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Sample records for endotracheal tube cuff

  1. Endotracheal Tube Cuff Management at Altitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-05

    the volume of saliva, if any, leaking around ETT cuffs. To simulate the clinical environment, four transport ventilators (Model 731, Impact...ETT. Table 1. Changes in ETT Cuff Pressure during the Study Method Sea Level (Baseline)a 8,000 fta Sea Level (Post-Flight)a 7.5 mm 8.0 mm...threshold typically required to prevent aspiration of secretions around the cuff. These findings have important clinical implications, as cuff

  2. Endotracheal tube cuff pressure monitoring during neurosurgery - Manual vs. automatic method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukul Kumar Jain

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Inflation and assessment of the endotracheal tube cuff pressure is often not appreciated as a critical aspect of endotracheal intubation. Appropriate endotracheal tube cuff pressure, endotracheal intubation seals the airway to prevent aspiration and provides for positive-pressure ventilation without air leak. Materials and Methods: Correlations between manual methods of assessing the pressure by an experienced anesthesiologists and assessment with maintenance of the pressure within the normal range by the automated pressure controller device were studied in 100 patients divided into two groups. In Group M, endotracheal tube cuff was inflated manually by a trained anesthesiologist and checked for its pressure hourly by cuff pressure monitor till the end of surgery. In Group C, endotracheal tube cuff was inflated by automated cuff pressure controller and pressure was maintained at 25-cm H 2 O throughout the surgeries. Repeated measure ANOVA was applied. Results: Repeated measure ANOVA results showed that average of endotracheal tube cuff pressure of 50 patients taken at seven different points is significantly different (F-value: 171.102, P-value: 0.000. Bonferroni correction test shows that average of endotracheal tube cuff pressure in all six groups are significantly different from constant group (P = 0.000. No case of laryngomalacia, tracheomalacia, tracheal stenosis, tracheoesophageal fistula or aspiration pneumonitis was observed. Conclusions: Endotracheal tube cuff pressure was significantly high when endotracheal tube cuff was inflated manually. The known complications of high endotracheal tube cuff pressure can be avoided if the cuff pressure controller device is used and manual methods cannot be relied upon for keeping the pressure within the recommended levels.

  3. Severed cuff inflation tubing of endotracheal tube: A novel way to prevent cuff deflation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Amrut K; Chaudhuri, Souvik; Joseph, Tim T; Kamble, Deependra; Gotur, Gopal; Venkatesh, Sandeep

    2014-01-01

    A well-secured endotracheal tube (ETT) is essential for safe anesthesia. The ETT has to be fixed with the adhesive plasters or with tie along with adhesive plasters appropriately. It is specially required in patients having beard, in intensive care unit (ICU) patients or in oral surgeries. If re-adjustment of the ETT is necessary, we should be cautious while removal of the plasters and tie, as there may be damage to the cuff inflation system. This can be a rare cause of ETT cuff leak, thus making maintenance of adequate ventilation difficult and requiring re-intubation. In a difficult airway scenario, it can be extremely challenging to re-intubate again. We report an incidence where the ETT cuff tubing was severed while attempting to re-adjust and re-fix the ETT and the patient required re-intubation. Retrospectively, we thought of and describe a safe, reliable and novel technique to prevent cuff deflation of the severed inflation tube. The technique can also be used to monitor cuff pressure in such scenarios.

  4. Effectiveness of the endotracheal tube cuff on the trachea: physical and mechanical aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maira Soliani Del Negro

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The inflation pressure of the endotracheal tube cuff can cause ischemia of the tracheal mucosa at high pressures; thus, it can cause important tracheal morbidity and tracheal microaspiration of the oropharyngeal secretion, or it can even cause pneumonia associated with mechanical ventilation if the pressure of the cuff is insufficient. Objective: In order to investigate the effectiveness of the RUSCH® 7.5 mm endotracheal tube cuff, this study was designed to investigate the physical and mechanical aspects of the cuff in contact with the trachea. Methods: For this end, we developed an in vitro experimental model to assess the flow of dye (methylene blue by the inflated cuff on the wall of the artificial material. We also designed an in vivo study with 12 Large White pigs under endotracheal intubation. We instilled the same dye in the oral cavity of the animals, and we analyzed the presence or not of leakage in the trachea after the region of the cuff after their deaths (animal sacrifice. All cuffs were inflated at the pressure of 30 cmH2O. Results: We observed the passage of fluids through the cuff in all in vitro and in vivo experimental models. Conclusion: We conclude that, as well as several other cuff models in the literature, the RUSCH® 7.5 mm tube cuffs are also not able to completely seal the trachea and thus prevent aspiration of oropharyngeal secretions. Other prevention measures should be taken.

  5. MEASUREMENT OF ENDOTRACHEAL TUBE CUFF PRESSURE IN MECHANICALLYVENTILATED PATIENTS ON ARRIVAL TO INTENSIVE CARE UNIT - A CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY

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    Arun Kumar Ajjappa

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The monitoring of Endotracheal Tube (ETT cuff pressure in intubated patients on arrival to intensive care unit is very essential. The cuff pressure must be within an optimal range of 20-30cm H2O ensuring ventilation with no complications related to cuff overinflation and underinflation. This can be measured with a cuff pressure manometer. The aim of the study is to measure the endotracheal tube cuff pressure in patients on arrival to intensive care unit and to identify prevalence of endotracheal cuff underinflation and overinflation. MATERIALS AND METHODS A cross-sectional study was done on mechanically-ventilated patients who were intubated in casualty (emergency department on arrival to intensive care unit in S.S. Institute of Medical Sciences and Research Centre, Davangere. About 50 critically-ill patients intubated with a high volume, low pressure endotracheal tube were included in the study. An analogue manometer was used to measure the endotracheal tube cuff pressure. It was compared with the recommended level. The settings of mechanical ventilation, endotracheal tube size and peak airway pressure were recorded. RESULTS It was found that the mean cuff pressure was 64.10 cm of H2O with a standard deviation of 32.049. Of the measured cuff pressures, only 2% had pressures within an optimal range (20-30cm of H2O. 88% had cuff pressures more than 30cm of H2O. The mean peak airway pressure found to be 20.50cm of H2O with a Standard Deviation (SD of 5.064. CONCLUSION This study is done to emphasise the importance of cuff pressure measurement in all mechanically-ventilated patients as cuff pressure is found to be high in most of the patients admitted to intensive care unit. Complications of overinflation and underinflation can only be prevented if the acceptable cuff pressures are achieved.

  6. Endotracheal tube cuff pressures during general anaesthesia while using air versus a 50% mixture of nitrous oxide and oxygen as inflating agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesni Joseph Manissery

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was aimed at assessing the efficacy of filling a 50% mixture of nitrous oxide : oxygen (50%N 2 O:O 2 in the endotracheal tube cuff to provide stable cuff pressures during general anaesthesia with 67%N 2 O. The endotracheal tube cuff pressures with air (control as the inflating agent in the tubes were found to have a total mean pressure of 62.60±12.33 at the end of one hour of general anaesthesia. When comparing the endotracheal tube cuff pressures in the Mallinckrodt tubes with that of the Portex tubes, with air as the inflating agent, the Portex tubes showed a significantly lower cuff pressures at the end of one hour. The endotracheal tube cuff pressures with 50%N 2 O:O 2 as the inflating agent showed a total mean pressure of 27.63 ± 3.221 at the end of one hour of general anaesthesia. This indicates that inflation of the cuff of the endotracheal tubes with a 50%N 2 O:O 2 rather than air maintains a stable intra cuff pressure. Therefore, the method of using a 50%N 2 O:O 2 for filling endotracheal tube cuff can be adopted for endotracheal tubes with high-volume, low-pressure cuffs to prevent both excessive cuff pressure and disruption of cuff seal, during general anaesthesia lasting up to one hour.

  7. Endotracheal tube cuff pressure management in adult critical care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of respondents performed cuff pressure measurements every 6 - 12 hours; 32% reported ... effectively when performing ETT cuff pressure management, to reduce practice variance, ... questionnaires were distributed to professional nurses working in .... MOV, CPM and the palpation method.3 No advantage of CPM over.

  8. Automated Control of Endotracheal Tube Cuff Pressure during Simulated Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-21

    accomplished in the intensive care unit (ICU) with stand-alone devices as well as those integral to a ventilator [13,14]. We hypothesized that closed loop ... Administration approved automatic cuff pressure adjustment devices (Intellicuff, Hamilton Medical , Reno, NV; Pyton, ARM Medical , Bristol, CT; Cuff Sentry, Outcome...711th Human Performance Wing U.S. Air Force School of Aerospace Medicine Int’l Expeditionary Educ & Training Dept Air Force Expeditionary Medical

  9. Pediatric cuffed endotracheal tubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neerja Bhardwaj

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Endotracheal intubation in children is usually performed utilizing uncuffed endotracheal tubes for conduct of anesthesia as well as for prolonged ventilation in critical care units. However, uncuffed tubes may require multiple changes to avoid excessive air leak, with subsequent environmental pollution making the technique uneconomical. In addition, monitoring of ventilatory parameters, exhaled volumes, and end-expiratory gases may be unreliable. All these problems can be avoided by use of cuffed endotracheal tubes. Besides, cuffed endotracheal tubes may be of advantage in special situations like laparoscopic surgery and in surgical conditions at risk of aspiration. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI scans in children have found the narrowest portion of larynx at rima glottides. Cuffed endotracheal tubes, therefore, will form a complete seal with low cuff pressure of <15 cm H 2 O without any increase in airway complications. Till recently, the use of cuffed endotracheal tubes was limited by variations in the tube design marketed by different manufacturers. The introduction of a new cuffed endotracheal tube in the market with improved tracheal sealing characteristics may encourage increased safe use of these tubes in clinical practice. A literature search using search words "cuffed endotracheal tube" and "children" from 1980 to January 2012 in PUBMED was conducted. Based on the search, the advantages and potential benefits of cuffed ETT are reviewed in this article.

  10. Comparison of endotracheal tube cuff pressure values before and after training seminar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özcan, Ayça Tuba Dumanlı; Döğer, Cihan; But, Abdülkadir; Kutlu, Işık; Aksoy, Şemsi Mustafa

    2018-06-01

    It is recommended that endotracheal cuff (ETTc) pressure be between 20 and 30 cm H 2 O. In this present study, we intend to observe average cuff pressure values in our clinic and the change in these values after the training seminar. The cuff pressure values of 200 patients intubated following general anesthesia induction in the operating theatre were measured following intubation. One hundred patients whose values were measured before the training seminar held for all physician assistants, and 100 patients whose values were measured after the training seminar were regarded as Group 1 and Group 2, respectively. Cuff pressures of both groups were recorded, and the difference between them was shown. Moreover, cuff pressure values were explored according to the working period of the physician assistants. There was no significant difference between the groups in terms of age, gender and tube diameters. Statistically significant difference was found between cuff pressure values before and after the training (p values decreased, however no statistically significant different was found (p values and potential complications.

  11. Endotracheal Tube Cuff Pressures in Patients Intubated Prior to Helicopter EMS Transport

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    Joseph Tennyson

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Endotracheal intubation is a common intervention in critical care patients undergoing helicopter emergency medical services (HEMS transportation. Measurement of endotracheal tube (ETT cuff pressures is not common practice in patients referred to our service. Animal studies have demonstrated an association between the pressure of the ETT cuff on the tracheal mucosa and decreased blood flow leading to mucosal ischemia and scarring. Cuff pressures greater than 30 cmH2O impede mucosal capillary blood flow. Multiple prior studies have recommended 30 cmH2O as the maximum safe cuff inflation pressure. This study sought to evaluate the inflation pressures in ETT cuffs of patients presenting to HEMS. Methods We enrolled a convenience sample of patients presenting to UMass Memorial LifeFlight who were intubated by the sending facility or emergency medical services (EMS agency. Flight crews measured the ETT cuff pressures using a commercially available device. Those patients intubated by the flight crew were excluded from this analysis as the cuff was inflated with the manometer to a standardized pressure. Crews logged the results on a research form, and we analyzed the data using Microsoft Excel and an online statistical analysis tool. Results We analyzed data for 55 patients. There was a mean age of 57 years (range 18–90. The mean ETT cuff pressure was 70 (95% CI= [61–80] cmH2O. The mean lies 40 cmH2O above the maximum accepted value of 30 cmH2O (p120 cmH2O, the maximum pressure on the analog gauge. Conclusion Patients presenting to HEMS after intubation by the referral agency (EMS or hospital have ETT cuffs inflated to pressures that are, on average, more than double the recommended maximum. These patients are at risk for tracheal mucosal injury and scarring from decreased mucosal capillary blood flow. Hospital and EMS providers should use ETT cuff manometry to ensure that they inflate ETT cuffs to safe pressures.

  12. Endotracheal tubes and fluid aspiration: an in vitro evaluation of new cuff technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariyaselvam, Maryanne Z; Marsh, Lucy L; Bamford, Sarah; Smith, Ann; Wise, Matt P; Williams, David W

    2017-03-04

    Aspiration of subglottic secretions past the endotracheal tube (ETT) cuff is a prerequisite for developing ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). Subglottic secretion drainage (SSD) ETTs reduce aspiration of subglottic secretions and have demonstrated lower VAP rates. We compared the performance of seven SSD ETTs against a non-SSD ETT in preventing aspiration below inflated cuffs. ETTs were positioned vertically in 2 cm diameter cylinders. Four ml of a standard microbial suspension was added above inflated cuffs. After 1 h, aspiration was measured and ETTs demonstrating no leakage were subjected to rotational movement and evaluation over 24 h. Collected aspirated fluid was used to inoculate agar media and incubated aerobically at 37 °C for 24 h. The aspiration rate, volume and number of microorganisms that leaked past the cuff was measured. Experiments were repeated (×10) for each type of ETT, with new ETTs used for each repeat. Best performing ETTs were then tested in five different cylinder diameters (1.6, 1.8, 2.0, 2.2 and 2.4 cm). Experiments were repeated as above using sterile water. Volume and time taken for aspiration past the cuff was measured. Experiments were repeated (×10) for each type of ETT. Results were analysed using non-parametric tests for repeated measures. The PneuX ETT prevented aspiration past the cuff in all experiments. All other ETTs allowed aspiration, with considerable variability in performance. The PneuX ETT was statistically superior in reducing aspiration compared to the SealGuard (p aspiration across the range of diameters compared to the SealGuard (p aspiration, relating to cuff material and design. Variability in performance was likely due to the random manner in which involutional folds form in the inflated ETT cuff. The PneuX ETT was the only ETT able to consistently prevent aspiration past the cuff in all experiments.

  13. Intraoperative Atelectasis Due to Endotracheal Tube Cuff Herniation: A Case Report

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    Hossein Madineh

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Endotracheal tube (ETT cuff herniation is a rare, and often difficult to diagnose, cause of bronchial obstruction. We present a case of outside cuff herniation of an endotracheal tube that caused pulmonary right lung atelectasis. A 29-year-old man ,a case of car accident with multiple fractures, was admitted to the emergency ward and transferred to the operating room(OR for open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF of all fractures .The procedures were done under general anesthesia (G/A. The past medical history of the patient did not indicate any problem. Anesthesia was induced with thiopental, atracurium and then maintained by propofol and remifentanyl infusions and 100% O2 via orally inserted ETT. The patient was positioned in left lateral decubitus position for operation. Two hours after induction of anesthesia, the oxygen saturation level dropped to 85 % and the breath sounds in the right side of the chest were weakened. The chest x-ray images showed right lung atelectasis especially in the upper lobe. The problem was disappeared after removal of the ETT. In this case, we observed that an ETT cuff herniation can be a cause of airway obstruction. If there is a decreased unilateral breath sounds, we recommend replacement or repositioning of ETT.

  14. A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF 2 AGENTS, AIR AND DISTILLED WATER FOR INFLATION OF THE CUFFS OF ENDOTRACHEAL TUBES DURING LAPAROSCOPIC SURGICAL PROCEDURES UNDER GENERAL ANAESTHESIA

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    Sistla Gopala Krishna

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND & AIM During Nitrous Oxide+ Oxygen anaesthesia and during laparoscopic surgeries using carbon dioxide for creating pneumoperitoneum, if cuff of endotracheal tube is inflated with air, cuff pressure can rise to dangerous limits and it can produce ischemia of tracheal mucosa. Hence distilled water as an alternative agent to air for inflation of cuffs of endotracheal tubes was used for our study. Our aim is to investigate the difference in increase of intra-cuff pressure with time during laparoscopic surgical procedures under general endotracheal anaesthesia with Nitrous oxide+ Oxygen+ relaxant technique when cuffs of endotracheal tube were inflated by air & distilled water. METHODS Fifty patients (n=50 undergoing different laparoscopic surgical procedures under general endotracheal anaesthesia were randomly divided into 2 groups. In group A, air was used & in group D, distilled water was used to inflate the cuffs of endotracheal tubes. General anaesthesia was given with Nitrous oxide+ Oxygen+ relaxant technique. The intra-cuff pressures of endotracheal tube cuffs were recorded in the beginning and at the end of laparoscopic surgical procedures. Increase of pressures with time were recorded and analysed. RESULTS In group in whom we inflated the cuffs with air, there was a significant increase in intra-cuff pressures with time and there was definite diffusion of gases into the cuffs. Increase of pressure with time was statistically highly significant (P=0.00001. But in group in whom we used distilled water to inflate the cuffs, there was no change in the volume of water used for inflation and water came out of cuffs at the end of the laparoscopic surgical procedures. No additional air could be aspirated from the cuffs at the end of laparoscopic surgeries in distilled water group, indicating that there was no diffusion of gases into the cuffs or the gases diffused got dissolved in distilled water. Hence there was no increase of volume

  15. Comparison of prophylactic effects of polyurethane cylindrical or tapered cuff and polyvinyl chloride cuff endotracheal tubes on ventilator-associated pneumonia.

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    Ata Mahmoodpoor

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Because microaspiration of contaminated supraglottic secretions past the endotracheal tube cuff is considered to be central in the pathogenesis of pneumonia, improved design of tracheal tubes with new cuff material and shape have reduced the size and number of folds, which together with the addition of suction ports above the cuff to drain pooled subglottic secretions leads to reduced aspiration of oropharyngeal secretions. So we conducted a study to compare the prophylactic effects of polyurethane-cylindrical or tapered cuff and polyvinyl chloride cuff endotracheal tubes (ETT on ventilator-associated pneumonia. This randomized clinical trial was carried out in a 12 bed surgical intensive care unit. 96 patients expected to require mechanical ventilation more than 96 hours were randomly allocated to one of three following groups: Polyvinyl chloride cuff (PCV ETT, Polyurethane (PU cylindrical Sealguard ETT and PU Taperguard ETT. Cuff pressure monitored every three hours 3 days in all patients. Mean cuff pressure didn't have significant difference between three groups during 72 hours. Pneumonia was seen in 11 patients (34% in group PVC, 8 (25% in Sealguard and 7 (21% in Taperguard group. Changes in mean cuff pressure between Sealguard and PVC tubes and also between Taperguard and PVC tubes did not show any significant difference. There was no significant difference in overinflation between three groups. The use of ETT with PU material results in reducing ventilator-associated pneumonia compared to ETT with PVC cuff. In PU tubes Taperguard has less incidence of ventilator-associated pneumonia compared to Sealguard tubes.

  16. Endotracheal tube and laryngeal mask airway cuff volume changes with altitude: a rule of thumb for aeromedical transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Catherine; Parkinson, Neil; Bleetman, Anthony

    2007-03-01

    Helicopters and light (unpressurised) aircraft are used increasingly for the transport of ventilated patients. Most of these patients are ventilated through endotracheal tubes (ETTs), others through laryngeal mask airways (LMAs). The cuffs of both ETTs and LMAs inflate with increases in altitude as barometric pressure decreases (30 mbar/1000 feet). Tracheal mucosa perfusion becomes compromised at a pressure of approximately 30 cm H2O; critical perfusion pressure is 50 cm H2O. The change in dimensions of the inflated cuffs of a size 8 ETT and a size 5 LMA were measured with digital callipers at 1000 feet intervals in the unpressurised cabin of an Agusta 109 helicopter used by the Warwickshire and Northamptonshire Air Ambulance. A linear expansion in cuff dimensions as a function of altitude increase was identified. For ETTs, a formula for removal of air from the cuff with increasing altitude was calculated and is recommended for use in aeromedical transfers. This is 1/17x1.1 = 0.06 ml/1000 foot ascent/ml initial cuff inflation. The data for LMA cuff expansion failed to show significant correlation with altitude change. Further work is required to determine a similar rule of thumb for LMA cuff deflation.

  17. Use and care of an endotracheal/ tracheostomy tube cuff — are ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    care units (ICUs) in the Free State. Therefore, the ... informed about the use and care of ET/TT tube cuffs. ... There was no consensus regarding the length of time ... Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University of the Free State, Bloemfontein.

  18. CO2 driven endotracheal tube cuff control in critically ill patients: A randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pascale, Gennaro; Pennisi, Mariano Alberto; Vallecoccia, Maria Sole; Bello, Giuseppe; Maviglia, Riccardo; Montini, Luca; Di Gravio, Valentina; Cutuli, Salvatore Lucio; Conti, Giorgio; Antonelli, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    To determine the safety and clinical efficacy of an innovative integrated airway system (AnapnoGuard™ 100 system) that continuously monitors and controls the cuff pressure (Pcuff), while facilitating the aspiration of subglottic secretions (SS). This was a prospective, single centre, open-label, randomized, controlled feasibility and safety trial. The primary endpoint of the study was the rate of device related adverse events (AE) and serious AE (SAE) as a result of using AnapnoGuard (AG) 100 during mechanical ventilation. Secondary endpoints were: (1) mechanical complications rate (2) ICU staff satisfaction; (3) VAP occurrence; (4) length of mechanical ventilation; (5) length of Intensive Care Unit stay and mortality; (6) volume of evacuated subglottic secretions. Sixty patients were randomized to be intubated with the AG endotracheal-tube (ETT) and connected to the AG 100 system allowing Pcuff adjustment and SS aspiration; or with an ETT combined with SS drainage and Pcuff controlled manually. No difference in adverse events rate was identified between the groups. The use of AG system was associated with a significantly higher incidence of Pcuff determinations in the safety range (97.3% vs. 71%; paspirated SS secretions: (192.0[64-413] ml vs. 150[50-200], p = 0.19 (total)); (57.8[20-88.7] ml vs. 50[18.7-62] ml, p = 0.11 (daily)). No inter-group difference was detected using AG system vs. controls in terms of post-extubation throat pain level (0 [0-2] vs. 0 [0-3]; p = 0.7), hoarseness (42.9% vs. 75%; p = 0.55) and tracheal mucosa oedema (16.7% vs. 10%; p = 0.65). Patients enrolled in the AG group had a trend to reduced VAP risk of ventilator-associated pneumonia(VAP) (14.8% vs. 40%; p = 0.06), which were more frequently monomicrobial (25% vs. 70%; p = 0.03). No statistically significant difference was observed in duration of mechanical ventilation, ICU stay, and mortality. The use AG 100 system and AG tube in critically ill intubated patients is safe and

  19. CO2 driven endotracheal tube cuff control in critically ill patients: A randomized controlled study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gennaro De Pascale

    Full Text Available To determine the safety and clinical efficacy of an innovative integrated airway system (AnapnoGuard™ 100 system that continuously monitors and controls the cuff pressure (Pcuff, while facilitating the aspiration of subglottic secretions (SS.This was a prospective, single centre, open-label, randomized, controlled feasibility and safety trial. The primary endpoint of the study was the rate of device related adverse events (AE and serious AE (SAE as a result of using AnapnoGuard (AG 100 during mechanical ventilation. Secondary endpoints were: (1 mechanical complications rate (2 ICU staff satisfaction; (3 VAP occurrence; (4 length of mechanical ventilation; (5 length of Intensive Care Unit stay and mortality; (6 volume of evacuated subglottic secretions. Sixty patients were randomized to be intubated with the AG endotracheal-tube (ETT and connected to the AG 100 system allowing Pcuff adjustment and SS aspiration; or with an ETT combined with SS drainage and Pcuff controlled manually.No difference in adverse events rate was identified between the groups. The use of AG system was associated with a significantly higher incidence of Pcuff determinations in the safety range (97.3% vs. 71%; p<0.01 and a trend to a greater volume of aspirated SS secretions: (192.0[64-413] ml vs. 150[50-200], p = 0.19 (total; (57.8[20-88.7] ml vs. 50[18.7-62] ml, p = 0.11 (daily. No inter-group difference was detected using AG system vs. controls in terms of post-extubation throat pain level (0 [0-2] vs. 0 [0-3]; p = 0.7, hoarseness (42.9% vs. 75%; p = 0.55 and tracheal mucosa oedema (16.7% vs. 10%; p = 0.65. Patients enrolled in the AG group had a trend to reduced VAP risk of ventilator-associated pneumonia(VAP (14.8% vs. 40%; p = 0.06, which were more frequently monomicrobial (25% vs. 70%; p = 0.03. No statistically significant difference was observed in duration of mechanical ventilation, ICU stay, and mortality.The use AG 100 system and AG tube in critically ill

  20. In vitro evaluation of the method effectiveness to limit inflation pressure cuffs of endotracheal tubes

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    Rafael de Macedo Coelho

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Cuffs of tracheal tubes protect the lower airway from aspiration of gastric contents and facilitate ventilation, but may cause many complications, especially when the cuff pressure exceeds 30 cm H2O. This occurs in over 30% of conventional insufflations, so it is recommended to limit this pressure. In this study we evaluated the in vitro effectiveness of a method of limiting the cuff pressure to a range between 20 and 30 cm H2O. METHOD: Using an adapter to connect the tested tube to the anesthesia machine, the relief valve was regulated to 30 cm H2O, inflating the cuff by operating the rapid flow of oxygen button. There were 33 trials for each tube of three manufacturers, of five sizes (6.5-8.5, using three times inflation (10, 15 and 20 s, totaling 1485 tests. After inflation, the pressure obtained was measured with a manometer. Pressure >30 cm H2O or <20 cm H2O were considered failures. RESULTS: There were eight failures (0.5%, 95% CI: 0.1-0.9%, with all by pressures <20 cm H2O and after 10 s inflation (1.6%, 95% CI: 0 5-2.7%. One failure occurred with a 6.5 tube (0.3%, 95% CI: -0.3 to 0.9%, six with 7.0 tubes (2%, 95% CI: 0.4-3.6%, and one with a 7.5 tube (0.3%, 95% CI: -0.3 to 0.9%. CONCLUSION: This method was effective for inflating tracheal tube cuffs of different sizes and manufacturers, limiting its pressure to a range between 20 and 30 cm H2O, with a success rate of 99.5% (95% CI: 99.1-99.9%.

  1. Improper tube fixation causing a leaky cuff

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    Gupta Babita

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Leaking endotracheal tube cuffs are common problems in intensive care units. We report a case wherein the inflation tube was damaged by the adhesive plaster used for tube fixation and resulted in leaking endotracheal tube cuff. We also give some suggestions regarding the tube fixation and some remedial measures for damaged inflation system.

  2. The impact of hospital-wide use of a tapered-cuff endotracheal tube on the incidence of ventilator-associated pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowton, David L; Hite, R Duncan; Martin, R Shayn; Sherertz, Robert

    2013-10-01

    Aspiration of colonized oropharyngeal secretions is a major factor in the pathogenesis of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). A tapered-cuff endotracheal tube (ETT) has been demonstrated to reduce aspiration around the cuff. Whether these properties are efficacious in reducing VAP is not known. This 2-period, investigator-initiated observational study was designed to assess the efficacy of a tapered-cuff ETT to reduce the VAP rate. All intubated, mechanically ventilated patients over the age of 18 were included. During the baseline period a standard, barrel-shaped-cuff ETT (Mallinckrodt Hi-Lo) was used. All ETTs throughout the hospital were then replaced with a tapered-cuff ETT (TaperGuard). The primary outcome variable was the incidence of VAP per 1,000 ventilator days. We included 2,849 subjects, encompassing 15,250 ventilator days. The mean ± SD monthly VAP rate was 3.29 ± 1.79/1,000 ventilator days in the standard-cuff group and 2.77 ± 2.00/1,000 ventilator days in the tapered-cuff group (P = .65). While adherence to the VAP prevention bundle was high throughout the study, bundle adherence was significantly higher during the standard-cuff period (96.5 ± 2.7%) than in the tapered-cuff period (90.3 ± 3.5%, P = .01). In the setting of a VAP rate very near the average of ICUs in the United States, and where there was high adherence to a VAP prevention bundle, the use of a tapered-cuff ETT was not associated with a reduction in the VAP rate.

  3. Cuffed endotracheal tubes in paediatrics

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cuffed endotracheal tubes (CETTs) in children who are younger than eight years old. Most paediatric ... the smallest functional part of the infant airway, because the ... During the 2003 severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) outbreak in ...

  4. The Effect of Endotracheal Inflation Technique on Endotracheal Cuff Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-10-01

    had upon tracheal wall blood flow of anesthetized dogs . This study found that low-volume, high-pressure cuffs required 320 to 360 mm Hg of pressure to...Som, P., Khilnani, M., Keller, R., & Som, M. (1972). Tracheal stenosis secondary to cuffed tubes. Mount Siai Journal of Medicine, 40, 652-665

  5. Use of Microcuff ® endotracheal tubes in paediatric laparoscopic surgeries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rameshwar Mhamane

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Traditionally, uncuffed endotracheal tubes have been used in children. Cuffed tubes may be useful in special situations like laparoscopy. Microcuff ® endotracheal tube is a specifically designed cuffed endotracheal tube for the paediatric airway. We studied the appropriateness of Microcuff ® tube size selection, efficacy of ventilation, and complications, in children undergoing laparoscopy. Methods: In a prospective, observational study, 100 children undergoing elective laparoscopy were intubated with Microcuff ® tube as per recommended size. We studied appropriateness of size selection, sealing pressure, ability to ventilate with low flow, quality of capnography and post-extubation laryngospasm or stridor. Results: Mean age of the patients was 5.44 years (range 8 months 5 days-9 years 11 months. There was no resistance for tube passage during intubation in any patient. Leak on intermittent positive pressure ventilation at airway pressure ≤20 cm H 2 O was present in all patients. Mean sealing pressure was 11.72 (1.9 standard deviation [SD] cm H 2 O. With the creation of pnemoperitoneum, mean intracuff pressure increased to 12.48 (3.12 SD cm H 2 O. With head low positioning, mean cuff pressure recorded was 13.32 (2.92 SD. Ventilation at low flow (mean flow 1 L/min, plateau-type capnography was noted in all patients. Mean duration of intubation was 83.50 min. Coughing at extubation occurred in 6 patients. Partial laryngospasm occurred in 4 patients, which responded to continuous positive airway pressure via face mask. Severe laryngospasm or stridor was not seen in any patient. Conclusion: Microcuff ® tubes can be safely used in children if size selection recommendations are followed and cuff pressure is strictly monitored. Advantages are better airway seal and effective ventilation, permitting use of low flows.

  6. 21 CFR 868.5800 - Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. 868.5800 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5800 Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. (a) Identification. A tracheostomy tube and tube cuff is a device intended to be placed into a...

  7. A change in humidification system can eliminate endotracheal tube occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Alex; Joshi, Manasi; Frank, Peter; Craven, Thomas; Moondi, Parvez; Young, Peter

    2011-12-01

    Inadequate airway humidification can result in endotracheal tube occlusion. There is evidence that heat and moisture exchangers (HMEs) are more prone to endotracheal tube occlusion than heated humidifiers (HHs) that contain a heated wire circuit. We aimed to compare the incidence of endotracheal tube occlusion while introducing a new dual-heated wire circuit HH in place of an established hydrophobic HME. This was a prospective observational study. All patients who required intubation were included in our analysis. Univariate statistical analysis was performed using a Fisher exact test. P humidification exclusively by HH. In the subsequent 18-month period, there were no further episodes of endotracheal tube occlusion. Our study demonstrates that there is a significant increase in the incidence of endotracheal tube occlusion when using a hydrophobic HME compared with an HH and that using a dual-heated wire circuit HH can eliminate endotracheal tube occlusion. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Sudden endotracheal tube block in a patient of Achalasia Cardia

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    Ajit Gupta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Endotracheal tube block due to various mechanical causes such as mucous, blood clot, denture, and ampoules have been reported. A patient of achalasia cardia with chronic passive aspiration pneumonitis developed mucoid mass in the respiratory passage which dislodged during the surgical procedure. The episode occurred almost an hour after induction of anesthesia and the dislodged mucoid mass blocked the lumen of endotracheal tube, leading to hypoxia and impending cardiac arrest. However, the patient was salvaged by replacing the tube.

  9. Accidental transection of flexometallic endotracheal tube during partial maxillectomy

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    Sushma D Ladi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a rare case of an 18-year-old female patient in whom accidental sectioning of flexometallic endotracheal tube occurred during partial maxillectomy for mass lesion under general anaesthesia. She was managed successfully by tracheostomy.

  10. Warming Endotracheal Tube in Blind Nasotracheal Intubation throughout Maxillofacial Surgeries

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    Hamzeh Hosseinzadeh

    2013-12-01

    Conclusion: In conclusion, our study showed that using an endotracheal tube softened by warm water could reduce the incidence and severity of epistaxis during blind nasotracheal intubation; however it could not facilitate blind nasotracheal intubation.

  11. The effectiveness of an endotracheal tube holder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byung Gun Lim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The security of the endotracheal tube (ETT is important in the anesthesia and intensive care settings. Recently, an ETT holder instead of an adhesive tape is frequently used to provide the fixation of the ETT. There are some studies that focused on the effectiveness of the ETT holder in preventing displacement of ETT compared to an adhesive tape (1, 2. I have experienced the use of an ETT holder (E-holder, KS medical, Bucheon, Korea in many different anesthesia settings and recognized its usefulness and convenience other than ETT security in the following specific settings.  Firstly, the ETT holder is definitely effective for patients undergoing procedures that frequently require the adjustment of ETT (or double lumen tube location including thoracic surgery. The location of double lumen tube needed for lung separation can be modified for effective ventilation during anesthetic induction or surgery, and after position changes. The tube can be easily relocated to the proper place for lung separation and effective ventilation by unlocking/relocking the button of the ETT holder under flexible bronchoscopic guidance (Fig. 1A, which can facilitate the operative procedure to be performed easily and quickly. Secondly, the ETT holder can be useful in procedures requiring the prone position (3. Especially, it is useful in all circumstances requiring the adjustment of ETT in the prone position. For instance, it is definitely useful for patients with Duchene muscular dystrophy undergoing scoliosis surgery under prone position. Adolescent patients with Duchene muscular dystrophy frequently have tracheobronchial malacia. If so, the airway pressure can be elevated due to the narrowing of the lesion of malacia when changed to the prone position (4. To overcome this problem, a reinforced ETT should be relocated so that it passes the narrowed tracheal lesion under flexible bronchoscopic guidance (Fig. 1B. However, the approach for this management is somewhat

  12. Continuous versus intermittent endotracheal cuff pressure control for the prevention of ventilator-associated respiratory infections in Vietnam: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dat, Vu Quoc; Geskus, Ronald B; Wolbers, Marcel; Loan, Huynh Thi; Yen, Lam Minh; Binh, Nguyen Thien; Chien, Le Thanh; Mai, Nguyen Thi Hoang; Phu, Nguyen Hoan; Lan, Nguyen Phu Huong; Hao, Nguyen Van; Long, Hoang Bao; Thuy, Tran Phuong; Kinh, Nguyen Van; Trung, Nguyen Vu; Phu, Vu Dinh; Cap, Nguyen Trung; Trinh, Dao Tuyet; Campbell, James; Kestelyn, Evelyne; Wertheim, Heiman F L; Wyncoll, Duncan; Thwaites, Guy Edward; van Doorn, H Rogier; Thwaites, C Louise; Nadjm, Behzad

    2018-04-04

    Ventilator-associated respiratory infection (VARI) comprises ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) and ventilator-associated tracheobronchitis (VAT). Although their diagnostic criteria vary, together these are the most common hospital-acquired infections in intensive care units (ICUs) worldwide, responsible for a large proportion of antibiotic use within ICUs. Evidence-based strategies for the prevention of VARI in resource-limited settings are lacking. Preventing the leakage of oropharyngeal secretions into the lung using continuous endotracheal cuff pressure control is a promising strategy. The aim of this study is to investigate the efficacy of automated, continuous endotracheal cuff pressure control in preventing the development of VARI and reducing antibiotic use in ICUs in Vietnam. This is an open-label randomised controlled multicentre trial. We will enrol 600 adult patients intubated for ≤ 24 h at the time of enrolment. Eligible patients will be stratified according to admission diagnosis (180 tetanus, 420 non-tetanus) and site and will be randomised in a 1:1 ratio to receive either (1) automated, continuous control of endotracheal cuff pressure or (2) intermittent measurement and control of endotracheal cuff pressure using a manual cuff pressure meter. The primary outcome is the occurrence of VARI, defined as either VAP or VAT during the ICU admission up to a maximum of 90 days after randomisation. Patients in both groups who are at risk for VARI will receive a standardised battery of investigations if their treating physician feels a new infection has occurred, the results of which will be used by an endpoint review committee, blinded to the allocated arm and independent of patient care, to determine the primary outcome. All enrolled patients will be followed for mortality and endotracheal tube cuff-related complications at 28 days and 90 days after randomisation. Other secondary outcomes include antibiotic use; days ventilated, in ICU and in hospital

  13. Evaluation of a new laser-resistant fabric and copper foil-wrapped endotracheal tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosis, M B; Braverman, B; Caldarelli, D D

    1996-07-01

    The risk of an endotracheal tube's combustion during laser airway surgery necessitates the use of special anesthetic techniques and equipment to prevent this complication. This study was designed to evaluate the Laser-Trach(TM), a new laser-resistant rubber endotracheal tube for use during laser airway surgery. The Laser-Trach endotracheal tubes that were evaluated were size 6.0 mm internal diameter (ID) red rubber endotracheal tubes which had been commercially wrapped by Kendall-Sheridan (Mansfield, Mass.) with copper foil tape and overwrapped with fabric. The fabric layer was saturated with water prior to our tests, as recommended by the manufacturer. The Laser-Trach endotracheal tubes were compared with plain (bare) size 6.0 mm ID Rusch red rubber endotracheal tubes. The tubes under study were positioned horizontally on wet towels in air and had 5 L x min(-1) of oxygen flowing through them. They were subjected to continuous laser radiation at 40 W from either a CO2 or an Nd-YAG laser. The Nd-YAG laser was propagated via a 600-micron fiber bundle. Each laser was directed perpendicularly at the shaft of the endotracheal tube being studied, and its output was continued until a blowtorch fire occurred or 60 seconds had elapsed. Sixty seconds of CO2 laser fire did not ignite any of the eight Laser-Trach endotracheal tubes tested. However, blowtorch ignition of all eight bare rubber tubes tested occurred after 0.87 +/- 0.21 (mean +/- SD) seconds of CO2 laser fire. Nd-YAG laser contact with the Laser-Trach endotracheal tubes caused the perforation and blowtorch ignition of all eight tubes tested after 18.79 +/- 7.83 seconds. This was a significantly (Presistant to the C02 laser. However, this endotracheal tube is not recommended for use with the Nd-YAG laser.

  14. Endotracheal tube defects: Hidden causes of airway obstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofi Khalid

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Manufacturing defects of endotracheal tube (ETT are still encountered in anesthesia practice. Many such defects go unnoticed during routine inspection prior to their use. Such defects in ETT may lead to partial or complete airway obstruction in an intubated patient. We report a case of partial airway obstruction with a prepacked, single use, uncuffed ETT due to a manufacturing defect in the form of a plastic meniscus at the distal end of the tube. This case report highlights the significance of standard monitoring of ventilation and the role of a vigilant clinician in detecting such defects in avoiding critical events as can arise from the use of such defective ETTs. It also emphasizes the need for double checking ETTs prior to their use.

  15. A comparison of tape-tying versus a tube-holding device for securing endotracheal tubes in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdoch, E; Holdgate, A

    2007-10-01

    During the transfer of intubated patients, endotracheal tube security is paramount. This study aims to compare two methods of securing an endotracheal tube in adults: tying with a cloth tape versus the Thomas Endotracheal Tube Holder (Laerdal). A manikin-based study was performed using paramedics and critical care doctors (consultants and senior trainees) as participants. Each participant was asked to secure an endotracheal tube that had been placed within the trachea of a manikin a total of six times, the first three times using tied cloth tape and the last three times using a Thomas Endotracheal Tube Holder. Following each 'fixation' and after the participant had left the room, the security of the tube was tested by applying a fixed force laterally and to the right by dropping a 1.25 kg weight a distance of 50 cm. The amount of movement of the tube with respect to the teeth was measured and recorded in millimetres. Two-hundred-and-seventy tube fixations (135 tied vs. 135 tube holder) were performed by 45 participants. The degree of tube movement was significantly higher when the tube was secured with a tie compared with when the tube holder was used (median movement 22 mm vs. 4 mm, P tube holder device minimised tube movement in a manikin model when compared with conventional tape tying. The use of this device when transporting intubated patients may reduce the risk of tube displacement though further clinical studies are warranted.

  16. Long-term outcome of conventional endotracheal tube balloon dilation of tracheal stenosis in a dog

    OpenAIRE

    Kahane, Nili; Segev, Gilad

    2014-01-01

    This report describes a successful dilation of tracheal stenosis in a 16-year-old dog using a conventional endotracheal tube balloon. This technique should be considered as palliative treatment when owners decline other therapeutic options.

  17. Long-term outcome of conventional endotracheal tube balloon dilation of tracheal stenosis in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahane, Nili; Segev, Gilad

    2014-01-01

    This report describes a successful dilation of tracheal stenosis in a 16-year-old dog using a conventional endotracheal tube balloon. This technique should be considered as palliative treatment when owners decline other therapeutic options.

  18. An in vitro comparison of tracheostomy tube cuffs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maguire S

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Seamus Maguire,1 Frances Haury,2 Korinne Jew2 1Research and Development, Covidien Respiratory and Monitoring Solutions, Athlone, Ireland; 2Medical Affairs, Covidien Respiratory and Monitoring Solutions, Boulder, CO, USA Introduction: The Shiley™ Flexible adult tracheostomy tube with TaperGuard™ cuff has been designed through its geometry, materials, diameter, and wall thickness to minimize micro-aspiration of fluids past the cuff and to provide an effective air seal in the trachea while also minimizing the risk of excessive contact pressure on the tracheal mucosa. The cuff also has a deflated profile that may allow for easier insertion through the stoma site. This unique design is known as the TaperGuard™ cuff. The purpose of the observational, in vitro study reported here was to compare the TaperGuard™ taper-shaped cuff to a conventional high-volume low-pressure cylindrical-shaped cuff (Shiley™ Disposable Inner Cannula Tracheostomy Tube [DCT] with respect to applied tracheal wall pressure, air and fluid sealing efficacy, and insertion force.Methods: Three sizes of tracheostomy tubes with the two cuff types were placed in appropriately sized tracheal models and lateral wall pressure was measured via pressure-sensing elements on the inner surface. Fluid sealing performance was assessed by inflating the cuffs within the tracheal models (25 cmH2O, instilling water above the cuff, and measuring fluid leakage past the cuff. To measure air leak, tubes were attached to a test lung and ventilator, and leak was calculated by subtracting the average exhaled tidal volume from the average delivered tidal volume. A tensile test machine was used to measure insertion force for each tube with the cuff deflated to simulate clinical insertion through a stoma site.Results: The average pressure exerted on the lateral wall of the model trachea was lower for the taper-shaped cuff than for the cylindrical cuff under all test conditions (P<0.05. The taper

  19. Temporal comparison of ultrasound vs. auscultation and capnography in verification of endotracheal tube placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, P; Rudolph, S S; Børglum, J; Isbye, D L

    2011-11-01

    This study compared the time consumption of bilateral lung ultrasound with auscultation and capnography for verifying endotracheal intubation. A prospective, paired, and investigator-blinded study carried out in the operating theatre. Twenty-five adult patients requiring endotracheal intubation were included. During intubation, transtracheal ultrasound was performed to visualize passage of the endotracheal tube. During bag ventilation, bilateral lung ultrasound was performed for the detection of lung sliding as a sign of ventilation simultaneous with capnography and auscultation of the epigastrium and chest. Primary outcome measure was time difference to confirmed endotracheal intubation between ultrasound and auscultation alone. Secondary outcome measure was time difference between ultrasound and auscultation combined with capnography. Both methods verified endotracheal tube placement in all patients. In 68% of patients, endotracheal tube placement was visualized by real-time transtracheal ultrasound. Comparing ultrasound with the combination of auscultation and capnography, there was a significant difference between the two methods. Median time for ultrasound was 40 s [interquartile range (IQR) 35-48 s] vs. 48 s (IQR 45-53 s), P auscultation alone. Median time for auscultation alone was 42 s (IQR 37-47 s), P = 0.6, with a mean difference of -0.88 s in favour of ultrasound (95% CI -4.2-2.5 s). Verification of endotracheal tube placement with ultrasound is as fast as auscultation alone and faster than the standard method of auscultation and capnography. © 2011 The Authors. Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica © 2011 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation.

  20. Tracheal palpation to assess endotracheal tube depth: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, William P; Klonarakis, Jim; Pelivanov, Vladko; O'Brien, Jennifer M; Plewes, Chris

    2014-03-01

    Correct placement of the endotracheal tube (ETT) occurs when the distal tip is in mid-trachea. This study compares two techniques used to place the ETT at the correct depth during intubation: tracheal palpation vs placement at a fixed depth at the patient's teeth. With approval of the Research Ethics Board, we recruited American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I-II patients scheduled for elective surgery with tracheal intubation. Clinicians performing the tracheal intubations were asked to "advance the tube slowly once the tip is through the cords". An investigator palpated the patient's trachea with three fingers spread over the trachea from the larynx to the sternal notch. When the ETT tip was felt in the sternal notch, the ETT was immobilized and its position was determined by fibreoptic bronchoscopy. The position of the ETT tip was compared with our hospital standard, which is a depth at the incisors or gums of 23 cm for men and 21 cm for women. The primary outcome was the incidence of correct placement. Correct placement of the ETT was defined as a tip > 2.5 cm from the carina and > 3.5 cm below the vocal cords. Movement of the ETT tip was readily palpable in 77 of 92 patients studied, and bronchoscopy was performed in 85 patients. Placement by tracheal palpation resulted in more correct placements (71 [77%]; 95% confidence interval [CI] 74 to 81) than hospital standard depth at the incisors or gums (57 [61%]; 95% CI 58 to 66) (P = 0.037). The mean (SD) placement of the ETT tip in palpable subjects was 4.1 (1.7) cm above the carina, 1.9 cm (1.5-2.3 cm) below the ideal mid-tracheal position. Tracheal palpation requires no special equipment, takes only a few seconds to perform, and may improve ETT placement at the correct depth. Further studies are warranted.

  1. Real-time tracheal ultrasonography for confirmation of endotracheal tube placement during cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Hao-Chang; Chong, Kah-Meng; Sim, Shyh-Shyong; Ma, Matthew Huei-Ming; Liu, Shih-Hung; Chen, Nai-Chuan; Wu, Meng-Che; Fu, Chia-Ming; Wang, Chih-Hung; Lee, Chien-Chang; Lien, Wan-Ching; Chen, Shyr-Chyr

    2013-12-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the accuracy of tracheal ultrasonography for assessing endotracheal tube position during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). We performed a prospective observational study of patients undergoing emergency intubation during CPR. Real-time tracheal ultrasonography was performed during the intubation with the transducer placed transversely just above the suprasternal notch, to assess for endotracheal tube positioning and exclude esophageal intubation. The position of trachea was identified by a hyperechoic air-mucosa (A-M) interface with posterior reverberation artifact (comet-tail artifact). The endotracheal tube position was defined as endotracheal if single A-M interface with comet-tail artifact was observed. Endotracheal tube position was defined as intraesophageal if a second A-M interface appeared, suggesting a false second airway (double tract sign). The gold standard of correct endotracheal intubation was the combination of clinical auscultation and quantitative waveform capnography. The main outcome was the accuracy of tracheal ultrasonography in assessing endotracheal tube position during CPR. Among the 89 patients enrolled, 7 (7.8%) had esophageal intubations. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of tracheal ultrasonography were 100% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 94.4-100%), 85.7% (95% CI: 42.0-99.2%), 98.8% (95% CI: 92.5-99.0%) and 100% (95% CI: 54.7-100%), respectively. Positive and negative likelihood ratios were 7.0 (95% CI: 1.1-43.0) and 0.0, respectively. Real-time tracheal ultrasonography is an accurate method for identifying endotracheal tube position during CPR without the need for interruption of chest compression. Tracheal ultrasonography in resuscitation management may serve as a powerful adjunct in trained hands. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Tracheomegaly Secondary to Tracheotomy Tube Cuff in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Dong Hoon; Yoon, Tae Mi; Lee, Joon Kyoo; Lim, Sang Chul

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Tracheomegaly has not been reported in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Herein, the authors report a case of tracheomegaly secondary to tracheotomy tube cuff in a patient with ALS. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an ALS patient with tracheomegaly and of tracheomegaly being associated with tracheotomy tube cuff and home tracheotomy mechanical ventilator. The clinician should consider the possibility of tracheomegaly in the differential diagnosis, if a patient with AL...

  3. EFFECT OF INTRACUFF MEDIA-ALKALINISED LIGNOCAINE, SALINE, AND AIR ON ENDOTRACHEAL TUBE INDUCED EMERGENCE PHENOMENA: A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indu S

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT Emergence from general anaesthesia is associated with post extubation cough, hoarseness, sore throat, and dysphagia, which may affect the smoothness of extubation. Prophylactic interventions have been studied to reduce these tracheal morbidities with varying results. AIMS To compare the efficacy of air, alkalinised lignocaine and saline in maintaining intracuff pressure and reducing postoperative cough (PEC and sore throat (POST. SETTINGS AND DESIGN A randomised controlled study conducted in a teaching hospital. METHODS AND MATERIALS 105 patients scheduled for elective surgeries were randomly allocated into groups of 35 each. The endotracheal tube (ETT cuffs were inflated with air, alkalinised lignocaine, or saline. The intracuff pressure (ICP was initially set to 25-30 cm of H2O; measured every 30 minutes and before extubation; the minimum volume for occlusion (MOV noted. The incidence PEC and POST were monitored. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS Data analysed using Chi-square test, Fisher’s exact test; Bonferroni method allowed multiple comparisons. A p value <0.05 was considered significant. RESULTS Pre-lubricated ETT cuff inflation with liquid media maintained an acceptable ICP. Saline and alkalinised lignocaine were effective in reducing PEC and POST. Alkalinised lignocaine provided smoother extubation and fared better in the early postoperative period. CONCLUSIONS Pre-lubricated ETT cuffs with liquid media reduced PEC and POST. Alkalinised lignocaine showed better profile than saline. Optimum ICP reduces tracheal morbidity.

  4. Ultrasonography for Proper Endotracheal Tube Placement Confirmation in Out-of-hospital Cardiac Arrest Patients: Two-center Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jen-Tang Sun

    2014-06-01

    Conclusion: Real-time tracheal ultrasonography is an accurate method for identifying endotracheal tube position during cardiopulmonary resuscitation without the need for interruption of chest compression.

  5. A comparison of a traditional endotracheal tube versus ETView SL in endotracheal intubation during different emergency conditions: A randomized, crossover cadaver trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truszewski, Zenon; Krajewski, Paweł; Fudalej, Marcin; Smereka, Jacek; Frass, Michael; Robak, Oliver; Nguyen, Bianka; Ruetzler, Kurt; Szarpak, Lukasz

    2016-11-01

    Airway management is a crucial skill essential to paramedics and personnel working in Emergency Medical Services and Emergency Departments: Lack of practice, a difficult airway, or a trauma situation may limit the ability of paramedics to perform direct laryngoscopy during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Videoscope devices are alternatives for airway management in these situations. The ETView VivaSight SL (ETView; ETView Ltd., Misgav, Israel) is a new, single-lumen airway tube with an integrated high-resolution imaging camera. To assess if the ETView VivaSight SL can be a superior alternative to a standard endotracheal tube for intubation in an adult cadaver model, both during and without simulated CPR. ETView VivaSight SL tube was investigated via an interventional, randomized, crossover, cadaver study. A total of 52 paramedics participated in the intubation of human cadavers in three different scenarios: a normal airway at rest without concomitant chest compression (CC) (scenario A), a normal airway with uninterrupted CC (scenario B) and manual in-line stabilization (scenario C). Time and rate of success for intubation, the glottic view scale, and ease-of-use of ETView vs. sETT intubation were assessed for each emergency scenario. The median time to intubation using ETView vs. sETT was compared for each of the aforementioned scenarios. For scenario A, time to first ventilation was achieved fastest for ETView, 19.5 [IQR, 16.5-22] sec, when compared to that of sETT at 21.5 [IQR, 20-25] sec (p = .013). In scenario B, the time for intubation using ETView was 21 [IQR, 18.5-24.5] sec (p cadavers and the time to ventilation were improved with the ETView. The time to glottis view, tube insertion, and cuff block were all found to be shorter with the ETView. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT02733536.

  6. 18-gauge needle cap as adjunct to prevent kinking of endotracheal tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Fuan Chiang; Kawamoto, Henry K; Bradley, James P

    2012-11-01

    A self-retaining Dingman mouth retractor is widely used to keep the mouth open during cleft palate and intraoral surgery. The airway is at risk of being crushed or occluded as the gag (tongue plate) of the Dingman mouth retractor is being pushed against the endotracheal tube.Kinking of the endotracheal tube between the teeth and Dingman mouth retractor has been reported even with the oral Ring-Adair-Elwyn or flexometallic or armored endotracheal tubes. To minimize kinking of the endotracheal tube and its consequent complications, we routinely insert an 18-gauge needle cap at the potential space between the teeth and the tongue plate (gag) of the Dingman mouth retractor, which is situated lateral to the endotracheal tube. In our experience of approximately 5000 intraoral cases using a Dingman mouth retractor and 18-gauge needle cap, we have not had any tooth avulsion or aspiration of the 18-gauge foreign body while maintaining a consistent and secured airway during cleft palate and intraoral surgery.

  7. Endotracheal tube verification in adult mechanically ventilated patients

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    in the titles of research studies found. Thereafter, a specific ... that unpublished research on the topic .... Manual cuff palpation is a simple technique, but is limited in .... method for literature review, but statistical synthesis of quantitative data was ...

  8. Evaluation of Endotracheal Tube Scraping on Airway Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, J Brady; Dubosky, Meagan N; Vines, David L; Sulaiman, Adewunmi S; Jendral, Kyle R; Singh, Gagan; Patel, Ankeet; Kaplan, Carl A; Gurka, David P; Balk, Robert A

    2017-11-01

    Spontaneous breathing trials (SBTs) are used to assess the readiness for discontinuation of mechanical ventilation. When airway resistance (R aw ) is elevated, the imposed work of breathing can lead to prolongation of mechanical ventilation. Biofilm and mucus build-up within the endotracheal tube (ETT) can increase R aw . Scraping the ETT can remove the biofilm build-up and decrease mechanical R aw . The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of ETT scraping on R aw . The secondary aim was to determine whether decreasing R aw would impact subsequent SBT success. Intubated, mechanically ventilated subjects were enrolled if they failed an SBT and had an R aw of > 10 cm H 2 O/L/s. SBT failure was based on institutional guidelines, and R aw was calculated by subtracting the difference between the measured peak and plateau pressures using a square flow waveform with an inspiratory flow set at 60 L/min. The endOclear device was inserted into the ETT and withdrawn per manufacturer's guidelines. Scraping was repeated until the ETT was cleared. Change in R aw was compared pre- and post-ETT scraping using a paired t test. A Mann-Whitney U test evaluated the difference in percentage change in R aw between SBT groups. Twenty-nine subjects completed the study. The mean pre- and post-ETT scraping R aw values were 15.17 ± 3.83 and 12.05 ± 3.19 cm H 2 O/L/s, respectively ( P < .001). Subsequent SBT success was 48%; however, there was no difference in percentage change in R aw between subsequent passed SBT (18.61% [interquartile range 8.90-33.93%]) and failed SBT (23.88% [interquartile range 0.00-34.80%]), U = 78.5, z = -0.284, P = .78. No adverse events were noted with ETT scraping. This study demonstrated that ETT scraping can reduce R aw . The decrease in R aw post-ETT scraping did not affect subsequent SBT success. Copyright © 2017 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  9. Deep versus shallow suction of endotracheal tubes in ventilated neonates and young infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillies, Donna; Spence, Kaye

    2011-07-06

    Mechanical ventilation is commonly used in Neonatal Intensive Care Units to assist breathing in a variety of conditions. Mechanical ventilation is achieved through the placement of an endotracheal tube (ETT) which is left in-situ. The ETT is suctioned to prevent a build-up of secretions and blockage of the airway. Methods of suctioning the endotracheal tube vary according to institutional practice and the individual clinician performing the task. The depth of suctioning is one of these variables. The catheter may be passed to the tip of the ETT or beyond the tip into the trachea or bronchi to facilitate removal of secretions. However, trauma to the lower airways may result from the suction catheter being passed into the airway beyond the tip of the endotracheal tube. To compare the effectiveness and complications of deep (catheter passed beyond the tip of the ETT) versus shallow (catheter passed to length of ETT only) suctioning of the endotracheal tube in ventilated infants. In this first update the searches were expanded to the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library, March 30), MEDLINE (from January 1966 to May 30 2011), CINAHL (from 1982 to May 30 2011) and EMBASE (1980 to May 2011) using text words and subject headings relevant to endotracheal suctioning. There were no language restrictions. Controlled trials using random or quasi-random allocation of neonates receiving ventilatory support via an endotracheal tube to either deep or shallow endotracheal suctioning. The updated search resulted in 149 potentially relevant references. Two of the studies from this search were identified as potentially relevant. We included one of the potentially relevant studies and the other was excluded because it did not fit the inclusion criteria. One small crossover trial (n = 27) of shallow versus deep suctioning met the criteria for inclusion in this review. The reported outcomes were oxygen saturation and heart rate, during and after suctioning

  10. Endotracheal tube cufi pressures in adult patients undergoing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    obstructing tracheal mucosal blood flow but high enough to form an effective seal when delivering PPV. Tracheal ... the capillary blood pressure supplying the trachea and is followed by ischaemia with inflammation. ... The aim of this study was to determine the ETT cuff pressures of patients receiving general anaesthesia at ...

  11. Obstruction of endotracheal tube with relevant respiratory acidosis during pediatric cardiac surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morei, N.M.; Mungroop, H. E.; Michielon, Guido; Scheeren, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    We describe a case of pediatric cardiac surgery in a 21- days old baby, in whom a nasal endotracheal tube (ETT) was inserted. At the end of surgery both ventilatory pressures and end-tidal CO2 increased suggesting airway obstruction. Suctioning of the ETT lumen did not relieve the problem, only ETT

  12. Sphingosine Prevents Bacterial Adherence to Endotracheal Tubes: A Novel Mechanism to Prevent Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-21

    and resists the antimicrobial properties of the host defense” [9]. Bacterial adhesion is the first step in biofilm formation [10]; thus, prevention...ETTs. Future in vitro and animal studies are necessary to establish the safety of sphingolipid coatings, and future randomized clinical trials will...SUBJECT TERMS Ventilator-associated pneumonia, VAP, Gram-negative, bacteria, endotracheal tubes, sphingosine, antimicrobial coating 16. SECURITY

  13. Management of dogs and cats with endotracheal tube tracheal foreign bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutt, Laura K.; Webb, Jinelle A.; Prosser, Kirsten J.; Defarges, Alice

    2014-01-01

    Two cats and 3 dogs were treated for an endotracheal tube tracheal foreign body (ETFB) during recovery from general anesthesia. Bronchoscopy was used to remove the ETFB. Animals were clinically normal at discharge. While rare, ETFB can occur upon recovery from anesthesia. Bronchoscopy is an effective way to remove ETFB. PMID:24891640

  14. Complete Obstruction of Endotracheal Tube in an Infant with a Retropharyngeal and Anterior Mediastinal Abscess

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis B. Thapa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Intraoperative ventilatory failure is not an uncommon complication; however, acute endotracheal obstruction by a foreign body or blood clot can be difficult to quickly discriminate from other causes. Once the diagnosis is made, quick action is needed to restore ventilation. The ultimate solution is to exchange the endotracheal tube; however, there can be other ways of resolving this in situations where reintubation would be difficult or unsafe. This case report discusses such an event in an infant with multiple airway challenges including a retropharyngeal and anterior mediastinal abscess. We have also formulated a pathway based on various case reports involving complete ETT obstruction.

  15. Complete Obstruction of Endotracheal Tube in an Infant with a Retropharyngeal and Anterior Mediastinal Abscess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapa, Dennis B; Greene, Nathaniel H; Udani, Andrea G

    2017-01-01

    Intraoperative ventilatory failure is not an uncommon complication; however, acute endotracheal obstruction by a foreign body or blood clot can be difficult to quickly discriminate from other causes. Once the diagnosis is made, quick action is needed to restore ventilation. The ultimate solution is to exchange the endotracheal tube; however, there can be other ways of resolving this in situations where reintubation would be difficult or unsafe. This case report discusses such an event in an infant with multiple airway challenges including a retropharyngeal and anterior mediastinal abscess. We have also formulated a pathway based on various case reports involving complete ETT obstruction.

  16. A Note regarding Problems with Interaction and Varying Block Sizes in a Comparison of Endotracheal Tubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard L. Einsporn

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A randomized clinical experiment to compare two types of endotracheal tubes utilized a block design where each of the six participating anesthesiologists performed tube insertions for an equal number of patients for each type of tube. Five anesthesiologists intubated at least three patients with each tube type, but one anesthesiologist intubated only one patient per tube type. Overall, one type of tube outperformed the other on all three effectiveness measures. However, analysis of the data using an interaction model gave conflicting and misleading results, making the tube with the better performance appear to perform worse. This surprising result was caused by the undue influence of the data for the anesthesiologist who intubated only two patients. We therefore urge caution in interpreting results from interaction models with designs containing small blocks.

  17. Cuff inflation to aid nasotracheal intubation using the C-mac ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The main thrust of the technique is that cuff inflation of the endotracheal tube is used to lift the endotracheal tube off the posterior pharyngeal wall and thus direct it towards the glottis. The technique was used successfully in 5 consecutive patients needing nasotracheal intubation. Indeed a couple of these patients might have ...

  18. Easy method of centralized fixation of endotracheal tube in cleft lip and palate surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S P Bajaj

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available As we all know that fixation of endotracheal tube is very important aspect in cleft palate and maxillofacial surgery. During cleft palate and oral surgery various methods of fixation and modified tubes are deviced to make surgery safer and ergonomically better. Our method consist of 3 point fixation of tube (RAE with dynaplast, which is freely available, cheap and good Adhesive quality. Dynaplast divided into 3 phalanges (one central and two lateral and one portion undivided as central limb. This undivided central limb is fixed in centre of chin and other 3 phalanges wrap around tube on either side. This fixation totally takes away any lateral movements of tube. This method can be used with any tube (RAE/ Oxford/Flexometallic. Our method is described for its simplicity, ease and convinence and result which impart universally similar results with all different members of our anesthetist team.

  19. Low flow anesthesia: Efficacy and outcome of laryngeal mask airway versus pressure-optimized cuffed-endotracheal tube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Seify Zeinab

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Low flow anesthesia can lead to reduction of anesthetic gas and vapor consumption. Laryngeal mask airway (LMA has proved to be an effective and safe airway device. The aim of this study is to assess the feasibility of laryngeal mask airway during controlled ventilation using low fresh gas flow (1.0 L/min as compared to endotracheal tube (ETT. Patients and Methods : Fifty nine non-smoking adult patients; ASA I or II, being scheduled for elective surgical procedures, with an expected duration of anesthesia 60 minutes or more, were randomly allocated into two groups - Group I (29 patients had been ventilated using LMA size 4 for females and 5 for males respectively; and Group II (30 patients were intubated using ETT. After 10 minutes of high fresh gas flow, the flow was reduced to 1 L/min. Patients were monitored for airway leakage, end-tidal CO 2 (ETCO 2 , inspiratory and expiratory isoflurane and nitrous oxide fraction concentrations, and postoperative airway-related complications Results : Two patients in the LMA-group developed initial airway leakage (6.9% versus no patient in ETT-group. Cough and sore throat were significantly higher in ETT patients. There were no evidences of differences between both groups regarding ETCO 2 , uptake of gases, nor difficulty in swallowing. Conclusion : The laryngeal mask airway proved to be effective and safe in establishing an airtight seal during controlled ventilation under low fresh gas flow of 1 L/min, inducing less coughing and sore throat during the immediate postoperative period than did the ETT, with continuous measurement and readjustment of the tube cuff pressure.

  20. Reliability of Ultrasonography in Confirming Endotracheal Tube Placement in an Emergency Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Vimal Koshy; Paul, Cherish; Rajeev, Punchalil Chathappan; Palatty, Babu Urumese

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Over the past few years, ultrasonography is increasingly being used to confirm the correct placement of endotracheal tube (ETT). In our study, we aimed to compare it with the traditional clinical methods and the gold standard quantitative waveform capnography. Two primary outcomes were measured in our study. First was the sensitivity and specificity of ultrasonography against the other two methods to confirm endotracheal intubation. The second primary outcome assessed was the time taken for each method to confirm tube placement in an emergency setting. Methods: This is a single-centered, prospective cohort study conducted in an emergency department of a tertiary care hospital. We included 100 patients with indication of emergency intubation by convenient sampling. The intubation was performed as per standard hospital protocol. As part of the study protocol, ultrasonography was used to identify ETT placement simultaneously with the intubation procedure along with quantitative waveform capnography (end-tidal carbon dioxide) and clinical methods. Confirmation of tube placement and time taken for the same were noted by three separate health-care staffs. Results and Discussion: Out of the 100 intubation attempts, five (5%) had esophageal intubations. The sensitivity and specificity of diagnosis using ultrasonography were 97.89% and 100%, respectively. This was statistically comparable with the other two modalities. The time taken to confirm tube placement with ultrasonography was 8.27 ± 1.54 s compared to waveform capnography and clinical methods which were 18.06 ± 2.58 and 20.72 ± 3.21 s, respectively. The time taken by ultrasonography was significantly less. Conclusions: Ultrasonography confirmed tube placement with comparable sensitivity and specificity to quantitative waveform capnography and clinical methods. But then, it yielded results considerably faster than the other two modalities. PMID:28584427

  1. Tracheomegaly Secondary to Tracheotomy Tube Cuff in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong Hoon; Yoon, Tae Mi; Lee, Joon Kyoo; Lim, Sang Chul

    2015-10-01

    Tracheomegaly has not been reported in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Herein, the authors report a case of tracheomegaly secondary to tracheotomy tube cuff in a patient with ALS. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an ALS patient with tracheomegaly and of tracheomegaly being associated with tracheotomy tube cuff and home tracheotomy mechanical ventilator.The clinician should consider the possibility of tracheomegaly in the differential diagnosis, if a patient with ALS develops repeat air leakage around the tracheotomy tube or rupture of tracheotomy tube cuff.

  2. Comparison of Tidal Volumes at the Endotracheal Tube and at the Ventilator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Paul; Salazar, Adler; Ross, Patrick A; Newth, Christopher J L; Khemani, Robinder G

    2015-11-01

    Lung protective ventilation for children with acute respiratory distress syndrome requires accurate assessment of tidal volume. Although modern ventilators compensate for ventilator tubing compliance, tidal volume measured at the ventilator may not be accurate, particularly in small children. Although ventilator-specific proximal flow sensors that measure tidal volume at the endotracheal tube have been developed, there is little information regarding their accuracy. We sought to test the accuracy of ventilator measured tidal volume with and without proximal flow sensors against a calibrated pneumotachometer in children. Prospective, observational. Tertiary care PICU. Fifty-one endotracheally intubated and mechanically ventilated children younger than 18 years. Tidal volumes were measured at the ventilator, using a ventilator-specific flow sensor, and a calibrated pneumotachometer connected to the SensorMedics 2600A Pediatric Pulmonary Function Cart. In a pressure control mode of ventilation: median tidal volume measured with the pneumotachometer (9.5 mL/kg [interquartile range, 8.2-11.7 mL/kg]) was significantly higher than tidal volume measured either at the ventilator (8.2 mL/kg [7.1-9.6 mL/kg]) or at the proximal flow sensor (8.1 mL/kg [7.2-10.0 mL/kg]) (p tidal volume measured with the pneumotachometer (10.2 mL/kg [8.8-12.4 mL/kg]) was significantly higher than tidal volume measured either at the ventilator (8.0 mL/kg [7.1-9.7 mL/kg]) or at the proximal flow sensor (8.5 mL/kg [7.3-10.4 mL/kg]) (p Tidal volume measured either at the endotracheal tube with a proximal flow sensor or at the ventilator with compensation for tubing compliance are both significantly lower than tidal volume measured with a calibrated pneumotachometer. This underestimation of delivered tidal volume may be particularly important when managing children with acute respiratory distress syndrome.

  3. Epistaxis during nasotracheal intubation: a randomized trial of the Parker Flex-Tip™ nasal endotracheal tube with a posterior facing bevel versus a standard nasal RAE endotracheal tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earle, Rosie; Shanahan, Enda; Vaghadia, Himat; Sawka, Andrew; Tang, Raymond

    2017-04-01

    Nasotracheal intubation is a widely performed technique to facilitate anesthesia induction during oral, dental, and maxillofacial surgeries. The technique poses several risks not encountered with oropharyngeal intubation, most commonly epistaxis due to nasal mucosal abrasion. The purpose of this study was to test whether the use of the Parker Flex-Tip™ (PFT) nasal endotracheal tube (ETT) with a posterior facing bevel reduces epistaxis when compared with the standard nasal RAE ETT with a leftward facing bevel. Sixty American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I and II patients undergoing oral or maxillofacial surgery with nasotracheal intubation were recruited. Patients were randomized to either a standard nasal RAE ETT or a PFT nasal ETT. The ETT was thermosoftened and lubricated for both study groups prior to insertion, and the size of the tube was chosen at the discretion of the attending anesthesiologist. The primary outcome was the incidence of epistaxis, with a secondary outcome of epistaxis severity (scored as none, mild, moderate, or severe). An investigator measured both outcomes five minutes after intubation was completed. Mild or moderate epistaxis was experienced by 22 of 30 (73%) patients in the PFT group compared with 21 of 30 (70%) patients in the standard nasal RAE ETT group (absolute risk reduction, 3%; 95% confidence interval, -19 to 25; P = 0.78). There were no occurrences of severe epistaxis in either group. There was no difference in the incidence or severity of epistaxis following nasal intubation using the Parker Flex-Tip nasal ETT when compared with a standard nasal RAE ETT. This trial was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov, identifier: NCT02315677.

  4. Fluoroscopic guidance for placing a double lumen endotracheal tube in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calenda, Emile; Baste, Jean Marc; Hajjej, Ridha; Rezig, Najiba; Moriceau, Jerome; Diallo, Yaya; Sghaeir, Slim; Danielou, Eric; Peillon, Christophe

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the right placement of the double lumen endotracheal tube with fluoroscopic guidance, which is used in first intention prior to the fiberscope in our institution. This was a prospective observational study. The study was conducted in vascular and thoracic operating rooms. We enrolled 205 patients scheduled for thoracic surgery, with ASA physical statuses of I (n = 37), II (n = 84), III (n = 80), and IV (n = 4). Thoracic procedures were biopsy (n = 20), wedge (n = 34), culminectomy (n = 6), lobectomy (n = 82), pneumonectomy (n = 4), sympathectomy (n = 9), symphysis (n = 47), and thymectomy (n = 3). The intubation with a double lumen tube was performed with the help of a laryngoscope. Tracheal and bronchial balloons were inflated and auscultation was performed after right and left exclusions. One shot was performed to locate the position of the bronchial tube and the hook. Fluoroscopic guidance was used to relocate the tube in case of a wrong position. When the fluoroscopic guidance failed to position the tube, a fiberscope was used. Perioperative collapse of the lung was assessed by the surgeon during the surgery. Correct fluoroscopic image was obtained after the first attempt in 58.5% of patients therefore a misplaced position was encountered in 41.5%. The fluoroscopic guidance allowed an exact repositioning in 99.5% of cases, and the mean duration of the procedure was 8 minutes. A fiberscope was required to move the hook for one patient. We did not notice a moving of the double lumen endotracheal tube during the surgery. The surgeon satisfaction was 100%. The fluoroscopy evidenced the right position of the double lumen tube and allowed a right repositioning in 99.5% of patients with a very simple implementation. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Comparison of armoured laryngeal mask airway with endotracheal tube for adenotonsillectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aziz, L.; Bashir, K.

    2006-01-01

    To assess the reliability of armoured laryngeal mask airway for adenotonsillectomy and to compare the haemodynamic changes during anaesthesia with those of endotracheal tube. A total of 100 patients undergoing adenotonsillectomy between ages 10-35 years and ASA I status were enrolled for the study. Two groups with 50 patients in each group were formed. Group I patients underwent surgery with armoured laryngeal mask airway while group II underwent surgery with endotracheal intubation. Baseline heart rate, systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure were noted pre-operatively, one minute after insertion and every five minutes after induction in both the groups. A change in all these haemodynamic parameters from the baseline was noted. The effect of Boyle Davis Gag and adequacy of surgical access were also noted. Occurrence of cough, laryngospasm and stridor were noted at the time of recovery in both the groups. Baseline variables in both groups were identical. Surgical access was adequate in 48/50 patients in group I while it was adequate in 49/50 patients in group II. The frequencies of cough, laryngeal spasm and stridor were lower in group I. In group I, there was insignificant change from baseline in heart rate, systolic and diastolic blood pressure at one, five and ten minutes after induction. In group II, significant change from baseline was observed in heart rate (p <0.01), systolic blood pressure (p <0.05) and diastolic blood pressure (p <0.05). (author)

  6. Temporal comparison of ultrasound vs. auscultation and capnography in verification of endotracheal tube placement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfeiffer, P; Rudolph, S S; Neimann, Jens Dupont Børglum

    2011-01-01

    This study compared the time consumption of bilateral lung ultrasound with auscultation and capnography for verifying endotracheal intubation.......This study compared the time consumption of bilateral lung ultrasound with auscultation and capnography for verifying endotracheal intubation....

  7. Randomized Pilot Trial of Two Modified Endotracheal Tubes To Prevent Ventilator-associated Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deem, Steven; Yanez, David; Sissons-Ross, Laura; Broeckel, Jo Ann Elrod; Daniel, Stephen; Treggiari, Miriam

    2016-01-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is a prevalent and costly nosocomial infection related to instrumentation of the airway with an endotracheal tube (ETT), enabling microaspiration of contaminated secretions. Modification of the ETT design to reduce microaspiration and/or biofilm formation may play an important role in VAP prevention. However, there is insufficient evidence to provide strong recommendations regarding the use of modified ETT and unaddressed safety concerns. We performed a pilot randomized controlled trial comparing two modified ETTs designed specifically to prevent VAP, with the standard ETT, to test the feasibility of and inform planning for a large, pivotal, randomized trial. This study was conducted with institutional review board approval under exception from informed consent. We randomized in a blinded fashion patients undergoing emergency endotracheal intubation both out of and in hospital to receive one of three different ETT types: (1) a polyurethane-cuffed tube (PUC-ETT), (2) a polyurethane-cuffed tube equipped with a port for continuous aspiration of subglottic secretions (PUC-CASS-ETT), or a (3) standard polyvinylchloride-cuffed tube (PVC-ETT). In addition to investigating feasibility and safety, the study coprimary end points were tracheal bacterial colonization reaching a cfu count >10(6) cfu per milliliter and the incidence of invasively diagnosed VAP. A total of 102 subjects were randomized and met the eligibility criteria. Randomization procedures performed well and integrity of blinding at randomization was maintained. The majority of intubations occurred in the hospital setting (n = 77), and the remainder occurred out of hospital (n = 25). Compared with the PVC-ETT, there were no significant differences in tracheal colonization for PUC-ETT (odds ratio [OR], 0.98; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.31-3.09) or for PUC-CASS-ETT (OR, 1.26; 95% CI, 0.42-3.76). There were no differences in the risk of invasively diagnosed VAP

  8. Endotracheal tube placement by EMT-Basics in a rural EMS system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, Jeffrey C; Hirshberg, Alan J

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of an intubation-training module and special-waiver project in which Emergency Medical Technician (EMT)-Basics were trained to perform endotracheal intubations in a rural community. This was a prospective observational study over a four-year period (July 1998 through May 2002) of all intubation attempts by EMT-Basics in the field. The authors observed intubation data, training methods, and quality-assurance methods of a special-waiver project agreed to by the State Department of Public Health to train and allow EMT-Basics to intubate patients. Data were from documentation unique to the project. Project documentation evaluated the placement and complication(s) of endotracheal tube (ETT) placement after arrival to the emergency department. An intubation attempt was defined as direct laryngoscopy. A successful attempt was defined as an appropriately sized ETT placed and secured in the trachea below the vocal cords and above the carina. Confirmation of placement in the field included accepted clinical methods and the use of qualitative colorimetric end-tidal carbon dioxide detectors. The EMT-Basics were trained using a paramedic curriculum, including operating room intubations on live adult patients. All patients were in either cardiopulmonary or respiratory arrest. Thirty-two intubations were performed by EMT-Basics. Thirty attempts were successful and two were unsuccessful (94%; 95% confidence interval [CI] 80-98%). Unsuccessful ETT placements were managed with accepted basic life support airway standards. There were no unrecognized esophageal ETT placements (0%; 95% CI 0-11%). This study demonstrated that with an intensive training program using selected highly motivated providers and close monitoring, a program of EMT-Basic ETT placement in a rural setting can achieve acceptable success rates in patients in cardiac or respiratory arrest.

  9. Corrosion casting of the subglottis following endotracheal tube intubation injury: a pilot study in Yorkshire piglets

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Subglottic stenosis can result from endotracheal tube injury. The mechanism by which this occurs, however, is not well understood. The purpose of this study was to examine the role of angiogenesis, hypoxia and ischemia in subglottic mucosal injury following endotracheal intubation. Methods Six Yorkshire piglets were randomized to either a control group (N=3, ventilated through laryngeal mask airway for corrosion casting) or accelerated subglottic injury group through intubation and induced hypoxia as per a previously described model (N=3). The vasculature of all animals was injected with liquid methyl methacrylate. After polymerization, the surrounding tissue was corroded with potassium hydroxide. The subglottic region was evaluated using scanning electron microscopy looking for angiogenic and hypoxic or degenerative features and groups were compared using Mann–Whitney tests and Friedman’s 2-way ANOVA. Results Animals in the accelerated subglottic injury group had less overall angiogenic features (P=.002) and more overall hypoxic/degenerative features (P=.000) compared with controls. Amongst angiogenic features, there was decreased budding (P=.000) and a trend toward decreased sprouting (P=.037) in the accelerated subglottic injury group with an increase in intussusception (P=.004), possibly representing early attempts at rapid revascularization. Amongst hypoxic/degenerative features, extravasation was the only feature that was significantly higher in the accelerated subglottic injury group (P=.000). Conclusions Subglottic injury due to intubation and hypoxia may lead to decreased angiogenesis and increased blood vessel damage resulting in extravasation of fluid and a decreased propensity toward wound healing in this animal model. PMID:24401165

  10. Clinical evaluation of stethoscope-guided inflation of tracheal tube cuffs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, R D C; Hirsch, N P

    2011-11-01

    Tracheal tube cuffs are commonly inflated to pressures exceeding the recommended upper limit of 30 cmH(2)O. We evaluated whether a stethoscope-guided method of cuff inflation results in pressures within the recommended range. Patients were randomly assigned to receive one of two methods of cuff inflation. In the standard 'just seal' group, air was introduced into the tracheal cuff until the audible leak at the mouth disappeared. In the stethoscope-guided group, air was introduced into the cuff until a change from harsh to soft breath sounds occurred, whilst listening with a stethoscope bell placed over the thyroid cartilage. Twenty-five patients were recruited to each group. The median (IQR [range]) cuff pressure in the 'just seal' group was 34 (28-40 [18-49]) cmH(2)O, and in the stethoscope-guided group was 20 (20-26 [16-28]) cmH(2)O, p stethoscope-guided method of tracheal tube cuff inflation is a novel, simple technique that reliably results in acceptable tracheal cuff pressures. © 2011 The Authors. Anaesthesia © 2011 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  11. Easy come, easy go: a simple and effective orthodontic enamel anchor for endotracheal tube stabilization in a child with extensive facial burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, Shinichiro; Hallett, Kerrod B; Brandon, Matthew S; McBride, Craig A

    2009-11-01

    Endotracheal tube stabilization in patients with facial burns is crucial and often challenging. We present a simple method of securing an endotracheal tube using two orthodontic brackets bonded to the maxillary central incisor teeth and a 0.08'' stainless steel ligature wire. Our technique is less traumatic, and is easier to maintain oral hygiene than with previously described methods. This anchorage system takes 5 min to apply and can be removed on the ward without the need for a general anaesthetic.

  12. Effects of shallow and deep endotracheal tube suctioning on cardiovascular indices in patients in intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irajpour, Alireza; Abbasinia, Mohammad; Hoseini, Abbas; Kashefi, Parviz

    2014-07-01

    Clearing the endotracheal tube through suctioning should be done to promote oxygenation. Depth of suctioning is one of the variables in this regard. In shallow suctioning method, the catheter passes to the tip of the endotracheal tube, and in deep suctioning method, it passes beyond the tip into the trachea or brunches. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of shallow and deep suctioning methods on cardiovascular indices in patients hospitalized in the intensive care units (ICUs). In this clinical trial, 74 patients were selected among those who had undergone mechanical ventilation in the ICU of Al-Zahra Hospital, Isfahan, Iran using convenience sampling method. The subjects were randomly allocated to shallow and deep suctioning groups. Heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP) were measured immediately before and 1, 2, and 3 min after each suctioning. Number of times of suctioning was also noted in both the groups. Data were analyzed using repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA), Chi-square and independent t-tests. HR and BP were significantly increased after suctioning in both the groups (P 0.05). The suctioning count was significantly higher in the shallow suctioning group than in the deep suctioning group. Shallow and deep suctioning were similar in their effects on HR and BP, but shallow suctioning caused further manipulation of patient's trachea than deep suctioning method. Therefore, in order to prevent complications, nurses are recommended to perform the endotracheal tube suctioning by the deep method.

  13. Community analysis of dental plaque and endotracheal tube biofilms from mechanically ventilated patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Poala J; Wise, Matt P; Smith, Ann; Marchesi, Julian R; Riggio, Marcello P; Lewis, Michael A O; Williams, David W

    2017-06-01

    Mechanically ventilated patients are at risk for developing ventilator-associated pneumonia, and it has been reported that dental plaque provides a reservoir of respiratory pathogens that may aspirate to the lungs and endotracheal tube (ETT) biofilms. For the first time, metataxonomics was used to simultaneously characterize the microbiome of dental plaque, ETTs, and non-directed bronchial lavages (NBLs) in mechanically ventilated patients to determine similarities in respective microbial communities and therefore likely associations. Bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences from 34 samples of dental plaque, NBLs, and ETTs from 12 adult mechanically ventilated patients were analyzed. No significant differences in the microbial communities of these samples were evident. Detected bacteria were primarily oral species (e.g., Fusobacterium nucleatum, Streptococcus salivarius, Prevotella melaninogenica) with respiratory pathogens (Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Streptococcuspneumoniae, and Haemophilus influenzae) also in high abundance. The high similarity between the microbiomes of dental plaque, NBLs, and ETTs suggests that the oral cavity is indeed an important site involved in microbial aspiration to the lower airway and ETT. As such, maintenance of good oral hygiene is likely to be highly important in limiting aspiration of bacteria in this vulnerable patient group. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The concordance of ultrasound technique versus X-ray to confirm endotracheal tube position in neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhry, R; Dangman, B; Pinheiro, J M B

    2015-07-01

    Given the distressingly high incidence of ETT malposition in the neonatal population, patients are exposed to ionizing radiation to confirm endotracheal tube (ETT) position. Our objective is to determine if ultrasound technique is concordant with X-ray in determining whether an ETT is deeply positioned or not. Prospective observational clinical trial. After obtaining informed consent, patients with an ETT who required X-ray for clinical reasons underwent sonographic evaluation of the ETT by an ultrasound technologist or pediatric radiologist, usually within the hour. A total of 56 image pairs were obtained from 29 patients. Ninety-eight percent of the ultrasound/X-ray image pairs were suitable for analysis. The concordance of ultrasound with X-ray to identify deeply and not deeply positioned ETTs was 95% (53/56). The sensitivity of ultrasound to detect deeply positioned ETTs on X-ray was 86% (6/7). The specificity of ultrasound to detect ETTs that were not deeply positioned on X-ray was 96% (47/49). As the largest clinical trial of its kind to date, with the greatest number of ultrasound operators, we have further established US as a feasible imaging modality to determine whether an ETT is deeply positioned or not.

  15. Oral and endotracheal tubes colonization by periodontal bacteria: a case-control ICU study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porto, A N; Cortelli, S C; Borges, A H; Matos, F Z; Aquino, D R; Miranda, T B; Oliveira Costa, F; Aranha, A F; Cortelli, J R

    2016-03-01

    Periodontal infection is a possible risk factor for respiratory disorders; however, no studies have assessed the colonization of periodontal pathogens in endotracheal tubes (ET). This case-control study analyzed whether periodontal pathogens are able to colonize ET of dentate and edentulous patients in intensive care units (ICU) and whether oral and ET periodontal pathogen profiles have any correlation between these patients. We selected 18 dentate and 18 edentulous patients from 78 eligible ICU patients. Oral clinical examination including probing depth, clinical attachment level, gingival index , and plaque index was performed by a single examiner, followed by oral and ET sampling and processing by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (total bacterial load, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Tannerella forsythia). Data were statistically analyzed by Mann-Whitney U, two-way analysis of variance (p Periodontal pathogens can colonize ET and the oral cavity of ICU patients. Periodontal pathogen profiles tend to be similar between dentate and edentulous ICU patients. In ICU patients, oral cavity represents a source of ET contamination. Although accompanied by higher oral bacterial levels, teeth do not seem to influence ET bacterial profiles.

  16. Factors leading to self-extubation of endotracheal tubes in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuan-Ting

    2009-01-01

    To discuss the factors leading to self-extubation of endotracheal tubes (ETTs) and explore the differences between the groups of patients who did and did not self-remove their ETTs. Self-extubation of ETTs has been reported to occur in 4.2% of severely ill patients and is associated with adverse medical effects. A case-control study. One hundred and thirty-nine subjects were recruited from a teaching hospital in southern Taiwan based on purposive sampling. The rate of self-extubation of ETTs was 6.4%. Analysis of the two groups demonstrated that significant variables were identified and fell into three categories: (1) the department to which the patient was admitted (p self-extubation of the ETT. Among the 44 patients who had self-extubation of their ETT, 28 met the criteria to be extubated, 70% and 81.8% of whom were not sedated, and self-extubation of their ETT was conscious of the act. Of the patients who attempted to self-remove their ETT, 80% were successful and 93.2% did not incur any adverse medical effects. The medical doctor and nurse should fully evaluate a patient's oxygenation status, decrease the length of the extubation training session for patients and extubate patients promptly when extubation criteria are met. Adopting a proactive approach to patient extubation will improve the overall quality of care.

  17. Deep Convolutional Neural Networks for Endotracheal Tube Position and X-ray Image Classification: Challenges and Opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhani, Paras

    2017-08-01

    The goal of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of deep convolutional neural networks (DCNNs) in differentiating subtle, intermediate, and more obvious image differences in radiography. Three different datasets were created, which included presence/absence of the endotracheal (ET) tube (n = 300), low/normal position of the ET tube (n = 300), and chest/abdominal radiographs (n = 120). The datasets were split into training, validation, and test. Both untrained and pre-trained deep neural networks were employed, including AlexNet and GoogLeNet classifiers, using the Caffe framework. Data augmentation was performed for the presence/absence and low/normal ET tube datasets. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC), area under the curves (AUC), and 95% confidence intervals were calculated. Statistical differences of the AUCs were determined using a non-parametric approach. The pre-trained AlexNet and GoogLeNet classifiers had perfect accuracy (AUC 1.00) in differentiating chest vs. abdominal radiographs, using only 45 training cases. For more difficult datasets, including the presence/absence and low/normal position endotracheal tubes, more training cases, pre-trained networks, and data-augmentation approaches were helpful to increase accuracy. The best-performing network for classifying presence vs. absence of an ET tube was still very accurate with an AUC of 0.99. However, for the most difficult dataset, such as low vs. normal position of the endotracheal tube, DCNNs did not perform as well, but achieved a reasonable AUC of 0.81.

  18. Tracheal tube and laryngeal mask cuff pressure during anaesthesia - mandatory monitoring is in need

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rokamp, K.Z.; Secher, N.H.; Møller, Ann

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: To prevent endothelium and nerve lesions, tracheal tube and laryngeal mask cuff pressure is to be maintained at a low level and yet be high enough to secure air sealing. METHOD: In a prospective quality-control study, 201 patients undergoing surgery during anaesthesia (without...... the use of nitrous oxide) were included for determination of the cuff pressure of the tracheal tubes and laryngeal masks. RESULTS: In the 119 patients provided with a tracheal tube, the median cuff pressure was 30 (range 8 - 100) cm H2O and the pressure exceeded 30 cm H2O (upper recommended level) for 54...... patients. In the 82 patients provided with a laryngeal mask, the cuff pressure was 95 (10 - 121) cm H2O and above 60 cm H2O (upper recommended level) for 56 patients and in 34 of these patients, the pressure exceeded the upper cuff gauge limit (120 cm H2O). There was no association between cuff pressure...

  19. Massive aspiration past the tracheal tube cuff caused by closed tracheal suction system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dave, Mital H; Frotzler, Angela; Madjdpour, Caveh; Koepfer, Nelly; Weiss, Markus

    2011-01-01

    Aspiration past the tracheal tube cuff has been recognized to be a risk factor for the development of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). This study investigated the effect of closed tracheal suctioning on aspiration of fluid past the tracheal tube cuff in an in vitro benchtop model. High-volume low pressure tube cuffs of 7.5 mm internal diameter (ID) were placed in a 22 mm ID artificial trachea connected to a test lung. Positive pressure ventilation (PPV) with 15 cm H₂O peak inspiratory pressure and 5 cm H₂O positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) was used. A closed tracheal suction system (CTSS) catheter (size 14Fr) was attached to the tracheal tube and suction was performed for 5, 10, 15, or 20 seconds under 200 or 300 cm H₂O suction pressures. Amount of fluid (mL) aspirated along the tube cuff and the airway pressure changes were recorded for each suction procedure. Fluid aspiration during different suction conditions was compared using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney test (Bonferroni correction [α = .01]). During 10, 15, and 20 seconds suction, airway pressure consistently dropped down to -8 to -13 cm H₂O (P aspiration was never observed under PPV + PEEP but occurred always during suctioning. Aspiration along the tube cuff was higher with -300 cm H₂O than with -200 cm H₂O suction pressure (P aspiration of fluid occurs along the tracheal tube cuff during suction with the closed tracheal suction system. © SAGE Publications 2011.

  20. Novel device (AirWave) to assess endotracheal tube migration: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nacheli, Gustavo Cumbo; Sharma, Manish; Wang, Xiaofeng; Gupta, Amit; Guzman, Jorge A; Tonelli, Adriano R

    2013-08-01

    Little is known about endotracheal tube (ETT) migration during routine care among critically ill patients. AirWave is a novel device that uses sonar waves to measure ETT migration and obstructions in real time. The aim of the present study is to assess the accuracy of the AirWave to evaluate ETT migration. In addition, we determined the degree of variation in ETT position and tested whether more pronounced migration occurs in specific clinical scenarios. After institutional review board approval, we included mechanically ventilated patients from February 2012 to May 2012. A chest radiography (CXR) was obtained at baseline and 24 hours when clinically indicated. The ETT distance at the lips was recorded at baseline and every 4 hours. The AirWave system continuously recorded ETT position changes from baseline, and luminal obstructions. A total of 42 patients (age: 61 [SD ±13] years, men: 52%) were recruited. A total of 19 patients had measurements of ETT migration at 24 hours by the 3 methodologies used in this study. The mean (SD) of the ETT migration at 24 hours was +0.04 (1.2), -0.42 (0.7) and +0.34 (1.81) cm when measured by portable CXR, ETT distance at the teeth and AirWave device, respectively. Bland-Altman analysis of tube migration at 24 hours comparing the AirWave with CXR readings showed a bias of 0.1 cm with 95% limit of agreement of -3.8 and +4.3 cm. Comparison of tube migration at 24 hours determined by AirWave with ETT distance at the lips revealed a bias of -0.4 with 95% limit of agreement -3.7 to +3 cm, similar to the values observed between CXR and ETT distance at the lips (bias of -0.3 cm, 95% limit of agreement of -3.4 to +2.8 cm). Factors associated with ETT migration at 24 hours were ETT size and initial measurement from ETT tip to carina by portable CXR. AirWave detected in eight patients some degree of ETT obstruction (30% ± 9.6%) that resolved with prompt ETT catheter suction. The AirWave may provide useful information regarding ETT

  1. Endobronchial intubation detected by insertion depth of endotracheal tube, bilateral auscultation, or observation of chest movements: randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitzwohl, Christian; Langheinrich, Angelika; Schober, Andreas; Krafft, Peter; Sessler, Daniel I; Herkner, Harald; Gonano, Christopher; Weinstabl, Christian; Kettner, Stephan C

    2010-11-09

    To determine which bedside method of detecting inadvertent endobronchial intubation in adults has the highest sensitivity and specificity. Prospective randomised blinded study. Department of anaesthesia in tertiary academic hospital. 160 consecutive patients (American Society of Anesthesiologists category I or II) aged 19-75 scheduled for elective gynaecological or urological surgery. Patients were randomly assigned to eight study groups. In four groups, an endotracheal tube was fibreoptically positioned 2.5-4.0 cm above the carina, whereas in the other four groups the tube was positioned in the right mainstem bronchus. The four groups differed in the bedside test used to verify the position of the endotracheal tube. To determine whether the tube was properly positioned in the trachea, in each patient first year residents and experienced anaesthetists were randomly assigned to independently perform bilateral auscultation of the chest (auscultation); observation and palpation of symmetrical chest movements (observation); estimation of the position of the tube by the insertion depth (tube depth); or a combination of all three (all three). Correct and incorrect judgments of endotracheal tube position. 160 patients underwent 320 observations by experienced and inexperienced anaesthetists. First year residents missed endobronchial intubation by auscultation in 55% of cases and performed significantly worse than experienced anaesthetists with this bedside test (odds ratio 10.0, 95% confidence interval 1.4 to 434). With a sensitivity of 88% (95% confidence interval 75% to 100%) and 100%, respectively, tube depth and the three tests combined were significantly more sensitive for detecting endobronchial intubation than auscultation (65%, 49% to 81%) or observation(43%, 25% to 60%) (Pauscultation to detect inadvertent endobronchial intubation. But even experienced physicians will benefit from inserting tubes to 20-21 cm in women and 22-23 cm in men, especially when high

  2. Difficulty with cuff deflation of reinforced tracheal tube caused by inflation line occlusion with silk thread ligation and fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotoh, Sayoko; Sugiyama, Daisuke; Imai, Eriko; Kawamata, Mikito

    2015-03-05

    A reinforced tracheal tube, ligated with silk threads, was inserted into a tracheostomy orifice and fixed to the skin. The cuff inflation line of the reinforced tracheal tube became occluded. Reinforced 'armoured' tracheal tubes have a spiral of wire embedded into the wall of the tube to give strength and flexibility, and may be sharply bent without compromising the tube lumen. The tracheal cuff attached to the tube is inflated by injecting air through a narrow-diameter tube welded to the outside of the tracheal tube. When a reinforced tracheal tube is ligated and fixed with silk threads, it should be confirmed whether the tracheal tube cuff can be deflated and inflated after fixation. Moreover, because occlusion can be eliminated by removing all silk threads used to ligate a tracheal tube, they should be removed before extubation. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  3. Three-finger tracheal palpation to guide endotracheal tube depth in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamble, Jonathan J; McKay, William P; Wang, Andrew F; Yip, Kinsha A; O'Brien, Jennifer M; Plewes, Christopher E

    2014-10-01

    Accurate endotracheal tube (ETT) depth is critical, especially in children. The current tools used to guide appropriate ETT depth have significant limitations. To evaluate the utility of tracheal palpation in the neck to guide appropriate ETT placement in children. A prospective observational study with a convenience sample of 50 children was conducted. During intubation, an investigator palpated the trachea with three fingertips side-by-side extending upward from the suprasternal notch. The anesthesiologist advanced the ETT slowly until palpated at the sternal notch. The investigator stated ETT palpation certainty as 'strongly felt', 'weakly felt', or 'not felt.' Final ETT position was determined by bronchoscopy and categorized as 'ETT too shallow' (tip in proximal ¼ of trachea), 'ETT too deep' (tip in distal ¼ of trachea), or 'ETT placement satisfactory' (between those extremes). Thirty boys and 20 girls undergoing dental surgery with nasal intubation were recruited (median age 4.4 years; range 2.0-10.8). The ETT (all ≥4 mm ID) was palpable at the sternal notch in all patients: 46 of 50 strongly palpable and 4 of 50 weakly palpable. The experimental methods led to satisfactory ETT placement in 49 of 50 patients, too deep in 1 of 50 patients. Compared with the Pediatrics Advanced Life Support (PALS) predictive formula, satisfactory placement would have been 41 of 50 patients (P guide ETT placement has excellent clinical performance and better guides appropriate ETT depth than the PALS formula in our study population. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Incremental change in cross sectional area in small endotracheal tubes: A call for more size options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortelliti, Caroline L; Mortelliti, Anthony J

    2016-08-01

    To elucidate the relatively large incremental percent change (IPC) in cross sectional area (CSA) in currently available small endotracheal tubes (ETTs), and to make recommendation for lesser incremental change in CSA in these smaller ETTs, in order to minimize iatrogenic airway injury. The CSAs of a commercially available line of ETTs were calculated, and the IPC of the CSA between consecutive size ETTs was calculated and graphed. The average IPC in CSA with large ETTs was applied to calculate identical IPC in the CSA for a theoretical, smaller ETT series, and the dimensions of a new theoretical series of proposed small ETTs were defined. The IPC of CSA in the larger (5.0-8.0 mm inner diameter (ID)) ETTs was 17.07%, and the IPC of CSA in the smaller ETTs (2.0-4.0 mm ID) is remarkably larger (38.08%). Applying the relatively smaller IPC of CSA from larger ETTs to a theoretical sequence of small ETTs, starting with the 2.5 mm ID ETT, suggests that intermediate sizes of small ETTs (ID 2.745 mm, 3.254 mm, and 3.859 mm) should exist. We recommend manufacturers produce additional small ETT size options at the intuitive intermediate sizes of 2.75 mm, 3.25 mm, and 3.75 mm ID in order to improve airway management for infants and small children. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. An expiratory assist during spontaneous breathing can compensate for endotracheal tube resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiyama, Akinori; Chang, Cheng; Suzuki, Shinya; Mashimo, Takashi; Fujino, Yuji

    2009-08-01

    Although inspiratory assist of spontaneous breathing in intubated patients is common, expiratory assist functions have rarely been reported. Effective expiratory support (ES) could be used to compensate for endotracheal tube (ETT) resistance during spontaneous breathing. In this study, we examined the performance of a new system designed to provide both inspiratory support (IS) and ES during spontaneous breathing with the goal of reducing the effective resistance of the ETT. The ES system consisted of a ventilator demand valve and a computer-controlled piston cylinder, which aspirated gas from the respiratory circuit during the expiratory phase. The movement of the piston was synchronized with spontaneous breathing. We compared the pressures at the tip of the ETT and in the breathing circuit during spontaneous breathing through an ETT of internal diameter (ID) 5 mm with that of an ETT with ID 8 mm in nine healthy adult male volunteers. The ventilatory mode was set to maintain a continuous airway pressure of 0 cm H(2)O. Three ventilator settings (no support, IS only, and IS plus ES) were compared using ID 5 mm ETT. We monitored pressure in the breathing circuit (P(aw)), ETT tip pressure (P(tip)), and respiratory flow. The P(tip) of the ID 5 mm ETT showed a large negative deflection during inspiration and a positive deflection during expiration without support. IS alone did not improve the respiratory pattern through the small ETT. However, IS plus ES resulted in negative P(aw) during expiration in addition to positive deflection of P(aw) during inspiration, making the pressure characteristics of P(tip) similar to those of ID 8 mm ETT. Moreover, IS plus ES produced a respiratory pattern through the ID 5 mm ETT that was similar to that through the ID 8 mm ETT. In this study of healthy volunteers, IS plus ES compensated for the airway resistance imposed by a ID 5.0 mm ETT to create pressure changes at the tip of the ETT similar to those of an ID 8.0 mm ETT.

  6. COMPARISON OF THE EFFECTIVENESS OF TWO LEVELS OF SUCTION PRESSURE ON OXYGEN SATURATION IN PATIENTS WITH ENDOTRACHEAL TUBE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhaji

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Endotracheal suctioning is one of the common supportive measures in intensive care units (ICU, which may be related to complications such as hypoxia. However, a questionable efficacy is still identified to choose suctioning pressure between 130 mmHg and 140 mmHg that is effective for patients with endotracheal tube. Objective: To compare the effectiveness of 130 mmHg and 140 mmHg suctioning pressure on oxygen saturation in patients with endotracheal tube. Methods: This research used a quasy experimental design with pretest and posttest group. The study was conducted from 31 January to 1 March 2017 in the Hospital of Panti Wilasa Citarum and Hospital of Roemani Muhammadiyah Semarang. There were 30 samples recruited using consecutive sampling, with 15 assigned in the 130 mmHg and 140 mmHg suctioning pressure group. Pulse oximetry was used to measure oxygen saturation. Paired t-test and Independent t-test were used for data analysis. Results: Findings showed that there was a statistically significant effect of 130 and 140 mmHg suctioning pressure on oxygen saturation in patients with ETT with p-value <0.05. There was a significant mean difference of oxygen saturation between 130 mmHg and 140 mmHg suctioning pressure group with p-value 0.004 (<0.05. The mean difference of oxygen saturation between both groups was 13.157. Conclusion: The 140 mmHg suctioning pressure is more effective compared with 130 mmHg suctioning pressure in increasing oxygen saturation in patients with ETT.

  7. High-fidelity simulation of lung isolation with double-lumen endotracheal tubes and bronchial blockers in anesthesiology resident training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Failor, Erin; Bowdle, Andrew; Jelacic, Srdjan; Togashi, Kei

    2014-08-01

    Demonstrate the feasibility of using the AirSim Bronchi airway simulator to teach residents how to manage lung isolation with double-lumen endotracheal tubes and bronchial blockers and evaluate their performance with a detailed checklist. Prospective observational study. University anesthesiology residency training program. Anesthesiology residents taking a cardiothoracic anesthesiology rotation. Residents were instructed in 7 tasks using the AirSim Bronchi: The use of the fiberoptic bronchoscope, methods for placing left and right double-lumen endotracheal tubes and 3 bronchial blockers (Univent, Arndt, and Cohen), and application of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) to the unventilated lung. Two to 3 weeks later, checklists and a detailed scoring system were used to assess performance. Residents rated the curriculum and their own confidence in performing the tasks using a 5-point Likert scale. Thirteen residents completed the curriculum. Their median Likert scale ratings of the curriculum based on a questionnaire with 6 items ranged from 4 to 5 of 5. Resident confidence scores for each lung isolation technique improved after the simulation training, with the median gain ranging from 0.5 to 1.5 Likert levels depending on the task. The largest improvement occurred with the bronchial blockers (psimulator in a novel simulation curriculum to teach lung-isolation techniques to anesthesiology residents and evaluated performance using a detailed checklist scoring system. This curriculum is a promising educational tool. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Colorimetric end-tidal CO2 detector for verification of endotracheal tube placement in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, S R; Sciammarella, J; Viccellio, P; Thode, H; Delagi, R

    1995-06-01

    To evaluate the ability of a disposable, colorimetric end-tidal CO2 detector to verify proper endotracheal (ET) tube placement in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, and to correlate semiquantitative CO2 measurements with the rate of return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). Prospective, observational study using a convenience sample of intubated out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients. A disposable, colorimetric end-tidal CO2 detector was attached to the ET tube after intubation. In the absence of a colorimetric change, the paramedics reassessed the tube placement and could reintubate the patient. Tube placement was verified at the hospital. Paramedics were instructed to contact the base station and report the colorimetric change upon hospital arrival. ROSC was defined as restoration of a self-sustaining pulse until hospital arrival. Between December 1990 and May 1993, ET tubes were placed in 566 victims of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. 541 of the 566 intubations (95.6%) were associated with a color change. In one case with a color change and out-of-hospital clinical evidence of proper tube placement, the tube was determined to be in the esophagus at the hospital. Correct placement of the remaining 565 of 566 (99.8%) tubes was verified. Of the 566 patients who had a colorimetric change, 91 (16%) had ROSC vs one of 25 (4%) patients who did not have a color change. In one subgroup (n = 179), the degree of color change was highly associated with ROSC (p = 0.004). A disposable, colorimetric end-tidal CO2 detector appears reliable in verifying proper ET tube placement in victims of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. The degree of color change correlates with the probability of ROSC.

  9. [Successful double-lumen endotracheal tube exchange with a soft-tipped extra firm exchange catheter in a patient with severe subcutaneous emphysema].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Kaori; Komasawa, Nobuyasu; Ishio, Junichi; Nakano, Shoko; Tatsumi, Shinichi; Minami, Toshiaki

    2014-07-01

    We report a case of successful double-lumen endotracheal tube exchange with a soft-tipped extra firm exchange catheter in a patient with severe subcutaneous emphysema. A 70-year-old man underwent right lower lobectomy for primary lung cancer under general anesthesia. He developed pneumothorax on postoperative day (POD) 14, which led to subcutaneous emphysema. An emergent operation was performed on POD20 to close the pulmonary fistula under general anesthesia with a single-lumen endotracheal tube and bronchial blocker. Subcutaneous emphysema became worse and pharyngeal emphysema was also suspected; re-operation to close the pulmonary or bronchial fistula was planned. We decided to place a double-lumen tube to precisely detect the fistula. Under the guide of a Pentax-AWS Airwayscope, the single-lumen endotracheal tube was exchanged uneventfully to a 35 Fr double-lumen endotracheal tube with a 110 cm soft-tipped extra firm exchange catheter. The fistula was detected by a leak test and the operation was performed uneventfully, leading to improvement of subcutaneous emphysema.

  10. A comparison between the v-gel supraglottic airway device and the cuffed endotracheal tube for airway management in spontaneously breathing cats during isoflurane anaesthesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oostrom, H.; Krauss, M.W.; Sap, R.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract OBJECTIVE: To compare airway management using the v-gel supraglottic airway device (v-gel SGAD) to that using an endotracheal tube (ETT), with respect to practicability, leakage of volatile anaesthetics and upper airway discomfort in cats. STUDY DESIGN: Prospective, randomized clinical

  11. Comparison of ProSeal laryngeal mask airway (PLMA with cuffed and uncuffed endotracheal tubes in infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eyyup Sabri Ozden

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to compare cuffed and uncuffed endotracheal tubes (ETTs with ProSealTM laryngeal mask airway (PLMA in terms of airway security and extubation, starting out from the hypothesis that PLMA will provide alternative airway safety to the endotracheal tubes, and that airway complications will be less observed. After obtaining approval from the local Ethics Committee and parental informed consent, 120 pediatric patients 1-24 months old, American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I-II, requiring general anesthesia for elective lower abdominal surgery, were randomized into PLMA (Group P, n = 40, cuffed ETT (Group C, n = 40, and uncuffed ETT (Group UC, n = 40 groups. The number of intubation or PLMA insertion attempts was recorded. Each patient’s epigastrium was auscultated for gastric insufflation, leak volumes and air leak fractions (leak volume/inspiratory volume were recorded. Post-operative adverse events related to airway management were also followed up during the first post-operative hour. Demographic and surgical data were similar among the groups. There were significantly fewer airway manipulations in the Group P than in the other groups (p < 0.01, and leak volume and air leak fractions were greater in the Group UC than in the other two groups (p < 0.01. Laryngospasm was significantly lower in the Group P during extubation and within the first minute of post-extubation than in the other groups (p < 0.01. Based on this study, PLMA may be a good alternative to cuffed and uncuffed ETTs for airway management of infants due to the ease of manipulation and lower incidence of laryngospasm.

  12. Efficacy of Hi-Lo Evac Endotracheal Tube in Prevention of Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia in Mechanically Ventilated Poisoned Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoochani Khorasani, Ahmad; Shadnia, Shahin; Mashayekhian, Mohammad; Rahimi, Mitra; Aghabiklooei, Abbas

    2016-01-01

    Background. Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is the most common health care-associated infection. To prevent this complication, aspiration of subglottic secretions using Hi-Lo Evac endotracheal tube (Evac ETT) is a recommended intervention. However, there are some reports on Evac ETT dysfunction. We aimed to compare the incidence of VAP (per ventilated patients) in severely ill poisoned patients who were intubated using Evac ETT versus conventional endotracheal tubes (C-ETT) in our toxicology ICU. Materials and Methods. In this clinical randomized trial, 91 eligible patients with an expected duration of mechanical ventilation of more than 48 hours were recruited and randomly assigned into two groups: (1) subglottic secretion drainage (SSD) group who were intubated by Evac ETT (n = 43) and (2) control group who were intubated by C-ETT (n = 48). Results. Of the 91 eligible patients, 56 (61.5%) were male. VAP was detected in 24 of 43 (55.8%) patients in the case group and 23 of 48 (47.9%) patients in the control group (P = 0.45). The most frequently isolated microorganisms were S. aureus (54.10%) and Acinetobacter spp. (19.68%). The incidence of VAP and ICU length of stay were not significantly different between the two groups, but duration of intubation was statistically different and was longer in the SSD group. Mortality rate was less in SSD group but without a significant difference (P = 0.68). Conclusion. The SSD procedure was performed intermittently with one-hour intervals using 10 mL syringe. Subglottic secretion drainage does not significantly reduce the incidence of VAP in patients receiving MV. This strategy appears to be ineffective in preventing VAP among ICU patients.

  13. Efficacy of Hi-Lo Evac Endotracheal Tube in Prevention of Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia in Mechanically Ventilated Poisoned Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Ghoochani Khorasani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP is the most common health care-associated infection. To prevent this complication, aspiration of subglottic secretions using Hi-Lo Evac endotracheal tube (Evac ETT is a recommended intervention. However, there are some reports on Evac ETT dysfunction. We aimed to compare the incidence of VAP (per ventilated patients in severely ill poisoned patients who were intubated using Evac ETT versus conventional endotracheal tubes (C-ETT in our toxicology ICU. Materials and Methods. In this clinical randomized trial, 91 eligible patients with an expected duration of mechanical ventilation of more than 48 hours were recruited and randomly assigned into two groups: (1 subglottic secretion drainage (SSD group who were intubated by Evac ETT (n=43 and (2 control group who were intubated by C-ETT (n=48. Results. Of the 91 eligible patients, 56 (61.5% were male. VAP was detected in 24 of 43 (55.8% patients in the case group and 23 of 48 (47.9% patients in the control group (P=0.45. The most frequently isolated microorganisms were S. aureus (54.10% and Acinetobacter spp. (19.68%. The incidence of VAP and ICU length of stay were not significantly different between the two groups, but duration of intubation was statistically different and was longer in the SSD group. Mortality rate was less in SSD group but without a significant difference (P=0.68. Conclusion. The SSD procedure was performed intermittently with one-hour intervals using 10 mL syringe. Subglottic secretion drainage does not significantly reduce the incidence of VAP in patients receiving MV. This strategy appears to be ineffective in preventing VAP among ICU patients.

  14. Is the Venner-PneuX Endotracheal Tube System A Cost-Effective Option For Post Cardiac Surgery Care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andronis, Lazaros; Oppong, Raymond A; Manga, Na'ngono; Senanayake, Eshan; Gopal, Shameer; Charman, Susan; Giri, Ramesh; Luckraz, Heyman

    2018-04-27

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is common and costly. In a recent randomized controlled trial, the Venner-PneuX (VPX) endotracheal tube system was found to be superior to standard endotracheal tubes (SET) in preventing VAP. However, VPX is considerably more expensive. We evaluated the costs and benefits of VPX to determine whether replacing SET with VPX is a cost-effective option for intensive care units. We developed a decision analytic model to compare intubation with VPX or SET for patients requiring mechanical ventilation post cardiac surgery. The model was populated with existing evidence on costs, effectiveness and quality of life. Cost-effectiveness and cost-utility analyses were conducted from an NHS hospital perspective. Uncertainty was assessed through deterministic and probabilistic sensitivity analyses. Compared to SET, VPX is associated with an expected cost saving of £738 per patient. VPX led to a small increase in quality-adjusted life years (QALYs), indicating that the device is overall less costly and more effective than SET. The probability of VPX being cost-effective at £30,000 per QALY is 97%. VPX would cease to be cost-effective if (i) it led to a risk reduction smaller than 0.02 compared to SET, (ii) the acquisition cost of VPX was as high as £890 or, (iii) the cost of treating a case of VAP was lower than £1,450. VPX resulted in improved outcomes and savings which far offset the cost of the device, suggesting that replacing SET with VPX is overall beneficial. Findings were robust to extreme values of key parameters. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Strategies to prevent ventilation-associated pneumonia: the effect of cuff pressure monitoring techniques and tracheal tube type on aspiration of subglottic secretions: an in-vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Eleanor L; Duguid, Alasdair; Ercole, Ari; Matta, Basil; Burnstein, Rowan M; Veenith, Tonny

    2014-03-01

    Ventilation-associated pneumonia (VAP) is the commonest nosocomial infection in intensive care. Implementation of a VAP prevention care bundle is a proven method to reduce its incidence. The UK care bundle recommends maintenance of the tracheal tube cuff pressure at 20 to 30  cmH₂O with 4-hourly pressure checks and use of tracheal tubes with subglottic aspiration ports in patients admitted for more than 72  h. To evaluate the effects of tracheal tube type and cuff pressure monitoring technique on leakage of subglottic secretions past the tracheal tube cuff. Bench-top study. Laboratory. A model adult trachea with simulated subglottic secretions was intubated with a tracheal tube with the cuff inflated to 25  cmH₂O. Experiments were conducted using a Portex Profile Soft Seal tracheal tube with three cuff pressure monitoring strategies and using a Portex SACETT tracheal tube with intermittent cuff pressure checks. Rate of simulated secretion leakage past the tracheal tube cuff. Mean ± SD leakage of fluid past the Profile Soft Seal tracheal tube cuff was 2.25 ± 1.49  ml  min⁻¹ with no monitoring of cuff pressure, 2.98 ± 1.63  ml  min⁻¹ with intermittent cuff pressure monitoring and 3.83 ± 2.17  ml  min⁻¹ with continuous cuff pressure monitoring (P aspiration port and aspirating the simulated secretions prior to intermittent cuff pressure checks reduced the leakage rate to 0.50 ± 0.48  ml  min⁻¹ (P aspiration port. Further evaluation of medical device performance is needed in order to design more effective VAP prevention strategies.

  16. A Comparative Study of Cuffed Pharyngeal Tube (CPR with Endotracheal Tube in Airway Management and Ventilation of Spontaneously Breathing Patients Undergoing General Anesthesia

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    F Mir Mohammad Sadeghi

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cuffed pharyngeal tube is a device designed for ventilation of anesthetized patients. CPT has advantages over face mask including: maintaining of face mask can be difficult and boring after several minutes and mobility of the practitioner is reduced due to involvement of hands. Mask pressure can cause soft tissue and nerve damage around the nose. Anesthetic gas leakage from the mask adds to the operation room pollution. In difficult intubation CPT can be life-saving. Materials and Methods: In our study CPT was compared with endotracheal tube (ET in anesthetized patients. A scoring system for evaluating ventilation of patients was designed using symmetric chest wall motion during ventilation with anesthesia bag and sensing lung compliance through it, auscultation of breathing sounds, oscilation of bag with breathing and peripheral oxygen saturation by pulse oxymetry. Respiratory complications (pulmonary aspiration, Iaryngospasm and bronchospasm, nausea and vomiting were looked for during anesthesia. Results: The results showed that CPT was successful as ET in ventilation of spontaneously breathing patients and incidence of respiratory complications with CPT was no more than ET. Airway resistance was significantly greater with CPT than ET (P<0.05. Patients with ET had significantly greater incidence of sore throat than with CPT (P<0.05. Conclusion: Thus we concluded that CPT can be used for ventilation of anesthetized patients not predisposed to pulmonary aspiration and whose peak airway pressure does not exceed 20-25 CmH2O.

  17. A simple method for accurate endotracheal placement of an intubation tube in Guinea pigs to assess lung injury following chemical exposure.

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    Nambiar, M P; Gordon, R K; Moran, T S; Richards, S M; Sciuto, A M

    2007-01-01

    ABSTRACT Guinea pigs are considered as the animal model of choice for toxicology and medical countermeasure studies against chemical warfare agents (CWAs) and toxic organophosphate pesticides because of the low levels of carboxylesterase compared to rats and mice. However, it is difficult to intubate guinea pigs without damaging the larynx to perform CWA inhalation experiments. We describe an easy technique of intubation of guinea pigs for accurate endotracheal placement of the intubation tube. The technique involves a speculum made by cutting the medium-size ear speculum in the midline leaving behind the intact circular connector to the otoscope. Guinea pigs were anesthetized with Telazol/meditomidine, the tongue was pulled using blunt forceps, and an otoscope attached with the specially prepared speculum was inserted gently. Insertion of the speculum raises the epiglottis and restrains the movements of vocal cord, which allows smooth insertion of the metal stylet-reinforced intubation tube. Accurate endotracheal placement of the intubation tube was achieved by measuring the length from the tracheal bifurcation to vocal cord and vocal cord to the upper front teeth. The average length of the trachea in guinea pigs (275 +/- 25 g) was 5.5 +/- 0.2 cm and the distance from the vocal cord to the front teeth was typically 3 cm. Coinciding an intubation tube marked at 6 cm with the upper front teeth accurately places the intubation tube 2.5 cm above the tracheal bifurcation. This simple method of intubation does not disturb the natural flora of the mouth and causes minimum laryngeal damage. It is rapid and reliable, and will be very valuable in inhalation exposure to chemical/biological warfare agents or toxic chemicals to assess respiratory toxicity and develop medical countermeasures.

  18. [A comparison of degree of precision of auscultation, partial pressure of carbon dioxide in end-expiration, and transillumination technique in verifying accurate position of endotracheal tube].

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    Qi, Le; Liu, Rong; Tang, Enhui; Li, Shouchun; Jin, Jun; He, Xihuan; Lyu, Shaojun; Weng, Hao

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the effect of auscultation, partial pressure of carbon dioxide in end-expiration (P(ET)CO2), transillumination technique to judge whether the endotracheal tube is misplaced into the esophagus. A blinded randomized controlled trial was conducted. Sixty patients with American Society of Anesthesiology (ASA) grade I - II undergoing endotracheal intubation in Fengxian Central Hospital admitted from September 2014 to February 2015 were enrolled. Two endotracheal tubes with the same size were respectively inserted into the trachea and esophagus for the same depth after general anesthesia by the same person. Two blinded anesthetists with different experience checked the tube position using three methods including auscultation, P(ET)CO2, and transillumination technique, respectively. The order of the tubes tested (trachea or esophagus) and the method used were randomized according to randomise numbers table. The experienced anesthetists conducted the test first, followed by an inexperienced anesthetist conducting the same methods. The numbers of right and wrong determinations with different methods by different anesthetists were recorded. Sixty patients underwent the procedures for 180 times, with intratracheal intubation for 90 times, and esophageal intubation for 90 times. It was shown that the results were not different in two groups [96.7% (174/180) vs. 92.2% (166/180), χ2 = 3.500, P = 0.057]. By using auscultation, the correct rate of experienced anesthetist was higher than that of inexperienced (95.0% vs. 78.3%, χ2 = 5.786, P = 0.013). Using P(ET)CO2, both anesthetists were correct in all cases, and the accuracy was 100%. Using transillumination, the experienced anesthetist was mistaken in 3 cases (accuracy was 95.0%), while the inexperienced mistook in 1 case (accuracy was 98.3%), and no significant difference was found between two groups χ2 = 0.500, P = 0.250). The correct rate of using transillumination was significantly higher than that of using

  19. Cuff depth and continuous chest auscultation method for determination of tracheal tube insertion depth in nasal intubation: observational study.

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    Ouchi, Kentaro; Sugiyama, Kazuna

    2016-04-01

    Incorrect endobronchial placement of the tracheal tube can lead to serious complications. Hence, it is necessary to determine the accuracy of tracheal tube positioning. Markers are included on tracheal tubes, in the process of their manufacture, as indicators of approximate intubation depth. In addition, continuous chest auscultation has been used for determining the proper position of the tube. We examined insertion depth using the cuff depth and continuous chest auscultation method (CC method), compared with insertion depth determined by the marker method, to assess the accuracy of these methods. After induction of anesthesia, tracheal intubation was performed in each patient. In the CC method, the depth of tube insertion was measured when the cuff had passed through the glottis, and again when breath sounds changed in quality; the depth of tube insertion was determined from these values. In the marker method, the depth of tube insertion was measured and determined when the marker of the tube had reached the glottis, using insertion depth according to the marker as an index. Insertion depth by the marker method was 26.6 ± 1.2 cm and by the CC method was 28.0 ± 1.2 cm (P < 0.0001). The CC method indicated a significantly greater depth than the marker method. This study determined the safe range of tracheal tube placement. Tube positions determined by the CC method were about 1 cm deeper than those determined by the marker. This information is important to prevent accidental one-lung ventilation and accidental extubation. UMIN No. UMIN000011375.

  20. Orotracheal tube as a risk factor for lower respiratory tract infection: preliminary data from a randomised trial.

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    Muzlovic, Igor; Perme, Janja; Stubljar, David

    2018-05-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate whether polyurethane (PU) endotracheal tubes, continuous measurements of cuff pressure and aspiration of the subglottic space as a bundle of parameters could reduce patients' risk for developing ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP). Two groups of patients that differed only in terms of endotracheal tubes and intubation intervention were compared. Group A was ventilated using PU tubes a with conical cuff; they also had continuous cuff pressure measurement and continuous subglottic aspiration. Group B was ventilated using PVC tubes with a cylindrical cuff; the patients underwent intermittent cuff pressure measurement and intermittent subglottic aspiration. Seven patients in group A (13.2%) and 18 in group B (36.0%) out of 103 were diagnosed with VAP. VAP patients were in general older, stayed longer in the ICU and were ventilated significantly longer compared with the patients with no VAP. Eight more patients in group B died compared with group A. Moreover, subjects in group A survived longer. Patient age, hours on mechanical ventilation, and days on an ICU were all positively associated with the occurrence of VAP. Prevention parameters in ventilation (PU cuff, conical cuff, continuous subglottic drainage and continuous cuff pressure measurement) could prevent the incidence of VAP in ICU patients.

  1. Endotracheal tube resistance and inertance in a model of mechanical ventilation of newborns and small infants—the impact of ventilator settings on tracheal pressure swings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hentschel, Roland; Buntzel, Julia; Guttmann, Josef; Schumann, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Resistive properties of endotracheal tubes (ETTs) are particularly relevant in newborns and small infants who are generally ventilated through ETTs with a small inner diameter. The ventilation rate is also high and the inspiratory time (ti) is short. These conditions effectuate high airway flows with excessive flow acceleration, so airway resistance and inertance play an important role. We carried out a model study to investigate the impact of varying ETT size, lung compliance and ventilator settings, such as peak inspiratory pressure (PIP), positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP) and inspiratory time (ti) on the pressure–flow characteristics with respect to the resistive and inertive properties of the ETT. Pressure at the Y piece was compared to direct measurement of intratracheal pressure (P trach ) at the tip of the ETT, and pressure drop (ΔP ETT ) was calculated. Applying published tube coefficients (Rohrer's constants and inertance), P trach was calculated from ventilator readings and compared to measured P trach using the root-mean-square error. The most relevant for ΔP ETT was the ETT size, followed by (in descending order) PIP, compliance, ti and PEEP, with gas flow velocity being the principle in common for all these parameters. Depending on the ventilator settings ΔP ETT exceeded 8 mbar in the smallest 2.0 mm ETT. Consideration of inertance as an additional effect in this setting yielded a better agreement of calculated versus measured P trach than Rohrer's constants alone. We speculate that exact tracheal pressure tracings calculated from ventilator readings by applying Rohrer's equation and the inertance determination to small size ETTs would be helpful. As an integral part of ventilator software this would (1) allow an estimate of work of breathing and implementation of an automatic tube compensation, and (2) be important for gentle ventilation in respiratory care, especially of small infants, since it enables the physician to

  2. Comparison the Effects of Shallow and Deep Endotracheal Tube Suctioning on Respiratory Rate, Arterial Blood Oxygen Saturation and Number of Suctioning in Patients Hospitalized in the Intensive Care Unit: A Randomized Controlled Trial

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    Mohammad Abbasinia

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Endotracheal tube suctioning is essential for improve oxygenation in the patients undergoing mechanical ventilation. There are two types of shallow and deep endotracheal tube suctioning. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of shallow and deep suctioning methods on respiratory rate (RR, arterial blood oxygen saturation (SpO2 and number of suctioning in patients hospitalized in the intensive care units of Al-Zahra Hospital, Isfahan, Iran. Methods: In this randomized controlled trial, 74 patients who hospitalized in the intensive care units of Isfahan Al-Zahra Hospital were randomly allocated to the shallow and deep suctioning groups. RR and SpO2 were measured immediately before, immediately after, 1 and 3 minute after each suctioning. Number of suctioning was also noted in each groups. Data were analyzed using repeated measures analysis of variance (RMANOVA, chi-square and independent t-tests. Results: RR was significantly increased and SpO2 was significantly decreased after each suctioning in the both groups. However, these changes were not significant between the two groups. The numbers of suctioning was significantly higher in the shallow suctioning group than in the deep suctioning group. Conclusion: Shallow and deep suctioning had a similar effect on RR and SpO2. However, shallow suctioning caused further manipulation of patient’s trachea than deep suctioning method. Therefore, it seems that deep endotracheal tube suctioning method can be used to clean the airway with lesser manipulation of the trachea.

  3. Comparison the effects of shallow and deep endotracheal tube suctioning on respiratory rate, arterial blood oxygen saturation and number of suctioning in patients hospitalized in the intensive care unit: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasinia, Mohammad; Irajpour, Alireza; Babaii, Atye; Shamali, Mehdi; Vahdatnezhad, Jahanbakhsh

    2014-09-01

    Endotracheal tube suctioning is essential for improve oxygenation in the patients undergoing mechanical ventilation. There are two types of shallow and deep endotracheal tube suctioning. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of shallow and deep suctioning methods on respiratory rate (RR), arterial blood oxygen saturation (SpO2) and number of suctioning in patients hospitalized in the intensive care units of Al-Zahra Hospital, Isfahan, Iran. In this randomized controlled trial, 74 patients who hospitalized in the intensive care units of Isfahan Al-Zahra Hospital were randomly allocated to the shallow and deep suctioning groups. RR and SpO2 were measured immediately before, immediately after, 1 and 3 minute after each suctioning. Number of suctioning was also noted in each groups. Data were analyzed using repeated measures analysis of variance (RMANOVA), chi-square and independent t-tests. RR was significantly increased and SpO2 was significantly decreased after each suctioning in the both groups. However, these changes were not significant between the two groups. The numbers of suctioning was significantly higher in the shallow suctioning group than in the deep suctioning group. Conclusion : Shallow and deep suctioning had a similar effect on RR and SpO2. However, shallow suctioning caused further manipulation of patient's trachea than deep suctioning method. Therefore, it seems that deep endotracheal tube suctioning method can be used to clean the airway with lesser manipulation of the trachea.

  4. Direct analysis of bacterial viability in endotracheal tube biofilm from a pig model of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus pneumonia following antimicrobial therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Barat, Laia; Li Bassi, Gianluigi; Ferrer, Miquel; Bosch, Anna; Calvo, Maria; Vila, Jordi; Gabarrús, Albert; Martínez-Olondris, Pilar; Rigol, Montse; Esperatti, Mariano; Luque, Néstor; Torres, Antoni

    2012-07-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) helps to observe the biofilms formed in the endotracheal tube (ETT) of ventilated subjects and to determine its structure and bacterial viability using specific dyes. We compared the effect of three different treatments (placebo, linezolid, and vancomycin) on the bacterial biofilm viability captured by CLSM. Eight pigs with pneumonia induced by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) were ventilated up to 96 h and treated with linezolid, vancomycin, or placebo (controls). ETT images were microscopically examined after staining with the live/dead(®) BacLight(™) Kit (Invitrogen, Barcelona, Spain) with a confocal laser scanning microscope. We analyzed 127 images obtained by CLSM. The median ratio of live/dead bacteria was 0.51, 0.74, and 1 for the linezolid, vancomycin, and control groups, respectively (P = 0.002 for the three groups); this ratio was significantly lower for the linezolid group, compared with the control group (P = 0.001). Images showed bacterial biofilm attached and non-attached to the ETT surface but growing within secretions accumulated inside ETT. Systemic treatment with linezolid is associated with a higher proportion of dead bacteria in the ETT biofilm of animals with MRSA pneumonia. Biofilm clusters not necessarily attach to the ETT surface. © 2012 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The incidence of ventilator-associated pneumonia using the PneuX System with or without elective endotracheal tube exchange: A pilot study

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    Blunt Mark

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The PneuX System is a novel endotracheal tube and tracheal seal monitor, which has been designed to minimise the aspiration of oropharyngeal secretions. We aimed to determine the incidence of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP in patients who were intubated with the PneuX System and to establish whether intermittent subglottic secretion drainage could be performed reliably and safely using the PneuX System. Findings In this retrospective observational study, data was collected from 53 sequential patients. Nine (17% patients were initially intubated with the PneuX System and 44 (83% patients underwent elective exchange to the PneuX System. There were no episodes of VAP while the PneuX System was in situ. On an intention to treat basis, the incidence VAP was 1.8%. There were no complications from, or failure of, subglottic secretion drainage during the study. Conclusions Our study demonstrates that a low incidence of VAP is possible using the PneuX System. Our study also demonstrates that elective exchange and intermittent subglottic secretion drainage can be performed reliably and safely using the PneuX System.

  6. Morphological findings in the tracheal epithelium of dogs exposed to the inhalation of poorly conditioned gases under use of an endotracheal tube or laryngeal mask airway.

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    Dias, Norimar Hernandes; Braz, José Reinaldo Cerqueira; Defaveri, Júlio; Carvalho, Lídia Raquel; Martins, Regina Helena Garcia

    2011-10-01

    To study morphological findings in the tracheal epithelium of dogs exposed to the inhalation of poorly conditioned gases under use of an endotracheal tube (ET) or laryngeal mask airway (LMA). Twelve dogs randomly were allocated to two groups: ET group (n-6) and LMA group (n-6), anaesthetized and mechanically ventilated, without CO(2) reabsorption. Haemodynamic and ventilatory parameters, tympanic temperature, temperature, relative and absolute humidity of the ambient and inhaled gases were analyzed during three hours. The animals were submitted to euthanasia and biopsies were carried out along the tracheal segment to morphological study. Three healthy dogs were used to morphological control. Inhaled gas temperature was maintained between 24ºC and 26ºC, relative humidity between 10% and 12%, and absolute humidity between 2 - 3 mg H(2)O.L(-1) with no significant differences between groups. In both groups, histological analysis showed epithelial inflammation and congestion in the corion and scanning electron microscopy showed ciliary grouping and disorganization. Transmission electron microscopy showed higher alterations in ET group than LMA group as widening of cell junctions, ciliary disorientation, cytoplasmic vacuolization, nuclear abnormalities, picnosis and chromatin condensation. LMA determined less pronounced changes in the tracheal epithelium in dogs exposed to the inhalation of poorly conditioned gases.

  7. Evaluation of performance of Streamlined Liner of the Pharynx Airway™, Laryngeal Mask Airway-ProSeal and endotracheal tube in prone position: A prospective, randomised study

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    Harihar Vishwanath Hegde

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Airway used in prone position should be efficacious and safe. The Streamlined Liner of the Pharynx Airway (SLIPA™ and Laryngeal Mask Airway-ProSeal (PLMA provide better airway seal and protection against aspiration. We planned to evaluate the performance of SLIPA™, PLMA and endotracheal tube (ETT in prone position. Methods: 114 adult patients undergoing elective surgery in prone position under general anaesthesia were randomised into Group-T (ETT, Group-S (SLIPA™ and Group-P (PLMA. Airways were inserted in supine position and patients turned prone subsequently. Airway characteristics, ventilatory parameters and complications were noted. One-way analysis of variance, Mann–Whitney U-test and Chi-square or Fisher's exact test were used. Results: Tidal volumes, peak airway pressure and compliance were comparable at all times. Leak pressure was significantly higher (P < 0.001 in Group-T (mean leak pressure = 40 cmH2O when compared to Group-S and Group-P at all the times of recording, and there was no significant difference between Group-S and Group-P. The number of patients requiring airway/neck manipulation in prone position was significantly higher (P < 0.001 in Group-S (19 [55.9%] when the three groups were compared (none in Group-T and in comparison with Group-P (5 [14.7%], P < 0.001. On airway removal, the incidence of complications and airway reaction was significantly higher in Group-T. Group-S had a significantly higher incidence of dysphagia at 2 h postoperatively. Conclusion: ETT was most efficacious. SLIPA™ and PLMA were efficacious, safe and less stimulating to the airway during removal. More patients required SLIPA™ airway/neck manipulation.

  8. ProSeal laryngeal mask airway as an alternative to standard endotracheal tube in securing upper airway in the patients undergoing beating-heart coronary artery bypass grafting

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    Kalpana Shah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: ProSeal laryngeal mask airways (PLMAs are routinely used after failed tracheal intubation as airway rescue, facilitating tracheal intubation by acting as a conduit and to secure airway during emergencies. In long duration surgeries, use of endotracheal tube (ETT is associated with various hemodynamic complications, which are minimally affected during PLMA use. However, except for few studies, there are no significant data available that promote the use of laryngeal mask during cardiac surgery. This prospective study was conducted with the objective of demonstrating the advantages of PLMA over ETT in the patients undergoing beating-heart coronary artery bypass graft (CABG. Methodology: This prospective, interventional study was carried out in 200 patients who underwent beating-heart CABG. Patients were randomized in equal numbers to either ETT group or PLMA group, and various hemodynamic and respiratory parameters were observed at different time points. Results: Patients in PLMA group had mean systolic blood pressure 126.10 ± 5.31 mmHg compared to the patients of ETT group 143.75 ± 6.02 mmHg. Pulse rate in the PLMA group was less (74.52 ± 10.79 per min (P < 0.05 compared to ETT group (81.72 ± 9.8. Thus, hemodynamic changes were significantly lower (P < 0.05 in PLMA than in ETT group. Respiratory parameters such as oxygen saturation, pressure CO 2 (pCO 2 , peak airway pressure, and lung compliance were similar to ETT group at all evaluation times. The incidence of adverse events was also lower in PLMA group. Conclusion: In experience hand, PLMA offers advantages over the ETT in airway management in the patients undergoing beating-heart CABG.

  9. Tidal Volume Delivery and Endotracheal Tube Leak during Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in Intubated Newborn Piglets with Hypoxic Cardiac Arrest Exposed to Different Modes of Ventilatory Support.

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    Mendler, Marc R; Weber, Claudia; Hassan, Mohammad A; Huang, Li; Mayer, Benjamin; Hummler, Helmut D

    2017-01-01

    There are few data available on the interaction of inflations, chest compressions (CC), and delivery of tidal volumes in newborn infants undergoing resuscitation in the presence of endotracheal tube (ET) leaks. To determine the effects of different respiratory support strategies along with CC on changes in tidal volume and ET leaks in hypoxic newborn piglets with cardiac arrest. Asphyxiated newborn piglets, intubated with weight-adapted uncuffed ET, were randomized into three groups and resuscitated according to ILCOR 2010 guidelines: (1) T-piece resuscitator (TPR) group = peak inspiratory pressure (PIP)/positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) 25/5 cm H2O, rate 30/min, inflations interposed between CC (3:1 ratio); (2) self- inflating bag (SIB) group = PIP 25 cm H2O without PEEP, rate 30/min, inflations interposed between CC (3:1 ratio), and (3) ventilator group = PIP/PEEP of 25/5 cm H2O, rate 30/min. CC were applied with a rate of 120/min without synchrony to inflations. We observed a significant increase of leak (average increase 11.4%) when CC was added to respiratory support (p = 0.0001). Expired tidal volume was larger in the SIB group than in the two other modes which both applied PEEP. However, tidal volumes caused by CC only were larger in the two groups with PEEP than in the SIB group (without PEEP). There is interaction between lung inflations and CC affecting leak and delivery of tidal volume, which may be influenced by the mode/device used for respiratory support. Leak is larger in the presence of PEEP. However, CC cause additional tidal volume which is larger in the presence of PEEP. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Bronchial blocker versus left double-lumen endotracheal tube in video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery: a randomized-controlled trial examining time and quality of lung deflation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussières, Jean S; Somma, Jacques; Del Castillo, José Luis Carrasco; Lemieux, Jérôme; Conti, Massimo; Ugalde, Paula A; Gagné, Nathalie; Lacasse, Yves

    2016-07-01

    Double-lumen endotracheal tubes (DL-ETT) and bronchial blockers (BB) have both been used for lung isolation in video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS). Though not well studied, it is widely thought that a DL-ETT provides faster and better quality lung collapse. The aim of this study was to compare a BB technique vs a left-sided DL-ETT strategy with regard to the time and quality of lung collapse during one-lung ventilation (OLV) for elective VATS. Forty patients requiring OLV for VATS were randomized to receive a BB (n = 20) or a left-sided DL-ETT (n = 20). The primary endpoint was the time from pleural opening (performed by the surgeon) until complete lung collapse. The time was evaluated offline by reviewing video recorded during the VATS. The quality of lung deflation was also graded offline using a visual scale (1 = no lung collapse; 2 = partial lung collapse; and 3 = total lung collapse) and was recorded at several time points after pleural incision. The surgeon also graded the time to complete lung collapse and quality of lung deflation during the procedure. The surgeon's guess as to which device was used for lung isolation was also recorded. Of the 40 patients enrolled in the study, 20 patients in the DL-ETT group and 18 in the BB group were analyzed. There mean (standard deviation) time to complete lung collapse of the operative lung was significantly faster using the BB compared with using the DL-ETT [7.5 (3.8) min vs 36.6 (29.1) min, respectively; mean difference, 29.1 min; 95% confidence interval, 1.8 to 7.2; P < 0.001]. Overall, a higher proportion of patients in the BB group than in the DL-ETT group achieved a quality of lung collapse score of 3 at five minutes (57% vs 6%, respectively; P < 0.004), ten minutes (73% vs 14%, respectively; P = 0.005), and 20 min (100% vs 25%, respectively; P = 0.002) after opening the pleura. The surgeon incorrectly guessed the type of device used in 78% of the BB group and 50% of the DL-ETT group (P = 0.10). The time and

  11. Bronchial Blocker Versus Left Double-Lumen Endotracheal Tube for One-Lung Ventilation in Right Video-Assisted Thoracoscopic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yao; Dai, Wei; Zong, Zhijun; Xiao, Yimin; Wu, Di; Liu, Xuesheng; Chun Wong, Gordon Tin

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the quality of lung deflation of a left-sided double-lumen endotracheal tube (DLT) with a bronchial blocker (BB) for one-lung ventilation in video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS). A prospective, randomized, clinical study. A university-affiliated teaching hospital. Forty-five adult patients undergoing esophageal tumor surgery using VATS with right lung deflation. Patients were assigned by a computer-generated randomization sequence to either the left-sided DLT or BB group. The correct positioning of the airway device was confirmed using fiberoptic bronchoscopy. The variables assessed included: (1) time required to correctly place the devices and to achieve lung collapse; (2) the number of times the device malpositioned; (3) the quality of lung deflation as rated by the surgeon; (4) blood pressure and heart rate at baseline (T 1 ), immediately before (T 2 ) and after (T 3 ) and 1 minute (T 4 ) after intubation; (5) the number of patients with hypoxemia (SpO 2 one-lung ventilation (OLV) period; and (6) postoperative hoarseness of voice, sore throat, or pulmonary infection. Of the 45 patients approached for the study, 21 patients in the DLT group and 19 patients in the BB group were analyzed. The time required to place the device in the correct position was similar between the 2 groups. The time to achieve right lung collapse in the BB group was significantly longer (mean difference: 3.232, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.993-4.471; p = 0.003). The quality of lung collapse, OLV duration, number of patients with device malposition, and hypoxemia in both groups were similar. There were more patients suffering hoarseness (odds ratio [OR]: 4.85, 95% CI: 1.08-21.76; p = 0.034) or sore throat (OR: 4.29, 95% CI: 1.14-16.18; p = 0.030) in the DLT group, while no patients developed postoperative lung infection in either group. Compared to T 1 , systolic blood pressure (sBP), diastolic BP (dBP), and heart rate (HR) at T 2 in both groups

  12. Comparison of the effect of lignocaine instilled through the endotracheal tube and intravenous lignocaine on the extubation response in patients undergoing craniotomy with skull pins: A randomized double blind clinical trial

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    Smitha Elizabeth George

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A desirable combination of smooth extubation and an awake patient after neurosurgical procedures is difficult to achieve in patients with skull pins. Lignocaine instilled into endotracheal tube has been reported to suppress cough by a local mucosal anesthetizing effect. We aimed to evaluate if this effect will last till extubation, if given before pin removal. Materials and Methods: A total of 114 patients undergoing elective craniotomy were divided into three groups and were given 1 mg/kg of intravenous (IV, 2% lignocaine (Group 1, placebo (Group 2 and 1 mg/kg of 2% lignocaine sprayed down the endotracheal tube (Group 3 before skull pin removal. The effectiveness of each to blunt extubation response was compared. Plasma levels of lignocaine were measured 10 min after administration of the study drug and at extubation. Sedation scores were noted, immediately after extubation and 10 min later. Results: Two percent of lignocaine instilled through endotracheal route was not superior to the IV route or placebo in attenuating cough or hemodynamic response at extubation when given 20-30 min before extubation. The plasma levels of lignocaine (0.8 μg/ml were not high enough even at the end of 10 min to have a suppressive effect on cough if given IV or intratracheally (IT. Lignocaine did not delay awakening in these groups. Conclusion: IT lignocaine in the dose of 1 mg/kg does not prevent cough at extubation if given 20-30 min before extubation. If the action is by a local mucosal anesthetizing effect, it does not last for 20-30 min to cover the period from pin removal to extubation.

  13. Prehospital endotracheal intubation and chest tubing does not prolong the overall resuscitation time of severely injured patients: a retrospective, multicentre study of the Trauma Registry of the German Society of Trauma Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulla, Martin; Helm, Matthias; Lefering, Rolf; Walcher, Felix

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether prehospital endotracheal intubation (ETI) and chest tube placement is unnecessarily time consuming in severely injured patients. A retrospective, multicentre study including all adult patients (ISS ≥9; 2002-7) of the Trauma Registry of the German Society of Trauma Surgery who were not secondarily transferred to a trauma centre and received a definitive airway and a chest tube. Creating four groups: AA (n=963) receiving ETI and chest tube on scene, AB (n=1547) ETI performed in the prehospital setting but chest tubing later in the emergency department (ED) and BB (n=640) receiving both procedures in the ED. The BA collective (ETI performed in the ED, but chest tubing on scene) was excluded from the study because of the small sample size (n=41). The trauma resuscitation time (TRT), demographic data, injuries, treatment and outcome of the remaining three collectives were compared. The prehospital TRT of the AA collective was longer than the AB and BB subgroups (80±37 min vs 77±44 min 65±46 min; pchest tube placement do not prolong the total TRT of severely injured patients.

  14. Respiratory-aspirated 35-mm hairpin successfully retrieved with a Teflon® snare system under fluoroscopic guidance via a split endotracheal tube: a useful technique in cases of failed extraction by bronchoscopy and avoiding the need for a thoracotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, S S; Pease, R A; Ashwin, C J; Gill, S S; Tait, N P

    2012-09-01

    Respiratory foreign body aspiration (FBA) is a common global health problem requiring prompt recognition and early treatment to prevent potentially fatal complications. The majority of FBAs are due to organic objects and treatment is usually via either endoscopic or surgical extraction. FBA of a straight hairpin has been described as a unique entity in the literature, occurring most commonly in females, particularly during adolescence. In the process of inserting hairpins, the pins will typically be between the teeth with the head tilted backwards, while tying their hair with both hands. This position increases the risk of aspiration, particularly if there is any sudden coughing or laughing. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of a 35-mm straight metallic hairpin foreign body that has been successfully retrieved by a radiological snare system under fluoroscopic guidance. This was achieved with the use of a split endotracheal tube, and therefore avoided the need for a thoracotomy in an adolescent female patient.

  15. Randomized intubation with polyurethane or conical cuffs to prevent pneumonia in ventilated patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippart, François; Gaudry, Stéphane; Quinquis, Laurent; Lau, Nicolas; Ouanes, Islem; Touati, Samia; Nguyen, Jean Claude; Branger, Catherine; Faibis, Frédéric; Mastouri, Maha; Forceville, Xavier; Abroug, Fekri; Ricard, Jean Damien; Grabar, Sophie; Misset, Benoît

    2015-03-15

    The occurrence of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is linked to the aspiration of contaminated pharyngeal secretions around the endotracheal tube. Tubes with cuffs made of polyurethane rather than polyvinyl chloride or with a conical rather than a cylindrical shape increase tracheal sealing. To test whether using polyurethane and/or conical cuffs reduces tracheal colonization and VAP in patients with acute respiratory failure. We conducted a multicenter, prospective, open-label, randomized study in four parallel groups in four intensive care units between 2010 and 2012. A cohort of 621 patients with expected ventilation longer than 2 days was included at intubation with a cuff composed of cylindrical polyvinyl chloride (n = 148), cylindrical polyurethane (n = 143), conical polyvinyl chloride (n = 150), or conical polyurethane (n = 162). We used Kaplan-Meier estimates and log-rank tests to compare times to events. After excluding 17 patients who secondarily refused participation or had met an exclusion criterion, 604 were included in the intention-to-treat analysis. Cumulative tracheal colonization greater than 10(3) cfu/ml at Day 2 was as follows (median [interquartile range]): cylindrical polyvinyl chloride, 0.66 (0.58-0.74); cylindrical polyurethane, 0.61 (0.53-0.70); conical polyvinyl chloride, 0.67 (0.60-0.76); and conical polyurethane, 0.62 (0.55-0.70) (P = 0.55). VAP developed in 77 patients (14.4%), and postextubational stridor developed in 28 patients (6.4%) (P = 0.20 and 0.28 between groups, respectively). Among patients requiring mechanical ventilation, polyurethane and/or conically shaped cuffs were not superior to conventional cuffs in preventing tracheal colonization and VAP. Clinical trial registered with clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01114022).

  16. Reliability and criterion-related validity testing (construct) of the Endotracheal Suction Assessment Tool (ESAT©).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Kylie; Bulsara, Max K; Ramelet, Anne-Sylvie; Monterosso, Leanne

    2018-05-01

    To establish criterion-related construct validity and test-retest reliability for the Endotracheal Suction Assessment Tool© (ESAT©). Endotracheal tube suction performed in children can significantly affect clinical stability. Previously identified clinical indicators for endotracheal tube suction were used as criteria when designing the ESAT©. Content validity was reported previously. The final stages of psychometric testing are presented. Observational testing was used to measure construct validity and determine whether the ESAT© could guide "inexperienced" paediatric intensive care nurses' decision-making regarding endotracheal tube suction. Test-retest reliability of the ESAT© was performed at two time points. The researchers and paediatric intensive care nurse "experts" developed 10 hypothetical clinical scenarios with predetermined endotracheal tube suction outcomes. "Experienced" (n = 12) and "inexperienced" (n = 14) paediatric intensive care nurses were presented with the scenarios and the ESAT© guiding decision-making about whether to perform endotracheal tube suction for each scenario. Outcomes were compared with those predetermined by the "experts" (n = 9). Test-retest reliability of the ESAT© was measured at two consecutive time points (4 weeks apart) with "experienced" and "inexperienced" paediatric intensive care nurses using the same scenarios and tool to guide decision-making. No differences were observed between endotracheal tube suction decisions made by "experts" (n = 9), "inexperienced" (n = 14) and "experienced" (n = 12) nurses confirming the tool's construct validity. No differences were observed between groups for endotracheal tube suction decisions at T1 and T2. Criterion-related construct validity and test-retest reliability of the ESAT© were demonstrated. Further testing is recommended to confirm reliability in the clinical setting with the "inexperienced" nurse to guide decision-making related to endotracheal tube

  17. Experience of monitoring the recurrent laryngeal nerve in thyroid surgery with endotracheal intubation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Feng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose:To analysis clinical experience of applying recurrent laryngeal monitoring endotracheal tube (NIM EMG Endotracheal Tube in the surgery of thyroid. Method: A retrospective analysis of 84 patients who underwent endotracheal intubation laryngeal nerve monitoring by thyroid surgery in the Chinese-Japanese Friendship Hospital of Jilin University from March to December in 2015. To summarize the experience of intubation with NIM EMG Endotracheal Tube. Result 77 (91.7%had initial intubation achievement in the 84 patients.FROM the 77 cases we had gotten s atisfactory nerve monitoring signal.Whereas there are 7 cases (8.3% appear abnormal EMG or signal missing, in the 7 cases there is one which being intubated too deep, 3 cases which being intubated too shallow and 3 cases with malrotation intubation.Conclusion: We got the satisfactory signals after adjust1ing the tube by using the visual laryngoscope.

  18. Cuff leak test and laryngeal survey for predicting post-extubation stridor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Anit B; Ani, Chizobam; Feeney, Colin

    2015-02-01

    Evidence for the predictive value of the cuff leak test (CLT) for post-extubation stridor (PES) is conflicting. We evaluated the association and accuracy of CLT alone or combined with other laryngeal parameters with PES. Fifty-one mechanically ventilated adult patients in a medical-surgical intensive care unit were tested prior to extubation using; CLT, laryngeal ultrasound and indirect laryngoscopy. Biometric, laryngeal and endotracheal tube (ETT) parameters were recorded. PES incidence was 4%. CLT demonstrated 'no leak' in 20% of patients. Laryngeal oedema was present in 10% of the patients on indirect laryngoscopy, and 71% of the patients had a Grades 1-3 indirect laryngoscopic view. Mean air column width on laryngeal ultrasound was 0.66 ± 0.15 cm (cuff deflated), mean ratio of ETT to laryngeal diameter was 0.48 ± 0.07, and the calculated CLT and laryngeal survey composite was 0.86 ± 1.25 (range 0-5). CLT and the CLT and Laryngeal survey composite measure were not associated with or predict PES. Age, sex, peri-extubation steroid use, intubation duration and body mass index were not associated with PES. Even including ultrasonographic and indirect laryngoscopic examination of the airway, no single aspect of the CLT or combination with laryngeal parameters accurately predicts PES.

  19. Rotator cuff exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 25560729 . Read More Frozen shoulder Rotator cuff problems Rotator cuff repair Shoulder arthroscopy Shoulder CT scan Shoulder MRI scan Shoulder pain Patient Instructions Rotator cuff - self-care Shoulder surgery - discharge Using your ...

  20. Blind Naso-Endotracheal Intubation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Difficult endotracheal intubation techniques include, use of fiberoptic bronchoscope, intubating laryngeal mask airway, tracheostomy, blind nasotracheal and retrograde intubation. According to the Difficult Airway Society guidelines, intubating with the aid of a fiberoptic scope has taken its place as the standard adjuvant for.

  1. Cuff deflation: rehabilitation in critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, John R; Gonçalves, Miguel R; Rodriguez, Pedro Landete; Saporito, Louis; Soares, Luisa

    2014-08-01

    This is a case series of rehabilitation failures that resulted in severe reactive depression from patients unnecessarily bereft of verbal communication by being left to breathe or be ventilated via tracheostomy tubes, with or without inflated cuffs, for months to years.

  2. Rotator cuff - self-care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000358.htm Rotator cuff - self-care To use the sharing features on ... and shoulder exercises may help ease your symptoms. Rotator Cuff Problems Common rotator cuff problems include: Tendinitis , which ...

  3. Positive pressure ventilation in a patient with a right upper lobar bronchocutaneous fistula: right upper bronchus occlusion using the cuff of a left-sided double lumen endobronchial tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omori, Chieko; Toyama, Hiroaki; Takei, Yusuke; Ejima, Yutaka; Yamauchi, Masanori

    2017-08-01

    In patients with a bronchocutaneous fistula, positive pressure ventilation leads to air leakage and potential hypoxemia. A male patient with a right upper bronchocutaneous fistula was scheduled for esophageal reconstruction. His preoperative chest computed tomography image revealed aeration in the right middle and lower lobe, a large bulla in the left upper lobe, and pleural effusion and pneumonia in the left lower lobe. Therefore, left one-lung ventilation was considered to result in hypoxemia. Before anesthesia induction, the bronchocutaneous fistula was covered with gauze and film to prevent air leakage. After anesthesia induction, mask ventilation was performed with a peak positive pressure of 10 cmH 2 O. A left-sided double lumen endobronchial tube (DLT) was then inserted into the right main bronchus for occluding only the right superior bronchus, and two-lung ventilation was performed to minimize airway pressure and maintain oxygenation, which did not cause air leakage through the fistula. During anesthesia, no ventilation-related difficulty was faced. The method of inserting a left-sided DLT into the right main bronchus and occluding the right upper bronchus selectively by bronchial cuff is considered to be an option for mechanical ventilation in patients with a right upper bronchial fistula, as demonstrated in the present case.

  4. Clinical indicators associated with successful tracheostomy cuff deflation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryor, Lee N; Ward, Elizabeth C; Cornwell, Petrea L; O'Connor, Stephanie N; Chapman, Marianne J

    2016-08-01

    Tracheostomy cuff deflation is a necessary stage of the decannulation pathway, yet the optimal clinical indicators to guide successful cuff deflation are unknown. The study aims were to identify (1) the proportion of patients tolerating continuous cuff deflation at first attempt; (2) the clinical observations associated with cuff deflation success or failure, including volume of above cuff secretions and (3) the predictive capacity of these observations within a heterogeneous cohort. A retrospective review of 113 acutely tracheostomised patients with a subglottic suction tube in situ was conducted. Ninety-five percent of patients (n=107) achieved continuous cuff deflation on the first attempt. The clinical observations recorded as present in the 24h preceding cuff deflation included: (1) medical stability, (2) respiratory stability, (3) fraction of inspired oxygen ≤0.4, (4) tracheal suction ≤1-2 hourly, (5) sputum thin and easy to suction, (6) sputum clear or white, (7) ≥moderate cough strength, (8) above cuff secretions ≤1ml per hour and (9) alertness≥eyes open to voice. Using the presence of all 9 indicators as predictors of successful cuff deflation tolerance, specificity and positive predictive value were 100%, although sensitivity was only 77% and negative predictive value 19%. Refinement to a set of 3 clinically driven criteria (medical and respiratory stability, above cuff secretions ≤1ml/h) provided high specificity (100%), sensitivity (95%), positive predictive value (100%) and an improved negative predictive value (55%). Key criteria can help guide clinical decision-making on patient readiness for cuff deflation. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Auscultation versus Point-of-care Ultrasound to Determine Endotracheal versus Bronchial Intubation: A Diagnostic Accuracy Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsingh, Davinder; Frank, Ethan; Haughton, Robert; Schilling, John; Gimenez, Kimberly M; Banh, Esther; Rinehart, Joseph; Cannesson, Maxime

    2016-05-01

    Unrecognized malposition of the endotracheal tube (ETT) can lead to severe complications in patients under general anesthesia. The focus of this double-blinded randomized study was to assess the accuracy of point-of-care ultrasound in verifying the correct position of the ETT and to compare it with the accuracy of auscultation. Forty-two adult patients requiring general anesthesia with ETT were consented. Patients were randomized to right main bronchus, left main bronchus, or tracheal intubation. After randomization, the ETT was placed via fiber-optic visualization. Next, the location of the ETT was assessed using auscultation by a separate blinded anesthesiologist, followed by an ultrasound performed by a third blinded anesthesiologist. Ultrasound examination included assessment of tracheal dilation via cuff inflation with air and evaluation of pleural lung sliding. Statistical analysis included sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and interobserver agreement for the ultrasound examination (95% CI). In differentiating tracheal versus bronchial intubations, auscultation showed a sensitivity of 66% (0.39 to 0.87) and a specificity of 59% (0.39 to 0.77), whereas ultrasound showed a sensitivity of 93% (0.66 to 0.99) and specificity of 96% (0.79 to 1). Identification of tracheal versus bronchial intubation was 62% (26 of 42) in the auscultation group and 95% (40 of 42) in the ultrasound group (P = 0.0005) (CI for difference, 0.15 to 0.52), and the McNemar comparison showed statistically significant improvement with ultrasound (P auscultation in determining the location of ETT.

  6. Endotracheal intubation skill acquisition by medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry E. Wang MD MS

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available During the course of their training, medical students may receive introductory experience with advanced resuscitation skills. Endotracheal intubation (ETI – the insertion of a breathing tube into the trachea is an example of an important advanced resuscitation intervention. Only limited data characterize clinical ETI skill acquisition by medical students. We sought to characterize medical student acquisition of ETI procedural skill.11Presented as a poster discussion on 17 October 2007 at the annual meeting of the American Society of Anesthesiologists in San Francisco, CA.The study included third-year medical students participating in a required anesthesiology clerkship. Students performed ETI on operating room patients under the supervision of attending anesthesiologists. Students reported clinical details of each ETI effort, including patient age, sex, Mallampati score, number of direct laryngoscopies and ETI success. Using mixed-effects regression, we characterized the adjusted association between ETI success and cumulative ETI experience.ETI was attempted by 178 students on 1,646 patients (range 1–23 patients per student; median 9 patients per student, IQR 6–12. Overall ETI success was 75.0% (95% CI 72.9–77.1%. Adjusted for patient age, sex, Mallampati score and number of laryngoscopies, the odds of ETI success improved with cumulative ETI encounters (odds ratio 1.09 per additional ETI encounter; 95% CI 1.04–1.14. Students required at least 17 ETI encounters to achieve 90% predicted ETI success.In this series medical student ETI proficiency was associated with cumulative clinical procedural experience. Clinical experience may provide a viable strategy for fostering medical student procedural skills.

  7. Comparison of an Endotracheal Cardiac Output Monitor to a Pulmonary Artery Catheter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-04

    8217-’ ’ ,, Background In combat, initial resuscitation and life saving measures are in itiated by securing a patent airway and administering fluid therapy. Wh...ile methods of fluid resuscitation remain controversial , maintenance of a patent airway and hemodynamic stabi lity as indicated by invasive...monito ri ng can influence the overall outcome of an injured individual. A patent airway may be maintained via an endotracheal tube . The use of

  8. Treatment of hypertension following endotracheal intubation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Treatment of hypertension following endotracheal intubation. A study comparing the efficacy of labetalol, practolol and placebo. R. J. MAHARAJ, M. THOMPSON, J. G. BROCK-UTNE,. J. W. DOWNING. R. WI LLlAMSON,. Summary. Labetalol, a new adrenergic receptor antagonist, has both a- and B-blocking properties.

  9. Rotator Cuff Injuries - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Rotator Cuff Injuries URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/ ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Rotator Cuff Injuries - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features ...

  10. Verification of endotracheal intubation in obese patients - temporal comparison of ultrasound vs. auscultation and capnography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, P; Bache, S; Isbye, D L; Rudolph, S S; Rovsing, L; Børglum, J

    2012-05-01

    Ultrasound (US) may have an emerging role as an adjunct in verification of endotracheal intubation. Obtaining optimal US images in obese patients is generally regarded more difficult than for other patients. This study compared the time consumption of bilateral lung US with auscultation and capnography for verifying endotracheal intubation in obese patients. A prospective, paired and investigator-blinded study performed in the operating theatre. Twenty-four adult patients requiring endotracheal intubation for bariatric surgery were included. During post-intubation bag ventilation, bilateral lung US was performed for detection of lungsliding indicating lung ventilation simultaneous with capnography and auscultation of epigastrium and chest. Primary outcome measure was the time difference to confirmed endotracheal intubation between US and auscultation alone. The secondary outcome measure was time difference between US and auscultation combined with capnography. Both methods verified endotracheal tube placement in all patients. No significant difference was found between US compared with auscultation alone. Median time for verification by auscultation alone was 47.5 s [interquartile (IQR) 40-51 s], with a mean difference of -0.3 s in favor of US (95% confidence interval -3.5-2.9 s) P = 0.87. Comparing US with the combination of auscultation and capnography, there was a significant difference between the two methods. Median time for verification by US was 43 s (IQR 40-51 s) vs. 55 s (IQR 46-65 s), P auscultation alone and faster than the standard method of auscultation and capnography. © 2012 The Authors. Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica © 2012 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation.

  11. Endotracheal intubation: application of virtual reality to emergency medical services education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayrose, James; Myers, Jeffrey W

    2007-01-01

    Virtual reality simulation has been identified as an emerging educational tool with significant potential to enhance teaching of residents and students in emergency clinical encounters and procedures. Endotracheal intubation represents a critical procedure for emergency care providers. Current methods of training include working with cadavers and mannequins, which have limitations in their representation of reality, ethical concerns, and overall availability with access, cost, and location of models. This paper will present a human airway simulation model designed for tracheal intubation and discuss the aspects that lend itself to use as an educational tool. This realistic and dynamic model is used to teach routine intubations, while future models will include more difficult airway management scenarios. This work provides a solid foundation for future versions of the intubation simulator, which will incorporate two haptic devices to allow for simultaneous control of the laryngoscope blade and endotracheal tube.

  12. Endotracheal tube connector defect causing airway obstruction in an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    detected during routine visual inspection before their use, while some go unnoticed during such inspection and can lead to partial or complete airway obstruction in intubated patients. We report one case of partial airway obstruction resulting from manufacturing defect in the ET connector. A 3-month-old infant girl weighing 5 ...

  13. Rotator cuff disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziatkin, M.B.; Iannotti, J.P.; Roberts, M.; Dalinka, M.K.; Esterhai, J.L.; Kressel, H.Y.; Lenkinski, R.E.

    1988-01-01

    A dual-surface-coil array in a Helmholtz configuration was used to evaluate th rotator cuff in ten normal volunteers and 44 patients. Studies were performed with a General Electric 1.5-T MR imager. Thirty-two patients underwent surgery, 25 of whom also underwent arthrography. In comparison with surgery, MR imaging was more sensitive than arthrography for rotator cuff tears (91% vs 71%). The specificity and accuracy of MR imaging were 88% and 91%. The accuracy increased with use of an MR grading system. MR findings correlated with surgical findings with regard to the size and site of tears. MR findings of cuff tears were studied with multivariate analysis. Correlation was also found between a clinical score, the MR grade, and the clinical outcome

  14. Comparative study of patients suffering sore throat after general anesthesia using laryngeal mask airway and cuffed pharyngeal tube in adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassani V

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Post-operative sore throat is one of the most common complications and complaints of patients after general anesthesia especially in operations that need endotracheal intubations. Its causes are: size of endotracheal tube and type of its cuff, inadequate airway humidification, trauma during intubation and suctioning, high flow of inspiratory gases, surgical manipulation of airway and adjacent organs, ect. Use of instruments with less invasion to upper respiratory tract, for example, face mask and airway, LMA or CPT are methods, used for decreasing the rate of post-operative sore throat. This study was performed to compare the rate of sore throat after general anesthesia between Laryngeal Mask Airway (LMA and Cuffed Pharyngeal Tube (CPT. From the patients, 120 ASA: PS-I cases, were selected, who were candidates for elective surgery of Orthopedics, Urology, General surgery and Gynecology in Hazrat Rasool-Akram Hospital Complex in the year 2000. Their operation were performed in supine position and did not need muscle relaxation and the patients had spontaneous breathing. Duration of surgery was less than 2 hours. The patients were randomly allocated into two groups: LMA was used for one group and CPT for others. Immediately after operation, in the recovery room and at 6, 12, 18 and 24 hours after removing the tube, the patients were asked about sore throat and the results were recorded in the related sheets. The results was 31.7 percent of patients in group LMA and 0 percent of patients in group CPT, had sore throat. There were significant difference between groups (LMA and CPT in presentation of sore throat (P<0.001.

  15. [Rotator cuff tear athropathy prevalence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra-Soriano, F; Encalada-Díaz, M I; Ruiz-Suárez, M; Valero-González, F S

    2017-01-01

    Glenohumeral arthritis secondary to massive rotator cuff tear presents with a superior displacement and femoralization of the humeral head with coracoacromial arch acetabularization. The purpose of this study was to establish prevalence of rotator cuff tear artropathy (CTA) at our institution. Four hundred electronic records were reviewed from which we identified 136 patients with rotator cuff tears. A second group was composed with patients with massive cuff tears that were analized and staged by the Seebauer cuff tear arthropathy classification. Thirty four patients with massive rotator cuff tears were identified, 8 male and 26 female (age 60.1 ± 10.26 years). Massive rotator cuff tear prevalence was 25%. CTA prevalence found in the rotator cuff group was 19 and 76% in the massive cuff tears group. Patients were staged according to the classification with 32% in stage 1a, 11% 1b, 32% 2a and 0% 2b. CTA prevalence in patients with rotator cuff tears and massive cuff tears is higher than the one reported in American population. We consider that a revision of the Seebauer classification to be appropriate to determine its reliability.

  16. Rotator Cuff Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connors, G. Patrick

    Many baseball players suffer from shoulder injuries related to the rotator cuff muscles. These injuries may be classified as muscular strain, tendonitis or tenosynovitis, and impingement syndrome. Treatment varies from simple rest to surgery, so it is important to be seen by a physician as soon as possible. In order to prevent these injuries, the…

  17. Percutaneous dilatational tracheostomy using the ETView Tracheoscopic Ventilation Tube®: a teaching course in a pig model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorelli, Alfonso; Ferraro, Fausto; Frongillo, Elisabetta; Fusco, Pierluigi; Pierdiluca, Matteo; Nagar, Francesca; Iuorio, Angela; Santini, Mario

    2017-10-01

    We planned a training course for trainees of different specialties with the aim of teaching the skills of a new procedure for performing percutaneous dilatational tracheostomy (PDT) with an ETView tracheoscopic ventilation tube instead of standard bronchoscopy in an ex vivo pig model. The endotracheal tube, with a camera-embedded tip, was used as an alternative to standard bronchoscopy for visualization of patient airways. The procedure was performed on a home-made animal model. The participants were asked to perform PDT in three different sessions to improve their dexterity. The primary endpoint was the reduction of complications seen during the different sessions of the training course. The secondary endpoint was the satisfaction of the participants as assessed by an anonymous survey. Thirty-seven residents in anesthesiology and 7 in thoracic surgery in the first 2 years of their training and without any confidence with percutaneous tracheostomy participated in the study. Tracheal cuff lesions and impalement of the tracheal tube were the most observed complications, and were concentrated in the early sessions. A significant reduction in complications and operative time was seen during the ongoing sessions of the course. No lesions of the posterior tracheal wall and only a ring fracture occurred during the last session of the course. All participants were satisfied with the course. Our course seems to confer the technical skills to perform percutaneous tracheostomy to trainees and instill confidence with the procedure. However, the experience acquired on a training course should be evaluated in clinical practice.

  18. Laryngotracheal Injury following Prolonged Endotracheal Intubation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Mehdizadeh

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prolonged endotracheal intubation is a growing method for supporting ventilation in patients who require intensive care. Despite considerable advancement in endotracheal intubation, this method still has some complications; the most important is laryngo-tracheal injuries. Methods: Over a 2-year period, this retrospective study was conducted on 57 patients with history of prolonged intubation who were referred to the ENT Department of Amir Alam Hospital. For each patient, a complete evaluation including history, physical examination, and direct laryngoscopy and bronchoscopy was done under general anesthesia. Results: Fifty-seven patients (44 male; mean age, 23.014.7 years were studied. Mean intubation period was 15.88 days. The most common presenting symptom was dyspnea (62%. Head trauma was responsible for most cases of intubation (72.4%. The most common types of tracheal and laryngeal lesions were tracheal (56.9% and subglottic (55.2% stenosis, respectively. Mean length of tracheal stenosis was 0.810.83 cm. There was a statistically significant relationship between length of tracheal stenosis and intubation period (P=0.0001 but no relation was observed between tracheal stenosis and age, sex, and etiology of intubation (All P=NS. Among the glottic lesions, inter- arytenoids adhesion was the most common lesion (25.9%. No statistically significant relation was found between glottic and subglottic lesions and age, sex and intubation period (all P=NS. Length of stenosis and intubation period was significantly greater in tracheal/ subglottic lesions than those in glottic/ supraglottic lesions (all P=NS. Conclusion: After prolonged endotracheal intubation, laryngo-tracheal lesions had no relation with patient’s age, sex, and cause of intubation.There was direct relation between length of tracheal stenosis and intubation period. Glottic lesions were more commonly observed in head trauma patients. Lesion length and intubation

  19. Endotracheal ectopic parathyroid adenoma mimicking asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Akif Özgül

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary benign tumors of the trachea are uncommon. These tumors may cause tracheal occlusion and lead to a misdiagnosis of asthma. Ectopic parathyroid adenoma (EPA can be seen anywhere between the mandibular angle and the mediastinum. The distal part of the trachea is a rare location for EPA, and EPA obstructing the endotracheal lumen has not been reported in the literature. We herein describe a 52-year-old female with a several-year history of asthma treatment who presented with progressive dyspnea. Computed tomography revealed a mass that was obstructing the tracheal lumen. Total mass excision was performed via endobronchial treatment, and pathologic examination revealed EPA.

  20. Laryngeal Chondroma: An Unusual Complication Endotracheal Entubation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gökdoğan, Ozan; Koybasioglu, Ahmet; Ileri, Fikret

    2016-06-01

    Laryngeal cartilaginous framework tumors are very rare. Chondroma and chondrosarcoma are the most common types of these tumors. A 27-year-old man with a history of intubation presented with exercise-induced dyspnea. A computed tomography scan of larynx showed a rounded and circumscribed mass without infiltration of the adjacent structures which obstructs 75% of airway. Histopathological investigation of the mass revealed the chondroma of the larynx. The patients' history of intubation trauma with the subsequent progressive onset of clinical symptoms demonstrates the relationship between these 2 entities. Clinicians should consider laryngeal chondroma in the differential diagnosis of dyspnea after endotracheal intubation.

  1. Endotracheal expandable metallic stent placement in dogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawada, S; Tanabe, Y; Fujiwara, Y; Koyama, T; Tanigawa, N; Kobayashi, M; Katsube, Y; Nakamura, H [Tottori Univ. School of Medicine, Yonago (Japan). Dept. of Radiology Research Inst. for Microbial Diseases, Osaka (Japan). Dept. of Radiology

    1991-01-01

    Various types of Gianturco zig-zag wire stent were implanted into the tracheas of 4 dogs to define the suitable characteristics of the endotracheal wire stent in these animals. These stents were constructed of 0.45, and 0.33 mm stainless steel wire. The diameter of the fully expanded stents was 3 cm and their lengths were 2, 3, and 4 cm. The 2 cm stent constructed of 0.33 mm wire showed minimum pathologic changes of the trachea of the dog compared to the other stents, and at the same time had a complete covering of ciliated columnar epithelium over the stent surface. (orig.).

  2. Interposition vein cuffs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, P; Da Silva, T; How, T

    1996-01-01

    A vein cuff interposed at the distal anastomosis between a prosthetic vascular graft and a recipient infrageniculate artery improves the chances of continued patency of the graft, at least in the short and medium term. The mode of effect appears to be suppression or modification of anastomotic myointimal hyperplasia (MIH). In the event of graft failure the recipient artery and run-off vessels remain free from MIH and their patency is preserved thereby improving the prospects for further vascular reconstruction and limb salvage. The mechanisms by which interposition vein cuffs might modulate MIH are reviewed. Experimental evidence is described to show that the geometry of a cuffed anastomosis promotes a characteristic haemodynamic flow structure with a stable vortex. It is suggested that this vortex exerts greater shear stress upon the wall of the artery than the normal laminar flow observed in conventional anastomoses. High shear stress is known to inhibit MIH.

  3. Nasogastric tube placement with video-guided laryngoscope: A manikin simulator study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Xiao-Lun; Yeh, Li-Chun; Jin, Yau-Dung; Chen, Chun-Chih; Lee, Ming-Ho; Huang, Ping-Wun

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to investigate video-guided laryngoscopy for nasogastric tube placement. This was an observational comparative study performed in a hospital. The participants included volunteers from the medical staff (physicians and nurses) experienced with nasogastric intubation, and non-medical staff (medical students, pharmacists and emergent medical technicians) with knowledge of nasogastric intubation but lacking procedural experience. Medical and non-medical hospital staff performed manual, laryngoscope-assisted and video-guided laryngoscope nasogastric intubation both in the presence and in the absence of an endotracheal tube, using a manikin. Nasogastric intubation times were compared between groups and methods. Using the video-guided laryngoscope resulted in a significantly shorter intubation time compared to the other 2 methods, both with and without an endotracheal tube, for the medical and non-medical staff alike (all p guided laryngoscope without endotracheal intubation, direct laryngoscope with endotracheal intubation and video-guided laryngoscope with endotracheal intubation compared to manual intubation without endotracheal intubation (0.49, 0.63 and 0.72 vs. 5.63, respectively, p ≤ 0.008). For non-medical staff, nasogastric intubation time was significantly shorter using video-guided laryngoscope without endotracheal intubation, direct laryngoscope with endotracheal intubation and video-guided laryngoscope with endotracheal intubation compared to manual intubation without endotracheal intubation (1.67, 1.58 and 0.95 vs. 6.9, respectively, p ≤ 0.002). And mean nasogastric intubation time for video-guided laryngoscope endotracheal intubation was significantly shorter for medical staff than for non-medical staff (0.49 vs. 1.67 min, respectively, p = 0.041). Video-guided laryngoscope reduces nasogastric intubation time compared to manual and direct laryngoscope intubation, which promotes a consistent technique when performed by

  4. ProSeal laryngeal mask airway: An alternative to endotracheal intubation in paediatric patients for short duration surgical procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaya Lalwani

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The laryngeal mask airway (LMA is a supraglottic airway management device. The LMA is preferred for airway management in paediatric patients for short duration surgical procedures. The recently introduced ProSeal (PLMA, a modification of Classic LMA, has a gastric drainage tube placed lateral to main airway tube which allows the regurgitated gastric contents to bypass the glottis and prevents the pulmonary aspiration. This study was done to compare the efficacy of ProSeal LMA with an endotracheal tube in paediatric patients with respect to number of attempts for placement of devices, haemodynamic responses and perioperative respiratory complications. Sixty children, ASA I and II, weighing 10-20 kg between 2 and 8 years of age group of either sex undergoing elective ophthalmological and lower abdominal surgeries of 30-60 min duration, randomly divided into two groups of 30 patients each were studied. The number of attempts for endotracheal intubation was less than the placement of PLMA. Haemodynamic responses were significantly higher (P<0.05 after endotracheal intubation as compared to the placement of PLMA. There were no significant differences in mean SpO 2 (% and EtCO 2 levels recorded at different time intervals between the two groups. The incidence of post-operative respiratory complications cough and bronchospasm was higher after extubation than after removal of PLMA. The incidence of soft tissue trauma was noted to be higher for PLMA after its removal. There were no incidences of aspiration and hoarseness/sore throat in either group. It is concluded that ProSeal LMA can be safely considered as a suitable and effective alternative to endotracheal intubation in paediatric patients for short duration surgical procedures.

  5. Postoperative Airway Emergency following Accidental Flexometallic Tube Transection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karim Habib MR

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Endotracheal intubation using flexometallic tubes are often required in anaesthesia practice for a variety of reasons. It is preferred in the head and neck region surgeries due to its relative resistance to kinking forces. At times, these patients postoperatively may need to be shifted to ICU or HDU without extubation for further stabilization/management and extubation after adequate recovery. We present an unusual accident where a new flexometallic endotracheal tube was permanently tapered, transected and migrated proximally due to patient’s bite on tube leading to airway emergency in post-operative recovery period.

  6. Innovative Application of a Microlaryngeal Surgery Tube for difficult Airway Management in a Case of Down's Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulabani, Michell; Gupta, Akhilesh; Bannerjee, Neerja Gaur; Sood, Rajesh; Dass, Prashant

    2016-04-01

    An 11-year-old male child, known case of down's syndrome with congenital oesophageal stricture was posted for oesophageal dilatation. Preoperative airway assessment revealed a high arched palate, receding mandible and Mallampati Score of 2. During surgery, after loss of consciousness which was described as loss of eyelash reflex and adequate jaw relaxation, direct laryngoscopy and endotracheal intubation was attempted with a cuffed endotracheal tube number 5.0mm ID (internal diameter). The endotracheal tube could not be negotiated smoothly, so 5.0mm ID uncuffed endotracheal tube was used which passed through easily, but on auscultation revealed a significant leak. Later, intubation via a Micro Laryngeal Surgery (MLS) cuffed tube 4.0mm ID was attempted. The MLS tube advanced smoothly and there was no associated leak on positive pressure ventilation. Thus by innovative thinking and avant-garde reasoning, a definitive airway device could be positioned with no other suitable alternative at hand.

  7. Complete separation of the tube from the mask of a reusable classic laryngeal mask airway: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Shahriari

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available

    The laryngeal mask airway (LMA is an important addition to the anesthetist's equipments. However, its usage may involve some complications. We have encountered an unusual and potentially serious complication using this equipment. A 45-year old man underwent cataract surgery under general anesthesia. After the induction of anesthesia, a size 4 of the reusable classic LMA was inserted without any difficulties and the cuff was inflated. After a little manipulation, the proximal tube of the LMA was separated from the distal part, leaving the distal mask inside the pharynx. The exit of the remaining portion of the LMA was very difficult and made the ventilation of the patient impossible. The patient’s oxygen saturation decreased to 40%. The remaining portion of the LMA was removed by a great clamp and with an extreme effort. Then, an endotracheal tube was inserted and the patient was ventilated with 100% oxygen. After 6 hours, the patient was discharged with no apparent complications. The autoclave was used several times for the sterilization of the LMA.

    KEY WORDS: Laryngeal mask airway, autoclave.

  8. Monitoring the monitors: tubes and lines on chest radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wunderbaldinger, P. . patrick.wunderbaldinger@univie.ac.at

    2001-01-01

    Chest radiography is essential to evaluate the placement and position of tubes and lines in patients treated in intensive care units, such as central venous and arterial catheters, endotracheal and nasogastric tubes, thorax drains, cardiac pacemakers and defibrillators. Radiologic findings with respect to normal positioning, wrong positioning, and complications are described and illustrated. (author)

  9. Camera Embedded Single Lumen Tube as a Rescue Device for Airway Handling during Lung Separation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højberg Holm, Jimmy; Andersen, Claus

    2016-01-01

    .Keywords: Thoracic anesthesia; Airway handling; VivaSight; Vivasight-SL; Lobectomy; Camera-embedded tube; Endotracheal; Lung isolation; Video tube Taking the small stature into account, use of a small conventional 35-Fr right sided DLT was planned for the procedure. As it turned out, this tube could not be passed...

  10. Sporcularda rotator cuff problemleri

    OpenAIRE

    Guven, Osman; Guven, Zeynep; Gundes, Hakan; Yalcin, Selim

    2004-01-01

    Rotator cuff tendinitinin etyolojisinde genellikle birden çok faktörün kombinasyonu görülür. Yüzme, raket sporları ve fırlatma sporlarının özellikle gelişmiş ülkelerde giderek yaygınlaşması bu konuya olan ilginin artmasına sebep olmuştur. Eski konseptlerde aktif bir sporcuda tedavinin başarısı genellikle eski atletik seviyesine dönmesi ile ölçülürdü. Son zamanlarda atletik tekniklerin analizi, atroskopik evaluasyon gibi yeni bir Iükse sahip olmamız ve Iiteratürün yeniden gözden geçirilmesi il...

  11. Case Report of Multiple Tracheostomy Revisions due to Persistent, Recurrent Cuff Leak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian P. Azimi-Bolourian

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This case is a patient with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis who was unable to be separated from mechanical ventilator support and required a tracheostomy. The patient underwent an initial open tracheostomy utilizing flexible fiberoptic tracheoscopy (FFT in the operating room (OR. Subsequently, he developed recurrent leaks in the tracheal tube cuff requiring multiple trips back to the operating room. The recurrent cuff leak occurred following each tube placement until the etiology of the leak was discovered during the fourth procedure. In the fourth procedure, the wound was explored more extensively, and it was found that there was a sharp, calcified, aberrant fragment of a tracheal cartilage ring protruding into the tracheal lumen, which was damaging the cuff of each tube. This fragment was not visible by multiple FFTs, nor was it visible in the wound by the surgeons until wider exploration of the wound occurred. The cartilage fragment was ultimately excised and the patient had no further cuff leaks. Aberrant tracheal cartilage should be on the differential diagnosis for cuff leaks subsequent to surgical tracheostomy (ST or percutaneous dilatational tracheostomy (PDT.

  12. [A design and study of a novel electronic device for cuff-pressure monitoring].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shupeng; Li, Wei; Li, Wen; Song, Dejing; Chen, Desheng; Duan, Jun; Li, Chen; Li, Gang

    2017-06-01

    To design a novel electronic device for measuring the pressure in the cuff of the artificial airway; and to study the advantage of this device on continuous and intermittent cuff pressure monitoring. (1) a portable electronic device for cuff pressure measurement was invented, which could turn pressure signal into electrical signal through a pressure transducer. Meantime, it was possible to avoid pressure leak from the joint and the inside of the apparatus by modified Luer taper and sophisticated design. If the cuff pressure was out of the normal range, the apparatus could release a sound and light alarm. (2) Six traditional mechanical manometers were used to determine the cuff pressure in 6 tracheal tubes. The cuff pressure was maintain at 30 cmH 2 O (1 cmH 2 O = 0.098 kPa) by the manometer first, and repeated every 30 seconds for 4 times. (3) Study of continuous cuff pressure monitoring: We used a random number generator to randomize 6 tracheal tubes, 6 mechanical manometers and 6 our products by number 1-6, which has the same number of a group. Every group was further randomized into two balanced groups, one group used the mechanical manometer first, and the other used our product first. The baseline pressure was 30 cmH 2 O, measurement was performed every 4 hours for 6 times. When traditional mechanical manometer was used for cuff pressure monitoring, cuff pressure was decreased by an average of 2.9 cmH 2 O for each measurement (F = 728.2, P = 0.000). In study of continually monitoring, at each monitoring point, the pressure measured by electronic manometer was higher than the mechanical manometer. All the pressures measured by mechanical manometer were dropped below 20 cmH 2 O at 8th hour, and there was no pressure decrease below 20 cmH 2 O measured by electronic manometer in 24 hours by contrast. In study of intermittent monitoring, the same result was found. The pressure was dropped significantly with time when measured by mechanical manometer (F = 61.795, P

  13. Monitoring tidal volumes in preterm infants at birth: mask versus endotracheal ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vonderen, Jeroen J; Hooper, Stuart B; Krabbe, Vera B; Siew, Melissa L; Te Pas, Arjan B

    2015-01-01

    Upper airway distention during mask ventilation could reduce gas volumes entering the lung compared with ventilation via an endotracheal tube. Therefore, respiratory tract volumes were measured in lambs and tidal volumes were compared in preterm infants before and after intubation. In seven preterm lambs, volumes of the airways (oropharynx, trachea, lungs) were assessed. In 10 preterm infants, delta pressures, tidal volumes and leak were measured during ventilation 2 min before (mask ventilation) and 2 min after intubation (endotracheal ventilation). Inflations coinciding with breaths were excluded. Amount of upper airway distention in lambs and differences in inspiratory and expiratory tidal volume before and after intubation. In lambs, the combined trachea and oropharynx contributed to 14 (12-21) % (median (IQR), whereas the oropharynx contributed to 9 (7-10) % of the total tidal volume measured at the mouth. In preterm infants, inspiratory (11.1 (7.9-22.6) mL/kg vs 5.8 (3.9-9.6) mL/kg (p=0.01)) and expiratory (8.3 (6.8-15.4) mL/kg vs 4.9 (3.9-9.6) mL/kg (p=0.02)) tidal volumes were significantly larger during mask ventilation compared with endotracheal ventilation. Leak was 18.7 (3.3-28.7) % before versus 0 (0-2.3) % after intubation (p0.05). During mask ventilation, expiratory tidal volume increased from 10.0 (5.4-15.6) mL/kg to 11.3 (7.6-17.0) mL/kg (p=0.01), but remained unchanged during endotracheal ventilation. During neonatal mask ventilation, distention of the upper respiratory tract contributes to the tidal volumes measured and should be taken into account when targeting tidal volumes during mask ventilation. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  14. Establishing predictors for successfully planned endotracheal extubation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chih-Cheng; Chen, Chin-Ming; Chiang, Shyh-Ren; Liu, Wei-Lun; Weng, Shih-Feng; Sung, Mei-I; Hsing, Shu-Chen; Cheng, Kuo-Chen

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to establish predictors for successfully planned extubation, which can be followed by medical personnel. The patients who were admitted to the adult intensive care unit of a tertiary hospital and met the following criteria between January 2005 and December 2014 were collected retrospectively: intubation > 48 hours; and candidate for extubation. The patient characteristics, including disease severity, rapid shallow breath index (RSBI), maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP), maximal expiratory pressure (MEP), cuff leak test (CLT) before extubation, and outcome, were recorded. The CLT was classified as 2+ with audible flow without a stethoscope, 1+ with audible flow using a stethoscope, and negative (N) with no audible flow, even with a stethoscope. Failure to extubate was defined as reintubation within 48 hours. In total, 6583 patients were enrolled and 403 patients (6.1%) had extubation failures. Male patients dominated the patient cohort (4261 [64.7%]). The mean age was 64.5±16.3 years. The overall in-hospital mortality rate was 11.3%. The extubation failure rate for females was greater than males (7.7% vs 5.3%, P respiratory capacity, was developed to better predict extubation success.

  15. Rotator cuff pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pigeau, I.; Doursounian, L.; Maigne, J.Y.; Guinet, C.; Meary, E.; Buy, J.N.; Touzard, R.C.; Vadrot, D.; Laval-Jeantet, M.

    1989-01-01

    Fifteen volunteers and 73 patients with suspected rotator cuff lesions were examined at 0.5 T with T2 * -weighted gradient-echo (GE) MR imaging (700/33/30 degrees) (oblique coronal and sagittal 3 mm thick, surface coil). Results were compared with those of arthrography (all cases), T1-weighted GE imaging (400/20/90 degrees) (35 cases), surgery (28 cases), and T2-weighted spin-echo (SE) images (2,000/60-120) (17 cases). GE images demonstrated all tears (complete, 32, partial, 12) and was superior to arthrography in determining site and size and in displaying muscles (critical point in surgical planning). In 20 cases without tears on arthrography, GE imaging demonstrated five cases of tendinitis, five cases of bursitis, and six probable intratendinous or superficial partial tears. T2 * -weighted GE imaging was superior to T2-weighted SE and T1-weighted GE imaging, with higher fluid contrast and a low fat signal. Therefore, it might replace arthrography in the diagnosis and surgical approach to this pathology

  16. influence of head flexion after endotracheal intuba- tion on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    David Ofori-Adjei

    2008-09-01

    Sep 1, 2008 ... Cataract is a common cause of visual impairment in older individuals. ... After induction of general anesthesia and endotracheal intubation, the ..... Stress re- sponse to tracheal intubation in patients undergoing coronary artery surgery: direct laryngoscopy versus an intubating laryngeal mask airway.

  17. Predicting the need for nonstandard tracheostomy tubes in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandian, Vinciya; Hutchinson, Christoph T; Schiavi, Adam J; Feller-Kopman, David J; Haut, Elliott R; Parsons, Nicole A; Lin, Jessica S; Gorbatkin, Chad; Angamuthu, Priya G; Miller, Christina R; Mirski, Marek A; Bhatti, Nasir I; Yarmus, Lonny B

    2017-02-01

    Few guidelines exist regarding the selection of a particular type or size of tracheostomy tube. Although nonstandard tubes can be placed over the percutaneous kit dilator, clinicians often place standard tracheostomy tubes and change to nonstandard tubes only after problems arise. This practice risks early tracheostomy tube change, possible bleeding, or loss of the airway. We sought to identify predictors of nonstandard tracheostomy tubes. In this matched case-control study at an urban, academic, tertiary care medical center, we reviewed 1220 records of patients who received a tracheostomy. Seventy-seven patients received nonstandard tracheostomy tubes (cases), and 154 received standard tracheostomy tubes (controls). Sex, endotracheal tube size, severity of illness, and computed tomography scan measurement of the distance from the trachea to the skin at the level of the superior aspect of the anterior clavicle were significant predictors of nonstandard tracheostomy tubes. Specifically, trachea-to-skin distance >4.4 cm and endotracheal tube sizes ≥8.0 were associated with nonstandard tracheostomy. The findings suggest that clinicians should consider using nonstandard tracheostomy tubes as the first choice if the patient is male with an endotracheal tube size ≥8.0 and has a trachea-to-skin distance >4.4 cm on the computed tomography scan. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Ultrasonography of the Rotator Cuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Yong Cheol

    2006-01-01

    The ultrasonography (US) is an important modality in evaluating shoulder disease. It is accurate in diagnosing the various shoulder diseases including tendinosis, calcific tendinitis, and subacromial bursitis as well as rotator cuff tears. This article presents a pictorial review of US anatomy of the shoulder, the technical aspects of shoulder US, major types of shoulder pathology, and interventional procedure under US guidance

  19. Ultrasonography of the Rotator Cuff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Yong Cheol [Samsung Medica Center, Sungkyunkwan University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-09-15

    The ultrasonography (US) is an important modality in evaluating shoulder disease. It is accurate in diagnosing the various shoulder diseases including tendinosis, calcific tendinitis, and subacromial bursitis as well as rotator cuff tears. This article presents a pictorial review of US anatomy of the shoulder, the technical aspects of shoulder US, major types of shoulder pathology, and interventional procedure under US guidance

  20. Accuracy of automatic tube compensation in new-generation mechanical ventilators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsasser, Serge; Guttmann, Josef; Stocker, Reto; Mols, Georg; Priebe, Hans-Joachim; Haberthür, Christoph

    2003-11-01

    To compare performance of flow-adapted compensation of endotracheal tube resistance (automatic tube compensation, ATC) between the original ATC system and ATC systems incorporated in commercially available ventilators. Bench study. University research laboratory. The original ATC system, Dräger Evita 2 prototype, Dräger Evita 4, Puritan-Bennett 840. The four ventilators under investigation were alternatively connected via different sized endotracheal tubes and an artificial trachea to an active lung model. Test conditions consisted of two ventilatory modes (ATC vs. continuous positive airway pressure), three different sized endotracheal tubes (inner diameter 7.0, 8.0, and 9.0 mm), two ventilatory rates (15/min and 30/min), and four levels of positive end-expiratory pressure (0, 5, 10, and 15 cm H2O). Performance of tube compensation was assessed by the amount of tube-related (additional) work of breathing (WOBadd), which was calculated on the basis of pressure gradient across the endotracheal tube. Compared with continuous positive airway pressure, ATC reduced inspiratory WOBadd by 58%, 68%, 50%, and 97% when using the Evita 4, the Evita 2 prototype, the Puritan-Bennett 840, and the original ATC system, respectively. Depending on endotracheal tube diameter and ventilatory pattern, inspiratory WOBadd was 0.12-5.2 J/L with the original ATC system, 1.5-28.9 J/L with the Puritan-Bennett 840, 10.4-21.0 J/L with the Evita 2 prototype, and 10.1-36.1 J/L with the Evita 4 (difference between each ventilator at identical test situations, p ventilator (p <.025). Flow-adapted tube compensation by the original ATC system significantly reduced tube-related inspiratory and expiratory work of breathing. The commercially available ATC modes investigated here may be adequate for inspiratory but probably not for expiratory tube compensation.

  1. Morphological findings in the tracheal epithelium of dogs exposed to the inhalation of poorly conditioned gases under use of an endotracheal tube or laryngeal mask airway Alterações morfológicas no epitélio traqueal de cães expostos à inalação de gases pouco condicionados, sob ventilação com tubo traqueal ou máscara laríngea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norimar Hernandes Dias

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To study morphological findings in the tracheal epithelium of dogs exposed to the inhalation of poorly conditioned gases under use of an endotracheal tube (ET or laryngeal mask airway (LMA. METHODS: Twelve dogs randomly were allocated to two groups: ET group (n-6 and LMA group (n-6, anaesthetized and mechanically ventilated, without CO2 reabsorption. Haemodynamic and ventilatory parameters, tympanic temperature, temperature, relative and absolute humidity of the ambient and inhaled gases were analyzed during three hours. The animals were submitted to euthanasia and biopsies were carried out along the tracheal segment to morphological study. Three healthy dogs were used to morphological control. RESULTS: Inhaled gas temperature was maintained between 24ºC and 26ºC, relative humidity between 10% and 12%, and absolute humidity between 2 - 3 mg H2O.L-1 with no significant differences between groups. In both groups, histological analysis showed epithelial inflammation and congestion in the corion and scanning electron microscopy showed ciliary grouping and disorganization. Transmission electron microscopy showed higher alterations in ET group than LMA group as widening of cell junctions, ciliary disorientation, cytoplasmic vacuolization, nuclear abnormalities, picnosis and chromatin condensation. CONCLUSION: LMA determined less pronounced changes in the tracheal epithelium in dogs exposed to the inhalation of poorly conditioned gases.OBJETIVO: Avaliar as alterações morfológicas no epitélio traqueal de cães expostos à inalação de gases pouco condicionados, sob ventilação com tubo traqueal (TT ou máscara laríngea (ML. MÉTODOS: Doze cães adultos foram divididos aleatoriamente em dois grupos: grupo TT (n-6 e grupo ML (n-6, submetidos à anestesia venosa e ventilação mecânica, em sistema sem reabsorção de CO2. Foram registrados parâmetros hemodinâmicos e ventilatórios, temperatura timpânica, temperatura, umidade relativa

  2. Delaminated rotator cuff tear: extension of delamination and cuff integrity after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwak, Heui-Chul; Kim, Chang-Wan; Kim, Jung-Han; Choo, Hye-Jeung; Sagong, Seung-Yeob; Shin, John

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the extension of delamination and the cuff integrity after arthroscopic repair of delaminated rotator cuff tears. Sixty-five patients with delaminated rotator cuff tears were retrospectively reviewed. The delaminated tears were divided into full-thickness delaminated tears and partial-thickness delaminated tears. To evaluate the medial extension, we calculated the coronal size of the delaminated portion. To evaluate the posterior extension, we checked the tendon involved. Cuff integrity was evaluated by computed tomography arthrography. The mean medial extension in the full-thickness and partial-thickness delaminated tears was 18.1 ± 6.0 mm and 22.7 ± 6.3 mm, respectively (P = .0084). The posterior extension into the supraspinatus and the infraspinatus was 36.9% and 32.3%, respectively, in the full-thickness delaminated tears, and it was 27.7% and 3.1%, respectively, in the partial-thickness delaminated tears (P = .0043). With regard to cuff integrity, 35 cases of anatomic healing, 10 cases of partial healing defects, and 17 cases of retear were detected. Among the patients with retear and partial healing of the defect, all the partially healed defects showed delamination. Three retear patients showed delamination, and 14 retear patients did not show delamination; the difference was statistically significant (P = .0001). The full-thickness delaminated tears showed less medial extension and more posterior extension than the partial-thickness delaminated tears. Delamination did not develop in retear patients, but delamination was common in the patients with partially healed defects. Copyright © 2015 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Lightwand-Guided Endotracheal Intubation Performed by the Nondominant Hand is Feasible

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Wei Kuo

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of lightwand-guided endotracheal intubation (LWEI performed using either the right (dominant or left (nondominant hand. Two hundred and forty patients aged 21–64 years, with a Mallampati airway classification grade of I—II and undergoing endotracheal intubation under general anesthesia, were enrolled in this randomized and controlled study. Induction of anesthesia was initiated by intravenous administration of fentanyl (2 mg/kg and thiopentone (5mg/kg, and tracheal intubation was facilitated by intravenous atracurium (0.5 mg/kg. In the direct-vision laryngoscope group (group D; n = 80, the intubator held the laryngoscope in the left hand and inserted the endotracheal tube (ETT into the glottic opening with the right hand. In the group in which LWEI was performed with the right hand (group R; n = 80, the intubator lifted the patients' jaws with the left hand and inserted the ETT-LW unit into the glottic openings with the right hand. On the contrary, in the group in which LWEI was performed with the left hand (group L; n = 80, the intubator lifted the jaws with the right hand and inserted the ETT-LW unit with the left hand. Data including total intubation time, the number of intubation attempts, hemodynamic changes during intubation, and side effects following intubation, were collected. Regardless of whether lightwand manipulation was performed with the left hand (group L; 11.4 ± 9.3 s or the right-hand (group R; 12.4 ± 9.2 s, less time was consumed in the LWEI groups than in the laryngoscope group (group D; 17.9 ± 9.9s (p 95% on their first intubation attempts. The changes in mean arterial blood pressure and heart rate were similar among the three groups. A higher incidence of intubation-related oral injury and ventricular premature contractions (VPC was found in group D compared with groups L and R (oral injury: group D 8.5%, group L 1.3%, group R 0%, p = 0.005; VPC: group D 16

  4. US detection of rotator cuff tear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soble, M.G.; Guay, R.C.; Kaye, A.D.

    1988-01-01

    Between June 1986 and April 1988, 75 patients suspected of having a tear of the rotator cuff underwent shoulder sonography and arthrography. Compared with anthrography, US demonstrated 92% of rotor cuff tears, with a specificity of 84% and a negative predictive value of 95%. In 30 patients who underwent surgery for a rotator cuff tear or other soft-tissue abnormality, sonography demonstrated a sensitivity of 93% and specificity of 73%, while arthrography demonstrated a sensitivity of 87% and specificity of 100%. The above data indicate that US is a useful, noninvasive screening procedure for patients suspected of having rotator cuff injury

  5. Injection Therapies for Rotator Cuff Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kenneth M; Wang, Dean; Dines, Joshua S

    2018-04-01

    Rotator cuff disease affects a large proportion of the overall population and encompasses a wide spectrum of pathologies, including subacromial impingement, rotator cuff tendinopathy or tear, and calcific tendinitis. Various injection therapies have been used for the treatment of rotator cuff disease, including corticosteroid, prolotherapy, platelet-rich plasma, stem cells, and ultrasound-guided barbotage for calcific tendinitis. However, the existing evidence for these therapies remains controversial or sparse. Ultimately, improved understanding of the underlying structural and compositional deficiencies of the injured rotator cuff tissue is needed to identify the biological needs that can potentially be targeted with injection therapies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Rotator cuff tear: A detailed update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Pandey

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rotator cuff tear has been a known entity for orthopaedic surgeons for more than two hundred years. Although the exact pathogenesis is controversial, a combination of intrinsic factors proposed by Codman and extrinsic factors theorized by Neer is likely responsible for most rotator cuff tears. Magnetic resonance imaging remains the gold standard for the diagnosis of rotator cuff tears, but the emergence of ultrasound has revolutionized the diagnostic capability. Even though mini-open rotator cuff repair is still commonly performed, and results are comparable to arthroscopic repair, all-arthroscopic repair of rotator cuff tear is now fast becoming a standard care for rotator cuff repair. Appropriate knowledge of pathology and healing pattern of cuff, strong and biological repair techniques, better suture anchors, and gradual rehabilitation of postcuff repair have led to good to excellent outcome after repair. As the healing of degenerative cuff tear remains unpredictable, the role of biological agents such as platelet-rich plasma and stem cells for postcuff repair augmentation is still under evaluation. The role of scaffolds in massive cuff tear is also being probed.

  7. "COMPARISON OF HEMODYNAMIC CHANGES AFTER INSERTION OF LARYNGEAL MASK AIRWAY, FACEMASK AND ENDOTRACHEAL INTUBATION"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Montazari

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Hemodynamic changes are major hazards of general anesthesia and are probably generated by direct laryngoscopy and endotracheal intubation. We designed this prospective randomised study to assess the cardiovascular changes after either laryngeal mask airway (LMA, face mask (FM or endotracheal tube (ETT insertion in the airway management of adult patients anesthetised with nitrous oxide and halothane. A total of 195 healthy normotensive adult patients with normal airways were randomly assigned to one of the three groups according to their airway management (n= 65 each for transurethral lithotripsy procedures. Heart rate (HR, systolic blood pressure (SBP, diastolic blood pressure (DBP and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP values were recorded before the induction of anesthesia, and then every three minutes until 30 min thereafter. The mean maximum HR and MAP values obtained during 15 and 30 minutes after insertion of LMA were 81±13, 73±8 bpm and 82±14, 79 ±11 mmHg, respectively which were significantly smaller compared to those with FM (84±12, 80±6 bpm and 86±10, 83±13 mmHg and ETT (96±8, 88±7 bpm and 91±11, 82±9 mmHg (P< 0.05. Direct stimulation of the trachea appears to be a major cause of the hemodynamic changes associated with tracheal intubation during general anesthesia, but why hemodynamic changes in LMA were smaller than facemask needs further study. In healthy normotensive patients the use of LMA for the airway management during general anesthesia results in a smaller cardiovascular change than FM and ETT.

  8. Artificial urinary sphincter revision for urethral atrophy: comparing single cuff downsizing and tandem cuff placement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian J. Linder

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective To compare outcomes for single urethral cuff downsizing versus tandem cuff placement during artificial urinary sphincter (AUS revision for urethral atrophy. Materials and Methods We identified 1778 AUS surgeries performed at our institution from 1990-2014. Of these, 406 were first AUS revisions, including 69 revisions for urethral atrophy. Multiple clinical and surgical variables were evaluated for potential association with device outcomes following revision, including surgical revision strategy (downsizing a single urethral cuff versus placing tandem urethral cuffs. Results Of the 69 revision surgeries for urethral atrophy at our institution, 56 (82% were tandem cuff placements, 12 (18% were single cuff downsizings and one was relocation of a single cuff. When comparing tandem cuff placements and single cuff downsizings, the cohorts were similar with regard to age (p=0.98, body-mass index (p=0.95, prior pelvic radiation exposure (p=0.73 and length of follow-up (p=0.12. Notably, there was no difference in 3-year overall device survival compared between single cuff and tandem cuff revisions (60% versus 76%, p=0.94. Likewise, no significant difference was identified for tandem cuff placement (ref. single cuff when evaluating the risk of any tertiary surgery (HR 0.95, 95% CI 0.32-4.12, p=0.94 or urethral erosion/device infection following revision (HR 0.79, 95% CI 0.20-5.22, p=0.77. Conclusions There was no significant difference in overall device survival in patients undergoing single cuff downsizing or tandem cuff placement during AUS revision for urethral atrophy.

  9. Laryngeal granuloma: a complication of prolonged endotracheal intubation.

    OpenAIRE

    Keiser, G. J.; Bozentka, N. E.; Gold, B. D.

    1991-01-01

    Laryngeal granuloma is an uncommon complication arising from irritation of the laryngeal structures. We present a case where bilateral laryngeal granulomas became clinically evident 3 mo after orthognathic surgery. The patient, a 19-yr-old female, developed acute dyspnea after experiencing gradual voice loss. Excision of the lesions under endotracheal general anesthesia led to an uneventful outcome. The causes, predisposing factors, diagnostic features, and treatment of laryngeal granuloma ar...

  10. Evaluation of three adjusting manoeuvres and type of endotracheal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-09-09

    Sep 9, 2011 ... cuff of the air-Q™ ILA was deflated and removed with the aid of a dedicated removal stylet. This was considered to be the first attempt at tracheal intubation. The ETT was now connected to the breathing circuit, and maintenance of anaesthesia commenced. If the tracheal intubation failed, three adjusting ...

  11. Ultrasound determination of rotator cuff tear repairability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Andrew K; Lam, Patrick H; Walton, Judie R; Hackett, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Background Rotator cuff repair aims to reattach the torn tendon to the greater tuberosity footprint with suture anchors. The present study aimed to assess the diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound in predicting rotator cuff tear repairability and to assess which sonographic and pre-operative features are strongest in predicting repairability. Methods The study was a retrospective analysis of measurements made prospectively in a cohort of 373 patients who had ultrasounds of their shoulder and underwent rotator cuff repair. Measurements of rotator cuff tear size and muscle atrophy were made pre-operatively by ultrasound to enable prediction of rotator cuff repairability. Tears were classified following ultrasound as repairable or irreparable, and were correlated with intra-operative repairability. Results Ultrasound assessment of rotator cuff tear repairability has a sensitivity of 86% (p tear size (p tear size ≥4 cm2 or anteroposterior tear length ≥25 mm indicated an irreparable rotator cuff tear. Conclusions Ultrasound assessment is accurate in predicting rotator cuff tear repairability. Tear size or anteroposterior tear length and age were the best predictors of repairability. PMID:27582996

  12. Proteomics perspectives in rotator cuff research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sejersen, Maria Hee Jung; Frost, Poul; Hansen, Torben Bæk

    2015-01-01

    Background Rotator cuff tendinopathy including tears is a cause of significant morbidity. The molecular pathogenesis of the disorder is largely unknown. This review aimed to present an overview of the literature on gene expression and protein composition in human rotator cuff tendinopathy and other...... studies on objectively quantified differential gene expression and/or protein composition in human rotator cuff tendinopathy and other tendinopathies as compared to control tissue. Results We identified 2199 studies, of which 54 were included; 25 studies focussed on rotator cuff or biceps tendinopathy......, which only allowed simultaneous quantification of a limited number of prespecified mRNA molecules or proteins, several proteins appeared to be differentially expressed/represented in rotator cuff tendinopathy and other tendinopathies. No proteomics studies fulfilled our inclusion criteria, although...

  13. Partial Thickness Rotator Cuff Tears: Current Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthewson, Graeme; Beach, Cara J.; Nelson, Atiba A.; Woodmass, Jarret M.; Ono, Yohei; Boorman, Richard S.; Lo, Ian K. Y.; Thornton, Gail M.

    2015-01-01

    Partial thickness rotator cuff tears are a common cause of pain in the adult shoulder. Despite their high prevalence, the diagnosis and treatment of partial thickness rotator cuff tears remains controversial. While recent studies have helped to elucidate the anatomy and natural history of disease progression, the optimal treatment, both nonoperative and operative, is unclear. Although the advent of arthroscopy has improved the accuracy of the diagnosis of partial thickness rotator cuff tears, the number of surgical techniques used to repair these tears has also increased. While multiple repair techniques have been described, there is currently no significant clinical evidence supporting more complex surgical techniques over standard rotator cuff repair. Further research is required to determine the clinical indications for surgical and nonsurgical management, when formal rotator cuff repair is specifically indicated and when biologic adjunctive therapy may be utilized. PMID:26171251

  14. NMR of the rotator cuff. An update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreitner, Karl-Friedrich; Maehringer-Kunz, Aline

    2016-01-01

    The rotator cuff consists of the tendons of the supscapularis, supraspinatus, infraspinatus and teres minor muscles. This group of muscles performs multiple functions and is often stressed during various activities. This explains, why rotator cuff disease is common and the most often cause of shoulder pain and dysfunction in adults. MR imaging still is the most important imaging modality in assessment of rotator cuff disease. It enables the radiologist to make an accurate diagnosis, the basis for an appropriate management. In this article, current concepts with regard to anatomy and imaging diagnosis will be reviewed. The discussion of the complex anatomy is followed by normal and pathologic MR imaging appearances of the rotator cuff including tendinopathy and tearing, and concluding with a review of the postoperative cuff.

  15. Partial Thickness Rotator Cuff Tears: Current Concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graeme Matthewson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Partial thickness rotator cuff tears are a common cause of pain in the adult shoulder. Despite their high prevalence, the diagnosis and treatment of partial thickness rotator cuff tears remains controversial. While recent studies have helped to elucidate the anatomy and natural history of disease progression, the optimal treatment, both nonoperative and operative, is unclear. Although the advent of arthroscopy has improved the accuracy of the diagnosis of partial thickness rotator cuff tears, the number of surgical techniques used to repair these tears has also increased. While multiple repair techniques have been described, there is currently no significant clinical evidence supporting more complex surgical techniques over standard rotator cuff repair. Further research is required to determine the clinical indications for surgical and nonsurgical management, when formal rotator cuff repair is specifically indicated and when biologic adjunctive therapy may be utilized.

  16. Cuff inflations do not affect night-time blood pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Emilie H; Theilade, Simone; Hansen, Tine W

    2015-01-01

    Discomfort related to cuff inflation may bias 24 h ambulatory blood pressure (BP) measurements, especially during night-time. We accessed the impact of cuff inflations by comparing 24 h BP recorded with a cuff-less tonometric wrist device and an upper-arm oscillometric cuff device. Fifty...

  17. Efeitos da pressão limite (25 cmH2O e mínima de “selo” do balonete de tubos traqueais sobre a mucosa traqueal do cão Efectos de la presión limite (25 cmH2O y mínima de “sello” del balón de tubos traquéales sobre la mucosa traqueal del can Effects of tracheal tube cuff limit pressure (25 cmH2O and “seal” pressure on tracheal mucosa of dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuel Celice Castilho

    2003-12-01

    ón del tubo traqueal insuflado con volumen de aire suficiente para obtener presión de “sello” o con la presión limite de 25 cmH2O, abajo de la presión crítica de 30 cm de agua para producción de lesión de la mucosa traqueal. MÉTODO: Diez y seis canes fueron sometidos a anestesia venosa y ventilación artificial. Los canes fueron distribuidos aleatoriamente en dos grupos de acuerdo con la presión en el balón del tubo traqueal (Portex Blue-Line, Inglaterra: Gsello (n = 8 balón con presión mínima de “sello” para impedir vaciamiento de aire durante la respiración artificial; G25 (n = 8 balón insuflado hasta la obtención de la presión de 25 cmH2O. La medida de la presión del balón fue realizada por medio de manómetro digital en el inicio (control y después de 60, 120 y 180 minutos. Después del sacrificio de los canes, fueron hechas biopsias en las áreas de la mucosa traqueal adyacentes al balón y al tubo traqueal para análisis de microscopio electrónico de barredura (MEV. RESULTADOS: La presión media del balón en G25 se mantuvo entre 24,8 y 25 cmH2O y en Gsello entre 11,9 y 12,5 cmH2O durante el experimento. Las alteraciones a la MEV fueron pequeñas y no significantemente diferentes en los grupos (p > 0,30, pero ocurrieron lesiones más intensas en las áreas de contacto de la mucosa traqueal con el balón del tubo traqueal, en los dos grupos, en relación a las áreas de la mucosa adyacentes o no al tubo traqueal (p BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Injuries of tracheal mucosa in contact with tracheal tube cuff is a function of cuff pressure and exposure time. This study aimed at analyzing injuries of tracheal mucosa in contact with tracheal tube cuff inflated to reach “seal” pressure or limit 25 cmH2O pressure, below critical 30 cmH2O, to prevent tracheal damage. METHODS: This study involved 16 dogs submitted to intravenous anesthesia and artificial ventilation. Dogs were randomly distributed into two experimental groups according to

  18. South African Journal of Surgery - Vol 42, No 1 (2004)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Use and care of an endotracheal/ tracheostomy tube cuff — are intensive care unit staff adequately informed? EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. DA Mol, GDT De Villiers, AJ Claassen ...

  19. Parotid Duct Repair with Intubation Tube: Technical Note

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öztürk, Muhammed Beşir; Barutca, Seda Asrufoğlu; Keskin, Elif Seda; Atik, Bekir

    2017-01-01

    The parotid duct can be damaged in traumatic injuries and surgical interventions. Early diagnosis and treatment of a duct injury is of great importance because complications such as sialocele and salivary gland fistula may develop if the duct is not surgically repaired. We think the cuff of an intubation tube is an ideal material in parotid duct repair, because of its technical characteristics, easiness of availability, and low-cost. In this paper, we described the use of the cuff cannula of an intubation tube for the diagnosis and treatment of parotid duct laceration, as a low-cost and easy to access material readily available in every operating room. PMID:28713751

  20. Effectiveness of MRI in rotator cuff injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohazama, Yuka

    1992-01-01

    To investigate the potential role of MR imaging in rotator cuf disorders, normal volunteers and patients with suspected rotator cuff injury were evaluated with a low field permanent magnet unit which had a wide gantry. MR findings of the patients were also compared with arthrography, subcromial bursography and operative findings. To establish optimal imaging technique and normal MR anatomy, 100 normal volunteers were examined. On proton density images, signal intensity of the rotator cuff tendon was low and homogenous, and that of rotator cuff muscles was intermediate. On T2 weighted images, signal intensity of muscles and tendon was decreased and that of joint effusion became brighter. In 38 patients with suspected rotator cuff injury, the signal intensity of the rotator cuff was increased to various degrees. In 21 of them, surgical correction was performed and 17 patients were followed with conservative treatment. MR imaging showed abnormalities in all 38 patients. Arthrography and bursography showed abnormalities in 28 out of 38 patients and 3 of 13 patients respectively. In 21 patients who underwent surgery, tear of the rotator cuff was confirmed, and discrepancies in MR and operative findings existed in 8 patients. In 2 patients, no tear was found in the other examinations, and it was suspected to be horizontal tear or degeneration in the substance of the muscle. MR imaging contributes to diagnosis and treatment planning in patients with suspected rotator cuff injury. (author)

  1. Current Biomechanical Concepts for Rotator Cuff Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    For the past few decades, the repair of rotator cuff tears has evolved significantly with advances in arthroscopy techniques, suture anchors and instrumentation. From the biomechanical perspective, the focus in arthroscopic repair has been on increasing fixation strength and restoration of the footprint contact characteristics to provide early rehabilitation and improve healing. To accomplish these objectives, various repair strategies and construct configurations have been developed for rotator cuff repair with the understanding that many factors contribute to the structural integrity of the repaired construct. These include repaired rotator cuff tendon-footprint motion, increased tendon-footprint contact area and pressure, and tissue quality of tendon and bone. In addition, the healing response may be compromised by intrinsic factors such as decreased vascularity, hypoxia, and fibrocartilaginous changes or aforementioned extrinsic compression factors. Furthermore, it is well documented that torn rotator cuff muscles have a tendency to atrophy and become subject to fatty infiltration which may affect the longevity of the repair. Despite all the aforementioned factors, initial fixation strength is an essential consideration in optimizing rotator cuff repair. Therefore, numerous biomechanical studies have focused on elucidating the strongest devices, knots, and repair configurations to improve contact characteristics for rotator cuff repair. In this review, the biomechanical concepts behind current rotator cuff repair techniques will be reviewed and discussed. PMID:23730471

  2. A new heat and moisture exchanger for laryngectomized patients: endotracheal temperature and humidity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheenstra, R.J.; Muller, S.H.; Vincent, A.; Ackerstaff, A.H.; Jacobi, I.; Hilgers, F.J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To assess the endotracheal temperature and humidity and clinical effects of 2 models of a new heat and moisture exchanger (HME): Rplus, which has regular breathing resistance, and Lplus, which has lower breathing resistance. Methods: We measured endotracheal temperature and humidity in 10

  3. A new heat and moisture exchanger for laryngectomized patients: endotracheal temperature and humidity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheenstra, Renske J.; Muller, Saar H.; Vincent, Andrew; Ackerstaff, Annemieke H.; Jacobi, Irene; Hilgers, Frans J. M.

    2011-01-01

    To assess the endotracheal temperature and humidity and clinical effects of 2 models of a new heat and moisture exchanger (HME): Rplus, which has regular breathing resistance, and Lplus, which has lower breathing resistance. We measured endotracheal temperature and humidity in 10 laryngectomized

  4. Ventilation via the 2.4 mm internal diameter Tritube® with cuff – new possibilities in airway management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, M S; de Wolf, M W P; Rasmussen, L S

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A small tube may facilitate tracheal intubation and improve surgical access. We describe our initial experience with the Tritube®that is a novel cuffed endotracheal tube with a 2.4 mm internal diameter. METHODS: The Tritube®was used in seven adult Ear-Nose-and Throat surgical patients...... of the intubated airway during oral, pharyngeal, laryngeal or tracheal procedures in adults. This technique has the potential to replace temporary tracheostomy, jet-ventilation or extra-corporal membrane oxygenation in selected patients....

  5. Rotator cuff tear measurement by arthropneumotomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilcoyne, R.F.; Matsen, F.A. III

    1983-01-01

    Five years of experience with a method of shoulder arthrography using upright tomography in cases of suspected or known rotator cuff tears has demonstrated its effectiveness. The value of the procedure lies in its ability to demonstrate the size of the cuff tear and the thickness of the remaining cuff tissue. This information provides the surgeon with a preoperative estimate of the difficulty of the repair and the prognosis for a good functional recovery. In 33 cases, there was good correlation between the upright thin-section tomogram findings and the surgical results. The tomograms provided better information about the size of the tear and the quality of the remaining cuff than did plain arthrograms

  6. Examination of rotator cuff re-tear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitahara, Hiroyuki; Yabe, Yoshihiro; Norimatsu, Takahiro; Adachi, Shinji; Sera, Keisuke

    2010-01-01

    The six-month post-operative re-tear rate in 72 arthroscopic rotator cuff repair cases was 16.3% by MRI. The re-tear rate of massive tears was 50%. We investigated the details of the re-tears by MRI and arthroscopic findings. High re-tear rates were connected with cuff tear size and fatty degeneration of muscle belly. Cases with poor cuff quality in arthroscopically showed high re-tear rate. These results suggest that surgery operation should be performed as soon as possible after diagnosis of cuff tear to obtain good results. Cases with damage of long head of the biceps (LHB) are likely to develop impingement causes of re-tears. Some type of rehabilitation is required to avoid impingement in such cases. (author)

  7. Occult Interpositional Rotator Cuff - an Extremely Rare Case of Traumatic Rotator Cuff Tear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Wei Ren; Jou, I Ming [National Cheng Kung University Hospital, Tainan (China); Lin, Cheng Li [Show-Chwan Memorial Hospital, Changhua (China); Chih, Wei Hsing [Chia-Yi Christian Hospital, Chiayi (China)

    2012-01-15

    Traumatic interposition of a rotator cuff tendon in the glenohumeral joint without recognizable glenohumeral dislocation is an unusual complication after shoulder trauma. Here we report the clinical and imaging presentations of a 17-year-old man with trapped rotator cuff tendons in the glenohumeral joint after a bicycle accident. The possible trauma mechanism is also discussed.

  8. Geospatial Analysis of Pediatric EMS Run Density and Endotracheal Intubation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Hansen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The association between geographic factors, including transport distance, and pediatric emergency medical services (EMS run clustering on out-of-hospital pediatric endotracheal intubation is unclear. The objective of this study was to determine if endotracheal intubation procedures are more likely to occur at greater distances from the hospital and near clusters of pediatric calls. Methods: This was a retrospective observational study including all EMS runs for patients less than 18 years of age from 2008 to 2014 in a geographically large and diverse Oregon county that includes densely populated urban areas near Portland and remote rural areas. We geocoded scene addresses using the automated address locator created in the cloud-based mapping platform ArcGIS, supplemented with manual address geocoding for remaining cases. We then use the Getis-Ord Gi spatial statistic feature in ArcGIS to map statistically significant spatial clusters (hot spots of pediatric EMS runs throughout the county. We then superimposed all intubation procedures performed during the study period on maps of pediatric EMS-run hot spots, pediatric population density, fire stations, and hospitals. We also performed multivariable logistic regression to determine if distance traveled to the hospital was associated with intubation after controlling for several confounding variables. Results: We identified a total of 7,797 pediatric EMS runs during the study period and 38 endotracheal intubations. In univariate analysis we found that patients who were intubated were similar to those who were not in gender and whether or not they were transported to a children’s hospital. Intubated patients tended to be transported shorter distances and were older than non-intubated patients. Increased distance from the hospital was associated with reduced odds of intubation after controlling for age, sex, scene location, and trauma system entry status in a multivariate logistic

  9. Management of avulsed permanent maxillary central incisors during endotracheal intubation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritesh R Kalaskar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Avulsion is serious injury that may encounter during endotracheal intubation and its management often presents a challenge. Replantation of the avulsed tooth can restore esthetic appearance and occlusal function shortly after the injury. The present article describes the management of air-dried maxillary permanent incisors that have been avulsed due to direct laryngoscopy during the induction of general anesthesia for tonsillectomy procedure. The replanted maxillary central incisors had maintained its function and esthetic for 1 year after replantation. Children in a mixed dentition phase are high-risk group children for traumatic dental injury during laryngoscopy; therefore, Anesthetic Departments should have local protocols to refer patients for dental treatment postoperatively in the event of trauma.

  10. Release of obstructing rectal cuff following transanal endorectal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    symptoms after transanal endorectal pullthrough for ... In both patients, the obstructing symptoms were because of a rectal cuff ... widely adopted for the treatment of Hirschsprung's disease ... The cuff was identified and cut strictly in the midline.

  11. Superior glenoid inclination and rotator cuff tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalmers, Peter N; Beck, Lindsay; Granger, Erin; Henninger, Heath; Tashjian, Robert Z

    2018-03-23

    The objectives of this study were to determine whether glenoid inclination (1) could be measured accurately on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using computed tomography (CT) as a gold standard, (2) could be measured reliably on MRI, and (3) whether it differed between patients with rotator cuff tears and age-matched controls without evidence of rotator cuff tears or glenohumeral osteoarthritis. In this comparative retrospective radiographic study, we measured glenoid inclination on T1 coronal MRI corrected into the plane of the scapula. We determined accuracy by comparison with CT and inter-rater reliability. We compared glenoid inclination between patients with full-thickness rotator cuff tears and patients aged >50 years without evidence of a rotator cuff tear or glenohumeral arthritis. An a priori power analysis determined adequate power to detect a 2° difference in glenoid inclination. (1) In a validation cohort of 37 patients with MRI and CT, the intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.877, with a mean difference of 0° (95% confidence interval, -1° to 1°). (2) For MRI inclination, the inter-rater intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.911. (3) Superior glenoid inclination was 2° higher (range, 1°-4°, P rotator cuff tear group of 192 patients than in the control cohort of 107 patients. Glenoid inclination can be accurately and reliably measured on MRI. Although superior glenoid inclination is statistically greater in those with rotator cuff tears than in patients of similar age without rotator cuff tears or glenohumeral arthritis, the difference is likely below clinical significance. Copyright © 2018 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Systematics of injuries of the rotator cuff and biceps tendon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breitenseher, M.J.; Pones, M.; Breitenseher, J.B.

    2015-01-01

    Injuries of the rotator cuff and the biceps tendon demonstrate different patterns, which can be recognized clinically and radiologically. These patterns are impingement syndrome with additional trauma, isolated trauma of the rotator cuff and shoulder dislocation causing rotator cuff tears. Furthermore, it is clinically crucial to evaluate the extent of a rotator cuff injury. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the modality of choice to differentiate these patterns. (orig.) [de

  13. 21 CFR 870.1120 - Blood pressure cuff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Blood pressure cuff. 870.1120 Section 870.1120...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1120 Blood pressure cuff. (a) Identification. A blood pressure cuff is a device that has an inflatable bladder in an inelastic...

  14. Degenerative full thickness rotator cuff tears : Towards optimal management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lambers Heerspink, Frederik

    2016-01-01

    The shoulder is one of the most complex joints in the body. Besides a wide range of motion it also has to be stable. The rotator cuff is a major stabiliser of the glenohumoral joint. With increasing age rotator cuff tears are common. Successful treatment is described following surgical (rotator cuff

  15. MR imaging of rotator cuff tears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumagai, Hideo

    1992-01-01

    A total of 115 patients with clinical symptoms and signs suggesting rotator cuff tears underwent MR imaging with a 1.5-Tesla system. The body coil was used as the receiver coil in 24 patients and a single 10 cm surface coil in 91. Arthrography or MR imaging with intra-articular Gd-DTPA (MR arthrography) was performed in 95 of the 115. T2-weighted images with the body coil showed high signal intensity lesions in rotator cuffs in only seven of the 10 patients who had tears demonstrated by arthrography or MR arthrography. On the other hand, T2-weighted images with the surface coil demonstrated high signal intensity lesions in cuffs in all 27 patients who were diagnosed to have tears by arthrography or MR arthrography. In 12 patietns, T2-wighted images with the surface coil showed high signal intensity lesions in cuffs, while arthrography and MR arthrography did not show tears. Surgery was performed in four of the 12 patients and partial tears were confirmed. A single 10 cm surface coil, 3 mm slice thickness and 2.5 second repetition time seem to account for the fine visualization of cuff tears by the T2-weighted images. These results suggest that T2-weighted images obtained with the surface coil are superior to arthrography and MR arthrography. (author)

  16. The feasibility of determining the position of an endotracheal tube in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    mainly premature babies with low birth weight (LBW). The mean thoracic vertebral body height was 5 mm, and the mean intervertebral disk height was 2.5 mm, giving a distance of ~7.5 mm from the inferior end of one thoracic vertebra to the inferior end of the next. Optimal measured distances from the aortic arch to the tip of.

  17. Microbial investigation of biofilms recovered from endotracheal tubes using sonication in intensive care unit pediatric patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago de Oliveira Ferreira

    2016-09-01

    Conclusions: Our study demonstrated that sonication technique can be applied to ET biofilms to identify microorganisms attached to their surface with a great variety of species identified. However, we did not find significant differences in comparison with the traditional tracheal aspirate culture approach.

  18. 76 FR 36557 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License; Devices for Clearing Mucus From Endotracheal Tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-22

    ... to Oculus Innovative Sciences, Inc., a company incorporated under the laws of the State of California having its headquarters in Petaluma, California. The United States of America is the assignee of the...

  19. 76 FR 52961 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Devices for Clearing Mucus From Endotracheal Tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-24

    .... Patent 7,051,737 to EndOclear, LLC, a company incorporated under the laws of the State of Michigan having its headquarters in Petoskey, Michigan. The United States of America is the assignee of the rights of...

  20. Lack of agreement and trending ability of the endotracheal cardiac output monitor compared with thermodilution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller-Sørensen, H; Hansen, K L; Ostergaard, M

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Minimally invasive monitoring systems of central haemodynamics are gaining increasing popularity. The present study investigated the precision of the endotracheal cardiac output monitor (ECOM) system and its agreement with pulmonary artery catheter thermodilution (PAC TD) for measuring...

  1. Arthroscintigraphy in suspected rotator cuff rupture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gratz, S.; Behr, T.; Becker, W.; Koester, G.; Vosshenrich, R.; Grabbe, E.

    1998-01-01

    Aim: In order to evaluate the diagnostic efficiency of arthroscintigraphy in suspected rotator cuff ruptures this new imaging procedure was performed 20 times in 17 patients with clinical signs of a rotator cuff lesion. The scintigraphic results were compared with sonography (n=20), contrast arthrography (n=20) and arthroscopy (n=10) of the shoulder joint. Methods: After performing a standard bone scintigraphy with intravenous application of 300 MBq 99m-Tc-methylene diphosphonate (MDP) for landmarking of the shoulder region arthroscintigraphy was performed after an intraarticular injection of 99m-Tc microcolloid (ALBU-RES 400 μCi/5 ml). The application was performed either in direct combination with contrast arthrography (n=10) or ultrasound conducted mixed with a local anesthetic (n=10). Findings at arthroscopical surgery (n=10) were used as the gold standard. Results: In case of complete rotator cuff rupture (n=5), arthroscintigraphy and radiographic arthrography were identical in 5/5. In one patient with advanced degenerative alterations of the shoulder joint radiographic arthrography incorrectly showed a complete rupture which was not seen by arthroscintigraphy and endoscopy. In 3 patients with incomplete rupture, 2/3 results were consistant. A difference was seen in one patient with a rotator cuff, that has been already revised in the past and that suffered of capsulitis and calcification. Conclusion: Arthroscinitgraphy is a sensitive technique for detection of rotator cuff ruptures. Because of the lower viscosity of the active compound, small ruptures can be easily detected, offering additional value over radiographic arthrography and ultrasound, especially for evaluation of incomplete cuff ruptures. (orig.) [de

  2. Rotator Cuff Repair in Adolescent Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzam, Michael G; Dugas, Jeffrey R; Andrews, James R; Goldstein, Samuel R; Emblom, Benton A; Cain, E Lyle

    2018-04-01

    Rotator cuff tears are rare injuries in adolescents but cause significant morbidity if unrecognized. Previous literature on rotator cuff repairs in adolescents is limited to small case series, with few data to guide treatment. Adolescent patients would have excellent functional outcome scores and return to the same level of sports participation after rotator cuff repair but would have some difficulty with returning to overhead sports. Case series; Level of evidence 4. A retrospective search of the practice's billing records identified all patients participating in at least 1 sport who underwent rotator cuff repair between 2006 and 2014 with an age Rotator Cuff Index. Thirty-two consecutive adolescent athletes (28 boys and 4 girls) with a mean age of 16.1 years (range, 13.2-17.9 years) met inclusion criteria. Twenty-nine patients (91%) had a traumatic event, and 27 of these patients (93%) had no symptoms before the trauma. The most common single tendon injury was to the supraspinatus (21 patients, 66%), of which 2 were complete tendon tears, 1 was a bony avulsion of the tendon, and 18 were high-grade partial tears. Fourteen patients (56%) underwent single-row repair of their rotator cuff tear, and 11 (44%) underwent double-row repair. All subscapularis injuries were repaired in open fashion, while all other tears were repaired arthroscopically. Twenty-seven patients (84%) completed the outcome questionnaires at a mean 6.2 years after surgery (range, 2-10 years). The mean ASES score was 93 (range, 65-100; SD = 9); mean Western Ontario Rotator Cuff Index, 89% (range, 60%-100%; SD = 13%); and mean numeric pain rating, 0.3 (range, 0-3; SD = 0.8). Overall, 25 patients (93%) returned to the same level of play or higher. Among overhead athletes, 13 (93%) were able to return to the same level of play, but 8 (57%) were forced to change positions. There were no surgical complications, but 2 patients did undergo a subsequent operation. Surgical repair of high-grade partial

  3. Composition of Muscle Fiber Types in Rat Rotator Cuff Muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rui, Yongjun; Pan, Feng; Mi, Jingyi

    2016-10-01

    The rat is a suitable model to study human rotator cuff pathology owing to the similarities in morphological anatomy structure. However, few studies have reported the composition muscle fiber types of rotator cuff muscles in the rat. In this study, the myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoforms were stained by immunofluorescence to show the muscle fiber types composition and distribution in rotator cuff muscles of the rat. It was found that rotator cuff muscles in the rat were of mixed fiber type composition. The majority of rotator cuff fibers labeled positively for MyHCII. Moreover, the rat rotator cuff muscles contained hybrid fibers. So, compared with human rotator cuff muscles composed partly of slow-twitch fibers, the majority of fast-twitch fibers in rat rotator cuff muscles should be considered when the rat model study focus on the pathological process of rotator cuff muscles after injury. Gaining greater insight into muscle fiber types in rotator cuff muscles of the rat may contribute to elucidate the mechanism of pathological change in rotator cuff muscles-related diseases. Anat Rec, 299:1397-1401, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. MRI of the rotator cuff and internal derangement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Opsha, Oleg [Department of Radiology, Maimonides Medical Center, 4802 10th Avenue, Brooklyn, NY 11219 (United States)], E-mail: oopsha@hotmail.com; Malik, Archana [Department of Radiology, Maimonides Medical Center, 4802 10th Avenue, Brooklyn, NY 11219 (United States)], E-mail: dr.armal@gmail.com; Baltazar, Romulo [Department of Radiology, Maimonides Medical Center, 4802 10th Avenue, Brooklyn, NY 11219 (United States)], E-mail: rbaltazar@gmail.com; Primakov, Denis [Department of Radiology, North Shore University Hospital, 300 Community Drive, Manhasset, NY 11030 (United States)], E-mail: dgprim@yahoo.com; Beltran, Salvador [Dr. Ramon Marti, 2 Albons, Ginrona 17136 (Spain); Miller, Theodore T. [Department of Radiology and Imaging, Hospital for Special Surgery, 535 East 70th Street, New York, NY 10021 (United States)], E-mail: MillerTT@hss.edu; Beltran, Javier [Department of Radiology, Maimonides Medical Center, 4802 10th Avenue, Brooklyn, NY 11219 (United States)], E-mail: jbeltran46@msn.com

    2008-10-15

    Disease to the rotator cuff is the most common cause of shoulder pain and dysfunction in adults. This group of muscles performs multiple functions and is often stressed during various activities. The anatomy and physiology of the rotator cuff is complex and interconnected to other muscle groups in the shoulder. One must take the anatomic status of the rotator cuff tendons into account when planning the treatment of the rotator cuff injury. Diagnostic imaging of the rotator cuff, performed by MRI, provides valuable information about the nature of the injury. In this article, we will review the various types and causes of rotator cuff injuries, normal MR anatomy, function, patho-anatomy, and the biomechanics of the rotator cuff. We will also review shoulder impingement syndromes.

  5. MRI of the rotator cuff and internal derangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Opsha, Oleg; Malik, Archana; Baltazar, Romulo; Primakov, Denis; Beltran, Salvador; Miller, Theodore T.; Beltran, Javier

    2008-01-01

    Disease to the rotator cuff is the most common cause of shoulder pain and dysfunction in adults. This group of muscles performs multiple functions and is often stressed during various activities. The anatomy and physiology of the rotator cuff is complex and interconnected to other muscle groups in the shoulder. One must take the anatomic status of the rotator cuff tendons into account when planning the treatment of the rotator cuff injury. Diagnostic imaging of the rotator cuff, performed by MRI, provides valuable information about the nature of the injury. In this article, we will review the various types and causes of rotator cuff injuries, normal MR anatomy, function, patho-anatomy, and the biomechanics of the rotator cuff. We will also review shoulder impingement syndromes

  6. Tube plug

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zafred, P. R.

    1985-01-01

    The tube plug comprises a one piece mechanical plug having one open end and one closed end which is capable of being inserted in a heat exchange tube and internally expanded into contact with the inside surface of the heat exchange tube for preventing flow of a coolant through the heat exchange tube. The tube plug also comprises a groove extending around the outside circumference thereof which has an elastomeric material disposed in the groove for enhancing the seal between the tube plug and the tube

  7. Gastrostomy Tube (G-Tube)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... any of these problems: a dislodged tube a blocked or clogged tube any signs of infection (including redness, swelling, or warmth at the tube site; discharge that's yellow, green, or foul-smelling; fever) excessive bleeding or drainage from the tube site severe abdominal pain lasting ...

  8. Treatment Alternative for Irreparable Rotator Cuff Ruptures ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-09-03

    Sep 3, 2016 ... and such ruptures also lead to a pseudo-paralysis.[1,2]. Pain during daily ... 2) repairable rotator cuff rupture, as determined on MRI and during arthroscopy ..... functioning and lead to cosmetic deformities.[4]. Arthroplasty is a ...

  9. Regenerative Medicine in Rotator Cuff Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randelli, Pietro; Ragone, Vincenza; Menon, Alessandra; Cabitza, Paolo; Banfi, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Rotator cuff injuries are a common source of shoulder pathology and result in an important decrease in quality of patient life. Given the frequency of these injuries, as well as the relatively poor result of surgical intervention, it is not surprising that new and innovative strategies like tissue engineering have become more appealing. Tissue-engineering strategies involve the use of cells and/or bioactive factors to promote tendon regeneration via natural processes. The ability of numerous growth factors to affect tendon healing has been extensively analyzed in vitro and in animal models, showing promising results. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is a whole blood fraction which contains several growth factors. Controlled clinical studies using different autologous PRP formulations have provided controversial results. However, favourable structural healing rates have been observed for surgical repair of small and medium rotator cuff tears. Cell-based approaches have also been suggested to enhance tendon healing. Bone marrow is a well known source of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Recently, ex vivo human studies have isolated and cultured distinct populations of MSCs from rotator cuff tendons, long head of the biceps tendon, subacromial bursa, and glenohumeral synovia. Stem cells therapies represent a novel frontier in the management of rotator cuff disease that required further basic and clinical research. PMID:25184132

  10. Glenohumeral stability in simulated rotator cuff tears

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenbrink, F.; Groot, J.H.; Veeger, H.E.J.; Helm, F.C.; Rozing, P.M.

    2009-01-01

    Rotator cuff tears disrupt the force balance in the shoulder and the glenohumeral joint in particular, resulting in compromised arm elevation torques. The trade-off between glenohumeral torque and glenohumeral stability is not yet understood. We hypothesize that compensation of lost abduction torque

  11. Diagnostic imaging of shoulder rotator cuff lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nogueira-Barbosa Marcello Henrique

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Shoulder rotator cuff tendon tears were evaluated with ultrasonography (US and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Surgical or arthroscopical correlation were available in 25 cases. Overall costs were also considered. Shoulder impingement syndrome diagnosis was done on a clinical basis. Surgery or arthroscopy was considered when conservative treatment failure for 6 months, or when rotator cuff repair was indicated. Ultrasound was performed in 22 patients and MRI in 17 of the 25 patients. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 80%, 100% and 90.9% for US and 90%, 100% and 94.12% for MRI, respectively. In 16 cases both US and MRI were obtained and in this subgroup statistical correlation was excellent (p< 0.001. We concluded that both methods are reliable for rotator cuff full thickness tear evaluation. Since US is less expensive, it could be considered as the screening method when rotator cuff integrity is the main question, and when well trained radiologists and high resolution equipment are available.

  12. Regenerative Medicine in Rotator Cuff Injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Randelli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rotator cuff injuries are a common source of shoulder pathology and result in an important decrease in quality of patient life. Given the frequency of these injuries, as well as the relatively poor result of surgical intervention, it is not surprising that new and innovative strategies like tissue engineering have become more appealing. Tissue-engineering strategies involve the use of cells and/or bioactive factors to promote tendon regeneration via natural processes. The ability of numerous growth factors to affect tendon healing has been extensively analyzed in vitro and in animal models, showing promising results. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP is a whole blood fraction which contains several growth factors. Controlled clinical studies using different autologous PRP formulations have provided controversial results. However, favourable structural healing rates have been observed for surgical repair of small and medium rotator cuff tears. Cell-based approaches have also been suggested to enhance tendon healing. Bone marrow is a well known source of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs. Recently, ex vivo human studies have isolated and cultured distinct populations of MSCs from rotator cuff tendons, long head of the biceps tendon, subacromial bursa, and glenohumeral synovia. Stem cells therapies represent a novel frontier in the management of rotator cuff disease that required further basic and clinical research.

  13. Biomaterials based strategies for rotator cuff repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Song; Su, Wei; Shah, Vishva; Hobson, Divia; Yildirimer, Lara; Yeung, Kelvin W K; Zhao, Jinzhong; Cui, Wenguo; Zhao, Xin

    2017-09-01

    Tearing of the rotator cuff commonly occurs as among one of the most frequently experienced tendon disorders. While treatment typically involves surgical repair, failure rates to achieve or sustain healing range from 20 to 90%. The insufficient capacity to recover damaged tendon to heal to the bone, especially at the enthesis, is primarily responsible for the failure rates reported. Various types of biomaterials with special structures have been developed to improve tendon-bone healing and tendon regeneration, and have received considerable attention for replacement, reconstruction, or reinforcement of tendon defects. In this review, we first give a brief introduction of the anatomy of the rotator cuff and then discuss various design strategies to augment rotator cuff repair. Furthermore, we highlight current biomaterials used for repair and their clinical applications as well as the limitations in the literature. We conclude this article with challenges and future directions in designing more advanced biomaterials for augmentation of rotator cuff repair. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Effects of user experience and method in the inflation of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Context: Endotracheal tube cuff pressure (ETCP) is recommended to be maintained between 20.30 cmH2O limits. While insufficient inflation of ETC may cause aspirations, over.inflation of it may lead to damage in tracheal epithelium. Aims: We planned to investigate the effects of user experience and cuff pressure inflation ...

  15. Acquired tracheoesophageal fistula due to high intracuff pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hameed Akmal

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available High-compliance endotracheal tube cuffs are used to prevent gas leak and also pulmonary aspiration in mechanically ventilated patients. However, the use of the usual cuff inflation volumes may cause tracheal damage and lead to tracheoesophageal fistula. Tracheostomy tube cuffs seal against the tracheal wall and prevent leakage of air around the tube, assuring that the tidal volume is delivered to the lungs. In the past, high-pressure cuffs were used, but these contributed to tracheal injury and have been replaced by high-volume, low-pressure cuffs. For long-term applications, some newer tubes have low-profile (tight to shaft cuffs that facilitate the tracheostomy tube changes by eliminating the lip that forms when standard cuffs are deflated.

  16. A Novel Artificial Intelligence System for Endotracheal Intubation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Jestin N; Das, Samarjit; De la Torre, Fernando; Frisch, Adam; Guyette, Francis X; Hodgins, Jessica K; Yealy, Donald M

    2016-01-01

    Adequate visualization of the glottic opening is a key factor to successful endotracheal intubation (ETI); however, few objective tools exist to help guide providers' ETI attempts toward the glottic opening in real-time. Machine learning/artificial intelligence has helped to automate the detection of other visual structures but its utility with ETI is unknown. We sought to test the accuracy of various computer algorithms in identifying the glottic opening, creating a tool that could aid successful intubation. We collected a convenience sample of providers who each performed ETI 10 times on a mannequin using a video laryngoscope (C-MAC, Karl Storz Corp, Tuttlingen, Germany). We recorded each attempt and reviewed one-second time intervals for the presence or absence of the glottic opening. Four different machine learning/artificial intelligence algorithms analyzed each attempt and time point: k-nearest neighbor (KNN), support vector machine (SVM), decision trees, and neural networks (NN). We used half of the videos to train the algorithms and the second half to test the accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity of each algorithm. We enrolled seven providers, three Emergency Medicine attendings, and four paramedic students. From the 70 total recorded laryngoscopic video attempts, we created 2,465 time intervals. The algorithms had the following sensitivity and specificity for detecting the glottic opening: KNN (70%, 90%), SVM (70%, 90%), decision trees (68%, 80%), and NN (72%, 78%). Initial efforts at computer algorithms using artificial intelligence are able to identify the glottic opening with over 80% accuracy. With further refinements, video laryngoscopy has the potential to provide real-time, direction feedback to the provider to help guide successful ETI.

  17. Large/Massive Tears, Fatty Infiltration, and Rotator Cuff Muscle Atrophy: A Review Article With Management Options Specific to These Types of Cuff Deficiencies

    OpenAIRE

    Gandhi Nathan Solayar; Bradley Seeto; Darren Chen; Samuel Mac Dessi

    2016-01-01

    Context There are many studies in the literature looking into factors affecting outcomes in rotator cuff surgery. The aetiology of rotator cuff deficiency is often multi-factorial and there are many facets towards successful management in this often debilitating condition. Evidence Acquisition We performed a literature search of MEDLINE and Embase databases using the terms large rotator cuff tears, fatty infiltration rotator cuff,...

  18. Rotator cuff ruptures of the shoulder joint, sonography - arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Triebel, H.J.; Wening, V.; Witte, G.; Hamburg Univ.

    1986-01-01

    47 patients suspected of rutpure of the rotator cuff were sonographed and arthrographed. Rupture of the rotator cuff was diagnosed in 12 cases, both diagnostic methods yielding the same result. In 29 patients sonography and arthrography did not reveal any abnormal findings. Six ruptures evident in sonography were not confirmed by arthrography and were considered false positive. Direct pointers towards rupture of the cuff would be: echoless defects, cuff cannot be visualised fully or in part and irregularities of movement during dynamic examination. Echoless 'cystic' areas in the periarticular soft parts must be considered an indirect pointer. Echorich focal findings in the echopoor cuff represent a differential diagnostic problem and we cannot give a final assessment as yet. Shoulder sonography is justified as a screening method in suspicion of rotator cuff rupture before initiating arthrography. If sonography reveals no abnormal findings, shoulder arthrography need not be performed. (orig.) [de

  19. Free Biceps Tendon Autograft to Augment Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair

    OpenAIRE

    Obma, Padraic R.

    2013-01-01

    Arthroscopic rotator cuff repairs have become the standard of treatment for all sizes of tears over the past several years. Current healing rates reported in the literature are quite good, but improving the healing potential of rotator cuff repairs remains a challenging problem. There has been an increase recently in the use of augmentation of rotator cuff repairs with xenografts or synthetics for large and massive tears. Biceps tenodesis is often indicated as part of the treatment plan while...

  20. Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair in elite rugby players

    OpenAIRE

    Tambe, Amol; Badge, Ravi; Funk, Lennard

    2009-01-01

    Background: Rugby is an increasingly popular collision sport. A wide spectrum of injuries can be sustained during training and match play. Rotator cuff injury is uncommon in contact sports and there is little published literature on the treatment of rotator cuff tears in rugby players. Aims: We therefore reviewed the results and functional outcomes of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair in elite rugby players. Materials and Methods: Eleven professional rugby players underwent arthroscopic ...

  1. Normal isometric strength of rotator cuff muscles in adults

    OpenAIRE

    Chezar, A.; Berkovitch, Y.; Haddad, M.; Keren, Y.; Soudry, M.; Rosenberg, N.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The most prevalent disorders of the shoulder are related to the muscles of rotator cuff. In order to develop a mechanical method for the evaluation of the rotator cuff muscles, we created a database of isometric force generation by the rotator cuff muscles in normal adult population. We hypothesised the existence of variations according to age, gender and dominancy of limb. Methods A total of 400 healthy adult volunteers were tested, classified into groups of 50 men and women for e...

  2. Bronchial lumen is the safer route for an airway exchange catheter in double-lumen tube replacement: preventable complication in airway management for thoracic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hsiang-Ling; Tai, Ying-Hsuan; Wei, Ling-Fang; Cheng, Hung-Wei; Ho, Chiu-Ming

    2017-10-01

    There is no current consensus on which lumen an airway exchange catheter (AEC) should be passed through in double-lumen endotracheal tube (DLT) to exchange for a single-lumen endotracheal tube (SLT) after thoracic surgery. We report an unusual case to provide possible solution on this issue. A 71-year-old man with lung adenocarcinoma had an event of a broken exchange catheter used during a DLT replacement with a SLT, after a video-assisted thoracic surgery. The exchange catheter was impinged at the distal tracheal lumen and snapped during manipulation. All three segments of the catheter were retrieved without further airway compromises. Placement of airway tube exchanger into the tracheal lumen of double-lumen tube is a potential contributing factor of the unusual complication. We suggest an exchange catheter be inserted into the bronchial lumen in optimal depth with the adjunct of video laryngoscope, as the safe method for double-lumen tube exchange.

  3. On cuff imbalance and tripolar ENG amplifier configurations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triantis, Iasonas F; Demosthenous, Andreas; Donaldson, Nick

    2005-02-01

    Electroneurogram (ENG) recording techniques benefit from the use of tripolar cuffs because they assist in reducing interference from sources outside the cuff. However, in practice the performance of ENG amplifier configurations, such as the quasi-tripole and the true-tripole, has been widely reported to be degraded due to the departure of the tripolar cuff from ideal behavior. This paper establishes the presence of cuff imbalance and investigates its relationship to cuff asymmetry, cuff end-effects and interference source proximity. The paper also presents a comparison of the aforementioned amplifier configurations with a new alternative, termed the adaptive-tripole, developed to automatically compensate for cuff imbalance. The output signal-to-interference ratio of the three amplifier configurations were compared in vivo for two interference signals (stimulus artifact and M-wave) superimposed on compound action potentials. The experiments showed (for the first time) that the two interference signals result in different cuff imbalance values. Nevertheless, even with two distinct cuff imbalances present, the adaptive-tripole performed better than the other two systems in 61.9% of the trials.

  4. Assessment and treatment strategies for rotator cuff tears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hakim, Wisam; Noorani, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Tears of the rotator cuff are common and becoming an increasingly frequent problem. There is a vast amount of literature on the merits and limitations of the various methods of clinical and radiological assessment of rotator cuff tears. This is also the case with regard to treatment strategies. Certain popular beliefs and principles practiced widely and the basis upon which they are derived may be prone to inaccuracy. We provide an overview of the historical management of rotator cuff tears, as well as an explanation for how and why rotator cuff tears should be managed, and propose a structured methodology for their assessment and treatment. PMID:27582960

  5. Hands-Off Time for Endotracheal Intubation during CPR Is Not Altered by the Use of the C-MAC Video-Laryngoscope Compared to Conventional Direct Laryngoscopy. A Randomized Crossover Manikin Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Schuerner

    Full Text Available Sufficient ventilation and oxygenation through proper airway management is essential in patients undergoing cardio-pulmonary resuscitation (CPR. Although widely discussed, securing the airway using an endotracheal tube is considered the standard of care. Endotracheal intubation may be challenging and causes prolonged interruption of chest compressions. Videolaryngoscopes have been introduced to better visualize the vocal cords and accelerate intubation, which makes endotracheal intubation much safer and may contribute to intubation success. Therefore, we aimed to compare hands-off time and intubation success of direct laryngoscopy with videolaryngoscopy (C-MAC, Karl Storz, Tuttlingen, Germany in a randomized, cross-over manikin study.Twenty-six anesthesia residents and twelve anesthesia consultants of the University Hospital Zurich were recruited through a voluntary enrolment. All participants performed endotracheal intubation using direct laryngoscopy and C-MAC in a random order during ongoing chest compressions. Participants were strictly advised to stop chest compression only if necessary.The median hands-off time was 1.9 seconds in direct laryngoscopy, compared to 3 seconds in the C-MAC group. In direct laryngoscopy 39 intubation attempts were recorded, resulting in an overall first intubation attempt success rate of 97%, compared to 38 intubation attempts and 100% overall first intubation attempt success rate in the C-MAC group.As a conclusion, the results of our manikin-study demonstrate that video laryngoscopes might not be beneficial compared to conventional, direct laryngoscopy in easily accessible airways under CPR conditions and in experienced hands. The benefits of video laryngoscopes are of course more distinct in overcoming difficult airways, as it converts a potential "blind intubation" into an intubation under visual control.

  6. Hands-Off Time for Endotracheal Intubation during CPR Is Not Altered by the Use of the C-MAC Video-Laryngoscope Compared to Conventional Direct Laryngoscopy. A Randomized Crossover Manikin Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuerner, Philipp; Grande, Bastian; Piegeler, Tobias; Schlaepfer, Martin; Saager, Leif; Hutcherson, Matthew T; Spahn, Donat R; Ruetzler, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    Sufficient ventilation and oxygenation through proper airway management is essential in patients undergoing cardio-pulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Although widely discussed, securing the airway using an endotracheal tube is considered the standard of care. Endotracheal intubation may be challenging and causes prolonged interruption of chest compressions. Videolaryngoscopes have been introduced to better visualize the vocal cords and accelerate intubation, which makes endotracheal intubation much safer and may contribute to intubation success. Therefore, we aimed to compare hands-off time and intubation success of direct laryngoscopy with videolaryngoscopy (C-MAC, Karl Storz, Tuttlingen, Germany) in a randomized, cross-over manikin study. Twenty-six anesthesia residents and twelve anesthesia consultants of the University Hospital Zurich were recruited through a voluntary enrolment. All participants performed endotracheal intubation using direct laryngoscopy and C-MAC in a random order during ongoing chest compressions. Participants were strictly advised to stop chest compression only if necessary. The median hands-off time was 1.9 seconds in direct laryngoscopy, compared to 3 seconds in the C-MAC group. In direct laryngoscopy 39 intubation attempts were recorded, resulting in an overall first intubation attempt success rate of 97%, compared to 38 intubation attempts and 100% overall first intubation attempt success rate in the C-MAC group. As a conclusion, the results of our manikin-study demonstrate that video laryngoscopes might not be beneficial compared to conventional, direct laryngoscopy in easily accessible airways under CPR conditions and in experienced hands. The benefits of video laryngoscopes are of course more distinct in overcoming difficult airways, as it converts a potential "blind intubation" into an intubation under visual control.

  7. Role of ultrasound in rotator cuff tears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siddiqi, H.A.; Mirza, T.

    2010-01-01

    The study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of ultrasound in rotator cuff tears and to compare it with MRI. Total number of patients was thirty. All of these were above thirty years of age and were referred by clinicians, with shoulder pain for diagnostic workup. Post operative patients were excluded. Ultrasound and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) were performed on each patient. Same operator performed ultrasound in all patients. Ultrasound (US) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) detected equal number of full thickness tears while two partial thickness tears were missed on US. Hypoechoic defect was the most important primary sign while cortical irregularity and fluid in subacromial and subdeltroid busra were the most important secondary signs on US. US was equally effective to MRI in detection of rotator cuff tears. It should be the primary investigation because of its availability, cost effective and real time evaluation provided significant expertise is developed, as it is highly operator dependent. (author)

  8. Whistle from Afar: A Case of Endotracheal Metastasis in Papillary Thyroid Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bitoti Chattopadhyay

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Endotracheal metastasis is a rare situation, usually associated with malignancies of breast and gastrointestinal tract, specially colon. Papillary carcinoma of thyroid commonly disseminates through lymphatic channels and tracheal involvement through vascular route is rarely reported. Here, we report a case of tracheal metastasis from papillary carcinoma of thyroid. The patient responded to external beam radiation therapy with cobalt 60 beams in a dose of 44 Gy followed by a 16 Gy boost. The patient is under followup and is presently asymptomatic. This paper adds to the repertoire of evidence in treatment of endotracheal metastasis.

  9. Glenohumeral interposition of rotator cuff stumps: a rare complication of traumatic rotator cuff tear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Moraes Agnollitto

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The present report describes a case where typical findings of traumatic glenohumeral interposition of rotator cuff stumps were surgically confirmed. This condition is a rare complication of shoulder trauma. Generally, it occurs in high-energy trauma, frequently in association with glenohumeral joint dislocation. Radiography demonstrated increased joint space, internal rotation of the humerus and coracoid process fracture. In addition to the mentioned findings, magnetic resonance imaging showed massive rotator cuff tear with interposition of the supraspinatus, infraspinatus and subscapularis stumps within the glenohumeral joint. Surgical treatment was performed confirming the injury and the rotator cuff stumps interposition. It is important that radiologists and orthopedic surgeons become familiar with this entity which, because of its rarity, might be neglected in cases of shoulder trauma.

  10. Analysis of failed rotator cuff repair – Retrospective survey of revisions after open rotator cuff repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupert Schupfner

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Rotator cuff defects are frequently occurring shoulder pathologies associated with pain and movement impairment. Aims The aim of the study was to analyse the pathologies that lead to operative revisions after primary open rotator cuff repair. Methods In 216 patients who underwent primary rotator cuff repair and later required operative revision between 1996 to 2005, pathologies found intraoperatively during the primary operation and during revision surgery were collected, analysed and compared. Results The average age at the time of revision surgery was 54.3 years. The right shoulder (61.6 per cent was more often affected than the left, males (63.4 per cent more often than females. At primary operation – apart from rotator cuff repair – there were the following surgical procedures performed: 190 acromioplasty, 86 Acromiclavicular joint resections, 68 tenodesis, 40 adhesiolysis and 1 tenotomy. If an ACJ-resection had been performed in the primary operation, ACJ-problems were rare in revision surgery (p<0.01. Primary gleno-humeral adhesions were associated with a significant rise in re-tearing rate (p=0.049. Primary absence of adhesions went along with a significant lower rate of adhesions found at revision (p=0.018. Primary performed acromioplasty had no influence on re-tearing rate (p=0.408 or on the rate of subacromial impingement at revision surgery (p=0.709. Conclusion To avoid operative revision after rotator cuff repair relevant copathologies of the shoulder have to be identified before or during operation and treated accordingly. Therefore, even during open rotator cuff repair, the surgeon should initially start with arthroscopy of the shoulder joint and subacromial space to recognise co-pathologies.

  11. Excessive pressure in multichambered cuffs used for sequential compression therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Segers, P; Belgrado, JP; Leduc, A; Leduc, O; Verdonck, P

    2002-01-01

    Background and Purpose. Pneumatic compression devices, used as part of the therapeutic strategy for lymphatic drainage, often have cuffs with multiple chambers that are, inflated sequentially. The purpose of this study was to investigate (1) the relationship between cuff chamber pressure

  12. Rotator Cuff Disease and Injury--Evaluation and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Randy

    This presentation considers the incidence, evaluation, and management of rotator cuff disease and injury. Pathogenesis, symptoms, physical findings, treatment (therapeutic and surgical), and prevention are discussed. It is noted that rotator cuff problems, common in athletes, are usually related to an error in training or lack of training. They…

  13. Recurrent rotator cuff tear: is ultrasound imaging reliable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilat, Ron; Atoun, Ehud; Cohen, Ornit; Tsvieli, Oren; Rath, Ehud; Lakstein, Dror; Levy, Ofer

    2018-02-02

    The diagnostic workup of the painful shoulder after rotator cuff repair (RCR) can be quite challenging. The aim of this study was to assess the reliability of ultrasonography (US) for the detection of recurrent rotator cuff tears in patients with shoulder pain after RCR. We hypothesized that US for the diagnosis of recurrent rotator cuff tear after RCR would not prove to be reliable when compared with surgical arthroscopic confirmation (gold standard). In this cohort study (diagnosis), we retrospectively analyzed the data of 39 patients with shoulder pain after arthroscopic RCR who had subsequently undergone US, followed by revision arthroscopy. The rotator cuff was evaluated first using US for the presence of retears. Thereafter, revision arthroscopy was performed, and the diagnosis was either established or disproved. The sensitivity and specificity of US were assessed in reference to revision arthroscopy (gold standard). A rotator cuff retear was indicated by US in 21 patients (54%) and by revision arthroscopy in 26 patients (67%). US showed a sensitivity of 80.8% and specificity of 100% in the diagnosis of rotator cuff retears. Omission of partial rotator cuff retears resulted in a spike in sensitivity to 94.7%, with 100% specificity remaining. US imaging is a highly sensitive and specific test for the detection of recurrent rotator cuff tears, as confirmed by revision arthroscopy, in patients with a painful shoulder after primary RCR. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Shouldering the blame for impingement: the rotator cuff continuum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this article was to summarise recent research on shoulder impingement and rotator cuff pathology. A continuum model of rotator cuff pathology is described, and the challenges of accurate clinical diagnosis, imaging and best management discussed. Keywords: shoulder impingement syndrome, subacromial ...

  15. SUPRAGLOTTIC JET VENTILATION VERSUS CONVENTIONAL ENDOTRACHEAL VENTILATION IN MINOR LARYNGEAL SURGERIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Illendual Upendranath

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Any attempt at intubation will cause many cardiovascular responses and the major concern during this time is to attenuate the same. Similar response is seen during procedures on Larynx in microlaryngeal surgery which produces an intense cardiovascular stimulation during suspension laryngoscopy and intubation. AIM OF STUDY Supraglottic jet ventilation versus conventional endotracheal ventilation in minor laryngeal surgeries. To evaluate the haemodynamic response in supraglottic jet ventilation and conventional intubation in minor laryngeal surgeries. METHODS Patients were randomised to 2 Groups: 30 patients in each group; Group A - in whom supraglottic jet ventilation was planned and Group B - in whom endotracheal intubation was planned. RESULT The haemodynamic response in terms of increase in MAP and HR is significantly more with endotracheal intubation than with supraglottic jet ventilation. CONCLUSION Our study showed that supraglottic jet ventilation showed a better haemodynamic stability when compared to conventional endotracheal intubation in patients undergoing minor laryngeal surgeries. Statistical scores were also in favour of the patients treated with supraglottic jet ventilation based on the p values.

  16. Endotracheal temperature and humidity measurements in laryngectomized patients: intra- and inter-patient variability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheenstra, R.J.; Muller, S.H.; Vincent, A.; Sinaasappel, M.; Zuur, J.K.; Hilgers, F.J.M.

    2009-01-01

    This study assesses intra- and inter-patient variability in endotracheal climate (temperature and humidity) and effects of heat and moister exchangers (HME) in 16 laryngectomized individuals, measured repeatedly (N = 47). Inhalation Breath Length (IBL) was 1.35 s without HME and 1.05 s with HME (P <

  17. Endotracheal temperature and humidity measurements in laryngectomized patients: intra- and inter-patient variability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheenstra, R. J.; Muller, S. H.; Vincent, A.; Sinaasappel, M.; Zuur, J. K.; Hilgers, Frans J. M.

    2009-01-01

    This study assesses intra- and inter-patient variability in endotracheal climate (temperature and humidity) and effects of heat and moister exchangers (HME) in 16 laryngectomized individuals, measured repeatedly (N = 47). Inhalation Breath Length (IBL) was 1.35 s without HME and 1.05 s with HME (P

  18. Distribution of endotracheally instilled surfactant protein SP-C in lung-lavaged rabbits.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bambang Oetomo, Sidarto; de Leij, Louis; Curstedt, T; ter Haar, J G; Schoots, Coenraad; Wildevuur, Charles; Okken, Albert

    In lung-lavaged surfactant-deficient rabbits (n = 6) requiring artificial ventilation, porcine surfactant was instilled endotracheally. This resulted in improvement of lung function so that the animals could be weaned off artificial ventilation. The animals were killed 4 1/2 h after surfactant

  19. Verification of endotracheal intubation in obese patients - temporal comparison of ultrasound vs. auscultation and capnography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfeiffer, P; Bache, Stefan Holst; Isbye, D L

    2012-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) may have an emerging role as an adjunct in verification of endotracheal intubation. Obtaining optimal US images in obese patients is generally regarded more difficult than for other patients. This study compared the time consumption of bilateral lung US with auscultation and capno...

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging in acute and chronic rotator cuff tears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buirski, G.

    1990-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging has been assessed in patients with acute rotator cuff tears and normal radiographs (9 cases) and those with chronic tears and changes of cuff arthropathy (9 cases). All images were obtained using a low field strength system (FONAR 0.3 T). Particular attention was placed on the appearances of the tendon and the cuff muscles themselves. Six complete acute tears were clearly identified, but MRI failed to demonstrate two partial tears. Muscle bulk was preserved in all patients in this group. In contrast, all patients with cuff arthropathy had complete tears of the supraspinatus tendon with marked tendon retraction and associated muscle atrophy: These changes precluded primary surgical repair. MRI should be used to assess muscle atrophy preoperatively in those patients with acute tears. When plain radiographs demonstrate cuff arthropathy, the MRI appearances are predictable and primary repair is unlikely to be successful. Further imaging is therefore not indicated. (orig.)

  1. Occlusion cuff for routine measurement of digital blood pressure and blood flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, N A; Krähenbühl, B; Hirai, M

    1977-01-01

    A miniaturized blood pressure cuff made of plastic material and applicable to fingers and toes is described. The cuff was compared to rubber cuffs and to bladder-free cuffs. It was found to be more reliable than the former type and much easier to use than the latter type. It is recommended for us...

  2. [The role of endotracheal aspiration in the diagnosis of ventilator associated pneumonia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürgün, Alev; Korkmaz Ekren, Pervin; Bacakoğlu, Feza; Başoğlu, Ozen Kaçmaz; Dirican, Nigar; Aydemir, Şöhret; Nart, Deniz; Sayıner, Abdullah

    2013-01-01

    Ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP) is one of the most important causes of mortality in patients treated with invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV) in intensive care unit (ICU). Microbiological examinations are required as clinical and radiological findings are usually insufficient in the diagnosis. Twenty four patients who were receiving IMV because of respiratory failure, had a Clinical Pulmonary Infection Score (CPIS) of ≥ 6 in the follow-up and died with the suspicion of VAP were enrolled in our study. Six patients were excluded as post-mortem biopsy could not be performed. The patients who had pre-mortem CPIS ≥ 6, in whom a causative organism was identified from the culture of post-mortem lung biopsy and/or histopathological examination of lung biopsy was compatible with pneumonia were diagnosed as VAP. In the 18 patients in whom a post-mortem lung biopsy was performed, quantitative culture results of endotracheal aspirate performed 48 hours prior to death were compared with microbiological and histopathological results of post-mortem lung biopsy specimens, and the role of endotracheal aspirate in the diagnosis of VAP was evaluated retrospectively. Out of 18 patients (12 men, mean age 67.0 ± 13.0 years) included in the study, 11 (61.1%) were diagnosed as VAP. The quantitative culture of endotracheal aspirate was positive in 9 (81.8%) out of 11 patients diagnosed as VAP. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of endotracheal aspirate culture for identifying VAP were found to be 81.8%, 14.3%, 60.0% and 33.3%, respectively. Our study shown that quantitative culture of endotracheal aspirate is a practical and reliable method that can be used for the diagnosis of VAP in patients receiving IMV in ICU and having CPIS ≥ 6.

  3. The Rotator Cuff Organ: Integrating Developmental Biology, Tissue Engineering, and Surgical Considerations to Treat Chronic Massive Rotator Cuff Tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothrauff, Benjamin B; Pauyo, Thierry; Debski, Richard E; Rodosky, Mark W; Tuan, Rocky S; Musahl, Volker

    2017-08-01

    The torn rotator cuff remains a persistent orthopedic challenge, with poor outcomes disproportionately associated with chronic, massive tears. Degenerative changes in the tissues that comprise the rotator cuff organ, including muscle, tendon, and bone, contribute to the poor healing capacity of chronic tears, resulting in poor function and an increased risk for repair failure. Tissue engineering strategies to augment rotator cuff repair have been developed in an effort to improve rotator cuff healing and have focused on three principal aims: (1) immediate mechanical augmentation of the surgical repair, (2) restoration of muscle quality and contractility, and (3) regeneration of native enthesis structure. Work in these areas will be reviewed in sequence, highlighting the relevant pathophysiology, developmental biology, and biomechanics, which must be considered when designing therapeutic applications. While the independent use of these strategies has shown promise, synergistic benefits may emerge from their combined application given the interdependence of the tissues that constitute the rotator cuff organ. Furthermore, controlled mobilization of augmented rotator cuff repairs during postoperative rehabilitation may provide mechanotransductive cues capable of guiding tissue regeneration and restoration of rotator cuff function. Present challenges and future possibilities will be identified, which if realized, may provide solutions to the vexing condition of chronic massive rotator cuff tears.

  4. Rotator cuff repair using cell sheets derived from human rotator cuff in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Yoshifumi; Mifune, Yutaka; Inui, Atsuyuki; Sakata, Ryosuke; Muto, Tomoyuki; Takase, Fumiaki; Ueda, Yasuhiro; Kataoka, Takeshi; Kokubu, Takeshi; Kuroda, Ryosuke; Kurosaka, Masahiro

    2017-02-01

    To achieve biological regeneration of tendon-bone junctions, cell sheets of human rotator-cuff derived cells were used in a rat rotator cuff injury model. Human rotator-cuff derived cells were isolated, and cell sheets were made using temperature-responsive culture plates. Infraspinatus tendons in immunodeficient rats were resected bilaterally at the enthesis. In right shoulders, infraspinatus tendons were repaired by the transosseous method and covered with the cell sheet (sheet group), whereas the left infraspinatus tendons were repaired in the same way without the cell sheet (control group). Histological examinations (safranin-O and fast green staining, isolectin B4, type II collagen, and human-specific CD31) and mRNA expression (vascular endothelial growth factor; VEGF, type II collagen; Col2, and tenomodulin; TeM) were analyzed 4 weeks after surgery. Biomechanical tests were performed at 8 weeks. In the sheet group, proteoglycan at the enthesis with more type II collagen and isolectin B4 positive cells were seen compared with in the control group. Human specific CD31-positive cells were detected only in the sheet group. VEGF and Col2 gene expressions were higher and TeM gene expression was lower in the sheet group than in the control group. In mechanical testing, the sheet group showed a significantly higher ultimate failure load than the control group at 8 weeks. Our results indicated that the rotator-cuff derived cell sheet could promote cartilage regeneration and angiogenesis at the enthesis, with superior mechanical strength compared with the control. Treatment for rotator cuff injury using cell sheets could be a promising strategy for enthesis of tendon tissue engineering. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:289-296, 2017. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. An evaluation of the retromolar space for oral tracheal tube placement for maxillofacial surgery in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Suman; Rattan, Vidya; Bhardwaj, Neerja

    2006-11-01

    The eruption of the first and second permanent molar teeth may influence the size of the retromolar space. In this study we evaluated the adequacy of the retromolar space for retromolar intubation and any effect of eruption of the first and second permanent molar teeth on this space in children. Children 3-15 yr of age, undergoing surgery other than facial surgery were included for evaluation of the retromolar space. After standard oral tracheal intubation, the endotracheal tube was shifted to the retromolar space and the mandible was slowly closed to achieve centric occlusion. At the same time, any increase in airway resistance or decrease in oxygen saturation was noted. In the second part of the study, the feasibility of retromolar intubation in pediatric patients undergoing maxillofacial surgery with intraoperative maxillomandibular fixation was assessed. There was enough space for endotracheal tube placement in the retromolar region. The eruption of the first and second permanent molar teeth did not affect intubation. It was possible to achieve centric occlusion in 79 of 80 children with the endotracheal tube positioned in the retromolar space. Retromolar intubation was successfully accomplished in six pediatric patients undergoing maxillomandibular fixation and maxillofacial surgery. The retromolar space can be safely used for intubation in children when intraoperative maxillomandibular fixation, and simultaneous access to the nose and oral cavity are needed.

  6. A case of laparoscopy-assisted vaginal cuff suturing for vaginal cuff dehiscence after total laparoscopic hysterectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoatsu Jimi

    Full Text Available Introduction: Vaginal cuff dehiscence after hysterectomy is a rare complication and occurs in less than 1% of patients. It can present with serious complications, such as bowel evisceration and peritonitis. Presentation of case: A 51-year-old multigravida Korean woman underwent total laparoscopic hysterectomy for leiomyoma. Six months later, she reported lower abdominal pain and vaginal bleeding. Physical examination revealed rebound tenderness in the lower abdomen, and pelvic examination showed a small amount of vaginal bleeding with an evisceration of the small intestine through the vagina that exhibited healthy peristalsis. The eviscerated bowel, which seemed to be a part of the ileum, was carefully manually reduced transvaginally into the abdominal cavity. Laparoscopic observation revealed adhesions between the omentum, small intestine, and the peritoneum. Specifically, the small intestine was adhered around the vaginal cuff. An abdominal abscess was found in the left lower abdominal cavity. An adhesiotomy was performed and the abdominal abscess was removed and irrigated. Complete separation of the anterior and posterior vaginal cuff edges was obtained. The vaginal cuff was closed with interrupted 0-polydioxanone absorbable sutures without bowel injury. A 6-month follow-up examination revealed complete healing of the vaginal cuff. Discussion: In this case, we were able to make use of both laparoscopic and transvaginal methods to perform a successful repair with a minimally invasive and safe technique. Conclusion: Laparoscopically assisted vaginal cuff suturing for vaginal cuff dehiscence after total laparoscopic hysterectomy was found to be effective, safe, and minimally invasive. Keywords: Vaginal cuff dehiscence, Vaginal cuff repair, Vaginal cuff evisceration, Laparoscopic hysterectomy, Complication

  7. Medialized repair for retracted rotator cuff tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Kyu; Jung, Kyu-Hak; Won, Jun-Sung; Cho, Seung-Hyun

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the functional outcomes of medialized rotator cuff repair and the continuity of repaired tendon in chronic retracted rotator cuff tears. Thirty-five consecutive patients were selected from 153 cases that underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair for more than medium-sized posterosuperior rotator cuff tears between July 2009 and July 2012 performed with the medialized repair. All cases were available for at least 2 years of postoperative follow-up. The visual analog scale of pain, muscle strength, Constant score, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score, and University of California-Los Angeles score were evaluated. At the final follow-up, all clinical outcomes were significantly improved. The visual analog scale score for pain improved from 6 ± 1 preoperatively to 2 ± 1 postoperatively. The range of motion increased from preoperatively to postoperatively: active forward elevation, from 134° ± 49° to 150° ± 16°; active external rotation at the side, from 47° ± 15° to 55° ± 10°; and active internal rotation, from L3 to L1. The shoulder score also improved: Constant score, from 53.5 ± 16.7 to 79 ± 10; American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score, from 51 ± 15 to 82 ± 8; and University of California-Los Angeles score, from 14 ± 4 to 28 ± 4. The retear cases at the final follow-up were 6 (17%). Medialized repair may be useful in cases in which anatomic bone-to-tendon repair would be difficult because of the excessive tension of the repaired tendon and a torn tendon that does not reach the anatomic insertion. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. [Treatment of intractable aspiration after partial laryngectomy by cuffed tracheostomy tube with inner cannula].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, P; Liu, Y H; Xu, Q S; Zheng, Z S

    2017-06-07

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of cuffed tracheostomy tube with inner cannula for the treatment of intractable aspiration after partial laryngectomy. Methods: From May 2010 to June 2015, 15 patients with intractable aspiration after partial laryngectomy of laryngeal and hypopharyngeal carcinoma were enrolled. Cuffed tracheostomy tube with inner cannula was used in the 15 patients for treatment of intractable aspiration. The patients and their family were trained to manage the cuffed tracheostomy tube with inner cannula and to eat since the 14th day after surgery. Cuff was initially inflated with 10 ml air and then deflated of 0.5 ml air every 2-3 days. Until the inflation of cuff was no longer required, the cuffed tracheostomy tube was replaced by metal tracheostomy tube. The patients' swallowing function and aspiration were evaluated 6 months after treatment. Results: The 15 cases with intractable aspiration were treated with cuffed tracheostomy tube with inner cannula and after 2-3 months, 14 of them replaced the cuffed tracheostomy tubes with inner cannula by metal tracheostomy tubes and recovered oral eating, and tracheostomy tubes were no longer required for 12 of 14 patients in following 3-6 months, showing a total decannulation rate of 80% in the patients with refractory aspiration. Conclusion: It was safe and effective to treat aspiration after laryngeal and hypopharyngeal surgery with cuffed tracheostomy tube with inner cannula.

  9. Impact of tracheal cuff shape on microaspiration of gastric contents in intubated critically ill patients: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaillette, Emmanuelle; Brunin, Guillaume; Girault, Christophe; Zerimech, Farid; Chiche, Arnaud; Broucqsault-Dedrie, Céline; Fayolle, Cyril; Minacori, Franck; Alves, Isabelle; Barrailler, Stephanie; Robriquet, Laurent; Tamion, Fabienne; Delaporte, Emmanuel; Thellier, Damien; Delcourte, Claire; Duhamel, Alain; Nseir, Saad

    2015-09-25

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is the most common infection in intubated critically ill patients. Microaspiration of the contaminated gastric and oropharyngeal secretions is the main mechanism involved in the pathophysiology of VAP. Tracheal cuff plays an important role in stopping the progression of contaminated secretions into the lower respiratory tract. Previous in vitro studies suggested that conical cuff shape might be helpful in improving tracheal sealing. However, clinical studies found conflicting results. The aim of this study is to determine the impact of conical tracheal cuff shape on the microaspiration of gastric contents in critically ill patients. This prospective cluster randomized controlled crossover open-label trial is currently being conducted in ten French intensive care units (ICUs). Patients are allocated to intubation with a polyvinyl chloride (PVC) standard (barrel)-shaped or a PVC conical-shaped tracheal tube. The primary objective is to determine the impact of the conical shaped tracheal cuff on abundant microaspiration of gastric contents. Secondary outcomes include the incidence of microaspiration of oropharyngeal secretions, tracheobronchial colonization, VAP and ventilator-associated events. Abundant microaspiration is defined as the presence of pepsin at significant level (>200 ng/ml) in at least 30 % of the tracheal aspirates. Pepsin and amylase are quantitatively measured in all tracheal aspirates during the 48 h following inclusion. Quantitative tracheal aspirate culture is performed at inclusion and twice weekly. We plan to recruit 312 patients in the participating ICUs. BEST Cuff is the first randomized controlled study evaluating the impact of PVC tracheal-cuff shape on gastric microaspirations in patients receiving invasive mechanical ventilation. Enrollment began in June 2014 and is expected to end in October 2015. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01948635 (registered 31 August 2013).

  10. Factors predicting rotator cuff retears: an analysis of 1000 consecutive rotator cuff repairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Brian T N; Wu, Xiao L; Lam, Patrick H; Murrell, George A C

    2014-05-01

    The rate of retears after rotator cuff repair varies from 11% to 94%. A retear is associated with poorer subjective and objective clinical outcomes than intact repair. This study was designed to determine which preoperative and/or intraoperative factors held the greatest association with retears after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. This study retrospectively evaluated 1000 consecutive patients who had undergone a primary rotator cuff repair by a single surgeon using an arthroscopic inverted-mattress knotless technique and who had undergone an ultrasound evaluation 6 months after surgery to assess repair integrity. Exclusion criteria included previous rotator cuff repair on the same shoulder, incomplete repair, and repair using a synthetic polytetrafluoroethylene patch. All patients had completed the modified L'Insalata Questionnaire and underwent a clinical examination before surgery. Measurements of tear size, tear thickness, associated shoulder injury, tissue quality, and tendon mobility were recorded intraoperatively. The overall retear rate at 6 months after surgery was 17%. Retears occurred in 27% of full-thickness tears and 5% of partial-thickness tears (P < .0001). The best independent predictors of retears were anteroposterior tear length (correlation coefficient r = 0.41, P < .0001), tear size area (r = 0.40, P < .0001), mediolateral tear length (r = 0.34, P < .0001), tear thickness (r = 0.29, P < .0001), age at surgery (r = 0.27, P < .0001), and operative time (r = 0.18, P < .0001). These factors produced a predictive model for retears: logit P = (0.039 × age at surgery in years) + (0.027 × tear thickness in %) + (1 × anteroposterior tear length in cm) + (0.76 × mediolateral tear length in cm) - (0.17 × tear size area in cm(2)) + (0.018 × operative time in minutes) -9.7. Logit P can be transformed into P, which is the chance of retears at 6 months after surgery. A rotator cuff retear is a multifactorial process

  11. Volumetric evaluation of the rotator cuff musculature in massive rotator cuff tears with pseudoparalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Yong Girl; Cho, Nam Su; Song, Jong Hoon; Park, Jung Gwan; Kim, Tae Yong

    2017-09-01

    If the balance of the rotator cuff force couple is disrupted, pseudoparalysis may occur, but the exact mechanism remains unknown. This study investigated the effect of rotator cuff force couple disruption on active range of motion in massive rotator cuff tear (mRCT) by rotator cuff muscle volume analysis. The study included 53 patients with irreparable mRCT: 22 in the nonpseudoparalysis group and 31 in the pseudoparalysis group. The volumes of the subscapularis (SBS), infraspinatus (ISP), and teres minor (TM) muscles were measured using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and the ratios of each muscle volume to the anatomic external rotator (aER) volume were calculated. A control group of 25 individuals with normal rotator cuffs was included. Anterior-to-posterior cuff muscle volume ratio (SBS/ISP + TM) was imbalanced in both mRCT groups (1.383 nonpseudoparalysis and 1.302 pseudoparalysis). Between the 2 groups, the ISP/aER ratio (0.277 vs. 0.249) and the inferior SBS/aER ratio (0.426 vs. 0.390) were significantly decreased in the pseudoparalysis group (P= .022 and P= .040, respectively). However, neither the TM/aER ratio (0.357 vs. 0.376) nor the superior SBS/aER ratio (0.452 vs. 0.424) showed a significant difference between the two groups (P= .749 and P= .068, respectively). If the inferior SBS was torn, a high frequency of pseudoparalysis was noted (81.0%, P= .010). The disruption of transverse force couple was noted in both irreparable mRCT groups, although no significant difference was found between the nonpseudoparalysis and pseudoparalysis groups. ISP and inferior SBS muscle volumes showed a significant decrease in pseudoparalysis group and, therefore, were considered to greatly influence the loss of active motion in mRCT. The TM did not exert significant effect on the incidence of pseudoparalysis. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Magnitude of Interfractional Vaginal Cuff Movement: Implications for External Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Daniel J.; Michaletz-Lorenz, Martha; Goddu, S. Murty; Grigsby, Perry W.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify the extent of interfractional vaginal cuff movement in patients receiving postoperative irradiation for cervical or endometrial cancer in the absence of bowel/bladder instruction. Methods and Materials: Eleven consecutive patients with cervical or endometrial cancer underwent placement of three gold seed fiducial markers in the vaginal cuff apex as part of standard of care before simulation. Patients subsequently underwent external irradiation and brachytherapy treatment based on institutional guidelines. Daily megavoltage CT imaging was performed during each external radiation treatment fraction. The daily positions of the vaginal apex fiducial markers were subsequently compared with the original position of the fiducial markers on the simulation CT. Composite dose–volume histograms were also created by summing daily target positions. Results: The average (± standard deviation) vaginal cuff movement throughout daily pelvic external radiotherapy when referenced to the simulation position was 16.2 ± 8.3 mm. The maximum vaginal cuff movement for any patient during treatment was 34.5 mm. In the axial plane the mean vaginal cuff movement was 12.9 ± 6.7 mm. The maximum vaginal cuff axial movement was 30.7 mm. In the craniocaudal axis the mean movement was 10.3 ± 7.6 mm, with a maximum movement of 27.0 mm. Probability of cuff excursion outside of the clinical target volume steadily dropped as margin size increased (53%, 26%, 4.2%, and 1.4% for 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, and 2.5 cm, respectively.) However, rectal and bladder doses steadily increased with larger margin sizes. Conclusions: The magnitude of vaginal cuff movement is highly patient specific and can impact target coverage in patients without bowel/bladder instructions at simulation. The use of vaginal cuff fiducials can help identify patients at risk for target volume excursion.

  13. Feeding Tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... feeding therapies have been exhausted. Please review product brand and method of placement carefully with your physician ... Total Parenteral Nutrition. Resources: Oley Foundation Feeding Tube Awareness Foundation Children’s Medical Nutrition Alliance APFED’s Educational Webinar ...

  14. Effect of mechanical behaviour of the brachial artery on blood pressure measurement during both cuff inflation and cuff deflation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Dingchang; Pan, Fan; Murray, Alan

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of different mechanical behaviour of the brachial artery on blood pressure (BP) measurements during cuff inflation and deflation. BP measurements were taken from each of 40 participants, with three repeat sessions under three randomized cuff deflation/inflation conditions. Cuff pressure was linearly deflated and inflated at a standard rate of 2-3 mmHg/s and also linearly inflated at a fast rate of 5-6 mmHg/s. Manual auscultatory systolic and diastolic BPs, and pulse pressure (SBP, DBP, PP) were measured. Automated BPs were determined from digitally recorded cuff pressures by fitting a polynomial model to the oscillometric pulse amplitudes. The BPs from cuff deflation and inflation were then compared. Repeatable measurements between sessions and between the sequential order of inflation/deflation conditions (all P > 0.1) indicated stability of arterial mechanical behaviour with repeat measurements. Comparing BPs obtained by standard inflation with those from standard deflation, manual SBP was 2.6 mmHg lower (P deflation suggest different arterial mechanical behaviour between arterial opening and closing during BP measurement. We have shown that the mechanical behaviour of the brachial artery during BP measurement differs between cuff deflation and cuff inflation.

  15. Metal artefacts severely hamper magnetic resonance imaging of the rotator cuff tendons after rotator cuff repair with titanium suture anchors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, Femke F; Huis In't Veld, Rianne; den Otter, Lydia A; van Raak, Sjoerd M; Ten Haken, Bennie; Vochteloo, Anne J H

    2018-04-01

    The rate of retear after rotator cuff surgery is 17%. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans are used for confirmative diagnosis of retear. However, because of the presence of titanium suture anchors, metal artefacts on the MRI are common. The present study evaluated the diagnostic value of MRI after rotator cuff tendon surgery with respect to assessing the integrity as well as the degeneration and atrophy of the rotator cuff tendons when titanium anchors are in place. Twenty patients who underwent revision surgery of the rotator cuff as a result of a clinically suspected retear between 2013 and 2015 were included. The MRI scans of these patients were retrospectively analyzed by four specialized shoulder surgeons and compared with intra-operative findings (gold standard). Sensitivity and interobserver agreement among the surgeons in assessing retears as well as the Goutallier and Warner classification were examined. In 36% (range 15% to 50%) of the pre-operative MRI scans, the observers could not review the rotator cuff tendons. When the rotator cuff tendons were assessable, a diagnostic accuracy with a mean sensitivity of 0.84 (0.70 to 1.0) across the surgeons was found, with poor interobserver agreement (kappa = 0.12). Metal artefacts prevented accurate diagnosis from MRI scans of rotator cuff retear in 36% of the patients studied.

  16. Evaluation of Repair Tension in Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair: Does It Really Matter to the Integrity of the Rotator Cuff?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Do Hoon; Jang, Young Hoon; Choi, Young Eun; Lee, Hwa-Ryeong; Kim, Sae Hoon

    2016-11-01

    Repair tension of a torn rotator cuff can affect healing after repair. However, a measurement of the actual tension during arthroscopic rotator cuff repair is not feasible. The relationship between repair tension and healing of a rotator cuff repair remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of repair tension on healing at the repair site. The hypothesis was that repair tension would be a major factor in determining the anatomic outcome of rotator cuff repair. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2. Arthroscopic rotator cuff repairs (132 patients) for full-thickness rotator cuff tears were analyzed. An intraoperative model was designed for the estimation of repair tension using a tensiometer. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed approximately 1 year (mean [±SD], 12.7 ± 3.2 months) postoperatively for the evaluation of healing at the repair site. Multivariable analysis was performed for tear size, amount of retraction, and fatty degeneration (FD) of rotator cuff muscles. The mean repair tension measured during the arthroscopic procedure was 28.5 ± 23.1 N. There was a statistically significant correlation between tension and tear size (Pearson correlation coefficient [PCC], 0.529; P repair tension also showed a significant inverse correlation with healing at the repair site (SCC, 0.195; P = .025). However, when sex, age, tear size, amount of retraction, tendon quality, and FD of rotator cuff muscles were included for multivariable logistic regression analysis, only FD of the infraspinatus showed an association with the anatomic outcome of repair (Exp(B) = 0.596; P = .010). Our intraoperative model for the estimation of rotator cuff repair tension showed an inverse correlation of repair tension with healing at the repair site, suggesting that complete healing is less likely with high-tension repairs. A significant association was observed on MRI between a high level of FD of the infraspinatus and repaired tendon integrity. © 2016

  17. Comparison of expandable endotracheal stents in the treatment of surgically induced piglet tracheomalacia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mair, E A; Parsons, D S; Lally, K P; Van Dellen, A F

    1991-09-01

    Present surgical alternatives for pediatric tracheobronchomalacia are limited and associated with many potentially undesirable complications. The feasibility of different intraluminal expandable endotracheal stents for the treatment of surgically induced tracheomalacia was analyzed in 27 piglets. A potentially fatal tracheomalacia was surgically created. Either a stainless steel "zig-zag" stent or a woven polymeric stent was then implanted. Tracheal patency, mucosal function, histopathologic respiratory tract changes, and effects of the stent on esophageal motility were evaluated over a 16-week period. Piglets with steel stents uniformly experienced intense inflammation leading to tracheal dysfunction and death. Piglets with polymeric stents experienced minimal respiratory symptoms. Expandable polymeric endotracheal stents alleviate surgically induced piglet tracheomalacia, were easy to insert, allowed for tracheal growth, and reduced the need for high-risk surgical procedures with prolonged ventilatory support.

  18. Endotracheal intubation with airtraq® versus storz® videolaryngoscope in children younger than two years - a randomized pilot-study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sørensen Martin

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background New laryngoscopes have become available for use in small children. The aim of the study was to compare the Storz® videolaryngoscope (SVL to the Airtraq® Optical laryngoscope (AOL for tracheal intubation in children younger than two years of age who had a normal airway assessment. Our hypothesis was that the SVL would have a better success rate than the AOL. Methods Ten children aged 2 years or younger scheduled for elective cleft lip/palate surgery were included. The anesthesia was standardized and a Cormack-Lehane (CL-score was obtained using a Macintosh laryngoscope. After randomization CL-score and endotracheal tube positioning in front of the glottis was performed with one device, followed by the same procedure and intubation with the other device. The video-feed was recorded along with real-time audio. The primary endpoint was the success rate, defined as intubation in first attempt. Secondary endpoints were the time from start of laryngoscopy to CL-score, tube positioning in front of the glottis, and intubation. Results Two intubation attempts were needed in two of five patients randomized to the SVL. The difference in time (SVL vs. AOL to CL-score was 4.5 sec (p = 0.0449. The difference in time (SVL vs. AOL to tube positioning was 11.6 sec (p = 0.0015. Time to intubation was 29.0 sec for SVL and 15.8 sec for AOL. Conclusion No difference in the success rate of endotracheal intubation could be established in this ten patient sample of children younger than two years with a normal airway assessment scheduled for elective cleft lip/palate surgery. However, the Airtraq® Optical videolaryngoscope showed a number of time related advantages over the Storz® videolaryngoscope. Because of the small sample size a larger trial is needed to confirm these findings. Both devices were considered safe in all intubations. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov; Identifier NCT01090726.

  19. Passive contribution of the rotator cuff to abduction and joint stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tétreault, Patrice; Levasseur, Annie; Lin, Jenny C; de Guise, Jacques; Nuño, Natalia; Hagemeister, Nicola

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare shoulder joint biomechanics during abduction with and without intact non-functioning rotator cuff tissue. A cadaver model was devised to simulate the clinical findings seen in patients with a massive cuff tear. Eight full upper limb shoulder specimens were studied. Initially, the rotator cuff tendons were left intact, representing a non-functional rotator cuff, as seen in suprascapular nerve paralysis or in cuff repair with a patch. Subsequently, a massive rotator cuff tear was re-created. Three-dimensional kinematics and force requirements for shoulder abduction were analyzed for each condition using ten abduction cycles in the plane of the scapula. Mediolateral displacements of the glenohumeral rotation center (GHRC) during abduction with an intact non-functioning cuff were minimal, but massive cuff tear resulted in significant lateral displacement of the GHRC (p non-functional cuff (p requirements were significantly less with an intact non-functioning cuff than with massive cuff tear (p requirement for abduction from 5 to 30° as compared with the results following a massive rotator cuff tear. This provides insight into the potential biomechanical effect of repairing massive rotator cuff tears with a biological or synthetic "patch," which is a new treatment for massive cuff tear.

  20. Steam generator tube extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delorme, H.

    1985-05-01

    To enable tube examination on steam generators in service, Framatome has now developed a process for removing sections of steam generator tubes. Tube sections can be removed without being damaged for treating the tube section expanded in the tube sheet

  1. A Randomized Comparison of In-hospital Rescuer Positions for Endotracheal Intubation in a Difficult Airway

    OpenAIRE

    Le Parc, Joanna M.; Bischof, Jason J.; King, Andrew M.; Greenberger, Sarah; Way, David P.; Panchal, Ashish R.; Finnegan, Geoffrey I.; Terndrup, Thomas E.

    2018-01-01

    Introduction: Emergency endotracheal intubation (ETI) is a common and critical procedure performed in both prehospital and in-hospital settings. Studies of prehospital providers have demonstrated that rescuer position influences ETI outcomes. However, studies of in-hospital rescuer position for ETI are limited. While we adhere to strict standards for the administration of ETI, we posited that perhaps requiring in-hospital rescuers to stand for ETI is an obstacle to effectiveness. Our objectiv...

  2. The LMACTrach, a Aew Approach for Endotracheal Intubation: Apilot Study in 100 Patients Undergoing Elective Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Valiollah Hassani; Maryam Zafarghandi; Mohammad Farhadi

    2010-01-01

    Backgroundand endotracheal intubation under direct vision in both anticipated and unexpecteddifficult intubation situations.: The LMA CTrach system is a new device for airway managementMethodsdifferent types of elective surgeries. After randomly selecting the patients for intubationwith this new device, the airway characteristics, height,weight, dental overbiteand thyromental distance were all evaluated before induction.Our goal was to exploreprimarily the success rate of intubation with LMAC...

  3. Rotator cuff tears: An evidence based approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambandam, Senthil Nathan; Khanna, Vishesh; Gul, Arif; Mounasamy, Varatharaj

    2015-01-01

    Lesions of the rotator cuff (RC) are a common occurrence affecting millions of people across all parts of the globe. RC tears are also rampantly prevalent with an age-dependent increase in numbers. Other associated factors include a history of trauma, limb dominance, contralateral shoulder, smoking-status, hypercholesterolemia, posture and occupational dispositions. The challenge lies in early diagnosis since a high proportion of patients are asymptomatic. Pain and decreasing shoulder power and function should alert the heedful practitioner in recognizing promptly the onset or aggravation of existing RC tears. Partial-thickness tears (PTT) can be bursal-sided or articular-sided tears. Over the course of time, PTT enlarge and propagate into full-thickness tears (FTT) and develop distinct chronic pathological changes due to muscle retraction, fatty infiltration and muscle atrophy. These lead to a reduction in tendon elasticity and viability. Eventually, the glenohumeral joint experiences a series of degenerative alterations - cuff tear arthropathy. To avert this, a vigilant clinician must utilize and corroborate clinical skill and radiological findings to identify tear progression. Modern radio-diagnostic means of ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging provide excellent visualization of structural details and are crucial in determining further course of action for these patients. Physical therapy along with activity modifications, anti-inflammatory and analgesic medications form the pillars of nonoperative treatment. Elderly patients with minimal functional demands can be managed conservatively and reassessed at frequent intervals. Regular monitoring helps in isolating patients who require surgical interventions. Early surgery should be considered in younger, active and symptomatic, healthy patients. In addition to being cost-effective, this helps in providing a functional shoulder with a stable cuff. An easily reproducible technique of maximal strength and

  4. [Difficult Ventilation Requiring Emergency Endotracheal Intubation during Awake Craniotomy Managed by Laryngeal Mask Airway].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Asako; Mizota, Toshiyuki; Tanaka, Tomoharu; Segawa, Hajime; Fukuda, Kazuhiko

    2016-04-01

    We report a case of difficult ventilation requiring emergency endotracheal intubation during awake craniotomy managed by laryngeal mask airway (LMA). A 45-year-old woman was scheduled to receive awake craniotomy for brain tumor in the frontal lobe. After anesthetic induction, airway was secured using ProSeal LMA and patient was mechanically ventilated in pressure-control mode. Patient's head was fixed with head-pins at anteflex position, and the operation started. About one hour after the start of the operation, tidal volume suddenly decreased. We immediately started manual ventilation, but the airway resistance was extremely high and we could not adequately ventilate the patient. We administered muscle relaxant for suspected laryngospasm, but ventilatory status did not improve; so we decided to conduct emergency endotracheal intubation. We tried to intubate using Airwayscope or LMA-Fastrach, but they were not effective in our case. Finally trachea was intubated using transnasal fiberoptic bronchoscopy. We discuss airway management during awake craniotomy, focusing on emergency endotracheal intubation during surgery.

  5. Shouldering the blame for impingement: the rotator cuff continuum

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    postural abnormalities.5 SIS can be defined as compression of the rotator cuff and ... is often the cause, but an acromial bony spur may occur in older age groups .... Management. Conservative treatment is successful in most patients. Patients.

  6. Progression from calcifying tendinitis to rotator cuff tear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gotoh, Masafumi; Higuchi, Fujio; Suzuki, Ritsu; Yamanaka, Kensuke [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Medical Center of Kurume University, 155-1 Kokubu-machi, Kurume City, Fukuoka 839-0862 (Japan)

    2003-02-01

    This report documents the clinical, radiographic and histologic findings in a 46-year-old man with calcifying tendinitis in his left shoulder which progressed to rotator cuff tear. The patient had a 1-year history of repeated calcifying tendinitis before being referred to our hospital. On the initial visit, radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed calcium deposition localized in the supraspinatus tendon without apparent tear. Three months after the first visit, MRI revealed a partial-thickness rotator cuff tear at the site of calcium deposition. Surgical and histologic findings demonstrated that calcium deposition was the cause of cuff rupture. To our knowledge, based on a review of the English literature, this is the first case report in which the progression from calcifying tendinitis to rotator cuff tear has been serially observed. (orig.)

  7. Progression from calcifying tendinitis to rotator cuff tear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gotoh, Masafumi; Higuchi, Fujio; Suzuki, Ritsu; Yamanaka, Kensuke

    2003-01-01

    This report documents the clinical, radiographic and histologic findings in a 46-year-old man with calcifying tendinitis in his left shoulder which progressed to rotator cuff tear. The patient had a 1-year history of repeated calcifying tendinitis before being referred to our hospital. On the initial visit, radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed calcium deposition localized in the supraspinatus tendon without apparent tear. Three months after the first visit, MRI revealed a partial-thickness rotator cuff tear at the site of calcium deposition. Surgical and histologic findings demonstrated that calcium deposition was the cause of cuff rupture. To our knowledge, based on a review of the English literature, this is the first case report in which the progression from calcifying tendinitis to rotator cuff tear has been serially observed. (orig.)

  8. Reactive rise in blood pressure upon cuff inflation: cuff inflation at the arm causes a greater rise in pressure than at the wrist in hypertensive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charmoy, Alexia; Würzner, Grégoire; Ruffieux, Christiane; Hasler, Christopher; Cachat, François; Waeber, Bernard; Burnier, Michel

    2007-10-01

    Cuff inflation at the arm is known to cause an instantaneous rise in blood pressure, which might be due to the discomfort of the procedure and might interfere with the precision of the blood pressure measurement. In this study, we compared the reactive rise in blood pressure induced by cuff inflation when the cuff was placed at the upper arm level and at the wrist. The reactive rise in systolic and diastolic blood pressure to cuff inflation was measured in 34 normotensive participants and 34 hypertensive patients. Each participant was equipped with two cuffs, one around the right upper arm (OMRON HEM-CR19, 22-32 cm) and one around the right wrist (OMRON HEM-CS 19, 17-22 cm; Omron Health Care Europe BV, Hoofddorp, The Netherlands). The cuffs were inflated in a double random order (maximal cuff pressure and position of the cuff) with two maximal cuff pressures: 180 and 240 mmHg. The cuffs were linked to an oscillometric device (OMRON HEM 907; Omron Health Care). Simultaneously, blood pressure was measured continuously at the middle finger of the left hand using photoplethysmography. Three measurements were made at each level of blood pressure at the arm and at the wrist, and the sequence of measurements was randomized. In normotensive participants, no significant difference was observed in the reactive rise in blood pressure when the cuff was inflated either at the arm or at the wrist irrespective of the level of cuff inflation. Inflating a cuff at the arm, however, induced a significantly greater rise in blood pressure than inflating it at the wrist in hypertensive participants for both systolic and diastolic pressures (Pblood pressure response to cuff inflation was independent of baseline blood pressure. The results show that in hypertensive patients, cuff inflation at the wrist produces a smaller reactive rise in blood pressure. The difference between the arm and the wrist is independent of the patient's level of blood pressure.

  9. Ultrasound of the rotator cuff with MRI and anatomic correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutten, Matthieu J.C.M. [Department of Radiology, Jeroen Bosch Hospital, Nieuwstraat 34, 5211 NL ' s-Hertogenbosch (Netherlands)]. E-mail: M.Rutten@JBZ.nl; Maresch, Bas J. [Department of Radiology, Hospital Gelderse Vallei, Willy Brandtlaan 10, 6710 HN Ede (Netherlands)]. E-mail: MareschB@zgv.nl; Jager, Gerrit J. [Department of Radiology, Jeroen Bosch Hospital, Nieuwstraat 34, 5211 NL ' s-Hertogenbosch (Netherlands)]. E-mail: G.Jager@JBZ.nl; Blickman, Johan G. [Department of Radiology, University Medical Center Nijmegen, Geert Grooteplein Zuid 18, 6500 HB Nijmegen (Netherlands)]. E-mail: J.Blickman@rad.umcn.nl; Holsbeeck, Marnix T. van [Department of Radiology, Henry Ford Hospital, 2799 W Grand Boulevard, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States)]. E-mail: vanholsbeeck@comcast.net

    2007-06-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging and high-resolution ultrasound (US) are frequently used for the detection of rotator cuff tears. The diagnostic yield of US is influenced by several factors as technique, knowledge of the imaging characteristics of anatomic and pathologic findings and of pitfalls. The purpose of this article is to illustrates that the standardized high-resolution US examination of the shoulder covers the entire rotator cuff and correlates with MR imaging and anatomic sections.

  10. Augmentation of Rotator Cuff Repair With Soft Tissue Scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thangarajah, Tanujan; Pendegrass, Catherine J.; Shahbazi, Shirin; Lambert, Simon; Alexander, Susan; Blunn, Gordon W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Tears of the rotator cuff are one of the most common tendon disorders. Treatment often includes surgical repair, but the rate of failure to gain or maintain healing has been reported to be as high as 94%. This has been substantially attributed to the inadequate capacity of tendon to heal once damaged, particularly to bone at the enthesis. A number of strategies have been developed to improve tendon-bone healing, tendon-tendon healing, and tendon regeneration. Scaffolds have received considerable attention for replacement, reconstruction, or reinforcement of tendon defects but may not possess situation-specific or durable mechanical and biological characteristics. Purpose To provide an overview of the biology of tendon-bone healing and the current scaffolds used to augment rotator cuff repairs. Study Design Systematic review; Level of evidence, 4. Methods A preliminary literature search of MEDLINE and Embase databases was performed using the terms rotator cuff scaffolds, rotator cuff augmentation, allografts for rotator cuff repair, xenografts for rotator cuff repair, and synthetic grafts for rotator cuff repair. Results The search identified 438 unique articles. Of these, 214 articles were irrelevant to the topic and were therefore excluded. This left a total of 224 studies that were suitable for analysis. Conclusion A number of novel biomaterials have been developed into biologically and mechanically favorable scaffolds. Few clinical trials have examined their effect on tendon-bone healing in well-designed, long-term follow-up studies with appropriate control groups. While there is still considerable work to be done before scaffolds are introduced into routine clinical practice, there does appear to be a clear indication for their use as an interpositional graft for large and massive retracted rotator cuff tears and when repairing a poor-quality degenerative tendon. PMID:26665095

  11. Use of the silicone tracheal T-tube for tracheostenosis or tracheomalacia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, H C; Wang, L S; Fahn, H J; Lee, Y C; Lu, C C; Chan, K H; Huang, M H

    1996-09-01

    Tracheobtenosib and tracheomalacia are trivial diseases. The conventional choice of managements with tracheostomy, either temporary or long-term usage, can only partially resolve the problems of airway obstruction. Silicone tracheal T-tube presents a substitute for it. We present 5 patients with tracheostenosis or tracheomalacia managed with nine procedures of long silicone Montgomery T-tube prothesis between 1984 and 1994 in VGH-Taipei. The primary diagnosis included tracheal injury (2), postintubation tracheal stenosis (2), and stenosis due to endotracheal tuberculosis (1). Three patients received a long segmental T-tube for permanent endotracheal stenting and the other two patients used T-tube insertion for temporary stenting of the trachea for 7 and 11 months, respectively, with satisfactory results. All patients got immediate benefit from the prothesis in respiration with simple postoperative care. Two patients with temporary T-tube placement had it successfully removed in 7 and 11 months, respectively. Placement of the T-tube for subglottic stenosis also protected the function of phonation. The tracheal T-tube restored airway patency reliably with good long-term results and could be the preferred management of chronic upper airway obstructive disease not amenable to surgical repair. The most common complication was airway obstruction caused by either granulations or sticky mucoid substance. Three patients and six tubes (60%) developed granulation obstruction and the average duration of granuloma formation was 7.7 months. Laser phototherapy or surgical intervention, such as tracheoplasty, with change of the T-tube was carried out for granuloma obstruction. T-tube is a good endoprothesis for tracheostenosis and tracheomalacia with minimal complication for cases of long tracheostenosis or complex tracheal injury.

  12. Relationships between rotator cuff tear types and radiographic abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Soo Hyun; Chun, Kyung Ah; Lee Soo Jung; Kang, Min Ho; Yi, Kyung Sik; Zhang, Ying [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, College of Medicine, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-15

    To determine relationships between different types of rotator cuff tears and radiographic abnormalities. The shoulder radiographs of 104 patients with an arthroscopically proven rotator cuff tear were compared with similar radiographs of 54 age-matched controls with intact cuffs. Two radiologists independently interpreted all radiographs for; cortical thickening with subcortical sclerosis, subcortical cysts, osteophytes in the humeral greater tuberosity, humeral migration, degenerations of the acromioclavicular and glenohumeral joints, and subacromial spurs. Statistical analysis was performed to determine relationships between each type of rotator cuff tears and radiographic abnormalities. Inter-observer agreements with respect to radiographic findings were analyzed. Humeral migration and degenerative change of the greater tuberosity, including sclerosis, subcortical cysts, and osteophytes, were more associated with full-thickness tears (p < 0.01). Subacromial spurs were more common for full-thickness and bursal-sided tears (p < 0.01). No association was found between degeneration of the acromioclavicular or glenohumeral joint and the presence of a cuff tear. Different types of rotator cuff tears are associated with different radiographic abnormalities.

  13. The Repaired Rotator Cuff: MRI and Ultrasound Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Susan C; Williams, Danielle; Endo, Yoshimi

    2018-03-01

    The purposes of this review were to provide an overview of the current practice of evaluating the postoperative rotator cuff on imaging and to review the salient imaging findings of the normal and abnormal postoperative rotator cuff, as well as of postoperative complications. The repaired rotator cuff frequently appears abnormal on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasound (US). Recent studies have shown that while the tendons typically normalize, they can demonstrate clinically insignificant abnormal imaging appearances for longer than 6 months. Features of capsular thickening or subacromial-subdeltoid bursal thickening and fluid distension were found to decrease substantially in the first 6-month postoperative period. MRI and US were found to be highly comparable in the postoperative assessment of the rotator cuff, although they had a lower sensitivity for partial thickness tears. Imaging evaluation of newer techniques such as patch augmentation and superior capsular reconstruction needs to be further investigated. MRI and US are useful in the postoperative assessment of the rotator cuff, not only for evaluation of the integrity of the rotator cuff, but also for detecting hardware complications and other etiologies of shoulder pain.

  14. Accuracy of MR imaging in partial tears of rotator cuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eto, Masao; Ito, Nobuyuki; Tomonaga, Tadashi; Harada, Shin'ichi; Rabbi, M.E.; Iwasaki, Katsuro

    1997-01-01

    MRI is very useful for the diagnosis of the rotator cuff tear However. in case of partial tears it is sometimes controvertible. In this study, we studied the accuracy of MRI in the diagnosis of partial tears. 67 patients who underwent MRI investigation before operation were chosen for this study. There were 61 males and 6 females, ranging from 30 to 80 years (mean: 54.8 years at the time of operation). MRI was performed with 1.5T superconductive system with shoulder surface coil. MPGR T2-weighted images were performed in the coronal oblique and sagittal oblique planes. Complete tears were diagnosed when full thickness high intensity was observed in the rotator cuff, whereas with partial high intensity of the rotator cuff, was considered as partial tears. MRI demonstrated 77.8% sensitivity, 91.4% specificity and 89.6% accuracy in the diagnosis of partial tear. In 8 cases MRI had misinterpretation. In MPGR T2-weighted images, not only the partial tears but the degenerative changes also show high intensity of the rotator cuff. Therefore, it is difficult to differentiate and maybe this is the reason of misinterpretations of partial tears by MRI. MRI provided with useful pre-operative informations of partial tears of the rotator cuff. However, in few cases it is hard to differentiate for the degenerative changes of the rotator cuff. (author)

  15. Relationships between rotator cuff tear types and radiographic abnormalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Soo Hyun; Chun, Kyung Ah; Lee Soo Jung; Kang, Min Ho; Yi, Kyung Sik; Zhang, Ying

    2014-01-01

    To determine relationships between different types of rotator cuff tears and radiographic abnormalities. The shoulder radiographs of 104 patients with an arthroscopically proven rotator cuff tear were compared with similar radiographs of 54 age-matched controls with intact cuffs. Two radiologists independently interpreted all radiographs for; cortical thickening with subcortical sclerosis, subcortical cysts, osteophytes in the humeral greater tuberosity, humeral migration, degenerations of the acromioclavicular and glenohumeral joints, and subacromial spurs. Statistical analysis was performed to determine relationships between each type of rotator cuff tears and radiographic abnormalities. Inter-observer agreements with respect to radiographic findings were analyzed. Humeral migration and degenerative change of the greater tuberosity, including sclerosis, subcortical cysts, and osteophytes, were more associated with full-thickness tears (p < 0.01). Subacromial spurs were more common for full-thickness and bursal-sided tears (p < 0.01). No association was found between degeneration of the acromioclavicular or glenohumeral joint and the presence of a cuff tear. Different types of rotator cuff tears are associated with different radiographic abnormalities.

  16. Improved apparatus for predictive diagnosis of rotator cuff disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillai, Anup; Hall, Brittany N.; Thigpen, Charles A.; Kwartowitz, David M.

    2014-03-01

    Rotator cuff disease impacts over 50% of the population over 60, with reports of incidence being as high as 90% within this population, causing pain and possible loss of function. The rotator cuff is composed of muscles and tendons that work in tandem to support the shoulder. Heavy use of these muscles can lead to rotator cuff tear, with the most common causes is age-related degeneration or sport injuries, both being a function of overuse. Tears ranges in severity from partial thickness tear to total rupture. Diagnostic techniques are based on physical assessment, detailed patient history, and medical imaging; primarily X-ray, MRI and ultrasonography are the chosen modalities for assessment. The final treatment technique and imaging modality; however, is chosen by the clinician is at their discretion. Ultrasound has been shown to have good accuracy for identification and measurement of full-thickness and partial-thickness rotator cuff tears. In this study, we report on the progress and improvement of our method of transduction and analysis of in situ measurement of rotator cuff biomechanics. We have improved the ability of the clinician to apply a uniform force to the underlying musculotendentious tissues while simultaneously obtaining the ultrasound image. This measurement protocol combined with region of interest (ROI) based image processing will help in developing a predictive diagnostic model for treatment of rotator cuff disease and help the clinicians choose the best treatment technique.

  17. Suprascapular Nerve: Is It Important in Cuff Pathology?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewis L. Shi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Suprascapular nerve and rotator cuff function are intimately connected. The incidence of suprascapular neuropathy has been increasing due to improved understanding of the disease entity and detection methods. The nerve dysfunction often results from a traction injury or compression, and a common cause is increased tension on the nerve from retracted rotator cuff tears. Suprascapular neuropathy should be considered as a diagnosis if patients exhibit posterosuperior shoulder pain, atrophy or weakness of supraspinatus and infraspinatus without rotator cuff tear, or massive rotator cuff with retraction. Magnetic resonance imaging and electromyography studies are indicated to evaluate the rotator cuff and function of the nerve. Fluoroscopically guided injections to the suprascapular notch can also be considered as a diagnostic option. Nonoperative treatment of suprascapular neuropathy can be successful, but in the recent decade there is increasing evidence espousing the success of surgical treatment, in particular arthroscopic suprascapular nerve decompression. There is often reliable improvement in shoulder pain, but muscle atrophy recovery is less predictable. More clinical data are needed to determine the role of rotator cuff repair and nerve decompression in the same setting.

  18. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF ROCURONIUM AND SUXAMETHONIUM IN ENDOTRACHEAL INTUBATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dadichiluka Veeragouri Sankararao

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Tracheal intubation is one of the best methods of securing a patent airway. Good intubating conditions minimise the risk of trauma associated with tracheal intubation. Intubating conditions (muscle tone, vocal cords position, reaction to laryngoscopy and tube positioning depend on depth of anaesthesia and kind of anaesthetic used. Tracheal intubation is commonly facilitated by muscle relaxation. Rocuronium has rapid onset of action, which is comparable to suxamethonium. It has been shown to produce intubating conditions similar to those produced by suxamethonium. This study compares rocuronium and suxamethonium in tracheal intubation. MATERIALS AND METHODS A total of 100 patients of ASA grade 1 and 2 for elective surgeries under general anaesthesia were recruited for this study after obtaining clearance from institutional ethics committee and informed consent from the patients. These 100 patients were divided into 2 groups, group R received rocuronium and group S received suxamethonium. All patients underwent through preanaesthetic checkup on the day before surgery. Thorough airway assesssment was done to rule out difficult intubation. Patients were advised to be nil orally from 10 p.m. onwards, the night before surgery. RESULTS The intubating conditions in the rocuronium group were found to be excellent in 50%, fair in 34% and satisfactory in 16% of the patients compared to excellent in 68%, fair in 32% in suxamethonium group. Clinically, acceptable intubating conditions were seen in 84% and 100% of patients administered rocuronium and suxamethonium, respectively. CONCLUSION Rocuronium in a dose of 0.6 mg/kg is a suitable alternative to suxamethonium in a dose of 1.5 mg/kg in premedicated and anaesthetised patients scheduled for elective surgeries.

  19. Laryngeal mask airway versus bag-mask ventilation or endotracheal intubation for neonatal resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Mosarrat J; Kumar, Manoj

    2018-03-15

    Providing effective positive pressure ventilation is considered to be the single most important component of successful neonatal resuscitation. Ventilation is frequently initiated manually with bag and face mask (BMV) followed by endotracheal intubation if respiratory depression continues. These techniques may be difficult to perform successfully resulting in prolonged resuscitation or neonatal asphyxia. The laryngeal mask airway (LMA) may achieve initial ventilation and successful resuscitation faster than a bag-mask device or endotracheal intubation. Among newborns requiring positive pressure ventilation for cardio-pulmonary resuscitation, is LMA more effective than BMV or endotracheal intubation for successful resuscitation? When BMV is either insufficient or ineffective, is effective positive pressure ventilation and successful resuscitation achieved faster with the LMA compared to endotracheal intubation? We used the standard search strategy of Cochrane Neonatal to search the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL 2017, Issue 1), MEDLINE via PubMed (1966 to 15 February 2017), Embase (1980 to 15 February 2017), and CINAHL (1982 to 15 February 2017). We also searched clinical trials registers, conference proceedings, and the reference lists of retrieved articles for randomised controlled trials and quasi-randomised trials. We included randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials that compared LMA for neonatal resuscitation with either BMV or endotracheal intubation and reported on any outcomes related to neonatal resuscitation specified in this review. Two review authors independently evaluated studies for risk of bias assessments, and extracted data using Cochrane Neonatal criteria. Categorical treatment effects were described as relative risks and continuous treatment effects were described as the mean difference, with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) of estimates. We included seven trials that involved a total of 794 infants. Five

  20. Ear Tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the ear drum or eustachian tube, Down Syndrome, cleft palate, and barotrauma (injury to the middle ear caused by a reduction of air pressure, ... specialist) may be warranted if you or your child has experienced repeated ... fluid in the middle ear, barotrauma, or have an anatomic abnormality that ...

  1. The Relationship Between Shoulder Stiffness and Rotator Cuff Healing: A Study of 1,533 Consecutive Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, William J; Lam, Patrick H; Murrell, George A C

    2016-11-16

    Retear and stiffness are not uncommon outcomes of rotator cuff repair. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between rotator cuff repair healing and shoulder stiffness. A total of 1,533 consecutive shoulders had an arthroscopic rotator cuff repair by a single surgeon. Patients assessed their shoulder stiffness using a Likert scale preoperatively and at 1, 6, 12, and 24 weeks (6 months) postoperatively, and examiners evaluated passive range of motion preoperatively and at 6, 12, and 24 weeks postoperatively. Repair integrity was determined by ultrasound evaluation at 6 months. After rotator cuff repair, there was an overall significant loss of patient-ranked and examiner-assessed shoulder motion at 6 weeks compared with preoperative measurements (p rotator cuff integrity at 6 months postoperatively (r = 0.11 to 0.18; p rotation at 6 weeks postoperatively was 7%, while the retear rate of patients with >20° of external rotation at 6 weeks was 15% (p rotator cuff repair was more likely to heal. Therapeutic Level III. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. Copyright © 2016 by The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Incorporated.

  2. The Societal and Economic Value of Rotator Cuff Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, Richard C.; Koenig, Lane; Acevedo, Daniel; Dall, Timothy M.; Gallo, Paul; Romeo, Anthony; Tongue, John; Williams, Gerald

    2013-01-01

    Background: Although rotator cuff disease is a common musculoskeletal problem in the United States, the impact of this condition on earnings, missed workdays, and disability payments is largely unknown. This study examines the value of surgical treatment for full-thickness rotator cuff tears from a societal perspective. Methods: A Markov decision model was constructed to estimate lifetime direct and indirect costs associated with surgical and continued nonoperative treatment for symptomatic full-thickness rotator cuff tears. All patients were assumed to have been unresponsive to one six-week trial of nonoperative treatment prior to entering the model. Model assumptions were obtained from the literature and data analysis. We obtained estimates of indirect costs using national survey data and patient-reported outcomes. Four indirect costs were modeled: probability of employment, household income, missed workdays, and disability payments. Direct cost estimates were based on average Medicare reimbursements with adjustments to an all-payer population. Effectiveness was expressed in quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). Results: The age-weighted mean total societal savings from rotator cuff repair compared with nonoperative treatment was $13,771 over a patient’s lifetime. Savings ranged from $77,662 for patients who are thirty to thirty-nine years old to a net cost to society of $11,997 for those who are seventy to seventy-nine years old. In addition, surgical treatment results in an average improvement of 0.62 QALY. Societal savings were highly sensitive to age, with savings being positive at the age of sixty-one years and younger. The estimated lifetime societal savings of the approximately 250,000 rotator cuff repairs performed in the U.S. each year was $3.44 billion. Conclusions: Rotator cuff repair for full-thickness tears produces net societal cost savings for patients under the age of sixty-one years and greater QALYs for all patients. Rotator cuff repair is cost

  3. Cost-Effectiveness of Reverse Total Shoulder Arthroplasty Versus Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair for Symptomatic Large and Massive Rotator Cuff Tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhni, Eric C; Swart, Eric; Steinhaus, Michael E; Mather, Richard C; Levine, William N; Bach, Bernard R; Romeo, Anthony A; Verma, Nikhil N

    2016-09-01

    To compare the cost-effectiveness within the United States health care system of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair versus reverse total shoulder arthroplasty in patients with symptomatic large and massive rotator cuff tears without cuff-tear arthropathy. An expected-value decision analysis was constructed comparing the costs and outcomes of patients undergoing arthroscopic rotator cuff repair and reverse total shoulder arthroplasty for large and massive rotator cuff tears (and excluding cases of cuff-tear arthropathy). Comprehensive literature search provided input data to extrapolate costs and health utility states for these outcomes. The primary outcome assessed was that of incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of reverse total shoulder arthroplasty versus rotator cuff repair. For the base case, both arthroscopic rotator cuff repair and reverse total shoulder were superior to nonoperative care, with an ICER of $15,500/quality-adjusted life year (QALY) and $37,400/QALY, respectively. Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair was dominant over primary reverse total shoulder arthroplasty, with lower costs and slightly improved clinical outcomes. Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair was the preferred strategy as long as the lifetime progression rate from retear to end-stage cuff-tear arthropathy was less than 89%. However, when the model was modified to account for worse outcomes when reverse shoulder arthroplasty was performed after a failed attempted rotator cuff repair, primary reverse total shoulder had superior outcomes with an ICER of $90,000/QALY. Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair-despite high rates of tendon retearing-for patients with large and massive rotator cuff tears may be a more cost-effective initial treatment strategy when compared with primary reverse total shoulder arthroplasty and when assuming no detrimental impact of previous surgery on outcomes after arthroplasty. Clinical judgment should still be prioritized when formulating treatment plans for these

  4. Estimation of optimal nasotracheal tube depth in adult patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Sung-Mi

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the optimal depth of nasotracheal tube placement. We enrolled 110 patients scheduled to undergo oral and maxillofacial surgery, requiring nasotracheal intubation. After intubation, the depth of tube insertion was measured. The neck circumference and distances from nares to tragus, tragus to angle of the mandible, and angle of the mandible to sternal notch were measured. To estimate optimal tube depth, correlation and regression analyses were performed using clinical and anthropometric parameters. The mean tube depth was 28.9 ± 1.3 cm in men (n = 62), and 26.6 ± 1.5 cm in women (n = 48). Tube depth significantly correlated with height (r = 0.735, P < 0.001). Distances from nares to tragus, tragus to angle of the mandible, and angle of the mandible to sternal notch correlated with depth of the endotracheal tube (r = 0.363, r = 0.362, and r = 0.546, P < 0.05). The tube depth also correlated with the sum of these distances (r = 0.646, P < 0.001). We devised the following formula for estimating tube depth: 19.856 + 0.267 × sum of the three distances (R 2 = 0.432, P < 0.001). The optimal tube depth for nasotracheally intubated adult patients correlated with height and sum of the distances from nares to tragus, tragus to angle of the mandible, and angle of the mandible to sternal notch. The proposed equation would be a useful guide to determine optimal nasotracheal tube placement.

  5. Analysis of dynamic autoregulation assessed by the cuff deflation method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlatky, Roman; Valadka, Alex B; Robertson, Claudia S

    2006-01-01

    Dynamic testing of cerebral pressure autoregulation is more practical than static testing for critically ill patients. The process of cuff deflation is innocuous in the normal subject, but the systemic and cerebral effects of cuff deflation in severely head-injured patients have not been studied. The purposes of this study were to examine the physiological effects of cuff deflation and to study their impact on the calculation of autoregulatory index (ARI). In 24 severely head-injured patients, 388 thigh cuff deflations were analyzed. The physiological parameters were recorded before, during, and after a transient decrease in blood pressure. Autoregulation was graded by generating an ARI value from 0 to 9. Mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) dropped rapidly during the first 2-3 seconds, but the nadir MAP was not reached until 8 +/- 7 seconds after the cuff deflation. MAP decreased by an average value of 19 +/- 5 mmHg. Initially the tracings for MAP and cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) were nearly identical, but after 30 seconds, variable increases in intracranial pressure caused some differences between the MAP and CPP curves. The difference between the ARI values calculated twice using MAP as well as CPP was zero for 70% of left-sided studies and 73% for right-sided studies and less than or equal to 1 for 93% of left- and 95% of right-sided cuff deflations. Transient and relatively minor perturbations were detected in systemic physiology induced by dynamic testing of cerebral pressure autoregulation. Furthermore, this study confirms that the early changes in MAP and CPP after cuff deflation are nearly identical. MAP can substitute for CPP in the calculation of ARI even in the severely brain-injured patient.

  6. HIGH-RESOLUTION ULTRASONOGRAPHY OF SHOULDER FOR ROTATOR CUFF TEAR: CORRELATION WITH ARTHROSCOPIC FINDINGS

    OpenAIRE

    Vishnumurthy H. Y; Jagdeesh K. S; Anand K; Ranoji Mane; Sanath G. Kamte; Fathima Zohra; Banerji B. H; Sathish Servegar

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Rotator cuff disease is the most common cause of shoulder pain. Ultrasonography being non-invasive, widely available, more cost-effective method and is the first choice in imaging of rotator cuff tears. Arthroscopy of shoulder is considered as the gold standard for diagnosis of rotator cuff tears. Objective of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of high-resolution ultrasonography of shoulder for rotator cuff tears with arthroscopy of shoulder. METHODS...

  7. Current Biomechanical Concepts of Suture Bridge Repair Technique for Rotator Cuff Tear

    OpenAIRE

    Ming-Long Yeh; Chih-Kai Hong; Wei-Ren Su; I-Ming Jou; Cheng-Li Lin; Chii-Jen Lin

    2015-01-01

    Rotator cuff tears are one of the most common disorders of the shoulder and can have significant effects on daily activities as a result of pain, loss of motion and strength. The goal of rotator cuff repair is aimed at anatomic restoration of the rotator cuff tendon to reduce pain and improve the joint function. Recently, arthroscopic repair has been widely accepted for treatment of rotator cuff tears due to its equal or better results than those from open repair. In 2006, a...

  8. Adhesion of volatile propofol to breathing circuit tubing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Dominik; Maurer, Felix; Trautner, Katharina; Fink, Tobias; Hüppe, Tobias; Sessler, Daniel I; Baumbach, Jörg Ingo; Volk, Thomas; Kreuer, Sascha

    2017-08-21

    Propofol in exhaled breath can be measured and may provide a real-time estimate of plasma concentration. However, propofol is absorbed in plastic tubing, thus estimates may fail to reflect lung/blood concentration if expired gas is not extracted directly from the endotracheal tube. We evaluated exhaled propofol in five ventilated ICU patients who were sedated with propofol. Exhaled propofol was measured once per minute using ion mobility spectrometry. Exhaled air was sampled directly from the endotracheal tube and at the ventilator end of the expiratory side of the anesthetic circuit. The circuit was disconnected from the patient and propofol was washed out with a separate clean ventilator. Propofol molecules, which discharged from the expiratory portion of the breathing circuit, were measured for up to 60 h. We also determined whether propofol passes through the plastic of breathing circuits. A total of 984 data pairs (presented as median values, with 95% confidence interval), consisting of both concentrations were collected. The concentration of propofol sampled near the patient was always substantially higher, at 10.4 [10.25-10.55] versus 5.73 [5.66-5.88] ppb (p tubing was 4.58 [4.48-4.68] ppb, 3.46 [3.21-3.73] in the first hour, 4.05 [3.77-4.34] in the second hour, and 4.01 [3.36-4.40] in the third hour. Out-gassing propofol from the breathing circuit remained at 2.8 ppb after 60 h of washing out. Diffusion through the plastic was not observed. Volatile propofol binds or adsorbs to the plastic of a breathing circuit with saturation kinetics. The bond is reversible so propofol can be washed out from the plastic. Our data confirm earlier findings that accurate measurements of volatile propofol require exhaled air to be sampled as close as possible to the patient.

  9. Electron tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suyama, Motohiro [Hamamatsu, JP; Fukasawa, Atsuhito [Hamamatsu, JP; Arisaka, Katsushi [Los Angeles, CA; Wang, Hanguo [North Hills, CA

    2011-12-20

    An electron tube of the present invention includes: a vacuum vessel including a face plate portion made of synthetic silica and having a surface on which a photoelectric surface is provided, a stem portion arranged facing the photoelectric surface and made of synthetic silica, and a side tube portion having one end connected to the face plate portion and the other end connected to the stem portion and made of synthetic silica; a projection portion arranged in the vacuum vessel, extending from the stem portion toward the photoelectric surface, and made of synthetic silica; and an electron detector arranged on the projection portion, for detecting electrons from the photoelectric surface, and made of silicon.

  10. Chest tube insertion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chest drainage tube insertion; Insertion of tube into chest; Tube thoracostomy; Pericardial drain ... Be careful there are no kinks in your tube. The drainage system should always sit upright and be placed ...

  11. Effect of rotator cuff dysfunction on the initial mechanical stability of cementless glenoid components

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.R. Suárez (Daniel); E.R. Valstar (Edward); J.C. Linden (Jacqueline); F. van Keulen (Fred); P.M. Rozing (Piet)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThe functional outcome of shoulder replacement is related to the condition of the rotator cuff. Rotator cuff disease is a common problem in candidates for total shoulder arthroplasty; this study relates the functional status of the rotator cuff to the initial stability of a cementless

  12. Tracheostomy Tube Ignition During Microlaryngeal Surgery Using Diode Laser: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsun-Mo Wang

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Ignition of the tracheal tube during laser microlaryngeal surgery under general anesthesia is an uncommon complication with potentially serious consequences. We present here a case of a patient with glottic stenosis following endotracheal intubation, who experienced this potentially catastrophic combustion during endoscopic arytenoidectomy, using a diode laser under general anesthesia via 60% FiO2, with an airway fire occurring at the tracheostomy tube and causing tubal damage and obstruction. The anesthetic connecting tube was immediately disconnected and the tracheostomy tube replaced. No adverse consequences to this patient's upper airway were noted during follow-up visits. Higher oxygen concentrations, the presence of combustibles, and the narrowness of the surgical field during endolaryngeal diode laser surgery are risk factors for airway fires.

  13. Work of breathing using different interfaces in spontaneous positive pressure ventilation: helmet, face-mask, and endotracheal tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Shinya; Otaki, Kei; Yashima, Nozomi; Kurota, Misato; Matsushita, Sachiko; Kumasaka, Airi; Kurihara, Hutaba; Kawamae, Kaneyuki

    2016-08-01

    Noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (NPPV) using a helmet is expected to cause inspiratory trigger delay due to the large collapsible and compliant chamber. We compared the work of breathing (WOB) of NPPV using a helmet or a full face-mask with that of invasive ventilation by tracheal intubation. We used a lung model capable of simulating spontaneous breathing (LUNGOO; Air Water Inc., Japan). LUNGOO was set at compliance (C) = 50 mL/cmH2O and resistance (R) = 5 cmH2O/L/s for normal lung simulation, C = 20 mL/cmH2O and R = 5 cmH2O/L/s for restrictive lung, and C = 50 mL/cmH2O and R = 20 cmH2O/L/s for obstructive lung. Muscle pressure was fixed at 25 cmH2O and respiratory rate at 20 bpm. Pressure support ventilation and continuous positive airway pressure were performed with each interface placed on a dummy head made of reinforced plastic that was connected to LUNGOO. We tested the inspiratory WOB difference between the interfaces with various combinations of ventilator settings (positive end-expiratory pressure 5 cmH2O; pressure support 0, 5, and 10 cmH2O). In the normal lung and restrictive lung models, WOB decreased more with the face-mask than the helmet, especially when accompanied by the level of pressure support. In the obstructive lung model, WOB with the helmet decreased compared with the other two interfaces. In the mixed lung model, there were no significant differences in WOB between the three interfaces. NPPV using a helmet is more effective than the other interfaces for WOB in obstructive lung disease.

  14. Risk factors for endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation in patients with opioids intoxication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirmoghtadaee, P.; Mood, N.E.; Sabzghabaee, A.M.; Yaraghi, A.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Patients poisoned with opioids sometimes need endotracheal intubation with or without the use of mechanical ventilation. This study was done to determine the prognostic risk factors for of the need for endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation. Methodology: In this cross-sectional study which was performed in Isfahan (Iran), one hundred (n=100) opioid poisoned patients whom their overdoses were diagnosed by their full and reliable history, physical examination and positive response to naloxone; vital signs at the hospital admission, blood biochemistry, ABG details and also the type and estimated dosage of opioid, route of consumption, and their need to mechanical ventilation were evaluated. Results: Patients were mostly aged between 20-40 years old. Seventy nine patients were male and 26 cases (21 men) required endotracheal intubation and 15 cases (14 men) needed both intubation and mechanical ventilation. The most consumed opiates among the poisoned patients were opium (35%), heroin (16%), Tramadol (15%), Methadone (9%), crack (6%), Diphenoxylate (4%) and others (15%). There was a significant difference between the mean heart rates and respiratory rate of the patients who were connected to the ventilator and others (99.8 +- 21.8 and 87.3 +- 16.3; p=0.01). The lower level of consciousness [OR: 2.2 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 1.2-4.2], and lower admission level of hemoglobin (OR: 3.6; CI:1.2-10.8) were among the factors for predicting the need for intubation and ventilation. Conclusion: Determining the risk factors with prognostic value for the need to intubation or ventilation seems to be necessary for improving the standard of therapy in opioids poisoned patients. (author)

  15. Low-dose esmolol: hemodynamic response to endotracheal intubation in normotensive patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Lakshmanappa

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose: Endotracheal intubation is a frequently utilized and highly invasive component of anesthesia that is often accompanied by potentially harmful hemodynamic pressor responses. The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficiency of a single pre-induction 1 mg/kg bolus injection of esmolol for attenuating these hemodynamic responses to endotracheal intubation in normotensive patients. Material and methods: The study was composed of 100 randomly selected male and female patients between the ages of 18 and 60 that were scheduled for elective surgery and belonged to ASA grade I or II. Two minutes prior to intubation the control group received 10 mL of saline (n=50 and the experimental group received an injection of esmolol 1 mg/kg diluted to 10 mL (n=50. Heart rate (HR, systolic blood pressure (SBP, diastolic blood pressure (DBP, mean arterial pressure (MAP, and rate pressure product (RPP were compared to basal values before receiving medication (T-0, during pre-induction (T-1, induction (T-2, intubation (T-3, and post-intubation at 1 (T-4, 3 (T-6, 5 (T-8, and 10 (T-13 minutes. Results: Esmolol significantly attenuated the hemodynamic responses to endotracheal intubation at the majority of measured points. Attenuation of HR (10.8%, SBP (7.04%, DBP (3.99%, MAP (5%, and RPP (16.9% was observed in the esmolol group when compared to the control group values. Conclusions: A single pre-induction 1 mg/kg bolus injection of esmolol successfully attenuated the hemodynamic pressor response in normotensive patients. A significant attenuation of heart rate, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure and mean arterial pressure was observed at the majority of measured time points in the esmolol administered group compared to the control group. [J Contemp Med 2012; 2(2.000: 69-76

  16. The effect of glenoid cavity depth on rotator cuff tendinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkoc, Melih; Korkmaz, Ozgur; Ormeci, Tugrul; Sever, Cem; Kara, Adna; Mahirogulları, Mahir

    2016-03-01

    Some of the most important causes of shoulder pain are inflammation and degenerative changes in the rotator cuff (RC). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive and safe imaging modality. MRI can be used for the evaluation of cuff tendinopathy. In this study, we evaluated the relationship between glenoid cavity depth and cuff tendinopathy and we investigated glenoid cavity depth on the pathogenesis of cuff tendinopathy. We retrospectively evaluated 215 patients who underwent MRI. Of these, 60 patients showed cuff tendinopathy (group A) and 54 patients showed no pathology (group B). Glenoid cavity depth was calculated in the coronal and transverse planes. The mean axial depth was 1.7 ± 0.9 and the mean coronal depth 3.8 ± 0.9, for group A. The mean axial depth was 3.5 ± 0.7 and the mean coronal depth 1.5 ± 0.8, for group B. There were significant differences in the axial and coronal depths between the two groups. High coronal and low axial depth of the glenoid cavity can be used to diagnose RC tendinitis.

  17. Natural History of Rotator Cuff Disease and Implications on Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Degenerative rotator cuff disease is commonly associated with ageing and is often asymptomatic. The factors related to tear progression and pain development are just now being defined through longitudinal natural history studies. The majority of studies that follow conservatively treated painful cuff tears or asymptomatic tears that are monitored at regular intervals show slow progression of tear enlargement and muscle degeneration over time. These studies have highlighted greater risks for disease progression for certain variables, such as the presence of a full-thickness tear and involvement of the anterior aspect supraspinatus tendon. Coupling the knowledge of the natural history of degenerative cuff tear progression with variables associated with greater likelihood of successful tendon healing following surgery will allow better refinement of surgical indications for rotator cuff disease. In addition, natural history studies may better define the risks of nonoperative treatment over time. This article will review pertinent literature regarding degenerative rotator cuff disease with emphasis on variables important to defining appropriate initial treatments and refining surgical indications. PMID:26726288

  18. Rotator cuff injury: fat suppression MR image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Won, Jong Yoon; Suh, Jin Suck; Park, Chang Yun; Lee, Yeon Hee; Kim, Yong Soo

    1994-01-01

    We performed the study prospectively to evaluate the advantage of fat suppression MR in the diagnosis of rotator cuff injury. Ten symptomatic patients were studied with both conventional T2WI and FST2WI using chemical shift technique. Each image was analyzed for the assessment of injuries, conspicuity of the lesion, the presence of effusion in subacromical bursae and joint space, and presence of humeral head injury. Arthroscopy was done in 4 patients following MRI. We could made presumptive diagnoses on FSMR as identical as on conventional MR in six cases(1 normal, 2 tendinitis, 2 partial thickness tear, 1 full thickness tear), two of them were confirmed by arthroscopic procedures. Two cases of partial thickness tear proved by arthroscopy were detected on FST2WI, whereas they were considered tendinitis on conventional T2WI. There were another 2 cases who showed tendinitis on FSMR, but normal on conventional T2WI. They, however, were not confirmed by either arthroscopy or surgical procedure. We found the FSMR were superior to conventional T2WI in the conspicuity of lesions and detection of joint effusion and abnormalities on the humeral head. We think FSMR of the shoulder could have significant diagnostic advantages over the conventional spin-echo MR imaging

  19. Rotator cuff injury: fat suppression MR image

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Won, Jong Yoon; Suh, Jin Suck; Park, Chang Yun; Lee, Yeon Hee [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong Soo [Inje University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-04-15

    We performed the study prospectively to evaluate the advantage of fat suppression MR in the diagnosis of rotator cuff injury. Ten symptomatic patients were studied with both conventional T2WI and FST2WI using chemical shift technique. Each image was analyzed for the assessment of injuries, conspicuity of the lesion, the presence of effusion in subacromical bursae and joint space, and presence of humeral head injury. Arthroscopy was done in 4 patients following MRI. We could made presumptive diagnoses on FSMR as identical as on conventional MR in six cases(1 normal, 2 tendinitis, 2 partial thickness tear, 1 full thickness tear), two of them were confirmed by arthroscopic procedures. Two cases of partial thickness tear proved by arthroscopy were detected on FST2WI, whereas they were considered tendinitis on conventional T2WI. There were another 2 cases who showed tendinitis on FSMR, but normal on conventional T2WI. They, however, were not confirmed by either arthroscopy or surgical procedure. We found the FSMR were superior to conventional T2WI in the conspicuity of lesions and detection of joint effusion and abnormalities on the humeral head. We think FSMR of the shoulder could have significant diagnostic advantages over the conventional spin-echo MR imaging.

  20. Animal models for rotator cuff repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebaschi, Amir; Deng, Xiang-Hua; Zong, Jianchun; Cong, Guang-Ting; Carballo, Camila B; Album, Zoe M; Camp, Christopher; Rodeo, Scott A

    2016-11-01

    Rotator cuff (RC) injuries represent a significant source of pain, functional impairment, and morbidity. The large disease burden of RC pathologies necessitates rapid development of research methodologies to treat these conditions. Given their ability to model anatomic, biomechanical, cellular, and molecular aspects of the human RC, animal models have played an indispensable role in reducing injury burden and advancing this field of research for many years. The development of animal models in the musculoskeletal (MSK) research arena is uniquely different from that in other fields in that the similarity of macrostructures and functions is as critical to replicate as cellular and molecular functions. Traditionally, larger animals have been used because of their anatomic similarity to humans and the ease of carrying out realistic surgical procedures. However, refinement of current molecular methods, introduction of novel research tools, and advancements in microsurgical techniques have increased the applicability of small animal models in MSK research. In this paper, we review RC animal models and emphasize a murine model that may serve as a valuable instrument for future RC tendon repair investigations. © 2016 New York Academy of Sciences.

  1. PRP as an Adjunct to Rotator Cuff Tendon Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, F Alan

    2018-06-01

    Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair is a commonly performed repair. Technical developments provide surgeons the tools to create biomechanically robust repairs. How can the biological response mirror the strong and stable surgery? Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is a supraphysiological platelet concentration which may positively augment rotator cuff healing. Not all PRPs are the same. High leukocyte levels and thrombin activation may be detrimental to tendon healing. Thrombin activation triggers an immediate release of growth factors and may actually inhibit some parts of the healing response. Clear differences exist between liquid PRP (products released within hours after activation) and solid fibrin PRP which slowly releases factors over days. The heterogenicity data and grouping liquid and solid PRP together make systematic reviews confusing. Solid PRP fibrin constructs are often associated with increased tendon healing. PRP fibrin matrix offers the greatest promise for improving clinical success after rotator cuff tendon repair.

  2. Rotator Cuff Strength Ratio and Injury in Glovebox Workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, Amelia M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-01-30

    Rotator cuff integrity is critical to shoulder health. Due to the high workload imposed upon the shoulder while working in an industrial glovebox, this study investigated the strength ratio of the rotator cuff muscles in glovebox workers and compared this ratio to the healthy norm. Descriptive statistics were collected using a short questionnaire. Handheld dynamometry was used to quantify the ratio of forces produced in the motions of shoulder internal and external rotation. Results showed this population to have shoulder strength ratios that were significantly different from the healthy norm. The deviation from the normal ratio demonstrates the need for solutions designed to reduce the workload on the rotator cuff musculature of glovebox workers in order to improve health and safety. Assessment of strength ratios can be used to screen for risk of symptom development.

  3. Risk Factors, Pathobiomechanics and Physical Examination of Rotator Cuff Tears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulton, Samuel G.; Greenspoon, Joshua A.; Millett, Peter J.; Petri, Maximilian

    2016-01-01

    Background: It is important to appreciate the risk factors for the development of rotator cuff tears and specific physical examination maneuvers. Methods: A selective literature search was performed. Results: Numerous well-designed studies have demonstrated that common risk factors include age, occupation, and anatomic considerations such as the critical shoulder angle. Recently, research has also reported a genetic component as well. The rotator cuff axially compresses the humeral head in the glenohumeral joint and provides rotational motion and abduction. Forces are grouped into coronal and axial force couples. Rotator cuff tears are thought to occur when the force couples become imbalanced. Conclusion: Physical examination is essential to determining whether a patient has an anterosuperior or posterosuperior tear. Diagnostic accuracy increases when combining a series of examination maneuvers. PMID:27708731

  4. photomultiplier tubes

    CERN Multimedia

    photomultiplier tubes. A device to convert light into an electric signal (the name is often abbreviated to PM). Photomultipliers are used in all detectors based on scintillating material (i.e. based on large numbers of fibres which produce scintillation light at the passage of a charged particle). A photomultiplier consists of 3 main parts: firstly, a photocathode where photons are converted into electrons by the photoelectric effect; secondly, a multiplier chain consisting of a serie of dynodes which multiply the number of electron; finally, an anode, which collects the resulting current.

  5. photomultiplier tube

    CERN Multimedia

    photomultiplier tubes. A device to convert light into an electric signal (the name is often abbreviated to PM). Photomultipliers are used in all detectors based on scintillating material (i.e. based on large numbers of fibres which produce scintillation light at the passage of a charged particle). A photomultiplier consists of 3 main parts: firstly, a photocathode where photons are converted into electrons by the photoelectric effect; secondly, a multiplier chain consisting of a serie of dynodes which multiply the number of electron; finally, an anode, which collects the resulting current.

  6. Impingement syndrome and rotator cuff tears: US findings in 140 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malvestiti, Oreste; Scorsolini, Alessandro; Ratti, Francesco; Ferraris, Giuseppe; Columbaro, Guido; Mariani, Claudio

    1997-01-01

    The authors investigated the role of rotator cuff impingement in causing tears of supraspinatus and biceps tendons and the comparative reliability of plain radiography and sonography (US). One hundred forty patients with symtoms referrable to the rotator cuff were examined with plain radiography and US of the shoulder. The differential diagnosis must distinguish all these common causes of shoulder dysfunction and cuff problems from other conditions. The authors conclude that US and plain radiography are accurate routine tests of rotator cuff integrity and rotator cuff impingement

  7. Rotator cuff tendon connections with the rotator cable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahu, Madis; Kolts, Ivo; Põldoja, Elle; Kask, Kristo

    2017-07-01

    The literature currently contains no descriptions of the rotator cuff tendons, which also describes in relation to the presence and characteristics of the rotator cable (anatomically known as the ligamentum semicirculare humeri). The aim of the current study was to elucidate the detailed anatomy of the rotator cuff tendons in association with the rotator cable. Anatomic dissection was performed on 21 fresh-frozen shoulder specimens with an average age of 68 years. The rotator cuff tendons were dissected from each other and from the glenohumeral joint capsule, and the superior glenohumeral, coracohumeral, coracoglenoidal and semicircular (rotator cable) ligaments were dissected. Dissection was performed layer by layer and from the bursal side to the joint. All ligaments and tendons were dissected in fine detail. The rotator cable was found in all specimens. It was tightly connected to the supraspinatus (SSP) tendon, which was partly covered by the infraspinatus (ISP) tendon. The posterior insertion area of the rotator cable was located in the region between the middle and inferior facets of the greater tubercle of the humerus insertion areas for the teres minor (TM), and ISP tendons were also present and fibres from the SSP extended through the rotator cable to those areas. The connection between the rotator cable and rotator cuff tendons is tight and confirms the suspension bridge theory for rotator cuff tears in most areas between the SSP tendons and rotator cable. In its posterior insertion area, the rotator cable is a connecting structure between the TM, ISP and SSP tendons. These findings might explain why some patients with relatively large rotator cuff tears can maintain seamless shoulder function.

  8. Comorbidities in rotator cuff disease: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titchener, Andrew G; White, Jonathan J E; Hinchliffe, Sally R; Tambe, Amol A; Hubbard, Richard B; Clark, David I

    2014-09-01

    Rotator cuff disease is a common condition in the general population, but relatively little is known about its associated risk factors. We have undertaken a large case-control study using The Health Improvement Network database to assess and to quantify the relative contributions of some constitutional and environmental risk factors for rotator cuff disease in the community. Our data set included 5000 patients with rotator cuff disease who were individually matched with a single control by age, sex, and general practice (primary care practice). The median age at diagnosis was 55 years (interquartile range, 44-65 years). Multivariate analysis showed that the risk factors associated with rotator cuff disease were Achilles tendinitis (odds ratio [OR] = 1.78), trigger finger (OR = 1.99), lateral epicondylitis (OR = 1.71), and carpal tunnel syndrome (OR = 1.55). Oral corticosteroid therapy (OR = 2.03), oral antidiabetic use (OR = 1.66), insulin use (OR = 1.77), and "overweight" body mass index of 25.1 to 30 (OR = 1.15) were also significantly associated. Current or previous smoking history, body mass index of greater than 30, any alcohol intake, medial epicondylitis, de Quervain syndrome, cubital tunnel syndrome, and rheumatoid arthritis were not found to be associated with rotator cuff disease. We have identified a number of comorbidities and risk factors for rotator cuff disease. These include lateral epicondylitis, carpal tunnel syndrome, trigger finger, Achilles tendinitis, oral corticosteroid use, and diabetes mellitus. The findings should alert the clinician to comorbid pathologic processes and guide future research into the etiology of this condition. Copyright © 2014 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Functional outcomes after bilateral arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleem, Alexander W; Syed, Usman Ali M; Wascher, Jocelyn; Zoga, Adam C; Close, Koby; Abboud, Joseph A; Cohen, Steven B

    2016-10-01

    Arthroscopic repair of rotator cuff tears is a common procedure performed by orthopedic surgeons. There is a well-known incidence of up to 35% of bilateral rotator cuff tear disease in patients who have a known unilateral tear. The majority of the literature focuses on outcomes after unilateral surgery. The purpose of this study was to determine if there are clinical differences in shoulders of patients who underwent staged bilateral rotator cuff repairs during their lifetime. A retrospective review of all patients who underwent staged bilateral arthroscopic rotator cuff surgery at our institution was performed. All patients had at least 2 years of follow-up. Clinical outcome scores including the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES), Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation, and Rowe measures were obtained. A subset of patients returned for clinical and ultrasound evaluation performed by an independent fellowship-trained musculoskeletal radiologist. Overall, 110 shoulders in 55 patients, representing 68% of all eligible patients, participated. No clinical or statistical difference was found in any outcome measure. ASES scores averaged 86.5 (36.7-100) in the dominant shoulder compared with 89.6 (23.3-100) in the nondominant shoulder (P = .42). Ultrasound was available on 34 shoulders and showed complete healing rate of 88%. The shoulders with retearing of the rotator cuff (12%) demonstrated clinically relevant lower ASES scores (72.5) compared with shoulders with confirmed healed repairs (86.2; P = .2). Patients who undergo staged bilateral rotator cuff repair can expect to have similarly good clinical outcomes regardless of hand dominance or chronologic incidence with excellent healing rates in both shoulders. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Establishing Maximal Medical Improvement After Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuke, William A; Leroux, Timothy S; Gregory, Bonnie P; Black, Austin; Forsythe, Brian; Romeo, Anthony A; Verma, Nikhil N

    2018-03-01

    As health care transitions from a pay-for-service to a pay-for-performance infrastructure, the value of orthopaedic care must be defined accurately. Significant efforts have been made in defining quality and cost in arthroplasty; however, there remains a lag in ambulatory orthopaedic care. Two-year follow-up has been a general requirement for reporting outcomes after rotator cuff repair. However, this time requirement has not been established scientifically and is of increasing importance in the era of value-based health care. Given that arthroscopic rotator cuff repair is a common ambulatory orthopaedic procedure, the purpose of this study was to establish a time frame for maximal medical improvement (the state when improvement has stabilized) after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Systematic review. A systematic review of the literature was conducted, identifying studies reporting sequential patient-reported outcomes up to a minimum of 2 years after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. The primary clinical outcome was patient-reported outcomes at 3-month, 6-month, 1-year, and 2-year follow-up. Secondary clinical outcomes included range of motion, strength, retears, and complications. Clinically significant improvement was determined between various time intervals by use of the minimal clinically important difference. The review included 19 studies including 1370 patients who underwent rotator cuff repair. Clinically significant improvement in patient-reported outcomes was seen up to 1 year after rotator cuff repair, but no clinical significance was noted from 1 year to 2 years. The majority of improvement in strength and range of motion was seen up to 6 months, but no clinically meaningful improvement was seen thereafter. All reported complications and the majority of retears occurred within 6 months after rotator cuff repair. After rotator cuff repair, a clinically significant improvement in patient-reported outcomes, range of motion, and strength was seen up to 1

  11. Diagnosis of the rotator cuff rupture by computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoh, Sansen; Takagishi, Naoto; Hirusaki, Takao; Hara, Masafumi; Nakamura, Kazuteru

    1983-01-01

    Twenty rotator cuff ruptures were diagnosed by CT. Plain CT was unable to reveal the damage, and CT arthrography was needed. CT arthrography was performed with a 3.25% low-concentration contrast medium to fill the shoulder joint by keeping the joint at the position of the maximal external rotation. CT identified the rotator cuff rupture more easily than other methods and disclosed the degree of the damage. CT may be useful in diagnosing the pathological state in various diseases of the shoulder joint.(Ueda, J.)

  12. Calcifying tendinitis of the rotator cuff with cortical bone erosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Roxanne; Kim, David H.; Millett, Peter J. [Harvard Medical School, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Weissman, Barbara N. [Harvard Medical School, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Musculoskeletal Division, Boston (United States)

    2004-10-01

    Calcifying tendinitis occurs most commonly in the rotator cuff tendons, particularly involving the supraspinatus tendon insertion, and is often asymptomatic. Cortical erosion secondary to calcifying tendinitis has been reported in multiple locations, including in the rotator cuff tendons. We present a pathologically proven case of symptomatic calcifying tendinitis involving the infraspinatus tendon with cortical erosion with correlative radiographic, CT, and MR findings. The importance of considering this diagnosis when evaluating lytic lesions of the humerus and the imaging differential diagnosis of calcifying tendinitis and cortical erosion are discussed. (orig.)

  13. MR alterations of the rotator cuff and anterior gienold labrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kjellin, I.; Ho, C.; Haghighi, P.; Kerr, R.; Trudell, D.; Cervilla, V.; Resnick, D.

    1990-01-01

    This paper determines the histopathologic causes of alterations in signal and morphology in the tendinous rotator cuff and glenoid labrum on shoulder MR images. MR imaging was performed in 13 cadaveric shoulders. Coronal oblique imaging of the rotator cuff was performed with spin-echo sequences (TR 2,000; TE 25/80). The labrum was examined with transaxial spin-echo, fat-suppression (HYBRID), and MPGR sequences. The shoulders then were frozen and sectioned at 3-mm intervals in the plane of interest. Areas corresponding to sites of MR alterations were examined histologically

  14. Calcifying tendinitis of the rotator cuff with cortical bone erosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, Roxanne; Kim, David H.; Millett, Peter J.; Weissman, Barbara N.

    2004-01-01

    Calcifying tendinitis occurs most commonly in the rotator cuff tendons, particularly involving the supraspinatus tendon insertion, and is often asymptomatic. Cortical erosion secondary to calcifying tendinitis has been reported in multiple locations, including in the rotator cuff tendons. We present a pathologically proven case of symptomatic calcifying tendinitis involving the infraspinatus tendon with cortical erosion with correlative radiographic, CT, and MR findings. The importance of considering this diagnosis when evaluating lytic lesions of the humerus and the imaging differential diagnosis of calcifying tendinitis and cortical erosion are discussed. (orig.)

  15. MRI analysis of the rotator cuff pathology a new classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavernier, T.; Lapra, C.; Bochu, M.; Walch, G.; Noel, E.

    1995-01-01

    The different classifications use for the rotator cuff pathology seem to be incomplete. We propose a new classification with many advantages: (1) Differentiate the tendinopathy between less serious (grade 2A) and serious (grade 2B). (2) Recognize the intra-tendinous cleavage of the infra-spinatus associated with complete tear of the supra-spinatus. (3) Differentiate partial and complete tears of the supra-spinatus. We established this classification after a retrospective study of 42 patients operated on for a rotator cuff pathology. Every case had had a preoperative MRI. This classification is simple, especially for the associated intra tendinous cleavage. (authors). 24 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs

  16. Diagnosis of subscapularis lesion in rotator cuff tears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terrier, F.; Wegmueller, H.; Vock, P.; Gerber, C.

    1989-01-01

    In rotator cuff tears, the subscapularis tendon is more often involved than previously suspected, and this lesion is often missed at arthrography. Because preoperative diagnosis is important for planning surgical repair, the authors have evaluated MR imaging and US in the detection of subscapularis tears. Fifteen patients with clinically suspected rotator cuff tears underwent MR imaging and US. Ten of 15 patients were treated surgically, and the other five were treated conservatively. MR imaging was performed with a 1.5-T Signa MR system. T1-weighted spin-echo (SE) and T2-weighted gradient-echo (GE) images were obtained

  17. Endotracheal Intubation Using the Macintosh Laryngoscope or KingVision Video Laryngoscope during Uninterrupted Chest Compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewelina Gaszynska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Advanced airway management, endotracheal intubation (ETI, during CPR is more difficult than, for example, during anesthesia. However, new devices such as video laryngoscopes should help in such circumstances. The aim of this study was to assess the performance of the KingVision video laryngoscopes in a manikin cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR scenario. Methods. Thirty students enrolled in the third year of paramedic school took part in the study. The simulated CPR scenario was ETI using the standard laryngoscope with a Macintosh blade (MCL and ETI using the KingVision video laryngoscope performed during uninterrupted chest compressions. The primary endpoints were the time needed for ETI and the success ratio. Results. The mean time required for intubation was similar for both laryngoscopes: 16.6 (SD 5.11, median 15.64, range 7.9–27.9 seconds versus 17.91 (SD 5.6, median 16.28, range 10.6–28.6 seconds for the MCL and KingVision, respectively (P=0.1888. On the first attempt at ETI, the success rate during CPR was comparable between the evaluated laryngoscopes: P=0.9032. Conclusion. The KingVision video laryngoscope proves to be less superior when used for endotracheal intubation during CPR compared to the standard laryngoscope with a Mackintosh blade. This proves true in terms of shortening the time needed for ETI and increasing the success ratio.

  18. The effects of succinylcholine or low-dose rocuronium to aid endotracheal intubation of adult sows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke-Novakovski, Tanya; Ambros, Barbara; Auckland, Crissie D.; Harding, John C.S.

    2012-01-01

    This randomized, prospective, blinded study compared the use of succinylcholine or rocuronium to aid endotracheal intubation of 27 adult sows [mean body weight 261 ± 28 (standard deviation) kg]. Preliminary trials allowed development of the intubation technique and skills. The sows were premedicated with azaperone, atropine, and morphine, and anesthesia was induced with thiopental [6 mg/kg body weight (BW)]. Nine sows each received succinylcholine (1.0 mg/kg BW), rocuronium (0.5 mg/kg BW), or saline (15 mL) after induction. Increments of thiopental (1 mg/kg BW) were used if swallowing impaired intubation. Intubation was performed 45 s after injection of the test drug and was timed and scored. The intubation scores were analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis analysis of variance (ANOVA). Time taken for intubation, body weight, and total dose of thiopental were analyzed with ANOVA and Bonferroni’s multiple-comparisons test. No significant differences (at P < 0.05) were found between the groups with regard to intubation score, time taken for intubation, or total thiopental dose. Thus, neuromuscular blocking agents did not aid endotracheal intubation of adult sows anesthetized with thiopental. PMID:22754096

  19. Differences in Risk Factors for Rotator Cuff Tears between Elderly Patients and Young Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Akihisa; Ono, Qana; Nishigami, Tomohiko; Hirooka, Takahiko; Machida, Hirohisa

    2018-02-01

    It has been unclear whether the risk factors for rotator cuff tears are the same at all ages or differ between young and older populations. In this study, we examined the risk factors for rotator cuff tears using classification and regression tree analysis as methods of nonlinear regression analysis. There were 65 patients in the rotator cuff tears group and 45 patients in the intact rotator cuff group. Classification and regression tree analysis was performed to predict rotator cuff tears. The target factor was rotator cuff tears; explanatory variables were age, sex, trauma, and critical shoulder angle≥35°. In the results of classification and regression tree analysis, the tree was divided at age 64. For patients aged≥64, the tree was divided at trauma. For patients agedrotator cuff tears in this study. However, these risk factors showed different trends according to age group, not a linear relationship.

  20. LB03.04: SPHYGMOMANOMETER CUFF CONSTRUCTION AND MATERIALS AFFECT TRANSMISSION OF PRESSURE FROM CUFF TO ARTERIAL WALL. FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF HUMAN PRESSURE MEASUREMENTS AND DICOM DATA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, P; Naqvi, S; Mandal, P; Potluri, P

    2015-06-01

    Sphygmomanometer cuff pressure during deflation is assumed to equal systolic arterial pressure at the point of resumption of flow. Previous studies demonstrated that pressure decreases with increasing depth of soft tissues whilst visco-elastic characteristics of the arm tissue cause spatial and temporal variation in pressure magnitude. These generally used non-anatomical axisymmetrical arm simulations without incorporating arterial pressure variation. We used data from a volunteer's Magnetic Resonance (MR) arm scan and investigated the effect of variations in cuff materials and construction on the simulated transmission of pressure from under the cuff to the arterial wall under sinusoidal flow conditions. Pressure was measured under 8 different cuffs using Oxford Pressure Monitor Sensors placed at 90 degrees around the mid upper arm of a healthy male. Each cuff was inflated 3 times to 155 mmHg and then deflated to zero with 90 seconds between inflations. Young's modulus, flexural rigidity and thickness of each cuff was measured.Using DICOM data from the MR scan of the arm, a 3D model was derived using ScanIP and imported into Abaqus for Finite Element Analysis (FEA). Published mechanical properties of arm tissues and geometric non-linearity were assumed. The measured sub-cuff pressures were applied to the simulated arm and pressure was calculated around the brachial arterial wall. which was loaded with a sinusoidal pressure of 125/85 mmHg. FEA estimates of pressure around the brachial artery cuffs varied by up to 27 mmHg SBP and 17 mmHg DBP with different cuffs. Pressures within the cuffs varied up to 27 mmHg. Pressure transmission from the cuff to the arterial surface achieved a 95% transmission ratio with one rubber-bladdered cuff but varied between 76 and 88% for the others. Non-uniform pressure distribution around the arterial wall was strongly related to cuff fabric elastic modulus. Identical size cuffs with a separate rubber bladder produced peri

  1. Massive cuff tears treated with arthroscopically assisted latissimus dorsi transfer. Surgical technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Cupis, Vincenzo; De Cupis, Mauro

    2012-01-01

    Summary Latissimus dorsi transfer is our preferred treatment for active disabled patients with a posterosuperior massive cuff tear. We present an arthroscopically assisted technique which avoids an incision through the deltoid obtaining a better and faster clinical outcome. The patient is placed in lateral decubitus. After the arthroscopic evaluation of the lesion through a posterior and a posterolateral portal, with the limb in traction we perform the preparation of the greater tuberosity of the humerus. We place the arm in abduction and internal rotation and we proceed to the harvest of the latissimus dorsi and the tendon preparation by stitching the two sides using very resistant sutures. After restoring limb traction, under arthroscopic visualization, we pass a curved grasper through the posterolateral portal by going to the armpit in the space between the teres minor and the posterior deltoid. Once the grasper has exited the access at the level of the axilla we fix two drainage transparent tubes, each with a wire inside, and, withdrawing it back, we shuttle the two tubes in the subacromial space. After tensioning the suture wires from the anterior portals these are assembled in a knotless anchor of 5.5 mm that we place in the prepared site on the greater tuberosity of the humerus. A shoulder brace at 15° of abduction and neutral rotation protect the patient for the first month post-surgery but physical therapy can immediately start. PMID:23738290

  2. Endotracheal intubation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the esophagus or stomach. Risks include: Bleeding Infection Trauma to the voice box (larynx), thyroid gland, vocal cords and windpipe (trachea), or esophagus Puncture or tearing (perforation) of body parts in the chest cavity, leading to lung collapse

  3. HEAT AND MOISTURE EXCHANGE CAPACITY OF THE UPPER RESPIRATORY TRACT AND THE EFFECT OF TRACHEOTOMY BREATHING ON ENDOTRACHEAL CLIMATE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheenstra, Renske J.; Muller, Sara H.; Vincent, Andrew; Hilgers, Frans J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study was to assess the heat and moisture exchange (HME) capacity of the upper respiratory tract and the effect of tracheotomy breathing on endotracheal climate in patients with head and neck cancer. Methods. We plotted the subglottic temperature and humidity measurements

  4. Comparison of rocuronium at two different doses and succinylcholine for endotracheal intubation in adult patients for elective surgeries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S G Chavan

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Rapid sequence induction of anesthesia with propofol and fentanyl, succinylcholine allowed a more rapid endotracheal intubation sequence and created superior intubation conditions than rocuronium. However, the technique of using a large dose of rocuronium to achieve perfect conditions for tracheal intubation may have application whenever succinylcholine is relatively contraindicated.

  5. Heat and moisture exchange capacity of the upper respiratory tract and the effect of tracheotomy breathing on endotracheal climate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheenstra, R.J.; Muller, S.H.; Vincent, A.; Hilgers, F.J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study was to assess the heat and moisture exchange (HME) capacity of the upper respiratory tract and the effect of tracheotomy breathing on endotracheal climate in patients with head and neck cancer. Methods. We plotted the subglottic temperature and humidity measurements

  6. Biceps Autograft Augmentation for Rotator Cuff Repair : A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, Egbert J D; Stevens, Martin; Diercks, Ronald L

    Purpose: To improve surgical outcomes in patients with massive cuff defects, different techniques and augmentations are proposed. The biceps tendon is easily available as an autograft. Our aim was to conduct a qualitative systematic review of various methods and surgical techniques that use a biceps

  7. A comparative study of the identification of rotator cuff calcifications ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A deposit of calcium in the rotator cuff tendons, also known as calcifying tendinopathy, is a common condition. Calcifications are often associated with significant pain and restriction of shoulder movement. The hypothesis of this retrospective, descriptive study is that ultrasound is more sensitive to detect calcifications in the ...

  8. Open versus arthroscopic treatment of chronic rotator cuff impingement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schröder, J.; van Dijk, C. N.; Wielinga, A.; Kerkhoffs, G. M.; Marti, R. K.

    2001-01-01

    We report the results of 238 consecutive patients who underwent in total 261 acromioplasties because of chronic rotator cuff impingement. The procedure was performed either in conventional open technique (80) or arthroscopically (181). Two years (1-10) after the operation 68% of the patients treated

  9. Ultrasonography and arthrography in rotator cuff lesions: algorithmic approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eui Jong; Ryu, Kyung Nam; Lee, Sun Wha; Lim, Jae Hoon; Rhee, Yong Girl [Kyung Hee University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yu, Pil Mun [Dankuk University College of Medicine, Chenona (Korea, Republic of)

    1992-11-15

    Twenty-six patients with chief complaint of shoulder pain who underwent both ultrasonographic examination and arthrography of the shoulder were analyzed. Ten out of 12 cases with clinical impression of frozen shoulder, showed normal findings on the ultrasonographic examination of the shoulder. Among these ten cases, nine cases showed adhesive capsulitis and one case showed rotator cuff tear on arthrography. Among six cases with the clinical impression of rotator cuff tear, five cases showed rotator cuff tear and one case showed combined calcific tendinitis and adhesive capsulitis on ultrasonographic examination. In arthrography, four cases of rotator cuff tear, one case of calcific tendinitis and biceps tendinitis and one case of normal finding were diagnosed. For the remaining eight cases in the ultrasonographic examination, normal finding or biceps tendinitis were found and for the remaining of the cases in arthrography adhesive capsulitis were found. With the above results, we recommend that the shoulder ultrasonography as the first line diagnostic modality for a patient with chief complaint of shoulder pain.

  10. Ultrasonography and arthrography in rotator cuff lesions: algorithmic approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Eui Jong; Ryu, Kyung Nam; Lee, Sun Wha; Lim, Jae Hoon; Rhee, Yong Girl; Yu, Pil Mun

    1992-01-01

    Twenty-six patients with chief complaint of shoulder pain who underwent both ultrasonographic examination and arthrography of the shoulder were analyzed. Ten out of 12 cases with clinical impression of frozen shoulder, showed normal findings on the ultrasonographic examination of the shoulder. Among these ten cases, nine cases showed adhesive capsulitis and one case showed rotator cuff tear on arthrography. Among six cases with the clinical impression of rotator cuff tear, five cases showed rotator cuff tear and one case showed combined calcific tendinitis and adhesive capsulitis on ultrasonographic examination. In arthrography, four cases of rotator cuff tear, one case of calcific tendinitis and biceps tendinitis and one case of normal finding were diagnosed. For the remaining eight cases in the ultrasonographic examination, normal finding or biceps tendinitis were found and for the remaining of the cases in arthrography adhesive capsulitis were found. With the above results, we recommend that the shoulder ultrasonography as the first line diagnostic modality for a patient with chief complaint of shoulder pain

  11. Muscle Progenitor Cell Regenerative Capacity in the Torn Rotator Cuff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Gretchen A.; Farris, Ashley L.; Sato, Eugene; Gibbons, Michael; Lane, John G.; Ward, Samuel R.; Engler, Adam J.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic rotator cuff (RC) tears affect a large portion of the population and result in substantial upper extremity impairment, shoulder weakness, pain and limited range of motion. Regardless of surgical or conservative treatment, persistent atrophic muscle changes limit functional restoration and may contribute to surgical failure. We hypothesized that deficits in the skeletal muscle progenitor (SMP) cell pool could contribute to poor muscle recovery following tendon repair. Biopsies were obtained from patients undergoing arthroscopic RC surgery. The SMP population was quantified, isolated and assayed in culture for its ability to proliferate and fuse in-vitro and in-vivo. The SMP population was larger in muscles from cuffs with partial tears compared with no tears or full thickness tears. However, SMPs from muscles in the partial tear group also exhibited reduced proliferative ability. Cells from all cuff states were able to fuse robustly in culture and engraft when injected into injured mouse muscle, suggesting that when given the correct signals, SMPs are capable of contributing to muscle hypertrophy and regeneration regardless of tear severity. The fact that this does not appear to happen in-vivo helps focus future therapeutic targets for promoting muscle recovery following rotator cuff repairs and may help improve clinical outcomes. PMID:25410765

  12. Compensatory muscle activation in patients with glenohumeral cuff tears

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenbrink, Franciscus

    2010-01-01

    Patients suffering tendon tears in the glenohumeral cuff muscles show activation of muscles which pull the arm downwards during arm elevation tasks. This so-called co-activation deviates from healthy controls and is triggered by pain. Goal of this thesis was to demonstrate that deviating muscle

  13. Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair for the elderly (over 75-years)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Rintaro; Furukawa, Keizo; Kajiyama, Shiro; Sakimura, Toshiyuki; Shindo, Hiroyuki; Eto, Masao

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the surgical results of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair (ARCR) and investigate the interoperative complications for elderly people (over 75-years). We evaluated nine patients 75 and over who underwent rotator cuff repair, followed up for more than 12 months, and underwent MRI six months or more after the operation which was performed between December 2004 to July 2008. Their average age was 77.3 years. The control patients were 61 patients less than 75 who underwent ARCR during same term. Their average age was 59.9 years. Clinical outcome was evaluated based on interoperative complications, the Japanese Orthopaedic Association score (JOA score), and cuff integrity using MRI Sugaya's classification. In the over 75 patients, anchors came out from the tuberosity in three patients. Postoperative complications were not seen in both groups. No differences were observed in JOA score and cuff integrity using MRI Sugaya's classification compared with patients under 75. The surgical outcome of ARCR for elderly people (over 75-years) was satisfactory, and ARCR for elderly people (over 75-years) shoud be performed with caution because of the coming out of anchors. (author)

  14. Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair in elite rugby players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tambe, Amol; Badge, Ravi; Funk, Lennard

    2009-01-01

    Rugby is an increasingly popular collision sport. A wide spectrum of injuries can be sustained during training and match play. Rotator cuff injury is uncommon in contact sports and there is little published literature on the treatment of rotator cuff tears in rugby players. We therefore reviewed the results and functional outcomes of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair in elite rugby players. Eleven professional rugby players underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair at our hospital over a 2-year period. We collected data on these patients from the operative records. The patients were recalled for outcome scoring and ultrasound scans. There were seven rugby league players and four rugby union players, including six internationals. Their mean age was 25.7 years. All had had a traumatic episode during match play and could not return to the game after the injury. The mean time to surgery was 5 weeks. The mean width of the cuff tear was 1.8 cm. All were full- thickness cuff tears. Associated injuries included two Bankart lesions, one bony Bankart lesion, one posterior labral tear, and two 360 degrees labral tears. The biceps was involved in three cases. Two were debrided and a tenodesis was performed in one. Repair was with suture anchors. Following surgery, all patients underwent a supervised accelerated rehabilitation programme. The final follow-up was at 18 months (range: 6-31 months) post surgery. The Constant scores improved from 44 preoperatively to 99 at the last follow-up. The mean score at 3 months was 95. The Oxford shoulder score improved from 34 to 12, with the mean third month score being 18. The mean time taken to return to full match play at the preinjury level was 4.8 months. There were no complications in any of the patients and postoperative scans in nine patients confirmed that the repairs had healed. We conclude that full-thickness rotator cuff tears in the contact athlete can be addressed successfully by arthroscopic repair, with a rapid return to

  15. MR Imaging of Rotator Cuff Tears: Correlation with Arthroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandary, Sudarshan; Khandige, Ganesh; Kabra, Utkarsh

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Rotator cuff tears are quite common and can cause significant disability. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has now emerged as the modality of choice in the preoperative evaluation of patients with rotator cuff injuries, in view of its improved inherent soft tissue contrast and resolution. Aim To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of routine MRI in the detection and characterisation of rotator cuff tears, by correlating the findings with arthroscopy. Materials and Methods This prospective study was carried out between July 2014 and August 2016 at the AJ Institute of Medical Sciences, Mangalore, Karnataka, India. A total of 82 patients were diagnosed with rotator cuff injury on MRI during this period, out of which 45 patients who underwent further evaluation with arthroscopy were included in this study. The data collected was analysed for significant correlation between MRI diagnosis and arthroscopic findings using kappa statistics. The sensitivity, specificity, predictive value and accuracy of MRI for the diagnosis of full and partial thickness tears were calculated using arthroscopic findings as the reference standard. Results There were 27 males and 18 females in this study. The youngest patient was 22 years and the oldest was 74 years. Majority of rotator cuff tears (78%) were seen in patients above the age of 40 years. MRI showed a sensitivity of 89.6%, specificity of 100%, positive predictive value of 100% and negative predictive value of 83.3% for the diagnosis of full thickness rotator cuff tears. For partial thickness tears, MRI showed a sensitivity of 100%, specificity of 86.6%, positive predictive value of 78.9% and negative predictive value of 100%. The accuracy was 93.1% for full thickness tears and 91.1% for partial thickness tears. The p-value was less than 0.01 for both full and partial thickness tears. There was good agreement between the MRI and arthroscopic findings, with kappa value of 0.85 for full thickness tears and 0.81 for partial

  16. Muscle gene expression patterns in human rotator cuff pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Alexander; McCarthy, Meagan; Pichika, Rajeswari; Sato, Eugene J; Lieber, Richard L; Schenk, Simon; Lane, John G; Ward, Samuel R

    2014-09-17

    Rotator cuff pathology is a common source of shoulder pain with variable etiology and pathoanatomical characteristics. Pathological processes of fatty infiltration, muscle atrophy, and fibrosis have all been invoked as causes for poor outcomes after rotator cuff tear repair. The aims of this study were to measure the expression of key genes associated with adipogenesis, myogenesis, and fibrosis in human rotator cuff muscle after injury and to compare the expression among groups of patients with varied severities of rotator cuff pathology. Biopsies of the supraspinatus muscle were obtained arthroscopically from twenty-seven patients in the following operative groups: bursitis (n = 10), tendinopathy (n = 7), full-thickness rotator cuff tear (n = 8), and massive rotator cuff tear (n = 2). Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) was performed to characterize gene expression pathways involved in myogenesis, adipogenesis, and fibrosis. Patients with a massive tear demonstrated downregulation of the fibrogenic, adipogenic, and myogenic genes, indicating that the muscle was not in a state of active change and may have difficulty responding to stimuli. Patients with a full-thickness tear showed upregulation of fibrotic and adipogenic genes; at the tissue level, these correspond to the pathologies most detrimental to outcomes of surgical repair. Patients with bursitis or tendinopathy still expressed myogenic genes, indicating that the muscle may be attempting to accommodate the mechanical deficiencies induced by the tendon tear. Gene expression in human rotator cuff muscles varied according to tendon injury severity. Patients with bursitis and tendinopathy appeared to be expressing pro-myogenic genes, whereas patients with a full-thickness tear were expressing genes associated with fatty atrophy and fibrosis. In contrast, patients with a massive tear appeared to have downregulation of all gene programs except inhibition of myogenesis. These data highlight the

  17. Eustachian tube patency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eustachian tube patency refers to how much the eustachian tube is open. The eustachian tube runs between the middle ear and the throat. It controls the pressure behind the eardrum and middle ear space. This helps keep ...

  18. Feeding tube - infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007235.htm Feeding tube - infants To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A feeding tube is a small, soft, plastic tube placed ...

  19. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 50 of 112 ... Vol 30, No 1 (2014), A prospective comparison of the efficacy and safety of fully closed-loop ... J de Beer, J Chipps ... Vol 28, No 1 (2012), Endotracheal tube cuff pressure management in adult critical care units, Abstract PDF.

  20. Intracuff buffered lidocaine versus saline or air – A comparative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... smoking or recently treated upper respiratory tract infections were randomly assigned into three groups (n = 25), based on the type of endotracheal tube cuff inflation, as follows: Group A (air), Group B (6 ml normal saline) and Group C (6 ml 2% lidocaine + 0.5 ml 7.5% sodium bicarbonate). A second, blinded anaesthetist, ...

  1. Catheter and Laryngeal Mask Endotracheal Surfactant Therapy: the CALMEST approach as a novel MIST technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannozzi, Ilaria; Ciantelli, Massimiliano; Moscuzza, Francesca; Scaramuzzo, Rosa T; Panizza, Davide; Sigali, Emilio; Boldrini, Antonio; Cuttano, Armando

    2017-10-01

    Neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) is a major cause of mortality and morbidity among preterm infants. Although the INSURE (INtubation, SURfactant administration, Estubation) technique for surfactant replacement therapy is so far the gold standard method, over the last years new approaches have been studied, i.e. less invasive surfactant administration (LISA) or minimally invasive surfactant therapy (MIST). Here we propose an originally modified MIST, called CALMEST (Catheter And Laryngeal Mask Endotracheal Surfactant Therapy), using a particular laryngeal mask as a guide for a thin catheter to deliver surfactant directly in the trachea. We performed a preliminary study on a mannequin and a subsequent in vivo pilot trial. This novel procedure is quick, effective and well tolerated and might represent an improvement in reducing neonatal stress. Ultimately, CALMEST offers an alternative approach that could be extremely useful for medical staff with low expertise in laryngoscopy and intubation.

  2. Normative Values and Interrelationship of MDVP Voice Analysis Parameters Before and After Endotracheal Intubation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Martin Kryspin; Durck, Tina Trier; Bork, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    normative values for adults and investigates the correlation between these MDVP parameters in relation to the "standardized" trauma of endotracheal intubation. METHODS: Preoperative and postoperative assessments of vocal fold pathology with flexible videolaryngoscopy and voice analysis with MDVP using...... the best-of-three standardized recording were performed in 121 patients with normal voices included consecutively in the RCT. The procedures of anesthesia were standardized. RESULTS: The normative MDVP values of this study are consistently lower compared with most normative values presented in other...... studies. The preoperative to postoperative differences in jitter values (jitter and relative average perturbation) were closely correlated to the shimmer values for patients with postoperative vocal fold edemas. In the patients with edema, the preoperative to postoperative differences in jitter had...

  3. Tube holding system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunningham, R.C.

    1978-01-01

    A tube holding rig is described for the lateral support of tubes arranged in tight parcels in a heat exchanger. This tube holding rig includes not less than two tube supporting assemblies, with a space between them, located crosswise with respect to the tubes, each supporting assembly comprising a first set of parallel components in contact with the tubes, whilst a second set of components is also in contact with the tubes. These two sets of parts together define apertures through which the tubes pass [fr

  4. Isolation of Separate Ureaplasma Species From Endotracheal Secretions of Twin Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeton, Michael L; Maxwell, Nicola C; Chalker, Victoria J; Brown, Rebecca J; Aboklaish, Ali F; Spiller, O Brad

    2016-08-01

    Isolation of Ureaplasma spp. from preterm neonates and the association with development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia has been previously investigated. However, few studies have contrasted the nature of infection in twins. In this article, we report that dizygotic twins (1 girl, 1 boy) born at 24 weeks gestation both yielded culturable Ureaplasma from endotracheal secretions. The samples were part of a serial blind collection cohort of ventilated premature neonates, and analysis of repeat cultures showed stable, separate infections over a period of 17 and 21 days, respectively. Immunoblot and probe-specific quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis determined that Twin 1 was solely infected with Ureaplasma parvum (specifically, serovar 6 by gene sequencing), whereas Twin 2 was solely infected with Ureaplasma urealyticum (specifically, genotype A- serovars 2, 5, and 8 by gene sequencing). Immunoblot analysis found that the major surface antigen (multiple-banded antigen) altered relative mass for both strains during the course of infection. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis of extracted endotracheal aspirates confirmed no evidence of mixed infection for either twin. Failure of sentinel ventilated preterm infants on the same ward to acquire Ureaplasma infection after the first week of birth suggests no cot-to-cot transfer of Ureaplasma infection occurred. This study demonstrated not only a contrasting clinical outcome for a set of twins infected with 2 separate species of Ureaplasma, but also the first real-time demonstration of multiple-banded antigen alteration and evolution of Ureaplasma over the course of a clinical infection. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  5. Transtendon rotator-cuff repair of partial-thickness articular surface tears can lead to medial rotator-cuff failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woods TC

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Tom C Woods,4 Michael J Carroll,1 Atiba A Nelson,2 Kristie D More,2 Randa Berdusco,1 Stephen Sohmer,3 Richard S Boorman,1,2 Ian KY Lo1,21Department of Surgery, 2Sport Medicine Centre, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada; 3Department of Orthopaedics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, 4St Joseph's Hospital, Comox, BC, CanadaPurpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate clinical and anatomic outcomes of patients following transtendon rotator-cuff repair of partial articular supraspinatus tendon avulsion (PASTA lesions.Patients and methods: Patients in the senior author's practice who had isolated PASTA lesions treated by transtendon rotator-cuff repair were included (n=8 and retrospectively reviewed. All patients were evaluated preoperatively and at a mean of 21.2 months (±9.7 months postoperatively using standardized clinical evaluation (physical exam, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons, and Simple Shoulder Test. All patients underwent postoperative imaging with a magnetic resonance imaging arthrogram.Results: There was a significant improvement in American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (42.7±17.5 to 86.9±25.2 and Simple Shoulder Test (4.6±3.2 to 10.1±3.8 scores from pre- to postoperative, respectively. Postoperative imaging demonstrated full-thickness medial cuff tearing in seven patients, and one patient with a persistent partial articular surface defect.Conclusion: Transtendon repair of PASTA lesions may lead to improvements in clinical outcome. However, postoperative imaging demonstrated a high incidence of full-thickness rotator-cuff defects following repair.Keywords: rotator cuff, PASTA lesion, transtendon repair

  6. Clinical results of arthroscopic polyglycolic acid sheet patch graft for irreparable rotator cuff tears

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Mochizuki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The high retear rates after surgery for irreparable rotator cuff tears can be explained by the healing capacity potential of tendons and the native rotator cuff enthesis characterised by complex morphological structures, called direct insertion. Many experimental researches have focused on biologically augmenting the rotator cuff reconstruction and improving tendon–bone healing of the rotator cuff. The results of the experimental study showed that the polyglycolic acid sheet scaffold material allows for the regeneration of not only tendon-to-tendon, but also tendon-to-bone interface in an animal model. We performed a clinical study of the arthroscopic polyglycolic acid sheet patch graft used for the repair of irreparable rotator cuff tears. One-year clinical results of the repair of irreparable rotator cuff tears by arthroscopic patch graft with a polyglycolic acid sheet demonstrated improved shoulder function and a significantly lower retear rate, compared with patients treated with a fascia lata patch.

  7. Result from arthroscopic surgical treatment of renewed tearing of the rotator cuff of the shoulder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glaydson Gomes Godinho

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To evaluate function among patients with postoperative recurrence of rotator cuff injuries that was treated arthroscopically (case series and compare this with function in patients without recurrence (control group; and to compare function among patients with recurrence of rotator cuff injuries that were greater than and smaller than 3 cm.METHODS: This was a retrospective evaluation of patients who underwent arthroscopic revision of rotator cuff injuries using the ASES, Constant & Murley and UCLA scores and a visual analog pain scale, in comparison with patients in a control group who underwent primary rotator cuff repair.RESULTS: The size of the rotator cuff injury recurrence had a statistically significant influence on the result from the arthroscopic surgical treatment. The functional scores showed worse results than those from the first procedure.CONCLUSION: Arthroscopic surgical treatment of renewed tearing of rotator cuff injuries showed worse functional scores than those from primary repair of the injury.

  8. Functional and magnetic resonance imaging evaluation after single-tendon rotator cuff reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, H B; Gelineck, J; Søjbjerg, Jens Ole

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate tendon integrity after surgical repair of single-tendon rotator cuff lesions. In 31 patients, 31 single-tendon repairs were evaluated. Thirty-one patients were available for clinical assessment and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at follow-up. A standard...... series of MR images was obtained for each. The results of functional assessment were scored according to the system of Constant. According to MRI evaluation, 21 (68%) patients had an intact or thinned rotator cuff and 10 (32%) had recurrence of a full-thickness cuff defect at follow-up. Patients...... with an intact or thinned rotator cuff had a median Constant score of 75.5 points; patients with a full-thickness cuff defect had a median score of 62 points. There was no correlation between tendon integrity on postoperative MR images and functional outcome. Patients with intact or thinned cuffs did not have...

  9. Progression of Fatty Muscle Degeneration in Atraumatic Rotator Cuff Tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebert-Davies, Jonah; Teefey, Sharlene A; Steger-May, Karen; Chamberlain, Aaron M; Middleton, William; Robinson, Kathryn; Yamaguchi, Ken; Keener, Jay D

    2017-05-17

    The purpose of this prospective study was to examine the progression of fatty muscle degeneration over time in asymptomatic shoulders with degenerative rotator cuff tears. Subjects with an asymptomatic rotator cuff tear in 1 shoulder and pain due to rotator cuff disease in the contralateral shoulder were enrolled in a prospective cohort. Subjects were followed annually with shoulder ultrasonography, which evaluated tear size, location, and fatty muscle degeneration. Tears that were either full-thickness at enrollment or progressed to a full-thickness defect during follow-up were examined. A minimum follow-up of 2 years was necessary for eligibility. One hundred and fifty-six shoulders with full-thickness rotator cuff tears were potentially eligible. Seventy shoulders had measurable fatty muscle degeneration of at least 1 rotator cuff muscle at some time point. Patients with fatty muscle degeneration in the shoulder were older than those without degeneration (mean, 65.8 years [95% confidence interval (CI), 64.0 to 67.6 years] compared with 61.0 years [95% CI, 59.1 to 62.9 years]; p tears at baseline was larger in shoulders with degeneration than in shoulders that did not develop degeneration (13 and 10 mm wide, respectively, and 13 and 10 mm long; p Tears with fatty muscle degeneration were more likely to have enlarged during follow-up than were tears that never developed muscle degeneration (79% compared with 58%; odds ratio, 2.64 [95% CI, 1.29 to 5.39]; p muscle degeneration occurred more frequently in shoulders with tears that had enlarged (43%; 45 of 105) than in shoulders with tears that had not enlarged (20%; 10 of 51; p tears with enlargement and progression of muscle degeneration were more likely to extend into the anterior supraspinatus than were those without progression (53% and 17%, respectively; p tear size (p = 0.56). The median time from tear enlargement to progression of fatty muscle degeneration was 1.0 year (range, -2.0 to 6.9 years) for the

  10. Vitamin D and the immunomodulation of rotator cuff injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dougherty KA

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Kaitlin A Dougherty,1 Matthew F Dilisio,2 Devendra K Agrawal1 1Department of Clinical & Translational Science, 2Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Creighton University School of Medicine, Omaha, NE, USA Abstract: Tendon-to-bone healing after rotator cuff repair surgery has a failure rate of 20%–94%. There has been a recent interest to determine the factors that act as determinants between successful and unsuccessful rotator cuff repair. Vitamin D level in patients is one of the factors that have been linked to bone and muscle proliferation and healing, and it may have an effect on tendon-to-bone healing. The purpose of this article is to critically review relevant published research that relates to the effect of vitamin D on rotator cuff tears and subsequent healing. A review of the literature was conducted to identify all studies that investigate the relationship between vitamin D and tendon healing, in addition to its mechanism of action. The data were then analyzed in order to summarize what is currently known about vitamin D, rotator cuff pathology, and tendon-to-bone healing. The activated metabolite of vitamin D, 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, affects osteoblast proliferation and differentiation. Likewise, vitamin D plays a significant role in the tendon-to-bone healing process by increasing the bone mineral density and strengthening the skeletal muscles. The 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 binds to vitamin D receptors on myocytes to stimulate growth and proliferation. The form of vitamin D produced by the liver, calcifediol, is a key initiator of the myocyte healing process by moving phosphate into myocytes, which improves function and metabolism. Investigation into the effect of vitamin D on tendons has been sparse, but limited studies have been promising. Matrix metalloproteinases play an active role in remodeling the extracellular matrix (ECM of tendons, particularly deleterious remodeling of the collagen fibers. Also, the levels of

  11. COMPARISON OF ASTYM THERAPY AND KINESIOTAPING FOR ROTATOR CUFF TENDINOPATHY IN DIABETIC PATIENTS: RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL

    OpenAIRE

    Azza Atya; Mahmoud Nasser; Aisha Hagag

    2017-01-01

    Background: Rotator cuff tendinopathy is a significant problem among diabetics that frequently restricts patient’s activity in terms of pain and disability. The purpose of this study was to compare between the effect of Astym therapy and kinesiotaping in treating diabetic patients with chronic rotator cuff tendinopathy. Methods: 56 diabetic patients diagnosed with chronic rotator cuff tendinopathy were randomly assigned into Astym therapy group (n=28) or kinesiotaping group (n= 28). All pa...

  12. Early postoperative fluoroquinolone use is associated with an increased revision rate after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancienne, Jourdan M; Brockmeier, Stephen F; Rodeo, Scott A; Young, Chris; Werner, Brian C

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate the association of postoperative fluoroquinolone use following arthroscopic primary rotator cuff repair with failure requiring revision rotator cuff repair. An insurance database was queried for patients undergoing rotator cuff repair from 2007 to 2015. These patients were divided into three groups: (1) patients prescribed fluoroquinolones within 6 months postoperatively (divided into 0-2, 2-4, and 4-6 months), (2) a matched negative control cohort of patients not prescribed fluoroquinolones, and (3) a matched positive control cohort of patients prescribed fluoroquinolones between 6 and 18 months following rotator cuff repair. Rates of failure requiring revision rotator cuff repair were compared within 2 years. A total of 1292 patients were prescribed fluoroquinolones within 6 months after rotator cuff repair, including 442 within 2 months, 433 within 2 to 4 months, and 417 within 4 to 6 months, and were compared to 5225 matched negative controls and 1597 matched positive controls. The rate of revision rotator cuff repair was significantly higher in patients prescribed fluoroquinolones within 2 months (6.1 %) compared to matched negative (2.2 %, P = 0.0009) and positive controls (2.4 %, P = 0.0026). There were no significant differences in the rate of revision rotator cuff repair when fluoroquinolones were prescribed >2 months after rotator cuff repair. Early use of fluoroquinolones following rotator cuff repair was independently associated with significantly increased rates of failure requiring revision rotator cuff repair. This is the first clinical study examining the association of postoperative fluoroquinolone use with failure following arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. III.

  13. Factors affecting rotator cuff healing after arthroscopic repair: osteoporosis as one of the independent risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Seok Won; Oh, Joo Han; Gong, Hyun Sik; Kim, Joon Yub; Kim, Sae Hoon

    2011-10-01

    The prognostic factors associated with structural outcome after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair have not yet been fully determined. The hypothesis of this study was that bone mineral density (BMD) is an important prognostic factor affecting rotator cuff healing after arthroscopic cuff repair. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Among 408 patients who underwent arthroscopic repair for full-thickness rotator cuff tear between January 2004 and July 2008, 272 patients were included whose postoperative cuff integrity was verified by computed tomography arthrography (CTA) or ultrasonography (USG) and simultaneously who were evaluated by various functional outcome instruments. The mean age at the time of operation was 59.5 ± 7.9 years. Postoperative CTA or USG was performed at a mean 13.0 ± 5.1 months after surgery, and the mean follow-up period was 37.2 ± 10.0 months (range, 24-65 months). The clinical, structural, and surgery-related factors affecting cuff integrity including BMD were analyzed using both univariate and multivariate analysis. Evaluation of postoperative cuff integrity was performed by musculoskeletal radiologists who were unaware of the present study. The failure rate of rotator cuff healing was 22.8% (62 of 272). The failure rate was significantly higher in patients with lower BMD (P cuff healing failure following arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Bone mineral density, as well as FI of the infraspinatus and amount of retraction, was an independent determining factor affecting postoperative rotator cuff healing. Further studies with prospective, randomized, and controlled design are needed to confirm the relationship between BMD and postoperative rotator cuff healing.

  14. The Biomechanical Role of Scaffolds in Augmented Rotator Cuff Tendon Repairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    The biomechanical role of scaffolds in augmented rotator cuff tendon repairs Amit Aurora, D Enga,b, Jesse A. McCarron, MDc, Antonie J. van den Bogert...used for rotator cuff repair augmentation; however, the appropriate scaffold material properties and/or surgical application techniques for achieving...The model predicts that the biomechanical performance of a rotator cuff repair can be modestly increased by augmenting the repair with a scaffold that

  15. Effect of contacts configuration and location on selective stimulation of cuff electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghipour-Farshi, Hamed; Frounchi, Javad; Ahmadiasl, Nasser; Shahabi, Parviz; Salekzamani, Yaghoub

    2015-01-01

    Cuff electrodes have been widely used chronically in different clinical applications. Advancements have been made in selective stimulation by using multi-contact cuff electrodes. Steering anodic current is a strategy to increase selectivity by reshaping and localizing electric fields. There are two configurations for contacts to be implemented in cuff, monopolar and tripolar. A cuff electrode with tripolar configuration can restrict the activation to a more localized region within a nerve trunk compared to a cuff with monopolar configuration and improve the selectivity. Anode contacts in tripolar configuration can be made in two structures, "ring" and "dot". In this study, the stimulation capabilities of these two structures were evaluated. The recruitment properties and the selectivity of stimulation were examined by measuring the electric potential produced by stimulation currents. The results of the present study indicated that using dot configuration, the current needed to stimulate fascicles in tripolar topologies would be reduced by 10%. It was also shown that stimulation threshold was increased by moving anode contacts inward the cuff. On the other hand, stimulation threshold was decreased by moving the anode contacts outward the cuff which would decrease selectivity, too. We conclude that dot configuration is a better choice for stimulation. Also, a cuff inward placement of 10% relative to the cuff length was near optimal.

  16. Immobilization After Rotator Cuff Repair: What Evidence Do We Have Now?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Jason E; Horneff, John G; Gee, Albert O

    2016-01-01

    Recurrent tears after rotator cuff repair are common. Postoperative rehabilitation after rotator cuff repair is a modifiable factor controlled by the surgeon that can affect re-tear rates. Some surgeons prefer early mobilization after rotator cuff repair, whereas others prefer a period of immobilization to protect the repair site. The tendon-healing process incorporates biochemical and biomechanical responses to mechanical loading. Healing can be optimized with controlled loading. Complete load removal and chronic overload can be deleterious to the process. Several randomized clinical studies have also characterized the role of postoperative mobilization after rotator cuff repair. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Standard sonography and arthrosonography in the study of rotator cuff tears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Dalati, Ghassan; Martone, Enrico; Caffarri, Sabrina; Fusaro, Michele; Pozzi Mucelli, Roberto; Castellarin, Gianluca; Ricci, Matteo; Vecchini, Eugenio

    2005-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity of ultrasonography, integrating standard ultrasound and arthrosonography after injecting a saline solution into the glenohumeral cavity in cases of suspected rotator cuff tears. Materials and methods. We respectively examinated 40 patients awaiting shoulder arthroscopy for suspected or diagnosed tears of the rotator cuff. A radiologist, unaware of the pre-operative diagnosis, performed an ultrasound scan on all the patients before and after the injection of saline solution into the glenohumeral cavity. The parameters considered were presence or absence of a rotator cuff injury; type of injury according to Snyder and its extent along the longitudinal and transverse planes; presence or absence of effusion into the articular cavity; subacromial/subdeltoid bursal distension. All the patients underwent arthroscopy either the same day of the day after the ultrasound examination. Results. Standard sonography showed 26 complete rotator cuff tears (type C according to Snyder), 2 partial tears (type B according to Snyder) and 12 intact rotator cuffs. Arthrosonography detected 31 complete rotator cuff tears (type C according to Snyder), 1 partial tear (type B according to Snyder) and 8 intact rotator cuffs. Arthroscopy identified 32 complete rotator cuff tears (type C according to Snyder), 1 partial tear (type B according to Snyder) and 8 intact rotator cuffs. Analysis of the results shows that, taking arthroscopy as the gold standard, the sensitivity of normal sonography is 81.2%, whereas that of arthosonography is 96.8% (p [it

  18. Bender/Coiler for Tubing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoltzfus, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    Easy-to-use tool makes coils of tubing. Tubing to be bend clamped with stop post. Die positioned snugly against tubing. Operator turns handle to slide die along tubing, pushing tubing into spiral groove on mandrel.

  19. I.S.Mu.L.T - Rotator Cuff Tears Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva, Francesco; Piccirilli, Eleonora; Bossa, Michela; Via, Alessio Giai; Colombo, Alessandra; Chillemi, Claudio; Gasparre, Giuseppe; Pellicciari, Leonardo; Franceschetti, Edoardo; Rugiero, Clelia; Scialdoni, Alessandro; Vittadini, Filippo; Brancaccio, Paola; Creta, Domenico; Buono, Angelo Del; Garofalo, Raffaele; Franceschi, Francesco; Frizziero, Antonio; Mahmoud, Asmaa; Merolla, Giovanni; Nicoletti, Simone; Spoliti, Marco; Osti, Leonardo; Padulo, Johnny; Portinaro, Nicola; Tajana, Gianfranco; Castagna, Alex; Foti, Calogero; Masiero, Stefano; Porcellini, Giuseppe; Tarantino, Umberto; Maffulli, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Despite the high level achieved in the field of shoulder surgery, a global consensus on rotator cuff tears management is lacking. This work is divided into two main sessions: in the first, we set questions about hot topics involved in the rotator cuff tears, from the etiopathogenesis to the surgical treatment. In the second, we answered these questions by mentioning Evidence Based Medicine. The aim of the present work is to provide easily accessible guidelines: they could be considered as recommendations for a good clinical practice developed through a process of systematic review of the literature and expert opinion, in order to improve the quality of care and rationalize the use of resources. PMID:26958532

  20. Calcific tendinitis of the rotator cuff: management options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Kentaro; Potts, Aaron; Anakwenze, Oke; Singh, Anshu

    2014-11-01

    Calcific tendinitis of the rotator cuff tendons is a common cause of shoulder pain in adults and typically presents as activity-related shoulder pain. It is thought to be an active, cell-mediated process, although the exact pathophysiology remains unclear. Nonsurgical management continues to be the mainstay of treatment; most patients improve with modalities such as oral anti-inflammatory medication, physical therapy, and corticosteroid injections. Several options are available for patients who fail nonsurgical treatment, including extracorporeal shock wave therapy, ultrasound-guided needle lavage, and surgical débridement. These modalities alleviate pain by eliminating the calcific deposit, and several recent studies have demonstrated success with the use of these treatment options. Surgical management options include arthroscopic procedures to remove calcific deposits and subacromial decompression; however, the role of subacromial decompression and repair of rotator cuff defects created by removing these deposits remains controversial. Copyright 2014 by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.

  1. Outcomes assessment in rotator cuff pathology: what are we measuring?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhni, Eric C; Steinhaus, Michael E; Morrow, Zachary S; Jobin, Charles M; Verma, Nikhil N; Cole, Brian J; Bach, Bernard R

    2015-12-01

    Assessments used to measure outcomes associated with rotator cuff pathology and after repair are varied. This lack of standardization leads to difficulty drawing comparisons across studies. We hypothesize that this variability in patient-reported outcome measures and objective metrics used in rotator cuff studies persists even in high-impact, peer reviewed journals. All studies assessing rotator cuff tear and repair outcomes in 6 orthopedic journals with a high impact factor from January 2010 to December 2014 were reviewed. Cadaveric and animal studies and those without outcomes were excluded. Outcome measures included range of motion (forward elevation, abduction, external rotation, and internal rotation), strength (in the same 4 planes), tendon integrity imaging, patient satisfaction, and functional assessment scores. Of the 156 included studies, 63% documented range of motion measurements, with 18% reporting range of motion in all 4 planes. Only 38% of studies reported quantitative strength measurements. In 65% of studies, tendon integrity was documented with imaging (38% magnetic resonance imaging/magnetic resonance anrhrogram, 31% ultrasound, and 8% computed tomography arthrogram). Finally, functional score reporting varied significantly, with the 5 most frequently reported scores ranging from 16% to 61% in studies, and 15 of the least reported outcomes were each reported in ≤6% of studies. Significant variability exists in outcomes reporting after rotator cuff tear and repair, making comparisons between clinical studies difficult. Creating a uniformly accepted, validated outcomes tool that assesses pain, function, patient satisfaction, and anatomic integrity would enable consistent outcomes assessment after operative and nonoperative management and allow comparisons across the literature. Copyright © 2015 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Calcific Tendinitis of the Rotator Cuff: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Kachewar, Sushil G; Kulkarni, Devidas S

    2013-01-01

    Calcifying tendinitis of the rotator cuff is a common disorder; its underlying mechanism still remains unknown. Although details of the clinical presentation(s) and pathological changes which are associated with calcific tendinitis are available, conservative management of this condition remains a topic of debate. About 90% of the patients can be treated non – operatively, but as some are resistant to conservative treatment; newer techniques or surgery should be indicated.

  3. Outcomes of rotator cuff augmentation surgery with autologous fascia lata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales-Varo, A P; García-Espona, M A; Roda-Murillo, O

    To evaluate whether augmentation grafts using autologous fascia lata improve functional results for rotator cuff repairs and reduce the retear rate compared to those without augmentation. This is a prospective evaluation comprising 20 patients with a complete symptomatic rotator cuff tear. The operations were carried out from a superior approach performing a total cuff repair, for 10 patients we used a suture augmented with an autologous graft taken from their own fascia lata while unaugmented sutures were used for the other 10 patients. The follow-up period lasted for one year post-intervention. We measured variables for tear type, functionality and pain, both baseline and at 6 and 12-month follow ups. We evaluated retear incidence in each group as well as each group's pain and functionality response. The improved pain levels in the non-graft group evolved gradually over time. Conversely, in the group with the augmentation grafts, average Constant-Murley shoulder outcome scores at six months were already above 10 and were maintained at 12 months. One retear occurred in the graft group and 2 in the group without grafts, thus presenting no significant differences. There were no significant changes in pain and function values at the one year follow up in either group. Our preliminary results regarding rotator cuff augmentation surgery with autologous fascia lata showed a significant improvement in pain levels after 6 months compared to the patients with no augmentation, who required 12 months to reach the same values. After a year of follow up, there were no differences between the mean Constant and pain scores in either intervention group The number of retears in the non-graft group was greater than that in the group with grafts although the difference was not significant. Copyright © 2018 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Effect of tamoxifen on fatty degeneration and atrophy of rotator cuff muscles in chronic rotator cuff tear: An animal model study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Edward; Zhang, Yue; Pruznak, Anne; Kim, H Mike

    2015-12-01

    Fatty degeneration of the rotator cuff muscles is an irreversible change resulting from chronic rotator cuff tear and is associated with poor clinical outcomes following rotator cuff repair. We evaluated the effect of Tamoxifen, a competitive estrogen receptor inhibitor, on fatty degeneration using a mouse model for chronic rotator cuff tear. Sixteen adult mice were divided into two diet groups (Tamoxifen vs. Regular) and subjected to surgical creation of a large rotator cuff tear and suprascapular nerve transection in their left shoulder with the right shoulder serving as a control. The rotator cuff muscles were harvested at 16 weeks and subjected to histology and RT-PCR for adipogenic and myogenic markers. Histology showed substantially decreased atrophy and endomysial inflammation in Tamoxifen group, but no significant differences in the amount of intramuscular adipocytes and lipid droplets compared to the Regular group. With RT-PCR, the operated shoulders showed significant upregulation of myogenin and PPAR-γ, and downregulation of myostatin compared to the nonsurgical shoulder. No significant differences of gene expression were found between the two diet groups. Our study demonstrated that tamoxifen diet leads to decreased muscle atrophy and inflammatory changes following chronic rotator cuff tear, but has no apparent effect on adipogenesis. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Cost-effectiveness of open versus arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adla, Deepthi N; Rowsell, Mark; Pandey, Radhakant

    2010-03-01

    Economic evaluation of surgical procedures is necessary in view of more expensive newer techniques emerging in an increasingly cost-conscious health care environment. This study compares the cost-effectiveness of open rotator cuff repair with arthroscopic repair for moderately size tears. This was a prospective study of 30 consecutive patients, of whom 15 had an arthroscopic repair and 15 had an open procedure. Clinical effectiveness was assessed using Oxford and Constant shoulder scores. Costs were estimated from departmental and hospital financial data. At last follow-up, no difference Oxford and Constant shoulder scores was noted between the 2 methods of repair. There was no significant difference between the groups in the cost of time in the operating theater, inpatient time, amount of postoperative analgesia, number of postoperative outpatient visits, physiotherapy costs, and time off work. The incremental cost of each arthroscopic rotator cuff repair was pound675 ($1248.75) more than the open procedure. This was mainly in the area of direct health care costs, instrumentation in particular. Health care policy makers are increasingly demanding evidence of cost-effectiveness of a procedure. This study showed both methods of repair provide equivalent clinical results. Open cuff repair is more cost-effective than arthroscopic repair and is likely to have lower cost-utility ratio. In addition, the tariff for the arthroscopic procedure in some health care systems is same as open repair. Copyright 2010 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Speed of recovery after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurowicki, Jennifer; Berglund, Derek D; Momoh, Enesi; Disla, Shanell; Horn, Brandon; Giveans, M Russell; Levy, Jonathan C

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to delineate the time taken to achieve maximum improvement (plateau of recovery) and the degree of recovery observed at various time points (speed of recovery) for pain and function after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. An institutional shoulder surgery registry query identified 627 patients who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair between 2006 and 2015. Measured range of motion, patient satisfaction, and patient-reported outcome measures were analyzed for preoperative, 3-month, 6-month, 1-year, and 2-year intervals. Subgroup analysis was performed on the basis of tear size by retraction grade and number of anchors used. As an entire group, the plateau of maximum recovery for pain, function, and motion occurred at 1 year. Satisfaction with surgery was >96% at all time points. At 3 months, 74% of improvement in pain and 45% to 58% of functional improvement were realized. However, only 22% of elevation improvement was achieved (P rotation. Smaller tears had higher motion and functional scores across all time points. Tear size did not influence pain levels. The plateau of maximum recovery after rotator cuff repair occurred at 1 year with high satisfaction rates at all time points. At 3 months, approximately 75% of pain relief and 50% of functional recovery can be expected. Larger tears have a slower speed of recovery. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Advances in biologic augmentation for rotator cuff repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sahishnu; Gualtieri, Anthony P.; Lu, Helen H.; Levine, William N.

    2016-01-01

    Rotator cuff tear is a very common shoulder injury that often necessitates surgical intervention for repair. Despite advances in surgical techniques for rotator cuff repair, there is a high incidence of failure after surgery because of poor healing capacity attributed to many factors. The complexity of tendon-to-bone integration inherently presents a challenge for repair because of a large biomechanical mismatch between the tendon and bone and insufficient regeneration of native tissue, leading to the formation of fibrovascular scar tissue. Therefore, various biological augmentation approaches have been investigated to improve rotator cuff repair healing. This review highlights recent advances in three fundamental approaches for biological augmentation for functional and integrative tendon–bone repair. First, the exploration, application, and delivery of growth factors to improve regeneration of native tissue is discussed. Second, applications of stem cell and other cell-based therapies to replenish damaged tissue for better healing is covered. Finally, this review will highlight the development and applications of compatible biomaterials to both better recapitulate the tendon–bone interface and improve delivery of biological factors for enhanced integrative repair. PMID:27750374

  8. Management of failed rotator cuff repair: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lädermann, Alexandre; Denard, Patrick J; Burkhart, Stephen S

    2016-01-01

    Importance Recurrent tear after rotator cuff repair (RCR) is common. Conservative, and open and arthroscopic revisions, have been advocated to treat these failures. Aim or objective The purpose of this systematic review was to evaluate the different options for managing recurrent rotator cuff tears. Evidence review A search was conducted of level I through 4 studies from January 2000 to October 2015, to identify studies reporting on failed RCR. 10 articles were identified. The overall quality of evidence was very low. Findings Mid-term to long-term follow-up of patients treated conservatively revealed acceptable results; a persistent defect is a well-tolerated condition that only occasionally requires subsequent surgery. Conservative treatment might be indicated in most patients, particularly in case of posterosuperior involvement and poor preoperative range of motion. Revision surgery might be indicated in a young patient with a repairable lesion, a 3 tendon tear, and in those with involvement of the subscapularis. Conclusions and relevance The current review indicates that arthroscopic revision RCR can lead to improvement in functional outcome despite a high retear rate. Further studies are needed to develop specific rehabilitation in the case of primary rotator cuff failure, to better understand the place of each treatment option, and, in case of repair, to optimise tendon healing. PMID:27134759

  9. Comparison of muscle sizes and moment arms of two rotator cuff muscles measured by ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul-Kristensen, B.; Bojsen-Møller, Finn; Holst, E.

    2000-01-01

    Anatomy, biomechanics, cross-section, magnetic resonance imaging, method comparison, rotator cuff muscles, ultrasound......Anatomy, biomechanics, cross-section, magnetic resonance imaging, method comparison, rotator cuff muscles, ultrasound...

  10. Analysis of the incidence of postintubation injuries in patients intubated in the prehospital or early hospital conditions of the hospital emergency department and the intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cierniak M

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Marcin Cierniak,1 Dariusz Timler,1 Renata Sobczak,1 Andrzej Wieczorek,2 Przemyslaw Sekalski,3 Natalia Borkowska,2 Tomasz Gaszynski1 1Department of Emergency Medicine and Disaster Medicine, Barlicki University Hospital, 2Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Therapy, Medical University of Lodz, 3Department of Microelectronics and Computer Science, IT Centre, Lodz University of Technology, Lodz, Poland Background: Intubation is still one of the best methods to secure the airway. In the case of prehospital or early hospital conditions when factors such as urgency, stress, or inaccuracy of the undertaken activities are involved, the risk of causing complications, for instance, edema or postintubation injuries, increases, especially while dealing with a difficult intubation. The risk of improper inflation of the endotracheal tube cuff also increases, which is considered in this study.Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of postintubation complications, such as postintubation injuries or edema, in a research sample, and to examine whether such complications occur more often, for example, while using a guidewire. In this study, we also evaluated the injuries associated with the inflation of the endotracheal tube cuff.Materials and methods: This study was performed on a group of 153 patients intubated in prehospital conditions. The tests were carried out in three clinical sites that received patients from prehospital care. Postintubation injuries were revealed and photographed using videolaryngoscope, such as the C-MAC and the McGrath series 5. The endotracheal tube cuff pressure was measured using a pressure gage manual (VBM Medizintechnik GmbH. The quantitative analyses of differences between incidence of variables were assessed using χ2 test for P<0.05. Analyses have been carried out using the Statistica software.Results: In the group of 153 patients, postintubation injuries occurred in 17% of cases. The dependency

  11. Arthroscopic undersurface rotator cuff repair versus conventional arthroscopic double-row rotator cuff repair - Comparable results at 2-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, Benjamin Fu Hong; Chen, Jerry Yongqiang; Yeo, William; Lie, Denny Tijauw Tjoen; Chang, Paul Chee Cheng

    2018-01-01

    The aim of our study is to compare the improvement in clinical outcomes after conventional arthroscopic double-row rotator cuff repair and arthroscopic undersurface rotator cuff repair. A consecutive series of 120 patients who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair was analysed. Sixty-one patients underwent conventional double-row rotator cuff repair and 59 patients underwent undersurface rotator cuff repair. Several clinical outcomes, including numerical pain rating scale (NPRS), constant shoulder score (CSS), Oxford shoulder score (OSS) and University of California Los Angeles shoulder score (UCLASS), were prospectively recorded by a trained healthcare professional preoperatively and at 3, 6, 12 and 24 months after surgery. Comparing both groups, there were no differences in age, gender and preoperative NPRS, CSS, OSS and UCLASS. However, the tear size was 0.7 ± 0.2 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.3-1.1) cm larger in the conventional group ( p = 0.002). There was no difference in the improvement of NPRS, CSS, OSS and UCLASS at all time points of follow-up, that is, at 3, 6, 12 and 24 months after surgery. The duration of operation was shorter by 35 ± 3 (95% CI 28-42) min in the undersurface group ( p rotator cuff repair and conventional arthroscopic double-row rotator cuff repair showed marked improvements in clinical scores when compared preoperatively, and there was no difference in improvements between both groups. Arthroscopic undersurface rotator cuff repair is a faster technique compared to the conventional arthroscopic double-row rotator cuff repair.

  12. A Comparison of Macintosh and Airtraq Laryngoscopes for Endotracheal Intubation in Adult Patients With Cervical Spine Immobilization Using Manual In Line Axial Stabilization: A Prospective Randomized Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayakumar, Vinodhadevi; Rao, Shwethapriya; Shetty, Nanda

    2016-10-01

    During cervical spine immobilization using Manual In Line Axial Stabilization (MILS), it is difficult to visualize the larynx by aligning the oropharyngeolaryngeal axes using Macintosh laryngoscope. Theoretically, Airtraq an anatomically shaped blade with endotracheal tube guide channel offers advantage over Macintosh. We hypothesized that intubation would be easier and faster with Airtraq compared with Macintosh laryngoscope. Ninety anesthetized adult patients with normal airways were intubated by experienced anesthesiologists after cervical immobilization with MILS either with Macintosh or Airtraq. Primary outcomes compared were successful intubation, and degree of difficulty of intubation as assessed by Intubation Difficulty Scale (IDS) score. Secondary outcomes compared were duration of laryngoscopy and intubation, degree of difficulty of intubation as assessed by Numerical Rating Scale score, soft tissue, and dental trauma. All 90 patients were successfully intubated in the first attempt. Intubation as assessed by IDS score was easier in Airtraq (84.44%) in contrast to slight difficulty in the Macintosh (77.78%) group; Numerical Rating Scale score was easy in both the groups (Airtraq-91.12%; Macintosh-93.34%). The median (interquartile range [IQR]) time for laryngoscopy, (12 s [IQR, 8 to 17.5) vs. 8 s [IQR, 6 to 12]); total duration for intubation (25 s [IQR, 20-33] vs. 22 s [IQR, 18-27.5]) were prolonged in Airtraq group in comparison to Macintosh group. In anesthetized adult patients with MILS compared with Macintosh, Airtraq provides equal success rate of intubation, statistically significant (although clinically insignificant) longer duration for laryngoscopy and intubation. Intubation with Airtraq was significantly easier than Macintosh as assessed by the IDS score.

  13. Reduction of rectal doses by removal of gas in the rectum during vaginal cuff brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabater, S.; Sevillano, M.M.; Andres, I.; Berenguer, R. [Complejo Hospitalario Univ. de Albacete (CHUA) (Spain). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Machin-Hamalainen, S. [C.S. General Ricardos, Madrid (Spain); Mueller, K.; Arenas, M. [Hospital Univ. Sant Joan, Reus (Spain). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2013-11-15

    Objective: The goal of this work was to evaluate whether the volume reduction related to removal of gas in the rectum could be translated in lower doses to organs at risk (OAR) during vaginal cuff brachytherapy (VBT). Material and methods: Fourteen pairs of brachytherapy planning CT scans derived from 11 patients were re-segmented and re-planned using the same parameters. The only difference between pairs of CTs was the presence or lack of gas in the rectum. The first CT showed the basal status and the second was carried out after gas removal with a tube. A set of values derived from bladder and rectum dose-volume histograms (DVH) and dose-surface histograms (DSH) were extracted. Moreover the cylinder position related to the patient craniocaudal axis was recorded. Results: Rectum volume decreased significantly from 77.8 {+-} 45 to 55.43 {+-} 17.6 ml (p = 0.0052) after gas removal. Such volume diminution represented a significant reduction on all rectal DVH parameters analyzed except D{sub 25%} and D{sub 50%}. DSH parameter results were similar to previous ones. A nonsignificant increase of the bladder volume was observed and was associated with an increase of the DVH metrics analyzed. Conclusion: Removal of gas pockets is a simple and inexpensive maneuver that decreases rectal dose parameters on VBT, which can be translated as a better therapeutic ratio. It also suggests that other actions directed to empty the rectum could have a similar effect. (orig.)

  14. Use of cuff tear arthroplasty head prosthesis for rotator cuff arthropathy treatment in elderly patients with comorbidities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Cassiano Diniz; Andreoli, Carlos Vicente; Pochini, Alberto de Castro; Ejnisman, Benno

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical and functional behavior of patients undergoing cuff tear arthroplasty at different stages of the disease. Cuff tear arthroplasty hemiarthroplasties were performed in 34 patients with rotator cuff arthropathy and associated comorbidities, classified according to Seebauer. The mean age was 76.3 years, and the sample comprised 23 females (67.6%) and 11 males (32.4%). The mean follow-up period was 21.7 months, and evaluations were performed using the Visual Analog Scale for pain and the Constant scale. There were no statistically significant differences in the mean reduction in the Visual Analog Scale or in the Constant scale increase between the female and male groups. The variation between the pre- and postoperative Visual Analog Scale and Constant scale evaluations was significant. There was also no statistically significant difference between the Seebauer classification groups regarding the mean Visual Analog Scale reduction, or the mean Constant scale increase. Cuff tear arthroplasty shoulder hemiarthroplasty is a good option for rotator cuff arthropathy in patients with comorbidities. Avaliar o comportamento clínico e funcional dos pacientes submetidos à artroplastia do tipo cuff tear arthroplasty para o tratamento da artropatia do manguito rotador em diferentes estágios da afecção. Foram realizadas 34 hemiartroplastias do tipo cuff tear arthroplasty em 34 pacientes com artropatia do manguito rotador e comorbidades associadas, classificadas de acordo com Seebauer. A média de idade foi de 76,3 anos, sendo 23 pacientes do sexo feminino (67,6%) e 11 do sexo masculino (32,4%). O seguimento médio foi de 21,7 meses e a avaliação foi realizada por meio da Escala Visual Analógica da dor e pela escala de Constant. Não houve diferença estatisticamente significante entre os grupos feminino e masculino, tanto nas médias de redução na Escala Visual Analógica quanto nas de aumento na escala de Constant. A variação entre as avalia

  15. HIGH-RESOLUTION ULTRASONOGRAPHY OF SHOULDER FOR ROTATOR CUFF TEAR: CORRELATION WITH ARTHROSCOPIC FINDINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishnumurthy H. Y

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Rotator cuff disease is the most common cause of shoulder pain. Ultrasonography being non-invasive, widely available, more cost-effective method and is the first choice in imaging of rotator cuff tears. Arthroscopy of shoulder is considered as the gold standard for diagnosis of rotator cuff tears. Objective of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of high-resolution ultrasonography of shoulder for rotator cuff tears with arthroscopy of shoulder. METHODS Thirty patients clinically suspected to have rotator cuff tear who underwent ultrasonography and arthroscopy of shoulder were included in the study. Duration of study was for two years. All ultrasonography examinations were conducted in ultrasound machine using GE Voluson 730 PRO high frequency (10-12 MHz linear array transducer done by two experienced radiologists. Arthroscopies were done by two experienced shoulder arthroscopic surgeons. RESULTS Age of the patients with rotator cuff tears ranged from 40 to 80 years. 57% were females and 43% were males among the patients who had rotator cuff tears. 71.43% of the rotator cuff tears were found in the dominant arm. 64.28% of patients with rotator cuff tear had given history of fall or trauma to the corresponding shoulder within 6 months prior to presentation. 39.28% of patients who had rotator cuff tears were known diabetics. Supraspinatus tendon was the most commonly affected tendon, followed by infraspinatus and subscapularis tendons. For overall detection of rotator cuff tears, ultrasonography in comparison with the arthroscopy has sensitivity and specificity of 92.85% and 100%. For detection of full thickness rotator cuff tear, its sensitivity and specificity was 94.73% and 100% and for partial thickness rotator cuff tears 76.92% and 100%. Ultrasonography has 100% sensitivity and specificity for detection of supraspinatus full thickness tear. For supraspinatus partial thickness tear, sensitivity and specificity was 88

  16. Tendon patch grafting using the long head of the biceps for irreparable massive rotator cuff tears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sano, Hirotaka; Itoi, Eiji; Mineta, Mitsuyoshi; Kita, Atsushi

    2010-01-01

    Surgical treatment of massive rotator cuff tears is challenging for shoulder surgeons. The purpose of this study was to investigate both clinical outcomes and cuff integrity after tendon patch grafting using the long head of the biceps (LHB) tendon for irreparable massive rotator cuff tears. A short deltoid splitting approach was used to expose the torn cuff tendon stump. After tenodesis of the LHB tendon, its intraarticular portion was resected. If the size of the harvested tendon was smaller than that of the cuff defect, it was split into two layers. Then, the LHB tendon was sutured to the remnant cuff tendons and fixed to the footprint using the transosseous suture technique. A total of 14 patients (12 men, 2 women; average age 64 years) underwent this procedure. The average postoperative follow-up period was 28 months (range 12-51 months). Active elevation angle of the shoulder as well as the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score were assessed before surgery and at the time of follow-up. Postoperative cuff integrity was assessed using T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). All cuff defects were successfully closed with this technique. Average active elevation angle improved from 69deg to 149deg. Total JOA score also improved from 54.7 points to 83.1 points. Thirteen shoulders showed no re-tearing on T2-weighted MRI; a minor discontinuity of the repaired cuff tendon was observed in the other shoulder. The LHB tendon is available in case tenodesis or tenotomy is needed. The resected tendon may be used as a graft for rotator cuff repair without any additional skin incision, which could reduce both the surgical invasion and the risk of infection. The LHB tendon patch grafting may be one of the useful options for surgical treatment of irreparable massive rotator cuff tears. (author)

  17. Meta-analysis of Clinical and Radiographic Outcomes After Arthroscopic Single-Row Versus Double-Row Rotator Cuff Repair

    OpenAIRE

    Perser, Karen; Godfrey, David; Bisson, Leslie

    2011-01-01

    Context: Double-row rotator cuff repair methods have improved biomechanical performance when compared with single-row repairs. Objective: To review clinical outcomes of single-row versus double-row rotator cuff repair with the hypothesis that double-row rotator cuff repair will result in better clinical and radiographic outcomes. Data Sources: Published literature from January 1980 to April 2010. Key terms included rotator cuff, prospective studies, outcomes, and suture techniques. Study Sele...

  18. Degree of tendon degeneration and stage of rotator cuff disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Chris Hyunchul; Shin, Won Hyoung; Park, Ji Wan; Shin, Ji Sun; Kim, Ji Eun

    2017-07-01

    While tendon degeneration has been known to be an important cause of rotator cuff disease, few studies have objectively proven the association of tendon degeneration and rotator cuff disease. The purpose of this study was to investigate changes of tendon degeneration with respect to the stage of rotator cuff disease. A total of 48 patients were included in the study: 12 with tendinopathy, 12 with a partial-thickness tear (pRCT), 12 with a full-thickness tear (fRCT), and 12 as the control. A full-thickness supraspinatus tendon sample was harvested en bloc from the middle portion between the lateral edge and the musculotendinous junction of the tendon using a biopsy punch with a diameter of 3 mm. Harvested samples were evaluated using a semi-quantitative grading scale with 7 parameters after haematoxylin and eosin staining. There was no significant difference in age, gender, symptom duration, and Kellgren-Lawrence grade between the groups except for the global fatty degeneration index. All of the seven parameters were significantly different between the groups and could be categorized as follows: early responders (fibre structure and arrangement), gradual responder (rounding of the nuclei), after-tear responders (cellularity, vascularity, and stainability), and late responder (hyalinization). The total degeneration scores were not significantly different between the control (6.08 ± 1.16) and tendinopathy (6.67 ± 1.83) (n.s.). However, the score of pRCT group (10.42 ± 1.31) was greater than that of tendinopathy (P rotator cuff disease progresses from tendinopathy to pRCT, and then to fRCT. The degree of degeneration of tendinopathy was not different from that of normal but aged tendons, and significant tendon degeneration began from the stage of pRCT. The clinical relevance of the study is that strategies and goals of the treatment for rotator cuff disease should be specific to its stage, in order to prevent disease progression for tendinopathy and pRCT, as

  19. [Evaluation of pain during mobilization and endotracheal aspiration in critical patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robleda, G; Roche-Campo, F; Membrilla-Martínez, L; Fernández-Lucio, A; Villamor-Vázquez, M; Merten, A; Gich, I; Mancebo, J; Català-Puigbó, E; Baños, J E

    2016-03-01

    1) To assess the prevalence of pain during nursing care procedures, and 2) to evaluate the usefulness of certain vital signs and the bispectral index (BIS) in detecting pain. A prospective, observational analytical study was made of procedures (endotracheal aspiration and mobilization with turning) in critically ill sedated patients on mechanical ventilation. The Behavioral Pain Scale was used to assess pain, with scores of ≥3 indicating pain. Various physiological signs and BIS values were recorded, with changes of >10% being considered clinically relevant. A total of 146 procedures in 70 patients were analyzed. Pain prevalence during the procedures was 94%. Vital signs and BIS values increased significantly during the procedures compared to resting conditions, but only the changes in BIS were considered clinically relevant. In the subgroup of patients receiving preemptive analgesia prior to the procedure, pain decreased significantly compared to the group of patients who received no such analgesia (-2 [IQR: {-5}-0] vs. 3 [IQR: 1-4]; P<.001, respectively). The procedures evaluated in this study are painful. Changes in vital signs are not good indicators of pain. Changes in BIS may provide useful information about pain, but more research is needed. The administration of preemptive analgesia decreases pain during the procedures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  20. Incidence and endoscopic characteristics of acute laryngeal lesions in children undergoing endotracheal intubation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliandra da Silveira de Lima

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: Acute laryngeal lesions after intubation appear to be precursors of chronic lesions. OBJECTIVE: To describe the incidence and type of acute laryngeal lesions after extubation in a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU. METHODS: A cohort study involving children from birth to <5 years, submitted to intubation for more than 24 h in the PICU of an university hospital. In the first eight hours after extubation, a flexible fiberoptic laryngoscopy (FFL was performed at the bedside. Those with moderate to severe abnormalities underwent a second examination seven to ten days later. RESULTS: 177 patients were included, with a median age of 2.46 months. The mean intubation time was 8.19 days. Seventy-three (41.2% patients had moderate or severe alterations at the FFL, with the remaining showing only minor alterations or normal results. During follow-up, 16 children from the group with moderate to severe lesions developed subglottic stenosis. One patient from the normal FFL group had subglottic stenosis, resulting in an incidence of 9.6% of chronic lesions. CONCLUSION: Most children in the study developed mild acute laryngeal lesions caused by endotracheal intubation, which improved in a few days after extubation.

  1. Correlation between oro and hypopharynx shape and position with endotracheal intubation difficulty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daher Rabadi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective: Prediction of intubation difficulty can save patients from major preoperative morbidity or mortality. The purpose of this paper is to assess the correlation between oro-hypo pharynx position, neck size, and length with endotracheal intubation difficulty. The study also explored the diagnostic value of Friedman Staging System in prediction cases with difficult intubation. Method: The consecutive 500 ASA (I, II adult patients undergoing elective surgery were evaluated for oro and hypopharynx shape and position by modified Mallampati, Cormack and Lehane score as well as Friedman obstructive sleep apnea classification systems. Neck circumference and length were also measured. All cases were intubated by a single anesthesiologist who was uninformed of the above evaluation and graded intubation difficulty in visual analog score. Correlation between these findings and difficulty of intubation was assessed. Sensitivity, Specificity, Positive and Negative Predictive Values were also reported. Results: Cormack-Lehane grade had the strongest correlation with difficulty of intubation followed by Friedman palate position. Friedman palate position was the most sensitive and had higher positive and negative predictive values than modified Mallampati classification. Cormack-Lehane grade was found to be the most specific with the highest negative predictive value among the four studied classifications. Conclusion: Friedman palate position is a more useful, valuable and sensitive test compared to the modified Mallampati screening test for pre-anesthetic prediction of difficult intubation where its involvement in Multivariate model may raise the accuracy and diagnostic value of preoperative assessment of difficult airway.

  2. Learning endotracheal intubation using a novel videolaryngoscope improves intubation skills of medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbstreit, Frank; Fassbender, Philipp; Haberl, Helge; Kehren, Clemens; Peters, Jürgen

    2011-09-01

    Teaching endotracheal intubation to medical students is a task provided by many academic anesthesia departments. We tested the hypothesis that teaching with a novel videolaryngoscope improves students' intubation skills. We prospectively assessed in medical students (2nd clinical year) intubation skills acquired by intubation attempts in adult anesthetized patients during a 60-hour clinical course using, in a randomized fashion, either a conventional Macintosh blade laryngoscope or a videolaryngoscope (C-MAC®). The latter permits direct laryngoscopy with a Macintosh blade and provides a color image on a video screen. Skills were measured before and after the course in a standardized fashion (METI Emergency Care Simulator) using a conventional laryngoscope. All 1-semester medical students (n = 93) were enrolled. The students' performance did not significantly differ between groups before the course. After the course, students trained with the videolaryngoscope had an intubation success rate on a manikin 19% higher (95% CI 1.1%-35.3%; P incidence of "difficult (manikin) laryngoscopy" was less frequent in the group trained with the videolaryngoscope (8% vs 34%; P = 0.005). Education using a video system mounted into a traditional Macintosh blade improves intubation skills in medical students.

  3. The active abduction view: A new maneuvre in the diagnosis of rotator cuff tears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloom, R.A.

    1991-01-01

    A new projection is described, the active abduction view of the shoulder, where in many patients with a comlete rotator cuff tear the humeral head is closely apposed to the acromion, obliterating the subacromial space. In such a situation,the medial portion of the torn rotator cuff retracts during active abduction, allowing approximation of the two bones. (orig./GDG)

  4. From the RSNA refresher courses: US of the rotator cuff: pitfalls, limitations, and artifacts.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, M.J.C.M.; Jager, G.J.; Blickman, J.G.

    2006-01-01

    High-resolution ultrasonography (US) has gained increasing popularity as a diagnostic tool for assessment of the soft tissues in shoulder impingement syndrome. US is a powerful and accurate method for diagnosis of rotator cuff tears and other rotator cuff abnormalities, provided the examiner has a

  5. From the RSNA refresher courses - US of the rotator cuff : Pitfalls, limitations, and artifacts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, Matthieu J. C. M.; Jager, Gerrit J.; Blickman, Johan G.

    2006-01-01

    High-resolution ultrasonography (US) has gained increasing popularity as a diagnostic tool for assessment of the soft tissues in shoulder impingement syndrome. US is a powerful and accurate method for diagnosis of rotator cuff tears and other rotator cuff abnormalities, provided the examiner has a

  6. Pathological muscle activation patterns in patients with massive rotator cuff tears, with and without subacromial anaesthetics.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenbrink, F.; Groot, J.H.; Veeger, H.E.J.; Meskers, C.G.M.; van de Sande, M.A.; Rozing, P.M.

    2006-01-01

    A mechanical deficit due to a massive rotator cuff tear is generally concurrent to a pain-induced decrease of maximum arm elevation and peak elevation torque. The purpose of this study was to measure shoulder muscle coordination in patients with massive cuff tears, including the effect of

  7. Rat rotator cuff muscle responds differently from hindlimb muscle to a combined tendon-nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Michael R; Ravishankar, Bharat; Laron, Dominique; Kim, Hubert T; Liu, Xuhui; Feeley, Brian T

    2015-07-01

    Rotator cuff tears (RCTs) are among the most common musculoskeletal injuries seen by orthopaedic surgeons. Clinically, massive cuff tears lead to unique pathophysiological changes in rotator cuff muscle, including atrophy, and massive fatty infiltration, which are rarely seen in other skeletal muscles. Studies in a rodent model for RCT have demonstrated that these histologic findings are accompanied by activation of the Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) pathways following combined tendon-nerve injury. The purpose of this study was to compare the histologic and molecular features of rotator cuff muscle and gastrocnemius muscle--a major hindlimb muscle, following combined tendon-nerve injury. Six weeks after injury, the rat gastrocnemius did not exhibit notable fatty infiltration compared to the rotator cuff. Likewise, the adipogenic markers SREBP-1 and PPARγ as well as the TGF-β canonical pathway were upregulated in the rotator cuff, but not the gastrocnemius. Our study suggests that the rat rotator cuff and hindlimb muscles differ significantly in their response to a combined tendon-nerve injury. Clinically, these findings highlight the unique response of the rotator cuff to injury, and may begin to explain the poor outcomes of massive RCTs compared to other muscle-tendon injuries. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Critical period and risk factors for retear following arthroscopic repair of the rotator cuff

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barth, J.; Andrieu, K.; Fotiadis, E.; Hannink, G.J.; Barthelemy, R.; Saffarini, M.

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: The incidence of retear following rotator cuff repair remains a major concern, and the cause and timing of retear remain unclear. The aim of this study was to prospectively investigate the timing of retears following rotator cuff repair at multiple time intervals. The hypothesis was that

  9. Comparing surgical repair with conservative treatment for degenerative rotator cuff tears : a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lambers Heerspink, Okke; van Raay, Jos J. A. M.; Koorevaar, Rinco C. T.; van Eerden, Pepijn J. M.; Westerbeek, Robin E.; van 't Riet, Esther; van den Akker-Scheek, Inge; Diercks, Ronald L.

    Background: Good clinical results have been reported for both surgical and conservative treatment of rotator cuff tears. The primary aim of this randomized controlled trial was to compare functional and radiologic improvement after surgical and conservative treatment of degenerative rotator cuff

  10. X-ray tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, R.W.

    1979-01-01

    A form of x-ray tube is described which provides satisfactory focussing of the electron beam when the beam extends for several feet from gun to target. Such a tube can be used for computerised tomographic scanning. (UK)

  11. Pressure tube type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komada, Masaoki.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To increase the safety of pressure tube type reactors by providing an additional ECCS system to an ordinary ECCS system and injecting heavy water in the reactor core tank into pressure tubes upon fractures of the tubes. Constitution: Upon fractures of pressure tubes, reduction of the pressure in the fractured tubes to the atmospheric pressure in confirmed and the electromagnetic valve is operated to completely isolate the pressure tubes from the fractured portion. Then, the heavy water in the reactor core tank flows into and spontaneously recycles through the pressure tubes to cool the fuels in the tube to prevent their meltdown. By additionally providing the separate ECCS system to the ordinary ECCS system, fuels can be cooled upon loss of coolant accidents to improve the safety of the reactors. (Moriyama, K.)

  12. Gastrostomy feeding tube - bolus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feeding - gastrostomy tube - bolus; G-tube - bolus; Gastrostomy button - bolus; Bard Button - bolus; MIC-KEY - bolus ... KEY, 3 to 8 weeks after surgery. These feedings will help your child grow strong and healthy. ...

  13. Feeding tube insertion - gastrostomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002937.htm Feeding tube insertion - gastrostomy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A gastrostomy feeding tube insertion is the placement of a feeding ...

  14. Neural Tube Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neural tube defects are birth defects of the brain, spine, or spinal cord. They happen in the ... that she is pregnant. The two most common neural tube defects are spina bifida and anencephaly. In ...

  15. NMR of the rotator cuff. An update; MRT der Rotatorenmanschette. Ein Update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreitner, Karl-Friedrich; Maehringer-Kunz, Aline [Universitaetsmedizin Mainz (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie

    2016-03-15

    The rotator cuff consists of the tendons of the supscapularis, supraspinatus, infraspinatus and teres minor muscles. This group of muscles performs multiple functions and is often stressed during various activities. This explains, why rotator cuff disease is common and the most often cause of shoulder pain and dysfunction in adults. MR imaging still is the most important imaging modality in assessment of rotator cuff disease. It enables the radiologist to make an accurate diagnosis, the basis for an appropriate management. In this article, current concepts with regard to anatomy and imaging diagnosis will be reviewed. The discussion of the complex anatomy is followed by normal and pathologic MR imaging appearances of the rotator cuff including tendinopathy and tearing, and concluding with a review of the postoperative cuff.

  16. Case Report of Acute Traumatic Rotator Cuff Tear Treatment in Traditional Korean Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong-Hwan Lee

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: There is no report on treatment of acute traumatic rotator cuff tear in Traditional Korean Medicine. We reported Traditional Korean Treatment for pain relief and better movement of acute traumatic rotator cuff tear. Methods: Shoulder MRI was used to confirm the diagnosis of tear of rotator cuff. The patient was treated with Traditional Korean Methods (Acupuncture, Herbal medicine, Pharmacopuncture for 6 months. We evaluated the patient through VAS (Visual Analogue Scale, UCLA shoulder scale, ROM (Range of motion and Shoulder MRI. Results: After 6 months of treatment, the patient's VAS was decreased whereas UCLA score and Shoulder ROM were increased. Rotator cuff tear was repaired on Shoulder MRI images. Conclusions: In acute traumatic rotator cuff tear, Korean Traditional Treatment is good method for pain relief and better movement.

  17. Assessment of musculoskeletal pain sensitivity and temporal summation by cuff pressure algometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graven-Nielsen, Thomas; Vaegter, Henrik Bjarke; Finocchietti, Sara

    2015-01-01

    ) conditioned pain modulation (CPM) assessed by cuff algometry. The influences of age and gender were evaluated. On two different days, cuff pain threshold (cPPT), cuff pain tolerance (cPTT), and temporal summation of pain (TSP) by visual analogue scale scores to 10 repeated cuff stimulations at cPTT intensity......, as well as pressure pain threshold (PPT) with handheld pressure algometry were assessed in 136 healthy subjects. In one session cuff pain sensitivity was also assessed before and after the cold-pressor induced CPM. Good to excellent intraclass correlations (ICCs: 0.60 - 0.90) were demonstrated for manual.......05). TSP were increased in women compared with men (PCPM demonstrated as increased cPPT, cPTT and reduced TSP (P

  18. Preliminary Results of a Consecutive Series of Large & Massive Rotator Cuff Tears Treated with Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repairs Augmented with Extracellular Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Consigliere

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recurrence rate of rotator cuff tears is still high despite the improvements of surgical techniques, materials used and a better knowledge of the healing process of the rotator cuff tendons. Large to massive rotator cuff tears are particularly associated with a high failure rate, especially in elderly. Augmentation of rotator cuff repairs with extracellular matrix or synthetic patches has gained popularity in recent years with the aim of reducing failure.The aim of this study was to investigate the outcome of rotator cuff repairs augmented with denatured extracellular matrix in a series of patients who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair for large to massive tears.Methods: Ten consecutive patients, undergoing arthroscopic rotator cuff repair with extracellular matrix augment for large and massive tears, were prospectively enrolled into this single surgeon study. All repairs were performed arthroscopically with a double row technique augmented with extracellular matrix. Oxford Shoulder Score, Constant Score and pain visual analogue scale (VAS were used to monitor the shoulder function and outcome pre-operatively and at three, six and 12-month follow-up. Minimum follow up was tree months. Mean follow up was 7 months.Results: Mean Constant score improved from 53 (SD=4 pre-operatively to 75 (SD=11 at final follow up. Mean Oxford score also increased from 30 (SD=8 pre-operatively to 47 (SD=10 at the final follow up. The visual analogue scale (VAS improved from seven out of 10 (SD=2 preoperatively to 0.6 (SD=0.8 at final follow up. Additionally, there was significant improvement at three months mark in Constant score. Conclusion: Arthroscopic repair and augmentation of large and massive rotator cuff tears with extracellular matrix patch has good early outcome.

  19. Evaluation of indirect blood pressure monitoring in awake and anesthetized red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis): effects of cuff size, cuff placement, and monitoring equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zehnder, Ashley M; Hawkins, Michelle G; Pascoe, Peter J; Kass, Philip H

    2009-09-01

    To compare Doppler and oscillometric methods of indirect arterial blood pressure (IBP) with direct arterial measurements in anesthetized and awake red-tailed hawks. Prospective, randomized, blinded study. Six, sex unknown, adult red-tailed hawks. Birds were anesthetized and IBP measurements were obtained by oscillometry (IBP-O) and Doppler (IBP-D) on the pectoral and pelvic limbs using three cuffs of different width based on limb circumference: cuff 1 (20-30% of circumference), cuff 2 (30-40%), and cuff 3 (40-50%). Direct arterial pressure measurements were obtained from the contralateral superficial ulnar artery. Indirect blood pressure measurements were compared to direct systolic arterial pressure (SAP) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) during normotension and induced states of hypotension and hypertension. Measurements were also obtained in awake, restrained birds. Three-way anova, linear regression and Bland-Altman analyses were used to evaluate the IBP-D data. Results are reported as mean bias (95% confidence intervals). The IBP-O monitor reported errors during 54% of the measurements. Indirect blood pressure Doppler measurements were most accurate with cuff 3 and were comparable to MAP with a bias of 2 (-9, 13 mmHg). However, this cuff consistently underestimated SAP with a bias of 33 (19, 48 mmHg). Variability in the readings within and among birds was high. There was no significant difference between sites of cuff placement. Awake birds had SAP, MAP and diastolic arterial pressure that were 56, 43, and 38 mmHg higher than anesthetized birds. Indirect blood pressure (oscillometric) measurements were unreliable in red-tailed hawks. Indirect blood pressure (Doppler) measurements were closer to MAP measurements than SAP measurements. There was slightly better agreement with the use of cuff 3 on either the pectoral or pelvic limbs. Awake, restrained birds have significantly higher arterial pressures than those under sevoflurane anesthesia.

  20. Effects of asymptomatic rotator cuff pathology on in vivo shoulder motion and clinical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumer, Timothy G; Dischler, Jack; Mende, Veronica; Zauel, Roger; van Holsbeeck, Marnix; Siegal, Daniel S; Divine, George; Moutzouros, Vasilios; Bey, Michael J

    2017-06-01

    The incidence of asymptomatic rotator cuff tears has been reported to range from 15% to 39%, but the influence of asymptomatic rotator cuff pathology on shoulder function is not well understood. This study assessed the effects of asymptomatic rotator cuff pathology on shoulder kinematics, strength, and patient-reported outcomes. A clinical ultrasound examination was performed in 46 asymptomatic volunteers (age: 60.3 ± 7.5 years) with normal shoulder function to document the condition of their rotator cuff. The ultrasound imaging identified the participants as healthy (n = 14) or pathologic (n = 32). Shoulder motion was measured with a biplane x-ray imaging system, strength was assessed with a Biodex (Biodex Medical Systems, Inc., Shirley, NY, USA), and patient-reported outcomes were assessed using the Western Ontario Rotator Cuff Index and visual analog scale pain scores. Compared with healthy volunteers, those with rotator cuff pathology had significantly less abduction (P = .050) and elevation (P = .041) strength, their humerus was positioned more inferiorly on the glenoid (P = .018), and the glenohumeral contact path length was longer (P = .007). No significant differences were detected in the Western Ontario Rotator Cuff Index, visual analog scale, range of motion, or acromiohumeral distance. The differences observed between the healthy volunteers and those with asymptomatic rotator cuff pathology lend insight into the changes in joint mechanics, shoulder strength, and conventional clinical outcomes associated with the early stages of rotator cuff pathology. Furthermore, these findings suggest a plausible mechanical progression of kinematic and strength changes associated with the development of rotator cuff pathology. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. What do standard radiography and clinical examination tell about the shoulder with cuff tear arthropathy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Favard Luc

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study evaluates the preoperative conventional anteroposterior radiography and clinical testing in non-operated patients with cuff tear arthropathy. It analyses the radiological findings in relation to the status of the rotator cuff and clinical status as also the clinical testing in relation to the rotator cuff quality. The aim of the study is to define the usefulness of radiography and clinical examination in cuff tear arthropathy. Methods This study analyses the preoperative radiological (AP-view, (Artro-CT-scan or MRI-scan and clinical characteristics (Constant-Murley-score plus active and passive mobility testing and the peroperative findings in a cohort of 307 patients. These patients were part of a multicenter, retrospective, consecutive study of the French Orthopaedic Society (SOFCOT-2006. All patients had no surgical antecedents and were all treated with prosthetic shoulder surgery for a painful irreparable cuff tear arthropathy (reverse-(84% or hemi-(8% or double cup-bipolar prosthesis (8%. Results A positive significancy could be found for the relationship between clinical testing and the rotator cuff quality; between acromiohumeral distance and posterior rotator cuff quality; between femoralization and posterior rotator cuff quality. Conclusion A conventional antero-posterior radiograph can not provide any predictive information on the clinical status of the patient. The subscapular muscle can be well tested by the press belly test and the teres minor muscle can be well tested by the hornblower' sign and by the exorotation lag signs. The upward migration index and the presence of femoralization are good indicators for the evaluation of the posterior rotator cuff. An inferior coracoid tip positioning suggests rotator cuff disease.

  2. Will Preoperative Atrophy and Fatty Degeneration of the Shoulder Muscles Improve after Rotator Cuff Repair in Patients with Massive Rotator Cuff Tears?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Yamaguchi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, retear rate after repair for massive cuff tear have been improved through devised suture techniques. However, reported retear rate is relevant to preoperative atrophy and fatty degeneration. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether preoperative atrophy and fatty degeneration of rotator cuff muscles improve by successful repair. Twenty-four patients with massive rotator cuff tear were evaluated on the recovery of atrophy and fatty degeneration of supraspinatus and infraspinatus muscle after surgery. Atrophy was classified by the occupation ratio and fatty degeneration by modified Goutallier's classification. Both were assessed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI before and after the operation. When the cuff was well repaired, improvement of the atrophy and fatty degeneration were observed in a half and a one-fourth of the cases, respectively. In retear cases, however, atrophy and fatty degeneration became worse. Improvement of atrophy and fatty degeneration of the rotator cuff muscles may be expected in the cases with successful achievement of rotator cuff repair for large and massive tear.

  3. MRI in diagnosing partial thickness tears of the rotator cuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Takeshi

    2000-01-01

    In this study 270 patients who had been treated for 10 years and had suspected rupture of the tendon and complete or partial thickness tears of the rotator cuff were diagnosed. Among these patients, MRI images in 50 cases were investigated to establish the diagnostic criteria for partial thickness tears of the rotator cuff. The rupture sites included the bursal surface in 15 shoulders, the articular surface in 30 shoulders, complicated cases of both surfaces in five shoulders with no intrasubstance. As for the imaging method, T2-weighted images were employed and the oblique coronary section, which is parallel to the scapula, was used as a imaging plane. From the results of the variation of the MRI signal intensity in the tendon, it was found that the signal intensity increased to 80% in the rupture of the bursal surface and 93.3% in the rupture of the articular surface. As for sites where the signals in the tendon increased, these were found at the bursal side in 83.3% of rupture at the bursal surface, and at the articular side in 100% of rupture at the articular surface. From these findings, the MRI-diagnostic criteria of partial thickness tears of the rotator cuff was defined as those cases which show a localized increase in signal intensity on the oblique coronary surface of T2 weighted images, but not in whole layers of the tendon. A high diagnostic rate with these criteria could be obtained with a sensitivity of 82.0%, specificity 90.9%, accuracy 84.7%, and positive predictive value 95.3%. (author)

  4. Muscle architectural changes after massive human rotator cuff tear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, Michael C; Sato, Eugene J; Bachasson, Damien; Cheng, Timothy; Azimi, Hassan; Schenk, Simon; Engler, Adam J; Singh, Anshuman; Ward, Samuel R

    2016-12-01

    Rotator cuff (RC) tendon tears lead to negative structural and functional changes in the associated musculature. The structural features of muscle that predict function are termed "muscle architecture." Although the architectural features of "normal" rotator cuff muscles are known, they are poorly understood in the context of cuff pathology. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of tear and repair on RC muscle architecture. To this end thirty cadaveric shoulders were grouped into one of four categories based on tear magnitude: Intact, Full-thickness tear (FTT), Massive tear (MT), or Intervention if sutures or hardware were present, and key parameters of muscle architecture were measured. We found that muscle mass and fiber length decreased proportionally with tear size, with significant differences between all groups. Conversely, sarcomere number was reduced in both FTT and MT with no significant difference between these two groups, in large part because sarcomere length was significantly reduced in MT but not FTT. The loss of muscle mass in FTT is due, in part, to subtraction of serial sarcomeres, which may help preserve sarcomere length. This indicates that function in FTT may be impaired, but there is some remaining mechanical loading to maintain "normal" sarcomere length-tension relationships. However, the changes resulting from MT suggest more severe limitations in force-generating capacity because sarcomere length-tension relationships are no longer normal. The architectural deficits observed in MT muscles may indicate deeper deficiencies in muscle adaptability to length change, which could negatively impact RC function despite successful anatomical repair. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:2089-2095, 2016. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Dextrose Prolotherapy Versus Control Injections in Painful Rotator Cuff Tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Helene; Reeves, Kenneth Dean; Bennett, Cameron J; Bicknell, Simon; Cheng, An-Lin

    2016-01-01

    To compare the effect of dextrose prolotherapy on pain levels and degenerative changes in painful rotator cuff tendinopathy against 2 potentially active control injection procedures. Randomized controlled trial, blinded to participants and evaluators. Outpatient pain medicine practice. Persons (N=73) with chronic shoulder pain, examination findings of rotator cuff tendinopathy, and ultrasound-confirmed supraspinatus tendinosis/tear. Three monthly injections either (1) onto painful entheses with dextrose (Enthesis-Dextrose), (2) onto entheses with saline (Enthesis-Saline), or (3) above entheses with saline (Superficial-Saline). All solutions included 0.1% lidocaine. All participants received concurrent programmed physical therapy. Primary: participants achieving an improvement in maximal current shoulder pain ≥2.8 (twice the minimal clinically important difference for visual analog scale pain) or not. Secondary: improvement in the Ultrasound Shoulder Pathology Rating Scale (USPRS) and a 0-to-10 satisfaction score (10, completely satisfied). The 73 participants had moderate to severe shoulder pain (7.0±2.0) for 7.6±9.6 years. There were no baseline differences between groups. Blinding was effective. At 9-month follow-up, 59% of Enthesis-Dextrose participants maintained ≥2.8 improvement in pain compared with Enthesis-Saline (37%; P=.088) and Superficial-Saline (27%; P=.017). Enthesis-Dextrose participants' satisfaction was 6.7±3.2 compared with Enthesis-Saline (4.7±4.1; P=.079) and Superficial-Saline (3.9±3.1; P=.003). USPRS findings were not different between groups (P=.734). In participants with painful rotator cuff tendinopathy who receive physical therapy, injection of hypertonic dextrose on painful entheses resulted in superior long-term pain improvement and patient satisfaction compared with blinded saline injection over painful entheses, with intermediate results for entheses injection with saline. These differences could not be attributed to a

  6. Pulmonary Embolism after Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadashi Yamamoto

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Total hip/knee arthroplasty may cause venous thromboembolism (VTE as a postoperative complication. However, there are few reports on VTE after arthroscopic shoulder surgery. We report a patient who developed pulmonary embolism (PE 6 days after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair but recovered without sequelae. In this case, the possibility of DVT of the lower limbs was denied by contrast-enhanced CT. Most possibly, the source of PE was deep vein thrombosis (DVT of the upper limb under Desault fixation which showed arthroscopic surgery-related swelling postoperatively.

  7. Evaluation of the Trends, Concomitant Procedures, and Complications With Open and Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repairs in the Medicare Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Andrew R; Cha, Peter S; Devana, Sai K; Ishmael, Chad; Di Pauli von Treuheim, Theo; D'Oro, Anthony; Wang, Jeffrey C; McAllister, David R; Petrigliano, Frank A

    2017-10-01

    Medicare insures the largest population of patients at risk for rotator cuff tears in the United States. To evaluate the trends in incidence, concomitant procedures, and complications with open and arthroscopic rotator cuff repairs in Medicare patients. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. All Medicare patients who had undergone open or arthroscopic rotator cuff repair from 2005 through 2011 were identified with a claims database. Annual incidence, concomitant procedures, and postoperative complications were compared between these 2 groups. In total, 372,109 rotator cuff repairs were analyzed. The incidence of open repairs decreased (from 6.0 to 4.3 per 10,000 patients, P rotator cuff repairs have increased in incidence and now represent the majority of rotator cuff repair surgery. Among concomitant procedures, subacromial decompression was most commonly performed despite evidence suggesting a lack of efficacy. Infections and stiffness were rare complications that were slightly but significantly more frequent in open rotator cuff repairs.

  8. Epidemiology, natural history, and indications for treatment of rotator cuff tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashjian, Robert Z

    2012-10-01

    The etiology of rotator cuff disease is likely multifactorial, including age-related degeneration and microtrauma and macrotrauma. The incidence of rotator cuff tears increases with aging with more than half of individuals in their 80s having a rotator cuff tear. Smoking, hypercholesterolemia, and genetics have all been shown to influence the development of rotator cuff tearing. Substantial full-thickness rotator cuff tears, in general, progress and enlarge with time. Pain, or worsening pain, usually signals tear progression in both asymptomatic and symptomatic tears and should warrant further investigation if the tear is treated conservatively. Larger (>1-1.5 cm) symptomatic full-thickness cuff tears have a high rate of tear progression and, therefore, should be considered for earlier surgical repair in younger patients if the tear is reparable and there is limited muscle degeneration to avoid irreversible changes to the cuff, including tear enlargement and degenerative muscle changes. Smaller symptomatic full-thickness tears have been shown to have a slower rate of progression, similar to partial-thickness tears, and can be considered for initial nonoperative treatment due to the limited risk for rapid tear progression. In both small full-thickness tears and partial-thickness tears, increasing pain should alert physicians to obtain further imaging as it can signal tear progression. Natural history data, along with information on factors affecting healing after rotator cuff repair, can help guide surgeons in making appropriate decisions regarding the treatment of rotator cuff tears. The management of rotator cuff tears should be considered in the context of the risks and benefits of operative versus nonoperative treatment. Tear size and acuity, the presence of irreparable changes to the rotator cuff or glenohumeral joint, and patient age should all be considered in making this decision. Initial nonoperative care can be safely undertaken in older patients (>70

  9. Heat exchanger tube tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gugel, G.

    1976-01-01

    Certain types of heat-exchangers have tubes opening through a tube sheet to a manifold having an access opening offset from alignment with the tube ends. A tool for inserting a device, such as for inspection or repair, is provided for use in such instances. The tool is formed by a flexible guide tube insertable through the access opening and having an inner end provided with a connector for connection with the opening of the tube in which the device is to be inserted, and an outer end which remains outside of the chamber, the guide tube having adequate length for this arrangement. A flexible transport hose for internally transporting the device slides inside of the guide tube. This hose is long enough to slide through the guide tube, into the heat-exchanger tube, and through the latter to the extent required for the use of the device. The guide tube must be bent to reach the end of the heat-exchanger tube and the latter may be constructed with a bend, the hose carrying anit-friction elements at interspaced locations along its length to make it possible for the hose to negotiate such bends while sliding to the location where the use of the device is required

  10. Resuscitation Prior to Emergency Endotracheal Intubation: Results of a National Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert S. Green

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Respiratory failure is a common problem in emergency medicine (EM and critical care medicine (CCM. However, little is known about the resuscitation of critically ill patients prior to emergency endotracheal intubation (EETI. Our aim was to describe the resuscitation practices of EM and CCM physicians prior to EETI. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was developed and tested for content validity and retest reliability by members of the Canadian Critical Care Trials Group. The questionnaire was distributed to all EM and CCM physician members of three national organizations. Using three clinical scenarios (trauma, pneumonia, congestive heart failure, we assessed physician preferences for use and types of fluid and vasopressor medication in pre-EETI resuscitation of critically ill patients. Results: In total, 1,758 physicians were surveyed (response rate 50.2%, 882/1,758. Overall, physicians would perform pre-EETI resuscitation using either fluids or vasopressors in 54% (1,193/2,203 of cases. Most physicians would “always/often” administer intravenous fluid pre-EETI in the three clinical scenarios (81%, 1,484/1,830. Crystalloids were the most common fluid physicians would “always/often” administer in congestive heart failure (EM 43%; CCM 44%, pneumonia (EM 97%; CCM 95% and trauma (EM 96%; CCM 96%. Pre-EETI resuscitation using vasopressors was uncommon (4.9%. Training in CCM was associated with performing pre-EETI resuscitation (odds ratio, 2.20; 95% CI, [1.44-3.36], p<0.001. Conclusion: Pre-EETI resuscitation is common among Canadian EM and CCM physicians. Most physicians use crystalloids pre-EETI as a resuscitation fluid, while few would give vasopressors. Physicians with CCM training were more likely to perform pre-EETI resuscitation.

  11. Apneic oxygenation reduces hypoxemia during endotracheal intubation in the pediatric emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukovic, Adam A; Hanson, Holly R; Murphy, Shelley L; Mercurio, Danielle; Sheedy, Craig A; Arnold, Donald H

    2018-04-18

    Apneic oxygenation (AO) has been evaluated in adult patients as a means of reducing hypoxemia during endotracheal intubation (ETI). While less studied in pediatric patients, its practice has been largely adopted. Determine association between AO and hypoxemia in pediatric patients undergoing ETI. Observational study at an urban, tertiary children's hospital emergency department. Pediatric patients undergoing ETI were examined during eras without (January 2011-June 2011) and with (August 2014-March 2017) apneic oxygenation. The primary outcome was hypoxemia, defined as pulse oximetry (SpO 2 ) < 90%. The χ 2 and Wilcoxon rank-sum tests examined differences between cohorts. Multivariable regression models examined adjusted associations between covariates and hypoxemia. 149 patients were included. Cohorts were similar except for greater incidence of altered mental status in those receiving AO (26% vs. 7%, p = 0.03). Nearly 50% of the pre-AO cohort experienced hypoxemia during ETI, versus <25% in the AO cohort. Median [IQR] lowest SpO 2 during ETI was 93 (69, 99) for pre-AO and 100 [95, 100] for the AO cohort (p < 0.001). In a multivariable logistic regression model, hypoxemia during ETI was associated with AO (aOR 0.3, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.1-0.8), increased age (for 1 year, aOR 0.8, 95% CI 0.7-1.0), lowest SpO 2 before ETI (for 1% increase, aOR 0.9, 95% CI 0.8-1.0), and each additional intubation attempt (aOR 4.0, 95% CI 2.2-7.2). Apneic oxygenation is an easily-applied intervention associated with decreases in hypoxemia during pediatric ETI. Nearly 50% of children not receiving AO experienced hypoxemia. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Intercostal drainage tube or intracardiac drainage tube?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Anitha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although insertion of chest drain tubes is a common medical practice, there are risks associated with this procedure, especially when inexperienced physicians perform it. Wrong insertion of the tube has been known to cause morbidity and occasional mortality. We report a case where the left ventricle was accidentally punctured leading to near-exsanguination. This report is to highlight the need for experienced physicians to supervise the procedure and train the younger physician in the safe performance of the procedure.

  13. Intercostal drainage tube or intracardiac drainage tube?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anitha, N; Kamath, S Ganesh; Khymdeit, Edison; Prabhu, Manjunath

    2016-01-01

    Although insertion of chest drain tubes is a common medical practice, there are risks associated with this procedure, especially when inexperienced physicians perform it. Wrong insertion of the tube has been known to cause morbidity and occasional mortality. We report a case where the left ventricle was accidentally punctured leading to near-exsanguination. This report is to highlight the need for experienced physicians to supervise the procedure and train the younger physician in the safe performance of the procedure.

  14. NEI You Tube Videos: Amblyopia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... YouTube Videos » NEI YouTube Videos: Amblyopia Listen NEI YouTube Videos YouTube Videos Home Age-Related Macular Degeneration ... Retinopathy of Prematurity Science Spanish Videos Webinars NEI YouTube Videos: Amblyopia Embedded video for NEI YouTube Videos: ...

  15. Effects of Lavender Inhalant on the Pain during Endotracheal Suctioning in Intensive Care Unit Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Taheri Rezgh Abadi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Patients undergoing artificial ventilation require tracheal tube suction because of inability to clear their effective airways, which is usually a painful process for the patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of spike lavender’s inhalant on pain during tracheal tube suctioning in ICU intubated patients. Materials & Methods: In this double-blinded randomized clinical trial, 60 intubated patients hospitalized in ICU of Shahid Modarres Hospital of Kashmar City, Iran, in 2017 were selected by available and simple sampling method, and were randomly divided into 2 control and case groups (each 30 individuals. Before the standard suctioning process, the test group patients received inhalant of 2% spike lavender for 5 minutes and the control group received inhalant of distilled water. The level of pain was recorded before and during tracheal tube suctioning. Data were analyzed by SPSS 16 software using independent T, paired T, Fisher and Mann-Whitney U tests. Findings: There was no significant difference in pain score before tracheal tube suction between 2 groups (p>0.05. However, there were significant differences between the level of pain during tracheal tube suctioning and the pain was increased in both groups, but this increase was significantly higher in the control group (p<0.001. Conclusion: Spike lavender’s inhalant is effective on pain reduction during suctioning process of ICU intubated patients.

  16. Evaluation of post-exercise magnetic resonance images of the rotator cuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cahoy, P.M.; Orwin, J.F.; Tuite, M.J.

    1996-01-01

    Objective. To examine the effect of strenuous exercise on the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics of the rotator cuff tendon. A second objective was to define an optimal time to image the rotator cuff and possibly eliminate exercise-induced false positives. Design and patients. Five male subjects from 24 to 38 years old with normal rotator cuffs by history, physical examination, and screening MRI underwent a rotator cuff exercise session on the Biodex System 2 (Biodex, Shirley, New York). The exercise sessions were followed by sequential MRI scans of the exercised shoulder. These were performed immediately and at 8 h and 24 h after exercise. Results and conclusions. The rotator cuff tendon and subacromial-subdeltoid bursal signal remained unchanged from the pre-exercise through the 24-h post-exercise scans. The rotator cuff muscle signal was increased in five of five subjects on the immediate post-exercise fat-suppressed T2-weighted images. This signal returned to baseline by the 8-h scan. Positive findings of rotator cuff pathology on MRI after strenuous athletic activity should not be discounted as normal exercise-induced changes. Also, diagnostic MRI scanning may take place after a practice session without an increased risk of false positives. (orig.). With 1 fig

  17. Acromion Index in Korean Population and Its Relationship with Rotator Cuff Tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kum, Dong Ho; Kim, Jun Ho; Park, Keun Min; Lee, Eun Su; Park, Yong Bok; Yoo, Jae Chul

    2017-06-01

    Among the many causes of rotator cuff tears, scapular morphology is associated with the accelerating degenerative process of the rotator cuff. Acromion index (AI) was previously introduced and compared in two populations. We enrolled 100 Korean patients diagnosed with full-thickness rotator cuff tears by magnetic resonance imaging and intraoperative arthroscopic findings between January and December 2013. Another 100 Korean patients with an intact rotator cuff tendon identified on magnetic resonance imaging and other shoulder diseases, such as frozen shoulder and instability, were enrolled as controls. We retrospectively compared these 100 rotator cuff tear patients (mean age, 63 years) and 100 controls (mean age, 51 years) in this study. Two independent orthopedic surgeons assessed the AI on radiographs. We performed an interobserver reliability test of the AI assessment, and then compared the AI between two groups. The measurement of the AI showed excellent reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.82). The mean AI in the rotator cuff tear group was 0.68 and it was significantly different between groups ( p rotator cuff tears in a Korean population.

  18. The effect of a rotator cuff tear and its size on three-dimensional shoulder motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolk, Arjen; Henseler, Jan Ferdinand; de Witte, Pieter Bas; van Zwet, Erik W; van der Zwaal, Peer; Visser, Cornelis P J; Nagels, Jochem; Nelissen, Rob G H H; de Groot, Jurriaan H

    2017-06-01

    Rotator cuff-disease is associated with changes in kinematics, but the effect of a rotator cuff-tear and its size on shoulder kinematics is still unknown in-vivo. In this cross-sectional study, glenohumeral and scapulothoracic kinematics of the affected shoulder were evaluated using electromagnetic motion analysis in 109 patients with 1) subacromial pain syndrome (n=34), 2) an isolated supraspinatus tear (n=21), and 3) a massive rotator cuff tear involving the supraspinatus and infraspinatus (n=54). Mixed models were applied for the comparisons of shoulder kinematics between the three groups during abduction and forward flexion. In the massive rotator cuff-tear group, we found reduced glenohumeral elevation compared to the subacromial pain syndrome (16°, 95% CI [10.5, 21.2], protator cuff tears coincides with an increase in scapulothoracic lateral rotation compared to subacromial pain syndrome (11°, 95% CI [6.5, 15.2], protator cuff-tear group had substantially less glenohumeral elevation and more scapulothoracic lateral rotation compared to the other groups. These observations suggest that the infraspinatus is essential to preserve glenohumeral elevation in the presence of a supraspinatus tear. Shoulder kinematics are associated with rotator cuff-tear size and may have diagnostic potential. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Evaluation of post-exercise magnetic resonance images of the rotator cuff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cahoy, P M [Division of Orthopedic Surgery G5/358, University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Madison, WI (United States); Orwin, J F [Division of Orthopedic Surgery G5/358, University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Madison, WI (United States); Tuite, M J [Department of Radiology, University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Madison, WI (United States)

    1996-11-01

    Objective. To examine the effect of strenuous exercise on the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics of the rotator cuff tendon. A second objective was to define an optimal time to image the rotator cuff and possibly eliminate exercise-induced false positives. Design and patients. Five male subjects from 24 to 38 years old with normal rotator cuffs by history, physical examination, and screening MRI underwent a rotator cuff exercise session on the Biodex System 2 (Biodex, Shirley, New York). The exercise sessions were followed by sequential MRI scans of the exercised shoulder. These were performed immediately and at 8 h and 24 h after exercise. Results and conclusions. The rotator cuff tendon and subacromial-subdeltoid bursal signal remained unchanged from the pre-exercise through the 24-h post-exercise scans. The rotator cuff muscle signal was increased in five of five subjects on the immediate post-exercise fat-suppressed T2-weighted images. This signal returned to baseline by the 8-h scan. Positive findings of rotator cuff pathology on MRI after strenuous athletic activity should not be discounted as normal exercise-induced changes. Also, diagnostic MRI scanning may take place after a practice session without an increased risk of false positives. (orig.). With 1 fig.

  20. Rotator cuff tear reduces muscle fiber specific force production and induces macrophage accumulation and autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumucio, Jonathan P; Davis, Max E; Bradley, Joshua R; Stafford, Patrick L; Schiffman, Corey J; Lynch, Evan B; Claflin, Dennis R; Bedi, Asheesh; Mendias, Christopher L

    2012-12-01

    Full-thickness tears to the rotator cuff can cause severe pain and disability. Untreated tears progress in size and are associated with muscle atrophy and an infiltration of fat to the area, a condition known as "fatty degeneration." To improve the treatment of rotator cuff tears, a greater understanding of the changes in the contractile properties of muscle fibers and the molecular regulation of fatty degeneration is essential. Using a rat model of rotator cuff injury, we measured the force generating capacity of individual muscle fibers and determined changes in muscle fiber type distribution that develop after a full thickness rotator cuff tear. We also measured the expression of mRNA and miRNA transcripts involved in muscle atrophy, lipid accumulation, and matrix synthesis. We hypothesized that a decrease in specific force of rotator cuff muscle fibers, an accumulation of type IIb fibers, and an upregulation in fibrogenic, adipogenic, and inflammatory gene expression occur in torn rotator cuff muscles. Thirty days following rotator cuff tear, we observed a reduction in muscle fiber force production, an induction of fibrogenic, adipogenic, and autophagocytic mRNA and miRNA molecules, and a dramatic accumulation of macrophages in areas of fat accumulation. Copyright © 2012 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  1. The global percutaneous shuttling technique tip for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan G. Vopat

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Most arthroscopic rotator cuff repairs utilize suture passing devices placed through arthro- scopic cannulas. These devices are limited by the size of the passing device where the suture is passed through the tendon. An alternative technique has been used in the senior author’s practice for the past ten years, where sutures are placed through the rotator cuff tendon using percutaneous passing devices. This technique, dubbed the global percutaneous shuttling technique of rotator cuff repair, affords the placement of sutures from nearly any angle and location in the shoulder, and has the potential advantage of larger suture bites through the tendon edge. These advantages may increase the area of tendon available to compress to the rotator cuff footprint and improve tendon healing and outcomes. The aim of this study is to describe the global percutaneous shuttling (GPS technique and report our results using this method. The GPS technique can be used for any full thickness rotator cuff tear and is particularly useful for massive cuff tears with poor tissue quality. We recently followed up 22 patients with an average follow up of 32 months to validate its usefulness. American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons scores improved significantly from 37 preoperatively to 90 postoperatively (P<0.0001. This data supports the use of the GPS technique for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Further biomechanical studies are currently being performed to assess the improvements in tendon footprint area with this technique.

  2. Recovery of Muscle Strength After Intact Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair According to Preoperative Rotator Cuff Tear Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sang-Jin; Chung, Jaeyoon; Lee, Juyeob; Ko, Young-Won

    2016-04-01

    The recovery of muscle strength after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair based on the preoperative tear size has not yet been well described. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the recovery period of muscle strength by a serial assessment of isometric strength after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair based on the preoperative tear size. The hypothesis was that muscle strength in patients with small and medium tears would recover faster than that in those with large-to-massive tears. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. A total of 164 patients who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair were included. Isometric strength in forward flexion (FF), internal rotation (IR), and external rotation (ER) was evaluated preoperatively and at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months after surgery. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging scans were assessed to evaluate the quality of the rotator cuff muscle, including fatty infiltration, occupation ratio, and tangent sign. Patient satisfaction as well as visual analog scale (VAS) for pain, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES), and Constant scores were assessed at every follow-up. Muscle strength demonstrated the slowest recovery in pain relief and the restoration of shoulder function. To reach the strength of the uninjured contralateral shoulder in all 3 planes of motion, recovery took 6 months in patients with small tears and 18 months in patients with medium tears. Patients with large-to-massive tears showed continuous improvement in strength up to 18 months; however, they did not reach the strength of the contralateral shoulder at final follow-up. At final follow-up, mean strength in FF, IR, and ER was 113.0%, 118.0%, and 112.6% of the contralateral shoulder in patients with small tears, respectively; 105.0%, 112.1%, and 102.6% in patients with medium tears, respectively; and 87.6%, 89.5%, and 85.2% in patients with large-to-massive tears, respectively. Muscle strength in any direction did not significantly correlate with

  3. Studies of the Effects of Perfluorocarbon Emulsions on Platelet Number and Function in Models of Critical Battlefield Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    intubated with an endotracheal tube (ID= 9~10 mm with cuff), an orogastric tube placed to expel vomit, and ventilated with mixed nitrogen/oxygen (80:20...were a few measurements of data which drifted away from baseline without clear reason (might be the size of sheep platelet is smaller than human’s...D) sections. An air blast pressure wave is created by building up pressure behind mylar membrane clamped between the driver (A) and transition

  4. Dynamic Three-Dimensional Shoulder Mri during Active Motion for Investigation of Rotator Cuff Diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Tempelaere

    Full Text Available MRI is the standard methodology in diagnosis of rotator cuff diseases. However, many patients continue to have pain despite treatment, and MRI of a static unloaded shoulder seems insufficient for best diagnosis and treatment. This study evaluated if Dynamic MRI provides novel kinematic data that can be used to improve the understanding, diagnosis and best treatment of rotator cuff diseases.Dynamic MRI provided real-time 3D image series and was used to measure changes in the width of subacromial space, superior-inferior translation and anterior-posterior translation of the humeral head relative to the glenoid during active abduction. These measures were investigated for consistency with the rotator cuff diseases classifications from standard MRI.The study included: 4 shoulders with massive rotator cuff tears, 5 shoulders with an isolated full-thickness supraspinatus tear, 5 shoulders with tendinopathy and 6 normal shoulders. A change in the width of subacromial space greater than 4mm differentiated between rotator cuff diseases with tendon tears (massive cuff tears and supraspinatus tear and without tears (tendinopathy (p = 0.012. The range of the superior-inferior translation was higher in the massive cuff tears group (6.4mm than in normals (3.4mm (p = 0.02. The range of the anterior-posterior translation was higher in the massive cuff tears (9.2 mm and supraspinatus tear (9.3 mm shoulders compared to normals (3.5mm and tendinopathy (4.8mm shoulders (p = 0.05.The Dynamic MRI enabled a novel measure; 'Looseness', i.e. the translation of the humeral head on the glenoid during an abduction cycle. Looseness was better able at differentiating different forms of rotator cuff disease than a simple static measure of relative glenohumeral position.

  5. Pulley lesions in rotator cuff tears: prevalence, etiology, and concomitant pathologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawi, Nael; Liodakis, Emmanouil; Garving, Christina; Habermeyer, Peter; Tauber, Mark

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to demonstrate the prevalence of lesions in the biceps pulley complex in a representative, consecutive series of rotator cuff tears and rotator cuff interval treatments. We also analyzed associated tear pattern of rotator cuff injuries and superior labrum anterior-posterior (SLAP) lesions. We evaluated the relationships of these lesions to traumatic genesis and the prevalence of pulley lesions in revision cases. This retrospective study analyzed all pre- and intra-operative documentation on arthroscopic rotator cuff reconstructions and isolated pulley lesion treatments performed by a single surgeon over 2 consecutive years. According to Habermeyer et al., we classified cases into four groups, based on the presence of additional or related complete or partial rotator cuff tears, SLAP lesions, trauma, and primary or revision surgery. Among 382 patients with rotator cuff tears, 345 (90.3%) had an injured pulley system; 151 (43.8%) had partial tears of the rotator cuff; out of these, 106 (30.6%) were articular-sided. All of these articular-sided partial tears showed extension into the pulley complex. In 154 cases (44.6%), history of shoulder trauma was associated with the beginning of symptoms. In addition, concomitant SLAP lesions occurred in 25-62% of pulley lesions, correlating with the severity of pulley lesions. Among the 345 cases, there have been 32 (9.3%) revision cases where a pulley lesion was intra-operatively identified and addressed. Pulley complex lesions are present in 90.3% of surgically treated rotator cuff lesions, particularly in articular-sided injuries. In addition, we found a significant relationship between the incidence of SLAP lesions and the severity of pulley lesions. It seems reasonable to assume an important role of pulley system injuries in the pathogenesis of rotator cuff lesions.

  6. Tissue discrimination in magnetic resonance imaging of the rotator cuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meschino, G J; Comas, D S; González, M A; Ballarin, V L; Capiel, C

    2016-01-01

    Evaluation and diagnosis of diseases of the muscles within the rotator cuff can be done using different modalities, being the Magnetic Resonance the method more widely used. There are criteria to evaluate the degree of fat infiltration and muscle atrophy, but these have low accuracy and show great variability inter and intra observer. In this paper, an analysis of the texture features of the rotator cuff muscles is performed to classify them and other tissues. A general supervised classification approach was used, combining forward-search as feature selection method with kNN as classification rule. Sections of Magnetic Resonance Images of the tissues of interest were selected by specialist doctors and they were considered as Gold Standard. Accuracies obtained were of 93% for T1-weighted images and 92% for T2-weighted images. As an immediate future work, the combination of both sequences of images will be considered, expecting to improve the results, as well as the use of other sequences of Magnetic Resonance Images. This work represents an initial point for the classification and quantification of fat infiltration and muscle atrophy degree. From this initial point, it is expected to make an accurate and objective system which will result in benefits for future research and for patients’ health. (paper)

  7. Gene expression analysis in calcific tendinopathy of the rotator cuff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Oliva

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the expression of several genes involved in tissue remodelling and bone development in patients with calcific tendinopathy of the rotator cuff. Biopsies from calcified and non-calcified areas were obtained from 10 patients (8 women and 2 men; average age: 55 years; range: 40-68 with calcific tendinopathy of the rotator cuff. To evaluate the expression of selected genes, RNA extraction, cDNA synthesis and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR were performed. A significantly increased expression of tissue transglutaminase (tTG2 and its substrate, osteopontin, was detected in the calcific areas compared to the levels observed in the normal tissue from the same subject with calcific tendinopathy, whereas a modest increase was observed for catepsin K. There was also a significant decrease in mRNA expression of Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP4 and BMP6 in the calcific area. BMP-2, collagen V and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF did not show significant differences. Collagen X and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-9 were not detectable. A variation in expression of these genes could be characteristic of this form tendinopathy, since an increased level of these genes has not been detected in other forms of tendon lesions.

  8. Tissue discrimination in magnetic resonance imaging of the rotator cuff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meschino, G. J.; Comas, D. S.; González, M. A.; Capiel, C.; Ballarin, V. L.

    2016-04-01

    Evaluation and diagnosis of diseases of the muscles within the rotator cuff can be done using different modalities, being the Magnetic Resonance the method more widely used. There are criteria to evaluate the degree of fat infiltration and muscle atrophy, but these have low accuracy and show great variability inter and intra observer. In this paper, an analysis of the texture features of the rotator cuff muscles is performed to classify them and other tissues. A general supervised classification approach was used, combining forward-search as feature selection method with kNN as classification rule. Sections of Magnetic Resonance Images of the tissues of interest were selected by specialist doctors and they were considered as Gold Standard. Accuracies obtained were of 93% for T1-weighted images and 92% for T2-weighted images. As an immediate future work, the combination of both sequences of images will be considered, expecting to improve the results, as well as the use of other sequences of Magnetic Resonance Images. This work represents an initial point for the classification and quantification of fat infiltration and muscle atrophy degree. From this initial point, it is expected to make an accurate and objective system which will result in benefits for future research and for patients’ health.

  9. Rotator cuff preservation in arthroscopic treatment of calcific tendinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Dirk; Jaeger, Martin; Izadpanah, Kaywan; Bornebusch, Lutz; Suedkamp, Norbert Paul; Ogon, Peter

    2013-05-01

    We sought to evaluate (1) clinical and radiologic results after arthroscopic calcific deposit (CD) removal and (2) the relevance of remnant calcifications (RCs). The study included 102 patients undergoing arthroscopic CD removal, preserving integrity of the rotator cuff. Postoperatively, we divided patients into 2 groups according to the extent of CD removal achieved. Group 1 consisted of patients with complete CD removal. Group 2 included patients showing minor RCs. Ninety-three patients (99 shoulders) completed follow-up. The mean patient age was 50.6 years (31 to 68 years), and the mean follow-up period was 37.3 months (24 to 83 months). We obtained anteroposterior (AP) and outlet radiographs before surgery, postoperatively, and at follow-up. We used the absolute and age- and sex-related Constant scores (CSabs, CSrel) as outcome measures. We compared both groups statistically (Mann-Whitney U test; P rotator cuff yielded good to excellent results in 90% of patients and avoided iatrogenic tendon defects in all patients. Minor RCs did not impair clinical outcome and spontaneously resolved at follow-up. Level IV, therapeutic case series. Copyright © 2013 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Factors affecting healing after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abtahi, Amir M; Granger, Erin K; Tashjian, Robert Z

    2015-01-01

    Rotator cuff repair has been shown to have good long-term results. Unfortunately, a significant proportion of repairs still fail to heal. Many factors, both patient and surgeon related, can influence healing after repair. Older age, larger tear size, worse muscle quality, greater muscle-tendon unit retraction, smoking, osteoporosis, diabetes and hypercholesterolemia have all shown to negatively influence tendon healing. Surgeon related factors that can influence healing include repair construct-single vs double row, rehabilitation, and biologics including platelet rich plasma and mesenchymal stem cells. Double-row repairs are biomechanically stronger and have better healing rates compared with single-row repairs although clinical outcomes are equivalent between both constructs. Slower, less aggressive rehabilitation programs have demonstrated improved healing with no negative effect on final range of motion and are therefore recommended after repair of most full thickness tears. Additionally no definitive evidence supports the use of platelet rich plasma or mesenchymal stem cells regarding improvement of healing rates and clinical outcomes. Further research is needed to identify effective biologically directed augmentations that will improve healing rates and clinical outcomes after rotator cuff repair. PMID:25793161

  11. Differences of RNA Expression in the Tendon According to Anatomic Outcomes in Rotator Cuff Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jin-Ok; Chung, Jin-Young; Kim, Do Hoon; Im, Wooseok; Kim, Sae Hoon

    2017-11-01

    Despite increased understanding of the pathophysiology of rotator cuff tears and the evolution of rotator cuff repair, healing failure remains a substantial problem. The critical roles played by biological factors have been emphasized, but little is known of the implications of gene expression profile differences at the time of repair. To document the relationship between the perioperative gene expression of healed and unhealed rotator cuffs by RNA microarray analysis. Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Superior (supraspinatus involvement) and posterosuperior (supraspinatus and infraspinatus involvement) tears were included in the study. Samples of rotator cuff tendons were prospectively collected during rotator cuff surgery. Three samples were harvested at the tendon ends of tears from the anterior, middle (apex), and posterior parts using an arthroscopic punch. Seven patients with an unhealed rotator cuff were matched one-to-one with patients with a healed rotator cuff by sex, age, tear size, and fatty degeneration of rotator cuff muscles. mRNA microarray analysis was used to identify genetic differences between healed and unhealed rotator cuff tendons. Gene ontology and gene association files were obtained from the Gene Ontology Consortium, and the Gene Ontology system in DAVID was used to identify enhanced biological processes. Microarray analyses identified 262 genes that were differentially expressed by at least 1.5-fold between the healed and unhealed groups. Overall, in the healed group, 103 genes were significantly downregulated, and 159 were significantly upregulated. DAVID Functional Annotation Cluster analysis showed that in the healed group, the genes most upregulated were related to the G protein-coupled receptor protein signaling pathway and to the neurological system. On the other hand, the genes most downregulated were related to immune and inflammatory responses. BMP5 was the gene most upregulated in the healed group, and the majority of

  12. Lunar Lava Tube Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    York, Cheryl Lynn; Walden, Bryce; Billings, Thomas L.; Reeder, P. Douglas

    1992-01-01

    Large (greater than 300 m diameter) lava tube caverns appear to exist on the Moon and could provide substantial safety and cost benefits for lunar bases. Over 40 m of basalt and regolith constitute the lava tube roof and would protect both construction and operations. Constant temperatures of -20 C reduce thermal stress on structures and machines. Base designs need not incorporate heavy shielding, so lightweight materials can be used and construction can be expedited. Identification and characterization of lava tube caverns can be incorporated into current precursor lunar mission plans. Some searches can even be done from Earth. Specific recommendations for lunar lava tube search and exploration are (1) an Earth-based radar interferometer, (2) an Earth-penetrating radar (EPR) orbiter, (3) kinetic penetrators for lunar lava tube confirmation, (4) a 'Moon Bat' hovering rocket vehicle, and (5) the use of other proposed landers and orbiters to help find lunar lava tubes.

  13. Categorising YouTube

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Thomas Mosebo

    2011-01-01

    This article provides a genre analytical approach to creating a typology of the User Generated Content (UGC) of YouTube. The article investigates the construction of navigation processes on the YouTube website. It suggests a pragmatic genre approach that is expanded through a focus on YouTube......’s technological affordances. Through an analysis of the different pragmatic contexts of YouTube, it is argued that a taxonomic understanding of YouTube must be analysed in regards to the vacillation of a user-driven bottom-up folksonomy and a hierarchical browsing system that emphasises a culture of competition...... and which favours the already popular content of YouTube. With this taxonomic approach, the UGC videos are registered and analysed in terms of empirically based observations. The article identifies various UGC categories and their principal characteristics. Furthermore, general tendencies of the UGC within...

  14. Steam generator tube performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatone, O.S.; Pathania, R.S.

    1983-08-01

    A review of the performance of steam generator tubes in 110 water-cooled nuclear power reactors showed that tubes were plugged at 46 (42 percent) of the reactors. The number of tubes removed from service increased from 1900 (0.14 percent) in 1980 to 4692 (0.30 percent) in 1981. The leading causes of tube failures were stress corrosion cracking from the primary side, stress corrosion cracking (or intergranular attack) from the secondary side and pitting corrosion. The lowest incidence of corrosion-induced defects from the secondary side occurred in reactors that used all-volatile treatment since start-up. At one reactor a large number of degraded tubes were repaired by sleeving which is expected to become an important method of tube repair in the future

  15. Rectangular drift tube characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denisov, D.S.; Musienko, Yu.V.

    1985-01-01

    Results on the study of the characteristics of a 50 x 100 mm aluminium drift tube are presented. The tube was filled with argon-methane and argon-isobutane mixtures. With 16 per cent methane concentration the largest deviation from a linear relation between the drift time and the drift path over 50 mm is less than 2 mm. The tube filled with argon-isobutane mixture is capable of operating in a limited streamer mode

  16. Categorising YouTube

    OpenAIRE

    Simonsen, Thomas Mosebo

    2011-01-01

    This article provides a genre analytical approach to creating a typology of the User Generated Content (UGC) of YouTube. The article investigates the construction of navigation processes on the YouTube website. It suggests a pragmatic genre approach that is expanded through a focus on YouTube’s technological affordances. Through an analysis of the different pragmatic contexts of YouTube, it is argued that a taxonomic understanding of YouTube must be analysed in regards to the vacillation of a...

  17. Pressure tube reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Susuki, Akira; Murata, Shigeto; Minato, Akihiko.

    1993-01-01

    In a pressure tube reactor, a reactor core is constituted by arranging more than two units of a minimum unit combination of a moderator sealing pipe containing a calandria tube having moderators there between and a calandria tube and moderators. The upper header and a lower header of the calandria tank containing moderators are communicated by way of the moderator sealing tube. Further, a gravitationally dropping mechanism is disposed for injecting neutron absorbing liquid to a calandria gas injection portion. A ratio between a moderator volume and a fuel volume is defined as a function of the inner diameter of the moderator sealing tube, the outer diameter of the calandria tube and the diameter of fuel pellets, and has no influence to intervals of a pressure tube lattice. The interval of the pressure tube lattice is enlarged without increasing the size of the pressure tube, to improve production efficiency of the reactor and set a coolant void coefficient more negative, thereby enabling to improve self controllability and safety. Further, the reactor scram can be conducted by injecting neutron absorbing liquid. (N.H.)

  18. Heated Tube Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Heated Tube Facility at NASA GRC investigates cooling issues by simulating conditions characteristic of rocket engine thrust chambers and high speed airbreathing...

  19. Steam generator tube performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatone, O.S.; Pathania, R.S.

    1984-10-01

    A review of the performance of steam generator tubes in 116 water-cooled nuclear power reactors showed that tubes were plugged at 54 (46 percent) of the reactors. The number of tubes removed from service decreased from 4 692 (0.30 percent) in 1981 to 3 222 (0.20 percent) in 1982. The leading causes of tube failures were stress corrosion cracking from the primary side, stress corrosion cracking (or intergranular attack) from the secondary side and pitting corrosion. The lowest incidence of corrosion-induced defects from the secondary side occurred in reactors that have used only volatile treatment, with or without condensate demineralization

  20. Steam generator tube performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatone, O.S.; Tapping, R.L.; Stipan, L.

    1992-03-01

    A survey of steam generator operating experience for 1986 has been carried out for 184 pressurized water and pressurized heavy-water reactors, and 1 water-cooled, graphite-moderated reactor. Tubes were plugged at 75 of the reactors (40.5%). In 1986, 3737 tubes were plugged (0.14% of those in service) and 3148 tubes were repaired by sleeving. A small number of reactors accounted for the bulk of the plugged tubes, a phenomenon consistent with previous years. For 1986, the available tubesheet sludge data for 38 reactors has been compiled into tabular form, and sludge/deposit data will be incorporated into all future surveys

  1. Tripolar-cuff deviation from ideal model: assessment by bioelectric field simulations and saline-bath experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triantis, Iasonas F; Demosthenous, Andreas

    2008-06-01

    Ideally, interference in neural measurements due to signals from nearby muscles can be completely eliminated with the use of tripolar cuffs, in combination with appropriate amplifier configurations, such as the quasi-tripole (QT) and the true-tripole (TT). The operation of these amplifiers, is based on the theoretical property of the nerve cuff to produce a linear relationship of potential versus distance along its length, internally, when external potentials appear between its ends. Thus, in principle, electroneurogram (ENG) recordings from an ideal tripolar cuff would be free from electromyogram (EMG) interference generated by nearby muscles. However, in practice the cuff exhibits non-ideal behaviour leading to "cuff imbalance". The main focus of this paper is to investigate the causes of cuff imbalance, to demonstrate that it should be incorporated as a main parameter in the theoretical ENG-recording cuff electrode model. In addition to cuff asymmetry and tissue growth, the proximity of the interference source to the cuff is shown to result in cuff imbalance. The influence of proximity imbalance on the performance of the QT and TT amplifiers is also considered. Proximity imbalance is studied using bioelectric field simulations and saline-bath experiments. Variation is observed with both distance (40 mm and 70 mm was examined) and orientation (0-180 degrees), with the latter causing a more severe effect especially when the source dipole and the cuff are vertical to each other. The simulations and measurements are in close agreement. Tissue growth imbalance and asymmetry imbalance are also investigated in vitro. Finally, the signal-to-interference ratio (SIR; ENG/EMG) of the QT and TT amplifiers is examined in the presence of cuff imbalance. It is shown that proximity imbalance results in their SIR to peak only at certain cuff orientation values. This important finding offers an insight as to why in practice ENG recordings using these amplifiers have been widely

  2. A portable Halbach magnet that can be opened and closed without force: the NMR-CUFF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windt, Carel W; Soltner, Helmut; van Dusschoten, Dagmar; Blümler, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Portable equipment for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is becoming increasingly attractive for use in a variety of applications. One of the main scientific challenges in making NMR portable is the design of light-weight magnets that possess a strong and homogeneous field. Existing NMR magnets can provide such magnetic fields, but only for small samples or in small regions, or are rather heavy. Here we show a simple yet elegant concept for a Halbach-type permanent magnet ring, which can be opened and closed with minimal mechanical force. An analytical solution for an ideal Halbach magnet shows that the magnetic forces cancel if the structure is opened at an angle of 35.3° relative to its poles. A first prototype weighed only 3.1 kg, and provided a flux density of 0.57 T with a homogeneity better than 200 ppm over a spherical volume of 5mm in diameter without shimming. The force needed to close it was found to be about 20 N. As a demonstration, intact plants were imaged and water (xylem) flow measured. Magnets of this type (NMR-CUFF = Cut-open, Uniform, Force Free) are ideal for portable use and are eminently suited to investigate small or slender objects that are part of a larger or immobile whole, such as branches on a tree, growing fruit on a plant, or non-metallic tubing in industrial installations. This new concept in permanent-magnet design enables the construction of openable, yet strong and homogeneous magnets, which aside from use in NMR or MRI could also be of interest for applications in accelerators, motors, or magnetic bearings. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. What happens to patients when we do not repair their cuff tears? Five-year rotator cuff quality-of-life index outcomes following nonoperative treatment of patients with full-thickness rotator cuff tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boorman, Richard S; More, Kristie D; Hollinshead, Robert M; Wiley, James P; Mohtadi, Nicholas G; Lo, Ian K Y; Brett, Kelly R

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine 5-year outcomes in a prospective cohort of patients previously enrolled in a nonoperative rotator cuff tear treatment program. Patients with chronic (>3 months), full-thickness rotator cuff tears (demonstrated on imaging) who were referred to 1 of 2 senior shoulder surgeons were enrolled in the study between October 2008 and September 2010. They participated in a comprehensive, nonoperative, home-based treatment program. After 3 months, the outcome in these patients was defined as "successful" or "failed." Patients in the successful group were essentially asymptomatic and did not require surgery. Patients in the failed group were symptomatic and consented to undergo surgical repair. All patients were followed up at 1 year, 2 years, and 5 or more years. At 5 or more years, all patients were contacted for follow-up; the response rate was 84%. Approximately 75% of patients remained successfully treated with nonoperative treatment at 5 years and reported a mean rotator cuff quality-of-life index score of 83 of 100 (SD, 16). Furthermore, between 2 and 5 years, only 3 patients who had previously been defined as having a successful outcome became more symptomatic and underwent surgical rotator cuff repair. Those in whom nonoperative treatment had failed and who underwent surgical repair had a mean rotator cuff quality-of-life index score of 89 (SD, 11) at 5-year follow-up. The operative and nonoperative groups at 5-year follow-up were not significantly different (P = .11). Nonoperative treatment is an effective and lasting option for many patients with a chronic, full-thickness rotator cuff tear. While some clinicians may argue that nonoperative treatment delays inevitable surgical repair, our study shows that patients can do very well over time. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Endotracheal intubation in patients with difficult airway: Using laryngeal mask airway with bougie versus video laryngoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hesameddin Modir

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Airway management is essential for safe anesthesia and endotracheal intubation is the most important procedure by which critically ill patients can be better managed, especially if done quickly and successfully. This study aimed to compare the techniques of intubation through laryngeal mask airway (LMA using a bougie versus video laryngoscopy (VL regarding to intubation success and the quality of intubation indices in patients with difficult airways. This randomized clinical trial was performed on 96 patients aged 16–76 years with Mallampati class 3 or 4 who underwent elective surgery. Once the demographics were recorded, patients were randomly divided into two groups and the first group intubated with VL, and the second group intubated through laryngeal mask using a bougie. Then vital signs, arterial oxygen saturation, the time required for successful intubation, and ease of intubation were recorded. Here t-tests, chi-square, Fisher exact tests, and analysis of variance for repeated measurement were used to analyze the data in SPSS software. The overall success rates of intubation in VL and LMA groups were 46 (96% and 44 (92%, respectively. The mean duration of intubation for the LMA and VL groups was 18.70 ± 6.73 and 14.21 ± 4.14 seconds, respectively (P < 0.001. Moreover, visual analogue scale score for pain in throat was significantly lower in VL group than LMA (1.65 ± 0.76 vs. 1.33 ± 0.52. Moreover, easy intubation in bougie group was 50%, while the easy intubation in VL was 73% (P = 0.023. In addition, incidence of cough was 31% in the LMA with bougie group and 9% in VL group (P = 0.005. The VL technique is an easier method and has a shorter intubation time than LMA using bougie, and causes a lower incidence of coughing, laryngospasm in patients that need intubation. Moreover, cough and discomfort in the throat tend to be less in VL, and the LMA could be used as replacement of VL in hard situations.

  5. Bedside screen for oral cavity structure, salivary flow, and vocal production over the 14days following endotracheal extubation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cheryl Chia-Hui; Wu, Kuo-Hsiang; Ku, Shih-Chi; Chan, Ding-Cheng; Lee, Jang-Jaer; Wang, Tyng-Guey; Hsiao, Tzu-Yu

    2018-06-01

    To describe the sequelae of oral endotracheal intubation by evaluating prevalence rates of structural injury, hyposalivation, and impaired vocal production over 14days following extubation. Consecutive adults (≥20years, N=114) with prolonged (≥48h) endotracheal intubation were enrolled from medical intensive care units at a university hospital. Participants were assessed by trained nurses at 2, 7, and 14days after extubation, using a standardized bedside screening protocol. Within 48-hour postextubation, structural injuries were common, with 51% having restricted mouth opening. Unstimulated salivary flow was reduced in 43%. For vocal production, 51% had inadequate breathing support for phonation, dysphonia was common (94% had hoarseness and 36% showed reduced efficiency of vocal fold closure), and >40% had impaired articulatory precision. By 14days postextubation, recovery was noted in most conditions, but reduced efficiency of vocal fold closure persisted. Restricted mouth opening (39%) and reduced salivary flow (34%) remained highly prevalent. After extubation, restricted mouth opening, reduced salivary flow, and dysphonia were common and prolonged in recovery. Reduced efficiency of vocal cord closure persisted at 14days postextubation. The extent and duration of these sequelae remind clinicians to screen for them up to 2weeks after extubation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Steam generator tube failures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacDonald, P.E.; Shah, V.N.; Ward, L.W.; Ellison, P.G.

    1996-04-01

    A review and summary of the available information on steam generator tubing failures and the impact of these failures on plant safety is presented. The following topics are covered: pressurized water reactor (PWR), Canadian deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactor, and Russian water moderated, water cooled energy reactor (VVER) steam generator degradation, PWR steam generator tube ruptures, the thermal-hydraulic response of a PWR plant with a faulted steam generator, the risk significance of steam generator tube rupture accidents, tubing inspection requirements and fitness-for-service criteria in various countries, and defect detection reliability and sizing accuracy. A significant number of steam generator tubes are defective and are removed from service or repaired each year. This wide spread damage has been caused by many diverse degradation mechanisms, some of which are difficult to detect and predict. In addition, spontaneous tube ruptures have occurred at the rate of about one every 2 years over the last 20 years, and incipient tube ruptures (tube failures usually identified with leak detection monitors just before rupture) have been occurring at the rate of about one per year. These ruptures have caused complex plant transients which have not always been easy for the reactor operators to control. Our analysis shows that if more than 15 tubes rupture during a main steam line break, the system response could lead to core melting. Although spontaneous and induced steam generator tube ruptures are small contributors to the total core damage frequency calculated in probabilistic risk assessments, they are risk significant because the radionuclides are likely to bypass the reactor containment building. The frequency of steam generator tube ruptures can be significantly reduced through appropriate and timely inspections and repairs or removal from service

  7. MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING EVALUATION OF ROTATOR CUFF IMPINGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrakanth K. S

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Shoulder pain is a common clinical problem. Impingement syndrome of the shoulder is believed to be the most common cause of shoulder pain. The term ‘impingement syndrome’ was first used by Neer to describe a condition of shoulder pain associated with chronic bursitis and partial thickness tear of Rotator Cuff (RC. The incidence of Rotator Cuff (RC tear is estimated to be about 20.7% in the general population. This study is intended to analyse various extrinsic and intrinsic causes of shoulder impingement. MATERIALS AND METHODS 110 consecutive patients referred for MRI with clinical suspicion of shoulder impingement were prospectively studied. All the patients were evaluated for Rotator Cuff (RC degeneration and various extrinsic factors that lead to degeneration like acromial shape, down-sloping acromion, Acromioclavicular (AC joint degeneration and acromial enthesophyte. Intrinsic factors like degeneration and its correlation with age of the patients were evaluated. RESULTS Of the total 110 patients, 19 (17.3% patients had FT RC tear and 31 (28.2% had PT (both bursal and articular surface tears. There was no statistically significant correlation (p=0.76 between acromion types and RC tear. Down-sloping acromion and enthesophytes had statistically significant association with RC tear (p=0.008 and 0.008, respectively. Statistically significant (0.008 correlation between the severity of AC joint degeneration and RC tears was noted. AC joint degeneration and RC pathologies also showed a correlation with the age of the patients with p values of <0.001 and 0.001, respectively. CONCLUSION No statistically significant correlation between RC pathologies with hooked acromion was found, that makes the role played by hooked acromion in FT RC tear questionable. AC joint degeneration association with RC tear is due to the association of both RC tear and AC joint degeneration with age of the patient. Down-sloping acromion, AC joint degeneration

  8. Acute tracheobronchial injuries: Impact of imaging on diagnosis and management implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scaglione, Mariano; Romano, Stefania; Pinto, Antonio; Sparano, Amelia; Scialpi, Michele; Rotondo, Antonio

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the role of chest radiography, single-slice CT and 16-row MDCT in the direct evidence of tracheobronchial injuries. Methods: Patients with acute tracheobronchial injury were identified from the registry of our level 1 trauma center during a 5-year period ending July 2005. Findings at chest radiograph and CT were compared to those shown at bronchoscopy. Results: Eighteen patients with tracheobronchial injury - three patients with cervical trachea injury, eight with thoracic trachea injury and seven with bronchial injury - were identified. Twelve patients had a blunt trauma (67%), six patients had a penetrating (iatrogenic) injury (33%). Chest radiograph directly identified the site of tracheal injury in four cases, showing overdistension of the endotracheal cuff in three cases and displacement of the endotracheal tube in one case. At the level of the bronchi, chest radiograph demonstrated only one injury. CT directly identified the site of tracheal injury in all the cases showing the overdistension of the endotracheal cuff at the level of the thoracic trachea (three cases), posterior herniation of the endotracheal cuff at the thoracic trachea (three cases), lateral endotracheal cuff herniation at the thoracic trachea (one case), tracheal wall discontinuity at the cervical (one case) and at the thoracic trachea (one case) and displacement of endotracheal tube at the cervical trachea (two cases). At the level of the bronchi, CT correctly showed the site of injury in six case including: discontinuity of the left main bronchial wall (two cases), the 'fallen lung' sign (one case), right main bronchial wall enlargement (one case), discontinuity of the right middle bronchial wall (two cases). In one case, CT showed just direct 'air leak' at the level of the carina suggesting main bronchus injury. This finding was confirmed by bronchoscopy. Conclusion: Chest radiograph was helpful for the assessment of iatrogenic tracheal injuries. CT detected the site

  9. Model-based evaluation of the short-circuited tripolar cuff configuration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreasen, Lotte N S; Struijk, Johannes J

    2006-05-01

    Recordings of neural information for use as feedback in functional electrical stimulation are often contaminated with interfering signals from muscles and from stimulus pulses. The cuff electrode used for the neural recording can be optimized to improve the S/I ratio. In this work, we evaluate a model of both the nerve signal and the interfering signals recorded by a cuff, and subsequently use this model to study the signal to interference ratio of different cuff designs and to evaluate a recently introduced short-circuited tripolar cuff configuration. The results of the model showed good agreement with results from measurements in rabbits and confirmed the superior performance of the short-circuited tripolar configuration as compared with the traditionally used tripolar configuration.

  10. Cuff size influences blood pressure measurement in obese children and adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muhamed, P. K.; Olsen, M. H.; Holm, Jens-Christian

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Recently, we established that a group ofobese children and adolescents had a higher blood pressure(BP) than a healthy control group. In the present study, weinvestigate whether the higher BP in the obese group wasinfluenced by BP cuff sizes.Methods: A total of 104 obese patients aged...... sizes had a significant impact on BP measurements.Despite the influence of cuff size, multiple regressionanalyses revealed that systolic BP was 68 mmHg higherand diastolic BP 32 mmHg higher in the obese groupthan in the control group. A step function, i.e. a sudden fallin BP, was seen at the point...... of switching from small to mediumcuff size in the control group, which suggests that systolicBP was overestimated when using small cuff size andunderestimated when using medium cuff size in subjectswith an AC near 23 cm.Conclusions: BP was higher in the obese group than inthe control group although BP...

  11. Do Different Cyclooxygenase Inhibitors Impair Rotator Cuff Healing in a Rabbit Model?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Lu

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs can delay tendon healing in the early stage after rotator cuff repair. Compared with nonselective COX inhibitors, selective COX-2 inhibitors significantly impact tendon healing.

  12. Arthroscopic Double-Row Transosseous Equivalent Rotator Cuff Repair with a Knotless Self-Reinforcing Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mook, William R; Greenspoon, Joshua A; Millett, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    Rotator cuff tears are a significant cause of shoulder morbidity. Surgical techniques for repair have evolved to optimize the biologic and mechanical variables critical to tendon healing. Double-row repairs have demonstrated superior biomechanical advantages to a single-row. The preferred technique for rotator cuff repair of the senior author was reviewed and described in a step by step fashion. The final construct is a knotless double row transosseous equivalent construct. The described technique includes the advantages of a double-row construct while also offering self reinforcement, decreased risk of suture cut through, decreased risk of medial row overtensioning and tissue strangulation, improved vascularity, the efficiency of a knotless system, and no increased risk for subacromial impingement from the burden of suture knots. Arthroscopic knotless double row rotator cuff repair is a safe and effective method to repair rotator cuff tears.

  13. MR arthrography gadolinium versus standard MR imaging in rotator cuff pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodler, J.; Brahme, S.K.; Karzel, R.; Cervilla, V.; Snyder, S.; Schweitzer, M.; Flannigan, B.; Resnick, D.

    1990-01-01

    This paper compares the accuracy of MR imaging with and without intraarticular gadolinium in the diagnosis of rotator cuff pathology, using arthroscopy as the gold standard. The authors examined 36 patients, first with T2-weighted sequences and then with T1-weighted sequences after the injection of 15-20 mL of diluted gadolinium. The images were read blindly by three radiologists experienced in musculoskeletal MR imaging. The results were compared with those of arthroscopy. In 16 of 19 arthroscopically intact rotator cuffs, both sequences demonstrated no evidence of rotator cuff tear. The remaining three cases were interpreted as partial or full-thickness tears. Of 12 partial tears, T1-weighted images with intraarticular gadolinium demonstrated a partial tear in five, degeneration in four, a full thickness tear in two, and a normal rotator cuff in one

  14. Rotator cuff tears in children and adolescents: experience at a large pediatric hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zbojniewicz, Andrew M.; Emery, Kathleen H.; Maeder, Matthew E.; Salisbury, Shelia R.

    2014-01-01

    Prior literature, limited to small case series and case reports, suggests that rotator cuff tears are rare in adolescents. However, we have identified rotator cuff tears in numerous children and adolescents who have undergone shoulder MRI evaluation. The purpose of this study is to describe the prevalence and characteristics of rotator cuff tears in children and adolescents referred for MRI evaluation of the shoulder at a large pediatric hospital and to correlate the presence of rotator cuff tears with concurrent labral pathology, skeletal maturity and patient activity and outcomes. We reviewed reports from 455 consecutive non-contrast MRI and magnetic resonance arthrogram examinations of the shoulder performed during a 2-year period, and following exclusions we yielded 205 examinations in 201 patients (ages 8-18 years; 75 girls, 126 boys). Rotator cuff tears were classified by tendon involved, tear thickness (partial or full), surface and location of tear (when partial) and presence of delamination. We recorded concurrent labral pathology when present. Physeal patency of the proximal humerus was considered open, closing or closed. Statistical analysis was performed to evaluate for a relationship between rotator cuff tears and degree of physeal patency. We obtained patient activity at the time of injury, surgical reports and outcomes from clinical records when available. Twenty-five (12.2%) rotator cuff tears were identified in 17 boys and 7 girls (ages 10-18 years; one patient had bilateral tears). The supraspinatus tendon was most frequently involved (56%). There were 2 full-thickness and 23 partial-thickness tears with articular-side partial-thickness tears most frequent (78%). Insertional partial-thickness tears were more common (78%) than critical zone tears (22%) and 10 (43%) partial-thickness tears were delamination tears. Nine (36%) patients with rotator cuff tears had concurrent labral pathology. There was no statistically significant relationship between

  15. Rotator cuff tears in children and adolescents: experience at a large pediatric hospital

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zbojniewicz, Andrew M.; Emery, Kathleen H. [University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Maeder, Matthew E. [University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Lenox Hill Hospital, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Salisbury, Shelia R. [University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Division of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Prior literature, limited to small case series and case reports, suggests that rotator cuff tears are rare in adolescents. However, we have identified rotator cuff tears in numerous children and adolescents who have undergone shoulder MRI evaluation. The purpose of this study is to describe the prevalence and characteristics of rotator cuff tears in children and adolescents referred for MRI evaluation of the shoulder at a large pediatric hospital and to correlate the presence of rotator cuff tears with concurrent labral pathology, skeletal maturity and patient activity and outcomes. We reviewed reports from 455 consecutive non-contrast MRI and magnetic resonance arthrogram examinations of the shoulder performed during a 2-year period, and following exclusions we yielded 205 examinations in 201 patients (ages 8-18 years; 75 girls, 126 boys). Rotator cuff tears were classified by tendon involved, tear thickness (partial or full), surface and location of tear (when partial) and presence of delamination. We recorded concurrent labral pathology when present. Physeal patency of the proximal humerus was considered open, closing or closed. Statistical analysis was performed to evaluate for a relationship between rotator cuff tears and degree of physeal patency. We obtained patient activity at the time of injury, surgical reports and outcomes from clinical records when available. Twenty-five (12.2%) rotator cuff tears were identified in 17 boys and 7 girls (ages 10-18 years; one patient had bilateral tears). The supraspinatus tendon was most frequently involved (56%). There were 2 full-thickness and 23 partial-thickness tears with articular-side partial-thickness tears most frequent (78%). Insertional partial-thickness tears were more common (78%) than critical zone tears (22%) and 10 (43%) partial-thickness tears were delamination tears. Nine (36%) patients with rotator cuff tears had concurrent labral pathology. There was no statistically significant relationship between

  16. Evaluation of the Risk Factors for a Rotator Cuff Retear After Repair Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yeong Seok; Jeong, Jeung Yeol; Park, Chan-Deok; Kang, Seung Gyoon; Yoo, Jae Chul

    2017-07-01

    A retear is a significant clinical problem after rotator cuff repair. However, no study has evaluated the retear rate with regard to the extent of footprint coverage. To evaluate the preoperative and intraoperative factors for a retear after rotator cuff repair, and to confirm the relationship with the extent of footprint coverage. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Data were retrospectively collected from 693 patients who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair between January 2006 and December 2014. All repairs were classified into 4 types of completeness of repair according to the amount of footprint coverage at the end of surgery. All patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) after a mean postoperative duration of 5.4 months. Preoperative demographic data, functional scores, range of motion, and global fatty degeneration on preoperative MRI and intraoperative variables including the tear size, completeness of rotator cuff repair, concomitant subscapularis repair, number of suture anchors used, repair technique (single-row or transosseous-equivalent double-row repair), and surgical duration were evaluated. Furthermore, the factors associated with failure using the single-row technique and transosseous-equivalent double-row technique were analyzed separately. The retear rate was 7.22%. Univariate analysis revealed that rotator cuff retears were affected by age; the presence of inflammatory arthritis; the completeness of rotator cuff repair; the initial tear size; the number of suture anchors; mean operative time; functional visual analog scale scores; Simple Shoulder Test findings; American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons scores; and fatty degeneration of the supraspinatus, infraspinatus, and subscapularis. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed patient age, initial tear size, and fatty degeneration of the supraspinatus as independent risk factors for a rotator cuff retear. Multivariate logistic regression analysis of the single-row group

  17. Tail-Cuff Technique and Its Influence on Central Blood Pressure in the Mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilde, Elena; Aubdool, Aisah A; Thakore, Pratish; Baldissera, Lineu; Alawi, Khadija M; Keeble, Julie; Nandi, Manasi; Brain, Susan D

    2017-06-27

    Reliable measurement of blood pressure in conscious mice is essential in cardiovascular research. Telemetry, the "gold-standard" technique, is invasive and expensive and therefore tail-cuff, a noninvasive alternative, is widely used. However, tail-cuff requires handling and restraint during measurement, which may cause stress affecting blood pressure and undermining reliability of the results. C57Bl/6J mice were implanted with radio-telemetry probes to investigate the effects of the steps of the tail-cuff technique on central blood pressure, heart rate, and temperature. This included comparison of handling techniques, operator's sex, habituation, and influence of hypertension induced by angiotensin II. Direct comparison of measurements obtained by telemetry and tail-cuff were made in the same mouse. The results revealed significant increases in central blood pressure, heart rate, and core body temperature from baseline following handling interventions without significant difference among the different handling technique, habituation, or sex of the investigator. Restraint induced the largest and sustained increase in cardiovascular parameters and temperature. The tail-cuff readings significantly underestimated those from simultaneous telemetry recordings; however, "nonsimultaneous" telemetry, obtained in undisturbed mice, were similar to tail-cuff readings obtained in undisturbed mice on the same day. This study reveals that the tail-cuff technique underestimates the core blood pressure changes that occur simultaneously during the restraint and measurement phases. However, the measurements between the 2 techniques are similar when tail-cuff readings are compared with telemetry readings in the nondisturbed mice. The differences between the simultaneous recordings by the 2 techniques should be recognized by researchers. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  18. Living with a symptomatic rotator cuff tear 'bad days, bad nights': a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minns Lowe, Catherine J; Moser, Jane; Barker, Karen

    2014-07-09

    Rotator cuff tears are a common cause of shoulder pain. There is an absence of information about symptomatic rotator cuffs from the patients' perspective; this limits the information clinicians can share with patients and the information that patients can access via sources such as the internet. This study describes the experiences of people with a symptomatic rotator cuff, their symptoms, the impact upon their daily lives and the coping strategies utilised by study participants. An interpretive phenomenological analysis approach was used. 20 participants of the UKUFF trial (The United Kingdom Rotator Cuff Surgery Trial) agreed to participate in in-depth semi-structured interviews about their experiences about living with a symptomatic rotator cuff tear. Interviews were digitally recorded and fully transcribed. Field notes, memos and a reflexive diary were used. Data was coded in accordance with interpretive phenomenological analysis. Peer review, code-recode audits and constant comparison of data, codes and categories occurred throughout. The majority of patients described intense pain and severely disturbed sleep. Limited movement and reduced muscle strength were described by some participants. The predominantly adverse impact that a symptomatic rotator cuff tear had upon activities of daily living, leisure activities and occupation was described. The emotional and financial impact and impact upon caring roles were detailed. Coping strategies included attempting to carry on as normally as possible, accepting their condition, using their other arm, using analgesics, aids and adaptions. Clinicians need to appreciate and understand the intensity and shocking nature of pain that may be experienced by participants with known rotator cuff tears and understand the detrimental impact tears can have upon all areas of patient's lives. Clinicians also need to be aware of the potential emotional impact caused by cuff tears and to ensure that patients needing help for

  19. Arthroscopic Double-Row Transosseous Equivalent Rotator Cuff Repair with a Knotless Self-Reinforcing Technique

    OpenAIRE

    Mook, William R.; Greenspoon, Joshua A.; Millett, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Rotator cuff tears are a significant cause of shoulder morbidity. Surgical techniques for repair have evolved to optimize the biologic and mechanical variables critical to tendon healing. Double-row repairs have demonstrated superior biomechanical advantages to a single-row. Methods: The preferred technique for rotator cuff repair of the senior author was reviewed and described in a step by step fashion. The final construct is a knotless double row transosseous equivalent construc...

  20. Increased supraspinatus tendon thickness following fatigue loading in rotator cuff tendinopathy: potential implications for exercise therapy

    OpenAIRE

    McCreesh, Karen M; Purtill, Helen; Donnelly, Alan E; Lewis, Jeremy S

    2017-01-01

    Background/aim Exercise imparts a load on tendon tissue that leads to changes in tendon properties. Studies suggest that loading immediately reduces tendon thickness, with a loss of this response in symptomatic tendinopathy. No studies investigating the response of tendon dimensions to load for the rotator cuff tendons exist. This study aimed to examine the short-term effect of loading on the thickness of the supraspinatus tendon and acromiohumeral distance those with and without rotator cuff...

  1. Do Magnetic Resonance Imaging Characteristics of Full-Thickness Rotator Cuff Tears Correlate With Sleep Disturbance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Bryan A; Hull, Brandon R; Kurth, Alexander B; Kukowski, Nathan R; Mulligan, Edward P; Khazzam, Michael S

    2017-11-01

    Many patients with rotator cuff tears suffer from nocturnal shoulder pain, resulting in sleep disturbance. To determine whether rotator cuff tear size correlated with sleep disturbance in patients with full-thickness rotator cuff tears. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Patients with a diagnosis of unilateral full-thickness rotator cuff tears (diagnosed via magnetic resonance imaging [MRI]) completed the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), a visual analog scale (VAS) quantifying their shoulder pain, and the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) questionnaire. Shoulder MRI scans were analyzed for anterior-posterior tear size (mm), tendon retraction (mm), Goutallier grade (0-4), number of tendons involved (1-4), muscle atrophy (none, mild, moderate, or severe), and humeral head rise (present or absent). Bivariate correlations were calculated between the MRI characteristics and baseline survey results. A total of 209 patients with unilateral full-thickness rotator cuff tears were included in this study: 112 (54%) female and 97 (46%) male (mean age, 64.1 years). On average, shoulder pain had been present for 24 months. The mean PSQI score was 9.8, and the mean VAS score was 5.0. No significant correlations were found between any of the rotator cuff tear characteristics and sleep quality. Only tendon retraction had a significant correlation with pain. Although rotator cuff tears are frequently associated with nocturnal pain and sleep disruption, this study demonstrated that morphological characteristics of full-thickness rotator cuff tears, such as size and tendon retraction, do not correlate with sleep disturbance and have little to no correlation with pain levels.

  2. Does the Rotator Cuff Tear Pattern Influence Clinical Outcomes After Surgical Repair?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Scott; Allen, Benjamin; Robbins, Chris; Bedi, Asheesh; Gagnier, Joel J; Miller, Bruce

    2018-03-01

    Limited literature exists regarding the influence of rotator cuff tear morphology on patient outcomes. To determine the effect of rotator cuff tear pattern (crescent, U-shape, L-shape) on patient-reported outcomes after rotator cuff repair. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Patients undergoing arthroscopic repair of known full-thickness rotator cuff tears were observed prospectively at regular intervals from baseline to 1 year. The tear pattern was classified at the time of surgery as crescent, U-shaped, or L-shaped. Primary outcome measures were the Western Ontario Rotator Cuff Index (WORC), the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES), and a visual analog scale (VAS) for pain. The tear pattern was evaluated as the primary predictor while controlling for variables known to affect rotator cuff outcomes. Mixed-methods regression and analysis of variance (ANOVA) were used to examine the effects of tear morphology on patient-reported outcomes after surgical repair from baseline to 1 year. A total of 82 patients were included in the study (53 male, 29 female; mean age, 58 years [range, 41-75 years]). A crescent shape was the most common tear pattern (54%), followed by U-shaped (25%) and L-shaped tears (21%). There were no significant differences in outcome scores between the 3 groups at baseline. All 3 groups showed statistically significant improvement from baseline to 1 year, but analysis failed to show any predictive effect in the change in outcome scores from baseline to 1 year for the WORC, ASES, or VAS when tear pattern was the primary predictor. Further ANOVA also failed to show any significant difference in the change in outcome scores from baseline to 1 year for the WORC ( P = .96), ASES ( P = .71), or VAS ( P = .86). Rotator cuff tear pattern is not a predictor of functional outcomes after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

  3. Calcifying tendinitis of the rotator cuff with focal umeral osteolysis. Imaging features

    OpenAIRE

    V. V. Mascarenhas; F. Morais; H. Marques; A. Guerra; E. Carpinteiro; A. Gaspar

    2015-01-01

    Calcifying tendinitis occurs most commonly in the rotator cuff tendons, particularly involving the supraspinatus tendon insertion, and is often asymptomatic. Cortical erosion secondary to calcifying tendinitis has been reported in multiple locations, including in the rotator cuff tendons. The authors report two cases of symptomatic calcifying tendinitis involving the infraspinatus tendon with cortical erosion with correlative radiographic, and MR findings. The importance of considering this d...

  4. Identification of a genetic variant associated with rotator cuff repair healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashjian, Robert Z; Granger, Erin K; Zhang, Yue; Teerlink, Craig C; Cannon-Albright, Lisa A

    2016-06-01

    A familial and genetic predisposition for the development of rotator cuff tearing has been identified. The purpose of this study was to determine if a familial predisposition exists for healing after rotator cuff repair and if the reported significant association with a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the ESRRB gene is present in patients who fail to heal. The study recruited 72 patients undergoing arthroscopic rotator cuff repair for a full-thickness posterosuperior tear. Magnetic resonance imaging studies were performed at a minimum of 1 year postoperatively (average, 2.6 years). Healing failures were classified as lateral or medial. Self-reported family history of rotator cuff tearing data and genome-wide genotypes were available. Characteristics of cases with and without a family history of rotator cuff tearing were compared, and a comparison of the frequency of SNP 1758384 (in ESRRB) was performed between patients who healed and those who failed to heal. Of the rotator cuff repairs, 42% failed to heal; 42% of patients reported a family history of rotator cuff tear. Multivariate regression analysis showed a significant association between familiality and overall healing failure (medial and lateral failures) (P = .036) and lateral failures independently (P = .006). An increased risk for the presence of a rare allele for SNP rs17583842 was present in lateral failures compared with those that healed (P = .005). Individuals with a family history of rotator cuff tearing were more likely to have repair failures. Significant association of a SNP variant in the ESRRB gene was also observed with lateral failure. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Difference between early versus delayed postoperative physical rehabilitation protocol following arthroscopic rotator cuff repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samar M Fawzy

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion Significant improvement in pain, ROM, and function after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair was seen at 1 year postoperatively, regardless of early or delayed postoperative rehabilitation protocols. However, early motion increases pain scores and may increase the possibility of rotator cuff retear but with early regain of ROM. A delayed rehabilitation protocol with immobilization for 6 weeks would be better for tendon healing without risk for retear or joint stiffness and easily convalescence with less postoperative pain.

  6. The Relationship Between Intraoperative Tear Dimensions and Postoperative Pain in 1624 Consecutive Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Daniel Y T; Walton, Judie R; Lam, Patrick; Murrell, George A C

    2017-03-01

    Rotator cuff repair often results in significant pain postoperatively, the cause of which is undetermined. Purpose/Hypothesis: The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between rotator cuff tear area and postoperative pain in patients who had undergone arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. We hypothesized that larger tears would be more painful because of elevated repair tension at 1 week postoperatively but that smaller tears would be more painful because of a greater healing response, especially from 6 weeks postoperatively. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. A total of 1624 patients who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair were included in this study. Exclusion criteria were moderate to severe osteoarthritis, isolated subscapularis repair, calcific tendinitis, synthetic patch repair, revision surgery, and retears on ultrasound at 6 months after surgery. Rotator cuff tears were subdivided into groups based on the tear size and retear rate found for each group. A modified L'Insalata questionnaire was given before surgery and at 1 week, 6 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months after surgery. Pearson and Spearman correlation coefficient tests were performed between rotator cuff tear areas and pain scores. Intraoperative rotator cuff tear areas did not correlate with pain scores preoperatively or at 1 week after surgery. A smaller tear area was associated with more frequent and severe pain with overhead activities, at rest, and during sleep as well as a poorer perceived overall shoulder condition at 6 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months after repair ( r = 0.11-0.23, P 8 cm 2 . There were fewer retears with smaller tears, but they were more painful than large tears postoperatively from 6 weeks to 6 months after surgery. Smaller tears may heal more vigorously, causing more pain. Patients with smaller tears experienced more pain after rotator cuff repair compared with patients with larger tears. These findings are contrary to previous ideas about tear size and

  7. No difference in outcome for open versus arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: a prospective comparative trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayle, Xavier; Pham, Thuy-Trang; Faruch, Marie; Gobet, Aurelie; Mansat, Pierre; Bonnevialle, Nicolas

    2017-12-01

    Arthroscopic techniques tend to become the gold standard in rotator cuff repair. However, little data are reported in the literature regarding the improvement of postoperative outcomes and re-tear rate relative to conventional open surgery. The aim of this study was to compare clinical outcomes and cuff integrity after arthroscopic versus open cuff repair. We prospectively assessed clinical outcomes and cuff integrity after an arthroscopic or open rotator cuff repair with a minimum follow-up of 12 months. Clinical evaluation was based on Constant score, Simple Shoulder Value (SSV) and American Shoulder and Elbow Score (ASES). Rotator cuff healing was explored with ultrasound. 44 patients in arthroscopic group A (mean age 56-year-old) and 43 in open group O (mean age 61-year-old) fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Tendons were repaired with a single row technique associated with biceps tenodesis and subacromial decompression. All objective clinical scores significantly improved postoperatively in both groups. No statistical difference was identified between group A and O regarding, respectively, Constant score (72 vs 75 points; p = 0.3), ASES score (88 vs 91 points; p = 0.3), and SSV (81 vs 85%). The overall rate of re-tear (Sugaya type IV or V) reached 7 and 9%, respectively, in group A and O (p = 0.8). This study did not prove any difference of arthroscopic over open surgery in case of rotator cuff repair regarding clinical outcome and cuff integrity at 1-year follow-up. Prospective comparative study.

  8. Method for shaping polyethylene tubing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, R. C.

    1981-01-01

    Method forms polyethylene plastic tubing into configurations previously only possible with metal tubing. By using polyethylene in place of copper or stain less steel tubing inlow pressure systems, fabrication costs are significantly reduced. Polyethylene tubing can be used whenever low pressure tubing is needed in oil operations, aircraft and space applications, powerplants, and testing laboratories.

  9. Pyrotechnic Tubing Connector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Thomas J.; Yang, Robert A.

    1988-01-01

    Tool forms mechanical seal at joint without levers or hydraulic apparatus. Proposed tool intended for use in outer space used on Earth by heavily garbed workers to join tubing in difficult environments. Called Pyrotool, used with Lokring (or equivalent) fittings. Piston slides in cylinder when pushed by gas from detonating pyrotechnic charge. Impulse of piston compresses fittings, sealing around butting ends of tubes.

  10. The Burden of Craft in Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair: Where Have We Been and Where We Are Going.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhart, Stephen S

    2015-08-01

    The rather turbulent history of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair went through stages of innovation, conflict, disruption, assimilation, and transformation that might be anticipated when a new and advanced technology (arthroscopic cuff repair) displaces an entrenched but outdated discipline (open cuff repair). The transition from open to arthroscopic rotator cuff repair has been a major paradigm shift that has greatly benefited patients. However, this technical evolution/revolution has also imposed a higher "burden of craft" on the practitioners of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Technological advancements in surgery demand that surgeons accept this burden of craft and master the advanced technology for the benefit of their patients. This article outlines the author's involvement in the development of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair, and it also explores the surgeon's obligation to accept the burden of craft that is imposed by this discipline.

  11. Molybdenum Tube Characterization report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beaux II, Miles Frank [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Usov, Igor Olegovich [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-02-07

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques have been utilized to produce free-standing molybdenum tubes with the end goal of nuclear fuel clad applications. In order to produce tubes with properties desirable for this application, deposition rates were lowered requiring long deposition durations on the order of 50 hours. Standard CVD methods as well as fluidized-bed CVD (FBCVD) methods were applied towards these objectives. Characterization of the tubes produced in this manner revealed material suitable for fuel clad applications, but lacking necessary uniformity across the length of the tubes. The production of freestanding Mo tubes that possess the desired properties across their entire length represents an engineering challenge that can be overcome in a next iteration of the deposition system.

  12. Detection of rotator cuff lesions with indirect MR angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudolph, J.; Lorenz, M.; Schroeder, R.; Felix, R.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the value of indirect MR arthrography in lesions of the rotator cuff, prospectively versus arthroscopy. Methods: 63 patients with suspected shoulder pathology were examined: Oblique-coronary and axial T 1 w sequences, axial FLASH-2 D sequences, furthermore oblique-coronary T 2 - and PD-weighted sequences were taken. After intravenous administration of 0.1 mmol Gd-DTPA/kilogram body weight and active motion of the shoulder T 1 w sequences were repeated. Signal intensities (SI) inside the tendon were quantitatively measured by the ROI technique (region-of-interest) and the percentual contrast-enhancement CE was calculated. In 32 patients the results were confirmed by surgical follow-up. Results: The mean SI measured in the supraspinous tendon were higher in lesions (degeneration, impingement, partial and total rupture), before as well as after contrast medium, compared to intact findings (p [de

  13. An affordable cuff-less blood pressure estimation solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Monika; Kumar, Niranjan; Deb, Sujay

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a cuff-less hypertension pre-screening device that non-invasively monitors the Blood Pressure (BP) and Heart Rate (HR) continuously. The proposed device simultaneously records two clinically significant and highly correlated biomedical signals, viz., Electrocardiogram (ECG) and Photoplethysmogram (PPG). The device provides a common data acquisition platform that can interface with PC/laptop, Smart phone/tablet and Raspberry-pi etc. The hardware stores and processes the recorded ECG and PPG in order to extract the real-time BP and HR using kernel regression approach. The BP and HR estimation error is measured in terms of normalized mean square error, Error Standard Deviation (ESD) and Mean Absolute Error (MAE), with respect to a clinically proven digital BP monitor (OMRON HBP1300). The computed error falls under the maximum standard allowable error mentioned by Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation; MAE cost home and clinic bases solution for continuous health monitoring.

  14. Is the Supraspinatus Muscle Atrophy Truly Irreversible after Surgical Repair of Rotator Cuff Tears?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Seok Won; Kim, Sae Hoon; Tae, Suk-Kee; Yoon, Jong Pil; Choi, Jung-Ah

    2013-01-01

    Background Atrophy of rotator cuff muscles has been considered an irreversible phenomenon. The purpose of this study is to evaluate whether atrophy is truly irreversible after rotator cuff repair. Methods We measured supraspinatus muscle atrophy of 191 patients with full-thickness rotator cuff tears on preoperative magnetic resonance imaging and postoperative multidetector computed tomography images, taken at least 1 year after operation. The occupation ratio was calculated using Photoshop CS3 software. We compared the change between pre- and postoperative occupation ratios after modifying the preoperative occupation ratio. In addition, possible relationship between various clinical factors and the change of atrophy, and between the change of atrophy and cuff integrity after surgical repair were evaluated. Results The mean occupation ratio was significantly increased postoperatively from 0.44 ± 0.17 to 0.52 ± 0.17 (p < 0.001). Among 191 patients, 81 (42.4%) showed improvement of atrophy (more than a 10% increase in occupation ratio) and 33 (17.3%) worsening (more than a 10% decrease). Various clinical factors such as age tear size, or initial degree of atrophy did not affect the change of atrophy. However, the change of atrophy was related to repair integrity: cuff healing failure rate of 48.5% (16 of 33) in worsened atrophy; and 22.2% (18 of 81) in improved atrophy (p = 0.007). Conclusions The supraspinatus muscle atrophy as measured by occupation ratio could be improved postoperatively in case of successful cuff repair. PMID:23467404

  15. [Rotator cuff repair: single- vs double-row. Clinical and biomechanical results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baums, M H; Kostuj, T; Klinger, H-M; Papalia, R

    2016-02-01

    The goal of rotator cuff repair is a high initial mechanical stability as a requirement for adequate biological recovery of the tendon-to-bone complex. Notwithstanding the significant increase in publications concerning the topic of rotator cuff repair, there are still controversies regarding surgical technique. The aim of this work is to present an overview of the recently published results of biomechanical and clinical studies on rotator cuff repair using single- and double-row techniques. The review is based on a selective literature research of PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Database on the subject of the clinical and biomechanical results of single- and double-row repair. In general, neither the biomechanical nor the clinical evidence can recommend the use of a double-row concept for the treatment for every rotator cuff tear. Only tears of more than 3 cm seem to benefit from better results on both imaging and in clinical outcome studies compared with the use of single-row techniques. Despite a significant increase in publications on the surgical treatment of rotator cuff tears in recent years, the clinical results were not significantly improved in the literature so far. Unique information and algorithms, from which the optimal treatment of this entity can be derived, are still inadequate. Because of the cost-effectiveness and the currently vague evidence, the double-row techniques cannot be generally recommended for the repair of all rotator cuff tears.

  16. Functional Outcomes and Predictors of Failure After Rotator Cuff Repair During Total Shoulder Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livesey, Michael; Horneff, John G; Sholder, Daniel; Lazarus, Mark; Williams, Gerald; Namdari, Surena

    2018-05-01

    A well-functioning rotator cuff is necessary for successful anatomic total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA). This study evaluated patients who underwent concomitant TSA and rotator cuff repair (RCR) for functional outcomes, revision rates, and predictors of poor results. Retrospective chart review was conducted to identify patients who underwent TSA and RCR. Demographic data, rotator cuff tear and RCR characteristics, range of motion, and radiographs were recorded. Minimum 2-year functional outcomes were obtained. Predictors of reoperation and/or poor clinical results were determined. Forty-five patients met inclusion criteria (22 high-grade partial-thickness and 23 full-thickness tears). Fourteen (31%) patients were labeled as having a poor result; 8 (18%) patients required reoperation. There was a significant difference between the acromiohumeral interval preoperatively and immediately postoperatively (P=.013). However, at maximum radiographic follow-up, the acromiohumeral interval was not significantly different from preoperative values (P=.86). Patients with a preoperative acromiohumeral interval of less than 8 mm had an increased rate of cuff-related reoperation (P=.003). Although concomitant TSA and RCR is a reasonable consideration, 31% of patients had a poor clinical result. An acromiohumeral interval of less than 8 mm was a predictor of cuff-related reoperation and may be an indication to consider reverse arthroplasty in the setting of joint arthrosis with a rotator cuff tear. [Orthopedics. 2018; 41(3):e334-e339.]. Copyright 2018, SLACK Incorporated.

  17. Preoperative and post-operative sleep quality evaluation in rotator cuff tear patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serbest, Sancar; Tiftikçi, Uğur; Askın, Aydogan; Yaman, Ferda; Alpua, Murat

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the potential relationship between subjective sleep quality and degree of pain in patients with rotator cuff repair. Thirty-one patients who underwent rotator cuff repair prospectively completed the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, the Western Ontario Rotator Cuff Index, and the Constant and Murley shoulder scores before surgery and at 6 months after surgery. Preoperative demographic, clinical, and radiologic parameters were also evaluated. The study analysed 31 patients with a median age of 61 years. There was a significant difference preoperatively versus post-operatively in terms of all PSQI global scores and subdivisions (p Rotator Cuff Scale and the Constant and Murley shoulder scores (p ˂ 0.001). Sleep disorders are commonly seen in patients with rotator cuff tear, and after repair, there is an increase in the quality of sleep with a parallel improvement in shoulder functions. However, no statistically significant correlation was determined between arthroscopic procedures and the size of the tear and sleep quality. It is suggested that rotator cuff tear repair improves the quality of sleep and the quality of life. IV.

  18. Comparison between T2*- and T2-weighted images in diagnosing rotator cuff tears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumagai, Hideo; Ito, Hisao; Kubo, Atsushi.

    1995-01-01

    This study was performed to determine the merits of T2 * -weighted images in diagnosing rotator cuff tear, compared with T2-weighted images. T2- and T2 * -weighted images were obtained in 10 asymptomatic volunteers and 94 patients with symptoms referable to the rotator cuff. The increased signal with full thickness of the rotator cuff was not shown on either T2- or T2 * -weighted images in the volunteers. These findings on T2-weighted images and on T2 * -weighted images were observed in 33 and 58 of 94 patients with symptoms, respectively. Every patient who showed these abnormal findings on T2-weighted images had the abnormal findings on T2 * -weighted images. These findings on T2 * -weighted images were wider than those on T2-weighted images in 20 of 33 patients. Surgical findings were available in 21 of 94 patients. Rotator cuff tears were surgically confirmed in 20 patients whose MR images showed increased signal lesions on both T2- and T2 * -weighted images. On the other hand, one patient who did not have rotator cuff tear showed increased signal lesion with full thickness on T2 * -weighted images, but not on T2-weighted images. We think increased signal lesions on T2-weighted images may strongly suggest rotator cuff tear, whereas those on T2 * -weighted images are not specific. (author)

  19. Relationship between massive chronic rotator cuff tear pattern and loss of active shoulder range of motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collin, Philippe; Matsumura, Noboru; Lädermann, Alexandre; Denard, Patrick J; Walch, Gilles

    2014-08-01

    Management of massive chronic rotator cuff tears remains controversial, with no clearly defined clinical presentation as yet. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effect of tear size and location on active motion in patients with chronic and massive rotator cuff tears with severe muscle degeneration. One hundred patients with massive rotator cuff tears accompanied by muscle fatty infiltration beyond Goutallier stage 3 were prospectively included in this study. All patients were divided into 5 groups on the basis of tear pattern (supraspinatus, superior subscapularis, inferior subscapularis, infraspinatus, and teres minor). Active range of shoulder motion was assessed in each group and differences were analyzed. Active elevation was significantly decreased in patients with 3 tear patterns involved. Pseudoparalysis was found in 80% of the cases with supraspinatus and complete subscapularis tears and in 45% of the cases with tears involving the supraspinatus, infraspinatus, and superior subscapularis. Loss of active external rotation was related to tears involving the infraspinatus and teres minor; loss of active internal rotation was related to tears of the subscapularis. This study revealed that dysfunction of the entire subscapularis and supraspinatus or 3 rotator cuff muscles is a risk factor for pseudoparalysis. For function to be preserved in patients with massive chronic rotator cuff tears, it may be important to avoid fatty infiltration with anterior extension into the lower subscapularis or involvement of more than 2 rotator cuff muscles. Copyright © 2014 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. EGR1 induces tenogenic differentiation of tendon stem cells and promotes rabbit rotator cuff repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Xu; Liu, Junpeng; Chen, Lei; Zhou, You; Tang, Kanglai

    2015-01-01

    The rate of healing failure after surgical repair of chronic rotator cuff tears is considerably high. The aim of this study was to investigate the function of the zinc finger transcription factor early growth response 1 (EGR1) in the differentiation of tendon stem cells (TSCs) and in tendon formation, healing, and tendon tear repair using an animal model of rotator cuff repair. Tenocyte, adipocyte, osteocyte, and chondrocyte differentiation as well as the expression of related genes were determined in EGR1-overexpressing TSCs (EGR1-TSCs) using tissue-specific staining, immunofluorescence staining, quantitative PCR, and western blotting. A rabbit rotator cuff repair model was established, and TSCs and EGR1-TSCs in a fibrin glue carrier were applied onto repair sites. The rabbits were sacrificed 8 weeks after repair operation, and tissues were histologically evaluated and tenocyte-related gene expression was determined. EGR1 induced tenogenic differentiation of TSCs and inhibited non-tenocyte differentiation of TSCs. Furthermore, EGR1 promoted tendon repair in a rabbit model of rotator cuff injury. The BMP12/Smad1/5/8 signaling pathway was involved in EGR1-induced tenogenic differentiation and rotator cuff tendon repair. EGR1 plays a key role in tendon formation, healing, and repair through BMP12/Smad1/5/8 pathway. EGR1-TSCs is a promising treatment for rotator cuff tendon repair surgeries. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. EGR1 Induces Tenogenic Differentiation of Tendon Stem Cells and Promotes Rabbit Rotator Cuff Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Tao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The rate of healing failure after surgical repair of chronic rotator cuff tears is considerably high. The aim of this study was to investigate the function of the zinc finger transcription factor early growth response 1 (EGR1 in the differentiation of tendon stem cells (TSCs and in tendon formation, healing, and tendon tear repair using an animal model of rotator cuff repair. Methods: Tenocyte, adipocyte, osteocyte, and chondrocyte differentiation as well as the expression of related genes were determined in EGR1-overexpressing TSCs (EGR1-TSCs using tissue-specific staining, immunofluorescence staining, quantitative PCR, and western blotting. A rabbit rotator cuff repair model was established, and TSCs and EGR1-TSCs in a fibrin glue carrier were applied onto repair sites. The rabbits were sacrificed 8 weeks after repair operation, and tissues were histologically evaluated and tenocyte-related gene expression was determined. Results: EGR1 induced tenogenic differentiation of TSCs and inhibited non-tenocyte differentiation of TSCs. Furthermore, EGR1 promoted tendon repair in a rabbit model of rotator cuff injury. The BMP12/Smad1/5/8 signaling pathway was involved in EGR1-induced tenogenic differentiation and rotator cuff tendon repair. Conclusion: EGR1 plays a key role in tendon formation, healing, and repair through BMP12/Smad1/5/8 pathway. EGR1-TSCs is a promising treatment for rotator cuff tendon repair surgeries.

  2. Prognostic Factors Affecting Rotator Cuff Healing After Arthroscopic Repair in Small to Medium-sized Tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji Soon; Park, Hyung Jun; Kim, Sae Hoon; Oh, Joo Han

    2015-10-01

    Small and medium-sized rotator cuff tears usually have good clinical and anatomic outcomes. However, healing failure still occurs in some cases. To evaluate prognostic factors for rotator cuff healing in patients with only small to medium-sized rotator cuff tears. Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Data were prospectively collected from 339 patients with small to medium-sized rotator cuff tears who underwent arthroscopic repair by a single surgeon between March 2004 and August 2012 and who underwent magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomographic arthrography at least 1 year after surgery. The mean age of the patients was 59.8 years (range, 39-80 years), and the mean follow-up time was 20.8 months (range, 12-66 months). The functional evaluation included the visual analog scale (VAS) for pain, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score, Constant-Murley score, and Simple Shoulder Test. Postoperative VAS for pain and functional scores improved significantly compared with preoperative values (P rotator cuff healing (P 2 cm in size (34.2%) compared with patients with a tear ≤2 cm (10.6%) (P rotator cuff tears, grade II fatty degeneration of the infraspinatus muscle according to the Goutallier classification could be a reference point for successful healing, and anatomic outcomes might be better if repair is performed before the patient is 69 years old and the tear size exceeds 2 cm. © 2015 The Author(s).

  3. Repair of rotator cuff injuries using different composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopiz, Y; Arvinius, C; García-Fernández, C; Rodriguez-Bobada, M C; González-López, P; Civantos, A; Marco, F

    Rotator cuff repairs have shown a high level of re-ruptures. It is hypothesised that the use of rhBMP-2 in a carrier could improve the biomechanical and histological properties of the repair. Controlled experimental study conducted on 40 rats with section and repair of the supraspinatus tendon and randomisation to one of five groups: Group 1 (control) only suture; Group 2 (double control), suture and alginate-chitin carrier; Group 3 (alginate-control), the rhBMP-2 was added to the alginate; Group 4 (chitin-control) application of the rhBMP-2 to the chitin, and Group 5 (double sample): The two components of the carrier (alginate and chitin) have rhBMP-2. A biomechanical and histological analysis was performed at 4 weeks. A gap was observed in all cases 4 weeks after supraspinatus detachment. The re-rupture rate was 7.5%, with 20% of them in the control-alginate Group. Histologically the best results were obtained in the double sample group: 4.5 (3.3-5.0). Double sample were also able to support higher loads to failure: 62.9N (59.8 to 69.4) with lower rigidity 12.7 (9.7 to 15.9). The use of alginate-chitin carrier with rhBMP-2 improves the biomechanical and histological properties of the repair site in a chronic rotator cuff tear. Copyright © 2016 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Simvastatin Exposure and Rotator Cuff Repair in a Rat Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deren, Matthew E; Ehteshami, John R; Dines, Joshua S; Drakos, Mark C; Behrens, Steve B; Doty, Stephen; Coleman, Struan H

    2017-03-01

    Simvastatin is a common medication prescribed for hypercholesterolemia that accelerates local bone formation. It is unclear whether simvastatin can accelerate healing at the tendon-bone interface after rotator cuff repair. This study was conducted to investigate whether local and systemic administration of simvastatin increased tendon-bone healing of the rotator cuff as detected by maximum load to failure in a controlled animal-based model. Supraspinatus tendon repair was performed on 120 Sprague-Dawley rats. Sixty rats had a polylactic acid membrane overlying the repair site. Of these, 30 contained simvastatin and 30 did not contain medication. Sixty rats underwent repair without a polylactic acid membrane. Of these, 30 received oral simvastatin (25 mg/kg/d) and 30 received a regular diet. At 4 weeks, 5 rats from each group were killed for histologic analysis. At 8 weeks, 5 rats from each group were killed for histologic analysis and the remaining 20 rats were killed for biomechanical analysis. One rat that received oral simvastatin died of muscle necrosis. Average maximum load to failure was 35.2±6.2 N for those receiving oral simvastatin, 36.8±9.0 N for oral control subjects, 39.5±12.8 N for those receiving local simvastatin, and 39.1±9.3 N for control subjects with a polylactic acid membrane. No statistically significant differences were found between any of the 4 groups (P>.05). Qualitative histologic findings showed that all groups showed increased collagen formation and organization at 8 weeks compared with 4 weeks, with no differences between the 4 groups at each time point. The use of systemic and local simvastatin offered no benefit over control groups. [Orthopedics. 2017; 40(2):e288-e292.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  5. Cuff inflation during ambulatory blood pressure monitoring and heart rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mia Skov-Madsen

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Mia Skov-Madsen, My Svensson, Jeppe Hagstrup ChristensenDepartment of Nephrology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aalborg, DenmarkIntroduction: Twenty four-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring is a clinically validated procedure in evaluation of blood pressure (BP. We hypothesised that the discomfort during cuff inflation would increase the heart rate (HR measured with 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring compared to a following HR measurement with a 24-h Holter monitor.Methods: The study population (n = 56 were recruited from the outpatient’s clinic at the Department of Nephrology, Aalborg Hospital, Aarhus University Hospital at Aalborg, Denmark. All the patients had chronic kidney disease (CKD. We compared HR measured with a 24-h Holter monitor with a following HR measured by a 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring.Results: We found a highly significant correlation between the HR measured with the Holter monitor and HR measured with 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (r = 0.77, p < 0.001. Using the Bland-Altman plot, the mean difference in HR was only 0.5 beat/min during 24 hours with acceptable limits of agreement for both high and low HR levels. Dividing the patients into groups according to betablocker treatment, body mass index, age, sex, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor treatment, statins treatment, diuretic treatment, or calcium channel blocker treatment revealed similar results as described above.Conclusion: The results indicate that the discomfort induced by cuff inflation during 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring does not increase HR. Thus, 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring may be a reliable measurement of the BP among people with CKD.Keywords: ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, Holter monitoring, heart rate, chronic kidney disease, hypertension

  6. Transtendon, Double-Row, Transosseous-Equivalent Arthroscopic Repair of Partial-Thickness, Articular-Surface Rotator Cuff Tears

    OpenAIRE

    Dilisio, Matthew F.; Miller, Lindsay R.; Higgins, Laurence D.

    2014-01-01

    Arthroscopic transtendinous techniques for the arthroscopic repair of partial-thickness, articular-surface rotator cuff tears offer the advantage of minimizing the disruption of the patient's remaining rotator cuff tendon fibers. In addition, double-row fixation of full-thickness rotator cuff tears has shown biomechanical advantages. We present a novel method combining these 2 techniques for transtendon, double-row, transosseous-equivalent arthroscopic repair of partial-thickness, articular-s...

  7. Accuracy and reliability of wrist-cuff devices for self-measurement of blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuya, Masahiro; Chonan, Kenichi; Imai, Yutaka; Goto, Eiji; Ishii, Masao

    2002-04-01

    Self-measurement of blood pressure (BP) might offer some advantages in diagnosis and therapeutic evaluation and in patient management of hypertension. Recently, wrist-cuff devices for self-measurement of BP have gained more than one-third of the world market share. In the present study, we validated wrist-cuff devices and compared the results between wrist- and arm-cuff devices. The factors affecting the accuracy of wrist-cuff devices were also studied. The research group to assess the validity of automated blood pressure measuring device consisted of 13 institutes in Japan, which validated two wrist-cuff devices (WC-1 and WC-2) and two arm-cuff devices (AC-1 and AC-2). They used a crossover method, where the comparison was done between auscultation, by two observers by means of a double stethoscope on one arm and the device on the opposite arm or wrist. There was good inter-observer agreement for the auscultation method in each institute (systolic blood pressure (SBP), -0.1 +/- 2.8 mmHg; diastolic blood pressure (DBP), -0.1 +/- 2.6 mmHg, n = 498). The mean difference between auscultation and the device was minimal both in arm-cuff devices (mean difference for AC-1, 2.2/1.9 mmHg, n = 97 and for AC-2, 5.1/2.9 mmHg, n = 136, SBP/DBP) and wrist-cuff devices (mean difference for WC-1, -2.1/1.2 mmHg, n = 173 mmHg and for WC-2, -2.3/-5.6 mmHg, n = 92). The standard deviation of the difference (SDD) in wrist-cuff devices, however (SDD for WC-1, 9.7/7.3 mmHg and for WC-2, 10.2/8.6 mmHg), was larger than that of the arm-cuff devices (SDD for AC-1, 5.6/6.6 mmHg and for AC-2, 6.3/5.1 mmHg). Grading of AC-1 and AC-2 based on criteria of British Hypertension Society was A/A and B/A, respectively, while that of WC-1 and WC-2 was C/B and D/B, respectively. Using the same validation protocol, the results of validation for one device were divergent in each institute. In wrist-cuff devices, the BP value obtained in palmar flexion was significantly higher and that obtained in palmar

  8. Differential Effects of Endotracheal Suctioning on Gas Exchanges in Patients with Acute Respiratory Failure under Pressure-Controlled and Volume-Controlled Ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Wei Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of open endotracheal suctioning on gas exchange and respiratory mechanics in ARF patients under the modes of PCV or VCV. Ninety-six ARF patients were treated with open endotracheal suctioning and their variations in respiratory mechanics and gas exchange after the suctions were compared. Under PCV mode, compared with the initial level of tidal volume (VT, ARF patients showed 30.0% and 27.8% decrease at 1 min and 10 min, respectively. Furthermore, the initial respiratory system compliance (Crs decreased by 29.6% and 28.5% at 1 min and 10 min, respectively. Under VCV mode, compared with the initial level, 38.6% and 37.5% increase in peak airway pressure (PAP were found at 1 min and 10 min, respectively. Under PCV mode, the initial PaO2 increased by 6.4% and 10.2 % at 3 min and 10 min, respectively, while 18.9% and 30.6% increase of the initial PaO2 were observed under VCV mode. Summarily, endotracheal suctioning may impair gas exchange and decrease lung compliance in ARF patients receiving mechanical ventilation under both PCV and VCV modes, but endotracheal suctioning effects on gas exchange were more severe and longer-lasting under PCV mode than VCV.

  9. The Effect of Progressive Muscle Relaxation Exercises After Endotracheal Extubation on Vital Signs and Anxiety Level in Open Heart Surgery Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özlem İbrahimoğlu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of the exercises of progressive muscle relaxation (PMR on vital signs and anxiety level after endotracheal extubation in open heart surgery. Materials and Methods: This study was carried out as quasi-experimental, pre-test, and post-test with a control group. The study recruited 30 experimental and 30 control group open heart surgery patients, who met the inclusion criteria, from a cardiac and vascular surgery clinic of a university hospital. PMR exercises, which were taught before the surgery, were implemented after the surgery in the intensive care unit simultaneously with endotracheal extubation. The vital signs of the patients were monitored for the first 30 min. The anxiety levels were measured after 30 min of extubation with state anxiety inventory. Results: The lower rates of heartbeat, breathing, arterial blood pressure, and anxiety were observed in the experimental group in all measurements (first 30 min after endotracheal extubation, and the differences were statistically significant in favor of the experimental group (p<0.05. Conclusion: The study showed that the relaxation exercises after endotracheal extubation in open heart surgery patients was effective in improving vital signs and reducing anxiety level.

  10. Influence of Rotator Cuff Tear Size and Repair Technique on the Creation and Management of Dog Ear Deformities in a Transosseous-Equivalent Rotator Cuff Repair Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redler, Lauren H.; Byram, Ian R.; Luchetti, Timothy J.; Tsui, Ying Lai; Moen, Todd C.; Gardner, Thomas R.; Ahmad, Christopher S.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Redundancies in the rotator cuff tissue, commonly referred to as “dog ear” deformities, are frequently encountered during rotator cuff repair. Knowledge of how these deformities are created and their impact on rotator cuff footprint restoration is limited. Purpose: The goals of this study were to assess the impact of tear size and repair method on the creation and management of dog ear deformities in a human cadaveric model. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: Crescent-shaped tears were systematically created in the supraspinatus tendon of 7 cadaveric shoulders with increasing medial to lateral widths (0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 cm). Repair of the 1.5-cm tear was performed on each shoulder with 3 methods in a randomized order: suture bridge, double-row repair with 2-mm fiber tape, and fiber tape with peripheral No. 2 nonabsorbable looped sutures. Resulting dog ear deformities were injected with an acrylic resin mixture, digitized 3-dimensionally (3D), and photographed perpendicular to the footprint with calibration. The volume, height, and width of the rotator cuff tissue not in contact with the greater tuberosity footprint were calculated using the volume injected, 3D reconstructions, and calibrated photographs. Comparisons were made between tear size, dog ear measurement technique, and repair method utilizing 2-way analysis of variance and Student-Newman-Keuls multiple-comparison tests. Results: Utilizing 3D digitized and injection-derived volumes and dimensions, anterior dog ear volume, height, and width were significantly smaller for rotator cuff repair with peripheral looped sutures compared with a suture bridge (P repair with 2-mm fiber tape alone (P repair with looped peripheral sutures compared with a suture bridge (P repair technique, peripheral No. 2 nonabsorbable looped sutures significantly decreased the volume, height, and width of dog ear deformities, better restoring the anatomic footprint of the rotator cuff. Clinical

  11. Critical shoulder angle in an East Asian population: correlation to the incidence of rotator cuff tear and glenohumeral osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinagawa, Kiyotsugu; Hatta, Taku; Yamamoto, Nobuyuki; Kawakami, Jun; Shiota, Yuki; Mineta, Mitsuyoshi; Itoi, Eiji

    2018-05-03

    Focus has recently been on the critical shoulder angle (CSA) as a factor related to rotator cuff tear and osteoarthritis (OA) in the European population. However, whether this relationship is observed in the Asian population is unclear. The correlation between the CSAs measured on anteroposterior radiographs and the presence or absence of rotator cuff tears or OA changes was assessed in 295 patients. Rotator cuff tears were diagnosed with magnetic resonance imaging or ultrasonography. OA findings were classified using the Samilson-Prieto classification. The CSAs among the patients with rotator cuff tears, OA changes, and those without pathologies were compared. Multivariable analyses were used to clarify the potential risks for these pathologies. The mean CSA with rotator cuff tear (33.9° ± 4.1°) was significantly greater than that without a rotator cuff tear (32.3° ± 4.5°; P = .002). Multivariable analysis also showed that a greater CSA had a significantly increased risk of rotator cuff tears, with the odds ratio of 1.08 per degree. OA findings showed no significant correlation to the CSAs. Our study demonstrates that the CSA is greater in those with a rotator cuff tear than in those without a tear or OA changes, which may be an independent risk factor for the incidence of rotator cuff tears in the Japanese population. Copyright © 2018 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Automation in tube finishing bay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatnagar, Prateek; Satyadev, B.; Raghuraman, S.; Syama Sundara Rao, B.

    1997-01-01

    Automation concept in tube finishing bay, introduced after the final pass annealing of PHWR tubes resulted in integration of number of sub-systems in synchronisation with each other to produce final cut fuel tubes of specified length, tube finish etc. The tube finishing bay which was physically segregated into four distinct areas: 1. tube spreader and stacking area, 2. I.D. sand blasting area, 3. end conditioning, wad blowing, end capping and O.D. wet grinding area, 4. tube inspection, tube cutting and stacking area has been studied

  13. Helically coiled tube heat exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, A.M.

    1981-01-01

    In a heat exchanger such as a steam generator for a nuclear reactor, two or more bundles of helically coiled tubes are arranged in series with the tubes in each bundle integrally continuing through the tube bundles arranged in series therewith. Pitch values for the tubing in any pair of tube bundles, taken transverse to the path of the reactor coolant flow about the tubes, are selected as a ratio of two unequal integers to permit efficient operation of each tube bundle while maintaining the various tube bundles of the heat exchanger within a compact envelope. Preferably, the helix angle and tube pitch parallel to the path of coolant flow are constant for all tubes in a single bundle so that the tubes are of approximately the same length within each bundle

  14. Steam generator tube performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatone, O.S.; Pathania, R.S.

    1982-04-01

    The performance of steam generator tubes in water-cooled nuclear power reactors has been reviewed for 1980. Tube defects occurred at 38% of the 97 reactors surveyed. This is a marginal improvement over 1979 when defects occurred at 41% of the reactors. The number of failed tubes was also lower, 0.14% of the tubes in service in 1980 compared with 0.20% of those in service in 1979. Analysis of the causes of these failures indicates that stress corrosion cracking was the leading failure mechanism. Reactors that used all-volatile treatment of secondary water, with or without full-flow condensate demineralization since start-up showed the lowest incidence of corrosion-related defects

  15. X-ray tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webley, R.S.

    1975-01-01

    The object of the invention described is to provide an X-ray tube providing a scanned X-ray output which does not require a scanned electron beam. This is obtained by an X-ray tube including an anode which is rotatable about an axis, and a source of a beam of energy, for example an electron beam, arranged to impinge on a surface of the anode to generate X-radiation substantially at the region of incidence on the anode surface. The anode is rotatable about the axis to move the region of incidence over the surface. The anode is so shaped that the rotation causes the region of incidence to move in a predetermined manner relative to fixed parts of the tube so that the generated X-radiation is scanned in a predetermined manner relative to the tube. (UK)

  16. Fuel assembly guide tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jabsen, F.S.

    1979-01-01

    This invention is directed toward a nuclear fuel assembly guide tube arrangement which restrains spacer grid movement due to coolant flow and which offers secondary means for supporting a fuel assembly during handling and transfer operations

  17. Bull Moose Tube Company

    Science.gov (United States)

    The EPA is providing notice of a proposed Administrative Penalty Assessment against the Bull Moose Tube Company, a business located at 1819 Clarkson Road, Chesterfield, MO, 63017, for alleged violations at the facility located at 406 East Industrial Drive,

  18. Tracheostomy tube - eating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trach - eating ... take your first bites. Certain factors may make eating or swallowing harder, such as: Changes in the ... easier to swallow. Suction the tracheostomy tube before eating. This will keep you from coughing while eating, ...

  19. Graft Utilization in the Bridging Reconstruction of Irreparable Rotator Cuff Tears: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewington, Matthew R; Ferguson, Devin P; Smith, T Duncan; Burks, Robert; Coady, Catherine; Wong, Ivan Ho-Bun

    2017-11-01

    Rotator cuff tears are one of the most common conditions affecting the shoulder. Because of the difficulty in managing massive rotator cuff tears and the inability of standard techniques to prevent arthropathy, surgeons have developed several novel techniques to improve outcomes and ideally alter the natural history. To systematically review the existing literature and analyze reported outcomes to evaluate the effectiveness of using a bridging graft reconstruction technique to treat large to massive irreparable rotator cuff tears. Systematic review. A systematic search of PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, and CENTRAL was employed with the key terms "tear," "allograft," and "rotator cuff." Eligibility was determined by a 3-phase screening process according to the outlined inclusion/exclusion criteria. Data in relation to the primary and secondary outcomes were summarized. The results were synthesized according to the origin of the graft and the level of evidence. Fifteen studies in total were included in this review: 2 comparative studies and 13 observational case series. Both the biceps tendon and the fascia lata autograft groups had significantly superior structural integrity rates on magnetic resonance imaging at 12-month minimum follow-up when compared with their partial primary repair counterparts (58% vs 26%, P = .036; 79% vs 58%, P rotator cuff tears demonstrated high structural healing rates (74%-90%, 73%-100%, and 60%-90%, respectively). Additionally, both comparative studies and case series demonstrated a general improvement of patients' functional outcome scores. Using a graft for an anatomic bridging rotator cuff repair results in improved function on objective testing and may be functionally better than nonanatomic or partial repair of large to massive rotator cuff tears. Allograft or xenograft techniques appear to be favorable options, given demonstrated functional improvement, imaging-supported graft survival, and lack of harvest complication risk. More high

  20. Trabecular microstructure and surface changes in the greater tuberosity in rotator cuff tears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Yebin; Zhao, Jenny; Ouyang, Xiaolong; Genant, Harry K.; Holsbeeck, Marnix T. van; Flynn, Michael J.

    2002-01-01

    Abstract Objective. When planning surgery in patients with rotator cuff tear, strength of bone at the tendon insertion and trabecular bone structure in the greater tuberosity are usually taken into consideration. We investigated radiographic changes in bone structure of the greater tuberosity in rotator cuff tears.Design. Twenty-two human cadaveric shoulders from subjects ranging from 55 to 75 years of age were obtained. The integrity of the rotator cuff was examined by sonography to determine if it is intact without any tear, or torn partially or completely. The humeral head was sectioned in 3 mm thick coronal slab sections and microradiographed. After digitization of the microradiographs and imaging processing with in-house semi-automated image processing software tools developed using software interfaces on a Sun workstation, the trabecular histomorphometrical structural parameters and connectivity in the greater tuberosity were quantified. The degenerative changes on the surface of the greater tuberosity were interpreted blindly by 2 independent readers.Results. Among the 22 shoulder specimens, the rotator cuff was found intact in 10 shoulders, partially in 7 and fully torn in 5. Statistically significant loss in apparent trabecular bone volume fraction, number of trabecular nodes, and number of trabecular branches, and a statistically significant increase in apparent trabecular separation and number of trabecular free ends were found in the greater tuberosity of the shoulders with tears. The loss was greater in association with full tear than in partial tear. Thickening of the cortical margin of the enthesis, irregularity of its surface, and calcification beyond the tidemark were observed in 2 (20%) shoulders with intact rotator cuff, in 6 (86%) shoulders with partial tear, and in 5 (100%) shoulders with full tear.Conclusions. Rotator cuff tears are associated with degenerative changes on the bone surface and with disuse osteopenia of the greater tuberosity