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Sample records for endodontically treated maxillary

  1. Direct restoration of endodontically treated maxillary central incisors: post or no post at all?

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    von Stein-Lausnitz, Manja; Bruhnke, M; Rosentritt, M; Sterzenbach, G; Bitter, K; Frankenberger, R; Naumann, M

    2018-04-30

    The aim of this ex-vivo study was to evaluate the impact of cavity size and glass-fiber post (GFP) placement on the load capability of endodontically treated maxillary incisors directly restored with resin composite. Ninety-six extracted human maxillary central incisors were endodontically treated and distributed to four groups (n = 24): access cavity (A), access cavity and uni-proximal class III cavity (U), access cavity and bi-proximal class III cavity (B), and decoronated tooth (D). Specimens were restored with resin composite, and 12 specimen of each group received an adhesively placed glass-fiber post (P). Prior to linear loading, specimens were exposed to thermo-mechanical loading (TCML). Statistical analysis was performed using log-rank test after TCML, Kruskall-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U test to compare load capabilities (F max) . Significantly more failures occurred in group D for specimens without GFP during TCML (p = 0.001). F max (mean (SD) in N was (A) 513 (124), (AP) 554 (201), (U) 438 (171), (UP) 537 (232) (B) 483 (219), (BP) 536 (281), D 143 (181), and DP 500 (331), and differed significantly among groups (p = 0.003). Pair-wise comparison revealed lower F max values for group D compared to all other groups (p central incisors with cavity sizes up to bi-proximal class III may be successfully directly restored with resin composite. Post placement shows no additional effect except for decoronated endodontically treated incisors. Endodontically treated incisors with access cavities to class III cavities can be successfully restored with resin composite. Post placement for decoronated ETT is recommended.

  2. Retreatment of failed regenerative endodontic of orthodontically treated immature permanent maxillary central incisor: a case report

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    Musaed Fahad Al-Tammami

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available A revascularization procedure was shown to be the best alternative therapy for immature teeth with necrotic pulp and apical infection. A 12 year old female with a history of trauma to her upper central incisor and a sinus tract was referred for endodontic treatment. She was an active orthodontic patient and had undergone regenerative endodontic treatment for the past 2 years. Clinical examination revealed no response to sensibility, percussion, and palpation tests. The preoperative radiograph showed an open apex and apical rarefaction. The case was diagnosed as previously treated tooth with asymptomatic apical periodontitis. Regenerative endodontic retreatment was performed, and the case was followed for 3 years. Clinical, radiographic, and cone-beam computed tomography follow-up examination revealed an asymptomatic tooth, with evidence of periapical healing and root maturation.

  3. Aspergillus in endodontic infection near the maxillary sinus

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    Cinthya Cristina Gomes

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: Diseases of the maxillary sinus have been associated with dental roots near the maxillary sinus that have undergone endodontic treatment. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the presence of filamentous fungi in patients with dental roots near the maxillary sinus who had apical periodontitis treated endodontically, and to alert practitioners that this could be a possible avenue of contamination of the sinus in patients who develop maxillary sinus infection. METHODS: Cross-sectional study in 60 palatal roots of the first maxillary molars near the maxillary sinus, that underwent endodontic treatment for apical periodontitis. After removal of the filling material, dentin shavings were collected and placed in test tubes containing Sabouraud dextrose agar and chloramphenicol. The phenotype was determined by macroscopic and microscopic examination of the colonies. For polymerase chain reaction, the primers ITS-5 and ITS-4 were used. The sequences obtained were compared with those deposited at GenBank using the Basic Local Alignment Search Tool program. RESULTS: Filamentous fungi were isolated from 6 of 60 canals (10%:Aspergillus niger (6.7%, Aspergillus versicolor (1.6%, and Aspergillus fumigatus(1.6%. CONCLUSION: Root canals near the maxillary sinus with endodontic treatment and apical periodontitis may exhibit positive cultures for filamentous fungi. Interested professionals should be alert, because these microorganisms have pathogenic characteristics that can cause disease of odontogenic origin in the maxillary sinus.

  4. Aspergillus in endodontic infection near the maxillary sinus.

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    Gomes, Cinthya Cristina; Pinto, Larissa Christina Costa; Victor, Fernanda Loretti; Silva, Erlange Andrade Borges da; Ribeiro, Apoena de Aguiar; Sarquis, Maria Inês de Moura; Camões, Isabel Coelho Gomes

    2015-01-01

    Diseases of the maxillary sinus have been associated with dental roots near the maxillary sinus that have undergone endodontic treatment. To investigate the presence of filamentous fungi in patients with dental roots near the maxillary sinus who had apical periodontitis treated endodontically, and to alert practitioners that this could be a possible avenue of contamination of the sinus in patients who develop maxillary sinus infection. Cross-sectional study in 60 palatal roots of the first maxillary molars near the maxillary sinus, that underwent endodontic treatment for apical periodontitis. After removal of the filling material, dentin shavings were collected and placed in test tubes containing Sabouraud dextrose agar and chloramphenicol. The phenotype was determined by macroscopic and microscopic examination of the colonies. For polymerase chain reaction, the primers ITS-5 and ITS-4 were used. The sequences obtained were compared with those deposited at GenBank using the Basic Local Alignment Search Tool program. Filamentous fungi were isolated from 6 of 60 canals (10%): Aspergillus niger (6.7%), Aspergillus versicolor (1.6%), and Aspergillus fumigatus (1.6%). Root canals near the maxillary sinus with endodontic treatment and apical periodontitis may exhibit positive cultures for filamentous fungi. Interested professionals should be alert, because these microorganisms have pathogenic characteristics that can cause disease of odontogenic origin in the maxillary sinus. Copyright © 2015 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  5. endodontic treatment of unusually long discolored maxillary central ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a few cases of dual–rooted maxillary central incisor have been reported in literature1-5. Maxillary central incisors vary in root ... The following case report describes the endodontic management of a patient with an unusually long maxillary central incisor in our environment. CASE PROFILE. A 31 year-old male was referred ...

  6. Endodontic Management of a Maxillary Molar with Three Mesiobuccal Canals

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    Sirisha Gundam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It is imperative that the clinician should have comprehensive knowledge about the normal anatomy and its variations of the teeth as the deviations from the usual are very common. An increased awareness of unusual anatomy and a better understanding of the root canal system guide the clinician in accurate diagnosis and treatment of such variations in order to achieve a successful endodontic outcome. The maxillary first molar has been shown to have a wide variation in respect to the number of canals specifically noted in the mesiobuccal root. The current case report shows the successful management of a maxillary molar in which the mesiobuccal root had three canals.

  7. Regenerative Endodontic Treatment of a Maxillary Mature Premolar

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    Qingan Xu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Regenerative endodontic treatment was performed on a mature maxillary premolar diagnosed as chronic pulpitis. The root canals were chemomechanically prepared and placed intracanal medicaments at the first appointment. Then 2 weeks later, a blood clot was created in the canals, over which mineral trioxide aggregate was placed. At 6-month follow-up, cementum-like tissue seemed to be formed in the root canal along with nearly recovered pulp vitality. At 12-month recall, the radiographic results revealed evidence of root wall thickening. At 30-month recall, no periapical lesion was found. This case report indicates that regenerative endodontic treatment for the mature premolar is feasible. More cases are needed for further validation.

  8. Endodontic Treatment of a Maxillary Second Molar with Developmental Anomaly: A Case Report

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    Asgary, Saeed

    2007-01-01

    Fusion is a rare occurrence in molar teeth. The purpose of this rare case presentation is to describe the nonsurgical endodontic treatment of maxillary molar. A 28-year-old patient was referred for endodontic treatment of her chronic apical abscess of right maxillary second molar. In the clinical examination, a sinus tract adjacent to involved tooth and a small crown of supernumerary tooth fused to the buccal surface of the molar at gingival margin was observed. Endodontic treatment was decid...

  9. Endodontic Management of Maxillary Second Molar with Two Palatal Roots: A Report of Two Cases

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    Patel, Surbhi; Patel, Pawan

    2012-01-01

    Endodontic treatment may sometimes fail because morphological features of the tooth adversely affect the treatment protocol. Maxillary second molars are recognized as usually having a single palatal root with a single palatal canal. The incidence of second palatal root in the maxillary second molar is very rare. Two cases are presented in this paper describing the endodontic management of a four-rooted maxillary second molar with two distinct palatal roots and canals and two distinct buccal r...

  10. Ceramic onlay for endodontically treated mandibular molar

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    Roopadevi Garlapati

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Restoration of endodontically treated teeth is important for the success of endodontic treatment. In full coverage restorations, maximum amount of tooth structure is compromised, so as to conserve the amount of tooth structure partial coverage restorations, can be preferred. This case report is on fabrication of a conservative tooth colored restoration for an endodontically treated posterior tooth. A 22-year-old male patient presented with pain in the mandibular left first molar. After endodontic treatment, composite material was used as postendodontic restoration. The tooth was then prepared to receive a ceramic onlay and bonded with self-adhesive universal resin cement. Ceramic onlay restoration was periodically examined up to 2 years.

  11. Maxillary Hypoplasia With Congenital Oligodontia Treated by Maxillary Distraction Osteogenesis.

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    Mishima, Sayaka; Yamaguchi, Takako; Watanabe, Takuma; Komatani, Toru; Nakao, Kazumasa; Takahashi, Katsu; Bessho, Kazuhisa

    2018-02-27

    It is known that congenitally missing teeth can often cause differences in craniofacial morphology; however, there are few reported cases of orthognathic surgical treatment for these patients. Herein, the authors report a rare case of maxillary hypoplasia with congenital oligodontia treated by maxillary distraction osteogenesis with internal device. A 17-year-old male presenting with multiple tooth agenesis and maxillary recession was referred to our hospital for orthognathic surgical treatment. Preoperative simulation surgery was performed using Full-Color 3-dimensional salt model. After surgery, improvement in maxillary recession and occlusal stability was observed. This report demonstrates the advantages of the method used herein, which includes reduction in operating time with increase in the safety of the procedure.

  12. Endodontic treatment of a maxillary second molar with developmental anomaly: a case report.

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    Asgary, Saeed

    2007-01-01

    Fusion is a rare occurrence in molar teeth. The purpose of this rare case presentation is to describe the nonsurgical endodontic treatment of maxillary molar. A 28-year-old patient was referred for endodontic treatment of her chronic apical abscess of right maxillary second molar. In the clinical examination, a sinus tract adjacent to involved tooth and a small crown of supernumerary tooth fused to the buccal surface of the molar at gingival margin was observed. Endodontic treatment was decided for the involved molar for functional reason. Recall examination, a year after completion of endodontic and restorative treatments, showed the tooth was clinically asymptomatic and there was no radiographic lucency around the apical region.

  13. Fracture Resistance and Failure Mode of Endodontically Treated Premolars Restored with Different Adhesive Restorations

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    Nasrin Sarabi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The restoration of endodontically treated teeth is a topic that has been studied extensively but it is still a challenge for dental practitioners. The aim of this study was to evaluate fracture resistance, fracture patterns and fracture location of endodontically treated human maxillary premolars restored with direct and indirect composite resin and ceramic restoration. Methods: Eighty non-carious maxillary premolars were selected and divided into four groups (n=20. Endodontic treatment and mesio-occluso-distal preparations were carried out in all the groups except for the control group (group I. Subsequently, the prepared teeth were restored as follows: group II: indirect composite restoration; group III: ceramic restoration; group IV: direct composite restoration. The specimens were subjected to compressive axial loading until fracture occurred. The mode of failure was also recorded. Results: Group I had higher fracture resistance (1196.82±241.74 than the other groups (P

  14. Restoration of the endodontically treated posterior tooth

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    Andrea Polesel

    2014-06-01

    Results and conclusions: Direct adhesive restorations, indirect bonded restorations and traditional full crown are three therapeutic options for the single posterior endodontically treated teeth. The amount of remaining sound tooth structure is the most significant factor influencing the therapeutic approach. The clinician's operative skill is a determining aspect for long-term success of adhesive inlays.

  15. Outcome of Endodontically Treated Cracked Teeth

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    2016-06-01

    directed by: CAPT Te!Ty Webb, D.D.S., M.S. A " cracked tooth" is defined as a thin surface enamel and dentin disruption of unknown depth, and is often...OUTCOME OF ENDODONTICALL Y TREATED CRACKED TEETH by David Michael Dow II, D.D.S. Lieutenant Commander, Dental Corps United States Navy A thesis...copyrighted material in the thesis manuscript titled: "Outcome ofEndodontically Treated Cracked Teeth" is appropriately acknowledged and, beyond

  16. Periodontal-endodontic lesion of a three-rooted maxillary premolar: report of a case.

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    Blanchard, Steven B; Almasri, Amjad; Gray, Jonathon L

    2010-05-01

    A 43-year-old African American male initially presented for a dental evaluation of a recurrent swelling on the buccal aspect of tooth #12. His medical history was unremarkable except for a 20-pack year history of smoking. He was eventually diagnosed as having a necrotic pulp #12, and received root canal treatment. The patient's problem was unresolved, and he was subsequently referred for a periodontal evaluation with a presumptive diagnosis of a periodontal abscess. A flap was reflected from teeth #11 through #15. A buccal furcation invasion was discovered on #12. Shortly thereafter, three distinct roots with three grade III furcation invasions were located. The tooth was deemed untreatable, and was extracted. The thin buccal plate of the extraction socket was preserved using freeze-dried bone allograft to facilitate future prosthodontic replacement. Healing was uneventful. Periodontal open flap debridement surgery was provided for the remainder of the mouth, and the patient was placed on a 3-month recall program. Periodontitis associated with endodontic lesions are among the most daunting diagnostic and therapeutic challenges faced by periodontists. This is particularly true for maxillary premolars with multiple roots. The tooth in this case, once periodontally involved, had a very poor prognosis. The prognosis was further compromised by the pulpal involvement. Therapy consisted of extraction of the tooth to relieve the patient's discomfort and treating the adjacent teeth with periodontal open flap debridement surgery. A review of the literature pertinent to the diagnosis and management of periodontal-endodontic lesions is also presented.

  17. Endodontic Management of Maxillary Second Molar with Two Palatal Roots: A Report of Two Cases

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    Surbhi Patel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Endodontic treatment may sometimes fail because morphological features of the tooth adversely affect the treatment protocol. Maxillary second molars are recognized as usually having a single palatal root with a single palatal canal. The incidence of second palatal root in the maxillary second molar is very rare. Two cases are presented in this paper describing the endodontic management of a four-rooted maxillary second molar with two distinct palatal roots and canals and two distinct buccal roots and canals. Clinical examination and radiographs showed the presence of two palatal roots during the root canal procedure. The canals were biomechanically prepared with crown-down technique and obturated using lateral condensation technique with AH-Plus sealer.

  18. Single-rooted maxillary first molar with a single canal: endodontic retreatment.

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    de la Torre, Francisco; Cisneros-Cabello, Rafael; Aranguren, José Luis; Estévez, Roberto; Velasco-Ortega, Eugenio; Segura-Egea, Juan José

    2008-12-01

    This case report presents an unusual root canal system in a maxillary first molar tooth: a single canal in a single root. The endodontic access cavity displayed only 1 canal orifice. This case demonstrated that: 1) clinicians must have adequate knowledge about root canal morphology and its variations; 2) the location and morphology of root canals should be identified radiologically before the root canal treatment; and 3) careful examination of radiographs and the internal anatomy of teeth is essential.

  19. Prevalence of technical errors and periapical lesions in a sample of endodontically treated teeth: a CBCT analysis.

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    Nascimento, Eduarda Helena Leandro; Gaêta-Araujo, Hugo; Andrade, Maria Fernanda Silva; Freitas, Deborah Queiroz

    2018-01-21

    The aims of this study are to identify the most frequent technical errors in endodontically treated teeth and to determine which root canals were most often associated with those errors, as well as to relate endodontic technical errors and the presence of coronal restorations with periapical status by means of cone-beam computed tomography images. Six hundred eighteen endodontically treated teeth (1146 root canals) were evaluated for the quality of their endodontic treatment and for the presence of coronal restorations and periapical lesions. Each root canal was classified according to dental groups, and the endodontic technical errors were recorded. Chi-square's test and descriptive analyses were performed. Six hundred eighty root canals (59.3%) had periapical lesions. Maxillary molars and anterior teeth showed higher prevalence of periapical lesions (p technical error in all root canals, except for the second mesiobuccal root canal of maxillary molars and the distobuccal root canal of mandibular molars, which were non-filled in 78.4 and 30% of the cases, respectively. There is a high prevalence of apical radiolucencies, which increased in the presence of poor coronal restorations, endodontic technical errors, and when both conditions were concomitant. Underfilling was the most frequent technical error, followed by non-homogeneous and non-filled canals. Evaluation of endodontic treatment quality that considers every single root canal aims on warning dental practitioners of the prevalence of technical errors that could be avoided with careful treatment planning and execution.

  20. Endodontic Management of a Maxillary Lateral Incisor with 4 Root Canals and a Dens Invaginatus Tract.

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    Nosrat, Ali; Schneider, S Craig

    2015-07-01

    Dens invaginatus (DI) is associated with complex internal anatomy. This article represents a maxillary lateral incisor with 5 root canals including DI. The treatment was planned and performed using cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) imaging. After clinical and radiographic evaluations, tooth #7 was diagnosed with DI and pulp necrosis with symptomatic apical periodontitis. Periapical radiographs of the tooth showed 2 roots and complex internal anatomy. CBCT evaluation revealed tooth #7 had 5 separate canals (4 root canals and 1 DI canal extending through the root to the periodontal ligament), communication between DI and the root canal system, and severe and multiple curvatures of the palatal canals. Root canal treatment was completed in 2 visits. Modified access openings were required to safely treat the dilacerated palatal canals. At the 6-month re-evaluation, the patient reported he had remained asymptomatic and his tooth had remained functional since the treatment was completed. Clinical examination showed tooth #7 had no sensitivity to percussion or palpation, probe depths within normal limits (≤3 mm), and no mobility. Radiographic assessment of the tooth showed significant osseous healing of the preoperative lesion. Three-dimensional imaging is a valuable tool for endodontic management of teeth with complex internal anatomy. Three-dimensional imaging is recommended for evaluating and treatment planning cases with DI. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Evaluation of Related Factors in the Failure of Endodontically Treated Teeth: A Cross-sectional Study.

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    Olcay, Keziban; Ataoglu, Hanife; Belli, Sema

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to review the factors related to the failure and extraction of unsuccessful endodontically treated teeth. A total of 1000 teeth treated with nonsurgical root canal therapy were analyzed, and the following information was recorded for each patient: reasons for failure and extraction, type of tooth, presence and type of coronal restoration, smoking status, age, gender, and level of education. One main reason was recorded for each failed tooth. The associations between reasons for failure, patient, and tooth were tested by using χ 2 analysis. Of the 1000 endodontically failed teeth analyzed in this study, 28.1% (n = 281) were extracted, 66% (n = 660) were re-treated, and 5.9% (n = 59) were treated with apical surgery. Among the reasons for failure, restorative and endodontic reasons were seen most frequently (43.9%, n = 439), whereas orthodontic reasons were seldom seen (0.1%, n = 1). The most common reason for extraction was for prosthetic reasons (40.8%), and perforation/stripping was the least common (2.9%). The mandibular first molars were the most frequently extracted teeth (27.4%, n = 77). The most common reason for the extraction of endodontically treated teeth was for prosthetic reasons. Among the reasons for failure, restorative and endodontic reasons were the most frequently seen, and orthodontic reasons were the most seldom. The teeth that failed most frequently were mandibular first molars, and the teeth that failed least frequently were maxillary third molars. The most common reason for the extraction of failed endodontically treated teeth was for prosthetic reasons. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Restoration of Endodontically Treated Molars Using All Ceramic Endocrowns

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    Roopak Bose Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical success of endodontically treated posterior teeth is determined by the postendodontic restoration. Several options have been proposed to restore endodontically treated teeth. Endocrowns represent a conservative and esthetic restorative alternative to full coverage crowns. The preparation consists of a circular equigingival butt-joint margin and central retention cavity into the entire pulp chamber constructing both the crown and the core as a single unit. The case reports discussed here are moderately damaged endodontically treated molars restored using all ceramic endocrowns fabricated using two different systems, namely, CAD/CAM and pressed ceramic.

  3. Management of endodontic-periodontic lesion of a maxillary lateral incisor with palatoradicular groove

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    Jayshree Ramakrishna Vishwas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Presence of palatal radicular grooves are considered to be an important contributing factor to the development of localized periodontitis, as it favored the accumulation and proliferation of bacterial plaque deep into the periodontium. Pulp involvement could result due to the introduction of bacterial toxins through channels that existed between the root canal system and the groove. Early diagnosis, elimination of inflammation and correction of anatomic complications are the key to a favorable outcome for managing palatoradicular groove. Present report describes successful management with an interdisciplinary approach of maxillary lateral incisor with combined endodontic periodontic lesion associated with palatoradicular groove.

  4. Effect of amalgam cuspal coverage on the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth

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    Mahshid Mohammdi Basir

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available   Background and Aims: Endodontically treated teeth are prone to fracture because they loose a big amount of their structure. The treatment plan of those teeth is completed when they are rehabilitated with a strong and functional restoration. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with amalgam cuspal coverage in comparison with other restorative techniques.   Materials and Methods: 40 human healthy maxillary premolars were divided into 4 groups: group1 (S: sound teeth, group 2(Co: endodontically treated teeth with MOD cavity restored with bonding and composite, group 3(Am-B: endodontically treated teeth with MOD cavity restored with bonding and amalgam and group 4 (Am-CC: endodontically treated teeth with MOD cavity restored with amalgam cuspal coverage. Then the restorations were stored in water and room temperature for 100 days at then thermocycled for 500 cycles between water baths at (5.5 ± 1 and (55 ± 1 0 C. The fracture resistance was evaluated by universal testing machine (Instron, 1195 UK with the compressive force of about 2000 N in 0.5 mm/min. The fracture modes were evaluated in four groups by a stereomicroscope. Statistical analysis (Scheffe test was done for all groups (P0.05. The lowest fracture resistance was found in group 2 (Co (384 ± 137.4 N that had no significant difference with group 3 (Am-B (P>0.05. The fracture resistance in group 4 was significantly higher than group 2 (Co and 3 (Am-B. The fracture mode in group 1 was cohesive within tooth and in group 2 (Co and 3 (Am-B was mixed cohesive and adhesive, and in group 4 was cohesive within in restorative material.   Conclusion: The highest fracture resistance was found in teeth that received amalgam cuspal coverage.

  5. Endodontic Management of Maxillary First Molar With Two Palatal Canals Aided With Cone Beam Computed Tomography: A Case Report.

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    Pamboo, Jaya; Hans, Manoj Kumar; Chander, Subhas; Sharma, Kapil

    2017-04-01

    The success of endodontic therapy is based on having sufficient endodontic access, correct cleaning and shaping, and adequate root canal obturation. However, endodontic treatment is also dependent on having a sound knowledge of the internal anatomy of human teeth, especially when anatomic variations are present. Reporting these alterations is important for improving the understanding and expertise of endodontists. The aim of this case report is to describe a unique case of maxillary first molar with 2 palatal canals within a single root, as confirmed by cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans. This article also reviews recent case reports of extra palatal root canals in the maxillary first molars and the role of CBCT analysis in successfully diagnosing them.

  6. Morphologic variations of maxillary molars palatal root and the importance of its knowledge for endodontic practice: a case series.

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    Scarparo, Roberta Kochenborger; Pereira, Leticia; Moro, Diana; Grundling, Grasiela; Gomes, Maximiliano; Grecca, Fabiana Soares

    2011-03-01

    The present report describes and discusses root canal variations in the internal morphology of maxillary molars. Dental internal anatomy is directly related to all the technical stages of the endodontic treatment. Even though, in some situations a typical anatomical characteristics can be faced, and the professional should be able to identify them. This clinical report describes five cases with different pulpar and periapical diagnostics where the endodontic treatment was performed, in which during the treatment the unusual occurrence of two or three canals in the palatal root 'or even two distinct palatal roots' of first and second maxillary molars, were described and important details for achieving treatment success were discussed. The knowledge of tooth internal anatomy must be considered during clinical and radiographic examinations. This should be valued not only to find atypical canals but also to enable calcified canals cleaning and shaping, once they are frequently omitted during endodontic therapy. Anatomic variations can occur in any tooth, and palatal roots of maxillary first and second molars are no exception. The complexity of the root canal system and the importance of identifying its internal anatomy for planning endodontic treatment increase the chances of success.

  7. Fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with a bulkfill flowable material and a resin composite.

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    Isufi, Almira; Plotino, Gianluca; Grande, Nicola Maria; Ioppolo, Pietro; Testarelli, Luca; Bedini, Rossella; Al-Sudani, Dina; Gambarini, Gianluca

    2016-01-01

    To determine and compare the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with a bulk fill flowable material (SDR) and a traditional resin composite. Thirty maxillary and 30 mandibular first molars were selected based on similar dimensions. After cleaning, shaping and filling of the root canals and adhesive procedures, specimens were assigned to 3 subgroups for each tooth type (n=10): Group A: control group, including intact teeth; Group B: access cavities were restored with a traditional resin composite (EsthetX; Dentsply-Italy, Rome, Italy); Group C: access cavities were restored with a bulk fill flowable composite (SDR; Dentsply-Italy), except 1.5 mm layer of the occlusal surface that was restored with the same resin composite as Group B. The specimens were subjected to compressive force in a material static-testing machine until fracture occurred, the maximum fracture load of the specimens was measured (N) and the type of fracture was recorded as favorable or unfavorable. Data were statistically analyzed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Bonferroni tests (Pcomposite and with a bulk fill flowable composite (SDR) was similar in both maxillary and mandibular molars and showed no significant decrease in fracture resistance compared to intact specimens. No significant difference was observed in the mechanical fracture resistance of endodontically treated molars restored with traditional resin composite restorations compared to bulk fill flowable composite restorations.

  8. Histologic Outcomes of Uninfected Human Immature Teeth Treated with Regenerative Endodontics: 2 Case Reports.

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    Nosrat, Ali; Kolahdouzan, Alireza; Hosseini, Farzaneh; Mehrizi, Ehsan A; Verma, Prashant; Torabinejad, Mahmoud

    2015-10-01

    A growing body of evidence exists showing the possibility of growing vital tissues in the root canal spaces of teeth with necrotic pulps and open apices. However, there is very limited histologic information regarding characteristics of tissues formed in the root canal space of human teeth after regenerative endodontics. The aim of this study was to examine clinically and histologically the outcomes of human immature teeth treated with regenerative endodontics. Two healthy birooted human maxillary first premolar teeth scheduled for extraction were included. Preoperative radiographs confirmed that these teeth had immature apices. Vitality tests showed the presence of vital pulps in these teeth. After receiving consent forms, the teeth were isolated with a rubber dam, and the pulps were completely removed. After the formation of blood clots in the canals, the teeth were covered with mineral trioxide aggregate. Four months later, the teeth were clinically and radiographically evaluated, extracted, and examined histologically. Both patients remained asymptomatic after treatment. Radiographic examination of the teeth showed signs of root development after treatment. Histologic examination of tissues growing into the root canal space of these teeth shows the presence of connective tissue, bone and cementum formation, and thickening of roots. Based on our findings, it appears that when canals of teeth with open apices are treated with regenerative endodontics, tissues of the periodontium grow into the root canals of these teeth. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. [Endodontically treated teeth. Success--failure. Endorestorative treatment plan].

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    Zabalegui, B

    1990-01-01

    More and more often the general dentist is finding the presence of endodontically treated teeth during his treatment planning procedure. He has to ask himself if the endo-treated tooth functions and will continue to function function successfully, when deciding which final endo-restorative procedure to apply. For this reason the dentist or the endodontist with whom he works should clinically evaluate these teeth, establish a diagnostic criteria of their success or failure and a treatment plan according to the prognosis. The purpose of this article is to offer an organized clinical view of the steps to follow when evaluating an endodontically treated tooth and how to establish a final endo-restorative plan.

  10. Fracture resistance of endodontically-treated teeth: effect of combination bleaching and an antioxidant.

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    Khoroushi, Maryam; Feiz, Atieh; Khodamoradi, Roghayeh

    2010-01-01

    This in vitro study assessed the fracture resistance of endodontically-treated teeth undergoing combination bleaching with 38% and 9.5% hydrogen peroxide gels as in-office and at-home bleaching techniques, respectively. In addition, the effect of an antioxidizing agent, sodium ascorbate, was investigated. Sixty maxillary premolars were endodontically-treated, received a glass ionomer barrier as a mechanical seal and were embedded in acrylic resin up to the cemento-enamel junction. The specimens were divided into four groups (n = 15) as follows: G I: no bleaching, access cavity restored with resin composite (negative control); G II: bleached for three weeks daily using 9.5% hydrogen peroxide for two hours and three sessions of in-office bleaching using 38% hydrogen peroxide every seven days, then restored (positive control); G III: bleached similar to G II and restored after one week; G IV: bleached similar to G II, along with the use of an antioxidizing agent for 24 hours, then restored. In each in-office and at-home bleaching session, the whitening gels were applied to the buccal surface of the tooth and placed inside the pulp chamber (inside/outside bleaching technique). Finally, the specimens underwent fracture resistance testing; the data were analyzed using ANOVA and Scheffé's test (alpha = 0.05). Significant differences were observed among the study groups (p 0.05). Within the limitations of the current study, it can be concluded that the fracture resistance of endodontically-treated teeth decreases after combination bleaching. The use of sodium ascorbate can reverse decreased fracture resistance.

  11. Resistance of Bonded Composite Restorations on Fractures of Endodontically Treated Teeth

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    AR Daneshkazemi

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This study was performed to evaluate the effect of dentine bonding agents and Glass Ionomer cement beneath composite restorations and its resistance on fractures of endodontically treated teeth. Material and Methods: Forty sound maxillary teeth were selected; ten of them for positive control, and on the rest, RCT and MOD cavity preparations were done with standard methods. Then, the teeth were divided to four groups: 1-Sound teeth for positive control. 2-Prepared without any restoration for negative control. 3-Prepared and restored with Vitrabond(3M, USA, Single bond(3M, USA and Z100(3M, USA resin composite. 4-Prepared and restored by Single bond and Z100 resin composite. Specimens were subjected to compressive load by Instron 8502 until fracture occurred. Results: Group 1 showed the highest resistance to compressive forces followed by group 4,3&2 respectively. ANOVA, t test and Chi-square tests indicated significant difference between all the groups. Conclusion: Use of dentine bonding agents and resin composite increases resistance of endodontically treated teeth to fractures more than teeth restored with sandwich of glass ionomer cements, dentine bonding agents and resin composite.

  12. Endodontic and periodontal management of a severely affected maxillary lateral incisor having combined mucosal fenestration and palatogingival groove

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    Sarang Sharma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mucosal fenestrations, wherein the tooth root apices are clinically discernible in the oral cavity subsequent to loss of overlying alveolar bone and mucosa, are rare pathologic entities. Palato gingival grooves- anatomic aberrations are also infrequent occurrences that notoriously predispose to periodontal pathologies of varying extent. Both conditions independently are known to popularly affect maxillary lateral incisors. Coexistent fenestration defect and palato gingival groove in the same tooth is extremely rare and undoubtedly is a perfect combination to precipitate severe endodontic-periodontal consequences. In this report, a 34-year-old patient presented to the dental department with complaint of esthetics in relation to exposed root of right maxillary lateral incisor. On closer inspection, a palato gingival groove in addition to fenestration defect was evident on the root surface along with a periodontal pocket of >5 mm. An interdisciplinary treatment was instituted which included endodontic treatment followed by root end resection, osseous bone graft placement and guided tissue regeneration procedures for repair of mucosal fenestration defect. Debridement of the palatal pocket, with saucerization of the groove and restoration with glass ionomer cement were simultaneously employed to correct the palatal defect.

  13. Successful nonsurgical endodontic outcome of a severely affected permanent maxillary canine with dens invaginatus Oehlers type 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, John K; Ribera, Michael J

    2014-10-01

    The morphogenic complexities of dens invaginatus (DI) Oehlers type 3 in maxillary canines offer significant endodontic challenges. A case report is provided of a 14-year-old female patient who presented with an anomalous-looking permanent maxillary canine associated with a sinus tract. Pulp testing revealed a normal response on the distal aspect of the tooth, whereas the mesial segment tested nonresponsive. A radiolucent lesion was seen on the mesiolateral radicular area adjacent to the severely distended pulp chamber. A gutta-percha point inserted into the sinus tract traced to this same region. The diagnosis was normal pulp coincident with DI Oehlers type 3 with pulp necrosis and chronic apical abscess. Despite a concerted effort to limit the root canal therapy to only the necrotic canal, its proximity to the normal canal obviated this possibility, entailing endodontic treatment of the entire root canal system. The necrotic pulp space was subjected to sustained irrigation with 5.25% sodium hypochlorite and then completed with 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid. A bolus of gutta-percha was used to create an apical barrier, and then the remainder of the enlarged pulp space was obturated with injectable thermoplasticized gutta-percha. At a 4.5-year recall, there was no clinical and radiographic evidence of infection. Endodontic success was accomplished with meticulous efforts of disinfection. Thermoplasticized gutta-percha can offer utility for obturation of anatomically complicated pulp spaces. The use of the dental operating microscope is an invaluable aid for discernment of the intricacies of teeth affected with DI type 3 variant and can enhance clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Factors affecting the periapical healing process of endodontically treated teeth

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    Roberto Holland

    Full Text Available Abstract Tissue repair is an essential process that reestablishes tissue integrity and regular function. Nevertheless, different therapeutic factors and clinical conditions may interfere in this process of periapical healing. This review aims to discuss the important therapeutic factors associated with the clinical protocol used during root canal treatment and to highlight the systemic conditions associated with the periapical healing process of endodontically treated teeth. The antibacterial strategies indicated in the conventional treatment of an inflamed and infected pulp and the modulation of the host's immune response may assist in tissue repair, if wound healing has been hindered by infection. Systemic conditions, such as diabetes mellitus and hypertension, can also inhibit wound healing. The success of root canal treatment is affected by the correct choice of clinical protocol. These factors are dependent on the sanitization process (instrumentation, irrigant solution, irrigating strategies, and intracanal dressing, the apical limit of the root canal preparation and obturation, and the quality of the sealer. The challenges affecting the healing process of endodontically treated teeth include control of the inflammation of pulp or infectious processes and simultaneous neutralization of unpredictable provocations to the periapical tissue. Along with these factors, one must understand the local and general clinical conditions (systemic health of the patient that affect the outcome of root canal treatment prediction.

  15. The effect of post material on the characteristic strength of fatigued endodontically treated teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Jefferson Ricardo; do Valle, Accácio Lins; Shiratori, Fabio Kenji; Ghizoni, Janaina Salomon; Bonfante, Estevam Augusto

    2014-11-01

    The biomechanical properties of post systems may become more important as the amount of remaining tooth structure decreases, thus different materials may influence the characteristic strength of fatigued endodontically treated teeth. The purpose of this study was to assess the characteristic strength and probability of survival of endodontically treated teeth restored with different intraradicular post systems. Forty human maxillary canines with similar root lengths were randomly divided into 4 groups (n=10): cast post and core, stainless-steel prefabricated post, carbon-fiber post, and glass-fiber post. Cores and metallic crowns were fabricated for all specimens. Restored teeth were exposed to mechanical fatigue (250,000 cycles) in a controlled chewing simulator. Each intact specimen was mounted in a special device and aligned at a 45-degree angle to the long axis of the tooth. A universal testing machine was used to apply a static load at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min until specimen failure. The maximum value was recorded in newtons (N). Probability Weibull curves (2-sided 90% confidence bounds) were calculated for each group, and a probability of survival as a function of load at failure was plotted for the groups. A significantly higher characteristic strength was observed for groups carbon-fiber post (755.82 N) and cast post and core (750.6 N) (P<.05) compared with glass-fiber post (461.35 N) and stainless-steel prefabricated post (524.78 N) groups. All the roots in the cast post and core group demonstrated catastrophic fracture, whereas the remaining groups had no root fractures. Prefabricated posts made of glass fiber and stainless steel showed significantly lower characteristic strength and probability of survival than cast post and core, whereas crowns with carbon-fiber posts presented a single load similar to the fracture values of cast posts. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  16. The etiology and symptoms of endodontic cases treated in a university clinic in Saudi Arabia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AlYahya, A. S.; Selirn, H. A.; Guile, E. E.

    1989-01-01

    Endodontic patients treated at a University Dental Clinic over a two year period were studied. A total of 281 patients seen in a beginning endodontic course were analyzed to determine (1) the etiology of the pulpal disease presenting and (2) the signs and symptoms of pulpal disease. Results indicated that caries was the most prevalent reason for endodontic treatment. Most cases (40.6%) were asymptomatic. Lower molars were the most commonly affected and there was no significant difference in endodontic treatment distribution between males and females in the patient population studied. (author)

  17. An original micro-CT study and meta-analysis of the internal and external anatomy of maxillary molars - implications for endodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaszewska, Iwona M; Jarzębska, Anna; Skinningsrud, Bendik; Pękala, Przemysław A; Wroński, Sebastian; Iwanaga, Joe

    2018-05-07

    The aim of this work was to conduct a radiological micro-CT study and meta-analysis to determine the morphological features of the root canal anatomy of the maxillary molars. The radiological study included micro-CT scans of 110 maxillary first molars and 98 maxillary second molars. To identify articles eligible for inclusion in our meta-analysis, PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science were search comprehensively. The following data were extracted: study type (cadaveric, intraoperative or imaging), Vertucci types of canal configuration, presence/number of canals, roots, apical foramina, apical deltas, and inter-canal communications. The mesiobuccal root was the most variable with respect to canal configuration, type I being the most common configuration followed by type II and type IV. Type I was the most common canal configuration in the distobuccal and palatal root. Regarding the number of canals in the maxillary first and second molars, one canal was most prevalent in all roots of the three molars, except for the mesiobuccal root of maxillary first molar, in which two canals were most prevalent. The most prevalent number of roots in all maxillary molars was three. Knowledge of endodontic anatomy determines the parameters of root canal treatment and significantly affects the probability of success. It is therefore especially important to know the morphology of the root canal system in order to perform endodontic treatment correctly. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. The Palatal Window for Treating an Incompletely Augmented Maxillary Sinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florio, Salvatore; Suzuki, Takanori; Cho, Sang-Choon

    2017-04-01

    Maxillary sinus augmentation through a lateral window is reported as one of the most predictable bone augmentation procedures before implant placement. The elevation of the membrane represents a delicate and crucial step that allows the creation of the space for the bone graft material. If the elevation is not completed, the regenerated bone might be inadequate for the implant placement. In this case, a new intervention will be necessary to complete the bone augmentation. Reaccessing from a lateral window, however, would be challenging due to thickness of the buccal boney wall because of the first grafting procedure; therefore, a different approach has to be used. The aim of this case report is to present the palatal window technique for treating incompletely augmented maxillary sinus. The detailed step-by-step diagnostic and surgical procedures are described, and the advantages and limitations of the technique are discussed through a review of the literature.

  19. Endodontic and Prosthetic Management of a Mid-Root and Crown Fracture of a Maxillary Central Incisor

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    Koidou Vasiliki P.

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Root fractures are relatively uncommon among other dental traumas and mostly affect the anterior dentition. This case report presents the endodontic and prosthodontic management of a maxillary central incisor with a combined fracture in the middle third of the root and the crown, as well as the 7-year follow up of the case. The healing potential of a horizontal root fracture in the middle third of the root is highlighted when appropriate treatment is applied. MTA used for obturation of the coronal fragment, induced hard tissue formation apically and promoted healing in the area, while the 2mm MTA left as apical barrier at the second stage of re-treatment and obturation with gutta-percha prevented its extrusion. The multidisciplinary approach in the management of such cases ensures a long term survival.

  20. Endodontic Treatment of Maxillary Premolar with Three Root Canals Using Optical Microscope and NiTi Rotatory Files System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Relvas, João Bosco Formiga; de Carvalho, Fredsom Marcio Acris; Marques, André Augusto Franco; Sponchiado, Emílio Carlos; Garcia, Lucas da Fonseca Roberti

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to report a clinical case of endodontic treatment of a maxillary first premolar with three root canals using an optical microscope and rotary instrumentation technique. The main complaint of the patient, a 16-year-old girl, was pain in tooth 14. After clinical and radiographic examination, irreversible pulpitis was diagnosed. An alteration in the middle third of the pulp chamber radiographically observed suggested the presence of three root canals. Pulp chamber access and initial catheterization using size number 10 K-files were performed. The optical microscope and radiographic examination were used to confirm the presence of three root canals. PathFiles #13, #16, and #19 were used to perform catheterization and ProTaper files S1 and S2 for cervical preparation. Apical preparation was performed using F1 file in the buccal canals and F2 in the palatal canal up to the working length. The root canals were filled with Endofill sealer by thermal compaction technique using McSpadden #50. The case has been receiving follow-up for 12 months and no painful symptomatology or periapical lesions have been found. The use of technological tools was able to assist the endodontic treatment of teeth with complex internal anatomy, such as three-canal premolars.

  1. Resistance to fracture of endodontically treated premolars restored with glass ionomer cement or acid etch composite resin: An in vitro study

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    B Ranga

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Due to the weakness of endodontically treated posterior teeth requires more strengthened restoration to withstand occlusal forces. The purpose of the present study was to determine and compare the resistance to fracture of endodontically treated maxillary 1 st premolars restored with different materials in mesio-occluso-distal (MOD cavity preparations. Materials and Methods: MOD cavity preparations in 80 endodontically treated maxillary 1 st premolars were restored using four different methods. Fiber rings were filled with stone plaster and the teeth were placed into the plaster up to the level of cemento-enamel junction. The teeth were grouped according to restorative method, mounted in an Instrom T.T. machine, and the buccal walls subjected to a slowly increasing compressive force until fracture occurred. Result: The force of fracture of the walls of each tooth was recorded and the results in the various groups compared. All teeth fractured in a similar manner irrespective of the restorative method used. Conclusion: The resistance to the fracture of the teeth was the same when they were stored with glass ionomer cement as a base over which composite resin was placed. When the entire cavities were filled with glass ionomer cement, the resistance to fracture of the teeth decreased significantly compared with the acid etch resin technique.

  2. Molecular fingerprinting of TGFbeta-treated embryonic maxillary mesenchymal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisano, M M; Mukhopadhyay, P; Greene, R M

    2003-11-01

    The transforming growth factor-beta (TGF(beta)) family represents a class of signaling molecules that plays a central role in normal embryonic development, specifically in development of the craniofacial region. Members of this family are vital to development of the secondary palate where they regulate maxillary and palate mesenchymal cell proliferation and extracellular matrix synthesis. The function of this growth factor family is particularly critical in that perturbation of either process results in a cleft of the palate. While the cellular and phenotypic effects of TGF(beta) on embryonic craniofacial tissue have been extensively cataloged, the specific genes that function as downstream mediators of TGF(beta) in maxillary/palatal development are poorly defined. Gene expression arrays offer the ability to conduct a rapid, simultaneous assessment of hundreds to thousands of differentially expressed genes in a single study. Inasmuch as the downstream sequelae of TGF(beta) action are only partially defined, a complementary DNA (cDNA) expression array technology (Clontech's Atlas Mouse cDNA Expression Arrays), was utilized to delineate a profile of differentially expressed genes from TGF(beta)-treated primary cultures of murine embryonic maxillary mesenchymal cells. Hybridization of a membrane-based cDNA array (1178 genes) was performed with 32P-labeled cDNA probes synthesized from RNA isolated from either TGF(beta)-treated or vehicle-treated embryonic maxillary mesenchymal cells. Resultant phosphorimages were subject to AtlasImage analysis in order to determine differences in gene expression between control and TGF(beta)-treated maxillary mesenchymal cells. Of the 1178 arrayed genes, 552 (47%) demonstrated detectable levels of expression. Steady state levels of 22 genes were up-regulated, while those of 8 other genes were down-regulated, by a factor of twofold or greater in response to TGF(beta). Affected genes could be grouped into three general functional

  3. Vitality preservation of an anomalous maxillary central incisor after endodontic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, A Y; Kaffe, I; Littner, M M

    1984-06-01

    Endodontic treatment of a case of fused immature central incisor with a supernumerary tooth with dens in dente is described. Although a chronic dentoalveolar abscess was diagnosed, vitality test signs were positive. Treatment consisted of pulpotomy with calcium hydroxide paste; after 2 1/2 months a permanent root canal filling was placed in the amputated part. Follow-up 2 years postoperatively indicated that the tooth has maintained its vitality. The periapical area is completely healed, and apical closure is evident.

  4. Fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with Zirconia filler containing composite core material and fiber posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeaidi, Zaid Al

    2016-01-01

    To assess the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth with a novel Zirconia (Zr) nano-particle filler containing bulk fill resin composite. Forty-five freshly extracted maxillary central incisors were endodontically treated using conventional step back preparation and warm lateral condensation filling. Post space preparation was performed using drills compatible for fiber posts (Rely X Fiber Post) on all teeth (n=45), and posts were cemented using self etch resin cement (Rely X Unicem). Samples were equally divided into three groups (n=15) based on the type of core materials, ZirconCore (ZC) MulticCore Flow (MC) and Luxacore Dual (LC). All specimens were mounted in acrylic resin and loads were applied (Universal testing machine) at 130° to the long axis of teeth, at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min until failure. The loads and the site at which the failures occurred were recorded. Data obtained was tabulated and analyzed using a statistical program. The means and standard deviations were compared using ANOVA and Multiple comparisons test. The lowest and highest failure loads were shown by groups LC (18.741±3.02) and MC (25.16±3.30) respectively. Group LC (18.741±3.02) showed significantly lower failure loads compared to groups ZC (23.02±4.21) and MC (25.16±3.30) (pcomposite cores was comparable to teeth restored with conventional Zr free bulk fill composites. Zr filled bulk fill composites are recommended for restoration of endodontically treated teeth as they show comparable fracture resistance to conventional composite materials with less catastrophic failures.

  5. Effect of fiber post length and abutment height on fracture resistance of endodontically treated premolars prepared for zirconia crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jie; Matinlinna, Jukka Pekka; Shinya, Akikazu; Botelho, Michael George; Zheng, Zhiqiang

    2018-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the fracture resistance, mode of fracture, and stress distribution of endodontically treated teeth prepared with three different fiber post lengths and two different abutment heights, using both experimental and finite element (FE) approaches. Forty-eight human maxillary premolars with two roots were selected and endodontically treated. The teeth were randomly distributed into six equally sized groups (n = 8) with different combinations of post lengths (7.5, 11, and 15 mm) and abutment heights (3 and 5 mm). All the teeth restored with glass fiber post (Rely X Fiber Post, 3M ESPE, USA) and a full zirconia crown. All the specimens were thermocycled and then loaded to failure at an oblique angle of 135°. Statistical analysis was performed for the effects of post length and abutment height on failure loads using ANOVA and Tukey's honestly significant difference test. In addition, corresponding FE models of a premolar restored with a glass fiber post were developed to examine mechanical responses. The factor of post length (P abutment height (P > 0.05) did not have a significant effect on failure load. The highest mean fracture resistance was recorded for the 15 mm post length and 5 mm abutment height test group, which was significantly more resistant to fracture than the 7.5 mm post and 5 mm abutment height group (P abutment heights.

  6. Effect of inadequate ferrule segment location on fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth

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    Satheesh B Haralur

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The circumferential 2 mm ferrule during the fabrication of the crown is strongly advocated for the long-term clinical success. During the routine clinical practice, the dentist encounters the endodontically treated tooth (ETT with inadequacy of the ferrule in some segment due to caries, abrasion, and erosions. The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the consequence of inadequate segmental ferrule location on fracture strength of the root canal-treated anterior and posterior teeth. Materials and Methods: Fifty each maxillary canine and mandibular premolar intact human teeth were root canal treated and sectioned at 2 mm above the cementum-enamel junction. The teeth samples were divided into 5 groups of 10 each. The G-I and G-V samples had the 360° ferrule and complete absence of the ferrule, respectively. The G-II had the inadequate ferrule on the palatal surface, while G-III and G-IV had inadequate ferrule at buccal and proximal area. Teeth samples were subsequently restored with glass-reinforced fiber post, composite core, and full veneer metal crown. The samples were tested with universal testing machine under static load to record the fracture resistance. The acquired data were subjected to ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc statistical analysis. Results: The G-I with circumferential ferrule showed the higher fracture resistance. The teeth samples with lack of the ferrule had the least fracture resistance. Among the segmental absence of ferrule, teeth samples with lack of the proximal ferrule were least affected. Deficiency of a ferrule on the lingual wall significantly affected the fracture strength in both anterior and posterior ETT. Conclusions: The ETT with sectional inadequacy of the ferrule is significantly more effective in resisting the fracture in comparison to the complete absence of the ferrule.

  7. Submergence of Roots for Alveolar Bone Preservation. I. Endodontically Treated Roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-05-10

    With Endodontic Submerged Roots Scale 0 1 2 3 Periapical 15 0 1 0 Pericoronal 7 3 3 3 (3 cysts ) = 1 _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ = REFERENCES 1. Lam, R.: Contour...with coronal portions of the roots. These epithe lial-lined cysts prevented the formation of osteo- cementum over the coronal surface . In this study...the endodontically treated roots appeared to be primarily a response to the excess root cana l sealer that was expressed coronally and periapically

  8. Cone Beam Computed Tomography Evaluation of the Diagnosis, Treatment Planning, and Long-Term Followup of Large Periapical Lesions Treated by Endodontic Surgery: Two Case Reports

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    Vijay Shekhar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this case report is to present two cases where cone beam computed tomography (CBCT was used for the diagnosis, treatment planning, and followup of large periapical lesions in relation to maxillary anterior teeth treated by endodontic surgery. Periapical disease may be detected sooner using CBCT, and their true size, extent, nature, and position can be assessed. It allows clinician to select the most relevant views of the area of interest resulting in improved detection of periapical lesions. CBCT scan may provide a better, more accurate, and faster method to differentially diagnose a solid (granuloma from a fluid-filled lesion or cavity (cyst. In the present case report, endodontic treatment was performed for both the cases followed by endodontic surgery. Biopsy was done to establish the confirmatory histopathological diagnosis of the periapical lesions. Long-term assessment of the periapical healing following surgery was done in all the three dimensions using CBCT and was found to be more accurate than IOPA radiography. It was concluded that CBCT was a useful modality in making the diagnosis and treatment plan and assessing the outcome of endodontic surgery for large periapical lesions.

  9. Cone Beam Computed Tomography Evaluation of the Diagnosis, Treatment Planning, and Long-Term Followup of Large Periapical Lesions Treated by Endodontic Surgery: Two Case Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekhar, Vijay; Shashikala, K.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this case report is to present two cases where cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) was used for the diagnosis, treatment planning, and followup of large periapical lesions in relation to maxillary anterior teeth treated by endodontic surgery. Periapical disease may be detected sooner using CBCT, and their true size, extent, nature, and position can be assessed. It allows clinician to select the most relevant views of the area of interest resulting in improved detection of periapical lesions. CBCT scan may provide a better, more accurate, and faster method to differentially diagnose a solid (granuloma) from a fluid-filled lesion or cavity (cyst). In the present case report, endodontic treatment was performed for both the cases followed by endodontic surgery. Biopsy was done to establish the confirmatory histopathological diagnosis of the periapical lesions. Long-term assessment of the periapical healing following surgery was done in all the three dimensions using CBCT and was found to be more accurate than IOPA radiography. It was concluded that CBCT was a useful modality in making the diagnosis and treatment plan and assessing the outcome of endodontic surgery for large periapical lesions. PMID:23762646

  10. Influence of intracanal irrigants on coronal fracture resistance of endodontically treated and bleached teeth: An In vitro Study

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    Maryam Khoroushi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Irrigation has a key role in the success of endodontic treatment. Intracanal irrigant solutions have adverse effects on the physical properties of dentin. Aim: The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of different irrigation protocols on coronal fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth undergoing bleaching treatment. Design and Materials and Methods: Access cavities were prepared in 120 maxillary premolars which were divided into two groups (n = 60 – Group A: nonbleached, Group B: bleached (B. Each group was subdivided into five subgroups based on irrigation protocol (n = 12; G1: normal saline (NS, G2: 2.5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl, G3: 10% citric acid (CA, G4: 17% ethylene diamine tetra acetic acid, and G5: NaOCl plus CA. In Group B, the teeth were bleached using 38% hydrogen peroxide and 20% carbamide peroxide gels as in-office and at-home bleaching techniques for 3 weeks. All the teeth were restored with composite resin, thermocycled, and incubated for 24 h. The specimens underwent fracture resistance tests. Data were analyzed with ANOVA, Tukey honestly significant difference test, t-test, and Chi-squared test (α =0.05. Results: T-test showed significant differences between each two corresponding subgroups (P < 0.0001. In Group A, NS demonstrated significantly higher fracture resistance compared to others; however, minimum fracture resistance recorded in G2. In Group B, the maximum fracture resistance was recorded in G1, with the minimum being recorded in G5. Samples irrigated with NaOCl and NaOCl plus CA exhibited significantly lower fracture resistance compared to NS subgroup (P < 0.05. Conclusions: Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that the irrigation protocol used during endodontic treatment with/without bleaching can affect the coronal fracture resistance.

  11. Relationship between crown placement and the survival of endodontically treated teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquilino, Steven A; Caplan, Daniel J

    2002-03-01

    Crowns have been considered the restoration of choice for endodontically treated teeth, but their selection has been based primarily on anecdotal evidence. This study tested the hypothesis that crown placement (coronal coverage) is associated with improved survival of endodontically treated teeth when preaccess, endodontic, and restorative factors are controlled. A University of Iowa College of Dentistry treatment database was used to identify permanent teeth that had undergone initial obturation between July 1, 1985, and December 31, 1987. Study patients were restricted to persons with at least 1 dental visit in each 2-year interval from 1985 to 1996; a simple random sample of 280 patients (n = 400 teeth) was selected. Dental charts, radiographs, and computerized databases were examined to ascertain variables of interest and to verify study inclusion criteria. Kaplan-Meier survival estimates were generated for the 203 teeth that satisfied study inclusion criteria. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression models were developed, with standard errors adjusted to account for clustering of teeth within patients. When tooth type and radiographic evidence of caries at access were controlled, the final Cox model showed that endodontically treated teeth not crowned after obturation were lost at a 6.0 times greater rate than teeth crowned after obturation (95% confidence interval: 3.2 to 11.3). Within the limitations of this study, a strong association between crown placement and the survival of endodontically treated teeth was observed. These results may impact treatment planning if long-term tooth retention is the primary goal.

  12. Fracture resistance of structurally compromised and normal endodontically treated teeth restored with different post systems: An in vitro study

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    Vajihesadat Mortazavi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: With the aim of developing methods that could increase the fracture resistance of structurally compromised endodontically treated teeth, this study was conducted to compare the effect of three esthetic post systems on the fracture resistance and failure modes of structurally compromised and normal roots. Materials and Methods: Forty five extracted and endodontically treated maxillary central teeth were assigned to 5 experimental groups (n=9. In two groups, the post spaces were prepared with the corresponding drills of the post systems to be restored with double taper light posts (DT.Light-Post (group DT.N and zirconia posts (Cosmopost (group Zr.N. In other 3 groups thin wall canals were simulated to be restored with Double taper Light posts (DT.W, double taper Light posts and Ribbond fibers (DT+R.W and Zirconia posts (Zr.W. After access cavity restoration and thermocycling, compressive load was applied and the fracture strength values and failure modes were evaluated. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA, Tukey and Fisher exact tests (P<0.05. Results: The mean failure loads (N were 678.56, 638.22, 732.44, 603.44 and 573.67 for groups DT.N, Zr.N, DT.W, DT+R.W and Zr.w respectively. Group DT+R.W exhibited significantly higher resistance to fracture compared to groups Zr.N, DT.W and Zr.w (P<0.05. A significant difference was detected between groups DT.N and Zr.W (P=0.027. Zirconia posts showed significantly higher root fracture compared to fiber posts (P=0.004. Conclusion: The structurally compromised teeth restored with double taper light posts and Ribbond fibers showed the most fracture resistance and their strengths were comparable to those of normal roots restored with double taper light posts. More desirable fracture patterns were observed in teeth restored with fiber posts.

  13. The effect of fiber dowel heights in resin composite cores on restoration failures of endodontically treated teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekayarajjananonth, Trakol; Chitcharus, Nattinee; Winkler, Sheldon; Bogert, Meredith C

    2009-01-01

    In vitro and in vivo testing suggest that fiber posts may reduce the incidence of root fractures of endodontically treated teeth. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the effect of fiber post height in resin composite cores on the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth. Forty maxillary central incisors were randomly divided into 2 control groups (Groups 1 and 2) of 5 teeth each, and 3 experimental groups (Groups 3, 4, and 5) of 10 teeth each. The teeth in Group 1 had their opening restored with composite resin, the teeth in Group 2 were restored with quartz fiber posts without resin composite cores, and the teeth in Groups 3, 4, and 5 were restored with quartz fiber posts of 2, 4, and 6 mm high, respectively, in 6-mm resin composite cores. Ceramic crowns were fabricated for the specimens. Specimens were positioned in a mounting device and aligned at a 130-degree angle to the long axis of each tooth. A universal testing machine was used to apply constant load at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min until failure occurred. The highest fracture load and mode of failure of each specimen was recorded. The highest fracture resistance force was observed in Group 2 (290.38 +/- 48.45 N) and decreased, respectively, in Group 1 (238.98 +/-26.26 N), Group 5 (228.35 +/-58.79 N), Group 4 (221.43 +/-38.74 N), and Group 3 (199.05 +/-58.00 N). According to one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Duncan's test (P teeth should be restored with the longest possible post height while preserving maximum tooth structure.

  14. Restorative outcomes for endodontically treated teeth in the Practitioners Engaged in Applied Research and Learning network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spielman, Howard; Schaffer, Scott B; Cohen, Mitchell G; Wu, Hongyu; Vena, Donald A; Collie, Damon; Curro, Frederick A; Thompson, Van P; Craig, Ronald G

    2012-07-01

    The authors aimed to determine the outcome of and factors associated with success and failure of restorations in endodontically treated teeth in patients in practices participating in the Practitioners Engaged in Applied Research and Learning (PEARL) Network. Practitioner-investigators (P-Is) invited the enrollment of all patients seeking care at participating practices who had undergone primary endodontic therapy and restoration in a permanent tooth three to five years earlier. P-Is classified endodontically reated teeth as restorative failures if the restoration was replaced, the restoration needed replacement or the tooth was cracked or fractured. P-Is from 64 practices enrolled in the study 1,298 eligible patients who had endodontically treated teeth that had been restored. The mean (standard deviation) time to follow-up was 3.9 (0.6) years. Of the 1,298 enrolled teeth, P-Is classified 181 (13.9 percent; 95 percent confidence interval [CI], 12.1-15.8 percent) as restorative failures: 44 (3.4 percent) due to cracks or fractures, 57 (4.4 percent) due to replacement of the original restoration for reasons other than fracture and 80 (6.2 percent) due to need for a new restoration. When analyzing the results by means of multivariate logistic regression, the authors found a greater risk of restorative failure to be associated with canines or incisors and premolars (P = .04), intracoronal restorations (P < .01), lack of preoperative proximal contacts (P < .01), presence of periodontal connective-tissue attachment loss (P < .01), younger age (P = .01), Hispanic/Latino ethnicity (P = .04) and endodontic therapy not having been performed by a specialist (P = .04). These results suggest that molars (as opposed to other types of teeth), full-coverage restorations, preoperative proximal contacts, good periodontal health, non-Hispanic/Latino ethnicity, endodontic therapy performed by a specialist and older patient age are associated with restorative success for

  15. Root resorption of endodontically treated teeth following orthodontic treatment: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannidou-Marathiotou, Ioulia; Zafeiriadis, Anastasios A; Papadopoulos, Moschos A

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this meta-analysis was to investigate the effect of orthodontic treatment on root resorption of endodontically treated teeth compared to vital teeth. A literature search was conducted in 18 electronic databases. Review articles and relevant articles were searched for cross-references. Two independent reviewers screened all articles according to predefined inclusion and exclusion criteria and extracted the corresponding data. The pooled estimate of mean difference of root resorption weighted by the fixed-effect model and the corresponding 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) were used to construct a forest plot by implementing the "RevMan 5.1" software. Quality and heterogeneity assessments as well as publication bias evaluation and sensitivity analyses were performed. Inter-reviewer agreement for data selection, data extraction and quality analysis was evaluated by Cohen's kappa. Six out of 1,942 original papers met the inclusion criteria. Four out of six studies were included in the quantitative analysis. Root resorption was less in endodontically treated teeth than in vital teeth (MD = -0.48 mm; 95 % CI = -0.81 to -0.14 mm). The funnel plot indicated no evidence of publication bias, while no data heterogeneity was present (I(2) = 0 %). However, the overall quality of the included studies was considered as "low." Following orthodontic treatment, endodontically treated teeth exhibit relatively less root resorption than teeth with vital pulps. Clinicians should consider orthodontic movement of endodontically treated teeth as a relatively safe clinical procedure.

  16. Preference for using posts to restore endodontically treated teeth: findings from a survey with dentists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sarkis-Onofre, R.; Pereira-Cenci, T.; Opdam, N.J.M.; Demarco, F.F.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate if clinical experience, whether in relation to length of practice time and/or level of specialization influences the dentist's preference for using posts to restore endodontically treated teeth. A cross sectional study was carried out using a questionnaire with

  17. Preference for using posts to restore endodontically treated teeth: findings from a survey with dentists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sarkis-Onofre, R.; Pereira-Cenci, T.; Opdam, N.J.M.; Demarco, F.F.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate if clinical experience, whether in relation to length of practice time and/or level of specialization influences the dentist's preference for using posts to restore endodontically treated teeth. A cross sectional study was carried out using a questionnaire with

  18. In vitro fracture resistance of endodontically treated central incisors with varying ferrule heights and configurations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Philip L B; Aquilino, Steven A; Gratton, David G; Stanford, Clark M; Tan, Swee Chian; Johnson, William T; Dawson, Deborah

    2005-04-01

    The in vitro effectiveness of a uniform circumferential ferrule has been established in the literature; however, the effect of a nonuniform circumferential ferrule height on fracture resistance is unknown. This in vitro study investigated the resistance to static loading of endodontically treated teeth with uniform and nonuniform ferrule configurations. Fifty extracted intact maxillary human central incisors were randomly assigned to 1 of 5 groups: CRN, no root canal treatment (RCT), restored with a crown; RCT/CRN, no dowel/core, restored with a crown; 2 FRL, 2-mm ferrule, cast dowel/core and crown; 0.5/2 FRL, nonuniform ferrule (2 mm buccal and lingual, 0.5 mm proximal), cast dowel/core and crown; and 0 FRL, no ferrule, cast dowel/core and crown. The teeth were prepared to standardized specifications and stored for 72 hours in 100% humidity prior to testing. Testing was conducted with a universal testing machine with the application of a static load, and the load (N) at failure was recorded. Statistical analysis was performed with a 1-way analysis of variance and the Tukey Honestly Significant Difference test (alpha=.05). The mode of fracture was noted by visual inspection for all specimens. There was strong evidence of group differences in mean fracture strength ( P <.0001). Following adjustment for all pairwise group comparisons, it was found that the lack of a ferrule resulted in a significantly lower mean fracture strength (0 FRL: 264.93 +/- 78.33 N) relative to all other groups. The presence of a nonuniform (0.5 to 2-mm vertical height) ferrule (0.5/2 FRL: 426.64 +/- 88.33 N) resulted in a significant decrease ( P =.0001) in mean fracture strength when compared with the uniform 2-mm vertical ferrule (2 FRL: 587.23 +/- 110.25 N), the group without RCT (CRN: 583.67 +/- 86.09 N), and the RCT-treated tooth with a crown alone (CRN/RCT: 571.04 +/- 154.86 N). The predominant mode of failure was an oblique fracture extending from the lingual margin to the facial

  19. Guided Endodontic Access in Maxillary Molars Using Cone-beam Computed Tomography and Computer-aided Design/Computer-aided Manufacturing System: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara-Mendes, Sônia T de O; Barbosa, Camila de Freitas M; Santa-Rosa, Caroline C; Machado, Vinícius C

    2018-05-01

    The aim of this study was to describe a guided endodontic technique that facilitates access to root canals of molars presenting with pulp calcifications. A 61-year-old woman presented to our service with pain in the upper left molar region. The second and third left molars showed signs of apical periodontitis confirmed by the cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) scans brought to us by the patient at the initial appointment. Conventional endodontic treatment was discontinued given the difficulty in locating the root canals. Intraoral scanning and the CBCT scans were used to plan the access to the calcified canals by means of implant planning software. Guides were fabricated through rapid prototyping and allowed for the correct orientation of a cylindrical drill used to provide access through the calcifications. Second to that, the root canals were prepared with reciprocating endodontic instruments and rested for 2 weeks with intracanal medication. Subsequently, canals were packed with gutta-percha cones using the hydraulic compression technique. Permanent restorations of the access cavities were performed. By comparing the tomographic images, the authors observed a drastic reduction of the periapical lesions as well as the absence of pain symptoms after 3 months. This condition was maintained at the 1-year follow-up. The guided endodontic technique in maxillary molars was shown to be a fast, safe, and predictable therapy and can be regarded as an excellent option for the location of calcified root canals, avoiding failures in complex cases. Copyright © 2018 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Influence of different adhesive systems on bond strength of carbon fiber posts used to restore endodontically treated teeth

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Lorena dos Santos; Reis, Kátia Rodrigues; Ambrosano, Glaucia Maria Bovi; Chuí, Fabíola Mendonça da Silva; Sena, Neylla Teixeira; Carvalhal, Cintia Iara Oda; Oliveira, Jonas Alves de

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of three adhesive systems on resinous bonding of carbon fiber posts on roots of endodontically treated bovine incisors. Thirty bovine lower incisors with similar dimensions were selected for this study. The roots were endodontically treated and subsequently prepared for post cementation. The posts were treated with adhesive systems Scotchbond MultiPurpose Plus – 3M chemical cure (Group I), light cure (Group II) and dual cure (Group III). Car...

  1. Impact of the use of plasma rich in growth factors (PRGF) on the quality of life of patients treated with endodontic surgery when a perforation of sinus membrane occurred. A comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taschieri, S; Corbella, S; Tsesis, I; Del Fabbro, M

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this retrospective investigation was to evaluate the postoperative quality of life after endodontic surgery in maxillary molars when a sinus membrane perforation occurred and platelet concentrates were used. Included patients were treated by microsurgical endodontic treatment in molar and premolar maxillary regions between 2007 and 2010. Patients who fulfilled the inclusion criteria were screened. Data from the quality of life questionnaire were analyzed. The use of plasma rich in growth factors (PRGF) (test group) was compared with a control group when a Schneiderian membrane perforation occurred during endodontic surgery performed with a modern technique in maxillary molars and premolars. A total of 20 patients (12 in the control group and eight in the test group) fulfilled the inclusion criteria. No differences were evaluated at baseline for clinical parameters. Significantly improved patients' quality of life was observed in the test group considering symptoms as swelling, bad breath or taste, and pain. Functional activities were less impaired in the test group and swelling was significantly higher in the control group. In the test group, pain was significantly lower than the control group during the first 6 days after surgery and also, the consumption of painkillers was lower for patients belonging to the test group even if it was not statistically significant. In general, a small sinus membrane perforation (less than 6 mm) during endodontic surgery did not cause severe complications. The use of platelet concentrates could be effective in reducing the impact on patients' quality of life, decreasing pain and surgery side effects as well as swelling.

  2. Effect of different composite core materials on fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with FRC posts

    OpenAIRE

    PANITIWAT, Prapaporn; SALIMEE, Prarom

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective This study evaluated the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with fiber reinforced composite posts, using three resin composite core build-up materials, (Clearfil Photo Core (CPC), MultiCore Flow (MCF), and LuxaCore Z-Dual (LCZ)), and a nanohybrid composite, (Tetric N-Ceram (TNC)). Material and Methods Forty endodontically treated lower first premolars were restored with quartz fiber posts (D.T. Light-Post) cemented with resin cement (Panavia F2...

  3. Endodontic-periodontal management of two rooted maxillary lateral incisor associated with complex radicular lingual groove by using spiral computed tomography as a diagnostic aid: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, A; Kathuria, A; Gandhi, T

    2011-06-01

    To present the successful endodontic and periodontal management of a two rooted maxillary lateral incisor tooth with a complex radicular lingual groove and severe periodontal destruction using spiral computed tomography as a diagnostic aid. A 30-year-old male patient presented with a chief complaint of mobility and discharge of pus in an upper front tooth. Clinical examination revealed a sinus tract on the labial gingival surface and a 10-mm-deep periodontal pocket associated with maxillary left lateral incisor tooth. On the lingual side, a groove emerging from cingulum, continuing mesioapically down the lingual aspect of tooth was found. Intraoral periapical radiographs demonstrated a lateral periodontal defect around the mesial aspect and a diffuse radiolucency at the apex of maxillary left lateral incisor tooth. The sinus tract was traced with gutta-percha to the maxillary left lateral incisor that showed an accessory root surrounded by a large radiolucent area. A spiral computed tomographic scan for better understanding of the complicated root canal morphology of the tooth was performed. Based on the clinical, radiographic and spiral computed tomographic findings, a diagnosis of an endo-perio lesion in tooth 22 was made. Management consisted of conventional root canal treatment, radiculoplasty, root resection of accessory root and surgical curettage of the periodontal defect. Follow-up with radiographic examination at 3 months and 1 year was performed. At 1-year recall, the patient was asymptomatic, there was no evidence of the sinus tract and a 3-mm nonbleeding pocket was present in relation to tooth 22. Progression of hard tissue healing was observed in the periapical radiograph taken 1 year postoperatively. The key to achieving favourable results in this particular type of developmental anomaly is accurate diagnosis and treatment planning. The health of the periapical osseous tissues appears to be the provital factor for tooth retention. A favourable outcome

  4. Endodontic treatment of a maxillary lateral incisor with a perforating internal resorption by using cone beam computed tomography as a diagnostic aid: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takita, Toshiya; Tsurumachi, Tamotsu; Ogiso, Bunnai

    2011-10-01

    This case report presents the endodontic treatment of a maxillary right lateral incisor with a perforating internal resorption in a 50-year-old woman. Radiographically, internal resorption appears as a fairly uniform, radiolucent enlargement of the pulp canal and distortion of the original root canal outline. The use of cone beam computed tomography can help the clinician in making a confirmatory diagnosis and determining the treatment plan before undertaking the actual treatment. After cleaning the root canal space and the resorptive defect by mechanic instrumentation, irrigation, and interim calcium hydroxide dressing, the apical third canal was filled with a gutta-percha point by lateral condensation. The resorptive defect was filled with mineral trioxide aggregate. Follow-up radiographs at 3 years showed adequate repair of the resorption, and the tooth remained asymptomatic.

  5. Fracture Resistance of Endodontically Treated Teeth Restored with 2 Different Fiber-reinforced Composite and 2 Conventional Composite Resin Core Buildup Materials: An In Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eapen, Ashly Mary; Amirtharaj, L Vijay; Sanjeev, Kavitha; Mahalaxmi, Sekar

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to comparatively evaluate the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with 2 fiber-reinforced composite resins and 2 conventional composite resin core buildup materials. Sixty noncarious unrestored human maxillary premolars were collected, endodontically treated (except group 1, negative control), and randomly divided into 5 groups (n = 10). Group 2 was the positive control. The remaining 40 prepared teeth were restored with various direct core buildup materials as follows: group 3 teeth were restored with dual-cure composite resin, group 4 with posterior composite resin, group 5 with fiber-reinforced composite resin, and group 6 with short fiber-reinforced composite resin. Fracture strength testing was performed using a universal testing machine. The results were statistically analyzed by 1-way analysis of variance and the post hoc Tukey test. Fracture patterns for each sample were also examined under a light microscope to determine the level of fractures. The mean fracture resistance values (in newtons) were obtained as group 1 > group 6 > group 4 > group 3 > group 5 > group 2. Group 6 showed the highest mean fracture resistance value, which was significantly higher than the other experimental groups, and all the fractures occurred at the level of enamel. Within the limitations of this study, a short fiber-reinforced composite can be used as a direct core buildup material that can effectively resist heavy occlusal forces against fracture and may reinforce the remaining tooth structure in endodontically treated teeth. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Endodontic management of maxillary second molars fused with paramolar tubercles diagnosed by cone beam computed tomography - two case reports.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preetham Jain

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of nonsurgical endodontic treatment is to eliminate micro-organisms from the root canal system. Adequate knowledge of the root canal morphology and its complexities is essential to render successful endodontic treatment. Variations in tooth form and morphology may be found in the form of anomalous cusps in the crown region or additional roots. In permanent molars, changes in the crown morphology may occur either in the form of an additional tooth (paramolar or supernumerary cusp termed as "paramolar tubercle".

  7. In Vitro Evaluation of the Effect of Tooth Structure Loss on Fracture Resistance of Endodontically Treated Teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirinzad M

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Since preserving the structure of treated teeth is a critical success factor, studying the effects of tooth structure loss on fracture resistance of the tooth tissue appears necessary. The aim of this study was to evaluate the consequences of the loss of different tissues regarding fracture resistance of teeth undergoing root canal treatment without the use of indirect restorations. Methods :In this experimental study, 70 healthy maxillary first premolar teeth were randomly divided into 7 groups of 10 members, including control group, endodontic access preparation only, MOD cavity preparation, cutting buccal cusp, cutting palatal cusp, cutting buccal cusp and marginal ridge, and cutting the palatal cusp and marginal ridge. The coronal section of teeth was restored incrementally with light cure composite. Finally, samples underwent compressive load with 45˚ angle from each cusp slope in the middle of cusp with an instant speed of 1 mm per min in the Instron machine. Fracture resistance was measured and samples were examined under stereo-microscope to evaluate the mode of failure. Results: The resistance to fracture in root canal treated teeth in different groups in order from first to seventh was 797.13 ± 52.92, 722.50 ± 131.40, 432.15 ± 203.20, 592.66 ± 195.86 124.53 ± 33.09, 85.17 ± 18.45, and 26.03 ± 5.21 Newton. ANOVA test showed statistically significant differences between the groups in terms of their fracture resistance (P = 0.000. Conclusions: The results showed that fracture resistance levels of teeth were significantly affected by amount of their tissue loss. In this study, removal of teeth palatal cusp and marginal ridge had a significant effect on decreasing the fracture resistance, while removing the buccal cusps alone cannot have a significant effect.

  8. Management of persistent periapical infection on maxillary lateral incisorby apex resection of: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusri Yusri

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Endodontic failure can be caused by different etiology, one of them is a persistent periapical infection in the root canal system. If the endodontic convensional retreatment is difficult to be done, surgical endodontic will be recomended. Endodontic surgical can eliminate the causative agent of periradicular disease and to restore the biological condition of periodontium and functional. A 22 years old male patient came to the Dental Hospital Hasanuddin University at Tamalanrea with the chief complaint is discomfort of the left maxillary lateral incisor. Radiograph examinations showed radiolucency 4 mm of tooth 22. The diagnosis is chronic apical periodontitis.Three month after endodontic conventional, the patients complaint is settled. Extended care plan will be treated is apex resection. The purpose of this case report is to present the treatment protocol of apex resection on  the maxillary left lateral incisor.

  9. To Cut or not to Cut: Can Large Periapical Cysts be Treated by Endodontic Treatment only?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MHK Motamedi

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The periapical cyst originates from the epithe-lium in a granuloma and is frequently associated with an inflammatory response to a necrotic pulp. This condition is clinically asymptomatic but can result in a slow-growth, bone resorption and swelling in the affected region.The hypothesis: Some authors support that if the endodontic infection is eliminated, the immune system is able to promote lesion repair, while others believe that surgical intervention is invariably nec-essary to remove cyst epithelium. This hypothesis indicates that large periapical cysts may be treated by only nonsurgical endodontic treatment.Evaluation of the hypothesis: Radicular cysts exist in two structurally distinct classes namely, those containing cavities completely enclosed in epithelial lining (periapical true cysts and those containing epithelium-lined cavities that are open to the root canals (periapical pocket cysts. From a clinical point of view a periapical pocket cyst may heal after conventional root canal therapy whereas an apical true cyst is less likely to be resolved without surgical intervention. During the endodontic therapy of teeth associated with periapi-cal cysts, root canal instrumentation could be done slightly beyond the apical foramen. This will produce a transitory acute inflammation and destruction of the protective epithelial layer of the cyst, converting it into a granulated tissue, which has better resolution. Instru-mentation beyond the apical foramen could be carried out because it would help in cyst resolution through the relief of the intra-cystic pressure.

  10. Long-term prognosis of endodontically treated teeth: a retrospective analysis of preoperative factors in molars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setzer, Frank C; Boyer, Keith R; Jeppson, Joshua R; Karabucak, Bekir; Kim, Syngcuk

    2011-01-01

    Long-term predictability of restored endodontically treated teeth is important for the decision of tooth retention versus extraction and implant placement. The purpose of this study was to validate the hypothesis that preoperative factors can predict the long-term prognosis of molars requiring endodontic and restorative treatment for future prognostic investigations. A clinical database was searched for molar endodontic treatments with crown placement and a minimum of 4-year follow-up. Charts of 42 patients with 50 individual treatments were randomly selected. Information concerning crown lengthening; periodontal diagnosis; attachment loss; furcation involvement; mobility; and internal, external, or periradicular resorption was recorded. Radiographs from treatment initiation and follow-up were digitalized. The presence of apical periodontitis was evaluated. Available ferrule was calculated from bitewing radiographs using CAD software (AutoCAD; Autodesk, Cupertino, CA). The resulting data, age, sex, and times of restoration and follow-up were analyzed for correlation with the presence of apical radiolucency at follow-up and the following four possible outcome scenarios: "no event," "nonsurgical retreatment," "surgical retreatment," or "extraction" using Spearman rank order correlation analysis. Patients' ages ranged from 19 to 87 years, 22 were male and 20 female, and 48 teeth (96.0%) were retained at follow-up. Of those, 44 (88.0%) were without intervention ("no event"), and four (8.0%) underwent surgical or nonsurgical retreatment. Two teeth (4.0%) had been extracted. Significant positive correlations existed between "untoward events" (any form of retreatment or extraction) and "prognostic value according to periodontal status" (p = 0.047) and "attachment loss" (p = 0.042). The only preoperative factors significant for the prognosis of restored endodontically treated molars were related to periodontal prognostic value and attachment loss. It can be concluded that

  11. Micro-surgical endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliyas, S; Vere, J; Ali, Z; Harris, I

    2014-02-01

    Non-surgical endodontic retreatment is the treatment of choice for endodontically treated teeth with recurrent or residual disease in the majority of cases. In some cases, surgical endodontic treatment is indicated. Successful micro-surgical endodontic treatment depends on the accuracy of diagnosis, appropriate case selection, the quality of the surgical skills, and the application of the most appropriate haemostatic agents and biomaterials. This article describes the armamentarium and technical procedures involved in performing micro-surgical endodontics to a high standard.

  12. Cermet reinforcement of a weakened endodontically treated root: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, J L

    1992-08-01

    Many clinical applications have been recommended for glass-cermet cement because of its improved properties compared to the original glass-ionomer cements. It has also been accepted as a dentinal substitute that can strengthen teeth. In this paper, an additional clinical application for glass-cermet cement, the reinforcement of weakened endodontically treated roots, is suggested. This technique is in keeping with the trends of tooth conservation and the use of an adhesive restorative material in the restoration of severely damaged teeth by a conservative approach.

  13. [Advantages and disadvantages of endocrown restorations of endodontically treated teeth with large coronal destruction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, X D

    2018-04-09

    The strength of endodontically treated teeth were reduced apparently because of structural damage, therefore further reduction of healthy tissue should be avoided as much as possible in restoration. Endocrown made by chair-side CAD/CAM is some kind of minimal invasive restoration, and the retention of restoration is achieved by reliable bonding and macromechanial retention forces. Without post preparation, the root structure could be resevered. Following the indications and use of biomechanical dentin-like CAD/CAM materials could reduce the adverse effect of tensile stress on cervical part.

  14. Fracture resistance of endodontically treated permanent anterior teeth restored with three different esthetic post systems: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ameet J Kurthukoti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Esthetic coronal reconstruction of fractured anterior teeth is often performed using intra radicular posts. Most of the commonly used commercially esthetic post systems do not exhibit similar physical properties as dentin resulting in failures. Aim: To evaluate and compare the fracture resistance and mode of failure of simulated traumatized permanent central incisors restored with three different post systems including biologic dentin posts. Materials and Methods: A total of 40 recently extracted human maxillary central incisors with similar dimensions were decoronated 2 mm above the cemento-enamel junction and endodontically treated. Ten specimens were randomly selected as the Group I - Control group (core built teeth without intraradicular posts. The remaining 30 teeth were equally divided and restored with zirconia (Group II, n = 10, fiber re-inforced composite (FRC (Group III, n = 10 and biologic dentin posts (Group IV, n = 10 using resin bonded cement and their cores built-up. These samples were embedded in acrylic resin and then secured in a Universal Testing Machine and subjected to fracture resistance testing. The location of failure in the specimens was evaluated using a stereomicroscope. Results: Intergroup comparison revealed that the control group and zirconia post group (522 ± 110 N demonstrated the least fracture resistance, while dentin post group (721 ± 127 N the highest. There was no statistically significant difference between fiber post and dentin post groups. Fractures that were repairable were observed in fiber post and dentin post groups, whereas mostly unrestorable, catastrophic fractures were observed in the zirconia post group. Conclusion: Teeth restored with the biologic dentin post system demonstrated the highest fracture resistance and repairable fractures, closely followed by FRC post system. The least fracture resistance and most catastrophic fractures were demonstrated by the zirconia post system.

  15. Treatment of combined endodontic-periodontic lesions using guided tissue regeneration: clinical case and histology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghezzi, Carlo; Virzì, Mauro; Schupbach, Peter; Broccaioli, Alessandro; Simion, Massimo

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this case report is to histologically evaluate periapical healing after combined endodontic-periodontic treatment. A maxillary left central incisor was treated with conventional endodontic therapy, followed by periodontal surgery. The facial bony defect was filled with a mixture of autologous bone and Bio-Oss. A resorbable membrane was used. Histology showed the presence of new cementum, ligament, and bone around the apex of the treated tooth. This finding was clinically associated with minimal residual probing depth and maximum attachment gain. This histologic report demonstrates the possibility of true regeneration in a case of severe periodontal attachment loss resulting from an endodontic-periodontic lesion.

  16. HEMISECTION: A TREATMENT OPTION FOR AN ENDODONTICALLY TREATED MOLAR WITH VERTICAL ROOT FRACTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anitha

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Vertical root fractures in endodontically treated teeth have long been reported and pose diagnostic difficulties. A h emisection/Root resection procedure which removes the fractured fragments completely, and retains a portion of the compromised tooth offers a predictable treatment option. The key to this rests in ideal case selection invol ving balancing all indications and contraindications. The success of the treatment depends on careful case selection based on a firm set of guidelines. This article presents a case with vertical root fracture in an endodontic treated molar. This article de scribes the case of a 60 - year - old man with a vertical root fracture on the mesial root and a healthy periodontium supporting the distal root making it ideal for retention as well as restoration and support of the final prosthesis. Also, the patient was mot ivated to try and save as much of the tooth as possible. Post - operatively no untoward complication was reported making it an alternative treatment option in patients with vertical root fracture in a molar, willing to retain the remaining tooth portion. Wit h all other factors balanced, it allows for retaining the remaining intact portion of the tooth structure.

  17. Simple direct composite resin restoration on endodontically treated tooth: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahyuni Suci Dwiandhany

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Endodontically treated teeth generally havegreat structure loss so that the resistance to fracture is reduced. Therefore, the post-endodontic restoration design that covers the entire cusp (full cuspal coverage is necessary to increase the resistance of teeth to fracture. The aim of this case report is to present direct onlay restoration technique using composite resin material in non-vital tooth with chronic apical periodontitis. A 74-years-old male patient came to the clinic complaining of discomfort in the lower right posterior tooth related to eating since 1 week ago. Clinical examination revealed a large amalgam restoration on the second lower right molar, the tooth is negative to pulp sensitivity test, and tender to percussion. Radiographically, the tooth showed periapical radiolucency at distal and mesial root. The diagnosis of the tooth was chronic apical periodontitis. The treatment plan is a non-vital root canal treatment with multiple visit. Root canal preparation with rotary files (ProTaper Next, Dentsply, Germany was performed on the first visit and irrigated with NaOCl. On the next visit, during subjective examination, there was no pain complaints and the percussion test was negative so the obturation with a single cone technique can be done. On the final visit, direct onlay restoration using nano-hybrid composite resin material (Polofil NHT, Voco, Germany was performed. In conclusion, after 3 months follow up, the marginal integrity of the restoration remains intact and the tooth were functioned properly.

  18. A comparative evaluation of fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth, with variable marginal ridge thicknesses, restored with composite resin and composite resin reinforced with Ribbond: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaishali Kalburge

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The anatomic shape of maxillary premolars show a tendency towards separation of their cusps during mastication after endodontic treatment. Preservation of the marginal ridge of endodontically treated and restored premolars can act as a strengthening factor and improve the fracture resistance. Objectives: To evaluate the effect of varying thickness of marginal ridge on the fracture resistance of endodontically treated maxillary premolars restored with composite and Ribbond reinforced composites. Materials and Methods: One hundred and twenty, freshly extracted, non carious human mature maxillary premolars were selected for this experimental in vitro study. The teeth were randomly assigned in to twelve groups ( n = 10. Group 1 received no preparation. All the premolars in other groups were root canal treated. In subgroups of 3 and 4, DO cavities were prepared while MOD cavities were prepared for all subgroups of group 2, the dimensions of the proximal boxes were kept uniform. In group 3 and 4 the dimensions of the mesial marginal ridge were measured using a digital Vernier caliper as 2 mm, 1.5 mm, 1 mm and 0.5 mm in the respective subgroups. All samples in groups 2.2 and all the subgroups of 3 were restored with a dentin bonding agent and resin composite. The teeth in group 2.3 and all subgroups of 4 were restored with composite reinforced with Ribbond fibers. The premolars were submitted to axial compression up to failure at 45 degree angle to a palatal cusp in universal testing machine. The mean load necessary to fracture was recorded in Newtons and the data was analysed. Results: There was a highly significant difference between mean values of force required to fracture teeth in group 1 and all subgroups of group 2, 3 and 4 (i.e., P < 0.01 Conclusion: On the basis of static loading, preserving the mesial marginal ridge with thicknesses of mm, 1.5 mm, 1 mm and 0.5 mm, composite restored and Ribbond reinforced composite restored

  19. Nasopalatine duct cyst mimicking an endodontic periapical lesion: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bains, Rhythm; Verma, Promila; Chandra, Anil; Tikku, A P; Singh, Nimisha

    2016-01-01

    Lesions of nonendodontic origin, such as nasopalatine or globulomaxillary cysts, may mimic periapical radiolucencies associated with pulpal pathosis, and incorrect diagnosis may lead to unnecessary endodontic treatment. Horizontal root fractures most commonly affect the maxillary central and lateral incisors. Prognosis depends largely on the level of fracture; fractures in the apical third have the best prognosis, and those in the cervical third have the worst. This case report discusses surgical and restorative management of a patient who had a nasopalatine cyst that had been misdiagnosed and treated as an endodontic lesion of the maxillary right central incisor as well as a midroot horizontal fracture of the adjacent lateral incisor.

  20. Detection of vertical root fractures in vivo in endodontically treated teeth by cone-beam computed tomography scans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Metska, M.E.; Aartman, I.H.A.; Wesselink, P.R.; Özok, A.R.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The presence of a vertical root fracture (VRF) in an endodontically treated tooth has an immense impact on the treatment’s outcome. Early diagnosis of a VRF is imperative to avoid overtreatment and extensive bone loss. Our study aimed to examine the validity of 2 cone-beam computed

  1. Endodontic management of a maxillary lateral incisor with an unusual root dilaceration diagnosed with cone beam computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Mohammed Eid Mahgoub

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Anterior teeth may have aberrant anatomical variations in the roots and root canals. Root dilaceration is an anomaly characterized by the displacement of the root of a tooth from its normal alignment with the crown which may be a consequence of injury during tooth development. This report aims to present a successful root canal treatment of a maxillary lateral incisor with unusual palatal root dilaceration (diagnosed with cone beam computed tomography in which the access cavity was prepared from the labial aspect of the tooth to provide a straight line access to the root canal system which was instrumented using OneShape rotary file system and precurved K-files up to size 50 under copious irrigation of 2.5% NaOCl using a side-vented irrigation tip. The canal was then obturated using the warm vertical compaction technique.

  2. Estimation of the failure risk of a maxillary premolar with different crack depths with endodontic treatment by computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing ceramic restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chun-Li; Chang, Yen-Hsiang; Hsieh, Shih-Kai; Chang, Wen-Jen

    2013-03-01

    This study evaluated the risk of failure for an endodontically treated premolar with different crack depths, which was shearing toward the pulp chamber and was restored by using 3 different computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing ceramic restoration configurations. Three 3-dimensional finite element models designed with computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing ceramic onlay, endocrown, and conventional crown restorations were constructed to perform simulations. The Weibull function was incorporated with finite element analysis to calculate the long-term failure probability relative to different load conditions. The results indicated that the stress values on the enamel, dentin, and luting cement for endocrown restorations exhibited the lowest values relative to the other 2 restoration methods. Weibull analysis revealed that the overall failure probabilities in a shallow cracked premolar were 27%, 2%, and 1% for the onlay, endocrown, and conventional crown restorations, respectively, in the normal occlusal condition. The corresponding values were 70%, 10%, and 2% for the depth cracked premolar. This numeric investigation suggests that the endocrown provides sufficient fracture resistance only in a shallow cracked premolar with endodontic treatment. The conventional crown treatment can immobilize the premolar for different cracked depths with lower failure risk. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Mandibular Bone and Soft Tissues Necrosis Caused by an Arsenical Endodontic Preparation Treated with Piezoelectric Device

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    A. Giudice

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a case of wide mandibular bone necrosis associated with significant soft tissues injury after using an arsenical endodontic preparation in the right lower second molar for endodontic purpose. Authors debate about the hazardous effects of the arsenic paste and the usefulness of piezosurgery for treatment of this drug related bone necrosis.

  4. Combined endodontic therapy and periapical surgery with MTA and bone graft in treating palatogingival groove.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Mudit; Vashisth, Pallavi; Arora, Rachita; Dwivedi, Swati

    2013-04-18

    A 37-year-old male patient reported to our department with chief complaint of pain and pus discharge from the labial marginal gingiva in the maxillary right lateral incisor region since last 4 months. Clinically, the tooth was hypersensitive to percussion and palpation but failed to respond to pulp sensitivity testing. After periodontal probing, a palatal groove was observed which started at the cingulum and travelled apically and laterally, associated with a pocket depth of 8 mm. Occlusal radiograph showed circumscribed radiolucency measuring 5 mm×7 mm in diameter at the apex of the tooth. A clinical diagnosis of chronic apical abscess was established. The case was treated with a combination of mineral trioxide aggregate and bone graft. At the 6-month follow-up visit, the tooth showed progressive healing without sinus track and sulcular bleeding.

  5. Maxillary sinus floor extension and posterior tooth inclination in adolescent patients with Class II Division 1 malocclusion treated with maxillary first molar extractions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Livas, Christos; Halazonetis, Demetrios J.; Booij, Johan Willem; Pandis, Nikolaos; Tu, Yu-Kang; Katsaros, Christos

    Introduction: Our objective was to investigate potential associations between maxillary sinus floor extension and inclination of maxillary second premolars and second molars in patients with Class II Division 1 malocclusion whose orthodontic treatment included maxillary first molar extractions.

  6. Maxillary sinus floor extension and posterior tooth inclination in adolescent patients with Class II Division 1 malocclusion treated with maxillary first molar extractions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Livas, C.; Halazonetis, D.J.; Booij, J.W.; Pandis, N.; Tu, Y.K.; Katsaros, C.

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Our objective was to investigate potential associations between maxillary sinus floor extension and inclination of maxillary second premolars and second molars in patients with Class II Division 1 malocclusion whose orthodontic treatment included maxillary first molar extractions.

  7. SEM and microCT validation for en face OCT imagistic evaluation of endodontically treated human teeth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrutiu, Meda L.; Nica, Luminita; Sinescu, Cosmin; Topala, Florin; Ionita, Ciprian; Bradu, Adrian; Petrescu, Emanuela L.; Pop, Daniela M.; Rominu, Mihai; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh.

    2011-03-01

    Successful root canal treatment is based on diagnosis, treatment planning, knowledge of tooth anatomy, endodontic access cavity design, controlling the infection by thorough cleaning and shaping, methods and materials used in root canal obturation. An endodontic obturation must be a complete, three-dimensional filling of the root canal system, as close as possible to cemento-dentinal junction, without massive overfilling or underfilling. There are several known methods which are used to assess the quality of the endodontic sealing, but most are invasive. These lead to the destruction of the samples and often no conclusion could be drawn in respect to the existence of any microleakage in the investigated areas of interest. Using an time domain en-face OCT system, we have recently demonstrated real time thorough evaluation of quality of root canal fillings. The purpose of this in vitro study was to validate the en face OCT imagistic evaluation of endodontically treated human teeth by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and microcomputer tomography (μCT). SEM investigations evidenced the nonlinear aspect of the interface between the endodontic filling material and the root canal walls and materials defects in some samples. The results obtained by μCT revealed also some defects inside the root-canal filling and at the interfaces between the material and the root canal walls. The advantages of the OCT method consist in non-invasiveness and high resolution. In addition, en face OCT investigations permit visualization of the more complex stratified structure at the interface between the filling material and the dental hard tissue.

  8. Effects of the Ratio between Pigment and Bleaching Gel on the Fracture Resistance and Dentin Microhardness of endodontically treated Teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloza, Marina Og; Jordão-Basso, Keren Cf; Bandeca, Matheus C; Costa, Samuel O; Borges, Alvaro H; Tonetto, Mateus R; Tirintan, Fabio C; Keine, Kátia C; Kuga, Milton C

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of bleaching gel using 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP), associated with red carmine pigment (RC), in the 3:1 or 1:1 ratio, on fracture resistance and dentin microhardness of endodontically treated teeth. A total of 40 lower incisors were endodontically treated and divided into four groups (n = 10), according to the bleaching protocol: G1 (HP3), 35% HP + RC (3:1); G2 (HP1), 35% HP + RC (1:1); G3 (positive), 38% HP; and G4 (negative), unbleached. Four dental bleaching sessions were performed. The dental crowns were restored after the last session and submitted to the fracture resistance test. Totally, 60 specimens from the endodontically treated lower incisor crowns were prepared to evaluate the effects on dentin microhardness. The analysis was measured (in Knoop) prior to and after the last dental bleaching session using similar bleaching protocols. G2 presented the lowest fracture resistance (p 0.05). No difference was observed in the reduction of dentin microhardness among the groups (p > 0.05). A 1:1 ratio (bleaching gel:pigment) caused a significant fracture resistance reduction in relation to the other protocols. No effect on the dentin microhardness reduction was observed. The pigment addition to the bleaching agent accelerates the bleaching chemical reaction. However, no studies have evaluated the ideal proportion to optimize tooth bleaching.

  9. Accuracy of digital radiography and cone beam computed tomography on periapical radiolucency detection in endodontically treated teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venskutonis, Tadas; Daugela, Povilas; Strazdas, Marijus; Juodzbalys, Gintaras

    2014-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the accuracy of intraoral digital periapical radiography and cone beam computed tomography in the detection of periapical radiolucencies in endodontically treated teeth. Radiographic images (cone beam computed tomography [CBCT] scans and digital periapical radiography [PR] images) from 60 patients, achieved from September 2008 to July 2013, were retrieved from databases of the Department of Oral Diseases, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences. Twenty patients met inclusion criteria and were selected for further evaluation. In 20 patients (42.4 [SD 12.1] years, 65% men and 35% women) a total of 35 endodontically treated teeth (1.75 [SD 0.91]; 27 in maxilla and 8 in mandible) were evaluated. Overall, it was observed a statistical significant difference between the number of periapical lesions observed in the CBCT (n = 42) and radiographic (n = 24) examinations (P cone beam computed tomography scans were more accurate compared to digital periapical radiographs for detecting periapical radiolucencies in endodontically treated teeth. The difference was more pronounced in molar teeth.

  10. Fibre reinforcement in a structurally compromised endodontically treated molar: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renita Soares

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The reconstruction of structurally compromised posterior teeth is a rather challenging procedure. The tendency of endodontically treated teeth (ETT to fracture is considerably higher than vital teeth. Although posts and core build-ups followed by conventional crowns have been generally employed for the purpose of reconstruction, this procedure entails sacrificing a considerable amount of residual sound enamel and dentin. This has drawn the attention of researchers to fibre reinforcement. Fibre-reinforced composite (FRC, designed to replace dentin, enables the biomimetic restoration of teeth. Besides improving the strength of the restoration, the incorporation of glass fibres into composite resins leads to favorable fracture patterns because the fibre layer acts as a stress breaker and stops crack propagation. The following case report presents a technique for reinforcing a badly broken-down ETT with biomimetic materials and FRC. The proper utilization of FRC in structurally compromised teeth can be considered to be an economical and practical measure that may obviate the use of extensive prosthetic treatment.

  11. A survey of Australian prosthodontists: The use of posts in endodontically treated teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambrook, Raelene; Burrow, Michael

    2018-05-09

    This study aimed to gain insight into common practices of Australian prosthodontists when placing a post in an endodontically treated tooth (ETT). A 17-question open- and closed- format questionnaire was sent to registered Australian prosthodontists. The response rate was 55% (n=95). The majority of respondents indicated the purpose of a post was to retain a core (n=94, 99%). The decision to place a post is affected by the quantity of remaining tooth structure (n=91, 96%) and the definitive restoration (n=68, 72%). The ideal post length is neither a short nor long post with the most frequent response (n=52, 34%) being 'as long as possible without disturbing the apical seal'. The apical seal requirements were defined as 4-5mm of Gutta Percha for 77% of respondents. The most preferred post type was a custom cast metal post (n=85, 49%). The most popular luting cement was resin composite (n=84, 39%). The results from this survey do not provide a definitive guide for restoring an ETT. However, it illustrates how Australian prosthodontists address this clinical challenge. The multiple responses received for a number of questions suggest that the material and technique employed in the Australian context is influenced by the individual clinical case. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  12. Management of an endo perio lesion in a maxillary canine using platelet-rich plasma concentrate and an alloplastic bone substitute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Sangeeta

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the efficacy of platelet-rich plasma concentrate in the management of a cirumferential, infrabony defect associated with an endoperio lesion in a maxillary canine. A 45 year-old male patient with an endoperio lesion in the left maxillary canine was initially treated with endodontic therapy. Following the endodontic treatment, the circumferential, infrabony defect was treated using platelet-rich plasma and an alloplastic bone substitute. At the end of three months, there was a gain in the clinical attachment level and reduction in probing depth. Radiographic evidence showed that there was significant bony fill. The results were maintained at the time of recall nine months later.

  13. Comparison of Radicular Peroxide Leakage from four Commonly used Bleaching agents following Intracoronal Bleaching in Endodontically treated teeth - An In Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhu, Ks; Hegde, Swaroop; Mathew, Sylvia; Lata, DA; Bhandi, Shilpa H; N, Shruthi

    2013-08-01

    Non vital bleaching is simple, conservative procedure for esthetic correction of discolored endodontically treated teeth. The aim of this study was to determine and compare the amount of peroxide leakage from four different bleaching agents i.e superoxol, sodium perborate, combination of superoxol & sodium perborate and carbamide peroxide during intracoronal bleaching, as the safe and effective bleaching is the need of the hour. 50 extracted maxillary centrals were selected for the study. Following standardized protocol access, cleaning and shaping by step back technique and obturation was done using guttapercha and AH plus sealer. Access was sealed with Cavit G and outer root surface was coated with wax and nail varnish. The teeth were separated into crown and root and the root portion was placed in plastic tube containing distilled water for 7days.After incubation, 3mm of gutta-percha was removed below CEJ and 2mm glass ionomer cement base was placed. Grouped into five categories based on the bleaching agent placed in pulp chamber as -group1 (control)-distilled water, group 2-sodium perborate with distilled water , group 3- 30% hydrogen peroxide ,group 4-mixture of sodium perborate and 30% hydrogen peroxide and group 5-10% carbamide peroxide gel. Peroxide leakage was measured after 24hrs using ferrothiocyanate method and optical density using spectrophotometer. Statistical analysis of the data was conducted using ANOVA and multiple comparisons within the groups was done using BONFERRONI method (Post-Hoc tests). The results showed highest peroxide penetration from 30% hydrogen peroxide followed by mixture of sodium perborate with 30% hydrogen peroxide, mixture of sodium perborate with distilled water and least penetration from 10% carbamide peroxide gel. The results were statistically significant. Radicular peroxide leakage in 10% carbamide peroxide was significantly lower than the other tested bleaching agents making it a very safe alternative for intracoronal

  14. Long-term prognosis of maxillary sinus malignant tumor patients treated by fast neutron radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kishi, Hirohisa; Numata, Tsutomu; Yuza, Jun; Suzuki, Haruhiko; Konno, Akiyoshi [Chiba Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine; Miyamoto, Tadaaki

    1995-03-01

    From 1976 through 1990, 19 patients with maxillary sinus malignant tumor were treated with combination therapy consisting of maxillectomy and radiation of fast neutron. Fast neutron radiotherapy was performed at National Institute of Radiological Sciences. Eight patients had adenoid cystic carcinomas, three patients squamous cell carcinomas, one patient a carcinoma in pleomorphic adenoma, four patients fibrosarcomas, one patient osteosarcoma, one patient chondrosarcoma and one patient rhabdomyosarcoma. Fast neutron therapy after/before surgery was effective in fresh cases with T2-3N0M0 adenoid cystic carcinomas and sarcomas (except for fibrosarcoma). Nine patients were alive more than three years after treatment. And serious complications of fast neutron radiation therapy appeared in six of these nine patients. Visual impairment of opposite side occurred in four patients. Bone necrosis occured in one patient and brain dysfunction in one patient. (author).

  15. Long-term prognosis of maxillary sinus malignant tumor patients treated by fast neutron radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishi, Hirohisa; Numata, Tsutomu; Yuza, Jun; Suzuki, Haruhiko; Konno, Akiyoshi; Miyamoto, Tadaaki.

    1995-01-01

    From 1976 through 1990, 19 patients with maxillary sinus malignant tumor were treated with combination therapy consisting of maxillectomy and radiation of fast neutron. Fast neutron radiotherapy was performed at National Institute of Radiological Sciences. Eight patients had adenoid cystic carcinomas, three patients squamous cell carcinomas, one patient a carcinoma in pleomorphic adenoma, four patients fibrosarcomas, one patient osteosarcoma, one patient chondrosarcoma and one patient rhabdomyosarcoma. Fast neutron therapy after/before surgery was effective in fresh cases with T2-3N0M0 adenoid cystic carcinomas and sarcomas (except for fibrosarcoma). Nine patients were alive more than three years after treatment. And serious complications of fast neutron radiation therapy appeared in six of these nine patients. Visual impairment of opposite side occurred in four patients. Bone necrosis occured in one patient and brain dysfunction in one patient. (author)

  16. [Comparing the anchorage effects of micro-implant and J hook on treating patients with maxillary protrusion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xin; Liu, Guo-yuan; Jiang, Yong-lian

    2015-10-01

    To investigate the differences in anchorage effects between micro-implants and J hook in treating patients with Class II division 1 maxillary protrusion. Thirty-one cases of adult patients with Class II division 1 maxillary protrusion were treated. They were divided into 2 groups depending on their selection. The first group included 17 patients for micro-implant anchorage, who adopted micro-implant and sliding mechanism to close maxillary extraction space and depress the mandibular molar. The second group encompassed 14 cases for J hook, who adopted sliding mechanism, J hooks in high traction and Class II intermaxillary traction to close extraction space. X-ray lateral cephalometric radiographs were measured before and after treatment, and SPSS16.0 software package was employed to compare the differences in soft and hard tissue changes before and after treatment between 2 groups. There were statistically significant differences in SNB, ANB, MP-FH, U1-Y, U6-Y, L6-MP, NLA, and UL-Y between the 2 groups before and after treatment, while there was no significant difference in SNA, U1-SN, U1-X, and U6-X between the 2 groups. In treating patients with Class II division 1 maxillary protrusion, micro-implant has stronger anchorage effects than J hook, while at the same time depressing the mandibular molars, and making it more favorable to improve Class II faces.

  17. Detection of vertical root fractures in endodontically treated teeth by a cone beam computed tomography scan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hassan, B.; Metska, M.E.; Özok, A.R.; van der Stelt, P.; Wesselink, P.R.

    2009-01-01

    Our aim was to compare the accuracy of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans and periapical radiographs (PRs) in detecting vertical root fractures (VRFs) and to assess the influence of root canal filling (RCF) on fracture visibility. Eighty teeth were endodontically prepared and divided into

  18. CAD/CAM Preparation Design Effects on Endodontically Treated and Restored Molars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-24

    teeth remains a challenge for clinicians, as endodontic treatment results in a tooth that represents a stark biomechanical difference compared to...using a LED-based visible light curing ( VLC ) unit (Bluephase G2, lvoclar-Vivadent, Amherst, NY, USA) whose irradiance was periodically verified (1000 mW

  19. Long-term observation of endodontic surgical intervention to treat root perforation and apical periodontitis: a case report of an amalgam-restored tooth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsurumachi, Tamotsu; Hayashi, Makoto

    2003-10-01

    A case of crestal root perforation and periapical lesion in a maxillary left lateral incisor is reported. Teeth with root perforation present technical difficulties in their clinical management because of their complex defects. In the present case, surgical endodontic treatment was chosen. The apical and lateral pathology was curetted, the tooth root was resected, and a retrograde root restoration of amalgam was placed in a root-end cavity and perforation site. A 10-year follow-up clinical and radiographic examination showed an asymptomatic tooth with osseous healing proceeding.

  20. Fracture resistance of endodontically treated roots filled with resilon and guttapercha - A comparative in-vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh R Shetty

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare in vitro the fracture resistance of endodontically treated roots filled with Resilon and Gutta-percha. Methodology: Eighty extracted single canal teeth were selected and randomly assigned to five groups of sixteen teeth each. Teeth were sectioned using a diamond disc so as to obtain a root length of 14±1 mm. Roots were instrumented using .04 taper Profile rotary system to an apical size of 40 and obturated using .04 taper single cone (size 40 as follows: Group 1: Resilon .04 taper cone and Epiphany Self etching sealer, Group 2: .04 taper gutta-percha cone and AH Plus sealer ,Group 3: .04 taper gutta-percha cone and Roeko Seal Automix sealer, Group 4: .04 taper gutta-percha cone and Zinc oxide Eugenol sealer , Group 5: .04 taper gutta-percha cone without the use of a sealer. Following obturation, teeth were mounted in Poly Vinyl Chloride jigs using self cure acrylic resin such that 9mm of the root remained exposed. Fracture resistance testing was done using Instron testing machine using a vertical load applied perpendicular to the root surface. Statistical analysis was done using ANOVA, Tukey HSD and Student′s ′t′ test. Results: Very highly significant difference was observed between the groups (P=.001. Resilon with Epiphany group demonstrated highest mean fracture resistance value and gutta-percha without sealer displayed the least, comparative results were highly significant. Resilon compared to gutta-percha with Roeko Seal Automix (P=.037 and Zinc Oxide Eugenolsealers (P=.029 showed statistically significant difference. AH plus group showed significantly higher value compared to gutta-percha without sealer. Conclusions: Filling the root canals with Resilon increased the in vitro fracture resistance of endodontically treated roots compared to standard gutta-percha techniques. Adhesive sealers are more beneficial in increasing the fracture resistance of

  1. Accuracy of Digital Radiography and Cone Beam Computed Tomography on Periapical Radiolucency Detection in Endodontically Treated Teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadas Venskutonis

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of the present study was to compare the accuracy of intraoral digital periapical radiography and cone beam computed tomography in the detection of periapical radiolucencies in endodontically treated teeth. Material and Methods: Radiographic images (cone beam computed tomography [CBCT] scans and digital periapical radiography [PR] images from 60 patients, achieved from September 2008 to July 2013, were retrieved from databases of the Department of Oral Diseases, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences. Twenty patients met inclusion criteria and were selected for further evaluation. Results: In 20 patients (42.4 [SD 12.1] years, 65% men and 35% women a total of 35 endodontically treated teeth (1.75 [SD 0.91]; 27 in maxilla and 8 in mandible were evaluated. Overall, it was observed a statistical significant difference between the number of periapical lesions observed in the CBCT (n = 42 and radiographic (n = 24 examinations (P < 0.05. In molar teeth, CBCT identify a significantly higher amount of periapical lesions than with the radiographic method (P < 0.05. There were significant differences between CBCT and PR in the mean number of lesions identified per tooth (1.2 vs 0.66, P = 0.03, number of teeth with lesions (0.71 vs 0.46, P = 0.03 and number of lesions identified per canal (0.57 vs 0.33, P = 0.005. Considering CBCT as “gold standard” in lesion detection with the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy considering as score 1, then the same parameters of PR were 0.57, 1 and 0.76 respectively. Conclusions: Within the limitations of the present study, it can be concluded that cone beam computed tomography scans were more accurate compared to digital periapical radiographs for detecting periapical radiolucencies in endodontically treated teeth. The difference was more pronounced in molar teeth.

  2. Intraradicular Splinting with Endodontic Instrument of Horizontal Root Fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ersan Çiçek

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Root fractures, defined as fractures involving dentine, cementum, and pulpal and supportive tissues, constitute only 0.5–7% of all dental injuries. Horizontal root fractures are commonly observed in the maxillary anterior region and 75% of these fractures occur in the maxillary central incisors. Methods. A 14-year-old female patient was referred to our clinic three days after a traffic accident. In radiographic examination, the right maxillary central incisor was fractured horizontally in apical thirds. Initially, following local infiltrative anesthetics, the coronal fragment was repositioned and this was radiographically confirmed. Then the stabilization splint was applied and remained for three months. After three weeks, according to the results of the vitality tests, the right and left central incisors were nonvital. For the right central incisor, both the coronal and apical fragments were involved in the endodontic preparation. Results. For the right central tooth, both the coronal and apical root fragments were endodontically treated and obturated at a single visit with white mineral trioxide aggregate whilst the fragments were stabilized internally by insertion of a size 40 Hedstrom stainless-steel endodontic file into the canal. Conclusion. Four-year follow-up examination revealed satisfactory clinical and radiographic findings with hard tissue repair of the fracture line.

  3. IPS Empress onlays luted with two dual-cured resin cements for endodontically treated teeth: a 3-year clinical evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atali, Pinar Yilmaz; Cakmakcioglu, Ozcan; Topbasi, Bulent; Turkmen, Cafer; Suslen, Ozlem

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of IPS Empress ceramic onlays luted with two dual-cured adhesive resin cements for endodontically treated teeth. Twenty molar teeth were restored with all-ceramic restorations luted randomly with Maxcem or Clearfil Esthetic Cement and DC Bond Kit luting systems (n = 10 each) in 20 patients. The restorations were assessed using modified US Public Health Service criteria at baseline, 6 months, and 1, 2, and 3 years. A statistically significant deterioration was found for the criteria marginal integrity, anatomical form, and surface roughness. For luting of ceramic onlays, no difference between the two luting systems was detected.

  4. [Radiologic picture of maxillary sinus aspergilloma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczmarek, I; Bilska, J; Osmola, K; Nowaczyk, M T

    2010-06-01

    Mycotic infection of paranasal sinus could be the etiological factor of chronic sinusitis. The increase in number of fungal sinusitis cases have been reported recently among nonimmunocompromised patient after endodontic treatment of maxillary teeth. Nonspecific clinical signs and incorrect radiologic pictures interpretation as well as loss of therapeutic standards seems to be the cause of false negative diagnosis and difficulties in treatment of fungal sinusitis. Clinical and radiological picture of maxillary sinus aspergillosis was described in this paper. In the period of 2006-2009 in the Department of Maxillo-Facial Surgery 19 patient with fungal maxillary sinusitis was treated. The endodontic treatment of maxillary teeth of the related side was performed previously in 80% examined cases. In 2 cases there were immunocompromised patients with immunosuppressive treatment. In 16 cases patients were referred to our Department due to metallic foreign body of the maxillary sinus. Routine diagnostic radiological imaging was performed in each case: paranasal sinus view--Water's view and panoramic radiograph (orthopantomograph). In 4 cases imaging was extended with computer tomography (CT) visualization. The surgical treatment was performed in each case. The final diagnosis was puted on histopathological examination and fungal culture. In 16 cases of analysed group histopathological examination and fungal culture revealed aspergilosis. In 2 cases fungal culture was negative, but histopathology slices confirm presence of hyphae of Aspergillus. In 1 case the root canal sealer was found in the maxillary sinus. In none case invasive form of aspergillosis was confirmed. In all cases Water's view of paranasal sinuses and ortopantomograph showed partially or totally clouded sinus with well-defined, single or multifocal radiopaque object similar to metallic foreign body. Characteristic finding in CT imaging was well-defined radiodence concretions that have been attributed to

  5. Cephalometric evaluation of maxillary retrognathism cases treated with FR-3 appliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biren, S; Erverdi, N

    1993-09-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the efficiency of the FR-3 appliance on functional Cl III malocclusion cases. A total of 45 functional Cl III cases were chosen from a general clinic intake of which 25 were treated with the FR-3 appliance and 20 were untreated and were taken as a control group. Patients that were treated with FR-3 had the following characteristics: Cl III with maxillary deficiency; functional anterior cross-bite; absence of anterior open-bite; patients in mixed dentition. The mean age in the treatment group was 8.4 years 8.8 years in the control group. The observation period was one year for both groups. The results were as follows: Sagittal forward growth stimulation was not observed in the maxilla. Mandibular growth was redirected in the vertical direction. The SNB angle decreased in that the mandible rotated downward and backward. The ANB angle increased. There was an increase in total and lower anterior facial height and reduction in the overbite. Another skeletal change observed was the increase in the cranial flexure angle. Improved dental results were a significant amount of overjet increase and a decrease in the IMPA. There was also a beneficial effect on the soft tissue profile.

  6. Maxillary sinusitis and periapical abscess following periodontal therapy: a case report using three-dimensional evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chih-Hao; Brunsvold, Michael A

    2006-01-01

    Maxillary sinusitis may develop from the extension of periodontal disease. In this case, reconstructed three-dimensional images from multidetector spiral computed tomographs were helpful in evaluating periodontal bony defects and their relationship with the maxillary sinus. A 42-year-old woman in good general health presented with a chronic deep periodontal pocket on the palatal and interproximal aspects of tooth #14. Probing depths of the tooth ranged from 2 to 9 mm, and it exhibited a Class 1 mobility. Radiographs revealed a close relationship between the root apex and the maxillary sinus. The patient's periodontal diagnosis was localized severe chronic periodontitis. Treatment of the tooth consisted of cause-related therapy, surgical exploration, and bone grafting. A very deep circumferential bony defect at the palatal root of tooth #14 was noted during surgery. After the operation, the wound healed without incidence, but 10 days later, a maxillary sinusitis and periapical abscess developed. To control the infection, an evaluation of sinus and alveolus using computed tomographs was performed, systemic antibiotics were prescribed, and endodontic treatment was initiated. Two weeks after surgical treatment, the infection was relieved with the help of antibiotics and endodontic treatment. Bilateral bony communications between the maxillary sinus and periodontal bony defect of maxillary first molars were shown on three-dimensional computed tomographs. The digitally reconstructed images added valuable information for evaluating the periodontal defects. Three-dimensional images from spiral computed tomographs (CT) aided in evaluating and treating the close relationship between maxillary sinus disease and adjacent periodontal defects.

  7. Effect of different composite core materials on fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with FRC posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panitiwat, Prapaporn; Salimee, Prarom

    2017-01-01

    This study evaluated the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with fiber reinforced composite posts, using three resin composite core build-up materials, (Clearfil Photo Core (CPC), MultiCore Flow (MCF), and LuxaCore Z-Dual (LCZ)), and a nanohybrid composite, (Tetric N-Ceram (TNC)). Forty endodontically treated lower first premolars were restored with quartz fiber posts (D.T. Light-Post) cemented with resin cement (Panavia F2.0). Samples were randomly divided into four groups (n=10). Each group was built-up with one of the four core materials following its manufacturers' instructions. The teeth were embedded in acrylic resin blocks. Nickel-Chromium crowns were fixed on the specimens with resin cement. The fracture resistance was determined using a universal testing machine with a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min at 1350 to the tooth axis until failure occurred. All core materials used in the study were subjected to test for the flexural modulus according to ISO 4049:2009. One-way ANOVA and Bonferroni multiple comparisons test indicated that the fracture resistance was higher in the groups with CPC and MCF, which presented no statistically significant difference (p>0.05), but was significantly higher than in those with LCZ and TNC (paligned with the same tendency of fracture loads. Among the cores used in this study, the composite core with high filler content tended to enhance fracture thresholds of teeth restored with fiber posts more than others.

  8. Physical and mechanical properties of a thermomechanically treated NiTi wire used in the manufacture of rotary endodontic instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, E S J; Peixoto, I F C; Viana, A C D; Oliveira, I I; Gonzalez, B M; Buono, V T L; Bahia, M G A

    2012-05-01

    To compare physical and mechanical properties of one conventional and one thermomechanically treated nickel-titanium (NiTi) wire used to manufacture rotary endodontic instruments. Two NiTi wires 1.0 mm in diameter were characterized; one of them, C-wire (CW), was processed in the conventional manner, and the other, termed M-Wire (MW), received an additional heat treatment according to the manufacturer. Chemical composition was determined by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, phase constitution by XRD and the transformation temperatures by DSC. Tensile loading/unloading tests and Vickers microhardness measurements were performed to assess the mechanical behaviour. Data were analysed using analysis of variance (α = 0.05). The two wires showed approximately the same chemical composition, close to the 1 : 1 atomic ratio, and the β-phase was the predominant phase present. B19' martensite and the R-phase were found in MW, in agreement with the higher transformation temperatures found in this wire compared with CW, whose transformation temperatures were below room temperature. Average Vickers microhardness values were similar for MW and CW (P = 0.91). The stress at the transformation plateau in the tensile load-unload curves was lower and more uniform in the M-Wire, which also showed the smallest stress hysteresis and apparent elastic modulus. The M-Wire had physical and mechanical properties that can render endodontic instruments more flexible and fatigue resistant than those made with conventionally processed NiTi wires. © 2011 International Endodontic Journal.

  9. Unusual anatomy of maxillary central incisor with two roots

    OpenAIRE

    T S Ashwini Shivakumar; Saleem Makandar; Ajay Kadam

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Knowledge of root canal morphology is essential for successful endodontic therapy. Failure to recognize unusual root canal anatomy may lead to unsuccessful endodontic treatment. Case Report: This case report describes the successful endodontic treatment of the maxillary central incisor with unusual anatomy of two roots and two root canals. A 23-year-old male patient was referred for dental consultation with discoloration of the maxillary right central incisor with periapical les...

  10. Fracture Resistance of Endodontically Treated Teeth Restored with Biodentine, Resin Modified GIC and Hybrid Composite Resin as a Core Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subash, Dayalan; Shoba, Krishnamma; Aman, Shibu; Bharkavi, Srinivasan Kumar Indu; Nimmi, Vijayan; Abhilash, Radhakrishnan

    2017-09-01

    The restoration of a severely damaged tooth usually needs a post and core as a part of treatment procedure to provide a corono - radicular stabilization. Biodentine is a class of dental material which possess high mechanical properties with excellent biocompatibility and bioactive behaviour. The sealing ability coupled with optimum physical properties could make Biodentine an excellent option as a core material. The aim of the study was to determine the fracture resistance of Biodentine as a core material in comparison with resin modified glass ionomer and composite resin. Freshly extracted 30 human permanent maxillary central incisors were selected. After endodontic treatment followed by post space preparation and luting of Glass fibre post (Reforpost, Angelus), the samples were divided in to three groups based on the type of core material. The core build-up used in Group I was Biodentine (Septodont, France), Group II was Resin-Modified Glass Ionomer Cement (GC, Japan) and Group III was Hybrid Composite Resin (TeEconom plus, Ivoclar vivadent). The specimens were subjected to fracture toughness using Universal testing machine (1474, Zwick/Roell, Germany) and results were compared using One-way analysis of variance with Tukey's Post hoc test. The results showed that there was significant difference between groups in terms of fracture load. Also, composite resin exhibited highest mean fracture load (1039.9 N), whereas teeth restored with Biodentine demonstrated the lowest mean fracture load (176.66 N). Resin modified glass ionomer exhibited intermediate fracture load (612.07 N). The primary mode of failure in Group I and Group II was favourable (100%) while unfavourable fracture was seen in Group III (30%). Biodentine, does not satisfy the requirements to be used as an ideal core material. The uses of RMGIC's as a core build-up material should be limited to non-stress bearing areas. Composite resin is still the best core build-up material owing to its high fracture

  11. Treatment of a Four-Rooted Maxillary Second Molar Detected with Cone-Beam Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahid Mohammadzade Akhlaghi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The significance of clinician’s knowledge about root canal anatomy and its possible variations cannot be overlooked. In some cases, taking advantage of complementary imaging techniques can help achieve a perfect flawless endodontic treatment. This article reports endodontic management of a second maxillary molar that had an uncommon anatomy of the chamber floor. After obtaining a cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT image, the presence of a second palatal root was confirmed. All four roots were treated and patient’s symptoms were resolved.Keywords: Cone-Beam Computed Tomography; Root Canal Therapy; Tooth Root

  12. Cellular Responses in Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells Treated with Three Endodontic Materials

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    Alejandro Victoria-Escandell

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Human dental pulp stem cells (HDPSCs are of special relevance in future regenerative dental therapies. Characterizing cytotoxicity and genotoxicity produced by endodontic materials is required to evaluate the potential for regeneration of injured tissues in future strategies combining regenerative and root canal therapies. This study explores the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity mediated by oxidative stress of three endodontic materials that are widely used on HDPSCs: a mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA-Angelus white, an epoxy resin sealant (AH-Plus cement, and an MTA-based cement sealer (MTA-Fillapex. Cell viability and cell death rate were assessed by flow cytometry. Oxidative stress was measured by OxyBlot. Levels of antioxidant enzymes were evaluated by Western blot. Genotoxicity was studied by quantifying the expression levels of DNA damage sensors such as ATM and RAD53 genes and DNA damage repair sensors such as RAD51 and PARP-1. Results indicate that AH-Plus increased apoptosis, oxidative stress, and genotoxicity markers in HDPSCs. MTA-Fillapex was the most cytotoxic oxidative stress inductor and genotoxic material for HDPSCs at longer times in preincubated cell culture medium, and MTA-Angelus was less cytotoxic and genotoxic than AH-Plus and MTA-Fillapex at all times assayed.

  13. Treatment stability in patients with Class II malocclusion treated with 2 maxillary premolar extractions or without extractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janson, Guilherme; Camardella, Leonardo Tavares; Araki, Janine Della Valle; de Freitas, Marcos Roberto; Pinzan, Arnaldo

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the occlusal stability of Class II malocclusion treatment with and without extraction of 2 maxillary premolars. A sample of 59 records from patients with complete Class II malocclusion was used. This sample was divided into 2 groups with the following characteristics: group 1, comprising 29 patients treated without extractions, and group 2, comprising 30 patients treated with extraction of 2 maxillary premolars. Dental cast measurements were obtained before and after treatment and at a minimum of 2.4 years after treatment. The pretreatment, posttreatment, and postretention occlusal statuses were evaluated with the peer assesment rating index. The occlusal indexes at the postretention stage and the posttreatment changes and percentages of posttreatment changes were compared with t tests. The nonextraction and the 2 maxillary premolar extraction treatment protocols of complete Class II malocclusions had no statistically significant differences in occlusal stability. Finishing Class II malocclusion treatment with the molars in a Class II relationship has similar occlusal stability as finishing with the molars in a Class I relationship. Copyright (c) 2010 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Survival of extensively damaged endodontically treated incisors restored with different types of posts-and-core foundation restoration material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazari, Priscilla Cardoso; de Carvalho, Marco Aurélio; Del Bel Cury, Altair A; Magne, Pascal

    2018-05-01

    Which post-and-core combination will best improve the performance of extensively damaged endodontically treated incisors without a ferrule is still unclear. The purpose of this in vitro study was to investigate the restoration of extensively damaged endodontically treated incisors without a ferrule using glass-ceramic crowns bonded to various composite resin foundation restorations and 2 types of posts. Sixty decoronated endodontically treated bovine incisors without a ferrule were divided into 4 groups and restored with various post-and-core foundation restorations. NfPfB=no-ferrule (Nf) with glass-fiber post (Pf) and bulk-fill resin foundation restoration (B); NfPfP=no-ferrule (Nf) with glass-fiber post (Pf) and dual-polymerized composite resin core foundation restoration (P); NfPt=no-ferrule (Nf) with titanium post (Pt) and resin core foundation restoration; and NfPtB=no-ferrule (Nf) with titanium post (Pt) and bulk-fill resin core foundation restoration (B). Two additional groups from previously published data from the same authors (FPf=2mm of ferrule (F) and glass-fiber post (Pf) and composite resin core foundation restoration; and NfPf=no-ferrule (Nf) with glass-fiber post (Pf) and composite resin core foundation restoration), which were tested concomitantly and using the same experimental arrangement, were included for comparison. All teeth were prepared to receive bonded glass-ceramic crowns luted with dual-polymerized resin cement and were subjected to accelerated fatigue testing under submerged conditions at room temperature. Cyclic isometric loading was applied to the incisal edge at an angle of 30 degrees with a frequency of 5 Hz, beginning with a load of 100 N (5000 cycles). A 100-N load increase was applied every 15000 cycles. The specimens were loaded until failure or to a maximum of 1000 N (140000 cycles). The 6 groups (4 groups from the present study and 2 groups from the previously published study) were compared using the Kaplan-Meier survival

  15. Dentofacial effects of bone-anchored maxillary protraction: a controlled study of consecutively treated Class III patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Clerck, Hugo; Cevidanes, Lucia; Baccetti, Tiziano

    2010-11-01

    In this cephalometric investigation, we analyzed the treatment effects of bone-anchored maxillary protraction (BAMP) with miniplates in the maxilla and mandible connected by Class III elastics in patients with Class III malocclusion. The treated sample consisted of 21 Class III patients consecutively treated with the BAMP protocol before the pubertal growth spurt (mean age, 11.10 ± 1.8 years) and reevaluated after BAMP therapy, about 1 year later. The treated group was compared with a matched control group of 18 untreated Class III subjects. Significant differences between the treated and control groups were assessed with independent-sample t tests (P <0.05). Sagittal measurements of the maxilla showed highly significant improvements during active treatment (about 4 mm more than the untreated controls), with significant protraction effects at orbitale and pterygomaxillare. Significant improvements of overjet and molar relationship were recorded, as well as in the mandibular skeletal measures at Point B and pogonion. Vertical skeletal changes and modifications in incisor inclination were negligible, except for a significant proclination of the mandibular incisors in the treated group. Significant soft-tissue changes reflected the underlying skeletal modifications. Compared with growth of the untreated Class III subjects, the BAMP protocol induced an average increment on skeletal and soft-tissue advancement of maxillary structures of about 4 mm, and favorable mandibular changes exceeded 2 mm. Copyright © 2010 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Effect of different composite core materials on fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with FRC posts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prapaporn PANITIWAT

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective This study evaluated the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with fiber reinforced composite posts, using three resin composite core build-up materials, (Clearfil Photo Core (CPC, MultiCore Flow (MCF, and LuxaCore Z-Dual (LCZ, and a nanohybrid composite, (Tetric N-Ceram (TNC. Material and Methods Forty endodontically treated lower first premolars were restored with quartz fiber posts (D.T. Light-Post cemented with resin cement (Panavia F2.0. Samples were randomly divided into four groups (n=10. Each group was built-up with one of the four core materials following its manufacturers’ instructions. The teeth were embedded in acrylic resin blocks. Nickel-Chromium crowns were fixed on the specimens with resin cement. The fracture resistance was determined using a universal testing machine with a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min at 1350 to the tooth axis until failure occurred. All core materials used in the study were subjected to test for the flexural modulus according to ISO 4049:2009. Results One-way ANOVA and Bonferroni multiple comparisons test indicated that the fracture resistance was higher in the groups with CPC and MCF, which presented no statistically significant difference (p>0.05, but was significantly higher than in those with LCZ and TNC (p<0.05. In terms of the flexural modulus, the ranking from the highest values of the materials was aligned with the same tendency of fracture loads. Conclusion Among the cores used in this study, the composite core with high filler content tended to enhance fracture thresholds of teeth restored with fiber posts more than others.

  17. Bilateral cross-bite treated by repeated rapid maxillary expansions: a 17-year follow-up case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozzani, M; Mazzotta, L; Caprioglio, A

    2014-07-01

    The objective of this paper is to show the clinical results after the repeated application of a Haas expander for rapid maxillary expansion (RME) anchored onto deciduous teeth in a 7-year-old patient that presented bilateral cross-bite, superior crowding and no space for permanent lateral incisors eruption. A first Haas expander was applied to the patient. She was told to activate it once a day, each activation was equal to 0.20 mm. After the first RME, the bilateral cross-bite was solved but still there was not enough space for lateral incisor eruption. A second and then a third Haas expander were applied, with the same activation protocol as the first one, in order to gain space in the anterior region and to achieve proper eruption of the lateral incisors. The patient was then treated with fixed appliances. At debonding the patient presented well aligned arch-forms: space for lateral incisor eruption was gained and superior crowding was solved. Bilateral cross-bite was also corrected. She was seen again 10 years and 17 years after expansions: she showed no relapse and presented a good functional occlusion that had remained stable, and an aesthetically pleasant smile, however she exhibited gingival recessions. Repeated rapid maxillary expansion, anchored onto deciduous teeth, performed in early mixed dentition represents a safe and successful treatment to correct severe bilateral cross- bites and to create space for maxillary incisor eruption.

  18. Maxillary First Molars with 2 Distobuccal Canals: A Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogel, Howard M; Cunha, Rodrigo Sanches

    2017-11-01

    An appreciation of the anatomic complexity of the root canal system is essential at every step of endodontic treatment. Endodontic treatment of teeth with unusual root canal anatomy presents a unique challenge. Eight patients underwent nonsurgical root canal treatment of 3-rooted maxillary first molars in a specialty endodontic private practice. Four cases of Weine type II and 4 cases of Weine type III canal configurations in the distobuccal root of maxillary first molars were presented.This article highlighted an uncommon anatomic variation of 2 canals in the distobuccal root of the maxillary first molar. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Complex aesthetic treatment on anterior maxillary teeth with malposition

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    Febriastuti Febriastuti

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Complex aesthetic treatment on anterior teeth involves more than one caries tooth with malformed shape and malposition. Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to find the alternative treatment for anterior maxillary teeth with malposition. Case: In this case, a 25 year-old man with a peg shaped teeth and caries on several teeth and malposition can be treated with complex aesthetic treatment. Case management: Endodontic pulpectomy treatment on anterior maxillary teeth and post construction with splint porcelain fused to metal crowns on 11, 12, and 21, 22 to correct the shape and position into normal position. Conclusion: Malformed and malpositioned teeth with caries can be treated with complex aesthetic treatment.

  20. Orthodontic Treatment with Rapid Maxillary Expansion for Treating a Boy with Severe Obstructive Sleep Apnea

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    Myungrip Kim

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This case report shows that orthodontic treatment with rapid maxillary expansion (RME is an effective treatment option for managing pediatric obstructive sleep apnea (OSA. An 11-year-old boy with severe pediatric OSA received comprehensive orthodontic treatment with RME. Four sleep studies were done: before orthodontic treatment, after RME, just after comprehensive orthodontic treatment and at the 2-year and 5-month follow-up. Polysomnographic findings showed that the orthodontic treatment with RME was successful for managing severe OSA in the patient.

  1. Assessment of endodontically treated teeth by using different radiographic methods: an ex vivo comparison between CBCT and other radiographic techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demiralp, Kemal Oeaguer; Uecok, Oezlem; Kamburoglu, Kivanc; Selcen Yuesel, Kahraman Guengoer; Demiralp, Gokcen

    2012-01-01

    To compare different radiographic methods for assessing endodontically treated teeth. Root canal treatments were applied in 120 extracted mandibular teeth, which were divided into four groups: (1) ideal root canal treatment (60 teeth), (2) insufficient lateral condensation (20 teeth), (3) root canals filled short of the apex (20 teeth), (4) overfilled root canal treatment (20 teeth). The teeth were imaged using intraoral film, panoramic film, digital intraoral systems (CCD and PSP), CCD obtained with portable X-ray source, digital panoramic, and CBCT images obtained at 0.3 mm 3 and 0.2 mm'3 voxel size. Images were evaluated separately by three observers, twice. Kappa coefficients were calculated. The percentage of correct readings obtained from each modality was calculated and compared using a t-test (p 3 voxel images revealed the best results. For insufficient lateral condensation, the best readings were found with periapical film followed by CCD and PSP. The assessment of teeth with root canals filled short of the apex showed the highest percentage of correct readings by CBCT and CCD. For the overfilled canal treatment group, PSP images and conventional periapical film radiographs had the best scores. CBCT was found to be successful in the assessment of teeth with ideal root canal treatment and teeth with canals filled short of the apex.

  2. Use of cone-beam computed tomography in diagnosing and treating endodontic treatment failure: A case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Lee

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT as a complementary imaging modality applies to various clinical situations that with conventional two-dimensional radiographs alone may pose diagnostic challenges. These challenges include but are not limited to locating missed canals in endodontic retreatment and diagnosing the presence of lesions such as resorption, periapical bone defects, root fractures, and perforations. In this study, we present a case of an asymptomatic apical periodontitis that was incidentally found on a panoramic radiograph. Analyses based on panoramic and periapical radiographs and clinical examinations were insufficient for definitive diagnosis, which necessitated the use of CBCT. The CBCT scan allowed identification of the cause of the apical disease, an unfilled mesiolingual canal in previously root canal treated left mandibular second molar, as well as the extent of the lesion. We also explore the diagnostic challenges in using traditional two-dimensional radiographs only, the challenges in locating root canals in mandibular second molars, and risks and benefits in using CBCT.

  3. Influence of gel/LED-laser application on cervical microleakage of two barrier materials used for endodontically treated teeth whitening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchesan, Melissa Andréia; Barros, Felipe; Porto, Saulo; Zaitter, Suellen; Brugnera, Aldo, Jr.; Sousa-Neto, Manoel D.

    2007-02-01

    This study evaluated ex vivo the influence of the number of gel/LED-laser applications/activations on cervical microleakage of two different barrier materials used for protection during whitening of endodontically treated teeth. Eighty-four canines were instrumented and obturated with epoxy resin sealer. The seal was removed 2 mm beyond the cemento-enamel junction for barrier placement and the teeth were divided into two groups of 40 teeth each: G1, zinc phosphate cement; G2, glass ionomer cement. The two groups were subdivided into 4 subgroups (n=10 each): I) no gel or LED-laser application; II) one gel application and two LED-laser activations; III) two gel applications and four LED-laser activations; IV) three gel applications and six LED-laser activations. The teeth were immersed in India ink for 7 days, decalcified and cleared. Cervical microleakage was quantified with a measurement microscope. Statistical analysis showed that zinc phosphate caused significantly lower microleakage than glass ionomer cement (presented microleakage in all subgroups). However, after two (p<0.01) and three (p<0.001) applications of gel, there was statistially significant microleakage in zinc phosphate barriers. Based on the present results, it can be concluded that cervical barriers with zinc phosphate cement show less cervical microleakage and that two or more applications/activations of gel/LED-laser significantly increase microleakage.

  4. Dental students' perceptions about the endodontic treatments performed using NiTi rotary instruments and hand stainless steel files.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Renata Castro; Seijo, Marília Oliveira Saraiva; Ferreira, Efigênia Ferreira; Paiva, Saul Martins; Ribeiro Sobrinho, Antônio Paulino

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the perceptions of Brazilian undergraduate dental students about the endodontic treatments performed using NiTi rotary instruments and hand stainless steel. Data were collected using a questionnaire administered to undergraduate dental students enrolled in endodontic disciplines. The students were divided into 3 groups: G1, students who had treated straight canals with SS hand instruments; G2, students who had treated curved canals with SS hand instruments; and G3, students who had treated both straight and curved canals with NiTi rotary instruments. The number of endodontic treatments performed, types of treated teeth, students' learning, time spent, encountered difficulties, quality of endodontic treatment and characteristics of the employed technique were analyzed. There was a 91.3% rate of return for the questionnaires. Mandibular molars were the most frequently treated teeth, followed by maxillary incisors. The Kruskal-Wallis test showed no differences in learning (p=0.528) or in the characteristics of the technique employed (p=0.560) among the three groups. G3 students performed a greater number of endodontic treatments (pendodontic treatments differed only between G1 and G2 (p=0.045). The use of NiTi rotary instruments should be included in undergraduate dental curriculum, contributing to the increase of patients assisted and consequently to improve the clinical experience of the students.

  5. Endodontics Simplified

    OpenAIRE

    Kansal, Rohit; Talwar, Sangeeta; Yadav, Seema; Chaudhary, Sarika; Nawal, Ruchika

    2014-01-01

    The preparation of the root canal system is essential for a successful outcome in root canal treatment. The development of rotary nickel titanium instruments is considered to be an important innovation in the field of endodontics. During few last years, several new instrument systems have been introduced but the quest for simplifying the endodontic instrumentation sequence has been ongoing for almost 20 years, resulting in more than 70 different engine-driven endodontic instrumentation system...

  6. Fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with short fiber composite used as a core material-An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garlapati, Tejesh Gupta; Krithikadatta, Jogikalmat; Natanasabapathy, Velmurugan

    2017-10-01

    This in-vitro study tested the fracture resistance of endodontically treated molars with Mesial-Occluso-Distal (MOD) cavities restored with fibre reinforced composite material everX posterior in comparision with hybrid composite and ribbond fiber composite. Fifty intact freshly extracted human mandibular first molars were collected and were randomly divided into five groups (n=10). Group 1: positive control (PC) intact teeth without any endodontic preparation. In groups 2 through 6 after endodontic procedure standard MOD cavities were prepared and restored with their respective core materials as follows: group 2, negative control (NC) left unrestored or temporary flling was applied. Group 3, Hybrid composite (HC) as a core material (Te-Econom Plus Ivoclar Vivadent Asia) group 4, Ribbond (Ribbond; Seattle, WA, USA)+conventional composite resin (RCR) group 5, everX posterior (everX Posterior GC EUROPE)+conventional composite resin (EXP) after thermocycling fracture resistance for the samples were tested using universal testing machine. The results were analysed using ANOVA and Tukey's HSD post hoc tests. Mean fracture resistance (in Newton, N) was group 1: 1568.4±221.71N, group 2: 891.0±50.107N, group 3: 1418.3±168.71N, group 4:1716.7±199.51N and group 5: 1994.8±254.195N. Among the materials tested, endodontically treated teeth restored with everX posterior fiber reinforced composite showed superior fracture resistance. Copyright © 2017 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Endodontic, surgical and periodontal treatment of dens invaginatus. Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellarin, M; Demitri, V; Politi, M

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to propose a single stage global treatment of endodontic, periapical and periodontal lesions in a lateral maxillary incisor with dens invaginatus. A 24 year-old woman presenting a lateral maxillary incisor with dens invaginatus in association with periapica1 and periodontal lesions underwent simultaneous surgical, endodontic and periodontal regenerative procedures. At 2, 6, 12, 18 months follow-up the radiographic healing appeared to be improved and the periapical lesion healed completely 1 year after surgical intervention. Surgery in association with endodontic and periodontal procedures represents the treatment of choice to maximize long term prognosis in cases of dens invaginatus with chronic periapical and periodontal lesions.

  8. Assessment of endodontically treated teeth by using different radiographic methods: an ex vivo comparison between CBCT and other radiographic techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demiralp, Kemal Oeaguer; Uecok, Oezlem [Dept. of Dentomaxillofacial Radiology, Faculty of Dentistry, Gazi University, Ankara (Turkmenistan); Kamburoglu, Kivanc [Dept. of Dentomaxillofacial Radiology, Faculty of Dentistry, Ankara University, Ankara (Turkmenistan); Selcen Yuesel, Kahraman Guengoer [Dept. of Biostatistics, Faculty of Medicine, Ankara University, Ankara (Turkmenistan); Demiralp, Gokcen [Dept. of Endodontics, Tepebasi Dental Health Center, Ankara (Turkmenistan)

    2012-09-15

    To compare different radiographic methods for assessing endodontically treated teeth. Root canal treatments were applied in 120 extracted mandibular teeth, which were divided into four groups: (1) ideal root canal treatment (60 teeth), (2) insufficient lateral condensation (20 teeth), (3) root canals filled short of the apex (20 teeth), (4) overfilled root canal treatment (20 teeth). The teeth were imaged using intraoral film, panoramic film, digital intraoral systems (CCD and PSP), CCD obtained with portable X-ray source, digital panoramic, and CBCT images obtained at 0.3 mm{sup 3} and 0.2 mm'3 voxel size. Images were evaluated separately by three observers, twice. Kappa coefficients were calculated. The percentage of correct readings obtained from each modality was calculated and compared using a t-test (p<0.05). The intra-observer kappa for each observer ranged between 0.327 and 0.849. The inter-observer kappa for each observer for both readings ranged between 0.312 and 0.749. For the ideal root canal treatment group, CBCT with 0.2 mm{sup 3} voxel images revealed the best results. For insufficient lateral condensation, the best readings were found with periapical film followed by CCD and PSP. The assessment of teeth with root canals filled short of the apex showed the highest percentage of correct readings by CBCT and CCD. For the overfilled canal treatment group, PSP images and conventional periapical film radiographs had the best scores. CBCT was found to be successful in the assessment of teeth with ideal root canal treatment and teeth with canals filled short of the apex.

  9. Cleaning and decompression of inferior alveolar canal to treat dysesthesia and paresthesia following endodontic treatment of a third molar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudy Scala

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Endodontic overfilling involving the mandibular canal may cause an injury of the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN. We report a case of disabling dysesthesia and paresthesia of a 70-year-old man after endodontic treatment of his mandibular left third molar that caused leakage of root canal filling material into the mandibular canal. After radiographic evaluation, extraction of the third molar and distal osteotomy, a surgical exploration was performed and followed by removal of the material and decompression of the IAN. The patient reported an improvement in sensation and immediate disappearance of dysesthesia already from the first postoperative day.

  10. Cleaning and decompression of inferior alveolar canal to treat dysesthesia and paresthesia following endodontic treatment of a third molar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scala, Rudy; Cucchi, Alessandro; Cappellina, Luca; Ghensi, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Endodontic overfilling involving the mandibular canal may cause an injury of the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN). We report a case of disabling dysesthesia and paresthesia of a 70-year-old man after endodontic treatment of his mandibular left third molar that caused leakage of root canal filling material into the mandibular canal. After radiographic evaluation, extraction of the third molar and distal osteotomy, a surgical exploration was performed and followed by removal of the material and decompression of the IAN. The patient reported an improvement in sensation and immediate disappearance of dysesthesia already from the first postoperative day.

  11. A comparison between the effect of zirconia-coated FRC and glass fiber posts on the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth

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    Ezatollah Jalalian

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available   Background and Aims : The root fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth depends on the types of posts. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of two types of bonded non-metallic posts with different elasticity modulus on the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth under compressive loads.   Materials and Methods: In this in vitro experimental study, 20 fresh extracted mandibular premolars were selected and sectioned adjacent to the CEJ and then were endodontically treated. The specimens were randomly divided into two groups (n=10. After post space preparations, the fiber RTD Light posts (R.T.D, France and zirconia coated fiber posts (ICE light, Danville were cemented into the root canals. Composite resin (Lumiglass R.T.D, France cores were built up. Aluminium foil was used to mimic the PDL, and the specimens were embedded in acrylic resin and tested in a Universal Testing Machine. A compressive load was applied at a 90 degree angle until fracture at a crosshead speed of 1mm/min. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and T test .   Results: The mean fracture resistance of R.T.D group was (1083.11 ± 156.74 (N and the mean of ICE light group was (865.18 ± 106.24 (N. The highest mean fracture resistance was observed in RTD fiberglass and a statistically significant difference was observed between the two groups (P<0.001.   Conclusion: FRC posts with zirconia coating due to unfavorable fractures of the teeth should be used with caution, and thus, fiber posts are preferred.

  12. Assessment of micro-leakage for light-cure glass ionomer and pro-root mineral trioxide aggregate as coronal barriers in intracoronal bleaching of endodontically treated teeth

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    Maryam Zare Jahromi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cervical root resorption is one of the most important complications of intra coronal bleaching. A way of preventing this type of resorption is using a coronal barrier under the bleaching materials. The aim of this study was to compare the sealing ability of glass ionomer cement and Pro Root Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA as a coronal barrier in intra coronal bleaching. Materials &Methods: In this study, 40 single-root maxillary anterior teeth were endodontically prepared and divided into two experimental groups (n= 15 and two positive and negative control groups (n=5. In the experimental groups, gutta percha was removed up to 3 mm below the cemento enamel junction (CEJ.RMGI and MTA were placed over gutta percha up to the level of CEJ. After a 24-hour incubation period, the bleaching agent (a mixture of sodium perborate and 30% hydrogen peroxide was placed in the access cavities. The bleaching agents were replaced every 3 days over 9 days. Then, the access cavity was filled with 2% methylene blue for 48 hours. All samples were longitudinally sectioned and the dye penetration range was evaluated using a stereomicroscope. Data were statistically analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann–Whitney tests (α=0.05. Results: Leakage mean indicated that there was a significant difference between these two groups and leakage was less in ProRoot than glass ionomer. Conclusion: It seems that the MTA can provide a better coronal seal during the bleaching.

  13. Assessment of the Effect of Orthodontic Treatment on the Periodontal Health of Endodontically Restored Tooth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalaluddin, Md; Goyal, Vinod; Naqvi, Zuber A; Gupta, Bhaskar; Asnani, Mohil M; Sonigra, Hitesh M

    2017-07-01

    Intorduction: Patients usually undergo orthodontic treatment for achieving ideal interocclusal relationship between the dental tissue and bony tissue along with improving the speech, mastication, and facial esthetic appearance. Literature quotes paucity in the studies evaluating the effect of orthodontic treatment on the periodontal health of endodontically treated teeth. Hence, we planned the present study to assess the effect of orthodontic treatment on the periodontal health of endodonti-cally restored tooth. The present study included assessment of 80 patients who underwent orthodontic treatment. All the patients were divided broadly into two study groups: groups I and II. Group I included patients with the absence of endodontically treated teeth, while group II included patients which maxillary central incisors were resorted endodontically. Examination of the periodontal health of the patients was done using the community periodontal index of treatment need (CPITN) around the selected teeth. All the values were recorded during the preorthodontic time, postorthodontic time, and after the first 6 months of starting of the orthodontic treatment. All the results were recorded separately and analyzed. In the groups I and II, 28 and 25 patients respectively, had score of 1, while 10 patients in group I and 12 patients in group II had score of 2. Nonsignificant results were obtained while comparing the CPITN score in between the two study groups when measured at the pre-, intra-, and postortho time. In patients undergoing orthodontic treatment, having endodontically resorted teeth, no difference exists in relation to the periodontal health. Orthodontic treatment can be safely carried in patients with endodontically restored teeth.

  14. Evidence-based recommendations for analgesic efficacy to treat pain of endodontic origin: A systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminoshariae, Anita; Kulild, James C; Donaldson, Mark; Hersh, Elliot V

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to identify evidence-based clinical trials to aid dental clinicians in establishing the efficacy for recommending or prescribing analgesics for pain of endodontic origin. The authors prepared and registered a protocol on PROSPERO and conducted electronic searches in MEDLINE, Scopus, the Cochrane Library, and ClinicalTrials.gov. In addition, the authors manually searched the bibliographies of all relevant articles, the gray literature, and textbooks for randomized controlled trials. Two authors selected the relevant articles independently. There were no disagreements between the authors. The authors analyzed 27 randomized, placebo-controlled trials. The authors divided the studies into 2 groups: preoperative and postoperative analgesic treatments. There was moderate evidence to support the use of steroids for patients with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis. Also, there was moderate evidence to support nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) preoperatively or postoperatively to control pain of endodontic origin. When NSAIDs were not effective, a combination of NSAIDs with acetaminophen, tramadol, or an opioid appeared beneficial. NSAIDs should be considered as the drugs of choice to alleviate or minimize pain of endodontic origin if there are no contraindications for the patient to ingest an NSAID. In situations in which NSAIDs alone are not effective, the combination of an NSAID with acetaminophen or a centrally acting drug is recommended. Steroids appear effective in irreversible pulpitis. Copyright © 2016 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Evidence-based recommendations for antibiotic usage to treat endodontic infections and pain: A systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminoshariae, Anita; Kulild, James C

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to identify evidence-based scientific methodologies to aid dental clinicians in establishing the indications for prescribing antibiotics for endodontic infection or pain. The authors prepared and registered a protocol on PROSPERO. They conducted electronic searches in MEDLINE, Scopus, Cochrane Library, and ClinicalTrials.gov. In addition, the authors hand searched the bibliographies of all relevant articles, the gray literature, and textbooks for randomized controlled clinical studies. The authors independently selected the relevant articles. The overall quality of the studies was fair with a low risk of bias, but 2 studies had a moderate risk of bias. The best available clinical evidence signals no indications for prescribing antibiotics preoperatively or postoperatively to prevent endodontic infection or pain unless the spread of infection is systemic, the patient is febrile, or both. Generally, an accurate diagnosis coupled with effective endodontic treatment will decrease microbial flora enough for healing to occur. To help decrease the number of drug-resistant microbes, oral health care providers should not prescribe antibiotics when they are not indicated. Copyright © 2016 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The 'E' factor -- evolving endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, M J

    2013-03-01

    Endodontics is a constantly developing field, with new instruments, preparation techniques and sealants competing with trusted and traditional approaches to tooth restoration. Thus general dental practitioners must question and understand the significance of these developments before adopting new practices. In view of this, the aim of this article, and the associated presentation at the 2013 British Dental Conference & Exhibition, is to provide an overview of endodontic methods and constantly evolving best practice. The presentation will review current preparation techniques, comparing rotary versus reciprocation, and question current trends in restoration of the endodontically treated tooth.

  17. Survival rates against fracture of endodontically treated posterior teeth restored with full-coverage crowns or resin composite restorations: a systematic review

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    Warattama Suksaphar

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This systematic review aims to summarize the current clinical studies that investigated survival rates against fracture of endodontically treated posterior teeth restored with crowns or resin composite restorations. Literature search were performed using keywords. Publications from 1980 to 2016 were searched in PubMed, ScienceDirect, Web of Science, MEDLINE, and SCOPUS. Included studies were selected based on inclusion and exclusion criteria. Three clinical studies were included: 1 randomized controlled trial and 1 prospective and 1 retrospective cohort studies. Pooled survival rates ranged from 94%–100% and 91.9%–100% for crowns and resin composite, respectively. The majority of teeth had no more than 3 surface loss of tooth structure. The studies included were heterogeneous, and were not appropriate for further meta-analysis. Current evidence suggested that the survival rates against the fracture of endodontically treated posterior teeth restored with crowns or resin composites were not significantly different in the teeth with minimum to moderate loss of tooth structure.

  18. Unusual anatomy of maxillary central incisor with two roots

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    T S Ashwini Shivakumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Knowledge of root canal morphology is essential for successful endodontic therapy. Failure to recognize unusual root canal anatomy may lead to unsuccessful endodontic treatment. Case Report: This case report describes the successful endodontic treatment of the maxillary central incisor with unusual anatomy of two roots and two root canals. A 23-year-old male patient was referred for dental consultation with discoloration of the maxillary right central incisor with periapical lesion, which revealed unusual anatomy of root on radiographic examination, and was confirmed upon exploration. Discussion: As described by Vertucci, the maxillary central incisor presents a single root and single root canal in 100% of the cases. However, few cases of maxillary central incisors with two canals were reported in the literature, most of which were associated with developmental anomalies like fusion, germination or dens invaginatus. Clinician should be aware of the unusual anatomical variations that should be detected by the different diagnostic resources available.

  19. Accuracy of Dolphin visual treatment objective (VTO prediction software on class III patients treated with maxillary advancement and mandibular setback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J. Peterman

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dolphin® visual treatment objective (VTO prediction software is routinely utilized by orthodontists during the treatment planning of orthognathic cases to help predict post-surgical soft tissue changes. Although surgical soft tissue prediction is considered to be a vital tool, its accuracy is not well understood in tow-jaw surgical procedures. The objective of this study was to quantify the accuracy of Dolphin Imaging’s VTO soft tissue prediction software on class III patients treated with maxillary advancement and mandibular setback and to validate the efficacy of the software in such complex cases. Methods This retrospective study analyzed the records of 14 patients treated with comprehensive orthodontics in conjunction with two-jaw orthognathic surgery. Pre- and post-treatment radiographs were traced and superimposed to determine the actual skeletal movements achieved in surgery. This information was then used to simulate surgery in the software and generate a final soft tissue patient profile prediction. Prediction images were then compared to the actual post-treatment profile photos to determine differences. Results Dolphin Imaging’s software was determined to be accurate within an error range of +/− 2 mm in the X-axis at most landmarks. The lower lip predictions were most inaccurate. Conclusions Clinically, the observed error suggests that the VTO may be used for demonstration and communication with a patient or consulting practitioner. However, Dolphin should not be useful for precise treatment planning of surgical movements. This program should be used with caution to prevent unrealistic patient expectations and dissatisfaction.

  20. Changes in occlusal relationships in mixed dentition patients treated with rapid maxillary expansion. A prospective clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, James A; Sigler, Lauren M; Franchi, Lorenzo; Guest, Susan S; Baccetti, Tiziano

    2010-03-01

    To prospectively measure occlusal changes in mixed dentition patients who underwent a standardized early expansion protocol. The treatment sample consisted of 500 patients who were assigned to three groups according to molar relationship: Class I (n = 204), end-to-end (n = 166), and Class II (n = 130). All patients were treated with a bonded rapid maxillary expander (RME) followed by a removable maintenance plate and a transpalatal arch. Mean age at the start of treatment was 8.8 years (T(1)), with a pre-phase 2 treatment cephalogram (T(2)) taken 3.7 years later. The control sample consisted of the cephalometric records of 188 untreated subjects (Class 1, n = 79; end-to-end, n = 51; Class II, n = 58). The largest change in molar relationship was noted when the Class II treatment group (1.8 mm) was compared with the matched control group (0.3 mm). A positive change was seen in 81% of the Class II treatment group, with almost half of the group improving by > or = 2.0 mm. The end-to-end treatment group had a positive change of 1.4 mm, compared with a control value of 0.6 mm, and the Class I group of about 1 mm compared with controls, who remained unchanged (0.1 mm). Skeletal changes were not significant when any of the groups were compared with controls. The expansion protocol had a significantly favorable effect on the sagittal occlusal relationships of Class II, end-to-end, and Class I patients treated in the early mixed dentition.

  1. Identification of possible factors impacting dental students' ability to locate MB2 canals in maxillary molars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ellen; Chehroudi, Babak; Coil, Jeffrey M

    2014-05-01

    This study examined the effect of the access size and straight-line path of access on third-year dental students' ability to locate a second mesiobuccal (MB2) canal in maxillary first and second molars. One hundred and six third-year dental students at one Faculty of Dentistry performed simulated root canal treatment with the aid of 2x magnification loupes on extracted teeth. A postgraduate endodontic student subsequently made a reasonable search for an untreated MB2 canal with the aid of a dental operating microscope. The mesiobuccal roots were then sectioned horizontally for determination of the canal configuration. The dental students were able to treat an MB2 canal in 15.8 percent of the teeth, but this was not associated with satisfactory access criteria. The postgraduate endodontic student identified an MB2 canal in 54.7 percent of the remaining tooth samples excluding those where the MB2 canal was found by the dental students; this represented 94.3 percent of those teeth confirmed by horizontal sectioning of the root to have an MB2 canal. The postgraduate student troughed, on average, 2.6 mm before negotiating the MB2 canal. As satisfactory access criteria and straight-line path of access did not correlate with the dental students' ability to find a second mesiobuccal canal, this result has important implications for educational goals with respect to endodontic treatment of maxillary molar teeth.

  2. Long-term stability of soft tissue changes in anterior open bite adults treated with zygomatic miniplate-anchored maxillary posterior intrusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzouk, Eiman S; Kassem, Hassan E

    2018-03-01

    To evaluate soft tissue changes and their long-term stability in skeletal anterior open bite adults treated by maxillary posterior teeth intrusion using zygomatic miniplates and premolar extractions. Lateral cephalograms of 26 patients were taken at pretreatment (T1), posttreatment (T2), 1 year posttreatment (T3), and 4 years posttreatment (T4). At the end of treatment, the soft tissue facial height and profile convexity were reduced. The lips increased in length and thickness, with backward movement of the upper lip and forward movement of the lower lip. The total relapse rate ranged from 20.2% to 31.1%. At 4 years posttreatment, 68.9% to 79.8% of the soft tissue treatment effects were stable. The changes in the first year posttreatment accounted for approximately 70% of the total relapse. Soft tissue changes following maxillary posterior teeth intrusion with zygomatic miniplates and premolar extractions appear to be stable 4 years after treatment.

  3. Comparative evaluation of the vertical fracture resistance of endodontically treated roots filled with Gutta-percha and Resilon: a meta-analysis of in vitro studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Minmin; Chai, Zhaowu; Sun, Chengjun; Hu, Bo; Gao, Xiang; Chen, Yunjia; Song, Jinlin

    2018-06-13

    Teeth treated endodontically are more susceptible to vertical root fracture (VRF). Some studies have suggested that obturating the root canals with Gutta-percha or Resilon can reinforce endodontically treated teeth, but a few others have presented conflicting results. These inconsistent results cannot guide clinicians in determining clinical approaches. The objective of this meta-analysis is to evaluate and compare the vertical fracture resistance of endodontically treated root canals obturated with Gutta-percha/AH plus and the Resilon system. Comprehensive literature searches were performed in the PubMed, Cochrane Library, ScienceDirect, Web of Science and Embase databases. The titles and abstracts of all of the retrieved articles were independently assessed by two authors according to predefined selection criteria. Data in the included articles were independently extracted. Statistical analyses were conducted using Review Manager 5.3 and Stata 12.0 software. The pooled standardized mean differences (SMDs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated for the outcome indicators. The level of statistical significance was set at p < 0.05. The Cochran Q test (I 2 test) was used to test for heterogeneity among studies. Fourteen randomized controlled in vitro trials were included in the meta-analysis. The results demonstrated that the vertical root fracture resistance of unprepared and unfilled roots was significantly higher than that of roots obturated with Gutta-percha/AH plus (SMD = - 0.69, 95% CI = - 1.34 to - 0.04, p = 0.04) or the Resilon system (SMD = - 0.54, 95% CI = - 1.07 to - 0.00, p = 0.05). The differences in fracture resistance between the roots filled with Gutta-percha/AH plus and the prepared unfilled root canals was not significant (SMD = 0.59, 95% CI = - 0.02 to 1.21, p = 0.06). Roots obturated with Resilon had higher fracture resistance than instrumented unfilled roots (SMD = 0.83, 95

  4. Interleukin 1 receptor antagonist (IL1RN) genetic variations condition post-orthodontic external root resorption in endodontically-treated teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias-Linares, Alejandro; Yañez-Vico, Rosa Ma; Ballesta-Mudarra, Sofía; Ortiz-Ariza, Estefanía; Mendoza-Mendoza, Asunción; Perea-Pérez, Evelio; Moreno-Fernández, Ana Ma; Solano-Reina, Enrique

    2013-06-01

    External apical root resorption (EARR) is a frequent iatrogenic problem following orthodontic treatment in endodontically-treated teeth, about which the literature reports substantial variability in post-orthodontic treatment EARR responses. The main focus of the present study is to clarify whether variants in the interleukin-1 receptor antagonist gene coding for the IL-1ra protein have a positive/negative influence on EARR of endodontically-treated teeth. Ninety-three orthodontic patients were genetically screened for a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP:rs419598) in the IL1 cluster. The sample was classified into 2 groups: group 1 (affected-group) showed radiographic EARR of more than 2mm; group 2 (control-group), had no EARR or EARR ≤ to 2mm following orthodontic treatment on root-filled teeth. Logistic regression analysis was performed to obtain an adjusted estimate between the SNPs studied and EARR. Genotype distributions, allelic frequencies, adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals were also calculated. We found that subjects homozygous [1/1(TT)] for the IL1RN gene [OR:10.85; p=0.001;CI:95%] were at risk of EARR in root-filled teeth. Genetic variants in the antagonist axis balance of the IL1RN (rs419598) have a direct repercussion on the predisposition to post-orthodontic EARR in root-filled teeth. Variants in allele 1 of the interleukin-1 receptor antagonist gene(rs419598) are associated(p=0.001**) with an increased risk of suffering post-orthodontic EARR in root-filled teeth.

  5. [Research on cleaning rate of the C-shaped canal treated by manual or rotary endodontic file combined with ultrasonic rinsing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Gao, Yan; Wang, Qing-shan; Zhang, Yan; Rong, Li; Wang, Jiu

    2014-08-01

    To evaluate the cleaning effect of the C-shaped canal treated by manual K file and ProTaper rotary endodontic file combined with ultrasonic cleaning, and find a better cleaning program for the C-shaped root canal. Fifty mandibular second molars were randomly divided into 5 groups: K file group, K file+ultrasonic rinsing group, ProTaper group, ProTaper+ultrasonic rinsing group and the control group. After initial shaping and cleaning, the mandibular second molars were soaked in formalin and stained. Under microscopy, the cleaning rate of necrotic tissue and cutting area were observed and analyzed. The data was processed with SPSS 17.0 software package. The cleaning rates of the treated groups were significantly higher than that of the control group (P<0.05); In each treatment group, the cleaning rate of the apex was significantly lower than that of the crown and central part (P<0.05); The cutting score of ProTaper+ultrasonic cleaning group was lower than that of the other treatment groups; The cutting score of the K file+ultrasonic rinsing group was significantly lower than that of the K file group (P<0.05); The cutting score and cleaning rate were negatively correlated (r=-0.712, P=0.000 ), the linear regression was the cleaning rate =98.325-4.325 × wall cutting score (R=0.454, P<0.05). In the process of shaping and cleaning of C-shaped canal, it is recommended that the ProTaper nickel-titanium rotary endodontic file should be chosen to clean the top of the taproot pipe and combined with ultrasonic rinsing to achieve better results.

  6. Treatment of combined endodontic: periodontic lesion by sealing of palato-radicular groove using biodentine

    OpenAIRE

    Naik, Mayuri; de Ataide, Ida de Noronha; Fernandes, Marina; Lambor, Rajan

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Palatoradicular groove is a developmental anomaly which is predominantly found in maxillary lateral incisors. It provides a susceptible alcove for the progression of localised periodontal inflammation which can further cause pulpal involvement. This case report describes the successful treatment of a large periodontic - endodontic lesion usingnon surgical endodontic therapy and biodentine for the sealing of the palatoradicular groove.

  7. Treatment of combined endodontic: periodontic lesion by sealing of palato-radicular groove using biodentine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Mayuri; de Ataide, Ida de Noronha; Fernandes, Marina; Lambor, Rajan

    2014-11-01

    Palatoradicular groove is a developmental anomaly which is predominantly found in maxillary lateral incisors. It provides a susceptible alcove for the progression of localised periodontal inflammation which can further cause pulpal involvement. This case report describes the successful treatment of a large periodontic - endodontic lesion usingnon surgical endodontic therapy and biodentine for the sealing of the palatoradicular groove.

  8. Unusual anatomy of a maxillary first molar with two palatal roots: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomazinho, Flávia S F; Baratto-Filho, Flares; Zaitter, Suellen; Leonardi, Denise P; Gonzaga, Carla C

    2010-03-01

    The success of endodontic therapy is based on good endodontic access, correct cleaning and shaping, and adequate root canal obturation. However, endodontic treatment is also dependent on a sound knowledge of the internal anatomy of human teeth, especially when anatomical variations are present. Certain anatomical changes may be present to varying degrees, and it is important to report these to improve the understanding and expertise of endodontic specialists. With this aim in mind, this study reports an example of a maxillary first molar showing unusual anatomy (four roots and six root canals) and describes the endodontic treatment that was employed.

  9. Regenerative endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, S; Smith, A J

    2014-03-01

    Significant advances in our understanding of the biological processes involved in tooth development and repair at the cellular and molecular levels have underpinned the newly emerging area of regenerative endodontics. Development of treatment protocols based on exploiting the natural wound healing properties of the dental pulp and applying tissue engineering principles has allowed reporting of case series showing preservation of tissue vitality and apexogenesis. To review current case series reporting regenerative endodontics. Current treatment approaches tend to stimulate more reparative than regenerative responses in respect of the new tissue generated, which often does not closely resemble the physiological structure of dentine-pulp. However, despite these biological limitations, such techniques appear to offer significant promise for improved treatment outcomes. Improved biological outcomes will likely emerge from the many experimental studies being reported and will further contribute to improvements in clinical treatment protocols.

  10. Regenerative endodontics: A way forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diogenes, Anibal; Ruparel, Nikita B; Shiloah, Yoav; Hargreaves, Kenneth M

    2016-05-01

    Immature teeth are susceptible to infections due to trauma, anatomic anomalies, and caries. Traditional endodontic therapies for immature teeth, such as apexification procedures, promote resolution of the disease and prevent future infections. However, these procedures fail to promote continued root development, leaving teeth susceptible to fractures. Regenerative endodontic procedures (REPs) have evolved in the past decade, being incorporated into endodontic practice and becoming a viable treatment alternative for immature teeth. The authors have summarized the status of regenerative endodontics on the basis of the available published studies and provide insight into the different levels of clinical outcomes expected from these procedures. Substantial advances in regenerative endodontics are allowing a better understanding of a multitude of factors that govern stem cell-mediated regeneration and repair of the damaged pulp-dentin complex. REPs promote healing of apical periodontitis, continued radiographic root development, and, in certain cases, vitality responses. Despite the clinical success of these procedures, they appear to promote a guided endodontic repair process rather than a true regeneration of physiological-like tissue. Immature teeth with pulpal necrosis with otherwise poor prognosis can be treated with REPs. These procedures do not preclude the possibility of apexification procedures if attempts are unsuccessful. Therefore, REPs may be considered first treatment options for immature teeth with pulpal necrosis. Copyright © 2016 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Clinical effectiveness of combining platelet rich fibrin with alloplastic bone substitute for the management of combined endodontic periodontal lesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Lata

    2014-02-01

    The term "endo-perio" lesion has been proposed to describe the destructive lesion resulting from inflammatory products found in varying degrees in both the periodontium and the pulpal tissues. In most of the cases, clinical symptoms disappear following successful endodontic therapy. However failure after conventional root canal treatment calls for surgical intervention. A 35 year old male patient with endo-perio lesion in right maxillary lateral incisor was treated with platelet rich fibrin (PRF) and alloplastic bone substitute after conventional endodontic therapy. At the end of 6 months there was gain in clinical attachment, increased radiographic bone fill and reduction in probing depth which was maintained till 18 month follow-up. Present case report aims to evaluate the efficacy of PRF and alloplastic bone substitute in the management of intrabony defect associated with endo-perio lesion in maxillary lateral incisor because the healing potential of PRF and bone graft has not been widely studied in endodontics. The use of PRF allows the clinician to optimize tissue remodelling, wound healing and angiogenesis by the local delivery of growth factors and proteins. The novel technique described here enables the clinician to be benefited from the full regenerative capacity of this autologous biologic material.

  12. Clinical effectiveness of combining platelet rich fibrin with alloplastic bone substitute for the management of combined endodontic periodontal lesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lata Goyal

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The term "endo-perio" lesion has been proposed to describe the destructive lesion resulting from inflammatory products found in varying degrees in both the periodontium and the pulpal tissues. In most of the cases, clinical symptoms disappear following successful endodontic therapy. However failure after conventional root canal treatment calls for surgical intervention. A 35 year old male patient with endo-perio lesion in right maxillary lateral incisor was treated with platelet rich fibrin (PRF and alloplastic bone substitute after conventional endodontic therapy. At the end of 6 months there was gain in clinical attachment, increased radiographic bone fill and reduction in probing depth which was maintained till 18 month follow-up. Present case report aims to evaluate the efficacy of PRF and alloplastic bone substitute in the management of intrabony defect associated with endo-perio lesion in maxillary lateral incisor because the healing potential of PRF and bone graft has not been widely studied in endodontics. The use of PRF allows the clinician to optimize tissue remodelling, wound healing and angiogenesis by the local delivery of growth factors and proteins. The novel technique described here enables the clinician to be benefited from the full regenerative capacity of this autologous biologic material.

  13. Short-term changes in temporomandibular joint function in subjects with cleft lip and palate treated with maxillary distraction osteogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, K; Otsuka, R; Minato, A; Sato-Wakabayashi, M; Takada, J; Inoue-Arai, M S; Miyamoto, J J; Ono, T; Ohyama, K; Moriyama, K

    2008-05-01

    To investigate the short-term effects of maxillary distraction osteogenesis (DO) on temporomandibular joint (TMJ) function in 21 subjects with cleft lip and palate (CLP). Design - Morphological changes in the maxillofacial region were measured using lateral cephalometric radiographs taken immediately before (pre-DO) and after DO (post-DO) and 1 year after DO (1-year follow-up). A questionnaire was evaluated using a visual analog scale. A chi-square test was used to compare the prevalence of TMJ symptoms between pre-DO and 1-year follow-up. The Spearman correlation coefficient was used to determine the correlation between changes in cephalometric variables and TMJ symptoms in association with maxillary DO. Statistical significance was set at p < 0.05. Results - The ANB (anteroposterior relationship of the maxilla with the mandible) angle and the mandibular plane angle at pre-DO, post-DO, and 1-year follow-up were -4.3 degrees , +5.8 degrees , +4.3 degrees and 32.1 degrees , 33.5 degrees , 33.6 degrees , respectively. The average amounts of anterior and downward movement of the maxilla at post-DO and 1-year follow-up were 8.3, -1.3 and 0.9, 1.1 mm, respectively. The prevalence of TMJ symptoms showed no significant increase in association with maxillary DO. Moreover, there was no significant correlation between changes in cephalometric variables and TMJ symptoms. Conclusion - These results suggest that there was no short-term (i.e., up to 1 year after DO) effect of maxillary DO on TMJ function in subjects with CLP.

  14. Three root canals in the maxillary second premolar

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    de Almeida-Gomes Fabio

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we report an endodontic treatment of the maxillary second premolar with three root canals and distinct foramens. The possibility of three root canals in this tooth is quite small; however, it must be taken into account in clinical and radiographic evaluation during endodontic treatment. Many times, their presence is noticed only after canal treatment due to continuing post-operative discomfort.

  15. Managing sub-gingival fracture by multi-disciplinary approach: Endodontics-forced orthodontic extrusion and prosthetic rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Mittal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatized anterior teeth with sub-gingival crown fractures are a challenge to treat. The management of sub-gingival fractures includes exposing the cervical margin followed by appropriate coronal restoration. The treatment modalities, which involve exposing the cervical margin, are surgical crown lengthening and orthodontic extrusion. This paper reports a case of fractured maxillary anterior tooth at the sub-gingival level that was managed by forced orthodontic extrusion after endodontic treatment followed by esthetic rehabilitation, a much forgotten technique not utilized routinely yet conservative and cost-effective.

  16. [A maxillary premolar reconstruction with a glass fiber reinforced post].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viţalariu, Anca Mihaela; Antohe, Magda; Bahrim, Delia; Tatarciuc, Monica

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the case of a 37 years old female patient who needed a reconstruction of an endodontic treated' second maxillary premolar. The patient presented large areas of occlusal abrasion caused by bruxism, therefore the solution consisted of a reconstruction with a non-metallic post reinforced with glass fibers. In such cases, the excessive occlusal forces developed by bruxism can produce a radicular fracture if the tooth would be reconstructed with a rigid metallic post. The glass-fiber reinforced post has some important qualities, which render it more suitable in most clinical cases: it is easy to use; has the ability to bond with restorative resins; decreases the risk of tooth fracture and provides better esthetics.

  17. Bilateral maxillary fused second and third molars: a rare occurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Rui-Zhen; Wu, Jin-Tao; Wu, You-Nong; Smales, Roger J; Hu, Ming; Yu, Jin-Hua; Zhang, Guang-Dong

    2012-12-01

    This case report describes the diagnosis and endodontic therapy of maxillary fused second and third molars, using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). A 31-year-old Chinese male, with no contributory medical or family/social history, presented with throbbing pain in the maxillary right molar area following an unsuccessful attempted tooth extraction. Clinical examination revealed what appeared initially to be a damaged large extra cusp on the buccal aspect of the distobuccal cusp of the second molar. However, CBCT revealed that a third molar was fused to the second molar. Unexpectedly, the maxillary left third molar also was fused to the second molar, and the crown of an unerupted supernumerary fourth molar was possibly also fused to the apical root region of the second molar. Operative procedures should not be attempted without adequate radiographic investigation. CBCT allowed the precise location of the root canals of the right maxillary fused molar teeth to permit successful endodontic therapy, confirmed after 6 months.

  18. Endodontic Treatment of an Anomalous Anterior Tooth with the Aid of a 3-dimensional Printed Physical Tooth Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Chanhee; Kim, Changhwan; Cho, Seungryong; Baek, Seung Hoon; Kim, Gyutae; Kim, Sahng G; Kim, Sun-Young

    2015-06-01

    Endodontic treatment of tooth formation anomalies is a challenge to clinicians and as such requires a complete understanding of the aberrant root canal anatomy followed by careful root canal disinfection and obturation. Here, we report the use of a 3-dimensional (3D) printed physical tooth model including internal root canal structures for the endodontic treatment of a challenging tooth anomaly. A 12-year-old boy was referred for endodontic treatment of tooth #8. The tooth showed class II mobility with swelling and a sinus tract in the buccal mucosa and periapical radiolucency. The tooth presented a very narrow structure between the crown and root by distal concavity and a severely dilacerated root. Moreover, a perforation site with bleeding and another ditching site were identified around the cervical area in the access cavity. A translucent physical tooth model carrying the information on internal root canal structures was built through a 3-step process: data acquisition by cone-beam computed tomographic scanning, virtual modeling by image processing, and manufacturing by 3D printing. A custom-made guide jig was then fabricated to achieve a safe and precise working path to the root canal. Endodontic procedures including access cavity preparation were performed using the physical tooth model and the guide jig. At the 7-month follow-up, the endodontically treated tooth showed complete periapical healing with no clinical signs and symptoms. This case report describes a novel method of endodontic treatment of an anomalous maxillary central incisor with the aid of a physical tooth model and a custom-made guide jig via 3D printing technique. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Carprofen neither reduces postoperative facial expression scores in rabbits treated with buprenorphine nor alters long term bone formation after maxillary sinus grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedenqvist, Patricia; Trbakovic, Amela; Thor, Andreas; Ley, Cecilia; Ekman, Stina; Jensen-Waern, Marianne

    2016-08-01

    In connection with bilateral maxillary sinus augmentation, the acute effects of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug carprofen on facial expressions and long-term effects on bone formation were evaluated in 18 male New Zealand White rabbits. A 10×10mm bone window was drilled in the maxilla, the sinus membrane elevated and a titanium mini-implant inserted. One of two test materials was randomly inserted unilaterally and bovine bone chips (control) on the contralateral side in the created space. Rabbits were randomly allocated to receive buprenorphine plus carprofen (n=9) or buprenorphine plus saline (n=9) postoperatively. Buprenorphine was administered subcutaneously every 6h for 3days in a tapered dose (0.05-0.01mg/kg) and carprofen (5mg/kg) or saline administered subcutaneously 1h before, and daily for 4days postoperatively. To assess pain, clinical examination, body weight recording and scoring of facial expressions from photos taken before, and 6-13h after surgery were performed. Twelve weeks after surgery the rabbits were euthanized and sections of maxillary bones and sinuses were analysed with histomorphometry and by qualitative histology. Carprofen had no effect on mean facial expression scores, which increased from 0.0 to 3.6 (carprofen) and 4.3 (saline), of a maximum of 8.0. Neither did carprofen have an effect on bone formation or implant incorporation, whereas the test materials had. In conclusion, treatment with 5mg/kg carprofen once daily for 5days did not reduce facial expression scores after maxillary sinus augmentation in buprenorphine treated rabbits and did not affect long term bone formation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Radiodiagnostics of maxillary osteomyelitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klemova, J.; Jenca, A.; Hanusinova, V.; Danko, J.; Ondrasovicova, J.

    2006-01-01

    Osteomyelitis is defined as an inflammation or infection in bone tissues - cancellous bone, bone marrow, bone compacta and periosteum due to invasion of infection from surrounding tissues. Maxillary osteomyelitis is less common disease than osteomyelitis of mandible. This can be explained by anatomical structure of maxilla which is mainly composed of sinuses and thin bone lamellae. Such a structure allows rapid propagation of the infection to the surface. There have been examined and treated 70 patients with osteomyelitis of facial bones within past 15 years at Department of stomatology and maxillo-facial surgery of P.J. Safarik University in Kosice. Only four cases were diagnosed as maxillary osteomyelitis. The aim of this study was to mention the differences in anatomy and symptoms of acute and chronic stage of maxillary osteomyelitis and to give a detailed radiographic picture of this affliction. (authors)

  1. Bilateral maxillary fused second and third molars: a rare occurrence

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, Rui-Zhen; Wu, Jin-Tao; Wu, You-Nong; Smales, Roger J; Hu, Ming; Yu, Jin-Hua; Zhang, Guang-Dong

    2012-01-01

    This case report describes the diagnosis and endodontic therapy of maxillary fused second and third molars, using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). A 31-year-old Chinese male, with no contributory medical or family/social history, presented with throbbing pain in the maxillary right molar area following an unsuccessful attempted tooth extraction. Clinical examination revealed what appeared initially to be a damaged large extra cusp on the buccal aspect of the distobuccal cusp of the secon...

  2. Unusal canal configuration in maxillary and mandibular second molars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramachandran Ragunathan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This clinical article describes three different case reports of maxillary and mandibular second molars with the unusual anatomy of single root with a single canal and their endodontic management. An unusual case of bilateralism is observed in the first two cases in the form of single-rooted second mandibular molars in both the quadrant of the same patient. The presence of maxillary second molar with single root and single canal in the third case is unusual.

  3. Interpretation of Endodontic File Length Adjustments Using Radiovisiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    periapical tissues would cause apical granulomas, and sometimes epithelial proliferation leading to cyst formation. They believed that better results...RVG) images. Comparisons were made between RVG images and conventional periapical radiographs. Maxillary and mandibular human cadaver sections with a...Biologic aspects of endodontics IV. Periapical tissue reactions to root-filled teeth whose canals had been instrumented short of their apices. Oral

  4. Root canal treatment of bilateral three-rooted maxillary first premolars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhavana Gandhi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In endodontics, several anatomic variations occur in teeth, both externally and in the internal root morphology, which play a very significant role in the diagnosis and treatment outcome. A thorough knowledge of the root canal anatomy, careful interpretation of the angled radiographs, proper endodontic access cavity preparation, and exploration of the root canal are the prerequisites for endodontic success. In a maxillary first premolar, it is rare to find extra roots and canals, and the aim of the present article is to report a case about the successful diagnosis and clinical management of bilateral three-rooted maxillary first premolars, with three independent root canals.

  5. Endodontics and the ageing patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, M; Parashos, P

    2015-03-01

    Patients are living longer and the rate of edentulism is decreasing. Endodontic treatment is an essential part of maintaining the health and well-being of the elderly. Retention of natural teeth improves the quality of life and the overall health and longevity of ageing patients. Also, teeth that might be otherwise extracted may be strategically valuable to retain a prosthesis, and elderly patients are more likely to have medical complications that may prevent dental extractions from being safely performed. The technical goals of endodontic treatment in the elderly are the same as those for younger patients. However, the pulpo-dentinal complex undergoes calcific changes over time, which may pose challenges for the clinician. The purposes of this review are to discuss age changes in the pulp and the challenges posed by diagnosing, treatment planning and treating the elderly endodontic patient. © 2015 Australian Dental Association.

  6. Three-dimensional finite element analysis of the stress distribution in the endodontically treated maxillary central incisor by glass fiber post and dentin post

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarfaraz Memon

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: The FEA results showed that the stress in the cervical area of the dentin was more for fiber post when compared to dentin post, and maximum displacement values were less for dentin post in comparison to fiber post.

  7. Finite element analysis of stress concentration in three popular brands of fiber posts systems used for maxillary central incisor teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Shalini; Garg, Vaibhav

    2011-07-01

    To study the stress concentrations in endodontically treated maxillary central incisor teeth restored with 3 different fiber post systems subjected to various oblique occlusal loads. FEM analysis was used to analyze stress concentrations generated in maxillary anterior teeth. Computer aided designing was used to create a 2-D model of an upper central incisor. Post systems analyzed were the DT Light Post (RDT, Bisco), Luscent Anchor (Dentatus) & RelyX (3M-ESPE). The entire design assembly was subjected to analysis by ANSYS for oblique loading forces of 25N, 80N & 125 N RESULTS: The resultant data showed that the RelyX generated the least amount of stress concentration. Minimal stress buildups contribute to the longevity of the restorations. Thus RelyX by virtue of judicious stress distribution is the better option for restoration of grossly decayed teeth.

  8. Maxillary hematocele

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inaba, Tsuyoshi; Fujimura, Takeyuki; Udaka, Tsuyoshi; Siomori, Teruo; Kadokawa, Yohei; Suzuki, Hideaki

    2007-01-01

    Hematocele is a benign hemorrhagic pseudotumor that preferably arises in the sinonasal tract, particularly in the maxillary sinus. The occurrence of maxillary hematocele has sporadically been documented, but its nature is not dearly understood. We herein report four cases of maxillary hematocele. The patients were 3 men and one woman, 30-62 years of age with an average of 49.8 years. Major symptoms were nasal obstruction (2 cases), nasal bleeding (2 cases), and toothache (1 case). Computed tomography demonstrated well-defined expansive soft tissue shadows with bone erosion. The lesions showed intermingled high/intermediate/low intensity in both T1- and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. Endoscopic sinus surgery was performed in 3 cases, and the other patient underwent Caldwell-Luc procedure. Surgical specimens microscopically exhibited inflammatory changes with hematoma and fibrin deposition. The postoperative clinical course was uneventful in all cases, and all the patients are currently free from disease 4-25 months after surgery. Clinical, histopathological and radiological characteristics of maxillary hematocele are reviewed. (author)

  9. An animal model to study regenerative endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torabinejad, Mahmoud; Corr, Robert; Buhrley, Matthew; Wright, Kenneth; Shabahang, Shahrokh

    2011-02-01

    A growing body of evidence is demonstrating the possibility for regeneration of tissues within the pulp space and continued root development in teeth with necrotic pulps and open apices. There are areas of research related to regenerative endodontics that need to be investigated in an animal model. The purpose of this study was to investigate ferret cuspid teeth as a model to investigate factors involved in regenerative endodontics. Six young male ferrets between the ages of 36-133 days were used in this investigation. Each animal was anesthetized and perfused with 10% buffered formalin. Block sections including the mandibular and maxillary cuspid teeth and their surrounding periapical tissues were obtained, radiographed, decalcified, sectioned, and stained with hematoxylin-eosin to determine various stages of apical closure in these teeth. The permanent mandibular and maxillary cuspid teeth with open apices erupted approximately 50 days after birth. Initial signs of closure of the apical foramen in these teeth were observed between 90-110 days. Complete apical closure was observed in the cuspid teeth when the animals were 133 days old. Based on the experiment, ferret cuspid teeth can be used to investigate various factors involved in regenerative endodontics that cannot be tested in human subjects. The most appropriate time to conduct the experiments would be when the ferrets are between the ages of 50 and 90 days. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. External apical root resorption in maxillary root-filled incisors after orthodontic treatment: a split-mouth design study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llamas-Carreras, José María; Amarilla, Almudena; Espinar-Escalona, Eduardo; Castellanos-Cosano, Lizett; Martín-González, Jenifer; Sánchez-Domínguez, Benito; López-Frías, Francisco Javier

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare, in a split mouth design, the external apical root resorption (EARR) associated with orthodontic treatment in root-filled maxillary incisors and their contralateral teeth with vital pulps. The study sample consisted of 38 patients (14 males and 24 females), who had one root-filled incisor before completion of multiband/bracket orthodontic therapy for at least 1 year. For each patient, digital panoramic radiographs taken before and after orthodontic treatment were used to determine the root resortion and the proportion of external root resorption (PRR), defined as the ratio between the root resorption in the endodontically treated incisor and that in its contralateral incisor with a vital pulp. The student's t-test, chi-square test and logistic regression analysis were used to determine statistical significance. There was no statistically significant difference (p > 0.05) between EARR in vital teeth (1.1 ± 1.0 mm) and endodontically treated incisors (1.1 ± 0.8 mm). Twenty-six patients (68.4%) showed greater resorption of the endodontically treated incisor than its homolog vital tooth (p > 0.05). The mean and standard deviation of PPR were 1.0 ± 0.2. Multivariate logistic regression suggested that PRR does not correlate with any of the variables analyzed. There was no significant difference in the amount or severity of external root resorption during orthodontic movement between root-filled incisors and their contralateral teeth with vital pulps.

  11. Survival Rates from Fracture of Endodontically Treated Premolars Restored with Full-coverage Crowns or Direct Resin Composite Restorations: A Retrospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suksaphar, Warattama; Banomyong, Danuchit; Jirathanyanatt, Titalee; Ngoenwiwatkul, Yaowaluk

    2018-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the survival rates against fracture of premolar endodontically treated teeth (ETT) restored with resin composite or crowns and to identify risk factors associated with the fracture. Data from dental records and radiographs of premolar ETT with postendodontic restorations (ie, resin composite or crowns) were collected between 2012 and 2016 and selected following selected inclusion and exclusion criteria. Tooth location, type of restoration, number of proximal contacts, and amount of tooth surface loss were recorded. The incidence and restorability of postendodontic fractures were identified. Survival rates against fracture of the 2 restoration types were calculated using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. Any potential factors associated with fractures were identified using Cox proportional hazards models. The survival rate against fracture of ETT restored with crowns (95.1%) was higher than resin composite (77.0%). ETT restored with resin composite with 1 or 2 tooth surface losses and 2 proximal contacts had a high survival rate of 88.5% that was not significantly different from ETT with crowns. A higher incidence of restorability after fracture was observed in teeth restored with resin composite than crowns. The type of restoration and number of proximal contacts were identified as potential risk factors associated with fracture incidence. The survival rate against fracture of ETT restored with crowns was higher than resin composite. However, ETT with 1 or 2 tooth surface losses and 2 proximal contacts and restored with resin composite showed a high survival rate that was comparable with ETT restored with crowns. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. [Stimulation and evaluation on maxillary distraction osteogenesis using CASSOS 2001].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Min; Qiu, Wei-liu; Tang, You-sheng; Li, Qing-yun

    2002-09-01

    To simulate maxillary distraction osteogenesis and evaluate the change of soft and hard tissue before and after treatment, using Computer-Assisted Simulation System for Orthognathic Surgery( CASSOS 2001). A fourteen-year-old boy with severe maxillary hypoplasia, due to unilateral cleft lip and palate, was analysed by cephalometric analysis. The simulations of maxillary distraction osteogenesis (Le Fort I osteotomy and Le Fort II osteotomy) were re-analysed. After the treatment, cephalometric analysis was preformed again. The data were compared. The maxillary hypoplasia was well treated using maxillary distraction osteogenesis; Compared with Le fort I osteotomy, more satisfactory results can be obtained by Le fort I distraction osteogenesis. Maxillary distraction osteogenesis is a better way to treat severe maxillary hypoplasia with operated CLP than maxillary osteotomy. CASSOS 2001 can help surgeons and patients on simulation and evaluation of maxillary distraction osteogenesis, and on decision of treatment plan.

  13. Evaluation of dental students' perception and self-confidence levels regarding endodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanalp, Jale; Güven, Esra Pamukçu; Oktay, Inci

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to obtain information about senior dental students' perceptions and self-confidence levels regarding endodontic practice. Anonymous survey forms were handed out to senior students at Yeditepe University, Faculty of Dentistry. The students were asked to score their level of confidence using a 5-point scale and comment about future practices. The response rate of the survey was 88%. 11.9% expressed endodontics as the first branch in terms of difficulty. The majority (90.5%) indicated they would perform root canal treatments within their expertise limit in the future but refer difficult cases to an endodontist. Bleaching of endodontically treated teeth, managing flare-ups, placement of a rubber dam were procedures in which students reported the lowest confidence (2.55 ± 1.17, 3.24 ± 0.96, 3.24 ± 1.19, respectively). On the other hand, students felt the lowest confidence in the treatment of maxillary molars followed by mandibular molars (3.43 ± 1.02 and 3.93 ± 0.97, respectively). Students also reported the lowest confidence in root resorptions, endo-perio lesions, traumas, retreatments and apexifications (2.93 ± 1.16, 3.07 ± 0.89, 3.24 ± 0.85, 3.33 ± 1.7 and 3.36 ± 1.1, respectively). The results showing students' lower confidence in more challenging aspects of dentistry may be related with the attitude of dental schools to refer these cases to post graduate students and instilling information about these cases on a theoretical basis only. Though there seems to be a tendency for students to refer challenging cases to a specialist in future, authorities should give priority to enhance the way information and experience is conveyed regarding various aspects of endodontic treatment.

  14. Evaluation of dental students’ perception and self-confidence levels regarding endodontic treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanalp, Jale; Güven, Esra Pamukçu; Oktay, Inci

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to obtain information about senior dental students’ perceptions and self-confidence levels regarding endodontic practice. Materials and Methods: Anonymous survey forms were handed out to senior students at Yeditepe University, Faculty of Dentistry. The students were asked to score their level of confidence using a 5-point scale and comment about future practices. Results: The response rate of the survey was 88%. 11.9% expressed endodontics as the first branch in terms of difficulty. The majority (90.5%) indicated they would perform root canal treatments within their expertise limit in the future but refer difficult cases to an endodontist. Bleaching of endodontically treated teeth, managing flare-ups, placement of a rubber dam were procedures in which students reported the lowest confidence (2.55 ± 1.17, 3.24 ± 0.96, 3.24 ± 1.19, respectively). On the other hand, students felt the lowest confidence in the treatment of maxillary molars followed by mandibular molars (3.43 ± 1.02 and 3.93 ± 0.97, respectively). Students also reported the lowest confidence in root resorptions, endo-perio lesions, traumas, retreatments and apexifications (2.93 ± 1.16, 3.07 ± 0.89, 3.24 ± 0.85, 3.33 ± 1.7 and 3.36 ± 1.1, respectively). Conclusions: The results showing students’ lower confidence in more challenging aspects of dentistry may be related with the attitude of dental schools to refer these cases to post graduate students and instilling information about these cases on a theoretical basis only. Though there seems to be a tendency for students to refer challenging cases to a specialist in future, authorities should give priority to enhance the way information and experience is conveyed regarding various aspects of endodontic treatment. PMID:24883030

  15. Finite elements study of the Flexi Post and Flexi Flange post systems in a maxillary central incisor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewgoy Hugo Roberto

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of post and core systems has become an excellent alternative for restoring endodontically treated teeth. The aim of this study was to evaluate the von Mises, maximal compressive and tensile stresses distribution using the Finite Element Method (FEM on human teeth restored with different post and core systems. The analysis was made on endodontically treated maxillary central incisors. The post systems used in this investigation were the stainless steel or titanium Flexi Post/Flexi Flange. Composite resin was used as core material and resin cement was the cement material of choice to seat a full porcelain crown. The bi-dimensional mathematical model was created from pictures taken from an intact human maxillary central incisor and prefabricated posts. This image was transferred to a personal computer in the MSC/Nastran 4.5 software. A static and linear analysis treatment was performed when a 45º load of 100 N was applied on the lingual surface of the tooth. Based on the results obtained, it can be concluded that the post design and its material can alter the stress pattern distribution.

  16. Problems associated with the diagnosis and treatment of endodontic disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emily, P.

    1990-01-01

    The diagnosis of endodontic lesions in animal dentistry is complicated and restricted by the use of objective diagnostic procedures. Human endodontics uses subjective symptoms to a large degree, as well as objective symptoms. Subjective symptoms include patient pain; sensitivity to hot or cold; percussion; and foul taste or odor. Veterinary dentists must receive input from clients, as well as using their own clinical and radiographic evaluation. Many endodontic lesions remain undetected because the client fails to notice broken or discolored teeth, facial swelling, drooling, difficulty in chewing, chewing only on one side, and general malaise. An increased awareness of the endodontic problems that can occur in animals increases the level of veterinary care. Numerous techniques, including apexogenesis, apexification, direct and indirect pulp capping, and conventional and surgical endodontic therapy, can be used to treat various endodontic problems successfully

  17. Maxillary obturator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aruna Jawahirlal Bhandari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Defects in the maxillary jaw can be congenital, developmental, acquired, traumatic or surgical involving the oral cavity and related anatomic structure. Absence or loss of some or all of the soft palate and / or hard palate results in insufficient structure or altered function of the remaining tissues. Defects can cause disruption of articulation and airflow during speech production and also nasal reflux during deglutition. Patients after surgical resection have altered anatomy due to scaring, tissue contracture, lack of bony support and tissue edema. These patients have problem of regurgitation of water and food through nose and difficulty in speech. These changes require the fabrication of prosthesis and also sometimes repeated prosthesis adjustments to confirm to the soft tissue changes. To prevent this and to help the patient in deglutition and speech defects must be restored with prosthesis. In such situation an obturator is designed to close the opening between the residual hard and / or soft palate and the pharynx. The prosthesis provided for these patients are called as obturators. An obturator is a prosthesis which is fabricated for the patients with the palatal defects in the form of cleft lip and palate, oroantral fistula or surgical resection after removable of pathology like tumor or cancer. This review article will highlight on the Prosthetic Rehabilitation of the maxillary defects and the types of obturators.

  18. A prospective clinical study of regenerative endodontic treatment of traumatized immature teeth with necrotic pulps using bi-antibiotic paste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazzal, H; Kenny, K; Altimimi, A; Kang, J; Duggal, M S

    2018-04-01

    To evaluate the treatment outcomes of a revitalization endodontic technique (RET) for the management of traumatized immature teeth with necrotic pulps in children. Fifteen healthy children (age range = 7-10 years) with traumatized immature maxillary incisors with necrotic pulps treated with bi-antibiotic revitalization endodontic technique were prospectively assessed over approximately two years (mean = 22 months). One operator undertook all treatments, clinical reviews and standardized radiographic exposures with radiographic analysis being carried out by two calibrated experienced clinicians. Crown colour change was assessed using an objective published methodology. Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to compare root lengths, root dentinal widths and apical foramen widths over time. Interoperator measurement reliability was consistently strong for all measurements. There was no significant difference in root lengths or root dentinal wall widths following RET. A significant difference in apical foramen widths was observed after 2 years (P = 0.013) with resolution of clinical signs of infection in all cases. Despite omitting minocycline and using Portland cement (nonbismuth containing cement), a noticeable crown colour change (yellower, redder and lighter), as measured by an objective colour measurement system with ΔE = 7.39, was recorded. Most patients, however, were satisfied with the aesthetic outcome. Traumatized immature teeth with necrotic pulps treated with revitalization endodontic technique did not demonstrate continuation of root development or dentine formation when assessed by periapical radiographs. However, apical closure and periodontal healing were observed. A measurable change in crown colour (yellower, redder and lighter), with mostly no aesthetic concern to the patients/parents, was also observed. © 2017 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Curricular Guidelines for Endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Dental Education, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Guidelines developed by the Section on Endodontics of the American Association of Dental Schools for use by educational institutions as curriculum development aids are provided. Endodontics is that branch of dentistry dealing with diagnosis and treatment of oral conditions that arise as a result of pathoses of dental pulp. (MLW)

  20. Maxillary lateral incisors with two canals and two separate curved roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajit George Mohan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Variation in the roots and root canal anatomy seems to be the norm rather than an exception. For a successful endodontic treatment, a clinician should have a thorough knowledge of the internal and external dental anatomy and its variations. Maxillary lateral incisors usually exhibit single canal with a single root. In this case, clinical examination and radiographs clearly demonstrates the presence of two root canals with two separate curved roots. This case report emphasizes the need for attention during endodontic management of maxillary lateral incisors.

  1. Endodontic treatment and esthetic management of a primary double tooth with direct composite using silicone buildup guide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinaya Kumar Kulkarni

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Gemination and fusion are morphological dental anomalies, characterized by the formation of a clinically wide tooth. Gemination occurs when one tooth bud tries to divide, while fusion occurs if two buds unite. The terms double teeth, double formation, conjoined teeth, geminifusion, vicinifusion and dental twinning are often used to describe fusion and gemination. Double teeth are associated with clinical problems such as poor esthetics, spacing problems and caries susceptibility. Management of such cases requires a comprehensive knowledge of the clinical entity as well as the problems associated with it. This report presents a case of primary double tooth in a 6-year-old boy involving maxillary left central incisor. The anomalous tooth was carious and pulpally involved. This was treated conservatively by endodontic treatment and esthetic rehabilitation was done with direct composite restoration using a silicone buildup guide. The treated tooth was followed up until exfoliation.

  2. [Theory and practice of minimally invasive endodontics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, H W

    2016-08-01

    The primary goal of modern endodontic therapy is to achieve the long-term retention of a functional tooth by preventing or treating pulpitis or apical periodontitis is. The long-term retention of endodontically treated tooth is correlated with the remaining amount of tooth tissue and the quality of the restoration after root canal filling. In recent years, there has been rapid progress and development in the basic research of endodontic biology, instrument and applied materials, making treatment procedures safer, more accurate, and more efficient. Thus, minimally invasive endodontics(MIE)has received increasing attention at present. MIE aims to preserve the maximum of tooth structure during root canal therapy, and the concept covers the whole process of diagnosis and treatment of teeth. This review article focuses on describing the minimally invasive concepts and operating essentials in endodontics, from diagnosis and treatment planning to the access opening, pulp cavity finishing, root canal cleaning and shaping, 3-dimensional root canal filling and restoration after root canal treatment.

  3. Maxillary Osteomyelitis: A Rare Entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayaaz Habib

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteomyelitis of the maxilla is now a rare event with the advent of antibiotics. The two predominant causes are odontogenic infections and sinusitis. Immunocompromised states such as diabetes, HIV, and malnutrition increase the risk of osteomyelitis. It is important to recognize this early as it is a difficult entity to treat with potentially serious consequences. We report an unusual case of right sided maxillary osteomyelitis in a lady with poorly controlled diabetes in rural Lincolnshire. Biopsy of the right maxillary bone showed features of acute osteomyelitis. This responded well to a prolonged course of oral antibiotics.

  4. Truncal anaesthesia of the maxillary nerve for outpatient surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robiony, M; Demitri, V; Costa, F; Politi, M; Cugini, U

    1998-10-01

    We present our experience of transcutaneous truncal anaesthesia of the maxillary nerve in association with transmucosal anaesthesia of the sphenopalatine ganglion in surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion. Twelve patients with a skeletal transverse discrepancy of the maxilla were treated in our department from 1994 to 1995. Maxillary transcutaneous nerve block was done with a Quincke 8 cm spinal needle together with transmucosal anaesthesia of the sphenopalatine ganglion. Mepivacaine without adrenaline and sodium bicarbonate 1/10 was used for truncal anaesthesia and lidocaine-prilocaine cream for transmucosal anaesthesia. A Le Fort I osteotomy, lateral nasal wall osteotomy, pterygomaxillary osteotomy, and a palatal osteotomy were done for all patients before the maxillary expansion. Total anaesthesia of the maxillary area facilitated the operations and appreciably reduced the amount of postoperative pain. The ease of achieving effective anaesthesia before and after operation and the absence of side-effects make this form of anaesthetic particularly useful in surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion.

  5. Two-Rooted Maxillary First Molars with Two Canals: A Case Series

    OpenAIRE

    Shakouie, Sahar; Mokhtari, Hadi; Ghasemi, Negin; Gholizadeh, Seddigheh

    2013-01-01

    Thorough understanding of the anatomic and internal morphology of a root canal system is absolutely essential for the success of endodontic treatment. Since permanent maxillary first molars have shown variation in internal anatomy, morphology, this tooth has been reviewed extensively. Presence of two canals in a two-rooted maxillary first molar has rarely been reported in studies describing tooth and root canal anatomies. In this report, three cases are presented, which involve the root canal...

  6. Surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogrel, M A; Kaban, L B; Vargervik, K; Baumrind, S

    1992-01-01

    Twelve adults with maxillary width discrepancy of greater than 5 mm were treated by surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion. The procedure consisted of bilateral zygomatic buttress and midpalatal osteotomies combined with the use of a tooth-borne orthopedic device postoperatively. Mean palatal expansion of 7.5 mm (range of 6 to 13 mm), measured in the first molar region, was achieved within 3 weeks in all patients. Expansion remained stable during the 12-month study period, with a mean relapse for the entire group of 0.88 +/- 0.48 mm. Morbidity was limited to mild postoperative discomfort. The results of this preliminary study indicated that surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion is a safe, simple, and reliable procedure for achieving a permanent increase in skeletal maxillary width in adults. Further study is necessary to document the three-dimensional movements of the maxillary segments and long-term stability of the skeletal and dental changes.

  7. Fifteen-year Clinical Follow-up of Restoration of Extensive Cervical Resorption in a Maxillary Central Incisor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reston, E G; Bueno, Rpr; Closs, L Q; Zettermann, J

    Internal bleaching in endodontically treated teeth requires care and protection to prevent harm to the periodontal ligament due to peroxide and may result in external root resorption. There is a myriad of treatment options when this occurs, such as monitoring, extraction, and subsequent rehabilitation with implants or fixed prosthodontics. In some cases, such as the one described here, a conservative attempt to maintain the tooth as a single structure can be made by sealing the resorptive defect. In the present case, we show a multidisciplinary approach where orthodontics, periodontics, and restorative dentistry were involved in treating the maxillary right central incisor (#8) of a 65-year-old patient with extensive cervical resorption, whose chief complaint was esthetics. The proposed treatment was extrusion of the tooth followed by curettage and restoration of the defect with glass ionomer cement. The patient has been followed for 15 years with no signs of recurrence, maintenance of periodontal health, and patient satisfaction with the esthetic outcome.

  8. One-visit endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashkenaz, P J

    1984-10-01

    I would like to conclude with some personal observations and comments on the use of single-visit endodontics in private practice based on my 12 years of experience utilizing this procedure. I cannot stress in strong enough terms that one-visit endodontics should not be undertaken by the novice. As an evolutionary philosophy of treatment, its use grows out of a full understanding of fundamental endodontic principles by the experienced practitioner. It is only after considering all of the indications and contraindications in each case on an individual basis, that a decision should be made as to whether or not it can be completed in a single visit. However, it is also important for the practitioner to have a clinical sense of what can be accomplished once the rubber dam has been placed and work commenced on the tooth. I submit to you that this very important clinical sense can be gained only after many years of clinical experience. Therefore, the endodontic competence of the practicing dentist becomes the overriding factor in determining the outcome of any one particular case. This is not to say that only a specialized few can and should perform this procedure. However, it does mean that a high degree of clinical skill is necessary to perform it in a successful manner. The performance of better endodontics in multiple visits will ensure success in single visits. Therefore, it is incumbent upon the individual practitioner to objectively evaluate his or her endodontic skills. The clinician should critically evaluate every aspect of his or her endodontic practice by determining the incidences of biomechanical errors such as ledging, perforations, overinstrumentation, broken instruments, interappointment flare-ups, and failures. For only after evaluating these areas will the clinician have an indication as to his or her level of endodontic skill and whether or not future study and practice need be done in one or more specific aspects of endodontic practice. Once a high

  9. Molecular diagnostics in endodontics

    OpenAIRE

    Rechenberg, Dan-Krister; Zehnder, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Recent systematic reviews have substantiated the fact that current testing methods to assess the inflammatory state of the pulp and the periapical tissues are of limited value. Consequently, it may be time to search for alternative routes in endodontic diagnostics. Molecular assessment methods could be the future. However, in the field of endodontics, the research in that direction is only about to evolve. Because pulpal and periradicular diseases are related to opportunistic infections, diag...

  10. Essentials of Endodontic Microsurgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    Holtzman DJ, et al. Quality of root-end preparations using ultrasonic and rotary instrumentation in cadavers. J Endod 2000;26:281. 39. Peters CI...00-00-2010 to 00-00-2010 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Essentials of Endodontic Microsurgery 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT... Endodontic Program,Harvard School of Dental Medicine,Boston,MA 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND

  11. Endodontic retreatment decisions: no consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryanpour, S; Van Nieuwenhuysen, J P; D'Hoore, W

    2000-05-01

    The objectives of the present study were to: (i) evaluate the consensus, if any, amongst dental schools, students and their instructors managing the same clinical cases, all of which involved endodontically treated teeth; and (ii) determine the predominant proposed treatment option. Final year students, endodontic staff members and instructors of 10 European dental schools were surveyed as decision makers. Fourteen different radiographic cases of root canal treated teeth accompanied by a short clinical history were presented to them in a uniform format. For each case the decision makers were requested to: (i) choose only one out of nine treatment alternatives proposed, from 'no treatment' to 'extraction' via 'retreatment' and 'surgery' (ii) assess on two 5-point scales: the difficulty of making a decision, and the technical complexity of the retreatment procedure. The results indicate wide inter- and also intra-school disagreements in the clinical management of root canal treated teeth. Analysis of variance showed that the main source of variation was the 'school effect', explaining 1.8% (NS) to 18.6% (P < 0.0001) of the treatment variations. No other factor explained as much variance. Decision difficulty was moderately correlated to technical complexity (Pearsons' r ranging from 0.19 to 0.35, P < 0.0001). No clear consensus occurred amongst and within dental schools concerning the clinical management of the 14 cases. The lack of consensus amongst schools seems to be due mainly to chance or uncertainty, but can be partly explained by the 'school effect'.

  12. Managing the severely proclined maxillary anteriors by extracting traumatized right maxillary central incisor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahesh Jain

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 14-year-old girl reported with severely proclined maxillary anterior teeth with fractured and discolored right maxillary central incisor with questionable prognosis. Autotransplantation of premolar to replace central incisor was considered a risky option as patient was 14-year-old with presence of advanced root development of premolar. The immediate placement of the prosthetic implant was also not possible because of patient′s age. Therefore, it was decided to use the space obtained by extracting questionable maxillary right central incisor for orthodontic purpose and also sacrificing the healthy premolar is invariably an excessive biological cost for a modest functional and aesthetic gain. Hence, the treatment plan for this case includes extraction of right maxillary central incisor and left maxillary first premolar, movement of right maxillary lateral incisor mesially, achieving normal axial inclination of maxillary anteriors with normal overjet and overbite. Mandibular arch was treated nonextraction due to congenitally missing central incisors with presence of normally inclined lower anteriors thereby maintaining Angles class I occlusion. Tipping, usually, seen in Begg mechanotherapy was used for our advantage to correct severely proclined maxillary anteriors with simultaneous bite opening mechanics. Case was completed in 19 months and posttreatment records including photographs, radiographs and study models were made. Begg wrap around the retainer was placed in the maxillary arch allowing natural settling of occlusion.

  13. Analysis of endodontic therapy in patients irradiated for head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seto, B.G.; Beumer, J. III; Kagawa, T.; Klokkevold, P.; Wolinsky, L.

    1985-01-01

    The outcome of endodontic therapy in 16 patients irradiated for head and neck cancer was studied. Thirty-five postradiation endodontically treated teeth (54 roots) were included in the study. The follow-up period ranged from 6 months to 54 months. At the time of last follow-up, 46 of 54 roots were being maintained. No osteoradionecroses were seen in association with teeth that had been endodontically treated. From this review, it is clear that endodontic therapy is a viable method of treating diseased teeth in patients irradiated for oral neoplasms

  14. Two-rooted maxillary first molars with two canals: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakouie, Sahar; Mokhtari, Hadi; Ghasemi, Negin; Gholizadeh, Seddigheh

    2013-01-01

    Thorough understanding of the anatomic and internal morphology of a root canal system is absolutely essential for the success of endodontic treatment. Since permanent maxillary first molars have shown variation in internal anatomy, morphology, this tooth has been reviewed extensively. Presence of two canals in a two-rooted maxillary first molar has rarely been reported in studies describing tooth and root canal anatomies. In this report, three cases are presented, which involve the root canal treatment of maxillary first molars with fusion of the two buccal roots.

  15. Maxillary Sinus Impaction of a Core Carrier Causing Sustained Apical Periodontitis, Sinusitis, and Nasal Stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørndal, Lars; Amaloo, Catharina; Markvart, Merete

    2016-01-01

    diagnosis and correct endodontic retreatment of a maxillary right first molar. A 36-year-old man presented in 2012 with complaints from the right nostril region. Medical treatment with antibiotics and surgical procedures because of nasal stenosis resulted only in partial improvement. Five years earlier...

  16. A review of the regenerative endodontic treatment procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin-Na Lee,

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, apexification has been used to treat immature permanent teeth that have lost pulp vitality. This technique promotes the formation of an apical barrier to close the open apex so that the filling materials can be confined to the root canal. Because tissue regeneration cannot be achieved with apexification, a new technique called regenerative endodontic treatment was presented recently to treat immature permanent teeth. Regenerative endodontic treatment is a treatment procedure designed to replace damaged pulp tissue with viable tissue which restores the normal function of the pulp-dentin structure. After regenerative endodontic treatment, continued root development and hard tissue deposition on the dentinal wall can occur under ideal circumstances. However, it is difficult to predict the result of regenerative endodontic treatment. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to summarize multiple factors effects on the result of regenerative endodontic treatment in order to achieve more predictable results. In this study, we investigated the features of regenerative endodontic treatment in comparison with those of other pulp treatment procedures and analyzed the factors that have an effect on regenerative endodontic treatment.

  17. Endodontic treatment of a tiger

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvist, J.; Kortegaard, H.; Grøndahl, C.

    The 84th Annual Meeting of NoF 2001, veterinary dentistry, endodontics, dental materials, animal case report......The 84th Annual Meeting of NoF 2001, veterinary dentistry, endodontics, dental materials, animal case report...

  18. Reactive correction of a maxillary incisor in single-tooth crossbite following periodontal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chih-Hao; Brunsvold, Michael A

    2005-05-01

    The reactive correction of a single tooth anterior crossbite following periodontal therapy is described. This case report provides new information regarding correction of a crossbite relationship and con- firms existing reports of tooth movement following periodontal therapy. A 39-year-old woman in good general health presented with a history of recurrent periodontal abscesses of a maxillary incisor. Probing depths of the abscessed tooth ranged from 5 to 12 mm, and class 1 mobility was noted. Radiographs revealed that the tooth had previously been treated endodontically. The patient's periodontal diagnosis was generalized chronic moderate to severe periodontitis. Treatment considerations were complicated by a single-tooth crossbite relationship of the involved incisor and clinical evidence that the periodontal abscess communicated with an apical infection. Treatment of the abscess consisted of cause-related therapy, bone grafting, and occlusal adjustment. Five months after surgical treatment, an edge-to-edge incisal relationship was observed, the first indicator of tooth movement. Further correction to a normal incisal relationship resulted 1 year after modification of the proximal contact. At this time, there was normal probing depth with only slight recession and mobility. Bone fill was radiographically noted. It appears that some cases of maxillary incisor crossbite that are complicated by periodontal disease may be corrected, without orthodontic appliances, following periodontal treatment.

  19. Worldwide pattern of antibiotic prescription in endodontic infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura-Egea, Juan José; Martín-González, Jenifer; Jiménez-Sánchez, María Del Carmen; Crespo-Gallardo, Isabel; Saúco-Márquez, Juan José; Velasco-Ortega, Eugenio

    2017-08-01

    Odontogenic infections, and especially endodontic infections, are polymicrobial, involving a combination of Gram-positive and Gram-negative facultative anaerobes and strictly anaerobic bacteria. Therefore, antibiotics can be used as an adjunct to endodontic treatment. However, most chronic and even acute endodontic infections can be successfully managed by disinfection of the root-canal system, which eliminates the source of infection, followed by abscess drainage or tooth extraction, without the need for antibiotics. The literature provides evidence of inadequate prescribing practices by dentists. The aim of this concise review was to analyse the worldwide pattern of antibiotic prescription in endodontic infections. Comprehensive searches were conducted in MEDLINE/PubMed, Wiley Online Database, Web of Science and Scopus. The databases were searched up to 13 March 2016 for studies in which dentists used systemic antibiotics to treat endodontic lesions and which reported data on the type of antibiotic prescribed and on the diagnosis of the endodontic disease treated. The electronic and hand searches identified 69 titles, of which 25 were included in the final analysis. Amoxicillin was reported as the drug of choice for endodontic infections in most countries, and clindamycin and erythromycin were the choice for patients allergic to penicillin. Dentists worldwide prescribe antibiotics for non-indicated conditions, such as pulpitis. Antibiotics are overprescribed for the management of endodontic infections. It is necessary to improve antibiotic-prescribing habits in the treatment of endodontic infections, as well as to introduce educational initiatives to encourage the coherent and proper use of antibiotics in such conditions. © 2017 FDI World Dental Federation.

  20. Space closure in the maxillary posterior area through the maxillary sinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jae Hyun; Tai, Kiyoshi; Kanao, Akira; Takagi, Masato

    2014-01-01

    A common dilemma in adult orthodontic treatment is deciding how best to treat missing posterior teeth. One treatment option is to orthodontically close the space. But closure can be difficult, especially if the open space is in the maxillary posterior area, because tooth movement through the maxillary sinus is limited. The increased difficulty of moving teeth in the maxillary sinus is similar to moving a tooth in the atrophic posterior mandibular ridge. If space closure is selected as a treatment method, proper mechanics and light forces should be applied. In this article, we report movement of teeth through the maxillary sinus and discuss various implications related to orthodontic treatment in the maxillary sinus. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Incidence of microcracks in maxillary first premolars after instrumentation with three different mechanized file systems: a comparative ex vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kfir, A; Elkes, D; Pawar, A; Weissman, A; Tsesis, I

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the potential for microcracks in the radicular dentin of first maxillary premolars using three different mechanized endodontic instrumentation systems. Eighty extracted maxillary first premolars with two root canals and no externally visible microcracks were selected. Root canal instrumentation was performed with either the ProTaper file system, the WaveOne primary file, or the self-adjusting file (SAF). Teeth with intact roots served as controls. The roots were cut into segments and examined with an intensive, small-diameter light source that was applied diagonally to the entire periphery of the root slice under ×20 magnification; the presence of microcracks and fractures was recorded. Pearson's chi-square method was used for statistical analysis, and significance was set at p systems, respectively, while no microcracks were present in the roots treated with the SAF (p = 0.008 and p = 0.035, respectively). Intact teeth presented with cracks in 5 % of the roots. The intensive, small-diameter light source revealed microcracks that could not be detected when using the microscope's light alone. Within the limitations of this study, it could be concluded that mechanized root canal instrumentation with the ProTaper and WaveOne systems in maxillary first premolars causes microcracks in the radicular dentin, while the use of the SAF file causes no such microcracks. Rotary and reciprocating files with large tapers may cause microcracks in the radicular dentin of maxillary first premolars. Less aggressive methods should be considered for these teeth.

  2. A new approach to the treatment of true-combined endodontic-periodontic lesions by the guided tissue regeneration technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, C C; Harn, W M; Chen, Y H; Huang, C C; Yuan, K; Huang, P H

    1996-12-01

    Clinicians often have difficulty in the diagnosis and treatment of the combined endodontal and periodontal (endo-perio) lesion. A case of an endo-perio true-combined lesion on a maxillary premolar was first treated with conventional endodontic therapy. Periodontal surgery was then completed, which included scaling and root planing and apical curettage on the tooth. The facial bony defect was then filled with a decalcified freeze-dried bone allograft mixed with tetracycline powder. A non-resorbable Teflon membrane was then used to cover the bone material and the periodontal flap sutured over this. This combined treatment resulted in minimal probing depth (2 mm), maximal clinical attachment gain (8 mm), as well as radiographic evidence of alveolar bone gain. This case report demonstrates that proper diagnosis, followed by removal of etiological factors and utilizing the guided tissue regeneration technique combined with osseous grafting, will restore health and function to a tooth with severe attachment loss caused by an endo-perio lesion.

  3. Confidence level in performing endodontic treatment among final year undergraduate dental students from the University of Medical Science and Technology, Sudan (2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elhadi Mohieldin Awooda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study is aimed to evaluate the confidence level of undergraduate final year dental students in performing root canal treatment (RCT and how it may affect their performance and perception regarding endodontics. Materials and Methods: A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to the final year dental students, at the University of Medical Sciences and Technology, Khartoum, Sudan (2013–2014. A total of 21 students were requested to participate voluntary and were asked to score their level of confidence using a 5-point Likert's scale. Results: Response rate was 100%, all the students (100% stated that the requirements set were enough, and 66.7% rated endodontic as average in terms of difficulty. When rating the mean of self-confidence for performing RCT in the dentition, maxillary teeth (2.43 ± 0.51 followed by mandibular teeth (2.71 ± 0.64 were higher, whereas the molars were the least. Higher scores of self-confidence were in administrating local anesthesia (4.24 ± 0.70, followed by root canal shaping by hand instrument (3.76 ± 0.54. No association was found between overall confidence level and the number of performed RCT (P = 0.721. No association was found between overall confidence level of students who were subjected to instrument fracture and their frequency of fracture (P = 0.507, supervisor' reaction (P = 0.587, and willingness to specialize in endodontics (P = 0.530. Conclusion: Students displayed high confidence in performing basic endodontic and treating single-rooted teeth. More exposure is recommended to enhance the students' self-confidence.

  4. Dilemmas pertaining to three canals in the mesiobuccal root of a maxillary second molar: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Arora, Ankit; Acharya, Shashi Rashmi; Saraswathi, Muliya Vidya; Sharma, Padmaja; Ather, Amber

    2013-01-01

    The mesiobuccal root of the maxillary molars is well known to pose a hindrance during endodontic therapy. Presented here is a case of a maxillary left second molar where three canals were located in its mesiobuccal root with the use of visual and diagnostic aids. Difficulties encountered during the process of unveiling the tooth's internal anatomy were discussed. The dilemmas encountered pertained to the root canal configuration, the nomenclature of the extra canals, and the justification for...

  5. Outcomes of endodontic therapy in general practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Susan D.; Horowitz, Allan J.; Man, Martin; Wu, Hongyu; Foran, Denise; Vena, Donald A.; Collie, Damon; Matthews, Abigail G.; Curro, Frederick A.; Thompson, Van P.; Craig, Ronald G.

    2014-01-01

    Background The authors undertook a study involving members of a dental practice-based research network to determine the outcome and factors associated with success and failure of endodontic therapy. Methods Members in participating practices (practitioner-investigators [P-Is]) invited the enrollment of all patients seeking treatment in the practice who had undergone primary endodontic therapy and restoration in a permanent tooth three to five years previously. If a patient had more than one tooth so treated, the P-I selected as the index tooth the tooth treated earliest during the three- to five-year period. The authors excluded from the study any teeth that served as abutments for removable partial dentures or overdentures, third molars and teeth undergoing active orthodontic endodontic therapy. The primary outcome was retention of the index tooth. Secondary outcomes, in addition to extraction, that defined failure included clinical or radiographic evidence (or both) of periapical pathosis, endodontic retreatment or pain on percussion. Results P-Is in 64 network practices enrolled 1,312 patients with a mean (standard deviation) time to follow-up of 3.9 (0.6) years. During that period, 3.3 percent of the index teeth were extracted, 2.2 percent underwent retreatment, 3.6 percent had pain on percussion and 10.6 percent had periapical radiolucencies for a combined failure rate of 19.1 percent. The presence of preoperative periapical radiolucency with a diagnosis of either irreversible pulpitis or necrotic pulp was associated with failure after multivariate analysis, as were multiple canals, male sex and Hispanic/Latino ethnicity. Conclusions These results suggest that failure rates for endodontic therapy are higher than previously reported in general practices, according to results of studies based on dental insurance claims data. Clinical Implications The results of this study can help guide the practitioner in deciding the most appropriate course of therapy for

  6. The impact of loupes and microscopes on vision in endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, P; Neuhaus, K W; Lussi, A

    2014-05-01

    To report on an intraradicular visual test in a simulated clinical setting under different optical conditions. Miniaturized visual tests with E-optotypes (bar distance from 0.01 to 0.05 mm) were fixed inside the root canal system of an extracted maxillary molar at different locations: at the orifice, a depth of 5 mm and the apex. The tooth was mounted in a phantom head for a simulated clinical setting. Unaided vision was compared with Galilean loupes (2.5× magnification) with integrated light source and an operating microscope (6× magnification). The influence of the dentists' age within two groups was evaluated: endodontic instruments. Dentists over 40 years of age were dependent on the microscope to inspect the root canal system. © 2013 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Irrigation in endodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basrani, Bettina

    2011-01-01

    The primary endodontic treatment goal is to optimize root canal disinfection and to prevent reinfection. Successful root canal therapy relies on the combination of proper instrumentation, irrigation, and obturation of the root canal system. In this review of the literature, various irrigants and the interactions between irrigants are discussed and new delivery systems are introduced.

  8. Maxillary Sinus Floor Augmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Starch-Jensen, Thomas; Jensen, Janek Dalsgaard

    2017-01-01

    , radiological and histomorphometric outcome as well as complications are presented after maxillary sinus floor augmentation applying the lateral window technique with a graft material, maxillary sinus membrane elevation without a graft material and osteotome-mediated sinus floor elevation with or without...

  9. Why intravenous moderate sedation should be taught in graduate endodontic programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montagnese, Thomas Anthony

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this opinion article is to present reasons why intravenous moderate sedation should be taught in graduate endodontic programs. Access to oral health care is an area of much interest and concern, but some patients are unable to get endodontic care because they have special needs. Special needs can refer to patients who fear dentistry itself and other aspects of dental treatment. A variety of phobias and medical, developmental, and physical conditions can make it difficult for some patients to tolerate the endodontic care they need and want. Moderate sedation can help many of these patients. Endodontists in general are not trained to provide intravenous moderate sedation. By incorporating intravenous moderate sedation into endodontic practice, many of these patients can be treated. The first step in achieving this goal is to add intravenous moderate sedation training to graduate endodontic programs. The long-term effect will be to make specialty endodontic care available to more people.

  10. Unusual Root Canal Morphology of the Maxillary Second Molar: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neslihan Şımşek

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. This clinical case report presents the successful endodontic treatment of a maxillary second molar that has a mandibular molar-like anatomy with no palatal root and with each of its roots containing two separate root canals. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT was used to confirm this unusual anatomy. Methods. A 34-year-old male patient was referred to the Department of Endodontics at Inonu University’s Faculty of Dentistry because of severe pain in his right maxillary second molar. Clinical and radiographic examinations identified unusual roots and root canals anatomy, and CBCT was planned in order to understand the nature of these variations. Cleaning and shaping procedures were performed using the crown down technique with Sybron Endo (Glendora, CA, USA rotary instruments, and endodontic treatment was completed with gutta-percha cones and AH Plus resin sealers using the cold lateral compaction technique. Conclusions. The maxillary second molar exhibits aberrations and variations in terms of the numbers and configurations of its roots and root canals, and CBCT can be a useful imaging technique in endodontics.

  11. Treatment of a Periodontic-Endodontic Lesion in a Patient with Aggressive Periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahmy, Mina D; Luepke, Paul G; Ibrahim, Mohamed S; Guentsch, Arndt

    2016-01-01

    Case Description. This case report describes the successful management of a left mandibular first molar with a combined periodontic-endodontic lesion in a 35-year-old Caucasian woman with aggressive periodontitis using a concerted approach including endodontic treatment, periodontal therapy, and a periodontal regenerative procedure using an enamel matrix derivate. In spite of anticipated poor prognosis, the tooth lesion healed. This case report also discusses the rationale behind different treatment interventions. Practical Implication. Periodontic-endodontic lesions can be successfully treated if dental professionals follow a concerted treatment protocol that integrates endodontic and periodontic specialties. General dentists can be the gatekeepers in managing these cases.

  12. Treatment of a Periodontic-Endodontic Lesion in a Patient with Aggressive Periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mina D. Fahmy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Case Description. This case report describes the successful management of a left mandibular first molar with a combined periodontic-endodontic lesion in a 35-year-old Caucasian woman with aggressive periodontitis using a concerted approach including endodontic treatment, periodontal therapy, and a periodontal regenerative procedure using an enamel matrix derivate. In spite of anticipated poor prognosis, the tooth lesion healed. This case report also discusses the rationale behind different treatment interventions. Practical Implication. Periodontic-endodontic lesions can be successfully treated if dental professionals follow a concerted treatment protocol that integrates endodontic and periodontic specialties. General dentists can be the gatekeepers in managing these cases.

  13. Management of an impacted and transposed maxillary canine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepti A

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Maxillary canine-lateral incisor transposition is a relatively rare anomaly, with both dental and facial esthetic implications. This is a case report of a maxillary canine-lateral incisor transposition that was successfully treated by surgical-orthodontic treatment followed by esthetic reshaping of the involved teeth.

  14. Trans-sinusal maxillary distraction for correction of midfacial hypoplasia: long-term clinical results.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nadjmi, N.; Schutyser, F.A.C.; Erum, R. van

    2006-01-01

    Maxillary distraction osteogenesis is indicated in severe angle class III malocclusions, and severe maxillary hypoplasia among some cleft patients and other craniofacial deformities. Twenty patients, aged 8-48 years (mean 17.8+/-10.5 SD) with maxillary and midfacial hypoplasia were treated. The

  15. Endodontic Treatment of a Mandibular Second Premolar with Three Roots and Three Canals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonny Paul

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Complex root canal system with atypical variations is a common finding among mandibular premolars. Endodontic treatment in these teeth may not be successful due to the failure to recognise and treat multiple canals. This paper presents endodontic treatment of a mandibular second premolar with three roots and three canals.

  16. Summary of: Regenerative endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Stephen J

    2014-03-01

    Significant advances in our understanding of the biological processes involved in tooth development and repair at the cellular and molecular levels have underpinned the newly emerging area of regenerative endodontics. Development of treatment protocols based on exploiting the natural wound healing properties of the dental pulp and applying tissue engineering principles has allowed reporting of case series showing preservation of tissue vitality and apexogenesis. To review current case series reporting regenerative endodontics. Current treatment approaches tend to stimulate more reparative than regenerative responses in respect of the new tissue generated, which often does not closely resemble the physiological structure of dentine-pulp. However, despite these biological limitations, such techniques appear to offer significant promise for improved treatment outcomes. Improved biological outcomes will likely emerge from the many experimental studies being reported and will further contribute to improvements in clinical treatment protocols.

  17. Chlorhexidine in endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Brenda P F A; Vianna, Morgana E; Zaia, Alexandre A; Almeida, José Flávio A; Souza-Filho, Francisco J; Ferraz, Caio C R

    2013-01-01

    Chemical auxiliary substances (CAS) are essential for a successful disinfection and cleanness of the root canals, being used during the instrumentation and if necessary, as antimicrobial intracanal medicaments. Different CAS have been proposed and used, among which sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), chlorhexidine (CHX), 17% EDTA, citric acid, MTAD and 37% phosphoric acid solution. CHX has been used in Endodontics as an irrigating substance or intracanal medicament, as it possesses a wide range of antimicrobial activity, substantivity (residual antimicrobial activity), lower cytotoxicity than NaOCl whilst demonstrating efficient clinical performance, lubricating properties, rheological action (present in the gel presentation, keeping the debris in suspension); it inhibits metalloproteinase, is chemically stable, does not stain cloths, it is odorless, water soluble, among other properties. CHX has been recommended as an alternative to NaOCl, especially in cases of open apex, root resorption, foramen enlargement and root perforation, due to its biocompatibility, or in cases of allergy related to bleaching solutions. The aim of this paper is to review CHX's general use in the medical field and in dentistry; its chemical structure, presentation form and storage; mechanism of action; antimicrobial activity including substantivity, effects on biofilms and endotoxins, effects on coronal and apical microbial microleakage; tissue dissolution ability; interaction with endodontic irrigants; effects on dentin bonding, metalloproteinases and collagen fibrils; its use as intracanal medicament and diffusion into the dentinal tubules; its use as disinfectant agent of obturation cones; other uses in the endodontic therapy; and possible adverse effects, cytotoxicity and genotoxicity.

  18. Regenerative endodontics: A state of the art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashmi Bansal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Scientific advances in the creation of restorative biomaterials, in vitro cell culture technology, tissue grafting, tissue engineering, molecular biology and the human genome project provide the basis for the introduction of new technologies into dentistry. Non-vital infected teeth have long been treated with root canal therapy (for mature root apex and apexification (for immature root apex, or doomed to extraction. Although successful, current treatments fail to re-establish healthy pulp tissue in these teeth. But, what if the non-vital tooth could be made vital once again? That is the hope offered by regenerative endodontics, an emerging field focused on replacing traumatized and diseased pulp with functional pulp tissue. Restoration of vitality of non-vital tooth is based on tissue engineering and revascularization procedures. The purpose of this article is to review these biological procedures and the hurdles that must be overcome to develop regenerative endodontic procedures.

  19. Radiographic Assessment of Bone Formation Using rhBMP2 at Maxillary Periapical Surgical Defects: A Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, M Siva; Kumar, M Hari; Vishalakshi, K; Sabitha, H

    2016-04-01

    Periapical cysts are the most common inflammatory odontogenic cysts arising from untreated dental caries with pulp necrosis and periapical infection. The choice of treatment is often influenced by various factors like size, extension of the lesion, proximity to vital structures, systemic condition and compliance of the patient too. The treatment protocol for management of periapical cysts is still under discussion and options vary from conservative treatment by means of endodontic technique to surgical treatment like decompression or a marsupialisation or even to enucleation. Large bony defect secondary to periapical surgery compromising the tooth integrity often requires bone graft to enhance bone formation and thus restoring function at the earliest. The present case series included 10 patients who had established periapical pathology secondary to history of trauma on upper anterior teeth as well patients with history of carious teeth with an apparent failure in root canal therapy. All ten patients were treated with cyst enucleation and apiceotomy along with 1.4cc Recombinant Human Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 soaked Absorbable Collagen Sponge implantation at surgical defect. Radiographs and clinical examinations were done upto 3 months to evaluate healing. Radiographic and clinical assessments revealed bone regeneration and restoration of the maxillary surgical defects in all 10 patients. No evidence of graft failure was noted. The Recombinant Human Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 soaked Absorbable Collagen Sponge carrier is thus proved to be a viable option for the treatment of maxillary periapical surgical defects.

  20. C-shaped root canal in a maxillary first molar: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Z; Tuncel, B; Serper, A; Calt, S

    2006-02-01

    This case report presents an unusual C-shaped root canal system in a maxillary first molar tooth. Although C-shaped root canals are most frequently seen in the mandibular second molar, they may also appear in maxillary molars. A literature search revealed only a few case reports of C-shaped root canal systems in maxillary molars. The present case describes a C-shaped canal in the buccal root of a maxillary first molar. The endodontic access cavity displayed two canal orifices, one leading to the canal system in the buccal root, the other into the palatal root canal system. In the buccal root, what appeared to be the mesial and distal canals joined to form a single C-shaped canal. --Careful examination of radiographs and the internal anatomy of teeth is essential.-- The location and morphology of root canals should be identified at high magnification under the microscope.

  1. Root Canal Configuration of Maxillary First Permanent Molars in an Iranian Population

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    Saeed Rahimi

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available

    Background and aims. It is critical to have a proper knowledge of the normal anatomy of the pulp and its variations for the success of endodontic treatment. The purpose of this study was to investigate variations in the root canal system of maxillary first permanent molars in an Iranian population.

    Materials and methods. In this study, 137 maxillary first molars were decalcified, dye-injected, cleared and studied.

    Results. The results demonstrated that 37.96% of the maxillary first molars under study had three canals, 58.4% had four canals and 3.64% had five canals.

    Conclusion. According to the results of this study and considering variations in the root canal systems of maxillary first molars, it seems that great care should be taken in the root canal treatment of these teeth.

  2. Congenitally Missing Maxillary Lateral Incisors: Update on the Functional and Esthetic Parameters of Patients Treated with Implants or Space Closure and Teeth Recontouring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pini, Núbia Inocencya Pavesi; Marchi, Luciana Manzotti De; Pascotto, Renata Corrêa

    2015-01-01

    Maxillary lateral incisor agenesis (MLIA) is a condition that affects both dental esthetics and function in young patients, and represents an important challenge for clinicians. Although several treatment options are available, the mesial repositioning of the canines followed by teeth recontouring into lateral incisors; or space opening/maintenance followed by implant placement have recently emerged as two important treatment approaches. In this article, the current and latest literature has been reviewed in order to summarize the functional and esthetic outcomes obtained with these two forms of treatment of MLIA patients in recent years. Indications, clinical limitations and the most important parameters to achieve the best possible results with each treatment modality are also discussed. Within the limitations of this review, it is not possible to assert at this point in time that one treatment approach is more advantageous than the other. Long-term followup studies comparing the existing treatment options are still lacking in the literature, and they are necessary to shed some light on the issue. It is possible, however, to state that adequate multidisciplinary diagnosis and planning are imperative to define the treatment option that will provide the best individual results for patients with MLIA. PMID:25646137

  3. Combined endodontic-periodontic treatment of a palatal groove: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Scott A; Koch, Michael A; Deas, David E; Powell, Charles A

    2006-06-01

    The palatal groove is a developmental anomaly that predisposes the tooth involved to a severe periodontal defect. When further complicated by pulp necrosis, these grooves often present a diagnostic and treatment planning challenge that requires an interdisciplinary treatment approach. This case report describes the successful collaborative management of a maxillary lateral incisor with an extensive palatal groove using a combination of nonsurgical endodontic therapy, odontoplasty, and periodontal regenerative techniques.

  4. Mass in right maxillary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marins, J.L.C.

    1988-01-01

    A radiological study in a patient with increasing of the volume in the naso-maxillary region was done. The proposed diagnosis were carcinomas, lymphomas, sarcomas, teeth cyst, granulomas, mycoses and other. (L.M.J.)

  5. Maxillary unicystic ameloblastoma: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agani, Zana; Hamiti-Krasniqi, Vjosa; Recica, Jehona; Loxha, Mergime Prekazi; Kurshumliu, Fisnik; Rexhepi, Aida

    2016-10-18

    Ameloblastoma is a benign epithelial odontogenic tumor. It is often aggressive and destructive, with the capacity to attain great size, erode bone and invade adjacent structures. Unicystic ameloblastoma is a rare odontogenic lesion, with clinical, radiographic and gross features of jaw cysts. The lesion histologically shows typical ameloblastomatous epithelium lining part of the cyst cavity with or without and/or mural tumor growth. Unicystic ameloblastoma usually presents in posterior mandibular ramus region, while it is rare and atypical in posterior maxillary region. . We report a case of 16 year old Kosovar male, Albanian ethnicity, who presented with a swelling located in right maxillary region. Clinical examination revealed a painless swelling extending from the maxillary right central incisor to the maxillary right first molar tooth. Panoramic radiograph disclosed a well corticated unilocular radiolucent lesion approximately 5 × 5 cm in diameter which was in contact with the roots of the teeth present inferiorly and with the maxillary sinus superiorly. Maxillary right canine impaction was noted and unerupted lateral incisor tooth was present inside the radiolucency. Preoperative diagnosis of the lesion was made as dentigerous cyst based on the age of the patient, location of the swelling, clinical and radiographic findings, but the unicystic ameloblastoma was also taken into consideration. The patient was treated by surgical enucleation of the lesion and extraction of lateral incisor tooth which was present inside the lesion. The histopathological examination of the lesion revealed confirmed finding for unicystic ameloblastoma mural form. No recurrence was observed in 1 year follow-up. Maxillary region is considered a rare and atypical location for unicystic ameloblastoma. We emphasize the importance of differential diagnosis of an odontogenic lesion with common clinical and radiological features that will impact the treatment planning and follow up

  6. Maxillary second molar with four roots and five canals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinjia Sha

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available In this case report, we present a maxillary second molar variant, which had two palatal roots with two canals and two buccal roots with three canals, including a second mesiobuccal canal. A 44-year-old female patient complained about a tooth crown fracture and severe pain in her right maxillary second molar. A clinical intraoral inspection and radiography were carried out on the tooth, and a diagnosis of chronic apical periodontitis was made. Four roots (two buccal and two palatal and five canals (three buccal and two palatal were found. The anatomical variation of the tooth was further confirmed by cone-beam computed tomography, a cone-fit procedure, and a radiograph with a shifted projection angle. Root-canal treatment was performed under an endodontic microscope.

  7. Regenerative endodontics: a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S G; Malek, M; Sigurdsson, A; Lin, L M; Kahler, B

    2018-05-19

    The European Society of Endodontology and the American Association for Endodontists have released position statements and clinical considerations for regenerative endodontics. There is increasing literature on this field since the initial reports of Iwaya et al. (Dental Traumatology, 17, 2001, 185) and Banchs & Trope (Journal of Endodontics, 30, 2004, 196). Endogenous stem cells from an induced periapical bleeding and scaffolds using blood clot, platelet rich plasma or platelet-rich fibrin have been utilized in regenerative endodontics. This approach has been described as a 'paradigm shift' and considered the first treatment option for immature teeth with pulp necrosis. There are three treatment outcomes of regenerative endodontics; (i) resolution of clinical signs and symptoms; (ii) further root maturation; and (iii) return of neurogenesis. It is known that results are variable for these objectives, and true regeneration of the pulp/dentine complex is not achieved. Repair derived primarily from the periodontal and osseous tissues has been shown histologically. It is hoped that with the concept of tissue engineering, namely stem cells, scaffolds and signalling molecules, that true pulp regeneration is an achievable goal. This review discusses current knowledge as well as future directions for regenerative endodontics. Patient-centred outcomes such as tooth discolouration and possibly more appointments with the potential for adverse effects needs to be discussed with patients and parents. Based on the classification of Cvek (Endodontics and Dental Traumatology, 8, 1992, 45), it is proposed that regenerative endodontics should be considered for teeth with incomplete root formation although teeth with near or complete root formation may be more suited for conventional endodontic therapy or MTA barrier techniques. However, much is still not known about clinical and biological aspects of regenerative endodontics. © 2018 International Endodontic Journal. Published by

  8. Bisphosphonates and their clinical implications in endodontic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moinzadeh, A-T; Shemesh, H; Neirynck, N A M; Aubert, C; Wesselink, P R

    2013-05-01

    This review gives an overview of the factors that may play a role in the development of osteonecrosis of the jaw in patients treated with bisphosphonates (BPs) and undergoing nonsurgical endodontic treatment as well as some recommendations for its prevention. BPs are a widely prescribed group of drugs for diverse bone diseases. The occasional but devastating adverse effect of these drugs has been described as bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (BRONJ). As this condition is debilitating and difficult to treat, all efforts should be made to prevent its occurence in patients at risk. The main triggering event is considered to be dental extraction. Even though nonsurgical endodontic treatment appears to be a relatively safe procedure, care remains essential. After an overview of this class of drugs, the clinical presentation, epidemiology and pathogenesis of BRONJ, as well as the possible risk factors associated with its development after nonsurgical endodontic treatment will be described. Finally, several strategies will be proposed for the prevention of BRONJ during nonsurgical endodontic treatment. © 2012 International Endodontic Journal. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. Squamous cell carcinoma presenting as an endodontic-periodontic lesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levi, Paul A; Kim, David M; Harsfield, Scott L; Jacobson, Erica R

    2005-10-01

    Regardless of advances in diagnosis and treatment during the past 40 years, the overall 5-year survival rates for oral and oropharyngeal squamous cancers have only slightly improved and remain around 50%. Thus, the early diagnosis and treatment of carcinoma by health care providers are essential in achieving a good prognosis. We report a case of invasive squamous cell carcinoma that presented as a benign endodontic-periodontic lesion with a 7-mm periodontal pocket on tooth #15 in a 40-year-old, non-smoking woman. The subsequent management of the case is also discussed. The study was conducted in accordance with the Helsinki Declaration of 1975, as revised in 2000. Our patient was seen for a comprehensive periodontal examination including a periodontal charting, occlusal analysis, study casts, electronic pulp test for tooth #15, and complete mouth periapical radiographs. As there was a periapical radiolucency, an endodontic consultation was obtained. A periodontal flap surgical procedure was performed on teeth #13 to #15, and as there was bone erosion into the maxillary sinus, a biopsy of the soft tissue was submitted to the local hospital for histological analysis. The biopsied lesion was diagnosed as invasive, moderately differentiated squamous cell carcinoma with focal spindle and clear cell differentiation (grade II to III of IV). Bone invasion was also identified. The treatment of the carcinoma involved a hemimaxillectomy with the removal of the maxillary left posterior teeth. The patient remained free of tumor for 5 years after the initial presentation. Patient education and periodic oral cancer examinations by dental professionals are necessary to reduce diagnostic delay and improve prognosis. This case report emphasizes the important role of dental professionals, especially periodontists and endodontists, of being aware that squamous cell carcinoma may manifest itself clinically and/or radiographically as a common periodontal or endodontic lesion.

  10. Maxillary sinus carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, G.L.; Ang, K.K.; Peters, L.J.; Wendt, C.D.; Oswald, M.J.; Goepfert, H.

    1991-01-01

    Between 1969 and 1985, 73 patients with maxillary sinus cancers underwent surgical excision and postoperative radiotherapy. The clinical stage distribution by the AJC system was 3T 1 , 16T 2 , 32T 3 and 22 T 4 . Six patients had palpable lymphadenopathy at diagnosis. Surgery for the primary tumor consisted of partial or radical maxillectomy, and if disease stage indicated it, ipsilateral orbital exenteration. This was followed by radiation treatment delivered through a wedge-pair or three-field technique. All but 3 patients received 50-60 Gy in 2 Gy fractions to an isodose line defining the target volume. Elective neck irradiation (ENI) was nor routinely given. Clinically involved nodes were treated with definitive radiotherapy (5 patients) or combined treatment (1 patient). Forty-five patients had no evidence of disease at the last follow-up. The 5-year relapse-free survival for the whole group was 51 percent. The overall local control rate was 78 percent, Patients with larger tumors, particularly if they also had histological signs of nerve invasion, had a higher recurrence rate than others. The overall nodal recurrence rate without ENI was 38 percent for squamous and undifferen-tiated carcinoma, and only 5 for adenoid cystic carcinomas. Therefore, the current recommendation is to deliver elective nodal irradiation routinely to patients with squamous or undifferentiated carcinoma, except for those who have T 1 lesions. Treatment complications were vision impairment, brain and bone necrosis, trismus, hearing loss, and pituitary insufficiency. The incidence of major side effects was determined by disease extent and treatment technique. Many technical refinements were introduced in order to limit the dose to normal tissues in an attempt to reduce the complication rate. To what extent such practice influences the outcome will be determined from subsequent analysis. (author). 23 refs.; 2 figs.; 5 tabs

  11. Management of type II dens invaginatus and peg laterals with spacing of maxillary anteriors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina Puthen Purayil

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of peg-shaped lateral with dens invaginatus (DI and midline diastema affecting maxillary incisors in a 32-year old female patient is discussed. This clinical report describes the endodontic management of DI in tooth #12, esthetic correction of peg laterals and diastema with all ceramic restorations. Satisfactory results were achieved esthetically following treatment and gave the patient a new confident smile.

  12. Root canal treatment of a maxillary first premolar with three roots

    OpenAIRE

    Mathew, Josey; Devadathan, Aravindan; Syriac, Gibi; Shamini, Sai

    2015-01-01

    Successful root canal treatment needs a thorough knowledge of both internal and external anatomy of a tooth. Variations in root canal anatomy constitute an impressive challenge to the successful completion of endodontic treatment. Undetected extra roots and canals are a major reason for failed root canal treatment. Three separate roots in a maxillary first premolar have a very low incidence of 0.5?6%. Three rooted premolars are anatomically similar to molars and are sometimes called ?small mo...

  13. [Nonsurgical endodontic treatment of an invaginated canine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández Guerrero, F; Miñana Laliga, R; Bullon Fernandez, P

    1989-01-01

    We present a case of a maxillary canine with a dens invaginatus treated successfully. The patient had pain, swelling and a sinus tract coming from the inmature apex of the canine. The canals were enlarged and cleaned and the main canal was filled with Calcium Hydroxide to allow the root development. Seven months later, the patient was asymptomatic and the tooth was obturated with guttapercha. One year later it was confirm the success in the treatment.

  14. Endodontic complications of root canal therapy performed by dental students with stainless-steel K-files and nickel-titanium hand files.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettiette, M T; Metzger, Z; Phillips, C; Trope, M

    1999-04-01

    Straightening of curved canals is one of the most common procedural errors in endodontic instrumentation. This problem is commonly encountered when dental students perform molar endodontics. The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of the type of instrument used by these students on the extent of straightening and on the incidence of other endodontic procedural errors. Nickel-titanium 0.02 taper hand files were compared with traditional stainless-steel 0.02 taper K-files. Sixty molar teeth comprised of maxillary and mandibular first and second molars were treated by senior dental students. Instrumentation was with either nickel-titanium hand files or stainless-steel K-files. Preoperative and postoperative radiographs of each tooth were taken using an XCP precision instrument with a customized bite block to ensure accurate reproduction of radiographic angulation. The radiographs were scanned and the images stored as TIFF files. By superimposing tracings from the preoperative over the postoperative radiographs, the degree of deviation of the apical third of the root canal filling from the original canal was measured. The presence of other errors, such as strip perforation and instrument breakage, was established by examining the radiographs. In curved canals instrumented by stainless-steel K-files, the average deviation of the apical third of the canals was 14.44 degrees (+/- 10.33 degrees). The deviation was significantly reduced when nickel-titanium hand files were used to an average of 4.39 degrees (+/- 4.53 degrees). The incidence of other procedural errors was also significantly reduced by the use of nickel-titanium hand files.

  15. Endodontic management of a mandibular third molar fused with a fourth molar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turell, I L; Zmener, O

    1999-05-01

    Developmental anomalies in permanent molars frequently require surgical intervention. A case of a mandibular third molar fused with a fourth molar which was successfully treated with conservative endodontic therapy is reported.

  16. Non-invasive endodontic treatment of large periapical lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harry Huiz Peeters

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: In most cases of large periapical radiolucent lesions of pulpal origin, we often encounter a dilemmatic situation, such as whether to either treat these cases endodontically or surgically. Development of techniques, instruments and root medicaments as well as the tendency toward minimally invasive treatment, all support dentists to treat those cases using the minimal invasive principle (i.e. endodontically instead of surgically. Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to report and discuss the managing of periapical lesions by endodontic no invasive treatment. Case management: The patient with large periapical lesions were treated with noninvasive endodontic treatment. After 6 months, patients in this report were asymptomatic and radiolucencies had disappeared. When the root canal treatment is done according to accepted clinical principles and under aseptic condition, including cleaning, shaping, abturating as well as proper diagnosis, the healing process of the infected area will occur. Conclusion: Some lesions, however, may not be treated conservatively and may require surgical treatment for total elimination of the lesions.

  17. CALCIUM HYDROXIDE IN ENDODONTIC TREATMENT OF PERIAPICALLY INFECTED TEETH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahmi Alma Farah Adang

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available An inadequate endodontic treatment may affect the root canal system and spread beyond its apical foramina that elicit periodontal tissue developing into abscess, granuloma and radicular cyst. Periodical lesions can be treated with non surgical endodontic treatment using calcium hydroxide dressing. This case study is reporting teeth 11 with periodical lesions and infection. Evidence of a clinical healing and radiographic assessments were followed by a non surgical endodontic therapy. Successful treatment outcome is related to the elimination of infection agents from the root canal. This can activate a stimulation zone to promote regeneration. Calcium hydroxide used as a root canal dressing may promote alkalinity at the adjacent tissue , create favourable environmental condition in which hard tissue formation can occur, interfere the bactericidal activity, increase mineralization, and induce healing.

  18. Progression of periapical cystic lesion after incomplete endodontic treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Ki Huh

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of large radicular cyst progression related to endodontic origin to emphasize proper intervention and follow-up for endodontic pathosis. A 25 yr old man presented with an endodontically treated molar with radiolucency. He denied any intervention because of a lack of discomfort. Five years later, the patient returned. The previous periapical lesion had drastically enlarged and involved two adjacent teeth. Cystic lesion removal and apicoectomy were performed on the tooth. Histopathological analysis revealed that the lesion was an inflammatory radicular cyst. The patient did not report any discomfort except for moderate swelling 3 days after the surgical procedure. Although the patient had been asymptomatic, close follow-ups are critical to determine if any periapical lesions persist after root canal treatment.

  19. Manual versus mechanical endodontic glidepath.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, John

    2011-01-01

    to Mother Nature as she sends her legacy to us: "You have never seen a canal like me before. I am full of curves and booby traps. Treat me gracefully--I know that may sound corny--and respect my delicate tissues and structures. I am waiting for you. All you have to do is follow me to my end. Make me smooth and big enough for safe rotary and you can have your way with me. Once cleaned, shaped, and packed, I will reward you with the gift of healing." In an upcoming issue of Dentistry Today, I will present useful guidelines for implementation of the endodontic Glifepath. Remember, knowing what to do is only half the answer to mastering elegant, artistic, and successful Glidepaths. The other half is to be able to bring these skills into the everyday clinical practice; implementation is often the missing link In order to do this, you will need a plan to design a culture, environment, and ergonomics in your office that will allow the time and energy to do it right.

  20. Lasers in endodontics: an overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frentzen, Matthias; Braun, Andreas; Koort, Hans J.

    2002-06-01

    The interest in endodontic use of dental laser systems is increasing. Developing laser technology and a better understanding of laser effects widened the spectrum of possible endodontic indications. Various laser systems including excimer-, argon+-, diode-, Nd:YAG-, Er:YAG- and CO2-lasers are used in pulp diagnosis, treatment of hypersensitivity, pulp capping, sterilization of root canals, root canal shaping and obturation or apicoectomy. With the development of new delivery systems - thin and flexible fibers - for many different wavelengths laser applications in endodontics may increase. Since laser devices are still relatively costly, access to them is limited. Most of the clinical applications are laser assisted procedures such as the removing of pulp remnants and debris or disinfection of infected root canals. The essential question is whether a laser can provide improved treatment over conventional care. To perform laser therapy in endodontics today different laser types with adopted wavelengths and pulse widths are needed, each specific to a particular application. Looking into the future we will need endodontic laser equipment providing optimal laser parameters for different treatment modalities. Nevertheless, the quantity of research reports from the last decade promises a genuine future for lasers in endodontics.

  1. Anterior maxillary segmental distraction for correction of maxillary hypoplasia and dental crowding in cleft palate patients: a preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X-X; Wang, X; Li, Z-L; Yi, B; Liang, C; Jia, Y-L; Zou, B-S

    2009-12-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of anterior maxillary segmental distraction (AMSD) to correct maxillary hypoplasia and severe dental crowding in cleft lip and palate (CLP) patients, 7 patients (average age 16.4 years) with maxillary hypoplasia, shortened maxillary dental arch length and severe anterior dental crowding secondary to CLP were selected for this study. After anterior maxillary segmental osteotomy, 3 patients were treated using bilateral internal distraction devices, and 4 patients were treated using rigid external distraction devices. Photographs and radiographs were taken to review the improvement in facial profile and occlusion after distraction. An average 10.25 mm anterior maxillary advancement was obtained in all patients after 10-23 days of distraction and 9-16 weeks of consolidation. The sella-nasion-point A (SNA) angle increased from 69.5 degrees to 79.6 degrees. Midface convexity was greatly improved and velopharyngeal competence was preserved. The maxillary dental arch length was greatly increased by 10.1 mm (P<0.01). Dental crowding and malocclusion were corrected by orthodontic treatment. These results show that AMSD can effectively correct the hypoplastic maxilla and severe dental crowding associated with CLP by increasing the midface convexity and dental arch length while preserving velopharyngeal function, and dental crowding can be corrected without requiring tooth extraction.

  2. The clinical meaning of external cervical resorption in maxillary canine: transoperative dental trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Consolaro

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available External Cervical Resorption in maxillary canines with pulp vitality is frequently associated with dental trauma resulting from surgical procedures carried out to prepare the teeth for further orthodontic traction. Preparation procedures might surgically manipulate the cementoenamel junction or cause luxation of teeth due to applying excessive force or movement tests beyond the tolerance limits of periodontal ligament and cervical tissue structures. Dentin exposure at the cementoenamel junction triggers External Cervical Resorption as a result of inflammation followed by antigen recognition of dentin proteins. External Cervical Resorption is painless, does not induce pulpitis and develops slowly. The lesion is generally associated with and covered by gingival soft tissues which disguise normal clinical aspects, thereby leading to late diagnosis when the process is near pulp threshold. Endodontic treatment is recommended only if surgical procedures are rendered necessary in the pulp space; otherwise, External Cervical Resorption should be treated by conservative means: protecting the dental pulp and restoring function and esthetics of teeth whose pulp will remain in normal conditions. Unfortunately, there is a lack of well-grounded research evincing how often External Cervical Resorption associated with canines subjected to orthodontic traction occurs.

  3. Management of a Two-rooted Maxillary Central Incisor Using Cone-beam Computed Tomography: Importance of Three-dimensional Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Kumar Gupta

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We report a rare case of a two-rooted maxillary central incisor, stressing the importance of three-dimensional imaging in treatment planning and conservative approach of management. Endodontic treatment of this central incisor was carried out with a successful outcome.

  4. Dens invaginatus with necrotic pulp in a right maxillary lateral incisor with preserved vitality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alessandro, Lanza; Fabrizio, Di Francesco; Gennaro, De Marco; Dario, Di Stasio; Eugenio, Guidetti; Letizia, Perillo; Luigi, Femiano; Felice, Femiano

    2018-01-01

    Dens invaginatus (DI) is a dental malformation occurring in several morphologic types. Consequently, treatment of teeth affected by DI can get complicated because of the complex root canal anatomy. The aim is to describe how to manage a rare report of a DI with necrotic pulp held within the vital pulp of a maxillary lateral incisor. Oral fistula was found on the buccal mucosa of the apex of the vital maxillary lateral incisor with a DI having necrotic pulp. Endodontic treatment of the maxillary lateral incisor and of the tract canal of DI was realized. Clinical disappearance of oral sinus tract was observed after 10 days. On the contrary, the disappearance of radiolucent area occurred after 6 months. A proper and prompt diagnosis is necessary to carry out effective prevention protocols or prevent consequences generating nonrecoverable endo-perio diseases.

  5. In-depth morphological study of mesiobuccal root canal systems in maxillary first molars: review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seok-Woo Chang

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available A common failure in endodontic treatment of the permanent maxillary first molars is likely to be caused by an inability to locate, clean, and obturate the second mesiobuccal (MB canals. Because of the importance of knowledge on these additional canals, there have been numerous studies which investigated the maxillary first molar MB root canal morphology using in vivo and laboratory methods. In this article, the protocols, advantages and disadvantages of various methodologies for in-depth study of maxillary first molar MB root canal morphology were discussed. Furthermore, newly identified configuration types for the establishment of new classification system were suggested based on two image reformatting techniques of micro-computed tomography, which can be useful as a further 'Gold Standard' method for in-depth morphological study of complex root canal systems.

  6. Comparison of two protocols for maxillary protraction: bone anchors versus face mask with rapid maxillary expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cevidanes, Lucia; Baccetti, Tiziano; Franchi, Lorenzo; McNamara, James A.; De Clerck, Hugo

    2010-01-01

    Objective To test the hypothesis that there is no difference in the active treatment effects for maxillary advancement induced by bone-anchored maxillary protraction (BAMP) and the active treatment effects for face mask in association with rapid maxillary expansion (RME/FM). Materials and Methods This is a study on consecutively treated patients. The changes in dentoskeletal cephalometric variables from start of treatment (T1) to end of active treatment (T2) with an average T1–T2 interval of about 1 year were contrasted in a BAMP sample of 21 subjects with a RME/FM sample of 34 patients. All subjects were prepubertal at T1. Statistical comparison was performed with t-tests for independent samples. Results The BAMP protocol produced significantly larger maxillary advancement than the RME/FM therapy (with a difference of 2 mm to 3 mm). Mandibular sagittal changes were similar, while vertical changes were better controlled with BAMP. The sagittal intermaxillary relationships improved 2.5 mm more in the BAMP patients. Additional favorable outcomes of BAMP treatment were the lack of clockwise rotation of the mandible as well as a lack of retroclination of the lower incisors. Conclusions The hypothesis is rejected. The BAMP protocol produced significantly larger maxillary advancement than the RME/FM therapy. PMID:20578848

  7. Rapid maxillary expansion in contemporary orthodontic literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Mutinelli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We have reviewed our retrospective research about rapid maxillary expansion performed in the early mixed dentition to summarize the results of different studies regarding maxillary dental arch width variation and crowding improvement in light of contemporary literature. The aim is to define the effects of treatments followed until the end of dental arch growth. In all studies, a Haas expander anchored to the deciduous dentition was used. The samples consisted of treated patients with and without a lateral crossbite and homogeneous untreated individuals as controls. Two additional control groups of adolescents and adults in dental Class 1 were also compared. As a result of the analysis, rapid maxillary expansion with anchorage to the deciduous dentition was found to be effective in increasing transverse width in intermolar and intercanine areas, and the change was preserved until the full permanent dentition stage. When performed before maxillary lateral incisors have fully erupted, this procedure allows for a rapid increase in the arch length in the anterior area and consequently, in the space available for permanent incisors with a stable reduction in crowding over time.

  8. Endodontic microsurgery, presentation of a clinical case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeledon Mayorga, Rodolfo

    2009-01-01

    A literature review is conducted on endodontic surgery. The report of a clinical case is facilitated. The technique chosen according to the clinical and radiographic examination was endodontic microsurgery, the case has presented a positive evolution of four years [es

  9. Endodontic therapy for a fused mandibular molar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotstein, I; Moshonov, J; Cohenca, N

    1997-06-01

    Variations in tooth morphology present a clinical challenge when endodontic treatment is required. A case of conservative endodontic therapy for a fused mandibular second and third molar is presented.

  10. Antibiotics for acute maxillary sinusitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahovuo-Saloranta, Anneli; Borisenko, Oleg V; Kovanen, Niina

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Expert opinions vary on the appropriate role of antibiotics for sinusitis, one of the most commonly diagnosed conditions among adults in ambulatory care. OBJECTIVES: We examined whether antibiotics are effective in treating acute sinusitis, and if so, which antibiotic classes...... are the most effective. SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library, 2007, Issue 3); MEDLINE (1950 to May 2007) and EMBASE (1974 to June 2007). SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing antibiotics with placebo...... or antibiotics from different classes for acute maxillary sinusitis in adults. We included trials with clinically diagnosed acute sinusitis, whether or not confirmed by radiography or bacterial culture. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: At least two review authors independently screened search results, extracted...

  11. Odontogenic maxillary sinusitis diagnosed using conebeam x-ray CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Kiminori

    2007-01-01

    We evaluated the usefulness of conebeam x-ray CT in the diagnosis of odontogenic maxillary sinusitis in 21 patients. Among teeth causing odontogenic maxillary sinusitis, 95% had apical lesions after root canal treatment. Most root canals were filled with filling materials incompletely. Apical lesions in inappropriately treated teeth thus caused odontogenic maxillary sinusitis. Conebeam CT involves 3-dimensional isotropic voxel image date in up to 512 frames for transaxial, coronal, and sagittal planes, so resolution in imaging on the body axis was especially high. Multiplanar reconstruction and volume rendering images at any optional plane could be obtained without interpolation. The relationship between causative teeth and the maxillary sinus could be observed and measured, and odontogenic maxillary sinusitis accurately diagnosed. In addition to the accurate diagnosis of apical lesions, maxilla, and maxillary sinus, periodontal ligament space, lamina dura, pulp cavity, root canal, canal-treated root, apical periodontitis, alveolar ostitis, marginal periodontitis of causative teeth could be observed. Metal artifacts were minimized, making conebeam CT useful in the diagnosis of periodontal tissue and causative teeth, including root-canal-treated and crown-restored teeth. (author)

  12. Fusobacterium nucleatum in endodontic flare-ups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chávez de Paz Villanueva, Luis Eduardo

    2002-02-01

    The extent to which Fusobacterium nucleatum is recovered from root canals of teeth that present with an interappointment flare-up following endodontic instrumentation was investigated. Included in the study were 28 patients that sought emergency treatment after initiation of root canal therapy. Only non-painful teeth that had been treated because of a necrotic pulp and periapical inflammatory lesion were studied. Root canal samples for bacterial analysis were taken, transported to a bacteriological laboratory, and processed for a semiquantitative assessment of bacterial isolates. Bacterial findings were correlated with self-assessed pain intensity as recorded by means of a Visual Analogue Scale. Clinical presentation of swelling and presence of exudate in the treated root canals were also linked. Bacteria were recovered from all teeth examined. Gram-negative anaerobic coccoid rods (Prevotella species and Porphyromonas species) were frequent isolates. All teeth in patients who were reported to be in severe pain (Visual Analogue Scale > or = 6) displayed F nucleatum. Nine out of 10 of these teeth also had swelling and exudate in the root canals. Samples from the remaining patients that had teeth with less pain score showed a variable bacterial recovery. None of these teeth displayed F nucleatum. F nucleatum appears to be associated with the development of the most severe forms of interappointment endodontic flare-ups.

  13. Autogenous transplantation of maxillary and mandibular molars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, Peter P

    2008-11-01

    Autogenous tooth transplantation has been used as a predictable surgical approach to correct malocclusion and replace edentulous areas. This article focuses on the surgical approach and technique for molar transplantation. Thirty-two patients aged between 11 and 25 years underwent 44 autogenous molar transplantations. The procedure involved transplantation of impacted or newly erupted third molars into the extraction sockets of nonrestorable molars and surgical removal and replacement of horizontally impacted molars into their proper vertical alignment. Five basic procedural concepts were applied: 1) atraumatic extraction, avoiding disruption of the root sheath and root buds; 2) apical contouring of bone at the transplantation site and maxillary sinus lift via the Summers osteotome technique, when indicated, for maxillary molars; 3) preparation of a 4-wall bony socket; 4) avoidance of premature occlusal interferences; and 5) stabilization of the tooth with placement of a basket suture. All 32 patients successfully underwent the planned procedure. To date, 2 patients have had localized infection that resulted in loss of the transplant. The remaining 42 transplants remain asymptomatic and functioning, with a mean follow-up period of 19 months. No infection, ankylosis, loss of the transplant, or root resorption has been noted. In addition, endodontic therapy has not been necessary on any transplanted teeth. Autogenous tooth transplantation has been discussed and described in the literature previously, with a primary focus on cuspid and bicuspid transplantation. The molar transplant is infrequently discussed in today's literature, possibly because of the preponderance of titanium dental implants. Autogenous molar transplantation is a viable procedure with low morbidity and excellent functional and esthetic outcomes. This report shows the successful transplantation of 42 of 44 molars in 32 patients with a mean follow-up period of 19 months.

  14. Antimicrobial Irrigants in the Endodontic Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Iqbal, Azhar

    2012-01-01

    This paper highlights the importance of root canal disinfection. It discusses the different endodontic irrigants available and comments on how these can be used most effectively. Eliminating bacteria from the root canal system is an essential stage in endodontic therapy. An objective of endodontic treatment is removal of diseased tissue, elimination of bacteria from the canal system and prevention of recontamination. (1) Disinfection of the root canal system, as part of endodontic therapy, by...

  15. The maxillary second molar - anatomical variations (case report).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beshkenadze, E; Chipashvili, N

    2015-01-01

    To be acquainted with dental anatomical specificity is of great importance for dental endodontic treatment algorithm. The subject of present publication is 2 clinical cases of upper second molars, detailed characterization of, which is considered very important for enrichment of anatomical knowledge about dental anatomical variations. In one case, the reason for admission to the clinic of a 38-year-old woman was complains as of esthetic character as well as functional misbalance (disturbance of chewing function due to the damage of orthopedic construction). The patient indicated to the existence of coronary defects of large size aesthetic discomforts, damage and discolouration of old orthopedic construction (denture) in maxillary right molar area. According to the data obtained after clinical and visiographical examinations, chronic periodontitis of 17 teeth was identified as a result of incomplete endodontic treatment. According to the data obtained after clinical and visiographical examinations, the diagnosis of chronic periodontitis of 17 teeth was identified, tooth 17 with 2 roots and 2 canals. In the second clinical case, the reason for admission to the clinic of a 39-year-old woman was severe pain in the upper right molar area. The patient indicated to the caries on the tooth 17. After completion of proper survey clinical and visiographical examinations, acute pulpitis (K04.00) - with three roots and 4 canals was diagnosed. In both cases after the proper examinations and agreement with the patients a treatment plan envisaging: 17 teeth endodontic treatment, filling of caries defects and their preparation on one hand for orthopedic construction (denture) and on the other hand for restoration of anatomical integrity by light-cured composite, was scheduled. The present study is designed to prevent complications of endodontic treatment of the second molar, to optimize diagnosis and treatment algorithm, once again proving reliable information indicating to the

  16. Endodontic treatment in geriatric patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milly Armilya Andang

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available With the increased number of geriatric population, it is predicted that the need for dental treatment also increases. The needs for esthetic factors and function of geriatric patient are maybe similar to young patient. The number of geriatric patients who refuse dental extraction is increasing if there are still other alternative. They can be more convinced when the clinician said that the dental disease experienced is a focal infection so that the loss of the tooth can be accepted as the best option. But if it is possible, they will prefer endodontic treatment, because they want to keep their teeth according to the treatment plan or based on patient's request, as a less traumatic alternative compared to extraction.Endodontic treatment consideration for geriatric patient is quite similar to younger patients. The technique is also the same, although the problem may be bigger. The problem or obstacle that may arise in endodontic treatment for geriatric patient relates to the visit duration, problems during x-ray, problems in defining root canal location, vertical root fracture, and in some cases, decreased pulp tissue recovery ability. Due to the fact that the challenge is quite big, the success of endodontic treatment in geriatric patients needs to be considered. This paper will explain the endodontic treatment prognosis for geriatric patients.

  17. Maxillary sinus augmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A B Tarun Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Placing dental implants in the maxillary posterior region can be both challenging and un-nerving for a regular implant dentist who is not well versed with advanced surgical procedures. It is vital for a general dentist to understand the fundamentals of bone grafting the maxillary sinus if he/she is really committed to providing the best health care for their patients. The dental practice is seeing an increasing group of patients who are living longer, and this group of older baby boomers often has an edentulous posterior maxilla either unilateral or bilateral. When edentulous, the posterior maxilla more likely has diminished bone height, which does not allow for the placement of dental implants without creating additional bone. Through grafting the maxillary sinus, bone of ideal quality can be created (allowing for placement of dental implants, which offer many advantages over other tooth replacement modalities. The sinus graft offers the dental patient a predictable procedure of regenerating lost osseous structure in the posterior maxilla. This offers the patient many advantages for long-term success. If dentists understand these concepts, they can better educate their patients and guide them to have the procedure performed. This article outlines bone grafting of the maxillary sinus for the purpose of placing dental implants. This review will help the readers to understand the intricacies of sinus augmentation. They can relate their patient's condition with the available literature and chalk out the best treatment plan for the patient, especially by using indirect sinus augmentation procedures which are less invasive and highly successful if done using prescribed technique.

  18. Aberrant Anatomical Variation of Maxillary Sinus Mimicking Periapical Cyst: A Report of Two Cases and Role of CBCT in Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Ercan Sekerci

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Most periapical lesions are associated with microorganisms from infected root canal systems. Maxillary sinus can pose a diagnostic dilemma radiographically because of its anatomical variation which can mimic a periapical pathosis. The aim of this study was to describe two cases of aberrant anatomical variation of the maxillary sinus that presented radiographic similarities to a periapical cyst in order to call the attention of clinicians to the fact that several different diseases are able to mimic endodontic periapical lesions. An accurate assessment of this morphology was made with the help of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT.

  19. Aberrant Anatomical Variation of Maxillary Sinus Mimicking Periapical Cyst: A Report of Two Cases and Role of CBCT in Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekerci, Ahmet Ercan; Sisman, Yildiray; Etoz, Meryem; Bulut, Duygu Goller

    2013-01-01

    Most periapical lesions are associated with microorganisms from infected root canal systems. Maxillary sinus can pose a diagnostic dilemma radiographically because of its anatomical variation which can mimic a periapical pathosis. The aim of this study was to describe two cases of aberrant anatomical variation of the maxillary sinus that presented radiographic similarities to a periapical cyst in order to call the attention of clinicians to the fact that several different diseases are able to mimic endodontic periapical lesions. An accurate assessment of this morphology was made with the help of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). PMID:23710374

  20. Maxillary distraction complications in cleft patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeblaoui, Y; Morand, B; Brix, M; Lebeau, J; Bettega, G

    2010-06-01

    Cleft lip and palate (CLP) patients often present with a class III malocclusion in connection with a three dimensional maxillary hypoplasia. Twenty-five to 60% of these patients need maxillary advancement. Two solutions are possible: orthognathic surgery and maxillary distraction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the complications of maxillary distraction in CLP patients. Data was collected from the records of patients treated in our surgery unit between 2000 and 2007. Among the eight patients (four male and four female), five presented with a bilateral CLP, two with a unilateral CLP, and one with a unilateral cleft lip associated to a soft palate cleft. The average age at surgery was 17 years. All underwent a Le Fort I osteotomy with a pterygomaxillary disjunction. An external distractor was used for the first two patients and an internal distractor for the six following patients. After a seven-day latency, activation was implemented at a rate of 1mm twice a day. The average period of consolidation was four months. Maxillary advancement ranged between 7 and 19mm, with an average of 12.6mm. The average follow-up was four years. Complications were noted in seven patients: one intra-operative hemorrhage, one avulsion of a tooth anchored at the pterygoid process during osteotomy, three cases of device dysfunction, two cases of significant pain during activation, one loosening of the orthodontic arch in an external system, two cases of labial ulceration, and one maxillary sinusitis due to migration of a wisdom tooth. Complications of maxillary distraction in CLP patients were very frequent. Most were related to the device and did not interfere with the final result. This must be taken into account when indicating distraction and choosing the device. Two types of complications can occur during distraction: those related to the osteotomy and those related to the device. The complications related to the osteotomy are linked to the cicatricial ground of previous

  1. [Maxillary distraction complications in cleft patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeblaoui, Y; Morand, B; Brix, M; Lebeau, J; Bettega, G

    2008-09-01

    Cleft lip and palate (CLP) patients often present with a class III malocclusion in connection with a three dimensional maxillary hypoplasia. Twenty-five to 60% of these patients require a maxillary advancement. Two solutions are possible: orthognathic surgery and maxillary distraction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the complications of the maxillary distraction in CLP patients. Data was collected from the records of patients treated at our Surgery Unit between 2000 and 2007. Among the eight patients (four male and four female), five presented a bilateral CLP, two a unilateral CLP and one a unilateral cleft lip associated to a soft palate cleft. The average age at surgery was 17 years old. All had a Le Fort I osteotomy with a pterygomaxillary disjunction. The first two patients had external distractors and the six following internal ones. After a seven-day latency, activation was led to the rate of 1mm per day twice. The period of consolidation was four months on average. The maxillary advancement varied between 7 and 19 mm with an average of 12.6mm. The average follow-up was four years. We encountered difficulties and/or complications in seven patients: one intraoperatively haemorrhage, one avulsion of a tooth fixed at the pterygoid process during the osteotomy, three device failures, two cases of significant pains during activation, one dissociation of the dental anchorage of an external system, two labial ulcerations and one maxillary sinusitis by migration of the 18. Difficulties of maxillary distraction in CLP patients are very frequent. The majority is related to the distractors and did not interfere with the final result. But this frequency must be taken into account in the indication and in the choice of the material. Two types of complications can occur during distraction: those related to the osteotomy and those related to the material. The complications related to the osteotomy are in connection with the cicatricial ground of the CLP. They are

  2. Le Fort I Maxillary Advancement Using Distraction Osteogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combs, Patrick D.; Harshbarger, Raymond J.

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of maxillary hypoplasia has traditionally involved conventional Le Fort I osteotomies and advancement. Advancements of greater than 10 mm risk significant relapse. This risk is greater in the cleft lip and palate population, whose anatomy and soft tissue scarring from prior procedures contributes to instability of conventional maxillary advancement. Le Fort I advancement with distraction osteogenesis has emerged as viable, stable treatment modality correction of severe maxillary hypoplasia in cleft, syndromic, and noncleft patients. In this article, the authors provide a review of current data and recommendations concerning Le Fort I advancement with distraction osteogenesis. In addition, they outline their technique for treating severe maxillary hypoplasia with distraction osteogenesis using internal devices. PMID:25383054

  3. Interaction between endodontics and periodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotstein, Ilan

    2017-06-01

    Endodontic-periodontal lesions present challenges to the clinician regarding diagnosis, treatment planning and prognosis. Etiologic factors, such as bacteria and viruses, as well as contributing factors, such as trauma, root resorptions, perforations, cracks and dental malformations, play an important role in the development and progression of such lesions. Treatment and prognosis of endodontic-periodontal lesions vary, depending on the etiology, pathogenesis and correct diagnosis of each specific condition. This chapter will appraise the interrelationship between endodontic and periodontal lesions and provide biological and clinical evidence for diagnosis, prognosis and decision-making in the treatment of these conditions. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Accuracy of CBCT as modality to identify the presence of secondary mesiobuccal root canal in the maxillary first molar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haikal Halil

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A successful endodontic treatment requires the clinician to be able to locate, disinfect, and obturate all canals presence in the root canal system to remove the infection and prevent re-infection. However, there are canals that often missed upon examination and the treatment, for example, the secondary mesiobuccal (MB root canal. The success of locating these canals is determined by the methods used, for example, a periapical radiograph and Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT. The purpose of this study was to examine the sensitivity and accuracy of the periapical radiograph (PA and CBCT on determining the presence of the secondary MB root canal. Methods: As much as 40 intact crown and intact radicular of the maxillary first molars, without root caries, root restoration, and endodontic treated, were taken as the samples. The presence of a secondary MB root canal was evaluated by a PA radiograph, CBCT and clinical sectioning. All of the samples were undergone each test and sectioned after being completed the radiographic evaluation steps. The results from each test were then documented and analyzed by using SPSS® version 16. Results: CBCT radiograph was successfully identifying 62.5% secondary MB root canal presence, whilst the PA radiograph has detected only 20% of the samples. The sensitivity of CBCT and PA radiograph was compared with the gold standard method, resulting 86.2% and 27.6% respectively. The statistical analysis showed that there was no significant difference between CBCT test and the gold standard (p=0.00. Conclusion: CBCT was proven to be a reliable method to detect the presence of secondary MB root canals due to its sensitivity and accuracy as high as the clinical sectioning compared to the PA radiograph.

  5. Orthograde endodontic retreatment of teeth with individual cast posts: Report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramić Bojana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The failure of primary endodontic treatment is manifested by various clinical symptoms following endodontic therapy or, more frequently, by the development of chronic inflammatory process in the apex region without any subjective symptoms. In case of unfavorable outcome of the primary endodontic treatment, orthograde endodontic retreatment is the method of choice for a prolonged therapy. Outline of Cases. Two female patients, 47 and 44 years old, were presented at the Dental Clinic of Vojvodina for endodontic retreatment of teeth 22, 23 and 13, within the repeated prosthetic restoration. Intraradicular individual cast posts were removed using ultrasonic instruments. Remains of gutta-percha were removed by engine driven rotary re-treatment files, root canals were shaped and cleaned using the crown-down technique, and obturated with gutta-percha and epoxy-resin-based sealer using the lateral compaction technique. Conclusion. When there are metal posts or broken instruments in the root canal, the use of ultrasonic instruments is considered a safe method characterized by negligible tooth substance loss and minimal root damage causing fractures and perforations, and the entire procedure is effective and predictable. Non-surgical orthograde endodontic retreatment, when properly performed in accessible and penetrable root canals, achieves a high cure rate, good and lasting results and eliminates the need for radical procedures, such as apical surgery or tooth extraction. When nonsurgical endodontic retreatment is done, treated teeth must be restored by full coronal coverage as soon as possible, to prevent coronal leakage or fracture.

  6. Regenerative Endodontics: A Road Less Travelled

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Ramta; Mittal, Sunandan; Kumar, Tarun; Kaur, Dilpreet

    2014-01-01

    Although traditional approaches like root canal therapy and apexification procedures have been successful in treating diseased or infected root canals, but these modalities fail to re-establish healthy pulp tissue in treated teeth. Regeneration-based approaches aims to offer high levels of success by replacing diseased or necrotic pulp tissues with healthy pulp tissue to revitalize teeth. The applications of regenerative approaches in dental clinics have potential to dramatically improve patients’ quality of life. This review article offers a detailed overview of present regenerative endodontic approaches aiming to revitalize teeth and also outlines the problems to be dealt before this emerging field contributes to clinical treatment protocols. It conjointly covers the basic trilogy elements of tissue engineering. PMID:25478476

  7. Biofilm in endodontics: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhajharia, Kapil; Parolia, Abhishek; Shetty, K Vikram; Mehta, Lata Kiran

    2015-01-01

    Endodontic disease is a biofilm-mediated infection, and primary aim in the management of endodontic disease is the elimination of bacterial biofilm from the root canal system. The most common endodontic infection is caused by the surface-associated growth of microorganisms. It is important to apply the biofilm concept to endodontic microbiology to understand the pathogenic potential of the root canal microbiota as well as to form the basis for new approaches for disinfection. It is foremost to understand how the biofilm formed by root canal bacteria resists endodontic treatment measures. Bacterial etiology has been confirmed for common oral diseases such as caries and periodontal and endodontic infections. Bacteria causing these diseases are organized in biofilm structures, which are complex microbial communities composed of a great variety of bacteria with different ecological requirements and pathogenic potential. The biofilm community not only gives bacteria effective protection against the host's defense system but also makes them more resistant to a variety of disinfecting agents used as oral hygiene products or in the treatment of infections. Successful treatment of these diseases depends on biofilm removal as well as effective killing of biofilm bacteria. So, the fundamental to maintain oral health and prevent dental caries, gingivitis, and periodontitis is to control the oral biofilms. From these aspects, the formation of biofilms carries particular clinical significance because not only host defense mechanisms but also therapeutic efforts including chemical and mechanical antimicrobial treatment measures have the most difficult task of dealing with organisms that are gathered in a biofilm. The aim of this article was to review the mechanisms of biofilms’ formation, their roles in pulpal and periapical pathosis, the different types of biofilms, the factors influencing biofilm formation, the mechanisms of their antimicrobial resistance, techniques to

  8. Argon laser application to endodontics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankenau, Richard J.; Ludlow, Marvin; Anderson, David

    1993-07-01

    The application of laser technology to endodontics has been studied for some time. At the present time several major problems are being investigated: (1) removal of infected tissues, (2) sterilization of canals, (3) obturation of canals, and (4) preservation of the vitality of supporting tissues. This list is not intended to imply other problems do not exist or have been solved, but it is a starting point. This paper reviews some of the literature that relates to laser applications to endodontics and concludes with some of the findings from our investigation.

  9. Learning experience in endodontics: Brazilian students' perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seijo, Marilia O S; Ferreira, Efigênia F; Ribeiro Sobrinho, Antônio P; Paiva, Saul M; Martins, Renata C

    2013-05-01

    Including students' perceptions in the educational process is considered a key component in monitoring the quality of academic programs. This study aimed to evaluate the concept of one's learning experience in endodontic teaching from the perspective of a group of Brazilian students. A total of 126 self-administered, structured questionnaires were distributed to undergraduate dental students enrolled in endodontics courses during the second semester of the 2009 academic year. The questionnaires were administered during final examinations and focused on students' opinions concerning learning during endodontic treatments, time spent during endodontic treatments, difficulties found during endodontic treatments, quality of endodontic treatments performed, characteristics of the technique employed, and suggestions to improve endodontic teaching. Ninety-one percent of the questionnaires were returned for evaluation. The obtained answers were discussed and analyzed, thereby generating quantitative and qualitative data showing students' perceptions of their experiences in endodontics courses. The main points that can affect the teaching of endodontics, according to the undergraduate students, included patients' absences and delays, selection of patients, preclinical and clinical training, difficulties found, type of technique employed, and teachers' orientation during endodontic treatment. The students' perceptions provided valuable information about the development of the course and the teacher-student relationship, together with the added intention of enhancing the teaching of endodontics as well as other courses.

  10. Antibacterial Nanoparticles in Endodontics: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Annie; Kishen, Anil

    2016-10-01

    A major challenge in root canal treatment is the inability of the current cleaning and shaping procedures to eliminate bacterial biofilms surviving within the anatomic complexities and uninstrumented portions of the root canal system. Nanoparticles with their enhanced and unique physicochemical properties, such as ultrasmall sizes, large surface area/mass ratio, and increased chemical reactivity, have led research toward new prospects of treating and preventing dental infections. This article presents a comprehensive review on the scientific knowledge that is available on the application of antibacterial nanoparticles in endodontics. The application of nanoparticles in the form of solutions for irrigation, medication, and as an additive within sealers/restorative materials has been evaluated to primarily improve the antibiofilm efficacy in root canal and restorative treatments. In addition, antibiotic or photosensitizer functionalized nanoparticles have been proposed recently to provide more potent antibacterial efficacy. The increasing interest in this field warrants sound research based on scientific and clinical collaborations to emphasize the near future potential of nanoparticles in clinical endodontics. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. An application framework of three-dimensional reconstruction and measurement for endodontic research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yuan; Peters, Ove A; Wu, Hongkun; Zhou, Xuedong

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to customize an application framework by using the MeVisLab image processing and visualization platform for three-dimensional reconstruction and assessment of tooth and root canal morphology. One maxillary first molar was scanned before and after preparation with ProTaper by using micro-computed tomography. With a customized application framework based on MeVisLab, internal and external anatomy was reconstructed. Furthermore, the dimensions of root canal and radicular dentin were quantified, and effects of canal preparation were assessed. Finally, a virtual preparation with risk analysis was performed to simulate the removal of a broken instrument. This application framework provided an economical platform and met current requirements of endodontic research. The broad-based use of high-quality free software and the resulting exchange of experience might help to improve the quality of endodontic research with micro-computed tomography.

  12. Long-term skeletal and dental changes in patients with cleft lip and palate after maxillary distraction: a report of three cases treated with a rigid external distraction device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Kiyoshi; Sato, Masaru; Omura, Ken

    2005-04-01

    We examined long-term skeletal and dental changes in three patients with cleft lip and palate who underwent maxillary distraction using a rigid external distraction device. Two were children, and one was an adult. Changes in the overjet (OJ), overbite (OB), and positions of the anterior nasal spine (ANS), upper incisors (U1), pogonion (Pog), and lower incisors (L1) were measured on preoperative to 36 months postoperative lateral-cephalograms. In the adult, the positions of all examination points were relatively stable from 6 to 36 months postoperatively, and the OJ and OB were maintained at over 2 mm at 36 months. In the children, the positions of ANS and U1 changed inferiorly, Pog and L1 changed anteroinferiorly, and OJ and OB tended to decrease from 6 to 36 months postoperatively. Long-term skeletal and dental stability following maxillary distraction was relatively well maintained in the adult patient. In the children, the maxillomandibular growth was observed after maxillary distraction, but the mandibular overgrowth might have been inhibited by the correction of class III dentoskeletal deformity resulting from the maxillary distraction.

  13. Congenital maxillary double lip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh Singh Chauhan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Double lip, also referred to as "macrocheilia," is a rare anomaly which affects the upper lip more commonly than the lower lip. It consists of a fold of excess or redundant hypertrophic tissue on the mucosal side of the lip. The congenital double lip is believed to be present at birth and becomes more prominent after eruption of teeth. It affects esthetics and also interferes with speech and mastication. Simple surgical excision produces good functional and cosmetic results. We report a case of a non-syndromic congenital maxillary double lip in a 21-year-old male patient.

  14. Modified hyrax splint for rapid maxillary expansion in esthetically concerned patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarabjeet Singh Sandhu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The orthodontic treatment of Class III malocclusion with a maxillary deficiency is often treated with maxillary protraction either with or without maxillary expansion. The routine procedure for rapid maxillary expansion includes banding on first premolars/first deciduous molars and the permanent first molars. However in some patients who are esthetically very conscious, banding of the first premolar would not be a good esthetic option. So for such circumstances we have designed a modified hyrax splint, which does not need the first premolars to be banded.

  15. Periapical and endodontic status of permanent teeth in patients with hypophosphatemic rickets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mette Guldbæk; Beck-Nielsen, Signe; Haubek, Dorte

    2012-01-01

    panoramic radiograph, which was scored for endodontically affected teeth (i.e. teeth with periapical radiolucencies and/or endodontically treated teeth). A total of 52 patients (age range: 5·7-74·5 years; 17 males and 35 females) were included. HR patients were characterised by a high number...... genetically. The aim of the present study was to describe the periapical and endodontic status of permanent teeth in patients with genetically and/or biochemically confirmed HR. The patients were recruited from a medical study on HR patients. The patients underwent a dental examination including a digital...... of endodontically affected teeth (mean: 4·2; s.d.: 5·0). The number of affected teeth rose significantly with age (P ...

  16. Endodontic applications of 3D printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, J; Wealleans, J; Ray, J

    2018-02-27

    Computer-aided design (CAD) and computer-aided manufacturing (CAM) technologies can leverage cone beam computed tomography data for production of objects used in surgical and nonsurgical endodontics and in educational settings. The aim of this article was to review all current applications of 3D printing in endodontics and to speculate upon future directions for research and clinical use within the specialty. A literature search of PubMed, Ovid and Scopus was conducted using the following terms: stereolithography, 3D printing, computer aided rapid prototyping, surgical guide, guided endodontic surgery, guided endodontic access, additive manufacturing, rapid prototyping, autotransplantation rapid prototyping, CAD, CAM. Inclusion criteria were articles in the English language documenting endodontic applications of 3D printing. Fifty-one articles met inclusion criteria and were utilized. The endodontic literature on 3D printing is generally limited to case reports and pre-clinical studies. Documented solutions to endodontic challenges include: guided access with pulp canal obliteration, applications in autotransplantation, pre-surgical planning and educational modelling and accurate location of osteotomy perforation sites. Acquisition of technical expertise and equipment within endodontic practices present formidable obstacles to widespread deployment within the endodontic specialty. As knowledge advances, endodontic postgraduate programmes should consider implementing 3D printing into their curriculums. Future research directions should include clinical outcomes assessments of treatments employing 3D printed objects. Published 2018. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  17. Maxillary overdentures retained by splinted and unsplinted implants : A retrospective study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Narhi, TO; Hevinga, M; Voorsmit, RACA; Kalk, W

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate the clinical performance of and patients' satisfaction with maxillary overdentures retained by splinted and unsplinted implants. Patients who had been treated with maxillary implant-retained overdentures because of functional problems with

  18. Occlusal plane change after intrusion of maxillary posterior teeth by microimplants to avoid maxillary surgery with skeletal Class III orthognathic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyo-Sang; Kim, Ji-Yeun; Kwon, Tae-Geon

    2010-11-01

    To increase stability and mandibular setback movement, surgical maxillary impaction is normally performed with mandibular setback surgery in treating adult skeletal Class III patients. This article demonstrates the use of microimplants for anchorage to intrude molars and the resultant rotation of the maxillary occlusal plane clockwise to increase the surgical mandibular setback and reduce the posterior vertical dimension instead of maxillary surgical impaction. A 21-year-old man with mandibular prognathism was treated with mandibular setback surgery that included orthodontic treatment for decompensation. Microimplants placed into the palatal alveolar bone between the maxillary first and second molars were used to intrude the maxillary posterior teeth and change the occlusal plane clockwise. This produced 4 mm more of distal movement of the chin during mandibular setback surgery compared with the surgical prediction with no change in the occlusal plane. These results were similar to those of 2-jaw surgery with maxillary posterior impaction. The intrusion of the maxillary posterior teeth with microimplants might prevent the need for maxillary surgery in adult skeletal Class III patients. Copyright © 2010 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Pediatric maxillary fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jack; Dinsmore, Robert; Mar, Philip; Bhatt, Kirit

    2011-07-01

    Pediatric craniofacial structures differ from those of adults in many ways. Because of these differences, management of pediatric craniofacial fractures is not the same as those in adults. The most important differences that have clinical relevance are the mechanical properties, craniofacial anatomy, healing capacity, and dental morphology. This article will review these key differences and the management of pediatric maxillary fractures. From the mechanical properties' perspective, pediatric bones are much more resilient than adult bones; as such, they undergo plastic deformation and ductile failure. From the gross anatomic perspective, the relative proportion of the cranial to facial structures is much larger for the pediatric patients and the sinuses are not yet developed. The differences related to dentition and dental development are more conical crowns, larger interdental spaces, and presence of permanent tooth buds in the pediatric population. The fracture pattern, as a result of all the above, does not follow the classic Le Fort types. The maxillomandibular fixation may require circum-mandibular wires, drop wires, or Ivy loops. Interfragmentary ligatures using absorbable sutures play a much greater role in these patients. The use of plates and screws should take into consideration the future development with respect to growth centers and the location of the permanent tooth buds. Pediatric maxillary fractures are not common, require different treatments, and enjoy better long-term outcomes.

  20. [Irrigants and intracanal medicaments in endodontics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zehnder, Matthias; Lehnert, Birgit; Schönenberger, Kathrin; Waltimo, Tuomas

    2003-01-01

    Modern, biologic root canal therapy should be performed with suitable irrigating solutions and intracanal medicaments. The goal of endodontic treatment is to free the treated tooth from infection and prevent reinfection as thoroughly as possible by means which do not put the organism at risk. In this review of the literature, an evidence-based concept for irrigation and medication of root canal systems is presented. Irrigants and medicaments are discussed with respect to their antimicrobial, tissue-dissolving and endotoxin-decontaminating capacity in relation to their systemic toxicity. Recent findings pertaining to interactions of root canal medicaments and irrigating solutions and their impact on a sound irrigating and medicating concept are discussed.

  1. Treatment of severe maxillary cleft hypoplasia in a case with missing premaxilla with anterior maxillary distraction using tooth-borne hyrax appliance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akshai Shetty

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cleft orthodontics generally poses a challenge and a missing premaxilla adds to the difficulty in managing them. The lack of bone support and anterior teeth in a case with missing premaxilla accounts not only for difficulty in rehabilitation but also in increasing the maxillary hypoplasia. This article presents a case report where planned orthodontic and surgical management using distraction has helped treat a severe maxillary hypoplasia in a patient with missing premaxilla. The treatment plan and method can be used to treat severe maxillary hypoplasia and yield reasonably acceptable results for such patients.

  2. A clinical analysis of maxillary sinus cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasumatsu, Ryuji; Nakashima, Torahiko; Ayada, Toranoshin; Shiratsuchi, Hideki; Toh, Satoshi; Komune, Shizuo

    2009-01-01

    Thirty-two patients (23 males, 9 females) with maxillary sinus cancer were treated at Kyushu University Hospital during 2000-2008. They were classified by T classification as 5 cases with T2, 13 with T3, 12 with T4a, and 2 with T4b. Between 2000 and 2003, 16 patients were given irradiation, intra-arterial 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) infusion chemotherapy, maxillectomy and postoperative irradiation. After 2004, two patients with T4b maxillary sinus cancer were treated by superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy with Cisplatin (CDDP) and Docetaxel (DOC) and irradiation. Other patients were given irradiation and chemotherapy with S-1 and intra-arterial infusion of 5-FU. The 3-year survival rate was 68.3% for all patients. The 3-year survival rate was 74.6% for patients treated after 2004, whereas it was 62.5% for patients treated between 2000 and 2003. Chemotherapy with S-1 or superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy with CDDP and DOC improved cause-specific survival rates. (author)

  3. Failure of endodontic treatment: The usual suspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabassum, Sadia; Khan, Farhan Raza

    2016-01-01

    Inappropriate mechanical debridement, persistence of bacteria in the canals and apex, poor obturation quality, over and under extension of the root canal filling, and coronal leakage are some of the commonly attributable causes of failure. Despite the high success rate of endodontic treatment, failures do occur in a large number of cases and most of the times can be attributed to the already stated causes. With an ever increasing number of endodontic treatments being done each day, it has become imperative to avoid or minimize the most fundamental of reasons leading to endodontic failure. This paper reviews the most common causes of endodontic failure along with radiographic examples.

  4. Dilemmas pertaining to three canals in the mesiobuccal root of a maxillary second molar: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankit Arora

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The mesiobuccal root of the maxillary molars is well known to pose a hindrance during endodontic therapy. Presented here is a case of a maxillary left second molar where three canals were located in its mesiobuccal root with the use of visual and diagnostic aids. Difficulties encountered during the process of unveiling the tooth's internal anatomy were discussed. The dilemmas encountered pertained to the root canal configuration, the nomenclature of the extra canals, and the justification for the presence of a third canal. The root canal configuration of 3-2-1 was confirmed for the mesiobuccal root using information gained from clinical, radiographic, and multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT scan findings. This case demonstrates the need for efforts to locate extra canals in the mesiobuccal root of the maxillary molars as their internal anatomy remains a mystery.

  5. Dilemmas pertaining to three canals in the mesiobuccal root of a maxillary second molar: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Ankit; Acharya, Shashi Rashmi; Saraswathi, Muliya Vidya; Sharma, Padmaja; Ather, Amber

    2013-08-01

    The mesiobuccal root of the maxillary molars is well known to pose a hindrance during endodontic therapy. Presented here is a case of a maxillary left second molar where three canals were located in its mesiobuccal root with the use of visual and diagnostic aids. Difficulties encountered during the process of unveiling the tooth's internal anatomy were discussed. The dilemmas encountered pertained to the root canal configuration, the nomenclature of the extra canals, and the justification for the presence of a third canal. The root canal configuration of 3-2-1 was confirmed for the mesiobuccal root using information gained from clinical, radiographic, and multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) scan findings. This case demonstrates the need for efforts to locate extra canals in the mesiobuccal root of the maxillary molars as their internal anatomy remains a mystery.

  6. Endodontics and the irradiated patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, F.L.

    1976-01-01

    With increasingly larger numbers of irradiated patients in our population, it seems likely that all dentists will eventually be called upon to manage the difficult problems that these patients present. Of utmost concern should be the patient's home care program and the avoidance of osteroradionecrosis. Endodontics and periodontics are the primary areas for preventing or eliminating the infection that threatens osteoradionecrosis. Endodontic treatment must be accomplished with the utmost care and maximum regard for the fragility of the periapical tissues. Pulpally involved teeth should never be left open in an irradiated patient, and extreme care must be taken with the between-visits seal. If one is called upon for preradiation evaluation, routine removal of all molar as well as other compromised teeth should be considered. Attention should be directed to the literature for further advances in the management of irradiated patients

  7. Role of herbs in endodontics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendra Kumar Tewari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Medicinal plants and herbs have attracted a lot of attention since the past few years. The market for drugs extracted from these plants and made from herbal extracts has seen a significant rise. India is known for its rich stock of medicinal plants. Among many, some herbs are rich in phytochemical content. These phytochemicals are useful in generating phytomedicines which have effects on the human body. In the field of endodontics, phytomedicines are a boon. They have been popularly used as analgesic, anti-inflammatory, sedatives, and antibiotics. They are most significantly used as endodontic irrigants. Phytotherapy has been a grand entrant in the drug market. The reason why herbal extracts have the potential to be highly popular is due to the side effects of synthetic medicines which alter microbiota.

  8. Are clinical decisions in endodontics influenced by the patient's fee-paying status?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, I; Gilbert, D; Asimakopoulou, K

    2015-12-01

    We explored whether the fee status of a UK patient influences clinical decision-making in endodontics. In a randomised-controlled vignette study describing either an 'NHS-funded', 'Privately-funded' or undisclosed fee-status patient, we examined the importance vocational trainer dentists placed on a series of factors normally considered when deciding whether to offer patients endodontic treatment as opposed to extracting the tooth. N = 119 experienced (M years post qualification = 20.01) dentists participated. Having read a vignette describing a hypothetical patient who could potentially be treated either endodontically or through an extraction, dentists rated a series of factors they would normally consider (for example, poor oral hygiene, the rest of their mouth is unfilled and caries-free), before recommending either endodontic treatment or an extraction. The patient's funding status had no influence on these dentists' clinical decision-making when considering endodontic treatment as an option (p >0.05) with the exception of a single item relating to infrequent attendance where the NHS patient was more likely than the 'undisclosed-fee' patient, to be offered extractions (F (2, 116) 3.43, p endodontic treatment by experienced dentists.

  9. Biofilm in endodontics: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Zambrano de la Peña, Sonia; Salcedo-Moncada, Doris; Petkova- Gueorguieva, Marieta; Ventocilla Huasupoma, María

    2017-01-01

    It is demonstrated the efforts made endodontic microbiology and science to get to decipher the secrets of this unique structure although every day new questions arise. We need the treatments we use to combat biofilm achieve oxygenate the periapical ecosystem and basically scrape and loosen the tightly adhering bacteria Knowing the process of biofilm formation, microbial metabolism and strategies that they use to resist and remain hidden but active , we know why we observe refractory periapica...

  10. Effects of maxillary sinus floor elevation surgery on maxillary sinus physiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmenga, NM; Raghoebar, GM; Liem, RSB; van Weissenbruch, R; Manson, WL; Vissink, A

    In a prospective study, the effects of elevation surgery of the maxillary sinus floor on maxillary sinus physiology were assessed. Seventeen consecutive patients without preoperative anamnestic, clinical and radiological signs of maxillary sinusitis underwent sinus floor elevation surgery with iliac

  11. Factors associated with endodontic flare-ups: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imura, N; Zuolo, M L

    1995-09-01

    The purpose of this prospective study was to assess the incidence of flare-ups (a severe problem requiring an unscheduled visit and treatment) among patients who received endodontic treatment by the two authors in their respective practices during a period of one year, and also to examine the correlation with pre-operative and operative variables. The results showed an incidence of 1.58% for flare-ups from 1012 endodontically treated teeth. Statistical analysis using the chi-square test (Pflare-ups were found to be positively correlated with multiple appointments, retreatment cases, periradicular pain prior to treatment, presence of radiolucent lesions, and patients taking analgesic or anti-inflammatory drugs. In contrast, there was no correlation between flare-up, and age, sex, different arch/tooth groups and the status of the pulp.

  12. Dentists with enhanced skills (Special Interest) in Endodontics: gatekeepers views in London.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghotane, Swapnil G; Al-Haboubi, Mustafa; Kendall, Nick; Robertson, Claire; Gallagher, Jennifer E

    2015-09-21

    Dentists with a special interest hold enhanced skills enabling them to treat cases of intermediate complexity. The aim of this study was to explore primary dental care practitioners' views of dentists with a special interest (DwSIs) in Endodontics in London, with reference to an educational and service initiative established by (the former) London Deanery in conjunction with the NHS. A cross-sectional postal survey of primary care dentists working across different models of care within London was conducted, with a target to achieve views of at least 5 % of London's dentists. The questionnaire instrument was informed by qualitative research and the dental literature and piloted prior to distribution; data were analysed using SPSS v19 and STATA v12.0. Six per cent of London's primary care dentists (n = 243) responded to the survey; 53 % were male. Just over one third (37 %; n = 90) were aware of the DwSI service being provided. Most practitioners reported that having access to a DwSI in Endodontics would support the care of their patients (89 %; n = 215), would carry out more endodontic treatment in the NHS primary dental care if adequately reimbursed (93 %; n = 220), and had more time (76 %; n = 180). Female respondents appeared to be less confident in doing endodontic treatment (p = 0.001). More recently qualified respondents reported greater need for training/support for performing more endodontic treatment in the NHS primary dental care (p = 0.001), were more dissatisfied with access to endodontic service in the NHS primary dental care (p = 0.007) and more interested to train as a DwSI in endodontics (p = 0.001) compared with respondents having a greater number of years of clinical experience since qualification. The findings lend support to the concept of developing dentists with enhanced skills as well as ensuring additional funding, time and support to facilitate more routine endodontics through the NHS primary care to meet

  13. Management of iatrogenically exposed maxillary sinus with a broken periosteal elevator trapped inside

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nureldeen Elhammali

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Foreign bodies may be ingested after being inserted into an oral cavity or deposited in the body by traumatic or iatrogenic injury. Accidentally left out foreign materials are common complications of dental procedures including apical deposition of endodontic materials, sub-mucosal amalgam pieces, graphite tattoos and traumatically introduced dental materials and instruments. Once a foreign material is left behind within a soft and/or hard tissue, it promotes local inflammation and infection that may cause pain and/or destruction within the surrounding tissues. This article presents a case of retrieval of iatrogenically broken periosteal elevator trapped in the maxillary sinus.

  14. Interceptive treatment of palatal impaction of maxillary canines with rapid maxillary expansion: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baccetti, Tiziano; Mucedero, Manuela; Leonardi, Maria; Cozza, Paola

    2009-11-01

    Our aim in this prospective randomized clinical study was to assess the prevalence rate of eruption of palatally displaced canines, diagnosed at an early developmental stage with posteroanterior radiographs and consequently treated by rapid maxillary expansion. A sample of 60 subjects in the early mixed dentition with palatally displaced canines diagnosed on posteroanterior radiographs was enrolled in the trial. Their age range at the first observation (T1) was 7.6 to 9.6 years, with a prepubertal stage of skeletal maturity (CS1 or CS2). The 60 subjects were randomly allocated to the treatment group (TG, 35 subjects) or the no-treatment group (NTG, 25 subjects). The TG was treated with a banded rapid maxillary expander; after expansion, all patients were retained with the expander in place for 6 months. Thereafter, the expander was removed, and the patients wore a retention plate at night for a year. The NTG received no treatment. All subjects were reevaluated in the early permanent dentition (T2) (postpubertal CS4). The number of dropouts was recorded. The main outcome recorded at T2 was successful or unsuccessful eruption of the maxillary permanent canines. The starting forms at T1 for measurements on posteroanterior and panoramic films were compared in the 2 groups with the Mann-Whitney U test (P <0.05). The prevalence rates of successful and unsuccessful treatments in the TG were compared with those in NTG with chi-square tests (P <0.05). From T1 to T2, there were 3 dropouts in each group. The final sample comprised 32 subjects in the TG and 22 subjects in the NTG. No statistically significant differences were found for any variable at T1. The prevalence rates of successful eruption of the maxillary canines were 65.7% (21 subjects) in the TG and 13.6% (3 subjects) in the NTG. The comparison was statistically significant (chi-square = 12.4; P <0.001). Subjects with palatally displaced canines in the early mixed dentition do not have transverse deficiency of the

  15. Long-term results of surgically-assisted maxillary protraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevzatoğlu, Sirin; Küçükkeleş, Nazan

    2014-05-01

    The long-term treatment results of surgically-assisted facemask therapy were assessed by a comparison of the immediate protraction effects with those seen at five years review. Nine patients treated with a corticotomy-assisted maxillary protraction protocol were recalled five years following protraction. Cephalometric films taken before treatment (T0), immediately after maxillary protraction (T1) and five years after treatment (T2) were compared. The short-term results of surgically-assisted facemask therapy showed significant skeletal and soft tissue changes. After five years, the profile and dental relationships were well maintained and a cephalometric analysis revealed a stable vertical increase but only partially maintained soft tissue changes with loss of sagittal advancement. There was significant upper incisor proclination providing dental camouflage. Patients who are treated with corticotomy-assisted maxillary advancement should be very carefully selected. Assessment criteria include a low mandibular plane angle Class III patients who have severe maxillary retrognathism unable to be treated by conventional orthopaedic correction alone; patients who have almost completed growth and missed the chance of earlier orthopaedic correction, as well as patients who are not willing to accept bimaxillary orthognathic surgery, may be successfully treated.

  16. Double palatal roots in maxillary second molars: A case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed S Alenazy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A thorough understanding of internal and external anatomy of various teeth is critical for a successful outcome of endodontic therapy. The aims of this paper were (1 to describe the clinical retreatment of a maxillary second molar with two palatal roots and (2 to review the available literature regarding this anatomical variation. A 45-year-old Saudi female presented for non-surgical retreatment of maxillary left second molar. Careful radiographic and clinical examinations revealed the presence of two buccal and two palatal roots each with a single root canal. Anatomical variations can occur in any tooth; therefore, the clinicians should always anticipate the occurrence of these variations and utilize all the available tools to diagnose and manage them

  17. Maxillary distraction osteogenesis in cleft lip and palate patients with skeletal anchorage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, Katsuhiro; Mori, Yoshihide; Tae-Geon, Kwon; Shimizu, Hidetaka; Ohtani, Miyuki; Yura, Yoshiaki

    2007-03-01

    Maxillary distraction osteogenesis with the rigid external distraction (RED) system has been used to treat cleft lip and palate (CLP) patients with severe maxillary hypoplasia. We introduce maxillary distraction osteogenesis for CLP patients with skeletal anchorage adapted on a stereolithographic model. Six maxillary deficiency CLP patients treated according to our CLP treatment protocol had undergone maxillary distraction osteogenesis. In all patients, computed tomography (CT) images were recorded preoperatively, and the data were transferred to a workstation. Three-dimensional skeletal structures were reconstructed with CT data sets, and a stereolithographic model was produced. On the stereolithographic model, miniplates were adapted to the surface of maxilla beside aperture piriforms. The operation performed involved a high Le Fort I osteotomy with pterygomaxillary disjunction. Miniplates were fixed to the maxillary segment with three or four screws and used for anchorage of the RED system. Retraction of the maxillary segment was initiated after 1 week. The accuracy of the stereolithographic models was enough to adapt the miniplates so that there was no need to readjust the plates during surgery. Postoperative cephalometric analysis showed that the direction of the retraction was almost parallel to the palatal plane, and dental compensation did not occur. We performed maxillary distraction osteogenesis with skeletal anchorage adapted on the stereolithographic models. Excellent esthetic outcome and skeletal advancement were achieved without dentoalveolar compensations.

  18. Nonsurgical endodontic retreatment of fused teeth with transposition: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Agostinho Beco Pinto Cardoso

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Tooth transposition is a disorder in which a permanent tooth develops and erupts in the normal position of another permanent tooth. Fusion and gemination are developmental disturbances presenting as the union of teeth. This article reports the nonsurgical retreatment of a very rare case of fused teeth with transposition. A patient was referred for endodontic treatment of her maxillary left first molar in the position of the first premolar, which was adjacent to it on the distobuccal side. Orthopantomography and periapical radiography showed two crowns sharing the same root, with a root canal treatment and an associated periapical lesion. Tooth fusion with transposition of a maxillary molar and a premolar was diagnosed. Nonsurgical endodontic retreatment was performed. At four yr follow-up, the tooth was asymptomatic and the radiolucency around the apical region had decreased, showing the success of our intervention. The diagnosis and treatment of fused teeth require special attention. The canal system should be carefully explored to obtain a full understanding of the anatomy, allowing it to be fully cleaned and obturated. Thermoplastic techniques were useful in obtaining hermetic obturation. A correct anatomical evaluation improves the set of treatment options under consideration, leading to a higher likelihood of esthetically and functionally successful treatment.

  19. Imaging Techniques in Endodontics: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deepak, B. S.; Subash, T. S.; Narmatha, V. J.; Anamika, T.; Snehil, T. K.; Nandini, D. B.

    2012-01-01

    This review provides an overview of the relevance of imaging techniques such as, computed tomography, cone beam computed tomography, and ultrasound, to endodontic practice. Many limitations of the conventional radiographic techniques have been overcome by the newer methods. Advantages and disadvantages of various imaging techniques in endodontic practice are also discussed. PMID:22530184

  20. Maxillary Chronic Osteomyelitis Caused by Domestic Violence: A Diagnostic Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Tamyris Inácio; de Carli, Marina Lara; Ribeiro Junior, Noé Vital; Pereira, Alessandro Antônio Costa; Tatakis, Dimitris N.; Hanemann, João Adolfo Costa

    2014-01-01

    Maxillary osteomyelitis is a rare condition defined as inflammation of the bone primarily caused by odontogenic bacteria, with trauma being the second leading cause. The present report documents a rare case of maxillary osteomyelitis in a 38-year-old female who was the victim of domestic violence approximately a year prior to presentation. Intraoral examination revealed a lesion appearing as exposed bony sequestrum, with significant destruction of gingiva and alveolar mucosa in the maxillary right quadrant, accompanied by significant pain, local edema, and continued purulence. Teeth numbers 11, 12, 13, 14, and 15 were mobile, not responsive to percussion, and nonvital. Treatment included antibiotic therapy for seven days followed by total enucleation of the necrotic bone tissue and extraction of the involved teeth. Microscopic findings confirmed the clinical diagnosis of chronic suppurative osteomyelitis. Six months postoperatively, the treated area presented complete healing and there was no sign of recurrence of the lesion. PMID:25610667

  1. Maxillary Chronic Osteomyelitis Caused by Domestic Violence: A Diagnostic Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamyris Inácio Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Maxillary osteomyelitis is a rare condition defined as inflammation of the bone primarily caused by odontogenic bacteria, with trauma being the second leading cause. The present report documents a rare case of maxillary osteomyelitis in a 38-year-old female who was the victim of domestic violence approximately a year prior to presentation. Intraoral examination revealed a lesion appearing as exposed bony sequestrum, with significant destruction of gingiva and alveolar mucosa in the maxillary right quadrant, accompanied by significant pain, local edema, and continued purulence. Teeth numbers 11, 12, 13, 14, and 15 were mobile, not responsive to percussion, and nonvital. Treatment included antibiotic therapy for seven days followed by total enucleation of the necrotic bone tissue and extraction of the involved teeth. Microscopic findings confirmed the clinical diagnosis of chronic suppurative osteomyelitis. Six months postoperatively, the treated area presented complete healing and there was no sign of recurrence of the lesion.

  2. Establishing Apical Patency and its Effect on Endodontic Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Endodontic  Outcomes   by Jason  S...Allen,  LT, DC, USN A thesis submitted to the Faculty of the Endodontics Graduate Program Naval Postgraduate Dental...Assistant Program Director, Endodontics Dept. Terry D. Webb, DDS, MS CAPT, DC, USN Chairman, Endodontics Dept. Glen M. Imamura, S, MS CAPT, DC,

  3. 21 CFR 872.3830 - Endodontic paper point.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Endodontic paper point. 872.3830 Section 872.3830...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3830 Endodontic paper point. (a) Identification. An endodontic paper point is a device made of paper intended for use during endodontic therapy to dry...

  4. Three-dimensional imaging modalities in endodontics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Recent research in endodontics has highlighted the need for three-dimensional imaging in the clinical arena as well as in research. Three-dimensional imaging using computed tomography (CT) has been used in endodontics over the past decade. Three types of CT scans have been studied in endodontics, namely cone-beam CT, spiral CT, and peripheral quantitative CT. Contemporary endodontics places an emphasis on the use of cone-beam CT for an accurate diagnosis of parameters that cannot be visualized on a two-dimensional image. This review discusses the role of CT in endodontics, pertaining to its importance in the diagnosis of root canal anatomy, detection of peri-radicular lesions, diagnosis of trauma and resorption, presurgical assessment, and evaluation of the treatment outcome. PMID:25279337

  5. Three-dimensional imaging modalities in endodontics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, Teresa; Neelakantan, Prasanna [Dept. of Conservative Dentistry and Endodontics, Saveetha Dental College and Hospitals, Saveetha University, Chennai (India)

    2014-09-15

    Recent research in endodontics has highlighted the need for three-dimensional imaging in the clinical arena as well as in research. Three-dimensional imaging using computed tomography (CT) has been used in endodontics over the past decade. Three types of CT scans have been studied in endodontics, namely cone-beam CT, spiral CT, and peripheral quantitative CT. Contemporary endodontics places an emphasis on the use of cone-beam CT for an accurate diagnosis of parameters that cannot be visualized on a two-dimensional image. This review discusses the role of CT in endodontics, pertaining to its importance in the diagnosis of root canal anatomy, detection of peri-radicular lesions, diagnosis of trauma and resorption, presurgical assessment, and evaluation of the treatment outcome.

  6. Three-dimensional imaging modalities in endodontics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao, Teresa; Neelakantan, Prasanna

    2014-01-01

    Recent research in endodontics has highlighted the need for three-dimensional imaging in the clinical arena as well as in research. Three-dimensional imaging using computed tomography (CT) has been used in endodontics over the past decade. Three types of CT scans have been studied in endodontics, namely cone-beam CT, spiral CT, and peripheral quantitative CT. Contemporary endodontics places an emphasis on the use of cone-beam CT for an accurate diagnosis of parameters that cannot be visualized on a two-dimensional image. This review discusses the role of CT in endodontics, pertaining to its importance in the diagnosis of root canal anatomy, detection of peri-radicular lesions, diagnosis of trauma and resorption, presurgical assessment, and evaluation of the treatment outcome

  7. Orthodontic management of bilateral maxillary canine-first premolar transposition and bilateral agenesis of maxillary lateral incisors: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Palma, Elena; Di Giuseppe, Biagio; Tepedino, Michele; Chimenti, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Maxillary canine-first premolar transposition (Mx.C.P1) is an uncommon dental positional anomaly that may create many orthodontic problems from both esthetic and functional points of view. In this report we show the orthodontic management of a case of Mx.C.P1 associated with bilateral maxillary lateral incisor agenesis and unilateral mandibular second premolar agenesis The patient was treated with a multibracket appliance and the extraction of the lower premolar. treatment was completed without the need for any prosthetic replacement.

  8. Guided endodontics: accuracy of a novel method for guided access cavity preparation and root canal location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zehnder, M S; Connert, T; Weiger, R; Krastl, G; Kühl, S

    2016-10-01

    To present a novel method utilizing 3D printed templates to gain guided access to root canals and to evaluate its accuracy in vitro. Sixty extracted human teeth were placed into six maxillary jaw models. Preoperative CBCT scans were matched with intra-oral scans using the coDiagnostix(™) software. Access cavities, sleeves and templates for guidance were virtually planned. Templates were produced by a 3D printer. After access cavity preparation by two operators, a postoperative CBCT scan was superimposed on the virtual planning. Accuracy was measured by calculating the deviation of planned and prepared cavities in three dimensions and angle. Ninety-five per cent confidence intervals were calculated for both operators. All root canals were accessible after cavity preparation with 'Guided Endodontics'. Deviations of planned and prepared access cavities were low with means ranging from 0.16 to 0.21 mm for different aspects at the base of the bur and 0.17-0.47 mm at the tip of the bur. Mean of angle deviation was 1.81°. Overlapping 95% confidence intervals revealed no significant difference between operators. 'Guided Endodontics' allowed an accurate access cavity preparation up to the apical third of the root utilizing printed templates for guidance. All root canals were accessible after preparation. © 2015 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. [Treatment of a fractured endodontical instrument in the root canal].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schipper, M; Peters, L B

    2015-12-01

    A 53-year-old woman with continuing pain coming from a lower first molar was diagnosed with apical periodontitis, with a retained fractured instrument in the root canal. There are a variety of treatment options for dealing with a corpus alienum in a root canal. In this case it was decided to treat the tooth endodontically, and leave the fractured instrument fragment in situ. The selection of this treatment option was made on the basis of knowledge of the original diagnosis and the success rates of the various treatment options as described in the relevant literature, weighed against the possible risks and their effects on the prognosis. This suggested that the use of a dental operating microscope has a positive impact on the success rates of endodontic treatment The prognosis for endodontic treatment when a fractured instrument fragment is left within the root canal, as in this case, is not significantly reduced. The presence of preoperative periapical pathology, however, is a more clinically significant prognostic indicator.

  10. A New Classification of Endodontic-Periodontal Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid S. Al-Fouzan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The interrelationship between periodontal and endodontic disease has always aroused confusion, queries, and controversy. Differentiating between a periodontal and an endodontic problem can be difficult. A symptomatic tooth may have pain of periodontal and/or pulpal origin. The nature of that pain is often the first clue in determining the etiology of such a problem. Radiographic and clinical evaluation can help clarify the nature of the problem. In some cases, the influence of pulpal pathology may cause the periodontal involvement and vice versa. The simultaneous existence of pulpal problems and inflammatory periodontal disease can complicate diagnosis and treatment planning. An endo-perio lesion can have a varied pathogenesis which ranges from simple to relatively complex one. The differential diagnosis of endodontic and periodontal diseases can sometimes be difficult, but it is of vital importance to make a correct diagnosis for providing the appropriate treatment. This paper aims to discuss a modified clinical classification to be considered for accurately diagnosing and treating endo-perio lesion.

  11. A new classification of endodontic-periodontal lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Fouzan, Khalid S

    2014-01-01

    The interrelationship between periodontal and endodontic disease has always aroused confusion, queries, and controversy. Differentiating between a periodontal and an endodontic problem can be difficult. A symptomatic tooth may have pain of periodontal and/or pulpal origin. The nature of that pain is often the first clue in determining the etiology of such a problem. Radiographic and clinical evaluation can help clarify the nature of the problem. In some cases, the influence of pulpal pathology may cause the periodontal involvement and vice versa. The simultaneous existence of pulpal problems and inflammatory periodontal disease can complicate diagnosis and treatment planning. An endo-perio lesion can have a varied pathogenesis which ranges from simple to relatively complex one. The differential diagnosis of endodontic and periodontal diseases can sometimes be difficult, but it is of vital importance to make a correct diagnosis for providing the appropriate treatment. This paper aims to discuss a modified clinical classification to be considered for accurately diagnosing and treating endo-perio lesion.

  12. Endodontic-periodontic bifurcation lesions: a novel treatment option.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shaul; Tillinger, Gabriel; Zuckerman, Offer

    2008-05-01

    The purpose of this preliminary clinical report is to suggest a novel treatment modality for periodontal bifurcation lesions of endodontic origin. The study consisted of 11 consecutive patients who presented with periodontal bifurcation lesions of endodontic origin (endo-perio lesions). All patients were followed-up for at least 12 months. Treatment included calcium hydroxide with iodine-potassium iodide placed in the root canals for 90 days followed by canal sealing with gutta-percha and cement during a second stage. Dentin bonding was used to seal the furcation floor to prevent the ingress of bacteria and their by-products to the furcation root area through the accessory canals. A radiographic examination showed complete healing of the periradicular lesion in all patients. Probing periodontal pocket depths decreased to 2 to 4 mm (mean 3.5 mm), and resolution of the furcation involvement was observed in post-operative clinical evaluations. The suggested treatment of endo-perio lesions may result in complete healing. Further studies are warranted. This treatment method improves both the disinfection of the bifurcation area and the healing process in endodontically treated teeth considered to be hopeless.

  13. Stem cells in endodontic therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sita Rama Kumar M, Madhu Varma K, Kalyan Satish R, Manikya kumar Nanduri.R, Murali Krishnam Raju S, Mohan rao

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells have the remarkable potential to develop into many different cell types in the body. Serving as a sort of repair system for the body, they can theoretically divide without limit to replenish other cells as long as the person or animal is still alive. However, progress in stem cell biology and tissue engineering may present new options for replacing heavily damaged or lost teeth, or even individual tooth structures. The goal of this review is to discuss the potential impact of dental pulp stem cells on regenerative endodontics.

  14. Introduction of a new removable adjustable intraoral maxillary distraction system for correction of maxillary hypoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Alvaro A; Polley, John W; Figueroa, Alexander L

    2009-09-01

    Distraction osteogenesis has become a treatment alternative to treat severe craniofacial skeletal dysplasias. A rigid external distraction device has been successfully used to advance the maxilla as well as the maxillary, orbital, and forehead complex (monobloc) in children as young as 2 years, adolescents, and adults. For this severe group of patients, the technique has been found to be simpler and safer than traditional surgical methods. Maxillary and midfacial advancement through distraction has been found to be extremely stable in the patients in whom the technique was used.The authors introduce an intraoral distractor for those patients requiring a moderate maxillary advancement. The advantages of the device include ease of insertion, vector adjustability, reactivation capabilities, and no need for second procedure for its removal.The above approaches have provided predictable and stable results. A detailed description of the device, necessary orthodontic and surgical procedures, case reports, and cephalometric outcomes are presented. The techniques can be applied alone or as an adjunct to traditional orthognathic and craniofacial surgical procedures.

  15. Evaluation of fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with prefabricated posts and composites with varying quantities of remaining coronal tooth structure Avaliação da resistência à fratura de dentes tratados endodonticamente restaurados com pinos pré-fabricados e resinas compostas variando o remanescente dentário coronal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murilo Pereira de Melo

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of remaining coronal tooth structure on endodontically treated teeth restored with prefabricated posts and two different composites for core build-up: dual-cured resin (Enforce Core and light-cured resin (Z-250. METHODS: Fourty freshly extracted canines were endodontically treated and divided into four groups: Group I - teeth with 3mm remaining coronal structure, restored with Enforce Core; Group II - teeth with 3mm remaining coronal structure, restored with Z-250; Group III - teeth with no remaining coronal structure, restored with Enforce; Group IV - teeth with no remaining coronal structure, restored with Z-250. After restoration, the teeth were embedded in acrylic resin and the fracture resistance was measured on a universal testing machine at 45 degrees to the long axis of the tooth until failure. RESULTS: Data were analyzed by two-way analysis of variance, which showed significant differences between groups (p=0.00. The Tukey test did not show significant differences between specimens with and without remaining coronal structure. Conversely, significant difference was observed between groups with different core build-up. The highest values of fracture resistance were found in the group restored with light-cured resin. SIGNIFICANCE: The remaining coronal tooth structure did not influence the resistance of endodontically treated teeth; however, the change of core build-up was able to modify this resistence.O objetivo desta pesquisa foi avaliar a influência do remanescente dentário coronal de dentes tratados endodonticamente, restaurados com pinos pré-fabricados e duas resinas como núcleos de preenchimento, uma de presa dual (Enforce Core e outra fotopolimerizável (Z-250. Foram utilizados 40 caninos superiores humanos extraídos, divididos em quatro grupos de 10 espécimes: Grupo l - com remanescente dentário coronal de 3mm e restaurados com Enforce Core; Grupo ll - com

  16. Classe II divisão 1 associada à deficiência transversal maxilar. Tratamento com disjuntor tipo Hyrax e aparelho de Herbst: relato de caso clínico Class II division 1 associated with maxillary transverse deficiency treated by Hyrax expander and Herbst appliance: clinical case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Leite Quaglio

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available A má oclusão de Classe II divisão 1 de Angle é, frequentemente, acompanhada da atresia maxilar. Esse problema transversal da maxila deve ser corrigido, sempre que possível, antes da correção anteroposterior, sendo que os aparelhos de expansão rápida são os mais utilizados para isso. Para a correção da Classe II, atualmente, os aparelhos funcionais fixos são os mais estudados e empregados, por serem aparelhos intrabucais e necessitarem de menor colaboração do paciente. O objetivo deste estudo é demonstrar a estabilidade dos resultados obtidos após seis anos de tratamento com expansor tipo Hyrax, seguido do aparelho funcional fixo de Herbst e aparelho fixo. Após uma revisão da literatura, será apresentado um caso clínico, com atresia maxilar e má oclusão de Classe II divisão 1, tratado com essa terapia. O tratamento foi realizado em um curto período de tempo, com resultados funcionais e estéticos satisfatórios e mantidos ao longo dos anos.The Angle Class II division 1 malocclusion is often accompanied by maxillary transverse deficiency. When ever is possible, this maxillary transverse problem must be corrected before the anteroposterior correction. The rapid maxillary expanders is the appliance more used to correct the transverse deficiency. For the Class II malocclusion correction the fixed functional appliances are more studied and used. They are a kind of intraoral appliance that almost don't need patient's collaboration. The aim of this study is to show the results' stability after six years of the orthodontic treatment with Hyrax expander, followed by Herbst and straight wire appliances. After a literature review, a clinical case with maxillary transverse deficiency and Class II division 1 malocclusion treated with this therapy is reported. The treatment duration was very brief and the results were functionally and esthetically satisfactory with a long-term stability.

  17. Rapid maxillary distraction protocol utilizing the halo distraction system and rigid internal fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Stephen B; Reid, Russell R; Burkey, Brooke; Bartlett, Scott P

    2007-09-01

    To shorten head frame wear time associated with external halo distraction (HD), we have adapted a protocol for maxillary distraction with the halo system that integrates plate fixation. All patients had a history of cleft lip and/or palate and maxillary retrusion > or = 8 mm. Five patients treated with this protocol and followed for at least 1 year were included in this study. The protocol included a 3-day latency period, variable maxillary distraction, and removal of the halo device with simultaneous rigid internal fixation. Two patients had a variable period of maxillomandibular fixation (MMF), which maintained the maxillary advancement and idealized intercuspal position while permitting further callus maturation. Cephalographs were obtained preoperatively, immediately following distractor removal, and 1 year after rigid internal fixation. The mean age at time of surgery was 18.7 years. The maxillary deficiency ranged from 8 to 15 mm (mean = 10.6 mm). All five patients demonstrated excellent occlusion. Cephalometric analysis 1-year post rigid internal fixation revealed minimal (maxillary distraction followed by MMF to maintain maxillary advancement may reduce halo device wear to 1 to 2 weeks. MMF optimizes occlusion by forcing the maxillary teeth into maximal intercuspal position. Rigid fixation is not only associated with less long-term relapse compared to nonrigid forms of fixation, but also minimizes the incidence of nonunion. This treatment protocol provides the advancement possible with distraction osteogenesis and the accuracy of orthognathic surgery, thereby minimizing external head frame wear.

  18. The use of internal maxillary distraction for maxillary hypoplasia: a preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Sickels, Joseph E; Madsen, Mathew J; Cunningham, Larry L; Bird, Douglas

    2006-12-01

    Distraction osteogenesis is a useful alternative to advance the maxilla in complicated cases of maxillary hypoplasia. The purpose of this article is to review the workup, experience, and preliminary results with the use of internal distraction osteogenesis for maxillary hypoplasia at one teaching institution. Over a 5-year period, more than 300 patients with craniofacial and dentofacial defects have undergone oral and maxillofacial surgery at our center to correct their skeletal discrepancies. Of these, 10 have had maxillary distraction osteogenesis done with internal distractors. Follow-up of 6 months or more was available for 8 patients. Stereolithographic models were used to bend distractors prior to surgery in 6 patients. Latency prior to the start of distraction was 3 to 7 days and varied with the age of the patient. Distraction occurred at approximately 1 mm per day with an average distraction length of 8.5 mm (range, 6-10 mm). Excellent occlusal results were obtained in 5 patients. Major complications including nonunion and failure to achieve acceptable occlusal results were observed in 3 patients. Minor complications including pain and loosening of the distracter devices were observed in 2 patients, but did not appear to affect the esthetic and functional results. Distraction osteogenesis is a useful alternative to traditional orthognathic surgery to treat maxillary hypoplasia. Internal distractions are attractive to patients, but are more difficult to place and can cause discomfort to patients when trying to achieve an ideal primary vector of distraction. Stereolithographic models can help with placement of the device. Changes in design of distractors may help with patient discomfort.

  19. Bilateral supernumerary primary maxillary canines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santanu Mukhopadhyay

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Supernumerary teeth are more common in the permanent than in primary dentition. In the primary dentition, the anomaly is most frequently observed in the maxillary lateral incisor region, followed by the maxillary midline where they are termed as mesiodens. Supernumerary teeth in the primary canine region are rare. This paper describes a rare case of nonsyndromic supernumerary primary maxillary canine distributed bilaterally in a 4-year-old boy. Both the supernumeraries resembled size and shape of normal primary canine. The right supplemental canine is high labially placed, whereas the left one is seen normally aligned in the dental arch distal to lateral incisor. One of the most significant sequelae of primary supernumerary teeth is their duplication in the permanent series. Radiographic examination of supernumerary primary canine did not indicate any such anomaly in the permanent dentition. The patient was kept under observation.

  20. Asymmetric extractions in a patient with a hopeless maxillary central incisor, followed by treatment with mini-implant anchorage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Min-Ho

    2018-05-01

    Premolar extraction is 1 option for treatment of patients with malocclusion and severe crowding or protrusion. When the patient has missing or hopeless teeth other than premolars, it is possible to consider removal of those teeth to use the space to decrease crowding. A 15-year-old girl sought treatment for severe crowding. She had already lost her maxillary right first premolar as a result of caries 1 year previously and had a hopeless maxillary right central incisor. Her mandibular left first molar still caused discomfort even after endodontic treatment. Extractions of the maxillary right central incisor and mandibular right first premolar and left first molar were chosen to resolve the occlusion problems. Orthodontic mini-implants were placed to translocate the maxillary left central incisor across the midpalatal suture to use the space in the maxillary right quadrant to relieve the crowding. Although a different extraction option was used in each quadrant, the final occlusion was acceptable. After debonding, porcelain crowns were placed on the anterior teeth to improve esthetics. The treatment result remained stable after 2 years of retention. Copyright © 2018 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Vector alignment in maxillary distraction osteogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uckan, Sina; Arman, Ayca; Bayram, Burak; Celik, Erkan

    2006-09-01

    Maxillary distraction osteogenesis is an alternative treatment of cleft patients with severe maxillary hypoplasia. The aim of this paper is to present the combined surgical/orthodontic treatment of a cleft lip and palate patient and to evaluate the maxillary distraction procedure and the distraction vector in high Le Fort I osteotomy.

  2. Treatment of maxillary cleft palate: Distraction osteogenesis vs. orthognathic surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachmiel, Adi; Even-Almos, Michal; Aizenbud, Dror

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to compare the treatment of hypoplastic, retruded maxillary cleft palate using distraction osteogenesis vs. orthognathic surgery in terms of stability and relapse, growth after distraction and soft tissue profile changes. Materials and Methods: The cleft patients showed anteroposterior maxillary hypoplasia with class III malocclusion and negative overjet resulting in a concave profile according to preoperative cephalometric measurements, dental relationship, and soft tissue analysis. The patients were divided in two groups of treatment : S0 eventeen were treated by orthognathic Le Fort I osteotomy fixed with four mini plates and 2 mm screws, and 19 were treated by maxillary distraction osteogenesis with rigid extraoral devices (RED) connected after a Le Fort I osteotomy. The rate of distraction was 1 mm per day to achieve Class I occlusion with slight overcorrection and to create facial profile convexity. Following a 10 week latency period the distraction devices were removed. Results: In the RED group the maxilla was advanced an average of 15.80 mm. The occlusion changed from class III to class I. The profile of the face changed from concave to convex. At a 1-year follow up the results were stable. The mean orthognathic movement was 8.4 mm. Conclusion: In mild maxillary deficiency a one stage orthognathic surgery is preferable. However, in patients requiring moderate to large advancements with significant structural deficiencies of the maxilla or in growing patients the distraction technique is preferred. PMID:23483803

  3. Endodontic misdiagnosis of periapical central giant cell granuloma: Report of case with 2 years of follow-up

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    Rahul Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Central giant cell granuloma is considered as reactive lesion of jaws possibly to intramedullary hemorrhage or trauma. It may manifest as radiolucencies anywhere in the mandible or maxilla. In rare cases, it can appear as a localized periapical area and mimic an endodontic lesion. This report presents a case where central giant cell granuloma was misdiagnosed as a periapical cyst in 20-year-old male and was treated by conventional endodontic treatment. However the lesion was refractory to endodontic treatment and proved to be central giant cell granuloma after surgical intervention and histopathological examination. The purpose of this case report is to emphasize on periodic follow-up of periapical lesions after endodontic treatment and surgical intervention if required.

  4. Effect of an intraoral retrusion plate on maxillary arch dimensions in complete bilateral cleft lip and palate patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterkamp, B.C.; van Oort, R.P.; Dijkstra, P.U.; Stellingsma, K.; Bierman, M.W.; de Bont, L.G.

    Objective: The aim of this study was to analyze maxillary arch dimensions in patients with complete bilateral cleft lip and palate treated with an intraoral retrusion plate prior to lip closure. Patients: The effects of the intraoral retrusion plate were evaluated on serially obtained maxillary

  5. The Sensitivity of Endodontic Enterococcus spp. Strains to Geranium Essential Oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łysakowska, Monika E; Sienkiewicz, Monika; Banaszek, Katarzyna; Sokołowski, Jerzy

    2015-12-21

    Enterococci are able to survive endodontic procedures and contribute to the failure of endodontic therapy. Thus, it is essential to identify novel ways of eradicating them from infected root canals. One such approach may be the use of antimicrobials such as plant essential oils. Enterococcal strains were isolated from endodontically treated teeth by standard microbiological methods. Susceptibility to antibiotics was evaluated by the disc-diffusion method. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of geranium essential oil was investigated by microdilution in 96-well microplates in Mueller Hinton Broth II. Biofilm eradication concentrations were checked in dentin tests. Geranium essential oil inhibited enterococcal strains at concentrations ranging from 1.8-4.5 mg/mL. No correlation was shown between resistance to antibiotics and the MICs of the test antimicrobials. The MICs of the test oil were lower than those found to show cytotoxic effects on the HMEC-1 cell line. Geranium essential oil eradicated enterococcal biofilm at concentrations of 150 mg/mL. Geranium essential oil inhibits the growth of endodontic enterococcal species at lower concentrations than those required to reach IC50 against the HMEC-1 cell line, and is effective against bacteria protected in biofilm at higher concentrations. In addition, bacteria do not develop resistance to essential oils. Hence, geranium essential oil represents a possible alternative to other antimicrobials during endodontic procedures.

  6. Maxillary sinus carcinoma: result of radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibuya, H.; Horiuchi, J.; Suzuki, S.; Shioda, S.; Enomoto, S.

    1984-01-01

    This hundred and sixteen patients with carcinoma of the maxillary sinus received primary therapy consisting of external beam irradiation alone or in combination with surgery and/or chemotherapy at the Department of Radiology, Tokyo Medical and Dental University Hospital, between 1953 and 1982. In our institution, methods of treating cancer of the maxillary sinus have been changed from time to time and showed different control rates and clinical courses. An actuarial 10-year survival rate of 21% has been obtained by the megavoltage irradiation alone as well as 34% actuarial 10-year survival rate by megavoltage irradiation with surgery. After the introduction of conservative surgery followed by conventional trimodal combination therapy, the local control rate has been improved. The amount of functional, cosmetic, and brain damages have been remarkably decreased by this mode of therapy. The actuarial five year survival rate was 67%. In addition, along with the improvement of the local control rate, the control of nodal and distant organ metastases have been emerging as one of the important contributions to the prognosis of this disease

  7. The management of an endodontically abscessed tooth: patient health state utility, decision-tree and economic analysis

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    Shepperd Sasha

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A frequent encounter in clinical practice is the middle-aged adult patient complaining of a toothache caused by the spread of a carious infection into the tooth's endodontic complex. Decisions about the range of treatment options (conventional crown with a post and core technique (CC, a single tooth implant (STI, a conventional dental bridge (CDB, and a partial removable denture (RPD have to balance the prognosis, utility and cost. Little is know about the utility patients attach to the different treatment options for an endontically abscessed mandibular molar and maxillary incisor. We measured patients' dental-health-state utilities and ranking preferences of the treatment options for these dental problems. Methods Forty school teachers ranked their preferences for conventional crown with a post and core technique, a single tooth implant, a conventional dental bridge, and a partial removable denture using a standard gamble and willingness to pay. Data previously reported on treatment prognosis and direct "out-of-pocket" costs were used in a decision-tree and economic analysis Results The Standard Gamble utilities for the restoration of a mandibular 1st molar with either the conventional crown (CC, single-tooth-implant (STI, conventional dental bridge (CDB or removable-partial-denture (RPD were 74.47 [± 6.91], 78.60 [± 5.19], 76.22 [± 5.78], 64.80 [± 8.1] respectively (p The standard gamble utilities for the restoration of a maxillary central incisor with a CC, STI, CDB and RPD were 88.50 [± 6.12], 90.68 [± 3.41], 89.78 [± 3.81] and 91.10 [± 3.57] respectively (p > 0.05. Their respective willingness-to-pay ($CDN were: 1,782.05 [± 361.42], 1,871.79 [± 349.44], 1,605.13 [± 348.10] and 1,351.28 [± 368.62]. A statistical difference was found between the utility of treating a maxillary central incisor and mandibular 1st-molar (p The expected-utility-value for a 5-year prosthetic survival was highest for the CDB and the

  8. Hemisection for treatment of an advanced endodontic-periodontal lesion: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haueisen, H; Heidemann, D

    2002-06-01

    To emphasize the importance of primary endodontic treatment when dealing with endo-perio lesions and to demonstrate the considerable healing potential of the endodontic aspect. After several years of unsuccessful symptomatic periodontal treatment, an advanced endo-perio lesion on a right-mandibular first molar was successfully treated by root-canal treatment and hemisection after the re-evaluation of the lesion. This successful treatment appeared to have a positive effect on the patient's general well-being. The origin of a combined endo-perio lesion is indicated by its clinical and radiographic appearance. The periodontal situation is often misinterpreted. The prognosis for the endodontic element of treatment is excellent. Local pathologic processes in the oral cavity may affect a patient's general health.

  9. The solutions to your problems in endodontic retreatment and microsurgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslie Ang

    2016-06-01

    How to find the 4th canal in the upper Second molars in 60% of your patients, How to find the 4th canal in the upper First molars in 90% of your patients, How to retreat canals root filled with metal posts, fiber posts, gutta percha, hard canal cement & thermafils, How to remove fractured posts and posts cemented with resin cements. Understand why and how to perform Endodontic Surgery: How to treat large periapical lesions microsurgically, How to use the latest Ultrasonic technology under the Surgical Operating Microscope in all forms of microsurgery, Learn about the modern concepts in transplants, apicoectomies and intentional replantations.

  10. Endodontic periapical lesion-induced mental nerve paresthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadmehr, Elham; Shekarchizade, Neda

    2015-01-01

    Paresthesia is a burning or prickling sensation or partial numbness, resulting from neural injury. The symptoms can vary from mild neurosensory dysfunction to total loss of sensation in the innervated area. Only a few cases have described apical periodontitis to be the etiological factor of impaired sensation in the area innervated by the inferior alveolar and mental nerves. The aim of the present paper is to report a case of periapical lesion-induced paresthesia in the innervation area of the mental nerve, which was successfully treated with endodontic retreatment. PMID:25878687

  11. Photodynamic therapy in endodontics: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trindade, Alessandra Cesar; De Figueiredo, José Antônio Poli; Steier, Liviu; Weber, João Batista Blessmann

    2015-03-01

    Recently, several in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated promising results about the use of photodynamic therapy during root canal system disinfection. However, there is no consensus on a standard protocol for its incorporation during root canal treatment. The purpose of this study was to summarize the results of research on photodynamic therapy in endodontics published in peer-reviewed journals. A review of pertinent literature was conducted using the PubMed database, and data obtained were categorized into sections in terms of relevant topics. Studies conducted in recent years highlighted the antimicrobial potential of photodynamic therapy in endodontics. However, most of these studies were not able to confirm a significant improvement in root canal disinfection for photodynamic therapy as a substitute for current disinfection methods. Its indication as an excellent adjunct to conventional endodontic therapy is well documented, however. Data suggest the need for protocol adjustments or new photosensitizer formulations to enhance photodynamic therapy predictability in endodontics.

  12. Endodontic flare-ups: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Vanessa de Oliveira

    2010-11-01

    The objective of this prospective clinical study was to evaluate the incidence of flare-ups (pain and/or swelling requiring endodontic interappointment and emergency treatment) and identify the risk factors associated with their occurrence in patients who received endodontic treatment from June 2006 to June 2007 at the endodontics clinic of the São Paulo Dental Association (APCD), Jardim Paulista branch, São Paulo, Brazil. The incidence of flare-ups was 1.71% out of 408 teeth that had received endodontic therapy. Statistical analysis using the chi-squared test (P flare-up rate and the presence of a periradicular radiolucency. Copyright © 2010 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Endodontic management of patients with systemic complications

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    Kalaiselvam Rajeswari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Successful endodontic practice requires complete knowledge about the various medical conditions and appropriateness in planning treatment as per the need with effective safety measures. This review focuses on a number of systemic complications encountered in endodontic practice and directions to be followed for avoiding potential complications. A detailed PubMed search was carried out using specific keywords, and 25 articles were referred for finalizing the content.

  14. Endo-periodontal lesion – endodontic approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jivoinovici, R; Suciu, I; Dimitriu, B; Perlea, P; Bartok, R; Malita, M; Ionescu, C

    2014-01-01

    Endo-perio lesions might be interdependent because of the vascular and anatomic connections between the pulp and the periodontium. The aim of this study is to emphasise that primary endodontic lesion heals after a proper instrumentation, disinfection and sealing of the endodontic space. The primary endodontic lesion with a secondary periodontal involvement first requires an endodontic therapy and, in the second stage, a periodontal therapy. The prognosis is good, with an adequate root canal treatment; it depends on the severity of the periodontal disease, appropriate healing time and the response to the treatment. A correct diagnosis is sometimes difficult; an accurate identification of the etiologic factors is important for an adequate treatment. Primary perio-endo lesion may heal after a proper disinfection and sealing of the endodontic system, the one-year follow-up radiograph showing bonny repair. Invasive periodontal procedures should be avoided at that moment. The microorganisms and by-products from the infected root canal may cross accessory and furcal canals and determine sinus tract and loss of attachment. In both clinical cases presented in this article, successful healing was obtained after a proper disinfection and sealing of the endodontic system. PMID:25713618

  15. Endo-periodontal lesion--endodontic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jivoinovici, R; Suciu, I; Dimitriu, B; Perlea, P; Bartok, R; Malita, M; Ionescu, C

    2014-01-01

    Endo-perio lesions might be interdependent because of the vascular and anatomic connections between the pulp and the periodontium. The aim of this study is to emphasise that primary endodontic lesion heals after a proper instrumentation, disinfection and sealing of the endodontic space. The primary endodontic lesion with a secondary periodontal involvement first requires an endodontic therapy and, in the second stage, a periodontal therapy. The prognosis is good, with an adequate root canal treatment; it depends on the severity of the periodontal disease, appropriate healing time and the response to the treatment. A correct diagnosis is sometimes difficult; an accurate identification of the etiologic factors is important for an adequate treatment. Primary perio-endo lesion may heal after a proper disinfection and sealing of the endodontic system, the one-year follow-up radiograph showing bonny repair. Invasive periodontal procedures should be avoided at that moment. The microorganisms and by-products from the infected root canal may cross accessory and furcal canals and determine sinus tract and loss of attachment. In both clinical cases presented in this article, successful healing was obtained after a proper disinfection and sealing of the endodontic system.

  16. A Case of Maxillary Protrusion with Congenitally Missing Canine Teeth in the Mandible

    OpenAIRE

    松井, 啓至; 酒徳, 明彦

    1996-01-01

    A patient that had a maxillary protrusion with congenitally missing canine teeth in the mandible was successfully treated with the extraction of the maxillary first premolars. The patient's cooperation in wearing headgear appliance was highly favorable. Her profile changes were pronounced and esthetically pleasing. A review of her post-treatment records revealed an excellent esthetic and occlusal result even though the first premolars were aligned instead of the canine teeth in the mandible. ...

  17. A survey of attitude and opinions of endodontic residents towards regenerative endodontics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utneja, Shivani; Nawal, Ruchika Roongta; Ansari, Mohammed Irfan; Talwar, Sangeeta; Verma, Mahesh

    2013-01-01

    Aim: The objective of this survey was to study the level of awareness, current state of knowledge and opinions towards regenerative endodontic treatments amongst the endodontic residents of India. Settings and Design: Questionnaire based survey was designed. Materials and Methods: After approval from the organizing committee of 26th Federation of Operative Dentistry of India and 19th Indian Endodontic Society National conference 2011, 200 copies of the questionnaire were circulated amongst the endodontic residents in conservative dentistry and endodontics at various colleges across the country about regenerative endodontic procedures. The survey included profile of the respondents and consisted of 23 questions about their knowledge, attitude and opinions regarding use of these procedures as part of future dental treatment. Results: The survey showed that half the participants (50.6%) had received continued education in stem cells and/or regenerative dental treatments. The majority of participants were of the opinion (86.6%) that regenerative therapy should be incorporated into dentistry, and most of them (88%) were willing to acquire training in learning this new treatment strategy. The results indicated that half of the participants (52.6%) were already using some type of regenerative therapy in their clinical practice; however, with a majority of these limited to use of membranes, scaffolds or bioactive materials. Conclusions: These results reflect that endodontic residents are optimistic about the use of regenerative endodontic procedures; however, a need for more research and training was felt. PMID:23956532

  18. Treatment of traumatized maxillary central incisors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Kuo

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic injury to the upper anterior teeth is not uncommon in young children. Dental ankylosis frequently occurs when teeth are traumatically luxated or replanted after being avulsed. Orthodontic movement of a traumatized tooth is difficult, especially when treating an ankylosed tooth without surgical luxation and distraction osteogenesis. This report describes a case of a patient with class I crowded malocclusion and labially displaced and intruded traumatized maxillary incisors. The protruded traumatized incisors were successfully brought to an acceptable position with acceptable gingival esthetics through the use of simple orthodontic traction combined with first-premolar extraction. An acceptable overbite and overjet were achieved within 14 months after completion of orthodontic treatment.

  19. Perpendicular serial maxillary distraction osteogenesis in cleft lip and palate patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ylikontiola, Leena P; Sándor, George K; Harila, Virpi

    2015-01-01

    Cleft lip and palate patients often have a retruded maxilla with a severely narrowed deficient maxillary arch. This report aims to describe the management of severe maxillary retrusion and constriction in cleft lip and palate patients using distraction osteogenesis applied in serial sequence in two directions perpendicular to each other. Two adult male cleft lip and palate patients were treated with maxillary distraction osteogenesis in two stages. In the first stage, surgically assisted rapid palatal expansion with a tooth-borne device was performed to significantly expand the maxillary arch in the transverse dimension. After the teeth were orthodontically aligned, the horizontal distraction of the maxilla was made by two internal maxillary distraction devices. In the first patient, the maxilla was initially widened by 11 mm and then distracted forward by 20 mm. Despite the breakage of the shaft of one of the two distractors at the end of distraction, a satisfactory occlusion was found at the time of distractor device removal. The maxillary position has remained stable through 8 years of follow-up. In the second patient, the palate was widened by 14 mm and the maxilla was distracted forward by 22 mm. The maxillary position has remained stable through 3 years of follow-up. Sequential serial distraction of maxilla in two planes perpendicular to each other is a safe and stable approach for the treatment of cleft lip and palate patients with severe transverse and anteroposterior discrepancies.

  20. Anterior maxillary segmental distraction in the treatment of severe maxillary hypoplasia secondary to cleft lip and palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongliang; Dai, Jiewen; Si, Jiawen; Zhang, Jianfei; Wang, Minjiao; Shen, Steve Guofang; Yu, Hongbo

    2015-01-01

    Anterior maxillary segmental distraction (AMSD) is an effective surgical procedure in the treatment of maxillary hypoplasia secondary to cleft lip and palate. Its unique advantage of preserving velopharyngeal function makes this procedure widely applied. In this study, the application of AMSD was described and its long-term stability was explored. Eight patients with severe maxillary hypoplasia secondary to CLP were included in this study. They were treated with AMSD using rigid external distraction (RED) device. Cephalometric analysis was performed twice at three time points for evaluation: before surgery (T1), after distraction (T2), and 2 years after treatment (T3). One-way analysis of variance was used to assess the differences statistically. All the distractions completed smoothly, and maxilla was distracted efficiently. The value of SNA, NA-FH, Ptm-A, U1-PP, overjet and PP (ANS-PNS) increased significantly after the AMSD procedure (P 0.05). Changes of palatopharyngeal depth and soft palatal length were insignificant. AMSD with RED device provided an effective way to correct maxillary hypoplasia secondary to CLP, extended the palatal and arch length, avoided damage on velopharyngeal closure function and reduced the relapse rate. It is a promising and valuable technique in this potentially complicated procedure.

  1. Morphological evaluation of maxillary second molars with fused roots: a micro-CT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordinola-Zapata, R; Martins, J N R; Bramante, C M; Villas-Boas, M H; Duarte, M H; Versiani, M A

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate the internal and external morphologies of fused-rooted maxillary second molars by means of micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) analysis. A total of 100 fused-rooted maxillary second molars from a Brazilian subpopulation were divided into six groups according to the root morphology. The samples were scanned at a resolution of 19.6 μm and evaluated with regard to the external morphology of the roots, the root canal configuration, the percentage frequency of C-shaped canals and isthmuses, as well as the morphology of the root canal system at 1, 2 and 3 mm from the anatomical apex of the fused roots. The most prevalent root canal fusions were type 1, mesiobuccal root fused with distobuccal root (32%), followed by type 3, DB root fused with P root (27%), and type 4, MB root fused with DB root, and P root fused with MB or DB roots (21%). The prevalence of C-shaped root canal systems were 22%. Depending on the type of root fusion, the percentage frequency of isthmuses in the apical level varied from 9.3% to 42.8%, whilst the presence of apical deltas ranged from 18.5% to 57.1% of teeth. The root canal system of maxillary second molars with fused roots may have a high incidence of merging canals, isthmuses, apical deltas and C-shaped configurations. © 2017 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Morphology of the Physiological Apical Foramen in Maxillary and Mandibular First Molars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abarca, J.; Zaror, C.; Monardes, H.; Hermosilla, V.; Muñoz, C.; Cantin, M.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Information regarding the anatomy of the physiological apical foramen is limited. Knowing its diameter and shapes contributes to clinical work, specifically to the cleaning and shaping of the apical third. The aim of this ex vivo study was to determine the minimum and maximum diameters and shape of the physiological apical foramen in the roots of maxillary and mandibular first molars. A descriptive study was conducted on 89 recently extracted first molars. Roots 3–5 mm from the apex were sectioned and prepared for analysis at 40× magnification. The minimum and maximum diameters of each physiological foramen were measured using the program Motic Images plus 2.0 ML. The shape of the foramina, classified as round, oval or irregular, was determined by the difference between the maximum and minimum diameters. A total of 174 physiological foramina were analyzed. The average of the minimum and maximum diameters was between 0.24–0.33 mm in maxillary first molars and between 0.25–0.33 mm in mandibular first molars. In maxillary molars, the most common shape of the foramen was oval (50%), then irregular (32%), then round (18%). In mandibular molars, the oval shape was also the most frequent (59%), followed by irregular (23%) and round (18%). The findings of this study regarding the morphology of physiological apical foramina in first molars make it easier for the operator to choose the appropriately-sized instruments to perform endodontic therapy successfully. PMID:25937698

  3. Morphology of the Physiological Apical Foramen in Maxillary and Mandibular First Molars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abarca, J; Zaror, C; Monardes, H; Hermosilla, V; Muñoz, C; Cantin, M

    2014-06-01

    Information regarding the anatomy of the physiological apical foramen is limited. Knowing its diameter and shapes contributes to clinical work, specifically to the cleaning and shaping of the apical third. The aim of this ex vivo study was to determine the minimum and maximum diameters and shape of the physiological apical foramen in the roots of maxillary and mandibular first molars. A descriptive study was conducted on 89 recently extracted first molars. Roots 3-5 mm from the apex were sectioned and prepared for analysis at 40× magnification. The minimum and maximum diameters of each physiological foramen were measured using the program Motic Images plus 2.0 ML. The shape of the foramina, classified as round, oval or irregular, was determined by the difference between the maximum and minimum diameters. A total of 174 physiological foramina were analyzed. The average of the minimum and maximum diameters was between 0.24-0.33 mm in maxillary first molars and between 0.25-0.33 mm in mandibular first molars. In maxillary molars, the most common shape of the foramen was oval (50%), then irregular (32%), then round (18%). In mandibular molars, the oval shape was also the most frequent (59%), followed by irregular (23%) and round (18%). The findings of this study regarding the morphology of physiological apical foramina in first molars make it easier for the operator to choose the appropriately-sized instruments to perform endodontic therapy successfully.

  4. Cone beam computed tomography evaluation of maxillary molar root canal morphology in a Turkish Cypriot population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalender, Atakan; Aksoy, Umut; Basmaci, Fatma; Celikten, Berkan; Tufenkci, Pelin; Kelahmet, Umay; Orhan, Kaan

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to review, analyse and characterize the root canal morphology of maxillary molars, using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), in a group of the Turkish Cypriot population. The sample for this cross-sectional study consisted of retrospective evaluation of CBCT scans of 290 adult patients (age range 1680). The number of roots and their morphology, the number of canals per tooth and the root canal configurations were also classified according to the method of Vertucci. Pearson’s chi-square test was performed for canal configurations, sides and gender (p < 0.05). Among the 373 first molars, there was no single-rooted specimen, 2 (0.53%) teeth had 2 roots, 365 (97.8%) teeth had 3 roots and 6 ones (1.6%) had 4 roots. Among the 438 second molars, 14 (3.1%) were single-rooted, 26 (5.9%) teeth had 2 roots, 392 (89.4%) teeth had 3 roots and 6 teeth (1.3%) had 4 roots. No sex difference was found in the frequency of additional canals both in the maxillary first and second molars. Occurrence of additional canals did not differ with age. These results provide detailed knowledge of the root canal anatomy of the maxillary molar teeth in this particular population, which is of clinical importance for dental professionals when performing endodontic treatment

  5. The role of proper treatment of maxillary sinusitis in the healing of persistent oroantral fistula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David B. Kamadjaja

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oroantral communication (OAC is one of the possible complications after extraction of the upper teeth. If not identified and treated properly, a large OAC may develop into oroantral fistula (OAF which means that there is a permanent epithelium-lined communication between antrum and oral cavity. Such fistulas may cause ingress of microorganism from oral cavity into the antrum leading to maxillary sinusitis. Oroantral fistula usually persists if the infection in the maxillary antrum is not eliminated. Therefore, treatment of oroantral fistula should include management of maxillary sinusitis in which surgical closure of oroantral fistula should be done only when the sinusitis has been cured. Purpose: This case report emphasizes on the importance of proper management of maxillary sinusitis in the healing of oroantral fistula. Case: A case of an oroantral fistula following removal of upper left third molar is presented. As the maxillary sinusitis was not identified pre-operatively, two surgical procedures to close the fistula had ended up in dehiscence. Case management: The diagnosis of maxillary sinusitis was finally made and the sinusitis subsequently treated with combination of trans-alveolar sinus wash out, insertion of an acrylic splint, and two series of nasal and sinus physiotherapy procedures. The size of the defect decreased gradually during the treatment of the sinusitis and finally closed up without any further surgical intervention. Conclusion: This case report points out that it is important to detect intraoperatively an antral perforation after any surgery of the maxillary teeth and to close any oroantral communication as early as possible and that it is important to treat properly any pre-existing maxillary sinusitis before any surgical method is done to close the fistula.

  6. [Discussion on combined periodontic-endodontic lesion type].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kai; Zhou, Li

    2008-02-01

    Combined the elaboration on periodontic-endodontic lesion in the textbook Periodontics with the deficiencies existed in the clinical and teaching work and demonstrated the understanding on the type of the combined periodontic-endodontic lesion, and suggested the viewpoint of no sub-type of combined periodontic-endodontic lesion. Only regard the type of pulp disease that induced by periodontal disease as genuine combined periodontic-endodontic lesion.

  7. [Test your decision making skills. When should endodontic treatment be redone?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryanpour, S; D'Hoore, W; Van Nieuwenhuysen, J P

    1999-01-01

    Research has shown wide variations in dentists' clinical attitude towards root canal treated teeth. Simulated cases are used as tools in the investigation of practitioners' clinical behavior and decision making. We therefore used simulated cases (clinical histories and radiographs) of 14 endodontically treated teeth to: (1) determine the predominant proposed treatment strategy for each case, (2) evaluate the consensus, if any, among practitioners, (3) identify pathology and dentist factors influencing the treatment choice.

  8. Radiation-induced maxillary cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haguma, Naoyuki; Shirane, Makoto; Hirakawa, Katsuhiro; Suzuki, Mamoru; Yajin, Kouji; Harada, Yasuo

    1990-01-01

    A maxillary cancer (T 2 N 0 M 0 ) recurred twice, five years and 18 years after the initial therapy. The first therapy was continuous intra-arterial infusion of 5-FU (5700 mg) and irradiation (50 Gy). The second therapy was intravenous infusion of 5-FU (4500 mg) and irradiation (46 Gy). The third therapy was partial maxillectomy and LASER cauterization. In this particular case local inflammation due to remaining food and repeated irradiation might have been responsible for the recurrences. (author)

  9. Nasopharyngeal cancer through maxillary swing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacheco Ojeda, Luis; Chicaiza Acosta, Jorge; Ulloa Miranda, Darwin

    2006-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal cancer is very rare in Ecuador. Radiotherapy associated to concurrent chemotherapy is currently the standard treatment. In case of tumor recurrence, these two treatment modalities are usually not effective. For this reason, several studies about the satisfactory results of salvage surgery in terms of locoregional control of the disease, have appeared recently in the literature. We report our first experience of surgical salvage resection of a recurrent tumor through an anterolateral approach (maxillary swing) with an initial satisfactory result. (The author)

  10. Management of an Endodontic Infection with an Extra Oral Sinus Tract in a Single Visit: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Satish Kumar, Krishnamurthy; Subbiya, Arunajatesan; Vivekanandhan, Paramasivam; Prakash, Venkatachalam; Tamilselvi, Ramachandran

    2013-01-01

    Chronic apical periodontitis can drain through a sinus tract, which may be intra-oral or extra-oral, though an intra-oral drainage is more common. Though such cases can be treated in a single visit, there is no report on a single visit endodontic treatment for a chronic apical periodontitis with a draining sinus. This case report demonstrates that the apical periodontitis with a cutaneous sinus tract can be successfully treated endodontically as a single visit procedure, if the patient is in ...

  11. Skeletal response to maxillary protraction with and without maxillary expansion: a finite element study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Pawan; Valiathan, Ashima; Adhikari, Raviraj

    2009-06-01

    The purpose of this finite element study was to evaluate biomechanically 2 treatment modalities-maxillary protraction alone and in combination with maxillary expansion-by comparing the displacement of various craniofacial structures. Two 3-dimensional analytical models were developed from sequential computed tomography scan images taken at 2.5-mm intervals of a dry young skull. AutoCAD software (2004 version, Autodesk, San Rafael, Calif) and ANSYS software (version 10, Belcan Engineering Group, Cincinnati, Ohio) were used. The model consisted of 108,799 solid 10 node 92 elements, 193,633 nodes, and 580,899 degrees of freedom. In the first model, maxillary protraction forces were simulated by applying 1 kg of anterior force 30 degrees downward to the palatal plane. In the second model, a 4-mm midpalatal suture opening and maxillary protraction were simulated. Forward displacement of the nasomaxillary complex with upward and forward rotation was observed with maxillary protraction alone. No rotational tendency was noted when protraction was carried out with 4 mm of transverse expansion. A tendency for anterior maxillary constriction after maxillary protraction was evident. The amounts of displacement in the frontal, vertical, and lateral directions with midpalatal suture opening were greater compared with no opening of the midpalatal suture. The forward and downward displacements of the nasomaxillary complex with maxillary protraction and maxillary expansion more closely approximated the natural growth direction of the maxilla. Displacements of craniofacial structures were more favorable for the treatment of skeletal Class III maxillary retrognathia when maxillary protraction was used with maxillary expansion. Hence, biomechanically, maxillary protraction combined with maxillary expansion appears to be a superior treatment modality for the treatment of maxillary retrognathia than maxillary protraction alone.

  12. Current overview on challenges in regenerative endodontics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Ramta; Jain, Aditya; Mittal, Sunandan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Regenerative endodontics provides hope of converting the non-vital tooth into vital once again. It focuses on substituting traumatized and pathological pulp with functional pulp tissue. Current regenerative procedures successfully produce root development but still fail to re-establish real pulp tissue and give unpredictable results. There are several drawbacks that need to be addressed to improve the quality and efficiency of the treatment. Aim: The aim of this review article is to discuss major priorities that ought to be dealt before applications of regenerative endodontics flourish the clinical practice. Materials and Methods: A web-based research on MEDLINE was done using filter terms Review, published in the last 10 years and Dental journals. Keywords used for research were “regenerative endodontics,” “dental stem cells,” “growth factor regeneration,” “scaffolds,” and “challenges in regeneration.” This review article screened about 150 articles and then the relevant information was compiled. Results: Inspite of the impressive growth in regenerative endodontic field, there are certain loopholes in the existing treatment protocols that might sometimes result in undesired and unpredictable outcomes. Conclusion: Considerable research and development efforts are required to improve and update existing regenerative endodontic strategies to make it an effective, safe, and biological mode to save teeth. PMID:25657518

  13. Regenerative endodontics--Creating new horizons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhillon, Harnoor; Kaushik, Mamta; Sharma, Roshni

    2016-05-01

    Trauma to the dental pulp, physical or microbiologic, can lead to inflammation of the pulp followed by necrosis. The current treatment modality for such cases is non-surgical root canal treatment. The damaged tissue is extirpated and the root canal system prepared. It is then obturated with an inert material such a gutta percha. In spite of advances in techniques and materials, 10%-15% of the cases may end in failure of treatment. Regenerative endodontics combines principles of endodontics, cell biology, and tissue engineering to provide an ideal treatment for inflamed and necrotic pulp. It utilizes mesenchymal stem cells, growth factors, and organ tissue culture to provide treatment. Potential treatment modalities include induction of blood clot for pulp revascularization, scaffold aided regeneration, and pulp implantation. Although in its infancy, successful treatment of damaged pulp tissue has been performed using principles of regenerative endodontics. This field is dynamic and exciting with the ability to shape the future of endodontics. This article highlights the fundamental concepts, protocol for treatment, and possible avenues for research in regenerative endodontics. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. One-appointment endodontic therapy: biological considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Louis M; Lin, Jarshen; Rosenberg, Paul A

    2007-11-01

    The authors conducted a literature review to present the best available biological evidence concerning one-appointment endodontic therapy for asymptomatic teeth with apical periodontitis. Because of recent advances in technology, such as rotary engines and nickel-titanium instruments, some practitioners are performing one-appointment endodontic therapy for asymptomatic teeth with apical periodontitis. The authors reviewed the literature, which revealed only a small number of randomized, controlled clinical trials that have been conducted on one-appointment versus multiple-appointment endodontic therapy. As the apical canal preparation is enlarged, a greater percentage of bacteria is eradicated from infected root canals. In addition, sufficiently large apical root canal enlargement facilitates the delivery of antimicrobial irrigant to the apical portion of the canal. However, an association between positive or negative preobturation root canal culture results and the outcome of endodontic treatment has not been well-established. The best available evidence, based on a systematic literature review, indicates that one-appointment endodontic therapy may be feasible in selected cases of apical periodontitis in asymptomatic teeth. However, additional randomized, controlled clinical trials are required.

  15. Effect of Ibuprofen on masking endodontic diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, Jason K; McClanahan, Scott B; Khan, Asma A; Lunos, Scott; Bowles, Walter R

    2014-08-01

    An accurate diagnosis is of upmost importance before initiating endodontic treatment; yet, there are occasions when the practitioner cannot reproduce the patient's chief complaint because the patient has become asymptomatic. Ibuprofen taken beforehand may "mask" or eliminate the patient's symptoms. In fact, 64%-83% of patients with dental pain take analgesics before seeing a dentist. The purpose of this study was to examine the possible "masking" effect of ibuprofen on endodontic diagnostic tests. Forty-two patients with endodontic pain underwent testing (cold, percussion, palpation, and bite force measurement) and then received either placebo or 800 mg ibuprofen. Both patients and operators were blinded to the medication received. One hour later, diagnostic testing was repeated and compared with pretreatment testing. Ibuprofen affected testing values for vital teeth by masking palpation 40%, percussion 25%, and cold 25% on affected teeth with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis and symptomatic apical periodontitis. There was no observed masking effect in the placebo group on palpation, percussion, or cold values. When nonvital teeth were included, the masking effect of ibuprofen was decreased. However, little masking occurred with the bite force measurement differences. Analgesics taken before the dental appointment can affect endodontic diagnostic testing results. Bite force measurements can assist in identifying the offending tooth in cases in which analgesics "mask" the endodontic diagnosis. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Persistent infection by Staphylococcus epidermidis in endodontic flare-up: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Simone Helena Ferreira; de Vasconcelos, Rafaela Andrade; Cavalcanti, Bruno das Neves; Camargo, Carlos Henrique Ribeiro

    2016-01-01

    Endodontic flare-ups are challenging situations and may result from selective growth of specific bacterial species; microbial cultures and antibiograms should be used to allow faster, successful management of refractory lesions. A 47-year-old man reported pain on percussion after uncomplicated retreatment of the maxillary left canine for prosthetic purposes. In the following days, pain dramatically increased, leading to removal of the filling and use of intracanal medication. After many unsuccessful attempts to resolve the problem, a microbial culture of the root canal detected the presence of Staphylococcus epidermidis. An antibiogram determined the best drug combination to control this infection: tetracycline (oxytetracycline hydrochloride, 500 mg orally) plus third-generation cephalosporin (ceftriaxone, 1 g intramuscularly). Once the infection was controlled, the root canal was obturated. There was a reduction in the area of radiolucency, and the patient reported no pain at a 2-year follow-up.

  17. Single visit nonsurgical endodontic therapy for periapical cysts: A clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ipsita Maity

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The aim of this study was to assess the outcome of single sitting root canal treatment (RCT of asymptomatic teeth with periapical cysts. Materials and Methods: Ten maxillary anterior teeth showing periapical lesion on the radiograph was further screened by ultrasound with color power Doppler (CPD for confirmation of a cyst. The average dimension of the lesions ranged from 1.3 to 1.9 cm. Single sitting RCT was performed on all the selected teeth. Postoperative healing was monitored at regular interval of 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year by using subjective feedback, radiograph, and ultrasound with CPD study. Results: Eight among the ten cases showed either signs of complete healing or healing in progress by the end of 6-12 months. Conclusions: It was observed that single sitting nonsurgical endodontic management of asymptomatic teeth with periapical cyst confirmed by ultrasound was successful in selected cases.

  18. Single visit nonsurgical endodontic therapy for periapical cysts: A clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, Ipsita; Meena, N; Kumari, R Anitha

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the outcome of single sitting root canal treatment (RCT) of asymptomatic teeth with periapical cysts. Ten maxillary anterior teeth showing periapical lesion on the radiograph was further screened by ultrasound with color power Doppler (CPD) for confirmation of a cyst. The average dimension of the lesions ranged from 1.3 to 1.9 cm. Single sitting RCT was performed on all the selected teeth. Postoperative healing was monitored at regular interval of 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year by using subjective feedback, radiograph, and ultrasound with CPD study. Eight among the ten cases showed either signs of complete healing or healing in progress by the end of 6-12 months. It was observed that single sitting nonsurgical endodontic management of asymptomatic teeth with periapical cyst confirmed by ultrasound was successful in selected cases.

  19. Correction of complete maxillary crossbite with severe crowding using Hyrax expansion and fixed appliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wangsrimongkol, Tasanee; Manosudprasit, Montian; Pisek, Poonsak; Leelasinjaroen, Pornnapha

    2013-09-01

    An 18-year-old Thai man who presented with a secondary cleft palate, maxillary hypoplasia and severe crowding was treated by rapid maxillary expansion and fixed orthodontic appliances. Initial assessment found skeletal Class III malrelationship and dental Class II malocclusion with anterior and bilateral posterior crossbites. Camouflage orthodontic treatment was planned using a rapid maxillary expansion appliance and correcting crowding with extraction all four premolar teeth. A Hyrax appliance and vertical loop arch wire were placed for maxillary arch expansion of 9.5 mms at first molars and canines, and 5.5 mms at the premolars and obtained positive overjet. Both acceptable skeletal and soft tissue relationships and satisfactory occlusion were produced. After 14 months of postoperative follow-up, the occlusal result was stable and no skeletal reversals could be detected.

  20. Periapical and endodontic status scale based on periapical bone lesions and endodontic treatment quality evaluation using cone-beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venskutonis, Tadas; Plotino, Gianluca; Tocci, Luigi; Gambarini, Gianluca; Maminskas, Julius; Juodzbalys, Gintaras

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to present a new periapical and endodontic status scale (PESS) that is based on the complex periapical index (COPI), which was designed for the identification and classification of periapical bone lesions in cases of apical periodontitis, and the endodontically treated tooth index, which was designed for endodontic treatment quality evaluation by means of cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) analysis. Periapical and endodontic status parameters were selected from the already known indexes and scientific literature for radiologic evaluation. Radiographic images (CBCT imaging, digital orthopantomography [DOR], and digital periapical radiography) from 55 patients were analyzed. All parameters were evaluated on CBCT, DOR, and digital periapical radiographic images by 2 external observers. The statistical analysis was performed with software SPSS version 19.0 (SPSS Inc, Chicago, IL). Chi-square tests were used to compare frequencies of qualitative variables. The level of significance was set at P ≤ .05. Overall intraobserver and interobserver agreements were very good and good, respectively. CBCT analysis found more lesions and lesions of bigger dimension (P < .001). CBCT imaging was also superior in locating lesions in the apical part on the side compared with DOR and in the diagnosis of cortical bone destruction compared with both methods (P < .001). Through CBCT analysis, more root canals and more canals associated with lesions were found. The most informative and reproducible periapical and endodontic status parameters were selected, and a new PESS was proposed. The classification proposed in the present study seems to be reproducible and objective and adds helpful information with respect to the existing indexes. Future studies need to be conducted to validate PESS. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Multidisciplinary treatment of a fractured maxillary central incisor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praveen Kumar Neela

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Subgingivally fractured incisors are still a challenge to treat. Restoration of severely damaged teeth requires careful attention and comprehensive preplanned treatment. Here, a patient who had traumatic injury to the upper left central incisor which led to an oblique fracture involving enamel, dental and extending into the root below the gingival margin was saved from extraction by accelerated forced eruption of a root portion, allowing placement of crown, and eliminating the need for a fixed partial denture. A tooth otherwise would have gone for extraction routinely was thus saved and restored through a multidisciplinary approach by a combined orthodontic, periodontal and endodontic treatment.

  2. Apical instrumentation in endodontic therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurniasri Darliana

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Cleaning and shaping of the root canal as the foundation for successful endodontic therapy. Cleaning of the root canal as the removal of all the contents of the root canal systems before and during shaping. Mechanical cleaning as the most important part of the root canal therapy. Instrumentation of the apical region has long been considered to be an essential component in the cleaning and shaping process. The apical area as the critical zone for instrumentation. The apical portion of the root canal system can retain microorganisms that could potentially cause periradicular inflammation. The nickel-titanium rotary instrumentation system to facilitate the cleaning and shaping process. Larger instrumentation sizes not only allow proper irrigation but also significantly decrease remaining bacteria in the canal system. How the larger apical sizes preparation must be achieved to clinical success. This paper will describe the major factors impacting the selection of final apical size, the factors are the anatomy of the apical constriction, root canal diameter, apical instrumentation, and bacteria in dentin tubuli.

  3. Lymph node metastasis in maxillary sinus carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le, Q.-T.; Fu, Karen K.; Kaplan, Michael J.; Terris, David J.; Fee, Willard E.; Goffinet, Don R.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the incidence and prognostic significance of lymph node metastasis in maxillary sinus carcinoma. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the records of 97 patients treated for maxillary sinus carcinoma with radiotherapy at Stanford University and at the University of California, San Francisco between 1959 and 1996. Fifty-eight patients had squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), 4 had adenocarcinoma (ADE), 16 had undifferentiated carcinoma (UC), and 19 had adenoid cystic carcinoma (AC). Eight patients had T2, 36 had T3, and 53 had T4 tumors according to the 1997 AJCC staging system. Eleven patients had nodal involvement at diagnosis: 9 with SCC, 1 with UC, and 1 with AC. The most common sites of nodal involvement were ipsilateral level 1 and 2 lymph nodes. Thirty-six patients were treated with definitive radiotherapy alone, and 61 received a combination of surgical and radiation treatment. Thirty-six patients had neck irradiation, 25 of whom received elective neck irradiation (ENI) for N0 necks. The median follow-up for alive patients was 78 months. Results: The median survival for all patients was 22 months (range: 2.4-356 months). The 5- and 10-year actuarial survivals were 34% and 31%, respectively. Ten patients relapsed in the neck, with a 5-year actuarial risk of nodal relapse of 12%. The 5-year risk of neck relapse was 14% for SCC, 25% for ADE, and 7% for both UC and ACC. The overall risk of nodal involvement at either diagnosis or on follow-up was 28% for SCC, 25% for ADE, 12% for UC, and 10% for AC. All patients with nodal involvement had T3-4, and none had T2 tumors. ENI effectively prevented nodal relapse in patients with SCC and N0 neck; the 5-year actuarial risk of nodal relapse was 20% for patients without ENI and 0% for those with elective neck therapy. There was no correlation between neck relapse and primary tumor control or tumor extension into areas containing a rich lymphatic network. The most common sites of nodal relapse were in the

  4. Management of endodontic-periodontic lesion of a maxillary lateral incisor with palatoradicular groove

    OpenAIRE

    Jayshree Ramakrishna Vishwas; Shoeb Yakub Shaikh; Varsha H. Tambe; Fareedi Mukram Ali; Mohammed Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    Presence of palatal radicular grooves are considered to be an important contributing factor to the development of localized periodontitis, as it favored the accumulation and proliferation of bacterial plaque deep into the periodontium. Pulp involvement could result due to the introduction of bacterial toxins through channels that existed between the root canal system and the groove. Early diagnosis, elimination of inflammation and correction of anatomic complications are the key to a favorabl...

  5. Cone beam computed tomography in endodontic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durack, Conor; Patel, Shanon [Unit of Endodontology, Department of Conservative Dentistry, King' s College London, London (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a contemporary, radiological imaging system designed specifically for use on the maxillofacial skeleton. The system overcomes many of the limitations of conventional radiography by producing undistorted, three-dimensional images of the area under examination. These properties make this form of imaging particularly suitable for use in endodontic. The clinician can obtain an enhanced appreciation of the anatomy being assessed, leading to an improvement in the detection of endodontic disease and resulting in more effective treatment planning. In addition, CBCT operates with a significantly lower effective radiation dose when compared with conventional computed tomography (CT). The purpose of this paper is to review the current literature relating to the limitations and potential applications of CBCT in endodontic practice. (author)

  6. Pulsed Nd-YAG laser in endodontics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragot-Roy, Brigitte; Severin, Claude; Maquin, Michel

    1994-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish an operative method in endodontics. The effect of a pulsed Nd:YAG laser on root canal dentin has been examined with a scanning electron microscope. Our first experimentation was to observe the impacts carried out perpendicularly to root canal surface with a 200 micrometers fiber optic in the presence of dye. Secondarily, the optical fiber was used as an endodontic instrument with black dye. The irradiation was performed after root canal preparation (15/100 file or 40/100 file) or directly into the canal. Adverse effects are observed. The results show that laser irradiation on root canal dentin surfaces induces a nonhomogeneous modified dentin layer, melted and resolidified dentin closed partially dentinal tubules. The removal of debris is not efficient enough. The laser treatment seems to be indicated only for endodontic and periapical spaces sterilization after conventional root canal preparation.

  7. Cone beam computed tomography in endodontic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durack, Conor; Patel, Shanon

    2012-01-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a contemporary, radiological imaging system designed specifically for use on the maxillofacial skeleton. The system overcomes many of the limitations of conventional radiography by producing undistorted, three-dimensional images of the area under examination. These properties make this form of imaging particularly suitable for use in endodontic. The clinician can obtain an enhanced appreciation of the anatomy being assessed, leading to an improvement in the detection of endodontic disease and resulting in more effective treatment planning. In addition, CBCT operates with a significantly lower effective radiation dose when compared with conventional computed tomography (CT). The purpose of this paper is to review the current literature relating to the limitations and potential applications of CBCT in endodontic practice. (author)

  8. A comparison of Kodak Ultraspeed and Ektaspeed Plus dental X-ray films for use in endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moule, A J; Wong, A; Monsour, P A; Basford, K E

    2001-06-01

    The advantage of using a faster film for length determination in endodontic therapy is obvious. However, for such a film to be generally accepted, it must demonstrate comparable diagnostic quality to traditionally used films. The comparative accuracy of canal length determination of Ultraspeed and Ektaspeed Plus dental X-ray films was assessed in maxillary first and second molars; for different canals, for different teeth, for different exposures, and for different examiners (five general dentists and three endodontic specialists). In general, there were no significant differences between films, among examiners, or any interaction between films and exposures. That is, an assessor's ability to estimate lengths was not significantly influenced by the film type or by exposure used. There was a wide divergence in the individual assessor's ability to estimate lengths. Specialists estimated lengths more accurately than general practitioners and estimated lengths more accurately with Ektaspeed Plus film. Length determination in distobuccal and mesiobuccal canals was more accurate than in palatal canals. Most palatal canals were underestimated in length by more than 1mm. The use of file sizes larger in number than size 15 is recommended in these canals. For length determination, Ektaspeed Plus dental X-ray film is as effective as Ultraspeed film. Given the acceptable quality and accuracy of Ektaspeed Plus film, there seems to be no clinical reason to subject patients to greater radiation by using a slower film during endodontic therapy.

  9. Clinical considerations for regenerative endodontic procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisler, Todd M

    2012-07-01

    The management of a tooth with incomplete root maturation and a necrotic pulp is an endodontic and a restorative challenge. Apexification procedures alone leave the tooth in a weakened state and at risk for reinfection. Regenerative endodontic procedures potentially offer advantages, including the possibility of hard tissue deposition and continued root development. Case studies have reported regeneration of human pulplike tissues in vivo, but there is no protocol that reliably regenerates pulplike tissue. This article summarizes historical, current, and future regenerative treatment approaches. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Natural Therapeutic Options in Endodontics - A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkateshbabu, Nagendrababu; Anand, Suresh; Abarajithan, Mohan; Sheriff, Sultan O.; Jacob, Pulikkotil S.; Sonia, Nath

    2016-01-01

    Complete eradication of microbial biofilms and elimination of the smear layer are the key factors during endodontic treatment. Various chemical irrigants have been proposed in the literature for the same. The major setback with these chemical irrigants is that they are not bio-friendly to the dental and peri-radicular tissues. In the recent years, research to use natural products for root canal disinfection has gained importance. The aim of this article is to compile various herbal products that have been used as an irrigants and intracanal medicaments in the field of Endodontics to eradicate the biofilm and remove smear layer. PMID:27386007

  11. [A clinical study of endodontic flare-ups].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, S J; Lin, Y T; Lu, S Y

    1994-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical variables influencing endodontic flare-ups. Three hundred and thirteen teeth receiving endodontic treatment at the Endodontic Department, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital were studied from December 1992 to February 1993. Among them, 21 teeth with significant pain and 9 with apical swelling were noted after the first appointment of treatment. Three teeth with persistent pain and one with apical swelling were also found one week after completion of endodontic therapy. The results showed significant improvement of clinical symptoms and signs one week after completion of endodontic treatment in comparison with pretreatment and after the first appointment (p endodontic flare-ups after the first appointment of treatment (P endodontic flare-ups.

  12. Maxillary sinus carcinoma: Natural history and outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Jhani, Ali S.; Nooh, Nasser S.; Al-Rajhi, Nasser M.; El-Sebaie, Medhat M.; Al-Amro, Abdullah S.; Mahasen, Ziyad Z.; Otieschan, Abdullah T.

    2004-01-01

    To assess natural history, treatment outcome and pattern of relapse in patients with maxillary sinus carcinoma. A review was conducted of the medical records of all adult patients with maxillary sinus carcinoma, who were treated at King Faisal Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, between January 1990 and December 1999. A total of 60 patients were identified for analysis, 36 men and 24 women; the median age was 58-years (range 23-95). Major presenting symptoms were facial swelling 55%, facial pain 50%, and nasal obstruction 43.4%, with a median duration of 5-months (range 1-24). Histology was quamous cell carcinoma in 71.7% and adenoid cystic in 16.7%. They were restaged according to American Joint Committee on Cancer classification 1997 as II, III and IV in 1, 10 and 49. Thirty patients received treatment with curative intent (surgery in 4 patients, radiotherapy in 2, and combined modality in 24), 6 patients refused treatment and 24 were treated palliatively. With a median follow up of 50-months (range 2-128) in surviving patients treated with a curative intent, 12/30 failed locally, 4/30 in the regional neck nodes and 2/30 had systemic relapse. The actuarial 5-year overall survival (OS), relapse free survival (RFS) and local control rate (LC) were 55%, 39% and 51%. Treatment modality was the only significant prognostic factor for outcome, with 5 year OS, RFS and LC of 72%, 49% and 61%, for combined modality using surgery followed by radiotherapy compared to 0% for single approach (p=0.0003, p=0.0052 and p=0.0098). This study indicates that the majority of our patients presented with advanced disease, resulting in poor outcome to conventional treatment modalities. Efforts should be directed to minimize the delay in diagnosis at the primary care level. Combined modality treatment should be offered to all patients with locally advanced disease. New approaches such as neoadjuvant or concurrent chemoradiotherapy with or without surgery need to

  13. Maxillary sinus agenesis - report of two cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierre, Jorge Henrique Arraes de Alencar; Santana, Expedito Araujo

    2000-01-01

    Agenesis or aplasia of the maxillary sinuses is an extremely rare condition, and only eight cases have been reported in the world medical literature. These malformations may arise as a result of developmental defects. Two cases of unilateral agenesis of the maxillary sinus are presented and the radiological abnormalities and the embryology are discussed. The literature is also reviewed. (author)

  14. Assessment of the Incidence of Posttreatment Endodontic Flare-ups in Patients undergoing Single-sitting Root Canal Therapies: A Clinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priyank, Harsh; Devi, T M Chaitra; Goel, Pallavi; Sahu, Nivedita; Nihalani, Shweta; Shandilya, Ashutosh

    2016-10-01

    Endodontic therapy is one of the commonly used procedures for treating the teeth affected by various pathologies. One of the major problems for endodontists despite the advancements in the root canal procedures is the posttreatment endodontic flare-ups. Much debate exists regarding the completion of endodontic therapy in a single sitting or multiple sittings. Hence, we assessed the incidence of endodontic flare-ups in patients undergoing single-sitting root canal therapies. The present study included 200 patients who underwent single-sitting endodontic therapy. Clinical details and conditions of each and every tooth of every patient were recorded before and after the completion of endodontic therapy. Irrigation during the root canal procedures was done by 2.5% NaOCl solution in most of the cases while others were irrigated with various combinations of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and cycloheximide (CHX) solutions. Follow-up records and readings of the patents were noted and were subjected to statistical analysis. Four groups were formed which divided the patients equally on the basis of their age. Out of 50 patients in the age group of 21 to 30 years, only 4 showed posttreatment endodontic flare-ups, while no endodontic flare-up was recorded in patients with age group of 31 to 50 years. Only two male and four females showed flare-ups postoperatively. A nonsignificant correlation was obtained when flare-up cases were compared on the basis of type of irrigation solution used during canal preparation. Single-sitting endodontic therapy appears to be a successful procedure with good prognosis and minimal posttreatment flare-up results, even in patients with periapical pathologies. Single-sitting root canal procedures can be successfully carried in patients with vital or nonvital pulp tissues and also in patients with periapical lesions.

  15. Analysis of the internal anatomy of maxillary first molars by using different methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baratto Filho, Flares; Zaitter, Suellen; Haragushiku, Gisele Aihara; de Campos, Edson Alves; Abuabara, Allan; Correr, Gisele Maria

    2009-03-01

    The success of endodontic treatment depends on the identification of all root canals so that they can be cleaned, shaped, and obturated. This study investigated internal morphology of maxillary first molars by 3 different methods: ex vivo, clinical, and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) analysis. In all these different methods, the number of additional root canals and their locations, the number of foramina, and the frequency of canals that could or could not be negotiated were recorded. In the ex vivo study, 140 extracted maxillary first molars were evaluated. After canals were accessed and detected by using an operating microscope, the teeth with significant anatomic variances were cleared. In the clinical analysis, the records of 291 patients who had undergone endodontic treatment in a dental school during a 2-year period were used. In the CBCT analysis, 54 maxillary first molars were evaluated. The ex vivo assessment results showed a fourth canal frequency in 67.14% of the teeth, besides a tooth with 7 root canals (0.72%). Additional root canals were located in the mesiobuccal root in 92.85% of the teeth (17.35% could not be negotiated), and when they were present, 65.30% exhibited 1 foramen. Clinical assessment showed that 53.26%, 0.35%, and 0.35% of the teeth exhibited 4, 5, and 6 root canals, respectively. Additional root canals were located in this assessment in mesiobuccal root in 95.63% (27.50% could not be negotiated), and when they were present, 59.38% exhibited 1 foramen. CBCT results showed 2, 4, and 5 root canals in 1.85%, 37.05%, and 1.85% of the teeth, respectively. When present, additional canals showed 1 foramen in 90.90% of the teeth studied. This study demonstrated that operating microscope and CBCT have been important for locating and identifying root canals, and CBCT can be used as a good method for initial identification of maxillary first molar internal morphology.

  16. Endodontic-periodontal microsurgery for combined endodontic-periodontal lesions: An overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ritu; Hegde, Vivek; Siddharth, M; Hegde, Rashmi; Manchanda, Gunsha; Agarwal, Pratul

    2014-11-01

    Endodontic and periodontal microsurgery has surpassed the success rates for traditional endodontic and periodontal surgical procedures. Excellent healing results are being attributed to both the techniques, when employed, for isolated endodontic or periodontal defects. Combined endodontic-periodontal lesions have been referred to as a true challenge, requiring not only endodontic microsurgical management but also concurrent bone grafting and membrane barriers techniques. The prevention of epithelial downgrowth and regeneration of periodontal cementum, fiber, and bone seals the fate of these cases. Achieving primary closure with submergence of grafts has a positive effect on GTR outcome. New techniques of periodontal microsurgery, such as minimally invasive papilla preserving flaps with passive internal mattress suturing, have managed to obtain 90% primary flap closure over grafted sites. Root surface treatment and conditioning has also shown to be beneficial for GTR. Endodontic microsurgery for the combined lesion has not integrated these advances yet. These advances, along with a recently suggested treatment strategy, are ushering in the level next in management of the combined lesions. This article offers an overview of the combined lesion, the disease, its classification, treatment strategy, regenerative tools, microsurgical recommendations, and outcome studies.

  17. Efficacy of single buccal infiltrations for maxillary first molars in patients with irreversible pulpitis: a randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atasoy Ulusoy, Ö İ; Alaçam, T

    2014-03-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of a single buccal infitration using 4% articaine hydrochloride (HCl) with 1 : 100,000 epinephrine or 4% articaine HCl with 1 : 100 000 epinephrine bitartrate for obtaining adequate pulpal anaesthesia in the palatal roots of maxillary first molars associated with irreversible pulpitis. In this single-blind randomized clinical trial, fifty subjects were randomly allocated to receive maxillary buccal injections of 1.5 mL 4% articaine with 1 : 100,000 epinephrine (n = 25) or 1.5 mL 4% articaine with 1 : 100,000 epinephrine bitartrate (n = 25). Visual analogue scale (VAS) scores and pulse rate measurements were recorded during access cavity preparation and initial file placement into the mesiobuccal, distobuccal and palatal canals. Data were analysed using Duncan and t-tests. There was no significant difference between the two anaesthetic solutions regarding the VAS scores and pulse rate measurements during endodontic procedures. The mean VAS ratings of the 50 patients during file placement into the palatal canals were significantly higher compared with the other three root canal procedures (P pulpitis. © 2013 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. The effects of uncinectomy and natural ostial dilatation on maxillary sinus ventilation: a clinical experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutluhan, Ahmet; Şalvız, Mehti; Bozdemir, Kazım; Kanbak, Orhan; Ulu, Mustafa; Yalçıner, Gökhan; Bilgen, Akif Sinan

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of uncinectomy without sinusotomy and natural ostial dilatation on maxillary sinus ventilation in chronic rhinosinusitis. Twenty patients with chronic rhinosinusitis were included in this study. The patients were randomly divided into two groups. Group 1 consisted of patients with uncinectomy (n = 10), while group 2 was made up of patients treated with natural ostial dilatation (n = 10). The CO(2) tension and pressure levels of the maxillary sinus during inspiration and expiration phases were obtained and compared before and after the procedures within and between the groups. The mean CO(2) tension levels in both groups were significantly decreased after the procedures. The mean maxillary sinus pressure during inspiration was significantly decreased to a negative value after uncinectomy; however, no significant change was observed during expiration. There were no significant changes in maxillary sinus pressures after natural ostial dilatation procedure. Both uncinectomy and natural ostial dilatation seem to be equally effective in decreasing maxillary sinus pCO(2) levels. The effects of decreased maxillary sinus pressure during inspiration after uncinectomy on mucociliary clearance and development mechanisms of chronic rhinosinusitis seem to be worth investigating.

  19. A comparative study of pain following endodontic treatment under general anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feizi Ghader

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available   Background and Aims: Postoperativee endodontic pain is an outstanding problem for dental patients. Therefore, a successful management of endodontic pain has become as one of the main dental objectives. The aim of the present study was to compare the postoperative endodontic pain in patients under general anesthesia versus local anesthesia.   Materials and Methods: For conducting this clinical trial study, 50 patients having mandibular molars candidate for root canal therapy were selected. Twenty-five patients treated under general anesthesia because of their fear, anxiety or gag reflex. Other 25 patients treated under local anesthesia. All teeth were prepared using engine-driven rotary system in a crown-down technique and filled using lateral condensation technique. Heft- parker visual analog scale was used to measure the degree of pain at 6, 12, 24, and 48 hours after the treatment. Mann-Whitney, Chi-square, and T-tests were used to compare the intensity of postoperative pain between the groups.   Results: The mean intensity of postoperative pain in local and general anesthesia groups at 6, 12 and 24 hours had statistically significant difference (P<0.05.   Conclusion: Postoperative pain in patients who treated under general anesthesia was significantly less than the patients who treated under local anesthesia.

  20. Syringe irrigation: blending endodontics and fluid dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boutsioukis, Christos; van der Sluis, Lucas; Basrani, Bettina

    2015-01-01

    This book reviews the available information on bacterial disinfection in endodontics, with emphasis on the chemical treatment of root canals based on current understanding of the process of irrigation. It describes recent advances in knowledge of the chemistry associated with irrigants and delivery

  1. Endodontic treatment completion following emergency pulpectomy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lynch, C D

    2010-06-01

    Emergency pulpectomy is frequently performed to relieve pain experienced by patients following acute episodes of endodontic pain, or to limit the risks of infection or possible root resorption following traumatic pulpal exposures. The aim of this study was to examine subsequent patient attendance for completion of root canal treatment following pulpectomy procedures in a dental emergency unit.

  2. A clarification on endodontic flare-ups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, D R; Esposito, J V

    1990-09-01

    In an article on endodontic flare-ups by Robert J. Matusow, our research and publications are discussed. Since we found what we consider to be distortions and misinterpretations of our work, it was decided to clarify the apparent discrepancies found in Matusow's article.

  3. Endotoxin content in endodontically involved teeth. 1975.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schein, Benjamin; Schilder, Herbert

    2006-04-01

    Fluid was aspirated from the root canals of 40 endodontically involved teeth. This fluid was assayed for endotoxin with the limulus lysate test. Pulpless teeth contained greater concentrations of endotoxin than those with vital pulps. Symptomatic teeth also contained more endotoxin than asymptomatic teeth.

  4. Meant to make a difference, the clinical experience of minimally invasive endodontics with the self-adjusting file system in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawar, Ajinkya M; Pawar, Mansing G; Kokate, Sharad R

    2014-01-01

    The vital steps in any endodontic treatment are thorough mechanical shaping and chemical cleaning followed by obtaining a fluid tight impervious seal by an inert obturating material. For the past two decades, introduction and use of rotary nickel-titanium (Ni-Ti) files have changed our concepts of endodontic treatment from conventional to contemporary. They have reported good success rates, but still have many drawbacks. The Self-Adjusting File (SAF) introduces a new era in endodontics by performing the vital steps of shaping and cleaning simultaneously. The SAF is a hollow file in design that adapts itself three-dimensionally to the root canal and is a single file system, made up of Ni-Ti lattice. The case series presented in the paper report the clinical experience, while treating primary endodontic cases with the SAF system in India.

  5. The effect of the duration of intravenous zolendronate medication on the success of non-surgical endodontic therapy: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dereci, Ömür; Orhan, Ekim Onur; Irmak, Özgür; Ay, Sinan

    2016-02-01

    Aim of this study is to compare the clinical and radiographic success of non-surgical endodontic therapy in patients receiving intravenous zolendronate less than 1 year and more than 1 year. The clinical and radiographic follow-up data of 24 patients who were receiving IV zolendronate with 37 teeth were retrieved from the archives to evaluate clinical and radiographic healing at the end of 12 months after non-surgical endodontic therapy. The clinical and radiographic scores of teeth treated with non-surgical endodontic therapy were analyzed. The amount of non-healed and incomplete healed teeth in patients receiving zolendronate more than 1 year were more than the amount of teeth of non-healed and incomplete healed in patients receiving bisphosphonates less than 1 year (p bisphosphonate medication and endodontic success.

  6. Meant to make a difference, the clinical experience of minimally invasive endodontics with the self-adjusting file system in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajinkya M Pawar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The vital steps in any endodontic treatment are thorough mechanical shaping and chemical cleaning followed by obtaining a fluid tight impervious seal by an inert obturating material. For the past two decades, introduction and use of rotary nickel-titanium (Ni-Ti files have changed our concepts of endodontic treatment from conventional to contemporary. They have reported good success rates, but still have many drawbacks. The Self-Adjusting File (SAF introduces a new era in endodontics by performing the vital steps of shaping and cleaning simultaneously. The SAF is a hollow file in design that adapts itself three-dimensionally to the root canal and is a single file system, made up of Ni-Ti lattice. The case series presented in the paper report the clinical experience, while treating primary endodontic cases with the SAF system in India.

  7. Preoperative radiotherapy of maxillary sinus cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae Chul; Park, In Kyu

    1998-01-01

    This study was to evaluate the effectiveness of preoperative radiotherapy in maxillary sinus cancer. A retrospective analysis was done for 42 patients with maxillary sinus cancer who were treated with radiation with or without surgery from April 1986 to September 1996. There were 27 male and 15 female patients. Patients' age ranged from 24 to 75 years (median 56 years). Stage distribution showed 2 in T2, 19 in T3, and 21 in T4 lesions. The histologic type was squamous cell carcinoma in 38, undifferentiated carcinoma in 1, transitional cell carcinoma in 1, and adenoid cystic carcinoma in 2 patients, All patients were treated with radiation initially with a dosage range of 50.4-70.2 Gy (median 70.2 Gy) before further evaluation of remnant disease. Eleven patients were given induction chemotherapy (2 cycles of 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin) concurrently with radiotherapy. Six to eight weeks after radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy, computerized tomography (CT) of paranasal sinus was taken to evaluate remnant disease. If the CT finding showed remnant disease, a Caldwell-Luc procedure was done to get the specimen of suspicious lesions. A radical maxillectomy was done if the specimen was proven to contain malignancy. In contrast periodic follow-up examination was done without any radical surgery if the tissue showed only granulation tissue. Follow-up period ranged from 3 to 92 months with a median 16 months. Nine (21.4%) patients showed complete response (CR) and 33 patients (78.6%) showed persistent disease (PER) to initial radiotherapy. Among the 9 CR patients, 7 patients had no evidence of disease (NED), 1 patient had local failure, and 1 patient had regional failure. Among 33 PER patients, salvage total maxillectomy was done in 10 patients, and the surgery was not feasible or refused in 23 patients. Following the salvage radical surgery, 2 patients were NED and 8 patients were PER status. Overall and disease- free survival rate at 5 years was 23.1% and 16

  8. Preoperative radiotherapy of maxillary sinus cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Chul; Park, In Kyu [College of Medicine, Kyungpook National Univ., Taegu (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-09-01

    This study was to evaluate the effectiveness of preoperative radiotherapy in maxillary sinus cancer. A retrospective analysis was done for 42 patients with maxillary sinus cancer who were treated with radiation with or without surgery from April 1986 to September 1996. There were 27 male and 15 female patients. Patients' age ranged from 24 to 75 years (median 56 years). Stage distribution showed 2 in T2, 19 in T3, and 21 in T4 lesions. The histologic type was squamous cell carcinoma in 38, undifferentiated carcinoma in 1, transitional cell carcinoma in 1, and adenoid cystic carcinoma in 2 patients, All patients were treated with radiation initially with a dosage range of 50.4-70.2 Gy (median 70.2 Gy) before further evaluation of remnant disease. Eleven patients were given induction chemotherapy (2 cycles of 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin) concurrently with radiotherapy. Six to eight weeks after radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy, computerized tomography (CT) of paranasal sinus was taken to evaluate remnant disease. If the CT finding showed remnant disease, a Caldwell-Luc procedure was done to get the specimen of suspicious lesions. A radical maxillectomy was done if the specimen was proven to contain malignancy. In contrast periodic follow-up examination was done without any radical surgery if the tissue showed only granulation tissue. Follow-up period ranged from 3 to 92 months with a median 16 months. Nine (21.4%) patients showed complete response (CR) and 33 patients (78.6%) showed persistent disease (PER) to initial radiotherapy. Among the 9 CR patients, 7 patients had no evidence of disease (NED), 1 patient had local failure, and 1 patient had regional failure. Among 33 PER patients, salvage total maxillectomy was done in 10 patients, and the surgery was not feasible or refused in 23 patients. Following the salvage radical surgery, 2 patients were NED and 8 patients were PER status. Overall and disease- free survival rate at 5 years was 23.1% and 16

  9. Maxillary advancement for mandibular prognathism: indications and rationale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, H M

    1991-05-01

    The surgical correction of mandibular prognathism has traditionally involved posterior repositioning of the mandibular body. This treatment approach corrects the skeletal disproportion at the expense of reducing facial skeletal volume and can unpredictably result in inadequately supported soft tissues with loss of skeletal definition. In an effort to avoid these sequelae of mandibular reduction, 18 patients diagnosed as having mandibular prognathism were treated with maxillary advancement surgery at the Le Fort I level. Mean patient SNB angle was 85.2 degrees, as compared with a normal 79 +/- 3 degrees. Maxillae were documented to be in normal position relative to both cranial base and Frankfort horizontal. The mean maxillary advancement was 6.9 mm, with a range of 4.5 to 8.8 mm. All patients required genioplasty to reduce vertical chin height and/or to laterally shift the chin. At the time of follow-up (mean 16.2 months), all patients retained cephalometric data suggestive of enlarged mandibles and excessive anterior facial divergence. However, maxillomandibular harmony and facial convexity had been restored without sacrificing skeletal volume. Treatment results demonstrated these faces to be skeletally well proportioned despite lower face protrusion that was beyond "normal." Postoperative appearances were characterized by a well-supported soft-tissue envelope and a highlighted skeletal foundation, creating angular, well-defined lower faces. These findings support the credibility of maxillary advancement as the procedure of choice in selected individuals with mandibular prognathism. Indications and an aesthetic rationale for this surgical approach are presented.

  10. Regenerative Endodontic Treatment with Orthodontic Treatment in a Tooth with Dens Evaginatus: A Case Report with a 4-year Follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natera, Marianella; Mukherjee, Padma M

    2018-06-01

    Dens evaginatus is a developmental tooth anomaly in which an extra cusp or tubercle protrudes on the occlusal surface of the tooth along with some pulpal tissue. Because of the fragile nature of the protrusion, these teeth are often at risk of pulpal exposure. When this occurs in an immature tooth, regenerative endodontic treatment may be a good treatment approach to promote root formation. There is limited literature that documents the occurrence of orthodontic treatment in teeth that have undergone regenerative endodontic therapy using triple antibiotic paste. Here we present a case of an immature premolar tooth with dens evaginatus that was diagnosed with pulp necrosis and chronic apical abscess. The tooth was treated with regenerative endodontic treatment; after which, the patient received orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances for 2 years. The tooth responded favorably to the regenerative endodontic treatment and orthodontic tooth movement. Clinically and radiographically, all the follow-up examinations revealed an asymptomatic tooth with evidence of periapical healing with stunted root development. The tooth remained asymptomatic even after 4 years. The regenerative endodontic procedure (REP) was successful in treating an immature permanent premolar with pulp necrosis and apical periodontitis with dens evaginatus. In this case, the tooth treated with an REP responded to orthodontic treatment similar to the nonendodontically treated teeth. Further studies are recommended to clarify the precise effects of orthodontic treatment on teeth treated with an REP. Copyright © 2018 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. [Test your decision-making. When to do endodontic retreatment? Some therapeutic alternatives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryanpour, S; D'Hoore, W; Van Nieuwenhuysen, J P

    2000-01-01

    The aim of the present article was to propose examples of treatment alternatives for the management of 14 clinical cases. All these cases involved endodontically treated teeth and have been managed by the same practitioner. In this paper, the authors tried to show the variety of treatment alternatives as well as the complexity of the decision-making process and, not to consider that proposed alternatives were the most adequate.

  12. The evaluation of endodontic flare-ups and their relationship to various risk factors

    OpenAIRE

    Onay, Emel Olga; Ungor, Mete; Yazici, A. Canan

    2015-01-01

    Background To evaluate the incidence of flare-ups and identify the risk factors including age, gender, tooth type, number of root canals, initial diagnosis, the type of irrigation regimen, treatment modality and the number of visits, in patients who received root canal treatment from January 2002 to January 2008. Methods Records of 1819 teeth belonging to 1410 patients treated by 1 endodontics specialist during 6-year period were kept. Patient, tooth, and treatment characteristics were evalua...

  13. Endodontic implications of the variability of the root canal systems of posterior teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggs, J T; Benenati, F W

    1995-01-01

    Variations in the morphology of roots and root canal systems create challenges which the dental practitioner must be able to recognize. Endodontic therapy is predictable and successful only to the extent that the root canal system can be debrided, disinfected and sealed against future contamination. In order to accomplish these goals it is necessary to become familiar with the variability of the system we seek to treat.

  14. Features of clinical course and treatment principles of endodontic-periodontal lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P I Moroz

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study the characteristic differences in the clinical course of chronic generalized periodontitis in the presence of periapical infection focus and the principles of combined treatment of endodontium and periodontium. Methods. A clinical and X-ray examination of 1525 patients of different age groups was performed. As a result, a clinical group of 68 patients with chronic generalized moderate and severe periodontitis was formed, who were divided into two groups depending on the presence or absence of periapical destruction. In group 1, 32 patients with the presence of chronic generalized periodontitis and signs of chronic apical periodontitis were united. Group 2 included 36 patients with chronic generalized periodontitis and no periapical infection and damage. The index estimation of the periodontal tissues state in the dynamics of combined endodontic and periodontal treatment was performed. Results. The initial task of treating endodontic periodontal lesions, regardless of the localization of the primary lesion focus, is the elimination or reversal of chronic periapical inflammatory processes of the teeth. The proposed monitoring system in the course of treatment and dynamic follow-up for 18 months for patients suffering from endodontic periodontal lesions using clinical and radiological methods of examination involves: (1 interim epicrisis or conclusion about negative or positive compliance 1-2 months after the completion of endodontic treatment and hygiene procedures; (2 periodontal treatment (according to indications with the assessment of clinical efficacy 6 and 12 months after the start of treatment; (3 epicrisis after 18 months. Conclusion. The use of proposed concept of complex treatment of endodontic-periodontal lesions, monitoring system in the course of dental therapeutic and preventive measures and dynamic follow-up for 18 months allows achieving positive compliance in 85% of patients according to the clinical examination and

  15. Endodontic retreatment: clinical comparison of reciprocating systems versus rotary system in disinfecting root canals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinho, Frederico C; Freitas, Lilian F; Nascimento, Gustavo G; Fernandes, Aleteia M; Leite, Fabio R M; Gomes, Ana P M; Camões, Izabel C G

    2015-07-01

    This clinical study was conducted to compare the effectiveness of single-file reciprocating systems and rotary systems in removing endotoxins and cultivable bacteria in endodontic retreatment. Thirty endodontically treated teeth with post-treatment apical periodontitis were selected. The specimens were divided into three groups according to the system used: WaveOne (n = 10), Reciproc instrument (n = 10), and ProTaper Universal Retreatment system (n = 10). Samples were collected before and after chemomechanical preparation. The irrigation was performed by using 2.5% sodium hypochlorite. A chromogenic limulus amebocyte lysate assay test was used to quantify endotoxins. Culture techniques were used to determine bacterial colony-forming unit counts. At baseline, endotoxins and cultivable bacteria were recovered from 100% of the root canal samples in a median value of 5.84 EU/mL and 4.98 × 10(3) CFU/mL, respectively. After CMP, no differences were found in the median percentage values of endotoxin reduction achieved with reciprocating systems-WaveOne [94.11%] and Reciproc [93.29%] and with rotary systems-ProTaper [94.98%] (P > 0.05). Both single-file reciprocating systems [WaveOne (98.27%) and Reciproc (99.54%)] and rotary system [ProTaper (98.73%)] were effective in reducing bacterial load (P > 0.05). Moreover, no differences were found among the systems tested. The Reciproc and WaveOne reciprocating systems were as effective as the ProTaper system for removal of endotoxins and bacteria in endodontic retreatment. All systems tested were effective to remove cultivable bacteria and endotoxin in endodontic retreatment. As no differences among systems were observed, it is possible to suggest that clinicians should choose the preferred technique to perform endodontic.

  16. Regeneration and Repair in Endodontics-A Special Issue of the Regenerative Endodontics-A New Era in Clinical Endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saoud, Tarek Mohamed A; Ricucci, Domenico; Lin, Louis M; Gaengler, Peter

    2016-02-27

    Caries is the most common cause of pulp-periapical disease. When the pulp tissue involved in caries becomes irreversibly inflamed and progresses to necrosis, the treatment option is root canal therapy because the infected or non-infected necrotic pulp tissue in the root canal system is not accessible to the host's innate and adaptive immune defense mechanisms and antimicrobial agents. Therefore, the infected or non-infected necrotic pulp tissue must be removed from the canal space by pulpectomy. As our knowledge in pulp biology advances, the concept of treatment of pulpal and periapical disease also changes. Endodontists have been looking for biologically based treatment procedures, which could promote regeneration or repair of the dentin-pulp complex destroyed by infection or trauma for several decades. After a long, extensive search in in vitro laboratory and in vivo preclinical animal experiments, the dental stem cells capable of regenerating the dentin-pulp complex were discovered. Consequently, the biological concept of 'regenerative endodontics' emerged and has highlighted the paradigm shift in the treatment of immature permanent teeth with necrotic pulps in clinical endodontics. Regenerative endodontics is defined as biologically based procedures designed to physiologically replace damaged tooth structures, including dentin and root structures, as well as the pulp-dentin complex. According to the American Association of Endodontists' Clinical Considerations for a Regenerative Procedure, the primary goal of the regenerative procedure is the elimination of clinical symptoms and the resolution of apical periodontitis. Thickening of canal walls and continued root maturation is the secondary goal. Therefore, the primary goal of regenerative endodontics and traditional non-surgical root canal therapy is the same. The difference between non-surgical root canal therapy and regenerative endodontic therapy is that the disinfected root canals in the former therapy are

  17. Changes in speech following maxillary distraction osteogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyette, T W; Polley, J W; Figueroa, A; Smith, B E

    2001-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe changes in articulation and velopharyngeal function following maxillary distraction osteogenesis. This is a descriptive, post hoc clinical report comparing the performance of patients before and after maxillary distraction. The independent variable was maxillary distraction while the dependent variables were resonance, articulation errors, and velopharyngeal function. The data were collected at a tertiary health care center in Chicago. The data from pre- and postoperative evaluations of 18 maxillary distraction patients were used. The outcome measures were severity of hypernasality and hyponasality, velopharyngeal orifice size as estimated using the pressure-flow technique, and number and type of articulation errors. At the long-term follow-up, 16.7% exhibited a significant increase in hypernasality. Seventy-five percent of patients with preoperative hyponasality experienced improved nasal resonance. Articulation improved in 67% of patients by the 1-year follow-up. In a predominately cleft palate population, the risk for velopharyngeal insufficiency following maxillary distraction is similar to the risk observed in Le Fort I maxillary advancement. Patients being considered for maxillary distraction surgery should receive pre- and postoperative speech evaluations and be counseled about risks for changes in their speech.

  18. Orthopantomographic study of the maxillary sinus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun Joo; Yu, Dong Su [School of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1971-11-15

    The author has observed the orthopantomograms of the maxillary sinus which were taken by special exposure method to study mesiodistal dimension, shape, symmetrical relationship, bony septum of the maxillary sinus and relationship between upper lst molar and the maxillary sinus, that were selected 56 cases of 23 to 27 years old male, who have good systemic conditions and no missing teeth on upper posterior molar in normal occlusion, and obtained following conclusions: 1. Mesiodistal dimensions of the maxillary sinus are shown as follows; The mean of left dimension is 50.94 {+-} 8.34 mm and of right dimension is 49.50 {+-} 9.87 mm. 2. To the shape of the maxillary sinus, V or U shape are 33 cases(29.5%) and W shape are 77 cases (70.5%). 3. In the ralationship between upper lst molar and floor of the maxllary sinus, superimposition are 62 cases (55.36%) a nd approach are 50 cases (44.64%). 4. In the right and left symmetrical relationship of the maxillary sinus, symmetry are 37 cases (66.07%) and asymmetry are 19 cases (33.93%). 5. The bony septums in the maxillary sinuses revealed that presence of bony septums are 29 cases (25.8%) and absence ar e 83 cases (74.11%).

  19. Endodontic Periodontic Lesions and Host Modulation – Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afaf Zia

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Host modulation, includes inhibition of matrix metalloproteinases, blocking production of proinflammatory cytokines and inhibition of osteoclastic activity, has therapeutic value as adjunctive therapy in treating chronic periodontitis. This case series presented three patients with chief complaint of teeth mobility where endo perio involvement was diagnosed. The endo perio combined lesions generally shows the communication between pulp and periodontal tissues with the same origin of dental infection. Diagnosis in such cases is difficult and generally raising problem in the management. All of the cases were managed by non surgical endodontic therapy combined with host modulation. All local factors causing the lesion were removed. Clinical outcome after six and nine months were quite satisfactory. Combined endo perio cases are challenging to the dentists and involve multidisciplinary involvement. To manage such cases, dentists have to rely on the unconventional techniques.DOI: 10.14693/jdi.v22i1.378

  20. A clinical analysis of maxillary cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishida, Haruhiko; Amatsu, Mutsuo [Kobe Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    2001-03-01

    Forty-five patients with maxillary cancer were treated at Kobe University Hospital during the years 1990-1999. We analyzed 35 of there cases that had undergone curative treatment. They were classified by T the classification (UICC, 1997) as two cases with T1, seven with T2, eight with T3, and 18 with T4. The two patients with T1 were treated with radiation alone, and four of the other patients were treated with surgery alone. Eight patients were given irradiation, intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy, and curettage of necotic tumor (combined therapy group); 10 received preoperative intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy, irradiation, and maxillectomy or extended maxillectomy (preoperative treatment group), and 11 underwent extended surgery and postoperative chemotherapy and/or irradiation (postoperative treatment group). The five-year survival rates were 65.1% for all patients, 83.3% for T3 cases, and 41.6% for T4 cases. The five-year survival rates were 48.6% for the combined therapy group, 80% for the preoperative treatment group, and 54.6% for the postoperative treatment group. Although the four cases with T2 who underwent combined therapy all remained disease-free, all three cases with T3 and T4 died of the disease. On the other hand, six of the seven patients with T3 and T4 in the preoperative treatment group remained disease-free. Based on these results, we believe that maxillectomy or extended maxillectomy following intra-arterial chemotherapy and irradiation is the most effective treatment modality for T3 and T4 cases. (author)

  1. A clinical analysis of maxillary cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, Haruhiko; Amatsu, Mutsuo

    2001-01-01

    Forty-five patients with maxillary cancer were treated at Kobe University Hospital during the years 1990-1999. We analyzed 35 of there cases that had undergone curative treatment. They were classified by T the classification (UICC, 1997) as two cases with T1, seven with T2, eight with T3, and 18 with T4. The two patients with T1 were treated with radiation alone, and four of the other patients were treated with surgery alone. Eight patients were given irradiation, intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy, and curettage of necotic tumor (combined therapy group); 10 received preoperative intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy, irradiation, and maxillectomy or extended maxillectomy (preoperative treatment group), and 11 underwent extended surgery and postoperative chemotherapy and/or irradiation (postoperative treatment group). The five-year survival rates were 65.1% for all patients, 83.3% for T3 cases, and 41.6% for T4 cases. The five-year survival rates were 48.6% for the combined therapy group, 80% for the preoperative treatment group, and 54.6% for the postoperative treatment group. Although the four cases with T2 who underwent combined therapy all remained disease-free, all three cases with T3 and T4 died of the disease. On the other hand, six of the seven patients with T3 and T4 in the preoperative treatment group remained disease-free. Based on these results, we believe that maxillectomy or extended maxillectomy following intra-arterial chemotherapy and irradiation is the most effective treatment modality for T3 and T4 cases. (author)

  2. "TuNa-saving" endoscopic medial maxillectomy: a surgical technique for maxillary inverted papilloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagella, Fabio; Pusateri, Alessandro; Matti, Elina; Avato, Irene; Zaccari, Dario; Emanuelli, Enzo; Volo, Tiziana; Cazzador, Diego; Citraro, Leonardo; Ricci, Giampiero; Tomacelli, Giovanni Leo

    2017-07-01

    The maxillary sinus is the most common site of sinonasal inverted papilloma. Endoscopic sinus surgery, in particular endoscopic medial maxillectomy, is currently the gold standard for treatment of maxillary sinus papilloma. Although a common technique, complications such as stenosis of the lacrimal pathway and consequent development of epiphora are still possible. To avoid these problems, we propose a modification of this surgical technique that preserves the head of the inferior turbinate and the nasolacrimal duct. A retrospective analysis was performed on patients treated for maxillary inverted papilloma in three tertiary medical centres between 2006 and 2014. Pedicle-oriented endoscopic surgery principles were applied and, in select cases where the tumour pedicle was located on the anterior wall, a modified endoscopic medial maxillectomy was carried out as described in this paper. From 2006 to 2014 a total of 84 patients were treated. A standard endoscopic medial maxillectomy was performed in 55 patients (65.4%), while the remaining 29 (34.6%) had a modified technique performed. Three recurrences (3/84; 3.6%) were observed after a minimum follow-up of 24 months. A new surgical approach for select cases of maxillary sinus inverted papilloma is proposed in this paper. In this technique, the endoscopic medial maxillectomy was performed while preserving the head of the inferior turbinate and the nasolacrimal duct ("TuNa-saving"). This technique allowed for good visualization of the maxillary sinus, good oncological control and a reduction in the rate of complications.

  3. Currently used systems of dental posts for endodontic treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Machado, Joana; Almeida, Paulo; Fernandes, Sampaio; Marques, Arcelina; Vaz, Mário

    2017-01-01

    An advanced stage of a tooth decay promotes an extremely damaged tooth that needs endodontic treatment to be restored. When satisfactory coronal tooth structure remains, an artificial crown can be placed without a post. On the other hand, the treatment of seriously damaged teeth often require an endodontic post. The main reason for using post is to enable rebuilding of the tooth structure prior to crown restoration. Dentists believe that endodontic posts provide a stable ...

  4. Advances in endodontics: Potential applications in clinical practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishen, Anil; Peters, Ove A.; Zehnder, Matthias; Diogenes, Anibal R.; Nair, Madhu K.

    2016-01-01

    Contemporary endodontics has seen an unprecedented advance in technology and materials. This article aimed to review some of the challenges and advances in the following sections: (1) endodontic imaging, (2) root canal preparation, (3) root canal disinfection, (4) root canal filling, and (4) regenerative endodontic procedures (REPs). Jointly, these advances are aimed at improving the state of the art and science of root canal treatment. PMID:27217630

  5. Cone beam computed tomography in Endodontics - a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, S; Durack, C; Abella, F; Shemesh, H; Roig, M; Lemberg, K

    2015-01-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) produces undistorted three-dimensional information of the maxillofacial skeleton, including the teeth and their surrounding tissues with a lower effective radiation dose than computed tomography. The aim of this paper is to: (i) review the current literature on the applications and limitations of CBCT; (ii) make recommendations for the use of CBCT in Endodontics; (iii) highlight areas of further research of CBCT in Endodontics. © 2014 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Regenerative Endodontics: Barriers and Strategies for Clinical Translation

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Sahng G.; Zhou, Jian; Ye, Ling; Cho, Shoko; Suzuki, Takahiro; Fu, Susan Y.; Yang, Rujing; Zhou, Xuedong; Mao, Jeremy J.

    2012-01-01

    Despite a great deal of enthusiasm and effort, regenerative endodontics has encountered substantial challenges towards clinical translation. Recent adoption by the American Dental Association (ADA) of evoked pulp bleeding in immature permanent teeth is an important step for regenerative endodontics. However, there is no regenerative therapy for the majority of endodontic diseases. Simple recapitulation of cell therapy and tissue engineering strategies that are under development for other orga...

  7. Clinical and radiographic evaluation of maxillary central incisors exposure in patients undergoing maxillary advancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme dos Santos Trento

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Patients with dentofacial deformities may undergo orthodontic or orthodontic-surgical treatment. Both modalities can affect esthetics. Objective: This study aims to evaluate clinical and radiographic changes in exposure of maxillary central incisors occurring after orthognathic surgery for maxillary advancement. Methods: A total of 17 patients who underwent orthognathic surgery for maxillary advancement between September, 2010 and July, 2011 were selected. Exposure of maxillary central incisors was evaluated clinically and by lateral cephalograms. Measurements were taken one week before and three months after surgery. Data were paired in terms of sex, age, nasolabial angle, height and thickness of the upper lip, the amount of maxillary advancement, clinical exposure and inclination of maxillary central incisor by statistical tests (CI 95%. Results: After maxillary advancement, incisor clinical exposure had increased even with relaxed lips and under forced smile. Moreover, there was a mean increase of 23.33% revealed by lateral cephalograms. There was an inverse correlation between upper lip thickness and incisors postsurgical exposure revealed by radiographic images (p = 0.002. Conclusions: Significant changes in the exposure of maxillary central incisors occur after maxillary advancement, under the influence of some factors, especially lip thickness.

  8. Outcome of Endodontically Treated Teeth Diagnosed With Cracked Tooth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    However, variable symptoms complicate the diagnosis (9). In a study of 32 patients presenting with diffuse longstanding orofacial pain eventually...883-92. 22)Byrnjulsen A, Fristad I, Grevstad T, Hals-Kvinnsland I. Incompletely fractured teeth associated with diffuse longstanding orofacial pain ...cracked tooth is highly associated with discomfort. Patients often describe a momentary, sudden, sharp, lancinating pain that results in continuous tooth

  9. Regenerative endodontics: barriers and strategies for clinical translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Jeremy J; Kim, Sahng G; Zhou, Jian; Ye, Ling; Cho, Shoko; Suzuki, Takahiro; Fu, Susan Y; Yang, Rujing; Zhou, Xuedong

    2012-07-01

    Regenerative endodontics has encountered substantial challenges toward clinical translation. The adoption by the American Dental Association of evoked pulp bleeding in immature permanent teeth is an important step for regenerative endodontics. However, there is no regenerative therapy for most endodontic diseases. Simple recapitulation of cell therapy and tissue engineering strategies that are under development for other organ systems has not led to clinical translation in regeneration endodontics. Recent work using novel biomaterial scaffolds and growth factors that orchestrate the homing of host endogenous cells represents a departure from traditional cell transplantation approaches and may accelerate clinical translation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Soft Tissue Changes in Cleft Lip and Palate Patients: Anterior Maxillary Distraction versus Conventional Le-Fort I Osteotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markose, Eldho; Paulose, Joby; Paul, Eldho T

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare the soft tissue changes after maxillary advancement in patients with maxillary deficiency associated with cleft lip and palate (CLP) by two approaches-anterior maxillary distraction (AMD) and advancement LeFort I osteotomy (ALO). Twenty patients with maxillary hypoplasia associated with cleft lip and palate who had undergone either LeFort I osteotomy or distraction osteogenesis with maxillary advancement were included in this study. Lateral cephalogram taken at various intervals of time were used to evaluate soft tissue and hard tissue changes over time. In both groups, vertical as well as horizontal changes in pronasale was well observed. A substantial increase in nasal parameters was noted in case of AMD group in comparison to ALO. Though maxillary advancement was evident in both the groups, a significant and consistent change was observed in AMD. Significant vertical and horizontal changes were seen with respect to subnasale and labrale superius in AMD group. Soft tissue as well as hard tissue relapse was greater in ALO group than AMD group. Significant soft tissue and hard tissue changes were clearly observed in both the groups, but the treatment results were more consistent in cases treated with AMD. Hence AMD could be considered as a better treatment of choice in cases of maxillary hypoplasia associated with cleft lip and palate.

  11. Maxillary Central Incisor with Two Roots: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Khojastehpour

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available A 16 year old female was referred to an oral and maxillofacial radiologist for evaluation of a radiolucent area at mesial radicular aspect of right maxillary central incisor which was detected accidentally during pre-orthodontic treatment check ups. Clinicalexamination showed no particular signs or symptoms except for slightly tenderness to lateral percussion. Second radiograph with altered horizontal angulations showed a mesial supernumerary root which the radiolucency seemed to be associated with that. Inorder to treat the tooth, the composite filling was removed and canals were cleaned,shaped, and obturated by lateral condensation technique.

  12. Mucous retention cyst of the maxillary sinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruprecht, A; Batniji, S; el-Neweihi, E

    1986-12-01

    The mucous retention cyst is not a rare phenomenon. The incidence of dental patients was determined. Of 1685 patient radiographs reviewed, 44 (2.6%) had one or more mucous retention cysts in the maxillary sinuses.

  13. Postoperative Maxillary Cyst: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asiye Şafak Bulut

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Postoperative maxillary cyst is a quite rare delayed complication of surgical intervention associated with maxillary sinuses. It occurs many years after surgery. This paper describes a 54-year-old woman presenting with swelling of left cheek for seven-years duration. The orthopantomograph revealed a unilocular cystic radiolucency with well-defined margins in left maxillary sinus. In the computerized tomography, the cyst had a sclerotic wall with bony condensations. Aspiration cytology revealed many neutrophil leukocytes. Cyst was drained and enucleated. Histopathologically, it had a fibrous wall with inflammation and focal reactive bone formation and lined by a respiratory-type epithelium. In the clinical history, it is learned that she had a maxillary sinus surgery 8 years ago and the diagnosis was made considering the clinical and histopathological findings.

  14. Rotary endodontics in primary teeth - A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Sageena; Anandaraj, S; Issac, Jyoti S; John, Sheen A; Harris, Anoop

    2016-01-01

    Endodontic treatment in primary teeth can be challenging and time consuming, especially during canal preparation, which is considered one of the most important steps in root canal therapy. The conventional instrumentation technique for primary teeth remains the "gold-standard" over hand instrumentation, which makes procedures much more time consuming and adversely affects both clinicians and patients. Recently nickel-titanium (Ni-Ti) rotary files have been developed for use in pediatric endodontics. Using rotary instruments for primary tooth pulpectomies is cost effective and results in fills that are consistently uniform and predictable. This article reviews the use of nickel-titanium rotary files as root canal instrumentation in primary teeth. The pulpectomy technique is described here according to different authors and the advantages and disadvantages of using rotary files are discussed.

  15. Characterization of experimental cements with endodontic goal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dantas, A.M.X.; Sousa, W.J.B.; Oliveira, E.D.C.; Carrodeguas, R.G.; Fook, M.V. Lia; Universidade Estadual da Paraiba

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed to characterize experimental endodontic cements using as comparative parameter MTA cement. Two experimental endodontic cements were assessed: one based on 95% tri-strontium aluminate and 5% gypsum (CE1) and another based on 50% Sr_3Al_2O_6 and 50% non-structural white cement (CE2). Experimental cements were manipulated and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), coupled to EDS mode, X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and Thermogravimetric (TG) analysis. Data analysis demonstrated that the particles of the materials used presented varied shapes and sizes, with similar elements and crystalline behavior. However, CE1 presented increased mass loss. Experimental cements presents similarities to MTA, nevertheless, further studies are encourage to determinate comparative properties with the commercially material. (author)

  16. Management pain and anxiety in endodontic treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andi Sumidarti

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Dental pain is a common symptom that most often causes patient to seek dentist. A survey conducted by the American Association of Endodontics revealed that more than half patients who come to dentist have experienced pain, which originate from the teeth or of the surrounding tissue, can causes difficulties in handling, also the anxiety of the patient. Understanding the pain experienced by patient will help dentist to determine when to make an action. Most patient being fear with pain, so they delay to getting treatment from dentist, and led to the development of further infection and inflammation. Aim of this paper is to improve the understanding of pharmacology and procedures for pain and anxiety management in endodontic treatment. So, it was importance of determining accurate diagnosis, management and drug administration.

  17. Effect of cyclic loading on fracture strength of endodontically treated teeth restored with conventional and esthetic posts Efeito da carga cíclica na resistência de dentes tratados endodonticamente restaurados com pinos dentários convencionais e estéticos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuar Antônio Xible

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Esthetic post and core systems were recently introduced. There are few reports regarding their behavior under cyclic loading. OBJECTIVES: This study compared the effect of cyclic loading on survival rate, residual strength and mode of fracture of endodontically treated teeth restored with esthetic and direct metallic post systems subjected to mechanical cyclic loading. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty canines were endodontically treated, decoronated and prepared for metal free ceramic crowns, leaving 1.5 mm of dentin for ferrule effect. They were distributed in 3 groups and restored as follows: group 1 with zirconia posts (Cosmopost and glass-ceramic cores (IPS Empress Cosmopost; group 2 with fiber reinforced composite posts (FibreKor and group 3 with titanium posts (AZthec Anchor. Direct resin composite (Build It FR Resin Composite was used as core in groups 2 and 3. All specimens were restored with all ceramic crowns (IPS Empress 2. A resin cement/adhesive system (Cement It/Bond It Primer A+B was used to lute the posts to root canals and metal free porcelain crowns to the teeth preparation. Specimens were subjected to mechanical load of 250 N for 500,000x at a frequency of 1.7 Hz and then to static load until failure in a universal testing machine. Data were analyzed using One-way ANOVA and Fischer Exact tests alpha=0.05. RESULTS: All groups had 100% survival rate after cyclic loading; fracture strength values (SD in N were: group 1 = 886.5(170.6, group 2 = 762.2(113.6 and group 3 = 768.9(72.9; there was no difference among groups (p=0.08; the percentage of mode of favorable fracture found was: group 1 = 60%, group 2 = 90% and group 3 = 50%; there was no correlation between the mode of failure and post and core system used (P=0.142. CONCLUSIONS: Esthetic post and core systems showed statistically equivalent fracture strength values, mode of failure and survival rate compared to conventional direct metallic post and resin composite

  18. Recent considerations in regenerative endodontic treatment approaches

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    Hacer Aksel

    2014-09-01

    Conclusion: Although the regenerative treatment approaches have good clinical outcomes in the majority of case reports, the outcomes are unpredictable. Since the current clinical protocols for regenerative endodontics do not fully fulfill the triad of tissue engineering ((growth factors, scaffold and stem cells, further translational studies are required to achieve more pulp- and dentin-like tissue in the root canal system to achieve pulp regeneration.

  19. Microbiologic endodontic status of young traumatized tooth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumotte, Karla; Bombana, Antonio C; Cai, Silvana

    2011-12-01

    Traumatic dental injuries could expose the dentin and, even the pulp, to the oral environment, making possible their contamination. The presence of microorganisms causes pulpal disease and further a tecidual clutter in the periradicular region. The therapy of periradicular pathosis is the consequence of a correct diagnoses which depends on the knowledge of the nature and complexity of endodontic infections. As there is no information on the microbiology of primary endodontic infection in young teeth, the aim of the current study was to investigate the microbiologic status of root canals from permanent young teeth with primary endodontic infection. Twelve patients with the need for endodontic treatment participated in the study. The selected teeth were uniradicular and had an incomplete root formation. They had untreated necrotic pulp. After the access preparation, nineteen microbiologic samples were obtained from the root canals with sterile paper points. Afterwards, the paper points were pooled in a sterile tube containing 2 ml of prereduced transport fluid. The samples were diluted and spread onto plates with selective medium for Enterococcus spp. and for yeast species and onto plates with non-selective medium. A quantitative analysis was performed. The mean number of cultivable bacterial cells in the root canals was 5.7 × 10(6). In four samples (21.05%) black pigmented species were recovered and the mean number of cells was 6.5 × 10(5). One specimen (5.25%) showed the growth of Enterococcus species and the mean number of cells in this case was of 1.5 × 10(4) . The results showed a root canal microbiota with similar design as seen in completely formed teeth. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  20. [The application of laser in endodontics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, W X; Liu, N N; Wang, X L; He, X Y

    2016-08-01

    Since laser was introduced in the field of medicine in 1970's, its application range has continuously expanded. The application of laser in endodontics also increased due to its safety and effectiveness in dental treatments. The majority of the laser application researches in dentistry focused on dentin hypersensitivity, removal of carious tissues, tooth preparations, pulp capping or pulpotomy, and root canal treatment. In this article, we reviewed literature on the effects of laser in the treatments of dental and pulp diseases.

  1. Antimicrobial Agents Used in Endodontic Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina George Kudiyirickal

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Biomechanical preparation alone does not completely eradicate microorganisms from the root canal, hence the next logical step is to perform root canal procedures in conjunction with antimicrobials. The use of an antimicrobial agent improves the efficacy and prognosis of endodontic treatment. This review enumerates the most widely used antimicrobial agents, their mechanism of action and their potential use in reducing the microbial load.

  2. Positional relationship between the maxillary sinus floor and the apex of the maxillary first molar using cone beam computed tomograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyung Hwa; Koh, Kwang Joon

    2008-01-01

    To assess the positional relationship between the maxillary sinus floor and the apex of the maxillary first molar using cone beam computed tomograph (CBCT). CBCTs from 127 subjects were analysed. A total of 134 maxillary first molars were classified according to their vertical and horizontal positional relationship to the maxillary sinus floor and measured according to the distance between the maxillary sinus floor and the maxillary first molar. Type III (The root projected laterally on the sinus cavity but its apex is outside the sinus boundaries) was dominated between 10 and 19 years and type I (The root apex was not in contact with the cortical borders of the sinus) was dominated (P<0.05) between 20 and 72 years on the vertical relationship between the maxillary sinus floor and the apex of the maxillary first molar. The maxillary sinus floor was located more at the apex (78.2%) than at the furcation (21.3%) for the palatal root. The distance from the root apex to the maxillary sinus floor confined to type I was increased according to the ages (P<0.05). Type M (The maxillary sinus floor was located between the buccal and the palatal root) was most common (72.4%) on the horizontal relationship between the maxillary sinus floor and the apex of the maxillary first molar. CBCT can provide highly qualified images for the maxillary sinus floor and the root apex of the maxillary first molar.

  3. Quantitative three-dimensional analysis of root canal curvature in maxillary first molars using micro-computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong-Ki; Ha, Byung-Hyun; Choi, Jeong-Ho; Heo, Seok-Mo; Perinpanayagam, Hiran

    2006-10-01

    In endodontic therapy, access and instrumentation are strongly affected by root canal curvature. However, the few studies that have actually measured curvature are mostly from two-dimensional radiographs. The purpose of this study was to measure the three-dimensional (3D) canal curvature in maxillary first molars using micro-computed tomography (microCT) and mathematical modeling. Extracted maxillary first molars (46) were scanned by microCT (502 image slices/tooth, 1024 X 1024 pixels, voxel size of 19.5 x 19.5 x 39.0 microm) and their canals reconstructed by 3D modeling software. The intersection of major and minor axes in the canal space of each image slice were connected to create an imaginary central axis for each canal. The radius of curvature of the tangential circle was measured and inverted as a measure of curvature using custom-made mathematical modeling software. Root canal curvature was greatest in the apical third and least in the middle third for all canals. The greatest curvatures were in the mesiobuccal (MB) canal (0.76 +/- 0.48 mm(-1)) with abrupt curves, and the least curvatures were in the palatal (P) canal (0.38 +/- 0.34 mm(-1)) with a gradual curve. This study has measured the 3D curvature of root canals in maxillary first molars and reinforced the value of microCT with mathematical modeling.

  4. 10-year follow-up of calcifying odontogenic cyst in the periapical region of vital maxillary central incisor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalhosa, Artur Aburad; de Araújo Estrela, Cyntia Rodrigues; Borges, Alvaro Henrique; Guedes, Orlando Aguirre; Estrela, Carlos

    2014-10-01

    Radiographic images may lead to misinterpretations of lesions of endodontic and nonendodontic origin. This report describes a case of a 10-year follow-up of a calcifying odontogenic cyst (COC) in the periapical region of a vital maxillary central incisor in a 9-year-old boy. The patient revealed a history of a swelling in the periapical area of tooth #9. The patient denied any dental trauma or history of pain. Clinical examination revealed no mobility, but there was discrete discomfort when horizontal pressure was applied. Pulp vitality was present in all maxillary anterior teeth. Radiographs revealed an oval radiolucent lesion in the periapical region of maxillary central incisor. The therapeutic option was enucleation of the periapical lesion and histologic examination of the specimen. Microscopic findings suggested the diagnosis of a COC. At a follow-up visit 10 years after surgery, panoramic and periapical radiographs showed new bone formation; the patient did not have any pain, and pulp vitality was maintained in all teeth in this area. A COC should be part of the differential diagnosis of other jaw lesions, such as apical periodontitis. The definitive diagnosis of a COC can only be made after microscopic evaluation of the specimen. The follow-up is a helpful reference because it confirms the survival of pulp tissue and no recurrence of the COC. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Patients’ Perceptions of Endodontic Treatment as Part of Public Health Services: A Qualitative Study

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    José Leonardo Barbosa Melgaço-Costa

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Evaluations by patients constitute an important part of the process of improving health services. This study examined patients’ perceptions of secondary dental care in three cities in Minas Gerais, Brazil based on the endodontic treatment received. Data were collected using semi-structured interviews (addressing access, treatment and results and a field diary (direct observations and report of professionals. The interviews were audiotaped, fully transcribed, and analyzed using content analysis. Two principal themes were identified: access to service and quality of service. The difficulties in accessing service were associated with the insufficient number of professionals to meet the high demand for endodontic treatment, problems in referring from primary to secondary care and geographic barriers. Service quality was related to the presence/absence of pain and anxiety that patients experienced, the time and number of sessions required to complete treatment, how patients were treated by dentists, and whether those patients would recommend the service to other patients. Access to endodontic treatment was a problem emphasized by users, and satisfaction with the quality of the service was more related to how patients were treated than to the technical competence of the dentist.

  6. Orthodontic Management of Congenitally Missing Maxillary Lateral Incisors: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Paduano, Sergio; Cioffi, Iacopo; Rongo, Roberto; Cupo, Antonello; Bucci, Rosaria; Valletta, Rosa

    2014-01-01

    This case report describes the orthodontic treatment of a woman, aged 15 years, with permanent dentition, brachyfacial typology, with congenitally missing maxillary lateral incisors. Multibracket straightwire fixed appliance was used to open the space for dental implant placement, and treat the impaired occlusion. The missing lateral incisors were substituted with oral implants.

  7. Long-term evaluation of Class II subdivision treatment with unilateral maxillary first molar extraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Livas, Christos; Pandis, Nikolaos; Booij, Johan Willem; Katsaros, Christos; Ren, Yijin

    Objective: To evaluate the long-term effects of asymmetrical maxillary first molar (M1) extraction in Class II subdivision treatment. Materials and Methods: Records of 20 Class II subdivision whites (7 boys, 13 girls; mean age, 13.0 years; SD, 1.7 years) consecutively treated with the Begg technique

  8. Orthodontic Management of Congenitally Missing Maxillary Lateral Incisors: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Paduano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report describes the orthodontic treatment of a woman, aged 15 years, with permanent dentition, brachyfacial typology, with congenitally missing maxillary lateral incisors. Multibracket straightwire fixed appliance was used to open the space for dental implant placement, and treat the impaired occlusion. The missing lateral incisors were substituted with oral implants.

  9. Endodontic cellulitis 'flare-up'. Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matusow, R J

    1995-02-01

    Endodontic cellulitis involves facial swelling which can vary from mild to severe and can occur as a primary case or a flare-up following initial treatment of asymptomatic teeth with periapical lesions. The microbial spectrum in primary cases involves a significant mixture of anaerobic and facultative aerobic microbes, chiefly streptococci. In a previous study, cultures from flare-up cases, utilizing the same anaerobic techniques as in primary cases, revealed an absence of obligate anaerobes and an 80 per cent incidence of facultative aerobic streptococci. These cases also revealed a significant time lapse from onset of symptoms to the cellulitis phase. No sex or age factors were noted in the primary or flare-up cases. The purpose of this case report is to restate a traditional theory, namely, the alteration of the oxidation/reduction potential (Eh), as a major factor for endodontic cellulitis flare-ups; to confirm the pathogenic potential of oral facultative streptococci; and that asymptomatic endodontic lesions tend to exist with mixed aerobic/anaerobic microbial flora.

  10. Activation of Alkaline Irrigation Fluids in Endodontics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence J. Walsh

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In conventional endodontic treatment, alkaline solutions of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA are used in combination to disinfect the root canal system and to eliminate debris and smear layers. An important concept that has emerged over recent years is the use of active physical methods for agitating these fluids to improve their penetration within areas that are not reached by endodontic instruments and to accelerate the chemical actions of these alkaline fluids against planktonic microorganisms, biofilms, soft tissue remnants and smear layers. Ultrasonic agitation and more recently pulsed lasers have emerged as two promising methods for activating endodontic irrigation fluids. Ultrasonic agitation with piezoelectric devices employs a moving tip, while laser agitation uses a stationary tip. Both methods cause cavitation, followed by implosions and shear forces which assist with debridement. Fluid streaming further enhances the activity of the fluids. While agitation enhances performance of irrigants, extrusion of fluids from the root canal during activation is a hazard that must be controlled.

  11. Diversity of spirochetes in endodontic infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Mitsuo; Siqueira, José F; Rôças, Isabela N; Benno, Yoshimi

    2009-05-01

    The diversity of spirochetes in primary endodontic infections of teeth with chronic apical periodontitis or acute apical abscesses was investigated using 16S rRNA gene clone library analysis. The prevalences of three common cultivable oral Treponema species were also determined using species-specific nested PCR. All detected spirochetes belonged to the genus Treponema. Overall, 28 different taxa were identified from the 431 clones sequenced: 9 cultivable and validly named species, 1 cultivable as-yet-uncharacterized strain, and 18 as-yet-uncultivated phylotypes, 17 of which were novel. The large majority of clones (94%) were from cultivable named species. The numbers of Treponema species/phylotypes per selected positive sample ranged from 2 to 12. Species-specific nested PCR detected T. denticola, T. socranskii, and T. maltophilum in 59 (66%), 33 (37%), and 26 (29%) of the 90 cases of primary endodontic infections, respectively. Clone library analysis revealed diverse Treponema species/phylotypes as part of the microbiota associated with asymptomatic and symptomatic (abscess) endodontic infections. Although several as-yet-uncultivated Treponema phylotypes were disclosed, including novel taxa, cultivable named species were more abundant and frequently detected.

  12. Endodontic-related facial paresthesia: systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Flávio R; Coutinho, Mariana S; Gonçalves, Lucio S

    2014-01-01

    Paresthesia is a neurosensitivity disorder caused by injury to the neural tissue. It is characterized by a burning or twinging sensation or by partial loss of local sensitivity. Paresthesia related to endodontic treatment can occur because of extravasation of filling material or the intracanal dressing, as a consequence of periapical surgery or because of periapical infection. A literature review of paresthesia in endodontics was undertaken, with a view to identifying and discussing the most commonly affected nerves, the diagnostic process and the treatment options. Among reported cases, the most commonly affected nerves were those passing through the jaw: the inferior alveolar nerve, the mental nerve and the lingual nerve. To diagnose paresthesia, the endodontist must carry out a complete medical history, panoramic and periapical radiography, and (in some cases) computed tomography, as well as mechanoceptive and nociceptive tests. To date, no specific treatment for endodontic-related paresthesia has been described in the literature, since the problem may be related to a variety of causes.

  13. Use of repeat anterior maxillary distraction to correct residual midface hypoplasia in cleft patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Sunil; Krishna, Shreya; Bansal, Avi

    2017-12-01

    The study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of performing a second, repeat anterior maxillary distraction (AMD) to treat residual cleft maxillary hypoplasia. Five patients between the ages of 12 to 15 years with a history of AMD and with residual cleft maxillary hypoplasia were included in the study. Inclusion was irrespective of gender, type of cleft lip and palate, and the amount of advancement needed. Repeat AMD was executed in these patients 4 to 5 years after the primary AMD procedure to correct the cleft maxillary hypoplasia that had developed since the initial procedure. Orthopantomogram (OPG) and lateral cephalograms were taken for evaluation preoperatively, immediately after distraction, after consolidation, and one year postoperatively. The data obtained was tabulated and a Mann Whitney U-test was used for statistical comparisons. At the time of presentation, a residual maxillary hypoplasia was observed with a well maintained distraction gap on the OPG which ruled out the occurrence of a relapse. Favorable movement of the segments without any resistance was seen in all patients. Mean maxillary advancement of 10.56 mm was achieved at repeat AMD. Statistically significant increases in midfacial length, SNA angle, and nasion perpendicular to point A distance was achieved ( P =0.012, P =0.011, and P =0.012, respectively). Good profile was achieved for all patients. Minimal transient complications, for example anterior open bite and bleeding episodes, were managed. Addressing the problem of cleft maxillary hypoplasia at an early age (12-15 years) is beneficial for the child. Residual hypoplasia may develop in some patients, which may require additional corrective procedures. The results of our study show that AMD can be repeated when residual deformity develops with the previous procedure having no negative impact on the results of the repeat procedure.

  14. Detection of Mesiobuccal Canal in Maxillary Molars and Distolingual Canal in Mandibular Molars by Dental CT: A Retrospective Study of 100 Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushma Rathi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To detect presence of MB2 canal in maxillary molars and distolingual canal in mandibular molars by Dental CT. Material and Methods. A retrospective study of 100 Dental CTs was done. Axial and paraxial images obtained were used to assess the presence of MB2 canal in maxillary molars and distolingual canal in mandibular molars. Results. The youngest patient was of 11 years while the eldest patient was of 77 years. Males were 58 in number and females were 42 in number. MB2 canals were present in 57 patients and distolingual canal was present in 18 patients. Maximum MB2 canals were present in age group between 51 and 60 years, while distolingual canals were present in age group of 21–30 years. Conclusion. Dental CT allows adequate visualization of variation in root canal morphology and can be important diagnostic tool for successful endodontic therapy.

  15. Frequency, location, and association with dental pathology of mucous retention cysts in the maxillary sinus. A radiographic study using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Andy Wai Kan; Tanaka, Ray; Khong, Pek-Lan; von Arx, Thomas; Bornstein, Michael M

    2018-04-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the frequency, locations, and dimensions of mucous retention cysts of the maxillary sinus and analyze potential associated dental pathology. A total of 156 cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans were included in the analysis, resulting in an evaluation of 310 maxillary sinuses. The presence of mucous retention cysts (MRC) manifesting as dome-shaped radiopacities in the sinus was diagnosed. Their locations were recorded, and dimensions (mm) were measured in coronal and sagittal/axial slices. The patients were grouped into (a) patients/sinuses with MRCs (test), and (b) patients/sinuses with healthy or any other changes (control) for further comparison and evaluation. There were 40 sinuses (12.9%) with a presence of a total of 56 MRCs. The mean age of involved patients was 29.0 years. The analysis showed that gender, age, sinus side, status of dentition, endodontic status, and periodontal status did not have a significant influence on the presence of MRCs when compared between test and control groups. Age and endodontic status exhibited a significant association with cyst location. Most of the sinuses analyzed (79.5%) did not present any MRC, and only 28.6% of the cysts diagnosed were found on the floor of the maxillary sinus. The mean dimension of the MRCs measured 6.28 ± 2.93 mm. No influencing factors on the presence or absence of MRCs were found in the present study. Most MRCs were not located on the floor of maxillary sinus. Future studies should assess their impact on surgical interventions in the sinus.

  16. Comparison of Single Visit Post Endodontic Pain Using Mtwo Rotary and Hand K-File Instruments: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Kashefinejad

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Pain is an unpleasant outcome of endodontic treatment that can be unbearable to patients. Instrumentation techniques may affect the frequency and intensity of post-endodontic pain. This study aimed to compare single visit post endodontic pain using Mtwo (NiTi rotary and hand K-file instruments.Materials and Methods: In this randomized controlled trial, 60 teeth with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis in 53 patients were selected and randomly assigned into two groups of 30 teeth. In group A, the root canals were prepared with Mtwo (NiTi rotary instruments. In group B, the root canals were prepared with hand K-file instruments. Pain assessment was implemented using visual analog scale (VAS at four, eight, 12 and 24 hours after treatment. The acquired data were analyzed using chi-square, Mann-Whitney U and Student’s t-test (P<0.05.Results: Patients treated with rotary instruments experienced significantly less post-endodontic pain than those treated with hand instruments (P<0.001.Conclusion: The use of Mtwo (NiTi rotary instruments in root canal preparation contributed to lower incidence of postoperative pain than hand K-files.

  17. Maxillary anterior segmental distraction osteogenesis with 2 different types of distractors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hye-Young; Hwang, Chung-Ju; Kim, Hee-Jin; Yu, Hyung-Seog; Cha, Jung-Yul

    2012-05-01

    Maxillary anterior segmental distraction osteogenesis (DO) has been the alternative treatment option for patients with midfacial retrusion. To investigate a potentially more effective maxillary anterior segmental DO, a newly designed intraoral alveolar distractor was applied. The objectives of this study were to investigate the skeletal and dental effects of maxillary anterior segmental DO and the relapse pattern. The study was carried out for 8 patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate (mean age, 16 years 7 months). Four patients were treated with an intraoral appliance (IA), and the remaining with a rigid external distractor (RED). Dental and skeletal measurements were obtained for both groups. These measurements were compared for different time points including pre-DO (T1), post-DO (T2), postconsolidation (T3), and 1-year follow-up (T4). Horizontal change of A point was significantly larger after distraction period (T2) in the RED group (mean, 11.0 mm; median, 10.1 mm) than in the IA group (mean, 6.6 mm; median, 7.4 mm) (P distraction, showing a significant difference between groups (P Maxillary anterior segmental DO is effective for the treatment of patients with cleft lip and palate. The alveolar space is regained, and the facial profile is improved without velopharyngeal problems. Superior results are obtained using the RED appliance for maxillary anterior segmental DO relative to the use of the intraoral distractor appliance.

  18. Mandibular effects of maxillary distraction osteogenesis in cleft lip and palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doucet, J-C; Herlin, C; Bigorre, M; Bäumler, C; Subsol, G; Captier, G

    2014-06-01

    Maxillary distraction osteogenesis (DO) is a reliable treatment for severe maxillary deficiency in cleft lip and palate (CLP). The objective was to analyze its long-term effects on the mandible. A retrospective study of 24 CLP treated with maxillary DO using the Polley and Figueroa technique was done; patients were followed for more than 4 years. Preoperative (T0), 6-12 months postoperative (T1), and ≥ 4 years postoperative (T2) cephalometric radiographs were evaluated. A classical cephalometric analysis was used to assess treatment stability, and a Procrustes superimposition method was used to assess local changes in the shape of the mandible. The mean age of patients at T0 was 15.4 ± 4.1 years. SNA increased at T1 and T2 (P Maxillary DO in CLP had no significant effect on the shape or rotation of the mandible. The maxillary advancement remained stable after 1 year. Copyright © 2014 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Use of anterior maxillary distraction osteogenesis in two cleft lip and palate patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Dhirendra; Ghassemi, Alireza; Ghassemi, Mehrangiz; Showkatbakhsh, Rahman; Jamilian, Abdolreza

    2015-01-01

    Distraction osteogenesis (DO) has become a mainstream surgical technique for patients with jaw deformities. The aim of this study was to report the effect of DO done by a hyrax screw incorporated in an acrylic plate in the treatment of two maxillary deficient cases with cleft lip and palate. Two patients, a 24-year-old female and a 29-year-old male who suffered from maxillary deficiency and cleft lip and palate, were treated by DO. After making vertical cuts between the premolars on both sides and horizontal cuts similar to Le Fort 1, a hyrax screw was mounted on an acrylic plate for the slow anteroposterior expansion of maxillary arch. The expansion was achieved by turning the hyrax screw 0.8 mm per day after the latency period. Treatment was discontinued after achieving satisfactory over jet and occlusion. This study showed that anterior maxillary distraction is a reliable technique for correction of midfacial deformity arising out of cleft lip and palate. Incidences of complications are negligible compared to total maxillary distraction. PMID:26668459

  20. Use of anterior maxillary distraction osteogenesis in two cleft lip and palate patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Dhirendra; Ghassemi, Alireza; Ghassemi, Mehrangiz; Showkatbakhsh, Rahman; Jamilian, Abdolreza

    2015-01-01

    Distraction osteogenesis (DO) has become a mainstream surgical technique for patients with jaw deformities. The aim of this study was to report the effect of DO done by a hyrax screw incorporated in an acrylic plate in the treatment of two maxillary deficient cases with cleft lip and palate. Two patients, a 24-year-old female and a 29-year-old male who suffered from maxillary deficiency and cleft lip and palate, were treated by DO. After making vertical cuts between the premolars on both sides and horizontal cuts similar to Le Fort 1, a hyrax screw was mounted on an acrylic plate for the slow anteroposterior expansion of maxillary arch. The expansion was achieved by turning the hyrax screw 0.8 mm per day after the latency period. Treatment was discontinued after achieving satisfactory over jet and occlusion. This study showed that anterior maxillary distraction is a reliable technique for correction of midfacial deformity arising out of cleft lip and palate. Incidences of complications are negligible compared to total maxillary distraction.

  1. Trans-sinusal maxillary distraction for correction of midfacial hypoplasia: long-term clinical results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadjmi, N; Schutyser, F; Van Erum, R

    2006-10-01

    Maxillary distraction osteogenesis is indicated in severe angle class III malocclusions, and severe maxillary hypoplasia among some cleft patients and other craniofacial deformities. Twenty patients, aged 8-48 years (mean 17.8+/-10.5 SD) with maxillary and midfacial hypoplasia were treated. The follow-up period was 13-65 months (mean 35+/-16.3 SD). A trans-sinusal maxillary distractor was placed intraorally at each side of the maxilla. The distraction vector was predicted using specialist software, and was transferred to the patients using stereolithographic models and individual templates. A (high) Le Fort I type osteotomy was performed. The amount of activation varied from 8 to 17.5 mm (mean 13.1+/-2.9 SD). Soft and hard tissue formation resulted in complete healing across the distraction gaps. The distractors are almost completely submerged, and can be left in place as long as necessary to avoid relapse. Wit's appraisal was used to measure the stability of the long-term distraction results. Results up to 5 years after distraction showed considerable maxillary advancement with long-term stability. Ongoing growth of the facial skeleton must be considered when distraction osteogenesis is chosen in growing patients.

  2. [Maxillary advancement osteotomy with sequelae cleft lip and palate: Dilemma between occlusion and aesthetic profile].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigneron, A; Morand, B; Lafontaine, V; Lesne, V; Lesne, C; Bettega, G

    2015-11-01

    Maxillary hypoplasia is a common sequela of cleft lip and palate. Its surgical treatment consists in a maxillary advancement by distraction or by conventional orthognathic surgery but morphological results are unpredictable. Our goal in this study was to see if the esthetical results (on the lip and the nose) of maxillary advancement were correlated to the preservation of lateral incisor space of the cleft side. This retrospective study included 38 patients operated between 2002 and 2013. Unilateral clefts were studied independently from bilateral clefts. Profile aesthetics was evaluated independently and subjectively by two surgeons and scored on an 8-point scale. The result was classified as "good" if the score was superior or equal to 6. The score was correlated to the following parameters: amount of maxillary advancement, upper incisor axis, preservation of the missing lateral incisor space. In the "good result" group, the space of the lateral incisor was less often preserved. The nasolabial angle was more open and the upper central incisor axis more vertical. These results were more pronounced in bilateral clefts, but also found in unilateral clefts. Under reservation of the subjective evaluation and of the small number of patients, it seemed that lateral incisor space closure improved the profile of patients treated by maxillary advancement for cleft lip and palate sequelae. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Stability of rapid maxillary expansion and facemask therapy: a long-term controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masucci, Caterina; Franchi, Lorenzo; Defraia, Efisio; Mucedero, Manuela; Cozza, Paola; Baccetti, Tiziano

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this prospective controlled study was to evaluate the long-term effects of rapid maxillary expansion and facemask therapy in Class III subjects. Twenty-two subjects (9 boys, 13 girls; mean age, 9.2 years ± 1.6) with Class III disharmony were treated consecutively with rapid maxillary expansion and facemask therapy followed by fixed appliances. The patients were reevaluated at the end of the 2-phase treatment (mean age, 14.5 years ± 1.9) and then recalled about 8.5 years after the end of rapid maxillary expansion and facemask treatment (mean age, 18.7 years ± 2.1). Two groups of controls with untreated Class III malocclusion were used for statistical comparisons of the short-term and long-term intervals. Statistical comparisons were performed with the Mann-Whitney U test. In the long term, no significant differences in maxillary changes were recorded, whereas the treatment group showed significantly smaller increases in mandibular protrusion. The sagittal maxillomandibular skeletal variables maintained significant improvements in the treatment group vs the control groups. In the long term, rapid maxillary expansion and facemask therapy led to successful outcomes in about 73% of the Class III patients. Favorable skeletal changes were mainly due to significant improvements in the sagittal position of the mandible. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Perioperative incidents associated with internal maxillary distraction osteogenesis: a retrospective study of 20 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristian, Andersen; Erik, Nørholt Sven; Annelise, Küseler; John, Jensen; Klit, Pedersen Thomas

    2012-12-01

    This retrospective study aimed to assess the frequency and distribution of incidents encountered during the perioperative period of maxillary distraction with internal devices. The perioperative period was defined as the period between device placement and removal. Records of 20 patients treated during 2004-2011 with internal maxillary distraction osteogenesis were examined. Incidents were registered in terms of severity and need of intervention. Eighty percent of the patients experienced minor incidents, of which the most frequent were pain during activation and infections; 80% of these experienced ≥1 hard and soft tissue-related incidents, and 20% ≥1 device-related incidents. All incidents were solved with minimal or no intervention. Maxillary distraction using internal devices is a safe treatment with only minor incidents in the perioperative period. Preoperative planning and good cooperation are essential for preventing postoperative incidents. Prophylactic antibiotic treatment during the distraction period may be indicated. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Transverse maxillary and mandibular growth during and after Bionator therapy: study with metallic implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André da Costa Monini

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: This study evaluated posteroanterior cephalograms before and after treatment and long term follow-up of Class II division 1 patients treated with bionator. OBJECTIVE: The objective was to demonstrate the transverse growth of maxilla and mandible during and after bionator therapy. METHODS: Measurement of transverse dimensions between posterior maxillary and mandibular implants, as well as the distances between the buccal, gonial and antegonial points were recorded. Measurements were analyzed at three periods: T1 = before bionator therapy, T2 = after bionator therapy and T3 = 5.74 years after T2. RESULTS: There was statistically significant transverse increase due to growth and/or treatment for all variables, except for the distance between the anterior maxillary implants. CONCLUSIONS: During the study period only the anterior maxillary area did not show transverse growth.

  6. Transverse maxillary and mandibular growth during and after bionator therapy: study with metallic implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monini, André da Costa; Júnior, Luiz Gonzaga Gandini; Maia, Luiz Guilherme Martins; Pinto, Ary dos Santos

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated posteroanterior cephalograms before and after treatment and long term follow-up of Class II division 1 patients treated with bionator. The objective was to demonstrate the transverse growth of maxilla and mandible during and after bionator therapy. Measurement of transverse dimensions between posterior maxillary and mandibular implants, as well as the distances between the buccal, gonial and antegonial points were recorded. Measurements were analyzed at three periods: T1 - before bionator therapy, T2 - after bionator therapy and T3 - 5.74 years after T2. There was statistically significant transverse increase due to growth and/or treatment for all variables, except for the distance between the anterior maxillary implants. During the study period only the anterior maxillary area did not show transverse growth.

  7. Long-term results of maxillary distraction osteogenesis in nongrowing cleft: 5-years experience using internal device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirjak, D; Reyneke, J P; Janec, J; Beno, M; Kupcova, I

    2016-01-01

    Patients with cleft lip and palate (CLP) related deformities frequently have maxillary hypoplasia in all dimensions. These patients usually present with class III malocclusions, retruded midfaces and narrow hard palates. The skeletal problems can be treated by means of Le Fort I maxillary procedures. Surgical and orthodontic correction of severe maxillary hypoplasia, as often seen in CLP patients, has however proved to be challenging. The magnitude of the advancement is often hampered and the post operative stability significantly affected by palatal soft tissue scarring. The slow distraction of bone and the histogenic abilities of distraction osteogenesis (DO) have made it an atractive alternative treatment option for the management of maxillary hypoplasia in these patients. This paper presents the treatment results of 15 nongrowing CLP patients with severe maxillary hypoplasia treated by means of intra oral distraction. The mean anterior distraction of the maxillas was 12.7 mm (9-15.0 mm). The long-term cephalometric and clinical evaluation after a minimum of 60 months (mean follow-up 71 months) proved to be stable. The treatment results revealed, that distraction osteogenesis in nongrowing CLP patients with severe maxillary hypoplasia proved to be a predictable and stable option (Tab. 2, Fig. 3, Ref. 26).

  8. Maxillary advancement using distraction osteogenesis with intraoral device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takigawa, Yoko; Uematsu, Setsuko; Takada, Kenji

    2010-11-01

    This article describes the surgical orthodontic treatment of maxillary hypoplasia in a patient with cleft lip and palate using maxillary distraction osteogenesis with internal maxillary distractors. Maxillary advancement was performed to correct the retrusive maxillary facial profile and Class III malocclusion. Rotational movement of the distraction segment was made to correct the upper dental midline. Although maxillary advancement was insufficient because of unexpected breakage of the intraoral distractor after completion of the distraction, skeletal traction with a face mask compensated for the shortage. Successful esthetic improvement and posttreatment occlusal stability were achieved with no discernible relapse after 2 years of retention.

  9. A case report of mucoid retention cyst in maxillary sinus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Han Pyoung [College of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1973-11-15

    The author have observed mucoid retention cyst in the right maxillary sinus of the patient, 41 year old woman, complained discharging of purulent exudate on the right maxillary molar area, and obtained the following conclusions; 1. The mucoid retention cyst in maxillary sinus casts a faint dome shaped shadow into the radiolucent image of maxillary sinus. 2. The mucoid retention cyst in maxillary sinus may occurred without the history of trauma. 3. Intraoral standard films are also valuable for the interpretation of the lesions in maxillary sinus but only extraoral roentgenograms.

  10. Rehabilitation of large maxillary defect with two-piece maxillary obturators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanchan P Dholam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The insertion and removal of an obturator in large maxillary defects with or without trismus is difficult. Fabrication of a two-piece obturator in such cases overcomes this problem. This article describes rehabilitation of large maxillary defects with two piece maxillary obturator of three types. All these obturators have a maxillary plate and a bulb component, which are approximated together by various techniques namely, silicone cover, embedded magnets, and press studs. Prosthetic rehabilitation of large maxillary defects with two-piece obturators offers the possibility of adequate oral rehabilitation by fabricating light weight prosthesis, which is easy to use. The bulb covers the undercut areas of the defect enhancing the facial contour and retention. It facilitates easy examination of underlying tissues, recreation of the anatomic barrier between the oral and nasal cavities and restoration of the function and esthetics. Thus, it adds to the quality of life.

  11. Pulse oximetry: a potential aid in endodontic diagnosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplan, Dan

    2010-06-01

    Pulse oximetry: review of a potential aid in endodontic diagnosis. Jafarzadeh H, Rosenberg PA. J Endod 2009;35(3):329-33. Dan Caplan, DDS, PhD. This article provided a description of pulse oximetry, its use in patient care settings, and its potential for use in endodontic diagnosis. Information not available. Comprehensive literature review. Level 3: Other evidence. Not applicable.

  12. Treatment of skeletal class III malocclusion using face mask therapy with alternate rapid maxillary expansion and constriction (Alt-RAMEC protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand Ramchandra Rathi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Class III malocclusion is very common malocclusion and can be due to maxillary retrusion, mandibular prognathism, or combination. Ellis and McNamara found a combination of maxillary retrusion and mandibular protrusion to be the most common skeletal relationship (30%. The treatment should be carried out as early as possible for permitting normal growth of the skeletal bases. Reverse pull head gear combined with maxillary expansion can effectively correct skeletal Class III malocclusion due to maxillary deficiency in growing patient. An eight-year-old female patient with chief complaint of prognathic mandible and anterior crossbite was successfully treated in duration of 5 months with facemask and expansion therapy based on Alternate Rapid Maxillary Expansion and Constriction (Alt-RAMEC protocol.

  13. Guided Endodontics: a novel treatment approach for teeth with pulp canal calcification and apical pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krastl, Gabriel; Zehnder, Marc S; Connert, Thomas; Weiger, Roland; Kühl, Sebastian

    2016-06-01

    To present a new treatment approach for teeth with pulp canal calcification (PCC) which require root canal treatment. A 15-year-old male patient presented with pain of his upper right central incisor. The tooth showed signs of apical periodontitis. Due to PCC, location of the root canal was judged to be difficult and associated with a high risk of perforation. A cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and an intra-oral surface scan were performed and matched using software for virtual implant planning. After planning the position of the drill for root canal location, a virtual template was designed, and the data were exported as an STL file and sent to a 3D printer for template fabrication. The template was positioned on the anterior maxillary teeth. A specific drill was used to penetrate through the obliterated part of the root canal and obtain minimally invasive access to the apical part. The root canal was accessible at 9 mm distance from the apex. Further root canal preparation was carried out using an endodontic rotary instrumentation system. After an interappointment dressing for 4 weeks, the root canal was filled with vertically condensed gutta-percha using an epoxy sealer. The access cavity was restored with a composite material. After 15 months, the patient was clinically asymptomatic with no pain on percussion. The radiograph showed no apical pathology. The presented guided endodontic approach seems to be a safe, clinically feasible method to locate root canals and prevent root perforation in teeth with PCC. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Maxillary distraction osteogenesis in the adolescent cleft patient: three-dimensional computed tomography analysis of linear and volumetric changes over five years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Philip Kuo-Ting; Por, Yong-Chen; Liou, Eric Jein-Wein; Chang, Frank Chun-Shin

    2011-07-01

    To assess the results of maxillary distraction osteogenesis with the Rigid External Distraction System using three-dimensional computed tomography scan volume-rendered images with respect to stability and facial growth at three time frames: preoperative (T0), 1-year postoperative (T1), and 5-years postoperative (T2). Retrospective analysis. Tertiary. A total of 12 patients with severe cleft maxillary hypoplasia were treated between June 30, 1997, and July 15, 1998. The mean age at surgery was 11 years 1 month. Le Fort I maxillary distraction osteogenesis. Distraction was started 2 to 5 days postsurgery at a rate of 1 mm per day. The consolidation period was 3 months. No face mask was used. A paired t test was used for statistical analysis. Overjet, ANB, and SNA and maxillary, pterygoid, and mandibular volumes. From T0 to T1, there were statistically significant increments of overjet, ANB, and SNA and maxillary, pterygoid, and mandibular volumes. The T1 to T2 period demonstrated a reduction of overjet (30.07%) and ANB (54.42%). The maxilla showed a stable SNA and a small but statistically significant advancement of the ANS point. There was a significant increase in the mandibular volume. However, there was no significant change in the maxillary and pterygoid volumes. Maxillary distraction osteogenesis demonstrated linear and volumetric maxillary growth during the distraction phase without clinically significant continued growth thereafter. Overcorrection is required to take into account recurrence of midface retrusion over the long term.

  15. Rare occurrence of the left maxillary horizontal third molar impaction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rare occurrence of the left maxillary horizontal third molar impaction, the right maxillary third molar vertical impaction and the left mandibular third molar vertical impaction with inferior alveolar nerve proximity in a 30 year old female: a case report.

  16. Microbial causes of endodontic flare-ups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siqueira, Jose F

    2003-07-01

    Inter-appointment flare-up is characterized by the development of pain, swelling or both, following endodontic intervention. The causative factors of flare-ups encompass mechanical, chemical and/or microbial injury to the pulp or periradicular tissues. Of these factors, microorganisms are arguably the major causative agents of flare-ups. Even though the host is usually unable to eliminate the root canal infection, mobilization and further concentration of defence components at the periradicular tissues impede spreading of infection, and a balance between microbial aggression and host defences is commonly achieved. There are some situations during endodontic therapy in which such a balance may be disrupted in favour of microbial aggression, and an acute periradicular inflammation can ensue. Situations include apical extrusion of infected debris, changes in the root canal microbiota and/or in environmental conditions caused by incomplete chemo-mechanical preparation, secondary intraradicular infections and perhaps the increase in the oxidation-reduction potential within the root canal favouring the overgrowth of the facultative bacteria. Based on these situations, preventive measures against infective flare-ups are proposed, including selection of instrumentation techniques that extrude lesser amounts of debris apically; completion of the chemo-mechanical procedures in a single visit; use of an antimicrobial intracanal medicament between appointments in the treatment of infected cases; not leaving teeth open for drainage and maintenance of the aseptic chain throughout endodontic treatment. Knowledge about the microbial causes of flare-ups and adoption of appropriate preventive measures can significantly reduce the incidence of this highly distressing and undesirable clinical phenomenon.

  17. Outcomes of radiation therapy for maxillary sinus carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komiyama, Takafumi; Kato, Daiki; Hara, Ryusuke; Itami, Jun; Onishi, Hiroshi; Kuriyama, Kengo; Tanaka Shiho; Araki, Tsutomu

    2004-01-01

    We evaluated the outcome of radiation therapy for maxillary sinus carcinoma treated in our institution. From 1984 to 2001, 48 patients with maxillary sinus carcinoma were irradiated with or without chemotherapy and surgery. Patients ranged from 20-89 years of age (median, 68 years) and included 29 men and 19 women. The clinical T factors for these patients, according to the International Union Against Cancer (UICC) classification (1997), were T2 (n=2), T3 (n=13), and T4 (n=29). Lymph node involvement was observed in 13 patients. The follow-up period ranged from 2.5 to 150 months (median, 25 months). The total radiotherapy dose ranged from 40 Gy to 72.8 Gy. Forty-three patients underwent surgery. Intra-arterial chemotherapy was delivered in 39 patients, and systemic chemotherapy was delivered in 7 patients. Fourteen patients were classified as ''unresected'' (radiation therapy with or without antrostomy), and 34 patients as ''resected'' (partial, total, or extended total maxillectomy with pre-or postoperative irradiation). The 5-year overall survival rate (OS), cause-specific survival rate (CSS), and local control rate (LC) of all patients were 52%, 64%, and 75%, respectively. There was no significant difference between the ''unresected'' and ''resected'' groups in OS, CSS, or LC. Local recurrence was observed in 12 patients. In the ''resected'' group, for local control, it was important to reduce viable tumor before maxillectomy. Preoperative ≥60 Gy irradiation was considered to be effective to reduce tumor viability. There was no significant difference between the ''unresected'' and ''resected'' groups in OS, CSS, or LC. In the ''resected'' group, preoperative irradiation ≥60 Gy was considered to be effective for local control. In radical treatment of maxillary sinus carcinoma, maxillectomy is not always necessary. Concurrent chemoradiation therapy with or without antrostomy is a reasonable treatment strategy. (author)

  18. An innovative approach in microscopic endodontics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Sunandan; Kumar, Tarun; Sharma, Jyotika; Mittal, Shifali

    2014-01-01

    The introduction of the dental operating microscope was a turning point in the history of dentistry. It triggered a rapid transition from the conventional world of macro-dentistry to the precise, detailed world of micro-dentistry. However, working at these higher-power magnifications brings the clinician into the realm where even slight hand movements are disruptive. Physiologic hand tremor is a problem resulting in difficulty in mouth mirror placement. Hence, in this paper, a new instrument was designed to overcome the drawback of hand tremors during microscopic endodontics. PMID:24944459

  19. Post-endodontic treatment of incisors and premolars among dental practitioners in Saarland: an interactive Web-based survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitov, Gergo; Dörr, Michael; Nothdurft, Frank P; Draenert, Florian; Pospiech, Peter R

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the trend of dental practitioners in the federal state of Saarland in Germany in regard to restoring endodontically treated teeth using a Web-based survey. An interactive Web-based survey instrument was developed, including seven clinical scenarios, presented by photographs of natural incisor and premolar with different types of cavities. Following a decision tree adapted to the clinical treatment, questions on different aspects of the post-endodontic treatment were asked. All 615 members of the Saarland Dental Association (SDA) were asked to participate in the survey. A total of 33 % completed the survey. The majority of the participants believed in the reinforcement effect of the ferrule design, as well as the post placement. The vast majority of the responding practitioners (92 %) adapted their treatment strategies to a high extent to the destruction degree of the endodontically treated tooth. Fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) posts are the most popular prefabricated post type, regardless of the cavity size and tooth localization. Significant differences between the dentists according to the degree of experience were detected only for the use of glass-ionomer cements as core buildup material. The predominant post-endodontic treatment strategies of German dental practitioners are only partly in agreement with the current literature. There is a clear trend toward the increasing use of metal-free post and core materials. Although the participants showed a general adoption of modern materials and techniques, different patterns of post-endodontic treatment were revealed that were not consistent with approaches supported by the literature.

  20. Outcomes of endodontic therapy in general practice: a study by the Practitioners Engaged in Applied Research and Learning Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Susan D; Horowitz, Allan J; Man, Martin; Wu, Hongyu; Foran, Denise; Vena, Donald A; Collie, Damon; Matthews, Abigail G; Curro, Frederick A; Thompson, Van P; Craig, Ronald G

    2012-05-01

    The authors undertook a study involving members of a dental practice-based research network to determine the outcome and factors associated with success and failure of endodontic therapy. Members in participating practices (practitioner-investigators [P-Is]) invited the enrollment of all patients seeking treatment in the practice who had undergone primary endodontic therapy and restoration in a permanent tooth three to five years previously. If a patient had more than one tooth so treated, the P-I selected as the index tooth the tooth treated earliest during the three- to five-year period. The authors excluded from the study any teeth that served as abutments for removable partial dentures or overdentures, third molars and teeth undergoing active orthodontic endodontic therapy. The primary outcome was retention of the index tooth. Secondary outcomes, in addition to extraction, that defined failure included clinical or radiographic evidence (or both) of periapical pathosis, endodontic retreatment or pain on percussion. P-Is in 64 network practices enrolled 1,312 patients with a mean (standard deviation) time to follow-up of 3.9 (0.6) years. During that period, 3.3 percent of the index teeth were extracted, 2.2 percent underwent retreatment, 3.6 percent had pain on percussion and 10.6 percent had periapical radiolucencies for a combined failure rate of 19.1 percent. The presence of preoperative periapical radiolucency with a diagnosis of either irreversible pulpitis or necrotic pulp was associated with failure after multivariate analysis, as were multiple canals, male sex and Hispanic/Latino ethnicity. These results suggest that failure rates for endodontic therapy are higher than previously reported in general practices, according to results of studies based on dental insurance claims data. The results of this study can help guide the practitioner in deciding the most appropriate course of therapy for teeth with irreversible pulpitis, necrotic pulp or periapical

  1. Maxillary first molar with 7 root canals diagnosed using cone-beam computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evaldo Rodrigues

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Root canal anatomy is complex, and the recognition of anatomic variations could be a challenge for clinicians. This case report describes the importance of cone beam computed tomographyic (CBCT imaging during endodontic treatment. A 23 year old woman was referred by her general dental practitioner with the chief complaint of spontaneous pain in her right posterior maxilla. From the clinical and radiographic findings, a diagnosis of symptomatic irreversible pulpitis was made and endodontic treatment was suggested to the patient. The patient underwent CBCT examination, and CBCT scan slices revealed seven canals: three mesiobuccal (MB1, MB2, and MB3, two distobuccal (DB1 and DB2, and two palatal (P1 and P2. Canals were successfully treated with reciprocating files and filled using single-cone filling technique. Precise knowledge of root canal morphology and its variation is important during root canal treatment. CBCT examination is an excellent tool for identifying and managing these complex root canal systems.

  2. Flare-up rate of single-visit endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trope, M

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare the flare-up rate for single-visit endodontics among teeth without radiographic or clinical signs of apical periodontitis, those with radiographic or clinical signs of apical periodontitis not previously root-treated, and those with apical periodontitis where retreatment was performed. All teeth were instrumented to a predetermined minimum size with a 0.5 per cent solution of sodium hypochlorite being used as the irrigant. The root canal was obturated without regard to the presence or absence of symptoms or diagnosis of the apical condition. The patients were given written post-operative instructions and a prescription for 600 mg ibuprofen to be taken if mild to moderate pain developed. If severe pain and/or swelling developed, the patient was instructed to telephone immediately and was considered to have had a flare-up. Teeth without signs of apical periodontitis did not have any flare-ups. One flare-up occurred in 69 teeth with signs of apical periodontitis not previously root-treated. The majority of the flare-ups (3 of 22 teeth) occurred in teeth with signs of apical periodontitis requiring retreatment.

  3. Comparison of Single Visit Post Endodontic Pain Using Mtwo Rotary and Hand K-File Instruments: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashefinejad, Mohamad; Harandi, Azade; Eram, Saeed; Bijani, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Pain is an unpleasant outcome of endodontic treatment that can be unbearable to patients. Instrumentation techniques may affect the frequency and intensity of post-endodontic pain. This study aimed to compare single visit post endodontic pain using Mtwo (NiTi) rotary and hand K-file instruments. In this randomized controlled trial, 60 teeth with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis in 53 patients were selected and randomly assigned into two groups of 30 teeth. In group A, the root canals were prepared with Mtwo (NiTi) rotary instruments. In group B, the root canals were prepared with hand K-file instruments. Pain assessment was implemented using visual analog scale (VAS) at four, eight, 12 and 24 hours after treatment. The acquired data were analyzed using chi-square, Mann-Whitney U and Student's t-test (Protary instruments experienced significantly less post-endodontic pain than those treated with hand instruments (Protary instruments in root canal preparation contributed to lower incidence of postoperative pain than hand K-files.

  4. Management of Cleft Maxillary Hypoplasia with Anterior Maxillary Distraction: Our Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacko, Tojan; Vinod, Sankar; Mani, Varghese; George, Arun; Sivaprasad, K K

    2014-12-01

    Maxillary hypoplasia is a common developmental problem in cleft lip and palate deformities. Since 1970s these deformities have traditionally been corrected by means of orthognathic surgery. Management of skeletal deformities in the maxillofacial region has been an important challenge for maxillofacial surgeons and orthodontists. Distraction osteogenesis is a surgical technique that uses body's own repairing mechanisms for optimal reconstruction of the tissues. We present four cases of anterior maxillary distraction osteogenesis with tooth borne distraction device-Hyrax, which were analyzed retrospectively for the efficacy of the tooth borne device-Hyrax and skeletal stability of distracted anterior maxillary segment.

  5. Maxillary palp glomeruli and ipsilateral projections in the antennal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Maxillary palp glomeruli and ipsilateral projections in the antennal lobe of Drosophila melanogaster. K P Rajashekhar V R ... The number of glomeruli receiving the maxillary palp sensory projections tallies with the number of Drosophila olfactory receptors (seven) reported to be expressed exclusively in the maxillary palp.

  6. Macrodontic maxillary incisor in alagille syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Cozzani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report describes the surgical-orthodontic guided-eruption of a deeply impacted macrodontic maxillary central incisor in a 10-year-old patient with Alagille syndrome (ALGS. In the first stage, orthodontic treatment with fixed appliance on deciduous teeth allowed to create enough space for the eruption of the maxillary right central incisor. The second stage included closed surgical exposure and vertical traction. After impacted tooth erupted in the proper position, accessory periodontal treatment and dental reshaping procedures may be indicated to camouflage macrodontic incisor with the adjacent teeth. This is the first report that presents a patient with ALGS undergoing orthodontic and surgical treatment.

  7. Antibiotics for acute maxillary sinusitis in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahovuo-Saloranta, Anneli; Rautakorpi, Ulla-Maija; Borisenko, Oleg V; Liira, Helena; Williams, John W; Mäkelä, Marjukka

    2014-02-11

    Sinusitis is one of the most common diagnoses among adults in ambulatory care, accounting for 15% to 21% of all adult outpatient antibiotic prescriptions. However, the role of antibiotics for sinusitis is controversial. To assess the effects of antibiotics in adults with acute maxillary sinusitis by comparing antibiotics with placebo, antibiotics from different classes and the side effects of different treatments. We searched CENTRAL 2013, Issue 2, MEDLINE (1946 to March week 3, 2013), EMBASE (1974 to March 2013), SIGLE (OpenSIGLE, later OpenGrey (accessed 15 January 2013)), reference lists of the identified trials and systematic reviews of placebo-controlled studies. We also searched for ongoing trials via ClinicalTrials.gov and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP). We imposed no language or publication restrictions. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing antibiotics with placebo or antibiotics from different classes for acute maxillary sinusitis in adults. We included trials with clinically diagnosed acute sinusitis, confirmed or not by imaging or bacterial culture. Two review authors independently screened search results, extracted data and assessed trial quality. We calculated risk ratios (RRs) for differences between intervention and control groups in whether the treatment failed or not. All measures are presented with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). We conducted the meta-analyses using either the fixed-effect or random-effects model. In meta-analyses of the placebo-controlled studies, we combined data across antibiotic classes. Primary outcomes were clinical failure rates at 7 to 15 days and 16 to 60 days follow-up. We used GRADEpro to assess the quality of the evidence. We included 63 studies in this updated review; nine placebo-controlled studies involving 1915 participants (seven of the studies clearly conducted in primary care settings) and 54 studies comparing different classes of antibiotics (10 different comparisons

  8. One-step transversal palatal distraction and maxillary repositioning: technical considerations, advantages, and long-term stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortese, Antonio; Savastano, Mauro; Savastano, Germano; Claudio, Pier Paolo

    2011-09-01

    Transversal maxillary hypoplasia in adolescence is a frequently seen pathology, which can be treated with a combination of surgery and orthodontic treatment to widen the maxilla in skeletally matured patients.We evaluated the advantages of a new surgical technique: Le Fort I distraction osteogenesis using a bone-borne device. Because relapse is one of the main problems in surgical maxillary expansion, long-term stability of this new technique was evaluated. Data from 4 adult patients with maxillary restriction, class III malocclusion, or maxillary malposition were collected preoperatively, 4 months after distraction, and 5 years after distraction. Measurements were recorded on dental models to detect palatal expansion at dental level; cephalograms by lateral and posteroanterior plane were analyzed to detect maxillary movements. Maxillary measurements were substantially stable 5 years after distractions. Only minor dental movements occurred at the dental analysis after 5 years related to a lack of orthodontic contention without any compromise of the dental result (no crossbite relapse and class I stability). Le Fort I with down-fracture for expansion and repositioning by bone-borne distractor device can [corrected] be used to simultaneously widen, advance, and vertically reposition the maxilla without causing healing problems, particularly using a rigid distraction device. Long-term stability can be achieved; however, further studies with a larger number of patients will be necessary for better evaluation.

  9. Dimensions of Velopharyngeal Space following Maxillary Advancement with Le Fort I Osteotomy Compared to Zisser Segmental Osteotomy: A Cephalometric Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Furkan Erol Karabekmez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study are to assess the velopharyngeal dimensions using cephalometric variables of the nasopharynx and oropharynx as well as to compare the Le Fort I osteotomy technique to Zisser’s anterior maxillary osteotomy technique based on patients’ outcomes within early and late postoperative follow-ups. 15 patients with severe maxillary deficiency treated with Le Fort I osteotomy and maxillary segmental osteotomy were assessed. Preoperative, early postoperative, and late postoperative follow-up lateral cephalograms, patient histories, and operative reports are reviewed with a focus on defined cephalometric landmarks for assessing velopharyngeal space dimension and maxillary movement (measured for three different tracing points. A significant change was found between preoperative and postoperative lateral cephalometric measurements regarding the distance between the posterior nasal spine and the posterior pharyngeal wall in Le Fort I osteotomy cases. However, no significant difference was found between preoperative and postoperative measurements in maxillary segmental osteotomy cases regarding the same measurements. The velopharyngeal area calculated for the Le Fort I osteotomy group showed a significant difference between the preoperative and postoperative measurements. Le Fort I osteotomy for advancement of upper jaw increases velopharyngeal space. On the other hand, Zisser’s anterior maxillary segmental osteotomy does not alter the dimension of the velopharyngeal space significantly.

  10. Cone-beam computed tomography evaluation of dental, skeletal, and alveolar bone changes associated with bonded rapid maxillary expansion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namrata Dogra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives: To evaluate skeletal changes in maxilla and its surrounding structures, changes in the maxillary dentition and maxillary alveolar bone changes produced by bonded rapid maxillary expansion (RME using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT. Materials and Methods: The sample consisted of 10 patients (6 males and 4 females with age range 12 to 15 years treated with bonded RME. CBCT scans were performed at T1 (pretreatment and at T2 (immediately after expansion to evaluate the dental, skeletal, and alveolar bone changes. Results: RME treatment increased the overall skeletal parameters such as interorbital, zygomatic, nasal, and maxillary widths. Significant increases in buccal maxillary width was observed at first premolar, second premolar, and first molar level. There was a significant increase in arch width both on the palatal side and on the buccal side. Significant tipping of right and left maxillary first molars was seen. There were significant reductions in buccal bone plate thickness and increase in palatal bone plate thickness. Conclusions: Total expansion achieved with RME was a combination of dental, skeletal and alveolar bone changes. At the first molar level, 28.45% orthopedic, 16.03% alveolar bone bending, and 55.5% orthodontic changes were observed.

  11. Current trends in endodontic practice: emergency treatments and technological armamentarium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Michelle; Winkler, Johnathon; Hartwell, Gary; Stewart, Jeffrey; Caine, Rufus

    2009-01-01

    The current clinical practice of endodontics includes the utilization of a variety of new technological advances and materials. The last comprehensive survey that compared treatment modalities used in endodontic practices was conducted in 1990. The purpose of the current survey was to determine the frequency with which these new endodontic technologies and materials are being used in endodontic practices today. An e-mail questionnaire was sent to the 636 active diplomates of the American Board of Endodontics with current e-mail addresses. Two hundred thirty-two diplomates responded for a response rate of 35%. Calcium hydroxide was found to be the most frequently used intracanal medicament for all cases diagnosed with necrotic pulps. Ibuprofen was the most frequently prescribed medication for pain, and penicillin was the most frequently prescribed antibiotic when an active infection was present. Eighty-two percent of the respondents are still incorporating hand files in some fashion during the cleansing and shaping phase of treatment. Lateral condensation and continuous wave were the most common methods used for obturation. Digital radiography was reported as being used by 72.5% of the respondents, whereas 45.3% reported using the microscope greater than 75% of the patient treatment. Ultrasonics was used by 97.8% of the respondents. It appears from the results that new endodontic technology is currently being used in the endodontic offices of those who responded to the survey.

  12. [Colonization of Porphyromonas endodontalis in primary and secondary endodontic infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Li; Hai, Ji; Yan-Yan, He; Shenghui, Yang; Benxiang, Hou

    2015-02-01

    This study aims to assess and compare the prevalence of Porphyromonas endodontalis (P. endodontalis) in root canals associated with primary and secondary endodontic infections by using 16s rDNA PCR and real-time fluorescence quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RTFQ-PCR). A total of 120 adult patients with one radiographically documented periapical lesion were included. Sixty teeth presented with primary endodontic infections and 60 with secondary endodontic infections requiring retreatment. P. endodontalis was identified by using 16s rDNA PCR techniques. The positive DNA expression of P. endodontalis in two types of infected root canals were quantitatively compared by using SYBR GREEN I RTFQ-PCR. The prevalence of P. endodontalis in the root canals with primary endodontic infections was significantly higher than that in root canals with secondary endodontic infections (P = 0.001). However, RTFQ-PCR results showed no significant difference in DNA expression quantities between the primary and secondary endodontic infections root canals (P = 0.303). P. endodontalis is more highly associated with root canals having primary endodontic infections, although P. endodontalis colonize in both root canals with primary and secondary chronic apical periodontitis.

  13. Impact of rapid maxillary expansion on nasomaxillary complex volume in mouth-breathers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Cappellette Jr.

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To assess the volumetric changes that occur in the nasomaxillary complex of mouth-breathing patients with transverse maxillary deficiency subjected to rapid maxillary expansion (RME. Methods: This was a controlled, prospective intervention study involving 38 mouth-breathing patients presenting with transverse maxillary deficiency, regardless of malocclusion type or race. Twenty-three of them comprised the experimental group, which was composed of 11 (47.8% boys, and 12 (52.2% girls, with a mean age of 9.6 years, ranging from 6.4 to 14.2 years and standard deviation of 2.3 years; and 15 of them comprised the control group, composed of 9 (60% boys and 6 (40% girls with an mean age of 10.5 years, ranging from 8.0 to 13.6 years, and standard deviation of 1.9 years. All patients were scanned (CT according to a standard protocol: Initial CT (T1, and CT three months thereafter (T2, and the patients in the experimental group were treated with RME using a Hyrax expander for the correction of maxillary deficiency during the T1-T2 interval. The CT scans were manipulated using Dolphin® Imaging version 11.7 software for total and partial volumetric assessment of the nasomaxillary complex. Results: The results revealed that in the experimental group there was a significant increase in the size of the structures of interest compared to the control group, both in general aspect and in specific regions. Conclusions: Rapid maxillary expansion (RME provided a significant expansion in all the structures of the nasomaxillary complex (nasal cavity, oropharynx, right and left maxillary sinuses.

  14. Evolving Trends in Endodontic Research: An Assessment of Published Articles in 2 Leading Endodontic Journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzanetakis, Giorgos N; Stefopoulos, Spyridon; Loizides, Alexios L; Kakavetsos, Vasileios D; Kontakiotis, Evangelos G

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate and analyze the evolving trends in endodontic research in 2 leading endodontic journals (ie, Journal of Endodontics and International Endodontic Journal) in articles published from January 2009 to December 2013. The differences in content between this period and a 10-year earlier period from January 1999 to December 2003 were also evaluated. Each journal's content was accessed through the web edition. For each article, the following parameters were recorded: number of authors, article type, number of affiliations, field of study, source of article, and geographic origin. The recorded data were analyzed using both descriptive and analytic statistics. During 2009-2013 (second period), the mean number of authors per article increased significantly compared with 1999-2003 (first period). The main volume of the literature in both periods and journals was original research articles. The number of published reviews increased significantly from the first to the second study period in contrast to case reports/clinical articles, which presented a significant decrease. "Endodontic materials" was the most prevalent thematic category in both study periods. The number of published articles related to "biology" and "chemical preparation and disinfection" increased significantly from the first to the second study period. On the contrary, the number of articles regarding "obturation and microleakage" presented a considerable decrease at the same time. The United States was the leading country in the number of publications in the first period followed by Brazil. In the second period, this rank was reversed with Brazil becoming the leading country followed by the United States. In the last 15 years, the progress of the specialty of endodontology was apparent as shown through the trends and shifts in research orientation in published articles in the 2 leading endodontic journals. The results of the present reviewing process encourage both journals

  15. An Unusual Complication After the Extraction of a Maxillary Third Molar: Extensive Subcutaneous Emphysema. A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emrah Soylu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Third molar surgery is one of the most frequently performed procedures in oral and maxillofacial surgery. Various complications including pain, bleeding, infection, edema, hematoma, perforation of the maxillary sinus, and subcutaneous emphysema (SE can occur after third molar surgery. Cervicofacial subcutaneous emphysema (CSE most often occurs after the extraction of third molars, especially when using high-speed air-turbine drills and air syringes, or during dental laser treatment or even after endodontic treatment. This report presents the diagnosis and treatment protocol of a CSE in a 42-year-old healthy male patient that occurred after extraction of a totally erupted upper third molar with just a straight elevator and extraction forceps.

  16. 3D printed replicas for endodontic education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reymus, M; Fotiadou, C; Kessler, A; Heck, K; Hickel, R; Diegritz, C

    2018-06-14

    To assess the feasibility of producing artificial teeth for endodontic training using 3D printing technology, to analyse the accuracy of the printing process, and to evaluate the teeth by students when used during training. Sound extracted human teeth were selected, digitalized by cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and appropriate software and finally reproduced by a stereolithographic printer. The printed teeth were scanned and compared with the original ones (trueness) and to one another (precision). Undergraduate dental students in the third and fourth years performed root canal treatment on printed molars and were subsequently asked to evaluate their experience with these compared to real teeth. The workflow was feasible for manufacturing 3D printed tooth replicas. The absolute deviation after printing (trueness) ranged from 50.9μm to 104.3μm. The values for precision ranged from 43.5μm to 68.2μm. Students reported great benefits in the use of the replicated teeth for training purposes. The presented workflow is feasible for any dental educational institution who has access to a CBCT unit and a stereolithographic printer. The accuracy of the printing process is suitable for the production of tooth replicas for endodontic training. Undergraduate students favoured the availability of these replicas and the fairness they ensured in training due to standardization. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  17. Scaffolds in regenerative endodontics: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gathani, Kinjal M.; Raghavendra, Srinidhi Surya

    2016-01-01

    Root canal therapy has enabled us to save numerous teeth over the years. The most desired outcome of endodontic treatment would be when diseased or nonvital pulp is replaced with healthy pulp tissue that would revitalize the teeth through regenerative endodontics. ‘A search was conducted using the Pubmed and MEDLINE databases for articles with the criteria ‘Platelet rich plasma’, ‘Platelet rich fibrin’, ‘Stem cells’, ‘Natural and artificial scaffolds’ from 1982–2015’. Tissues are organized as three-dimensional structures, and appropriate scaffolding is necessary to provide a spatially correct position of cell location and regulate differentiation, proliferation, or metabolism of the stem cells. Extracellular matrix molecules control the differentiation of stem cells, and an appropriate scaffold might selectively bind and localize cells, contain growth factors, and undergo biodegradation over time. Different scaffolds facilitate the regeneration of different tissues. To ensure a successful regenerative procedure, it is essential to have a thorough and precise knowledge about the suitable scaffold for the required tissue. This article gives a review on the different scaffolds providing an insight into the new developmental approaches on the horizon. PMID:27857762

  18. Scaffolds in regenerative endodontics: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinjal M Gathani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Root canal therapy has enabled us to save numerous teeth over the years. The most desired outcome of endodontic treatment would be when diseased or nonvital pulp is replaced with healthy pulp tissue that would revitalize the teeth through regenerative endodontics. ′A search was conducted using the Pubmed and MEDLINE databases for articles with the criteria ′Platelet rich plasma′, ′Platelet rich fibrin′, ′Stem cells′, ′Natural and artificial scaffolds′ from 1982-2015′. Tissues are organized as three-dimensional structures, and appropriate scaffolding is necessary to provide a spatially correct position of cell location and regulate differentiation, proliferation, or metabolism of the stem cells. Extracellular matrix molecules control the differentiation of stem cells, and an appropriate scaffold might selectively bind and localize cells, contain growth factors, and undergo biodegradation over time. Different scaffolds facilitate the regeneration of different tissues. To ensure a successful regenerative procedure, it is essential to have a thorough and precise knowledge about the suitable scaffold for the required tissue. This article gives a review on the different scaffolds providing an insight into the new developmental approaches on the horizon.

  19. Alkaline Materials and Regenerative Endodontics: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bill Kahler

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Periapical health is the primary goal of endodontic treatment in mature and immature teeth. In addition, the goals of treatment of immature teeth with arrested root development include root growth to length and maturation of the apex, as well as thickening of the canal wall. These goals are valid for immature teeth that have been subjected to trauma and dental caries or that are the result of developmental anomalies that expose the tooth to the risk of pulp necrosis and consequently result in the cessation of root maturation. Regenerative endodontic procedures (REPs have been described as a “paradigm shift” in the treatment of immature teeth with pulp necrosis and underdeveloped roots, as there is the potential for further root maturation and return of vitality. Treatment with REPs is advocated as the treatment of choice for immature teeth with pulp necrosis. REP protocols involve the use of alkaline biomaterials, primarily sodium hypochlorite, calcium hydroxide, mineral trioxide aggregates and Biodentine, and are the essential components of a successful treatment regimen.

  20. [Sequence orthodontic treatment of impacted dilacerated maxillary central incisors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yi; Pang, Xuannai; Nan, Lan; Mo, Shuixue

    2012-06-01

    To explore an effective orthodontic method for treating impacted dilacerated maxillary central incisors. 12 impacted teeth of 11 cases were chosen. The position of the impacted teeth and the relations with neighbour tissues were assessed by X-ray images, oral examination and plaster model, etc. The impacted teeth were induced to erupt with the closed-eruption technique and fixed orthodontic appliances, root canal therapy, apicoectomy and prosthetic treatment. 12 impacted teeth were moved into arches, and the occlusal relationship was normal. There were no root resorption or conglutination in those impacted teeth. The labial impacted teeth of nine cases had bigger labial crown torsion. The root apexes of four impacted teeth were palpable under mucosa of the labial sulcus and operated by root canal therapy and apicoectomy. One of them received prosthetic treatment. Others (five cases) hadn't accepted root canal therapy, and were observed temporarily. The effects of two palatal impacted teeth was stable. It was a good method to expand indication with sequence orthodontic treatment. The impacted dilacerated maxillary central incisors could be aligned with good esthetical and functional effect.

  1. Modified custom made J-hook for maxillary protraction in a rapid maxillary expansion appliance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jithesh Kumar Kodoth

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple yet innovative attaching the J-hook along with an rapid maxillary appliance for the protraction of maxilla is presented. The proposed method not only simplifies construction but also is equally effective.

  2. Detection of Second Mesiobuccal Canals in Maxillary First Molars Using a New Angle of Cone Beam Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktan, Ali Murat; Yildirim, Cihan; Culha, Emre; Demir, Erhan; Ertugrul Ciftci, Mehmet

    2016-10-01

    The localization of the additional canal orifice is one of the primary factors influencing the success of endodontic treatment. To deal with this problem, several techniques that each have their own advantages and disadvantages have been discussed in the literature. The aim of the present in vitro study was to review a new approach to localizing second mesiobuccal (MB2) canals in maxillary first molars using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). The CBCT scans of 296 patients who were referred to the department of dentomaxillofacial radiology were included in the study. The presence of MB2 canals, the angle formed by the mesiobuccal, distobuccal, and palatal root canal orifices (∠MDP), and the angle formed by the mesiobuccal, distobuccal, and MB2 canal orifices (∠MDMB2) were evaluated on the axial section. Pearson correlation and multiple linear regression methods were used for all predictions. All of the analyses were performed using SPSS for windows version 22.0. A two-sided P value values, it was shown that the ∠MDMB2 increased by 0.420 degrees when the ∠MDP increased by 1 degree. If the ∠MDP was greater than 90.95 degrees, there was a 78% probability that MB2 canals could be found. The determination of the presence of MB2 in the maxillary first molars may be carried out using CBCT scans. If the ∠MDP was 91 degrees or greater, there was considered to be a higher probability that MB2 canals would be found in the endodontic cavity. Due to the positive correlation between the ∠MDP and the ∠MDMB2, the localization of MB2 canals may be easily performed in relation to the main MB canal.

  3. Extraction of maxillary canines: Esthetic perceptions of patient smiles among dental professionals and laypeople.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiruvenkatachari, Badri; Javidi, Hanieh; Griffiths, Sarah Elizabeth; Shah, Anwar A; Sandler, Jonathan

    2017-10-01

    Maxillary canines are generally considered important both cosmetically and functionally. Most claims on the importance of maxillary canines, however, have been based on expert opinions and clinician-based studies. There are no scientific studies in the literature reporting on their cosmetic importance or how laypeople perceive a smile treated by maxillary canine extractions. Our objective was to investigate whether there is any difference in the perceptions of patients' smiles treated by extracting either maxillary canines or first premolars, as judged by orthodontists, dentists, and laypeople. This retrospective study included 24 participants who had unilateral or bilateral extraction of maxillary permanent canines and fixed appliances in the maxillary and mandibular arches to comprehensively correct the malocclusion, selected from orthodontic patients treated at Chesterfield Royal Hospital NHS trust in the United Kingdom over the last 20 years. The control group of patients had extraction of maxillary first premolars followed by fixed appliances and finished to an extremely high standard judged by the requirement that they had been submitted for the Membership in Orthodontics examination. The finished Peer Assessment Rating scores for this group were less than 5. The end-of-treatment frontal extraoral smiling and frontal intraoral views were presented for both groups. The photographs were blinded for extraction choice and standardized for size and brightness using computer software (Adobe Photoshop CC version 14.0; Adobe Systems, San Jose, Calif). The work file was converted to an editable pdf file and e-mailed to the assessors. The assessor panel consisted of 30 members (10 orthodontists, 10 dentists, and 10 laypeople), who were purposely selected. The measures were rated on a 10-point Likert scale. The attractiveness ratings were not statistically significantly different between the canine extraction and premolar extraction groups, with a mean difference of 0

  4. Root Length and Anatomy of Impacted Maxillary Canines in Patients with Unilateral Maxillary Canine Impaction

    OpenAIRE

    Mostfa Shahabi; Maryam Omidkhoda; Seyedeh Haniyeh Omidi; Seyed Hosein Hoseini Zarch

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Canine impaction is a common occurrence. In this study, we sought to investigate the root anatomy and length of impacted canines and lateral incisor adjacent to impacted maxillary canine. Materials and Methods: In this retrospective study, three-dimensional tomographic imaging was performed on 26 patients with unilateral maxillary canine impaction. In this study, we evaluated root length and anatomy of impacted canines, in terms of resorption intensity and curvature, with Planme...

  5. Maxillary Tuberosity Reconstruction with Transport Distraction Osteogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Ugurlu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Severe bone loss due to pathology in the maxillary tuberosity region is a challenging problem both surgically and prosthetically. Large bone grafts have a poor survival rate due to the delicate bony architecture in this area and presence of the maxillary sinus. Our case presentation describes a new technique for reconstructing severe bony defect in the maxillary tuberosity with horizontal distraction osteogenesis in a 45-year-old man. A 4×6×3cm cyst was discovered in the left maxillary molar region and enucleated. Three months postoperatively, the area had a severe bone defect extending to the zygomatic buttress superiorly and hamular notch posteriorly. Three months later, a bone segment including the right upper second premolar was osteotomised and distracted horizontally. The bone segment was distracted 15 mm distally. After consolidation, implants were placed when the distractor was removed. A fixed denture was loaded over the implants after 3 months. Complete alveolar bone loss extending to the cranial base can be reconstructed with transport distraction osteogenesis. Distalisation of the alveolar bone segment adjacent to the bony defect is an easy method for reconstructing such severe defects.

  6. Palatal Surface Area of Maxillary Plaster Casts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darvann, Tron Andre; Hermann, Nuno V.; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the relationship between corresponding two-dimensional and three-dimensional measurements on maxillary plaster casts taken from photographs and three-dimensional surface scans, respectively. Materials and Methods: Corresponding two-dimensional and three-dimensional measu...

  7. Neonatal maxillary orthopedics: past to present

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.; Prahl, C.; Berkowitz, S.

    2013-01-01

    Neonatal maxillary orthopedics was introduced in the treatment protocol for cleft lip and palate in the 1950s of the last century. A wide range of appliances has been designed with pin-retained active appliances at one end of the spectrum and passive appliances at the other. Although neonatal

  8. Maxillary brown tumour: unusual presentation of parathyroid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This is a report of a maxillary brown tumour caused by primary hyperparathyroidism (HPT) secondary to parathyroid carcinoma. A 62-year-old man presented with a large swelling in the right maxilla, which caused right-sided nasal obstruction, intermittent bleeding and diplopia. A computed tomography scan demonstrated ...

  9. Analysis of the cause of failure in nonsurgical endodontic treatment by microscopic inspection during endodontic microsurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Minju; Kim, Hyeon-Cheol; Lee, Woocheol; Kim, Euiseong

    2011-11-01

    This study examined the clinical causes of failure and the limitation of a previous endodontic treatment by an inspection of the root apex and resected root surface at 26× magnification during endodontic microsurgery. The data were collected from patients in the Department of Conservative Dentistry at the Dental College, Yonsei University in Seoul, Korea between March 2001 and January 2011. All root-filled cases with symptomatic or asymptomatic apical periodontitis were enrolled in this study. All surgical procedures were performed by using an operating microscope. The surface of the apical root to be resected or the resected root surface after methylene blue staining was examined during the surgical procedure and recorded carefully with 26× magnification to determine the state of the previous endodontic treatment by using an operating microscope. Among the 557 cases with periapical surgery, 493 teeth were included in this study. With the exclusion of unknown cases, the most common possible cause of failure was perceived leakage around the canal filling material (30.4%), followed by a missing canal (19.7%), underfilling (14.2%), anatomical complexity (8.7%), overfilling (3.0%), iatrogenic problems (2.8%), apical calculus (1.8%), and cracks (1.2%). The frequency of possible failure causes differed according to the tooth position (P < .001). An appreciation of the root canal anatomy by using an operating microscope in nonsurgical endodontic treatment can make the prognosis more predictable and favorable. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The evaluation of cultivable microbiota profile in patients with secondary endodontic infection before and after photo-activated disinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourhajibagher, Maryam; Ghorbanzadeh, Roghayeh; Parker, Steven; Chiniforush, Nasim; Bahador, Abbas

    2017-06-01

    Secondary/persistent endodontic infection can be the outcome of failure of endodontic treatment. Photo-activated disinfection (PAD) can be a useful adjunct to mechanical and antimicrobial agents in eliminating endopathogenic microorganisms. In this study, we evaluated the effect of PAD on diversity and count of microbiota related to secondary/persistent endodontic infections. Root canal samples were taken using sterile paper points from the root canals of 14 patients with secondary/persistent endodontic infections after removing the root-canal filling materials. PAD was performed on teeth with toluidine blue O (TBO) in combination with diode laser. Then re-sampling was conducted from the canal root using sterile paper points and transferred to transport medium. The samples were plated and pure cultures of the target microorganisms were then isolated and identified by analytical profile index (API ® 20A) assays and 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing. Before TBO-PAD, a total of 31 cultivable isolates could be retrieved; 25.8% of the isolated species were obligate anaerobic or microphilics including Veillonella parvula, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Propionibacterium acnes, and Lactobacillus acidophilus, and 74.2% of the isolated species were facultative anaerobic such as Enterococcus faecalis, Actinomyces naeslundii, L. rhamnosus, L. casei, Streptococcus sanguinis, S. mitis, and Candida albicans. According to this in vivo study, the diversity and count of microbiota in root canal-treated teeth were decreased after TBO-PAD, so that E. faecalis, V. parvula, and C. albicans were the microorganisms that recovered after PAD. TBO-PAD is an effective approach that exhibited anti-microbial potential activity against microbiota involved in secondary/persistent endodontic infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Undergraduate Confidence When Undertaking Root Canal Treatment and Their Perception of the Quality of Their Endodontic Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Puryer

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The General Dental Council expects graduating dentists to be competent at treating pulpal disease. Previous studies have found dental undergraduates to have low levels of confidence with respect to endodontic treatments. The aim of this study was to investigate the confidence of undergraduate dental students at the University of Bristol when performing root canal treatment, and to investigate their perception of the quality of their endodontic education. An anonymous questionnaire, based upon one used in a 2015 study at Cardiff University, was distributed to all (n = 204 undergraduate students in Years 3–5 at the University of Bristol. The results were analysed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences software (SPSS. There was a 59% (n = 120 response rate and a significant (p < 0.01 difference in confidence levels for root canal treatments (RCTs completed between these students. All (100% Year-5 students felt confident in completing anterior RCTs, and 91% felt confident in completing posterior RCTs. The majority (93% of Year-4 students felt confident in completing anterior RCTs, and 77% felt confident in completing posterior RCTs. Over one-half (56% of Year-3 students felt confident in anterior RCTs and 17% in posterior RCTs. With respect to the individual stages of RCT (access cavity, cleaning and shaping of root canal system, and obturation/filling, results showed that there was a significant difference (p < 0.01 in confidence levels between year groups. Many students thought the amount of time spent on endodontic teaching and the quality of teaching to be satisfactory. Improvements suggested for future endodontic teaching included higher numbers of staff supervision and additional endodontic practice on extracted teeth before seeing patients. There was a strong association between students’ clinical experience and their levels of confidence when completing RCT. Increasing the amount of clinical experience of RCTs could

  12. An endodontic management of mandibular third molar with five root canals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dakshita Joy Sinha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The existence of several anatomical variations in the root canal system may contribute to failure of the root canal therapy. The planning and performing of endodontic therapy requires knowledge of the internal dental morphology. This paper reports the case of a left mandibular third molar that presented with five root canals; a case of unusual root canal morphology so as to demonstrate the anatomic variations in mandibular third molars. Root canal therapy and case management are described. This report highlights the importance of looking for additional roots and root canals so as to enable clinicians to treat a case successfully, which might have ended in failure.

  13. Comparison of fracture and deformation in the rotary endodontic instruments: Protaper versus K-3 system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagi, Sana Ehsen; Khan, Farhan Raza; Rahman, Munawar

    2016-03-01

    This experimental study was done on extracted human teeth to compare the fracture and deformation of the two rotary endodontic files system namely K-3 and Protapers. It was conducted at the dental clinics of the Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, A log of file deformation or fracture during root canal preparation was kept. The location of fracture was noted along with the identity of the canal in which fracture took place. The fracture in the two rotary systems was compared. SPSS 20 was used for data analysis. Of the 172(80.4%) teeth possessing more than 15 degrees of curvature, fracture occurred in 7(4.1%) cases and deformation in 10(5.8%). Of the 42(19.6%) teeth possessing less than 15 degrees of curvature, fracture occurred in none of them while deformation was seen in 1(2.4%). There was no difference in K-3 and Protaper files with respect to file deformation and fracture. Most of the fractures occurred in mesiobuccal canals of maxillary molars, n=3(21.4%). The likelihood of file fracture increased 5.65-fold when the same file was used more than 3 times. Irrespective of the rotary system, apical third of the root canal space was the most common site for file fracture.

  14. Oxidative stress in patients with endodontic pathologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vengerfeldt, Veiko; Mändar, Reet; Saag, Mare; Piir, Anneli; Kullisaar, Tiiu

    2017-01-01

    Apical periodontitis (AP) is an inflammatory disease affecting periradicular tissues. It is a widespread condition but its etiopathogenetic mechanisms have not been completely elucidated and the current treatment options are not always successful. To compare oxidative stress (OxS) levels in the saliva and the endodontium (root canal [RC] contents) in patients with different endodontic pathologies and in endodontically healthy subjects. The study group of this comparison study included 22 subjects with primary chronic apical periodontitis (pCAP), 26 with posttreatment or secondary chronic apical periodontitis (sCAP), eight with acute periapical abscess, 13 with irreversible pulpitis, and 17 healthy controls. Resting saliva samples were collected before clinical treatment. Pulp samples (remnants of the pulp, tooth tissue, and/or previous root filling material) were collected under strict aseptic conditions using the Hedström file. The samples were frozen to -80°C until analysis. OxS markers (myeloperoxidase [MPO], oxidative stress index [OSI], 8-isoprostanes [8-EPI]) were detected in the saliva and the endodontium. The highest MPO and 8-EPI levels were seen in pCAP and pulpitis, while the highest levels of OSI were seen in pCAP and abscess patients, as well as the saliva of sCAP patients. Controls showed the lowest OxS levels in both RC contents and saliva. Significant positive correlations between OxS markers, periapical index, and pain were revealed. Patients with pain had significantly higher OxS levels in both the endodontium (MPO median 27.9 vs 72.6 ng/mg protein, p =0.004; OSI 6.0 vs 10.4, p <0.001; 8-EPI 50.0 vs 75.0 pg/mL, p <0.001) and saliva (MPO 34.2 vs 117.5 ng/mg protein, p <0.001; 8-EPI 50.0 vs 112.8 pg/mL, p <0.001) compared to pain-free subjects. OxS is an important pathomechanism in endodontic pathologies that is evident at both the local (RC contents) and systemic (saliva) level. OxS is significantly associated with dental pain and bone

  15. Oxidative stress in patients with endodontic pathologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vengerfeldt V

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Veiko Vengerfeldt,1 Reet Mändar,2,3 Mare Saag,1 Anneli Piir,2 Tiiu Kullisaar2 1Institute of Dental Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tartu, 2Institute of Biomedicine and Translational Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tartu, 3Competence Centre on Health Technologies, Tartu, Estonia Background: Apical periodontitis (AP is an inflammatory disease affecting periradicular tissues. It is a widespread condition but its etiopathogenetic mechanisms have not been completely elucidated and the current treatment options are not always successful.Purpose: To compare oxidative stress (OxS levels in the saliva and the endodontium (root canal [RC] contents in patients with different endodontic pathologies and in endodontically healthy subjects.Patients and methods: The study group of this comparison study included 22 subjects with primary chronic apical periodontitis (pCAP, 26 with posttreatment or secondary chronic apical periodontitis (sCAP, eight with acute periapical abscess, 13 with irreversible pulpitis, and 17 healthy controls. Resting saliva samples were collected before clinical treatment. Pulp samples (remnants of the pulp, tooth tissue, and/or previous root filling material were collected under strict aseptic conditions using the Hedström file. The samples were frozen to −80°C until analysis. OxS markers (myeloperoxidase [MPO], oxidative stress index [OSI], 8-isoprostanes [8-EPI] were detected in the saliva and the endodontium. Results: The highest MPO and 8-EPI levels were seen in pCAP and pulpitis, while the highest levels of OSI were seen in pCAP and abscess patients, as well as the saliva of sCAP patients. Controls showed the lowest OxS levels in both RC contents and saliva. Significant positive correlations between OxS markers, periapical index, and pain were revealed. Patients with pain had significantly higher OxS levels in both the endodontium (MPO median 27.9 vs 72.6 ng/mg protein, p=0.004; OSI 6.0 vs 10.4, p<0

  16. Physical characterisation of endodontic instruments in NiTi alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torrisi, L.

    2000-01-01

    NiTi based endodontic instruments are investigated in functionality and wear. The instrument surfaces have been studied applying Auger electron spectroscopy, mechanical analysis, differential-scanning calorimetry, wear tests, and scanning electron microscopy. (orig.)

  17. Antimicrobial Activity of Calcium Hydroxide in Endodontics: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalavi, S; Yazdizadeh, M

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of endodontic therapy is to preserve the patient's natural teeth without compromising the patient's local or systemic health. Calcium hydroxide has been included in several materials and antimicrobial formulations that are used in several treatment modalities in endodontics, such as inter-appointment intracanal medicaments. The purpose of this article was to review the antimicrobial properties of calcium hydroxide in endodontics. Calcium hydroxide has a high pH (approximately 12.5-12.8) and is classified chemically as a strong base. The lethal effects of calcium hydroxide on bacterial cells are probably due to protein denaturation and damage to DNA and cytoplasmic membranes. Calcium hydroxide has a wide range of antimicrobial activity against common endodontic pathogens but is less effective against Enterococcus faecalis and Candida albicans. Calcium hydroxide is also a valuable anti-endotoxin agent. However, its effect on microbial biofilms is controversial. PMID:23323217

  18. Bioactive Materials in Endodontics: An Evolving Component of Clinical Dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, Satyajit; Patro, Swadheena; Mishra, Sumita

    2016-06-01

    Achieving biocompatibility in a material requires an interdisciplinary approach that involves a sound knowledge of materials science, bioengineering, and biotechnology. The host microbial-material response is also critical. Endodontic treatment is a delicate procedure that must be planned and executed properly. Despite major advances in endodontic therapy in recent decades, clinicians are confronted with a complex root canal anatomy and a wide selection of endodontic filling materials that, in turn, may not be well tolerated by the periapical tissues and may evoke an immune reaction. This article discusses published reports of various bioactive materials that are used in endodontic therapy, including calcium hydroxide, mineral trioxide aggregate, a bioactive dentin substrate, calcium phosphate ceramics, and calcium phosphate cements.

  19. Flare-ups in endodontics: II. Therapeutic measures. 1985.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seltzer, Samuel; Naidorf, Irving J

    2004-07-01

    Various treatment regimens for the relief of pain during endodontic therapy, including relief of occlusion, pre-medication, establishment of drainage, and intracanal and systemic medications are presented. In addition, the rationale for the use of placebos is discussed.

  20. Thin-plate spline analysis of the short- and long-term effects of rapid maxillary expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franchi, Lorenzo; Baccetti, Tiziano; Cameron, Christopher G; Kutcipal, Elizabeth A; McNamara, James A

    2002-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the short- and long-term effects induced by rapid maxillary expansion (RME) on the shape of the maxillary and circummaxillary structures by means of thin-plate spline (TPS) analysis. The sample consisted of 42 patients who were compared with a control sample of 20 subjects. The treated subjects underwent Haas-type RME, followed by fixed appliance therapy. Postero-anterior (PA) cephalograms were analysed for each treated subject at T1 (pre-treatment), T2 (immediate post-expansion), and T3 (long-term observation), and were available at T1 and T3 for the control group (CG). The mean age at T1 was 11 years and 10 months for both groups. The mean chronological ages at T3 were 20 years, 6 months for the treated group (TG) and 17 years, 8 months for the control group. The study focused on shape changes in the maxillary, nasal, zygomatic, and orbital regions. TPS analysis revealed significant shape changes in the TG. They consisted of an upward and lateral displacement of the two halves of the naso-maxillary complex as a result of active expansion in the short-term, and normalization of maxillary shape in the transverse dimension in the long-term (the initial transverse deficiency of the maxilla in the treated group was eliminated by RME therapy both in the short- and long-term). At the end of the observation period, the nasal cavities were larger when compared with both their pre-expansion configuration and the final configuration in the controls. RME with the Haas appliance appears to be an efficient therapeutic means to induce permanent favourable changes in the shape of the naso-maxillary complex.