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Sample records for endor

  1. Wide band ENDOR spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendonca Filho, C.

    1973-01-01

    The construction of an ENDOR spectrometer operating from 0,5 to 75 MHz within a single band, with ore Klystron and homodine detection, and no fundamental changes on the electron spin resonance spectrometer was described. The ENDOR signal can be detected both by amplitude modulation of the frequency field, or direct detection of the ESR output, which is taken to a signal analyser. The signal-to-noise ratio is raised by averaging rather than filtering avoiding the use of long time constants, providing natural line widths. The experimental apparatus and the spectra obtained are described. A discussion, relating the ENDOR line amplitudes with the experimental conditions is done and ENDOR mechanism, in which there is a relevant presence of cross relaxation is proposed

  2. A theoretical interpretation of EPR and ENDOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matos, M.O.M. de.

    1975-08-01

    To interpret the EPR and ENDOR results of the U 2 center in SrF 2 , two wavefunctions are proposed to describe the unpaired electron of the defect. Use is made of two different models in order to obtain the wavefunctions: the Heitler-London and that of molecular orbitals models. The Pauli repulsion (overlap of wavefunctions) is discussed as well as covalency mechanisms and their influence in the calculation of the hyperfine constants due to magnetic interaction of the unpaired electron and the magnetic nucleus of the cristal. A small amount of covalency between the ground state of the interstitial Hydrogen atom and the 2p shell of the F - ions of the first cristaline shell is introduced fenomenologically in the molecular orbitals model. Both methods are discussed by comparing the theoretical calculations of the hyperfine constants with the measured experimental values obtained with the EPR and ENDOR techniques. (Author) [pt

  3. ENDOR investigations on heat treatment centers in oxygen rich Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michel, J.; Meilwes, N.; Spaeth, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    Previous ENDOR results on NL8 centers (thermal donors TD) in Czochralski (Cz) Si and 17 O diffused float zone (FZ) Si are summarised. Comparison of ENDOR spectra of NL8 centers in B and Al doped Si shows that no dopant impurity is involved in the TD + structure while Al is incorporated in the NL10 defects in Al-doped Si. No 10,11 B - ENDOR is found for NL10 in B doped Si. It is concluded that NL10 is not related to NL8 and that NL10 is not even a unique defect. (author) 6 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  4. ENDOR with band-selective shaped inversion pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tait, Claudia E.; Stoll, Stefan

    2017-04-01

    Electron Nuclear DOuble Resonance (ENDOR) is based on the measurement of nuclear transition frequencies through detection of changes in the polarization of electron transitions. In Davies ENDOR, the initial polarization is generated by a selective microwave inversion pulse. The rectangular inversion pulses typically used are characterized by a relatively low selectivity, with full inversion achieved only for a limited number of spin packets with small resonance offsets. With the introduction of pulse shaping to EPR, the rectangular inversion pulses can be replaced with shaped pulses with increased selectivity. Band-selective inversion pulses are characterized by almost rectangular inversion profiles, leading to full inversion for spin packets with resonance offsets within the pulse excitation bandwidth and leaving spin packets outside the excitation bandwidth largely unaffected. Here, we explore the consequences of using different band-selective amplitude-modulated pulses designed for NMR as the inversion pulse in ENDOR. We find an increased sensitivity for small hyperfine couplings compared to rectangular pulses of the same bandwidth. In echo-detected Davies-type ENDOR, finite Fourier series inversion pulses combine the advantages of increased absolute ENDOR sensitivity of short rectangular inversion pulses and increased sensitivity for small hyperfine couplings of long rectangular inversion pulses. The use of pulses with an almost rectangular frequency-domain profile also allows for increased control of the hyperfine contrast selectivity. At X-band, acquisition of echo transients as a function of radiofrequency and appropriate selection of integration windows during data processing allows efficient separation of contributions from weakly and strongly coupled nuclei in overlapping ENDOR spectra within a single experiment.

  5. Fingerprints of single nuclear spin energy levels using STM - ENDOR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manassen, Yishay; Averbukh, Michael; Jbara, Moamen; Siebenhofer, Bernhard; Shnirman, Alexander; Horovitz, Baruch

    2018-04-01

    We performed STM-ENDOR experiments where the intensity of one of the hyperfine components detected in ESR-STM is recorded while an rf power is irradiated into the tunneling junction and its frequency is swept. When the latter frequency is near a nuclear transition a dip in ESR-STM signal is observed. This experiment was performed in three different systems: near surface SiC vacancies where the electron spin is coupled to a next nearest neighbor 29 Si nucleus; Cu deposited on Si(111)7x7 surface, where the unpaired electron of the Cu atom is coupled to the Cu nucleus ( 63 Cu, 65 Cu) and on Tempo molecules adsorbed on Au(111), where the unpaired electron is coupled to a Nitrogen nucleus ( 14 N). While some of the hyperfine values are unresolved in the ESR-STM data due to linewidth we find that they are accurately determined in the STM-ENDOR data including those from remote nuclei, which are not detected in the ESR-STM spectrum. Furthermore, STM-ENDOR can measure single nuclear Zeeman frequencies, distinguish between isotopes through their different nuclear magnetic moments and detect quadrupole spectra. We also develop and solve a Bloch type equation for the coupled electron-nuclear system that facilitates interpretation of the data. The improved spectral resolution of STM - ENDOR opens many possibilities for nanometric scale chemical analysis. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Application of ENDOR-induced electron spin resonance to the study of point defects in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niklas, J.R.; Spaeth, J.M.

    1980-01-01

    The technique of ENDOR-induced ESR (EI-ESR) is applied to the investigation of several point defects in insulating crystals. It is shown that the lineshape of the EI-ESR spectrum depends on the ENDOR line used for the experiment. The EI-ESR technique allows the separation of overlapping ESR spectra in the presence of several defects. New applications are the selection of spin states and the determination of relative signs of spin-Hamiltonian parameters, the selection of centre orientations and the assignment of nuclei in complex ENDOR spectra, and the determination of quadrupole interactions which are not resolved in the ENDOR spectrum. (author)

  7. Some ENDOR studies of 3d transition metal ions in semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engelen, P.P.J.

    1980-01-01

    The author considers 3d transition metal ions substituted in covalent semiconducting crystals. The magnitude of the contact hyperfine field at the 59 Co nucleus in cobalt doped CdS is determined. The results of an ENDOR study of supertransferred hyperfine interactions with nearest neighbour Ga ions in Mn doped GaP are presented. (G.T.H.)

  8. Natural and induced endoreic hydrological conditions in the Alta Murgia karstic region (Apulia, Southern Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canora, F.; Fidelibus, M. D.; Spilotro, G.

    2009-04-01

    A study aimed at understanding the hydrological processes in karst areas related to the presence of natural and artificial endoreic basins and their modification due to land use change, as well as the influence of above factors on the infiltration rate has been carried out in the Alta Murgia region (Apulia, Southern Italy). The region is a Cretaceous limestone plateau of the Apulian platform, characterized by a mature karstic landscape: due to its elevation, climatic conditions and lithology, the plateau constitutes the main recharge area of the Murgia aquifer. The typical karst topography is essentially related to the subterranean drainage (sinkholes, caves, conduit): surface and subsurface karst geomorphology is strictly interrelated with hydrology. The morphological features of the karstic plateau are defined by the high density of surface karstic forms (mainly dolines), the presence of exposed karst and karren fields, as well as by the extensive outcrop of fractured rocks. Karst surface shows, on the bottom of the morpho-structural depressions called "lame", natural distribution of modest deposits of "terra rossa" and regolith. The "lame" work as streams during and after intense rainfall events, often outlining a primordial ephemeral hydrographical network, frequently convergent towards dolines, poljes or endoreic basins. Alta Murgia shows many natural endoreic basin conditions in a quite flat morphology. In this environment, when intense rainfall events cover large areas and rainfall intensity exceeds the infiltration capacity of soils and/or sinkholes, significant runoff amounts are produced and stored in the basins causing floods. Most of the natural endoreic basins are small and independent: while the majority of them continue functioning as endoreic even in presence of extreme events of high return time, others (quasi-endoreic), under the same circumstances can start contributing to other basins, due to exceeding their water storage capability. This way

  9. ENDOR-Induced EPR of Disordered Systems: Application to X-Irradiated Alanine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusakovskij, Jevgenij; Maes, Kwinten; Callens, Freddy; Vrielinck, Henk

    2018-02-15

    The electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra of radiation-induced radicals in organic solids are generally composed of multiple components that largely overlap due to their similar weak g anisotropy and a large number of hyperfine (HF) interactions. Such properties make these systems difficult to study using standard cw EPR spectroscopy even in single crystals. Electron-nuclear double-resonance (ENDOR) spectroscopy is a powerful and widely used complementary technique. In particular, ENDOR-induced EPR (EIE) experiments are useful for separating the overlapping contributions. In the present work, these techniques were employed to study the EPR spectrum of stable radicals in X-irradiated alanine, which is widely used in dosimetric applications. The principal values of all major proton HF interactions of the dominant radicals were determined by analyzing the magnetic field dependence of the ENDOR spectrum at 50 K, where the rotation of methyl groups is frozen. Accurate simulations of the EPR spectrum were performed after the major components were separated using an EIE analysis. As a result, new evidence in favor of the model of the second dominant radical was obtained.

  10. ENDOR/ESR of Mn atoms and MnH molecules in solid argon

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zee, R. J.; Garland, D. A.; Weltner, W., Jr.

    1986-09-01

    Mn atoms and MnH molecules, the latter formed by reaction between metal and hydrogen atoms, were trapped in solid argon and their ESR/ENDOR spectra measured at 4 K. At each pumping magnetic field two ENDOR lines were observed for 55Mn(I=5/2) atoms, corresponding to hyperfine transitions within the MS =±1/2 levels. Values of the hyperfine interaction constant and nuclear moment of 55Mn were derived from the six sets of data. For MnH, three sets of signals were detected: a proton ``matrix ENDOR'' line, transitions in the MS =0,±1 levels involving MI (55Mn)=1/2, 3/2, 5/2 levels, and proton transitions corresponding to νH and νH±aH. Analysis yielded the hyperfine constant aH =6.8(1) MHz and the nuclear quadrupole coupling constant Q'(55Mn)=-11.81(2) MHz. The latter compared favorably with a theoretical value derived earlier by Bagus and Schaefer. A higher term in the spin Hamiltonian appeared to be necessary to fit the proton hyperfine data.

  11. An ENDOR spectrum of H atoms in solid H{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumada, Takayuki; Kumagai, J.; Aratono, Yasuyuki; Miyazaki, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Kitagawa, N.; Noda, T.

    1998-10-01

    An ENDOR spectrum of H atoms produced in the {gamma}-rays irradiated solid H{sub 2} was measured at 4.2 K in order to elucidate the structures of the local environment of the H atoms in solid H{sub 2}. We found that the H atoms were not trapped in interstitial sites but in substitutional sites of the solid, and almost all ortho-H{sub 2} molecules at the first nearest sites from the H atoms converted into para-H{sub 2} molecules. This result shows that the ortho-para conversion is induced by electron spins of the H atoms. (author)

  12. EPR dating CO2- sites in tooth enamel apatites by ENDOR and triple resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vugman, N.V.; Rigby, S.E.J.

    1995-01-01

    In this work we combine electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), high-resolution electron nucleus double resonance (ENDOR) and general triple resonance (GTR) spectroscopies, to study the local environment of the CO 2 - groups created by ionizing radiation in fossil tooth enamel. We demonstrate that the CO 2 - groups occupy slightly modified phosphate sites in the hydroxyapatite lattice. In quaternary shark enamel we found these groups to be interacting with water molecules in the apatite channels. The absence of water molecules as first neighbours in mammalian samples indicate, however, that these molecules are not significantly responsible for the stabilization of CO 2 - dating centers in enamel. (author)

  13. Solid state radiation chemistry of co-crystallized DNA base pairs studied with EPR and ENDOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, W.H.; Nimmala, S.; Hole, E.O.; Sagstuen, E.; Close, D.M.

    1995-01-01

    For a number of years, the authors' group has focused on identification of radicals formed from x-irradiation of DNA components by application of EPR and ENDOR spectroscopic techniques to samples in the form of single crystals. With single crystals as samples, it is possible to use the detailed packing and structural information available from x-ray or neutron diffraction reports. This report summarizes results from two crystal systems in which DNA bases are paired by hydrogen bonding. Extensive results are available from one of these, 1-methyl-thymine:9-methyladenine (MTMA), in which the base pairing is the Hoogsteen configuration. Although this configuration is different from that found by Watson-Crick in DNA, nonetheless the hydrogen bond between T(O4) and A(NH 2 ) is present. Although MTMA crystals have been studied previously, the objective was to apply the high-resolution technique of ENDOR to crystals irradiated and studied at temperatures of 10 K or lower in the effort to obtain direct evidence for specific proton transfers. The second system, from which the results are only preliminary, is 9-ethylguanine:1-methyl-5-fluorocytosine (GFC) in which the G:C bases pair is in the Watson Crick configuration. Both crystal systems are anhydrous, so the results include no possible effects from water interactions

  14. Electronic Structure of ZnO Quantum Dots studied by High-frequency EPR, ESE, ENDOR and ODMR Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baranov, P.G.; Romanov, N.G.; Bundakova, A.P.; de Mello-Donega, Celso; Schmidt, J.

    2016-01-01

    High-frequency electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), electron spin echo (ESE), electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) and optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) were applied for the investigation of the electronic properties of ZnO colloidal quantum dots (QDs) which consist of a ZnO

  15. ENDOR investigations of the Ce.sup.3+./sup. ions in YAG: Transferred hyperfine interaction with nearest aluminum ions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Azamat, Dmitry; Badalyan, A. G.; Feng, D.H.; Lančok, Ján; Jastrabík, Lubomír; Dejneka, Alexandr; Baranov, P. G.; Yakovlev, D.R.; Bayer, M.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 122, č. 24 (2017), s. 1-3, č. článku 243903. ISSN 0021-8979 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LO1409; GA ČR GA16-22092S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : ENDOR * Ce 3+ ions in YAG * transferred hyperfine interactions Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 2.068, year: 2016

  16. 13C ENDOR Spectroscopy of Lipoxygenase-Substrate Complexes Reveals the Structural Basis for C-H Activation by Tunneling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horitani, Masaki; Offenbacher, Adam R; Carr, Cody A Marcus; Yu, Tao; Hoeke, Veronika; Cutsail, George E; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon; Klinman, Judith P; Hoffman, Brian M

    2017-02-08

    In enzymatic C-H activation by hydrogen tunneling, reduced barrier width is important for efficient hydrogen wave function overlap during catalysis. For native enzymes displaying nonadiabatic tunneling, the dominant reactive hydrogen donor-acceptor distance (DAD) is typically ca. 2.7 Å, considerably shorter than normal van der Waals distances. Without a ground state substrate-bound structure for the prototypical nonadiabatic tunneling system, soybean lipoxygenase (SLO), it has remained unclear whether the requisite close tunneling distance occurs through an unusual ground state active site arrangement or by thermally sampling conformational substates. Herein, we introduce Mn 2+ as a spin-probe surrogate for the SLO Fe ion; X-ray diffraction shows Mn-SLO is structurally faithful to the native enzyme. 13 C ENDOR then reveals the locations of 13 C10 and reactive 13 C11 of linoleic acid relative to the metal; 1 H ENDOR and molecular dynamics simulations of the fully solvated SLO model using ENDOR-derived restraints give additional metrical information. The resulting three-dimensional representation of the SLO active site ground state contains a reactive (a) conformer with hydrogen DAD of ∼3.1 Å, approximately van der Waals contact, plus an inactive (b) conformer with even longer DAD, establishing that stochastic conformational sampling is required to achieve reactive tunneling geometries. Tunneling-impaired SLO variants show increased DADs and variations in substrate positioning and rigidity, confirming previous kinetic and theoretical predictions of such behavior. Overall, this investigation highlights the (i) predictive power of nonadiabatic quantum treatments of proton-coupled electron transfer in SLO and (ii) sensitivity of ENDOR probes to test, detect, and corroborate kinetically predicted trends in active site reactivity and to reveal unexpected features of active site architecture.

  17. ESR and ENDOR of free radicals in γ-irradiated single crystals of trimethoprim at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krzyminiewski, R.; Kawacka, U.; Pietrzak, J.; Erickson, R.; Lund, A.

    1995-01-01

    Singe crystals of trimethoprim were examined after γ-irradiation at room temperature by ESR and ENDOR spectroscopy. A radicals is formed by abstraction of a hydrogen atom from the CH 2 group of the bridge. The unpaired electron is delocalized mainly onto the trimethoxybenzyl ring. It interacts with one proton of the bridge and with two protons in the trimethoxybenzyl ring. (au) (14 refs.)

  18. ENDOR-investigations in the environment of the ferroelectric phase transition temperature of γ-irradiated TSCC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welter, M.

    1983-01-01

    The structure of the CH 3 NHCH 2 COOH radical in the paraelectric phase and during the transition into the ferroelectric phase has been determined by means of ENDOR measurements. The carboxyl group of the radical is a sensitive probe for the study of crystal field changes. Structural differences of the radical between the paraelectric and the ferroelectric phase were attributed to structural changes within the nearest environment

  19. Electron spin resonance (ESR), electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) and general triple resonance of irradiated biocarbonates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schramm, D.U.; Rossi, A.M.

    1996-01-01

    Several irradiated bicarbonates were studied by magnetic resonance techniques. Seven paramagnetic species, attributed to CO 2 - , SO 2 - and SO 3 - were identified. Comparison between radiation induced defects in bioaragonites and aragonite single-crystals show that isotropic and orthorhombic CO 2 - centers with broad line spectra are not produced in the latter samples. Vibrational and rotational properties of isotropic CO 2 - centers were studied from low temperature Q-band spectras. Vibrational frequency is determined from the 13 CO 2 - hyperfine spectrum and yielded ν 1.54 x 10 13 s -1 . The correlation time for isotropic CO 2 - , τc) = 1.2 x 10 -11 s (T = 300 K0, is typical of radicals rotating in liquids. ENDOR and General Triple spectroscopy show that orthorhombic CO 2 - centres are surrounded by water molecules located in the second nearest CO 2 2- sites at 5.14, 5.35 and 6.02 A. Water molecules replacing carbonates or as liquid inclusion of growth solution in local crystal imperfections may be responsible for the variety of orthorhombic and isotropic CO 2 - species, respectively. (author)

  20. Electron spin resonance and E.N.D.O.R. double resonance study of free radicals produced by gamma irradiation of imidazole single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamotte, B.

    1970-01-01

    Gamma irradiation of imidazole single crystals at 300 deg. K gives two radicals. Identification and detailed studies of their electronic and geometric structure have been made by ESR and ENDOR techniques. A study of the hydrogen bonded protons hyperfine tensor is made and let us conclude to the inexistence of movement and tunneling of these protons. The principal low temperature radical, produced by gamma irradiation at 77 deg. K has been also studied by ESR and a model has been proposed. (author) [fr

  1. ENDOR determination of the proton positions around Gd3+ in La(C2H5SO4)3.9H2O

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beer, R. de; Biesboer, F.; Ormondt, D. van

    1976-01-01

    The water proton positions around Gd 3+ in La(C 2 H 5 SO 4 ) 3 .9H 2 O have been determined by means of ENDOR. The positions of the nearest neighbour water oxygens are discussed on the basis of a superposition model analysis of the ratios b 2 0 /A 2 0 2 >, b 6 6 /b 6 0 and mod(A 6 6 )modA 6 0 . (Auth.)

  2. Effects of ionizing radiation in cocrystals of DNA model compounds: ESR-ENDOR studies of X-irradiated imidazole:barbital and adenosine:5-bromouracil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kar, L.

    1982-01-01

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) and electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) techniques have been used to study radiation induced damage in cocrystalline complexes X-irradiated at 12 K. The study addresses the following questions: (1) whether radiation induced damage is stabilized preferentially on one of the components of the cocrystalline system; and (2) whether charge transfer occurs between purine and pyrimidine bases in hydrogen bonded or stacked configurations. The cocrystals used in this study are imidazole:5,5-diethylbarbituric acid (barbital) and adenosine:5-bromouracil (AR:BU). Results indicate that (1) preferential stability of radiation damage may be observed in a cocrystal even in the absence of stacking interactions; (2) in the presence of purine:pyrimidine stacking electron transfer may occur, but hole transfer is not likely to be the mechanism of redistribution of radiation damage in cocrystalline systems. The radiation chemistry of AR:BU is used as a model to predict the effects of ionizing radiation on DNA

  3. Thermodynamic Basis of Electron Transfer in Dihydroorotate Dehydrogenase B from Lactococcus lactis:  Analysis by Potentiometry, EPR Spectroscopy, and ENDOR Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohnsen, Al-Walid A.; Rigby, Stephen E. J.; Jensen, Kaj Frank

    2004-01-01

    Dihydroorotate dehydrogenase B (DHODB) is a complex iron-sulfur flavoprotein that catalyzes the conversion of dihydroorotate to orotate and the reduction of NAD+. The enzyme is a dimer of heterodimers containing an FMN, an FAD, and a 2Fe-2S center. UV-visible, EPR, and ENDOR spectroscopies have...... similar to those recorded for the blue semiquinone of free flavins in aqueous solution, thus confirming the presence of this species in DHODB. Spectral features observed during EPR spectroscopy of dithionite-reduced DHODB are consistent with the midpoint reduction potentials determined using UV-visible...... spectroscopy and further identify an unusual EPR signal with very small rhombic anisotropy and g values of 2.02, 1.99, and 1.96. This unusual signal is assigned to the formation of a spin interacting state between the FMN semiquinone species and the reduced 2Fe-2S center. Reduction of DHODB using an excess...

  4. Electron spin resonance and E.N.D.O.R. double resonance study of free radicals produced by gamma irradiation of imidazole single crystals; Etude par resonance paramagnetique electronique et double resonance E.N.D.O.R. des radicaux libres crees par irradiation gamma de monocristaux d'imidazole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamotte, B [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1970-07-01

    Gamma irradiation of imidazole single crystals at 300 deg. K gives two radicals. Identification and detailed studies of their electronic and geometric structure have been made by ESR and ENDOR techniques. A study of the hydrogen bonded protons hyperfine tensor is made and let us conclude to the inexistence of movement and tunneling of these protons. The principal low temperature radical, produced by gamma irradiation at 77 deg. K has been also studied by ESR and a model has been proposed. (author) [French] L'irradiation gamma de monocristaux d'imidazole a 300 deg. K conduit a deux radicaux dont l'identification et l'etude detaillee des structures electroniques et geometriques ont ete obtenues par la resonance paramagnetique electronique (RPE) et la double resonance ENDOR. En particulier l'examen des protons de la liaison hydrogene permet de conclure, pour ceux-ci, a l'inexistence de tout mouvement par effet tunnel. De plus, l'analyse des spectres de RPE du radical principal cree par irradiation gamma de l'imidazole a 77 deg. K nous a permis de proposer un modele pour ce radical. (auteur)

  5. Detection of Anisotropic Hyperfine Components of Chemically Prepared Carotenoid Radical Cations:1D and 2D ESEEM and Pulsed ENDOR Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konovalova, Tatyana A.; Dikanov, Sergei A.; Bowman, Michael K.; Kispert, Lowell D.

    2001-01-01

    Canthaxanthin and 8'-apo-B-caroten-8'-al radical cations chemically prepared on activated silica-alumina and in CH2CI2 solution containing A1C13 were studied by pulsed EPR and ENDOR spectroscopies. Both the 1D three-pulse ESEEM and the 2D HYSCORE spectra of the carotenoid-A1C13 mixtures exhibited the 27 A1 nuclei peak at 3.75 MHz. This indicates electron-transfer interactions between carotenoids and A1III ions resulting in the formation and stabilization of carotenoid radical cations. Davies ENDOR measurements of the canthaxanthin radical cation on silica-alumina determined the hyperfine couplings of B protons belonging to three different methyl groups with ahI=2.6 MHz, aH2=8.6MHz, and ah3 ca. 13 MHz. The principal components of the proton hyperfine tensors were obtained from HYSCORE spectra in A1C13 solutions and on the solid support. Identification of the protons was made on the basis of isotropic hyperfine couplings determined by RHF-INDO/SP molecular orbital calculations. In frozen A1C13 solution, the C(7, 7')Ha and C(14, 14')-Ha a protons were observed for Canthaxanthin and the C(8 or 14')-Ha, C(15')-Ha were observed for 8'-apo-B-caroten-8'-al. On the silica-alumina support, the C(10, 10')-Ha, C(11, 11')-Ha, and C(15,15')-Ha a protons were measured for Canthaxanthin and the C(12)-Ha and C(15')-Ha were measured for 8' apo-B-caroten-8'-al. Some protons with large isotropic couplings (> 10 MHz) determined from HYSCORE analysis could be assigned to B protons, but the principal components of their hyperfine tensors are much more anisotropic than those reported previously for B protons. We suggest that cis/trans isomerization of carotenoids on silica-alumina results in stabilization of di-cis isomers with large isotropic couplings for some a protons which are comparable to those of B protons

  6. H?, D? and HD adsorption upon the metal-organic framework [Cu?Zn?(btc)?]? studied by pulsed ENDOR and HYSCORE spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jee, Bettina; Hartmann, Martin; Pöppl, Andreas

    2013-10-01

    The adsorption of hydrogen has become interesting in terms of gas separation as well as safe and reversible storage of hydrogen as an energy carrier. In this regard, metal-organic framework compounds are potential candidates. The metal-organic framework [Cu?Zn?(btc)?]? as a partially Zn-substituted analogue of the well known compound HKUST-1 is well suited for studying adsorption geometries at cupric ions by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) methods due to the formation of few mixed Cu/Zn paddle wheel units with isolated S = 1/2 electron spins. The adsorption of hydrogen (H2) as well as the deuterium (D2) and HD molecules were investigated by continuous wave EPR and pulsed ENDOR and HYSCORE spectroscopy. The principal values of the proton and deuterium hyperfine coupling tensors ? and ? were determined by spectral simulations as well as of the deuterium nuclear quadrupole tensor ? for adsorbed HD and D2. The results show a side-on coordination of HD and D2 with identical Cu-H and Cu-D distances rCuX = 2.8 Å with the tensors ? and ? aligned parallel to the C4 symmetry axis of the paddle wheel unit. A thermodynamic non-equilibrium state with J = 1, mJ = ±1 is indicated by the experimental data with ? and ? averaged by rotation around C4.

  7. Strong resistance of Arabidopsis thaliana and Raphanus sativus seeds for ionizing radiation as studied by ESR, ENDOR, ESE spectroscopy and germination measurement: Effect of long-lived and super-long-lived radicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumagai, Jun E-mail: kumagai@apchem.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Katoh, Hiromi; Kumada, Takayuki; Tanaka, Atsushi; Tano, Shigemitsu; Miyazaki, Tetsuo

    2000-01-01

    Resistance of seeds for ionizing radiation effects on Arabidopsis thaliana and Raphanus sativus seeds were investigated by ESR, ENDOR, ESE spectroscopy and germination measurement. Two types of free radicals, such as long-lived (LL) and super-long-lived (SL) radicals, were produced by the {gamma}-irradiation in the seeds. More than 90% of the 1 kGy-irradiated-seeds can germinate probably by decreasing the LL radicals by absorbing water. 10 kGy-irradiated-seeds cannot germinate at all probably due to the existence of significant amounts of the SL radicals even after absorbing water. (author)

  8. Electron gain and electron loss radicals stabilized on the purine and pyrimidine of a cocrystal exhibiting base-base interstacking: ESR-ENDOR of X-irradiated adenosine:5-bromouracil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kar, L.; Bernhard, W.A.

    1983-01-01

    The predominant free radicals trapped in cocrystals of adenosine:5-bromouracil X-irradiated at 12 0 K were identified by ESR-ENDOR spectroscopy and the radical reactions were followed upon annealing to 480 0 K. The dominant electron abstraction and electron addition products stabilized on the bases at 12 0 K are observed to be the bromouracil π-cation and the adenine π-cation and π-anion. The formation of an anion on bromouracil is inferred from the presence of a radical formed by deuterium addition to C 6 of bromouracil at higher temperatures. Above 40 0 K the bromouracil π-cation appears to decay by recombination and is reduced to undetectable levels at approx.170 0 K. Both adenine π-ions are also observed to decay within the same temperature range. Above 200 0 K hydrogen adducts are stabilized on the bases. Experiments using partially deuterated cocrystals indicate that the H-adducts are formed via both hydrogen addition and protonation of the respective anions. Two hydrogen abstraction radicals stabilized on the sugar residue are detectable at temperatures above 200 0 K, but these may be present at much lower temperatures. The results presented here question the generally accepted hypothesis that, in the presence of purine:pyrimidine stacking interactions, holes are predominantly transferred to the purines while electrns are predominantly transferred to the pyrimidines

  9. Laparoscopic appendicectomy using endo-ring applicator and fallope rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, Iyoob V; Maliekkal, Joji I

    2009-01-01

    Wider adoption of laparoscopic appendicectomy (LA) is limited by problems in securing the appendiceal base as well as the cost and the duration compared with the open procedure. The objective of this study was to assess the feasibility and efficacy of a new method for securing the appendiceal base in LA, so as to make the entire procedure simpler and cheaper, and hence, more popular. Twenty-five patients who were candidates for appendicectomy (emergency as well as elective) and willing for the laparoscopic procedure were selected for this study. Ports used were 10 mm at the umbilicus, 5 mm at the lower right iliac fossa, and 10 mm at the left iliac fossa. Extremely friable, ruptured, or turgid organs of diameters larger than 8 mm were excluded from the study. The mesoappendix was divided close to the appendix by diathermy. Fallope rings were applied to the appendiceal base using a special ring applicator, and the appendix was divided and extracted through the lumen of the applicator. The procedure was successful in 23 (92%) cases, and the mean duration of the procedure was 20 minutes (15-32 minutes). There were no procedural complications seen during a median follow-up of two weeks. The equipment and rings were cheaper when compared with that of the standard methods of securing the base of the appendix. LA using fallope rings is a safe, simple, easy-to-learn, and economically viable method. (author)

  10. Spin-mapping of Coal Structures with ESE and ENDOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belford, R. L.; Clarkson, R. B.

    1989-12-01

    The broad goals of this project are to determine by nondestructive magnetic resonance methods chemical and physical structural characteristics of organic parts of native and treated coals. In this project period, we have begun to explore a technique which promises to enable us to follow to course of coal cleaning processes with microscopic spatial resolution. For the past five years, our laboratory has worked on extensions of the EPR technique as applied to coal to address these analytical problems. In this report we (1) describe the world's first nuclear magnetic resonance imaging results from an Illinois {number sign}6 coal and (2) transmit a manuscript describing how organic sulfur affect the very-high-frequency EPR spectra of coals. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a non-destructive technique that has found wide medical application as a means of visualizing the interior of human bodies. We have used MRI techniques to study the diffusion of an organic solvent (DMSO) into the pores of Illinois {number sign}6 coal. Proton MRI images reveal that this solvent at room temperature does not penetrate approximately 30% of the coal volume. Regions of the coal that exclude solvent could be related to inertinite and mineral components. A multi-technique imaging program is contemplated.

  11. EPR and ENDOR Studies of Point Defects in Lithium Tetraborate Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-14

    the US and its allies. Terrorist groups have shown interest in seeking and deploying weapons of mass destruction and mass disruption--weapons that...5]. Lithium tetraborate, has been grown pure and doped with many different elements including transition metals, actinides , and rare earth...microwave cavity is said to be “ critically coupled” when there is no reflected microwave power. Absorption of microwaves, which occurs when the magnetic

  12. ESR-ENDOR study of x-irradiated single crystals of α.D.glucopyranose and α-methyl.D.glucopyranoside; environmental effects upon radiation and free radical chemistry in carbohydrate model systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madden, K.P.

    1980-01-01

    Single crystals of x-irradiated α-D-glucopyranose (αGlu) and α-methyl-D-glucopyranoside (αMeGlu) were studied using electron spin resonance and electron nuclear double resonance spectroscopy, to determine products and reaction mechanisms in carbohydrate radiation and free-radical chemistry. Four free-radical products were identified in αMeGlu single crystals irradiated and studied at 77K. Irradiation and observation at 12K produced yet another species. Four free radicals were identified in αGlu single crystals irradiated and observed at 12K and 77K. Free radical reaction in αGlu and αMeGlu were induced by slowly warming crystals irradiated at 77K until conversion occurred. Environmental influences upon these free-radical reaction mechanisms are discussed. The results from previous work on irradiated aqueous glasses of αGlu is briefly reviewed, and compared to those obtained from the single crystal system

  13. How Formaldehyde Inhibits Hydrogen Evolution by [FeFe]-Hydrogenases: Determination by ¹³C ENDOR of Direct Fe-C Coordination and Order of Electron and Proton Transfers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmeier, Andreas; Esselborn, Julian; Hexter, Suzannah V; Krämer, Tobias; Klein, Kathrin; Happe, Thomas; McGrady, John E; Myers, William K; Armstrong, Fraser A

    2015-04-29

    Formaldehyde (HCHO), a strong electrophile and a rapid and reversible inhibitor of hydrogen production by [FeFe]-hydrogenases, is used to identify the point in the catalytic cycle at which a highly reactive metal-hydrido species is formed. Investigations of the reaction of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii [FeFe]-hydrogenase with formaldehyde using pulsed-EPR techniques including electron-nuclear double resonance spectroscopy establish that formaldehyde binds close to the active site. Density functional theory calculations support an inhibited super-reduced state having a short Fe-(13)C bond in the 2Fe subsite. The adduct forms when HCHO is available to compete with H(+) transfer to a vacant, nucleophilic Fe site: had H(+) transfer already occurred, the reaction of HCHO with the Fe-hydrido species would lead to methanol, release of which is not detected. Instead, Fe-bound formaldehyde is a metal-hydrido mimic, a locked, inhibited form analogous to that in which two electrons and only one proton have transferred to the H-cluster. The results provide strong support for a mechanism in which the fastest pathway for H2 evolution involves two consecutive proton transfer steps to the H-cluster following transfer of a second electron to the active site.

  14. Radiation effects in x-irradiated hydroxy compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budzinski, E.E.; Potter, W.R.; Box, H.C.

    1980-01-01

    Radiation effects are compared in single crystals of xylitol, sorbitol, and dulcitol x-irradiated at 4.2 0 K. In xylitol and dulcitol, but not in sorbitol, a primary oxidation product is identified as an alkoxy radical. ENDOR measurements detected three proton hyperfine couplings associated with the alkoxy ESR absorption, one of which is attributed to a proton three bond lengths removed from the seat of unpaired spin density. Intermolecular trapping of electrons is observed in all three crystals. ENDOR measurements were made of the hyperfine couplings between the trapped electron and the hydroxy protons forming the trap

  15. Electronic structure of deep impurity centers in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oosten, A.B. van.

    1989-01-01

    This thesis reports an experimental study of deep level impurity centers in silicon, with much attention for theoretical interpretation of the data. A detailed picture of the electronic structure of several centers was obtained by magnetic resonance techniques, such as electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) and field scanned ENDOR (FSE). The thesis consists of two parts. The first part deals with chalcogen (sulfur, selenium and tellurium) related impurities, which are mostly double donors. The second part is about late transition metal (nickel, palladium and platinum) impurities, which are single (Pd,Pt) or double (Ni) acceptor centers. (author). 155 refs.; 51 figs.; 23 tabs

  16. Some examples of utilization of electron paramagnetic resonance in biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bemski, G.

    1982-10-01

    A short outline of the fundamentals of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) is presented and is followed by examples of the application of EPR to biology. These include use of spin labels, as well as of ENDOR principally to problems of heme proteins, photosynthesis and lipids. (Author) [pt

  17. Investigations on resolution enhancement in EPR by means of electron spin echoes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merks, R.P.J.

    1979-01-01

    The electron spin echo technique has been applied in four types of experiments: the measurement of electric field induced shifts of the EPR line; the detection of electron spin echo ENDOR; a relaxation measurement and the measurement of hyperfine interactions via the nuclear modulation effect. (Auth.)

  18. CWRJ Author Template

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rob de Loe

    African Journal of Environmental Science and. Technology. Full Length Research Paper .... the main reason of the Sebkha of Oran endoreism and its subsequently closing (full) with the setting up of the wind ..... Report 99-4259, Washington, DC. p. 326. Vogel I (1970). A text book of inorganic analysis published by Harley.

  19. Primary oxidation and reduction products in x-irradiated aspartic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, S.M.; Budzinski, E.E.; Box, H.C.

    1976-01-01

    The primary reduction products identified by ESR--ENDOR spectroscopy in single crystals of DL-aspartic acid hydrochloride irradiated at 4.2degreeK are anions formed by addition of an electron to the carbonyl oxygen atoms of the carboxylic acid groups. The main consequence of the oxidation process is to produce a hole centered mainly on atomic chlorine

  20. Missed adenomas with behind-folds visualizing colonoscopy technologies compared with standard colonoscopy: a pooled analysis of 3 randomized back-to-back tandem colonoscopy studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand, E.C.; Dik, V.K.; Oijen, M.G. van; Siersema, P.D.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The Third Eye Retroscope, Full Spectrum Endoscope (FUSE), and EndoRings devices have been shown to reduce overall adenoma miss rates. We evaluated the characteristics of adenomas and patient subgroups for which these behind-folds visualizing technologies mostly reduce adenoma

  1. Missed adenomas with behind-folds visualizing colonoscopy technologies compared with standard colonoscopy: a pooled analysis of 3 randomized back-to-back tandem colonoscopy studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand, Eelco C.; Dik, Vincent K.; van Oijen, Martijn G. H.; Siersema, Peter D.

    2017-01-01

    Background and Aims: The Third Eye Retroscope, Full Spectrum Endoscope (FUSE), and EndoRings devices have been shown to reduce overall adenoma miss rates. We evaluated the characteristics of adenomas and patient subgroups for which these behind-folds visualizing technologies mostly reduce adenoma

  2. A magnetic resonance study of 3d transition metals and thermal donors in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wezep, D.A. van.

    1986-01-01

    This thesis describes a study of 3d-transition metal impurities in silicon (titanium and iron in particular) and a study of oxygen-related heat-treatment centers in silicon, both carried out mainly by magnetic resonances techniques like EPR and ENDOR. 119 refs.; 31 figs.; 14 tabs

  3. Study of γ-irradiated lithographic polymers by electron spin resonance and electron nuclear double resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlick, S.; Kevan, L.

    1982-01-01

    The room temperature gamma irradiation degradation of the lithographic polymers, poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA), poly(methyl-α-chloroacrylate) (PMCA), poly(methyl-α-fluoroacrylate) (PMFA), and poly(methylacrylonitrile) (PMCN), have been studied by electron spin resonance and electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) to assess their molecular degradation processes of relevance to electron beam lithography. Two classes of radicals are found, chain radicals and chain scission radicals. PMMA and PMCA mainly form chain scission radicals consistent with degradation while for PMCN the resolution is poorer, and this is only probable. PMFA forms mainly chain radicals consistent with predominant crosslinking. The total radical yield is greatest in PMCA and PMCN. ENDOR is used to assess the compactness of the radiation degradation region for PMMA and PMCA and hence the potential resolution of the resist; this appears to be about the same for these methacrylate polymers

  4. Investigation of the structure of photosynthetic reaction centers. Progress report, June 1, 1981-April 1, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    van Willigen, H.

    1982-04-01

    The investigation is concerned with the application of Electron Nuclear Double Resonance (ENDOR) and Electron Nuclear Triple Resonance (TRIPLE) in the study of the photo excited triplet state of photosynthetic resonance methods hyperfine interactions between unpaired electrons and nuclear spins can be measured, giving an insight in the electronic and geometric structure of paramagnetic systems. During this initial phase of the project, research has focused on the following areas. (1) Instrumental aspects associated with the application of ENDOR and TRIPLE on the photo excited triplets randomly oriented in solid solution. (2) Exploration of the conditions required for these studies employing ground state triplet systems. (3) Study of photo excited triplet states of model systems such as naphthylene, zinc and magnesium tetraphenyl-porphyrin in polymethylmethacrylate or polycrystalline benzophenone. Progress made in these areas is discussed

  5. Advances in magnetic resonance 10

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 10, presents a variety of contributions to the theory and practice of magnetic resonance. The book contains three chapters that examine superoperators in magnetic resonance; ultrasonically modulated paramagnetic resonance; and the utility of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and electron-nuclear double-resonance (ENDOR) techniques for studying low-frequency modes of atomic fluctuations and their significance for understanding the mechanism of structural phase transitions in solids.

  6. Electric field gradient at nuclei on orthorhombic sites in CaF2 and SrCl2 : comparison with electronic zero-field splitting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ormondt, van D.; Andriessen, J.; Dam, J.A.M.; Ast, van M.A.; Hartog, den H.W.; Bijvank, E.J.

    1979-01-01

    The electric field gradients (EFG) Vzz and Vxx-Vyy at the nucleus of 157Gd3+ have been determined, using ENDOR, for CaF2:Gd3+M+(M+=Li,K+) and SrCl2:Gd3+Na+. The results are compared with the electronic zero-field splitting parameters of Gd3+, B20 and B22 for the same sites. A simple relation between

  7. ESR analysis of irradiated frogs' legs and fishes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raffi, J.; Agnel, J.-P.; Evans, J.C.; Rowlands, C.C.; Lesgards, G.

    1989-01-01

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectral analysis of different parts (bones, scales, jaw, etc.) from ionized (irradiated) frozen frogs' legs and fishes (brown trout and sardine) were recorded. There is always present, after treatment, a signal due to the irradiation. ESR and ENDOR experiments lead us to assign it to h 1 centers from hydroxyapatite, as in the case of other irradiated meat bones. The use of ESR to prove whether one of these foods has been irradiated or not is discussed. (author)

  8. République de Djibouti : lac Assal [بحيرة عسل

    OpenAIRE

    Pouyllau , Stéphane

    2009-01-01

    Vue des berges sud-est du lac Assal (République de Djibouti) le 11 novembre 2009. Le Lac Assal est un lac salé endoréique situé au fond du golfe du Ghoubbet-el-Kharab. D'une superficie de 54 km2 et fermé de la mer par le volcan Ardoukôba, sont altitude est de -153m sous le niveau de la mer.

  9. Free radical formation in single crystals of 9-methyladenine X-irradiated at 10 K. An electron paramagnetic resonance and electron nuclear double resonance study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hole, E.O.; Sagstuen, E.; Nelson, W.H.

    1995-01-01

    Single crystals of 9-methyladenine were X-irradiated at 10 K and at 65 K and were studied using K-band EPR, ENDOR and field-swept ENDOR (FSE) techniques in the temperature range 10 K to 290 K. Three major radicals are stabilized in 9-methyladenine at 10 K. These are: MA1, the adenine anion, probably protonated at N3; MA2, the species formed by net hydrogen abstraction from the 9-methyl group; and MA3, the radical formed by net hydrogen addition to C8 of the adenine moiety. Radical MA1 decayed at about 80 K, possibly into the C2 H adduct (MA4). The other two species (MA2, MA3) were stable at room temperature. A fifth radical species was clearly present in the EPR spectra at 10 K but was not detectable by ENDOR. This species, which decayed above 200 K (possibly into MA3), remains unidentified. The radical population at room temperature is as described by previous authors. The mechanisms for radical formation in 9-methyladenine are discussed in light of the hydrogen bonding scheme and molecular stacking interactions. 32 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  10. Monovalent Cation Activation of the Radical SAM Enzyme Pyruvate Formate-Lyase Activating Enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shisler, Krista A; Hutcheson, Rachel U; Horitani, Masaki; Duschene, Kaitlin S; Crain, Adam V; Byer, Amanda S; Shepard, Eric M; Rasmussen, Ashley; Yang, Jian; Broderick, William E; Vey, Jessica L; Drennan, Catherine L; Hoffman, Brian M; Broderick, Joan B

    2017-08-30

    Pyruvate formate-lyase activating enzyme (PFL-AE) is a radical S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) enzyme that installs a catalytically essential glycyl radical on pyruvate formate-lyase. We show that PFL-AE binds a catalytically essential monovalent cation at its active site, yet another parallel with B 12 enzymes, and we characterize this cation site by a combination of structural, biochemical, and spectroscopic approaches. Refinement of the PFL-AE crystal structure reveals Na + as the most likely ion present in the solved structures, and pulsed electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) demonstrates that the same cation site is occupied by 23 Na in the solution state of the as-isolated enzyme. A SAM carboxylate-oxygen is an M + ligand, and EPR and circular dichroism spectroscopies reveal that both the site occupancy and the identity of the cation perturb the electronic properties of the SAM-chelated iron-sulfur cluster. ENDOR studies of the PFL-AE/[ 13 C-methyl]-SAM complex show that the target sulfonium positioning varies with the cation, while the observation of an isotropic hyperfine coupling to the cation by ENDOR measurements establishes its intimate, SAM-mediated interaction with the cluster. This monovalent cation site controls enzyme activity: (i) PFL-AE in the absence of any simple monovalent cations has little-no activity; and (ii) among monocations, going down Group 1 of the periodic table from Li + to Cs + , PFL-AE activity sharply maximizes at K + , with NH 4 + closely matching the efficacy of K + . PFL-AE is thus a type I M + -activated enzyme whose M + controls reactivity by interactions with the cosubstrate, SAM, which is bound to the catalytic iron-sulfur cluster.

  11. Handbook of Applied Solid State Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Vij, D. R

    2006-01-01

    Solid-State spectroscopy is a burgeoning field with applications in many branches of science, including physics, chemistry, biosciences, surface science, and materials science. Handbook of Applied Solid-State Spectroscopy brings together in one volume information about various spectroscopic techniques that is currently scattered in the literature of these disciplines. This concise yet comprehensive volume covers theory and applications of a broad range of spectroscopies, including NMR, NQR, EPR/ESR, ENDOR, scanning tunneling, acoustic resonance, FTIR, auger electron emission, x-ray photoelectron emission, luminescence, and optical polarization, and more. Emphasis is placed on fundamentals and current methods and procedures, together with the latest applications and developments in the field.

  12. Hydrogen bonding between the QB site ubisemiquinone and Ser-L223 in the bacterial reaction centre – a combined spectroscopic and computational perspective^

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Erik; Baldansuren, Amgalanbaatar; Lin, Tzu-Jen; Samoilova, Rimma I.; Wraight, Colin A.; Dikanov, Sergei A.; O’Malley, Patrick J.

    2012-01-01

    In the QB site of the Rba. sphaeroides photosynthetic reaction centre the donation of a hydrogen bond from the hydroxyl group of Ser-L223 to the ubisemiquinone formed after the first flash is debatable. In this study we use a combination of spectroscopy and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) calculations to comprehensively explore this topic. We show that ENDOR, ESEEM and HYSCORE spectroscopic differences between the mutant L223SA and the wild type sample (WT) are negligible, indic...

  13. Electron paramagnetic resonance of transition ions

    CERN Document Server

    Abragam, Anatole

    1970-01-01

    This book is a reissue of a classic Oxford text, and provides a comprehensive treatment of electron paramagnetic resonance of ions of the transition groups. The emphasis is on basic principles, with numerous references to publications containing further experimental results and more detailed developments of the theory. An introductory survey gives a general understanding, and a general survey presents such topics as the classical and quantum resonance equations, thespin-Hamiltonian, Endor, spin-spin and spin-lattice interactions, together with an outline of the known behaviour of ions of each

  14. Reduction of nucleotides by ionizing radiation: uridine 5' phosphate, and cytidine 3' phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Box, H.C.; Potter, W.R.; Budzinski, E.E.

    1974-01-01

    Anions formed by the addition of an electron to the uracil base were observed in single crystals of the barium salt of uridine 5' phosphate x irradiated at 4.2 0 K. The hyperfine coupling tensor for the C 6 -H proton was deduced from ENDOR measurements; the principal values are -59.12, -32.92 and -16.24 MHz. Similar measurements were made on single crystals of cytidine 3' phosphate. The principal values for the C 6 -H proton hyperfine coupling in the anion formed on the cytosine base are -59.26, -33.98 and -14.68 MHz. (U.S.)

  15. The reduction of nucleotides by ionizing radiation: uridine 5' phosphate and cytidine 3' phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Box, H.C.; Potter, W.R.; Budzinski, E.E.

    1975-01-01

    Anions formed by the addition of an electron to the uracil base were observed in single crystals of the barium salt of uridine 5' phosphate x-irradiated at 4.2 degreeK. The hyperfine coupling tensor for the C 6 --H proton was deduced from ENDOR measurements; the principal values are -59.12, -32.92, and -16.24 MHz. Similar measurements were made on single crystals of cytidine 3' phosphate. The principal values for the C 6 --H proton hyperfine coupling in the anion formed on the cytosine base are -59.26, -33.98, and -14.68 MHz

  16. Electron paramagnetic resonance of radicals and metal complexes. 2. international conference of the Polish EPR Association. Warsaw 9-13 September 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    The conference of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance of Radicals and Metal Complexes has been held in Warsaw from 9 to 13 September 1996. It was the Second International Conference of the Polish EPR Association. The very extensive group of systems containing paramagnetic species has been studied by means of ESR or other magnetic techniques like ENDOR, Spin Echo etc. By radiation or photochemically generated radicals have been stabilized in low temperatures or being detected by means of very fast pulsed techniques. The chemical reactions, reaction kinetics of radicals as well as spin interaction with matrices have been studied and discussed. Over 100 lectures and posters have been presented.

  17. Optical and paramagnetic properties of Ti in LiF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krystek, M.

    1982-01-01

    Titanium replaces substitutionally Li + at its lattice site in LiF. The resulting deep impurity must be understood as TiF 6 -cluster. The symmetry of this cluster is octahedral in the case of the unoccupied impurity. If the impurity will be occupied by an electron, a trigonal distortion of the cluster results, whereby the orbital degeneracy of the ground state will be liftet. Since the occupied impurity is paramagnetic, the symmetry reduction could be proved by ENDOR measurements. Using a calculated term diagram of the impurity inside the crystal a model is offered to explain the photoluminescence and the thermoluminescence of LiF:Ti. (orig./HP) [de

  18. Calculation of hyperfine constants for the H center in LiF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alencar, P.T.S.

    1975-01-01

    The EPR and the ENDOR hyperfine parameters for the H center in LiF are calculated assuming that the F - 2 central molecule is a simplified model for the electronic structure of this deffect. The best theoretical fitting was obtained by relaxing the ions neighboring the central molecule. We have obtained relaxations which are in agreement with the physical nature of this deffect, but for some ions the results have shown that a better wave functions for the unpaired electrons must be used. The results and the limitations of the suggested model, are discussed proposing a more realistic description for the deffect, than the F - 2 central molecule model

  19. Magnetic hyperfine interactions of U2 center in CaF2, SrF2 and BaF2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graf, C.J.F.

    1976-02-01

    The magnetic hyperfine parameters of the U 2 center in CaF 2 , SeF 2 and BaF 2 , using a molecular orbitals scheme have been calculated. The need for the inclusion of mechanisms such as Pauli Repulsion and Covalence in order to describe the electronic structure of the defect has been shown. In the molecular orbitals model a weak covalence parameter has been phenomenologically introduced, mixing the is atomic wavefunction of hydrogen with a properly symmetrized linear combination of 2p F - functions centered on the ions of the first fluorine shell. The results obtained are compared with experimental measurements of EPR and ENDOR. (Author) [pt

  20. Electron paramagnetic resonance of radicals and metal complexes. 2. international conference of the Polish EPR Association. Warsaw 9-13 September 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The conference of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance of Radicals and Metal Complexes has been held in Warsaw from 9 to 13 September 1996. It was the Second International Conference of the Polish EPR Association. The very extensive group of systems containing paramagnetic species has been studied by means of ESR or other magnetic techniques like ENDOR, Spin Echo etc. By radiation or photochemically generated radicals have been stabilized in low temperatures or being detected by means of very fast pulsed techniques. The chemical reactions, reaction kinetics of radicals as well as spin interaction with matrices have been studied and discussed. Over 100 lectures and posters have been presented

  1. Electron paramagnetic resonance of radicals and metal complexes. 2. international conference of the Polish EPR Association. Warsaw 9-13 September 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    The conference of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance of Radicals and Metal Complexes has been held in Warsaw from 9 to 13 September 1996. It was the Second International Conference of the Polish EPR Association. The very extensive group of systems containing paramagnetic species has been studied by means of ESR or other magnetic techniques like ENDOR, Spin Echo etc. By radiation or photochemically generated radicals have been stabilized in low temperatures or being detected by means of very fast pulsed techniques. The chemical reactions, reaction kinetics of radicals as well as spin interaction with matrices have been studied and discussed. Over 100 lectures and posters have been presented.

  2. Comment on: Geoarchaeological and chronometrical evidence of early human occupation on Lanzarote (Canary Islands), by Zöller et al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carracedo, Juan-Carlos; Meco, Joaquín.; Lomoschitz, Alejandro; Antonia Perera, María.; Ballester, Javier; Betancort, Juan-Francisco

    2004-10-01

    In a recent paper Zöller et al. (2003) present their results of the stratigraphic, sedimentologic, soil mineralogy and IRSL dating of several soil beds filling a basin located near the village of Guatiza, at the eastern flank of the Famara shield, in the island of Lanzarote (Canary Islands). According to these authors, the soils correspond to a desert loess-palaeosol sequence with many coarse alluvial fan deposits, accumulated as scoria cones encircled the open ancient valley extending from SW to NE near Guatiza and their lava flowed to form the Vega de Guatiza endoreic basin. According to these authors, this depression served as a sediment trap from its formation.

  3. Assessing the water balance in the Sahel : Impact of small scale rainfall variability on runoff. Part 2 : Idealized modeling of runoff sensitivity

    OpenAIRE

    Vischel, Théo; Lebel, Thierry

    2007-01-01

    As in many other semi-arid regions in the world, the Sahelian hydrological environment is characterized by a mosaic of small endoreic catchments with dry soil surface conditions producing mostly Hortonian runoff. Using an SCS-type event based rainfall-runoff model, an idealized modeling experiment of a Sahelian environment is set up to study the sensitivity of runoff to small scale rainfall variability. A set of 548 observed rain events is used to force the hydrological model to study the sen...

  4. Paramagnetic material for quantum information processing: electronic and nuclear spins manipulations in β - Ga2O3: Ti

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mentink-Vigier, Frederic

    2011-01-01

    Quantum information processing is a major challenge both on fundamental and technological grounds. In this research field, the spin bus concept relies on the use of both the electronic and nuclear spins in which the electron is used as a reading and writing head over the nuclei system which makes the qubit register. The requested material to build a spin bus must have unpaired electrons delocalized over a great number of nuclear spins having long decoherence time. In this work, we studied a spin system composed of titanium (III) interacting with multiple gallium nuclei in gallium oxide. We synthesized and studied the titanium paramagnetic center in gallium oxide single crystals by continuous wave EPR and ENDOR spectroscopy and showed that the electron is delocalized over eight neighbouring gallium nuclei. This study also revealed a strong isotopic effect on the nucleus-nucleus interaction mediated by the electron. When the two nearest gallium nuclei surrounding the titanium are identical (same isotopes) this interaction is one order of magnitude higher than in the case of inequivalent nuclei. This effect can be used in order to reduce the computation time. Finally, the dynamical properties of the spin system have been characterized by pulsed EPR and ENDOR spectroscopy. The electron spin decoherence is driven by instantaneous and spectral diffusion. The nuclear dynamical properties have also been studied in order to determine the order of magnitude of nuclear spin relaxation and decoherence time. (author) [fr

  5. Giant titanium electron wave function in gallium oxide: A potential electron-nuclear spin system for quantum information processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentink-Vigier, Frédéric; Binet, Laurent; Vignoles, Gerard; Gourier, Didier; Vezin, Hervé

    2010-11-01

    The hyperfine interactions of the unpaired electron with eight surrounding G69a and G71a nuclei in Ti-doped β-Ga2O3 were analyzed by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) spectroscopies. They are dominated by strong isotropic hyperfine couplings due to a direct Fermi contact interaction with Ga nuclei in octahedral sites of rutile-type chains oriented along b axis, revealing a large anisotropic spatial extension of the electron wave function. Titanium in β-Ga2O3 is thus best described as a diffuse (Ti4+-e-) pair rather than as a localized Ti3+ . Both electron and G69a nuclear spin Rabi oscillations could be observed by pulsed EPR and pulsed ENDOR, respectively. The electron spin decoherence time is about 1μs (at 4 K) and an upper bound of 520μs (at 8 K) is estimated for the nuclear decoherence time. Thus, β-Ga2O3:Ti appears to be a potential spin-bus system for quantum information processing with a large nuclear spin quantum register.

  6. EPR analysis of cyanide complexes of wild-type human neuroglobin and mutants in comparison to horse heart myoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Doorslaer, Sabine; Trandafir, Florin; Harmer, Jeffrey R; Moens, Luc; Dewilde, Sylvia

    2014-06-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) data reveal large differences between the ferric ((13)C-)cyanide complexes of wild-type human neuroglobin (NGB) and its H64Q and F28L point mutants and the cyanide complexes of mammalian myo- and haemoglobin. The point mutations, which involve residues comprising the distal haem pocket in NGB, induce smaller, but still significant changes, related to changes in the stabilization of the cyanide ligand. Furthermore, for the first time, the full (13)C hyperfine tensor of the cyanide carbon of cyanide-ligated horse heart myoglobin (hhMb) was determined using Davies ENDOR (electron nuclear double resonance). Disagreement of these experimental data with earlier predictions based on (13)C NMR data and a theoretical model reveal significant flaws in the model assumptions. The same ENDOR procedure allowed also partial determination of the corresponding (13)C hyperfine tensor of cyanide-ligated NGB and H64QNGB. These (13)C parameters differ significantly from those of cyanide-ligated hhMb and challenge our current theoretical understanding of how the haem environment influences the magnetic parameters obtained by EPR and NMR in cyanide-ligated haem proteins. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. High-field EPR on membrane proteins - crossing the gap to NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möbius, Klaus; Lubitz, Wolfgang; Savitsky, Anton

    2013-11-01

    In this review on advanced EPR spectroscopy, which addresses both the EPR and NMR communities, considerable emphasis is put on delineating the complementarity of NMR and EPR concerning the measurement of molecular interactions in large biomolecules. From these interactions, detailed information can be revealed on structure and dynamics of macromolecules embedded in solution- or solid-state environments. New developments in pulsed microwave and sweepable cryomagnet technology as well as ultrafast electronics for signal data handling and processing have pushed to new horizons the limits of EPR spectroscopy and its multifrequency extensions concerning the sensitivity of detection, the selectivity with respect to interactions, and the resolution in frequency and time domains. One of the most important advances has been the extension of EPR to high magnetic fields and microwave frequencies, very much in analogy to what happens in NMR. This is exemplified by referring to ongoing efforts for signal enhancement in both NMR and EPR double-resonance techniques by exploiting dynamic nuclear or electron spin polarization via unpaired electron spins and their electron-nuclear or electron-electron interactions. Signal and resolution enhancements are particularly spectacular for double-resonance techniques such as ENDOR and PELDOR at high magnetic fields. They provide greatly improved orientational selection for disordered samples that approaches single-crystal resolution at canonical g-tensor orientations - even for molecules with small g-anisotropies. Exchange of experience between the EPR and NMR communities allows for handling polarization and resolution improvement strategies in an optimal manner. Consequently, a dramatic improvement of EPR detection sensitivity could be achieved, even for short-lived paramagnetic reaction intermediates. Unique structural and dynamic information is thus revealed that can hardly be obtained by any other analytical techniques. Micromolar

  8. Inactivation of Lactobacillus leichmannii ribonucleotide reductase by 2',2'-difluoro-2'-deoxycytidine 5'-triphosphate: adenosylcobalamin destruction and formation of a nucleotide-based radical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohman, Gregory J S; Gerfen, Gary J; Stubbe, Joanne

    2010-02-23

    Ribonucleotide reductase (RNR, 76 kDa) from Lactobacillus leichmannii is a class II RNR that requires adenosylcobalamin (AdoCbl) as a cofactor. It catalyzes the conversion of nucleoside triphosphates to deoxynucleotides and is 100% inactivated by 1 equiv of 2',2'-difluoro-2'-deoxycytidine 5'-triphosphate (F(2)CTP) in cytidine, characterized by mass spectrometry and NMR spectroscopy, indicating the trapped nucleotide had lost both of its fluorides and gained an oxygen. High-field ENDOR studies with [1'-(2)H]F(2)CTP from the reaction quenched at 30 s revealed a radical that is nucleotide-based. The relationship between this radical and the trapped cytidine analogue provides insight into the nonalkylative pathway for RNR inactivation relative to the alkylative pathway.

  9. Metal Chelation in Asymmetric Diels-Alder Reaction (II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Kyoo Hyun; Chu, Chan Kook; Chang, Min Ho

    2004-01-01

    In the reaction, the inverse asymmetric induction has been observed by the use of either monovalent Lewis acids or divalent Lewis acids. The reaction of the acrylate of (S)-ethyl lactate with cyclopentadiene proceeded with 86% endo-S selectivity in the presence of TiCl 4 , divalent Lewis acid, whereas did with 32% endo-R selectivity in the presence of BF 3 ·Et 2 O, monovalent Lewis acid. When a chiral dienophile which was prepared from benzyl ester of (S)-proline or methyl ester of (S)-indoline-2-carboxylic acid was employed in the reaction, a similar diastereofacial selectivity was also observed. Recently, we reported the similar selectivity in the reaction of methyl (2S,5S)-(5-t-butyldimethylsilyloxypiperidin- 2-yl)ethanoatewith cyclopentadiene.

  10. Electron spin resonance of radicals and metal complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The materials are a collection of extended synopsis of papers presented at the conference sessions. The broad area of magnetic techniques applications has been described as well as their spectra interpretation methods. The ESR, NMR, ENDOR and spin echo were applied for studying the radiation and UV induced radicals in chemical and biological systems. Also in the study of complexes of metallic ions (having the paramagnetic properties) and their interaction with the matrix, the magnetic techniques has been commonly used. They are also very convenient tool for the study of reaction kinetics and mechanism as well as interaction of paramagnetic species with themselves and crystal lattice or with the surface as for thee catalytic processes

  11. Model studies of radiation induced oxidation and reduction processes in DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hole, E.O.

    1992-01-01

    The papers presented in this thesis represent the major part of a systematic study of primary and secondary radiation induced damages in DNA. The magnetic resonance techniques EPR, ENDOR and FSE have been the experimental methods used. The study of radical formation in isolated DNA components under different environmental conditions demonstrates certain characteristics of the DNA components which are important in the study of DNA. It has been clearly demonstrated that the electrostatic environment, in particular the hydrogen bond pattern, is a vital factor for the secondary reaction scheme. Even radicals which are found in all related systems seem to be formed by different reaction pathways, depending upon the specific matrix. 92 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs

  12. A field-sweep/field-lock system for superconducting magnets--Application to high-field EPR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maly, Thorsten; Bryant, Jeff; Ruben, David; Griffin, Robert G

    2006-12-01

    We describe a field-lock/field-sweep system for the use in superconducting magnets. The system is based on a commercially available field mapping unit and a custom designed broad-band 1H NMR probe. The NMR signal of a small water sample is used in a feedback loop to set and control the magnetic field to high accuracy. The current instrumental configuration allows field sweeps of +/-0.4 T and a resolution of up to 10(-5) T (0.1 G) and the performance of the system is demonstrated in a high-field electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) application. The system should also be of utility in other experiments requiring precise and reproducible sweeps of the magnetic field such as DNP, ENDOR or PELDOR.

  13. A Field-Sweep/Field-Lock System for Superconducting Magnets-Application to High-Field EPR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maly, Thorsten; Bryant, Jeff; Ruben, David; Griffin, Robert G.

    2007-01-01

    We describe a field-lock/field-sweep system for the use in superconducting magnets. The system is based on a commercially available field mapping unit and a custom designed broad-band 1H-NMR probe. The NMR signal of a small water sample is used in a feedback loop to set and control the magnetic field to high accuracy. The current instrumental configuration allows field sweeps of ± 0.4 T and a resolution of up to 10-5 T (0.1 G) and the performance of the system is demonstrated in a high-field electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) application. The system should also be of utility in other experiments requiring precise and reproducible sweeps of the magnetic field such as DNP, ENDOR or PELDOR. PMID:17027306

  14. 14N nuclear quadrupole interaction in Cu(II) doped L-alanine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murgich, J.; Calvo, R.; Oseroff, S.B.; Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas, Caracas. Dept. de Quimica)

    1980-01-01

    The 14 N nuclear quadrupole interaction tensor Psub(N) measured by ENDOR in Cu(II) doped L-alanine is analyzed in terms of the Townes and Daily theory assuming a tetra-hedrally bonded N atom. The results of this analysis are compared with those for the 14 N in pure L-alanine and it is found that the principal directions of the Psub(N) tensor are drastically changed upon metal complexation as a consequence of the higher electron affinity of Cu(II) with respect to C and H. Comparison of the corresponding bond populations in pure and Cu(II) doped L-alanine indicates that the Cu draws 0.11 more electron from the N than the substituted H atom. (orig.)

  15. Delocalization of Coherent Triplet Excitons in Linear Rigid Rod Conjugated Oligomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hintze, Christian; Korf, Patrick; Degen, Frank; Schütze, Friederike; Mecking, Stefan; Steiner, Ulrich E; Drescher, Malte

    2017-02-02

    In this work, the triplet state delocalization in a series of monodisperse oligo(p-phenyleneethynylene)s (OPEs) is studied by pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and pulsed electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) determining zero-field splitting, optical spin polarization, and proton hyperfine couplings. Neither the zero-field splitting parameters nor the optical spin polarization change significantly with OPE chain length, in contrast to the hyperfine coupling constants, which showed a systematic decrease with chain length n according to a 2/(1 + n) decay law. The results provide striking evidence for the Frenkel-type nature of the triplet excitons exhibiting full coherent delocalization in the OPEs under investigation with up to five OPE repeat units and with a spin density distribution described by a nodeless particle in the box wave function. The same model is successfully applied to recently published data on π-conjugated porphyrin oligomers.

  16. Radiation damage mechanisms in single crystals of creatine monohydrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, J.W.; Ko, C.

    1978-01-01

    ENDOR spectroscopy is utilized to define the temperature dependent sequence of molecular fragmentation processes occuring in x-irradiated single crystals of creatine monohydrate. Two conformations of the primary reduction product =OOC--C(H 2 ) --N(CH) 3 --C(NH 2 ) 2 + are found to undergo a series of subtle changes before deamination. The resultant radical -OOC--CH 2 then induces hydrogen abstraction to form a final room temperature product - OOC--CH--N(CH 3 ) --C(NH 2 ) + . An unknown initial oxidation species is found to decarboxylate forming the radical H 2 C--N(CH 3 ) --C(NH 2 ) 2 + which, although similar to the deamination product, exists at room temperature. The stability of this species is attributed to a delocalization of spin indicated by calculation and measurement

  17. Understanding the dosimetric powder EPR spectrum of sucrose by identification of the stable radiation-induced radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vrielinck, H.; Vanhaelewyn, G.; Matthys, P.; Callens, F.; Kusakovskij, J.

    2014-01-01

    Sucrose, the main component of table sugar, present in nearly every household and quite radiation sensitive, is considered as an interesting emergency dosemeter. Another application of radiation-induced radicals in sugars is the detection of irradiation in sugar-containing foodstuffs. The complexity of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra of radicals in these materials, as a result of many hyperfine interactions and the multi-compositeness of the spectra of individual sugars, complicate dose assessment and the improvement of protocols for control and identification of irradiated sugar-containing foodstuffs using EPR. A thorough understanding of the EPR spectrum of individual irradiated sugars is desirable when one wants to reliably use them in a wide variety of dosimetric applications. Recently, the dominant room temperature stable radicals in irradiated sucrose have been thoroughly characterised using EPR, electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) and ENDOR-induced EPR. These radicals were structurally identified by comparing their proton hyperfine and g-tensors with the results of Density Functional Theory calculations for test radical structures. In this paper, the authors use the spin Hamiltonian parameters determined in these studies to simulate powder EPR spectra at the standard X-band (9.5 GHz), commonly used in applications, and at higher frequencies, up to J-band (285 GHz), rendering spectra with higher resolution. A few pitfalls in the simulation process are highlighted. The results indicate that the major part of the dosimetric spectrum can be understood in terms of three dominant radicals, but as-yet unidentified radicals also contribute in a non-negligible way. (authors)

  18. Development of methods for determining organic free radical structures by electron spin resonance and application to the radiation chemistry of nucleic acid model compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fouse, G.W. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    This project was undertaken with the objective of developing more efficient and reliable methods for the analysis of free radicals in organic single crystals. A technique was developed for the rapid calculation of single crystal ESR line positions and intensities. This method, which avoids the time-consuming matrix operations required by conventional methods, has been incorporated into a computer program for determining ESR parameters by the least-squares fitting of digitized ESR spectra. This program has been used to analyze complex spectra arising from a . CH 2 -CH 2 -O-PO 3 H - radical trapped in O-phosphorylethanolamine. A method was developed for the estimation of variance and covariance of eigenvectors and eigenvalues of experimentally-determined tensors. This error analysis is quite general, and may be applied to any tensors which can be determined by the non-linear least-squares fitting of ESR data. Monte-Carlo simulations have been employed to estimate the limitations of the approximation method. This error analysis has been included in the analysis of two phosphite radicals, - O 2 -P-OX, found in single crystals of O-phosphorylethanolamine. To aid in the formulation and evaluation of free radical models, a generalized method for the calculation of theoretically-expected hyperfine coupling tensors for arbitrary radical models was developed. Tensors are calculated for a furan-type radical which may be found in 5' dCMP. These calculated tensors are compared with tensors determined by an ENDOR experiment. Two ENDOR studies were done, one in 5' dCMP, the other in L-asparagine. The observed radical in 5' dCMP is allylic, characterized by coupling to three α-hydrogens. In L-asparagine, the dominant room-temperature radical has the form CO(NH 2 )CHCH(N + H 3 )CO 2 - . In both these studies, a series of molecular orbital calculations were performed as a means of substantiating the postulated radical structures

  19. Structure of Radicals from X-irradiated Guanine Derivatives: An Experimental and Computational Study of Sodium Guanosine Dihydrate Single Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayatilaka, Nayana; Nelson, William H.

    2008-01-01

    In sodium guanosine dihydrate single crystals, the guanine moiety is deprotonated at N1 due to growth from high-pH (>12) solutions. EPR and ENDOR study of crystals x-irradiated at 10 K detected evidence for three radical forms. Radical R1,characterized by two proton and two nitrogen hyperfine interactions, was identified as the product of net hydrogenation at N7 of the N1-deprotonated guanine unit. R1 exhibited an unusually distorted structure leading to net positive isotropic components of the hydrogen couplings. Radical R2, characterized by one proton and one nitrogen hyperfine coupling was identified as the primary electron loss product. This product is equivalent to that of deprotonation at N1 by the guanine cation and represents the first ENDOR characterization of that product. Radical R3, characterized by a single hydrogen hyperfine coupling, was identified as the product of net dehydrogenation at C1 of the ribose moiety. The identification of radicals R1-R3 was supported by DFT calculations on several possible structures using the B3LYP/6-311G(2df,p)//6-31G(d,p) approach. Radical R4, detected after warming the crystals to room temperature, was identified as the well-known product of net hydrogenation of C8 of the (N1-deprotonated) guanine component. Radical R1, evidently formed by protonation of the primary electron addition product, was present as roughly 60% of the total radicals detected at 10 K. Radical R2 was present as roughly 27% of the total yield, and the concentration of R3 contributed the remaining 13%. R3 is evidently the product of oneelectron oxidation followed by deprotonation; thus, the balance of oxidation and reduction products is approximately equal within experimental uncertainty. PMID:17249824

  20. Magnetic Resonance Studies of Proton Loss from Carotenoid Radical Cations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kispert, Lowell D [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Focsan, A Ligia [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Konovalova, Tatyana A [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lawrence, Jesse [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bowman, Michael K [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Dixon, David A [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Molnar, Peter [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Deli, Jozsef [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2007-06-11

    Carotenoids, intrinsic components of reaction centers and pigment-protein complexes in photosynthetic membranes, play a photoprotective role and serve as a secondary electron donor. Before optimum use of carotenoids can be made in artificial photosynthetic systems, their robust nature in living materials requires extensive characterization of their electron transfer, radical trapping ability, stability, structure in and on various hosts, and photochemical behavior. Pulsed ENDOR and 2D-HYSCORE studies combined with DFT calculations reveal that photo-oxidation of natural zeaxanthin (I) and violaxanthin (II) on silica-alumina produces not only the carotenoid radical cations (Car•+) but also neutral radicals (#Car•) by proton loss from the methyl groups at positions 5 or 5', and possibly 9 or 9' and 13 or 13'. Notably, the proton loss favored in I at the 5 position by DFT calculations, is unfavorable in II due to the epoxide at the 5, 6 position. DFT calculations predict the isotropic methyl proton couplings of 8-10 MHz for Car•+ which agree with the ENDOR for carotenoid α-conjugated radical cations. Large α-proton hyperfine coupling constants (>10 MHz) determined from HYSCORE are assigned from the DFT calculations to neutral carotenoid radicals. Proton loss upon photolysis was also examined as a function of carotenoid polarity [Lycopene (III) versus 8'-apo-β-caroten-8'-al (IV)]; hydrogen bonding [Lutein (V) versus III]; host [silica-alumina versus MCM-41 molecular sieve]; and substituted metal in MCM-41. Loss of H+ from the 5(5'), 9(9') or 13(13') methyl positions has importance in photoprotection. Photoprotection involves nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ) in which 1Ch1* decays via energy transfer to the carotenoid which returns to the ground state by thermal dissipation; or via electron transfer to form a charge transfer state (I •+…Chl•-), lower in energy than 1Chl*. Formation of I •+ results in bond

  1. Magnetic Resonance Studies of Proton Loss from Carotenoid Radical Cations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kispert, Lowell D.; Focsan, A. Ligia; Konovalova, Tatyana A.; Lawrence, Jesse; Bowman, Michael K.; Dixon, David A.; Molnar, Peter; Deli, Jozsef

    2007-01-01

    Carotenoids, intrinsic components of reaction centers and pigment-protein complexes in photosynthetic membranes, play a photoprotective role and serve as a secondary electron donor. Before optimum use of carotenoids can be made in artificial photosynthetic systems, their robust nature in living materials requires extensive characterization of their electron transfer, radical trapping ability, stability, structure in and on various hosts, and photochemical behavior. Pulsed ENDOR and 2D-HYSCORE studies combined with DFT calculations reveal that photo-oxidation of natural zeaxanthin (I) and violaxanthin (II) on silica-alumina produces not only the carotenoid radical cations (Car ·+ ) but also neutral radicals ((number s ign)Car · ) by proton loss from the methyl groups at positions 5 or 5(prime), and possibly 9 or 9(prime) and 13 or 13(prime). Notably, the proton loss favored in I at the 5 position by DFT calculations, is unfavorable in II due to the epoxide at the 5, 6 position. DFT calculations predict the isotropic methyl proton couplings of 8-10 MHz for Car # center d ot# + which agree with the ENDOR for carotenoid π-conjugated radical cations. Large α-proton hyperfine coupling constants (>10 MHz) determined from HYSCORE are assigned from the DFT calculations to neutral carotenoid radicals. Proton loss upon photolysis was also examined as a function of carotenoid polarity (Lycopene (III) versus 8(prime)-apo-β-caroten-8(prime)-al (IV)); hydrogen bonding (Lutein (V) versus III); host (silica-alumina versus MCM-41 molecular sieve); and substituted metal in MCM-41. Loss of H + from the 5(5(prime)), 9(9(prime)) or 13(13(prime)) methyl positions has importance in photoprotection. Photoprotection involves nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ) in which 1 Ch1* decays via energy transfer to the carotenoid which returns to the ground state by thermal dissipation; or via electron transfer to form a charge transfer state (I # center d ot# + ...Chl # center d ot# - ), lower in

  2. Multi factorial interactions in the pathogenesis pathway of Alzheimer’s disease: a new risk charts for prevention of dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carbone Ilaria

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The population longitudinal study named “The Conselice Study” has been the focus of the present investigation. 65 years old or older participants of this population study on brain aging were followed up for 5 years: 937 subjects completed the follow-up. Relationships of 46 genetic, phenotypic, clinical and nutritional factors on incident cognitive decline and incident dementia cases were investigated. Results A new statistical approach, called the Auto Contractive Map (AutoCM was applied to find relationship between variables and a possible hierarchy in the relevance of each variable with incident dementia. This method, based on an artificial adaptive system, was able to define the association strength of each variable with all the others. Moreover, few variables resulted to be aggregation points in the variable connectivity map related to cognitive decline and dementia. Gene variants and cognate phenotypic variables showed differential degrees of relevance to brain aging and dementia. A risk map for age associated cognitive decline and dementia has been constructed and will be presented and discussed. Conclusion This map of variables may be use to identify subjects with increased risk of developing cognitive decline end/or dementia and provide pivotal information for early intervention protocols for prevention of dementia.

  3. Evidence of organic luminescent centers in sol-gel-synthesized yttrium aluminum borate matrix leading to bright visible emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burner, Pauline; Salauen, Mathieu; Ibanez, Alain; Gautier-Luneau, Isabelle [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, Inst NEEL, Grenoble (France); CNRS, Inst NEEL, Grenoble (France); Sontakke, Atul D.; Viana, Bruno [PSL Research University, Chimie ParisTech - CNRS, Institut de Recherche de Chimie Paris (France); Bardet, Michel [Universite Grenoble Alpes, CEA, CNRS, INAC, MEM, Grenoble (France); Mouesca, Jean-Marie; Gambarelli, Serge; Maurel, Vincent [Universite Grenoble Alpes, CEA, CNRS, INAC, SyMMES, Grenoble (France); Barra, Anne-Laure [Laboratoire National des Champs Magnetiques Intenses, UPR CNRS 3228, Universite Grenoble Alpes, Grenoble (France); Ferrier, Alban [PSL Research University, Chimie ParisTech - CNRS, Institut de Recherche de Chimie Paris (France); Sorbonne Universites UPMC Universites Paris 06, Paris (France)

    2017-11-06

    Yttrium aluminum borate (YAB) powders prepared by sol-gel process have been investigated to understand their photoluminescence (PL) mechanism. The amorphous YAB powders exhibit bright visible PL from blue emission for powders calcined at 450 C to broad white PL for higher calcination temperature. Thanks to {sup 13}C labelling, NMR and EPR studies show that propionic acid initially used to solubilize the yttrium nitrate is decomposed into aromatic molecules confined within the inorganic matrix. DTA-TG-MS analyses show around 2 wt % of carbogenic species. The PL broadening corresponds to the apparition of a new band at 550 nm, associated with the formation of aromatic species. Furthermore, pulsed ENDOR spectroscopy combined with DFT calculations enables us to ascribe EPR spectra to free radicals derived from small (2 to 3 rings) polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). PAH molecules are thus at the origin of the PL as corroborated by slow afterglow decay and thermoluminescence experiments. (copyright 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  4. In Quest of the Alanine R3 Radical: Multivariate EPR Spectral Analyses of X-Irradiated Alanine in the Solid State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jåstad, Eirik O; Torheim, Turid; Villeneuve, Kathleen M; Kvaal, Knut; Hole, Eli O; Sagstuen, Einar; Malinen, Eirik; Futsaether, Cecilia M

    2017-09-28

    The amino acid l-α-alanine is the most commonly used material for solid-state electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) dosimetry, due to the formation of highly stable radicals upon irradiation, with yields proportional to the radiation dose. Two major alanine radical components designated R1 and R2 have previously been uniquely characterized from EPR and electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) studies as well as from quantum chemical calculations. There is also convincing experimental evidence of a third minor radical component R3, and a tentative radical structure has been suggested, even though no well-defined spectral signature has been observed experimentally. In the present study, temperature dependent EPR spectra of X-ray irradiated polycrystalline alanine were analyzed using five multivariate methods in further attempts to understand the composite nature of the alanine dosimeter EPR spectrum. Principal component analysis (PCA), maximum likelihood common factor analysis (MLCFA), independent component analysis (ICA), self-modeling mixture analysis (SMA), and multivariate curve resolution (MCR) were used to extract pure radical spectra and their fractional contributions from the experimental EPR spectra. All methods yielded spectral estimates resembling the established R1 spectrum. Furthermore, SMA and MCR consistently predicted both the established R2 spectrum and the shape of the R3 spectrum. The predicted shape of the R3 spectrum corresponded well with the proposed tentative spectrum derived from spectrum simulations. Thus, results from two independent multivariate data analysis techniques strongly support the previous evidence that three radicals are indeed present in irradiated alanine samples.

  5. Study on the EPR/dosimetric properties of some substituted alanines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gancheva, Veselka; Sagstuen, Einar; Yordanov, Nicola D.

    2006-01-01

    Polycrystalline phenyl-alanine and perdeuterated l-α-alanine (l-α-alanine-d 4 ) were studied as potential high-energy radiation-sensitive materials (RSM) for solid state/EPR dosimetry. It was found that phenyl-alanine exhibits a linear dose response in the dose region 0.1-17kGy. However, phenyl-alanine is about 10 times less sensitive to γ-irradiation than standard l-α-alanine irradiated at the same doses. Moreover, the EPR response from phenyl-alanine is unstable and, independent of the absorbed dose, decreases by about 50% within 20 days after irradiation upon storage at room temperature. γ-irradiated polycrystalline perdeuterated l-α-alanine (CD 3 CD(NH 2 )COOH) has not previously been studied at room temperature by EPR spectroscopy. The first part of the present analysis was with respect to the structure of the EPR spectrum. By spectrum simulations, the presence of at least two radiation induced free radicals, R 1 =CH 3 C*(H)COOH and R 2 =H 3 N + -C*(CH 3 )COO - , was confirmed very clearly. Both these radicals were suggested previously from EPR and ENDOR studies of standard alanine crystals. The further investigations into the potential use of alanine-d 4 as RSM, after choosing optimal EPR spectrometer settings parameters for this purpose, show that it is ca. two times more sensitive than standard l-α-alanine

  6. Pulsed-High Field/High-Frequency EPR Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuhs, Michael; Moebius, Klaus

    Pulsed high-field/high-frequency electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy is used to disentangle many kinds of different effects often obscured in continuous wave (cw) EPR spectra at lower magnetic fields/microwave frequencies. While the high magnetic field increases the resolution of G tensors and of nuclear Larmor frequencies, the high frequencies allow for higher time resolution for molecular dynamics as well as for transient paramagnetic intermediates studied with time-resolved EPR. Pulsed EPR methods are used for example for relaxation-time studies, and pulsed Electron Nuclear DOuble Resonance (ENDOR) is used to resolve unresolved hyperfine structure hidden in inhomogeneous linewidths. In the present article we introduce the basic concepts and selected applications to structure and mobility studies on electron transfer systems, reaction centers of photosynthesis as well as biomimetic models. The article concludes with an introduction to stochastic EPR which makes use of an other concept for investigating resonance systems in order to increase the excitation bandwidth of pulsed EPR. The limited excitation bandwidth of pulses at high frequency is one of the main limitations which, so far, made Fourier transform methods hardly feasible.

  7. New developments in high field electron paramagnetic resonance with applications in structural biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennati, Marina; Prisner, Thomas F

    2005-01-01

    Recent developments in microwave technologies have led to a renaissance of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) due to the implementation of new spectrometers operating at frequencies ≥90 GHz. EPR at high fields and high frequencies (HF-EPR) has been established up to THz (very high frequency (VHF) EPR) in continuous wave (cw) operation and up to about 300 GHz in pulsed operation. To date, its most prominent application field is structural biology. This review article first gives an overview of the theoretical basics and the technical aspects of HF-EPR methodologies, such as cw and pulsed HF-EPR, as well as electron nuclear double resonance at high fields (HF-ENDOR). In the second part, the article illustrates different application areas of HF-EPR in studies of protein structure and function. In particular, HF-EPR has delivered essential contributions to disentangling complex spectra of radical cofactors or reaction intermediates in photosynthetic reaction centres, radical enzymes (such as ribonucleotide reductase) and in metalloproteins. Furthermore, HF-EPR combined with site-directed spin labelling in membranes and soluble proteins provides new methods of investigating complex molecular dynamics and intermolecular distances

  8. Dental radiography: tooth enamel EPR dose assessment from Rando phantom measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aragno, D.; Fattibene, P.; Onori, S.

    2000-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance dosimetry of tooth enamel is now established as a suitable method for individual dose reconstruction following radiation accidents. The accuracy of the method is limited by some confounding factors, among which is the dose received due to medical x-ray irradiation. In the present paper the EPR response of tooth enamel to endoral examination was experimentally evaluated using an anthropomorphic phantom. The dose to enamel for a single exposure of a typical dental examination performed with a new x-ray generation unit working at 65 kVp gave rise to a CO 2 -signal of intensity similar to that induced by a dose of about 2 mGy of 60 Co. EPR measurements were performed on the entire tooth with no attempt to separate buccal and lingual components. Also the dose to enamel for an orthopantomography exam was estimated. It was derived from TLD measurements as equivalent to 0.2 mGy of 60 Co. In view of application to risk assessment analysis, in the present work the value for the ratio of the reference dose at the phantom surface measured with TLD to the dose at the tooth measured with EPR was determined. (author)

  9. High-field/ high-frequency EPR study on stable free radicals formed in sucrose by gamma-irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgieva, Elka R; Pardi, Luca; Jeschke, Gunnar; Gatteschi, Dante; Sorace, Lorenzo; Yordanov, Nicola D

    2006-06-01

    The EPR spectrum of sucrose irradiated by high-energy radiation is complex due to the presence of more than one radical species. In order to decompose the spectrum and elucidate the radical magnetic parameters a high-field (HF(-)EPR) study on stable free radicals in gamma-irradiated polycrystalline sucrose (table sugar) was performed at three different high frequencies--94, 190 and 285 GHz as well as at the conventional X-band. We suggest a presence of three stable radicals R1, R2 and R3 as the main radical species. Due to the increase of g-factor resolution at high fields the g-tensors of these radicals could be extracted by accurate simulations. The moderate g-anisotropy suggests that all three radicals are carbon-centred. Results from an earlier ENDOR study on X-irradiated sucrose single crystals (Vanhaelewyn et al., Appl Radiat Isot, 52, 1221 (2000)) were used for analyzing of the spectra in more details. It was confirmed that the strongest hyperfine interaction has a relatively small anisotropy, which indicates either the absence of alpha-protons or a strongly distorted geometry of the radicals.

  10. Hyperfine structure of the MnH X 7Sigma + state: A large gas-to-matrix shift in the Fermi contact interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varberg, Thomas D.; Field, Robert W.; Merer, Anthony J.

    1990-06-01

    Sub-Doppler spectra of the A 7Π-X 7Σ+ (0,0) band of gas phase MnH near 5680 Å were recorded by intermodulated fluorescence spectroscopy. The spectra reveal hyperfine splittings arising from both the 55Mn and 1H nuclear spins. Internal hyperfine perturbations have been observed between the different spin components of the ground state at low N`. From a preliminary analysis of several rotational lines originating from the isolated and unperturbed F1(J`=3) spin component of the X 7Σ+(N`=0) level, the 55Mn Fermi contact interaction in the ground state has been measured as bF=Aiso =276(1) MHz. This value is 11% smaller than the value obtained by Weltner et al. from an electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) study of MnH in an argon matrix at 4 K. This unprecedented gas-to-matrix shift in the Fermi contact parameter is discussed.

  11. Hyperfine structure of the MnH X 7Σ+ state: A large gas-to-matrix shift in the Fermi contact interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varberg, T.D.; Field, R.W.; Merer, A.J.

    1990-01-01

    Sub-Doppler spectra of the A 7 Π--X 7 Σ + (0,0) band of gas phase MnH near 5680 A were recorded by intermodulated fluorescence spectroscopy. The spectra reveal hyperfine splittings arising from both the 55 Mn and 1 H nuclear spins. Internal hyperfine perturbations have been observed between the different spin components of the ground state at low N double-prime. From a preliminary analysis of several rotational lines originating from the isolated and unperturbed F 1 (J double-prime=3) spin component of the X 7 Σ + (N double-prime=0) level, the 55 Mn Fermi contact interaction in the ground state has been measured as b F =A iso =276(1) MHz. This value is 11% smaller than the value obtained by Weltner et al. from an electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) study of MnH in an argon matrix at 4 K. This unprecedented gas-to-matrix shift in the Fermi contact parameter is discussed

  12. Solid state radiation chemistry of the DNA backbone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernhard, W.A.

    1989-09-01

    The long term goal of this program is to determine the fundamental rules needed to predict the type and yield of damage produced in DNA due to direct effects of ionizing radiation. The focus is on damage to the sugar-phosphate backbone, damage that would lead to strand breaks. Model systems have been chosen that permit various aspects of this problem to be investigated. The emphasis will be on single crystals of monosaccharides, nucleosides, and nucleotides but will also include some powder work on polynucleotides. In these model systems, free radical products and reactions are observed by electron spin resonance (ESR) and electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) techniques. The information thus gained is used in constructing rules that predict what primary free radicals are formed in single crystals of model compounds and the reactions stemming from the primary radicals. The formulation of a set of rules that work in model systems will represent a major advance toward formulating a set of rules that predict the direct damage in DNA itself. In a broader context this program is part of the effort to understand and predict the effects of exposure to ionizing radiation received at low dose rates over long periods of time. Assessment of low dose effects requires a basic understanding of the action of radiation at the molecular level. By contributing to that basic understanding, this program will help solve the problems of risk assessment under low dose conditions. 5 refs., 3 figs

  13. Electron-mediating Cu(A) centers in proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Epel, Boris; Slutter, Claire S; Neese, Frank

    2002-01-01

    High field (W-band, 95 GHz) pulsed electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) measurements were carried out on a number of proteins that contain the mixed-valence, binuclear electron-mediating Cu(A) center. These include nitrous oxide reductase (N(2)OR), the recombinant water-soluble fragment...... of subunit II of Thermus thermophilus cytochrome c oxidase (COX) ba(3) (M160T9), its M160QT0 mutant, where the weak axial methionine ligand has been replaced by a glutamine, and the engineered "purple" azurin (purpAz). The three-dimensional (3-D) structures of these proteins, apart from the mutant, are known...... indicates differences in the positions of the imidazole rings relative to the Cu(2)S(2) core. Comparison of the spectral features of the weakly coupled protons of M160QT0 with those of the other investigated proteins shows that they are very similar to those of purpAz, where the Cu(A) center is the most...

  14. Periapical cemento-osseous dysplasia: clinicopathological features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roghi, Marco; Scapparone, Chiara; Crippa, Rolando; Silvestrini-Biavati, Armando; Angiero, Francesca

    2014-05-01

    Periapical cemento-osseous dysplasia (PCOD) is a rare benign lesion, often asymptomatic, in which fibrous tissue replaces the normal bone tissue, with metaplasic bone and neo-formed cement. We present a rare case of mandibular PCOD in a woman of 55 years, who presented with moderate swelling and mobility of teeth 32-33-34. Endoral radiography showed that these teeth had been devitalized; they had deep periodontal pockets and marked radicular radiotransparency; the root apices exhibited mixed radiotransparency and radio-opacity. Clinical and radiographical findings led to a diagnosis of periapical rarefying osteitis, and the three teeth were thus extracted. Due to the persistence of swelling and slight pain post-extraction, a cone-beam computed tomographic scan was taken; this showed a mixed radiotransparent and radio-opaque lesion in the area of the extracted teeth. A bone biopsy of the affected area was taken for histopathological evaluation; a diagnosis of PCOD was rendered. This case demonstrates the importance of a full investigation when a patient presents after tooth extraction with non-healing socket, pain, and swelling. A multidisciplinary approach is required to manage these rare cases.

  15. Molecular accessibility in solvent swelled coals. Quarterly report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kispert, L.D.

    1993-02-01

    An EPR technique developed in this lab is being used to determine the pore size and number distribution changes after swelling the coal samples with various solvents. Stable nitroxide radical spin probes of different sizes, shapes and reactivity are dissolved in an appropriate solvent, the coal sample is added to the resulting solution, stirred over night at elevated temperature, filtered, washed with a non swelling solvent to eliminate any spin probes that are not trapped in the pores and the spin concentration is measured. Comparing these spin probe measurements to DRIFT data have shown that the relative number distribution of acidic functionalities can be accurately predicted by the spin probe method. The spin probe method had also been used to predict the increase in elongated voids in Pittsburgh No. 8 (APCS No. 4) upon swelling with pyridine in agreement with independent SANS data. NMR relaxation data show that it is possible to deduce the pore (accessibility) distribution as a function of size (up to 6 mn). It has also been possible by variable temperature and ENDOR measurements to determine the presence of hydrogen bonding as a function of pore shape and size. The advantage of the EPR method is that it permits molecules of selected shape and size to be used as probes of accessible regions of coal, thus providing information on the importance of molecular shape.

  16. Molecular accessibility in solvent swelled coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kispert, L.D.

    1993-02-01

    An EPR technique developed in this lab is being used to determine the pore size and number distribution changes after swelling the coal samples with various solvents. Stable nitroxide radical spin probes of different sizes, shapes and reactivity are dissolved in an appropriate solvent, the coal sample is added to the resulting solution, stirred over night at elevated temperature, filtered, washed with a non swelling solvent to eliminate any spin probes that are not trapped in the pores and the spin concentration is measured. Comparing these spin probe measurements to DRIFT data have shown that the relative number distribution of acidic functionalities can be accurately predicted by the spin probe method. The spin probe method had also been used to predict the increase in elongated voids in Pittsburgh No. 8 (APCS No. 4) upon swelling with pyridine in agreement with independent SANS data. NMR relaxation data show that it is possible to deduce the pore (accessibility) distribution as a function of size (up to 6 mn). It has also been possible by variable temperature and ENDOR measurements to determine the presence of hydrogen bonding as a function of pore shape and size. The advantage of the EPR method is that it permits molecules of selected shape and size to be used as probes of accessible regions of coal, thus providing information on the importance of molecular shape.

  17. Biennial report of Radiochemistry Division 1997-1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sastry, M.D.; Manchanda, V.K.; Ramaswami, A.; Goswami, A.; Manohar, S.B.

    2000-03-01

    This report describes the work carried by Radiochemistry Division of BARC during the period 1997 and 1998. The work is divided in three main branches (1) Nuclear Chemistry (2) Actinides Chemistry (3) Actinide Spectroscopy. During this period research in nuclear chemistry was focussed on nuclear fission, nuclear reactions, neutron activation analysis, use of nuclear techniques for understanding of physico-chemical phenomena and developmental activities in non-destructive assay techniques. The research work on chemistry of actinides was directed on basic as well as applied studies related to complexation and extraction behaviour of actinides and lanthanides with a variety of novel ligands. The choice of complexing ligands was made with a view to examining the suitability in reprocessing streams, treatment of high level active waste and recovery of valuables. The third part spectroscopy of actinides describes the basic studies solid state spectroscopy of actinides and analytical spectroscopy for trace metallic assay. The solid state spectroscopy investigations were carried out using EPR, ENDOR, fluorescence, thermally stimulated luminescence and photo acoustic for spectroscopy techniques. In the analytical spectroscopy work a lot of stress was given on finding suitable chemical separation procedures for pre concentration of trace metals and a determination by ICP-AES/ETA-AAS techniques. (author)

  18. Electrical detection of hyperfine interactions in silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoehne, Felix

    2012-12-15

    The main focus of this work was the measurement of hyperfine interactions of defects in silicon using EDMR. We combined the high sensitivity of EDMR when compared to conventional ESR with the two most commonly used methods for the measurement of hyperfine interactions: ESEEM and ENDOR. We first demonstrated the electrical detection of ESEEM by measuring the hyperfine interactions of {sup 31}P donors in Si:P with {sup 29}Si nuclear spins. We then apply EDESEEM to P{sub b0} defects at the Si/SiO{sub 2} interface. In isotopically engineered, we observe an ESEEM modulation with a characteristic beating caused by {sup 29}Si nuclei at 4th and 5th nearest neighbor lattice sites. Then we combine pulsed ENDOR with the high sensitivity of EDMR (EDENDOR). First we demonstrate the measurement of {sup 31}P nuclear spin hyperfine transitions and the coherent manipulation and readout of the {sup 31}P nuclear spins under continuous illumination with above bandgap light. We further show that the EDENDOR method can be greatly improved by switching off the illumination during the microwave and rf pulses. This improves the signal-to-noise ratio by two orders of magnitude and removes the non-resonant background induced by the strong rf pulse allowing to measure ENDOR with a sensitivity <3000 nuclear spins. We apply EDENDOR to the {sup 31}P-P{sub b0} spin system and the {sup 31}P-SL1 spin system allowing us to compare the hyperfine interactions of bulk and interface-near donors. The pulsed illumination also makes spectroscopy of the {sup 31}P{sup +} nuclear spin possible, which due to its long coherence time of 18 ms compared to 280 {mu}s for the {sup 31}P{sub 0} nuclear spin, might be a candidate for a nuclear spin memory. In the last part, we devise a scheme for the hyperpolarization of {sup 31}P nuclei by combining pulsed optical excitation and pulsed ENDOR and demonstrate a {sup 31}P nuclear spin polarization of more than 50%. Crucial for these experiments was the development of a

  19. Fluorescein angiography and retinal vascular development in premature infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcaro, Velia; Velia, Purcaro; Baldascino, Antonio; Antonio, Baldascino; Papacci, Patrizia; Patrizia, Papacci; Giannantonio, Carmen; Carmen, Giannantonio; Molisso, Anna; Anna, Molisso; Molle, Fernando; Fernando, Molle; Lepore, Domenico; Domenico, Lepore; Romagnoli, Costantino; Costantino, Romagnoli

    2012-10-01

    To investigate the role of fluorescein angiography (FA) in the management of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) in preterm newborns. An observational case series of 13 extremely low birth weight infants. From September 2009 to March 2010, 13 newborn infants with a gestational age <29 weeks end/or birth weight <1000 g underwent serial fluorescein angiography with RetCam (Clarity, Pleasanton, CA) every 2 weeks. The fluorescein angiograms were examined to optimize the timing of diagnosis of ROP and to investigate development of retinal and choroidal vascularization. There were no side effects related to FA. Variable features of retinal and choroidal circulation in preterm infants with a high risk of developing ROP were noted. FA allows vessels branching at the junction between vascular and avascular retina (V-Av junction) to be viewed easily and shows the ROP findings that sometimes cannot be seen by indirect ophthalmoscopy. Dye leakage is the most significant sign of progression to severe ROP or the need for surgery in newborn babies with ROP. RetCam-assisted intravenous FA is safe and allows a more objective assessment of the ROP stage and zone.

  20. Theory and applications of generalized operator transforms for diagonalization of spin hamiltonians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schweiger, A.; Graf, F.; Rist, G.; Guenthard, Hs.H.

    1976-01-01

    A generalized transform formalism for vector operators is devised for diagonalization of a rather wide class of spin hamiltonians. The operator technique leads to equations for transformation matrices, for which analytical solutions are given. These allow analytical formulation of the transformed electron Zeeman term, the sum of the magnetic hyperfine and nuclear Zeeman term, the electric quadrupole term and the electronic and nuclear Zeeman coupling terms. The angular dependence of energy eigenvalues, frequencies and line strengths of ESR and ENDOR transitions to first order will be expressed as compact bilinear and quadratic forms of the columns of the matrix relating the molecular coordinate system to the laboratory system. Thereby the explicit calculation of rotation matrices may be completely avoided, though the latter formally express the operator transforms. The generalized operator transform is also carried out for the off-diagonal blocks originating from hyperfine interaction terms. This allows the second order energy terms to be expressed explicitly as compact hermitean forms of a simple structure, in particular the explicit structure of mixing terms between hyperfine interactions of different (sets of) nuclei is obtained. The relationship to the conventional Bleaney transform is discussed and the analogy to the generalized operator transform is worked out. (Auth.)

  1. Electrical detection of hyperfine interactions in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoehne, Felix

    2012-01-01

    The main focus of this work was the measurement of hyperfine interactions of defects in silicon using EDMR. We combined the high sensitivity of EDMR when compared to conventional ESR with the two most commonly used methods for the measurement of hyperfine interactions: ESEEM and ENDOR. We first demonstrated the electrical detection of ESEEM by measuring the hyperfine interactions of 31 P donors in Si:P with 29 Si nuclear spins. We then apply EDESEEM to P b0 defects at the Si/SiO 2 interface. In isotopically engineered, we observe an ESEEM modulation with a characteristic beating caused by 29 Si nuclei at 4th and 5th nearest neighbor lattice sites. Then we combine pulsed ENDOR with the high sensitivity of EDMR (EDENDOR). First we demonstrate the measurement of 31 P nuclear spin hyperfine transitions and the coherent manipulation and readout of the 31 P nuclear spins under continuous illumination with above bandgap light. We further show that the EDENDOR method can be greatly improved by switching off the illumination during the microwave and rf pulses. This improves the signal-to-noise ratio by two orders of magnitude and removes the non-resonant background induced by the strong rf pulse allowing to measure ENDOR with a sensitivity 31 P-P b0 spin system and the 31 P-SL1 spin system allowing us to compare the hyperfine interactions of bulk and interface-near donors. The pulsed illumination also makes spectroscopy of the 31 P + nuclear spin possible, which due to its long coherence time of 18 ms compared to 280 μs for the 31 P 0 nuclear spin, might be a candidate for a nuclear spin memory. In the last part, we devise a scheme for the hyperpolarization of 31 P nuclei by combining pulsed optical excitation and pulsed ENDOR and demonstrate a 31 P nuclear spin polarization of more than 50%. Crucial for these experiments was the development of a lock-in detection scheme for pEDMR, which improves the signal-to-noise ratio by one order of magnitude by removing low

  2. Nitrite and hydroxylamine as nitrogenase substrates: mechanistic implications for the pathway of N₂ reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Sudipta; Lukoyanov, Dmitriy; Danyal, Karamatullah; Dean, Dennis R; Hoffman, Brian M; Seefeldt, Lance C

    2014-09-10

    Investigations of reduction of nitrite (NO2(-)) to ammonia (NH3) by nitrogenase indicate a limiting stoichiometry, NO2(-) + 6e(-) + 12ATP + 7H(+) → NH3 + 2H2O + 12ADP + 12Pi. Two intermediates freeze-trapped during NO2(-) turnover by nitrogenase variants and investigated by Q-band ENDOR/ESEEM are identical to states, denoted H and I, formed on the pathway of N2 reduction. The proposed NO2(-) reduction intermediate hydroxylamine (NH2OH) is a nitrogenase substrate for which the H and I reduction intermediates also can be trapped. Viewing N2 and NO2(-) reductions in light of their common reduction intermediates and of NO2(-) reduction by multiheme cytochrome c nitrite reductase (ccNIR) leads us to propose that NO2(-) reduction by nitrogenase begins with the generation of NO2H bound to a state in which the active-site FeMo-co (M) has accumulated two [e(-)/H(+)] (E2), stored as a (bridging) hydride and proton. Proton transfer to NO2H and H2O loss leaves M-[NO(+)]; transfer of the E2 hydride to the [NO(+)] directly to form HNO bound to FeMo-co is one of two alternative means for avoiding formation of a terminal M-[NO] thermodynamic "sink". The N2 and NO2(-) reduction pathways converge upon reduction of NH2NH2 and NH2OH bound states to form state H with [-NH2] bound to M. Final reduction converts H to I, with NH3 bound to M. The results presented here, combined with the parallels with ccNIR, support a N2 fixation mechanism in which liberation of the first NH3 occurs upon delivery of five [e(-)/H(+)] to N2, but a total of seven [e(-)/H(+)] to FeMo-co when obligate H2 evolution is considered, and not earlier in the reduction process.

  3. DEEP HST /STIS VISIBLE-LIGHT IMAGING OF DEBRIS SYSTEMS AROUND SOLAR ANALOG HOSTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Glenn; Gaspar, Andras [Steward Observatory and the Department of Astronomy, The University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Grady, Carol A. [Eureka Scientific, 2452 Delmer, Suite 100, Oakland, CA 96002 (United States); Stark, Christopher C.; Kuchner, Marc J. [NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Exoplanets and Stellar Astrophysics Laboratory, Code 667, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Carson, Joseph [Department of Physics and Astronomy, College of Charleston, 66 George Street, Charleston, SC 29424 (United States); Debes, John H.; Hines, Dean C.; Perrin, Marshall [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Henning, Thomas [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117, Heidelberg (Germany); Jang-Condell, Hannah [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071 (United States); Rodigas, Timothy J. [Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Institute of Washington, 5241 Branch Road, NW, Washington, DC 20015 (United States); Tamura, Motohide [The University of Tokyo, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo, 181-8588 (Japan); Wisniewski, John P., E-mail: gschneider@as.arizona.edu [H. L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, 440 West Brooks Street, Norman, OK 73019 (United States)

    2016-09-01

    We present new Hubble Space Telescope observations of three a priori known starlight-scattering circumstellar debris systems (CDSs) viewed at intermediate inclinations around nearby close-solar analog stars: HD 207129, HD 202628, and HD 202917. Each of these CDSs possesses ring-like components that are more massive analogs of our solar system's Edgeworth–Kuiper Belt. These systems were chosen for follow-up observations to provide imaging with higher fidelity and better sensitivity for the sparse sample of solar-analog CDSs that range over two decades in systemic ages, with HD 202628 and HD 207129 (both ∼2.3 Gyr) currently the oldest CDSs imaged in visible or near-IR light. These deep (10–14 ks) observations, made with six-roll point-spread-function template visible-light coronagraphy using the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph, were designed to better reveal their angularly large debris rings of diffuse/low surface brightness, and for all targets probe their exo-ring environments for starlight-scattering materials that present observational challenges for current ground-based facilities and instruments. Contemporaneously also observing with a narrower occulter position, these observations additionally probe the CDS endo-ring environments that are seen to be relatively devoid of scatterers. We discuss the morphological, geometrical, and photometric properties of these CDSs also in the context of other CDSs hosted by FGK stars that we have previously imaged as a homogeneously observed ensemble. From this combined sample we report a general decay in quiescent-disk F {sub disk}/ F {sub star} optical brightness ∼ t {sup −0.8}, similar to what is seen at thermal IR wavelengths, and CDSs with a significant diversity in scattering phase asymmetries, and spatial distributions of their starlight-scattering grains.

  4. Reversible Photoinduced Reductive Elimination of H2 from the Nitrogenase Dihydride State, the E(4)(4H) Janus Intermediate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukoyanov, Dmitriy; Khadka, Nimesh; Yang, Zhi-Yong; Dean, Dennis R; Seefeldt, Lance C; Hoffman, Brian M

    2016-02-03

    We recently demonstrated that N2 reduction by nitrogenase involves the obligatory release of one H2 per N2 reduced. These studies focus on the E4(4H) "Janus intermediate", which has accumulated four reducing equivalents as two [Fe-H-Fe] bridging hydrides. E4(4H) is poised to bind and reduce N2 through reductive elimination (re) of the two hydrides as H2, coupled to the binding/reduction of N2. To obtain atomic-level details of the re activation process, we carried out in situ 450 nm photolysis of E4(4H) in an EPR cavity at temperatures below 20 K. ENDOR and EPR measurements show that photolysis generates a new FeMo-co state, denoted E4(2H)*, through the photoinduced re of the two bridging hydrides of E4(4H) as H2. During cryoannealing at temperatures above 175 K, E4(2H)* reverts to E4(4H) through the oxidative addition (oa) of the H2. The photolysis quantum yield is temperature invariant at liquid helium temperatures and shows a rather large kinetic isotope effect, KIE = 10. These observations imply that photoinduced release of H2 involves a barrier to the combination of the two nascent H atoms, in contrast to a barrierless process for monometallic inorganic complexes, and further suggest that H2 formation involves nuclear tunneling through that barrier. The oa recombination of E4(2H)* with the liberated H2 offers compelling evidence for the Janus intermediate as the point at which H2 is necessarily lost during N2 reduction; this mechanistically coupled loss must be gated by N2 addition that drives the re/oa equilibrium toward reductive elimination of H2 with N2 binding/reduction.

  5. Spectroscopic Evidence for a H Bond Network at Y356 Located at the Subunit Interface of Active E. coli Ribonucleotide Reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nick, Thomas U; Ravichandran, Kanchana R; Stubbe, JoAnne; Kasanmascheff, Müge; Bennati, Marina

    2017-07-18

    The reaction catalyzed by E. coli ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) composed of α and β subunits that form an active α2β2 complex is a paradigm for proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) processes in biological transformations. β2 contains the diferric tyrosyl radical (Y 122 ·) cofactor that initiates radical transfer (RT) over 35 Å via a specific pathway of amino acids (Y 122 · ⇆ [W 48 ] ⇆ Y 356 in β2 to Y 731 ⇆ Y 730 ⇆ C 439 in α2). Experimental evidence exists for colinear and orthogonal PCET in α2 and β2, respectively. No mechanistic model yet exists for the PCET across the subunit (α/β) interface. Here, we report unique EPR spectroscopic features of Y 356 ·-β, the pathway intermediate generated by the reaction of 2,3,5-F 3 Y 122 ·-β2/CDP/ATP with wt-α2, Y 731 F-α2, or Y 730 F-α2. High field EPR (94 and 263 GHz) reveals a dramatically perturbed g tensor. [ 1 H] and [ 2 H]-ENDOR reveal two exchangeable H bonds to Y 356 ·: a moderate one almost in-plane with the π-system and a weak one. DFT calculation on small models of Y· indicates that two in-plane, moderate H bonds (r O-H ∼1.8-1.9 Å) are required to reproduce the g x value of Y 356 · (wt-α2). The results are consistent with a model, in which a cluster of two, almost symmetrically oriented, water molecules provide the two moderate H bonds to Y 356 · that likely form a hydrogen bond network of water molecules involved in either the reversible PCET across the subunit interface or in H + release to the solvent during Y 356 oxidation.

  6. Role of the Muon in Semiconductor Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengyan, Rick (P. W.)

    Muons are used in semiconductor research as an experimentally accessible analog to the isolated Hydrogen (H) impurity - a complex that is very difficult (or impossible) to study by other means. Hydrogen impurities of any concentration can modify the electrical, optical or magnetic properties of the host. For instance, H can be incorporated to remove electrically active levels from the energy gap (i.e. passivation) while some can form isolated centers that tend to be responsible for the trap and release of charge carriers and participate in site and charge-state dynamics which certainly affect the electrical properties of the host. Therefore, it can be quite useful to characterize these impurities in semiconducting materials that are of interest for use in devices. A muon has the same charge and spin as a proton but a mass that is nine times lighter. When implanted in a target material, a positively charged muon can behave as a light proton or bind with an electron to form a complex known as Muonium (Mu) with properties that are very similar to that of ionic or neutral H, respectively. A result of these similarities and direct non-destructive implantation is that Mu provides a direct measure of local electronic structure, thermal stability and charge-state transitions of these impurity centers. Since any material can be subjected to muon implantation and it is the muons themselves that mimic the H impurity centers, these measurements do not depend (at all) on the host's solubility of hydrogen nor do they require some minimum concentration; unlike many other techniques, such as EPR, ENDOR, NMR, or IR vibrational spectroscopy. Here we summarize major contributions muons have made to the field of semiconductor research followed by a few case studies to demonstrate the technique and detailed knowledge of the physical and electronic structures as well as dynamics (e.g.: charge-state and site transitions; local motion; long-range diffusion) of Mu/H that can be obtained.

  7. Molecular orbital study of the primary electron donor P700 of photosystem I based on a recent X-ray single crystal structure analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plato, Martin; Krauss, Norbert; Fromme, Petra; Lubitz, Wolfgang

    2003-01-01

    The X-ray structure analysis of photosystem (PS) I single crystals showed that the primary electron donor P700 is a heterodimer formed by one chlorophyll (Chl) a and one Chl a ' [Nature 411 (2001) 909]. The electronic structure of the cation radical P700 +· of the primary donor, which is created in the charge separation process, has been probed by semiempirical molecular orbital calculations including spin polarization effects (RHF-INDO/SP). The calculations, which were based on the X-ray structure, clearly show that P700 is a supermolecule formed by two chlorophyll species. They furthermore predict an asymmetrical charge and spin density distribution in favor of the monomeric Chl a half of this dimer in accordance with results from earlier EPR and ENDOR studies [J. Phys. Chem. B 105 (2000) 1225]. The stepwise inclusion of various electrostatic interactions of the dimer with its nearest surrounding (one threonine forming a hydrogen bond to the keto group of Chl a ' and two histidines liganding the Mg atoms of the two chlorophylls) leads to a systematic enhancement of this electronic asymmetry yielding a spin density ratio of almost 5:1 as also found experimentally. A large part of this value is caused by spin polarization effects. This result is only weakly affected by the electrostatic field of more remote amino acid residues and other pigment molecules ('accessory' Chl a molecules) present in PS I. A separate group of calculations involving local geometry optimizations by energy minimization techniques yields a further enhancement of the spin density asymmetry. A particularly strong effect is obtained by allowing for variations of the geometry of the vinyl groups on both chlorophylls of the P700 dimer. Theoretical results for individual isotropic proton and nitrogen hyperfine coupling constants, showing a satisfactory agreement with experimental findings, are also presented

  8. Probing Ligand Exchange in the P450 Enzyme CYP121 from Mycobacterium tuberculosis: Dynamic Equilibrium of the Distal Heme Ligand as a Function of pH and Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielding, Andrew J; Dornevil, Kednerlin; Ma, Li; Davis, Ian; Liu, Aimin

    2017-12-06

    CYP121 is a cytochrome P450 enzyme from Mycobacterium tuberculosis that catalyzes the formation of a C-C bond between the aromatic groups of its cyclodityrosine substrate (cYY). The crystal structure of CYP121 in complex with cYY reveals that the solvent-derived ligand remains bound to the ferric ion in the enzyme-substrate complex. Whereas in the generally accepted P450 mechanism, binding of the primary substrate in the active-site triggers the release of the solvent-derived ligand, priming the metal center for reduction and subsequent O 2 binding. Here we employed sodium cyanide to probe the metal-ligand exchange of the enzyme and the enzyme-substrate complex. The cyano adducts were characterized by UV-vis, EPR, and ENDOR spectroscopies and X-ray crystallography. A 100-fold increase in the affinity of cyanide binding to the enzyme-substrate complex over the ligand-free enzyme was observed. The crystal structure of the [CYP121(cYY)CN] ternary complex showed a rearrangement of the substrate in the active-site, when compared to the structure of the binary [CYP121(cYY)] complex. Transient kinetic studies showed that cYY binding resulted in a lower second-order rate constant (k on (CN) ) but a much more stable cyanide adduct with 3 orders of magnitude slower k off (CN) rate. A dynamic equilibrium between multiple high- and low-spin species for both the enzyme and enzyme-substrate complex was also observed, which is sensitive to changes in both pH and temperature. Our data reveal the chemical and physical properties of the solvent-derived ligand of the enzyme, which will help to understand the initial steps of the catalytic mechanism.

  9. Spectroscopy of Cu(II)-PcoC and the multicopper oxidase function of PcoA, two essential components of Escherichia coli pco copper resistance operon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, David L; Huyett, Jennifer; Outten, F Wayne; Doan, Peter E; Finney, Lydia A; Hoffman, Brian M; O'Halloran, Thomas V

    2002-08-06

    The plasmid-encoded pco copper resistance operon in Escherichia coli consists of seven genes that are expressed from two pco promoters in response to elevated copper; however, little is known about how they mediate resistance to excess environmental copper. Two of the genes encode the soluble periplasmic proteins PcoA and PcoC. We show here that inactivation of PcoC, and PcoA to a lesser extent, causes cells to become more sensitive to copper than wild-type nonresistant strains, consistent with a tightly coupled detoxification pathway. Periplasmic extracts show copper-inducible oxidase activity, attributed to the multicopper oxidase function of PcoA. PcoC, a much smaller protein than PcoA, binds one Cu(II) and exhibits a weak electronic transition characteristic of a type II copper center. ENDOR and ESEEM spectroscopy of Cu(II)-PcoC and the (15)N- and Met-CD(3)-labeled samples are consistent with a tetragonal ligand environment of three nitrogens and one aqua ligand "in the plane". A weakly associated S-Met and aqua are likely axial ligands. At least one N is a histidine and is likely trans to the in-plane aqua ligand. The copper chemistry of PcoC and the oxidase function of PcoA are consistent with the emerging picture of the chromosomally encoded copper homeostasis apparatus in the E. coli cell envelope [Outten, F. W., Huffman, D. L., Hale, J. A., and O'Halloran, T. V. (2001) J. Biol. Chem. 276, 30670-30677]. We propose a model for the plasmid system in which Cu(I)-PcoC functions in this copper efflux pathway as a periplasmic copper binding protein that docks with the multiple repeats of Met-rich domains in PcoA to effect oxidation of Cu(I) to the less toxic Cu(II) form. The solvent accessibility of the Cu(II) in PcoC may allow for metal transfer to other plasmid and chromosomal factors and thus facilitate removal of Cu(II) from the cell envelope.

  10. Why Nature Uses Radical SAM Enzymes so Widely: Electron Nuclear Double Resonance Studies of Lysine 2,3-Aminomutase Show the 5'-dAdo• "Free Radical" Is Never Free.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horitani, Masaki; Byer, Amanda S; Shisler, Krista A; Chandra, Tilak; Broderick, Joan B; Hoffman, Brian M

    2015-06-10

    Lysine 2,3-aminomutase (LAM) is a radical S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) enzyme and, like other members of this superfamily, LAM utilizes radical-generating machinery comprising SAM anchored to the unique Fe of a [4Fe-4S] cluster via a classical five-membered N,O chelate ring. Catalysis is initiated by reductive cleavage of the SAM S-C5' bond, which creates the highly reactive 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical (5'-dAdo•), the same radical generated by homolytic Co-C bond cleavage in B12 radical enzymes. The SAM surrogate S-3',4'-anhydroadenosyl-L-methionine (anSAM) can replace SAM as a cofactor in the isomerization of L-α-lysine to L-β-lysine by LAM, via the stable allylic anhydroadenosyl radical (anAdo•). Here electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) spectroscopy of the anAdo• radical in the presence of (13)C, (2)H, and (15)N-labeled lysine completes the picture of how the active site of LAM from Clostridium subterminale SB4 "tames" the 5'-dAdo• radical, preventing it from carrying out harmful side reactions: this "free radical" in LAM is never free. The low steric demands of the radical-generating [4Fe-4S]/SAM construct allow the substrate target to bind adjacent to the S-C5' bond, thereby enabling the 5'-dAdo• radical created by cleavage of this bond to react with its partners by undergoing small motions, ∼0.6 Å toward the target and ∼1.5 Å overall, that are controlled by tight van der Waals contact with its partners. We suggest that the accessibility to substrate and ready control of the reactive C5' radical, with "van der Waals control" of small motions throughout the catalytic cycle, is common within the radical SAM enzyme superfamily and is a major reason why these enzymes are the preferred means of initiating radical reactions in nature.

  11. Why Nature Uses Radical SAM Enzymes so Widely: Electron Nuclear Double Resonance Studies of Lysine 2,3-Aminomutase Show the 5′-dAdo• “Free Radical” Is Never Free

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horitani, Masaki; Byer, Amanda S.; Shisler, Krista A.; Chandra, Tilak; Broderick, Joan B.; Hoffman, Brian M.

    2015-01-01

    Lysine 2,3-aminomutase (LAM) is a radical S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) enzyme and, like other members of this superfamily, LAM utilizes radical-generating machinery comprising SAM anchored to the unique Fe of a [4Fe-4S] cluster via a classical five-membered N,O chelate ring. Catalysis is initiated by reductive cleavage of the SAM S–C5′ bond, which creates the highly reactive 5′-deoxyadenosyl radical (5′-dAdo•), the same radical generated by homolytic Co–C bond cleavage in B12 radical enzymes. The SAM surrogate S-3′,4′-anhydroadenosyl-L-methionine (anSAM) can replace SAM as a cofactor in the isomerization of L-α-lysine to L-β-lysine by LAM, via the stable allylic anhydroadenosyl radical (anAdo•). Here electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) spectroscopy of the anAdo• radical in the presence of 13C, 2H, and 15N-labeled lysine completes the picture of how the active site of LAM from Clostridium subterminale SB4 “tames” the 5′-dAdo• radical, preventing it from carrying out harmful side reactions: this “free radical” in LAM is never free. The low steric demands of the radical-generating [4Fe-4S]/SAM construct allow the substrate target to bind adjacent to the S–C5′ bond, thereby enabling the 5′-dAdo• radical created by cleavage of this bond to react with its partners by undergoing small motions, ~0.6 Å toward the target and ~1.5 Å overall, that are controlled by tight van der Waals contact with its partners. We suggest that the accessibility to substrate and ready control of the reactive C5′ radical, with “van der Waals control” of small motions throughout the catalytic cycle, is common within the radical SAM enzyme superfamily and is a major reason why these enzymes are the preferred means of initiating radical reactions in nature. PMID:25923449

  12. Tunneling Kinetics and Nonadiabatic Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer in Proteins: The Effect of Electric Fields and Anharmonic Donor-Acceptor Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salna, Bridget; Benabbas, Abdelkrim; Russo, Douglas; Champion, Paul M

    2017-07-20

    A proper description of proton donor-acceptor (D-A) distance fluctuations is crucial for understanding tunneling in proton-coupled electron transport (PCET). The typical harmonic approximation for the D-A potential results in a Gaussian probability distribution, which does not appropriately reflect the electronic repulsion forces that increase the energetic cost of sampling shorter D-A distances. Because these shorter distances are the primary channel for thermally activated tunneling, the analysis of tunneling kinetics depends sensitively on the inherently anharmonic nature of the D-A interaction. Thus, we have used quantum chemical calculations to account for the D-A interaction and developed an improved model for the analysis of experimental tunneling kinetics. Strong internal electric fields are also considered and found to contribute significantly to the compressive forces when the D-A distance distribution is positioned below the van der Waals contact distance. This model is applied to recent experiments on the wild type (WT) and a double mutant (DM) of soybean lipoxygenase-1 (SLO). The compressive force necessary to prepare the tunneling-active distribution in WT SLO is found to fall in the ∼ nN range, which greatly exceeds the measured values of molecular motor and protein unfolding forces. This indicates that ∼60-100 MV/cm electric fields, aligned along the D-A bond axis, must be generated by an enzyme conformational interconversion that facilitates the PCET tunneling reaction. Based on the absolute value of the measured tunneling rate, and using previously calculated values of the electronic matrix element, the population of this tunneling-active conformation is found to lie in the range 10 -5 -10 -7 , indicating this is a rare structural fluctuation that falls well below the detection threshold of recent ENDOR experiments. Additional analysis of the DM tunneling kinetics leads to a proposal that a disordered (high entropy) conformation could be

  13. Modeling the bacterial photosynthetic reaction center. VII. Full simulation of the intervalence hole-transfer absorption spectrum of the special-pair radical cation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reimers, Jeffrey R.; Hush, Noel S.

    2003-01-01

    ENDOR data suggests that the special-pair radical cation P + from Rhodobacter sphaeroides is 68% localized on P L while simple interpretations of FTIR difference spectra based primarily on intensity information, but to some extent also bandwidths, suggest near-complete charge localization. We provide a complete a priori spectral simulation of the spectrum of P + in the range 0-5000 cm-1, including explicit treatment of the high-resolution vibrational transitions, the low-resolution hole-transfer absorption centered at 2700 cm-1, and the resonance with the SHOMO to HOMO transition at 2200 cm-1 that resolve the issues concerning the nature of P + . The description of the vibrational aspects of the problem were taken from results of previous density-functional calculations, and a qualitatively realistic large number of vibrational modes (50 antisymmetric and 18-20 symmetric) were included. To facilitate the calculations, a new representation of the vibronic-coupling Hamiltonian for intervalence hole-transfer or electron-transfer problems is introduced, allowing the spectrum to be simulated efficiently using only up to 4x10 9 vibronic basis functions and leading also to new general analytical relationships. Observed spectra are fitted using seven adjustable chemical parameters describing the interactions between the four electronic states involved. The resulting fits provide unique descriptions of the parameters that are insensitive to the source of the observed spectrum or the nature of the symmetric modes used in the model, and all fitted parameters are found to be close in value to those from independent estimates. We determine the electronic coupling, antisymmetric-mode reorganization energy, and redox asymmetry to be J=0.126±0.002 eV, λ=0.139±0.003 eV, and E 0 =0.069±0.002 eV, respectively. Our description forms the basis of understanding for a wide range of other properties observed for Rhodobacter sphaeroides mutants, as well as the properties of the

  14. Surface water - groundwater relationship in the downstream part of the Komadougou Yobe River (Eastern Sahelian Niger)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hector, B.; Genthon, P.; Luxereau, A.; Descloîtres, M.; Moumouni Moussa, A.; Abdou, H.

    2012-04-01

    The Komadougou Yobe (KY) is a temporary river meandering on nearly 100 km along the Niger/Nigeria border in its lower part, before reaching the endoreic Lake Chad. There, seasonal flow from July to January is related to rainfall amount on the upstream Jos Plateau, Nigeria. In the semi-arid downstream area (350 mm annual rainfall in Diffa, Niger) the KY is the main source of recharge for the sandy quaternary aquifer which is used both for irrigation and for drinking water supply. The borders of the KY in Niger are subjected to an agricultural development involving intensive irrigated cropping of sweet pepper mainly produced for sale in Nigeria. Irrigation waters are mainly extracted from the KY, and therefore irrigation must stop when the River runs dry, but irrigation from wells is now developing with an increased risk of soil salinization. The flow rate of the KY has been impacted both by the 80s and 90s droughts, also underwent by the entire Sahel, and by the building up of a series of dams starting from the 70s in Nigeria. Therefore the KY and its relations with the underlying groundwaters should be carefully monitored to provide guidelines for policy makers in charge of the development of this area. However, in this remote area, data are scarce and often discontinuous : there are for example no continuous groundwater level data from before the drought. As part of the Lake Chad French IRD project, series of campaigns involving water level, exploration geophysics, gravity, soil sampling and social studies have been carried out between 2008 and 2011. They allowed to build a numerical model for groundwater-river interactions which in some instances has been compared with previously recorded data. This model is then forced with theoretical climatic senarii based on humid 60s data and data from the drought period. This allows discussing the relationships between the river and groundwaters in a changing climate. Our results militate for the setting up of a limited

  15. Hidroquímica de las aguas del Altiplano de Bolivia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available HYDROCHIMIE DES EAUX DE L’ALTIPLANO BOLIVIEN. Les eaux de surface ont été échantillonnées sur 36 points de mesure du bassin endoreïque qui inclut le lac Titicaca, le rio Desaguadero et les lacs Uru-Uru et Poopó (bassin TDPS. Pour les eaux souterraines, des échantillons ont été prélevés dans 37 puits du bassin TDPS et dans 33 puits de la province Aroma. La présente étude concerne la période de 1989 à 1993 qui est déficitaire en précipitation. La salinité augmente du nord au sud c’est un problème grave pour les lacs Uru-Uru et Poopó. Au sud du bassin versant, il y a une pollution naturelle par arsenic, silice, chlorures, sulfates, sodium, calcium et bore. L’influence anthropique est à l’origine d’une pollution bactériologique dans la région d’Oruro et aussi d’une pollution par le wolfram, l’étain, le cobalt, le cadmium, le nickel, l’antimoine et le plomb dans les zones rurales. En général, les eaux de surface présentent un risque pour les populations ainsi que pour les animaux et l’irrigation. En revanche les eaux souterraines montrent de meilleures caractéristiques physico-chimiques. Se muestrearon 36 lugares de agua superficial en la cuenca que incluye el lago Titicaca, río Desaguadero y los lagos Uru Uru y Poopó (Sistema TDPS. En agua subterránea se analizaron 37 pozos del sistema TDPS y 33 pozos en la provincia Aroma. La presente evaluación se refiere a un período de déficit pluviométrico entre 1989 y 1993. El contenido en sales aumenta de norte a sur y es grave en los lagos Uru-Uru y Poopó. Al sur de la cuenca, se nota una contaminación natural por arsénico, sílice, cloruros, sulfatos, sodio, calcio y boro. La contaminación antrópica está al origen de una polución de tipo bacteriológico en el área de Oruro y con wolfram, estaño, cobalto, cadmio, níquel, antimonio y plomo en el área rural. En general, las aguas superficiales presentan riesgos para el consumo humano, animal y para riego

  16. Time series analysis of Mexico City subsidence constrained by radar interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doin, Marie-Pierre; Lopez-Quiroz, Penelope; Yan, Yajing; Bascou, Pascale; Pinel, Virginie

    2010-05-01

    In Mexico City, subsidence rates reach up to 40 cm/yr mainly due to soil compaction led by the over exploitation of the Mexico Basin aquifer. The Mexico Valley, an endoreic basin surrounded by mountains, was in the past covered by large lakes. After the Spanish conquest, the lakes have almost completely disappeared, being progressively replaced by buildings of the current Mexican capital. The simplified hydrogeologic structure includes a superficial 50 to 300 m thick lacustrine aquitard overlying a thicker aquifer made of alluvial deposits. The aquitard layer plays a crucial role in the subsidence process due to the extremely high compressibility of its clay deposits separated by a less compressible sand layer where the biggest buildings of the city are anchored. The aquifer over-exploitation leads to a large scale 30m depression of its piezometric level, inducing water downwards flow in the clays, yielding compaction and subsidence. In order to quantitatively link subsidence to water pumping, the Mexico city subsidence needs to be mapped and analyzed through space and time. We map its spatial and temporal patterns by differential radar interferometry, using 38 ENVISAT images acquired between end of 2002 and beginning of 2007. We employ both a Permanent Scatterer (PS) and a small baseline (SBAS) approach. The main difficulty consists in the severe unwrapping problems mostly due to the high deformation rate. We develop a specific SBAS approach based on 71 differential interferograms with a perpendicular baseline smaller than 500 m and a temporal baseline smaller than 9 months, forming a redundant network linking all images: (1) To help the unwrapping step, we use the fact that the deformation shape is stable for similar time intervals during the studied period. As a result, a stack of the five best interferograms can be used to reduce the number of fringes in wrapped interferograms. (2) Based on the redundancy of the interferometric data base, we quantify the

  17. Donaldson v. Van de Kamp: cryonics, assisted suicide, and the challenges of medical science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pommer, R W

    1993-01-01

    brain. In addition, Donaldson's doctors sought an injunction against criminal prosecution for their participation in the suspension, because Donaldson, once suspended, would be considered "dead" under California law. Donaldson and his doctors built their novel argument upon the recent right-to-die cases in which the courts recognized a patient's right to have life-sustaining medical treatment withdrawn. Donaldson argued that his right to privacy and self-determination is paramount to any state interest in maintaining life. Thus, according to Donaldson, balancing the state's reasons to end--or "interrupt," as cryonics enthusiasts would have it--his own life was not necessary. The trial court dismissed the complaint for failure to state a cause of action, and Donaldson appealed to the California Court of Appeals. Because the cryonic process would necessarily involve physician-assisted death, or the aiding, advising, or encouraging of another to commit suicide, the appellate court affirmed the ruling of the trial court, holding that Donaldson did not have a constitutional right to assisted death. Additionally, in light of Donaldson's First Amendment challenge to the statute, the court upheld the criminal statute prohibiting the aiding, advising, or encouraging of another to commit suicide. This Note briefly discusses the process of cryonic suspension and explores the holding of Donaldson in light of the underlying rationale of the California right-to-die cases. Considering the contradictory state and individual interests balanced in the right-to-die cases, this Note concludes that, under a similar balancing test, premortem cryonic suspension could be permitted under certain circumstances; however, the right to premortem cryonic suspension may be more effectively recognized through legislation.

  18. Recherches géomorphologiques sur le Néogène du Sud du Pérou

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    1976-01-01

    Full Text Available Pendant la première moitié du Miocène, un cycle d'érosion en partie contemporaine de la fin du volcanisme Tacaza achève l'aplanissement complet des Andes. Les produits de l'érosion se déposent en régime endoréique dans des bassins situés entre la Cordillère Occidentale et Ia chaîne côtière (formation Moquegua. Ainsi se développe une surface de régradation en direction de la Sierra ('Puna' et d'aggradation vers la niveau de base (Moquegua. Cette surface s'étend sur un domaine continental séparé du domaine pacifique par la chaîne côtière non encore aplanie. En effet, sur le flanc pacifique de celle-ci, on note la présence de sédiments continentaux (membre supérieur de la formation Camaná semblables à ceux de la formation Moquegua, mais les deux aires de sédimentation sont séparées par une ligne quasi-continue de reliefs côtiers. Ces reliefs sont en partie ennoyés en direction du Pacifique par les dépôts marins de la formation Pisco (Miocène supérieur, concordants sur le membre supérieur continental de la formation Camaná. Pendant ce même Miocène supérieur, se produit le soulèvement du voussoir andin, qui, en faisant basculer la surface de la Puna en direction du Pacifique, déclenche son rajeunissement par un nouveau cycle d'érosion en fonction d'un réseau hydrographique Incliné vers le nouveau niveau de base (celui de la transgression Pisco. Ce réseau hydrographique s'installe sur une couverture d'ignimbrites fossilisant la surface de la Puna et reposant en concordance avec la formation Moquegua. Ces ignimbrites datées de 14 à 15 millions d'années, confirment l'âge miocène de la surface de la Puna dans le Sud du Pérou. Pendant le Pliocène Inférieur l'abaissement du niveau de base vient ajouter ses effets à ceux du soulèvement des Andes et une phase générale de dissection du relief se développe en régime exoréique. Les formes dégagées par l'érosion différentielle sont d'une part des