statistics of Baleares Islands in 1993. Estatistiques energetiques de les Illes Balears 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-01-01

    This annual report summarizes the energetic and demand. It is focussed to analyze the energetic fuel (natural gas). The environment, and energetic supplies. Statistical data of energetic production, distribution and consumption in 1992 and 1993 are introduced.

  9. Modeling solid-state precipitation

    CERN Document Server

    Nebylov, AlexanderKozeschnik, Ernst

    2012-01-01

    Over recent decades, modeling and simulation of solid-state precipitation has attracted increased attention in academia and industry due to their important contributions in designing properties of advanced structural materials and in increasing productivity and decreasing costs for expensive alloying. In particular, precipitation of second phases is an important means for controlling the mechanical-technological properties of structural materials. However, profound physical modeling of precipitation is not a trivial task. This book introduces you to the classical methods of precipitation modeling and to recently-developed advanced, computationally-efficient techniques. If you're a research professional, academic, or student, you'll learn: nucleation theory, precipitate growth, calculation of interfacial energies. advanced techniques for technologically relevant multicomponent systems and complex thermo-mechanical treatments. numerical approaches using evolution equations and discrete particle size distribu...

  10. Discontinuous precipitation in a nickel-free high nitrogen austenitic stainless steel on solution nitriding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohammadzadeh, Roghayeh; Akbari, Alireza; Grumsen, Flemming Bjerg

    2017-01-01

    elements between austenite and nitrides, with chromium contents of about 80 wt.% in the precipitates. XRD analysis indicated that the Chromium-rich nitride precipitates are hexagonal (Cr, Mo)2N. Based on the TEM studies, (Cr, Mo)2N precipitates presented a (1 1 1)γ//(0 0 2)(Cr, Mo)2N, (Formula presented......, morphology and crystallographic orientation between the resulted austenite and precipitates were investigated using optical microscopy, X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Electron Back Scatter Diffraction (EBSD). On prolonged nitriding, Chromium-rich nitride...

  11. Energetics of multiple-ion species hohlraum plasmasa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumayer, P.; Berger, R. L.; Callahan, D.; Divol, L.; Froula, D. H.; London, R. A.; MacGowan, B. J.; Meezan, N. B.; Michel, P. A.; Ross, J. S.; Sorce, C.; Widmann, K.; Suter, L. J.; Glenzer, S. H.

    2008-05-01

    A study of the laser-plasma interaction processes has been performed in multiple-ion species hohlraum plasmas at conditions similar to those expected in indirect drive inertial confinement fusion targets. Gas-filled hohlraums with electron densities of 5.5×1020 and 9×1020cm-3 are heated by 14.3kJ of laser energy (wavelength 351nm) to electron temperatures of 3keV and backscattered laser light is measured. Landau damping of the ion acoustic waves is increased by adding hydrogen to a CO2 or CF4 gas. Stimulated Brillouin backscattering of a 351nm probe beam is found to decrease monotonically with increasing Landau damping, accompanied by a comparable increase in the transmission. More efficient energy coupling into the hohlraum by suppression of backscatter from the heater beams results in an increased hohlraum radiation temperature, showing that multiple-ion species plasmas improve the overall hohlraum energetics. The reduction in backscatter is reproduced by linear gain calculations as well as detailed full-scale three-dimensional laser-plasma interaction simulations, demonstrating that Landau damping is the controlling damping mechanism in inertial confinement fusion relevant high-electron temperature plasmas. These findings have led to the inclusion of multiple-ion species plasmas in the hohlraum point design for upcoming ignition campaigns at the National Ignition Facility.

  12. Assessment of CRBR core disruptive accident energetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theofanous, T.G.; Bell, C.R.

    1984-03-01

    The results of an independent assessment of core disruptive accident energetics for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor are presented in this document. This assessment was performed for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission under the direction of the CRBR Program Office within the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation. It considered in detail the accident behavior for three accident initiators that are representative of three different classes of events; unprotected loss of flow, unprotected reactivity insertion, and protected loss of heat sink. The primary system's energetics accommodation capability was realistically, yet conservatively, determined in terms of core events. This accommodation capability was found to be equivalent to an isentropic work potential for expansion to one atmosphere of 2550 MJ or a ramp rate of about 200 $/s applied to a classical two-phase disassembly.

  13. Energetics in robotic flight at small scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karydis, Konstantinos; Kumar, Vijay

    2017-02-06

    Recent advances in design, sensing and control have led to aerial robots that offer great promise in a range of real-world applications. However, one critical open question centres on how to improve the energetic efficiency of aerial robots so that they can be useful in practical situations. This review paper provides a survey on small-scale aerial robots (i.e. less than 1 m 2 area foot print, and less than 3 kg weight) from the point of view of energetics. The paper discusses methods to improve the efficiency of aerial vehicles, and reports on recent findings by the authors and other groups on modelling the impact of aerodynamics for the purpose of building energy-aware motion planners and controllers.

  14. Quantitative Analysis of Hohlraum Energetics Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Mehul V.; Mauche, Christopher W.; Jones, Odgen S.; Scott, Howard A.

    2016-10-01

    New 1D/2D hohlraum models have been developed to enable quantitative studies of ICF hohlraum energetics. The models employ sufficient numerical resolution (spatial, temporal discetization, radiation energy groups, laser rays, IMC photons) to satisfy a priori convergence criteria on the observables to be compared. For example, we aim for numerical errors of less than 5% in the predicted X-ray flux. Post shot simulations using the new models provide quantitative assessments of the accuracy of energetics modeling across a range of ICF platforms. The models have also been used to reexamine physics sensitivities in the modeling of the NLTE wall plasma. This work is guiding improvements in the underlying DCA atomic physics models and the radiation hydrodynamics code (HYDRA). Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  15. Energetic Particle Estimates for Stellar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngblood, Allison; Chamberlin, Phil; Woods, Tom

    2018-01-01

    In the heliosphere, energetic particles are accelerated away from the Sun during solar flares and/or coronal mass ejections where they frequently impact the Earth and other solar system bodies. Solar (or stellar) energetic particles (SEPs) not only affect technological assets, but also influence mass loss and chemistry in planetary atmospheres (e.g., depletion of ozone). SEPs are increasingly recognized as an important factor in assessing exoplanet habitability, but we do not yet have constraints on SEP emission from any stars other than the Sun. Until indirect measurements are available, we must assume solar-like particle production and apply correlations between solar flares and SEPs detected near Earth to stellar flares. We present improved scaling relations between solar far-UV flare flux and >10 MeV proton flux near Earth. We apply these solar scaling relations to far-UV flares from exoplanet host stars and discuss the implications for modeling chemistry and mass loss in exoplanet atmospheres.

  16. Theoretical investigation on structural evolution, energetic stability ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... This result indicates that the geometrical, electronic and chemical stabilities of AuCd with even number of valence electrons are higher than those of the neighbouring AuCd with odd number of valence electrons and corresponding Au+1 with odd number of valence electrons. Additionally, 4 valence electrons orbital ...

  17. Transformation and Crystallization Energetics of Synthetic and Biogenic Amorphous Calcium Carbonate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radha, A. V. [Peter A. Rock Thermochemistry Lab. and Nanomaterials in the Environment, Agriculture, and Technology Organized Research Unit (NEAT ORU), Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Forbes, Tori Z. [Peter A. Rock Thermochemistry Lab. and Nanomaterials in the Environment, Agriculture, and Technology Organized Research Unit (NEAT ORU), Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Killian, Christopher E. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Gilbert, P.U.P.A [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Navrotsky, Alexandra [Peter A. Rock Thermochemistry Lab. and Nanomaterials in the Environment, Agriculture, and Technology Organized Research Unit (NEAT ORU), Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) is a metastable phase often observed during low temperature inorganic synthesis and biomineralization. ACC transforms with aging or heating into a less hydrated form, and with time crystallizes to calcite or aragonite. The energetics of transformation and crystallization of synthetic and biogenic (extracted from California purple sea urchin larval spicules, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus) ACC were studied using isothermal acid solution calorimetry and differential scanning calorimetry. Transformation and crystallization of ACC can follow an energetically downhill sequence: more metastable hydrated ACC → less metastable hydrated ACC→anhydrous ACC ~ biogenic anhydrous ACC→vaterite → aragonite → calcite. In a given reaction sequence, not all these phases need to occur. The transformations involve a series of ordering, dehydration, and crystallization processes, each lowering the enthalpy (and free energy) of the system, with crystallization of the dehydrated amorphous material lowering the enthalpy the most. ACC is much more metastable with respect to calcite than the crystalline polymorphs vaterite or aragonite. The anhydrous ACC is less metastable than the hydrated, implying that the structural reorganization during dehydration is exothermic and irreversible. Dehydrated synthetic and anhydrous biogenic ACC are similar in enthalpy. The transformation sequence observed in biomineralization could be mainly energetically driven; the first phase deposited is hydrated ACC, which then converts to anhydrous ACC, and finally crystallizes to calcite. The initial formation of ACC may be a first step in the precipitation of calcite under a wide variety of conditions, including geological CO₂ sequestration.

  18. The energetic alpha particle transport method EATM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirkpatrick, R.C.

    1998-02-01

    The EATM method is an evolving attempt to find an efficient method of treating the transport of energetic charged particles in a dynamic magnetized (MHD) plasma for which the mean free path of the particles and the Larmor radius may be long compared to the gradient lengths in the plasma. The intent is to span the range of parameter space with the efficiency and accuracy thought necessary for experimental analysis and design of magnetized fusion targets.

  19. Energetic ion leakage from foreshock transient cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Terry Z.; Angelopoulos, Vassilis; Hietala, Heli

    2017-07-01

    Earth's foreshock is filled with backstreaming particles that can interact with the ambient solar wind and its discontinuities to form foreshock transients. Many foreshock transients have a core with low dynamic pressure that can significantly perturb the bow shock and the magnetosphere-ionosphere system. Foreshock transients have also been recently recognized as sites of particle acceleration, which may be important for seeding the parent shock with energetic particles. A relevant step of this seeding would be energetic ion leakage into the surrounding foreshock environment. On the other hand, such leakage would also suppress the energetic particle flux contrast across foreshock transients' boundaries masking their perceived contribution to ion energization. To further examine this hypothesis of ion leakage, we report on multipoint case studies of three foreshock transient events selected from a large database. The cases were selected to exemplify, in increasing complexity, the nature and consequences of energetic ion leakage. Ion energy dispersion, observed upstream and/or downstream of the foreshock transients, is explained with a simple, ballistic model of ions leaking from the foreshock transients. Larger energies are required for leaked ions to reach the spacecraft as the distance between the transient and spacecraft increases. Our model, which explains well the observed ion energy dispersion and velocity distributions, can also be used to reveal the shape of the foreshock transients in three dimensions. Our results suggest that ion leakage from foreshock transient cores needs to be accounted for both in statistical studies and in global models of ion acceleration under quasi-parallel foreshock conditions.

  20. Energetic particle instabilities in fusion plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharapov, S. E.; Alper, B.; Berk, H. L.; Borba, D. N.; Breizman, B. N.; Challis, C. D.; Classen, I. G. J.; Edlund, E. M.; Eriksson, J.; Fasoli, A.; Fredrickson, E. D.; Fu, G. Y.; Garcia-Munoz, M.; Gassner, T.; Ghantous, K.; Goloborodko, V.; Gorelenkov, N. N.; Gryaznevich, M. P.; Hacquin, S.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Hellesen, C.; Kiptily, V. G.; Kramer, G. J.; Lauber, P.; Lilley, M. K.; Lisak, M.; Nabais, F.; Nazikian, R.; Nyqvist, R.; Osakabe, M.; Perez von Thun, C.; Pinches, S. D.; Podesta, M.; Porkolab, M.; Shinohara, K.; Schoepf, K.; Todo, Y.; Toi, K.; Van Zeeland, M. A.; Voitsekhovich, I.; White, R. B.; Yavorskij, V.; TG, ITPA EP; Contributors, JET-EFDA

    2013-10-01

    Remarkable progress has been made in diagnosing energetic particle instabilities on present-day machines and in establishing a theoretical framework for describing them. This overview describes the much improved diagnostics of Alfvén instabilities and modelling tools developed world-wide, and discusses progress in interpreting the observed phenomena. A multi-machine comparison is presented giving information on the performance of both diagnostics and modelling tools for different plasma conditions outlining expectations for ITER based on our present knowledge.

  1. Energetic particle instabilities in fusion plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Sharapov, S E; Berk, H L; Borba, D N; Breizman, B N; Challis, C D; Classen, I G J; Edlund, E M; Eriksson, J; Fasoli, A; Fredrickson, E D; Fu, G Y; Garcia-Munoz, M; Gassner, T; Ghantous, K; Goloborodko, V; Gorelenkov, N N; Gryaznevich, M P; Hacquin, S; Heidbrink, W W; Hellesen, C; Kiptily, V G; Kramer, G J; Lauber, P; Lilley, M K; Lisak, M; Nabais, F; Nazikian, R; Nyqvist, R; Osakabe, M; von Thun, C Perez; Pinches, S D; Podesta, M; Porkolab, M; Shinohara, K; Schoepf, K; Todo, Y; Toi, K; Van Zeeland, M A; Voitsekhovich, I; White, R B; Yavorskij, V; TG, ITPA EP; Contributors, JET-EFDA

    2013-01-01

    Remarkable progress has been made in diagnosing energetic particle instabilities on present-day machines and in establishing a theoretical framework for describing them. This overview describes the much improved diagnostics of Alfven instabilities and modelling tools developed world-wide, and discusses progress in interpreting the observed phenomena. A multi-machine comparison is presented giving information on the performance of both diagnostics and modelling tools for different plasma conditions outlining expectations for ITER based on our present knowledge.

  2. Energetic cost of walking in fossil hominins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal-Cordasco, M; Mateos, A; Zorrilla-Revilla, G; Prado-Nóvoa, O; Rodríguez, J

    2017-11-01

    Many biomechanical studies consistently show that a broader pelvis increases the reaction forces and bending moments across the femoral shaft, increasing the energetic costs of unloaded locomotion. However, a biomechanical model does not provide the real amount of metabolic energy expended in walking. The aim of this study is to test the influence of pelvis breadth on locomotion cost and to evaluate the locomotion efficiency of extinct Pleistocene hominins. The current study measures in vivo the influence of pelvis width on the caloric cost of locomotion, integrating anthropometry, body composition and indirect calorimetry protocols in a sample of 46 subjects of both sexes. We show that a broader false pelvis is substantially more efficient for locomotion than a narrower one and that the influence of false pelvis width on the energetic cost is similar to the influence of leg length. Two models integrating body mass, femur length and bi-iliac breadth are used to estimate the net and gross energetic costs of locomotion in a number of extinct hominins. The results presented here show that the locomotion of Homo was not energetically more efficient than that of Australopithecus and that the locomotion of extinct Homo species was not less efficient than that of modern Homo sapiens. The changes in the anatomy of the pelvis and lower limb observed with the appearance of Homo ergaster probably did not fully offset the increased expenditure resulting from a larger body mass. Moreover, the narrow pelvis in modern humans does not contribute to greater efficiency of locomotion. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Novel Energetic Materials for Counter WMD Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    TNT. Thermal and hydrolytic stabilities are acceptable. Polymer salts ofN-vinyl triazolium monomeric salts were prepared by polymerization of the N...0 0 _, 0 •1. .1𔃿. ’SUBJECT TERMS ,. high energy heterocycles , pentafluorosulfanyl monomers and polymers , high nitrogen species, density, heat...Nitroimino tetrazoles were considerably more energetic than their nitroimino triazole counterparts; however, the triazoles are more stable thermally . In

  4. Probing Kill Mechanisms and Tuning Energetic Biocides

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-01

    attributed to the unique porous inner structure combined with energetic gas generator nitrocellulose which we have previously shown minimizes sintering among...as the temperature increased 373 suggesting that HCl/HOCl is more effective in spore neutralization. HCl and HOCl have unique 374 chemical properties...Disinfection of Bacillus subtilis spore-contaminated surface 512 materials with a sodium hypochlorite and a hydrogen peroxide-based sanitizer, Lett

  5. Energetic Materials for Bio-Agent Destruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    work was to produce known energetic materials or design and produce new materials which upon detonation will destroy support/storage facilities while...permit prediction of the likelihood and desirability of synthesis of the proposed materials based on density, heat of formation and detonation...sensitive the compound is. Based upon electrostatic potential ( ESP ) calculations, 18 has wider and stronger positive potentials, and 20 has the weakest

  6. Fundamental energetic limits of radio communication systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudais, Jean-Yves

    2017-02-01

    The evaluation of the energy consumption of a radiocommunication requires to analyse the life cycle of the elements used. However, this analysis does not specify the energetic limits. Theoretical approaches allow one to draw these limits, which are known in multiple cases of information transmission. However, the answers are not always satisfactory, in particular in the case of time-varying channels. After a brief presentation of the notion of energetic limits of a radiocommunication, and beginning with a global approach, we show that, contrary to the published results, the energetic limits always differ from zero if the physical constraints are correctly expressed. xml:lang="fr" Cependant, les réponses ne sont pas toujours satisfaisantes, particulièrement dans le cas de canaux variants dans le temps. Après une rapide présentation des notions d'énergie limite d'une radiocommunication, et en commençant par une approche globale du problème, nous montrons que, contrairement aux résultats publiés, les limites énergétiques sont toujours différentes de zéro si les contraintes physiques sont correctement exprimées.

  7. Linking Surface Precipitation in Fe-Au Alloys to Its Self-healing Potential During Creep Loading

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sun, W. W.; Fang, H.; van Dijk, N.H.; van der Zwaag, S.; Hutchinson, C. R.

    2017-01-01

    The precipitation of Au-rich precipitates on the external surfaces of Fe-Au alloys has been studied by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The surface precipitates formed at elevated temperatures are found to self-organize in regular patterns and their growth rate is determined

  8. PREDICTION OF NEW POLYNITROGEN COMPOUNDS AND ANALOGOUS AS HIGHLY ENERGETIC MATERIALS

    OpenAIRE

    Cubas C., R.; Egresado de Maestría en Química, Facultad de Química e Ingeniería Química-Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos. Lima-Perú; Cjuno H., A.; Departamento de Fisicoquimica, Facultad de Química e Ingeniería Química-Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos. Lima-Perú

    2014-01-01

    In the last years, the discovery of new energetic materials has accelerated due to the use of the computational quantum chemistry, identifying innovative compounds with promising energy properties. The estimate of these, as the heat of formation, density, speed of the detonation, pressure of the detonation and sensibility, allow us in a following stage, to select to the candidates potentials for laboratory synthesis. In this paper, we study the structural, electronic and spectroscopic propert...

  9. Modeling of light-induced degradation due to Cu precipitation in p-type silicon. I. General theory of precipitation under carrier injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahlman, H.; Haarahiltunen, A.; Kwapil, W.; Schön, J.; Inglese, A.; Savin, H.

    2017-05-01

    Copper contamination causes minority carrier lifetime degradation in p-type silicon bulk under illumination, leading to considerable efficiency losses in affected solar cells. Although the existence of this phenomenon has been known for almost two decades, ambiguity prevails about the underlying defect mechanism. In Paper I of this two-part contribution, we propose the first comprehensive mathematical model for Cu-related light-induced degradation in p-type silicon (Cu-LID). The model is based on the precipitation of interstitial Cu ions, which is assumed to be kinetically limited by electrostatic repulsion from the growing Cu precipitates. Hence, growth and dissolution rates of individual Cu precipitates are derived from the drift-diffusion equation of interstitial Cu and used in a kinetic precipitation model that is based on chemical rate equations. The kinetic model is interlinked to a Schottky junction model of metallic precipitates in silicon, enabling accurate calculation of the injection-dependent electric field enclosing the precipitates, as well as the precipitate-limited minority carrier lifetime. It is found that a transition from darkness to illuminated conditions can cause an increase in the kinetics of precipitation by five orders of magnitude. Since our approach enables a direct connection between the time evolution of precipitate size-density distribution and minority carrier lifetime degradation under illumination, a procedure for calculating the Cu-LID-related lifetime as a function of illumination time is included at the end of this article. The model verification with experiments is carried out in Paper II of this contribution along with a discussion of the kinetic and energetic aspects of Cu-LID.

  10. Arsenic Precipitation in the Bioleaching of Realgar Using Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The current study investigates the characteristics of arsenic precipitation during the bioleaching of realgar. The bioleaching performance of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans BY-3 (A. ferrooxidans was investigated through scanning electron microscopy (SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR spectrophotometry. SEM and XRD analyses revealed that the arsenic-adapted strain of A. ferrooxidans was more hydrophobic and showed higher attachment efficiency to realgar compared with the wild strain. The arsenic precipitation using A. ferrooxidans resulted in the precipitation of an arsenic-rich compound on the surface of the bacterial cell, as shown in the TEM images. The FT-IR spectra suggested that the −OH and −NH groups were closely involved in the biosorption process. The observations above strongly suggest that the cell surface of A. ferrooxidans plays a role in the induction of arsenic tolerance during the bioleaching of realgar.

  11. Precipitation in an AA6111 aluminium alloy and cosmetic corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Y. [Corrosion and Protection Centre, School of Materials, University of Manchester, Manchester M60 1QD (United Kingdom); Zhou, X. [Corrosion and Protection Centre, School of Materials, University of Manchester, Manchester M60 1QD (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: xiaorong.zhou@manchester.ac.uk; Thompson, G.E. [Corrosion and Protection Centre, School of Materials, University of Manchester, Manchester M60 1QD (United Kingdom); Hashimoto, T. [Corrosion and Protection Centre, School of Materials, University of Manchester, Manchester M60 1QD (United Kingdom); Scamans, G.M. [Innoval Technology, Beaumont Close, Banbury, Oxon OX16 1TQ (United Kingdom); Afseth, A. [Novelis Technology and Management, 8212 Neuhausen (Switzerland)

    2007-01-15

    The near-surface deformed layer on AA6111 automotive closure sheet alloy, generated by mechanical grinding during rectification, has an ultrafine grain microstructure, of 50-150 nm diameter, and a sharp transition with the underlying bulk alloy microstructure. Grinding and heat treatment to simulate rectification and paint baking processes result in the nucleation and growth of {approx}20 nm diameter precipitates at grain boundaries within the near-surface deformed layer. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy has shown Q phase precipitates in the deformed layer, giving dramatically increased corrosion susceptibility compared with the bulk microstructure, and this is responsible for the rapid-onset filiform corrosion. Transmission electron microscopy of the corrosion attack showed directly that the mode of corrosion was intergranular and that the Q phase precipitates were preserved after the passage of the corrosion front.

  12. Precipitate and Microstructural Stability in Alloys Subjected to Sustained Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellon, P.

    The sustained irradiation of a material by energetic particles leads to the continuous production of damage in the form of point defects, point-defect clusters, and forced atomic relocations, as reviewed in Chap. 1. These elementary processes lead to an acceleration of thermally activated diffusion owing to point-defect supersaturation, as well as a forced mixing of chemical species due to atomic replacements. In materials with precipitates or ordered phases, this forced mixing alone would lead to dissolution and chemical disordering, respectively. At high enough temperatures, however, these dynamical processes compete with thermally activated diffusion, which tends to restore an equilibrium state. The outcome of this competition depends of course on the relative intensity, or rates, of these processes, but also on their characteristic length scales. We review in some detail the evolution of pre-existing precipitates under irradiation to illustrate the complex material's response to these dynamical processes, including the potential self-organization of the microstructure. Similar effects are anticipated in materials undergoing order-disorder transformations. In addition, the kinetic coupling between point defects and chemical fluxes can lead to radiation-induced segregation and precipitation. Finally, we discuss the contribution of point-defect evolution to microstructural changes, which can produce dimensional changes and alter mechanical properties.

  13. Magnetic topology of coronal mass ejection events out of the ecliptic: Ulysses/HI-SCALE energetic particle observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. E. Malandraki

    Full Text Available Solar energetic particle fluxes (Ee > 38 keV observed by the ULYSSES/HI-SCALE experiment are utilized as diagnostic tracers of the large-scale structure and topology of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF embedded within two well-identified Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections (ICMEs detected at 56° and 62° south heliolatitudes by ULYSSES during the solar maximum southern high-latitude pass. On the basis of the energetic solar particle observations it is concluded that: (A the high-latitude ICME magnetic structure observed in May 2000 causes a depression in the solar energetic electron intensities which can be accounted for by either a detached or an attached magnetic field topology for the ICME; (B during the traversal of the out-of-ecliptic ICME event observed in July 2000 energetic electrons injected at the Sun are channeled by the ICME and propagate freely along the ICME magnetic field lines to 62° S heliolatitude.

    Key words. Interplanetary physics (energetic particles; interplanetary magnetic fields

  14. Magnetic topology of coronal mass ejection events out of the ecliptic: Ulysses/HI-SCALE energetic particle observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. E. Malandraki

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Solar energetic particle fluxes (Ee > 38 keV observed by the ULYSSES/HI-SCALE experiment are utilized as diagnostic tracers of the large-scale structure and topology of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF embedded within two well-identified Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections (ICMEs detected at 56° and 62° south heliolatitudes by ULYSSES during the solar maximum southern high-latitude pass. On the basis of the energetic solar particle observations it is concluded that: (A the high-latitude ICME magnetic structure observed in May 2000 causes a depression in the solar energetic electron intensities which can be accounted for by either a detached or an attached magnetic field topology for the ICME; (B during the traversal of the out-of-ecliptic ICME event observed in July 2000 energetic electrons injected at the Sun are channeled by the ICME and propagate freely along the ICME magnetic field lines to 62° S heliolatitude.Key words. Interplanetary physics (energetic particles; interplanetary magnetic fields

  15. A diagnostic study of monsoon energetics for two contrasting years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. V. S. Ramakrishna

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present study we made an attempt to explain the behavior of the southwest monsoon for two contrasting years, from the view point of energetics. As a test case we selected 2002 and 2003, which were weak and strong monsoon years, respectively, based on rainfall. The energy terms Kψ, Kχ and APE and the conversion terms f∇ψ. ∇χ, −ω'T' are calculated at 850 hPa level and also vertically integrated from 1000 hPa to 100 hPa. The results indicate that, the year of high energy (both KΨ, Kχ i.e. 2002, does not give a good amount of rainfall compared to the good year i.e. 2003. The break period during the year 2002 has been clearly explained using the block diagrams. Periods of highest rainfall coincide with the positive conversions of f∇ψ. ∇χ and −ω'T'. Vertically integrated moisture fluxes during the break period of 2002, 2003 are also analyzed. The main reservoirs (sources and sinks for the monsoon energy are also identified using block diagrams. Negative correlation between daily rainfall and energy terms in the year 2002 indicates its unusual behavior both in terms of energetics as well as precipitation. Positive correlations in the year 2003 represent strong monsoonal behavior. We calculated the climatology of the total kinetic energy at 850 hPa, vertically integrated (1000–100 hPa for 30 years (1980–2009 and rainfall for 103 years (1901–2003 which clearly indicates that the monsoon is indeed a season of high energy for the South Asian region.

    Also the east- west direct thermal circulations are strongly related to the good and bad monsoon years.

  16. Hourly and Daily Precipitation Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Precipitation reports submitted on many form types, including tabular and autographic charts. Reports are almost exclusively from the US Cooperative Observer Network.

  17. Electrostatic precipitators for industrial applications

    CERN Document Server

    Francis, Steve L; Bradburn, Keith M

    2014-01-01

    This Guidebook provides basic knowledge of the physics and power supplies of electrostatic precipitators. It also deals with practical aspects of ESP design and gives examples of typical applications of ESPs.

  18. Atrial Ectopics Precipitating Atrial Fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson Francis

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Holter monitor tracing showing blocked atrial ectopics and atrial ectopic precipitating atrial fibrillation is being demonstrated. Initially it was coarse atrial fibrillation, which rapidly degenerated into fine atrial fibrillation.

  19. Environmental Radioactivity, Temperature, and Precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riland, Carson A.

    1996-01-01

    Reports that environmental radioactivity levels vary with temperature and precipitation and these effects are due to radon. Discusses the measurement of this environmental radioactivity and the theory behind it. (JRH)

  20. Identifying Anomality in Precipitation Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, P.; Zhang, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Safety, risk and economic analyses of engineering constructions such as storm sewer, street and urban drainage, and channel design are sensitive to precipitation storm properties. Whether the precipitation storm properties exhibit normal or anomalous characteristics remains obscure. In this study, we will decompose a precipitation time series as sequences of average storm intensity, storm duration and interstorm period to examine whether these sequences could be treated as a realization of a continuous time random walk with both "waiting times" (interstorm period) and "jump sizes" (average storm intensity and storm duration). Starting from this viewpoint, we will analyze the statistics of storm duration, interstorm period, and average storm intensity in four regions in southwestern United States. We will examine whether the probability distribution is temporal and spatial dependent. Finally, we will use fractional engine to capture the randomness in precipitation storms.

  1. Long-Term Variations of the Electron Slot Region and Global Radiation Belt Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Shing F.; Shao, Xi; Tan, Lun C.

    2005-01-01

    We report the observations of changes of the nominal position of the quiet-time radiation belt slot over the solar cycles. It has been found that the slot region, believed to be a result of enhanced precipitation losses of energetic electrons due to their interactions with VLF waves in the magnetosphere, tends to shift to higher L (approximately 3) during a solar maximum compared to its canonical L value of approximately 2.5, which is more typical of a solar minimum. The solar-cycle migration of the slot can be understood in terms of the solar-cycle changes in ionospheric densities, which may cause the optimal wave-particle interaction region during higher solar activity periods to move to higher altitudes and higher latitudes, thus higher L. Our analysis also suggests that the primary wave-particle interaction processes that result in the slot formation are located off of the magnetic equator.

  2. Monte Carlo study of electron relaxation in graphene with spin polarized, degenerate electron gas in presence of electron-electron scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowik, Piotr; Thobel, Jean-Luc; Adamowicz, Leszek

    2017-12-01

    The Monte Carlo simulation method is applied to study the relaxation of excited electrons in monolayer graphene. The presence of spin polarized background electrons population, with density corresponding to highly degenerate conditions is assumed. Formulas of electron-electron scattering rates, which properly account for electrons presence in two energetically degenerate, inequivalent valleys in this material are presented. The electron relaxation process can be divided into two phases: thermalization and cooling, which can be clearly distinguished when examining the standard deviation of electron energy distribution. The influence of the exchange effect in interactions between electrons with parallel spins is shown to be important only in transient conditions, especially during the thermalization phase.

  3. Precipitation behavior of carbides in high-carbon martensitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Qin-tian; Li, Jing; Shi, Cheng-bin; Yu, Wen-tao; Shi, Chang-min [University of Science and Technology, Beijing (China). State Key Laboratory of Advanced Metallurgy; Li, Ji-hui [Yang Jiang Shi Ba Zi Group Co., Ltd, Guangdong (China)

    2017-01-15

    A fundamental study on the precipitation behavior of carbides was carried out. Thermo-calc software, scanning electron microscopy, electron probe microanalysis, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffractometry and high-temperature confocal laser scanning microscopy were used to study the precipitation and transformation behaviors of carbides. Carbide precipitation was of a specific order. Primary carbides (M7C3) tended to be generated from liquid steel when the solid fraction reached 84 mol.%. Secondary carbides (M7C3) precipitated from austenite and can hardly transformed into M23C6 carbides with decreasing temperature in air. Primary carbides hardly changed once they were generated, whereas secondary carbides were sensitive to heat treatment and thermal deformation. Carbide precipitation had a certain effect on steel-matrix phase transitions. The segregation ability of carbon in liquid steel was 4.6 times greater that of chromium. A new method for controlling primary carbides is proposed.

  4. Van Allen Probes Measurements of Energetic Particle Deep Penetration Into the Low L Region (L < 4) During the Storm on 8 April 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, H.; Baker, D. N.; Califf, S.; Li, X.; Jaynes, A. N.; Leonard, T.; Kanekal, S. G.; Blake, J. B.; Fennell, J. F.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Turner, D. L.; Reeves, G. D.; Spence, H. E.

    2017-12-01

    Using measurements from the Van Allen Probes, a penetration event of tens to hundreds of keV electrons and tens of keV protons into the low L shells (L electric field represented by the Volland-Stern model or a uniform dawn-dusk electric field model based on the electric field measurements. It suggests that the underlying physical mechanism responsible for energetic electron deep penetration, which is very important for fully understanding energetic electron dynamics in the low L shells, should be MLT localized.

  5. Energetics of Multiple-Ion Species Hohlraum Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumayer, P; Berger, R; Callahan, D; Divol, L; Froula, D; London, R; MacGowan, B J; Meezan, N; Michel, P; Ross, J S; Sorce, C; Widmann, K; Suter, L; Glenzer, S H

    2007-11-05

    A study of the laser-plasma interaction processes in multiple-ion species plasmas has been performed in plasmas that are created to emulate the plasma conditions in indirect drive inertial confinement fusion targets. Gas-filled hohlraums with densities of xe22/cc are heated to Te=3keV and backscattered laser light is measured by a suite of absolutely calibrated backscatter diagnostics. Ion Landau damping is increased by adding hydrogen to the CO2/CF4 gas fill. We find that the backscatter from stimulated Brillouin scattering is reduced is monotonically reduced with increasing damping, demonstrating that Landau damping is the controlling damping mechanism in ICF relevant high-electron temperature plasmas. The reduction in backscatter is accompanied by a comparable increase in both transmission of a probe beam and an increased hohlraum radiation temperature, showing that multiple-ion species plasmas improve the overall hohlraum energetics/performance. Comparison of the experimental data to linear gain calculations as well as detailed full-scale 3D laser-plasma interaction simulations show quantitative agreement. Our findings confirm the importance of Landau damping in controlling backscatter from high-electron temperature hohlraum plasmas and have lead to the inclusion of multi-ion species plasmas in the hohlraum point design for upcoming ignition campaigns at the National Ignition Facility.

  6. Energetic Ion Interactions with the Galilean Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, John F.

    2000-01-01

    The principal research tasks of this investigation are: (1) specification of the energetic (keV to MeV) ion environments upstream of the four Galilean satellites and (2) data analysis and numerical modeling of observed ion interactions with the satellites. Differential flux spectra are being compiled for the most abundant ions (protons, oxygen, and sulfur) from measurements at 20 keV to 100 MeV total energy by the Energetic Particle Detector (EPD) experiment and at higher ion energies by the Heavy Ion Counter (HIC) experiment. Runge-Kutta and other numerical techniques are used to propagate test particles sampled from the measured upstream spectra to the satellite surface or spacecraft through the local magnetic and corotational electric field environment of each satellite. Modeling of spatial variations in directional flux anisotropies measured during each close flyby provides limits on atomic charge states for heavy (O, S) magnetospheric ions and on internal or induced magnetic fields of the satellites. Validation of models for magnetic and electric field configurations then allows computation of rates for ion implantation, sputtering, and energy deposition into the satellite surfaces for further modeling of observable chemical changes induced by irradiation. Our ongoing work on production of oxidants and other secondary species by ice irradiation on Europa's surface has significant applications, already acknowledged in current literature, to astrobiological evolution. Finally, the work will improve understanding of energetic ion sources and sinks at the satellite orbits for improved modeling of magnetospheric transport processes. The scope of the research effort mainly includes data from the primary Galileo mission (1995-1997) but may also include some later data where directly relevant (e.g., comparison of J0 and I27 data for Io) to the primary mission objectives. Funding for this contract also includes partial support for our related education and public

  7. Superthermal electrons at Mars: Photoelectrons, solar wind electrons, and dust storm influences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shaosui

    Mars is unique in the solar system in terms of its interaction with solar wind because it lacks of a significant intrinsic global magnetic field but possesses localized strong crustal fields. This interaction results in a very complex magnetic topology at Mars so that superthermal electrons, mainly including photoelectrons and solar wind electrons, can be distinctively important for such a complicated planetary space environment. These energetic electrons (1-1000 electron volts) can carry and rapidly redistribute energy along the magnetic field lines. They are also a reliable tool to deduce the Martian magnetic topology, which is critical to understand the electromagnetic dynamics of the Martian space environment. The investigation methodology involves both data analysis and modeling. This dissertation mainly investigates three topics of superthermal electrons at Mars. (1) This dissertation confirms that the long-lived influence of Martian low-altitude dust storms on high-altitude photoelectron fluxes is common for a wide range of energy and pitch angles and determines that this effect originates from the thermosphere-ionosphere source region of the photoelectrons, rather than at exospheric altitudes at or above MGS. Through simulations, the results suggest that the global dust storm altered the photoelectron fluxes by causing CO2 to be the dominant species at a much larger altitude range than usual. (2) Because the integral of the production rate above the superthermal electron exobase is about the same for all solar zenith angles, quite counterintuitively, it is found, observationally and numerically/theoretically, that the high-altitude photoelectron fluxes are quite independent of solar zenith angle. (3) Based on the energy spectral (flux against energy) difference between photoelectrons and solar wind electrons, a statistical approach is taken to distinguish the two populations and also allows us to quantify the occurrence rate of solar wind electron

  8. Complex nanostructures: synthesis and energetic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liou, X.; Lin, Y.; Zhou, S.; Sheehan, S.; Wang, D. [Department of Chemistry, Merkert Chemistry Center, Boston College, 2609 Beacon St., Chestnut Hill, MA 02467 (United States)

    2010-07-01

    Connected through single crystalline junctions, low dimensional materials such as nanowires and nanorods form complex nanostructures. These new materials exhibit mechanical strengths and electrical conductivities superior to their constituents while maintaining comparable surface areas, an attribute ideal for energetic applications. More efficient solar cells, higher capacity batteries and better performing photoelectrochemical cells have been built using these materials. This article reviews this exciting new class of materials and covers topics from controlled syntheses to applications in photovoltaics, chemical energy conversion and electrical charge storage. Mechanisms responsible for the improved performance are discussed. The prospect of their applications in a broader energy-related field is analyzed. (author)

  9. Simmer analysis of prompt burst energetics experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hitchcock, J.T.

    1982-03-01

    The Prompt Burst Energetics experiments are designed to measure the pressure behavior of fuel and coolant as working fluids during a hypothetical prompt burst disassembly in an LMFBR. The work presented in this report consists of a parametric study of PBE-5S, a fresh oxide fuel experiment, using SIMMER-II. The various pressure sources in the experiment are examined, and the dominant source identified as incondensable contaminant gasses in the fuel. The important modeling uncertainties and limitations of SIMMER-II as applied to these experiments are discussed.

  10. Reversibly formed bilayer vesicles: Energetics and polydispersity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergstöm, M.

    1997-01-01

    orders of magnitude larger than where the local free energy minima of the equilibrium vesicle actually occur. Moreover, according to our analysis, the relative width of a vesicle size distribution, sigma(R)/R-max, is generally at full equilibrium equal to 0.283, independently of the energetic vesicle....... and a statistical-mechanical factor that accounts for the fluctuations in composition, chain packing density and shape. We demonstrate that the free energy required to form a spherical vesicle is made up of two main contributions: the (size-independent) work of bending the constituent monolayers and the work...

  11. Nonlinear Electromagnetic Interactions in Energetic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, M. A.; Dalvit, D. A. R.; Moore, D. S.

    2016-01-01

    We study the scattering of electromagnetic waves in anisotropic energetic materials. Nonlinear light-matter interactions in molecular crystals result in frequency-conversion and polarization changes. Applied electromagnetic fields of moderate intensity can induce these nonlinear effects without triggering chemical decomposition, offering a mechanism for the nonionizing identification of explosives. We use molecular-dynamics simulations to compute such two-dimensional THz spectra for planar slabs made of pentaerythritol tetranitrate and ammonium nitrate. We discuss third-harmonic generation and polarization-conversion processes in such materials. These observed far-field spectral features of the reflected or transmitted light may serve as an alternative tool for standoff explosive detection.

  12. Complex Nanostructures: Synthesis and Energetic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dunwei Wang

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Connected through single crystalline junctions, low dimensional materials such as nanowires and nanorods form complex nanostructures. These new materials exhibit mechanical strengths and electrical conductivities superior to their constituents while maintaining comparable surface areas, an attribute ideal for energetic applications. More efficient solar cells, higher capacity batteries and better performing photoelectrochemical cells have been built using these materials. This article reviews this exciting new class of materials and covers topics from controlled syntheses to applications in photovoltaics, chemical energy conversion and electrical charge storage. Mechanisms responsible for the improved performance are discussed. The prospect of their applications in a broader energy-related field is analyzed.

  13. Effect of creep-aging on precipitates of 7075 aluminum alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Y.C., E-mail: yclin@csu.edu.cn [School of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); State Key Laboratory of High Performance Complex Manufacturing, Changsha 410083 (China); State Key Laboratory of Material Processing and Die and Mould Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Jiang, Yu-Qiang; Chen, Xiao-Min; Wen, Dong-Xu [School of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); State Key Laboratory of High Performance Complex Manufacturing, Changsha 410083 (China); Zhou, Hua-Min [State Key Laboratory of Material Processing and Die and Mould Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2013-12-20

    The creep-aging behaviors of 7075 aluminum alloy are studied by uniaxial tensile creep experiments under elevated temperatures. The effects of creep-aging temperature and applied stress on the precipitates of 7075-T651 aluminum alloy are investigated using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and a transmission electron microscope (TEM). Results show that (1) coarse insoluble precipitates (Al{sub 7}Cu{sub 2}Fe and Mg{sub 2}Si) and intermediate precipitates (Al{sub 18}Mg{sub 3}Cr{sub 2} and Al{sub 3}Zr) are found in the aluminum matrix, and the effects of creep-aging treatment on these precipitates are not obvious; (2) the main aging precipitates are η′ and η phases, and the amount of aging precipitates increase with the increase of creep-aging temperature and applied stress; (3) with the increase of creep-aging temperature and applied stress, the precipitates are discontinuously distributed on the grain boundary, and the width of precipitate free zone increases with the increase of creep-aging temperature and applied stress and (4) compared with the microstructure in the traditional stress-free aged sample, the creep-aging process can refine the precipitates and narrow the width of the precipitate free zone.

  14. Investigating radiation belt losses though numerical modelling of precipitating fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Rodger

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available It has been suggested that whistler-induced electron precipitation (WEP may be the most significant inner radiation belt loss process for some electron energy ranges. One area of uncertainty lies in identifying a typical estimate of the precipitating fluxes from the examples given in the literature to date. Here we aim to solve this difficulty through modelling satellite and ground-based observations of onset and decay of the precipitation and its effects in the ionosphere by examining WEP-produced Trimpi perturbations in subionospheric VLF transmissions. In this study we find that typical Trimpi are well described by the effects of WEP spectra derived from the AE-5 inner radiation belt model for typical precipitating energy fluxes. This confirms the validity of the radiation belt lifetimes determined in previous studies using these flux parameters. We find that the large variation in observed Trimpi perturbation size occurring over time scales of minutes to hours is primarily due to differing precipitation flux levels rather than changing WEP spectra. Finally, we show that high-time resolution measurements during the onset of Trimpi perturbations should provide a useful signature for discriminating WEP Trimpi from non-WEP Trimpi, due to the pulsed nature of the WEP arrival.

  15. Electron heating and acceleration during magnetic reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlin, Joel

    2017-10-01

    Magnetic reconnection is thought to be an important driver of energetic particles in a variety of astrophysical phenomena such as solar flares and magnetospheric storms. However, the observed fraction of energy imparted to a nonthermal component can vary widely in different regimes. We use kinetic particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations to demonstrate the important role of the non-reversing (guide) field in controlling the efficiency of electron acceleration in collisionless reconnection. In reconnection where the guide field is smaller than the reconnecting component, the dominant electron accelerator is a Fermi-type mechanism that preferentially energizes the most energetic particles. In strong guide field reconnection, the field-line contraction that drives the Fermi mechanism becomes weak. Instead, parallel electric fields are primarily responsible for driving electron heating but are ineffective in driving the energetic component of the spectrum. Three-dimensional simulations reveal that the stochastic magnetic field that develops during 3D guide field reconnection plays a vital role in particle acceleration and transport. The reconnection outflows that drive Fermi acceleration also expel accelerating particles from energization regions. In 2D reconnection, electrons are trapped in island cores and acceleration ceases, whereas in 3D the stochastic magnetic field enables energetic electrons to leak out of islands and freely sample regions of energy release. A finite guide field is required to break initial 2D symmetry and facilitate escape from island structures. We show that reconnection with a guide field comparable to the reconnecting field generates the greatest number of energetic electrons, a regime where both (a) the Fermi mechanism is an efficient driver and (b) energetic electrons may freely access acceleration sites. These results have important implications for electron acceleration in solar flares and reconnection-driven dissipation in turbulence.

  16. Status of Galileo interim radiation electron model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, H. B.; Jun, I.; Ratliff, J. M.; Evans, R. W.; Clough, G. A.; McEntire, R. W.

    2003-01-01

    Measurements of the high energy, omni-directional electron environment by the Galileo spacecraft Energetic Particle Detector (EDP) were used to develop a new model of Jupiter's trapped electron radiation in the jovian equatorial plane for the range 8 to 16 Jupiter radii.

  17. November 2013 Analysis of High Energy Electrons on the Japan Experimental Module (JEM: Kibo)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badavi, Francis F.; Matsumoto, Haruhisa; Koga, Kiyokazu; Mertens, Christopher J.; Slaba, Tony C.; Norbury, John W.

    2015-01-01

    Albedo (precipitating/splash) electrons, created by galactic cosmic rays (GCR) interaction with the upper atmosphere move upwards away from the surface of the earth. In the past validation work these particles were often considered to have negligible contribution to astronaut radiation exposure on the International Space Station (ISS). Estimates of astronaut exposure based on the available Computer Aided Design (CAD) models of ISS consistently underestimated measurements onboard ISS when the contribution of albedo particles to exposure were neglected. Recent measurements of high energy electrons outside ISS Japan Experimental Module (JEM) using Exposed Facility (EF), Space Environment Data Acquisition Equipment - Attached Payload (SEDA-AP) and Standard DOse Monitor (SDOM), indicates the presence of high energy electrons at ISS altitude. In this presentation the status of these energetic electrons is reviewed and mechanism for the creation of these particles inside/outside South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) region explained. In addition, limited dosimetric evaluation of these electrons at 600 MeV and 10 GeV is presented.

  18. Helium trapping at erbium oxide precipitates in erbium hydride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foiles, Stephen M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Battaile, Corbett Chandler [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-02-01

    The formation of He bubbles in erbium tritides is a significant process in the aging of these materials. Due to the long-standing uncertainty about the initial nucleation process of these bubbles, there is interest in mechanisms that can lead to the localization of He in erbium hydrides. Previous work has been unable to identify nucleation sites in homogeneous erbium hydride. This work builds on the experimental observation that erbium hydrides have nano- scale erbium oxide precipitates due to the high thermodynamic stability of erbium oxide and the ubiquitous presence of oxygen during materials processing. Fundamental DFT calculations indicate that the He is energetically favored in the oxide relative to the bulk hydride. Activation energies for the motion of He in the oxide and at the oxide-hydride interface indicate that trapping is kinetically feasible. A simple kinetic Monte Carlo model is developed that demonstrates the degree of trapping of He as a function of temperature and oxide fraction.

  19. Middle atmosphere NO/x/ production due to ion propulsion induced radiation belt proton precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aikin, A. C.; Jackman, C. H.

    1980-01-01

    The suggestion that keV Ar(+) resulting from ion propulsion operations during solar power satellite construction could cause energetic proton precipitation from the inner radiation belt is examined to determine if such precipitation could cause significant increases in middle atmosphere nitric oxide concentrations thereby adversely affecting stratospheric ozone. It is found that the initial production rate of NO (mole/cu cm-sec) at 50 km is 130 times that due to nitrous oxide reacting with excited oxygen. However, since the time required to empty the inner belt of protons is about 1 sec and short compared to the replenishment time due to neutron decay, precipitation of inner radiation belt protons will have no adverse atmospheric environmental effect.

  20. Characterization of energetic and non-energetic polymers for laser ablation propulsion applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paturi, Prem Kiran; Chelikani, Leela; Billa, Narasimha Rao; Guthikonda, Nagaraju; Jana, Tushar; Acrhem Team; School Of Chemistry Team

    2015-06-01

    Energetic Polymers, considered to be cleaner, environmental friendly materials are one of the primary candidates for future plasma thrusters. For e.g., energetic hydroxyl terminated polybutadiene (HTPB) is being used as a binder for high-performance composite propellants. Understanding the conversion of optical energy to kinetic energy is essential in evaluating these materials as thrusters. Spatio-temporal evolution of laser ablative (LA) and blow-off (BO) shock waves (SW) during laser excitation provide a valuable insight into the energy release of the polymers. LASW and LBOSW during 7 ns laser pulse (532 nm, 10Hz) interaction with ~ 200 micron thick HTPB and its variants with energetic additives taken in the form of a sheet were studied simultaneously using defocused shadowgraphic imaging over 0.2 - 30 μs time scales. The results were compared with non-energetic polyvinyl chloride (PVC) under same experimental conditions. The SW was observed to propagate faster through the HTPB variant compared to HTPB. Appearance of LBOSW at different time scales for the polymers revealed the shock propagation characteristics through the polymers. The work is supported by Defence Research and Developement Organization, India through Grants-in-Aid Program.

  1. Energetics of hydrogen bonding in proteins: a model compound study.

    OpenAIRE

    Habermann, S. M.; Murphy, K. P.

    1996-01-01

    Differences in the energetics of amide-amide and amide-hydroxyl hydrogen bonds in proteins have been explored from the effect of hydroxyl groups on the structure and dissolution energetics of a series of crystalline cyclic dipeptides. The calorimetrically determined energetics are interpreted in light of the crystal structures of the studied compounds. Our results indicate that the amide-amide and amide-hydroxyl hydrogen bonds both provide considerable enthalpic stability, but that the amide-...

  2. The Global Precipitation Measurement Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Gail

    2014-05-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission's Core satellite, scheduled for launch at the end of February 2014, is well designed estimate precipitation from 0.2 to 110 mm/hr and to detect falling snow. Knowing where and how much rain and snow falls globally is vital to understanding how weather and climate impact both our environment and Earth's water and energy cycles, including effects on agriculture, fresh water availability, and responses to natural disasters. The design of the GPM Core Observatory is an advancement of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM)'s highly successful rain-sensing package [3]. The cornerstone of the GPM mission is the deployment of a Core Observatory in a unique 65o non-Sun-synchronous orbit to serve as a physics observatory and a calibration reference to improve precipitation measurements by a constellation of 8 or more dedicated and operational, U.S. and international passive microwave sensors. The Core Observatory will carry a Ku/Ka-band Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) and a multi-channel (10-183 GHz) GPM Microwave Radiometer (GMI). The DPR will provide measurements of 3-D precipitation structures and microphysical properties, which are key to achieving a better understanding of precipitation processes and improving retrieval algorithms for passive microwave radiometers. The combined use of DPR and GMI measurements will place greater constraints on possible solutions to radiometer retrievals to improve the accuracy and consistency of precipitation retrievals from all constellation radiometers. Furthermore, since light rain and falling snow account for a significant fraction of precipitation occurrence in middle and high latitudes, the GPM instruments extend the capabilities of the TRMM sensors to detect falling snow, measure light rain, and provide, for the first time, quantitative estimates of microphysical properties of precipitation particles. The GPM Core Observatory was developed and tested at NASA

  3. ULYSSES JUPITER EPAC OMNI-DIRECTIONAL ELECTRON FLUX

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains Ulysses Energetic Particle Composition Experiment (EPAC) 1 hour averaged omni-directional electron flux data from the Ulysses Jupiter...

  4. Preliminary Hazard Analysis of Supercritical Fluid Separation of Energetic Materials

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1997-01-01

    .... Army Research Laboratory (ARL) and elsewhere, particularly at the Phasex Corporation, Lawrence, MA, has demonstrated the feasibility of separating the energetic moieties by use of supercritical CO2...

  5. Study of energetic particle physics with advanced ECEI system on the HL-2A tokamak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi Zhongbing

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the physics of energetic particles (EP is crucial for the burning plasmas in next generation fusion devices such as ITER. In this work, three types of internal kink modes (a saturated internal kink mode (SK, a resonant internal kink mode (RK, and a double e-fishbone excited by energetic particles in the low density discharges during ECRH/ECCD heating have been studied by the newly developed 24(poloidal × 16(radial = 384 channel ECEI system on the HL-2A tokamak. The SK and RK rotate in the electron diamagnetic direction poloidally and are destabilized by the energetic trapped electrons. The SK is destabilized in the case of qmin > 1, while the RK is destabilized in the case of qmin < 1. The double e-fishbone, which has two m/n = 1/1 modes propagating in the opposite directions poloidally, has been observed during plasma current ramp-up with counter-ECCD. Strong thermal transfer and mode coupling between the two m/n = 1/1 modes have been studied.

  6. Energetics of the terrestrial bow shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamrin, Maria; Gunell, Herbert; Norqvist, Patrik

    2017-04-01

    The solar wind is the primary energy source for the magnetospheric energy budget. Energy can enter through the magnetopause both as kinetic energy (plasma entering via e.g. magnetic reconnection and impulsive penetration) and as electromagnetic energy (e.g. by the conversion of solar wind kinetic energy into electromagnetic energy in magnetopause generators). However, energy is extracted from the solar wind already at the bow shock, before it encounters the terrestrial magnetopause. At the bow shock the supersonic solar wind is slowed down and heated, and the region near the bow shock is known to host many complex processes, including the accelerating of particles and the generation of waves. The processes at and near the bow shock can be discussed in terms of energetics: In a generator (load) process kinetic energy is converted to (from) electromagnetic energy. Bow shock regions where the solar wind is decelerated correspond to generators, while regions where particles are energized (accelerated and heated) correspond to loads. Recently, it has been suggested that currents from the bow shock generator should flow across the magnetosheath and connect to the magnetospause current systems [Siebert and Siscoe, 2002; Lopez et al., 2011]. In this study we use data from the Magnetospheric MultiScale (MMS) mission to investigate the energetics of the bow shock and the current closure, and we compare with the MHD simulations of Lopez et al., 2011.

  7. Bucket transport of energetic ions in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yakovenko, Yu.V., E-mail: yakovenko@kinr.kiev.ua [Institute for Nuclear Research, Prospekt Nauky 47, Kyiv 03680 (Ukraine); National University of Kyiv Mohyla Academy, Vul. Skovorody 2, Kyiv 04070 (Ukraine); Burdo, O.S.; Kolesnichenko, Ya.I.; Tyshchenko, M.H. [Institute for Nuclear Research, Prospekt Nauky 47, Kyiv 03680 (Ukraine)

    2015-09-25

    The so-called “bucket transport” of energetic ions — the spatial mixing of these ions due to spatial displacement of resonances — is studied with special attention to quasi-steady-state magnetic perturbations. A Hamiltonian formalism suitable to the case when the resonance displacement results from the collisional slowing down of the particles and the temporal evolution of the safety factor profile is suggested. The energy flux produced due to the bucket transport is shown to be considerable in configurations with low shear. It is shown that the bucket transport flux associated with magnetic islands tends to be localized at some distance from the islands. The bucket transport caused by perturbations with non-zero frequencies is also discussed. - Highlights: • The bucket transport of energetic ions is the spatial mixing due to spatial displacements of resonances. • The bucket transport may be of importance when the magnetic shear is small. • The particle and energy fluxes are located apart from the magnetic islands causing the transport. • The transport due to non-zero-frequency perturbations is less sensitive to the shear and may contribute to ash removal.

  8. The magnetosphere of Neptune: Hot plasmas and energetic particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauk, B. H.; Keath, E. P.; Kane, M.; Krimigis, S. M.; Cheng, A. F.; Acuña, M. H.; Armstrong, T. P.; Ness, N. F.

    A comprehensive overview is provided of the hot plasmas and energetic particles (≳keV) observed in the vicinity of Neptune by the low energy charged particle (LECP) experiment on the Voyager 2 spacecraft. The LECP data are ordered with respect to magnetic field data and models derived from the Voyager magnetometer experiment. The findings include the following: (1) Weakly enhanced ion and electron fluxes were observed at the position of the subsolar bow shock. (2) Magnetic-field-aligned, antiplanetward streaming ions and electrons were sporadically observed within the inbound (subsolar) and outbound (tail flank) magnetosheaths, and within the unique “pole-on” cusp region encountered during the inbound trajectory. (3) Tangential ion streaming was observed at the positions of both the inbound (dawnward streaming) and outbound (tailward streaming) magnctopauscs. (4) A distinct “trans-Triton” ion population outside the minimum L shell of Triton is characterized by large angular anisotropics that show that heavy ions (presumably N+) are a likely constituent This population is at least partially corotating with Neptune out to at least L = 27 RNand is also characterized at times by cigar-shaped (field-aligned) pitch angle distributions, possibly indicative of an interaction with a neutral torus. (5) Within the middle magnetospheric regions (inside Triton), pitch angle distributions have well-developed trapped or “pancake” shapes. Also, in contrast to Uranus, flux profiles show no evidence of substorm-generated azimuthal asymmetries. (6) Triton (and/or Triton-generated neutral gas) controls the outer bounds of the hot plasmas and energetic particles, although the mechanism of that control is unclear. Also, there are clear charged particle signatures of satellite 1989NI and of ring 1989N3R. However, the large number of calculated critical L shell positions associated with all of the rings and satellites renders impractical at this time the unique determination

  9. ERNE observations of energetic particles associated with Earth-directed coronal mass ejections in April and May, 1997

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Anttila

    2000-11-01

    Full Text Available Two Earth-directed coronal mass ejections (CMEs, which were most effective in energetic (~1–50 MeV particle acceleration during the first 18 months since the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO launch, occurred on April 7 and May 12, 1997. In the analysis of these events we have deconvoluted the injection spectrum of energetic protons by using the method described by Anttila et al. In order to apply the method developed earlier for data of a rotating satellite (Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites, GOES, we first had to develop a method to calculate the omnidirectional energetic particle intensities from the observations of Energetic and Relativistic Nuclei and Electrons (ERNE, which is an energetic particle detector onboard the three-axis stabilized SOHO spacecraft. The omnidirectional intensities are calculated by fitting an exponential pitch angle distribution from directional information of energetic protons observed by ERNE. The results of the analysis show that, compared to a much faster and more intensive CMEs observed during the previous solar maximum, the acceleration efficiency decreases fast when the shock propagates outward from the Sun. The particles injected at distances <0.5 AU from the Sun dominate the particle flux during the whole period, when the shock propagates to the site of the spacecraft. The main portion of particles injected by the shock during its propagation further outward from the Sun are trapped around the shock, and are seen as an intensity increase at the time of the shock passage.Key words: Interplanetary physics (interplanetary shocks – Solar physics, astrophysics and astronomy (energetic particles; flares and mass ejections

  10. ERNE observations of energetic particles associated with Earth-directed coronal mass ejections in April and May, 1997

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Anttila

    Full Text Available Two Earth-directed coronal mass ejections (CMEs, which were most effective in energetic (~1–50 MeV particle acceleration during the first 18 months since the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO launch, occurred on April 7 and May 12, 1997. In the analysis of these events we have deconvoluted the injection spectrum of energetic protons by using the method described by Anttila et al. In order to apply the method developed earlier for data of a rotating satellite (Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites, GOES, we first had to develop a method to calculate the omnidirectional energetic particle intensities from the observations of Energetic and Relativistic Nuclei and Electrons (ERNE, which is an energetic particle detector onboard the three-axis stabilized SOHO spacecraft. The omnidirectional intensities are calculated by fitting an exponential pitch angle distribution from directional information of energetic protons observed by ERNE. The results of the analysis show that, compared to a much faster and more intensive CMEs observed during the previous solar maximum, the acceleration efficiency decreases fast when the shock propagates outward from the Sun. The particles injected at distances <0.5 AU from the Sun dominate the particle flux during the whole period, when the shock propagates to the site of the spacecraft. The main portion of particles injected by the shock during its propagation further outward from the Sun are trapped around the shock, and are seen as an intensity increase at the time of the shock passage.

    Key words: Interplanetary physics (interplanetary shocks – Solar physics, astrophysics and astronomy (energetic particles; flares and mass ejections

  11. Nonlinear longitudinal resonance interaction of energetic charged particles and VLF waves in the magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkalcevic, S.

    1982-01-01

    The longitudinal resonance of waves and energetic electrons in the Earth's magnetosphere, and the possible role this resonance may play in generating various magnetospheric phenomena are studied. The derivation of time-averaged nonlinear equations of motion for energetic particles longitudinally resonant with a whistler mode wave propagating with nonzero wave normal is considered. It is shown that the wave magnetic forces can be neglected at lower particle pitch angles, while they become equal to or larger than the wave electric forces for alpha 20 deg. The time-averaged equations of motion were used in test particle simulation which were done for a wide range of wave amplitudes, wave normals, particle pitch angles, particle parallel velocities, and in an inhomogeneous medium such as the magnetosphere. It was found that there are two classes of particles, trapped and untrapped, and that the scattering and energy exchange for those two groups exhibit significantly different behavior.

  12. VLF waves from ground-based transmitters observed by the Van Allen Probes: Statistical model and effects on plasmaspheric electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qianli; Mourenas, Didier; Li, Wen; Artemyev, Anton; Thorne, Richard M.

    2017-07-01

    Whistler mode very low frequency (VLF) waves from powerful ground-based transmitters can resonantly scatter energetic plasmaspheric electrons and precipitate them into the atmosphere. A comprehensive 4 year statistics of Van Allen Probes measurements is carried out to assess their consequences on the dynamics of the inner radiation belt and slot region. Statistical models of the measured wave electric field power and of the inferred full wave magnetic amplitude are provided as a function of L, magnetic local time, season, and Kp over L = 1-3, revealing the localization of VLF wave intensity and its variation with geomagnetic activity over 2012-2016. Since this VLF wave model can be directly used together with existing hiss and lightning-generated wave models in radiation belt simulation codes, we perform numerical calculations of the corresponding quasi-linear pitch angle diffusion rates, allowing us to demonstrate the crucial role played by VLF waves from transmitters in energetic electron loss at L < 2.5.

  13. Radar-Derived Quantitative Precipitation Estimation Based on Precipitation Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A method for improving radar-derived quantitative precipitation estimation is proposed. Tropical vertical profiles of reflectivity (VPRs are first determined from multiple VPRs. Upon identifying a tropical VPR, the event can be further classified as either tropical-stratiform or tropical-convective rainfall by a fuzzy logic (FL algorithm. Based on the precipitation-type fields, the reflectivity values are converted into rainfall rate using a Z-R relationship. In order to evaluate the performance of this rainfall classification scheme, three experiments were conducted using three months of data and two study cases. In Experiment I, the Weather Surveillance Radar-1988 Doppler (WSR-88D default Z-R relationship was applied. In Experiment II, the precipitation regime was separated into convective and stratiform rainfall using the FL algorithm, and corresponding Z-R relationships were used. In Experiment III, the precipitation regime was separated into convective, stratiform, and tropical rainfall, and the corresponding Z-R relationships were applied. The results show that the rainfall rates obtained from all three experiments match closely with the gauge observations, although Experiment II could solve the underestimation, when compared to Experiment I. Experiment III significantly reduced this underestimation and generated the most accurate radar estimates of rain rate among the three experiments.

  14. Complexing-precipitating geochemical barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savenko, A. V.

    2017-02-01

    New types of geochemical barriers on which chemical elements are immobilized as a result of combined complex formation and precipitation of barely soluble mineral phases are examined. A significant concentration of major components (Fe, Al) forming more stable complexes than an immobilized component X in the material is a necessary condition for this type of geochemical barriers. Filtration of the solution through a geochemical barrier is accompanied by substitution of X in the complex with a major component. As a result, the activity of X in the free state increases, and one barely soluble mineral phase or another of the component X precipitates when the state of saturation is achieved.

  15. Fused electron deficient semiconducting polymers for air stable electron transport

    KAUST Repository

    Onwubiko, Ada

    2018-01-23

    Conventional semiconducting polymer synthesis typically involves transition metal-mediated coupling reactions that link aromatic units with single bonds along the backbone. Rotation around these bonds contributes to conformational and energetic disorder and therefore potentially limits charge delocalisation, whereas the use of transition metals presents difficulties for sustainability and application in biological environments. Here we show that a simple aldol condensation reaction can prepare polymers where double bonds lock-in a rigid backbone conformation, thus eliminating free rotation along the conjugated backbone. This polymerisation route requires neither organometallic monomers nor transition metal catalysts and offers a reliable design strategy to facilitate delocalisation of frontier molecular orbitals, elimination of energetic disorder arising from rotational torsion and allowing closer interchain electronic coupling. These characteristics are desirable for high charge carrier mobilities. Our polymers with a high electron affinity display long wavelength NIR absorption with air stable electron transport in solution processed organic thin film transistors.

  16. Influence of cooling rate and tempering on precipitation and hardness of vanadium microalloyed steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guenduez, S. [Karabuek Technical Education Faculty, Zonguldak Karaelmas University, 78200 Karabuek (Turkey)]. E-mail: sgunduz@hotmail.com; Cochrane, R.C. [Department of Materials, School of Process, Environmental and Materials Engineering, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: mtlrcc@ecu-01.novell.leeds.ac.uk

    2005-07-01

    In the present work precipitate distributions in a C-Mn-Al-V-N microalloyed steel and hardness were examined for as-received, heat-treated and heat-treated and tempered samples. Examination of as-received and heat-treated samples from the vanadium microalloyed steels using transmission electron microscopy revealed quite different precipitate distributions. The type and sizes of the precipitate particles and also hardness of the steel samples were markedly affected as the austenitisation time and cooling rates were changed. Tempering steel samples after air cooling produced fine matrix precipitates which are closely spaced, obstruct moving dislocations and hence make the steel harder.

  17. Fe embedded in ice: The impacts of sublimation and energetic particle bombardment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankland, Victoria L.; Plane, John M. C.

    2015-05-01

    Icy particles containing a variety of Fe compounds are present in the upper atmospheres of planets such as the Earth and Saturn. In order to explore the role of ice sublimation and energetic ion bombardment in releasing Fe species into the gas phase, Fe-dosed ice films were prepared under UHV conditions in the laboratory. Temperature-programmed desorption studies of Fe/H2O films revealed that no Fe atoms or Fe-containing species co-desorbed along with the H2O molecules. This implies that when noctilucent ice cloud particles sublimate in the terrestrial mesosphere, the metallic species embedded in them will coalesce to form residual particles. Sputtering of the Fe-ice films by energetic Ar+ ions was shown to be an efficient mechanism for releasing Fe into the gas phase, with a yield of 0.08 (Ar+ energy=600 eV). Extrapolating with a semi-empirical sputtering model to the conditions of a proton aurora indicates that sputtering by energetic protons (>100 keV) should also be efficient. However, the proton flux in even an intense aurora will be too low for the resulting injection of Fe species into the gas phase to compete with that from meteoric ablation. In contrast, sputtering of the icy particles in the main rings of Saturn by energetic O+ ions may be the source of recently observed Fe+ in the Saturnian magnetosphere. Electron sputtering (9.5 keV) produced no detectable Fe atoms or Fe-containing species. Finally, it was observed that Fe(OH)2 was produced when Fe was dosed onto an ice film at 140 K (but not at 95 K). Electronic structure theory shows that the reaction which forms this hydroxide from adsorbed Fe has a large barrier of about 0.7 eV, from which we conclude that the reaction requires both translationally hot Fe atoms and mobile H2O molecules on the ice surface.

  18. Induced calcium carbonate precipitation using Bacillus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifan, Mostafa; Samani, Ali Khajeh; Berenjian, Aydin

    2016-12-01

    Microbially induced calcium carbonate precipitation is an emerging process for the production of self-healing concrete. This study was aimed to investigate the effects and optimum conditions on calcium carbonate biosynthesis. Bacillus licheniformis, Bacillus sphaericus, yeast extract, urea, calcium chloride and aeration were found to be the most significant factors affecting the biomineralization of calcium carbonate. It was noticed that the morphology of microbial calcium carbonate was mainly affected by the genera of bacteria (cell surface properties), the viscosity of the media and the type of electron acceptors (Ca2+). The maximum calcium carbonate concentration of 33.78 g/L was achieved at the optimum conditions This value is the highest concentration reported in the literature.

  19. Stability investigations of zinc and cobalt precipitates immobilized by in situ bioprecipitation (ISBP) process

    KAUST Repository

    Satyawali, Yamini

    2010-09-01

    In situ bioprecipitation (ISBP), which involves immobilizing the metals as precipitates (mainly sulphides) in the solid phase, is an effective method of metal removal from contaminated groundwater. This study investigated the stability of metal precipitates formed after ISBP in two different solid-liquid matrices (artificial and natural). The artificial matrix consisted of sand, Zn (200mgL-1), artificial groundwater and a carbon source (electron donor). Here the stability of the Zn precipitates was evaluated by manipulation of redox and pH. The natural system matrices included aquifer material and groundwater samples collected from three different metal (Zn and Co) contaminated sites and different carbon sources were provided as electron donors. In the natural matrices, metal precipitates stability was assessed by changing aquifer redox conditions, sequential extraction, and BIOMET® assay. The results indicated that, in the artificial matrix, redox manipulation did not impact the Zn precipitates. However the sequential pH change proved detrimental, releasing 58% of the precipitated Zn back into liquid phase. In natural matrices, the applied carbon source largely affected the stability of metal precipitates. Elemental analysis performed on the precipitates formed in natural matrix showed that the main elements of the precipitates were sulphur with Zn and Co. © 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  20. Validation of Predicted Precipitate Compositions in Al-Si-Ge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dracup, B; Turchi, P A; Radmilovic, V; Dahmen, U; Morris, Jr., J W

    2004-04-21

    Aged alloys of Al-0.5Si-0.5Ge (at.%) contain diamond cubic (A4) precipitates in a dispersion that is much finer than is found in alloys with Si or Ge alone. To help understand this aging behavior, the present work was undertaken to determine alloy composition as a function of aging temperature. The composition was estimated theoretically using a CALPHAD approach, and measured experimentally with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) in a high-resolution electron microscope. Theory and experiment are in reasonable agreement. As the aging temperature rises, the precipitates become enriched in Si, changing from 50 at. % in the low-temperature limit to about 80 at.% Si as temperature approaches 433 C, the high-temperature limit of the precipitate field.

  1. Synchrotron X-ray induced solution precipitation of nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, H J; Hwu, Y; Tsai, W L

    2003-01-01

    By irradiating a solution in electroless Ni deposition using synchrotron X-rays, Ni composite was found to nucleate homogeneously and eventually precipitate in the form of nanoparticles. The size of the nanoparticles precipitated is rather uniform (100-300 nm depending on the applied temperature). By the addition of an organic acid, well-dispersed nanoparticles could be effectively deposited on glass substrate. The hydrated electrons (e sub a sub q sup -), products of radiolysis of water molecules by synchrotron X-rays, may be responsible for the effective reduction of the metal ions, resulting in homogeneous nucleation and nanoparticle formation. Our results suggest that synchrotron X-ray can be used to induce solution precipitation of nanoparticles and therefore lead to a new method of producing nanostructured particles and coating.

  2. Homogeneous Precipitation Synthesis and Magnetic Properties of Cobalt Ferrite Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhigang Liu

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic nanoparticles (NPs of cobalt ferrite have been synthesized via a homogeneous precipitation route using hexamethylenetetramine (HMT as the precipitant. The particle size, crystal structure, and magnetic properties of the synthesized particles were investigated by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and vibrating sample magnetometer. The NPs are of cubic inverse spinel structure and nearly spherical shape. With the increase of oxidation time from 30 to 180 minutes in the reaction solution at 90∘C, the average particle size increases from ~30 nm to ~45 nm. The as-synthesized NPs ~30 nm in size show higher Ms (61.5 emu/g and moderate Hc (945 Oe and Mr/Ms (0.45 value compared with the materials synthesized by coprecipitation method using NaOH as precipitate at high pH value.

  3. Isothermal Aging Precipitate of TB17 Titanium Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Zhe

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM, X-Ray Diffraction(XRD and Optical Microscope(OMwere employed to investigate the aging precipitation behavior of a new type of ultra-high strength TB17 titanium alloy. The results show that during heat solution treated in the β phase field followed by aging the secondary α phase is nucleated, precipitated and grew on the β phase matrix,and the precipitated phase is lamellar structure which has burgers relation with the matrix. The secondary α phase content is increased rapidly and finally reach a steady-state as aging time increased and the final product of aging consists of α phase and β phase. there is a good linearity relationship between the content of secondary α phase and the hardness of age hardening. The TB17 titanium alloy isothermal phase transformation kinetics can be described by JMAK equation.

  4. Electrostatic Precipitator (ESP) TRAINING MANUAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    The manual assists engineers in using a computer program, the ESPVI 4.0W, that models all elements of an electrostatic precipitator (ESP). The program is a product of the Electric Power Research Institute and runs in the Windows environment. Once an ESP is accurately modeled, the...

  5. Acid Precipitation: Causes and Consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babich, Harvey; And Others

    1980-01-01

    This article is the first of three articles in a series on the acid rain problem in recent years. Discussed are the causes of acid precipitation and its consequences for the abiotic and biotic components of the terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, and for man-made materials. (Author/SA)

  6. Waste and Simulant Precipitation Issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steele, W.V.

    2000-11-29

    As Savannah River Site (SRS) personnel have studied methods of preparing high-level waste for vitrification in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), questions have arisen with regard to the formation of insoluble waste precipitates at inopportune times. One option for decontamination of the SRS waste streams employs the use of an engineered form of crystalline silicotitanate (CST). Testing of the process during FY 1999 identified problems associated with the formation of precipitates during cesium sorption tests using CST. These precipitates may, under some circumstances, obstruct the pores of the CST particles and, hence, interfere with the sorption process. In addition, earlier results from the DWPF recycle stream compatibility testing have shown that leaching occurs from the CST when it is stored at 80 C in a high-pH environment. Evidence was established that some level of components of the CST, such as silica, was leached from the CST. This report describes the results of equilibrium modeling and precipitation studies associated with the overall stability of the waste streams, CST component leaching, and the presence of minor components in the waste streams.

  7. Energetic assessment of soybean biodiesel obtainment in West ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    2014-07-16

    Jul 16, 2014 ... This work presents the result of a research that aimed to assess soybean-based biodiesel production in .... and; is the Energetic Efficiency. In order to extract soybean oil, the energetic consumption was measured for the milling of 1 kg of soybean grains. The production ..... Ethanol production using corn,.

  8. Particle coating – a novel trend in energetic materials engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abadjieva, E.; Heijden, A.E.D.M. van der; Creyghton, Y.L.M.

    2010-01-01

    The development of new energetic materials with enhanced blast properties requires better understanding of factors as particle type, size and particle/matrix distribution. The ability of growing a coating on particles opens new possibilities in energetic materials engineering. Functionalities as

  9. Benchtop Energetics: Research Progress, Concept Evaluation, and Apparatus Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-31

    spin coater and drying oven. FY05 Objectives: In FY05 we will complete the assembly and testing of the permanent version of the main...Preparation ....................................................... 21 1. Spin Coating of Energetic Thin Films...will produce nanometric energetic film coatings on metal coated substrates via spin coating and spray coating methods. Teflon AF is an amorphous

  10. Energetic parameters in pregnant and lactating rat ( Lasiopodomys ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Energetic parameters in pregnant and lactating rat (Lasiopodomys brandtii) fed high- or low-fibre diets. OO Adewumi, XY Zhang, DH Wang. Abstract. The effect of diet quality (high-fibre (HF) or low-fibre (LF)) on energetic parameters in pregnant and lactating rats (Lasiopodomys brandtii) was examined. There was no ...

  11. Energetic adaptations persist after bariatric surgery in severely obese adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Energetic adaptations induced by bariatric surgery have not been studied in adolescents or for extended periods postsurgery. Energetic, metabolic, and neuroendocrine responses to Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery were investigated in extremely obese adolescents. At baseline and at 1.5, 6, and...

  12. Sodium Pentazolate: a Nitrogen Rich Energetic Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleynik, Ivan; Steele, Brad

    Sodium pentazolates NaN5 and Na2N5, new energetic materials, are discovered using first principles crystal structure search for the compounds of varying amounts of elemental sodium and nitrogen. The pentazole anion (N5-s)i stabilized in the condensed phase by sodium Na+ cations at pressures exceeding 20 GPa, and becomes metastable upon release of pressure, i.e. at ambient conditions. The sodium azide (NaN3) precursor for the new compounds is predicted to undergo a chemical transformation above 50 GPa into sodium pentazolates NaN5 and Na2N5. The calculated Raman spectrum of NaN5 is in agreement with the experimental Raman spectrum of a previously unidentified substance appearing upon compression and heating of NaN3 precursor, thus confirming the appearance of the new compound.

  13. Liquid surface model for carbon nanotube energetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solov'yov, Ilia; Mathew, Maneesh; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2008-01-01

    In the present paper we developed a model for calculating the energy of single-wall carbon nanotubes of arbitrary chirality. This model, which we call as the liquid surface model, predicts the energy of a nanotube with relative error less than 1% once its chirality and the total number of atoms...... an important insight in the energetics and stability of nanotubes of different chirality and might be important for the understanding of nanotube growth process. For the computations we use empirical Brenner and Tersoff potentials and discuss their applicability to the study of carbon nanotubes. From...... the calculated energies we determine the elastic properties of the single-wall carbon nanotubes (Young modulus, curvature constant) and perform a comparison with available experimental measurements and earlier theoretical predictions....

  14. Forces and energetics of intermittent swimming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floryan, Daniel; Van Buren, Tyler; Smits, Alexander J.

    2017-08-01

    Experiments are reported on intermittent swimming motions. Water tunnel experiments on a nominally two-dimensional pitching foil show that the mean thrust and power scale linearly with the duty cycle, from a value of 0.2 all the way up to continuous motions, indicating that individual bursts of activity in intermittent motions are independent of each other. This conclusion is corroborated by particle image velocimetry (PIV) flow visualizations, which show that the main vortical structures in the wake do not change with duty cycle. The experimental data also demonstrate that intermittent motions are generally energetically advantageous over continuous motions. When metabolic energy losses are taken into account, this conclusion is maintained for metabolic power fractions less than 1.

  15. Nonlinear Electromagnetic Interactions in Energetic Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Wood, M A; Moore, D S

    2016-01-01

    We study the scattering of electromagnetic waves in anisotropic energetic materials. Nonlinear light-matter interactions in molecular crystals result in frequency-conversion and polarization changes. Applied electromagnetic fields of moderate intensity can induce these nonlinear effects without triggering chemical decomposition, offering a mechanism for non-ionizing identification of explosives. We use molecular dynamics simulations to compute such two-dimensional Raman spectra in the terahertz range for planar slabs made of PETN and ammonium nitrate. We discuss third-harmonic generation and polarization-conversion processes in such materials. These observed far-field spectral features of the reflected or transmitted light may serve as an alternative tool for stand-off explosive detection.

  16. Energetics of swimming of schooling fish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffensen, John Fleng

    2012-01-01

    , i.e. nearest neighbour distance, water temperature, gill oxygen extraction, gill ventilation capacity, etc. Fish swimming in a school have been shown to have energetic advantages when trailing behind neighbours, resulting in up to 20% energy saving. The effect of this energy saving is that the fish......Soc for experimental Biol Annual Meeting - Salzburg 2012 John F. Steffensen (University of Copenhagen, Denmark) When a fish school swims through the water, every individual consumes a certain amount of oxygen, which means that less will be available for the trailing fish in the school. In 1967 Mc......Farland and Moss reported that the oxygen saturation decreased approximately 30% from the front to the rear of an approximately 150-m long school of mullets swimming in normoxic water. They also observed that the decline in oxygen saturation at the rear resulted in the school disintegrating into smaller separate...

  17. Effect of Sawtooth Oscillations on Energetic Ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R.B. White; V.V. Lutsenko; Ya. I. Kolesnichenko; Yu. V. Yakovenko

    1999-12-10

    The work summarizes results of the authors' studies on the energetic ion transport induced by sawtooth oscillations in tokamaks. The main attention is paid to description of physical mechanisms responsible for the transport. In addition to overview, the work contains new material. The new results concern the resonant interaction of the particles and the electromagnetic field of the sawtooth crash. In particular, it is discovered that the dominant harmonic of the crash (m = n = 1) can lead to stochastic motion of particles having large orbit width (potatoes). Regular motion of potatoes and quasi-stagnation particles in the presence of an n = 1 mode is studied, and their characteristic displacements associated with quick switching on/off the mode are found.

  18. Towards coherent control of energetic material initiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenfield, Margo T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mcgrane, Shawn D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Scharff, R Jason [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Moore, David S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Direct optical initiation (DOI) of energetic materials using coherent control of localized energy deposition requires depositing energy into the material to produce a critical size hot spot, which allows propagation of the reaction and thereby initiation, The hot spot characteristics needed for growth to initiation can be studied using quantum controlled initiation (QCI). Achieving direct quantum controlled initiation (QCI) in condensed phase systems requires optimally shaped ultrafast laser pulses to coherently guide the energy flow along the desired paths. As a test of our quantum control capabilities we have successfully demonstrated our ability to control the reaction pathway of the chemical system stilbene. An acousto-optical modulator based pulse shaper was used at 266 nm, in a shaped pump/supercontinuum probe technique, to enhance and suppress th relative yields of the cis- to trans-stilbene isomerization. The quantum control techniques tested in the stilbene experiments are currently being used to investigate QCI of the explosive hexanitroazobenzene (HNAB).

  19. Precipitation of neptunium dioxide from aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, K E

    1999-12-01

    Tens of thousands of metric tons of highly radioactive, nuclear waste have been generated in the US. Currently, there is no treatment or disposal facility for these wastes. Of the radioactive elements in high-level nuclear waste, neptunium (Np) is of particular concern because it has a long half-life and may potentially be very mobile in groundwaters associated with a proposed underground disposal site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Aqueous Np concentrations observed in previous, short-term solubility experiments led to calculated potential doses exceeding proposed long-term regulatory limits. However, thermodynamic data for Np at 25 C showed that these observed aqueous Np concentrations were supersaturated with respect to crystalline NpO{sub 2}. It was hypothesized that NpO{sub 2} is the thermodynamically stable solid phase in aqueous solution, but it is slow to form in an aqueous solution of NpO{sub 2}{sup +} on the time scale of previous experiments. The precipitation of NpO{sub 2} would provide significantly lower aqueous Np concentrations leading to calculated doses below proposed regulatory limits. To test this hypothesis, solubility experiments were performed at elevated temperature to accelerate any slow precipitation kinetics. Ionic NpO{sub 2}{sup +} (aq) was introduced into very dilute aqueous solutions of NaCl with initial pH values ranging from 6 to 10. The reaction vessels were placed in an oven and allowed to react at 200 C until steady-state aqueous Np concentrations were observed. In all cases, aqueous Np concentrations decreased significantly from the initial value of 10{sup {minus}4} M. The solids that formed were analyzed by x-ray powder diffraction, x-ray absorption spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. The solids were determined to be high-purity crystals of NpO{sub 2}. This is the first time that crystalline NpO{sub 2} has been observed to precipitate from NpO{sub 2}{sup +}(aq) in near-neutral aqueous solutions. The results obtained

  20. Energetic dose: Beyond fire and flint?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linder, G.; Rattner, B.; Cohen, J.

    2000-01-01

    Nutritional and bioenergetic interactions influence exposure to environmental chemicals and may affect the risk realized when wildlife are exposed in the field. Here, food-chain analysis focuses on prairie voles (Microtus ochrogaster) and the evaluation of chemical risks associated with paraquat following 10-d dietary exposures. Reproductive effects were measured in 60-d trials that followed exposures to paraquat-tainted feed: control (untainted feed); 21 mg paraquat/kg feed; 63 mg paraquat/kg feed; and feed-restricted control (untainted feed restricted to 60% baseline consumption). Reproductive success was evaluated in control and treated breeding pairs, and a preliminary bioenergetics analysis was completed in parallel to derive exposure dose. Although reproductive performance differed among groups, feed-restriction appeared to be the dominant treatment effect observed in these 10-d feeding exposure/limited reproductive trials. Exposure dose ranged from 3.70-3.76 to 9.41-11.51 mg parquat/kg BW/day at 21 and 63 mg paraquat/kg feed stock exposures, respectively. Energetic doses as ug paraquat/kcal yielded preliminary estimates of energetic costs associated with paraquat exposure, and were similar within treatments for both sexes, ranging from 4.2-5.5 and 13.1-15.0 ug paraquat/kcal for voles exposed to 21 mg/kg feed stock and 63 mg/kg feed stock, respectively. Given the increasing likelihood that environmental chemicals will be found in wildlife habitat at 'acceptable levels', the critical role that wildlife nutrition plays in evaluating ecological risks should be fully integrated into the assessment process. Tools applied to the analysis of risk must gain higher resolution than the relatively crude methods we currently bring to the process.