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Sample records for endolymph

  1. Transitory endolymph leakage induced hearing loss and tinnitus: depolarization, biphasic shortening and loss of electromotility of outer hair cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenner, H. P.; Reuter, G.; Zimmermann, U.; Gitter, A. H.; Fermin, C.; LePage, E. L.

    1994-01-01

    There are types of deafness and tinnitus in which ruptures or massive changes in the ionic permeability of the membranes lining the endolymphatic space [e.g., of the reticular lamina (RL)] are believed to allow potassium-rich endolymph to deluge the low [K+] perilymphatic fluid (e.g., in the small spaces of Nuel). This would result in a K+ intoxication of sensory and neural structures. Acute attacks of Meniere's disease have been suggested to be an important example for this event. The present study investigated the effects of transiently elevated [K+] due to the addition of artificial endolymph to the basolateral cell surface of outer hair cells (OHC) in replicating endolymph-induced K+ intoxication of the perilymph in the small spaces of Nuel. The influence of K+ intoxication of the basolateral OHC cell surface on the transduction was then examined. Intoxication resulted in an inhibition of the physiological repolarizing K+ efflux from hair cells. This induced unwanted depolarizations of the hair cells, interfering with mechanoelectrical transduction. A pathological longitudinal OHC shortening was also found, with subsequent compression of the organ of Corti possibly influencing the micromechanics of the mechanically active OHC. Both micromechanical and electrophysiological alterations are proposed to contribute to endolymph leakage induced attacks of deafness and possibly also to tinnitus. Moreover, repeated or long-lasting K+ intoxications of OHC resulted in a chronic and complete loss of OHC motility. This is suggested to be a pathophysiological basis in some patients with chronic hearing loss resulting from Meniere's syndrome.

  2. The Density Difference of Cupula and Endolymph Changes the Mechanics of Semicircular Canals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondrachuk, Alexander V.; Boyle, Richard D.

    2011-11-01

    A precise balance of cupula and endolymph densities is key to the proper sensing of angular acceleration by the semicircular canals (SC). Estimates show that a density difference of cupula and endolymph (DD) as small as 10 - 4 g/cm3 is sufficient to make the SC sensitive to gravity and centrifugal forces provided they are comparable with gravity. As a result this might cause vestibular disorders. There are conditions under which the DD may even exceed this value. One of them is a change of intra-labyrinth pressure (IP) that may take place during a spaceflight. Here, the effect of DD on SC dynamics is considered using a simplified one-dimensional toroidal mathematical model of a canal for rotation with constant or harmonically oscillating angular velocities. The DD results in: dependence of cupula dynamics on orientation of both the gravity vector relative to the SC plane and the axis of rotation, as well as on the distance between the axis of rotation and the center of SC; shift of the cupula to a new position of equilibrium that depends on both the gravity vector and the parameters of head rotation; and onset of cupula oscillations with multiple frequencies under harmonic stimulation. The DD effect may be important under conditions of artificial gravity where the directions of centrifugal forces, the values of which are comparable with Earth's gravity, the orientations of the axis of rotation of a space station, and the axes of the SCs change during movements of the individuals and their habitat.

  3. Trace element-protein interactions in endolymph from the inner ear of fish: implications for environmental reconstructions using fish otolith chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Oliver R B; Ganio, Katherine; Roberts, Blaine R; Swearer, Stephen E

    2017-03-22

    Otoliths, the biomineralised hearing "ear stones" from the inner ear of fish, grow throughout the lifespan of an individual, with deposition of alternating calciferous and proteinaceous bands occurring daily. Trace element : calcium ratios within daily increments measured by laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) are often used in fisheries science to reconstruct environmental histories. There is, however, considerable uncertainty as to which elements are interacting with either the proteinaceous or calciferous zones of the otolith, and thus their utility as indicators of environmental change. To answer this, we used size exclusion chromatography-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (SEC-ICP-MS) of endolymph, the otolith growth medium, to determine the binding interactions for a range of elements. In addition, we used solution ICP-MS to quantify element concentrations in paired otolith and endolymph samples and determined relative enrichment factors for each. We found 12 elements that are present only in the proteinaceous fraction, 6 that are present only in the salt fraction, and 4 that are present in both. These findings have important implications for the reconstruction of environmental histories based on changes in otolith elemental composition: (1) elements occurring only in the salt fraction are most likely to reflect changes in the physico-chemical environment experienced during life; (2) elements occurring only in the proteinaceous fraction are more likely to reflect physiological rather than environmental events; and (3) elements occurring in both the salt and proteinaceous fractions are likely to be informative about both endogenous and exogenous processes, potentially reducing their utility in environmental reconstructions.

  4. Endolymphatic potassium of the chicken vestibule during embryonic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masetto, Sergio; Zucca, Giampiero; Bottà, Luisa; Valli, Paolo

    2005-08-01

    The endolymph fills the lumen of the inner ear membranous labyrinth. Its ionic composition is unique in vertebrates as an extracellular fluid for its high-K(+)/low-Na(+) concentration. The endolymph is actively secreted by specialized cells located in the vestibular and cochlear epithelia. We have investigated the early phases of endolymph secretion by measuring the endolymphatic K(+) concentration in the chicken vestibular system during pre-hatching development. Measurements were done by inserting K(+)-selective microelectrodes in chicken embryo ampullae dissected at different developmental stages from embryonic day 9 up to embryonic day 21 (day of hatching). We found that the K(+) concentration is low (<10mM/L) up to embryonic day 11, afterward it increases steeply to reach a plateau level of about 140 mM/L at embryonic day 19--21. We have developed a short-term in vitro model of endolymph secretion by culturing vestibular ampullae dissected from embryonic day 11 chicken embryos for a few days. The preparation reproduced a double compartment system where the luminal K(+) concentration increased along with the days of culturing. This model could be important for (1) investigating the development of cellular mechanisms contributing to endolymph homeostasis and (2) testing compounds that influence those mechanisms.

  5. The difference in endolymphatic hydrostatic pressure elevation induced by isoproterenol between the ampulla and the cochlea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inamoto, Ryuhei; Miyashita, Takenori; Matsubara, Ai; Hoshikawa, Hiroshi; Mori, Nozomu

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the difference in the responses of endolymphatic hydrostatic pressure to isoproterenol, β-adrenergic receptor agonist, between pars superior and pars inferior. The hydrostatic pressure of endolymph and perilymph and endolymphatic potential in the ampulla and the cochlea during the intravenous administration of isoproterenol were recorded using a servo-null system in guinea pigs. The hydrostatic pressure of endolymph and perilymph in the ampulla and cochlea was similar in magnitude. Isoproterenol significantly increased hydrostatic pressure of ampullar and cochlear endolymph and perilymph with no change in the ampullar endolymphatic potential and endocochlear potential, respectively. The isoproterenol-induced maximum change of endolymphatic hydrostatic pressure in ampulla was significantly (phydrostatic pressure in the ampulla disappeared like that in the cochlea. Isoproterenol elevates endolymphatic hydrostatic pressure in different manner between the vestibule and the cochlea. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Actin filaments as the fast pathways for calcium ions involved in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-08-14

    Aug 14, 2015 ... energy supply provided by ATP hydrolysis. Calcium obvi- ously affects ..... If the viscosity constant is taken for the water it amounts η ~ 10−3 Pa·s, ... and protected of leaking out into the bulk endolymph, thus preventing to be ...

  7. Ultrastructure of the endolymphatic sac in two-phase endolymphatic hydrops in the guinea pig

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheul, J; Segenhout, JM; Dunnebier, EA; Albers, FWJ; Blaauw, EH; Wit, HP

    1999-01-01

    Two-phase endolymphatic hydrops is a subtle experimental model for Meniere's disease. Chronic dysfunction of the endolymphatic sac, induced by dissection of the most distal part without causing damage to the intermediate part, is combined with increased endolymph production induced by administration

  8. Bacterial Invasion of the Inner Ear in Association With Pneumococcal Meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Martin Nue; Brandt, Christian; Østergaard, Christian

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the pathways of bacterial invasion and subsequent spreading in the inner ear during pneumococcal meningitis. STUDY DESIGN: A well-established adult rat model of Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis was used. METHODS: Thirty rats were inoculated intrathecally with S. pneumoniae...... scala vestibuli of the basal turn of the cochlea, hematogenous spreading occurred to the spiral ligament and into the cochlear endolymph, subsequently to the vestibular endolymph. We found no evidence of alternative routes for bacterial invasion in the inner ear. Several internal barriers to bacterial...... spreading were found within the inner ear. Bacterial elimination was evidenced by engulfment by macrophages within the inner ear. CONCLUSION: From the meninges, pneumococci invade the inner ear through the cochlear aqueduct during the first days of infection, whereas hematogenous invasion via the spiral...

  9. MR volumetric assessment of endolymphatic hydrops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerkov, R.; Berman, A.; Jerin, C.; Krause, E.; Dietrich, O.; Flatz, W.; Ertl-Wagner, B.; Keeser, D.

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to volumetrically quantify endolymph and perilymph spaces of the inner ear in order to establish a methodological basis for further investigations into the pathophysiology and therapeutic monitoring of Meniere's disease. Sixteen patients (eight females, aged 38-71 years) with definite unilateral Meniere's disease were included in this study. Magnetic resonance (MR) cisternography with a T2-SPACE sequence was combined with a Real reconstruction inversion recovery (Real-IR) sequence for delineation of inner ear fluid spaces. Machine learning and automated local thresholding segmentation algorithms were applied for three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction and volumetric quantification of endolymphatic hydrops. Test-retest reliability was assessed by the intra-class coefficient; correlation of cochlear endolymph volume ratio with hearing function was assessed by the Pearson correlation coefficient. Endolymph volume ratios could be reliably measured in all patients, with a mean (range) value of 15 % (2-25) for the cochlea and 28 % (12-40) for the vestibulum. Test-retest reliability was excellent, with an intra-class coefficient of 0.99. Cochlear endolymphatic hydrops was significantly correlated with hearing loss (r = 0.747, p = 0.001). MR imaging after local contrast application and image processing, including machine learning and automated local thresholding, enable the volumetric quantification of endolymphatic hydrops. This allows for a quantitative assessment of the effect of therapeutic interventions on endolymphatic hydrops. (orig.)

  10. MR volumetric assessment of endolymphatic hydrops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerkov, R.; Berman, A.; Jerin, C.; Krause, E. [University of Munich, Department of Otorhinolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Grosshadern Medical Centre, Munich (Germany); University of Munich, German Centre for Vertigo and Balance Disorders, Grosshadern Medical Centre, Marchioninistr. 15, 81377, Munich (Germany); Dietrich, O.; Flatz, W.; Ertl-Wagner, B. [University of Munich, Institute of Clinical Radiology, Grosshadern Medical Centre, Munich (Germany); Keeser, D. [University of Munich, Institute of Clinical Radiology, Grosshadern Medical Centre, Munich (Germany); University of Munich, German Centre for Vertigo and Balance Disorders, Grosshadern Medical Centre, Marchioninistr. 15, 81377, Munich (Germany); University of Munich, Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Innenstadtkliniken Medical Centre, Munich (Germany)

    2014-10-16

    We aimed to volumetrically quantify endolymph and perilymph spaces of the inner ear in order to establish a methodological basis for further investigations into the pathophysiology and therapeutic monitoring of Meniere's disease. Sixteen patients (eight females, aged 38-71 years) with definite unilateral Meniere's disease were included in this study. Magnetic resonance (MR) cisternography with a T2-SPACE sequence was combined with a Real reconstruction inversion recovery (Real-IR) sequence for delineation of inner ear fluid spaces. Machine learning and automated local thresholding segmentation algorithms were applied for three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction and volumetric quantification of endolymphatic hydrops. Test-retest reliability was assessed by the intra-class coefficient; correlation of cochlear endolymph volume ratio with hearing function was assessed by the Pearson correlation coefficient. Endolymph volume ratios could be reliably measured in all patients, with a mean (range) value of 15 % (2-25) for the cochlea and 28 % (12-40) for the vestibulum. Test-retest reliability was excellent, with an intra-class coefficient of 0.99. Cochlear endolymphatic hydrops was significantly correlated with hearing loss (r = 0.747, p = 0.001). MR imaging after local contrast application and image processing, including machine learning and automated local thresholding, enable the volumetric quantification of endolymphatic hydrops. This allows for a quantitative assessment of the effect of therapeutic interventions on endolymphatic hydrops. (orig.)

  11. A dynamic model of the eye nystagmus response to high magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glover, Paul M; Li, Yan; Antunes, Andre; Mian, Omar S; Day, Brian L

    2014-02-07

    It was recently shown that high magnetic fields evoke nystagmus in human subjects with functioning vestibular systems. The proposed mechanism involves interaction between ionic currents in the endolymph of the vestibular labyrinth and the static magnetic field. This results in a Lorentz force that causes endolymph flow to deflect the cupulae of the semi-circular canals to evoke a vestibular-ocular reflex (VOR). This should be analogous to stimulation by angular acceleration or caloric irrigation. We made measurements of nystagmus slow-phase velocities in healthy adults experiencing variable magnetic field profiles of up to 7 T while supine on a bed that could be moved smoothly into the bore of an MRI machine. The horizontal slow-phase velocity data were reliably modelled by a linear transfer function incorporating a low-pass term and a high-pass adaptation term. The adaptation time constant was estimated at 39.3 s from long exposure trials. When constrained to this value, the low-pass time constant was estimated at 13.6 ± 3.6 s (to 95% confidence) from both short and long exposure trials. This confidence interval overlaps with values obtained previously using angular acceleration and caloric stimulation. Hence it is compatible with endolymph flow causing a cupular deflection and therefore supports the hypothesis that the Lorentz force is a likely transduction mechanism of the magnetic field-evoked VOR.

  12. A dynamic model of the eye nystagmus response to high magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glover, Paul M; Li, Yan; Antunes, Andre; Mian, Omar S; Day, Brian L

    2014-01-01

    It was recently shown that high magnetic fields evoke nystagmus in human subjects with functioning vestibular systems. The proposed mechanism involves interaction between ionic currents in the endolymph of the vestibular labyrinth and the static magnetic field. This results in a Lorentz force that causes endolymph flow to deflect the cupulae of the semi-circular canals to evoke a vestibular–ocular reflex (VOR). This should be analogous to stimulation by angular acceleration or caloric irrigation. We made measurements of nystagmus slow-phase velocities in healthy adults experiencing variable magnetic field profiles of up to 7 T while supine on a bed that could be moved smoothly into the bore of an MRI machine. The horizontal slow-phase velocity data were reliably modelled by a linear transfer function incorporating a low-pass term and a high-pass adaptation term. The adaptation time constant was estimated at 39.3 s from long exposure trials. When constrained to this value, the low-pass time constant was estimated at 13.6 ± 3.6 s (to 95% confidence) from both short and long exposure trials. This confidence interval overlaps with values obtained previously using angular acceleration and caloric stimulation. Hence it is compatible with endolymph flow causing a cupular deflection and therefore supports the hypothesis that the Lorentz force is a likely transduction mechanism of the magnetic field-evoked VOR. (paper)

  13. β-trace protein (prostaglandin D synthase - a stable and reliable protein in perilymph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nekic, Marko

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Beta-trace protein (β-TP has been analysed in human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF and other body fluids. Beta-trace protein is a very sensitive and specific clinical marker and can confirm reliably the presence of CSF in patients with a suspected CSF leakage. Design: Perilymph specimens from the scala vestibuli (n=10 and from the lateral semicircular canal (n=4 were taken from patients undergoing stapedotomy or surgery for acoustic neuroma. During post-mortem examinations perilymph specimens from the scala vestibuli (n=70, the scala tympani (n=11, endolymph specimens (n=21 and CSF specimens (n=17 were obtained. All specimens were analyzed by a one-dimensional immunoelectrophoresis using a polyclonal, monospecific antibody. Results: Specimens from live surgery showed a mean concentration of 51.5 ± 48.9 mg/l β-TP in scala vestibuli perilymph. Specimens from post-mortem examinations revealed a mean concentration of 49.1 ± 17.7 mg/l in CSF, 71.9 ± 29.3 mg/l in perilymph and 68.0 ± 21.7 mg/l in endolymph. There was no evidence of a circadian alteration of β-TP in CSF or inner ear fluids. Conclusions: Our results demonstrated clearly that β-TP is contained in human perilymph and endolymph. This is the first published data that point out the aptitude of the β-TP-test in verifying traces of perilymph, a valuable diagnostic tool for the existence of perilymphatic leaks.

  14. Definition of fluctuant hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, J J

    1975-06-01

    In summary, fluctuant hearing loss is defined as a disorder of the inner ear characterized by fullness, roaring tinnitus, and fluctuations in hearing. It is believed to be caused by an inadequate absorption of endolymph from the endolymphatic sac, with or without one or more metabolic disorders, that interferes with the delicate balance between the production and absorption of endolymph and thus produces cochlear hydrops. This triad of fullness, roaring tinnitus, and fluctuant hearing loss resulting from cochlear hydrops is much more common than the quadrad of true turning vertigo, fullness, roaring tinnitus, and fluctuant hearing loss due to vestibular and cochlear hydrops known as Meniere's disease. Although patients with fluctuant hearing loss only may eventually develop vertigo as the chief complaint and then be said to have Meniere's disease, it is remarkable how many patients continue to suffer mainly from cochlear symptoms at all times. It would appear, because of the greater frequency of fluctuant hearing loss than in Meniere's disease, that the cochlear labyrinth is more susceptible to hydrops than the vestibular labyrinth. For the purposes of diagnosis and treatment it is very useful to separate patients into those with fluctuant hearing loss and those with Meniere's disease.

  15. Changes of ampulla pressure in the semicircular canal of pigeons by caloric stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Yoshiro; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Satoru

    Still now several hypotheses about the mechanisms of the caloric nystagmus have been in conclusive. In this study we confirmed the convection effect and the volume change effect of the endolymph in horizontal semicircular canal following the caloric stimulation using pigeons ( Columba livia). Although the direction of the caloric nystagmus depended on the head position and the stimulus site of calorization, the caloric nystagmus disappeared after plugging of horizontal semicircular canal. On the other hand, the ampulla pressure increased by cold calorization and decreased by hot calorization and these pressure changes had no relation to the head position. These results show that the main role of the mechanisms of the caloric nystagmus under 1G is the convection effect but the volume change effect may act on the caloric nystagmus not only under 1G but also under microgravity.

  16. Labyrinth and cerebral-spinal fluid pressure changes in guinea pigs and monkeys during simulated zero G

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, D. E.

    1977-01-01

    This study was undertaken to explore the hypothesis that shifts of body fluids from the legs and torso toward the head contribute to the motion sickness experienced by astronauts and cosmonauts. The shifts in body fluids observed during zero-G exposure were simulated by elevating guinea pigs' and monkeys' torsos and hindquarters. Cerebral-spinal fluid pressure was recorded from a transducer located in a brain ventricle; labyrinth fluid pressure was recorded from a pipette cemented in a hole in a semicircular canal. An anticipated divergence in cerebral-spinal fluid pressure and labyrinth fluid pressure during torso elevation was not observed. The results of this study do not support a fluid shift mechanism of zero-G-induced motion sickness. However, a more complete test of the fluid shift mechanism would be obtained if endolymph and perilymph pressure changes were determined separately; we have been unable to perform this test to date.

  17. How to Bury the Dead

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anttonen, Tommi; Belevich, Ilya; Kirjavainen, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Hair cell death is a major cause of hearing impairment. Preservation of surface barrier upon hair cell loss is critical to prevent leakage of potassium-rich endolymph into the organ of Corti and to prevent expansion of cellular damage. Understanding of wound healing in this cytoarchitecturally...... complex organ requires ultrastructural 3D visualization. Powered by the serial block-face scanning electron microscopy, we penetrate into the cell biological mechanisms in the acute response of outer hair cells and glial-like Deiters' cells to ototoxic trauma in vivo. We show that Deiters' cells function...... as phagocytes. Upon trauma, their phalangeal processes swell and the resulting close cellular contacts allow engulfment of apoptotic cell debris. Apical domains of dying hair cells are eliminated from the inner ear sensory epithelia, an event thought to depend on supporting cells' actomyosin contractile...

  18. An Interstitial Network of Podoplanin-Expressing Cells in the Human Endolymphatic Duct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayerl, Christina; Rubin, Kristofer; Wick, Georg; Rask-Andersen, Helge

    2006-01-01

    The human endolymphatic duct (ED) with encompassing interstitial connective tissue (CT) is believed to be important for endolymph resorption and fluid pressure regulation of the inner ear. The periductal CT cells are interconnected via numerous cellular extensions, but do not form vessel structures. Here we report that the periductal CT is populated by two distinct cell phenotypes; one expressing podoplanin, a protein otherwise found on lymph endothelia and on epithelia involved in fluid fluxes, and a second expressing a fibroblast marker. A majority of the interstitial cells expressed podoplanin but not the lymphatic endothelial cell markers hyaluronan receptor (LYVE-1) or vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-3 (VEGFR-3). The fibroblast marker positive cells were found close to the ED epithelium. In the mid- and distal parts of the ED, these cells were enriched under folded epithelia. Furthermore, subepithelial CT cells were found to express activated platelet derived growth factor (PDGF)-β receptors. Cultured CT cells from human inner ear periductal and perisaccular explant tissues were identified as fibroblasts. These cells compacted a three-dimensional collagen lattice by a process that could be promoted by PDGF-BB, a factor involved in interstitial fluid pressure regulation. Our results are compatible with the notion that the periductal CT cells are involved in the regulation of inner ear fluid pressure. By active compaction of the periductal CT and by the formation of villous structures, the CT cells could modulate fluid fluxes over the ED epithelium as well as the longitudinal flow of endolymph in the ED. PMID:16408168

  19. SLC4A11 Prevents Osmotic Imbalance Leading to Corneal Endothelial Dystrophy, Deafness, and Polyuria*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gröger, Nicole; Fröhlich, Henning; Maier, Hannes; Olbrich, Andrea; Kostin, Sawa; Braun, Thomas; Boettger, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Maintenance of ion concentration gradients is essential for the function of many organs, including the kidney, the cornea, and the inner ear. Ion concentrations and fluid content in the cornea are regulated by endothelial cells that separate the collagenous avascular corneal stroma from the anterior eye chamber. Failure to maintain correct ion concentrations leads to swelling and destruction of the cornea. In the inner ear, the stria vascularis is responsible for generating proper ion concentrations in the endolymph, which is essential for hearing. Mutations of SLC4A11 in humans lead to syndromes associated with corneal dystrophy and perceptive deafness. The molecular mechanisms underlying these symptoms are poorly understood, impeding therapeutic interventions. The ion transporter SLC4A11 mediates sodium-dependent transport of borate as well as flux of sodium and hydroxyl ions in vitro. Here, we show that SLC4A11 is expressed in the endothelial cells of the cornea where it prevents severe morphological changes of the cornea caused by increased sodium chloride concentrations in the stroma. In the inner ear, SLC4A11 is located in fibrocytes underlying the stria vascularis. Loss of SLC4A11 leads to morphological changes in the fibrocytes and deafness. We demonstrate that SLC4A11 is essential for the generation of the endocochlear potential but not for regulation of potassium concentrations in the endolymph. In the kidney, SLC4A11 is expressed in the thin descending limb of Henle loop. SLC4A11 is essential for urinary concentration, suggesting that SLC4A11 participates in the countercurrent multiplication that concentrates urine in the kidney medulla. PMID:20185830

  20. Regulation of Fn14 Receptor and NF-κB Underlies Inflammation in Meniere’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidia Frejo

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Meniere’s disease (MD is a rare disorder characterized by episodic vertigo, sensorineural hearing loss, tinnitus, and aural fullness. It is associated with a fluid imbalance between the secretion of endolymph in the cochlear duct and its reabsorption into the subarachnoid space, leading to an accumulation of endolymph in the inner ear. Epidemiological evidence, including familial aggregation, indicates a genetic contribution and a consistent association with autoimmune diseases (AD. We conducted a case–control study in two phases using an immune genotyping array in a total of 420 patients with bilateral MD and 1,630 controls. We have identified the first locus, at 6p21.33, suggesting an association with bilateral MD [meta-analysis leading signal rs4947296, OR = 2.089 (1.661–2.627; p = 1.39 × 10−09]. Gene expression profiles of homozygous genotype-selected peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs demonstrated that this region is a trans-expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL in PBMCs. Signaling analysis predicted several tumor necrosis factor-related pathways, the TWEAK/Fn14 pathway being the top candidate (p = 2.42 × 10−11. This pathway is involved in the modulation of inflammation in several human AD, including multiple sclerosis, systemic lupus erythematosus, or rheumatoid arthritis. In vitro studies with genotype-selected lymphoblastoid cells from patients with MD suggest that this trans-eQTL may regulate cellular proliferation in lymphoid cells through the TWEAK/Fn14 pathway by increasing the translation of NF-κB. Taken together; these findings suggest that the carriers of the risk genotype may develop an NF-κB-mediated inflammatory response in MD.

  1. Gentamicin concentration gradients in scala tympani perilymph following systemic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Hartmut; Salt, Alec N; Schumacher, Ulrike; Plontke, Stefan K

    2013-01-01

    It has been shown in prior studies that round window membrane (RWM) application of gentamicin produced a robust basal-apical concentration gradient in the perilymph of scala tympani (ST) with peak concentrations in the basal turn of ST. These gradients potentially contribute to the clinical efficacy and safety of intratympanic gentamicin applications for the treatment of Ménière's disease. The present study aimed to establish the distribution of gentamicin along ST perilymph after systemic applications. Gentamicin sulfate was applied intravenously in the amounts of 100, 300 and 600 mg/kg body weight (BW) over a period of 3 h or as a 300 mg/kg BW subcutaneous bolus injection. At 3 and 5 h after the start of the application perilymph of ST was aspirated from the cochlea apex of the right and left cochlea, respectively, and 10 sequential 1-µl perilymph samples from the apex of each cochlea were quantitatively analyzed using a fluorescence polarization immunoassay. In contrast to local RWM delivery, systemic application of gentamicin resulted in the highest perilymph levels in the apex of the cochlea with decreasing concentrations towards the basal regions of ST. The absolute gentamicin concentrations increased with the amount of drug applied and time before sampling. While it is likely that the basal-apical gradient measured after local drug applications to the round window niche is the result of the direct uptake of drugs into the perilymph of the ST, distribution by diffusion and a very low perilymph flow towards the cochlear apex, computer simulations suggested that the apical-basal gradient observed with these systemic applications can be explained by higher entry rates of gentamicin in the apex compared to the basal turns of the cochlea. It is also possible that gentamicin enters perilymph indirectly from the blood via the endolymph. In this case the faster kinetics in apical turns could be due to the smaller cross-sectional area of ST relative to endolymph in

  2. Mechanical properties and motion of the cupula of the human semicircular canal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selva, Pierre; Oman, Charles M; Stone, Howard A

    2009-01-01

    The mathematical model for the dynamics of the cupula-endolymph system of the inner ear semicircular canal, as elaborated by numerous investigators, remains a foundational tool in all of vestibular physiology. Most models represent the cupula as a linear spring-like element of stiffness K=DeltaP/DeltaV, where DeltaV is the volume displaced upon application of a pressure difference DeltaP. The parameter K directly influences the long time constant of the cupula-endolymph system. Given estimates of K based on experiments, we use thick and thin bending membrane theory, and also finite-element simulations based on more realistic cupula morphologies, to estimate the human cupula's Young's modulus E approximately 5.4 Pa. We show that for a model morphology, thick bending membrane theory and finite-element predictions are in good agreement, and conclude that the morphology of the attachment of the cupula to the slope of the crista should not greatly influence the volume displacement. We note, however, that other biological materials with very low E are hydrogels that have significant viscoelastic properties. Experiments to directly measure E and investigate potential viscoelastic behavior ultimately may be needed. In addition, based on experimental images we study two other different shapes for the cupula and quantify their impact on the deflection of the cupula. We also use a three-dimensional finite-element model to analyze both the shear strain distribution and its time evolution near the sensory epithelium. We conclude that stimulation of sensory hair cells probably begins at the centre of the crista and spreads toward the periphery of the cupula and down the sides of the crista. Thus, spatio-temporal variations in the shearing stimulus are predicted to impact subsequent transduction and encoding. Finally, modeling the fluid-filled vertical channels believed to lie within the cupula, we investigate the impact of different tube diameters on the transverse displacement

  3. Molecular cloning and evolutionary analysis of the GJA1 (connexin43) gene from bats (Chiroptera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Li, Gang; Wang, Jinhong; Ye, Shaohui; Jones, Gareth; Zhang, Shuyi

    2009-04-01

    Gap junction protein connexin43 (Cx43), encoded by the GJA1 gene, is the most abundant connexin in the cardiovascular system and was reported as a crucial factor maintaining cardiac electrical conduction, as well as having a very important function in facilitating the recycling of potassium ions from hair cells in the cochlea back into the cochlear endolymph during auditory transduction processes. In mammals, bats are the only taxon possessing powered flight, placing exceptional demand on many organismal processes. To meet the demands of flying, the hearts of bats show many specialties. Moreover, ultrasonic echolocation allows bat species to orientate and often detect and locate food in darkness. In this study, we cloned the full-length coding region of GJA1 gene from 12 different species of bats and obtained orthologous sequences from other mammals. We used the maximum likelihood method to analyse the evolution of GJA1 gene in mammals and the lineage of bats. Our results showed this gene is much conserved in mammals, as well as in bats' lineage. Compared with other mammals, we found one private amino acid substitution shared by bats, which is located on the inner loop domain, as well as some species-specific amino acid substitutions. The evolution rate analyses showed the signature of purifying selection on not only different classification level lineages but also the different domains and amino acid residue sites of this gene. Also, we suggested that GJA1 gene could be used as a good molecular marker to do the phylogenetic reconstruction.

  4. Xyloside primed glycosaminoglycans alter hair bundle micromechanical coupling and synaptic transmission: Pharmacokinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holman, Holly A.; Nguyen, Lynn Y. [Bioengineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Tran, Vy M.; Arungundram, Sailaja; Kalita, Mausam [Medicinal Chemistry, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Kuberan, Balagurunathan [Medicinal Chemistry, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Neuroscience Program, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Rabbitt, Richard D. [Bioengineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Neuroscience Program, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Otolaryngology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, Massachusetts (United States)

    2015-12-31

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are ubiquitous in the inner ear, and disorders altering their structure or production often result in debilitating hearing and balance deficits. The specific mechanisms responsible for loss of hair-cell function are not well understood. We recently reported that introduction of a novel BODIPY conjugated xyloside (BX) into the endolymph primes fluorescent GAGs in vivo [6, 15]. Confocal and two-photon fluorescence imaging revealed rapid turnover and assembly of a glycocalyx enveloping the kinocilia and extending into the cupula, a structure that presumably serves as a mechanical link between the hair bundle and the cupula. Extracellular fluorescence was also observed around the basolateral surface of hair cells and surrounding afferent nerve projections into the crista. Single unit afferent recordings during mechanical hair bundle stimulation revealed temporary interruption of synaptic transmission following BX administration followed by recovery, demonstrating an essential role for GAGs in function of the hair cell synapse. In the present work we present a pharmacokinetic model to quantify the time course of BX primed GAG production and turnover in the ear.

  5. Xyloside primed glycosaminoglycans alter hair bundle micromechanical coupling and synaptic transmission: Pharmacokinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holman, Holly A.; Nguyen, Lynn Y.; Tran, Vy M.; Arungundram, Sailaja; Kalita, Mausam; Kuberan, Balagurunathan; Rabbitt, Richard D.

    2015-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are ubiquitous in the inner ear, and disorders altering their structure or production often result in debilitating hearing and balance deficits. The specific mechanisms responsible for loss of hair-cell function are not well understood. We recently reported that introduction of a novel BODIPY conjugated xyloside (BX) into the endolymph primes fluorescent GAGs in vivo [6, 15]. Confocal and two-photon fluorescence imaging revealed rapid turnover and assembly of a glycocalyx enveloping the kinocilia and extending into the cupula, a structure that presumably serves as a mechanical link between the hair bundle and the cupula. Extracellular fluorescence was also observed around the basolateral surface of hair cells and surrounding afferent nerve projections into the crista. Single unit afferent recordings during mechanical hair bundle stimulation revealed temporary interruption of synaptic transmission following BX administration followed by recovery, demonstrating an essential role for GAGs in function of the hair cell synapse. In the present work we present a pharmacokinetic model to quantify the time course of BX primed GAG production and turnover in the ear

  6. Effect of lentiviruses carrying enhanced green fluorescent protein injected into the scala media through a cochleostomy in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yan; Fu, Yong; Liu, Shaosheng; Xia, Guihua; Pan, Song

    2013-01-01

    The purposes of the current study were to assess the feasibility of post-auricular microinjection of lentiviruses carrying enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) into the scala media through cochleostomies in rats, determine the expression of viral gene in the cochlea, and record the post-operative changes in the number and auditory function of cochlear hair cells (HCs). Healthy rats were randomly divided into two groups. The left ears of the animals in group I were injected with lentivirus carrying EGFP (n=10) via scala media lateral wall cochleostomies, and the left ears of the animals in group II were similarly injected with artificial endolymph (n=10). Prior to and 30 days post-injection, auditory function was assessed with click-auditory brainstem response (ABR) testing, EGFP expression was determined with cochlear frozen sections under fluorescence microscopy, and survival of HCs was estimated based on whole mount preparations. Thirty days after surgery, click-ABR testing revealed that there were significant differences in the auditory function, EGFP expression, and survival of HCs in the left ears before and after surgery in the same rats from each group. In group I, EGFP was noted in the strial marginal cells of the scala media, the organ of Corti, spiral nerves, and spiral ganglion cells. Lentiviruses were successfully introduced into the scala media through cochleostomies in rats, and the EGFP reporter gene was efficiently expressed in the organ of Corti, spiral nerves, and spiral ganglion cells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The sense of balance in humans: Structural features of otoconia and their response to linear acceleration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rüdiger Kniep

    Full Text Available We explored the functional role of individual otoconia within the otolith system of mammalians responsible for the detection of linear accelerations and head tilts in relation to the gravity vector. Details of the inner structure and the shape of intact human and artificial otoconia were studied using environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM, including decalcification by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA to discriminate local calcium carbonate density. Considerable differences between the rhombohedral faces of human and artificial otoconia already indicate that the inner architecture of otoconia is not consistent with the point group -3m. This is clearly confirmed by decalcified otoconia specimen which are characterized by a non-centrosymmetric volume distribution of the compact 3+3 branches. This structural evidence for asymmetric mass distribution was further supported by light microscopy in combination with a high speed camera showing the movement of single otoconia specimen (artificial specimen under gravitational influence within a viscous medium (artificial endolymph. Moreover, the response of otoconia to linear acceleration forces was investigated by particle dynamics simulations. Both, time-resolved microscopy and computer simulations of otoconia acceleration show that the dislocation of otoconia include significant rotational movement stemming from density asymmetry. Based on these findings, we suggest an otolith membrane expansion/stiffening mechanism for enhanced response to linear acceleration transmitted to the vestibular hair cells.

  8. Separate visualization of endolymphatic space, perilymphatic space and bone by a single pulse sequence; 3D-inversion recovery imaging utilizing real reconstruction after intratympanic Gd-DTPA administration at 3 tesla

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naganawa, Shinji; Satake, Hiroko; Kawamura, Minako; Fukatsu, Hiroshi; Sone, Michihiko; Nakashima, Tsutomu

    2008-01-01

    Twenty-four hours after intratympanic administration of gadolinium contrast material (Gd), the Gd was distributed mainly in the perilymphatic space. Three-dimensional FLAIR can differentiate endolymphatic space from perilymphatic space, but not from surrounding bone. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether 3D inversion-recovery turbo spin echo (3D-IR TSE) with real reconstruction could separate the signals of perilymphatic space (positive value), endolymphatic space (negative value) and bone (near zero) by setting the inversion time between the null point of Gd-containing perilymph fluid and that of the endolymph fluid without Gd. Thirteen patients with clinically suspected endolymphatic hydrops underwent intratympanic Gd injection and were scanned at 3 T. A 3D FLAIR and 3D-IR TSE with real reconstruction were obtained. In all patients, low signal of endolymphatic space in the labyrinth on 3D FLAIR was observed in the anatomically appropriate position, and it showed negative signal on 3D-IR TSE. The low signal area of surrounding bone on 3D FLAIR showed near zero signal on 3D-IR TSE. Gd-containing perilymphatic space showed high signal on 3D-IR TSE. In conclusion, by optimizing the inversion time, endolymphatic space, perilymphatic space and surrounding bone can be separately visualized on a single image using a 3D-IR TSE with real reconstruction. (orig.)

  9. Structural properties of the intrinsically disordered, multiple calcium ion-binding otolith matrix macromolecule-64 (OMM-64).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poznar, Monika; Hołubowicz, Rafał; Wojtas, Magdalena; Gapiński, Jacek; Banachowicz, Ewa; Patkowski, Adam; Ożyhar, Andrzej; Dobryszycki, Piotr

    2017-11-01

    Fish otoliths are calcium carbonate biominerals that are involved in hearing and balance sensing. An organic matrix plays a crucial role in their formation. Otolith matrix macromolecule-64 (OMM-64) is a highly acidic, calcium-binding protein (CBP) found in rainbow trout otoliths. It is a component of high-molecular-weight aggregates, which influence the size, shape and polymorph of calcium carbonate in vitro. In this study, a protocol for the efficient expression and purification of OMM-64 was developed. For the first time, the complete structural characteristics of OMM-64 were described. Various biophysical methods were combined to show that OMM-64 occurs as an intrinsically disordered monomer. Under denaturing conditions (pH, temperature) OMM-64 exhibits folding propensity. It was determined that OMM-64 binds approximately 61 calcium ions with millimolar affinity. The folding-unfolding experiments showed that calcium ions induced the collapse of OMM-64. The effect of other counter ions present in trout endolymph on OMM-64 conformational changes was studied. The significance of disordered properties of OMM-64 and the possible function of this protein is discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Survival of partially differentiated mouse embryonic stem cells in the scala media of the guinea pig cochlea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrand, Michael S; Dahl, Hans-Henrik M; Hardman, Jennifer; Coleman, Bryony; Shepherd, Robert K; de Silva, Michelle G

    2005-12-01

    The low regenerative capacity of the hair cells of the mammalian inner ear is a major obstacle for functional recovery following sensorineural hearing loss. A potential treatment is to replace damaged tissue by transplantation of stem cells. To test this approach, undifferentiated and partially differentiated mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells were delivered into the scala media of the deafened guinea pig cochlea. Transplanted cells survived in the scala media for a postoperative period of at least nine weeks, evidenced by histochemical and direct fluorescent detection of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). Transplanted cells were discovered near the spiral ligament and stria vascularis in the endolymph fluid of the scala media. In some cases, cells were observed close to the damaged organ of Corti structure. There was no evidence of significant immunological rejection of the implanted ES cells despite the absence of immunosuppression. Our surgical approach allowed efficient delivery of ES cells to the scala media while preserving the delicate structures of the cochlea. This is the first report of the survival of partially differentiated ES cells in the scala media of the mammalian cochlea, and it provides support for the potential of cell-based therapies for sensorineural hearing impairment.

  11. Role of endolymphatic anion transport in forskolin-induced Cl- activity increase of scala media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitano, I; Mori, N; Matsunaga, T

    1995-03-01

    To determine the role of anion transport in the forskolin-induced Cl- increase of scala media (SM), effects of forskolin on the EP (endocochlear potential) and Cl- activity (ACl) in SM were examined with double-barrelled Cl(-)-selective microelectrodes. The experiments were carried out on guinea pig cochleae, using a few anion transport inhibitors: IAA-94 for a Cl- channel blocker, bumetanide (BU) for an Na+/K+/2Cl- cotransport blocker, and SITS and DIDS for Cl-/HCO3- exchange blockers. The application of forskolin (200 microM) into scala vestibuli (SV) caused a 20 mEq increase of endolymphatic ACl and a 15 mV elevation of EP, and IAA-94 with forskolin completely abolished these responses. Although each application of BU, SITS or DIDS did not completely suppress EP elevation, the concurrent application of these inhibitors completely suppressed EP with endolymphatic ACl increase. The results indicate the involvement of Cl- channels, Na+/K+/2Cl- cotransport and Cl-/HCO3- exchange in forskolin-induced increase of ACl and EP. The role of adenylate cyclase activation and Cl- transport in endolymph homeostasis was discussed.

  12. Virally mediated Kcnq1 gene replacement therapy in the immature scala media restores hearing in a mouse model of human Jervell and Lange-Nielsen deafness syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Qing; Wang, Jianjun; Li, Qi; Kim, Yeunjung; Zhou, Binfei; Wang, Yunfeng; Li, Huawei; Lin, Xi

    2015-08-01

    Mutations in the potassium channel subunit KCNQ1 cause the human severe congenital deafness Jervell and Lange-Nielsen (JLN) syndrome. We applied a gene therapy approach in a mouse model of JLN syndrome (Kcnq1(-/-) mice) to prevent the development of deafness in the adult stage. A modified adeno-associated virus construct carrying a Kcnq1 expression cassette was injected postnatally (P0-P2) into the endolymph, which resulted in Kcnq1 expression in most cochlear marginal cells where native Kcnq1 is exclusively expressed. We also found that extensive ectopic virally mediated Kcnq1 transgene expression did not affect normal cochlear functions. Examination of cochlear morphology showed that the collapse of the Reissner's membrane and degeneration of hair cells (HCs) and cells in the spiral ganglia were corrected in Kcnq1(-/-) mice. Electrophysiological tests showed normal endocochlear potential in treated ears. In addition, auditory brainstem responses showed significant hearing preservation in the injected ears, ranging from 20 dB improvement to complete correction of the deafness phenotype. Our results demonstrate the first successful gene therapy treatment for gene defects specifically affecting the function of the stria vascularis, which is a major site affected by genetic mutations in inherited hearing loss. © 2015 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  13. Tetramethylammonium for in vivo marking of the cross-sectional area of the scala media in the guinea pig cochlea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salt, A N; DeMott, J

    1992-01-01

    A physiologic technique was developed to measure endolymphatic cross-sectional area in vivo using tetramethylammonium (TMA) as a volume marker. The technique was evaluated in guinea pigs as an animal model. In the method, the cochlea was exposed surgically and TMA was injected into endolymph of the second turn at a constant rate by iontophoresis. The concentration of TMA was monitored during and after the injection using ion-selective electrodes. Cross-section estimates derived from the TMA concentration measurements were compared in normal animals and animals in which endolymphatic hydrops had been induced by ablation of the endolymphatic duct and sac 8 weeks earlier. The method demonstrated a mean increase in cross-sectional area of 258% in the hydropic group. Individually measured area values were compared with action potential threshold shifts and the magnitude of the endocochlear potential (EP). Hydropic animals typically showed an increase in threshold to 2 kHz stimuli and a decrease in EP. However, the degree of threshold shift or EP decrease did not correlate well with the degree of hydrops present.

  14. How to generate a sound-localization map in fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hemmen, J. Leo

    2015-03-01

    How sound localization is represented in the fish brain is a research field largely unbiased by theoretical analysis and computational modeling. Yet, there is experimental evidence that the axes of particle acceleration due to underwater sound are represented through a map in the midbrain of fish, e.g., in the torus semicircularis of the rainbow trout (Wubbels et al. 1997). How does such a map arise? Fish perceive pressure gradients by their three otolithic organs, each of which comprises a dense, calcareous, stone that is bathed in endolymph and attached to a sensory epithelium. In rainbow trout, the sensory epithelia of left and right utricle lie in the horizontal plane and consist of hair cells with equally distributed preferred orientations. We model the neuronal response of this system on the basis of Schuijf's vector detection hypothesis (Schuijf et al. 1975) and introduce a temporal spike code of sound direction, where optimality of hair cell orientation θj with respect to the acceleration direction θs is mapped onto spike phases via a von-Mises distribution. By learning to tune in to the earliest synchronized activity, nerve cells in the midbrain generate a map under the supervision of a locally excitatory, yet globally inhibitory visual teacher. Work done in collaboration with Daniel Begovic. Partially supported by BCCN - Munich.

  15. [A comparative study on efficacy of glucocorticoids, mineralocorticoids and vasoactive drugs on reversing hearing loss in patients suffering idiopathic sensorineural cochlear hypoacusis. A preliminary clinical trial].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos-Bañales, Eugenia María; López-Campos, Daniel; de Serdio-Arias, José Luis; Esteban-Rodriguez, J; García-Sáinz, Mar; Muñoz-Cortés, Álvaro; López-Aguado, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Sensory neural hearing loss (SNHL) is a disorder characterised by an important deterioration of the auditory function. Re-establishing normal ion homeostasis of the endolymph could be related to hearing recovery and it might be mediated by mineralocorticoids. The main purpose of this preliminary, randomized controlled clinical trial was assessing the recovery of idiopathic sensory neural cochlear hearing loss (SNHL) by comparing the efficacy of 2 types of steroids versus vasodilators. The 3-month intervention involved 70 patients, allocated into 4 different groups: a control with no medication, consisting of 14 patients (8 men and 6 women); a vasodilator group of 21 patients (11 men and 10 women); a glucocorticoid group with 16 patients (10 men and 6 women); and a mineralocorticoid therapy group, consisting of 19 patients (11 men and 8 women). The level of hearing loss and its topography were estimated using Liminal Tone Audiometry (LTA) and Auditory Brainstem Response (ABR). Our research found overall greater efficacy of mineralocorticoids versus glucocorticoids and vasodilators. There was better response in women than in men and it was higher from the left ear, regardless of patient gender. The hearing gain was significantly superior in the mineralocorticoid group, followed by the glucocorticoid group. However, the responses to vasodilators were lesser and of low statistical significance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Patología Cérvico-Facial. All rights reserved.

  16. Patients with vestibular loss, tullio phenomenon, and pressure-induced nystagmus: vestibular atelectasis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenzel, Angela; Ward, Bryan K; Schubert, Michael C; Kheradmand, Amir; Zee, David S; Mantokoudis, Georgios; Carey, John Patrick

    2014-06-01

    To propose an etiology for a syndrome of bilateral vestibular hypofunction and sound and/or pressure-evoked eye movements with normal hearing thresholds. Retrospective case series. Tertiary care referral center. Four patients with bilateral vestibular hypofunction, sound and/or pressure-evoked nystagmus and normal hearing thresholds were identified over a 3-year period. No evidence of other known vestibular disorders was identified. None of these patients presented with a history of exposure to toxins, radiation, aminoglycosides or chemotherapy; head trauma; or a family history of inherited vestibular loss. All patients underwent high-resolution CT scan of the temporal bones to evaluate for labyrinthine dehiscence. Additionally, all individuals underwent audiometric testing to ANSI standards, vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP) testing using either click stimulus cervical VEMPs (cVEMPs), or tone burst ocular VEMPs (oVEMPs). Bithermal caloric stimulation was used to measure horizontal semicircular canal function, with either videonystagmography (VNG) or electronystagmography (ENG) to record eye movements. Individual responses of each of the 6 semicircular canals (SCC) to rapid head rotations were tested with the bedside head impulse test. We identified 4 patients with a combination of bilateral vestibular hypofunction and sound and/or pressure-induced eye movements, normal-hearing thresholds and no evidence for any other vestibular disorder. We suggest that this unique combination of symptoms should be considered as the clinical presentation of vestibular atelectasis, which has been previously described histologically as collapse of the endolymph-containing portions of the labyrinth.

  17. Computed tomography of the petrous bone in otosclerosis and Meniere's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groot, J.A.M. de.

    1987-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to examine if, in the case of otosclerosis and Meniere's disease, one could obtain more information with high resolution computer tomography than with conventional polytomography. In the first part of this thesis a brief survey of some principles of computer tomography is given and a computer tomographic atlas of the normal petrous bone in the otoradiologic planes used in this study. In the introduction of the second part some aspects of otosclerose are discussed (definition, clinical aspects). Subsequently a treatment is given of a part of the histopathology referring to the otospongiotic and otosclerotic changes in the labyrinthine capsule. A survey is given of preceding studies on the petrous bone in the case of otosclerosis; in these studies mostly classical planigraphic techniques were employed. In the third part some general aspects of Meniere's disease are discussed: definition, incidence, clinical aspects and pathophysiology. It is assumed that the symptoms of Meniere's disease are caused by an overpressure in the endolymphatic areas of the labyrinthum ('hydrops'), however till now a proof for this is still not given. The ductus endolympathicus, which passes through a channel in the petrous bone (the vestibular aqueduct), plays a role in the drainage of endolymph. Stagnation of this drainage could cause hydrops. (Auth.)

  18. Driven equilibrium (drive) MR imaging of the cranial nerves V-VIII: comparison with the T2-weighted 3D TSE sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciftci, E. E-mail: eciftcis7@hotmail.com; Anik, Yonca; Arslan, Arzu; Akansel, Gur; Sarisoy, Tahsin; Demirci, Ali

    2004-09-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of the driven equilibrium radio frequency reset pulse (DRIVE) on image quality and nerve detection when used in adjunction with T2-weighted 3D turbo spin-echo (TSE) sequence. Materials and methods: Forty-five patients with cranial nerve symptoms referable to the cerebellopontine angle (CPA) were examined using a T2-weighted 3D TSE pulse sequence with and without DRIVE. MR imaging was performed on a 1.5-T MRI scanner. In addition to the axial resource images, reformatted oblique sagittal, oblique coronal and maximum intensity projection (MIP) images of the inner ear were evaluated. The nerve identification and image quality were graded for the cranial nerves V-VIII as well as inner ear structures. These structures were chosen because fluid-solid interfaces existed due to the CSF around (the cranial nerves V-VIII) or the endolymph within (the inner ear structures). Statistical analysis was performed using the Wilcoxon test. P<0.05 was considered significant. Results: The addition of the DRIVE pulse shortens the scan time by 25%. T2-weighted 3D TSE sequence with DRIVE performed slightly better than the T2-weighted 3D TSE sequence without DRIVE in identifying the individual nerves. The image quality was also slightly better with DRIVE. Conclusion: The addition of the DRIVE pulse to the T2-weighted 3D TSE sequence is preferable when imaging the cranial nerves surrounded by the CSF, or fluid-filled structures because of shorter scan time and better image quality due to reduced flow artifacts.

  19. Avian dark cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, J.; Plymale, D. R.; Shepard, D. L.; Hara, H.; Garry, Robert F.; Yoshihara, T.; Zenner, Hans-Peter; Bolton, M.; Kalkeri, R.; Fermin, Cesar D.

    2002-01-01

    Dark cells (DCs) of mammalian and non-mammalian species help to maintain the homeostasis of the inner ear fluids in vivo. Although the avian cochlea is straight and the mammalian cochlea is coiled, no significant difference in the morphology and/or function of mammalian and avian DCs has been reported. The mammalian equivalent of avian DCs are marginal cells and are located in the stria vascularis along a bony sheet. Avian DCs hang free from the tegmentum vasculosum (TV) of the avian lagena between the perilymph and endolymph. Frame averaging was used to image the fluorescence emitted by several fluorochromes applied to freshly isolated dark cells (iDCs) from chickens (Gallus domesticus) inner ears. The viability of iDCs was monitored via trypan blue exclusion at each isolation step. Sodium Green, BCECF-AM, Rhodamine 123 and 9-anthroyl ouabain molecules were used to test iDC function. These fluorochromes label iDCs ionic transmembrane trafficking function, membrane electrogenic potentials and Na+/K+ ATPase pump's activity. Na+/K+ ATPase pump sites, were also evaluated by the p-nitrophenyl phosphatase reaction. These results suggest that iDCs remain viable for several hours after isolation without special culturing requirements and that the number and functional activity of Na+/K+ ATPase pumps in the iDCs were indistinguishable from in vivo DCs. Primary cultures of freshly iDCs were successfully maintained for 28 days in plastic dishes with RPMI 1640 culture medium. The preparation of iDCs overcomes the difficulty of DCs accessability in vivo and the unavoidable contamination that rupturing the inner ear microenvironments induces.

  20. Diagnostic value of three-dimensional fluid-attenuated inversion recovery MR imaging after intratympanic administration of contrast media in Meniere's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Honglu; Zhang Daogong; Wang Guangbin; Fan Zhaomin; Bai Xue; Guo Lijun; Man Xiaoni

    2012-01-01

    Objective: After intratympanic gadolinium administration through the tympanic membrane, three-dimensional fluid-attenuated inversion recovery magnetic resonance imaging (3D-FLAIR MRI) was performed to evaluate endolymphatic visualization and its diagnostic value in Meniere's disease. Methods: Twenty-four hours after intratympanic gadolinium administration through the tympanic membrane, 19 patients with unilateral Meniere's disease diagnosed clinically underwent 3D-FLAIR and 3D-Balance-FFE imaging at 3.0 T MR scanner. The enhanced imaging of perilymphatic space in bilateral cochlea, vestibular and (or) canal were observed. Scala tympani and scala vestibule of bilateral cochlear basal turn were scored respectively. The enhanced range of bilateral vestibule and the signal intensity ratio (SIR) between the vestibule and the brain stem were measured. Wilcoxon tests and paired t tests were used. Results: The gadolinium appeared in almost all parts of the perilymph in cochlea,vestibular and (or) canal, so the endolymphatic space was clearly visualized on 3D-FLAIR imaging. The score of scala vestibuli between the affected side (3 cases scored 2, 9 cases scored 1, 7 cases scored 0) and the healthy side (15 cases scored 2, 2 cases scored 1, 2 cases scored 0) were significantly different (U=3.090, P<0.05). The area of enhanced vestibular were (5.77 ± 2.33) mm 2 and (8.11 ± 3.32) mm 2 for the affected side and the healthy side, which were significantly different (U=3.090, P<0.05 and t=2.638, P<0.05). Conclusions: According to 3D-Balance-FFE MRI and the enhancement of perilymphatic space, 3D-FLAIR MRI with intratympanic gadolinium injection through the tympanic membrane can be used to show the border between the perilymph and the endolymph and confirm endolymphatic hydrops, thus providing radiographic evidence for the diagnosis of Meniere's disease. (authors)

  1. Ménière's Disease: Molecular Analysis of Aquaporins 2, 3 and Potassium Channel KCNE1 Genes in Brazilian Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Karen de Carvalho; Sartorato, Edi Lúcia; da Silva-Costa, Sueli M; de Macedo Adamov, Nadya Soares; Ganança, Fernando Freitas

    2016-09-01

    Ménière's disease (MD) is a complex disease of unknown etiology characterized by a symptomatic tetrad of vertigo, hearing loss, tinnitus, and aural fullness. In addition to factors related to homeostasis of the inner ear, genetic factors have been implicated in its pathophysiology, including genes related to the transport of water and ionic composition maintenance of the endolymph, such as the aquaporin genes AQP2 and AQP3, and the potassium channel gene KCNE1. The aim of this study was to identify polymorphisms of these genes and determine their association with clinical characteristics of patients with MD. A case-control genetic association study was carried out, including 30 patients with definite Ménière's disease and 30 healthy controls. The coding regions of the target genes were amplified from blood samples by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), followed by direct sequencing. The associations of polymorphisms with clinical characteristics were analyzed with logistic regression. Five polymorphisms were identified: rs426496 in AQP2; rs591810 in AQP3; and rs1805127, rs1805128, and rs17173510 in KCNE1. After adjustment, rs426496 was significantly associated with tinnitus during the initial crisis and with altered electronystagmography, and rs1805127 was significantly associated with nephropathy. The genetic variant rs426496 in AQP2; rs591810 in AQP3 and rs1805127, rs1805128, and rs17173510, in KCNE1 were found in patients with Ménière's disease. The polymorphism rs426496, in AQP2, is associated with tinnitus at the onset of Ménière's disease and altered electronystagmography. In addition, rs1805127, in KCNE1, is associated with the presence of nephropathy.

  2. Expression of alpha and beta subunit isoforms of Na,K-ATPase in the mouse inner ear and changes with mutations at the Wv or Sld loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, B A; Steel, K P

    1994-07-01

    Mice homozygous for mutations at the viable dominant spotting (Wv) and Steel-dickie (Sld) loci exhibit a similar phenotype which includes deafness. The auditory dysfunction derives from failure of the stria vascularis to develop normally and to generate a high positive endocochlear potential (EP). Because strial function is driven by Na,K-ATPase its expression was investigated in inner ears of Wv/Wv and Sld/Sld mice and their wild-type littermates by immunostaining with antisera against four of the enzyme's subunit isoforms. Wild-type mice from two different genetic backgrounds showed an identical distribution of subunit isoforms among inner ear transport cells. Several epithelial cell types coexpressed the alpha 1 and beta 1 subunits. Vestibular dark cells showed no reactivity for beta 1 but expressed abundant beta 2, whereas, strial marginal cells stained strongly for both beta isoforms. The only qualitative difference between mutant and wild-type mice was the absence of beta 1 subunit in marginal cells of the mutant's stria. However, it is unlikely that this difference accounts for failure of mutants to generate a high EP because the beta 1 subunit is not present in the stria vascularis of either rats or gerbils with normal EP values. Strong immunostaining for Na,K-ATPase in lateral wall fibrocytes of normal mice along with diminished immunoreactivity in the mutants supports the concept that these strategically located transport fibrocytes actively resorb K+ leaked across Reissner's membrane into scala vestibuli or effluxed from hair cells and nerves into scala tympani. It is further speculated that the resorbed K+ normally is siphoned down its concentration gradient into the intrastrial space through gap junctions between fibrocytes and strial basal and intermediate cells where it is recycled back to endolymph via marginal cells. Thus, failure of mutants to generate a positive EP could be explained by the absence of intermediate cells which may form the final

  3. High-resolution numerical model of the middle and inner ear for a detailed analysis of radio frequency absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmid, Gernot; Ueberbacher, Richard; Samaras, Theodoros; Jappel, Alexandra; Baumgartner, Wolf-Dieter; Tschabitscher, Manfred; Mazal, Peter R

    2007-01-01

    In order to enable a detailed analysis of radio frequency (RF) absorption in the human middle and inner ear organs, a numerical model of these organs was developed at a spatial resolution of 0.1 mm, based on a real human tissue sample. The dielectric properties of the liquids (perilymph and endolymph) inside the bony labyrinth were measured on samples of ten freshly deceased humans. After inserting this model into a commercially available numerical head model, FDTD-based computations for exposure scenarios with generic models of handheld devices operated close to the head in the frequency range 400-3700 MHz were carried out. For typical output power values of real handheld mobile communication devices the obtained results showed only very small amounts of absorbed RF power in the middle and inner ear organs. Highest absorption in the middle and inner ear was found for the 400 MHz irradiation. In this case, the RF power absorbed inside the labyrinth and the vestibulocochlear nerve was as low as 166 μW and 12 μW, respectively, when considering a device of 500 mW output power operated close to the ear. For typical mobile phone frequencies (900 MHz and 1850 MHz) and output power values (250 mW and 125 mW) the corresponding values of absorbed RF power were found to be more than one order of magnitude lower than the values given above. These results indicate that temperature-related biologically relevant effects on the middle and inner ear, induced by the RF emissions of typical handheld mobile communication devices, are unlikely

  4. Murine model for congenital CMV infection and hearing impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Liu

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV infection is the leading cause of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL, and SNHL is the most frequent sequela of congenital CMV infection. But the pathogenic mechanism remains unknown, and there is no ideal CMV intrauterine infection animal model to study the mechanisms by which SNHL develops. Methods We established the congenital murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV infection model by directly injecting the virus into the placenta on day 12.5 of gestation. Then, we observed the development and the MCMV congenital infection rate of the fetuses on the day they were born. Furthermore, we detected the auditory functions, the conditions of the MCMV infection, and the histological change of the inner ears of 28-day-old and 70-day-old offspring. Results Both the fetal loss rate and the teratism rate of offspring whose placentas were inoculated with MCMV increased, and their body length, head circumference, and weight decreased. The hearing level of offspring both decreased at both 28- and 70-days post birth; the 70-day-old mice developed lower hearing levels than did the 28-day old mice. No significant inflammatory changes in the cochleae of the mice were observed. MCMV DNA signals were mainly detected in the spiral ganglion neurons and the endolymph area, but not in the perilymph area. The number of neurons decreased, and their ultrastructures changed. Moreover, with age, the number of neurons dramatically decreased, and the ultrastructural lesions of neurons became much more severe. Conclusions The results suggest that the direct injection of MCMV into the placenta may efficiently cause fetal infection and disturb the intrauterine development of the fetus, and placental inoculation itself has no obvious adverse effects on offspring. The reduction in the number of spiral ganglion neurons and the ultrastructural lesions of the neurons may be the major cause of congenital CMV infection-induced progressive SNHL.

  5. Driven equilibrium (drive) MR imaging of the cranial nerves V-VIII: comparison with the T2-weighted 3D TSE sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciftci, E.; Anik, Yonca; Arslan, Arzu; Akansel, Gur; Sarisoy, Tahsin; Demirci, Ali

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of the driven equilibrium radio frequency reset pulse (DRIVE) on image quality and nerve detection when used in adjunction with T2-weighted 3D turbo spin-echo (TSE) sequence. Materials and methods: Forty-five patients with cranial nerve symptoms referable to the cerebellopontine angle (CPA) were examined using a T2-weighted 3D TSE pulse sequence with and without DRIVE. MR imaging was performed on a 1.5-T MRI scanner. In addition to the axial resource images, reformatted oblique sagittal, oblique coronal and maximum intensity projection (MIP) images of the inner ear were evaluated. The nerve identification and image quality were graded for the cranial nerves V-VIII as well as inner ear structures. These structures were chosen because fluid-solid interfaces existed due to the CSF around (the cranial nerves V-VIII) or the endolymph within (the inner ear structures). Statistical analysis was performed using the Wilcoxon test. P<0.05 was considered significant. Results: The addition of the DRIVE pulse shortens the scan time by 25%. T2-weighted 3D TSE sequence with DRIVE performed slightly better than the T2-weighted 3D TSE sequence without DRIVE in identifying the individual nerves. The image quality was also slightly better with DRIVE. Conclusion: The addition of the DRIVE pulse to the T2-weighted 3D TSE sequence is preferable when imaging the cranial nerves surrounded by the CSF, or fluid-filled structures because of shorter scan time and better image quality due to reduced flow artifacts

  6. High-resolution T2-weighted MR imaging of the inner ear using a long echo-train-length 3D fast spin-echo sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naganawa, S.; Yamakawa, K.; Fukatsu, H.; Ishigaki, T.; Nakashima, T.; Sugimoto, H.; Aoki, I.; Miyazaki, M.; Takai, H.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the value of a long echo-train-length 3D fast spin-echo (3D-FSE) sequence in visualizing the inner ear structures. Ten normal ears and 50 patient ears were imaged on a 1.5T MR unit using a head coil. Axial high-resolution T2-weighted images of the inner ear and the internal auditory canal (IAC) were obtained in 15 min. In normal ears the reliability of the visualization for the inner ear structures was evaluated on original images and the targeted maximum intensity projection (MIP) images of the labyrinth. In ten normal ears, 3D surface display (3D) images were also created and compared with MIP images. On the original images the cochlear aqueduct, the vessels in the vicinity of the IAC, and more than three branches of the cranial nerves were visualized in the IAC in all the ears. The visibility of the endolympathic duct was 80%. On the MIP images the visibility of the three semicircular canals, anterior and posterior ampulla, and of more than two turns of the cochlea was 100%. The MIP images and 3D images were almost comparable. The visibility of the endolymphatic duct was 80% in normal ears and 0% in the affected ears of the patients with Meniere's disease (p<0.001). In one patient ear a small intracanalicular tumor was depicted clearly. In conclusion, the long echo train length T2-weighted 3D-FSE sequence enables the detailed visualization of the tiny structures of the inner ear and the IAC within a clinically acceptable scan time. Furthermore, obtaining a high contrast between the soft/bony tissue and the cerebrospinal/endolymph/perilymph fluid would be of significant value in the diagnosis of the pathologic conditions around the labyrinth and the IAC. (orig.)

  7. Magnetic Vestibular Stimulation in Subjects with Unilateral Labyrinthine Disorders

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    Bryan Kevin Ward

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We recently discovered that static magnetic fields from high-strength MRI machines induce nystagmus in all normal humans, and that a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD Lorentz force, derived from ionic currents in the endolymph and pushing on the cupula, best explains this effect. Individuals with no labyrinthine function have no nystagmus. The influence of magnetic vestibular stimulation (MVS in individuals with unilateral loss of labyrinthine function is unknown and may provide insight into mechanism of MVS. These individuals should experience MVS, but with differences consistent with their residual labyrinthine function. We recorded eye movements in the static magnetic field of a 7T MRI machine in nine individuals with unilateral labyrinthine hypofunction, as determined by head impulse testing and vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP. Eye movements were recorded using infrared videooculography. Static head positions were varied in pitch with the body supine, and slow-phase eye velocity (SPV was assessed. All subjects exhibited predominantly horizontal nystagmus after entering the magnet head-first, lying supine. The SPV direction reversed when entering feet-first. Pitching chin-to-chest caused subjects to reach a null point for horizontal SPV. Right unilateral vestibular hypofunction (UVH subjects developed slow-phase-up nystagmus and left UVH subjects, slow-phase-down nystagmus. Vertical and torsional components were consistent with superior semicircular canal excitation or inhibition, respectively, of the intact ear. These findings provide compelling support for the hypothesis that MVS is a result of a Lorentz force and suggest that the function of individual structures within the labyrinth can be assessed with MVS. As a novel method of comfortable and sustained labyrinthine stimulation, MVS can provide new insights into vestibular physiology and pathophysiology.

  8. On the vertigo due to static magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mian, Omar S; Li, Yan; Antunes, Andre; Glover, Paul M; Day, Brian L

    2013-01-01

    Vertigo is sometimes experienced in and around MRI scanners. Mechanisms involving stimulation of the vestibular system by movement in magnetic fields or magnetic field spatial gradients have been proposed. However, it was recently shown that vestibular-dependent ocular nystagmus is evoked when stationary in homogenous static magnetic fields. The proposed mechanism involves Lorentz forces acting on endolymph to deflect semicircular canal (SCC) cupulae. To investigate whether vertigo arises from a similar mechanism we recorded qualitative and quantitative aspects of vertigo and 2D eye movements from supine healthy adults (n = 25) deprived of vision while pushed into the 7T static field of an MRI scanner. Exposures were variable and included up to 135s stationary at 7T. Nystagmus was mainly horizontal, persisted during long-exposures with partial decline, and reversed upon withdrawal. The dominant vertiginous perception with the head facing up was rotation in the horizontal plane (85% incidence) with a consistent direction across participants. With the head turned 90 degrees in yaw the perception did not transform into equivalent vertical plane rotation, indicating a context-dependency of the perception. During long exposures, illusory rotation lasted on average 50 s, including 42 s whilst stationary at 7T. Upon withdrawal, perception re-emerged and reversed, lasting on average 30 s. Onset fields for nystagmus and perception were significantly correlated (p<.05). Although perception did not persist as long as nystagmus, this is a known feature of continuous SSC stimulation. These observations, and others in the paper, are compatible with magnetic-field evoked-vertigo and nystagmus sharing a common mechanism. With this interpretation, response decay and reversal upon withdrawal from the field, are due to adaptation to continuous vestibular input. Although the study does not entirely exclude the possibility of mechanisms involving transient vestibular stimulation

  9. On the vertigo due to static magnetic fields.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar S Mian

    Full Text Available Vertigo is sometimes experienced in and around MRI scanners. Mechanisms involving stimulation of the vestibular system by movement in magnetic fields or magnetic field spatial gradients have been proposed. However, it was recently shown that vestibular-dependent ocular nystagmus is evoked when stationary in homogenous static magnetic fields. The proposed mechanism involves Lorentz forces acting on endolymph to deflect semicircular canal (SCC cupulae. To investigate whether vertigo arises from a similar mechanism we recorded qualitative and quantitative aspects of vertigo and 2D eye movements from supine healthy adults (n = 25 deprived of vision while pushed into the 7T static field of an MRI scanner. Exposures were variable and included up to 135s stationary at 7T. Nystagmus was mainly horizontal, persisted during long-exposures with partial decline, and reversed upon withdrawal. The dominant vertiginous perception with the head facing up was rotation in the horizontal plane (85% incidence with a consistent direction across participants. With the head turned 90 degrees in yaw the perception did not transform into equivalent vertical plane rotation, indicating a context-dependency of the perception. During long exposures, illusory rotation lasted on average 50 s, including 42 s whilst stationary at 7T. Upon withdrawal, perception re-emerged and reversed, lasting on average 30 s. Onset fields for nystagmus and perception were significantly correlated (p<.05. Although perception did not persist as long as nystagmus, this is a known feature of continuous SSC stimulation. These observations, and others in the paper, are compatible with magnetic-field evoked-vertigo and nystagmus sharing a common mechanism. With this interpretation, response decay and reversal upon withdrawal from the field, are due to adaptation to continuous vestibular input. Although the study does not entirely exclude the possibility of mechanisms involving transient

  10. Sodium selectivity of Reissner's membrane epithelial cells

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    Kim Kyunghee X

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sodium absorption by Reissner's membrane is thought to contribute to the homeostasis of the volume of cochlear endolymph. It was previously shown that the absorptive transepithelial current was blocked by amiloride and benzamil. The most commonly-observed target of these drugs is the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC, which is composed of the three subunits α-,β- and γ-ENaC. However, other less-selective cation channels have also been observed to be sensitive to benzamil and amiloride. The aim of this study was to determine whether Reissner's membrane epithelial cells could support parasensory K+ absorption via amiloride- and benzamil-sensitive electrogenic pathways. Results We determined the molecular and functional expression of candidate cation channels with gene array (GEO GSE6196, RT-PCR, and whole-cell patch clamp. Transcript expression analysis of Reissner's membrane detected no amiloride-sensitive acid-sensing ion channels (ASIC1a, ASIC2a, ASIC2b nor amiloride-sensitive cyclic-nucleotide gated channels (CNGA1, CNGA2, CNGA4, CNGB3. By contrast, α-,β- and γ-ENaC were all previously reported as present in Reissner's membrane. The selectivity of the benzamil-sensitive cation currents was observed in whole-cell patch clamp recordings under Cl--free conditions where cations were the only permeant species. The currents were carried by Na+ but not K+, and the permeability of Li+ was greater than that of Na+ in Reissner's membrane. Complete replacement of bath Na+ with the inpermeable cation NMDG+ led to the same inward current as with benzamil in a Na+ bath. Conclusions These results are consistent with the amiloride/benzamil-sensitive absorptive flux of Reissner's membrane mediated by a highly Na+-selective channel that has several key characteristics in common with αβγ-ENaC. The amiloride-sensitive pathway therefore absorbs only Na+ in this epithelium and does not provide a parasensory K+ efflux route from scala

  11. Sagittal otolith morphogenesis asymmetry in marine fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mille, T; Mahe, K; Villanueva, M C; De Pontual, H; Ernande, B

    2015-09-01

    This study investigated and compared asymmetry in sagittal otolith shape and length between left and right inner ears in four roundfish and four flatfish species of commercial interest. For each species, the effects of ontogenetic changes (individual age and total body length), sexual dimorphism (individual sex) and the otolith's location on the right or left side of the head, on the shape and length of paired otoliths (between 143 and 702 pairs according to species) were evaluated. Ontogenetic changes in otolith shape and length were observed for all species. Sexual dimorphism, either in otolith shape and length or in their ontogenetic changes, was detected for half of the species, be they round or flat. Significant directional asymmetry in otolith shape and length was detected in one roundfish species each, but its inconsistency across species and its small average amplitude (6·17% for shape and 1·99% for length) suggested that it has barely any biological relevance. Significant directional asymmetry in otolith shape and length was found for all flatfish species except otolith length for one species. Its average amplitude varied between 2·06 and 17·50% for shape and between 0·00 and 11·83% for length and increased significantly throughout ontogeny for two species, one dextral and one sinistral. The longer (length) and rounder otolith (shape) appeared to be always on the blind side whatever the species. These results suggest differential biomineralization between the blind and ocular inner ears in flatfish species that could result from perturbations of the proximal-distal gradient of otolith precursors in the endolymph and the otolith position relative to the geometry of the saccular epithelium due to body morphology asymmetry and lateralized behaviour. The fact that asymmetry never exceeded 18% even at the individual level suggests an evolutionary canalization of otolith shape symmetry to avoid negative effects on fish hearing and balance. Technically

  12. Responses of the ear to low frequency sounds, infrasound and wind turbines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salt, Alec N; Hullar, Timothy E

    2010-09-01

    Infrasonic sounds are generated internally in the body (by respiration, heartbeat, coughing, etc) and by external sources, such as air conditioning systems, inside vehicles, some industrial processes and, now becoming increasingly prevalent, wind turbines. It is widely assumed that infrasound presented at an amplitude below what is audible has no influence on the ear. In this review, we consider possible ways that low frequency sounds, at levels that may or may not be heard, could influence the function of the ear. The inner ear has elaborate mechanisms to attenuate low frequency sound components before they are transmitted to the brain. The auditory portion of the ear, the cochlea, has two types of sensory cells, inner hair cells (IHC) and outer hair cells (OHC), of which the IHC are coupled to the afferent fibers that transmit "hearing" to the brain. The sensory stereocilia ("hairs") on the IHC are "fluid coupled" to mechanical stimuli, so their responses depend on stimulus velocity and their sensitivity decreases as sound frequency is lowered. In contrast, the OHC are directly coupled to mechanical stimuli, so their input remains greater than for IHC at low frequencies. At very low frequencies the OHC are stimulated by sounds at levels below those that are heard. Although the hair cells in other sensory structures such as the saccule may be tuned to infrasonic frequencies, auditory stimulus coupling to these structures is inefficient so that they are unlikely to be influenced by airborne infrasound. Structures that are involved in endolymph volume regulation are also known to be influenced by infrasound, but their sensitivity is also thought to be low. There are, however, abnormal states in which the ear becomes hypersensitive to infrasound. In most cases, the inner ear's responses to infrasound can be considered normal, but they could be associated with unfamiliar sensations or subtle changes in physiology. This raises the possibility that exposure to the

  13. Fish otolith biomineralization process: first investigations about organic matrix and growth of Triglidae (Scorpaeniformes otoliths

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    Stefano Montanini

    2015-11-01

    influenced matrix content and its control on crystals growth and biomineralization process according to previous studies (Morales Nin, 1986; Vallisneri et al., 2014. Further investigation will be focused on comparing endolymph and otolith protein matter to related endogenous and exogenous elements with otolith growth.

  14. Effect of head pitch and roll orientations on magnetically induced vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mian, Omar S; Li, Yan; Antunes, Andre; Glover, Paul M; Day, Brian L

    2016-02-15

    Lying supine in a strong magnetic field, such as in magnetic resonance imaging scanners, can induce a perception of whole-body rotation. The leading hypothesis to explain this invokes a Lorentz force mechanism acting on vestibular endolymph that acts to stimulate semicircular canals. The hypothesis predicts that the perception of whole-body rotation will depend on head orientation in the field. Results showed that the direction and magnitude of apparent whole-body rotation while stationary in a 7 T magnetic field is influenced by head orientation. The data are compatible with the Lorentz force hypothesis of magnetic vestibular stimulation and furthermore demonstrate the operation of a spatial transformation process from head-referenced vestibular signals to Earth-referenced body motion. High strength static magnetic fields are known to induce vertigo, believed to be via stimulation of the vestibular system. The leading hypothesis (Lorentz forces) predicts that the induced vertigo should depend on the orientation of the magnetic field relative to the head. In this study we examined the effect of static head pitch (-80 to +40 deg; 12 participants) and roll (-40 to +40 deg; 11 participants) on qualitative and quantitative aspects of vertigo experienced in the dark by healthy humans when exposed to the static uniform magnetic field inside a 7 T MRI scanner. Three participants were additionally examined at 180 deg pitch and roll orientations. The effect of roll orientation on horizontal and vertical nystagmus was also measured and was found to affect only the vertical component. Vertigo was most discomforting when head pitch was around 60 deg extension and was mildest when it was around 20 deg flexion. Quantitative analysis of vertigo focused on the induced perception of horizontal-plane rotation reported online with the aid of hand-held switches. Head orientation had effects on both the magnitude and the direction of this perceived rotation. The data suggest

  15. Magnetic field effects on the vestibular system: calculation of the pressure on the cupula due to ionic current-induced Lorentz force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antunes, A; Glover, P M; Li, Y; Mian, O S; Day, B L

    2012-01-01

    Large static magnetic fields may be employed in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). At high magnetic field strengths (usually from about 3 T and above) it is possible for humans to perceive a number of effects. One such effect is mild vertigo. Recently, Roberts et al (2011 Current Biology 21 1635–40) proposed a Lorentz-force mechanism resulting from the ionic currents occurring naturally in the endolymph of the vestibular system. In the present work a more detailed calculation of the forces and resulting pressures in the vestibular system is carried out using a numerical model. Firstly, realistic 3D finite element conductivity and fluid maps of the utricle and a single semi-circular canal containing the current sources (dark cells) and sinks (hair cells) of the utricle and ampulla were constructed. Secondly, the electrical current densities in the fluid are calculated. Thirdly, the developed Lorentz force is used directly in the Navier–Stokes equation and the trans-cupular pressure is computed. Since the driving force field is relatively large in comparison with the advective acceleration, we demonstrate that it is possible to perform an approximation in the Navier–Stokes equations that reduces the problem to solving a simpler Poisson equation. This simplification allows rapid and easy calculation for many different directions of applied magnetic field. At 7 T a maximum cupula pressure difference of 1.6 mPa was calculated for the combined ampullar (0.7 µA) and utricular (3.31 µA) distributed current sources, assuming a hair-cell resting current of 100 pA per unit. These pressure values are up to an order of magnitude lower than those proposed by Roberts et al using a simplistic model and calculation, and are in good agreement with the estimated pressure values for nystagmus velocities in caloric experiments. This modeling work supports the hypothesis that the Lorentz force mechanism is a significant contributor to the perception of magnetic field induced

  16. Visualization of white matter tracts using a non-diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging method: does intravenous gadolinium injection four hours prior to the examination affect the visualization of white matter tracts?

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    Masahiro Yamazaki

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Visualization of white matter (WM-tracts such as the corticospinal tract (CST, medial lemniscus (ML, and superior cerebellar peduncle (SCP using delayed enhanced (DE-heavily T2-weighted three-dimensional fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (hT2w-3D-FLAIR imaging has recently been reported. In that report, all patients were clinically suspected of having Ménière's disease, because DE-hT2w-3D-FLAIR imaging of the inner ear has been reported to separately visualize perilymph and endolymph fluid and can identify the presence of endolymphatic hydrops. Therefore, the previous report could not rule out the possible effect of delayed enhancement. From this perspective, the purpose of this study was to elucidate if the use of gadolinium affects the visualization of WM-tracts on hT2w-3D-FLAIR. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The records of nine patients with suspected Ménière's disease who underwent plain (P and DE-hT2w-3D-FLAIR by 3-Tesla were retrospectively analyzed. The regions of interest were set on the CST, ML, and SCP, and on contiguous brain parenchyma: The thalamus (Th, pontine parenchyma (PP, and cerebellar parenchyma (CP, respectively. The signal intensity ratio between each WM-tract and the relevant contiguous brain parenchyma was calculated for both P- and DE-hT2w-3D-FLAIR images, and statistically compared using paired t-tests. RESULTS: The CST/Th signal intensity ratio was 3.75±0.67 on P-hT2w-3D-FLAIR and 3.62±0.50 on DE-hT2w-3D-FLAIR (p = 0.24. The ML/PP signal intensity ratio was 2.19±0.59 on P-hT2w-3D-FLAIR and 2.08±0.53 on DE-hT2w-3D-FLAIR (p = 0.25. The SCP/CP signal intensity ratio was 4.08±0.91 on P-hT2w-3D-FLAIR and 4.04±0.96 on DE-hT2w-3D-FLAIR (p = 0.43. There were no significant differences in the signal intensity ratios between P- and DE-hT2w-3D-FLAIR images. CONCLUSIONS: The use of gadolinium is not necessary for visualization of WM-tracts using hT2w-3D-FLAIR, and P-hT2w-3D-FLAIR without gadolinium may