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Sample records for endocrine disrupting substances

  1. Endocrine disrupting chemicals: harmful substances and how to test them

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olea-Serrano Nicolás

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an analysis of the opinions of different groups from: scientists, international regulatory bodies, non-governmental organizations and industry; with an interest in the problem of identifying chemical substances with endocrine disrupting activity. There is also discussion of the consequences that exposure to endocrine disruptors may have for human health, considering concrete issues related to: the estimation of risk; the tests that must be used to detect endocrine disruption; the difficulties to establish an association between dose, time of exposure, individual susceptibility, and effect; and the attempts to create a census of endocrine disruptors. Finally, it is proposed that not all hormonal mimics should be included under the single generic denomination of endocrine disruptors.

  2. Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Center Pacientes y Cuidadores Hormones and Health The Endocrine System Hormones Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) Steroid and Hormone ... Hormones and Health › Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) The Endocrine System Hormones Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) EDCs Myth vs. ...

  3. Endocrine disrupting compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøgh, I B; Christensen, P; Dantzer, V

    2001-01-01

    processes, and exposure during critical periods of prenatal development might affect reproductive performance over several generations. Alkylphenols and their metabolites are lipophilic substances exerting apparent estrogenic action in in vitro and in vivo testing systems. With the widespread industrial use...... or embryo models for the evaluation of possible consequences of human exposure to endocrine disrupting compounds is discussed. Furthermore, possible consequences of exposure to endocrine disrupting compounds for the embryo transfer industry are addressed....

  4. Effects of endocrine disrupting substance on estrogen receptor gene transcription in dialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanno, Yoshihiko; Okada, Hirokazu; Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Takenaka, Tsuneo; Suzuki, Hiromichi

    2007-08-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) and phthalate diesters, two well-described endocrine-disrupting substances (EDSs), were shown to elute out of the dialysis tubing used by patients who underwent hemodialysis (HD) and peritoneal dialysis (PD). Since these patients require dialysis for survival, they may be exposed to potentially harmful levels of these compounds. In this study, serum BPA levels were quantified in HD (n = 45) and PD (n = 43) patients, and healthy controls (n = 12) using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit. Our results showed that serum BPA levels were significantly elevated in both HD (5.3 +/- 0.3 ng/mL) and PD (3.8 +/- 0.2 ng/mL) patients compared to controls (2.6 +/- 0.1 ng/mL; P dialysis patients, such as phthalate diesters (DEHP), though this remains to be determined.

  5. Information/testing strategy for identification of substances with endocrine disrupting properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hass, Ulla; Christiansen, Sofie; Bjerregaard, Poul

    . The overall scope of this project is to provide a science based input to the ongoing work in EU with regard to endocrine disruptors, i.e. the development of criteria for identification, REACH review on EDs and the revised strategy for the future work on endocrine disruptors, focusing on adequate detection......This report has been prepared by the Danish Centre on Endocrine Disrupters (CeHoS) as a project contracted by the Danish Environmental Protection Agency. The Danish Centre on Endocrine Disrupters is an interdisciplinary scientific network without walls. The main purpose of the Centre is to build...... and gather new knowledge on endocrine disrupters (EDs) with the focus on providing information requested for the preventive work of the regulatory authorities. The Centre is financed by the Ministry of the Environment and the scientific work programme is followed by an international scientific advisory board...

  6. Altered steroid metabolism in several teleost species exposed to endocrine disrupting substances in refuse dump leachate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noaksson, E.; Linderoth, M.; Bosveld, A.T.C.; Balk, L.

    2003-01-01

    Endocrine disruption associated with reproductive failure has been reported previously in female perch (Perca fluviatilis) and roach (Rutilus rutilus) from Lake Molnbyggen in Sweden and in female brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) from Vadbäcken, a stream emptying into Molnbyggen. Both Molnbyggen

  7. [Xenoestrogens: endocrine disrupting compounds].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wozniak, Milena; Murias, Marek

    2008-11-01

    In recent years much attention has been paid to the issues of chemicals that disrupt the normal function of endocrine system, namely xenoestrogens. These chemicals can mimic the activity of endogenous estrogens, antagonize their interaction with estrogen receptors or disrupt the synthesis, metabolism and functions of endogenous female hormones. Due to the fact that they act thanks to many different mechanisms, it is very difficult to estimate their estrogenic activity by means of a simple tests. The important issue remains the fact that xenoestrogens may have a positive or negative influence on the function of the endocrine system. It seems to be very important that there are many sources of xenoestrogens, that is not only vegetables and fruit (phytoestrogens), but also metals (Co, Cu, Ni, Cr, Pb), dental appliances (alkilphenols), food containers or blood containers (PVC--polyvinyl chloride, DEHP--di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate), cosmetics (parabens) and pesticides (DDT--dichlor-diphenyl-trichlorethylane, endosulfane).

  8. Endocrine disrupting compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøgh, I B; Christensen, P; Dantzer, V

    2001-01-01

    of alkylphenols, these are disseminated in the environment with sewage sludge, and domestic animals and humans are likely to be exposed via the food chain. Using the pig as an in vivo model, we studied the effect of intrauterine exposure to tertiary octylphenol (OP) on essential reproductive parameters over 3......With the growing concern that environmental chemicals might impair human and animal fertility, it is important to investigate the possible influence of these substances on sexual differentiation and genital development of mammals. Many of these substances are suspected to interfere with endocrine...... processes, and exposure during critical periods of prenatal development might affect reproductive performance over several generations. Alkylphenols and their metabolites are lipophilic substances exerting apparent estrogenic action in in vitro and in vivo testing systems. With the widespread industrial use...

  9. Endocrine disrupting chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandrup, Karen

    BACKGROUND: Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) may contribute to reproductive changes in boys in the Western world, however, less is known about influence of EDCs in women. The incidence of precocious breast development is increasing in USA and Europe and mammary gland development has been...... gland development before puberty in whole mounted mammary glands and in adults in histological sections of the mammary glands. Moreover, female offspring were evaluated for external genital malformations. The EDCs studied for mammary gland effects were the estrogenic compounds ethinyl estradiol...... were sensitive to EDCs. EDCs with estrogenic mode of action appeared to increase mammary outgrowth in prepubertal female rats and a potent model compound, ethinyl estradiol, increased the density in females and males and the number of terminal end buds in male rats. Histological examination showed...

  10. Pesticides Provoke Endocrine Disruption A Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aly, M.A.S.

    2006-01-01

    Increasing numbers of environmental chemicals,including pesticides, have the ability to produce endocrine disruption by various mechanisms. such substances may affect hormone secretion from an endocrine gland and may alter the rate of hormone elimination from the body. environmental chemicals may also disrupt regulatory feedback mechanisms that exist between two endocrine organs; or may interact with a hormone receptor either by mimicking or antagonizing the actions of the natural hormone. these chemicals are referred to endocrine disruptive chemicals (EDC's). EDC's act to alter the blood hormone levels or the subsequent action of hormones . the use of radioimmunoassay(RIA) constitutes a superior and unrivalled tool for the determination and quantification of hormones.the endocrine system participates in virtually all important functions of an organism, such as sexual differentiation before birth, sexual maturation during puberty, reproduction in adulthood, growth, metabolism, digestion, cardiovascular function and excretion. hormones are also implicated in the etiology of certain cancers of hormone- dependent tissues, such as those of the breast, uterus, and prostate gland. therefore, endocrine disruption can potentially produce widespread effects. scientists should not stick to the past belief which presumes that pesticides have limited effect on some hormones. A paradigm shift in which a wider vision of understanding of the wholesome complex effects of pesticides on the whole body rather than a narrow limited understanding should take place

  11. Endocrine-disrupting chemicals and skin manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Qiang; Zouboulis, Christos C

    2016-09-01

    Endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are exogenous compounds that have the ability to disrupt the production and actions of hormones through direct or indirect interaction with hormone receptors, thus acting as agonists or antagonists. Human health is affected after either individual occupation or dietary and environmental exposure to EDCs. On the other hand, skin is one of the largest organs of the body and its main function is protection from noxious substances. EDCs perturb the endocrine system, and they are also carcinogenic, immunotoxic, and hepatotoxic to human skin. In addition, their effects on keratinocytes, melanocytes, sebocytes, inflammatory and immunological cells, and skin stem cells produce inflammatory and allergic skin diseases, chloracne, disorders of skin pigmentation, skin cancer, and skin aging. Mechanisms, which EDCs use to induce these skin disorders are complicated, and involve the interference of endogenous hormones and most importantly the activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor signal pathway. Further studies on EDCs and skin diseases are necessary to elucidate these mechanisms.

  12. The effects of endocrine disrupting chemicals on the human organism

    OpenAIRE

    Karolina Kulik-Kupka; Justyna Nowak; Ilona Korzonek-Szlacheta; Barbara Zubelewicz-Szkodzińska

    2017-01-01

    The development of civilization has not only improved the quality of life, but it is also responsible for increasing environmental pollution. Between 80000-100000 previously unknown chemicals have been estimated to circulate in the air. They include substances known as endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDC). These substances can naturally be found in the environment and food, or are classified as pollutants. EDCs are said to change the functionality of the endocrine system and, in this way, exe...

  13. Mechanistic evaluation of endocrine disrupting chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taxvig, Camilla

    BACKGROUND: This PhD project is part of the research area concerning effects of endocrine disrupters at the National Food Institute at DTU in Denmark. Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) have proved to be important for improper development of the male reproductive organs and subsequent for the ......BACKGROUND: This PhD project is part of the research area concerning effects of endocrine disrupters at the National Food Institute at DTU in Denmark. Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) have proved to be important for improper development of the male reproductive organs and subsequent...... metabolising system using liver S9 mixtures or hepatic rat microsomes could be a convenient method for the incorporation of metabolic aspects into in vitro testing for endocrine disrupting effects....

  14. Endocrine disruption in brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) exposed to leachate from a public refuse dump

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noaksson, E.; Linderoth, M.; Bosveld, A.T.C.; Norrgren, L.; Zebühr, Y.; Balk, L.

    2003-01-01

    Lake Molnbyggen was previously found to harbour a large number of sexually immature female perch (Perca fluviatilis) suffering from endocrine disruption. In an attempt to pin-point the source of the endocrine-disrupting substance(s) (EDSs), brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) from Vadbacken, a

  15. Report on Criteria for Endocrine Disrupters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holbech, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    This report has been prepared by the Danish Centre on Endocrine Disrupters as a project contracted by the Danish Environmental Protection Agency. The Danish Centre on Endocrine Disrupters is an interdisciplinary scientific network without walls. The main purpose of the Centre is to build and gather....... The overall aim of this project is to provide a science based proposal for criteria for endocrine disrupters. The terms of reference for the project specify elements to be included and/or addressed when developing the criteria (Annex 1). Also, several international reports and papers dealing with assessment...

  16. Incidence of Breast, Prostate, Testicular, and Thyroid Cancer in Italian Contaminated Sites with Presence of Substances with Endocrine Disrupting Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Benedetti

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to investigate the incidence of breast (females, prostate, testicular, and thyroid cancer in the Italian National Priority Contaminated Sites (NPCSs, served by cancer registries, where the presence of endocrine disruptors (EDs, reported to be linked to these tumours, was documented. Evidence of carcinogenicity of EDs present in NPCSs was assessed based on evaluation by international scientific institutions and committees. Standardized Incidence Ratios (SIRs were computed for each NPCS and cancer site between 1996 and 2005. Excess incidence of one or more cancer site studied was found in twelve out of fourteen NPCSs. Significantly increased SIRs were found for breast cancer in eight NPCSs, for prostate cancer in six, for thyroid cancer (both gender in four, and for testicular cancer in two. Non-significantly increased SIRs were found in five NPCSs for testicular cancer and in two for thyroid cancer (males. In a small number of instances a significant deficit was reported, mainly for thyroid and prostate cancer. Although increased incidence of one or more cancer sites studied were found in several NPCSs, the ecological study design and the multifactorial aetiology of the considered tumours do not permit concluding causal links with environmental contamination. Regarding the observation of some excesses in SIRs, continuing epidemiological surveillance is warranted.

  17. Endocrine-disrupting chemicals: associated disorders and mechanisms of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Coster, Sam; van Larebeke, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    The incidence and/or prevalence of health problems associated with endocrine-disruption have increased. Many chemicals have endocrine-disrupting properties, including bisphenol A, some organochlorines, polybrominated flame retardants, perfluorinated substances, alkylphenols, phthalates, pesticides, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, alkylphenols, solvents, and some household products including some cleaning products, air fresheners, hair dyes, cosmetics, and sunscreens. Even some metals were shown to have endocrine-disrupting properties. Many observations suggesting that endocrine disruptors do contribute to cancer, diabetes, obesity, the metabolic syndrome, and infertility are listed in this paper. An overview is presented of mechanisms contributing to endocrine disruption. Endocrine disruptors can act through classical nuclear receptors, but also through estrogen-related receptors, membrane-bound estrogen-receptors, and interaction with targets in the cytosol resulting in activation of the Src/Ras/Erk pathway or modulation of nitric oxide. In addition, changes in metabolism of endogenous hormones, cross-talk between genomic and nongenomic pathways, cross talk with estrogen receptors after binding on other receptors, interference with feedback regulation and neuroendocrine cells, changes in DNA methylation or histone modifications, and genomic instability by interference with the spindle figure can play a role. Also it was found that effects of receptor activation can differ in function of the ligand.

  18. Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals: Associated Disorders and Mechanisms of Action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam De Coster

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence and/or prevalence of health problems associated with endocrine-disruption have increased. Many chemicals have endocrine-disrupting properties, including bisphenol A, some organochlorines, polybrominated flame retardants, perfluorinated substances, alkylphenols, phthalates, pesticides, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, alkylphenols, solvents, and some household products including some cleaning products, air fresheners, hair dyes, cosmetics, and sunscreens. Even some metals were shown to have endocrine-disrupting properties. Many observations suggesting that endocrine disruptors do contribute to cancer, diabetes, obesity, the metabolic syndrome, and infertility are listed in this paper. An overview is presented of mechanisms contributing to endocrine disruption. Endocrine disruptors can act through classical nuclear receptors, but also through estrogen-related receptors, membrane-bound estrogen-receptors, and interaction with targets in the cytosol resulting in activation of the Src/Ras/Erk pathway or modulation of nitric oxide. In addition, changes in metabolism of endogenous hormones, cross-talk between genomic and nongenomic pathways, cross talk with estrogen receptors after binding on other receptors, interference with feedback regulation and neuroendocrine cells, changes in DNA methylation or histone modifications, and genomic instability by interference with the spindle figure can play a role. Also it was found that effects of receptor activation can differ in function of the ligand.

  19. Criteria for endocrine disrupters: report from the Danish centre on Endocrine Disrupters (CEHOS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holbech, Henrik; Bjerregaard, Poul; Hass, Ulla

    The aim of this session is to give a presentation of the report (both ENV and HH) on criteria carried out by the Danish Centre on Endocrine Disrupters (CEHOS) as a project contracted by the Danish Environmental Protection Agency. CEHOS is an interdisciplinary scientific network without walls and ...... and gives examples of available ED data and relevant placement in groups. The overall purpose of the report is to provide scientific background for Danish input to the ongoing EU work within this field....... and the main purpose of the Centre is to build and gather new knowledge on endocrine disrupters (EDs) with focus on information needed for the preventive work of the regulatory authorities. The aim of the report was to propose scientific criteria for the identification of ED substances of concern for human...... health and the environment. A number of issues relevant for the development of criteria for EDs were considered such as definition, potency, lead effects, specificity and relevance for humans and the environment. The proposed criteria divide substances into three categories dependent on the available...

  20. Heavy Metals Acting as Endocrine Disrupters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan Georgescu

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Last years researches focused on several natural and synthetic compounds that may interfere with the major functionsof the endocrine system and were termed endocrine disrupters. Endocrine disrupters are defined as chemicalsubstances with either agonist or antagonist endocrine effects in human and animals. These effects may be achievedby interferences with the biosynthesis or activity of several endogenous hormones. Recently, it was demonstratedthat heavy metals such as cadmium (Cd, arsen (As, mercury (Hg, nickel (Ni, lead (Pb and zinc (Zn may exhibitendocrine-disrupting activity in animal experiments. Emerging evidence of the intimate mechanisms of action ofthese heavy metals is accumulating. It was revealed, for example, that the Zn atom from the Zn fingers of theestrogen receptor can be replaced by several heavy metal molecules such as copper, cobalt, Ni and Cd. By replacingthe Zn atom with Ni or copper, binding of the estrogen receptor to the DNA hormone responsive elements in the cellnucleus is prevented. In both males and females, low-level exposure to Cd interferes with the biological effects ofsteroid hormones in reproductive organs. Arsen has the property to bind to the glucocorticoid receptor thusdisturbing glucocorticoids biological effects. With regard to Hg, this may induce alterations in male and femalefertility, may affect the function of the hypothalamo-pituitary-thyroid axis or the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis,and disrupt biosynthesis of steroid hormones.

  1. Preliminary investigation into the possible endocrine disrupting ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    JTEkanem

    Preliminary investigation into the possible endocrine disrupting activity of Bonny light crude oil contaminated - diet on ... rats (twenty male and twenty five females) were expose to Bonny –light crude oil contaminated diet at concentrations of 1%, 5% and 10% .... also being implicated in possessing antiestrogenic activity9.

  2. Science and policy on endocrine disrupters must not be mixed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergman, Åke; Andersson, Anna-Maria; Becher, Georg

    2013-01-01

    The "common sense" intervention by toxicology journal editors regarding proposed European Union endocrine disrupter regulations ignores scientific evidence and well-established principles of chemical risk assessment. In this commentary, endocrine disrupter experts express their concerns about...... of views detrimental to reaching a consensus about scientific foundations for endocrine disrupter regulation in the EU....

  3. Endocrine disrupting chemicals: harmful substances and how to test them Produtos químicos como desreguladores endócrinos: substâncias danosas e como devem ser testadas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolás Olea-Serrano

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an analysis of the opinions of different groups from: scientists, international regulatory bodies, non-governmental organizations and industry; with an interest in the problem of identifying chemical substances with endocrine disrupting activity. There is also discussion of the consequences that exposure to endocrine disruptors may have for human health, considering concrete issues related to: the estimation of risk; the tests that must be used to detect endocrine disruption; the difficulties to establish an association between dose, time of exposure, individual susceptibility, and effect; and the attempts to create a census of endocrine disruptors. Finally, it is proposed that not all hormonal mimics should be included under the single generic denomination of endocrine disruptors.Este artigo apresenta uma análise das opiniões de diferentes grupos, inclusive de cientistas, agências regulatórias internacionais, organizações não-governamentais e indústrias, interessados na questão da identificação de substâncias químicas com atividade desreguladora endócrina. Os autores discutem também o impacto da exposição aos desreguladores endócrinos sobre a saúde humana, considerando as seguintes questões: estimativa de risco; testes utilizados para detectar distúrbios endócrinos; dificuldades na identificação de uma associação entre dose, tempo de exposição, suscetibilidade individual e efeito e tentativas no sentido de mapear os desreguladores endócrinos. Finalmente, os autores argumentam que nem todos os agonistas hormonais devem ser incluídos sob a denominação genérica de desreguladores endócrinos.

  4. Manufacturing doubt about endocrine disrupter science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergman, Åke; Becher, Georg; Blumberg, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    as flawed. We show that Lamb et al. misuse conceptual frameworks for assessing causality, especially the Bradford-Hill criteria, by ignoring the fundamental problems that exist with inferring causality from empirical observations. We conclude that Lamb et al.'s attempt of deconstructing the UNEP/WHO (2013......We present a detailed response to the critique of "State of the Science of Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals 2012" (UNEP/WHO, 2013) by financial stakeholders, authored by Lamb et al. (2014). Lamb et al.'s claim that UNEP/WHO (2013) does not provide a balanced perspective on endocrine disruption...... is based on incomplete and misleading quoting of the report through omission of qualifying statements and inaccurate description of study objectives, results and conclusions. Lamb et al. define extremely narrow standards for synthesizing evidence which are then used to dismiss the UNEP/WHO 2013 report...

  5. Direct and indirect endocrine disruption : aromatase and estrogen receptor-mediated processes in breast cancer development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heneweer, Marjoke

    2005-01-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) have been defined by the World Health Organization as: “exogenous substances or mixtures that alters function(s) of the endocrine system and causes adverse health effects in an intact organism, or its progeny, or (sub)populations”. Synthetic, as well as,

  6. Endocrine disruption: fact or urban legend?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nohynek, Gerhard J; Borgert, Christopher J; Dietrich, Daniel; Rozman, Karl K

    2013-12-16

    Endocrine disruptors (EDs) are substances that cause adverse health effects via endocrine-mediated mechanisms in an intact organism or its progeny or (sub) populations. Purported EDCs in personal care products include 4-MBC (UV filter) or parabens that showed oestrogenic activity in screening tests, although regulatory toxicity studies showed no adverse effects on reproductive endpoints. Hormonal potency is the key issue of the safety of EDCs. Oestrogen-based drugs, e.g. the contraceptive pill or the synthetic oestrogen DES, possess potencies up to 7 orders of magnitude higher than those of PCP ingredients; yet, in utero exposure to these drugs did not adversely affect fertility or sexual organ development of offspring unless exposed to extreme doses. Additive effects of EDs are unlikely due to the multitude of mechanisms how substances may produce a hormone-like activity; even after uptake of different substances with a similar mode of action, the possibility of additive effects is reduced by different absorption, metabolism and kinetics. This is supported by a number of studies on mixtures of chemical EDCs. Overall, despite of 20 years of research a human health risk from exposure to low concentrations of exogenous chemical substances with weak hormone-like activities remains an unproven and unlikely hypothesis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Risk Evaluation of Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Gioiosa

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available We review here our studies on early exposure to low doses of the estrogenic endocrine-disrupting chemical bisphenol A (BPA on behavior and metabolism in CD-1 mice. Mice were exposed in utero from gestation day (GD 11 to delivery (prenatal exposure or via maternal milk from birth to postnatal day 7 (postnatal exposure to 10 µg/kg body weight/d of BPA or no BPA (controls. Bisphenol A exposure resulted in long-term disruption of sexually dimorphic behaviors. Females exposed to BPA pre- and postnatally showed increased anxiety and behavioral profiles similar to control males. We also evaluated metabolic effects in prenatally exposed adult male offspring of dams fed (from GD 9 to 18 with BPA at doses ranging from 5 to 50 000 µg/kg/d. The males showed an age-related significant change in a number of metabolic indexes ranging from food intake to glucose regulation at BPA doses below the no observed adverse effect level (5000 µg/kg/d. Consistent with prior findings, low but not high BPA doses produced significant effects for many outcomes. These findings provide further evidence of the potential risks that developmental exposure to low doses of the endocrine disrupter BPA may pose to human health, with fetuses and infants being highly vulnerable.

  8. Endocrine disrupter - estradiol - in Chesapeake Bay tributaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorabawila, Nelum [University of Maryland Eastern Shore, Princess Anne, MD 21853 (United States); Gupta, Gian [University of Maryland Eastern Shore, Princess Anne, MD 21853 (United States)]. E-mail: gcgupta@umes.edu

    2005-04-11

    Exogenous chemicals that interfere with natural hormonal functions are considered endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). Estradiol (17{beta}-estradiol or E2) is the most potent of all xenoestrogens. Induction of vitellogenin (VTG) production in male fish occurs at E2 concentrations as low as 1 ng l{sup -1}. E2 reaches aquatic systems mainly through sewage and animal waste disposal. Surface water samples from ponds, rivers (Wicomico, Manokin and Pocomoke), sewage treatment plants (STPs), and coastal bays (Assawoman, Monie, Chincoteague, and Tangier Sound - Chesapeake Bay) on the Eastern Shore of Maryland were analyzed for E2 using enzyme linked immuno-sorbent assay (ELISA). E2 concentrations in river waters varied between 1.9 and 6.0 ng l{sup -1}. Highest E2 concentrations in river waters were observed immediately downstream of STPs. E2 concentrations in all the coastal bays tested were 2.3-3.2 ng l{sup -1}.

  9. Endocrine disrupter - estradiol - in Chesapeake Bay tributaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorabawila, Nelum; Gupta, Gian

    2005-01-01

    Exogenous chemicals that interfere with natural hormonal functions are considered endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). Estradiol (17β-estradiol or E2) is the most potent of all xenoestrogens. Induction of vitellogenin (VTG) production in male fish occurs at E2 concentrations as low as 1 ng l -1 . E2 reaches aquatic systems mainly through sewage and animal waste disposal. Surface water samples from ponds, rivers (Wicomico, Manokin and Pocomoke), sewage treatment plants (STPs), and coastal bays (Assawoman, Monie, Chincoteague, and Tangier Sound - Chesapeake Bay) on the Eastern Shore of Maryland were analyzed for E2 using enzyme linked immuno-sorbent assay (ELISA). E2 concentrations in river waters varied between 1.9 and 6.0 ng l -1 . Highest E2 concentrations in river waters were observed immediately downstream of STPs. E2 concentrations in all the coastal bays tested were 2.3-3.2 ng l -1

  10. Endocrine disrupting chemicals and growth of children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botton, Jérémie; Kadawathagedara, Manik; de Lauzon-Guillain, Blandine

    2017-06-01

    According to the "environmental obesogen hypothesis", early-life (including in utero) exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) may disturb the mechanisms involved in adipogenesis or energy storage, and thus may increase the susceptibility to overweight and obesity. Animal models have shown that exposure to several of these chemicals could induce adipogenesis and mechanisms have been described. Epidemiological studies are crucial to know whether this effect could also be observed in humans. We aimed at summarizing the literature in epidemiology on the relationship between EDCs exposure and child's growth. Overall, epidemiological studies suggest that pre- and/or early postnatal exposure to some EDCs may increase the risk of overweight or obesity during childhood. In that review, we present some limitations of these studies, mainly in exposure assessment, that currently prevent to conclude about causality. Recent advances in epidemiology should bring further knowledge. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. In vitro screening for endocrine disruptive activity in selected South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Various waterborne anthropogenic contaminants disrupt the endocrine systems of wildlife and humans, targeting reproductive pathways, among others. Very little is known, however, regarding the occurrence of endocrine disruptive activity in South African freshwater ecosystems, and coastal ecosystems have not been ...

  12. The European strategy on endocrine disrupters: progress to date and EU/US cooperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bontoux, L

    2001-01-01

    The European Commission has been active in the field of endocrine disrupters since 1995. Its first actions were to fund research projects through the Fourth Framework Programme for Research and Development covering various aspects of the issue (identification of endocrine disrupters, environmental and human health impacts). This involvement in research has continued through the Fifth Framework Programme and increased to this day. The publication of a specific call for proposals on endocrine disrupters on May 31, 2001 bears witness to these efforts. In parallel, the policy profile of the issue quickly rose and led to the adoption of the Community Strategy on Endocrine Disrupters (COM (1999)706 final) in 1999. This strategy identifies actions short, medium and long term and is supported by the European Parliament and the European Council. Its short-term actions focus on the establishment of a list of substances for further evaluation of their role in endocrine disruption and on the use of existing legislation to control the risk; the medium-term actions focus on the identification and assessment of endocrine disrupters as well as on further research to better understand the ED phenomenon, and the long-term actions focus on legislative actions to protect human health and the environment. These European developments have gone hand in hand with international cooperation with the USA on research (in the frame of the EC/US S&T cooperation agreement), with the WHO on health issues and with the OECD on screening and testing issues.

  13. Human biological monitoring of suspected endocrine-disrupting compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moosa Faniband

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Endocrine-disrupting compounds are exogenous agents that interfere with the natural hormones of the body. Human biological monitoring is a powerful method for monitoring exposure to endocrine disrupting compounds. In this review, we describe human biological monitoring systems for different groups of endocrine disrupting compounds, polychlorinated biphenyls, brominated flame retardants, phthalates, alkylphenols, pesticides, metals, perfluronated compounds, parabens, ultraviolet filters, and organic solvents. The aspects discussed are origin to exposure, metabolism, matrices to analyse, analytical determination methods, determinants, and time trends.

  14. Fungal laccases degradation of endocrine disrupting compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macellaro, Gemma; Pezzella, Cinzia; Cicatiello, Paola; Sannia, Giovanni; Piscitelli, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decades, water pollution by trace organic compounds (ng/L) has become one of the key environmental issues in developed countries. This is the case of the emerging contaminants called endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs). EDCs are a new class of environmental pollutants able to mimic or antagonize the effects of endogenous hormones, and are recently drawing scientific and public attention. Their widespread presence in the environment solicits the need of their removal from the contaminated sites. One promising approach to face this challenge consists in the use of enzymatic systems able to react with these molecules. Among the possible enzymes, oxidative enzymes are attracting increasing attention because of their versatility, the possibility to produce them on large scale, and to modify their properties. In this study five different EDCs were treated with four different fungal laccases, also in the presence of both synthetic and natural mediators. Mediators significantly increased the efficiency of the enzymatic treatment, promoting the degradation of substrates recalcitrant to laccase oxidation. The laccase showing the best performances was chosen to further investigate its oxidative capabilities against micropollutant mixtures. Improvement of enzyme performances in nonylphenol degradation rate was achieved through immobilization on glass beads.

  15. Fungal Laccases Degradation of Endocrine Disrupting Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gemma Macellaro

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decades, water pollution by trace organic compounds (ng/L has become one of the key environmental issues in developed countries. This is the case of the emerging contaminants called endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs. EDCs are a new class of environmental pollutants able to mimic or antagonize the effects of endogenous hormones, and are recently drawing scientific and public attention. Their widespread presence in the environment solicits the need of their removal from the contaminated sites. One promising approach to face this challenge consists in the use of enzymatic systems able to react with these molecules. Among the possible enzymes, oxidative enzymes are attracting increasing attention because of their versatility, the possibility to produce them on large scale, and to modify their properties. In this study five different EDCs were treated with four different fungal laccases, also in the presence of both synthetic and natural mediators. Mediators significantly increased the efficiency of the enzymatic treatment, promoting the degradation of substrates recalcitrant to laccase oxidation. The laccase showing the best performances was chosen to further investigate its oxidative capabilities against micropollutant mixtures. Improvement of enzyme performances in nonylphenol degradation rate was achieved through immobilization on glass beads.

  16. Contribution of the Endocrine Perspective in the Evaluation of Endocrine Disrupting Chemical Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bourguignon, Jean-Pierre; Juul, Anders; Franssen, Delphine

    2016-01-01

    Debate makes science progress. In the field of endocrine disruption, endocrinology has brought up findings that substantiate a specific perspective on the definition of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs), the role of the endocrine system and the endpoints of hormone and EDC actions among other...... issues. This paper aims at discussing the relevance of the endocrine perspective with regard to EDC effects on pubertal timing. Puberty involves particular sensitivity to environmental conditions. Reports about the advancing onset of puberty in several countries have led to the hypothesis...

  17. Tributyltin: Advancing the science on assessing endocrine disruption with an unconventional endocrine-disrupting compound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagadic, Laurent; Katsiadaki, Ioanna; Biever, Ronald C.; Guiney, Patrick; Karouna-Renier, Natalie; Schwarz, Tamar; Meador, James P.

    2018-01-01

    Tributyltin (TBT) has been recognized as an endocrine disrupting chemical (EDC) for several decades. However, only in the last decade, was its primary endocrine mechanism of action (MeOA) elucidated—interactions with the nuclear retinoid-X receptor (RXR), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), and their heterodimers. This molecular initiating event (MIE) alters a range of reproductive, developmental, and metabolic pathways at the organism level. It is noteworthy that a variety of MeOAs have been proposed over the years for the observed endocrine-type effects of TBT; however, convincing data for the MIE was provided only recently and now several researchers have confirmed and refined the information on this MeOA. One of the most important lessons learned from years of research on TBT concerns apparent species sensitivity. Several aspects such as the rates of uptake and elimination, chemical potency, and metabolic capacity are all important for identifying the most sensitive species for a given chemical, including EDCs. For TBT, much of this was discovered by trial and error, hence important relationships and important sensitive taxa were not identified until several decades after its introduction to the environment. As recognized for many years, TBT-induced responses are known to occur at very low concentrations for molluscs, a fact that has more recently also been observed in fish species. This review explores the MeOA and effects of TBT in different species (aquatic molluscs and other invertebrates, fish, amphibians, birds, and mammals) according to the OECD Conceptual Framework for Endocrine Disruptor Testing and Assessment (CFEDTA). The information gathered on biological effects that are relevant for populations of aquatic animals was used to construct Species Sensitivity Distributions (SSDs) based on No Observed Effect Concentrations (NOECs) and Lowest Observed Effect Concentrations (LOECs). Fish appear at the lower end of these distributions

  18. CUMULATIVE DEVELOPMENTAL EFFECTS OF ENDOCRINE DISRUPTERS: SYNERGY OR ADDITIVITY?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exposure to chemicals with hormonal activity during critical developmental periods can disrupt reproductive function and development. Within the last decade, several classes of pesticides and toxic substances have been shown to disrupt differentiation of the male rat reproductive...

  19. Biomarkers used in Environmental Health with focus on Endocrine Disrupters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krüger, Tanja; Ghisari, Mandana; Long, Manhai

    2012-01-01

    Endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are compounds that either mimic or block endogenous hormones and can disrupt the normal function of the body. Bio-monitoring is the assessment of internal doses of EDCs and has been used for decades to provide information about exposures to chemicals giving...

  20. Neuro-endocrine disruption in molluscs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holbech, Henrik; Bech Sanderhoff, Lene; Waller, Stine P.

    The Mollusca phylum is the second largest animal phylum with around 85,000 registered mollusc species and increasing attention to effects of chemicals on the molluscan endocrine system have been given during the last years. This includes initiation of the development of OECD test guidelines (TG) ...... embryo rotation test system.......The Mollusca phylum is the second largest animal phylum with around 85,000 registered mollusc species and increasing attention to effects of chemicals on the molluscan endocrine system have been given during the last years. This includes initiation of the development of OECD test guidelines (TG......) to assess the effect of chemicals in molluscs. To date no endocrine specific mollusc biomarkers have though been validated and included in draft test guidelines due to lack of knowledge of the endocrine system. Here we investigate effects of pharmaceuticals targeting serotonin and dopamine in a cost...

  1. Substances that disrupt thyroid hormone biosynthesis (in Romanian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pap, Andreea

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Endocrine disrupters are natural or synthetic chemical substances that have the possibility to alter the endocrine functions leading to serious metabolic changes especially in newborns. The accumulation and persistence over long periods of time became a priority in terms of health and environment. The mechanism of action is represented by blocking, mimicking or modifying the effects of thyroid hormones. In this review, the main purpose was to determine what effects have the endocrine disruptors on the thyroid gland, especially on the thyroid hormone biosynthesis and setting the stage involved by it. We focused on the action of perchlorates, phthalates, BPC, PDPEs, soy, isoflavones, nitrates, thiocyanates, bisphenol A and triclorsan and came to the conclusion that their intervention can result in either hyperthyroidism or hypothyroidism.

  2. Ecotoxicological hazard and risk assessment of endocrine active substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leopold, Annegaaike; Roberts, Mike; Matthiessen, Peter

    2017-03-01

    This collection of papers provides state-of-the-art science on a complex topic that has been challenging for scientists and regulators for a long time. The papers emanated from the Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry (SETAC) Pellston Workshop ® Environmental Hazard and Risk Assessment Approaches for Endocrine-Active Substances (EHRA). Forty-eight international experts met in early February 2016 to discuss whether the environmental risks posed by endocrine-disrupting substances (EDS) can be reliably assessed. The primary conclusion of the workshop was that if data on environmental exposure, effects on sensitive species and life-stages, delayed effects, and effects at low concentrations are robust, initiating environmental risk assessment of EDS is scientifically sound and reliable. Integr Environ Assess Manag 2017;13:264-266. © 2016 The Authors. Integrated Environmental Assessment and Management published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Society of Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry (SETAC). © 2016 The Authors. Integrated Environmental Assessment and Management published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Society of Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry (SETAC).

  3. Preliminary investigation into the possible endocrine disrupting ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... reduction (p<0.05). The estrogen level in the female rats showed a general significant increase (p<0.05) in all the groups when compared with the female control group. This preliminary result suggest that Bonny-Light crude oil may have the potential to alter reproductive activity and hence a possible endocrine disruptor.

  4. CONTAMINANT-ASSOCIATED ENDOCRINE DISRUPTION IN REPTILES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The data presented suggest that contaminants can alter the endocrine and reproductive system of reptiles by mimicking hormones and by various mechanisms other than direct hormonal mimicry. However, these data indicate, as do many other studies using various vertebrates, that a fo...

  5. Estrogenic and anti-androgenic endocrine disrupting chemicals and their impact on the male reproductive system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria eDe Falco

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs are identified for their ability to perturb the homeostasis of endocrine system and hormonal balance. The male reproductive system is under close control of hormones and each change in their concentration and time of exposition and action can induce a deregulation of its physiology. In this review we summarize the most recent studies on two main categories of EDCs with different action: the estrogenic bisphenol A and alkylphenols and the anti-androgenic phthalates. This review describes the main effects of these substances on male reproductive system.

  6. Symbiotic Gene Activation is Interrupted by Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals

    OpenAIRE

    Jennifer E. Fox; Matthew E. Burow; John A. McLachlan

    2001-01-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) include organochlorine pesticides, plastics manufacturing by-products, and certain herbicides[1]. These chemicals have been shown to disrupt hormonal signaling in exposed wildlife, lab animals, and mammalian cell culture by binding to estrogen receptors (ER-α and ER-β) and affecting the expression of estrogen responsive genes[2,3]. Additionally, certain plant chemicals, termed phytoestrogens, are also able to bind to estrogen receptors and modulate gene e...

  7. Assessment of three approaches for regulatory decision making on pesticides with endocrine disrupting properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marx-Stoelting, P; Niemann, L; Ritz, V; Ulbrich, B; Gall, A; Hirsch-Ernst, K I; Pfeil, R; Solecki, R

    2014-12-01

    Recent EU legislation has introduced endocrine disrupting properties as a hazard-based "cut-off" criterion for the approval of active substances as pesticides and biocides. Currently, no specific science-based approach for the assessment of substances with endocrine disrupting properties has been agreed upon, although this new legislation provides interim criteria based on classification and labelling. Different proposals for decision making on potential endocrine disrupting properties in human health risk assessment have been developed by the German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR) and other regulatory bodies. All these frameworks, although differing with regard to hazard characterisation, include a toxicological assessment of adversity of the effects, the evaluation of underlying modes/mechanisms of action in animals and considerations concerning the relevance of effects to humans. Three options for regulatory decision making were tested upon 39 pesticides for their applicability and to analyze their potential impact on the regulatory status of active substances that are currently approved for use in Europe: Option 1, based purely on hazard identification (adversity, mode of action, and the plausibility that both are related); Option 2, based on hazard identification and additional elements of hazard characterisation (severity and potency); Option 3, based on the interim criteria laid down in the recent EU pesticides legislation. Additionally, the data analysed in this study were used to address the questions, which parts of the endocrine system were affected, which studies were the most sensitive and whether no observed adverse effect levels were observed for substance with ED properties. The results of this exercise represent preliminary categorisations and must not be used as a basis for definitive regulatory decisions. They demonstrate that a combination of criteria for hazard identification with additional criteria of hazard characterisation

  8. Recent Advances on Endocrine Disrupting Effects of UV Filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiaying; Pan, Liumeng; Wu, Shenggan; Lu, Liping; Xu, Yiwen; Zhu, Yanye; Guo, Ming; Zhuang, Shulin

    2016-08-03

    Ultraviolet (UV) filters are used widely in cosmetics, plastics, adhesives and other industrial products to protect human skin or products against direct exposure to deleterious UV radiation. With growing usage and mis-disposition of UV filters, they currently represent a new class of contaminants of emerging concern with increasingly reported adverse effects to humans and other organisms. Exposure to UV filters induce various endocrine disrupting effects, as revealed by increasing number of toxicological studies performed in recent years. It is necessary to compile a systematic review on the current research status on endocrine disrupting effects of UV filters toward different organisms. We therefore summarized the recent advances on the evaluation of the potential endocrine disruptors and the mechanism of toxicity for many kinds of UV filters such as benzophenones, camphor derivatives and cinnamate derivatives.

  9. Recent Advances on Endocrine Disrupting Effects of UV Filters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaying Wang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Ultraviolet (UV filters are used widely in cosmetics, plastics, adhesives and other industrial products to protect human skin or products against direct exposure to deleterious UV radiation. With growing usage and mis-disposition of UV filters, they currently represent a new class of contaminants of emerging concern with increasingly reported adverse effects to humans and other organisms. Exposure to UV filters induce various endocrine disrupting effects, as revealed by increasing number of toxicological studies performed in recent years. It is necessary to compile a systematic review on the current research status on endocrine disrupting effects of UV filters toward different organisms. We therefore summarized the recent advances on the evaluation of the potential endocrine disruptors and the mechanism of toxicity for many kinds of UV filters such as benzophenones, camphor derivatives and cinnamate derivatives.

  10. EVALUATION OF THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN OBESITY AND ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING CHEMICALS. PHTHALATES AND BISPHENOL A

    OpenAIRE

    SHAHVIRDI, Leila; GÜLTEKIN, Timur

    2018-01-01

    Obesity is defined as a case in which body-mass index isover 30. Obesity and Metabolic disorders are increasing health problem inrecent days. Endocrine disruptings are synthetic or natural substance damagingbody's normal physiological functions by imitating or preventing hormones. Theyshow their effects by increasing the metabolism of endogen peptidic orsteroidal hormones; or activating or deactivating the receptors onhypothalamus, adiposis tissue, liver and the other tissues. They can b...

  11. Review: Endocrine disrupting chemicals (phenol and phthalates) in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There has been increasing concern about the impacts of exposure to chemical compounds with endocrine disrupting activities in the environment, especially aquatic environments, to wildlife and humans. South Africa is known to have used and abused most chemicals listed by developed and developing countries as ...

  12. Mixture effects of endocrine disrupting compounds in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærstad, Mia Birkhøj; Taxvig, Camilla; Andersen, H. R.

    2010-01-01

    assuming additivity. Overall these and other studies show that weak endocrine disrupting compounds, like parabens and azole fungicides, give rise to combination effects when they occur in mixtures. These combination effects should be taken into account in regulatory risk assessment not to under...

  13. Endocrine-disrupting chemicals and public health protection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zoeller, R Thomas; Brown, T R; Doan, L L

    2012-01-01

    An endocrine-disrupting chemical (EDC) is an exogenous chemical, or mixture of chemicals, that can interfere with any aspect of hormone action. The potential for deleterious effects of EDC must be considered relative to the regulation of hormone synthesis, secretion, and actions and the variabili...

  14. Thyroid effects of endocrine disrupting chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boas, Malene; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Main, Katharina M

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, many studies of thyroid-disrupting effects of environmental chemicals have been published. Of special concern is the exposure of pregnant women and infants, as thyroid disruption of the developing organism may have deleterious effects on neurological outcome. Chemicals may exert...... thyroid effects through a variety of mechanisms of action, and some animal experiments and in vitro studies have focused on elucidating the mode of action of specific chemical compounds. Long-term human studies on effects of environmental chemicals on thyroid related outcomes such as growth...... and development are still lacking. The human exposure scenario with life long exposure to a vast mixture of chemicals in low doses and the large physiological variation in thyroid hormone levels between individuals render human studies very difficult. However, there is now reasonably firm evidence that PCBs have...

  15. Endocrine disrupting chemicals as potential risk factor for estrogen-dependent cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutkowska, Aleksandra Z; Szybiak, Aleksandra; Serkies, Krystyna; Rachoń, Dominik

    2016-08-09

    Civilization, industrialization, and urbanization create an environment where humans are continuously exposed to endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). Some of breast cancers and endometrial cancer, which are the most common female malignant neoplasms, are estrogen-dependent tumors. Prolonged exposure to estrogens or substances with estrogenic properties may be a risk factor for their development. This paper aimed to discuss the potential adverse effect of EDCs on human health, including the role of EDCs in hormone-dependent carcinogenesis. A review of literature regarding the sources of environmental exposure to EDCs and molecular mechanisms of their action was performed. We analyzed the possible mechanisms of how these substances alter the function of the endocrine system, resulting in adverse health effects. Hundreds of substances with endocrine disrupting potential have been identified in our environment. There is accumulating evidence linking exposure to EDCs with the development of mammary and endometrial cancer. By interacting with steroid receptors, EDCs can impact the cellular processes potentially leading to carcinogenesis. There are also data showing the effect of EDCs on immune dysfunction. During lifespan, people are usually exposed to a mixture of various EDCs, which complicates the assessment of individual substances or compounds implicated in cancer development. As the prevalence of hormone-dependent tumors among women continues to increase, their successful prevention is of human benefit. Institutions representing medicine, science, industry, and governments should develop joint strategies to decrease exposure to EDC, and thus to reduce the risk of hormonedependent tumors in women.

  16. Endocrine-disrupting chemicals and male reproductive health: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damjan Balabanič

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Balanced functioning of the endocrine system is essential for preservation of human species by providing normal growth and development, reproduction, and normal functioning of all other organ systems. In the last decades, emerging area of interest is the impact of environmental exposures to human health. Important environmental pollutants are endocrine-disrupting che- micals (EDCs, which can have adverse e ects on the living organism due to their interference with the endocrine system. The group of known EDCs embraces ubiquitous synthetic substan- ces used as industrial lubricants and solvents, with their by-products, incomplete combustion remains, pharmaceuticals and personal care products, pesticides and plasticizers. Natural com- pounds such as genistein, a phytoestrogen, and heavy metals can also have endocrine e ects. Endocrine disruption is a serious public health problem. EDCs among other health problems ge- nerate reproductive disorders in males, such as decreases in sperm count and quality, increases in testicular germ cell numbers, prostate and breast cancers, cryptorchidism and hypospadias, impaired fertility, and infertility. This paper critically reviews the current knowledge of the impa- ct of EDCs on reproductive disorders in human males.

  17. Endocrine Disruption and In Vitro Ecotoxicology: Recent Advances and Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Martin; Kienle, Cornelia; Vermeirssen, Etiënne L M; Oehlmann, Jörg

    Endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are man-made compounds interfering with hormone signaling. Omnipresent in the environment, they can cause adverse effects in a wide range of wildlife. Accordingly, Endocrine Disruption is one focal area of ecotoxicology. Because EDCs induce complex response patterns in vivo via a wide range of mechanisms of action, in vitro techniques have been developed to reduce and understand endocrine toxicity. In this review we revisit the evidence for endocrine disruption in diverse species and the underlying molecular mechanisms. Based on this, we examine the battery of in vitro bioassays currently in use in ecotoxicological research and discuss the following key questions. Why do we use in vitro techniques? What endpoints are we looking at? Which applications are we using in vitro bioassays for? How can we put in vitro data into a broader context? And finally, what is the practical relevance of in vitro data? In critically examining these questions, we review the current state-of-the-art of in vitro (eco)toxicology, highlight important limitations and challenges, and discuss emerging trends and future research needs.

  18. Towards an internationally harmonized test method for reproductive and developmental effects of endocrine disrupters in marine copepods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusk, Kresten Ole; Wollenberger, Leah

    2007-01-01

    with marine copepods (Acartia tonsa, Nitocra spinipes, Tisbe battagliai, and Amphiascus tenuiremis). The present paper gives an overview on the endocrine system of crustaceans with special emphasis on development and reproduction, which are targets for endocrine disruption, and reviews available methods......New and updated methods to detect and characterize endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are urgently needed for the purpose of environmental risk assessment since these substances are often not detected using existing chronic toxicity tests. Numerous reports on the effects of EDCs on crustacean...... development and reproduction have been published and the development of life-cycle tests with crustaceans has been prioritized within the OECD work program for endocrine disrupter testing and assessment. As a result, Sweden, and Denmark initiated a proposal for development of a full life-cycle test...

  19. Refinement of the ECETOC approach to identify endocrine disrupting properties of chemicals in ecotoxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weltje, Lennart; Wheeler, James R; Weyers, Arnd; Galay-Burgos, Malyka

    2013-12-16

    To use and implement an assessment scheme for the evaluation of endocrine disrupting properties of chemicals in ecotoxicology, the types of effect need to be agreed. Effects that merit further consideration in this context should fulfil the following three criteria: caused by an endocrine mode of action, be adverse, and be relevant at the population level to reflect the protection goal of ecotoxicological assessments. Thereafter, a comparison of effect values, regardless of the causative mechanisms, should be made, firstly to determine if endocrine toxicity generates the lowest endpoint within a taxon, and secondly if it is the lowest endpoint compared to that of other taxa living in the same compartment. These comparisons inform on two levels of specificity and determine if endocrine-mediated side-effects determine the ecotoxicological profile of a chemical. Various quantitative measures for the assessment of potency are also presented, which could assist in determining how to handle substances in the risk assessment when a regulatory concern is identified. Finally, derogation criteria should be defined for compounds that were designed as endocrine disruptors for non-vertebrates and those for which there is 'negligible exposure'. This paper discusses and provides proposals on how to apply these concepts for assessment of substances. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Endocrine-disrupting chemicals and the regulation of energy balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadal, Angel; Quesada, Ivan; Tudurí, Eva; Nogueiras, Rubén; Alonso-Magdalena, Paloma

    2017-09-01

    Energy balance involves the adjustment of food intake, energy expenditure and body fat reserves through homeostatic pathways. These pathways include a multitude of biochemical reactions, as well as hormonal cues. Dysfunction of this homeostatic control system results in common metabolism-related pathologies, which include obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Metabolism-disrupting chemicals (MDCs) are a particular class of endocrine-disrupting chemicals that affect energy homeostasis. MDCs affect multiple endocrine mechanisms and thus different cell types that are implicated in metabolic control. MDCs affect gene expression and the biosynthesis of key enzymes, hormones and adipokines that are essential for controlling energy homeostasis. This multifaceted spectrum of actions precludes compensatory responses and favours metabolic disorders. Herein, we review the main mechanisms used by MDCs to alter energy balance. This work should help to identify new MDCs, as well as novel targets of their action.

  1. Bird populations as sentinels of endocrine disrupting chemicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Carere

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs is a widespread phenomenon in nature. Although the mechanisms of action of EDCs are actively studied, the consequences of endocrine disruption (ED at the population level and the adaptations evolved to cope with chronic EDC exposure have been overlooked. Birds probably represent the animal taxon most successfully adapted to synanthropic life. Hence, birds share with humans a similar pattern of exposure to xenobiotics. In this article, we review case studies on patterns of behaviour that deviate from the expectation in bird species exposed to EDCs. We provide behavioural and ecological parameters to be used as endpoints of ED; methodological requirements and caveats based on species-specific life-history traits, behavioural repertoires, developmental styles, and possibility of captive breeding; a list of species that could be used as sentinels to assess the quality of man-made environment.

  2. Recent Advances on Endocrine Disrupting Effects of UV Filters

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Jiaying; Pan, Liumeng; Wu, Shenggan; Lu, Liping; Xu, Yiwen; Zhu, Yanye; Guo, Ming; Zhuang, Shulin

    2016-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) filters are used widely in cosmetics, plastics, adhesives and other industrial products to protect human skin or products against direct exposure to deleterious UV radiation. With growing usage and mis-disposition of UV filters, they currently represent a new class of contaminants of emerging concern with increasingly reported adverse effects to humans and other organisms. Exposure to UV filters induce various endocrine disrupting effects, as revealed by increasing number of ...

  3. Persistent developmental toxicity in rat offspring after low dose exposure to a mixture of endocrine disrupting pesticides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Pernille Rosenskjold; Petersen, Marta Axelstad; Boberg, Julie

    2012-01-01

    There is growing concern of permanent damage to the endocrine and nervous systems after developmental exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals. In this study the permanent reproductive and neurobehavioral effects of combined exposure to five endocrine disrupting pesticides, epoxiconazole...

  4. Endocrine active chemicals and endocrine disruption in Minnesota streams and lakes: implications for aquatic resources, 1994-2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kathy E.; Schoenfuss, Heiko L.; Barber, Larry B.; Writer, Jeff H.; Blazer, Vicki; Keisling, Richard L.; Ferrey, Mark L.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with St. Cloud State University, Minnesota Department of Health, Minnesota Pollution Control Agency, Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, Metropolitan Council Environmental Services, and the University of Minnesota, has conducted field monitoring studies and laboratory research to determine the presence of endocrine active chemicals and the incidence of endocrine disruption in Minnesota streams and lakes during 1994–2008. Endocrine active chemicals are chemicals that interfere with the natural regulation of endocrine systems, and may mimic or block the function of natural hormones in fish or other organisms. This interference commonly is referred to as endocrine disruption. Indicators of endocrine disruption in fish include vitellogenin (female egg yolk protein normally expressed in female fish) in male fish, oocytes present in male fish testes, reduced reproductive success, and changes in reproductive behavior.

  5. Possible endocrine disrupting effects of parabens and their metabolites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boberg, Julie; Taxvig, Camilla; Christiansen, Sofie

    2010-01-01

    and provides an overview of studies on toxicokinetics. After dermal uptake, parabens are hydrolyzed and conjugated and excreted in urine. Despite high total dermal uptake of paraben and metabolites,little intact paraben can be recovered in blood and urine. Paraben metabolites may play a role in the endocrine...... disruption seen in experimental animals and studies are needed to determine human levels of parabens and metabolites. Overall, the estrogenic burden of parabens and their metabolites in blood may exceed the action of endogenous estradiol in childhood and the safety margin for propylparaben is very low when...

  6. Exposures to Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals in Consumer Products-A Guide for Pediatricians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Katelyn H; Durrani, Timur S

    2017-05-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals, a group of exogenous chemicals that can interfere with hormone action in the body, have been implicated in disrupting endocrine function, which negatively affects human health and development. Endocrine disrupting chemicals are ubiquitously detected in consumer products, foods, beverages, personal care products, and household cleaning products. Due to concerns about their negative effects on human health, several professional health provider societies have recommended the reduction of common endocrine disrupting chemical exposures. The purpose of this review is to provide a brief overview of common endocrine disrupting chemicals (bisphenol A, phthalates, triclosan, polybrominated ethers, and parabens) and potential effects on child development and health. In addition, we aim to provide guidance and resources for pediatricians and other health care providers with counseling strategies to help patients to minimize exposures to common endocrine disrupting chemicals. Copyright © 2017 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Endocrine Disruption of Vasopressin Systems and Related Behaviors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather B. Patisaul

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs are chemicals that interfere with the organizational or activational effects of hormones. Although the vast majority of the EDC literature focuses on steroid hormone signaling related impacts, growing evidence from a myriad of species reveals that the nonapeptide hormones vasopressin (AVP and oxytocin (OT may also be EDC targets. EDCs shown to alter pathways and behaviors coordinated by AVP and/or OT include the plastics component bisphenol A (BPA, the soy phytoestrogen genistein (GEN, and various flame retardants. Many effects are sex specific and likely involve action at nuclear estrogen receptors. Effects include the elimination or reversal of well-characterized sexually dimorphic aspects of the AVP system, including innervation of the lateral septum and other brain regions critical for social and other non-reproductive behaviors. Disruption of magnocellular AVP function has also been reported in rats, suggesting possible effects on hemodynamics and cardiovascular function.

  8. Symbiotic Gene Activation is Interrupted by Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer E. Fox

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs include organochlorine pesticides, plastics manufacturing by-products, and certain herbicides[1]. These chemicals have been shown to disrupt hormonal signaling in exposed wildlife, lab animals, and mammalian cell culture by binding to estrogen receptors (ER-α and ER-β and affecting the expression of estrogen responsive genes[2,3]. Additionally, certain plant chemicals, termed phytoestrogens, are also able to bind to estrogen receptors and modulate gene expression, and as such also may be considered EDCs[4]. One example of phytoestrogen action is genistein, a phytochemical produced by soybeans, binding estrogen receptors, and changing expression of estrogen responsive genes which certain studies have linked to a lower incidence of hormonally related cancers in Japanese populations[5]. Why would plants make compounds that are able to act as estrogens in the human body? Obviously, soybeans do not intentionally produce phytoestrogens to prevent breast cancer in Japanese women.

  9. Consensus models to predict endocrine disruption for all ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humans are potentially exposed to tens of thousands of man-made chemicals in the environment. It is well known that some environmental chemicals mimic natural hormones and thus have the potential to be endocrine disruptors. Most of these environmental chemicals have never been tested for their ability to disrupt the endocrine system, in particular, their ability to interact with the estrogen receptor. EPA needs tools to prioritize thousands of chemicals, for instance in the Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program (EDSP). Collaborative Estrogen Receptor Activity Prediction Project (CERAPP) was intended to be a demonstration of the use of predictive computational models on HTS data including ToxCast and Tox21 assays to prioritize a large chemical universe of 32464 unique structures for one specific molecular target – the estrogen receptor. CERAPP combined multiple computational models for prediction of estrogen receptor activity, and used the predicted results to build a unique consensus model. Models were developed in collaboration between 17 groups in the U.S. and Europe and applied to predict the common set of chemicals. Structure-based techniques such as docking and several QSAR modeling approaches were employed, mostly using a common training set of 1677 compounds provided by U.S. EPA, to build a total of 42 classification models and 8 regression models for binding, agonist and antagonist activity. All predictions were evaluated on ToxCast data and on an exte

  10. Endocrine disrupting compounds exposure and testis development in mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egbowona, Biola F.; Mustapha, Olajide A.

    2011-01-01

    In the last few decades, there is substantial evidence that male reproductive function is deteriorating in humans and wildlife and this is associated with unintentional exposure to widely used synthetic chemicals. Subsequently, much has been done to show that certain chemicals in the environment adversely interfere with the developing fetal gonads of the laboratory animals. Some in vitro studies have demonstrated treatment-induced reproductive problems in offspring exposed to endocrine disrupting compounds (EDC) which are similar to those observed in wildlife and human population. Few EDC studies have demonstrated that there are certain periods of gestation when the developing fetus is highly sensitive and at risk of small endocrine changes. Similar observations have been made in the sewage sludge model, however, while animal studies have been insightful in providing valuable information about the range of effects that can be attributed to in utero exposure to EDCs, varying levels of maternal doses administered in different studies exaggerated extrapolation of these results to human. Thus the EDC concentration representative of fetal exposure levels is uncertain because of the complexities of its nature. So far, the level of fetal exposure can only be roughly estimated. There is substantial evidence from animal data to prove that EDCs can adversely affect reproductive development and function in male and more has accumulated on the mechanisms by which they exert their effects. This paper therefore, reviews previous studies to highlight the extent to which testis development can be disrupted during fetal life. PMID:29255381

  11. European Union's strategy on endocrine disrupting chemicals and the current position of Slovenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perharič, Lucija; Fatur, Tanja; Drofenik, Jernej

    2016-06-01

    In view of the European Union regulations 1107/2009 and 528/2012, which say that basic substances in plant protection and biocidal products marketed in the European Union (EU) should not have an inherent capacity to cause endocrine disruption, an initiative was started to define scientific criteria for the identification of endocrine disruptors (EDs). The objectives of the EU strategy on EDs are to protect human health and the environment, to assure the functioning of the market, and to provide clear and coherent criteria for the identification of EDs that could have broad application in the EU legislation. Policy issues were to be addressed by the Ad-hoc group of Commission Services, EU Agencies and Member States established in 2010, whereas the scientific issues were to be addressed by the Endocrine Disruptors Expert Advisory Group (ED EAG), established in 2011. The ED EAG adopted the 2002 World Health Organization (WHO) definition of endocrine disruptor and agreed that for its identification it is necessary to produce convincing evidence of a biologically plausible causal link between an adverse effect and endocrine disrupting mode of action. In 2014, the European Commission proposed four ED identification criteria options and three regulatory options, which are now being assessed for socio-economic, environmental, and health impact. Slovenia supports the establishing of identification criteria and favours option 4, according to which ED identification should be based on the WHO definition with the addition of potency as an element of hazard characterisation. As for regulatory options, Slovenia favours the risk-based rather than hazard-based regulation.

  12. Endocrine disruption of courtship behaviour and reproduction in zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broch-Lips, Mia Gina Gruwier

    2011-01-01

    Many different compounds have the abilities to interfere with the endocrine system. The endocrine system in vertebrates is complex and consists of different cross talking systems. Endocrine disruptive chemicals (EDCs) can disturb these systems in various ways, for example by mimicking or countera...

  13. Exposure to Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals and Male Reproductive Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hueiwang Anna Jeng

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs can interfere with normal hormonal balance and may exert adverse consequences on humans. The male reproductive system may be susceptible to the effects of such environmental toxicants. This review discusses the recent progress in scientific data mainly from epidemiology studies on the associations between EDCs and male reproductive health and our understanding of possible mechanisms associated with the effects of EDCs on male reproductive health. Finally, the review provides recommendations on future research to enhance our understanding of EDCs and male reproductive health. The review highlights the need for 1 well-defined longitudinal epidemiology studies, with appropriately designed exposure assessment to determine potential causal relationships; 2 chemical and biochemical approaches aimed at a better understanding of the mechanism of action of xenoestrogens with regard to low-dose effects, and assessment of identify genetic susceptibility factors associated with the risk of adverse effects following exposure to EDCs.

  14. Organizational and activational effects of estrogenic endocrine disrupting chemicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silbergeld Ellen K.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Endocrine disruption is a hypothesis of common mode of action that may define a set of structurally varied chemicals, both natural and synthetic. Their common mode of action may suggest that they produce or contribute to similar toxic effects, although this has been difficult to demonstrate. Insights from developmental biology suggest that development of hormone sensitive systems, such as the brain and the genitourinary tract, may be particularly sensitive to EDCs. Because these systems are both organized and later activated by hormones, the brain and vagina may be valuable model systems to study the toxicity of EDCs in females and to elucidate mechanisms whereby early exposures appear to affect long term function.

  15. Endocrine disrupting properties in vivo of widely used azole fungicides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taxvig, Camilla; Vinggaard, Anne; Hass, Ulla

    2008-01-01

    The endocrine-disrupting potential of four commonly used azole fungicides, propiconazole, tebuconazole, epoxiconazole and ketoconazole, were tested in two short-term in vivo studies. Initially, the antiandrogenic effects of propiconazole and tebuconazole (50, 100 and 150 mg/kg body weight/day each......) were examined in the Hershberger assay. In the second study, pregnant Wistar rats were dosed with propiconazole, tebuconazole, epoxiconazole or ketoconazole (50 mg/kg/day each) from gestational day (GD) 7 to GD 21. Caesarian sections were performed on dams at GD 21. Tebuconazole and propiconazole...... demonstrated no antiandrogenic effects at doses between 50 and 150 mg/kg body weight/day in the Hershberger assay. In the in utero exposure toxicity study, ketoconazole, a pharmaceutical to treat human fungal infections, decreased anogenital distance and reduced testicular testosterone levels, demonstrating...

  16. QSAR Models for Reproductive Toxicity and Endocrine Disruption Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjan Vračko

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Reproductive toxicity is an important regulatory endpoint, which is required in registration procedures of chemicals used for different purposes (for example pesticides. The in vivo tests are expensive, time consuming and require large numbers of animals, which must be sacrificed. Therefore an effort is ongoing to develop alternative In vitro and in silico methods to evaluate reproductive toxicity. In this review we describe some modeling approaches. In the first example we describe the CAESAR model for prediction of reproductive toxicity; the second example shows a classification model for endocrine disruption potential based on counter propagation artificial neural networks; the third example shows a modeling of relative binding affinity to rat estrogen receptor, and the fourth one shows a receptor dependent modeling experiment.

  17. Endocrine disruption and human health: Workshop report on the state of the art

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piersma AH; LEO

    2001-01-01

    Within the project on endocrine disruption and human health one aim is to keep track with the state of the art as regards endocrine disrupter research relating to human health effects. This report summarizes the presentations given at the Workshop on the subject held in May 2000 in Copenhagen, which

  18. Endocrine disrupting chemicals in indoor and outdoor air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudel, Ruthann A.; Perovich, Laura J.

    The past 50 years have seen rapid development of new building materials, furnishings, and consumer products and a corresponding explosion in new chemicals in the built environment. While exposure levels are largely undocumented, they are likely to have increased as a wider variety of chemicals came into use, people began spending more time indoors, and air exchange rates decreased to improve energy efficiency. As a result of weak regulatory requirements for chemical safety testing, only limited toxicity data are available for these chemicals. Over the past 15 years, some chemical classes commonly used in building materials, furnishings, and consumer products have been shown to be endocrine disrupting chemicals - that is they interfere with the action of endogenous hormones. These include PCBs, used in electrical equipment, caulking, paints and surface coatings; chlorinated and brominated flame retardants, used in electronics, furniture, and textiles; pesticides, used to control insects, weeds, and other pests in agriculture, lawn maintenance, and the built environment; phthalates, used in vinyl, plastics, fragrances, and other products; alkylphenols, used in detergents, pesticide formulations, and polystyrene plastics; and parabens, used to preserve products like lotions and sunscreens. This paper summarizes reported indoor and outdoor air concentrations, chemical use and sources, and toxicity data for each of these chemical classes. While industrial and transportation-related pollutants have been shown to migrate indoors from outdoor sources, it is expected that indoor sources predominate for these consumer product chemicals; and some studies have identified indoor sources as the predominant factor influencing outdoor ambient air concentrations in densely populated areas. Mechanisms of action, adverse effects, and dose-response relationships for many of these chemicals are poorly understood and no systematic screening of common chemicals for endocrine disrupting

  19. Use of external metabolizing systems when testing for endocrine disruption in the T-screen assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taxvig, Camilla; Olesen, Pelle Thonning; Nellemann, Christine

    2011-01-01

    Although, it is well-established that information on the metabolism of a substance is important in the evaluation of its toxic potential, there is limited experience with incorporating metabolic aspects into in vitro tests for endocrine disrupters. The aim of the current study was a) to study different in vitro systems for biotransformation of ten known endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDs): five azole fungicides, three parabens and 2 phthalates, b) to determine possible changes in the ability of the EDs to bind and activate the thyroid receptor (TR) in the in vitro T-screen assay after biotransformation and c) to investigate the endogenous metabolic capacity of the GH3 cells, the cell line used in the T-screen assay, which is a proliferation assay used for the in vitro detection of agonistic and antagonistic properties of compounds at the level of the TR. The two in vitro metabolizing systems tested the human liver S9 mix and the PCB-induced rat microsomes gave an almost complete metabolic transformation of the tested parabens and phthalates. No marked difference the effects in the T-screen assay was observed between the parent compounds and the effects of the tested metabolic extracts. The GH3 cells themselves significantly metabolized the two tested phthalates dimethyl phthalate (DMP) and diethyl phthalate (DEP). Overall the results and qualitative data from the current study show that an in vitro metabolizing system using liver S9 or microsomes could be a convenient method for the incorporation of metabolic and toxicokinetic aspects into in vitro testing for endocrine disrupting effects.

  20. Bisphenol A, an endocrine-disrupting chemical, and brain development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Kyoko; Yaoi, Takeshi; Fushiki, Shinji

    2012-08-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is an endocrine-disrupting chemical, widely used in various industries and the field of dentistry. The consequent increase in BPA exposure among humans has led us to some concerns regarding the potential deleterious effects on reproduction and brain development. The emphasis of this review is on the effects of prenatal and lactational exposure to low doses of BPA on brain development in mice. We demonstrated that prenatal exposure to BPA affected fetal murine neocortical development by accelerating neuronal differentiation/migration during the early embryonic stage, which was associated with up- and down-regulation of the genes critical for brain development, including the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors. In the adult mice brains, both abnormal neocortical architecture and abnormal corticothalamic projections persisted in the group exposed to the BPA. Functionally, BPA exposure disturbed murine behavior, accompanied with a disrupted neurotransmitter system, including monoamines, in the postnatal development period and in adult mice. We also demonstrated that epigenetic alterations in promoter-associated CpG islands might underlie some of the effects on brain development after exposure to BPA. © 2012 Japanese Society of Neuropathology.

  1. Neuroendocrine and behavioral implications of endocrine disrupting chemicals in quail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottinger, M.A.; Abdelnabi, M.A.; Henry, P.; McGary, S.; Thompson, N.; Wu, J.M.

    2001-01-01

    Studies in our laboratory have focused on endocrine, neuroendocrine, and behavioral components of reproduction in the Japanese quail. These studies considered various stages in the life cycle, including embryonic development, sexual maturation, adult reproductive function, and aging. A major focus of our research has been the role of neuroendocrine systems that appear to synchronize both endocrine and behavioral responses. These studies provide the basis for our more recent research on the impact of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) on reproductive function in the Japanese quail. These endocrine active chemicals include pesticides, herbicides, industrial products, and plant phytoestrogens. Many of these chemicals appear to mimic vertebrate steroids, often by interacting with steroid receptors. However, most EDCs have relatively weak biological activity compared to native steroid hormones. Therefore, it becomes important to understand the mode and mechanism of action of classes of these chemicals and sensitive stages in the life history of various species. Precocial birds, such as the Japanese quail, are likely to be sensitive to EDC effects during embryonic development, because sexual differentiation occurs during this period. Accordingly, adult quail may be less impacted by EDC exposure. Because there are a great many data available on normal development and reproductive function in this species, the Japanese quail provides an excellent model for examining the effects of EDCs. Thus, we have begun studies using a Japanese quail model system to study the effects of EDCs on reproductive endocrine and behavioral responses. In this review, we have two goals: first, to provide a summary of reproductive development and sexual differentiation in intact Japanese quail embryos, including ontogenetic patterns in steroid hormones in the embryonic and maturing quail. Second, we discuss some recent data from experiments in our laboratory in which EDCs have been tested in

  2. Commercial processed food may have endocrine-disrupting potential: soy-based ingredients making the difference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omoruyi, Iyekhoetin Matthew; Kabiersch, Grit; Pohjanvirta, Raimo

    2013-01-01

    Processed and packaged food items as well as ready-to-eat snacks are neglected and poorly characterised sources of human exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs). In this study we investigated the presence of xenoestrogens in commercially processed and packaged Finnish foods, arising from substances deliberately added or inadvertently contaminating the food, substances formed as a result of food processing, or substances leaching from food packaging materials. Samples were obtained in three separate batches of equivalent products from both a supermarket and a local representative of a global chain of hamburger restaurants and extracted by a solid-phase extraction method. Their endocrine-disrupting potential was determined by yeast bioluminescent assay, using two recombinant yeast strains Saccharomyces cerevisiae BMAEREluc/ERα and S. cerevisiae BMA64/luc. In this test system, the majority of samples (both foodstuffs and wrappers) analysed proved negative. However, all batches of industrially prepared hamburgers (but not those obtained from a hamburger restaurant) as well as pepper salami significantly induced luciferase activity in the BMAEREluc/ERα yeast strain indicating the presence of xenoestrogens, with estradiol equivalents of these products ranging from 0.2 to 443 pg g(-1). All three products contained soy-based ingredients, which apparently accounted for, or at least contributed to, their high estrogenic activity, since no signal in the assay was observed with extracts of the packaging material, while two different soy sauces tested yielded an intense signal (28 and 54 pg ml(-1) estradiol-equivalent). These findings imply that by and large chemicals arising in the processing or packaging of foodstuffs in Finland constitute an insignificant source of xenoestrogens to consumers. However, soy-derived ingredients in certain food items might render the entire products highly estrogenic. The estrogenic activity of soy is attributed to isoflavones whose

  3. Are Endocrine Disrupting Compounds a Health Risk in Drinking Water?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian R. Falconer

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available There has been a great deal of international discussion on the nature and relevance of endocrine disrupting compounds in the environment. Changes in reproductive organs of fish and mollusks have been demonstrated in rivers downstream of sewage discharges in Europe and in North America, which have been attributed to estrogenic compounds in the effluent. The anatomical and physiological changes in the fauna are illustrated by feminization of male gonads. The compounds of greatest hormonal activity in sewage effluent are the natural estrogens 17β-estradiol, estrone, estriol and the synthetic estrogen ethinylestradiol. Androgens are also widely present in wastewaters. Investigations of anthropogenic chemical contaminants in freshwaters and wastewaters have shown a wide variety of organic compounds, many of which have low levels of estrogenic activity. In many highly populated countries the drinking water is sourced from the same rivers and lakes that are the recipients of sewage and industrial discharge. The River Thames which flows through London, England, has overall passed through drinking water and sewage discharge 5 times from source to mouth of the river. Under these types of circumstance, any accumulation of endocrine disrupting compounds from sewage or industry potentially affects the quality of drinking water. Neither basic wastewater treatment nor basic drinking water treatment will eliminate the estrogens, androgens or detergent breakdown products from water, due to the chemical stability of the structures. Hence a potential risk to health exists; however present data indicate that estrogenic contamination of drinking water is very unlikely to result in physiologically detectable effects in consumers. Pesticide, detergent and industrial contamination remain issues of concern. As a result of this concern, increased attention is being given to enhanced wastewater treatment in locations where he effluent is directly or indirectly in

  4. EDC-2: The Endocrine Society's Second Scientific Statement on Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, V. A.; Fenton, S. E.; Flaws, J. A.; Nadal, A.; Prins, G. S.; Toppari, J.; Zoeller, R. T.

    2015-01-01

    The Endocrine Society's first Scientific Statement in 2009 provided a wake-up call to the scientific community about how environmental endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) affect health and disease. Five years later, a substantially larger body of literature has solidified our understanding of plausible mechanisms underlying EDC actions and how exposures in animals and humans—especially during development—may lay the foundations for disease later in life. At this point in history, we have much stronger knowledge about how EDCs alter gene-environment interactions via physiological, cellular, molecular, and epigenetic changes, thereby producing effects in exposed individuals as well as their descendants. Causal links between exposure and manifestation of disease are substantiated by experimental animal models and are consistent with correlative epidemiological data in humans. There are several caveats because differences in how experimental animal work is conducted can lead to difficulties in drawing broad conclusions, and we must continue to be cautious about inferring causality in humans. In this second Scientific Statement, we reviewed the literature on a subset of topics for which the translational evidence is strongest: 1) obesity and diabetes; 2) female reproduction; 3) male reproduction; 4) hormone-sensitive cancers in females; 5) prostate; 6) thyroid; and 7) neurodevelopment and neuroendocrine systems. Our inclusion criteria for studies were those conducted predominantly in the past 5 years deemed to be of high quality based on appropriate negative and positive control groups or populations, adequate sample size and experimental design, and mammalian animal studies with exposure levels in a range that was relevant to humans. We also focused on studies using the developmental origins of health and disease model. No report was excluded based on a positive or negative effect of the EDC exposure. The bulk of the results across the board strengthen the

  5. Thyroid endocrine disruption and external body morphology of Zebrafish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Prakash; Grabowski, Timothy B.; Patino, Reynaldo

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the effects thyroid-active compounds during early development on body morphology of Zebrafish (Danio rerio). Three-day postfertilization (dpf) larvae were exposed to goitrogen [methimazole (MZ, 0.15 mM)], combination of MZ (0.15 mM) and thyroxine (T4, 2 nM), T4 (2 nM), or control (reconstituted water) treatments until 33 dpf and subsequently maintained in reconstituted water until 45 dpf. Samples were taken at 33 and 45 dpf for multivariate analysis of geometric distances between selected homologous landmarks placed on digital images of fish, and for histological assessment of thyrocytes. Body mass, standard length, and pectoral fin length were separately measured on remaining fish at 45 dpf. Histological analysis confirmed the hypothyroid effect (increased thyrocyte height) of MZ and rescue effect of T4 co-administration. Geometric distance analysis showed that pectoral and pelvic fins shifted backward along the rostrocaudal axis under hypothyroid conditions at 45 dpf and that T4 co-treatment prevented this shift. Pectoral fin length at 45 dpf was reduced by exposure to MZ and rescued by co-administration of T4, but it was not associated with standard length. Methimazole caused a reduction in body mass and length at 45 dpf that could not be rescued by T4 co-administration, and non-thyroidal effects of MZ on body shape were also recognized at 33 and 45 dpf. Alterations in the length and position of paired fins caused by exposure to thyroid-disrupting chemicals during early development, as shown here for Zebrafish, could affect physical aspects of locomotion and consequently other important organismal functions such as foraging, predator avoidance, and ultimately survival and recruitment into the adult population. Results of this study also suggest the need to include rescue treatments in endocrine disruption studies that rely on goitrogens as reference for thyroid-mediated effects.

  6. Endocrine Disrupters: the new players able to affect the epigenome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavinia eCasati

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Epigenetics represents the way by which the environment is able to program the genome; there are three main levels of epigenetic control on genome: DNA methylation, post-translational histone modification and microRNA expression. The term Epigenetics has been widened by NIH to include both heritable changes in gene activity and expression but also stable, long-term alterations in the transcriptional potential of a cell that are not necessarily heritable. These changes might be produced mostly by the early life environment and might affect health influencing the susceptibility to develop diseases, from cancer to mental disorder, during the entire life span. The most studied environmental influences acting on epigenome are diet, infections, wasting, child care, smoking and environmental pollutants, in particular endocrine disrupters (EDs. These are environmental xenobiotics able to interfere with the normal development of the male and female reproductive systems of wildlife, of experimental animals and possibly of humans, disrupting the normal reproductive functions. Data from literature indicate that EDs can act at different levels of epigenetic control, in some cases transgenerationally, in particular when the exposure to these compounds occurs during the prenatal and earliest period of life. Some of the best characterized EDs will be considered in this review. Among the EDs, vinclozolin (VZ and methoxychlor (MXC promote epigenetic transgenerational effects. Polychlorinated biphenils (PCBs, the most widespread environmental EDs, affect histone post-translational modifications in a dimorphic way, possibly as the result of an alteration of gene expression of the enzymes involved in histone modification, as the demethylase Jarid1b, an enzyme also involved in regulating the interaction of androgens with their receptor.

  7. Mate choice, sexual selection, and endocrine-disrupting chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gore, Andrea C; Holley, Amanda M; Crews, David

    2017-09-11

    Humans have disproportionately affected the habitat and survival of species through environmental contamination. Important among these anthropogenic influences is the proliferation of organic chemicals, some of which perturb hormone systems, the latter referred to as endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs). EDCs are widespread in the environment and affect all levels of reproduction, including development of reproductive organs, hormone release and regulation through the life cycle, the development of secondary sexual characteristics, and the maturation and maintenance of adult physiology and behavior. However, what is not well-known is how the confluence of EDC actions on the manifestation of morphological and behavioral sexual traits influences mate choice, a process that requires the reciprocal evaluation of and/or acceptance of a sexual partner. Moreover, the outcomes of EDC-induced perturbations are likely to influence sexual selection; yet this has rarely been directly tested. Here, we provide background on the development and manifestation of sexual traits, reproductive competence, and the neurobiology of sexual behavior, and evidence for their perturbation by EDCs. Selection acts on individuals, with the consequences manifest in populations, and we discuss the implications for EDC contamination of these processes, and the future of species. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Mixtures of endocrine disrupting contaminants modelled on human high end exposures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Sofie; Kortenkamp, A.; Petersen, Marta Axelstad

    2012-01-01

    though each individual chemical is present at low, ineffective doses, but the effects of mixtures modelled based on human intakes have not previously been investigated. To address this issue for the first time, we selected 13 chemicals for a developmental mixture toxicity study in rats where data about...... in vivo endocrine disrupting effects and information about human exposures was available, including phthalates, pesticides, UV‐filters, bisphenol A, parabens and the drug paracetamol. The mixture ratio was chosen to reflect high end human intakes. To make decisions about the dose levels for studies...... in the rat, we employed the point of departure index (PODI) approach, which sums up ratios between estimated exposure levels and no‐observed‐adverse‐effect‐level (NOAEL) values of individual substances. For high end human exposures to the 13 selected chemicals, we calculated a PODI of 0.016. As only a PODI...

  9. Recommended approaches to the scientific evaluation of ecotoxicological hazards and risks of endocrine-active substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthiessen, Peter; Ankley, Gerald T; Biever, Ronald C; Bjerregaard, Poul; Borgert, Christopher; Brugger, Kristin; Blankinship, Amy; Chambers, Janice; Coady, Katherine K; Constantine, Lisa; Dang, Zhichao; Denslow, Nancy D; Dreier, David A; Dungey, Steve; Gray, L Earl; Gross, Melanie; Guiney, Patrick D; Hecker, Markus; Holbech, Henrik; Iguchi, Taisen; Kadlec, Sarah; Karouna-Renier, Natalie K; Katsiadaki, Ioanna; Kawashima, Yukio; Kloas, Werner; Krueger, Henry; Kumar, Anu; Lagadic, Laurent; Leopold, Annegaaike; Levine, Steven L; Maack, Gerd; Marty, Sue; Meador, James; Mihaich, Ellen; Odum, Jenny; Ortego, Lisa; Parrott, Joanne; Pickford, Daniel; Roberts, Mike; Schaefers, Christoph; Schwarz, Tamar; Solomon, Keith; Verslycke, Tim; Weltje, Lennart; Wheeler, James R; Williams, Mike; Wolf, Jeffrey C; Yamazaki, Kunihiko

    2017-03-01

    A SETAC Pellston Workshop ® "Environmental Hazard and Risk Assessment Approaches for Endocrine-Active Substances (EHRA)" was held in February 2016 in Pensacola, Florida, USA. The primary objective of the workshop was to provide advice, based on current scientific understanding, to regulators and policy makers; the aim being to make considered, informed decisions on whether to select an ecotoxicological hazard- or a risk-based approach for regulating a given endocrine-disrupting substance (EDS) under review. The workshop additionally considered recent developments in the identification of EDS. Case studies were undertaken on 6 endocrine-active substances (EAS-not necessarily proven EDS, but substances known to interact directly with the endocrine system) that are representative of a range of perturbations of the endocrine system and considered to be data rich in relevant information at multiple biological levels of organization for 1 or more ecologically relevant taxa. The substances selected were 17α-ethinylestradiol, perchlorate, propiconazole, 17β-trenbolone, tributyltin, and vinclozolin. The 6 case studies were not comprehensive safety evaluations but provided foundations for clarifying key issues and procedures that should be considered when assessing the ecotoxicological hazards and risks of EAS and EDS. The workshop also highlighted areas of scientific uncertainty, and made specific recommendations for research and methods-development to resolve some of the identified issues. The present paper provides broad guidance for scientists in regulatory authorities, industry, and academia on issues likely to arise during the ecotoxicological hazard and risk assessment of EAS and EDS. The primary conclusion of this paper, and of the SETAC Pellston Workshop on which it is based, is that if data on environmental exposure, effects on sensitive species and life-stages, delayed effects, and effects at low concentrations are robust, initiating environmental risk

  10. Recommended approaches to the scientific evaluation of ecotoxicological hazards and risks of endocrine-active substances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthiessen, Peter; Ankley, Gerald T.; Biever, Ronald C.; Bjerregaard, Poul; Borgert, Christopher; Brugger, Kristin; Blankinship, Amy; Chambers, Janice; Coady, Katherine K.; Constantine, Lisa; Dang, Zhichao; Denslow, Nancy D.; Dreier, David; Dungey, Steve; Gray, L. Earl; Gross, Melanie; Guiney, Patrick D.; Hecker, Markus; Holbech, Henrik; Iguchi, Taisen; Kadlec, Sarah; Karouna-Renier, Natalie K.; Katsiadaki, Ioanna; Kawashima, Yukio; Kloas, Werner; Krueger, Henry; Kumar, Anu; Lagadic, Laurent; Leopold, Annegaaike; Levine, Steven L.; Maack, Gerd; Marty, Sue; Meador, James P.; Mihaich, Ellen; Odum, Jenny; Ortego, Lisa; Parrott, Joanne L.; Pickford, Daniel; Roberts, Mike; Schaefers, Christoph; Schwarz, Tamar; Solomon, Keith; Verslycke, Tim; Weltje, Lennart; Wheeler, James R.; Williams, Mike; Wolf, Jeffery C.; Yamazaki, Kunihiko

    2017-01-01

    A SETAC Pellston Workshop® “Environmental Hazard and Risk Assessment Approaches for Endocrine-Active Substances (EHRA)” was held in February 2016 in Pensacola, Florida, USA. The primary objective of the workshop was to provide advice, based on current scientific understanding, to regulators and policy makers; the aim being to make considered, informed decisions on whether to select an ecotoxicological hazard- or a risk-based approach for regulating a given endocrine-disrupting substance (EDS) under review. The workshop additionally considered recent developments in the identification of EDS. Case studies were undertaken on 6 endocrine-active substances (EAS—not necessarily proven EDS, but substances known to interact directly with the endocrine system) that are representative of a range of perturbations of the endocrine system and considered to be data rich in relevant information at multiple biological levels of organization for 1 or more ecologically relevant taxa. The substances selected were 17α-ethinylestradiol, perchlorate, propiconazole, 17β-trenbolone, tributyltin, and vinclozolin. The 6 case studies were not comprehensive safety evaluations but provided foundations for clarifying key issues and procedures that should be considered when assessing the ecotoxicological hazards and risks of EAS and EDS. The workshop also highlighted areas of scientific uncertainty, and made specific recommendations for research and methods-development to resolve some of the identified issues. The present paper provides broad guidance for scientists in regulatory authorities, industry, and academia on issues likely to arise during the ecotoxicological hazard and risk assessment of EAS and EDS. The primary conclusion of this paper, and of the SETAC Pellston Workshop on which it is based, is that if data on environmental exposure, effects on sensitive species and life-stages, delayed effects, and effects at low concentrations are robust, initiating environmental risk

  11. Removal of Selected Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals During On-Site Wastewater Treatment Using A Constructed Wetland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Significant research has shown that domestic and industrial wastewater can be a source of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) to the environment. Much of this research has focused on municipal and industrial centralized wastewater treatment plants. These plants have been show...

  12. Assessing Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals In Landfills, Solid Waste Sites and Wastewater

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA researchers are assessing waste water effluents to measure their effects on ecosystems and aquatic animals while also developing innovative solutions to reduce concentrations of potential endocrine disrupting chemicals.

  13. Female Reproductive Disorders, Diseases, and Costs of Exposure to Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals in the European Union.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Patricia A; Sathyanarayana, Sheela; Fowler, Paul A; Trasande, Leonardo

    2016-04-01

    We estimated the economic costs of female reproductive disorders attributable to endocrine disrupting chemical exposures. These may contribute substantially to fibroids and endometriosis, costing nearly €1.5 billion annually.

  14. Putative effects of endocrine disrupters on pubertal development in the human

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teilmann, Grete; Juul, Anders; Skakkebaek, Niels E

    2002-01-01

    Pubertal development is regulated by gonadotrophins and sex hormones. There has been a clear secular trend in the timing of puberty during the last century, puberty becoming earlier. Although improved nutrition is assumed to be the cause, this could partly be associated with exposure to so......-called endocrine disrupters. Precocious puberty has been described in several case reports of accidental exposure to oestrogenic compounds in cosmetic products, food and pharmaceuticals. Local epidemics of premature thelarche have also been suggested to be linked to endocrine disrupters. Children adopted from...... developing countries to industrialized countries often develop precocious puberty. Not only precocious puberty, but also delayed puberty can, theoretically, be associated with exposure to endocrine disrupters. While it is very plausible that endocrine disrupters may disturb pubertal development...

  15. A path forward in the debate over health impacts of endocrine disrupting chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zoeller, Robert T; Bergmann, Åke; Becher, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Several recent publications reflect debate on the issue of "endocrine disrupting chemicals" (EDCs), indicating that two seemingly mutually exclusive perspectives are being articulated separately and independently. Considering this, a group of scientists with expertise in basic science, medicine...

  16. Metabolic targets of endocrine disrupting chemicals assessed by cord blood transcriptome profiling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Remy, Sylvie; Govarts, Eva; Wens, Britt

    2016-01-01

    Early life exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) has been frequently associated with impaired perinatal growth, an important risk factor for later onset of metabolic disorders. We analyzed whether the cord blood transcriptome showed early indications of alterations in metabolic...

  17. Sex reversal assessments reveal different vulnerability to endocrine disruption between deeply diverged anuran lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamschick, Stephanie; Rozenblut-Kościsty, Beata; Ogielska, Maria; Lehmann, Andreas; Lymberakis, Petros; Hoffmann, Frauke; Lutz, Ilka; Kloas, Werner; Stöck, Matthias

    2016-03-31

    Multiple anthropogenic stressors cause worldwide amphibian declines. Among several poorly investigated causes is global pollution of aquatic ecosystems with endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs). These substances interfere with the endocrine system and can affect the sexual development of vertebrates including amphibians. We test the susceptibility to an environmentally relevant contraceptive, the artificial estrogen 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2), simultaneously in three deeply divergent systematic anuran families, a model-species, Xenopus laevis (Pipidae), and two non-models, Hyla arborea (Hylidae) and Bufo viridis (Bufonidae). Our new approach combines synchronized tadpole exposure to three EE2-concentrations (50, 500, 5,000 ng/L) in a flow-through-system and pioneers genetic and histological sexing of metamorphs in non-model anurans for EDC-studies. This novel methodology reveals striking quantitative differences in genetic-male-to-phenotypic-female sex reversal in non-model vs. model species. Our findings qualify molecular sexing in EDC-analyses as requirement to identify sex reversals and state-of-the-art approaches as mandatory to detect species-specific vulnerabilities to EDCs in amphibians.

  18. Reproductive endocrine-disrupting effects of triclosan: Population exposure, present evidence and potential mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cai-Feng; Tian, Ying

    2015-11-01

    Triclosan has been used as a broad-spectrum antibacterial agent for over 40 years worldwide. Increasing reports indicate frequent detection and broad exposure to triclosan in the natural environment and the human body. Current laboratory studies in various species provide strong evidence for its disrupting effects on the endocrine system, especially reproductive hormones. Multiple modes of action have been suggested, including disrupting hormone metabolism, displacing hormones from hormone receptors and disrupting steroidogenic enzyme activity. Although epidemiological studies on its effects in humans are mostly negative but conflicting, which is typical of much of the early evidence on the toxicity of EDCs, overall, the evidence suggests that triclosan is an EDC. This article reviews human exposure to triclosan, describes the current evidence regarding its reproductive endocrine-disrupting effects, and discusses potential mechanisms to provide insights for further study on its endocrine-disrupting effects in humans. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Using short-term bioassays to evaluate the endocrine disrupting capacity of the pesticides linuron and fenoxycarb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spirhanzlova, Petra; De Groef, Bert; Nicholson, Freda E; Grommen, Sylvia V H; Marras, Giulia; Sébillot, Anthony; Demeneix, Barbara A; Pallud-Mothré, Sophie; Lemkine, Gregory F; Tindall, Andrew J; Du Pasquier, David

    2017-10-01

    Several short-term whole-organism bioassays based on transgenic aquatic models are now under validation by the OECD (Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development) to become standardized test guidelines for the evaluation of the endocrine activity of substances. Evaluation of the endocrine disrupting capacity of pesticides will be a domain of applicability of these future reference tests. The herbicide linuron and the insecticide fenoxycarb are two chemicals commonly used in agricultural practices. While numerous studies indicate that linuron is likely to be an endocrine disruptor, there is little information available on the effect of fenoxycarb on vertebrate endocrine systems. Using whole-organism bioassays based on transgenic Xenopus laevis tadpoles and medaka fry we assessed the potential of fenoxycarb and linuron to disrupt thyroid, androgen and estrogen signaling. In addition we used in silico approach to simulate the affinity of these two pesticides to human hormone receptors. Linuron elicited thyroid hormone-like activity in tadpoles at all concentrations tested and, showed an anti-estrogenic activity in medaka at concentrations 2.5mg/L and higher. Our experiments suggest that, in addition to its previously established anti-androgenic action, linuron exhibits thyroid hormone-like responses, as well as acting at the estrogen receptor level to inhibit estrogen signaling. Fenoxycarb on the other hand, did not cause any changes in thyroid, androgen or estrogen signaling at the concentrations tested. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Reproductive endocrine-disrupting effects of triclosan: Population exposure, present evidence and potential mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Cai-Feng; Tian, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Triclosan has been used as a broad-spectrum antibacterial agent for over 40 years worldwide. Increasing reports indicate frequent detection and broad exposure to triclosan in the natural environment and the human body. Current laboratory studies in various species provide strong evidence for its disrupting effects on the endocrine system, especially reproductive hormones. Multiple modes of action have been suggested, including disrupting hormone metabolism, displacing hormones from hormone receptors and disrupting steroidogenic enzyme activity. Although epidemiological studies on its effects in humans are mostly negative but conflicting, which is typical of much of the early evidence on the toxicity of EDCs, overall, the evidence suggests that triclosan is an EDC. This article reviews human exposure to triclosan, describes the current evidence regarding its reproductive endocrine-disrupting effects, and discusses potential mechanisms to provide insights for further study on its endocrine-disrupting effects in humans. - Highlights: • Triclosan is widely detected in human urine, blood and breast milk. • Laboratory studies suggest reproductive endocrine-disrupting effects of triclosan. • Laboratory studies suggest estrogenic properties of triclosan. • There are three potential mechanisms regarding the estrogenic effect of triclosan. • Prospective epidemiological studies on vulnerable populations are needed. - This review summarizes current evidence on human exposure to triclosan, and its reproductive endocrine-disrupting effects and potential mechanisms.

  1. Implications of research on endocrine disruption for the environmental risk assessment, regulation and monitoring of chemicals in the European Union

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthiessen, Peter; Johnson, Ian

    2007-01-01

    We assess the implications which research on endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) has for the regulation of synthetic substances and for the protection of the environment, particularly under the forthcoming European Union (EU) REACH legislation. EDCs present regulatory problems inter alia because they can act additively at concentrations which are individually harmless, and they may have non-classical dose (concentration)-response relationships at low exposure levels. Furthermore, current in vivo testing routines were not specifically designed to assess the endocrine disrupting properties of chemicals, whilst in silico and in vitro methods have only limited applicability and availability for this purpose. We need to ensure that the assessment approaches specified in the draft REACH legislation and Technical Guidance are able to evaluate EDCs efficiently. However, it must also be recognised that environmental monitoring procedures in Europe will need to be improved to detect EDCs that have evaded identification, and where appropriate, control, under REACH. - The challenges associated with the environmental risk assessment and regulation of endocrine disrupting chemicals are discussed

  2. Prenatal exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals and birth weight – a prospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Cock, M.; de Boer, M.R.; Lamoree, M.; Legler, J.; van de Bor, M.

    2016-01-01

    Prenatal exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals may affect fetal development through disruption of hormonal actions and epigenetic modifications, potentially predisposing individuals to later on-set health risks, such as obesity. The objective of this study was to determine associations between

  3. Disruption of the endocrine control of final oocyte maturation in teleosts by xenobiotic chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, P.

    1999-07-01

    Final oocyte maturation (FOM) in fish and other vertebrates is under precise endocrine control and involves changes in hormone secretion at all levels of the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal axis. Several potential sites and mechanisms of chemical disruption of the endocrine system controlling FOM by are discussed. Neurotoxic chemicals such as lead and PCBs can alter monoamine neurotransmitter function and xenoestrogens can interfere with steroid feedback mechanisms at the hypothalamus and pituitary to impair the neuroendocrine control of gonadotropin secretion. Chemicals which disrupt calcium homeostasis such as cadmium can interfere with calcium-dependent signal transduction pathway activated by reproductive hormones in the pituitary and gonads. Other xenobiotics may disrupt maturation-inducing steroid (MIS) function by impairing its synthesis or receptor binding. The problems in assessing endocrine disruption of FOM are discussed. The relatively few investigations reported in the literature on endocrine disruption of FOM in fishes by chemicals indicate that organochlorine and organophosphorus pesticides at concentrations less than one ppb can impair induction of FOM in response to gonadotropin and the MIS. Moreover, evidence is presented that certain organochlorine pesticides block MIS action by binding to the MIS receptor which is localized on the oocyte plasma membrane. Steroid membrane receptor function may be particularly susceptible to interference by hydrophilic chemicals. Finally, an in vitro bioassay capable of screening many chemicals simultaneously for their ability to disrupt the endocrine control of FOM is described.

  4. Detection of endocrine active substances in the aquatic environment in southern Taiwan using bioassays and LC-MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kuang-Yu; Chou, Pei-Hsin

    2016-06-01

    Endocrine active substances, including naturally occurring hormones and various synthetic chemicals have received much concern owing to their endocrine disrupting potencies. It is essential to monitor their environmental occurrence since these compounds may pose potential threats to biota and human health. In this study, yeast-based reporter assays were carried out to investigate the presence of (anti-)androgenic, (anti-)estrogenic, and (anti-)thyroid compounds in the aquatic environment in southern Taiwan. Liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was also used to measure the environmental concentrations of selected endocrine active substances for assessing potential ecological risks and characterizing contributions to the endocrine disrupting activities. Bioassay results showed that anti-androgenic (ND-7489 μg L(-1) flutamide equivalent), estrogenic (ND-347 ng L(-1) 17β-estradiol equivalent), and anti-thyroid activities were detected in the dissolved and particulate phases of river water samples, while anti-estrogenic activities (ND-10 μg L(-1) 4-hydroxytamoxifen equivalent) were less often found. LC-MS/MS analysis revealed that anti-androgenic and estrogenic contaminants, such as bisphenol A, triclosan, and estrone were frequently detected in Taiwanese rivers. In addition, their risk quotient values were often higher than 1, suggesting that they may pose an ecological risk to the aquatic biota. Further identification of unknown anti-androgenic and estrogenic contaminants in Taiwanese rivers may be necessary to protect Taiwan's aquatic environment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Development and application of QSAR models for mechanisms related to endocrine disruption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abildgaard Rosenberg, Sine

    is a background section, comprising 1) an introduction to the endocrine system with a focus on thyroid hormones (THs) and their essential function in neurodevelopment as well as a description of how chemicals may interference with endocrine mechanisms and cause adverse effects, 2) an introduction to the applied......Humans are daily exposed to a wide variety of man-made chemicals through food, consumer products, water, air inhalation etc. For the main part of these chemicals no or only very limited information is available on their potential to cause endocrine disruption. Traditionally such information has...... information on the mode of action of chemicals in a faster and cheaper way. The main purpose in this PhD project was to develop QSAR models for mechanisms related to endocrine disruption and apply the models to predict 10,000s of chemicals to which humans are potentially exposed. The first part of the thesis...

  6. Environmental analysis of endocrine disrupting effects from hydrocarbon contaminants in the ecosystem. 1997 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    'The overall objective of the basic research grant is to characterize the potential of common hydrocarbon contaminants in ecosystems to act as endocrine disruptors. The three major lines of research include (1) a biotechnology based screening system to identify potential hormone mimics and antagonists; (2) an animal screening system to identify biomarkers of endocrine effects. and (3) a literature review to identify compounds at a variety of DOE sites that need to be examined for endocrine disrupting effects. By relating results obtained from this research project to contamination problems at various DOE sites. CBR will provide data and information on endocrine disrupting contaminants to DOE for consideration in risk analyses for determining clean-up levels and priorities needed at the sites.'

  7. Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) – New endocrine disruptors in polar bears (Ursus maritimus)?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kathrine Eggers; Letcher, Robert J.; Sonne, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) are emerging in the Arctic and accumulate in brain tissues of East Greenland (EG) polar bears. In vitro studies have shown that PFASs might possess endocrine disrupting abilities and therefore the present study was conducted to investigate potential PFAS...... induced alterations in brain steroid concentrations. The concentrations of eleven steroid hormones were determined in eight brain regions from ten EG polar bears. Pregnenolone (PRE), the dominant progestagen, was found in mean concentrations of 5-47ng/g (ww) depending on brain region. PRE showed...... significantly (pbears. Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) found in mean concentrations 0.67-4.58ng/g (ww) was the androgen found in highest concentrations. Among the estrogens estrone (E1) showed mean concentrations of 0.90-2.21ng/g (ww) and was the most...

  8. Female reproductive disorders: the roles of endocrine-disrupting compounds and developmental timing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crain, D.A.; Janssen, S.J.; Edwards, T.M.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the possible role of endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs) on female reproductive disorders emphasizing developmental plasticity and the complexity of endocrine-dependent ontogeny of reproductive organs. Declining conception rates and the high incidence of female reproducti...... reproductive dysfunction together with tools to assess the specific exposures and methods to block their effects. This review of the EDC literature as it relates to female health provides an important platform on which women's health can be improved Udgivelsesdato: 2008/10...

  9. Endocrine Function in Aquatic Invertebrates and Evidence for Disruption by Environmental Pollutants

    OpenAIRE

    Pinder, L. C. V.; Pottinger, T. G.; Billinghurst, Z.; Depledge, M. H.

    1999-01-01

    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Objectives 1. This report addresses five primary objectives:- (i) to summarize the key elements of invertebrate endocrine systems; (ii) to assess whether existing test systems are adequate for the detection of endocrine disruption in invertebrates, what new tests might be required, which species of invertebrates are most appropriate for such tests, what end-points should be measured and whether the same organisms can be used for both laboratory and environme...

  10. Effects of endocrine disrupting heavy metals on pituitary and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Association of hypogonadism and visceral obesity (VO) was recently demonstrated in male auto-mechanics occupationally exposed to endocrine disruptors (ED)-lead, cadmium, mercury and arsenic, known to alter the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis. The effects of exposure to these EDs on pituitary and gonadal ...

  11. Multiple endocrine disrupting effects in rats perinatally exposed to butylparaben

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boberg, Julie; Petersen, Marta Axelstad; Svingen, Terje

    2016-01-01

    Parabens comprise a group of preservatives commonly added to cosmetics, lotions and other consumer products. Butylparaben has estrogenic and anti-androgenic properties and is known to reduce sperm counts in rats following perinatal exposure. Whether butylparaben exposure can affect other endocrine...

  12. Polish Society of Endocrinology Position statement on endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutkowska, Aleksandra; Rachoń, Dominik; Milewicz, Andrzej; Ruchała, Marek; Bolanowski, Marek; Jędrzejuk, Diana; Bednarczuk, Tomasz; Górska, Maria; Hubalewska-Dydejczyk, Alicja; Kos-Kudła, Beata; Lewiński, Andrzej; Zgliczyński, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    With the reference to the position statements of the Endocrine Society, the Paediatric Endocrine Society, and the European Society of Paediatric Endocrinology, the Polish Society of Endocrinology points out the adverse health effects caused by endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) commonly used in daily life as components of plastics, food containers, pharmaceuticals, and cosmetics. The statement is based on the alarming data about the increase of the prevalence of many endocrine disorders such as: cryptorchidism, precocious puberty in girls and boys, and hormone-dependent cancers (endometrium, breast, prostate). In our opinion, it is of human benefit to conduct epidemiological studies that will enable the estimation of the risk factors of exposure to EDCs and the probability of endocrine disorders. Increasing consumerism and the industrial boom has led to severe pollution of the environment with a corresponding negative impact on human health; thus, there is great necessity for the biomonitoring of EDCs in Poland.

  13. Late-life effects on rat reproductive system after developmental exposure to mixtures of endocrine disrupters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isling, Louise Krag; Boberg, Julie; Jacobsen, Pernille Rosenskjold

    2014-01-01

    This study examined late-life effects of perinatal exposure of rats to a mixture of endocrine-disrupting contaminants. Four groups of 14 time-mated Wistar rats were exposed by gavage from gestation day 7 to pup day 22 to a mixture of 13 anti-androgenic and estrogenic chemicals including phthalates...... group. Developmental exposure of rats to the highest dose of a human-relevant mixture of endocrine disrupters induced adverse effects late in life, manifested as earlier female reproductive senescence, reduced sperm counts, higher score for prostate atypical hyperplasia, and higher incidence...... of pituitary tumors. These delayed effects highlight the need for further studies on the role of endocrine disrupters in hormone-related disorders in aging humans....

  14. Toxicity tests with crustaceans for detecting sublethal effects of potential endocrine disrupting chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wollenberger, Leah

    on effects of potential endocrine disrupters on crustacean development and reproduction have been published since the beginning of the nineties. However, most crustacean toxicity test protocols routinely used so far have not been designed with endocrine-specific endpoints in mind. The main objectives...... of effective concentrations (ECx). After having demonstrated that larval development of A. tonsa was a very sensitive endpoint for evaluating effects of chemicals that might interfere with the endocrine system of crustaceans, the larval development test has been applied to two groups of emerging environmental...

  15. Endocrine-disrupting chemicals and obesity development in humans: A review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang-Péronard, Jeanett; Andersen, Helle Raun; Jensen, Tina Kold

    2011-01-01

    This study reviewed the literature on the relations between exposure to chemicals with endocrine-disrupting abilities and obesity in humans. The studies generally indicated that exposure to some of the endocrine-disrupting chemicals was associated with an increase in body size in humans. The resu......This study reviewed the literature on the relations between exposure to chemicals with endocrine-disrupting abilities and obesity in humans. The studies generally indicated that exposure to some of the endocrine-disrupting chemicals was associated with an increase in body size in humans...... dibenzofurans found either associations with weight gain or an increase in waist circumference, or no association. The one study investigating relations with bisphenol A found no association. Studies investigating prenatal exposure indicated that exposure in utero may cause permanent physiological changes...... predisposing to later weight gain. The study findings suggest that some endocrine disruptors may play a role for the development of the obesity epidemic, in addition to the more commonly perceived putative contributors....

  16. Mixtures of endocrine-disrupting contaminants induce adverse developmental effects in preweaning rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Marta Axelstad; Christiansen, Sofie; Boberg, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Reproductive toxicity was investigated in rats after developmental exposure to a mixture of 13 endocrine-disrupting contaminants, including pesticides, plastic and cosmetic ingredients, and paracetamol. The mixture was composed on the basis of information about high-end human exposures, and the d......Reproductive toxicity was investigated in rats after developmental exposure to a mixture of 13 endocrine-disrupting contaminants, including pesticides, plastic and cosmetic ingredients, and paracetamol. The mixture was composed on the basis of information about high-end human exposures...

  17. The Molecular Mechanism of Alternative P450-Catalyzed Metabolism of Environmental Phenolic Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ji, Li; Ji, Shujing; Wang, Chenchen

    2018-01-01

    Understanding the bioactivation mechanisms to predict toxic metabolites is critical for risk assessment of phenolic endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs). One mechanism involves ipso-substitution, which may contribute to the total turnover of phenolic EDCs, yet the detailed mechanism and its...... EDCs. We envision that the identified pathways will be applicable for prediction of metabolites from phenolic EDCs whose fate is affected by this alternative type of P450 reactivity, and accordingly enable the screening of these metabolites for endocrine-disrupting activity....

  18. Phytoplankton blooms: an overlooked marine source of natural endocrine disrupting chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yinhan; Wang, Xiaochong; Indran, Inthrani Raja; Zhang, Shi-Jun; Lv, Zhengbing; Li, Jun; Holmes, Michael; Tang, Ying Zhong; Yong, E L

    2014-09-01

    We had previously reported high androgenic and estrogenic activities in seawaters in confined clusters close to Singapore. Further investigations revealed a hitherto unsuspected link between estrogenic/androgenic activity and net phytoplankton count. The primary objective of this study was to investigate the cause of a correlation between net phytoplankton and endocrine activity, and corroborate this observation, and rule out other possible confounding factors. Our secondary objective was to study if these estrogenic secretions can impact human health. Five species of phytoplankton, Gymnodinium catenatum, Prorocentrum minimum, Alexandrium leei, Chattonella marina, and Fibrocapsa japonica, were isolated from Singapore waters and mass cultured and the cells and culture media screened for estrogenic and androgenic activity using human cell-based bioassays. The raphidophytes C. marina and F. japonica displayed significant estrogenic activity whilst the dinoflagellates G. catenatum and P. minimum displayed significant androgenic activity in both the cell extracts and the cell culture media extract. Our data shows that selected phytoplankton isolates are potent secretors of estrogenic and androgenic substances, which are potential endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). As the harmful nature of EDCs is largely due to their bioaccumulation in the aquatic food chain our findings imply that the impact of these phytoplankton secretions needs to be investigated especially for seafoods, which are only a single trophic level away from phytoplankton. Alternatively, should these phytoplankton-origin EDCs not accumulate through marine food chains to significantly impact humans or marine mammals, our results indicate that functional assays could greatly over-estimate the risk from naturally occurring EDCs produced by marine phytoplankton. It remains to be determined if these EDCs affect zooplankton and other organisms that directly feed on marine phytoplankton, or if the secreted

  19. ENDOCRINE-DISRUPTING CHEMICALS: PREPUBERTAL EXPOSURES AND EFFECTS ON SEXUAL MATURATION AND THYROID FUNCTION IN THE MALE RAT. A FOCUS ON THE EDSTAC RECOMMENDATIONS. ENDOCRINE DISRUPTER SCREENING AND TESTING ADVISORY COMMITTEE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endocrine-disrupting chemicals: prepubertal exposures and effects on sexual maturation and thyroid function in the male rat. A focus on the EDSTAC recommendations. Endocrine Disrupter Screening and Testing Advisory Committee.Stoker TE, Parks LG, Gray LE, Cooper RL.

  20. Desreguladores endócrinos no meio ambiente: efeitos e conseqüências Endocrine disrupters in the enviroment: part 1 - effects and consequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Maia Bila

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available There is an increasing interest in micropollutants in the environment that can interfere with the endocrine system, affecting health, growth and reproduction of animals and humans. These substances are known as Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs and can be found in domestic sewage, domestic wastewater treatment plant effluents, and in natural and potable waters. There are numerous chemicals classified as EDCs, such as pesticides, chemicals used and produced by chemical industries and natural and synthetic estrogens. EDCs can be related to the increase of the incidence of anomalies in the reproductive system of animals, cancer in humans and reduction of the masculine fertility.

  1. Prepubertal subchronic exposure to soy milk and glyphosate leads to endocrine disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardi, Jessica; Moras, Patricia Bonamigo; Koeppe, Carina; Dallegrave, Eliane; Leal, Mirna Bainy; Rossato-Grando, Luciana Grazziotin

    2017-02-01

    Lactose intolerance is characterized by low or inexistent levels of lactase, and the main treatment consists of dietary changes, especially replacing dairy milk by soy milk. Soy contains phytoestrogens, substances with known estrogenic activity, besides, glyphosate-based herbicides are extensively used in soy crops, being frequently a residue in soy beans, bringing to a concern regarding the consumption of soy-based products, especially for children in breastfeeding period with lactose intolerance. This study evaluated the pubertal toxicity of a soy milk rich feeding (supplemented or not with glyphosate, doses of 50 and 100 mg/kg) during prepubertal period in male rats. Endocrine disruption was observed through decrease in testosterone levels, decrease in Sertoli cell number and increase in the percentage of degenerated Sertoli and Leydig cells in animals receiving soy milk supplemented with glyphosate (both doses) and in animals treated only with soy milk. Animals treated with soy milk with glyphosate (both doses) showed decrease spermatids number and increase of epididymal tail mass compared to control, and decrease in the diameter of seminiferous tubules compared to soy milk control group. Animals receiving soy milk supplemented with 100 mg/kg glyphosate showed decrease in round spermatids and increase in abnormal sperm morphology, compared to control. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Extent of endocrine disruption in fish of western and Alaskan National Parks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreck, Carl B.; Kent, Michael

    2013-01-01

    In 2008 2009, 998 fish were collected from 43 water bodies across 11 western Alaskan national parks and analyzed for reproductive abnormalities. Exposure to estrogenic substances such as pesticides can induce abnormalities like intersex. Results suggest there is a greater propensity for male intersex fish collected from parks located in the Rocky Mountains, and specifically in Rocky Mountain NP. Individual male intersex fish were also identified at Lassen Volcanic, Yosemite, and WrangellSt. Elias NPs. The preliminary finding of female intersex was determined to be a false positive. The overall goal of this project was to assess the general health of fish from eleven western national parks to infer whether health impacts may be linked to contaminant health thresholds for animal andor human health. This was accomplished by evaluating the presence of intersex fish with eggs developing in male gonads or sperm developing in female gonads using histology. In addition, endocrine disrupting compounds and other contaminants were quantified in select specimens. General histologic appearance of the gonadal tissue and spleen were observed to assess health.

  3. CURRENT ISSUES REGARDING ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING CHEMICALS AND ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recently public concern has increased regarding industrial and environmental substances that may have adverse hormonal effects in human and wildlife populations. This concern has also been expanded to include antibiotic-resistant bacteria and the presence of various antibiotics a...

  4. Endocrine disruption: In silico interactions between phthalate plasticizers and corticosteroid binding globulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh, Ishfaq A; Beg, Mohd A

    2017-12-01

    Endocrine disruption is a phenomenon when a man-made or natural compound interferes with normal hormone function in human or animal body systems. Endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs) have assumed considerable importance as a result of industrial activity, mass production of synthetic chemicals and environmental pollution. Phthalate plasticizers are a group of chemicals used widely and diversely in industry especially in the plastic industry, and many of the phthalate compounds have endocrine-disrupting properties. Increasing evidence indicates that steroid nuclear receptors and steroid binding proteins are the main targets of endocrine disruption. Corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG) is a steroid binding protein that binds and transports cortisol in the blood circulation and is a potential target for endocrine disruption. An imbalance of cortisol in the body leads to many health problems. Induced fit docking of nine important and environmentally relevant phthalate plasticizers (DMP, BBP, DBP, DIBP, DnHP, DEHP, DINP, DnOP, DIDP) showed interactions with 10-19 amino acid residues of CBG. Comparison of the interacting residues of CBG with phthalate ligands and cortisol showed an overlapping of the majority (53-82%) of residues for each phthalate. Five of nine phthalate compounds and cortisol shared a hydrogen bonding interaction with the Arg-252 residue of CBG. Long-chain phthalates, such as DEHP, DINP, DnOP and DIDP displayed a higher binding affinity and formed a number of interactions with CBG in comparison to short-chain phthalates. The similarity in structural binding characteristics of phthalate compounds and native ligand cortisol suggested potential competitive conflicts in CBG-cortisol binding function and possible disruption of cortisol and progesterone homeostasis. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Endocrine disrupting effects of waterborne fluoxetine exposure on the reproductive axis of female goldfish, Carassius auratus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mennigen, Jan A; Zamora, Jacob M; Chang, John P; Trudeau, Vance L

    2017-11-01

    Evidence suggests that pharmaceuticals and personal care products reach urban watersheds, bioconcentrate in fish, and potentially disrupt physiological homeostasis. These impairments often affect hormone functions. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SRRIs) are increasingly studied with regards to their endocrine disrupting effects on teleost physiological processes, including reproduction. To examine whether FLX effects on the endocrine regulation of reproductive physiology in goldfish are sex-specific, we exposed sexually recrudescent female goldfish to two waterborne concentrations of FLX (0.54μg/L and 54μg/L) using an experimental design previously used for sexually mature male goldfish. To evaluate possible endocrine disrupting effects, we quantified the gonadosomatic index, circulating hormone concentrations (luteinizing hormone, LH; growth hormone, GH; 17-β estradiol, E 2 ; and testosterone, T), and the expression of isotocin and vasotocin in the telencephalon, gonadotropin subunits and GH in the pituitary, and gonadotropin receptors, GH receptors, and aromatase in the ovary. Female goldfish exposed to 0.54μg/L FLX exhibited a significant decrease in circulating E 2 , and conversely, a significant increase in circulating LH and ovarian aromatase mRNA levels, suggesting disruption of E 2 -mediated feedback on LH release. These results, when compared with those previously observed in males, reveal that waterborne exposure to environmentally relevant levels of FLX sex-specifically disrupts the reproductive endocrine axis in goldfish, characterized by a decrease in E 2 in females, and conversely, estrogen-like effects in males. These data emphasize the importance of studying the effect of endocrine disrupting chemicals on both sexes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Estimating Burden and Disease Costs of Exposure to Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals in the European Union

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trasande, Leonardo; Zoeller, R. Thomas; Hass, Ulla

    2015-01-01

    Rapidly increasing evidence has documented that endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) contribute substantially to disease and disability. Objective: The objective was to quantify a range of health and economic costs that can be reasonably attributed to EDC exposures in the European Union (EU......). Design: A Steering Committee of scientists adapted the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change weight-of-evidence characterization for probability of causation based upon levels of available epidemiological and toxicological evidence for one or more chemicals contributing to disease by an endocrine...... Environmental Protection Agency for evaluating laboratory and animal evidence of endocrine disruption. Expert panels used the Delphi method to make decisions on the strength of the data. Results: Expert panels achieved consensus at least for probable (>20%) EDC causation for IQ loss and associated intellectual...

  7. The Japanese Quail as an avian model for testing endocrine disrupting chemicals: endocrine and behavioral end points

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottinger, M.A.; Abdelnabi, M.A.; Thompson, N.; Wu, J.; Henry, K.; Humphries, E.; Henry, P.F.P.

    2000-01-01

    Birds have extremely varied reproductive strategies. As such, the impact of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) can greatly differ across avian species. Precocial species, such as Japanese quail appear to be most sensitive to EDC effects during embryonic development, particularly sexual differentiation. A great deal is known about the ontogeny of Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) relative to endocrine, neuro-endocrine, and behavioral components of reproduction. Therefore, this species provides an excellent model for understanding effects of EDCs on reproductive biology with exposure at specific stages of the life cycle. The purpose of these experiments was to conduct a 1- or 2- generation experiment with positive or negative control chemicals and to determine changes in selected end points. Japanese quail embryos were exposed to estradiol benzoate (EB; positive control) in a 2-generation design or to fadrozole (FAD; negative control) in a 1-generation design. Embryonic EB treatment resulted in significant reductions (p< 0.5) in hen day production (90.2 vs 54.1; control vs EB, resp.) and fertility (85.3 vs 33.4%, control vs EB, resp.). Males showed sharply reduced courtship and mating behaviors as well as increased lag time (26 vs 148 sec; control vs EB) in behavioral tests. Fadrozole exposure resulted in reduced hatchability of fertile eggs, particularly at higher doses. There were no significant effects on courtship and mating behavior of males although males showed an increased lag time in their responses, nally, a behavioral test for studying motor and fear responses in young chicks was used; chicks exposed to an estrogenic pesticide (methoxychlor) showed some deficits. In summary, the use of appropriate and reliable end points that are responsive to endocrine disruption are critical for assessment of EDCs. Supported in part by EPA grant R826134.

  8. Removal Of Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals By A Constructed Wetland For On-Site Domestic Wastewater Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research has shown that domestic and industrial wastewater can be a source of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) to the environment. Much of this research has focused on municipal and industrial centralized wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). These WWTPs have been shown to ...

  9. A proposed framework for the systematic review and integrated assessment (SYRINA) of endocrine disrupting chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vandenberg, Laura N.; Agerstrand, Marlene; Beronius, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Background: The issue of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) is receiving wide attention from both the scientific and regulatory communities. Recent analyses of the EDC literature have been criticized for failing to use transparent and objective approaches to draw conclusions about the strength...

  10. Potential exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals and selected adverse pregnancy outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bengtsson, Jessica; Thygesen, Pernille Søgaard; Kaerlev, Linda

    2017-01-01

    potential occupational exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDC) of the mother during pregnancy is associated with preterm birth and low birth weight. Methods: Pregnant women referred to an Occupational Health Clinic (OHC) in two Danish regions (Copenhagen or Aarhus) between 1984 and 2010, suspected...

  11. Reversibility of endocrine disruption in zebrafish (Danio rerio) - comparison of different effect levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baumann, Lisa; Holbech, Henrik; Schiller, V.S.

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) exert effects at very low concentrations and can cause serious problems for the hormonal balance of various organisms. Exposure of wildlife to EDCs is not necessarily continuous, but may often occur in pulses. Consequently for the evaluation of the long-term ...

  12. Impact of Endocrine Disruptions on Man: The likely Causes and Effects

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is now common knowledge that synthetic chemicals in the environment can find access into the body of humans and wildlife, thereby mimicking the action of endogenous hormones that regulate maintenance of normal growth, metabolism and reproduction. The chemicals able to do this are known as Endocrine Disrupting ...

  13. Obesity, Diabetes, and Associated Costs of Exposure to Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals in the European Union

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Legler, J.; Fletcher, T.; Govarts, E.; Porta, M.; Blumberg, B.; Heindel, J.J.; Trasande, L.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Obesityanddiabetes are epidemic in the European Union(EU). Exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) is increasingly recognized as a contributor, independent of diet and physical activity. Objective: The objective was to estimate obesity, diabetes, and associated costs that can be

  14. Estimating Burden and Disease Costs of Exposure to Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals in the European Union

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trasande, L.; Zoeller, R.T.; Hass, U.; Kortenkamp, A.; Grandjean, P.; Peterson Myers, J.; Bellanger, M.; Hauser, R.; Legler, J.; Skakkebaek, N.E.; Heindel, J.J.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Rapidly increasing evidence has documented that endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) contribute substantially to disease and disability. Objective: The objective was to quantify a range of health and economic costs that can be reasonably attributed to EDC exposures in the European Union

  15. Product-to-Parent Reversion of Trenbolone: Unrecognized Risks for Endocrine Disruption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qu, Shen; Kolodziej, E.P.; Long, S.A.; Gloer, J.B.; Patterson, E.V.; Baltrusaitis, Jonas; Jones, G.D.; Benchetler, P.V.; Cole, E.A.; Kimbrough, K.C.; Tarnoff, M.D.; Cwiertny, D.M.

    2013-01-01

    Trenbolone acetate (TBA) is a high-value steroidal growth promoter often administered to beef cattle, whose metabolites are potent endocrine-disrupting compounds. We performed laboratory and field phototransformation experiments to assess the fate of TBA metabolites and their photoproducts.

  16. Development and validation of in vitro bioassays for thyroid hormone receptor mediated endocrine disruption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Freitas, de J.

    2012-01-01

    Thyroid hormones regulate crucial processes in vertebrates such as reproduction, development and energy metabolism. Endocrine disruption via the thyroid hormone system is gaining more attention both from scientists and regulators, because of the increasing incidence of hormone-related cancers and

  17. Toxicological profiling of sediments with in vitro mechanisms-based bioassays for endocrine disruption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houtman, C.J.; Cenijn, P.H.; Hamers, T.; Lamoree, M.H.; Legler, J.; Murk, A.J.; Brouwer, A.

    2004-01-01

    In vitro bioassays are valuable tools for screening environmental samples for the presence of bioactive (e.g., endocrine-disrupting) compounds. They can be used to direct chemical analysis of active compounds in toxicity identification and evaluation (TIE) approaches. In the present study, five in

  18. Toxicological profiling of sediments using in vitro bioassays, with emphasis on endocrine disruption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houtman, C.J.; Cenijn, P.H.; Hamers, T.; Lamoree, M.H.; Legler, J.; Murk, A.J.; Brouwer, A.

    2004-01-01

    In vitro bioassays are valuable tools for screening environmental samples for the presence of bioactive (e.g., endocrine-disrupting) compounds. They can be used to direct chemical analysis of active compounds in toxicity identification and evaluation (TIE) approaches. In the present study, five in

  19. Effects of endocrine disrupting chemicals on in vitro global DNA methylation and adipocyte differentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bastos Sales, L.; Kamstra, J.H.; Cenijn, P.H.; van Rijt, L.S.; Hamers, T.; Legler, J.

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) may form a risk factor for obesity by altering energy metabolism through epigenetic gene regulation. The goal of this study is to investigate the effects of a range of EDCs with putative obesogenic properties on global DNA methylation

  20. Mixtures of environmentally relevant endocrine disrupting chemicals affect mammary gland development in female and male rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandrup, Karen Riiber; Johansson, Hanna Katarina Lilith; Boberg, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Estrogenic chemicals are able to alter mammary gland development in female rodents, but little is known on the effects of anti-androgens and mixtures of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) with dissimilar modes of action. Pregnant rat dams were exposed during gestation and lactation to mixtures...

  1. Examining the biodegradation of endocrine disrupting bisphenol A and nonylphenol in WWTPs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Press-Kristensen, Kåre; Lindblom, Erik Ulfson; Schmidt, Jens Ejbye

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this work was to examine biodegradation of the endocrine disrupting chemicals bisphenol A (BPA) and nonylphenol (NP) in activated sludge. Experiments were performed in a pilot wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) in Copenhagen, Denmark. During standard operation the BPA concentration...

  2. Effects of endocrine disrupting chemicals on in vitro global DNA methylation and adipocyte differentiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bastos Sales, L.; Kamstra, J. H.; Cenijn, P. H.; van Rijt, L. S.; Hamers, T.; Legler, J.

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) may form a risk factor for obesity by altering energy metabolism through epigenetic gene regulation. The goal of this study is to investigate the effects of a range of EDCs with putative obesogenic properties on global DNA methylation

  3. Endocrine disruption in a terrestrial isopod under exposure to bisphenol A and vinclozin.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lemos, M.F.L.; van Gestel, C.A.M.; Soares, A.M.V.M.

    2009-01-01

    Background, aim, and scope In the past decade there has been an increasing awareness about the possible consequences of human and wildlife exposure to endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs). Bisphenol A (BPA) and vinclozolin (Vz) are EDCs which impacts on vertebrates have been largely investigated.

  4. Protein differential expression induced by endocrine disrupting compounds in a terrestrial isopod.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lemos, M.F.L.; Esteves, A.C.; Samyn, B.; Timperman, I.; van Beeumen, J.; Correia, A.D.; van Gestel, C.A.M.; Soares, A.M.V.M.

    2010-01-01

    Endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) have been studied due to their impact on human health and increasing awareness of their impact on wildlife species. Studies concerning the organ-specific molecular effects of EDC in invertebrates are important to understand the mechanisms of action of this class

  5. A Rat α-Fetoprotein Binding Activity Prediction Model to Facilitate Assessment of the Endocrine Disruption Potential of Environmental Chemicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huixiao Hong

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Endocrine disruptors such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs, diethylstilbestrol (DES and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT are agents that interfere with the endocrine system and cause adverse health effects. Huge public health concern about endocrine disruptors has arisen. One of the mechanisms of endocrine disruption is through binding of endocrine disruptors with the hormone receptors in the target cells. Entrance of endocrine disruptors into target cells is the precondition of endocrine disruption. The binding capability of a chemical with proteins in the blood affects its entrance into the target cells and, thus, is very informative for the assessment of potential endocrine disruption of chemicals. α-fetoprotein is one of the major serum proteins that binds to a variety of chemicals such as estrogens. To better facilitate assessment of endocrine disruption of environmental chemicals, we developed a model for α-fetoprotein binding activity prediction using the novel pattern recognition method (Decision Forest and the molecular descriptors calculated from two-dimensional structures by Mold2 software. The predictive capability of the model has been evaluated through internal validation using 125 training chemicals (average balanced accuracy of 69% and external validations using 22 chemicals (balanced accuracy of 71%. Prediction confidence analysis revealed the model performed much better at high prediction confidence. Our results indicate that the model is useful (when predictions are in high confidence in endocrine disruption risk assessment of environmental chemicals though improvement by increasing number of training chemicals is needed.

  6. Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) - New endocrine disruptors in polar bears (Ursus maritimus)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Kathrine Eggers; Letcher, Robert J; Sonne, Christian; Dietz, Rune; Styrishave, Bjarne

    2016-11-01

    Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) are emerging in the Arctic and accumulate in brain tissues of East Greenland (EG) polar bears. In vitro studies have shown that PFASs might possess endocrine disrupting abilities and therefore the present study was conducted to investigate potential PFAS induced alterations in brain steroid concentrations. The concentrations of eleven steroid hormones were determined in eight brain regions from ten EG polar bears. Pregnenolone (PRE), the dominant progestagen, was found in mean concentrations of 5-47ng/g (ww) depending on brain region. PRE showed significantly (pbears. Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) found in mean concentrations 0.67-4.58ng/g (ww) was the androgen found in highest concentrations. Among the estrogens estrone (E1) showed mean concentrations of 0.90-2.21ng/g (ww) and was the most abundant. Remaining steroid hormones were generally present in concentrations below 2ng/g (ww). Steroid levels in brain tissue could not be explained by steroid levels in plasma. There was however a trend towards increasing estrogen levels in plasma resulting in increasing levels of androgens in brain tissue. Correlative analyses showed positive associations between PFASs and 17α-hydroxypregnenolone (OH-PRE) (e.g. perflouroalkyl sulfonates (∑PFSA): pbears. It is, however, not possible to determine whether alterations in brain steroid concentrations arise from interference with de novo steroid synthesis or via disruption of peripheral steroidogenic tissues mainly in gonads and feedback mechanisms. Steroids are important for brain plasticity and gender specific behavior as well as postnatal development and sexually dimorph brain function. The present work indicates an urgent need for a better mechanistic understanding of how PFASs may affect the endocrine system of polar bears and potentially other mammal species. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Endocrine potency of wastewater: Contents of endocrine disrupting chemicals and effects measured by in vivo and in vitro assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusk, Kresten Ole; Krüger, Tanja; Long, Manhai

    2011-01-01

    properties: phthalate metabolites, parabens, industrial phenols, ultraviolet screens, and natural and synthetic steroid estrogens. The endocrine disrupting bioactivity and toxicity of the extracts were analyzed in cell culture assay for the potency to affect the function of the estrogen, androgen, aryl...... of EDCs was reduced in the STPs but not eliminated, as verified by the applied bioassays that all responded to the extracts of effluent samples. Our data suggest that the wastewater treatment processes are not efficient enough to prevent contamination of environmental surface waters. © 2010 SETAC....

  8. Alternatives to in vivo tests to detect endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in fish and amphibians – interactions with estrogens, androgens, and thyroid hormones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endocrine disruption is considered a highly relevant endpoint for environmental risk assessment of chemicals, plant protection products, biocides and pharmaceuticals. Therefore, screening for endocrine disruption – with focus on vertebrates (fish and amphibians) and estrogen, and...

  9. Identification of Endocrine Disruptive Effects in the Aquatic Environment - a Partial Life Cycle Study in Zebrafish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wester PW; Brandhof EJ van den; Vos JH; Ven LTM van der; TOX; LER

    2003-01-01

    In this project, an assay was developed and applied to identify hormone active substances in the aquatic environment. Laboratory fish were exposed during the reproductive and development phase to a range of established endocrine active compounds; these were estrogen (17 beta-estradiol),

  10. Proteomic response of Macrobrachium rosenbergii hepatopancreas exposed to chlordecone: Identification of endocrine disruption biomarkers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafontaine, Anne; Baiwir, Dominique; Joaquim-Justo, Célia; De Pauw, Edwin; Lemoine, Soazig; Boulangé-Lecomte, Céline; Forget-Leray, Joëlle; Thomé, Jean-Pierre; Gismondi, Eric

    2017-07-01

    The present work is the first study investigating the impacts of chlordecone, an organochlorine insecticide, on the proteome of the decapod crustacean Macrobrachium rosenbergii, by gel-free proteomic analysis. The hepatopancreas protein expression variations were analysed in organisms exposed to three environmental relevant concentrations of chlordecone (i.e. 0.2, 2 and 20µg/L). Results revealed that 62 proteins were significantly up- or down-regulated in exposed prawns compared to controls. Most of these proteins are involved in important physiological processes such as ion transport, defense mechanisms and immune system, cytoskeleton dynamics, or protein synthesis and degradation. Moreover, it appears that 6% of the deregulated protein are involved in the endocrine system and in the hormonal control of reproduction or development processes of M. rosenbergii (e.g. vitellogenin, farnesoic acid o-methyltransferase). These results indicate that chlordecone is potentially an endocrine disruptor compound for decapods, as already observed in vertebrates. These protein modifications could lead to disruptions of M. rosenbergii growth and reproduction, and therefore of the fitness population on the long-term. Besides, these disrupted proteins could be suggested as biomarkers of exposure for endocrine disruptions in invertebrates. However, further investigations are needed to complete understanding of action mechanisms of chlordecone on proteome and endocrine system of crustaceans. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Molasses as a possible cause of an ''endocrine disruptive syndrome'' in calves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.S. Masgoret

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available During the mid 1990s a potentially serious, chronic syndrome was reported in well-managed beef and dairy herds from unrelated parts of South Africa. Farmers reported that it manifested as various combinations of decreased production, decreased weaning masses, apparent immune breakdown in previously immunocompetent animals, increased reproductive disorders, various mineral imbalances in non-deficient areas and goitre, noticeable as enlarged thyroid glands. The farmers associated this syndrome with certain batches of sugar cane molasses and molasses-based products. The syndrome was reminiscent of an ''endocrine disruptive syndrome''. The objective of this study was to evaluate the suspected endocrine disruptive effect of molasses included in cattle feed. Using existing in vitro assays, four batches of molasses syrup were screened for possible inclusion in a calf feeding trial. Two batches were selected for the trial. Thirty-two, 4- to 6-week-old, weaned Holstein bull calves were included in the single phase, three treatment, parallel design experiment. In two of the groups of calves, two different batches of molasses were included in their rations respectively. The control group was fed a ration to which no molasses was added, but which was balanced for energy and mineral content. The mass gain of the calves was recorded over the 6-month study period. The calves were clinically examined every week and clinical pathology parameters, immune responses and endocrine effects were regularly evaluated. Even though endocrine disrupting effects were detected with the in vitro screening assays, these could not be reproduced in the calves in the experiment. The two batches of molasses utilized in the calf feeding trial did not induce major differences in any of the parameters measured, with the exception of a lower mass gain in one of the molasses-fed groups (Group 1, which tended towards significance. The results of the study indicate that the two batches

  12. Endocrine disrupting effects in rats perinatally exposed to a dietary relevant mixture of phytoestrogens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boberg, Julie; Mandrup, Karen; Jacobsen, Pernille Rosenskjold

    2013-01-01

    Dietary phytoestrogens may prevent certain human diseases, but endocrine activity has been reported in animal studies. Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed perinatally to a 1-, 10- or 100-fold “high human dietary intake” mixture of 12 phytoestrogens consisting of mainly the lignan secoisolarici resinol...... genes in testis and prostate were unaffected. Decreased serum estradiol was seen in genistein-exposed dams. This study indicated adverse effects at high intake levels in rats, but does not provide evidence for risk of phytoestrogen-mediated endocrine disruption at normal human dietary consumption levels...

  13. Guidance Document on Standardised Test Guidelines for Evaluating Chemicals for Endocrine Disruption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Satya, Sneha; Wade, Mike; Hass, Ulla

    and Assessment). In 2010, the OECD Secretariat presented the objectives and a draft outline of the document at the meeting of the Working Group of National Coordinators of the Test Guidelines Programme (WNT). The document was then developed by two consultants in close cooperation with an advisory group......This guidance document was developed as a follow-up to the workshop on OECD countries’ activities regarding testing, assessment and management of endocrine disrupters, which was held in Copenhagen (Denmark) on 22-24 September 2010 (see document No. 118 published in the Series on Testing...... on testing and assessment of endocrine disrupters (EDTA AG). In November 2010, comments were requested from the WNT, the EDTA AG, the Task Force on Hazard Assessment and experts involved in the assessment of chemicals. The EDTA AG addressed the comments from the WNT at a meeting held in April 2011...

  14. Female reproductive disorders: the roles of endocrine-disrupting compounds and developmental timing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crain, D.A.; Janssen, S.J.; Edwards, T.M.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the possible role of endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs) on female reproductive disorders emphasizing developmental plasticity and the complexity of endocrine-dependent ontogeny of reproductive organs. Declining conception rates and the high incidence of female reproductive...... disruptions warrant evaluation of the impact of EDCs on female reproductive health. DESIGN: Publications related to the contribution of EDCs to disorders of the ovary (aneuploidy, polycystic ovary syndrome, and altered cyclicity), uterus (endometriosis, uterine fibroids, fetal growth restriction......, and pregnancy loss), breast (breast cancer, reduced duration of lactation), and pubertal timing were identified, reviewed, and summarized at a workshop. CONCLUSION(S): The data reviewed illustrate that EDCs contribute to numerous human female reproductive disorders and emphasize the sensitivity of early life...

  15. Evaluation of Endocrine Disrupting Compounds Migration in Household Food Containers under Domestic Use Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáiz, Jorge; Gómara, Belén

    2017-08-09

    Plasticizers and plastic monomers are commonly used in packaging. Most of them act as endocrine disrupters and are susceptible to migrate from the packaging to the food. We evaluated the migration of endocrine disrupting compounds from three different household food containers to four food simulants under different domestic treatments and for different periods of time, with the aim of reproducing real domestic conditions. The results showed that the migration to the simulants increased with the storage time, up to more than 50 times in certain cases. The heating power seemed to increase the migration processes (up to more than 30 times), and reusing containers produced an increase or decrease of the concentrations depending on the container type and the simulant. The concentrations found were lower than other concentrations reported (always less than 4000 pg/mL, down to less than 20 pg/mL), which might be a consequence of the domestic conditions used.

  16. Endocrine disruptive effects in vitro of conazole antifungals used as pesticides and pharmaceutical

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærstad, Mia Birkhøj; Taxvig, Camilla; Nellemann, Christine Lydia

    2010-01-01

    Widely used conazole antifungals were tested for endocrine disruptive effects using a panel of in vitro assays. They all showed endocrine disrupting potential and ability to act via several different mechanisms. Overall the imidazoles (econazole, ketoconazole, miconazole, prochloraz) were more...... inhibition of enzymes involved in the conversion of progesterone to testosterone. Prochloraz was most potent followed by econazole~miconazole>ketoconazole>tebuconazole>epoxiconazole>propiconazole. In the MCF-7 cell proliferation assay, the conazoles showed anti-estrogenic effect, including aromatase...... inhibition, since they inhibited the response induced by both 17β-estradiol (miconazole>econazole~ketoconazole>prochloraz>tebuconazole>epoxiconazole>propiconazole) and testosterone (econazole>miconazole>prochloraz>ketoconazole>tebuconazole>epoxiconazole>propiconazole). The triazoles were anti...

  17. Premature reproductive aging in female rats after developmental exposure to mixtures of endocrine disrupters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Pernille Rosenskjold; Petersen, Marta Axelstad; Christiansen, Sofie

    2013-01-01

    Long-lasting and delayed reproductive effects of developmental exposure to mixtures of environmental chemicals were investigated in female rats. Wistar rats were dosed during gestation and lactation to mixtures of endocrine disrupters, and effects in offspring were studied. The mixtures consisted...... or effects on ovary development may account for the observed effect. This study demonstrated that developmental exposure of rats to mixtures of endocrine disrupters can induce long-lasting adverse effects manifested as early reproductive senescence even though no effects on estrous cyclicity were observed....... Additionally, groups received mixtures including only the anti-androgens or estrogens at 200 or 450 times human intake. Female offspring exposed to the high dose mixture of all 13 chemicals showed earlier reproductive aging measured as early onset of irregular estrous cycle as compared to controls...

  18. Endocrine disruption of sexual selection by an estrogenic herbicide in the mealworm beetle (Tenebrio molitor).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCallum, Malcolm L; Matlock, Makensey; Treas, Justin; Safi, Barroq; Sanson, Wendy; McCallum, Jamie L

    2013-12-01

    The role that endocrine disruption could play in sexual selection remains relatively untested, and although estrogens occur in insects, little information exists about their biological role in insect reproduction. Atrazine is a commonly applied herbicide that mimics estrogen in vertebrates. Tenebrio molitor were raised from egg to adult under a gradation of environmentally relevant atrazine exposures and a non-treated control. Atrazine was delivered in the drinking water ad libitum. Female T. molitor were provided with a choice between unrelated males raised under three levels of atrazine exposures. Female preference for males demonstrated a non-monotonic inverted U-shaped response to atrazine exposure. There was no significant difference between the control and the high exposure to atrazine. Excluding the control, female preference increased as exposure concentration increased. These results have important repercussions for nonlethal effects of endocrine disruption on populations, their capacity to interfere with sexual selection, and the role of estrogen in pheromone communication among insects.

  19. Late effects of early exposures to endocrine disrupting chemicals in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boberg, Julie; Hass, Ulla

    2017-01-01

    Endocrine disrupting compounds may interfere with tissues at critical developmental stages and give rise to cancer later in life. This talk will focus on early-life exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals which is associated with increased risk for carcinogenesis in mammary and prostate glands......, and this was associated with early changes in pre-pubertal mammary development. In the prostate, we observed a shift from the general age-related atrophy towards hyperplasia in aging rats that had been exposed perinatally to a mixture of human relevant anti-androgenic chemicals. This causes concern that human perinatal...... exposure to environmental chemicals may increase the risk of prostate or mammary cancer later in life. Possible modes of action and the human relevance of these findings will be discussed....

  20. Uncertainties in biological responses that influence hazard and risk approaches to the regulation of endocrine active substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrott, Joanne L; Bjerregaard, Poul; Brugger, Kristin E; Gray, L Earl; Iguchi, Taisen; Kadlec, Sarah M; Weltje, Lennart; Wheeler, James R

    2017-03-01

    Endocrine-disrupting substances (EDS) may have certain biological effects including delayed effects, multigenerational effects, and may display nonmonotonic dose-response (NMDR) relationships that require careful consideration when determining environmental hazards. Endocrine disrupting substances can have specific and profound effects when exposure occurs during sensitive windows of the life cycle (development, reproduction). This creates the potential for delayed effects that manifest when exposure has ceased, possibly in a different life stage. This potential underscores the need for testing in appropriate (sensitive) life stages and full life cycle designs. Such tests are available in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) tool box and should be used to derive endpoints that can be considered protective of all life stages. Similarly, the potential for effects to be manifest in subsequent generations (multigenerational effects) has also been raised as a potential issue in the derivation of appropriate endpoints for EDS. However, multigenerational studies showing increasing sensitivity of successive generations are uncommon. Indeed this is reflected in the design of new higher tier tests to assess endocrine active substances (EAS) that move to extended one-generation designs and away from multi-generational studies. The occurrence of NMDRs is also considered a limiting factor for reliable risk assessment of EDS. Evidence to date indicates NMDRs are more prevalent in in vitro and mechanistic data, not often translating to adverse apical endpoints that would be used in risk assessment. A series of steps to evaluate NMDRs in the context of endocrine hazard and risk assessment procedures is presented. If careful consideration of delayed, multigenerational effects and NMDRs is made, it is feasible to assess environmental endocrine hazards and derive robust apical endpoints for risk assessment procedures ensuring a high level of environmental

  1. QSAR models for reproductive toxicity and endocrine disruption in regulatory use – a preliminary investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Gunde Egeskov; Niemelä, Jay Russell; Wedebye, Eva Bay

    2008-01-01

    the new legislation. This article focuses on a screening exercise by use of our own and commercial QSAR models for identification of possible reproductive toxicants. Three QSAR models were used for reproductive toxicity for the endpoints teratogenic risk to humans (based on animal tests, clinical data...... for humans owing to possible developmental toxic effects: Xn (Harmful) and R63 (Possible risk of harm to the unborn child). The chemicals were also screened in three models for endocrine disruption....

  2. Biodegradation of endocrine-disrupting compounds and suppresion of estrogenic activity by ligninolytic fungi

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cajthaml, Tomáš; Křesinová, Zdena; Svobodová, Kateřina; Moeder, M.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 75, č. 6 (2009), s. 745-750 ISSN 0045-6535 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC06066; GA MŠk 2B06156; GA AV ČR KJB600200613 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : Biodegradation * Endocrine disrupters * White rot fungi Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.253, year: 2009

  3. The epidemiologic evidence linking prenatal and postnatal exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals with male reproductive disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Jens Peter; Flachs, Esben Meulengracht; Rimborg, Susie

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: More than 20 years ago, it was hypothesized that exposure to prenatal and early postnatal environmental xenobiotics with the potential to disrupt endogenous hormone signaling might be on the causal path to cryptorchidism, hypospadias, low sperm count and testicular cancer. Several...... was to systematically synthesize published data on the risk of cryptorchidism, hypospadias, low sperm counts and testicular cancer following in utero or infant exposure to chemicals that have been included on the European Commission's list of Category 1 endocrine disrupting chemicals defined as having documented...

  4. Pulp and paper mill effluent treatments have differential endocrine-disrupting effects on rainbow trout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orrego, Rodrigo; Guchardi, John; Hernandez, Victor; Krause, Rachelle; Roti, Lucia; Armour, Jeffrey; Ganeshakumar, Mathumai; Holdway, Douglas

    2009-01-01

    Endocrine disruption (ED) effects due to pulp and paper mill effluents extracts involving different industrial procedures and effluent treatments (nontreated, primary, and secondary treated) were evaluated using immature triploid rainbow trout in a pulse-exposure toxicity experiment. The protocol involved the use of intraperitoneal injection of mill extracts (solid-phase extraction [SPE]) corrected for individual fish weight and included several laboratory standards (steroidal hormones and phytosterols). Biological endpoints at two different levels of biological organization were analyzed (molecular and individual organism). Results indicated that nonsignificant changes were observed in the individual physiological indices represented by condition factor, liver somatic index, and gonad somatic index during the experiment. Significant induction of liver ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase activity was observed between different effluent treatments and experimental controls. Significant endocrine-disrupting effects at the reproductive level were observed in all effluent treatments involving significant increments in plasma vitellogenin (VTG) levels. Fish exposed to untreated effluent extracts had significantly higher VTG levels compared to fish exposed to primary and secondary treatment effluent extracts, indicating a decrease of the estrogenic effect due to the effluent treatment. The present study has shown that for the Chilean pulp and paper mill SPE extracts evaluated, an endocrine disruption effect was induced in immature triploid rainbow, reaffirming the significant estrogenic effects demonstrated previously in laboratory and field experiments.

  5. Endocrine disrupting chemicals in Minnesota lakes - Water-quality and hydrological data from 2008 and 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Larry B.; Writer, Jeffrey H.; Keefe, Steffanie K.; Brown, Greg K.; Ferrey, Mark L.; Jahns, Nathan D.; Kiesling, Richard L.; Lundy, James R.; Poganski, Beth H.; Rosenberry, Donald O.; Taylor, Howard E.; Woodruff, Olivia P.; Schoenfuss, Heiko L.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the sources, fate, and effects of endocrine disrupting chemicals in aquatic ecosystems is important for water-resource management. This study was conducted during 2008 and 2010 to establish a framework for assessing endocrine disrupting chemicals, and involved a statewide survey of their occurrence in 14 Minnesota lakes and a targeted study of different microhabitats on a single lake. The lakes ranged in size from about 0.1 to 100 square kilometers, varied in trophic status from oligotrophic to eutrophic, and spanned a range of land-uses from wetlands and forest to agricultural and urban use. Water and sediment samples were collected from the near-shore littoral environment and analyzed for endocrine disrupting chemicals, including trace elements, acidic organic compounds, neutral organic compounds, and steroidal hormones. In addition, polar organic compound integrative samplers were deployed for 21 days and analyzed for the same organic compounds. One lake was selected for a detailed microhabitat study of multiple near-shore environments. This report compiles the results from the field measurements and laboratory chemical analysis of water, sediment, and polar organic compound integrative sampler samples collected during 2008 and 2010. Most of the organic compounds measured were not detected in any of the water samples, although a few compounds were detected in several of the lakes.

  6. Endocrine disrupting chemicals in the atmosphere: Their effects on humans and wildlife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annamalai, Jayshree; Namasivayam, Vasudevan

    2015-03-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are exogenous agents that interfere or disrupt the normal synthesis, secretion, transportation, binding and metabolism of natural hormones; eventually dysregulating homeostatic mechanisms, reproduction and development. They are emitted into the atmosphere during anthropogenic activities and physicochemical reactions in nature. Inhalation of these EDCs as particulate and gaseous vapors triggers their interaction with endocrine glands and exerts agonist or antagonists actions at hormone receptors. The endocrine disruption at nanogram levels of EDC's has gained concern in the last decade, due to infertility among men and women, early puberty, obesity, diabetes and cancer. Thus, the review explores the literature that addresses the major occurring EDCs in the atmosphere including phthalates, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), brominated flame retardants (BFRs), dioxins, alkylphenols (APs) and perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs). Sources, fate, half-life, mechanism, measured concentrations in air, bioaccumulation in tissues, laboratory exposures correlating to toxicological effects of these EDCs in humans and wildlife are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. [Endocrine disruptors are a novel direction of endocrinologic scientific investigation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iaglova, N V; Iaglov, V V

    2012-01-01

    Endocrine disruptors are exogenous anthropogenic chemicals (pesticides, herbicides, polychlorinated biphenyls, bisphenol A, polybrominated diphenyl ethers, phthalates and others), that are able to bind hormonal receptors of endocrine and other cells in vivo and act like hormones. These substances disrupt endocrine regulation of metabolism, reproduction and adaptive reactions of organisms and promote human and animal endocrine disorders.

  8. Effects of endocrine disrupters on the expression of growth hormone and prolactin mRNA in the rainbow trout pituitary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    It is now widely accepted that chemical pollutants in the environment can interfere with the endocrine system of animals, thus affecting development and reproduction. Some of these endocrine disrupters (EDs) can have estrogenic or antiestrogenic effects. Most studies to date have focused on the ef...

  9. Thyroid endocrine disruption in zebrafish larvae after exposure to mono-(2-ethylhexyl phthalate (MEHP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenhui Zhai

    Full Text Available Phthalates are extensively used as plasticizers in a variety of daily-life products, resulting in widespread distribution in aquatic environments. However, limited information is available on the endocrine disrupting effects of phthalates in aquatic organisms. The aim of the present study was to examine whether exposure to mono-(2-ethylhexyl phthalate (MEHP, the hydrolytic metabolite of di-(2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP disrupts thyroid endocrine system in fish. In this study, zebrafish (Danio rerio embryos were exposed to different concentrations of MEHP (1.6, 8, 40, and 200 μg/L from 2 h post-fertilization (hpf to 168 hpf. The whole-body content of thyroid hormone and transcription of genes involved in the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT axis were examined. Treatment with MEHP significantly decreased whole-body T4 contents and increased whole-body T3 contents, indicating thyroid endocrine disruption. The upregulation of genes related to thyroid hormone metabolism (Dio2 and UGT1ab might be responsible for decreased T4 contents. Elevated gene transcription of Dio1 was also observed in this study, which might assist to degrade increased T3 contents. Exposure to MEHP also significantly induced transcription of genes involved in thyroid development (Nkx2.1 and Pax8 and thyroid hormone synthesis (TSHβ, NIS and TG. However, the genes encoding proteins involved in TH transport (transthyretin, TTR was transcriptionally significantly down-regulated after exposure to MEHP. Overall, these results demonstrate that acute exposure to MEHP alters whole-body contents of thyroid hormones in zebrafish embryos/larvae and changes the transcription of genes involved in the HPT axis, thus exerting thyroid endocrine toxicity.

  10. Environmental analysis of endocrine disrupting effects from hydrocarbon contaminants in the ecosystem. 1998 annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLachlan, J.

    1998-06-01

    'The objective of this project is to determine how environmental contaminants, namely hydrocarbons, can act as hormones or anti-hormones (i.e., environmental hormones) in different species present in aquatic ecosystems. Species of particular focus are those which can serve as sentinel species (e.g., amphibians) and, thus, provide early warning signals for more widespread impacts on an ecosystem and its wildlife and human inhabitants. This reports the progress of 1.5 years of a three-year grant awarded to the Tulane/Xavier Center for Bioenvironmental Research (CBR). A growing body of evidence suggests that chemicals in the environment can disrupt the endocrine system of animals (i.e., wildlife and humans) and adversely impact the development of these species. Because of the multitude of known endocrine-disrupting chemicals and the numerous industrial and government sectors producing these chemicals, almost every federal agency has initiated research on the endocrine effects of chemicals relevant to their operations. This study represents the Department of Energy (DOE) Basic Energy Sciences'' only research on the impacts of endocrine-disrupting chemicals. The activities employed by this project to determine these impacts include development of biotechnology screens (in vitro), animal screens (in vivo), and other analyses of aquatic ecosystem biomarkers of exposure. The results from this study can elucidate how chemicals in the environment, including those from DOE activities, can signal (and alter) the development of a number of species in aquatic ecosystems. These signals can have detrimental impacts not only on an organismal level, but also on community, population, and entire ecosystem levels, including humans.'

  11. Environmental analysis of endocrine disrupting effects from hydrocarbon contaminants in the ecosystem. 1998 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLachlan, J.

    1998-01-01

    'The objective of this project is to determine how environmental contaminants, namely hydrocarbons, can act as hormones or anti-hormones (i.e., environmental hormones) in different species present in aquatic ecosystems. Species of particular focus are those which can serve as sentinel species (e.g., amphibians) and, thus, provide early warning signals for more widespread impacts on an ecosystem and its wildlife and human inhabitants. This reports the progress of 1.5 years of a three-year grant awarded to the Tulane/Xavier Center for Bioenvironmental Research (CBR). A growing body of evidence suggests that chemicals in the environment can disrupt the endocrine system of animals (i.e., wildlife and humans) and adversely impact the development of these species. Because of the multitude of known endocrine-disrupting chemicals and the numerous industrial and government sectors producing these chemicals, almost every federal agency has initiated research on the endocrine effects of chemicals relevant to their operations. This study represents the Department of Energy (DOE) Basic Energy Sciences'' only research on the impacts of endocrine-disrupting chemicals. The activities employed by this project to determine these impacts include development of biotechnology screens (in vitro), animal screens (in vivo), and other analyses of aquatic ecosystem biomarkers of exposure. The results from this study can elucidate how chemicals in the environment, including those from DOE activities, can signal (and alter) the development of a number of species in aquatic ecosystems. These signals can have detrimental impacts not only on an organismal level, but also on community, population, and entire ecosystem levels, including humans.'

  12. Analysis of Endocrine Disrupting Pesticides by Capillary GC with Mass Spectrometric Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Hrouzková

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Endocrine disrupting chemicals, among them many pesticides, alter the normal functioning of the endocrine system of both wildlife and humans at very low concentration levels. Therefore, the importance of method development for their analysis in food and the environment is increasing. This also covers contributions in the field of ultra-trace analysis of multicomponent mixtures of organic pollutants in complex matrices. With this fact conventional capillary gas chromatography (CGC and fast CGC with mass spectrometric detection (MS has acquired a real importance in the analysis of endocrine disrupting pesticide (EDP residues. This paper provides an overview of GC methods, including sample preparation steps, for analysis of EDPs in a variety of matrices at ultra-trace concentration levels. Emphasis is put on separation method, mode of MS detection and ionization and obtained limits of detection and quantification. Analysis time is one of the most important aspects that should be considered in the choice of analytical methods for routine analysis. Therefore, the benefits of developed fast GC methods are important.

  13. The Roles of Three Types of Knowledge and Perceived Uncertainty in Explaining Risk Perception, Acceptability, and Self-Protective Response-A Case Study on Endocrine Disrupting Surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Hien; Watanabe, Tsunemi

    2018-02-08

    The ubiquitous surfactants nonylphenol (NP) and its ethoxylates (NPEOs), which are known as endocrine disrupters, have appeared in the lists of restricted chemical substances, monitoring programs, and environmental quality standards of many countries due to their adverse effects. Recent studies have reported alarming levels of NP, as the final metabolite of NPEOs, in Vietnamese urban waters, whilst response to this issue is negligible. With the aim of addressing how the public perceives and expects to avoid the risk of endocrine disrupting surfactants (EDSs), the study tested the hypothesized roles of specific knowledge, general knowledge, and perceived uncertainty using structural equation modelling. The findings revealed that different types of knowledge played certain roles in explaining risk perception, risk acceptability, and self-protective response, which are distinguished by experience amongst the public. Evidence of the mediating role that perceived uncertainty may play in the decrease of risk perception and the increase of risk unacceptance has been provided. The insights gained from the study may help answer why the public are in favor of taking non-diet-related self-protective measures rather than changing their dietary habits, which illustrates a comparison with the basis of health belief model. The needs for building cognitive capacity amongst the public, particularly pregnant women and young mothers, and risk communication concerning endocrine disrupting contamination linked to reproductive health are highlighted.

  14. Endocrine disrupters, microRNAs, and primordial germ cells: a dangerous cocktail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brieño-Enríquez, Miguel Angel; Larriba, Eduardo; Del Mazo, Jesús

    2016-09-15

    Endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are environmental pollutants that may change the homeostasis of the endocrine system, altering the differentiation of germ cells with consequences for reproduction. In mammals, germ cell differentiation begins with primordial germ cells (PGCs) during embryogenesis. Primordial germ cell development and gametogenesis are genetically regulated processes, in which the posttranscriptional gene regulation could be mediated by small noncoding RNAs (sncRNAs) such as microRNAs (miRNAs). Here, we review the deleterious effects of exposure during fetal life to EDCs mediated by deregulation of ncRNAs, and specifically miRNAs on PGC differentiation. Moreover, the environmental stress induced by exposure to some EDCs during the embryonic window of development could trigger reproductive dysfunctions transgenerationally transmitted by epigenetic mechanisms with the involvement of miRNAs expressed in germ line cells. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The use of yolk protein as biomarkers for endocrine disruption in molluscs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holbech, Henrik; Kinnberg, Karin Lund; Bjerregaard, Poul

    Invertebrates and especially molluscs have received increasing attention in relation to endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDs) during the last few years and the development of OECD test guidelines to assess the effect of EDs with molluscs are in progress. One of the main problems with the development...... of standardized tests in molluscs is that no specific biomarkers or endpoints for endocrine effects have been validated. Some attempts have been made to transfer biomarkers developed for vertebrates – e.g. from fish to molluscs to investigate ED effects. One example is the vertebrate yolk protein vitellogenin...... that is known to be oestrogen dependent in fish. The yolk proteins in molluscs have been proposed to have the same oestrogenic dependence and used as biomarker for oestrogenic EDs. The present work investigates the possible usability of the main yolk protein in three species of molluscs to function as biomarker...

  16. An in vitro investigation of endocrine disrupting effects of the mycotoxin alternariol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frizzell, Caroline; Ndossi, Doreen; Kalayou, Shewit; Eriksen, Gunnar S; Verhaegen, Steven; Sørlie, Morten; Elliott, Christopher T; Ropstad, Erik; Connolly, Lisa

    2013-08-15

    Alternariol (AOH) is a mycotoxin commonly produced by Alternaria alternata on a wide range of foods. Few studies to date have been performed to evaluate the effects of AOH on endocrine activity. The present study makes use of in vitro mammalian cellular based assays and gene expression to investigate the ability of AOH to act as an endocrine disruptor by various modes of action. Reporter gene assays (RGAs), incorporating natural steroid hormone receptors for oestrogens, androgens, progestagens and glucocorticoids were used to identify endocrine disruption at the level of nuclear receptor transcriptional activity, and the H295R steroidogenesis assay was used to assess endocrine disruption at the level of gene expression and steroid hormone production. AOH exhibited a weak oestrogenic response when tested in the oestrogen responsive RGA and binding of progesterone to the progestagen receptor was shown to be synergistically increased in the presence of AOH. H295R cells when exposed to 0.1-1000ng/ml AOH, did not cause a significant change in testosterone and cortisol hormones but exposure to 1000ng/ml (3.87μM) AOH resulted in a significant increase in estradiol and progesterone production. In the gene expression study following exposure to 1000ng/ml (3.87μM) AOH, only one gene NR0B1 was down-regulated, whereas expression of mRNA for CYP1A1, MC2R, HSD3B2, CYP17, CYP21, CYP11B2 and CYP19 was up-regulated. Expression of the other genes investigated did not change significantly. In conclusion AOH is a weak oestrogenic mycotoxin that also has the ability to interfere with the steroidogenesis pathway. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. An in vitro investigation of endocrine disrupting effects of the mycotoxin alternariol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frizzell, Caroline; Ndossi, Doreen; Kalayou, Shewit; Eriksen, Gunnar S.; Verhaegen, Steven; Sørlie, Morten; Elliott, Christopher T.; Ropstad, Erik; Connolly, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Alternariol (AOH) is a mycotoxin commonly produced by Alternaria alternata on a wide range of foods. Few studies to date have been performed to evaluate the effects of AOH on endocrine activity. The present study makes use of in vitro mammalian cellular based assays and gene expression to investigate the ability of AOH to act as an endocrine disruptor by various modes of action. Reporter gene assays (RGAs), incorporating natural steroid hormone receptors for oestrogens, androgens, progestagens and glucocorticoids were used to identify endocrine disruption at the level of nuclear receptor transcriptional activity, and the H295R steroidogenesis assay was used to assess endocrine disruption at the level of gene expression and steroid hormone production. AOH exhibited a weak oestrogenic response when tested in the oestrogen responsive RGA and binding of progesterone to the progestagen receptor was shown to be synergistically increased in the presence of AOH. H295R cells when exposed to 0.1–1000 ng/ml AOH, did not cause a significant change in testosterone and cortisol hormones but exposure to 1000 ng/ml (3.87 μM) AOH resulted in a significant increase in estradiol and progesterone production. In the gene expression study following exposure to 1000 ng/ml (3.87 μM) AOH, only one gene NR0B1 was down-regulated, whereas expression of mRNA for CYP1A1, MC2R, HSD3B2, CYP17, CYP21, CYP11B2 and CYP19 was up-regulated. Expression of the other genes investigated did not change significantly. In conclusion AOH is a weak oestrogenic mycotoxin that also has the ability to interfere with the steroidogenesis pathway. - Highlights: • Alternariol was investigated for endocrine disrupting activity. • Reporter gene assays and the H295R steroidogenesis assay have been used. • An oestrogenic effect of alternariol was observed. • This can lead to an increase in expression of the progesterone receptor. • Alternariol is capable of modulating hormone production and gene expression

  18. An in vitro investigation of endocrine disrupting effects of the mycotoxin alternariol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frizzell, Caroline [Institute for Global Food Security, School of Biological Sciences, Queen' s University Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Ndossi, Doreen [Section of Experimental Biomedicine, Norwegian School of Veterinary Science, Oslo (Norway); Sokoine University of Agriculture, Morogoro (Tanzania, United Republic of); Kalayou, Shewit [Section of Experimental Biomedicine, Norwegian School of Veterinary Science, Oslo (Norway); Mekelle University College of Veterinary Medicine, Mekelle (Ethiopia); Eriksen, Gunnar S. [Norwegian Veterinary Institute, Oslo (Norway); Verhaegen, Steven [Section of Experimental Biomedicine, Norwegian School of Veterinary Science, Oslo (Norway); Sørlie, Morten [Department of Chemistry, Biotechnology and Food Science, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Ås (Norway); Elliott, Christopher T. [Institute for Global Food Security, School of Biological Sciences, Queen' s University Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Ropstad, Erik [Section of Experimental Biomedicine, Norwegian School of Veterinary Science, Oslo (Norway); Connolly, Lisa, E-mail: l.connolly@qub.ac.uk [Institute for Global Food Security, School of Biological Sciences, Queen' s University Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom)

    2013-08-15

    Alternariol (AOH) is a mycotoxin commonly produced by Alternaria alternata on a wide range of foods. Few studies to date have been performed to evaluate the effects of AOH on endocrine activity. The present study makes use of in vitro mammalian cellular based assays and gene expression to investigate the ability of AOH to act as an endocrine disruptor by various modes of action. Reporter gene assays (RGAs), incorporating natural steroid hormone receptors for oestrogens, androgens, progestagens and glucocorticoids were used to identify endocrine disruption at the level of nuclear receptor transcriptional activity, and the H295R steroidogenesis assay was used to assess endocrine disruption at the level of gene expression and steroid hormone production. AOH exhibited a weak oestrogenic response when tested in the oestrogen responsive RGA and binding of progesterone to the progestagen receptor was shown to be synergistically increased in the presence of AOH. H295R cells when exposed to 0.1–1000 ng/ml AOH, did not cause a significant change in testosterone and cortisol hormones but exposure to 1000 ng/ml (3.87 μM) AOH resulted in a significant increase in estradiol and progesterone production. In the gene expression study following exposure to 1000 ng/ml (3.87 μM) AOH, only one gene NR0B1 was down-regulated, whereas expression of mRNA for CYP1A1, MC2R, HSD3B2, CYP17, CYP21, CYP11B2 and CYP19 was up-regulated. Expression of the other genes investigated did not change significantly. In conclusion AOH is a weak oestrogenic mycotoxin that also has the ability to interfere with the steroidogenesis pathway. - Highlights: • Alternariol was investigated for endocrine disrupting activity. • Reporter gene assays and the H295R steroidogenesis assay have been used. • An oestrogenic effect of alternariol was observed. • This can lead to an increase in expression of the progesterone receptor. • Alternariol is capable of modulating hormone production and gene expression.

  19. EDC IMPACT: Reduced sperm counts in rats exposed to human relevant mixtures of endocrine disrupters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Axelstad

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Human semen quality is declining in many parts of the world, but the causes are ill defined. In rodents, impaired sperm production can be seen with early life exposure to certain endocrine-disrupting chemicals, but the effects of combined exposures are not properly investigated. In this study, we examined the effects of early exposure to the painkiller paracetamol and mixtures of human relevant endocrine-disrupting chemicals in rats. One mixture contained four estrogenic compounds; another contained eight anti-androgenic environmental chemicals and a third mixture contained estrogens, anti-androgens and paracetamol. All exposures were administered by oral gavage to time-mated Wistar dams rats (n = 16–20 throughout gestation and lactation. In the postnatal period, testicular histology was affected by the total mixture, and at the end of weaning, male testis weights were significantly increased by paracetamol and the high doses of the total and the anti-androgenic mixture, compared to controls. In all dose groups, epididymal sperm counts were reduced several months after end of exposure, i.e. at 10  months of age. Interestingly, the same pattern of effects was seen for paracetamol as for mixtures with diverse modes of action. Reduced sperm count was seen at a dose level reflecting human therapeutic exposure to paracetamol. Environmental chemical mixtures affected sperm count at the lowest mixture dose indicating an insufficient margin of safety for the most exposed humans. This causes concern for exposure of pregnant women to paracetamol as well as environmental endocrine disrupters.

  20. Impact of exposure to endocrine disrupters in utero and in childhood on adult reproduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norgil Damgaard, Ida; Main, Katharina Maria; Toppari, Jorma

    2002-01-01

    Recent reports have demonstrated a decline in human male reproductive health: high and probably increasing prevalence of cryptorchidism and hypospadias, low and probably decreasing semen quality, a rising incidence of testicular cancer and a growing demand for assisted reproduction. These changes...... seem to be interrelated and may be symptoms of a common underlying entity, the testicular dysgenesis syndrome, with foundations in fetal life due to adverse environmental influences. Wildlife experience and animal studies have provided evidence that fetal or perinatal exposure to endocrine disrupters...

  1. EDC IMPACT: Reduced sperm counts in rats exposed to human relevant mixtures of endocrine disrupters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelstad Petersen, Marta; Hass, Ulla; Scholze, M.

    2018-01-01

    examined the effects of early exposure to the painkiller paracetamol and mixtures of human relevant endocrine-disrupting chemicals in rats. One mixture contained four estrogenic compounds; another contained eight anti-androgenic environmental chemicals and a third mixture contained estrogens, anti......-androgens and paracetamol. All exposures were administered by oral gavage to time-mated Wistar dams rats (n = 16-20) throughout gestation and lactation. In the postnatal period, testicular histology was affected by the total mixture, and at the end of weaning, male testis weights were significantly increased by paracetamol...

  2. Review of Bioassays for Monitoring Fate and Transport ofEstrogenic Endocrine Disrupting Compounds in Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CGCampbell@lbl.gov

    2004-01-30

    Endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) are recognizedcontaminants threatening water quality. Despite efforts in sourceidentification, few strategies exist for characterization or treatment ofthis environmental pollution. Given that there are numerous EDCs that cannegatively affect humans and wildlife, general screening techniques likebioassays and biosensors provide an essential rapid and intensiveanalysis capacity. Commonly applied bioassays include the ELISA and YESassays, but promising technologies include ER-CALUXa, ELRA, Endotecta,RIANA, and IR-bioamplification. Two biosensors, Endotecta and RIANA, arefield portable using non-cellular biological detection strategies.Environmental management of EDCs in water requires integration ofbiosensors and bioassays for monitoring and assessment.

  3. The exposure of fetuses and children to endocrine disrupting chemicals: a European Society for Paediatric Endocrinology (ESPE) and Pediatric Endocrine Society (PES) call to action statement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skakkebæk, Niels E; Toppari, Jorma; Söder, Olle

    2011-01-01

    During recent years, evidence has accumulated that both wildlife species and humans are exposed to ubiquitous endocrine-disrupting chemicals. Some are persistent in our bodies; others are nonpersistent but are produced in large quantities. Hitherto, the bulk of research in this area has been carr...

  4. The exposure of fetuses and children to endocrine disrupting chemicals: a European Society for Paediatric Endocrinology (ESPE) and Pediatric Endocrine Society (PES) call to action statement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skakkebæk, Niels E; Toppari, Jorma; Söder, Olle

    2011-01-01

    carried out by basic and experimental scientists and wildlife researchers. Relatively few clinical scientists have been engaged in research on this topic to date. The aim of this statement is to have pediatric endocrinologists consider the issue of endocrine disrupters in their clinical work and research....

  5. Bisphenol A and Phthalate Endocrine Disruption of Parental and Social Behaviors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl Susan Rosenfeld

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Perinatal exposure to endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs can induce promiscuous neurobehavioral disturbances. Bisphenol A and phthalates are two widely prevalent and persistent EDCs reported to lead to such effects. Parental and social behaviors are especially vulnerable to endocrine disruption, as these traits are programmed by the organizational-activational effects of testosterone and estrogen. BPA and other EDC exposure disrupts normal maternal care provided by rodents and non-human primates, such as nursing, time she spends hunched over and in the nest, and grooming her pups. Paternal care may also be affected by BPA. No long term study has linked perinatal exposure to BPA or other EDC and later parental behavioral deficits in humans. The fact that the same brain regions and neural hormone substrates govern parental behaviors in animal models and humans suggests that this suite of behaviors may also be vulnerable in the latter. Social behaviors, such as communication, mate choice, pair bonding, social inquisitiveness and recognition, play behavior, social grooming, copulation, and aggression, are compromised in animal models exposed to BPA, phthalates, and other EDCs. Early contact to these chemicals is also correlated with maladaptive social behaviors in children. These behavioral disturbances may originate by altering the fetal or adult gonadal production of testosterone or estrogen, expression of ESR1, ESR2, and AR in the brain regions governing these behaviors, neuropeptide/ protein hormone (oxytocin, vasopressin, and prolactin and their cognate neural receptors, and/or through epimutations. Robust evidence exists for all of these EDC-induced changes. Concern also exists for transgenerational persistence of such neurobehavioral disruptions. In sum, evidence for social and parental deficits induced by BPA, phthalates, and related chemicals is strongly mounting, and such effects may ultimately compromise the overall social fitness of

  6. Infant and mother related outcomes from exposure to metals with endocrine disrupting properties during pregnancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahman, A. [Interdisciplinary School of Health Sciences, University of Ottawa, Ottawa (Canada); Kumarathasan, P. [Environmental Health Science and Research Bureau, Health Canada, Ottawa (Canada); Gomes, J., E-mail: jgomes@uottawa.ca [Interdisciplinary School of Health Sciences, University of Ottawa, Ottawa (Canada); McLaughlin Centre for Population Health Risk Assessment, University of Ottawa, Ottawa (Canada)

    2016-11-01

    Background: Endocrine-related adverse health effects from exposure to heavy metals such as lead, arsenic, cadmium, and mercury are yet to be adequately described. The purpose of this review was to gain insight into maternal exposure to heavy metals, and to identify potential endocrine-related adverse health effects in the mother and the infant. Methods: Relevant databases were searched for original research reports and a total of 46 articles were retained for scrutiny. Required data was extracted from these studies and their methodology was assessed. Results: Impaired fetal growth was observed from exposure to all endocrine disrupting metals, while exposure to lead and arsenic were associated with spontaneous abortion, stillbirth and neonatal deaths. Maternal exposure to arsenic was associated with impaired glucose tolerance in these mothers. Conclusion: Impaired fetal growth, fetal loss, and neonatal deaths were significantly associated with heavy metals exposure during pregnancy; however, hypertension and gestational diabetes require further investigation. - Highlights: • Low and high dose exposure to lead was associated with low birth weight, preterm birth, stillbirths, spontaneous abortions and hypertension. • Exposure to arsenic was associated with fetal loss, stillbirths and spontaneous abortions. • Exposure to cadmium was associated with low birth weight. • Exposure to mercury was associated with spontaneous abortions and neurotoxic effects. • Exposure to copper was associated with low birth weight and spontaneous abortions and exposure to zinc was associated with low birth weight.

  7. Infant and mother related outcomes from exposure to metals with endocrine disrupting properties during pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, A.; Kumarathasan, P.; Gomes, J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Endocrine-related adverse health effects from exposure to heavy metals such as lead, arsenic, cadmium, and mercury are yet to be adequately described. The purpose of this review was to gain insight into maternal exposure to heavy metals, and to identify potential endocrine-related adverse health effects in the mother and the infant. Methods: Relevant databases were searched for original research reports and a total of 46 articles were retained for scrutiny. Required data was extracted from these studies and their methodology was assessed. Results: Impaired fetal growth was observed from exposure to all endocrine disrupting metals, while exposure to lead and arsenic were associated with spontaneous abortion, stillbirth and neonatal deaths. Maternal exposure to arsenic was associated with impaired glucose tolerance in these mothers. Conclusion: Impaired fetal growth, fetal loss, and neonatal deaths were significantly associated with heavy metals exposure during pregnancy; however, hypertension and gestational diabetes require further investigation. - Highlights: • Low and high dose exposure to lead was associated with low birth weight, preterm birth, stillbirths, spontaneous abortions and hypertension. • Exposure to arsenic was associated with fetal loss, stillbirths and spontaneous abortions. • Exposure to cadmium was associated with low birth weight. • Exposure to mercury was associated with spontaneous abortions and neurotoxic effects. • Exposure to copper was associated with low birth weight and spontaneous abortions and exposure to zinc was associated with low birth weight.

  8. Integrative assessment of enantioselectivity in endocrine disruption and immunotoxicity of synthetic pyrethroids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao Meirong [Research Center of Environmental Science, College of Biological and Environmental Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310032 (China); Chen Fang [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Zhejiang Gongshang University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Wang Cui; Zhang Quan [Research Center of Environmental Science, College of Biological and Environmental Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310032 (China); Gan Jianying [Department of Environmental Sciences, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Liu Weiping, E-mail: wliu@zjut.edu.c [Research Center of Environmental Science, College of Biological and Environmental Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310032 (China)

    2010-05-15

    The increasing release of chiral chemicals into the environment dictates attention to a better understanding of enantioselectivity in their human and ecotoxicological effects. Although enantioselectivity has been considered in many recent studies, there is little effort for discerning the connection between different processes, and as such, our current knowledge about chiral contaminants is rather scattered and incoherent. In this study, we simultaneously evaluated enantioselectivity of two chiral pesticides, lambda-cyhalothrin (LCT) and (Z)-cis-bifenthrin (cis-BF), in immunotoxicity to macrophage cells (RAW264.7), and endocrine disruption activity in human breast carcinoma cell line MCF-7. Analysis of cell proliferation, cell viability, apoptosis, and receptor gene expression showed significant differences between the enantiomers of LCT or cis-BF in estrogenic potential and immunocytotoxicity. The selectivity in these effects consistently followed the same direction, with (-)-LCT or 1S-cis-BF displaying a greater activity than its counterpart. The consistency was attributed to interplaying mechanisms in the closely interacting immune and endocrine systems. The underlying interplays suggest that other chiral xenobiotics may also show a directional enantioselectivity in immunotoxicity and endocrine toxicity. Given that many biological processes are inter-related, enantioselectivity may follow specific patterns that can be revealed via integrative assessments as demonstrated in this study. - Chiral contaminants should consider multiple effects and relate directions of enantioselectivity to their interplaying processes.

  9. Integrative assessment of enantioselectivity in endocrine disruption and immunotoxicity of synthetic pyrethroids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Meirong; Chen Fang; Wang Cui; Zhang Quan; Gan Jianying; Liu Weiping

    2010-01-01

    The increasing release of chiral chemicals into the environment dictates attention to a better understanding of enantioselectivity in their human and ecotoxicological effects. Although enantioselectivity has been considered in many recent studies, there is little effort for discerning the connection between different processes, and as such, our current knowledge about chiral contaminants is rather scattered and incoherent. In this study, we simultaneously evaluated enantioselectivity of two chiral pesticides, lambda-cyhalothrin (LCT) and (Z)-cis-bifenthrin (cis-BF), in immunotoxicity to macrophage cells (RAW264.7), and endocrine disruption activity in human breast carcinoma cell line MCF-7. Analysis of cell proliferation, cell viability, apoptosis, and receptor gene expression showed significant differences between the enantiomers of LCT or cis-BF in estrogenic potential and immunocytotoxicity. The selectivity in these effects consistently followed the same direction, with (-)-LCT or 1S-cis-BF displaying a greater activity than its counterpart. The consistency was attributed to interplaying mechanisms in the closely interacting immune and endocrine systems. The underlying interplays suggest that other chiral xenobiotics may also show a directional enantioselectivity in immunotoxicity and endocrine toxicity. Given that many biological processes are inter-related, enantioselectivity may follow specific patterns that can be revealed via integrative assessments as demonstrated in this study. - Chiral contaminants should consider multiple effects and relate directions of enantioselectivity to their interplaying processes.

  10. Atrazine acts as an endocrine disrupter by inhibiting cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase-4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kucka, Marek [Section on Cellular Signaling, Program in Developmental Neuroscience, NICHD, NIH, Bethesda, MD (United States); Pogrmic-Majkic, Kristina; Fa, Svetlana [Laboratory for Ecotoxicology, Department of Biology and Ecology, University of Novi Sad, Faculty of Sciences, 21000 Novi Sad (Serbia); Stojilkovic, Stanko S. [Section on Cellular Signaling, Program in Developmental Neuroscience, NICHD, NIH, Bethesda, MD (United States); Kovacevic, Radmila, E-mail: radmila.kovacevic@dbe.uns.ac.rs [Laboratory for Ecotoxicology, Department of Biology and Ecology, University of Novi Sad, Faculty of Sciences, 21000 Novi Sad (Serbia)

    2012-11-15

    Atrazine, one of the most commonly used herbicides worldwide, acts as an endocrine disruptor, but the mechanism of its action has not been characterized. In this study, we show that atrazine rapidly increases cAMP levels in cultured rat pituitary and testicular Leydig cells in a concentration-dependent manner, but less effectively than 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine, a competitive non-specific inhibitor of phosphodiesterases (PDEs). In forskolin (an activator of adenylyl cyclase)- and probenecid (an inhibitor of cyclic nucleotide transporters)-treated cells, but not in 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine-treated cells, atrazine further increased cAMP levels, indicating that inhibition of PDEs accounts for accumulation of cAMP. In contrast to cAMP, atrazine did not alter cGMP levels, further indicating that it inhibits cAMP-specific PDEs. Atrazine-induced changes in cAMP levels were sufficient to stimulate prolactin release in pituitary cells and androgen production in Leydig cells, indicating that it acts as an endocrine disrupter both in cells that secrete by exocytosis of prestored hormones and in cells that secrete by de novo hormone synthesis. Rolipram abolished the stimulatory effect of atrazine on cAMP release in both cell types, suggesting that it acts as an inhibitor of PDE4s, isoforms whose mRNA transcripts dominate in pituitary and Leydig cells together with mRNA for PDE8A. In contrast, immortalized lacto-somatotrophs showed low expression of these mRNA transcripts and several fold higher cAMP levels compared to normal pituitary cells, and atrazine was unable to further increase cAMP levels. These results indicate that atrazine acts as a general endocrine disrupter by inhibiting cAMP-specific PDE4s. -- Highlights: ► Atrazine stimulates cAMP accumulation in pituitary and Leydig cells. ► Atrazine also stimulates PRL and androgens secretion. ► Stimulatory effects of atrazine were abolished in cells with IBMX-inhibited PDEs. ► Atrazine specificity toward c

  11. Endocrine disruption in aquatic systems: up-scaling research to address ecological consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windsor, Fredric M; Ormerod, Steve J; Tyler, Charles R

    2018-02-01

    Endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) can alter biological function in organisms at environmentally relevant concentrations and are a significant threat to aquatic biodiversity, but there is little understanding of exposure consequences for populations, communities and ecosystems. The pervasive nature of EDCs within aquatic environments and their multiple sub-lethal effects make assessments of their impact especially important but also highly challenging. Herein, we review the data on EDC effects in aquatic systems focusing on studies assessing populations and ecosystems, and including how biotic and abiotic processes may affect, and be affected by, responses to EDCs. Recent research indicates a significant influence of behavioural responses (e.g. enhancing feeding rates), transgenerational effects and trophic cascades in the ecological consequences of EDC exposure. In addition, interactions between EDCs and other chemical, physical and biological factors generate uncertainty in our understanding of the ecological effects of EDCs within aquatic ecosystems. We illustrate how effect thresholds for EDCs generated from individual-based experimental bioassays of the types commonly applied using chemical test guidelines [e.g. Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)] may not necessarily reflect the hazards associated with endocrine disruption. We argue that improved risk assessment for EDCs in aquatic ecosystems urgently requires more ecologically oriented research as well as field-based assessments at population-, community- and food-web levels. © 2017 The Authors. Biological Reviews published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Cambridge Philosophical Society.

  12. Toxicity and Estrogenic Endocrine Disrupting Activity of Phthalates and Their Mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueping Chen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Phthalates, widely used in flexible plastics and consumer products, have become ubiquitous contaminants worldwide. This study evaluated the acute toxicity and estrogenic endocrine disrupting activity of butyl benzyl phthalate (BBP, di(n-butyl phthalate (DBP, bis(2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP, diisodecyl phthalate (DIDP, diisononyl phthalate (DINP, di-n-octyl phthalate (DNOP and their mixtures. Using a 72 h zebrafish embryo toxicity test, the LC50 values of BBP, DBP and a mixture of the six phthalates were found to be 0.72, 0.63 and 0.50 ppm, respectively. The other four phthalates did not cause more than 50% exposed embryo mortality even at their highest soluble concentrations. The typical toxicity symptoms caused by phthalates were death, tail curvature, necrosis, cardio edema and no touch response. Using an estrogen-responsive ChgH-EGFP transgenic medaka (Oryzias melastigma eleutheroembryos based 24 h test, BBP demonstrated estrogenic activity, DBP, DEHP, DINP and the mixture of the six phthalates exhibited enhanced-estrogenic activity and DIDP and DNOP showed no enhanced- or anti-estrogenic activity. These findings highlighted the developmental toxicity of BBP and DBP, and the estrogenic endocrine disrupting activity of BBP, DBP, DEHP and DINP on intact organisms, indicating that the widespread use of these phthalates may cause potential health risks to human beings.

  13. Degrading Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals from Wastewater by TiO Photocatalysis: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Chung Sin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Widespread concerns continue to be raised about the impacts of exposure to chemical compounds with endocrine disrupting activities. To date, the percolation of endocrine disrupting chemical (EDC effluent into the aquatic system remains an intricate challenge abroad the nations. With the innovation of advanced oxidation processes (AOPs, there has been a consistent growing interest in this research field. Hence, the aim of this paper is to focus one such method within the AOPs, namely, heterogeneous photocatalysis and how it is used on the abatement of EDCs, phthalates, bisphenol A and chlorophenols in particular, using TiO2-based catalysts. Degradation mechanisms, pathways, and intermediate products of various EDCs for TiO2 photocatalysis are described in detail. The effect of key operational parameters on TiO2 photocatalytic degradation of various EDCs is then specifically covered. Finally, the future prospects together with the challenges for the TiO2 photocatalysis on EDCs degradation are summarized and discussed.

  14. Female reproductive disorders: the roles of endocrine-disrupting compounds and developmental timing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crain, D. Andrew; Janssen, Sarah J.; Edwards, Thea M.; Heindel, Jerrold; Ho, Shuk-mei; Hunt, Patricia; Iguchi, Taisen; Juul, Anders; McLachlan, John A.; Schwartz, Jackie; Skakkebaek, Niels; Soto, Ana M.; Swan, Shanna; Walker, Cheryl; Woodruff, Teresa K.; Woodruff, Tracey J.; Giudice, Linda C.; Guillette, Louis J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the possible role of endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs) on female reproductive disorders emphasizing developmental plasticity and the complexity of endocrine-dependent ontogeny of reproductive organs. Declining conception rates and the high incidence of female reproductive disruptions warrant evaluation of the impact of EDCs on female reproductive health. Design Publications related to the contribution of EDCs to disorders of the ovary (aneuploidy, polycystic ovary syndrome, and altered cyclicity), uterus (endometriosis, uterine fibroids, fetal growth restriction, and pregnancy loss), breast (breast cancer, reduced duration of lactation), and pubertal timing were identified, reviewed, and summarized at a workshop. Conclusion(s) The data reviewed illustrate that EDCs contribute to numerous human female reproductive disorders and emphasize the sensitivity of early life-stage exposures. Many research gaps are identified that limit full understanding of the contribution of EDCs to female reproductive problems. Moreover, there is an urgent need to reduce the incidence of these reproductive disorders, which can be addressed by correlative studies on early life exposure and adult reproductive dysfunction together with tools to assess the specific exposures and methods to block their effects. This review of the EDC literature as it relates to female health provides an important platform on which women’s health can be improved. PMID:18929049

  15. Multi-class of endocrine disrupting compounds in aquaculture ecosystems and health impacts in exposed biota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Nur Afifah Hanun; Wee, Sze Yee; Aris, Ahmad Zaharin

    2017-12-01

    Fishes are a major protein food source for humans, with a high economic value in the aquaculture industry. Because endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) have been introduced into aquatic ecosystems, the exposure of humans and animals that depend on aquatic foods, especially fishes, should be seriously considered. EDCs are emerging pollutants causing global concern because they can disrupt the endocrine system in aquatic organisms, mammals, and humans. These pollutants have been released into the environment through many sources, e.g., wastewater treatment plants, terrestrial run-off (industrial activities, pharmaceuticals, and household waste), and precipitation. The use of pharmaceuticals, pesticides, and fertilizers for maintaining and increasing fish health and growth also contributes to EDC pollution in the water body. Human and animal exposure to EDCs occurs via ingestion of contaminated matrices, especially aquatic foodstuffs. This paper aims to review human EDC exposure via fish consumption. In respect to the trace concentration of EDCs in fish, types of instrument and clean-up method are of great concerns. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Thyroid endocrine system disruption by pentachlorophenol: an in vitro and in vivo assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yongyong; Zhou, Bingsheng

    2013-10-15

    The present study aimed to evaluate the disruption caused to the thyroid endocrine system by pentachlorophenol (PCP) using in vitro and in vivo assays. In the in vitro assay, rat pituitary GH3 cells were exposed to 0, 0.1, 0.3, and 1.0 μM PCP. PCP exposure significantly downregulated basal and triiodothyronine (T3)-induced Dio 1 transcription, indicating the antagonistic activity of PCP in vitro. In the in vivo assay, zebrafish embryos were exposed to 0, 1, 3, and 10 μg/L of PCP until 14 days post-fertilization. PCP exposure resulted in decreased thyroxine (T4) levels, but elevated contents of whole-body T3. PCP exposure significantly upregulated the mRNA expression of genes along hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis, including those encoding thyroid-stimulating hormone, sodium/iodide symporter, thyroglobulin, Dio 1 and Dio 2, alpha and beta thyroid hormone receptor, and uridinediphosphate-glucuronosyl-transferase. PCP exposure did not influence the transcription of the transthyretin (TTR) gene. The results indicate that PCP potentially disrupts the thyroid endocrine system both in vitro and in vivo. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. QSAR classification models for the screening of the endocrine-disrupting activity of perfluorinated compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovarich, S; Papa, E; Li, J; Gramatica, P

    2012-01-01

    Perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) are a class of emerging pollutants still widely used in different materials as non-adhesives, waterproof fabrics, fire-fighting foams, etc. Their toxic effects include potential for endocrine-disrupting activity, but the amount of experimental data available for these pollutants is limited. The use of predictive strategies such as quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) is recommended under the REACH regulation, to fill data gaps and to screen and prioritize chemicals for further experimentation, with a consequent reduction of costs and number of tested animals. In this study, local classification models for PFCs were developed to predict their T4-TTR (thyroxin-transthyretin) competing potency. The best models were selected by maximizing the sensitivity and external predictive ability. These models, characterized by robustness, good predictive power and a defined applicability domain, were applied to predict the activity of 33 other PFCs of environmental concern. Finally, classification models recently published by our research group for T4-TTR binding of brominated flame retardants and for estrogenic and anti-androgenic activity were applied to the studied perfluorinated chemicals to compare results and to further evaluate the potential for these PFCs to cause endocrine disruption.

  18. Thyroid endocrine disruption in zebrafish larvae following exposure to hexaconazole and tebuconazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Liang; Chen, Mengli; Liu, Yihua; Gui, Wenjun; Zhu, Guonian

    2013-08-15

    The widely used triazole fungicides have the potential to disrupt endocrine system, but little is known of such effects or underlying mechanisms of hexaconazole (HEX) and tebuconazole (TEB) in fish. In the present study, zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos were exposed to various concentrations of HEX (0.625, 1.25 and 2.5 mg/L) and TEB (1, 2 and 4 mg/L) from fertilization to 120 h post-fertilization (hpf). The whole body content of thyroid hormone and transcription of genes in the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis were analyzed. The results showed that thyroxine (T4) levels were significantly decreased, while triiodothyronine (T3) concentrations were significantly increased after exposure to HEX and TEB, indicating thyroid endocrine disruption. Exposure to HEX significantly induced the transcription of all the measured genes (i.e., corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH), thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSHβ), sodium/iodide symporter (NIS), transthyretin (TTR), uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase (UGT1ab), thyronine deiodinase (Dio1 and Dio2), thyroid hormone receptors (TRα and TRβ) in the HPT axis, but did not affect the transcription of thyroglobulin (TG). However, TEB exposure resulted in the upregulation of all the measured genes, excepting that TG, Dio1and TRα had not changed significantly. The overall results indicated that exposure to HEX and TEB could alter thyroid hormone levels as well as gene transcription in the HPT axis in zebrafish larvae. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Estimating burden and disease costs of exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals in the European union.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trasande, Leonardo; Zoeller, R Thomas; Hass, Ulla; Kortenkamp, Andreas; Grandjean, Philippe; Myers, John Peterson; DiGangi, Joseph; Bellanger, Martine; Hauser, Russ; Legler, Juliette; Skakkebaek, Niels E; Heindel, Jerrold J

    2015-04-01

    Rapidly increasing evidence has documented that endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) contribute substantially to disease and disability. The objective was to quantify a range of health and economic costs that can be reasonably attributed to EDC exposures in the European Union (EU). A Steering Committee of scientists adapted the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change weight-of-evidence characterization for probability of causation based upon levels of available epidemiological and toxicological evidence for one or more chemicals contributing to disease by an endocrine disruptor mechanism. To evaluate the epidemiological evidence, the Steering Committee adapted the World Health Organization Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) Working Group criteria, whereas the Steering Committee adapted definitions recently promulgated by the Danish Environmental Protection Agency for evaluating laboratory and animal evidence of endocrine disruption. Expert panels used the Delphi method to make decisions on the strength of the data. Expert panels achieved consensus at least for probable (>20%) EDC causation for IQ loss and associated intellectual disability, autism, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, childhood obesity, adult obesity, adult diabetes, cryptorchidism, male infertility, and mortality associated with reduced testosterone. Accounting for probability of causation and using the midpoint of each range for probability of causation, Monte Carlo simulations produced a median cost of €157 billion (or $209 billion, corresponding to 1.23% of EU gross domestic product) annually across 1000 simulations. Notably, using the lowest end of the probability range for each relationship in the Monte Carlo simulations produced a median range of €109 billion that differed modestly from base case probability inputs. EDC exposures in the EU are likely to contribute substantially to disease and dysfunction across the life course with costs in

  20. Endocrine Disrupting Effects of Triclosan on the Placenta in Pregnant Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yixing Feng

    Full Text Available Triclosan (TCS is a broad-spectrum antimicrobial agent that is frequently used in pharmaceuticals and personal care products. Reports have shown that TCS is a potential endocrine disruptor; however, the potential effects of TCS on placental endocrine function are unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the endocrine disrupting effects of TCS on the placenta in pregnant rats. Pregnant rats from gestational day (GD 6 to GD 20 were treated with 0, 30, 100, 300 and 600 mg/kg/d TCS followed by analysis of various biochemical parameters. Of the seven tissues examined, the greatest bioaccumulation of TCS was observed in the placenta. Reduction of gravid uterine weight and the occurrence of abortion were observed in the 600 mg/kg/d TCS-exposed group. Moreover, hormone detection demonstrated that the serum levels of progesterone (P, estradiol (E2, testosterone (T, human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG and prolactin (PRL were decreased in groups exposed to higher doses of TCS. Real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (Q-RT-PCR analysis revealed a significant increase in mRNA levels for placental steroid metabolism enzymes, including UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 (UGT1A1, estrogen sulfotransferase 1E1 (SULT1E1, steroid 5α-reductase 1 (SRD5A1 and steroid 5α-reductase 2 (SRD5A2. Furthermore, the transcriptional expression levels of progesterone receptor (PR, estrogen receptor (ERα and androgen receptor (AR were up-regulated. Taken together, these data demonstrated that the placenta was a target tissue of TCS and that TCS induced inhibition of circulating steroid hormone production might be related to the altered expression of hormone metabolism enzyme genes in the placenta. This hormone disruption might subsequently affect fetal development and growth.

  1. Endocrine Disruption: Computational Perspectives on Human Sex Hormone-Binding Globulin and Phthalate Plasticizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh, Ishfaq A; Turki, Rola F; Abuzenadah, Adel M; Damanhouri, Ghazi A; Beg, Mohd A

    2016-01-01

    Phthalates are a class of high volume production chemicals used as plasticizers for household and industrial use. Several members of this chemical family have endocrine disrupting activity. Owing to ubiquitous environmental distribution and exposure of human population at all stages of life, phthalate contamination is a continuous global public health problem. Clinical and experimental studies have indicated that several phthalates are associated with adverse effects on development and function of human and animal systems especially the reproductive system and exposures during pregnancy and early childhood are by far of utmost concern. Sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) is a plasma carrier protein that binds androgens and estrogens and represents a potential target for phthalate endocrine disruptor function in the body. In the present study, the binding mechanism of the nine phthalates i.e. DMP, DBP, DIBP, BBP, DNHP, DEHP, DNOP, DINP, DIDP with human SHBG was delineated by molecular docking simulation. Docking complexes of the nine phthalates displayed interactions with 15-31 amino acid residues of SHBG and a commonality of 55-95% interacting residues between natural ligand of SHBG, dihydrotestosterone, and the nine phthalate compounds was observed. The binding affinity values were more negative for long chain phthalates DEHP, DNOP, DINP, and DIDP compared to short chain phthalates such as DMP and DBP. The Dock score and Glide score values were also higher for long chain phthalates compared to short chain phthalates. Hence, overlapping of interacting amino acid residues between phthalate compounds and natural ligand, dihydrotestosterone, suggested potential disrupting activity of phthalates in the endocrine homeostasis function of SHBG, with long chain phthalates expected to be more potent than the short chain phthalates.

  2. Endocrine Disrupting Effects of Triclosan on the Placenta in Pregnant Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhaobin; Shi, Jiachen; Jiao, Zhihao; Shao, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Triclosan (TCS) is a broad-spectrum antimicrobial agent that is frequently used in pharmaceuticals and personal care products. Reports have shown that TCS is a potential endocrine disruptor; however, the potential effects of TCS on placental endocrine function are unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the endocrine disrupting effects of TCS on the placenta in pregnant rats. Pregnant rats from gestational day (GD) 6 to GD 20 were treated with 0, 30, 100, 300 and 600 mg/kg/d TCS followed by analysis of various biochemical parameters. Of the seven tissues examined, the greatest bioaccumulation of TCS was observed in the placenta. Reduction of gravid uterine weight and the occurrence of abortion were observed in the 600 mg/kg/d TCS-exposed group. Moreover, hormone detection demonstrated that the serum levels of progesterone (P), estradiol (E2), testosterone (T), human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) and prolactin (PRL) were decreased in groups exposed to higher doses of TCS. Real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (Q-RT-PCR) analysis revealed a significant increase in mRNA levels for placental steroid metabolism enzymes, including UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 (UGT1A1), estrogen sulfotransferase 1E1 (SULT1E1), steroid 5α-reductase 1 (SRD5A1) and steroid 5α-reductase 2 (SRD5A2). Furthermore, the transcriptional expression levels of progesterone receptor (PR), estrogen receptor (ERα) and androgen receptor (AR) were up-regulated. Taken together, these data demonstrated that the placenta was a target tissue of TCS and that TCS induced inhibition of circulating steroid hormone production might be related to the altered expression of hormone metabolism enzyme genes in the placenta. This hormone disruption might subsequently affect fetal development and growth. PMID:27149376

  3. Burden of disease and costs of exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals in the European Union: an updated analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trasande, L.; Zoeller, R. T.; Hass, Ulla

    2016-01-01

    A previous report documented that endocrine disrupting chemicals contribute substantially to certain forms of disease and disability. In the present analysis, our main objective was to update a range of health and economic costs that can be reasonably attributed to endocrine disrupting chemical...... to contribute substantially to disease and dysfunction across the life course with costs in the hundreds of billions of Euros per year. These estimates represent only those endocrine disrupting chemicals with the highest probability of causation; a broader analysis would have produced greater estimates...... exposures in the European Union, leveraging new burden and disease cost estimates of female reproductive conditions from accompanying report. Expert panels evaluated the epidemiologic evidence, using adapted criteria from the WHO Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation Working...

  4. Echinoderm regenerative response as a sensitive ecotoxicological test for the exposure to endocrine disrupters: effects of p,p'DDE and CPA on crinoid arm regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugni, Michela; Manno, Valentina; Barbaglio, Alice; Mozzi, Daniela; Bonasoro, Francesco; Tremolada, Paolo; Candia Carnevali, M Daniela

    2008-12-01

    Echinoderms are valuable test species in marine ecotoxicology and offer a wide range of biological processes appropriate for this approach. Regenerating echinoderms can be regarded as amenable experimental models for testing the effects of exposure to contaminants, particularly endocrine disrupter compounds (EDCs). As regeneration is a typical developmental process, physiologically regulated by humoral mechanisms, it is highly susceptible to the action of pseudo-hormonal contaminants which appear to be obvious candidates for exerting deleterious actions. In our laboratory experiments, selected EDCs suspected for their antiandrogenic action (p,p'-DDE and cyproterone acetate) were tested at low concentrations on regenerating specimens of the crinoid Antedon mediterranea. An integrated approach which combines exposure experiments and different morphological analyses was employed; the obtained results suggest an overall pattern of plausible endocrine disruption in the exposed samples, showing that processes such as regenerative growth, histogenesis, and differentiation are affected by the exposure to the selected compounds. These results confirm that (1) regenerative phenomena of echinoderms can be considered valuable alternative models to assess the effects of exposure to exogenous substances such as EDCs, and (2) these compounds significantly interfere with fundamental processes of developmental physiology (proliferation, differentiation, etc...) plausibly via endocrine alterations. In terms of future prospects, taking into account the increasing need to propose animal models different from vertebrates, echinoderms represent a group on which ecotoxicological studies should be encouraged and specifically addressed.

  5. In ovo exposure quail assay for risk assessment of endocrine disrupting chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamata, Ryo; Takahashi, Shinji; Shimizu, Akira; Morita, Masatoshi; Shiraishi, Fujio

    2006-12-01

    Although there are in vivo assays using various organisms for the risk assessment of chemicals with endocrine disrupting properties, effective experimental methods for avian species are still under debate. We have developed an in ovo exposure assay using Japanese quail eggs, aimed at assessing disrupting effects on avian reproductive development and function. Hybrid eggs from Brazilian Brown male and White Egg female quails, which can be genetically sexed by their plumage color after hatching, were prepared, and test materials dissolved in olive oil were injected into the air-chamber on day 10 of incubation. After sexual maturation of hatched chicks, we observed egg production by females and the egg quality and male-typical reproductive behavior, and then examined reproductive system morphology and serum steroid concentrations in both sexes. Treatment with a synthetic estrogen, diethylstilbestrol (DES, 0.5-50 ng/g egg), dose-dependently reduced the eggshell thickness and strength of eggs. A few females treated with 5 ng/g DES per egg produced soft-shelled/ unmarked eggs, and all laying females treated with 50 ng/g egg produced eggs completely lacking shells. DES also induced shortening of the left oviduct and abnormal development of the right oviduct in a dose-dependent manner, while testis weight was reduced symmetrically. In addition, 2,2',4',6'-tetrachlorobiphenyl-4-ol (10-1,000 ng/g egg), which previously showed relatively high estrogenic activity in vitro, caused dose-dependent shortening of the left oviduct and reduction in testis weight. The methods for evaluating endocrine disrupting effects and preparing experimental birds proposed in the present study are expected to facilitate assays for avian reproductive toxicology.

  6. Effect of Sediment Humic Substances on Sorption of Selected Endocrine Disruptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, W. L., E-mail: sunweiling@iee.pku.edu.cn; Ni, J. R.; Liu, T. T. [The Key Laboratory of Water and Sediment Sciences, Ministry of Education, Department of Environmental Engineering, Peking University (China)

    2006-12-15

    Characterizing sorption processes is essential to understand the environmental distribution and toxicity potential of endocrine disruptors in terrestrial and aquatic systems. The sorption behaviors of three endocrine disruptors (bisphenol A (BPA), 17{beta}-estradiol (E2), and 17{alpha}-ethynylestradiol (EE2)) on sediments were investigated using batch techniques. Samples were taken from some representative reaches in several major Chinese rivers. More attention has been paid to the effect of sediment organic components on the sorption of BPA, E2, and EE2. The results show that the sediment organic carbon-normalized partition coefficients (K{sub oc}(sed)) for three endocrine disruptors are in the order of EE2 > E2 > BPA, which corresponds to the octanol-water partitioning coefficients (logK{sub ow}) of the compounds. Moreover, the K{sub oc} values for humic substances (K{sub oc}(hs)) are comparable with the K{sub oc}(sed) values and highly dependent on the physico-chemical properties of humic substances in sediments. The UV absorptivity at 272 nm (A{sub 272}), which suggests the abundance of aromatic rings in humic substance structure, correlates well with the K{sub oc}(hs) values. In addition, the infrared spectra of the humic substances extracted from sediments show four strong bands centered at 3,400 cm{sup -1}, 1,625 cm{sup -1}, 1,390 cm{sup -1}, and 1,025 cm{sup -1}. The K{sub oc}(hs) values have a positive linear relation with the peak area ratio for peak at 1,025 cm{sup -1} and a negative linear relation with the peak area ratio between peaks at 1,625 cm{sup -1} and 1,025 cm{sup -1}. Hence, the hydrogen bonds play a critical role to the sorption of selected endocrine disruptors.

  7. Environmental signaling: from environmental estrogens to endocrine-disrupting chemicals and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLachlan, J A

    2016-07-01

    The landmark report (Herbst et al. 1971) linking prenatal treatment with a synthetic estrogen, diethylstilbestrol (DES), to cancer at puberty in women whose mothers took the drug while pregnant ushered in an era of research on delayed effects of such exposures on functional outcomes in offspring. An animal model developed in our laboratory at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences confirmed that DES was the carcinogen and exposure to DES caused, as well, functional alterations in the reproductive, endocrine, and immune systems of male and female mice treated in utero. DES was also being used in agriculture and we discovered, at the first meeting on Estrogens in the Environment in 1979 (Estrogens in the Environment, 1980), that many environmental contaminants were also estrogenic. Many laboratories sought to discern the basis for estrogenicity in environmental chemicals and to discover other hormonally active xenobiotics. Our laboratory elucidated how DES and other estrogenic compounds worked by altering differentiation through epigenetic gene imprinting, helping explain the transgenerational effects found in mice and humans. At the Wingspread Conference on the Human-Wildlife Connection in 1991 (Advances in Modern Environmental Toxicology, 1992), we learned that environmental disruption of the endocrine system occurred in many species and phyla, and the term endocrine disruption was introduced. Further findings of transgenerational effects of environmental agents that mimicked or blocked various reproductive hormones and the ubiquity of environmental signals, such as bisphenol A increased concern for human and ecological health. Scientists began to look at other endocrine system aspects, such as cardiovascular and immune function, and other nuclear receptors, with important observations regarding obesity and metabolism. Laboratories, such as ours, are now using stem cells to try to understand the mechanisms by which various environmental signals

  8. Environmental Analysis of Endocrine Disrupting Effects from Hydrocarbon Contaminants in the Ecosystem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLachlan, John A.

    2000-06-01

    This annual report summarizes the progress of three years of a three-year grant awarded to the Center for Bioenvironmental Research (CBR) at Tulane and Xavier Universities. The objective of this project is to determine how environmental contaminants, namely hydrocarbons, can act as hormones or anti-hormones in different species present in aquatic ecosystems. The three major areas of research include (1) a biotechnology based screening system to identify potential hormone mimics and antagonists; (2) an animal screening system to identify biomarkers of endocrine effects; and (3) a literature review to identify compounds at various DOE sites that are potential endocrine disruptors. Species of particular focus in this study are those which can serve as sentinel species (e.g., amphibians) and, thus, provide early warning signals for more widespread impacts on an ecosystem and its wildlife and human inhabitants. The focus of the literature research was to provide an analysis of the contaminants located on or around various Department of Energy (DOE) sites that are or have the potential to function as endocrine disruptors and to correlate the need for studying endocrine disruptors to DOE's programmatic needs. Previous research within the Center for Bioenvironmental Research at Tulane and Xavier Universities has focused on understanding the effects of environmental agents on the human and wildlife health and disease. In particular this research has focused on how exogenous agents can function to mimic or disrupt normal endocrine signaling, i.e. estrogen, thyroid within various systems from whole animal studies with fish, amphibians and insects to human cancer cell lines. Significant work has focused on the estrogenic and anti-estrogenic action of both synthetic organochlorine chemicals and naturally produced phytochemicals. Recent projects have extended these research objectives to examination of these environmental agents on the symbiotic relationship between

  9. Bridging the gap between academic research and regulatory health risk assessment of Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beronius, Anna; Hanberg, Annika; Zilliacus, Johanna; Rudén, Christina

    2014-12-01

    Regulatory risk assessment is traditionally based primarily on toxicity studies conducted according to standardized and internationally validated test guidelines. However, health risk assessment of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) is argued to rely on the efficient integration of findings from academic research. The aim of this review was to provide an overview of current developments to facilitate the use of academic research in regulatory risk assessment of chemicals and how certain aspects of study design and reporting are particularly important for the risk assessment process. By bridging the gap between academic research and regulatory health risk assessment of EDCs, scientific uncertainty in risk assessment conclusions can be reduced, allowing for better targeted policy decisions for chemical risk reduction. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Solar photocatalytic degradation of resorcinol a model endocrine disrupter in water using zinc oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardeshi, S K; Patil, A B

    2009-04-15

    Photocatalytic degradation (PCD) of resorcinol a potent endocrine disrupting chemical in aqueous medium was investigated by ZnO under sunlight irradiation in a batch photoreactor. The influence of various parameters such as photocatalyst amount, initial concentration of resorcinol and pH was examined for maximum PCD of resorcinol. A considerable influence of pH upon the chemical oxygen demand (COD) disappearance was observed. In general, neutral or basic pH is favorable for COD removal of resorcinol. PCD intermediates were identified using FTIR and GC/MS. Two of the initial oxidation intermediates detected were 1,2,4-trihydroxy-benzene and 1,2,3-trihydroxy-benzene. FTIR studies revealed 1,2,4-trihydroxy-benzene as the major PCD intermediate. A working photodegradation mechanism is also suggested for PCD of resorcinol. This work envisages the great potential that sunlight mediated photocatalysis has in the removal of resorcinol from waste water.

  11. Passive sampling of selected endocrine disrupting compounds using polar organic chemical integrative samplers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arditsoglou, Anastasia; Voutsa, Dimitra

    2008-01-01

    Two types of polar organic chemical integrative samplers (pharmaceutical POCIS and pesticide POCIS) were examined for their sampling efficiency of selected endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs). Laboratory-based calibration of POCISs was conducted by exposing them at high and low concentrations of 14 EDCs (4-alkyl-phenols, their ethoxylate oligomers, bisphenol A, selected estrogens and synthetic steroids) for different time periods. The kinetic studies showed an integrative uptake up to 28 days. The sampling rates for the individual compounds were obtained. The use of POCISs could result in an integrative approach to the quality status of the aquatic systems especially in the case of high variation of water concentrations of EDCs. The sampling efficiency of POCISs under various field conditions was assessed after their deployment in different aquatic environments. - Calibration and field performance of polar organic integrative samplers for monitoring EDCs in aquatic environments

  12. Reproductive Impacts of Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals on Wildlife Species: Implications for Conservation of Endangered Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubbs, Christopher W; McDonough, Caitlin E

    2018-02-15

    Wildlife have proven valuable to our understanding of the potential effects of endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) on human health by contributing considerably to our understanding of the mechanisms and consequences of EDC exposure. But the threats EDCs present to populations of wildlife species themselves are significant, particularly for endangered species whose existence is vulnerable to any reproductive perturbation. However, few studies address the threats EDCs pose to endangered species owing to challenges associated with their study. Here, we highlight those barriers and review the available literature concerning EDC effects on endangered species. Drawing from other investigations into nonthreatened wildlife species, we highlight opportunities for new approaches to advance our understanding and potentially mitigate the effects of EDCs on endangered species to enhance their fertility.

  13. Early Life Exposure to Ractopamine Causes Endocrine-Disrupting Effects in Japanese Medaka (Oryzias latipes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Liwei; Wang, Sisi; Lin, Xia; Tan, Hana; Fu, Zhengwei

    2016-02-01

    β-Agonists, which are used as human pharmaceuticals or feed additives, have been detected in aquatic environments. β-Agonists have also been proposed for use in aquaculture. However, there are limited data available regarding the adverse effects of β-agonists in aquatic organisms. In this study, ractopamine was selected as the representative β-agonist, and medaka embryos were exposed at concentrations ranging from 5 to 625 μg/L for 44 days. In contrast to what has been found in mammals, ractopamine caused no growth response in medaka. However, the transcriptional changes of genes related to the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis, especially in females, suggested that β-agonists may have the potential to disrupt the endocrine system. Moreover, genes involved in anti-oxidative activity or detoxification were affected in a gender-specific manner. These findings, particularly the effects on the endocrine system of fish, will advance our understanding of the ecotoxicity of β-agonists.

  14. Mugilid Fish Are Sentinels of Exposure to Endocrine Disrupting Compounds in Coastal and Estuarine Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maren Ortiz-Zarragoitia

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Effects on fish reproduction can result from a variety of toxicity mechanisms first operating at the molecular level. Notably, the presence in the environment of some compounds termed endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs can cause adverse effects on reproduction by interfering with the endocrine system. In some cases, exposure to EDCs leads to the animal feminization and male fish may develop oocytes in testis (intersex condition. Mugilid fish are well suited sentinel organisms to study the effects of reproductive EDCs in the monitoring of estuarine/marine environments. Up-regulation of aromatases and vitellogenins in males and juveniles and the presence of intersex individuals have been described in a wide array of mullet species worldwide. There is a need to develop new molecular markers to identify early feminization responses and intersex condition in fish populations, studying mechanisms that regulate gonad differentiation under exposure to xenoestrogens. Interestingly, an electrophoresis of gonad RNA, shows a strong expression of 5S rRNA in oocytes, indicating the potential of 5S rRNA and its regulating proteins to become useful molecular makers of oocyte presence in testis. Therefore, the use of these oocyte markers to sex and identify intersex mullets could constitute powerful molecular biomarkers to assess xenoestrogenicity in field conditions.

  15. In vitro screening of the endocrine disrupting potency of brominated flame retardants and their metabolites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamers, T.; Kamstra, J.H. [Inst. for Environmental Studies (IVM), Amsterdam (Netherlands); Sonneveld, E. [BioDetection Systems (BDS), Amsterdam (Netherlands); Murk, A.J. [Wageningen Univ., Toxicology Group, Wageningen (Netherlands); Zegers, B.N.; Boon, J.P. [Royal Netherlands Inst. for Sea Research (NIOZ), Den Burg (Netherlands); Brouwer, A. [Umea Univ., Umea (Sweden)

    2004-09-15

    Substantial evidence is recently becoming available that brominated flame retardants (BFRs) are potential endocrine disruptors. The toxicological profile of BFRs, however, is too incomplete and insufficient to perform human and ecological risk assessment. To fill these gaps, the EU funded research program FIRE was started in December 2002. This program aims at the identification and toxicological characterization of the most potent and environmentally relevant BFRs and their possible risk for human and wildlife health. As part of a hazard identification approach, twenty seven BFRs have been selected within the framework of FIRE for pre-screening their endocrinedisrupting potencies. Selection of test compounds was based on a maximal variation in physicochemical characteristics of BFRs within the test set, allowing the establishment of quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs). In addition, environmental relevance (e.g. high production volumes and persistence) and availability for testing were used as selection criteria. BFRs were tested in seven different in vitro bioassays for their potency to interfere via estrogenic, thyroidal, androgenic, progestagenic, and Ah-receptor mediated pathways. Metabolisation rates of BFRs were determined using phenobarbital-induced rat liver microsomes. Finally, the endocrine disrupting potency of the metabolites was determined in the same in vitro bio-assays and compared to the potency of the parent compounds.

  16. Towards an integrated biosensor array for simultaneous and rapid multi-analysis of endocrine disrupting chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scognamiglio, Viviana, E-mail: viviana.scognamiglio@mlib.ic.cnr.it [IC-CNR Istituto di Cristallografia, AdR1 Dipartimento Agroalimentare - Via Salaria Km 29.3 00015, Rome (Italy); Pezzotti, Italo; Pezzotti, Gianni; Cano, Juan; Manfredonia, Ivano [Biosensor S.r.l. - Via degli Olmetti 44 00060 Formello, Rome (Italy); Buonasera, Katia [IC-CNR Istituto di Cristallografia, AdR1 Dipartimento Agroalimentare - Via Salaria Km 29.3 00015, Rome (Italy); Arduini, Fabiana; Moscone, Danila; Palleschi, Giuseppe [Universita di Roma Tor Vergata, Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Chimiche - Via della Ricerca Scientifica 00133, Rome (Italy); Giardi, Maria Teresa [IC-CNR Istituto di Cristallografia, AdR1 Dipartimento Agroalimentare - Via Salaria Km 29.3 00015, Rome (Italy)

    2012-11-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A multitask biosensor for the detection of endocrine disrupting chemicals is proposed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The sensing system employ an array of biological recognition elements. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Amperometric and optical transduction methods are provided in an integrated biosensor together with flow control systems. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The biosensing device results in an integrated, automatic and portable system for environmental and agrifood application. - Abstract: In this paper we propose the construction and application of a portable multi-purpose biosensor array for the simultaneous detection of a wide range of endocrine disruptor chemicals (EDCs), based on the recognition operated by various enzymes and microorganisms. The developed biosensor combines both electrochemical and optical transduction systems, in order to increase the number of chemical species which can be monitored. Considering to the maximum residue level (MRL) of contaminants established by the European Commission, the biosensor system was able to detect most of the chemicals analysed with very high sensitivity. In particular, atrazine and diuron were detected with a limit of detection of 0.5 nM, with an RSD% less than 5%; paraoxon and chlorpyrifos were revealed with a detection of 5 {mu}M and 4.5 {mu}M, respectively, with an RSD% less than 6%; catechol and bisphenol A were identified with a limit of detection of 1 {mu}M and 35 {mu}M respectively, with an RSD% less than 5%.

  17. Towards an integrated biosensor array for simultaneous and rapid multi-analysis of endocrine disrupting chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scognamiglio, Viviana; Pezzotti, Italo; Pezzotti, Gianni; Cano, Juan; Manfredonia, Ivano; Buonasera, Katia; Arduini, Fabiana; Moscone, Danila; Palleschi, Giuseppe; Giardi, Maria Teresa

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A multitask biosensor for the detection of endocrine disrupting chemicals is proposed. ► The sensing system employ an array of biological recognition elements. ► Amperometric and optical transduction methods are provided in an integrated biosensor together with flow control systems. ► The biosensing device results in an integrated, automatic and portable system for environmental and agrifood application. - Abstract: In this paper we propose the construction and application of a portable multi-purpose biosensor array for the simultaneous detection of a wide range of endocrine disruptor chemicals (EDCs), based on the recognition operated by various enzymes and microorganisms. The developed biosensor combines both electrochemical and optical transduction systems, in order to increase the number of chemical species which can be monitored. Considering to the maximum residue level (MRL) of contaminants established by the European Commission, the biosensor system was able to detect most of the chemicals analysed with very high sensitivity. In particular, atrazine and diuron were detected with a limit of detection of 0.5 nM, with an RSD% less than 5%; paraoxon and chlorpyrifos were revealed with a detection of 5 μM and 4.5 μM, respectively, with an RSD% less than 6%; catechol and bisphenol A were identified with a limit of detection of 1 μM and 35 μM respectively, with an RSD% less than 5%.

  18. QSAR modeling and prediction of the endocrine-disrupting potencies of brominated flame retardants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papa, Ester; Kovarich, Simona; Gramatica, Paola

    2010-05-17

    In the European Union REACH regulation, the chemicals with particularly harmful behaviors, such as endocrine disruptors (EDs), are subject to authorization, and the identification of safer alternatives to these chemicals is required. In this context, the use of quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR) becomes particularly useful to fill the data gap due to the very small number of experimental data available to characterize the environmental and toxicological profiles of new and emerging pollutants with ED behavior such as brominated flame retardants (BFRs). In this study, different QSAR models were developed on different responses of endocrine disruption measured for several BFRs. The multiple linear regression approach was applied to a variety of theoretical molecular descriptors, and the best models, which were identified from all of the possible combinations of the structural variables, were internally validated for their performance using the leave-one-out (Q(LOO)(2) = 73-91%) procedure and scrambling of the responses. External validation was provided, when possible, by splitting the data sets in training and test sets (range of Q(EXT)(2) = 76-90%), which confirmed the predictive ability of the proposed equations. These models, which were developed according to the principles defined by the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development to improve the regulatory acceptance of QSARs, represent a simple tool for the screening and characterization of BFRs.

  19. Endocrine Disruptors (Chapter 14) in Mammalian Toxicology Book

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are exogenous substances that alter endocrine system function(s) and consequently cause adverse health effects in intact organisms or its progeny. The endocrine system is important for a wide range of biological processes, from normal cell si...

  20. Endocrine disrupting effects of ochratoxin A at the level of nuclear receptor activation and steroidogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frizzell, C; Verhaegen, S; Ropstad, E; Elliott, C T; Connolly, L

    2013-03-13

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a mycotoxin and extrolite of fungi which has been reported in a range of foods. This study uses mammalian reporter gene assays (RGAs) with natural steroid receptors and the H295R steroidogenesis assay to assess the endocrine disrupting activity of OTA. At the receptor level, OTA (within a concentration range of 0.25-2500 ng/ml) did not induce an agonistic response in an oestrogen, androgen, progestagen or glucocorticoid RGA. An antagonistic effect was observed in all of the RGAs at the highest concentration tested (2500 ng/ml). However, while there was no significant cytotoxic effect observed in the MTT (thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide) cell viability assay at this concentration, there was a corresponding change in cell morphology which may be related to the resulting antagonistic effect. At the hormone production level, H295R cells were used as a steroidogenesis model and exposed to OTA (within a concentration range of 0.1-1000 ng/ml). Treatment of the cells with 1000 ng/ml OTA increased the production of estradiol (117±14 ng/ml) over 3 times that of the solvent control (36±9 pg/ml). Western blotting confirmed an increase in aromatase protein. Overall the results indicate that OTA does not appear to interact with steroid receptors but has the potential to cause endocrine disruption by interfering with steroidogenesis. This is the first study identifying the effect OTA may have on production of the steroid hormone estradiol. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Pentachlorophenol-Induced Cytotoxic, Mitogenic, and Endocrine-Disrupting Activities in Channel Catfish, Ictalurus punctatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul B. Tchounwou

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Pentachlorophenol (PCP is an organochlorine compound that has been widely used as a biocide in several industrial, agricultural, and domestic applications. Although it has been shown to induce systemic toxicity and carcinogenesis in several experimental studies, the literature is scarce regarding its toxic mechanisms of action at the cellular and molecular levels. Recent investigations in our laboratory have shown that PCP induces cytotoxicity and transcriptionally activates stress genes in human liver carcinoma (HepG2 cells [1]. In this research, we hypothesize that environmental exposure to PCP may trigger cytotoxic, mitogenic, and endocrine-disrupting activities in aquatic organisms including fish. To test this hypothesis, we carried out in vitro cultures of male channel catfish hepatocytes, and performed the fluorescein diacetate assay (FDA to assess for cell viability, and the Western Blot analysis to assess for vitellogenin expression following exposure to PCP. Data obtained from FDA experiments indicated a strong dose-response relationship with respect to PCP cytotoxicity. Upon 48 hrs of exposure, the chemical dose required to cause 50% reduction in cell viability (LD50 was computed to be 1,987.0 + 9.6 μg PCP/mL. The NOAEL and LOAEL were 62.5 + 10.3 μg PCP/mL and 125.0+15.2 μg PCP/mL, respectively. At lower levels of exposure, PCP was found to be mitogenic, showing a strong dose- and time-dependent response with regard to cell proliferation. Western Blot analysis demonstrated the potential of PCP to cause endocrine-disrupting activity, as evidenced by the up regulation of the 125-kDa vitellogenin protein the hepatocytes of male channel catfish.

  2. Endocrine disrupting chemicals affect the adipogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells in distinct ontogenetic windows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biemann, Ronald; Navarrete Santos, Anne; Navarrete Santos, Alexander; Riemann, Dagmar; Knelangen, Julia; Blüher, Matthias; Koch, Holger; Fischer, Bernd

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Endocrine disrupting chemicals affect adipogenesis in mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). ► The adipogenic impact depends strongly on the window of exposure. ► Bisphenol A reduces the potential of MSC to differentiate into adipocytes. ► DEHP and TBT trigger the adipogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells. ► BPA, DEHP and TBT did not affect adipogenesis in embryonic stem cells. -- Abstract: Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDC) like bisphenol A (BPA), bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) and tributyltin (TBT) are ubiquitously present in the environment and in human tissues. They bind to nuclear hormone receptors and affect cellular and developmental processes. In this study, we show that BPA, DEHP and TBT affect the adipogenic differentiation of murine mesenchymal stem cells (MSC, C3H/10T1/2) in a concentration-, stage- and compound-specific manner. C3H/10T1/2 cells and embryonic stem cells (CGR8) were exposed to BPA, DEHP or TBT at different stages of cell determination and differentiation (undifferentiated growth, adipogenic induction and terminal adipogenic differentiation). The final amount of differentiated adipocytes, cellular triglyceride content and mRNA expression of adipogenic marker genes (adiponectin, FABP4, PPARγ2, LPL) were quantified and compared with corresponding unexposed cells. BPA (10 μM) decreased subsequent adipogenic differentiation of MSC, when cells were exposed during undifferentiated growth. In contrast, DEHP (100 μM) during the hormonal induction period, and TBT (100 nM) in all investigated stages, enhanced adipogenesis. Importantly, exposure of undifferentiated murine embryonic stem cells did not show any effect of the investigated EDC on subsequent adipogenic differentiation.

  3. Endocrine disrupting chemicals affect the adipogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells in distinct ontogenetic windows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biemann, Ronald, E-mail: ronald.biemann@medizin.uni-halle.de [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Martin Luther University, Faculty of Medicine, Halle (Germany); Navarrete Santos, Anne [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Martin Luther University, Faculty of Medicine, Halle (Germany); Navarrete Santos, Alexander [Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Martin Luther University, Faculty of Medicine, Halle (Germany); Riemann, Dagmar [Department of Immunology, Martin Luther University, Faculty of Medicine, Halle (Germany); Knelangen, Julia [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Martin Luther University, Faculty of Medicine, Halle (Germany); Blueher, Matthias [Department of Medicine, University of Leipzig, Leipzig (Germany); Koch, Holger [Institute for Prevention and Occupational Medicine of the German Social Accident Insurance, Institute of the Ruhr-University Bochum (IPA), Ruhr-University Bochum, Bochum (Germany); Fischer, Bernd [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Martin Luther University, Faculty of Medicine, Halle (Germany)

    2012-01-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Endocrine disrupting chemicals affect adipogenesis in mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The adipogenic impact depends strongly on the window of exposure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bisphenol A reduces the potential of MSC to differentiate into adipocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DEHP and TBT trigger the adipogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BPA, DEHP and TBT did not affect adipogenesis in embryonic stem cells. -- Abstract: Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDC) like bisphenol A (BPA), bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) and tributyltin (TBT) are ubiquitously present in the environment and in human tissues. They bind to nuclear hormone receptors and affect cellular and developmental processes. In this study, we show that BPA, DEHP and TBT affect the adipogenic differentiation of murine mesenchymal stem cells (MSC, C3H/10T1/2) in a concentration-, stage- and compound-specific manner. C3H/10T1/2 cells and embryonic stem cells (CGR8) were exposed to BPA, DEHP or TBT at different stages of cell determination and differentiation (undifferentiated growth, adipogenic induction and terminal adipogenic differentiation). The final amount of differentiated adipocytes, cellular triglyceride content and mRNA expression of adipogenic marker genes (adiponectin, FABP4, PPAR{gamma}2, LPL) were quantified and compared with corresponding unexposed cells. BPA (10 {mu}M) decreased subsequent adipogenic differentiation of MSC, when cells were exposed during undifferentiated growth. In contrast, DEHP (100 {mu}M) during the hormonal induction period, and TBT (100 nM) in all investigated stages, enhanced adipogenesis. Importantly, exposure of undifferentiated murine embryonic stem cells did not show any effect of the investigated EDC on subsequent adipogenic differentiation.

  4. Endocrine disruption mechanism of o,p'-DDT in mature male tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leanos-Castaneda, Olga; Kraak, Glen van der; Rodriguez-Canul, Rossanna; Gold, G.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate, in vivo, the potential of o,p'-DDT to disrupt the endocrine system of mature male tilapia. In particular, the possibility that o,p'-DDT effects were mediated directly via the estrogen receptor (ER). Compounds with known ability to bind to the ER were employed: estradiol to induce and tamoxifen to inhibit the estrogenic effects result of the activation of the ER. In addition, an aromatase inhibitor, 4-hydrxyandrostenedione (4-OHA), was used to assess the ability of o,p'-DDT to induce estrogenic effects in a surrounding of low estradiol concentration. The effects of estradiol and o,p'-DDT were studied alone or in the presence of tamoxifen or 4-OHA at the end of a 12-day period of exposure. The main endpoints measured were plasma alkaline-labile phosphorous (ALP; an indirect indicator of vitellogenin), estradiol, testosterone and o,p'-DDT. It was found that o,p'-DDT was able to induce the vitellogenesis (measured as plasma ALP increase) and decrease the circulating levels of estradiol and testosterone. Interestingly, o,p'-DDT kept this ability in whole fish with low concentrations of estradiol which would exclude endogenous estradiol as indirect mediator of the estrogenic effects induced by o,p'-DDT. In addition, the plasma concentration of o,p'-DDT, instead of that of estradiol, was closely related to the plasma ALP increase induced by o,p'-DDT. This indicates that o,p'-DDT could have directly activated the vitellogenesis. The antiestrogenic action of tamoxifen to inhibit the vitellogenesis and the decrease on plasma estradiol induced by o,p'-DDT indicates that o,p'-DDT can bind directly to the ER. In conclusion, this in vivo study shows that o,p'-DDT has the potential to disrupt the endocrine system and strongly supports that the estrogenic actions of o,p'-DDT involve binding to the ER

  5. Comparative responses to endocrine disrupting compounds in early life stages of Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Tara A.; Iwanowicz, Luke R.; McCormick, Stephen D.

    2014-01-01

    Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) are endangered anadromous fish that may be exposed to feminizing endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) during early development, potentially altering physiological capacities, survival and fitness. To assess differential life stage sensitivity to common EDCs, we carried out short-term (four day) exposures using three doses each of 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2), 17β-estradiol (E2), and nonylphenol (NP) on four early life stages; embryos, yolk-sac larvae, feeding fry and one year old smolts. Differential response was compared using vitellogenin (Vtg, a precursor egg protein) gene transcription. Smolts were also examined for impacts on plasma Vtg, cortisol, thyroid hormones (T4/T3) and hepatosomatic index (HSI). Compound-related mortality was not observed in any life stage, but Vtg mRNA was elevated in a dose-dependent manner in yolk-sac larvae, fry and smolts but not in embyos. The estrogens EE2 and E2 were consistently stronger inducers of Vtg than NP. Embryos responded significantly to the highest concentration of EE2 only, while older life stages responded to the highest doses of all three compounds, as well as intermediate doses of EE2 and E2. Maximal transcription was greater for fry among the three earliest life stages, suggesting fry may be the most responsive life stage in early development. Smolt plasma Vtg was also significantly increased, and this response was observed at lower doses of each compound than was detected by gene transcription suggesting this is a more sensitive indicator at this life stage. HSI was increased at the highest doses of EE2 and E2 and plasma T3 decreased at the highest dose of EE2. Our results indicate that all life stages after hatching are potentially sensitive to endocrine disruption by estrogenic compounds and that physiological responses were altered over a short window of exposure, indicating the potential for these compounds to impact fish in the wild.

  6. The impact of endocrine disruptors on endocrine targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamanti-Kandarakis, E; Palioura, E; Kandarakis, S A; Koutsilieris, M

    2010-07-01

    Endocrine disruption represents one of the most controversial environmental issues of our époque. So far, many substances, both natural and artificial, have been recognized to interfere with endocrine signaling pathways. In intact laboratory animals, this interaction has been documented to generate adverse health outcomes by impairing normal functions. With regard to humans, evidence is limited and inconsistent to clearly establish a causal inference, however, accumulating data incriminate endocrine disrupting chemicals to reproductive disorders and disturbed thyroid homeostasis. Recently, as a result of animal models and preliminary human studies, a new area of interest has arisen concerning the implication of endocrine disruptors in the etiology of obesity and diabetes, the two major, life-threatening, epidemics of modern world. This article reviews the evidence linking endocrine disrupting chemicals to a broad spectrum of clinical perturbations from reproduction and thyroid to metabolic regulation. (c) Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart . New York.

  7. Occurrence of pharmaceuticals and endocrine disrupting compounds in macroalgaes, bivalves, and fish from coastal areas in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Álvarez-Muñoz, D.; Rodríguez-Mozaz, S.; Maulvault, A.L.; Tediosi, A.; Fernández-Tejedor, M.; Heuvel, Van den F.; Kotterman, M.; Marques, A.; Barceló, D.

    2015-01-01

    The ocurrence and levels of PhACs, Endocrine Disrupting and related Compounds (EDCs) in seafood from potential contaminated areas in Europe has been studied. Macroalgae (S. accharina latissima and Laminaria digitata), bivalves (Mytilus galloprovincialis, Mytilus spp., Chamalea gallina and

  8. A computational approach predicting CYP450 metabolism and estrogenic activity of an endocrine disrupting compound (PCB-30).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Jason B; Eldridge, Melanie L; Sayler, Gary; Menn, Fu-Min; Layton, Alice C; Baudry, Jerome

    2014-07-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals influence growth and development through interactions with the hormone system, often through binding to hormone receptors such as the estrogen receptor. Computational methods can predict endocrine disrupting chemical activity of unmodified compounds, but approaches predicting activity following metabolism are lacking. The present study uses a well-known environmental contaminant, PCB-30 (2,4,6-trichlorobiphenyl), as a prototype endocrine disrupting chemical and integrates predictive (computational) and experimental methods to determine its metabolic transformation by cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) and cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) into estrogenic byproducts. Computational predictions suggest that hydroxylation of PCB-30 occurs at the 3- or 4-phenol positions and leads to metabolites that bind more strongly than the parent molecule to the human estrogen receptor alpha (hER-α). Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry experiments confirmed that the primary metabolite for CYP3A4 and CYP2D6 is 4-hydroxy-PCB-30, and the secondary metabolite is 3-hydroxy-PCB-30. Cell-based bioassays (bioluminescent yeast expressing hER-α) confirmed that hydroxylated metabolites are more estrogenic than PCB-30. These experimental results support the applied model's ability to predict the metabolic and estrogenic fate of PCB-30, which could be used to identify other endocrine disrupting chemicals involved in similar pathways. © 2014 SETAC.

  9. Adverse effects on sexual development in rat offspring after low dose exposure to a mixture of endocrine disrupting pesticides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hass, Ulla; Boberg, Julie; Christiansen, Sofie

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigated whether a mixture of low doses of five environmentally relevant endocrine disrupting pesticides, epoxiconazole, mancozeb, prochloraz, tebuconazole and procymidone, would cause adverse developmental toxicity effects in rats. In rat dams, a significant increase...... and cumulative intake, because of the potentially serious impact of mixed exposure on development and reproduction in humans....

  10. 78 FR 57859 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Endocrine Disruption Potential of Drugs: Nonclinical Evaluation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-20

    ... the endocrine system. This draft guidance also discusses factors to consider in determining the need... interfere with some aspect of the endocrine system of an organism or its progeny. Any component of the endocrine system can be a target of endocrine disruptors, although the systems most commonly affected...

  11. Endocrine disruption by environmental gestagens in amphibians - A short review supported by new in vitro data using gonads of Xenopus laevis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziková, Andrea; Lorenz, Claudia; Hoffmann, Frauke; Kleiner, Wibke; Lutz, Ilka; Stöck, Matthias; Kloas, Werner

    2017-08-01

    Endocrine disruption caused by various anthropogenic compounds is of persisting concern, especially for aquatic wildlife, because surface waters are the main sink of these so-called endocrine disruptors (ED). In the past, research focused on (anti)estrogenic, (anti)androgenic, and (anti)thyroidal substances, affecting primarily reproduction and development in vertebrates; however, other endocrine systems might be also targeted by ED. Environmental gestagens, including natural progestogens (e.g. progesterone (P4)) and synthetic progestins used for contraception, are supposed to affect vertebrate reproduction via progesterone receptors. In the present paper, we review the current knowledge about gestagenic effects in amphibians, focussing on reproduction and the thyroid system. In addition, we support the literature data with results of recent in vitro experiments, demonstrating direct impacts of the gestagens levonorgestrel (LNG) and P4 on sexually differentiated gonads of larval Xenopus laevis. The results showed a higher susceptibility of female over male gonads to gestagenic ED. Only in female gonads LNG, but not P4, had direct inhibitory effects on gene expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein and P 450 side chain cleavage enzyme, whereas aromatase expression decreased in reaction to both gestagens. Surprisingly, beyond the expected ED effects of gestagens on reproductive physiology in amphibians, LNG drastically disrupted the thyroid system, which resembles direct effects on thyroid glands and pituitary along the pituitary-thyroid axis disturbing metamorphic development. In amphibians, environmental gestagens not only affect the reproductive system but at least LNG can impact also development by disruption of the thyroid system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Endocrine disruption via estrogen receptors that participate in nongenomic signaling pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Cheryl S.; Jeng, Yow-Juin; Guptarak, Jutatip

    2011-01-01

    When inappropriate (non-physiologic) estrogens affect organisms at critical times of estrogen sensitivity, disruption of normal endocrine functions can result. Non-physiologic estrogen mimetics (environmental, dietary, pharmaceutical) can signal rapidly and potently via the membrane versions of estrogen receptors, as can physiologic estrogens. Both physiologic and non-physiologic estrogens activate multiple signaling pathways, leading to altered cellular functions (eg. peptide release, cell proliferation or death, transport). Xenoestrogens’ mimicry of physiologic estrogens is imperfect. When superimposed, xenoestrogens can alter endogenous estrogens’ signaling and thereby disrupt normal signaling pathways, leading to malfunctions in many tissue types. Though these xenoestrogen actions occur rapidly via nongenomic signaling pathways, they can be sustained with continuing ligand stimulation, combinations of ligands, and signaling that perpetuates downstream, eventually also impinging on genomic regulation by controlling the activation state of transcription factors. Because via these pathways estrogens and xenoestrogens cause nonmonotonic stimulation patterns, they must be carefully tested for activity and toxicity over wide dose ranges. Nongenomic actions of xenoestrogens in combination with each other, and with physiologic estrogens, are still largely unexplored from these mechanistic perspectives. PMID:21300151

  13. Integration of in silico methods and computational systems biology to explore endocrine-disrupting chemical binding with nuclear hormone receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, P; Sack, A; Wampole, M; Bobst, S; Vracko, M

    2017-07-01

    Thousands of potential endocrine-disrupting chemicals present difficult regulatory challenges. Endocrine-disrupting chemicals can interfere with several nuclear hormone receptors associated with a variety of adverse health effects. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) has released its reviews of Tier 1 screening assay results for a set of pesticides in the Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program (EDSP), and recently, the Collaborative Estrogen Receptor Activity Prediction Project (CERAPP) data. In this study, the predictive ability of QSAR and docking approaches is evaluated using these data sets. This study also presents a computational systems biology approach using carbaryl (1-naphthyl methylcarbamate) as a case study. For estrogen receptor and androgen receptor binding predictions, two commercial and two open source QSAR tools were used, as was the publicly available docking tool Endocrine Disruptome. For estrogen receptor binding predictions, the ADMET Predictor, VEGA, and OCHEM models (specificity: 0.88, 0.88, and 0.86, and accuracy: 0.81, 0.84, and 0.88, respectively) were each more reliable than the MetaDrug™ model (specificity 0.81 and accuracy 0.77). For androgen receptor binding predictions, the Endocrine Disruptome and ADMET Predictor models (specificity: 0.94 and 0.8, and accuracy: 0.78 and 0.71, respectively) were more reliable than the MetaDrug™ model (specificity 0.33 and accuracy 0.4). A consensus approach is proposed that reaches general agreement among the models (specificity 0.94 and accuracy 0.89). This study integrates QSAR, docking, and systems biology approaches as a virtual screening tool for use in risk assessment. As such, this systems biology pathways and network analysis approach provides a means to more critically assess the potential effects of endocrine-disrupting chemicals. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Generation and characterization of gsuα:EGFP transgenic zebrafish for evaluating endocrine-disrupting effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Xiaoxia; Chen, Xiaowen; Jin, Xia; He, Jiangyan; Yin, Zhan

    2014-01-01

    The glycoprotein subunit α (gsuα) gene encodes the shared α subunit of the three pituitary heterodimeric glycoprotein hormones: follicle-stimulating hormone β (Fshβ), luteinizing hormone β (Lhβ) and thyroid stimulating hormone β (Tshβ). In our current study, we identified and characterized the promoter region of zebrafish gsuα and generated a stable gsuα:EGFP transgenic line, which recapitulated the endogenous gsuα expression in the early developing pituitary gland. A relatively conserved regulatory element set is presented in the promoter regions of zebrafish and three other known mammalian gsuα promoters. Our results also demonstrated that the expression patterns of the gsuα:EGFP transgene were all identical to those expression patterns of the endogenous gsuα expression in the pituitary tissue when our transgenic fish were treated with various endocrine chemicals, including forskolin (FSK), SP600125, trichostatin A (TSA), KClO 4 , dexamethasone (Dex), β-estradiol and progesterone. Thus, this gsuα:EGFP transgenic fish reporter line provides another valuable tool for investigating the lineage development of gsuα-expressing gonadotrophins and the coordinated regulation of various glycoprotein hormone subunit genes. These reporter fish can serve as a novel platform to perform screenings of endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in vivo as well. - Highlights: • Identification of the promoter of zebrafish glycoprotein subunit α (gsuα) gene • Generation of stable transmission gsuα:EGFP transgenic zebrafish reporter • Demonstration of the recapitulation of the gsuα:EGFP and endogenous gsuα expression • Suggestion of the gsuα:EGFP transgenic zebrafish as a novel platform for EDC study

  15. Generation and characterization of gsuα:EGFP transgenic zebrafish for evaluating endocrine-disrupting effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Xiaoxia [Key Laboratory of Aquatic Biodiversity and Conservation of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of Hydrobiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, Hubei (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Chen, Xiaowen; Jin, Xia; He, Jiangyan [Key Laboratory of Aquatic Biodiversity and Conservation of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of Hydrobiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, Hubei (China); Yin, Zhan, E-mail: zyin@ihb.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Aquatic Biodiversity and Conservation of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of Hydrobiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, Hubei (China); Ningbo Laboratory, State Key Laboratory of Freshwater Ecology and Biotechnology (China)

    2014-07-01

    The glycoprotein subunit α (gsuα) gene encodes the shared α subunit of the three pituitary heterodimeric glycoprotein hormones: follicle-stimulating hormone β (Fshβ), luteinizing hormone β (Lhβ) and thyroid stimulating hormone β (Tshβ). In our current study, we identified and characterized the promoter region of zebrafish gsuα and generated a stable gsuα:EGFP transgenic line, which recapitulated the endogenous gsuα expression in the early developing pituitary gland. A relatively conserved regulatory element set is presented in the promoter regions of zebrafish and three other known mammalian gsuα promoters. Our results also demonstrated that the expression patterns of the gsuα:EGFP transgene were all identical to those expression patterns of the endogenous gsuα expression in the pituitary tissue when our transgenic fish were treated with various endocrine chemicals, including forskolin (FSK), SP600125, trichostatin A (TSA), KClO{sub 4}, dexamethasone (Dex), β-estradiol and progesterone. Thus, this gsuα:EGFP transgenic fish reporter line provides another valuable tool for investigating the lineage development of gsuα-expressing gonadotrophins and the coordinated regulation of various glycoprotein hormone subunit genes. These reporter fish can serve as a novel platform to perform screenings of endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in vivo as well. - Highlights: • Identification of the promoter of zebrafish glycoprotein subunit α (gsuα) gene • Generation of stable transmission gsuα:EGFP transgenic zebrafish reporter • Demonstration of the recapitulation of the gsuα:EGFP and endogenous gsuα expression • Suggestion of the gsuα:EGFP transgenic zebrafish as a novel platform for EDC study.

  16. First evidence of endocrine disruption in feral carp from the Ebro River

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavado, Ramon; Thibaut, Remi; Raldua, Demetrio; Martin, Rebeca; Porte, Cinta

    2004-01-01

    Feral carps (Cyprinus carpio) were collected in spring 2001 from five sites along the lower course of Ebro River (Spain) with the aim of investigating the existence of endocrine-disrupting effects. Several findings (low gonadosomatic index (GSI), plasmatic vitellogenin (VTG), depressed levels of testosterone, and histological alterations in gonads) detected in male carps downstream of Zaragoza's sewage treatment plant (STP) strongly suggest that the concentration of sewage effluent in the area is a major causal factor leading to the detected estrogenic effects. Important alterations (viz. delayed maturation in females, indications of arrested spermatogenesis in males) were detected in carps from Flix, a heavily industrialized area. Low ovarian P-450 aromatase and reduced glucuronidation of testosterone and estradiol in males were observed in Zaragoza and Canal Imperial de Aragon--an agricultural area--which suggest decreased estrogen synthesis, and possibly, reduced sex hormone excretion in those organisms. These results were related to some in vitro assays aimed to assess the interference of model compounds (atrazin, vinclozolin, diuron, pp'-DDE, dicofol, triphenyltin, nonylphenol, and fenarimol) with the glucuronidation of testosterone and estradiol by liver microsomal fractions. The fungicide fenarimol (10-20 μM) and nonylphenol (50 μM) were found to significantly inhibit (20%) both activities at relatively low doses. Overall, this work provides the first evidence of the existence of significant alterations of the endocrine system of carps from the medium-low course of the Ebro River and demonstrates the ability of several chemicals to modulate the inactivation of endogenous steroids

  17. Molecular imaging, an innovative methodology for whole-body profiling of endocrine disrupter action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Lorenzo, Diego; Rando, Gianpaolo; Ciana, Paolo; Maggi, Adriana

    2008-12-01

    Endocrine disrupters (EDs) are environment and food contaminants known to alter metabolic functions of mammals by interfering with specific endocrine pathways. Many EDs act on steroid hormone target cells by interacting with intracellular receptors (IRs) like estrogen receptors, androgen receptors, and thyroid hormone receptors; other receptors may be engaged. IRs are ligand-operated transcription factors acting in concert with general or cell-specific coregulators. The newly acquired awareness on the panoply of IR functions has increased the concern on potential, unsought, harmful effects of EDs on human health and has questioned the capability of currently available methodologies to identify and study EDs in the environment and in the food chain. Indeed, current in vivo and in vitro methodologies restrict the analysis to very specific organs or cell systems, with obvious limitations in predicting the systemic metabolic consequences of ED exposure. The emphasis recently laid by Regulatory Authorities, including European Center for the Validation of Alternative Methods, on the generation of in vitro model systems for toxicological analyses discouraged the development of models suitable to envision the whole spectrum of ED body actions required when studying compounds acting through IRs. Molecular imaging now provides the opportunity to quantify ED effects in living organisms enabling, for the first time, to acquire a full comprehension of the systemic effects of acute and prolonged exposure to EDs, solving the issue of the potential harm due to repeated low-dose exposure. The systems here reviewed are of unquestionable toxicological relevance and need to be taken into consideration to improve the methodology currently available and in use.

  18. The role of retinoic acid receptors and their cognate ligands in reproduction in a context of triorganotin based endocrine disrupting chemicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macejova Dana

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Retinoic acid (RA, an active form of vitamin A, regulates the embryonic development, male and female reproduction and induces important effects on the cell development, proliferation, and differentiation. These effects are mediated by the retinoid (RAR and rexinoid nuclear receptors (RXR, which are considered to be a ligand-activated, DNA-binding, trans-acting, and transcription-modulating proteins, involved in a general molecular mechanism responsible for the transcriptional responses in target genes. Organotin compounds are typical environmental contaminants and suspected endocrine disrupting substances. They may affect processes of reproductive system in mammals, predominantly via nuclear receptor signaling pathways. Triorganotins, such as tributyltin chloride (TBTCl and triphenyltin chloride (TPTCl, are capable to bind to RXR molecules, and thus represent potent agonists of RXR subtypes of nuclear receptors not sharing any structural characteristics with endogenous ligands of nuclear receptors. Th is article summarizes selected effects of biologically active retinoids and rexinoids on both male and female reproduction and also deals with the effects of organotin compounds evoking endocrine disrupting actions in reproduction.

  19. Comparative responses to endocrine disrupting compounds in early life stages of Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, T A; Iwanowicz, L R; McCormick, S D

    2014-07-01

    Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) are endangered anadromous fish that may be exposed to feminizing endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) during early development, potentially altering physiological capacities, survival and fitness. To assess differential life stage sensitivity to common EDCs, we carried out short-term (4 day) exposures using three doses each of 17 α-ethinylestradiol (EE2), 17 β-estradiol (E2), and nonylphenol (NP) on four early life stages; embryos, yolk-sac larvae, feeding fry and 1 year old smolts. Differential response was compared using vitellogenin (Vtg, a precursor egg protein) gene transcription. Smolts were also examined for impacts on plasma Vtg, cortisol, thyroid hormones (T4/T3) and hepatosomatic index (HSI). Compound-related mortality was not observed in any life stage, but Vtg mRNA was elevated in a dose-dependent manner in yolk-sac larvae, fry and smolts but not in embryos. The estrogens EE2 and E2 were consistently stronger inducers of Vtg than NP. Embryos responded significantly to the highest concentration of EE2 only, while older life stages responded to the highest doses of all three compounds, as well as intermediate doses of EE2 and E2. Maximal transcription was greater for fry among the three earliest life stages, suggesting fry may be the most responsive life stage in early development. Smolt plasma Vtg was also significantly increased, and this response was observed at lower doses of each compound than was detected by gene transcription suggesting plasma Vtg is a more sensitive indicator at this life stage. HSI was increased at the highest doses of EE2 and E2, and plasma T3 was decreased at the highest dose of EE2. Our results indicate that all life stages are potentially sensitive to endocrine disruption by estrogenic compounds and that physiological responses were altered over a short window of exposure, indicating the potential for these compounds to impact fish in the wild. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  20. Are endocrine disrupting compounds environmental risk factors for autism spectrum disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosa, Amer; Shu, Henry; Sarachana, Tewarit; Hu, Valerie W

    2017-10-23

    Recent research on the etiology of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) has shifted in part from a singular focus on genetic causes to the involvement of environmental factors and their gene interactions. This shift in focus is a result of the rapidly increasing prevalence of ASD coupled with the incomplete penetrance of this disorder in monozygotic twins. One such area of environmentally focused research is the association of exposures to endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) with elevated risk for ASD. EDCs are exogenous chemicals that can alter endogenous hormone activity and homeostasis, thus potentially disrupting the action of sex and other natural hormones at all stages of human development. Inasmuch as sex hormones play a fundamental role in brain development and sexual differentiation, exposure to EDCs in utero during critical stages of development can have lasting neurological and other physiological influences on the developing fetus and, ultimately, the child as well as adult. This review will focus on the possible contributions of EDCs to autism risk and pathogenesis by first discussing the influence of endogenous sex hormones on the autistic phenotype, followed by a review of documented human exposures to EDCs and associations with behaviors relevant to ASD. Mechanistic links between EDC exposures and aberrant neurodevelopment and behaviors are then considered, with emphasis on EDC-induced transcriptional profiles derived from animal and cellular studies. Finally, this review will discuss possible mechanisms through which EDC exposure can lead to persistent changes in gene expression and phenotype, which may in turn contribute to transgenerational inheritance of ASD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Assessment and Molecular Actions of Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals That Interfere with Estrogen Receptor Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerdivel, Gwenneg; Habauzit, Denis; Pakdel, Farzad

    2013-01-01

    In all vertebrate species, estrogens play a crucial role in the development, growth, and function of reproductive and nonreproductive tissues. A large number of natural or synthetic chemicals present in the environment and diet can interfere with estrogen signaling; these chemicals are called endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) or xenoestrogens. Some of these compounds have been shown to induce adverse effects on human and animal health, and some compounds are suspected to contribute to diverse disease development. Because xenoestrogens have varying sources and structures and could act in additive or synergistic effects when combined, they have multiple mechanisms of action. Consequently, an important panel of in vivo and in vitro bioassays and chemical analytical tools was used to screen, evaluate, and characterize the potential impacts of these compounds on humans and animals. In this paper, we discuss different molecular actions of some of the major xenoestrogens found in food or the environment, and we summarize the current models used to evaluate environmental estrogens. PMID:23737774

  2. Assessment and Molecular Actions of Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals That Interfere with Estrogen Receptor Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gwenneg Kerdivel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In all vertebrate species, estrogens play a crucial role in the development, growth, and function of reproductive and nonreproductive tissues. A large number of natural or synthetic chemicals present in the environment and diet can interfere with estrogen signaling; these chemicals are called endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs or xenoestrogens. Some of these compounds have been shown to induce adverse effects on human and animal health, and some compounds are suspected to contribute to diverse disease development. Because xenoestrogens have varying sources and structures and could act in additive or synergistic effects when combined, they have multiple mechanisms of action. Consequently, an important panel of in vivo and in vitro bioassays and chemical analytical tools was used to screen, evaluate, and characterize the potential impacts of these compounds on humans and animals. In this paper, we discuss different molecular actions of some of the major xenoestrogens found in food or the environment, and we summarize the current models used to evaluate environmental estrogens.

  3. Adipogenic Effects of a Combination of the Endocrine-Disrupting Compounds Bisphenol A, Diethylhexylphthalate, and Tributyltin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald Biemann

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The food contaminants bisphenol A (BPA, diethylhexylphthalate (DEHP, and tributyltin (TBT are potent endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDC known to interfere with adipogenesis. EDC usually act in mixtures and not as single compounds. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a simultaneous exposure of BPA, DEHP, and TBT on mesenchymal stem cell differentiation into adipocytes. Methods: Multipotent murine mesenchymal stem cells (C3H10T1/2 were exposed to EDC mixtures in high concentrations, i.e. MIX-high (10 µmol/l BPA, 100 µmol/l DEHP, 100 nmol/l TBT, and in environmentally relevant concentrations, i.e. MIX-low (10 nmol/l BPA, 100 nmol/l DEHP, 1 nmol/l TBT. The exposure was performed either for the entire culture time (0-12 days or at distinct stages of adipogenic differentiation. At day 12 of cell culture, the amount of adipocytes, triglyceride content (TG, and adipogenic marker gene expression were analyzed. Results: MIX-high increased the development of adipocytes and the expression of adipogenic marker genes independently of the exposure window. The total TG amount was not increased. The low-concentrated EDC mixture had no obvious impact on adipogenesis. Conclusion: In EDC mixtures, the adipogenic effect of TBT and DEHP predominates single effects of BPA. Mixture effects of EDC are not deducible from single compound experiments.

  4. Effects of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) on bacterial communities in mangrove sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ke; Xiao, Sirui; Jiang, Xiaotao; Yang, Lihua; Chen, Baowei; Luan, Tiangang; Lin, Li; Tam, Nora Fung Yee

    2017-09-15

    The diversity and composition of bacterial communities in mudflat and mangrove sediments were investigated under the stresses of endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) using high-throughput sequencing technique. Bacterial diversity in the original sediments was highest among all samples, followed by non-sterilized and sterilized sediments after 84-day incubation. Proteobacteria were the predominant phylum in both mangrove and mudflat sediments, which accounted for 40-60% of the total tags, followed by Cyanobacteria, Chloroflexi, Planctomycetes and Acidobacteria. Although the total population of bacteria was not significantly declined due to the addition of EDCs, bacterial community structures were considerably altered. The number of bacterial genera promoted or inhibited by EDCs was 288 and 324, respectively. Bacterial genera affected by EDCs varied greatly with the types of sediments and the initial status of bacterial communities. Overall, our results suggested that bacterial community structure in mangrove sediments were closely related to their re-development and responses to EDC contamination. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Modulation of cytokine expression in human macrophages by endocrine-disrupting chemical Bisphenol-A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yanzhen; Mei, Chenfang [State Key Laboratory of Applied Microbiology Southern China, Guangzhou 510070 (China); Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Microbial Culture Collection and Application, Guangdong Institute of Microbiology, Guangzhou 510070 (China); Liu, Hao [Affiliated Cancer Hospital and Cancer Research Institute, Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou 510095 (China); Wang, Hongsheng [Department of Microbial and Biochemical Pharmacy, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Zeng, Guoqu; Lin, Jianhui [State Key Laboratory of Applied Microbiology Southern China, Guangzhou 510070 (China); Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Microbial Culture Collection and Application, Guangdong Institute of Microbiology, Guangzhou 510070 (China); Xu, Meiying, E-mail: xumy@gdim.cn [State Key Laboratory of Applied Microbiology Southern China, Guangzhou 510070 (China); Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Microbial Culture Collection and Application, Guangdong Institute of Microbiology, Guangzhou 510070 (China)

    2014-09-05

    Highlights: • Effects of BPA on the cytokines expression of human macrophages were investigated. • BPA increased pro-inflammation cytokines TNF-α and IL-6 production. • BPA decreased anti-inflammation IL-10 and TGF-β production. • ERα/β/ERK/NF-κB signaling involved in BPA-mediated cytokines expression. - Abstract: Exposure to environmental endocrine-disrupting chemical Bisphenol-A (BPA) is often associated with dysregulated immune homeostasis, but the mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, the effects of BPA on the cytokines responses of human macrophages were investigated. Treatment with BPA increased pro-inflammation cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) production, but decreased anti-inflammation cytokines interleukin-10 (IL-10) and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) production in THP1 macrophages, as well as in primary human macrophages. BPA effected cytokines expression through estrogen receptor α/β (ERα/β)-dependent mechanism with the evidence of ERα/β antagonist reversed the expression of cytokines. We also identified that activation of extracellular regulated protein kinases (ERK)/nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) signal cascade marked the effects of BPA on cytokines expression. Our results indicated that BPA effected inflammatory responses of macrophages via modulating of cytokines expression, and provided a new insight into the link between exposure to BPA and human health.

  6. Modulation of cytokine expression in human macrophages by endocrine-disrupting chemical Bisphenol-A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yanzhen; Mei, Chenfang; Liu, Hao; Wang, Hongsheng; Zeng, Guoqu; Lin, Jianhui; Xu, Meiying

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Effects of BPA on the cytokines expression of human macrophages were investigated. • BPA increased pro-inflammation cytokines TNF-α and IL-6 production. • BPA decreased anti-inflammation IL-10 and TGF-β production. • ERα/β/ERK/NF-κB signaling involved in BPA-mediated cytokines expression. - Abstract: Exposure to environmental endocrine-disrupting chemical Bisphenol-A (BPA) is often associated with dysregulated immune homeostasis, but the mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, the effects of BPA on the cytokines responses of human macrophages were investigated. Treatment with BPA increased pro-inflammation cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) production, but decreased anti-inflammation cytokines interleukin-10 (IL-10) and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) production in THP1 macrophages, as well as in primary human macrophages. BPA effected cytokines expression through estrogen receptor α/β (ERα/β)-dependent mechanism with the evidence of ERα/β antagonist reversed the expression of cytokines. We also identified that activation of extracellular regulated protein kinases (ERK)/nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) signal cascade marked the effects of BPA on cytokines expression. Our results indicated that BPA effected inflammatory responses of macrophages via modulating of cytokines expression, and provided a new insight into the link between exposure to BPA and human health

  7. Human cost burden of exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals. A critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Gregory G; Dietrich, Daniel R

    2017-08-01

    Recently published papers have alleged that exposures to endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are causing substantial disease burdens in the EU and US and are consequently costing society hundreds of billions of dollars annually. To date, these cost estimates have not undergone adequate scientific scrutiny, but nevertheless are being used aggressively in advocacy campaigns in an attempt to fundamentally change how chemicals are tested, evaluated and regulated. Consequently, we critically evaluated the underlying methodology and assumptions employed by the chief architects of the disease burden cost estimates. Since the vast majority of their assigned disease burden costs are driven by the assumption that "loss of IQ" and "increased prevalence of intellectual disability" are caused by exposures to organophosphate pesticides (OPPs) and brominated flame retardants (PBDEs), we have taken special care in describing and evaluating the underlying toxicology and epidemiology evidence that was relied upon. Unfortunately, our review uncovered substantial flaws in the approach taken and the conclusions that were drawn. Indeed, the authors of these papers assumed causal relationships between putative exposures to EDCs and selected diseases, i.e., "loss of IQ" and "increased prevalence of intellectual disability", despite not having established them via a thorough evaluation of the strengths and weaknesses of the underlying animal toxicology and human epidemiology evidence. Consequently, the assigned disease burden costs are highly speculative and should not be considered in the weight of evidence approach underlying any serious policy discussions serving to protect the public and regulate chemicals considered as EDCs.

  8. Exploitation of Trametes versicolor for bioremediation of endocrine disrupting chemicals in bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezzella, Cinzia; Macellaro, Gemma; Sannia, Giovanni; Raganati, Francesca; Olivieri, Giuseppe; Marzocchella, Antonio; Schlosser, Dietmar; Piscitelli, Alessandra

    2017-01-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are environmental contaminants causing increasing concerns due to their toxicity, persistence and ubiquity. In the present study, degradative capabilities of Trametes versicolor, Pleurotus ostreatus and Phanerochaete chrysosporium to act on five EDCs, which represent different classes of chemicals (phenols, parabens and phthalate) and were first applied as single compounds, were assessed. T. versicolor was selected due to its efficiency against target EDCs and its potentialities were exploited against a mixture of EDCs in a cost-effective bioremediation process. A fed-batch approach as well as a starvation strategy were applied in order to reduce the need for input of 'fresh' biomass, and avoid the requirement for external nutrients. The fungus was successfully operated in two different bioreactors over one week. Semi-batch cultures were carried out by daily adding a mixture of EDCs to the bioreactors in a total of five consecutive degradation cycles. T. versicolor was able to efficiently remove all compounds during each cycle converting up to 21 mg L-1 day-1 of the tested EDCs. The maintained ability of T. versicolor to remove EDCs without any additional nutrients represents the main outcome of this study, which enables to forecast its application in a water treatment process.

  9. Exploitation of Trametes versicolor for bioremediation of endocrine disrupting chemicals in bioreactors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cinzia Pezzella

    Full Text Available Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs are environmental contaminants causing increasing concerns due to their toxicity, persistence and ubiquity. In the present study, degradative capabilities of Trametes versicolor, Pleurotus ostreatus and Phanerochaete chrysosporium to act on five EDCs, which represent different classes of chemicals (phenols, parabens and phthalate and were first applied as single compounds, were assessed. T. versicolor was selected due to its efficiency against target EDCs and its potentialities were exploited against a mixture of EDCs in a cost-effective bioremediation process. A fed-batch approach as well as a starvation strategy were applied in order to reduce the need for input of 'fresh' biomass, and avoid the requirement for external nutrients. The fungus was successfully operated in two different bioreactors over one week. Semi-batch cultures were carried out by daily adding a mixture of EDCs to the bioreactors in a total of five consecutive degradation cycles. T. versicolor was able to efficiently remove all compounds during each cycle converting up to 21 mg L-1 day-1 of the tested EDCs. The maintained ability of T. versicolor to remove EDCs without any additional nutrients represents the main outcome of this study, which enables to forecast its application in a water treatment process.

  10. Mechanistic insight into degradation of endocrine disrupting chemical by hydroxyl radical: An experimental and theoretical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Ruiyang; Gao, Lingwei; Wei, Zongsu; Spinney, Richard; Luo, Shuang; Wang, Donghong; Dionysiou, Dionysios D; Tang, Chong-Jian; Yang, Weichun

    2017-12-01

    Advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) based on formation of free radicals at ambient temperature and pressure are effective for treating endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in waters. In this study, we systematically investigated the degradation kinetics of bisphenol A (BPA), a representative EDC by hydroxyl radical (OH) with a combination of experimental and theoretical approaches. The second-order rate constant (k) of BPA with OH was experimentally determined to be 7.2 ± 0.34 × 10 9  M -1  s -1 at pH 7.55. We also calculated the thermodynamic and kinetic behaviors for the bimolecular reactions by density functional theory (DFT) using the M05-2X method with 6-311++G** basis set and solvation model based on density (SMD). The results revealed that H-abstraction on the phenol group is the most favorable pathway for OH. The theoretical k value corrected by the Collins-Kimball approach was determined to be 1.03 × 10 10  M -1  s -1 , which is in reasonable agreement with the experimental observation. These results are of fundamental and practical importance in understanding the chemical interactions between OH and BPA, and aid further AOPs design in treating EDCs during wastewater treatment processes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Sources of endocrine-disrupting compounds in North Carolina waterways: a geographic information systems approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sackett, Dana K.; Pow, Crystal Lee; Rubino, Matthew J.; Aday, D.D.; Cope, W. Gregory; Kullman, Seth W.; Rice, J.A.; Kwak, Thomas J.; Law, L.M.

    2015-01-01

    The presence of endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs), particularly estrogenic compounds, in the environment has drawn public attention across the globe, yet a clear understanding of the extent and distribution of estrogenic EDCs in surface waters and their relationship to potential sources is lacking. The objective of the present study was to identify and examine the potential input of estrogenic EDC sources in North Carolina water bodies using a geographic information system (GIS) mapping and analysis approach. Existing data from state and federal agencies were used to create point and nonpoint source maps depicting the cumulative contribution of potential sources of estrogenic EDCs to North Carolina surface waters. Water was collected from 33 sites (12 associated with potential point sources, 12 associated with potential nonpoint sources, and 9 reference), to validate the predictive results of the GIS analysis. Estrogenicity (measured as 17β-estradiol equivalence) ranged from 0.06 ng/L to 56.9 ng/L. However, the majority of sites (88%) had water 17β-estradiol concentrations below 1 ng/L. Sites associated with point and nonpoint sources had significantly higher 17β-estradiol levels than reference sites. The results suggested that water 17β-estradiol was reflective of GIS predictions, confirming the relevance of landscape-level influences on water quality and validating the GIS approach to characterize such relationships.

  12. Association between Endocrine Disrupting Phenols in Colostrums and Maternal and Infant Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Yi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bisphenol A (BPA and alkylphenols (APs are well-known endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs which may threat the next generations' health. We performed biomonitoring of these phenols in colostrums to assess risk of the phenols in breast-fed neonates. Study subjects were the lactating mothers who delivered babies within 2 weeks (N=325; 30.67 ± 3.45 years and their neonates (N=326; embryonic period, 39.1 ± 1.5 weeks. BPA, nonylphenol (NP, and octylphenol (OP in colostrums were quantified with LC/MS/MS. Information for environmental exposure sources of the phenols was obtained by questionnaires. As results, median level of BPA in colostrums was 7.8 ng/mL, while most NP or OP was not detected. Regarding health risks of phenols, levels of total NP in colostrums were elevated among sick mothers with toxemia, thyroid disorders, gastritis, and so forth than health mothers (3.51 ± 4.98 versus 2.04 ± 3.71 ng/mL, P=0.02. Dairy products intake and detergents use were positively correlated with total BPA levels (Ps<0.05. In conclusion, we estimate most neonates who are exposed to BPA rather than NP or OP via colostrums and recommend continuous biomonitoring of the phenols to clarify their suspected health risk on neonates and pregnant or gestation mothers.

  13. In vitro endocrine disruption potential of organophosphate flame retardants via human nuclear receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Hiroyuki; Takeuchi, Shinji; Itoh, Toshihiro; Iida, Mitsuru; Kobayashi, Satoshi; Yoshida, Takahiko

    2013-12-06

    Various organophosphate flame retardants (OPFRs) are widely used in building materials, textiles and electric appliances, and have been reported to cause indoor environmental pollution in houses and office buildings. In this study, using cell-based transactivation assays, we characterized the agonistic and/or antagonistic activities of 11 OPFRs against human nuclear receptors; estrogen receptor α (ERα), ERβ, androgen receptor (AR), glucocorticoid receptor (GR), thyroid hormone receptor α1 (TRα1), TRβ1, retinoic acid receptor α (RARα), retinoid X receptor α (RXRα), pregnane X receptor (PXR), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα), and PPARγ. Of the 11 OPFRs tested, triphenyl phosphate (TPhP) and tricrecyl phosphate (TCP) showed ERα and/or ERβ agonistic activity. In addition, tributyl phosphate (TBP), tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TDCPP), TPhP and TCP showed AR antagonistic activity, and TBP, tris(2-ethylhexyl) phosphate (TEHP), TDCPP, TPhP and TCP showed GR antagonistic activity. Furthermore, we found that seven compounds, TBP, tris(2-chloro-1-methylethyl) phosphate (TCPP), TEHP, tris(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate (TBEP), TDCPP, TPhP, and TCP, display PXR agonistic activity. However, none of test compounds showed agonistic or antagonistic activity against TRα/β, or agonistic activity against RARα, RXRα or PPARα/γ. Taken together, these results suggest that several OPFRs may have potential endocrine disrupting effects via ERα, ERβ, AR, GR and PXR. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Sources and levels of endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) in Kuwait's coastal areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Talat; Al-Jandal, Noura; Abusam, Abdalla; Taqi, Hameeda; Al-Khabbaz, Ahmad; Zafar, Jamal

    2017-05-15

    The sources and levels of endocrine disrupting compounds in Kuwait's coastal areas were investigated. Phthalates, alkylphenols and estrogens were measured in the inflows and outflows of three sewage treatment plants as well as in the seawater and sediments from the sewage impacted coastal areas. Phthalate levels in the inflow of the treatment plants ranged from 8.9 to 78.3μg/l; alkylphenols from 0.7 to 279ng/l and estrogens from 30 to 368ng/l. On average, the treatment plants removed about 80% of these compounds. The outflows, however, contained significant levels of all three classes of compounds. The seawater from the sewage impacted area also contained detectable levels of these compounds. Sediment samples from these locations contained elevated levels of phthalates (ranging from 2145 to 15,722μg/kg) and lower levels of alkylphenols (ranging from 2.49 to 15.14μg/kg) and estrogens (ranging from 4.1 to 214μg/kg, dry wt.). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. QSAR classification models for the prediction of endocrine disrupting activity of brominated flame retardants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovarich, Simona; Papa, Ester; Gramatica, Paola

    2011-06-15

    The identification of potential endocrine disrupting (ED) chemicals is an important task for the scientific community due to their diffusion in the environment; the production and use of such compounds will be strictly regulated through the authorization process of the REACH regulation. To overcome the problem of insufficient experimental data, the quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) approach is applied to predict the ED activity of new chemicals. In the present study QSAR classification models are developed, according to the OECD principles, to predict the ED potency for a class of emerging ubiquitary pollutants, viz. brominated flame retardants (BFRs). Different endpoints related to ED activity (i.e. aryl hydrocarbon receptor agonism and antagonism, estrogen receptor agonism and antagonism, androgen and progesterone receptor antagonism, T4-TTR competition, E2SULT inhibition) are modeled using the k-NN classification method. The best models are selected by maximizing the sensitivity and external predictive ability. We propose simple QSARs (based on few descriptors) characterized by internal stability, good predictive power and with a verified applicability domain. These models are simple tools that are applicable to screen BFRs in relation to their ED activity, and also to design safer alternatives, in agreement with the requirements of REACH regulation at the authorization step. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Extranuclear-initiated estrogenic actions of endocrine disrupting chemicals: Is there toxicology beyond paracelsus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadal, Angel; Fuentes, Esther; Ripoll, Cristina; Villar-Pazos, Sabrina; Castellano-Muñoz, Manuel; Soriano, Sergi; Martinez-Pinna, Juan; Quesada, Ivan; Alonso-Magdalena, Paloma

    2018-02-01

    Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs), including bisphenol-A (BPA) do not act as traditional toxic chemicals inducing massive cell damage or death in an unspecific manner. EDCs can work upon binding to hormone receptors, acting as agonists, antagonists or modulators. Bisphenol-A displays estrogenic activity and, for many years it has been classified as a weak estrogen, based on the classic transcriptional action of estrogen receptors serving as transcription factors. However, during the last two decades our knowledge about estrogen signaling has advanced considerably. It is now accepted that estrogen receptors ERα and ERβ activate signaling pathways outside the nucleus which may or may not involve transcription. In addition, a new membrane estrogen receptor, GPER, has been proposed. Pharmacological and molecular evidence, along with results obtained in genetically modified mice, demonstrated that BPA, and its substitute BPS, are potent estrogens acting at nanomolar concentrations via extranuclear ERα, ERβ, and GPER. The different signaling pathways activated by BPA and BPS explain the well-known estrogenic effects of low doses of EDCs as well as non-monotonic dose-response relationships. These signaling pathways may help to explain the actions of EDCs with estrogenic activity in the etiology of different pathologies, including type-2 diabetes and obesity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Endocrine disrupting compounds in drinking water supply system and human health risk implication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wee, Sze Yee; Aris, Ahmad Zaharin

    2017-09-01

    To date, experimental and epidemiological evidence of endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) adversely affecting human and animal populations has been widely debated. Notably, human health risk assessment is required for risk mitigation. The lack of human health risk assessment and management may thus unreliably regulate the quality of water resources and efficiency of treatment processes. Therefore, drinking water supply systems (DWSSs) may be still unwarranted in assuring safe access to potable drinking water. Drinking water supply, such as tap water, is an additional and crucial route of human exposure to the health risks associated with EDCs. A holistic system, incorporating continuous research in DWSS monitoring and management using multi-barrier approach, is proposed as a preventive measure to reduce human exposure to the risks associated with EDCs through drinking water consumption. The occurrence of EDCs in DWSSs and corresponding human health risk implications are analyzed using the Needs, Approaches, Benefits, and Challenges (NABC) method. Therefore, this review may act as a supportive tool in protecting human health and environmental quality from EDCs, which is essential for decision-making regarding environmental monitoring and management purposes. Subsequently, the public could have sustainable access to safer and more reliable drinking water. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Endocrine-disrupting Chemicals: Review of Toxicological Mechanisms Using Molecular Pathway Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Oneyeol; Kim, Hye Lim; Weon, Jong-Il; Seo, Young Rok

    2015-01-01

    Endocrine disruptors are known to cause harmful effects to human through various exposure routes. These chemicals mainly appear to interfere with the endocrine or hormone systems. As importantly, numerous studies have demonstrated that the accumulation of endocrine disruptors can induce fatal disorders including obesity and cancer. Using diverse biological tools, the potential molecular mechanisms related with these diseases by exposure of endocrine disruptors. Recently, pathway analysis, a bioinformatics tool, is being widely used to predict the potential mechanism or biological network of certain chemicals. In this review, we initially summarize the major molecular mechanisms involved in the induction of the above mentioned diseases by endocrine disruptors. Additionally, we provide the potential markers and signaling mechanisms discovered via pathway analysis under exposure to representative endocrine disruptors, bisphenol, diethylhexylphthalate, and nonylphenol. The review emphasizes the importance of pathway analysis using bioinformatics to finding the specific mechanisms of toxic chemicals, including endocrine disruptors. PMID:25853100

  19. Composition, distribution, and characterization of suspected endocrine-disrupting pesticides in Beijing GuanTing Reservoir (GTR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Nandong; Xu, Xiaobai

    2006-05-01

    GuanTing Reservoir (GTR) is one of two main water resources for the agriculture, industry, and living uses of Beijing (China). As a result of extensive pollution over the last few decades (particularly the 1980s), the reservoir has not supplied potable water to Beijing city since 1997. Composition, distribution, and characterization of 31 suspected endocrine-disrupting pesticides in surface water, pore water, and surface sediments from the reservoir are reported in this study. An analytical procedure based on solid-phase extraction (SPE) technology and capillary gas chromatography with electron-capture detection has been developed for the simultaneous determination of the 31 suspected endocrine-disrupting pesticides including the compounds hexachlorocyclohexane, cyclodiene, diphenyl aliphatic, chlordane, and other selected pesticides (hexachlorobenzene, heptachlor, endrin aldehyde, hepachlor epoxide, dicofol, acetochlor, alachlor, metolachlor, chlorpyriphos, nitrofen, trifluralin, cypermethrin, fenvalerate, and deltamethrin). The result shows that the pesticide pollution is moderate in GTR and its tributaries, although pesticide residue values in a few sites are quite high when considering their endocrine-disrupting effects and chronic health effects. Among the analyzed pesticides, p,p'-DDE, o,p'-DDT, beta-HCH, endosulfan sulfate, and aldrin were the most abundant pesticides in water while o,p'-DOT, delta-HCH, beta-HCH, p,p'-DDE, p,p'-DDT, and endosulfan sulfate were the most abundant in sediment. The variation in concentration of pesticides among sites can be expected to be caused by several factors such as contaminants in the rivers and drainage of contaminated water from the surrounding agricultural fields. To reduce exposure to these endocrine-disrupting compounds, the abundant current use of pesticides in the area should be minimized. Regular monitoring is needed to manage the environmental hazards due to these pesticides.

  20. Polyamide 6/chitosan nanofibers as support for the immobilization of Trametes versicolor laccase for the elimination of endocrine disrupting chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maryšková, Milena; Ardao, Inés; García-González, Carlos A; Martinová, Lenka; Rotková, Jana; Ševců, Alena

    2016-07-01

    In recent years, there has been an increase in efforts to improve wastewater treatment as the concentration of dangerous pollutants, such as endocrine disrupting chemicals, in wastewater increases. These compounds, which mimic the effect of hormones, have a negative impact on human health and are not easily removed from water. One way to effectively eliminate these pollutants is to use enzymatically activated materials. In this study, we report on the use of laccase from the white rot fungus Trametes versicolor immobilized onto polyamide 6/chitosan (PA6/CHIT) nanofibers modified using two different spacers (bovine serum albumin and hexamethylenediamine). We then tested the ability of the PA6/CHIT-laccase biocatalysts to eliminate a mixture containing 50μM of two endocrine disrupting chemicals: bisphenol A and 17α-ethinylestradiol. The PA6/CHIT nanofiber matrix used in this study not only proved to be a suitable carrier for immobilized and modified laccase but was also efficient in the removal of a mixture of endocrine disrupting chemicals in three treatment cycles. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. An investigation of the endocrine disrupting potential of enniatin B using in vitro bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalayou, Shewit; Ndossi, Doreen; Frizzell, Caroline; Groseth, Per Kristian; Connolly, Lisa; Sørlie, Morten; Verhaegen, Steven; Ropstad, Erik

    2015-03-04

    Evidence that some of the fungal metabolites present in food and feed may act as potential endocrine disruptors is increasing. Enniatin B (ENN B) is among the emerging Fusarium mycotoxins known to contaminate cereals. In this study, the H295R and neonatal porcine Leydig cell (LC) models, and reporter gene assays (RGAs) have been used to investigate the endocrine disrupting activity of ENN B. Aspects of cell viability, cell cycle distribution, hormone production as well as the expression of key steroidogenic genes were assessed using the H295R cell model. Cell viability and hormone production levels were determined in the LC model, while cell viability and steroid hormone nuclear receptor transcriptional activity were measured using the RGAs. ENN B (0.01-100μM) was cytotoxic in the H295R and LC models used; following 48h incubation with 100μM. Flow cytometry analysis showed that ENN B exposure (0.1-25μM) led to an increased proportion of cells in the S phase at higher ENN B doses (>10μM) while cells at G0/G1 phase were reduced. At the receptor level, ENN B (0.00156-15.6μM) did not appear to induce any specific (ant) agonistic responses in reporter gene assays (RGAs), however cell viability was affected at 15.6μM. Measurement of hormone levels in H295R cells revealed that the production of progesterone, testosterone and cortisol in exposed cells were reduced, but the level of estradiol was not significantly affected. There was a general reduction of estradiol and testosterone levels in exposed LC. Only the highest dose (100μM) used had a significant effect, suggesting the observed inhibitory effect is more likely associated with the cytotoxic effect observed at this dose. Gene transcription analysis in H295R cells showed that twelve of the sixteen genes were significantly modulated (pendocrine toxicity is an important potential hazard. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Waterborne exposure to BPS causes thyroid endocrine disruption in zebrafish larvae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan-Hua Zhang

    Full Text Available Bisphenol S (BPS is widely used as a raw material in industry, resulting in its ubiquitous distribution in natural environment, including the aqueous environment. However, the effect of BPS on the thyroid endocrine system is largely unknown. In this study, zebrafish (Danio rerio embryos were exposed to BPS at 1, 3, 10, and 30 μg/L, from 2 h post-fertilization (hpf to 168hpf. Bioconcentration of BPS and whole-body thyroid hormones (THs, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH concentrations as well as transcriptional profiling of key genes related to the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT axis were examined. Chemical analysis indicated that BPS was accumulated in zebrafish larvae. Thyroxine (T4 and triiodothyronine (T3 levels were significantly decreased at ≥ 10 and 30 μg/L of BPS, respectively. However, TSH concentration was significantly induced in the 10 and 30 μg/L BPS-treated groups. After exposure to BPS, the mRNA expression of corticotrophin releasing hormone (crh and thyroglobulin (tg genes were up-regulated at ≥10 μg/L of BPS, in a dose-response manner. The transcription of genes involved in thyroid development (pax8 and synthesis (sodium/iodide symporter, slc5a5 were also significantly increased in the 30 μg/L of BPS treatment group. Moreover, exposure to 10 μg/L or higher concentration of BPS significantly up-regulated genes related to thyroid hormone metabolism (deiodinases, dio1, dio2 and uridinediphosphate glucoronosyltransferases, ugt1ab, which might be responsible for the altered THs levels. However, the transcript of transthyretin (ttr was significantly down-regulated at ≥ 3 μg/L of BPS, while the mRNA levels of thyroid hormone receptors (trα and trβ and dio3 remained unchanged. All the results indicated that exposure to BPS altered the whole-body THs and TSH concentrations and changed the expression profiling of key genes related to HPT axis, thus triggering thyroid endocrine disruption.

  3. November 6, 2017, Virtual Meeting on the Charge Questions for the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act Scientific Advisory Panel (FIFRA SAP) Meeting on Endocrine Disruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    This virtual FIFRA SAP meeting will be discus questions on Continuing Development of Alternative High-Throughput Screens to Determine Endocrine Disruption, focusing on Androgen Receptor, Steroidogenesis, and Thyroid Pathways

  4. Maximum permissible concentrations and negligible concentrations for phthalates (dibutylphthalate and di(2-ethylhexyl)phthlate), with emphasis on endocrine disruptive properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wezel AP van; Posthumus R; Vlaardingen P van; Crommentuijn T; Plassche EJ van de; CSR

    This report presents maximal permissible concentrations (MPCs) and negligible concentrations (NCs) are derived for di-n-butylphthalate (DBP) and di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP). Phthalates are often mentioned as suspected endocrine disrupters. Data with endpoints related to the endocrine or

  5. Assessing dose-response relationships for endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs): a focus on non-monotonicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoeller, R Thomas; Vandenberg, Laura N

    2015-05-15

    The fundamental principle in regulatory toxicology is that all chemicals are toxic and that the severity of effect is proportional to the exposure level. An ancillary assumption is that there are no effects at exposures below the lowest observed adverse effect level (LOAEL), either because no effects exist or because they are not statistically resolvable, implying that they would not be adverse. Chemicals that interfere with hormones violate these principles in two important ways: dose-response relationships can be non-monotonic, which have been reported in hundreds of studies of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs); and effects are often observed below the LOAEL, including all environmental epidemiological studies examining EDCs. In recognition of the importance of this issue, Lagarde et al. have published the first proposal to qualitatively assess non-monotonic dose response (NMDR) relationships for use in risk assessments. Their proposal represents a significant step forward in the evaluation of complex datasets for use in risk assessments. Here, we comment on three elements of the Lagarde proposal that we feel need to be assessed more critically and present our arguments: 1) the use of Klimisch scores to evaluate study quality, 2) the concept of evaluating study quality without topical experts' knowledge and opinions, and 3) the requirement of establishing the biological plausibility of an NMDR before consideration for use in risk assessment. We present evidence-based logical arguments that 1) the use of the Klimisch score should be abandoned for assessing study quality; 2) evaluating study quality requires experts in the specific field; and 3) an understanding of mechanisms should not be required to accept observable, statistically valid phenomena. It is our hope to contribute to the important and ongoing debate about the impact of NMDRs on risk assessment with positive suggestions.

  6. An endocrine disrupting chemical changes courtship and parental care in the sand goby

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saaristo, Minna, E-mail: Minna.Saaristo@helsinki.fi [Department of Bio- and Environmental Sciences, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 65, FI-00014 Helsinki (Finland); Craft, John A. [Biological and Biomedical Sciences, Glasgow Caledonian University, Cowcaddens Road, Glasgow G4 0BA, Scotland (United Kingdom); Lehtonen, Kari K. [Finnish Environment Institute, Marine Research Centre, P.O. Box 140, FI-00251 Helsinki (Finland); Lindstroem, Kai [Environmental and Marine Biology, Abo Akademi University, FI-20520 Turku (Finland)

    2010-05-10

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are a diverse group of compounds that can mimic, block or modulate the synthesis of natural hormones. They are known to cause impairment of reproduction of aquatic organisms at very low concentrations. The aim of this study was to examine how exposure from 10 to 31 days to 17{alpha}-ethinyl estradiol (EE2, 41 ng L{sup -1}) affects the courtship and parental care behaviour of male sand gobies (Pomatoschistus minutus). The sand goby exhibits a polygynous mating system, where males compete for females and provide paternal care. First, male courtship performance towards a stimulus female was recorded with video camera. Secondly, after the male had received eggs his parental care behaviour was video recorded. In addition to behavioural endpoints, we measured the expression of hepatic vitellogenin (Vtg) and zona radiata protein (Zrp) mRNA, as well as common somatic indices. Our study shows that exposure to EE2 affected male fanning behaviour during both courtship and parental care. Interestingly, small exposed males increased their courtship fanning to similar levels as larger control males. However, during parental care egg fanning was not related to male size, and all exposed males fanned more than control males. The EE2-exposure induced Vtg and Zrp mRNA expression in males and decreased hepatosomatic index (HSI), and increased gonadosomatic index (GSI). Females prefer males that fan more, which will favour the small EDC exposed males. This may lead to mating that favours males that are not strong enough to tend the eggs until they hatch, thus decreasing the reproductive success of individuals.

  7. Behaviour of estrogenic endocrine-disrupting chemicals in permeable carbonate sands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Benjamin O; Erler, Dirk V; Tait, Douglas R; van Zwieten, Lukas; Kimber, Stephen; Eyre, Bradley D

    2015-08-01

    The remediation of four estrogenic endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs), estrone (E1), estradiol (E2), ethinylestradiol (EE2) and estriol (E3), was measured in saturated and unsaturated carbonate sand-filled columns dosed with wastewater from a sewage treatment plant. The estrogen equivalency (EEQ) of inlet wastewater was 1.2 ng L(-1) and was remediated to an EEQ of 0.5 ng L(-1) through the unsaturated carbonate sand-filled columns. The high surface area of carbonate sand and associated high microbial activity may have assisted the degradation of these estrogens. The fully saturated sand columns showed an increase in total estrogenic potency with an EEQ of 2.4 ng L(-1), which was double that of the inlet wastewater. There was a significant difference (P columns. The breakdown of conjugated estrogens to estrogenic EDCs formed under long residence time and reducing conditions may have been responsible for the increase in the fully saturated columns. This may also be explained by the desorption of previously sorbed estrogenic EDCs. The effect of additional filter materials, such as basalt sediment and coconut fibre, on estrogenic EDC reduction was also tested. None of these amendments provided improvements in estrogen remediation relative to the unamended unsaturated carbonate sand columns. Aerobic carbonate sand filters have good potential to be used as on-site wastewater treatment systems for the reduction of estrogenic EDCs. However, the use of fully saturated sand filters, which are used to promote denitrification, and the loss of nitrogen as N2 were shown to cause an increase in EEQ. The potential for the accumulation of estrogenic EDCs under anaerobic conditions needs to be considered when designing on-site sand filtration systems required to reduce nitrogen. Furthermore, the accumulation of estrogens under anaerobic conditions such as under soil absorption systems or leachate fields has the potential to contaminate groundwater especially when the water table

  8. Exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals among residents of a rural vegetarian/vegan community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tordjman, Karen; Grinshpan, Laura; Novack, Lena; Göen, Thomas; Segev, Dar; Beacher, Lisa; Stern, Naftali; Berman, Tamar

    2016-12-01

    Endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are increasingly thought to be involved in the rising prevalence of disorders such as obesity, diabetes, and some hormone-dependent cancers. Several lines of evidence have indicated that vegetarian and vegan diets may offer some protection from such diseases. We hypothesized that exposure to selected EDCs among residents of the unique vegetarian/vegan community of Amirim would be lower than what has recently been reported for the omnivorous population in the first Israel Biomonitoring Study (IBMS). We studied 42 Amirim residents (29 vegetarians/13 vegans; 24 women/18men, aged 50.7±13.7y). Subjects answered detailed lifestyle, and multipass, memory-based 24-hr dietary recall questionnaires. Concentrations of bisphenol A (BPA), 11 phthalate metabolites, and the isoflavone phytoestrogens (genistein and daidzein) were determined by GC or LC tandem mass-spectrometry on a spot urine sample. The results were compared to those obtained following the same methodology in the Jewish subgroup of the IBMS (n=184). While a vegetarian/vegan nutritional pattern had no effect on exposure to BPA, it seemed to confer a modest protection (~21%) from exposure to high molecular weight phthalates. Furthermore, the summed metabolites of the high molecular weight phthalate DiNP were 36% lower in vegans compared to vegetarians (P<0.05). In contrast, Amirim residents exhibited a level of exposure to isoflavone phytoestrogens about an order of magnitude higher than in the IBMS (P<0.001). In Israel, a country whose inhabitants demonstrate exposure to EDCs comparable to that of the US and Canada, a voluntary lifestyle of vegetarianism and preference for organic food has a modest, but possibly valuable, impact on exposure to phthalates, while it is associated with a very steep increase in the exposure to phytoestrogens. Major reduction in exposure to EDCs will require regulatory actions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Enantioselective disruption of the endocrine system by Cis-Bifenthrin in the male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yuanxiang; Wang, Jiangcong; Pan, Xiuhong; Miao, Wenyu; Lin, Xiaojian; Wang, Linggang; Fu, Zhengwei

    2015-07-01

    Bifenthrin (BF), as a chiral pyrethroid, is widely used to control field and household pests in China. At present, the commercial BF is a mixed compound containing cis isomers (cis-BF) including two enantiomers of 1R-cis-BF and 1S-cis-BF. In the present study, the two individual cis-BF enantiomers were separated by a preparative supercritical fluid chromatography. Then, four week-old adolescent male ICR mice were orally administered 1R-cis-BF and 1S-cis-BF separately daily for 3 weeks at doses of 0, 7.5 and 15 mg/kg/day, respectively. Results showed that the transcription status of some genes involved in cholesterol synthesis and transport as well as testosterone (T) synthesis in the testes were influenced by cis-BF enantiomers. Especially, we observed that the transcription status of key genes on the pathway of T synthesis including cytochrome P450 cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc) and cytochrome P450 17α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (P45017α)) were selectively altered in the testis of mice when treated with 1S-cis-BF, suggesting that it is the possible reason to explain why the lower serum T concentration in 1S-cis-BF treated group. Taken together, it concluded that both of the cis-BF enantiomers have the endocrine disruption activities, while 1S-cis-BF was higher than 1R-cis-BF in mice when exposed during the puberty. The data was helpful to understand the toxicity of cis-BF in mammals under enantiomeric level. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. A novel ICK mutation causes ciliary disruption and lethal endocrine-cerebro-osteodysplasia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oud, Machteld M; Bonnard, Carine; Mans, Dorus A; Altunoglu, Umut; Tohari, Sumanty; Ng, Alvin Yu Jin; Eskin, Ascia; Lee, Hane; Rupar, C Anthony; de Wagenaar, Nathalie P; Wu, Ka Man; Lahiry, Piya; Pazour, Gregory J; Nelson, Stanley F; Hegele, Robert A; Roepman, Ronald; Kayserili, Hülya; Venkatesh, Byrappa; Siu, Victoria M; Reversade, Bruno; Arts, Heleen H

    2016-01-01

    Endocrine-cerebro-osteodysplasia (ECO) syndrome [MIM:612651] caused by a recessive mutation (p.R272Q) in Intestinal cell kinase (ICK) shows significant clinical overlap with ciliary disorders. Similarities are strongest between ECO syndrome, the Majewski and Mohr-Majewski short-rib thoracic dysplasia (SRTD) with polydactyly syndromes, and hydrolethalus syndrome. In this study, we present a novel homozygous ICK mutation in a fetus with ECO syndrome and compare the effect of this mutation with the previously reported ICK variant on ciliogenesis and cilium morphology. Through homozygosity mapping and whole-exome sequencing, we identified a second variant (c.358G > T; p.G120C) in ICK in a Turkish fetus presenting with ECO syndrome. In vitro studies of wild-type and mutant mRFP-ICK (p.G120C and p.R272Q) revealed that, in contrast to the wild-type protein that localizes along the ciliary axoneme and/or is present in the ciliary base, mutant proteins rather enrich in the ciliary tip. In addition, immunocytochemistry revealed a decreased number of cilia in ICK p.R272Q-affected cells. Through identification of a novel ICK mutation, we confirm that disruption of ICK causes ECO syndrome, which clinically overlaps with the spectrum of ciliopathies. Expression of ICK-mutated proteins result in an abnormal ciliary localization compared to wild-type protein. Primary fibroblasts derived from an individual with ECO syndrome display ciliogenesis defects. In aggregate, our findings are consistent with recent reports that show that ICK regulates ciliary biology in vitro and in mice, confirming that ECO syndrome is a severe ciliopathy.

  11. Sunscreens: are they beneficial for health? An overview of endocrine disrupting properties of UV-filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, M; Klit, A; Blomberg Jensen, M; Søeborg, T; Frederiksen, H; Schlumpf, M; Lichtensteiger, W; Skakkebaek, N E; Drzewiecki, K T

    2012-06-01

    Today, topical application of sunscreens, containing ultraviolet-filters (UV-filters), is preferred protection against adverse effects of ultraviolet radiation. Evidently, use of sunscreens is effective in prevention of sunburns in various models. However, evidence for their protective effects against melanoma skin cancer is less conclusive. Three important observations prompted us to review the animal data and human studies on possible side effects of selected chemical UV-filters in cosmetics. (1) the utilization of sunscreens with UV-filters is increasing worldwide; (2) the incidence of the malignant disorder for which sunscreens should protect, malignant melanoma, is rapidly increasing and (3) an increasing number of experimental studies indicating that several UV-filters might have endocrine disruptive effects. The selected UV-filters we review in this article are benzophenone-3 (BP-3), 3-benzylidene camphor (3-BC), 3-(4-methyl-benzylidene) camphor (4-MBC), 2-ethylhexyl 4-methoxy cinnamate (OMC), Homosalate (HMS), 2-ethylhexyl 4-dimethylaminobenzoate (OD-PABA) and 4-aminobenzoic acid (PABA). The potential adverse effects induced by UV-filters in experimental animals include reproductive/developmental toxicity and disturbance of hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis (HPT). Few human studies have investigated potential side effects of UV-filters, although human exposure is high as UV-filters in sunscreens are rapidly absorbed from the skin. One of the UV-filters, BP-3, has been found in 96% of urine samples in the US and several UV-filters in 85% of Swiss breast milk samples. It seems pertinent to evaluate whether exposure to UV-filters contribute to possible adverse effects on the developing organs of foetuses and children. © 2012 The Authors. International Journal of Andrology © 2012 European Academy of Andrology.

  12. In vitro screening for estrogenic endocrine disrupting compounds using Mozambique tilapia and sea bass scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Patrícia I S; Estêvão, M Dulce; Santos, Soraia; Andrade, André; Power, Deborah M

    2017-09-01

    A wide range of estrogenic endocrine disruptors (EDCs) are accumulating in the environment and may disrupt the physiology of aquatic organisms. The effects of EDCs on fish have mainly been assessed using reproductive endpoints and in vivo animal experiments. We used a simple non-invasive assay to evaluate the impact of estrogens and EDCs on sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) and tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) scales. These were exposed to estradiol (E2), two phytoestrogens and six anthropogenic estrogenic/anti-estrogenic EDCs and activities of enzymes related to mineralized tissue turnover (TRAP, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase and ALP, alkaline phosphatase) were measured. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR detected the expression of both membrane and nuclear estrogen receptors in the scales of both species, confirming scales as a target for E2 and EDCs through different mechanisms. Changes in TRAP or ALP activities after 30minute and 24h exposure were detected in sea bass and tilapia scales treated with E2 and three EDCs, although compound-, time- and dose-specific responses were observed for the two species. These results support again that the mineralized tissue turnover of fish is regulated by estrogens and reveals that the scales are a mineralized estrogen-responsive tissue that may be affected by some EDCs. The significance of these effects for whole animal physiology needs to be further explored. The in vitro fish scale bioassay is a promising non-invasive screening tool for E2 and EDCs effects, although the low sensitivity of TRAP/ALP quantification limits their utility and indicates that alternative endpoints are required. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Effect of wastewater treatment facility closure on endocrine disrupting chemicals in a Coastal Plain stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Paul M.; Journey, Celeste; Clark, Jimmy M.

    2016-01-01

    Wastewater treatment facility (WWTF) closures are rare environmental remediation events; offering unique insight into contaminant persistence, long-term wastewater impacts, and ecosystem recovery processes. The U.S. Geological Survey assessed the fate of select endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDC) in surface water and streambed sediment one year before and one year after closure of a long-term WWTF located within the Spirit Creek watershed at Fort Gordon, Georgia. Sample sites included a WWTF-effluent control located upstream from the outfall, three downstream effluent-impacted sites located between the outfall and Spirit Lake, and one downstream from the lake's outfall. Prior to closure, the 2.2-km stream segment downstream from the WWTF outfall was characterized by EDC concentrations significantly higher (α = 0.05) than at the control site; indicating substantial downstream transport and limited in-stream attenuation of EDC, including pharmaceuticals, estrogens, alkylphenol ethoxylate (APE) metabolites, and organophosphate flame retardants (OPFR). Wastewater-derived pharmaceutical, APE metabolites, and OPFR compounds were also detected in the outflow of Spirit Lake, indicating the potential for EDC transport to aquatic ecosystems downstream of Fort Gordon under effluent discharge conditions. After the WWTF closure, no significant differences in concentrations or numbers of detected EDC compounds were observed between control and downstream locations. The results indicated EDC pseudo-persistence under preclosure, continuous supply conditions, with rapid attenuation following WWTF closure. Low concentrations of EDC at the control site throughout the study and comparable concentrations in downstream locations after WWTF closure indicated additional, continuing, upstream contaminant sources within the Spirit Creek watershed. 

  14. Carbendazim has the potential to induce oxidative stress, apoptosis, immunotoxicity and endocrine disruption during zebrafish larvae development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jinhua; Wu, Shenggan; Wang, Yanhua; An, Xuehua; Cai, Leiming; Zhao, Xueping; Wu, Changxing

    2015-10-01

    Increasing evidence have suggested deleterious effects of carbendazim on reproduction, apoptosis, immunotoxicity and endocrine disruption in mice and rats, however, the developmental toxicity of carbendazim to aquatic organisms remains obscure. In the present study, we utilized zebrafish as an environmental monitoring model to characterize the effects of carbendazim on expression of genes related to oxidative stress, apoptosis, immunotoxicity and endocrine disruption during larval development. Different trends in gene expression were observed upon exposing the larvae to 4, 20, 100, and 500 μg/L carbendazim for 4 and 8d. The mRNA levels of catalase, glutathione peroxidase and manganese superoxide dismutase (CAT, GPX, and Mn/SOD) were up-regulated after exposure to different concentrations of carbendazim for 4 or 8d. The up-regulation of p53, Apaf1, Cas8 and the down-regulation of Bcl2, Mdm2, Cas3 in the apoptosis pathway, as well as the increased expression of cytokines and chemokines, including CXCL-C1C, CCL1, IL-1b, IFN, IL-8, and TNFα, suggested carbendazim might trigger apoptosis and immune response during zebrafish larval development. In addition, the alteration of mRNA expression of VTG, ERα, ERβ1, ERβ2, TRα, TRβ, Dio1, and Dio2 indicated the potential of carbendazim to induce endocrine disruption in zebrafish larvae. These data suggested that carbendazim could simultaneously induce multiple responses during zebrafish larval development, and bidirectional interactions among oxidative stress, apoptosis pathway, immune and endocrine systems might be present. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Characterization of the interactions between endocrine disruptors and aquatic humic substances from tropical rivers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botero, Wander G. [Universidade Federal de Alagoas (UFAL), Arapiraca, AL (Brazil); Oliveira, Luciana C. de [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (UFSCar), Sorocaba, SP (Brazil); Cunha, Bruno B.; Oliveira, Lilian K. de; Goveia, Danielle; Fraceto, Leonardo F.; Rosa, Andre Henrique, E-mail: ahrosa@sorocaba.unesp.b [UNESP, Sorocaba, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia do Meio Ambiente; Rocha, Julio Cesar [UNESP, Araraquara, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica. Dept. de Quimica Analitica

    2011-07-01

    Interactions between two endocrine disruptors (ED) and aquatic humic substances (AHS) from tropical rivers were studied using an ultrafiltration system equipped with a 1 kDa cut-off cellulose membrane to separate free ED from the fraction bound in the AHS. Quantification of 17{alpha}-ethynylestradiol and bisphenol A was performed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The times required for establishment of equilibrium between the AHS and the ED were ca. 30 min, and complexation capacities for 17{alpha}-ethynylestradiol and bisphenol A were 18.53 and 2.07 mg g{sup -1} TOC, respectively. The greater interaction of AHS with 17{alpha}-ethynylestradiol, compared to bisphenol A, was due to the presence of hydrogen in the structure of 17{alpha}-ethynylestradiol, which could interact with ionized oxygenated groups of the AHS. The results indicate that AHS can strongly influence the transport and reactivity of endocrine disruptors in aquatic systems. (author)

  16. An investigation of endocrine disrupting effects and toxic mechanisms modulated by benzo[a]pyrene in female scallop Chlamys farreri

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Shuangmei; Pan, Luqing, E-mail: panlq@ouc.edu.cn; Sun, Xiaohua

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: •B[a]P disturbed progesterone, 17β-estradiol and testosterone production in scallop. •B[a]P inhibited 3β-HSD, CYP17 and 17β-HSD expression after a 10-day exposure. •B[a]P of lower dose elevated AHR-CYP1A expression but high dose B[a]P inhibited them. •ER and vitellogenin transcription was consistent with AHR after B[a]P exposure. •B[a]P exposure induced relatively developmental delay and impairment of ovary. -- Abstract: The purpose of this study was to investigate the endocrine disrupting effects induced by benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) and explore the underlying mechanisms in mollusks. In this study, sexually mature female Chlamys farreri were exposed to benzo[a]pyrene for 10 days at four different concentrations as 0, 0.025, 0.5 and 10 μg/L. Sex steroids were identified and quantified by electrochemiluminescence immunoassay (ECLIA) method and results showed that exposure to B[a]P exerts great suppression on 17β-estradiol, testosterone production and disrupts progesterone levels in ovary. Transcription of genes were detected and measured by real-time RT-PCR. It showed that at day 10 B[a]P inhibited 3β-HSD, CYP17 and 17β-HSD mRNA expression in a dose-dependent manner, which suggests that they could be potential targets of B[a]P that disrupt steroidogenic machinery. Moreover, 0.025 μg/L B[a]P activated transcription of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), AHR nuclear translocator (ARNT), CYP1A1 and estrogen receptor (ER), while 10 μg/L B[a]P suppressed all of them. The consistency of their responses to B[a]P exposure implies that AHR action may be involved in invertebrate CYP regulation and ER transcription despite of unknown mechanisms. Additionally, B[a]P exposure could induce ovarian impairment and developmental delay in C. farreri. Overall, sensitivity of C. farreri to endocrine disruption and toxicity suggests that C. farreri is a suitable species for study of endocrine-disrupting effects in marine invertebrates. This study will form a

  17. An investigation of endocrine disrupting effects and toxic mechanisms modulated by benzo[a]pyrene in female scallop Chlamys farreri

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian, Shuangmei; Pan, Luqing; Sun, Xiaohua

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •B[a]P disturbed progesterone, 17β-estradiol and testosterone production in scallop. •B[a]P inhibited 3β-HSD, CYP17 and 17β-HSD expression after a 10-day exposure. •B[a]P of lower dose elevated AHR-CYP1A expression but high dose B[a]P inhibited them. •ER and vitellogenin transcription was consistent with AHR after B[a]P exposure. •B[a]P exposure induced relatively developmental delay and impairment of ovary. -- Abstract: The purpose of this study was to investigate the endocrine disrupting effects induced by benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) and explore the underlying mechanisms in mollusks. In this study, sexually mature female Chlamys farreri were exposed to benzo[a]pyrene for 10 days at four different concentrations as 0, 0.025, 0.5 and 10 μg/L. Sex steroids were identified and quantified by electrochemiluminescence immunoassay (ECLIA) method and results showed that exposure to B[a]P exerts great suppression on 17β-estradiol, testosterone production and disrupts progesterone levels in ovary. Transcription of genes were detected and measured by real-time RT-PCR. It showed that at day 10 B[a]P inhibited 3β-HSD, CYP17 and 17β-HSD mRNA expression in a dose-dependent manner, which suggests that they could be potential targets of B[a]P that disrupt steroidogenic machinery. Moreover, 0.025 μg/L B[a]P activated transcription of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), AHR nuclear translocator (ARNT), CYP1A1 and estrogen receptor (ER), while 10 μg/L B[a]P suppressed all of them. The consistency of their responses to B[a]P exposure implies that AHR action may be involved in invertebrate CYP regulation and ER transcription despite of unknown mechanisms. Additionally, B[a]P exposure could induce ovarian impairment and developmental delay in C. farreri. Overall, sensitivity of C. farreri to endocrine disruption and toxicity suggests that C. farreri is a suitable species for study of endocrine-disrupting effects in marine invertebrates. This study will form a

  18. Recommended approaches to the scientific evaluation of ecotoxicological hazards and risks of endocrine-active substances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthiessen, Peter; Ankley, Gerald T.; Biever, Ronald C

    2017-01-01

    for clarifying key issues and procedures that should be considered when assessing the ecotoxicological hazards and risks of EAS and EDS. The workshop also highlighted areas of scientific uncertainty, and made specific recommendations for research and methods-development to resolve some of the identified issues......A SETAC Pellston Workshop(®) "Environmental Hazard and Risk Assessment Approaches for Endocrine-Active Substances (EHRA)" was held in February 2016 in Pensacola, Florida, USA. The primary objective of the workshop was to provide advice, based on current scientific understanding, to regulators......, is that if data on environmental exposure, effects on sensitive species and life-stages, delayed effects, and effects at low concentrations are robust, initiating environmental risk assessment of EDS is scientifically sound and sufficiently reliable and protective of the environment. In the absence of such data...

  19. Parental occupational exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals and male genital malformations: A study in the danish national birth cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaerlev Linda

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sex hormones closely regulate development of the male genital organs during fetal life. The hypothesis that xenobiotics may disrupt endogenous hormonal signalling has received considerable scientific attention, but human evidence is scarce. Objectives We analyse occurrence of hypospadias and cryptorchidism according to maternal and paternal occupational exposure to possible endocrine disrupting chemicals. Methods We conducted a follow-up study of 45,341 male singleton deliveries in the Danish National Birth Cohort during 1997-2009. Information on work during pregnancy was obtained by telephone interviews around gestational week 16. Parents' job titles were classified according to DISCO-88. A job exposure matrix for endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs was implemented to assess occupational exposures. The Medical Birth and National Hospital Register provided data on congenital anomalies diagnosed at birth or during follow-up, which ended in 2009. Crude and adjusted hazard ratios (HR were obtained from Cox regression models. Results Among all pregnancies, 6.3% were classified as possibly or probably exposed to EDCs. The most prevalent occupations conferring possible exposure were cleaners, laboratory technicians, hairdressers and agricultural workers (58% of all potentially exposed. The final cumulative incidence of cryptorchidism in boys was 2.2% (1002 cases, and of hypospadias 0.6% (262 cases. The occurrence of hypospadias increased when mothers were probably [HRa = 1.8 (95% CI 1.0-2.6] or possibly exposed to one or more EDCs [HRa = 2.6 (95% CI 1.8-3.4. Possible paternal exposure to heavy metals increased the risk of hypospadias [HRa 2.2 (95% CI: 1.0-3.4] and cryptorchidism [HRa 1.9 (95% CI: 1.1-2.7]. None of the exposure groups reached statistical significance. Conclusion The study provides some but limited evidence that occupational exposure to possible endocrine disrupting chemicals during pregnancy increases the risk of

  20. Identification, expression, and endocrine-disruption of three ecdysone-responsive genes in the sentinel species Gammarus fossarum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouveia, D; Bonneton, F; Almunia, C; Armengaud, J; Quéau, H; Degli-Esposti, D; Geffard, O; Chaumot, A

    2018-02-28

    Taking advantage of a large transcriptomic dataset recently obtained in the sentinel crustacean amphipod Gammarus fossarum, we developed an approach based on sequence similarity and phylogenetic reconstruction to identify key players involved in the endocrine regulation of G. fossarum. Our work identified three genes of interest: the nuclear receptors RXR and E75, and the regulator broad-complex (BR). Their involvement in the regulation of molting and reproduction, along with their sensitivity to chemical contamination were experimentally assessed by studying gene expression during the female reproductive cycle, and after laboratory exposure to model endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs): pyriproxyfen, tebufenozide and piperonyl butoxide. RXR expression suggested a role of this gene in ecdysis and post-molting processes. E75 presented two expression peaks that suggested a role in vitellogenesis, and molting. BR expression showed no variation during molting/reproductive cycle. After exposure to the three EDCs, a strong inhibition of the inter-molt E75 peak was observed with tebufenozide, and an induction of RXR after exposure to pyriproxyfen and piperonyl butoxide. These results confirm the implication of RXR and E75 in hormonal regulation of female reproductive cycles in G. fossarum and their sensitivity towards EDCs opens the possibility of using them as specific endocrine disruption biomarkers.

  1. Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals and Oil and Natural Gas Operations: Potential Environmental Contamination and Recommendations to Assess Complex Environmental Mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassotis, Christopher D; Tillitt, Donald E; Lin, Chung-Ho; McElroy, Jane A; Nagel, Susan C

    2016-03-01

    Hydraulic fracturing technologies, developed over the last 65 years, have only recently been combined with horizontal drilling to unlock oil and gas reserves previously deemed inaccessible. Although these technologies have dramatically increased domestic oil and natural gas production, they have also raised concerns for the potential contamination of local water supplies with the approximately 1,000 chemicals that are used throughout the process, including many known or suspected endocrine-disrupting chemicals. We discuss the need for an endocrine component to health assessments for drilling-dense regions in the context of hormonal and antihormonal activities for chemicals used. We discuss the literature on a) surface and groundwater contamination by oil and gas extraction operations, and b) potential human exposure, particularly in the context of the total hormonal and antihormonal activities present in surface and groundwater from natural and anthropogenic sources; we also discuss initial analytical results and critical knowledge gaps. In light of the potential for environmental release of oil and gas chemicals that can disrupt hormone receptor systems, we recommend methods for assessing complex hormonally active environmental mixtures. We describe a need for an endocrine-centric component for overall health assessments and provide information supporting the idea that using such a component will help explain reported adverse health trends as well as help develop recommendations for environmental impact assessments and monitoring programs.

  2. Endocrine-disrupting chemicals and oil and natural gas operations: Potential environmental contamination and recommendations to assess complex environmental mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassotis, Christopher D.; Tillitt, Donald E.; Lin, Chung-Ho; McElroy, Jane A.; Nagel, Susan C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hydraulic fracturing technologies, developed over the last 65 years, have only recently been combined with horizontal drilling to unlock oil and gas reserves previously deemed inaccessible. While these technologies have dramatically increased domestic oil and natural gas production, they have also raised concerns for the potential contamination of local water supplies with the approximately 1,000 chemicals used throughout the process, including many known or suspected endocrine-disrupting chemicals.Objectives: We discuss the need for an endocrine component to health assessments for drilling-dense regions in the context of hormonal and anti-hormonal activities for chemicals used.Methods: We discuss the literature on 1) surface and ground water contamination by oil and gas extraction operations, and 2) potential human exposure, particularly in context of the total hormonal and anti-hormonal activities present in surface and ground water from natural and anthropogenic sources, with initial analytical results and critical knowledge gaps discussed.Discussion: In light of the potential for environmental release of oil and gas chemicals that can disrupt hormone receptor systems, we recommend methods for assessing complex hormonally active environmental mixtures.Conclusions: We describe a need for an endocrine-centric component for overall health assessments and provide supporting information that using this may help explain reported adverse health trends as well as help develop recommendations for environmental impact assessments and monitoring programs.

  3. Comparative toxicity and endocrine disruption potential of urban and rural atmospheric organic PM1 in JEG-3 human placental cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Drooge, Barend L; Marqueño, Anna; Grimalt, Joan O; Fernández, Pilar; Porte, Cinta

    2017-11-01

    Outdoor ambient air particulate matter and air pollution are related to adverse effects on human health. The present study assesses the cytotoxicity and ability to disrupt aromatase activity of organic PM 1 extracts from rural and urban areas at equivalent air volumes from 2 to 30 m 3 , in human placental JEG-3 cells. Samples were chemically analyzed for particle bounded organic compounds with endocrine disrupting potential, i.e. PAH, O-PAH, phthalate esters, but also for organic molecular tracer compounds for the emission source identification. Rural samples collected in winter were cytotoxic at the highest concentration tested and strongly inhibited aromatase activity in JEG-3 cells. No cytotoxicity was detected in summer samples from the rural site and the urban samples, while aromatase activity was moderately inhibited in these samples. In the urban area, the street site samples, collected close to intensive traffic, showed stronger inhibition of aromatase activity than the samples simultaneously collected at a roof site, 50 m above ground level. The cytotoxicity and endocrine disruption potential of the samples were linked to combustion products, i.e. PAH and O-PAH, especially from biomass burning in the rural site in winter. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Adsorption of selected endocrine disrupting compounds and pharmaceuticals on activated biochars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Chanil [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Park, Junyeong [Department of Forest Biomaterials, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Lim, Kwang Hun [Department of Chemistry, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC 27858 (United States); Park, Sunkyu [Department of Forest Biomaterials, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Heo, Jiyong [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Korea Army Academy at Young-Cheon, PO Box 135-1, Changhari, Gogyeongmeon, Young-cheon 770-849, Gyeongbuk (Korea, Republic of); Her, Namguk [Department of Chemistry and Environmental Sciences, Korea Army Academy at Young-Cheon, PO Box 135-1, Changhari, Gogyeongmeon, Young-cheon 770-849, Gyeongbuk (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Jeill; Yun, Soyoung [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Chung-Ang University, Dongjak-Ku, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Yeomin, E-mail: yoony@cec.sc.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • Biochars were prepared at different gas environments. • The competitive adsorption among EDCs/PhACs were investigated. • Aromaticity of adsorbent plays a significant role for EDCs/PhACs adsorption. -- Abstract: Chemically activated biochar produced under oxygenated (O-biochar) and oxygen-free (N-biochar) conditions were characterized and the adsorption of endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs): bisphenol A (BPA), atrazine (ATR), 17 α-ethinylestradiol (EE2), and pharmaceutical active compounds (PhACs); sulfamethoxazole (SMX), carbamazepine (CBM), diclofenac (DCF), ibuprofen (IBP) on both biochars and commercialized powdered activated carbon (PAC) were investigated. Characteristic analysis of adsorbents by solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) was conducted to determine better understanding about the EDCs/PhACs adsorption. N-biochar consisted of higher polarity moieties with more alkyl (0–45 ppm), methoxyl (45–63 ppm), O-alkyl (63–108 ppm), and carboxyl carbon (165–187 ppm) content than other adsorbents, while aromaticity of O-biochar was higher than that of N-biochar. O-biochar was composed mostly of aromatic moieties, with low H/C and O/C ratios compared to the highly polarized N-biochar that contained diverse polar functional groups. The higher surface area and pore volume of N-biochar resulted in higher adsorption capacity toward EDCs/PhACs along with atomic-level molecular structural property than O-biochar and PAC. N-biochar had a highest adsorption capacity of all chemicals, suggesting that N-biochar derived from loblolly pine chip is a promising sorbent for agricultural and environmental applications. The adsorption of pH-sensitive dissociable SMX, DCF, IBP, and BPA varied and the order of adsorption capacity was correlated with the hydrophobicity (K{sub ow}) of adsorbates throughout the all adsorbents, whereas adsorption of non-ionizable CBM, ATR, and EE2 in varied pH allowed adsorbents to interact with hydrophobic property

  5. Adsorption of selected endocrine disrupting compounds and pharmaceuticals on activated biochars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Chanil; Park, Junyeong; Lim, Kwang Hun; Park, Sunkyu; Heo, Jiyong; Her, Namguk; Oh, Jeill; Yun, Soyoung; Yoon, Yeomin

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Biochars were prepared at different gas environments. • The competitive adsorption among EDCs/PhACs were investigated. • Aromaticity of adsorbent plays a significant role for EDCs/PhACs adsorption. -- Abstract: Chemically activated biochar produced under oxygenated (O-biochar) and oxygen-free (N-biochar) conditions were characterized and the adsorption of endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs): bisphenol A (BPA), atrazine (ATR), 17 α-ethinylestradiol (EE2), and pharmaceutical active compounds (PhACs); sulfamethoxazole (SMX), carbamazepine (CBM), diclofenac (DCF), ibuprofen (IBP) on both biochars and commercialized powdered activated carbon (PAC) were investigated. Characteristic analysis of adsorbents by solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) was conducted to determine better understanding about the EDCs/PhACs adsorption. N-biochar consisted of higher polarity moieties with more alkyl (0–45 ppm), methoxyl (45–63 ppm), O-alkyl (63–108 ppm), and carboxyl carbon (165–187 ppm) content than other adsorbents, while aromaticity of O-biochar was higher than that of N-biochar. O-biochar was composed mostly of aromatic moieties, with low H/C and O/C ratios compared to the highly polarized N-biochar that contained diverse polar functional groups. The higher surface area and pore volume of N-biochar resulted in higher adsorption capacity toward EDCs/PhACs along with atomic-level molecular structural property than O-biochar and PAC. N-biochar had a highest adsorption capacity of all chemicals, suggesting that N-biochar derived from loblolly pine chip is a promising sorbent for agricultural and environmental applications. The adsorption of pH-sensitive dissociable SMX, DCF, IBP, and BPA varied and the order of adsorption capacity was correlated with the hydrophobicity (K ow ) of adsorbates throughout the all adsorbents, whereas adsorption of non-ionizable CBM, ATR, and EE2 in varied pH allowed adsorbents to interact with hydrophobic property of

  6. Obesity, diabetes, and associated costs of exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals in the European Union.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legler, Juliette; Fletcher, Tony; Govarts, Eva; Porta, Miquel; Blumberg, Bruce; Heindel, Jerrold J; Trasande, Leonardo

    2015-04-01

    Obesity and diabetes are epidemic in the European Union (EU). Exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) is increasingly recognized as a contributor, independent of diet and physical activity. The objective was to estimate obesity, diabetes, and associated costs that can be reasonably attributed to EDC exposures in the EU. An expert panel evaluated evidence for probability of causation using weight-of-evidence characterization adapted from that applied by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Exposure-response relationships and reference levels were evaluated for relevant EDCs, and biomarker data were organized from peer-reviewed studies to represent European exposure and burden of disease. Cost estimation as of 2010 utilized published cost estimates for childhood obesity, adult obesity, and adult diabetes. Setting, Patients and Participants, and Intervention: Cost estimation was performed from the societal perspective. The panel identified a 40% to 69% probability of dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene causing 1555 cases of overweight at age 10 (sensitivity analysis: 1555-5463) in 2010 with associated costs of €24.6 million (sensitivity analysis: €24.6-86.4 million). A 20% to 39% probability was identified for dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene causing 28 200 cases of adult diabetes (sensitivity analysis: 28 200-56 400) with associated costs of €835 million (sensitivity analysis: €835 million-16.6 billion). The panel also identified a 40% to 69% probability of phthalate exposure causing 53 900 cases of obesity in older women and €15.6 billion in associated costs. Phthalate exposure was also found to have a 40% to 69% probability of causing 20 500 new-onset cases of diabetes in older women with €607 million in associated costs. Prenatal bisphenol A exposure was identified to have a 20% to 69% probability of causing 42 400 cases of childhood obesity, with associated lifetime costs of €1.54 billion. EDC exposures in the EU contribute

  7. [Study on contamimation of endocrine disrupting chemicals in aquatic environment of Qiantang River].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Delei; Chen, Jiang; Fu, Jianyun; Zheng, Yunyan; Song, Yanhua; Yan, Jun; Ding, Gangqiang

    2011-07-01

    To study contamination of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in aquatic environment of Qiantang River. Carp vitellogenin (VTG) content in serum and ethoxyresorufin-o-deethylase (EROD) activity in liver of wild crucian, pesticide content including organic cholorine, organic phosphorus and pyrethroid in its muscle from 7 monitoring sites including Zhangtan (ZT), Jiekou (JK), Jiangjunyan (JJY), Yandongguan (YDG), Tonglu (TL), Fuyang (FY) and Yuanpu (YP) in Qiantang river were detected. And chemical analysis of water quality was carried on in four sites. EROD activity in crucian from ZT, JJY, FY and YP [(23.51 +/- 4.17), (16.79 +/- 7.39), (18.74 +/- 5.16), (18.65 +/- 8.86) nmol x g(-1) pro x min(-1), respectively] was significantly higher than that of control ((7.84 +/- 2.42) nmol x g(-1) pro x min(-1)), and VTG content in wild crucian from ZT, TL, FY and YP [(1.536 +/- 0.521), (16.404 +/- 13.579), (19.672 +/- 16.354) and (17.079 +/- 18.397)] microg/ml, respectively) was significantly higher than that of control [(0.400 +/- 0.099) (microg/ ml]. No significantly difference in biomarkers was observed between other site and control. From high to low, in total organophosphorus, it was followed as: TL, YDG, YP, FY, QZ, JK, JJY (EPN was up to 2695.64, 611.96 microg/kg in TL and YDG, respectively). In total organochlorine: TL, YP, YDG, FY, QZ, JK and JJY (tetradifon content in muscle of wild crucian from TL was up to 3962.17 microg/kg). For pyrethroid pesticides: TL, YDG, YP, ZT, JK, FY and JJY (alpha-tetramethrin and alpha-phenothrin was comparatively high in TL and YDG, up to 371.54, 239.62 microg/kg in the former, 416.23, 189.15 microg/kg in the latter, respectively). Aquatic environment of these sites including ZT, TL, FY and YP in Qiantang river received comparatively high EDCs, whose effects may be mainly due to pesticide pollution. Obvious organic contamination occurred in these sites including ZT, JJY, FY and YP. Changes of chemicals in water and EROD activity in

  8. Endocrine disrupting potential in freshwater ecosystems near agricultural areas on Prince Edward Island

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gray, M. A

    2000-01-01

    ...% of the land is agricultural and pesticide used is some of the most intensive in Canada. One component of the study measured the effects on endocrine function in caged rainbow trout and wild brook trout...

  9. Corticosteroid production in H295R cells during exposure to 3 endocrine disrupters analyzed with LC-MS/MS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Christina S; Nielsen, Frederik K; Hansen, Martin

    2013-01-01

    295R cell line. The method was applied by studying the effects of 2 model endocrine disrupters, ketoconazole and prochloraz, the pharmaceutical budesonide, and the inducer forskolin on the steroid production in this cell line. Dose-response curves were obtained for the correlation between hormone...... concentrations and the concentration of the individual disruptors. Exposing cells to ketoconazole resulted in a decrease in cortisol and corticosterone concentrations in a dose-dependent manner with EC₅₀ values of 0.24 and 0.40 μmol/L, respectively. The same applied for cells exposed to prochloraz with EC₅₀...

  10. Estradiol and endocrine disrupting compounds adversely affect development of sea urchin embryos at environmentally relevant concentrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roepke, Troy A. [Bodega Marine Laboratory, University of California, Davis, POB 247, Bodega Bay, CA 94923 (United States); Snyder, Mark J. [Bodega Marine Laboratory, University of California, Davis, POB 247, Bodega Bay, CA 94923 (United States); Cherr, Gary N. [Bodega Marine Laboratory, University of California, Davis, POB 247, Bodega Bay, CA 94923 (United States) and Departments of Environmental Toxicology and Nutrition, One Shields Avenue, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States)]. E-mail: gncherr@ucdavis.edu

    2005-01-26

    Environmental endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) are a wide variety of chemicals that typically exert effects, either directly or indirectly, through receptor-mediated processes, thus mimicking endogenous hormones and/or inhibiting normal hormone activities and metabolism. Little is known about the effects of EDCs on echinoderm physiology, reproduction and development. We exposed developing sea urchin embryos (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus and Lytechinus anamesus) to two known EDCs (4-octylphenol (OCT), bisphenol A (BisA)) and to natural and synthetic reproductive hormones (17{beta}-estradiol (E{sub 2}), estrone (E{sub 1}), estriol (E{sub 3}), progesterone (P{sub 4}) and 17{alpha}-ethynylestradiol (EE{sub 2})). In addition, we studied two non-estrogenic EDCs, tributyltin (TBT) and o,p-DDD. Successful development to the pluteus larval stage (96 h post-fertilization) was used to define EDC concentration-response relationships. The order of compound potency based on EC{sub 50} values for a reduction in normal development was as follows: TBT {sub L.anamesus} > OCT > TBT {sub S.{sub p}}{sub urpuratus} >> E{sub 2} > EE{sub 2} > DDD >> BisA > P{sub 4} > E{sub 1} >> E{sub 3}. The effect of TBT was pronounced even at concentrations substantially lower than those commonly reported in heavily contaminated areas, but the response was significantly different in the two model species. Sea urchin embryos were generally more sensitive to estrogenic EDCs and TBT than most other invertebrate larvae. Stage-specific exposure experiments were conducted to determine the most sensitive developmental periods using blastula, gastrula and post-gastrula (pluteus) stages. The stage most sensitive to E{sub 2}, OCT and TBT was the blastula stage with less overall sensitivity in the gastrula stage, regardless of concentration. Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) were added to the experiments individually and in combination with estrogenic EDCs to interfere with potential receptor

  11. An in vitro investigation of endocrine disrupting effects of trichothecenes deoxynivalenol (DON), T-2 and HT-2 toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndossi, D G; Frizzell, C; Tremoen, N H; Fæste, C K; Verhaegen, S; Dahl, E; Eriksen, G S; Sørlie, M; Connolly, L; Ropstad, E

    2012-11-15

    Trichothecenes are a large family of chemically related mycotoxins. Deoxynivalenol (DON), T-2 and HT-2 toxins belong to this family and are produced by various species of Fusarium. The H295R steroidogenesis assay, regulation of steroidogenic gene expression and reporter gene assays (RGAs) for the detection of androgen, estrogen, progestagen and glucocorticoid (ant)agonist responses, have been used to assess the endocrine disrupting activity of DON, T-2 and HT-2 toxins. H295R cells were used as a model for steroidogenesis and gene expression studies and exposed with either DON (0.1-1000ng/ml), T-2 toxin (0.0005-5ng/ml) or HT-2 toxin (0.005-50ng/ml) for 48h. We observed a reduction in hormone levels in media of exposed cells following radioimmunoassay. Cell viability was determined by four colorimetric assays and we observed reduced cell viability with increasing toxin concentrations partly explaining the significant reduction in hormone levels at the highest toxin concentration of all three trichothecenes. Thirteen of the 16 steroidogenic genes analyzed by quantitative real time PCR (RT-qPCR) were significantly regulated (Pendocrine disruption, the present findings indicate that exposure to DON, T-2 toxin and HT-2 toxin have effects on cell viability, steroidogenesis and alteration in gene expression indicating their potential as endocrine disruptors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A novel endocrine-disrupting agent in corn with mitogenic activity in human breast and prostatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markaverich, Barry; Mani, Shaila; Alejandro, Mary Ann; Mitchell, Andrea; Markaverich, David; Brown, Trellis; Velez-Trippe, Claudia; Murchison, Chris; O'Malley, Bert; Faith, Robert

    2002-01-01

    Housing adult rats on ground corncob bedding impedes male and female mating behavior and causes acyclicity in females. The suppressive effects on ovarian cyclicity are mimicked by a mitogenic agent purified from the ground corncob bedding material (corn mitogen; CM), which stimulates the proliferation of estrogen receptor (ER)-positive (MCF-7 cells) and ER-negative (MDA-MD-231 cells) breast cancer cells. Purified CM does not compete for [(3)H]estradiol binding to ER or nuclear type II sites, and its effects on MCF-7 breast cancer cell proliferation are not blocked by the antiestrogen ICI-182,780. These results suggest that the active component is unlikely to be a phytoestrogen, bioflavonoid, mycotoxin, or other known endocrine-disrupting agent that modifies cell growth via ER or type II [(3)H]estradiol binding sites. CM also stimulates the proliferation of PC-3 human prostatic cancer cells in vitro, and the growth rate of PC-3 cell xenografts is accelerated in nude male mice housed on ground corncob as opposed to pure cellulose bedding. Consequently, this endocrine-disrupting agent in ground corncob bedding may influence behavioral and physiologic reproductive response profiles and malignant cell proliferation in experimental animals. Fresh corn (kernels and cob) or corn tortillas also contain CM, indicating that human exposure is likely; consequently, CM and/or related mitogens in corn products may influence human health and development. PMID:11836146

  13. Assessment of endocrine disruption potential of essential oils of culinary herbs and spices involving glucocorticoid, androgen and vitamin D receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartoňková, Iveta; Dvořák, Zdeněk

    2018-04-25

    Essential oils (EOs) of culinary herbs and spices are consumed on a daily basis. They are multicomponent mixtures of compounds with already demonstrated biological activities. Taking into account regular dietary intake and the chemical composition of EOs, they may be considered as candidates for endocrine-disrupting entities. Therefore, we examined the effects of 31 EOs of culinary herbs and spices on transcriptional activities of glucocorticoid receptor (GR), androgen receptor (AR) and vitamin D receptor (VDR). Using reporter gene assays in stably transfected cell lines, weak anti-androgen and anti-glucocorticoid activity was observed for EO of vanilla and nutmeg, respectively. Moderate augmentation of calcitriol-dependent VDR activity was caused by EOs of ginger, thyme, coriander and lemongrass. Mixed anti-glucocorticoid and VDR-stimulatory activities were displayed by EOs of turmeric, oregano, dill, caraway, verveine and spearmint. The remaining 19 EOs were inactive against all receptors under investigation. Analyses of GR, AR and VDR target genes by means of RT-PCR confirmed the VDR-stimulatory effects, but could not confirm the anti-glucocorticoid and anti-androgen effects of EOs. In conclusion, although we observed minor effects of several EOs on transcriptional activities of GR, AR and VDR, the toxicological significance of these effects is very low. Hence, 31 EOs of culinary herbs and spices may be considered safe, in terms of endocrine disruption involving receptors GR, AR and VDR.

  14. Endocrine-disrupting activity of hydraulic fracturing chemicals and adverse health outcomes after prenatal exposure in male mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassotis, Christopher D.; Klemp, Kara C.; Vu, Danh C.; Lin, Chung-Ho; Meng, Chun-Xia; Besch-Williford, Cynthia L.; Pinatti, Lisa; Zoeller, R. Thomas; Drobnis, Erma Z.; Balise, Victoria D.; Isiguzo, Chiamaka J.; Williams, Michelle A.; Tillitt, Donald E.; Nagel, Susan C.

    2015-01-01

    Oil and natural gas operations have been shown to contaminate surface and ground water with endocrine-disrupting chemicals. In the current study, we fill several gaps in our understanding of the potential environmental impacts related to this process. We measured the endocrine-disrupting activities of 24 chemicals used and/or produced by oil and gas operations for five nuclear receptors using a reporter gene assay in human endometrial cancer cells. We also quantified the concentration of 16 of these chemicals in oil and gas wastewater samples. Finally, we assessed reproductive and developmental outcomes in male C57BL/6J mice after the prenatal exposure to a mixture of these chemicals. We found that 23 commonly used oil and natural gas operation chemicals can activate or inhibit the estrogen, androgen, glucocorticoid, progesterone, and/or thyroid receptors, and mixtures of these chemicals can behave synergistically, additively, or antagonistically in vitro. Prenatal exposure to a mixture of 23 oil and gas operation chemicals at 3, 30, and 300 μg/kg · d caused decreased sperm counts and increased testes, body, heart, and thymus weights and increased serum testosterone in male mice, suggesting multiple organ system impacts. Our results suggest possible adverse developmental and reproductive health outcomes in humans and animals exposed to potential environmentally relevant levels of oil and gas operation chemicals.

  15. Use of medaka (Oryzias latipes) as a model teleost to identify reproductive endpoints indicative of exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papoulias, D.M.; Tillitt, D.; Jones, S. [National Biological Service, Columbia, MO (United States); Noltie, D. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this research is to identify effects of endocrine disrupting chemicals on the reproductive system of fish at various stages of sexual differentiation and development. The model teleost used was the d-rR strain of medaka (Oryzias latipes) which has a heritable sex-linked color gene. In medaka, sex differences are first detected at the cellular level at hatch. In males, the mitotic activity of the primordial germ cells (PGC) is arrested while the PGCs of the females continue to divide. The germ cells of the gonochoristic medaka have been demonstrated to be totipotent with respective to gonia production. Because endogenous sex steroid hormones are believed to regulate this early process of sexual differentiation, the authors have hypothesized that mitotic activity in males and females exposed to endocrine disrupting chemicals will be different than unexposed individuals. Results are presented for tests conducted by injecting medaka eggs within 36 hours post-hatch with 3 doses of 2,3,7,8-TCDD (nominally 2.3, 1.3, 0.2 pg/embryo), a known anti-estrogen, dissolved in triolein.

  16. Mobilization of endocrine-disrupting chemicals and estrogenic activity in simulated rainfall runoff from land-applied biosolids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giudice, Ben D; Young, Thomas M

    2011-10-01

    Municipal biosolids are commonly applied to land as soil amendment or fertilizer as a form of beneficial reuse of what could otherwise be viewed as waste. Balanced against this benefit are potential risks to groundwater and surface water quality from constituents that may be mobilized during storm events. The objective of the present study was to characterize the mobilization of selected endocrine-disrupting compounds, heavy metals, and total estrogenic activity in rainfall runoff from land-applied biosolids. Rainfall simulations were conducted on soil plots amended with biosolids. Surface runoff and leachate was collected and analyzed for the endocrine-disrupting compounds bisphenol A, 17α-ethynylestradiol, triclocarban, triclosan, octylphenol, and nonylphenol; a suite of 16 metals; and estrogenic activity via the estrogen receptor-mediated chemical activated luciferase gene expression (ER-CALUX) bioassay. Triclocarban (2.3-17.3 ng/L), triclosan (background levels. Triclosan, Ni, and Cu were detected at levels that might pose some risk to aquatic life, though levels of metals in the biosolids were well below the maximum allowable regulatory limits. The ER-CALUX results were mostly explained by background bisphenol A contamination and octylphenol in runoff, although unknown contributors or matrix effects were also found. Copyright © 2011 SETAC.

  17. Sorption and toxicity reduction of pharmaceutically active compounds and endocrine disrupting chemicals in the presence of colloidal humic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Injeong; Kim, Hyo-Dong; Jeong, Tae-Yong; Kim, Sang Don

    This study investigated the toxicity changes and sorption of pharmaceuticals and endocrine disrupters in the presence of humic acid (HA). For the sorption experiment, a dead end filtration (DEF) system was used to separate bound and free-form target compounds. An algae growth inhibition test and E-screen assay were conducted to estimate the toxic effect of pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs) and endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs), respectively. The permeate concentration was confirmed using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. In the sorption test, we observed significant sorption of PhACs and EDCs on colloidal HA, except for sulfamethoxazole (SMX). The values of log KCOC derived from DEF determinations ranged from 4.40 to 5.03. The removal efficiency varied with the HA concentration and the target chemical properties. Tetracycline and 4-octylphenol showed the highest sorption or removal efficiency (≈50%), even at 5 mg C/L HA. The algal growth inhibition of PhACs and the estrogenic effects of EDCs were significantly decreased in proportion to HA concentrations, except for SMX. In addition, the chemical analysis results showed a positive relationship with the bioassay results. Consequently, the sorption of PhACs and EDCs onto colloidal HA should be emphasized in natural environments because it significantly reduces bioavailable concentrations and toxicity to aquatic organisms.

  18. Weight of evidence approaches for the identification of endocrine disrupting properties of chemicals: Review and recommendations for EU regulatory application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Melanie; Green, Richard M; Weltje, Lennart; Wheeler, James R

    2017-12-01

    A Weight-of-evidence (WoE) evaluation should be applied in assessing all the available data for the identification of endocrine disrupting (ED) properties of chemicals. The European Commission draft acts specifying criteria under the biocidal products and plant protection products regulations require that WoE is implemented for the assessment of such products. However, only some general considerations and principles of how a WoE should be conducted are provided. This paper reviews WoE approaches to distil key recommendations specifically for the evaluation of potential ED properties of chemicals. In a manner, which is consistent with existing, published WoE frameworks, the WoE evaluation of ED properties can be divided into four phases: 1) Definition of causal questions and data gathering and selection, 2) Review of individual studies, 3) Data integration and evaluation, and 4) Drawing conclusions based on inferences. Recommendations are made on how to conduct each phase robustly and transparently to help guide the WoE evaluation of potential endocrine disrupting properties of chemicals within a European regulatory context. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Comparative potential of black tea leaves waste to granular activated carbon in adsorption of endocrine disrupting compounds from aqueous solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.O. Ifelebuegu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption properties and mechanics of selected endocrine disrupting compounds; 17 β-estradiol, 17 α – ethinylestradiol and bisphenol A on locally available black tea leaves waste and granular activated carbon were investigated. The results obtained indicated that the kinetics of adsorption were pH, adsorbent dose, contact time and temperature dependent with equilibrium being reached at 20 to 40 minutes for tea leaves waste and 40 to 60 minutes for granular activated compound. Maximum adsorption capacities of 3.46, 2.44 and 18.35 mg/g were achieved for tea leaves waste compared to granular activated compound capacities of 4.01, 2.97 and 16.26 mg/g for 17 β- estradiol, 17 α-ethinylestradiol and bisphenol A respectively. Tea leaves waste adsorption followed pseudo-first order kinetics while granular activated compound fitted better to the pseudo-second order kinetic model. The experimental isotherm data for both tea leaves waste and granular activated compound showed a good fit to the Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin isotherm models with the Langmuir model showing the best fit. The thermodynamic and kinetic data for the adsorption indicated that the adsorption process for tea leaves waste was predominantly by physical adsorption while the granular activated compound adsorption was more chemical in nature. The results have demonstrated the potential of waste tea leaves for the adsorptive removal of endocrine disrupting compounds from water.

  20. Integrative rodent models for assessing male reproductive toxicity of environmental endocrine active substances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques Auger

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In the present review, we first summarize the main benefits, limitations and pitfalls of conventional in vivo approaches to assessing male reproductive structures and functions in rodents in cases of endocrine active substance (EAS exposure from the postulate that they may provide data that can be extrapolated to humans. Then, we briefly present some integrated approaches in rodents we have recently developed at the organism level. We particularly focus on the possible effects and modes of action (MOA of these substances at low doses and in mixtures, real-life conditions and at the organ level, deciphering the precise effects and MOA on the fetal testis. It can be considered that the in vivo experimental EAS exposure of rodents remains the first choice for studies and is a necessary tool (together with the epidemiological approach for understanding the reproductive effects and MOA of EASs, provided the pitfalls and limitations of the rodent models are known and considered. We also provide some evidence that classical rodent models may be refined for studying the multiple consequences of EAS exposure, not only on the reproductive axis but also on various hormonally regulated organs and tissues, among which several are implicated in the complex process of mammalian reproduction. Such models constitute an interesting way of approaching human exposure conditions. Finally, we show that organotypic culture models are powerful complementary tools, especially when focusing on the MOA. All these approaches have contributed in a combinatorial manner to a better understanding of the impact of EAS exposure on human reproduction.

  1. Effects of Exposure to the Endocrine-Disrupting Chemical Bisphenol A During Critical Windows of Murine Pituitary Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckstrum, Kirsten S; Edwards, Whitney; Banerjee, Annesha; Wang, Wei; Flaws, Jodi A; Katzenellenbogen, John A; Kim, Sung Hoon; Raetzman, Lori T

    2018-01-01

    Critical windows of development are often more sensitive to endocrine disruption. The murine pituitary gland has two critical windows of development: embryonic gland establishment and neonatal hormone cell expansion. During embryonic development, one environmentally ubiquitous endocrine-disrupting chemical, bisphenol A (BPA), has been shown to alter pituitary development by increasing proliferation and gonadotrope number in females but not males. However, the effects of exposure during the neonatal period have not been examined. Therefore, we dosed pups from postnatal day (PND)0 to PND7 with 0.05, 0.5, and 50 μg/kg/d BPA, environmentally relevant doses, or 50 μg/kg/d estradiol (E2). Mice were collected after dosing at PND7 and at 5 weeks. Dosing mice neonatally with BPA caused sex-specific gene expression changes distinct from those observed with embryonic exposure. At PND7, pituitary Pit1 messenger RNA (mRNA) expression was decreased with BPA 0.05 and 0.5 μg/kg/d in males only. Expression of Pomc mRNA was decreased at 0.5 μg/kg/d BPA in males and at 0.5 and 50 μg/kg/d BPA in females. Similarly, E2 decreased Pomc mRNA in both males and females. However, no noticeable corresponding changes were found in protein expression. Both E2 and BPA suppressed Pomc mRNA in pituitary organ cultures; this repression appeared to be mediated by estrogen receptor-α and estrogen receptor-β in females and G protein-coupled estrogen receptor in males, as determined by estrogen receptor subtype-selective agonists. These data demonstrated that BPA exposure during neonatal pituitary development has unique sex-specific effects on gene expression and that Pomc repression in males and females can occur through different mechanisms. Copyright © 2018 Endocrine Society.

  2. Reproductive failure and endocrine disruption by organohalogens in fish-eating birds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosveld, A.T.C.; Berg, van den M.

    2002-01-01

    Effects of organohalogens in fish-eating birds in the field have been monitored largely by studying reproductive outcome in contaminated populations or, at the individual level, by studying the sexual behaviour, egg production, or embryonal and postnatal development and survival. Endocrine

  3. Evaluation of Endocrine Disrupting Effects of Nitrate after In Utero Exposure in Rats and of Nitrate and Nitrite in the H295R and T-Screen Assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Pernille Reimer; Taxvig, Camilla; Christiansen, Sofie

    2009-01-01

    /l. At GD21, fetuses were examined for anogenital distance, plasma thyroxine levels, testicular and plasma levels of testosterone and progesterone, and testicular testosterone production and histopathology. In addition, endocrine disrupting activity of nitrate and nitrite were studied in two in vitro assays......Animal studies have shown that nitrate acts as an endocrine disrupter affecting the androgen production in adult males. This raises a concern for more severe endocrine disrupting effects after exposure during the sensitive period of prenatal male sexual development. As there are no existing studies...... of effects of nitrate on male sexual development, the aim of the study was to examine how in utero exposure to nitrate would affect male rat fetuses. Pregnant dams were dosed with nitrate in the drinking water from gestational day (GD) 7 to GD21 at the following dose levels 17.5, 50, 150, 450, and 900 mg...

  4. The endocrine disruption properties of an adipose contaminant mixture extracted from East Greenland polar bears studied in the H295R cell line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, R.; Letcher, R. J.; Blair, D.

    In recent years there has been much debate on the potential risk of chemicals that have been classified as endocrine disruption compounds (EDCs). Human and environmental risk assessment of EDCs is a challenge since the exposure to humans and wildlife is a complex mixture of many known and unknown...... compounds, where some can be in the parts-perbillion (ppb) concentration range. However, most reported studies on endocrine disruption effects have been on single compounds at concentrations higher than environmentally relevant. The presence of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in arctic wildlife has...... been well described and especially the polar bear (Ursus maritimus) is recognized as being one of the most contaminated species in the Arctic. The present study investigated the in vitro endocrine disruptive effects of the POP mixture found in adipose tissue from 10 East Greenland polar bears collected...

  5. Endocrine disrupting activities of surface water associated with a West Virginia oil and gas industry wastewater disposal site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kassotis, Christopher D., E-mail: christopher.kassotis@duke.edu [Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Iwanowicz, Luke R. [U.S. Geological Survey, Leetown Science Center, Fish Health Branch, 11649 Leetown Road, Kearneysville, WV 25430 (United States); Akob, Denise M.; Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.; Mumford, Adam C. [U.S. Geological Survey, National Research Program, 12201 Sunrise Valley Drive, MS 430, Reston, VA 20192 (United States); Orem, William H. [U.S. Geological Survey, Eastern Energy Resources Science Center, 12201 Sunrise Valley Drive, MS 956, Reston, VA 20192 (United States); Nagel, Susan C., E-mail: nagels@health.missouri.edu [Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Women' s Health, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Currently, > 95% of end disposal of hydraulic fracturing wastewater from unconventional oil and gas operations in the US occurs via injection wells. Key data gaps exist in understanding the potential impact of underground injection on surface water quality and environmental health. The goal of this study was to assess endocrine disrupting activity in surface water at a West Virginia injection well disposal site. Water samples were collected from a background site in the area and upstream, on, and downstream of the disposal facility. Samples were solid-phase extracted, and extracts assessed for agonist and antagonist hormonal activities for five hormone receptors in mammalian and yeast reporter gene assays. Compared to reference water extracts upstream and distal to the disposal well, samples collected adjacent and downstream exhibited considerably higher antagonist activity for the estrogen, androgen, progesterone, glucocorticoid and thyroid hormone receptors. In contrast, low levels of agonist activity were measured in upstream/distal sites, and were inhibited or absent at downstream sites with significant antagonism. Concurrent analyses by partner laboratories (published separately) describe the analytical and geochemical profiling of the water; elevated conductivity as well as high sodium, chloride, strontium, and barium concentrations indicate impacts due to handling of unconventional oil and gas wastewater. Notably, antagonist activities in downstream samples were at equivalent authentic standard concentrations known to disrupt reproduction and/or development in aquatic animals. Given the widespread use of injection wells for end-disposal of hydraulic fracturing wastewater, these data raise concerns for human and animal health nearby. - Highlights: • Oil and gas wastewater disposal may increase endocrine disrupting activity in water. • Tested EDC activity in surface water near oil and gas wastewater injection site. • Water downstream had significantly

  6. Science and policy on endocrine disrupters must not be mixed: a reply to a “common sense” intervention by toxicology journal editors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergman, Åke; Andersson, Anna-Maria; Becher, Georg

    2013-01-01

    The “common sense” intervention by toxicology journal editors regarding proposed European Union endocrine disrupter regulations ignores scientific evidence and well-established principles of chemical risk assessment. In this commentary, endocrine disrupter experts express their concerns about...... a recently published, and is in our considered opinion inaccurate and factually incorrect, editorial that has appeared in several journals in toxicology. Some of the shortcomings of the editorial are discussed in detail. We call for a better founded scientific debate which may help to overcome a polarisation...

  7. Analytical Methodologies for the Determination of Endocrine Disrupting Compounds in Biological and Environmental Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoraida Sosa-Ferrera

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Endocrine-disruptor compounds (EDCs can mimic natural hormones and produce adverse effects in the endocrine functions by interacting with estrogen receptors. EDCs include both natural and synthetic chemicals, such as hormones, personal care products, surfactants, and flame retardants, among others. EDCs are characterised by their ubiquitous presence at trace-level concentrations and their wide diversity. Since the discovery of the adverse effects of these pollutants on wildlife and human health, analytical methods have been developed for their qualitative and quantitative determination. In particular, mass-based analytical methods show excellent sensitivity and precision for their quantification. This paper reviews recently published analytical methodologies for the sample preparation and for the determination of these compounds in different environmental and biological matrices by liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. The various sample preparation techniques are compared and discussed. In addition, recent developments and advances in this field are presented.

  8. Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals and Endometrial Cancer: An Overview of Recent Laboratory Evidence and Epidemiological Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallozzi, Maddalena; Leone, Chiara; Manurita, Francesca; Bellati, Filippo; Caserta, Donatella

    2017-01-01

    Background: Although exposure to endocrine disruptor compounds (EDCs) has been suggested as a contributing factor to a range of women’s health disorders including infertility, polycystic ovaries and the early onset of puberty, considerable challenges remain in attributing cause and effect on gynaecological cancer. Until recently, there were relatively few epidemiological studies examining the relationship between EDCs and endometrial cancer, however, in the last years the number of these studies has increased. Methods: A systematic MEDLINE (PubMed) search was performed and relevant articles published in the last 23 years (from 1992 to 2016) were selected. Results: Human studies and animal experiments are confirming a carcinogenic effect due to the EDC exposure and its carcinogenesis process result to be complex, multifactorial and long standing, thus, it is extremely difficult to obtain the epidemiological proof of a carcinogenic effect of EDCs for the high number of confusing factors. Conclusions: The carcinogenic effects of endocrine disruptors are plausible, although additional studies are needed to clarify their mechanisms and responsible entities. Neverthless, to reduce endocrine disruptors (ED) exposure is mandatory to implement necessary measures to limit exposure, particularly during those periods of life most vulnerable to the impact of oncogenic environmental causes, such as embryonic period and puberty. PMID:28327540

  9. Conifer Diterpene Resin Acids Disrupt Juvenile Hormone-Mediated Endocrine Regulation in the Indian Meal Moth Plodia interpunctella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Hyun-Woo; Yun, Chan-Seok; Jeon, Jun Hyoung; Kim, Ji-Ae; Park, Doo-Sang; Ryu, Hyung Won; Oh, Sei-Ryang; Song, Hyuk-Hwan; Shin, Yunhee; Jung, Chan Sik; Shin, Sang Woon

    2017-07-01

    Diterpene resin acids (DRAs) are important components of oleoresin and greatly contribute to the defense strategies of conifers against herbivorous insects. In the present study, we determined that DRAs function as insect juvenile hormone (JH) antagonists that interfere with the juvenile hormone-mediated binding of the JH receptor Methoprene-tolerant (Met) and steroid receptor coactivator (SRC). Using a yeast two-hybrid system transformed with Met and SRC from the Indian meal moth Plodia interpunctella, we tested the interfering activity of 3704 plant extracts against JH III-mediated Met-SRC binding. Plant extracts from conifers, especially members of the Pinaceae, exhibited strong interfering activity, and four active interfering DRAs (7α-dehydroabietic acid, 7-oxodehydroabietic acid, dehydroabietic acid, and sandaracopimaric acid) were isolated from roots of the Japanese pine Pinus densiflora. The four isolated DRAs, along with abietic acid, disrupted the juvenile hormone-mediated binding of P. interpunctella Met and SRC, although only 7-oxodehydroabietic acid disrupted larval development. These results demonstrate that DRAs may play a defensive role against herbivorous insects via insect endocrine-disrupting activity.

  10. Parental occupational exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals and male genital malformations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morales-Suárez-Varela, María M; Toft, Gunnar; Jensen, Morten S

    2011-01-01

    Sex hormones closely regulate development of the male genital organs during fetal life. The hypothesis that xenobiotics may disrupt endogenous hormonal signalling has received considerable scientific attention, but human evidence is scarce....

  11. Correlation of Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals Serum Levels and White Blood Cells Gene Expression of Nuclear Receptors in a Population of Infertile Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donatella Caserta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Significant evidence supports that many endocrine disrupting chemicals could affect female reproductive health. Aim of this study was to compare the internal exposure to bisphenol A (BPA, perfluorooctane sulphonate (PFOS, perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA, monoethylhexyl phthalate (MEHP, and di(2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP in serum samples of 111 infertile women and 44 fertile women. Levels of gene expression of nuclear receptors (ERα, ERβ, AR, AhR, PXR, and PPARγ were also analyzed as biomarkers of effective dose. The percentage of women with BPA concentrations above the limit of detection was significantly higher in infertile women than in controls. No statistically significant difference was found with regard to PFOS, PFOA, MEHP and DEHP. Infertile patients showed gene expression levels of ERα, ERβ, AR, and PXR significantly higher than controls. In infertile women, a positive association was found between BPA and MEHP levels and ERα, ERβ, AR, AhR, and PXR expression. PFOS concentration positively correlated with AR and PXR expression. PFOA levels negatively correlated with AhR expression. No correlation was found between DEHP levels and all evaluated nuclear receptors. This study underlines the need to provide special attention to substances that are still widely present in the environment and to integrate exposure measurements with relevant indicators of biological effects.

  12. Endocrine-disrupting environmental chemicals - hazards to man and animal; Hormonell wirksame Umweltchemikalien - Gefahr fuer Mensch und Tier? Seminarband der Zentralen Informationsstelle Umweltberatung Bayern. Bd. 12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behling, G.; Koller, U.; Klemmer, A.; Haury, H.J. [comps.

    1998-08-01

    The spectrum of problems relating to endocrine-disrupting environmental chemicals was presented by competent experts from public authorities and scientific institutions. The lecturers described the current stage and future tasks of research. Their lectures focused on effects of hormone-like substances on humans and animals and an assessment of risk factors on the basis of data from scientific tests and current environmental exposure. There was also a contribution presenting the chemical industry`s view of the matter. [Deutsch] Kompetente Sachverstaendige aus Behoerden und wissenschaftlichen Einrichtungen stellten das Themenspektrum vor, fuehrten in den Forschungsstand ein und zeigten den Forschungsbedarf auf. Der Schwerpunkt lag in der Darstellung der der Auswirkungen hormonell wirksamer Substanzen, wie z.B. DDT, Dioxinen und PCBs, auf Mensch und Tier sowie in der Abschaetzung der Risikofaktoren anhand der bekannten Daten aus wissenschaftlichen Tests sowie der aktuellen Exposition in der Umwelt. Mit einem Beitrag der chemischen Industrie wurde auch deren Einschaetzung der Umweltproblematik aufgezeigt. (orig./MG) m9

  13. The UV-filter benzophenone-1 inhibits 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 3: Virtual screening as a strategy to identify potential endocrine disrupting chemicals.

    OpenAIRE

    Nashev Lyubomir G; Schuster Daniela; Laggner Christian; Sodha Seloni; Langer Thierry; Wolber Gerhard; Odermatt Alex

    2010-01-01

    The prevalence of male reproductive disorders and testicular cancer is steadily increasing. Because the exposure to chemicals disrupting natural hormone action has been associated with these diseases it is important to identify endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) and their targets of action. Here a 3D structural database that can be applied for virtual screening approaches to facilitate the identification of EDCs was constructed. The database was screened using pharmacophores of 17beta hydr...

  14. Perinatal exposure to mixtures of endocrine disrupting chemicals reduces female rat follicle reserves and accelerates reproductive aging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Hanna Katarina Lilith; Jacobsen, Pernille Rosenskjold; Hass, Ulla

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) during development can have negative consequences later in life. In this study we investigated the effect of perinatal exposure to mixtures of human relevant EDCs on the female reproductive system. Rat dams were exposed to a mixture of phthalates...... numbers was seen in AAmix and PM groups, and reduced plasma levels of prolactin was seen in AAmix. In one-year-old animals, the incidence of irregular estrous cycles was higher after Totalmix-exposure and reduced ovary weights were seen in Totalmix, AAmix, and PM groups. These findings resemble premature...... ovarian insufficiency in humans, and raises concern regarding potential effects of mixtures of EDCs on female reproductive function....

  15. Enantioselective endocrine disrupting effects of omeprazole studied in the H295R cell assay and by molecular modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Amalie Møller; Hansen, Cecilie Hurup; Bonomo, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    -OME) and R-omeprazole (R-OME) in CYP17A1, CYP19A1 and CYP21A2 were carried out. Exposing H295R cells to OME and its enantiomers resulted in an increase of progesterone (PRO) and 17α-hydroxy-progesterone (OH-PRO) levels. At the same time, a decrease in the corticosteroid and androgen synthesis was observed...... of the heme for S-OME in CYP17A1 and S- and R-OME in CYP21A2. However, density functional theory calculations suggest that the direct N-Fe interaction is weak. The study demonstrates enantioselective differences in the endocrine disrupting potential of chiral drugs such as omeprazole. These findings may have...

  16. Neurobehavioral deficits, diseases, and associated costs of exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals in the European union

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bellanger, Martine; Demeneix, Barbara; Grandjean, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    CONTEXT: Epidemiological studies and animal models demonstrate that endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) contribute to cognitive deficits and neurodevelopmental disabilities. OBJECTIVE: The objective was to estimate neurodevelopmental disability and associated costs that can be reasonably...... peer-reviewed studies to represent European exposure and approximate burden of disease. Cost estimation as of 2010 utilized lifetime economic productivity estimates, lifetime cost estimates for autism spectrum disorder, and annual costs for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. Setting, Patients...... by multiple EDCs was assigned a 20-69% probability, with 19 300 to 31 200 attributable cases at a cost of €1.21 billion to €2.86 billion. CONCLUSIONS: EDC exposures in Europe contribute substantially to neurobehavioral deficits and disease, with a high probability of >€150 billion costs/year. These results...

  17. Short-term exposure of arsenite disrupted thyroid endocrine system and altered gene transcription in the HPT axis in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hong-Jie; Li, Hong-Bo; Xiang, Ping; Zhang, Xiaowei; Ma, Lena Q

    2015-10-01

    Arsenic (As) pollution in aquatic environment may adversely impact fish health by disrupting their thyroid hormone homeostasis. In this study, we explored the effect of short-term exposure of arsenite (AsIII) on thyroid endocrine system in zebrafish. We measured As concentrations, As speciation, and thyroid hormone thyroxine levels in whole zebrafish, oxidative stress (H2O2) and damage (MDA) in the liver, and gene transcription in hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis in the brain and liver tissues of zebrafish after exposing to different AsIII concentrations for 48 h. Result indicated that exposure to AsIII increased inorganic As in zebrafish to 0.46-0.72 mg kg(-1), induced oxidative stress with H2O2 being increased by 1.4-2.5 times and caused oxidative damage with MDA being augmented by 1.6 times. AsIII exposure increased thyroxine levels by 1.3-1.4 times and modulated gene transcription in HPT axis. Our study showed AsIII caused oxidative damage, affected thyroid endocrine system and altered gene transcription in HPT axis in zebrafish. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Detection of endocrine disrupting chemicals and evidence of their effects on the HPG axis of the European anchovy Engraulis encrasicolus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miccoli, Andrea; Maradonna, Francesca; De Felice, Andrea; Caputo Barucchi, Vincenzo; Estonba, Andone; Genangeli, Michele; Vittori, Sauro; Leonori, Iole; Carnevali, Oliana

    2017-06-01

    Natural/synthetic Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) may display estrogenic activity and a lower potency than 17β-estradiol. Nonetheless, their concentrations and additive effects can affect the endocrine system and reproductive processes related to the Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Gonadal (HPG) axis. Because of their persistence in both the environment and biological systems, they ultimately target multi-level predators, including humans. We detected presence and effects of xenobiotics on wild anchovy Engraulis encrasicolus in the Western Adriatic Sea. Twenty-one PCBs and five organochlorines were detected on the order of ng g -1 ; vitellogenin, vitellogenin receptor and genes encoding for the zona radiata proteins were evaluated in gonad and/or liver and found transcribed in male specimens; in addition, intersex was histologically identified in the 13% of testis. Our results have developed the understanding of the European anchovy's reproductive toxicological risk and our approach could assist the comprehension of the complex dynamics of commercially relevant Teleost species. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Environmental Analysis of Endocrine Disrupting Effects from Hydrocarbon Contaminants in the Ecosystem - Final Report - 09/15/1996 - 09/14/2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLachlan, John A.

    2000-01-01

    The three major components of the research included: (a) a biotechnology based screening system to identify potential hormone mimics and antagonists (b) an animal screening system to identify biomarkers of endocrine effects and (c) a literature review to identify compounds at various DOE sites that are potential endocrine disruptors. Species of particular interest in this study were those that can serve as sentinel species (e.g., amphibians) and thus provide early warning signals for more widespread impacts on an ecosystem and its wildlife and human inhabitants. The objective of this basic research is to characterize the potential of common hydrocarbon contaminants in ecosystems to act as endocrine disruptors. Although the endocrine disrupting effects of contaminants such as dioxin and PCBs have been well characterized in both animals and humans, little is known about the capacities of other hydrocarbon contaminants to act as endocrine disruptors. Results obtained from this research project have provided information on endocrine disrupting contaminants for consideration in DOE's risk analyses for determining clean-up levels and priorities at contaminated DOE sites

  20. Environmental Analysis of Endocrine Disrupting Effects from Hydrocarbon Contaminants in the Ecosystem - Final Report - 09/15/1996 - 09/14/2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLachlan, John A.

    2000-09-14

    The three major components of the research included: (a) a biotechnology based screening system to identify potential hormone mimics and antagonists (b) an animal screening system to identify biomarkers of endocrine effects and (c) a literature review to identify compounds at various DOE sites that are potential endocrine disruptors. Species of particular interest in this study were those that can serve as sentinel species (e.g., amphibians) and thus provide early warning signals for more widespread impacts on an ecosystem and its wildlife and human inhabitants. The objective of this basic research is to characterize the potential of common hydrocarbon contaminants in ecosystems to act as endocrine disruptors. Although the endocrine disrupting effects of contaminants such as dioxin and PCBs have been well characterized in both animals and humans, little is known about the capacities of other hydrocarbon contaminants to act as endocrine disruptors. Results obtained from this research project have provided information on endocrine disrupting contaminants for consideration in DOE's risk analyses for determining clean-up levels and priorities at contaminated DOE sites.

  1. Endocrine-disrupting effects and reproductive toxicity of low dose MCLR on male frogs (Rana nigromaculata) in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, Xiuying; Cai, Chenchen; Wang, Jia; Gao, Nana; Zhang, Hangjun, E-mail: zhanghangjun@gmail.com

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Low-dose MCLR (1 μg/L) elicits a potential ecological effect on amphibian populations. • MCLR can induce abnormal sperm morphologies and activities on male frogs. • MCLR can induce a decrease in serum testosterone and an increase in serum estradiol of male frogs. • MCLR can increase SF-1 protein levels and decrease P450 aromatase levels in the gonads of frogs. - Abstract: Toxic cyanobacterial blooms are potential global threats to aquatic ecosystems and human health. The World Health Organization has set a provisional guideline limit of 1 μg/L microcystin-LR (MCLR) in freshwater. However, MCLR concentrations in several water bodies have exceeded this level. Despite this recommended human safety standard, MCLR-induced endocrine-disrupting effects and reproductive toxicity on male frog (Rana nigromaculata) were demonstrated in this study. Results showed that sperm motility and sperm count were significantly and negatively correlated with exposure time and concentration. By contrast, abnormal sperm rate was positively correlated with both parameters. Ultrastructural observation results revealed abnormal sperm morphologies, vacuoles in spermatogenic cells, cell dispersion, incomplete cell structures, and deformed nucleoli. These results indicated that MCLR could induce toxic effects on the reproductive system of frogs, significantly decrease testosterone content, and rapidly increase estradiol content. Prolonged exposure and increased concentration enhanced the relative expression levels of P450 aromatase and steroidogenic factor 1; thus, endocrine function in frogs was disrupted. This study is the first to demonstrate in vivo MCLR toxicity in the reproductive system of male R. nigromaculata. This study provided a scientific basis of the global decline in amphibian populations.

  2. Endocrine-disrupting effects and reproductive toxicity of low dose MCLR on male frogs (Rana nigromaculata) in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia, Xiuying; Cai, Chenchen; Wang, Jia; Gao, Nana; Zhang, Hangjun

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Low-dose MCLR (1 μg/L) elicits a potential ecological effect on amphibian populations. • MCLR can induce abnormal sperm morphologies and activities on male frogs. • MCLR can induce a decrease in serum testosterone and an increase in serum estradiol of male frogs. • MCLR can increase SF-1 protein levels and decrease P450 aromatase levels in the gonads of frogs. - Abstract: Toxic cyanobacterial blooms are potential global threats to aquatic ecosystems and human health. The World Health Organization has set a provisional guideline limit of 1 μg/L microcystin-LR (MCLR) in freshwater. However, MCLR concentrations in several water bodies have exceeded this level. Despite this recommended human safety standard, MCLR-induced endocrine-disrupting effects and reproductive toxicity on male frog (Rana nigromaculata) were demonstrated in this study. Results showed that sperm motility and sperm count were significantly and negatively correlated with exposure time and concentration. By contrast, abnormal sperm rate was positively correlated with both parameters. Ultrastructural observation results revealed abnormal sperm morphologies, vacuoles in spermatogenic cells, cell dispersion, incomplete cell structures, and deformed nucleoli. These results indicated that MCLR could induce toxic effects on the reproductive system of frogs, significantly decrease testosterone content, and rapidly increase estradiol content. Prolonged exposure and increased concentration enhanced the relative expression levels of P450 aromatase and steroidogenic factor 1; thus, endocrine function in frogs was disrupted. This study is the first to demonstrate in vivo MCLR toxicity in the reproductive system of male R. nigromaculata. This study provided a scientific basis of the global decline in amphibian populations

  3. CDNA CLONING OF FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS) ESTROGEN AND ANDROGEN RECEPTORS FOR USE IN STEROID RECEPTOR EXTRAPOLATION STUDIES FOR ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING CHEMICALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    cDNA Cloning of Fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) Estrogen and Androgen Receptors for Use in Steroid Receptor Extrapolation Studies for Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals. Wilson, V.S.1,, Korte, J.2, Hartig P. 1, Ankley, G.T.2, Gray, L.E., Jr 1, , and Welch, J.E.1. 1U.S...

  4. Use of an In Vitro, Nuclear Receptor Assay Panel to Characterize the Endocrine-Disrupting Activity Load of Wastewater Treatment Plant Effluent Extracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Use of an In Vitro, Nuclear Receptor Assay Panel to Characterize the Endocrine-Disrupting Activity Load of Wastewater Treatment Plant Effluent Extracts Katie B. Paul 1.2, Ruth Marfil-Vega 1 Marc A. Mills3, Steve 0. Simmons2, Vickie S. Wilson4, Kevin M. Crofton2 10ak Rid...

  5. Search for the evidence of endocrine disruption in the aquatic environment: Lessons to be learned from joint biological and chemical monitoring in the European Project COMPREHEND

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eggen, R.I.L.; Bengtsson, B.E.; Bowmer, C.T.; Gerritsen, A.A.M.; Gibert, M.; Hylland, K.; Johnson, A.C.; Leonards, P.E.G.; Nakari, T.; Norrgren, L.; Sumpter, J.P.; Suter, M.J.F.; Svenson, A.; Pickering, A.D.

    2003-01-01

    Between January 1999 and December 2001, the European Community project COMPREHEND was performed. The overall aim of COMPREHEND was to assess endocrine disruption in the aquatic environment in Europe, consequent to effluent discharge, with emphasis on estrogenic activity. COMPREHEND demonstrated the

  6. Selected endocrine disrupting compounds (vinclozolin, flutamide, ketoconazole and dicofol): Effects on survival, occurrence of males, growth, molting and reproduction of Daphnia magna

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Haeba, M. H.; Hilscherová, Klára; Mazurová, E.; Bláha, Luděk

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 3 (2008), s. 222-227 ISSN 0944-1344 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : Daphnia magna * dicofol * endocrine disruption Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 2.492, year: 2008

  7. Contaminant mixtures and repoductive health: Developmental toxicity effects in rats after mixed exposure to environmentally relevant endocrine disrupting chemicals, with focus on effects in females

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Pernille Rosenskjold; Christiansen, Sofie; Hass, Ulla

    chemicals included phthalates, pesticides, UV-filters, bisphenol A, parabens and the drug paracetamol. Together the chemicals represented several modes of action with regard to endocrine disrupting mode of action. Finally, results from a dose response study on the estrogenic drug EE2 were included. In all...

  8. Prenatal exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals and risk of being born small for gestational age: Pooled analysis of seven European birth cohorts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Govarts, Eva; Iszatt, Nina; Trnovec, Tomas; de Cock, Marijke; Eggesbø, Merete; Palkovicova Murinova, Lubica; van de Bor, Margot; Guxens, Mònica; Chevrier, Cécile; Koppen, Gudrun; Lamoree, Marja; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva; Lopez-Espinosa, Maria Jose; Lertxundi, Aitana; Grimalt, Joan O.; Torrent, Maties; Goñi-Irigoyen, Fernando; Vermeulen, Roel; Legler, Juliette; Schoeters, Greet

    Background and aims: There is evidence that endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) have developmental effects at environmental concentrations. We investigated whether some EDCs are associated with the adverse birth outcome Small for Gestational Age (SGA). Methods: We used PCB 153, p,p’-DDE, HCB, PFOS

  9. An investigation of the endocrine-disruptive effects of bisphenol a in human and rat fetal testes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Millissia Ben Maamar

    Full Text Available Few studies have been undertaken to assess the possible effects of bisphenol A (BPA on the reproductive hormone balance in animals or humans with often contradictory results. We investigated possible direct endocrine disruption by BPA of the fetal testes of 2 rat strains (14.5-17.5 days post-coitum and humans (8-12 gestational weeks and under different culture conditions. BPA concentrations of 10(-8M and 10(-5M for 72 h reduced testosterone production by the Sprague-Dawley fetal rat testes, while only 10-5M suppressed it in the Wistar strain. The suppressive effects at 10-5M were seen as early as 24h and 48 h in both strains. BPA at 10(-7-10(-5M for 72 h suppressed the levels of fetal rat Leydig cell insulin-like factor 3 (INSL3. BPA exposure at 10(-8M, 10(-7M, and 10(-5M for 72 h inhibited testosterone production in fetal human testes. For the lowest doses, the effects observed occurred only when no gonadotrophin was added to the culture media and were associated with a poorly preserved testicular morphology. We concluded that (i BPA can display anti-androgenic effects both in rat and human fetal testes; (ii it is essential to ascertain that the divergent effects of endocrine disruptors between species in vitro do not result from the culture conditions used, and/or the rodent strain selected; (iii the optimization of each in vitro assay for a given species should be a major objective rather than the search of an hypothetical trans-species consensual model-system, as the organization of the testis is intrinsically different between mammalian species; (iv due to the uncertainty existing on the internal exposure of the human fetal testis to BPA, and the insufficient number of epidemiological studies on the endocrine disruptive effects of BPA, caution should be taken in the extrapolation of our present results to the human reproductive health after fetal exposure to BPA.

  10. Occupational exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals and the risk of uveal melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrens, Thomas; Lynge, Elsebeth; Cree, Ian

    2012-01-01

    -disrupting agents. We constructed several exposure scores, taking into account intensity of exposure, use of personal protective equipment, and exposure duration. We calculated unconditional logistic regression analyses, adjusting for country, age, sex, eye color and a history of ocular damage due to intense...

  11. Endocrine disrupting activities of surface water associated with a West Virginia oil and gas industry wastewater disposal site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassotis, Christopher D.; Iwanowicz, Luke R.; Akob, Denise M.; Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.; Mumford, Adam; Orem, William H.; Nagel, Susan C.

    2016-01-01

    Currently, >95% of end disposal of hydraulic fracturing wastewater from unconventional oil and gas operations in the US occurs via injection wells. Key data gaps exist in understanding the potential impact of underground injection on surface water quality and environmental health. The goal of this study was to assess endocrine disrupting activity in surface water at a West Virginia injection well disposal site. Water samples were collected from a background site in the area and upstream, on, and downstream of the disposal facility. Samples were solid-phase extracted, and extracts assessed for agonist and antagonist hormonal activities for five hormone receptors in mammalian and yeast reporter gene assays. Compared to reference water extracts upstream and distal to the disposal well, samples collected adjacent and downstream exhibited considerably higher antagonist activity for the estrogen, androgen, progesterone, glucocorticoid and thyroid hormone receptors. In contrast, low levels of agonist activity were measured in upstream/distal sites, and were inhibited or absent at downstream sites with significant antagonism. Concurrent analyses by partner laboratories (published separately) describe the analytical and geochemical profiling of the water; elevated conductivity as well as high sodium, chloride, strontium, and barium concentrations indicate impacts due to handling of unconventional oil and gas wastewater. Notably, antagonist activities in downstream samples were at equivalent authentic standard concentrations known to disrupt reproduction and/or development in aquatic animals. Given the widespread use of injection wells for end-disposal of hydraulic fracturing wastewater, these data raise concerns for human and animal health nearby.

  12. Bioconcentration and endocrine disruption effects of diazepam in channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overturf, C L; Overturf, M D; Huggett, D B

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the detection of pharmaceuticals in surface waters has increased worldwide. Pharmaceuticals are typically found in the environment at concentrations well below therapeutic levels in humans; however, their mechanisms of action may be largely unknown in non-target organisms, such as teleost species. Thus, chronic exposure to these types of compounds warrants further investigation. The goal of this study was to examine the potential for diazepam, a model benzodiazepine drug, to bioconcentrate in tissues of channel catfish and to examine its ability to interact with the endocrine system through modulation of steroid hormones and/or steroidogenic genes. To investigate the bioconcentration potential of diazepam, channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) were exposed to 1 ng/mL diazepam for seven days, followed by clean water for another seven days, using an abbreviated OECD 305 Fish Bioconcentration Test study design. This concentration of diazepam is well below environmentally relevant concentrations of diazepam (ng/L). To evaluate steroidogenic effects, fish were exposed to 1 ng/mL diazepam for seven days only. Steroid hormone concentrations were analyzed for various tissues, as well as expression of selected steroidogenic genes. Calculated bioconcentration factors for diazepam were well below regulatory threshold values in all tissues analyzed. No changes in steroid hormone concentration were detected in any tissue analyzed; however, the steroidogenic gene cytochrome P450 side chain cleavage (P450scc) was significantly down-regulated at day 5 and 3β-hydroxy steroid dehydrogenase (3β-HSD) was significantly down-regulated at day 7 in the gonad. These results indicate that although diazepam does not significantly bioconcentrate, low-level chronic exposure to diazepam may have the potential to interact with endocrine function by altering gene expression. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Bisphenol A accumulation in eggs disrupts the endocrine regulation of growth in rainbow trout larvae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birceanu, Oana; Servos, Mark R.; Vijayan, Mathilakath M., E-mail: matt.vijayan@ucalgary.ca

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • BPA in eggs reduces growth and increases food conversion ratio in trout larvae. • BPA in eggs disrupts larval transcript abundance of genes involved in GH/IGF axis. • BPA in eggs disrupts thyroid hormone receptor mRNA levels. • BPA in eggs consistently suppressed IGF-1rb mRNA levels during early development. - Abstract: Bisphenol A (BPA), a monomer used in the production of plastics and epoxy resins, is ubiquitously present in the aquatic environment. BPA is considered a weak estrogen in fish, but the effects of this chemical on early developmental events are far from clear. We tested the hypothesis that BPA accumulation in eggs, mimicking maternal transfer, disrupts growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor (GH/IGF) axis function, leading to defects in larval growth in rainbow trout. Trout oocytes were exposed to 0 (control), 0.3, 3, and 30 μg ml{sup −1} BPA for 3 h, which led to an accumulation of around 0, 1, 4 and 40 ng BPA per egg, respectively. All treatment groups were fertilized with clean milt and reared in clean water for the rest of the experiment. The embryo BPA content declined over time in all groups and was completely eliminated by 42 days post-fertilization (dpf). Hatchlings from BPA accumulated eggs had higher water content and reduced total energy levels prior to first feed. There was an overall reduction in the specific growth rate and food conversion ratio in larvae reared from BPA-laden eggs. BPA accumulation disrupted the mRNA abundance of genes involved in GH/IGF axis function, including GH isoforms and their receptors, IGF-1 and -2 and IGF receptors, in a life stage-dependent manner. Also, there was a temporal disruption in the mRNA levels of thyroid hormone receptors in the larvae raised from BPA-laden eggs. Altogether, BPA accumulation in eggs, mimicking maternal transfer, affects larval growth and the mode of action involves disruption of genes involved in the GH/IGF and thyroid axes function in trout.

  14. Bisphenol A accumulation in eggs disrupts the endocrine regulation of growth in rainbow trout larvae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birceanu, Oana; Servos, Mark R.; Vijayan, Mathilakath M.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • BPA in eggs reduces growth and increases food conversion ratio in trout larvae. • BPA in eggs disrupts larval transcript abundance of genes involved in GH/IGF axis. • BPA in eggs disrupts thyroid hormone receptor mRNA levels. • BPA in eggs consistently suppressed IGF-1rb mRNA levels during early development. - Abstract: Bisphenol A (BPA), a monomer used in the production of plastics and epoxy resins, is ubiquitously present in the aquatic environment. BPA is considered a weak estrogen in fish, but the effects of this chemical on early developmental events are far from clear. We tested the hypothesis that BPA accumulation in eggs, mimicking maternal transfer, disrupts growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor (GH/IGF) axis function, leading to defects in larval growth in rainbow trout. Trout oocytes were exposed to 0 (control), 0.3, 3, and 30 μg ml −1 BPA for 3 h, which led to an accumulation of around 0, 1, 4 and 40 ng BPA per egg, respectively. All treatment groups were fertilized with clean milt and reared in clean water for the rest of the experiment. The embryo BPA content declined over time in all groups and was completely eliminated by 42 days post-fertilization (dpf). Hatchlings from BPA accumulated eggs had higher water content and reduced total energy levels prior to first feed. There was an overall reduction in the specific growth rate and food conversion ratio in larvae reared from BPA-laden eggs. BPA accumulation disrupted the mRNA abundance of genes involved in GH/IGF axis function, including GH isoforms and their receptors, IGF-1 and -2 and IGF receptors, in a life stage-dependent manner. Also, there was a temporal disruption in the mRNA levels of thyroid hormone receptors in the larvae raised from BPA-laden eggs. Altogether, BPA accumulation in eggs, mimicking maternal transfer, affects larval growth and the mode of action involves disruption of genes involved in the GH/IGF and thyroid axes function in trout

  15. Endocrine Parameters and Phenotypes of the Growth Hormone Receptor Gene Disrupted (GHR−/−) Mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    List, Edward O.; Sackmann-Sala, Lucila; Berryman, Darlene E.; Funk, Kevin; Kelder, Bruce; Gosney, Elahu S.; Okada, Shigeru; Ding, Juan; Cruz-Topete, Diana

    2011-01-01

    Disruption of the GH receptor (GHR) gene eliminates GH-induced intracellular signaling and, thus, its biological actions. Therefore, the GHR gene disrupted mouse (GHR−/−) has been and is a valuable tool for helping to define various parameters of GH physiology. Since its creation in 1995, this mouse strain has been used by our laboratory and others for numerous studies ranging from growth to aging. Some of the most notable discoveries are their extreme insulin sensitivity in the presence of obesity. Also, the animals have an extended lifespan, which has generated a large number of investigations into the roles of GH and IGF-I in the aging process. This review summarizes the many results derived from the GHR−/− mice. We have attempted to present the findings in the context of current knowledge regarding GH action and, where applicable, to discuss how these mice compare to GH insensitivity syndrome in humans. PMID:21123740

  16. The endocrine disruption properties of an adipose contaminant mixture extracted from East Greenland polar bears studied in the H295R cell line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, R.; Letcher, R. J.; Blair, D.

    been well described and especially the polar bear (Ursus maritimus) is recognized as being one of the most contaminated species in the Arctic. The present study investigated the in vitro endocrine disruptive effects of the POP mixture found in adipose tissue from 10 East Greenland polar bears collected...... compounds, where some can be in the parts-perbillion (ppb) concentration range. However, most reported studies on endocrine disruption effects have been on single compounds at concentrations higher than environmentally relevant. The presence of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in arctic wildlife has...... (dehydroepiandrosterone and androstenedione). These results demonstrated comprehensive in vitro effects of POPs extracted from polar bear adipose tissue on key elements in the steroidogenesis, and identifies disruption of CYP17 activity as a mode of action. A POP-induced interference with CYP17 can potentially explain...

  17. Current limitations and recommendations to improve testing for the environmental assessment of endocrine active substances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coady, Katherine K.; Biever, Ronald C.; Denslow, Nancy D.; Gross, Melanie; Guiney, Patrick D.; Holbech, Henrik; Karouna-Renier, Natalie K.; Katsiadaki, Ioanna; Krueger, Hank; Levine, Steven L.; Maack, Gerd; Williams, Mike; Wolf, Jeffrey C.; Ankley, Gerald T.

    2017-01-01

    In the present study, existing regulatory frameworks and test systems for assessing potential endocrine active chemicals are described, and associated challenges are discussed, along with proposed approaches to address these challenges. Regulatory frameworks vary somewhat across geographies, but all basically evaluate whether a chemical possesses endocrine activity and whether this activity can result in adverse outcomes either to humans or to the environment. Current test systems include in silico, in vitro, and in vivo techniques focused on detecting potential endocrine activity, and in vivo tests that collect apical data to detect possible adverse effects. These test systems are currently designed to robustly assess endocrine activity and/or adverse effects in the estrogen, androgen, and thyroid hormone signaling pathways; however, there are some limitations of current test systems for evaluating endocrine hazard and risk. These limitations include a lack of certainty regarding: 1) adequately sensitive species and life stages; 2) mechanistic endpoints that are diagnostic for endocrine pathways of concern; and 3) the linkage between mechanistic responses and apical, adverse outcomes. Furthermore, some existing test methods are resource intensive with regard to time, cost, and use of animals. However, based on recent experiences, there are opportunities to improve approaches to and guidance for existing test methods and to reduce uncertainty. For example, in vitro high-throughput screening could be used to prioritize chemicals for testing and provide insights as to the most appropriate assays for characterizing hazard and risk. Other recommendations include adding endpoints for elucidating connections between mechanistic effects and adverse outcomes, identifying potentially sensitive taxa for which test methods currently do not exist, and addressing key endocrine pathways of possible concern in addition to those associated with estrogen, androgen, and thyroid

  18. Development of a Biosensor for Identifying Novel Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-02-01

    experiments to discover novel ligands of the estrogen receptor. 8 Figure 6. The experimental plan for regeneration of the biosensor surface and...that humic acid as a model for dissolved organic substances in wastewater and other sources did not interfere with the gold surfaces used in a...depen- dent on the ionic strength of the system. Because very small additions of salts might cause coagulation of the AuNPs, we first studied the effect

  19. Endocrine disrupting effects of zearalenone, alpha- and beta-zearalenol at the level of nuclear receptor binding and steroidogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frizzell, C; Ndossi, D; Verhaegen, S; Dahl, E; Eriksen, G; Sørlie, M; Ropstad, E; Muller, M; Elliott, C T; Connolly, L

    2011-10-10

    The mycotoxin zearalenone (ZEN) is a secondary metabolite of fungi which is produced by certain species of the genus Fusarium and can occur in cereals and other plant products. Reporter gene assays incorporating natural steroid receptors and the H295R steroidogenesis assay have been implemented to assess the endocrine disrupting activity of ZEN and its metabolites α-zearalenol (α-ZOL) and β-zearalenol (β-ZOL). α-ZOL exhibited the strongest estrogenic potency (EC(50) 0.022±0.001 nM), slightly less potent than 17-β estradiol (EC(50) 0.015±0.002 nM). ZEN was ~70 times less potent than α-ZOL and twice as potent as β-ZOL. Binding of progesterone to the progestagen receptor was shown to be synergistically increased in the presence of ZEN, α-ZOL or β-ZOL. ZEN, α-ZOL or β-ZOL increased production of progesterone, estradiol, testosterone and cortisol hormones in the H295R steroidogenesis assay, with peak productions at 10 μM. At 100 μM, cell viability decreased and levels of hormones were significantly reduced except for progesterone. β-ZOL increased estradiol concentrations more than α-ZOL or ZEN, with a maximum effect at 10 μM, with β-ZOL (562±59 pg/ml)>α-ZOL (494±60 pg/ml)>ZEN (375±43 pg/ml). The results indicate that ZEN and its metabolites can act as potential endocrine disruptors at the level of nuclear receptor signalling and by altering hormone production. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Elucidation of endocrine disrupting mechanism of dioxin and related compounds for health risk assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tohyama, Chiharu [National Institute for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba (Japan)

    2004-09-15

    The important point on health risk assessment for dioxins as well as environmental endocrine disruptors is that we should scientifically evaluate whether the actual exposure level from food and environment may pose a threat to human health not only for the present but also for the future generations. We formulated a research project, called CREST project with support from the Japan Science and Technology Agency, in order to obtain experimental evidence for risk assessment as well as for the mechanism of toxicity. We thus investigated the dose-response relationships of certain 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-pdioxin (TCDD)-like compounds for eliciting various endpoints. First, we administered TCDD or coplanar polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) to rats and mice during the sensitive period from fertilization to birth. Second, we studied what kinds of adverse effects could be observed in terms of reproductive/developmental effects, cognitive/learning abilities and immune functions. Third, we focused on the actual toxicity phenotypes found at the whole body and organ/tissue levels by a forward toxicology approach, and tried to narrow down appropriate phenomena, to study the mechanism on the molecular basis by the reverse toxicology approach. In this presentation, I will summarize the outcome of the CREST project.

  1. Towards an integrated biosensor array for simultaneous and rapid multi-analysis of endocrine disrupting chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scognamiglio, Viviana; Pezzotti, Italo; Pezzotti, Gianni; Cano, Juan; Manfredonia, Ivano; Buonasera, Katia; Arduini, Fabiana; Moscone, Danila; Palleschi, Giuseppe; Giardi, Maria Teresa

    2012-11-02

    In this paper we propose the construction and application of a portable multi-purpose biosensor array for the simultaneous detection of a wide range of endocrine disruptor chemicals (EDCs), based on the recognition operated by various enzymes and microorganisms. The developed biosensor combines both electrochemical and optical transduction systems, in order to increase the number of chemical species which can be monitored. Considering to the maximum residue level (MRL) of contaminants established by the European Commission, the biosensor system was able to detect most of the chemicals analysed with very high sensitivity. In particular, atrazine and diuron were detected with a limit of detection of 0.5nM, with an RSD% less than 5%; paraoxon and chlorpyrifos were revealed with a detection of 5 μM and 4.5 μM, respectively, with an RSD% less than 6%; catechol and bisphenol A were identified with a limit of detection of 1 μM and 35 μM respectively, with an RSD% less than 5%. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. DDT in zebra mussels from Lake Maggiore (N. Italy): level of contamination and endocrine disruptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binelli, Andrea; Bacchetta, Renato; Mantecca, Paride; Ricciardi, Francesco; Provini, Alfredo; Vailati, Giovanni

    2004-08-10

    The DDT contamination of Lake Maggiore (Northern Italy) has been monitored since a serious pollution event occurred in 1996. To assess the environmental risk associated with this contamination, bioaccumulation data coupled with histopathological markers were evaluated on zebra mussel populations from two different contaminated sites from April 2001 to April 2002. Biomonitoring results showed high DDT pollution in 2001 because of a flood which transported DDTs still contained in the sediments of a polluted river to the lake. DDT concentrations reached values of 4-5 microg/g lipids, higher than those recorded in other industrialized countries but comparable to levels measured in developing ones. In the ovaries of the most highly polluted mussels, histological analyses showed a delay in oocyte maturation and a high incidence of pathological pictures mainly referable to oocyte degeneration and haemocytic infiltration. Moreover, despite the presence of mature sperms, in 2001 first male gamete release occurred about 2 months later than in females. These results indicated a neuroendocrine interference of DDT on Dreissena polymorpha reproduction and also showed that these invertebrates can be successfully used to evaluate ecological implications due to exposure to endocrine disruptors in freshwater environments.

  3. QSAR models for reproductive toxicity and endocrine disruption in regulatory use - a preliminary investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Gunde Egeskov; Niemela, J.R.; Wedebye, Eva Bay

    2008-01-01

    and epidemiological human studies), dominant lethal effect in rodents (in vivo) and Drosophila melanogaster sex-linked recessive lethal effect. A structure set of 57,014 European Inventory of Existing Chemical Substances (EINECS) chemicals was screened. A total of 5240 EINECS chemicals, corresponding to 9.2%, were...... predicted as reproductive toxicants by one or more of the models. The chemicals predicted positive for reproductive toxicity will be submitted to the Danish Environmental Protection Agency as scientific input for a future updated advisory classification list with advisory classifications for concern...

  4. Identification of putative estrogen receptor-mediated endocrine disrupting chemicals using QSAR- and structure-based virtual screening approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Liying; Sedykh, Alexander; Tripathi, Ashutosh; Zhu, Hao; Afantitis, Antreas; Mouchlis, Varnavas D.; Melagraki, Georgia; Rusyn, Ivan; Tropsha, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Identification of endocrine disrupting chemicals is one of the important goals of environmental chemical hazard screening. We report on the development of validated in silico predictors of chemicals likely to cause estrogen receptor (ER)-mediated endocrine disruption to facilitate their prioritization for future screening. A database of relative binding affinity of a large number of ERα and/or ERβ ligands was assembled (546 for ERα and 137 for ERβ). Both single-task learning (STL) and multi-task learning (MTL) continuous quantitative structure–activity relationship (QSAR) models were developed for predicting ligand binding affinity to ERα or ERβ. High predictive accuracy was achieved for ERα binding affinity (MTL R 2 = 0.71, STL R 2 = 0.73). For ERβ binding affinity, MTL models were significantly more predictive (R 2 = 0.53, p < 0.05) than STL models. In addition, docking studies were performed on a set of ER agonists/antagonists (67 agonists and 39 antagonists for ERα, 48 agonists and 32 antagonists for ERβ, supplemented by putative decoys/non-binders) using the following ER structures (in complexes with respective ligands) retrieved from the Protein Data Bank: ERα agonist (PDB ID: 1L2I), ERα antagonist (PDB ID: 3DT3), ERβ agonist (PDB ID: 2NV7), and ERβ antagonist (PDB ID: 1L2J). We found that all four ER conformations discriminated their corresponding ligands from presumed non-binders. Finally, both QSAR models and ER structures were employed in parallel to virtually screen several large libraries of environmental chemicals to derive a ligand- and structure-based prioritized list of putative estrogenic compounds to be used for in vitro and in vivo experimental validation. - Highlights: • This is the largest curated dataset inclusive of ERα and β (the latter is unique). • New methodology that for the first time affords acceptable ERβ models. • A combination of QSAR and docking enables prediction of affinity and function. • The results

  5. Identification of putative estrogen receptor-mediated endocrine disrupting chemicals using QSAR- and structure-based virtual screening approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Liying; Sedykh, Alexander; Tripathi, Ashutosh [Eshelman School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Zhu, Hao [The Rutgers Center for Computational and Integrative Biology, Rutgers University, Camden, NJ (United States); Department of Chemistry, Rutgers University, Camden, NJ (United States); Afantitis, Antreas; Mouchlis, Varnavas D.; Melagraki, Georgia [NovaMechanics Ltd., Nicosia (Cyprus); Rusyn, Ivan, E-mail: iir@unc.edu [Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Tropsha, Alexander, E-mail: alex_tropsha@unc.edu [Eshelman School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Identification of endocrine disrupting chemicals is one of the important goals of environmental chemical hazard screening. We report on the development of validated in silico predictors of chemicals likely to cause estrogen receptor (ER)-mediated endocrine disruption to facilitate their prioritization for future screening. A database of relative binding affinity of a large number of ERα and/or ERβ ligands was assembled (546 for ERα and 137 for ERβ). Both single-task learning (STL) and multi-task learning (MTL) continuous quantitative structure–activity relationship (QSAR) models were developed for predicting ligand binding affinity to ERα or ERβ. High predictive accuracy was achieved for ERα binding affinity (MTL R{sup 2} = 0.71, STL R{sup 2} = 0.73). For ERβ binding affinity, MTL models were significantly more predictive (R{sup 2} = 0.53, p < 0.05) than STL models. In addition, docking studies were performed on a set of ER agonists/antagonists (67 agonists and 39 antagonists for ERα, 48 agonists and 32 antagonists for ERβ, supplemented by putative decoys/non-binders) using the following ER structures (in complexes with respective ligands) retrieved from the Protein Data Bank: ERα agonist (PDB ID: 1L2I), ERα antagonist (PDB ID: 3DT3), ERβ agonist (PDB ID: 2NV7), and ERβ antagonist (PDB ID: 1L2J). We found that all four ER conformations discriminated their corresponding ligands from presumed non-binders. Finally, both QSAR models and ER structures were employed in parallel to virtually screen several large libraries of environmental chemicals to derive a ligand- and structure-based prioritized list of putative estrogenic compounds to be used for in vitro and in vivo experimental validation. - Highlights: • This is the largest curated dataset inclusive of ERα and β (the latter is unique). • New methodology that for the first time affords acceptable ERβ models. • A combination of QSAR and docking enables prediction of affinity and function.

  6. Trypanosoma cruzi Disrupts Thymic Homeostasis by Altering Intrathymic and Systemic Stress-Related Endocrine Circuitries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepletier, Ailin; de Carvalho, Vinicius Frias; e Silva, Patricia Machado Rodrigues; Villar, Silvina; Pérez, Ana Rosa; Savino, Wilson; Morrot, Alexandre

    2013-01-01

    -related endocrine circuitries with major consequences upon the normal process of intrathymic T cell development. PMID:24324845

  7. Managing the impacts of endocrine disrupting chemicals in wastewater-impacted streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journey, Celeste A.; Bradley, Paul M.; Kolpin, Dana W.; Bradley, Paul M.

    2013-01-01

    A revolution in analytical instrumentation circa 1920 greatly improved the ability to characterize chemical substances [1]. This analytical foundation resulted in an unprecedented explosion in the design and production of synthetic chemicals during and post-World War II. What is now often referred to as the 2nd Chemical Revolution has provided substantial societal benefits; with modern chemical design and manufacturing supporting dramatic advances in medicine, increased food production, and expanding gross domestic products at the national and global scales as well as improved health, longevity, and lifestyle convenience at the individual scale [1, 2]. Presently, the chemical industry is the largest manufacturing sector in the United States (U.S.) and the second largest in Europe and Japan, representing approximately 5% of the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) in each of these countries [2]. At the turn of the 21st century, the chemical industry was estimated to be worth more than $1.6 trillion and to employ over 10 million people, globally [2]. During the first half of the 20th century, the chemical sector expanded rapidly, the chemical industry enjoyed a generally positive status in society, and chemicals were widely appreciated as fundamental to individual and societal quality of life. Starting in the 1960s, however, the environmental costs associated with the chemical industry increasingly became the focus, due in part to the impact of books like “Silent Spring” [3] and “Our Stolen Future” [4] and to a number of highly publicized environmental disasters. Galvanizing chemical industry disasters included the 1976 dioxin leak north of Milan, Italy, the Love Canal evacuations in Niagara, New York beginning in 1978, and the Union Carbide leak in Bhopal, India in 1984 [2]. Understanding the environmental impact of synthetic compounds is essential to any informed assessment of net societal benefit, for the simple reason that any chemical substance that is in

  8. Managing the effects of endocrine disrupting chemicals in wastewater-impacted streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Paul M.; Kolpin, Dana W.

    2013-01-01

    A revolution in analytical instrumentation circa 1920 greatly improved the ability to characterize chemical substances. This analytical foundation resulted in an unprecedented explosion in the design and production of synthetic chemicals during and post-World War II. What is now often referred to as the 2nd Chemical Revolution has provided substantial societal benefits; with modern chemical design and manufacturing supporting dramatic advances in medicine, increased food production, and expanding gross domestic products at the national and global scales as well as improved health, longevity, and lifestyle convenience at the individual scale. Presently, the chemical industry is the largest manufacturing sector in the United States (U.S.) and the second largest in Europe and Japan, representing approximately 5% of the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) in each of these countries. At the turn of the 21st century, the chemical industry was estimated to be worth more than $1.6 trillion and to employ over 10 million people, globally. During the first half of the 20th century, the chemical sector expanded rapidly, the chemical industry enjoyed a generally positive status in society, and chemicals were widely appreciated as fundamental to individual and societal quality of life. Starting in the 1960s, however, the environmental costs associated with the chemical industry increasingly became the focus, due in part to the impact of books like “Silent Spring” and “Our Stolen Future” and to a number of highly publicized environmental disasters. Galvanizing chemical industry disasters included the 1976 dioxin leak north of Milan, Italy, the Love Canal evacuations in Niagara, New York beginning in 1978, and the Union Carbide leak in Bhopal, India in 1984. Understanding the environmental impact of synthetic compounds is essential to any informed assessment of net societal benefit, for the simple reason that any chemical substance that is in commercial production or use will

  9. Aerobic biodegradation potential of endocrine disrupting chemicals in surface-water sediment at Rocky Mountains National Park, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Paul M.; Battaglin, William A.; Iwanowicz, Luke R.; Clark, Jimmy M.; Journey, Celeste

    2016-01-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDC) in surface water and bed sediment threaten the structure and function of aquatic ecosystems. In natural, remote, and protected surface-water environments where contaminant releases are sporadic, contaminant biodegradation is a fundamental driver of exposure concentration, timing, duration, and, thus, EDC ecological risk. Anthropogenic contaminants, including known and suspected EDC, were detected in surface water and sediment collected from 2 streams and 2 lakes in Rocky Mountains National Park (ROMO). The potential for aerobic EDC biodegradation was assessed in collected sediments using 6 14C-radiolabeled model compounds. Aerobic microbial mineralization of natural (estrone and 17β-estradiol) and synthetic (17α-ethinylestradiol) estrogen was significant at all sites. ROMO bed sediment microbial communities also effectively degraded the xenoestrogens, bisphenol-A and 4-nonylphenol. The same sediment samples exhibited little potential for aerobic biodegradation of triclocarban, however, illustrating the need to assess a wider range of contaminant compounds. The current results support recent concerns over the widespread environmental occurrence of carbanalide antibacterials, like triclocarban and triclosan, and suggest that backcountry use of products containing these compounds should be discouraged.

  10. Identification and quantification of polychlorinated biphenyls and some endocrine disrupting pesticides in human adipose tissue from Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeds, A; Saukko, P

    2001-09-01

    Organochlorine pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were analysed in extracts of human adipose tissue. The samples consisted of abdominal, mammary, and perirenal fat tissue of 27 Finnish adult males and females. Lipids were separated from the low-molecular compounds by preparative gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and the extracts were further cleaned-up using Florisil chromatography. The compounds were analysed in the extracts by gas chromatography (GC) using electron capture detection and by GC-mass spectrometry in the selected ion monitoring mode. Of the 23 analysed pesticide residues only seven could be detected in the extracts. All the extracts contained the DDT metabolite 4,4'-DDE, hexachlorobenzene, and PCBs. Other compounds found in the extracts were 4,4'-DDT, 4,4'-DDD, pentachlorobenzene, and beta- and gamma-hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH). The antiandrogenic 4,4'-DDE was the most abundant pesticide with concentration levels ranging from 3.5 to 3229 ng/g lipids (ppb). The mean concentration of DDE was 567 ppb, of pesticides in all 1008 ppb and of PCBs 504 ppb. Several of the identified compounds have been shown to exhibit endocrine disrupting effects. Statistical analysis showed a positive age correlation of DDE in females and hexachlorobenzene in males. No statistically significant differences were found for concentrations of individual compounds between sexes.

  11. Occurrence and partitioning of endocrine-disrupting compounds in the marine environment of Thermaikos Gulf, Northern Aegean Sea, Greece

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arditsoglou, Anastasia; Voutsa, Dimitra

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Add knowledge regarding the fate of EDCs in marine environment. ► Nonylphenols and its ethoxylates are the dominant pollutants. ► EDCs originated from mainly from river and urban effluents. ► The partition coefficients negatively correlated to suspended particulate matter. ► Mussels exhibited low bioconcentartion factors for nonylphenol and octylphenol. - Abstract: An integrated study was conducted to determine the presence of phenolic and steroid endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs), in the marine environment of Thermaikos Gulf, Northern Aegean Sea, Greece. Seawater, suspended particulate matter, sediments and biota were examined for nonylphenol, octylphenol, their mono- and diethoxylate oligomers, bisphenol A, estrone, 17α-estradiol, 17β-estradiol, estriol, mestranol and 17 α-ethynylestradiol. Phenolic compounds were detected in all of the compartments, with nonylphenol and its ethoxylates being the dominant pollutants. The occurrence of nonylphenol in sediments presents a significant risk to the biota. Mussels exhibited relatively low concentrations and low bioconcentration factors for NP and OP. The effect of terrestrial sources of the EDCs on the marine environment is discussed. The influence of suspended particulate matter and organic carbon in the partition of the EDCs between the dissolved and the particulate phase was investigated.

  12. Exposure to Endocrine Disrupters and Nuclear Receptor Gene Expression in Infertile and Fertile Women from Different Italian Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cinzia La Rocca

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Within the PREVIENI project, infertile and fertile women were enrolled from metropolitan, urban and rural Italian areas. Blood/serum levels of several endocrine disrupters (EDs (perfluorooctane sulfonate, PFOS; perfluorooctanoic acid, PFOA; di-2-ethylhexyl-phthalate, DEHP; mono-(2-ethylhexyl-phthalate, MEHP; bisphenol A, BPA were evaluated concurrently with nuclear receptors (NRs gene expression levels (ERa, ERb, AR, AhR, PPARg, PXR in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs. Infertile women from the metropolitan area displayed significantly higher levels of: BPA compared to fertile women (14.9 vs. 0.5 ng/mL serum; BPA and MEHP compared to infertile women from urban and rural areas; enhanced expression levels of NRs, except PPARg. Infertile women from urban and rural areas had PFOA levels significantly higher than those from metropolitan areas. Our study indicates the relevance of the living environment when investigating the exposure to EDs and the modulation of the NR panel in PBMC as a suitable biomarker of the effect, to assess the EDs impact on reproductive health.

  13. Distribution and accumulation of endocrine-disrupting chemicals and pharmaceuticals in wastewater irrigated soils in Hebei, China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Feng [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Ying Guangguo, E-mail: guangguo.ying@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Kong Lingxiao [Institute of Plant Protection, Hebei Academy of Agriculture and Forestry Science, Baoding 07100 (China); Wang Li; Zhao Jianliang; Zhou Lijun; Zhang Lijuan [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China)

    2011-06-15

    This study investigated the occurrence of 43 emerging contaminants including 9 endocrine-disrupting chemicals and 34 pharmaceuticals in three sites in Hebei Province, north China. Each site has a wastewater irrigated plot and a separate groundwater irrigated plot for comparison purpose. The results showed that the concentrations of the target compounds in the wastewater irrigated soils were in most cases higher than those in the groundwater irrigated soils. Among the 43 target compounds, nine compounds bisphenol-A, triclocarban, triclosan, 4-nonylphenol, salicylic acid, oxytetracycline, tetracycline, trimethoprim and primidone were detected at least once in the soils. Preliminary environmental risk assessment showed that triclocarban might pose high risks to terrestrial organisms while the other detected compounds posed minimal risks. Irrigation with wastewater could lead to presence or accumulation of some emerging contaminants to some extent in irrigated soils. - Highlights: > Some EDCs and PPCPs were detected in the wastewater irrigated soils. > Application of reclaimed water could lead to accumulation of some compounds. > Groundwater has been contaminated by some compounds. > Triclocarban posed high risks to soil organisms. - Application of reclaimed wastewater on agricultural land could lead to the presence or accumulation of wastewater-related contaminants in soils.

  14. Distribution and accumulation of endocrine-disrupting chemicals and pharmaceuticals in wastewater irrigated soils in Hebei, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Feng; Ying Guangguo; Kong Lingxiao; Wang Li; Zhao Jianliang; Zhou Lijun; Zhang Lijuan

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the occurrence of 43 emerging contaminants including 9 endocrine-disrupting chemicals and 34 pharmaceuticals in three sites in Hebei Province, north China. Each site has a wastewater irrigated plot and a separate groundwater irrigated plot for comparison purpose. The results showed that the concentrations of the target compounds in the wastewater irrigated soils were in most cases higher than those in the groundwater irrigated soils. Among the 43 target compounds, nine compounds bisphenol-A, triclocarban, triclosan, 4-nonylphenol, salicylic acid, oxytetracycline, tetracycline, trimethoprim and primidone were detected at least once in the soils. Preliminary environmental risk assessment showed that triclocarban might pose high risks to terrestrial organisms while the other detected compounds posed minimal risks. Irrigation with wastewater could lead to presence or accumulation of some emerging contaminants to some extent in irrigated soils. - Highlights: → Some EDCs and PPCPs were detected in the wastewater irrigated soils. → Application of reclaimed water could lead to accumulation of some compounds. → Groundwater has been contaminated by some compounds. → Triclocarban posed high risks to soil organisms. - Application of reclaimed wastewater on agricultural land could lead to the presence or accumulation of wastewater-related contaminants in soils.

  15. Estrogenic Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals Influencing NRF1 Regulated Gene Networks in the Development of Complex Human Brain Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Preciados

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available During the development of an individual from a single cell to prenatal stages to adolescence to adulthood and through the complete life span, humans are exposed to countless environmental and stochastic factors, including estrogenic endocrine disrupting chemicals. Brain cells and neural circuits are likely to be influenced by estrogenic endocrine disruptors (EEDs because they strongly dependent on estrogens. In this review, we discuss both environmental, epidemiological, and experimental evidence on brain health with exposure to oral contraceptives, hormonal therapy, and EEDs such as bisphenol-A (BPA, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs, phthalates, and metalloestrogens, such as, arsenic, cadmium, and manganese. Also we discuss the brain health effects associated from exposure to EEDs including the promotion of neurodegeneration, protection against neurodegeneration, and involvement in various neurological deficits; changes in rearing behavior, locomotion, anxiety, learning difficulties, memory issues, and neuronal abnormalities. The effects of EEDs on the brain are varied during the entire life span and far-reaching with many different mechanisms. To understand endocrine disrupting chemicals mechanisms, we use bioinformatics, molecular, and epidemiologic approaches. Through those approaches, we learn how the effects of EEDs on the brain go beyond known mechanism to disrupt the circulatory and neural estrogen function and estrogen-mediated signaling. Effects on EEDs-modified estrogen and nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF1 signaling genes with exposure to natural estrogen, pharmacological estrogen-ethinyl estradiol, PCBs, phthalates, BPA, and metalloestrogens are presented here. Bioinformatics analysis of gene-EEDs interactions and brain disease associations identified hundreds of genes that were altered by exposure to estrogen, phthalate, PCBs, BPA or metalloestrogens. Many genes modified by EEDs are common targets of both 17 β-estradiol (E2 and

  16. Dietary exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals in metropolitan population from China: a risk assessment based on probabilistic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Dongliang; Ye, Xiaolei; Xiao, Yonghua; Zhao, Nana; Long, Jia; Zhang, Piwei; Fan, Ying; Ding, Shibin; Jin, Xin; Tian, Chong; Xu, Shunqing; Ying, Chenjiang

    2015-11-01

    The intake of contaminated foods is an important exposure pathway for endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). However, data on the occurrence of EDCs in foodstuffs are sporadic and the resultant risk of co-exposure is rarely concerned. In this study, 450 food samples representing 7 food categories (mainly raw and fresh food), collected from three geographic cities in China, were analyzed for eight EDCs using high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS). Besides estrone (E1), other EDCs including diethylstilbestrol (DES), nonylphenol (NP), bisphenol A (BPA), octylphenol (OP), 17β-estradiol (E2), 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2), and estriol (E3) were ubiquitous in food. Dose-dependent relationships were found between NP and EE2 (r=0.196, pRisk Assessment (MCRA) system. The 50th and 95th percentile exposure of any EDCs isomer were far below the tolerable daily intake (TDI) value identically. However, the sum of 17β-estradiol equivalents (∑EEQs) exposure in population was considerably larger than the value of exposure to E2, which implied the underlying resultant risk of multiple EDCs in food should be concern. In conclusion, co-exposure via food consumption should be considered rather than individual EDCs during health risk evaluation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. MOBILIZATION OF ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING CHEMICALS AND ESTROGENIC ACTIVITY IN SIMULATED RAINFALL RUNOFF FROM LAND-APPLIED BIOSOLIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giudice, Ben D.; Young, Thomas M.

    2012-01-01

    Municipal biosolids are commonly applied to land as soil amendment or fertilizer as a form of beneficial reuse of what could otherwise be viewed as waste. Balanced against this benefit are potential risks to groundwater and surface water quality from constituents that may be mobilized during storm events. The objective of the present study was to characterize the mobilization of selected endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs), heavy metals, and total estrogenic activity in rainfall runoff from land-applied biosolids. Rainfall simulations were conducted on soil plots amended with biosolids. Surface runoff and leachate was collected and analyzed for the EDCs bisphenol A, 17α-ethynylestradiol, triclocarban, triclosan, octylphenol, and nonylphenol; a suite of sixteen metals; and estrogenic activity via the ER-CALUX bioassay. Triclocarban (2.3–17.3 ng/L), triclosan (background levels. Triclosan, nickel, and copper were detected at levels that might pose some risk to aquatic life, though levels of metals in the biosolids were well below maximum allowable regulatory limits. ER-CALUX results were mostly explained by background bisphenol A contamination and octylphenol in runoff, though unknown contributors and/or matrix effects were also found. PMID:21786314

  18. Estrogenic Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals Influencing NRF1 Regulated Gene Networks in the Development of Complex Human Brain Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preciados, Mark; Yoo, Changwon; Roy, Deodutta

    2016-12-13

    During the development of an individual from a single cell to prenatal stages to adolescence to adulthood and through the complete life span, humans are exposed to countless environmental and stochastic factors, including estrogenic endocrine disrupting chemicals. Brain cells and neural circuits are likely to be influenced by estrogenic endocrine disruptors (EEDs) because they strongly dependent on estrogens. In this review, we discuss both environmental, epidemiological, and experimental evidence on brain health with exposure to oral contraceptives, hormonal therapy, and EEDs such as bisphenol-A (BPA), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), phthalates, and metalloestrogens, such as, arsenic, cadmium, and manganese. Also we discuss the brain health effects associated from exposure to EEDs including the promotion of neurodegeneration, protection against neurodegeneration, and involvement in various neurological deficits; changes in rearing behavior, locomotion, anxiety, learning difficulties, memory issues, and neuronal abnormalities. The effects of EEDs on the brain are varied during the entire life span and far-reaching with many different mechanisms. To understand endocrine disrupting chemicals mechanisms, we use bioinformatics, molecular, and epidemiologic approaches. Through those approaches, we learn how the effects of EEDs on the brain go beyond known mechanism to disrupt the circulatory and neural estrogen function and estrogen-mediated signaling. Effects on EEDs-modified estrogen and nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF1) signaling genes with exposure to natural estrogen, pharmacological estrogen-ethinyl estradiol, PCBs, phthalates, BPA, and metalloestrogens are presented here. Bioinformatics analysis of gene-EEDs interactions and brain disease associations identified hundreds of genes that were altered by exposure to estrogen, phthalate, PCBs, BPA or metalloestrogens. Many genes modified by EEDs are common targets of both 17 β-estradiol (E2) and NRF1. Some of

  19. Epigenetic regulation of non-lymphoid cells by Bisphenol-A, a model endocrine disrupter: Potential Implications for Immunoregulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deena eKhan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDC abound in the environment since many compounds are released from chemical, agricultural, pharmaceutical and consumer product industries. Many of the EDCs such as Bisphenol A (BPA have estrogenic activity or interfere with endogenous sex hormones. Experimental studies have reported a positive correlation of BPA with reproductive toxicity, altered growth and immune dysregulation. Although the precise relevance of these studies to the environmental levels is unclear, nevertheless, their potential health implications remain a concern. One possible mechanism by which BPA can alter genes is by regulating epigenetics, including microRNA, alteration of methylation and histone acetylation. There is now wealth of information on BPA effects on non-lymphoid cells and by comparison, paucity of data on effects of BPA on the immune system. In this mini review, we will highlight BPA regulation of estrogen receptor-mediated immune cell functions and in different inflammatory conditions. In addition, BPA-mediated epigenetic regulation of non-lymphoid cells is emphasized. We recognize that most of these studies are on non-lymphoid cells, and given that BPA also affects the immune system, it is plausible that BPA could have similar epigenetic regulation in immune cells. It is hoped that this review will stimulate studies in this area to ascertain whether or not BPA epigenetically regulates the cells of the immune system.

  20. Biotransformation of endocrine disrupting compounds by selected phase I and phase II enzymes--formation of estrogenic and chemically reactive metabolites by cytochromes P450 and sulfotransferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinen, J; Vermeulen, N P E

    2015-01-01

    The endocrine system is a major communication system in the body and is involved in maintenance of the reproductive system, fetal development, growth, maturation, energy production, and metabolism,. The endocrine system responds to the needs of an organism by secreting a wide variety of hormones that enable the body to maintain homeostasis, to respond to external stimuli, and to follow various developmental programs. This occurs through complex signalling cascades,with multiple sites at which the signals can be regulated. Endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) affect the endocrine system by simulating the action of the naturally produced hormones, by inhibiting the action of natural hormones, by changing the function and synthesis of hormone receptors, or by altering the synthesis, transport, metabolism, and elimination of hormones. It has been established that exposure to environmental EDCs is a risk factor for disruption of reproductive development and oncogenesis in both humans and wildlife. For accurate risk assessment of EDCs, the possibility of bioactivation through biotransformation processes needs to be included since neglecting these mechanisms may lead to undervaluation of adverse effects on human health caused by EDCs and/or their metabolites. This accurate risk assessment should include: (1) possibility of EDCs to be bioactivated into metabolites with enhanced endocrine disruption (ED) effects, and (2) possibility of EDCs to be biotransformed into reactive metabolites that may cause DNA damage. Here, we present an overview of different metabolic enzymes that are involved in the biotransformation of EDCs. In addition, we describe how biotransformation by Cytochromes P450 (CYPs), human estrogen sulfotransferase 1E1 (SULT1E1) and selected other phase II enzymes, can lead to the formation of bioactive metabolites. This review mainly focuses on CYP- and SULT-mediated bioactivation of estrogenic EDCs and summarizes our views on this topic while also showing

  1. Exposure assessment of prepubertal children to steroid endocrine disrupters 1. Analytical strategy for estrogens measurement in plasma at ultra-trace level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Courant, Frédérique; Antignac, Jean-Philippe; Maume, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    , prepubertal children). In this context, we decided to focus our attention on steroid hormones as they are the most potent endocrine disrupters. Our general goal is to investigate whether the steroid intake through food may represent a risk for prepubertal children, from an endocrine disruption point of view......) and negative chemical ionisation (NCI). Preliminary results obtained by applying this method on plasma samples from healthy prepubertal children demonstrated that estradiol endogenous level in prepubertal children is unsurprisingly very low. Estrone was determined in almost all samples at concentration...... in the 2-70 ng L(-1) range while 17alpha and 17beta estradiol were quantified in only few samples at concentrations ranging from 2 to 6 ng L(-1). Exogenous contributions of estrogens will therefore constitute a relatively higher proportion of sex hormone activity in the immature child....

  2. The Increasing Prevalence in Intersex Variation from Toxicological Dysregulation in Fetal Reproductive Tissue Differentiation and Development by Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alisa L. Rich

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available An increasing number of children are born with intersex variation (IV; ambiguous genitalia/hermaphrodite, pseudohermaphroditism, etc.. Evidence shows that endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs in the environment can cause reproductive variation through dysregulation of normal reproductive tissue differentiation, growth, and maturation if the fetus is exposed to EDCs during critical developmental times in utero. Animal studies support fish and reptile embryos exhibited IV and sex reversal when exposed to EDCs. Occupational studies verified higher prevalence of offspring with IV in chemically exposed workers (male and female. Chemicals associated with endocrine-disrupting ability in humans include organochlorine pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, bisphenol A, phthalates, dioxins, and furans. Intersex individuals may have concurrent physical disorders requiring lifelong medical intervention and experience gender dysphoria. An urgent need exists to determine which chemicals possess the greatest risk for IV and the mechanisms by which these chemicals are capable of interfering with normal physiological development in children.

  3. Endocrine disrupting, mutagenic, and teratogenic effects of upper Danube River sediments using effect-directed analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higley, Eric; Grund, Stefanie; Jones, Paul D; Schulze, Tobias; Seiler, Thomas-B; Lübcke-von Varel, Urte; Brack, Werner; Wölz, Jan; Zielke, Hanno; Giesy, John P; Hollert, Henner; Hecker, Markus

    2012-05-01

    Effect-directed analysis (EDA) can be useful in identifying and evaluating potential toxic chemicals in matrixes. Previous investigations of extracts of sediments from the upper Danube River in Germany revealed acute nonspecific and mechanism-specific toxicity as determined by several bioassays. In the present study, EDA was used to further characterize these sediments and identify groups of potentially toxic chemicals. Four extracts of sediments were subjected to a novel fractionation scheme coupled with identification of chemicals to characterize their ability to disrupt steroidogenesis or cause mutagenic and/or teratogenic effects. All four whole extracts of sediment caused significant alteration of steroidogenesis and were mutagenic as well as teratogenic. The whole extracts of sediments were separated into 18 fractions and these fractions were then subjected to the same bioassays as the whole extracts. Fractions 7 to 15 of all four extracts were consistently more potent in both the Ames fluctuation and H295R assays. Much of this toxicity could be attributed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, sterols, and in fraction 7-naphthoic acids. Because the fraction containing polychlorinated biphenyls, polychlorodibenzodioxin/furan, dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane, and several organophosphates did not cause any observable effects on hormone production or a mutagenic response, or were not detected in any of the samples, these compounds could be eliminated as causative agents for the observed effects. These results demonstrate the value of using EDA, which uses multiple bioassays and new fractionation techniques to assess toxicity. Furthermore, to our knowledge this is the first study using the recently developed H295R assay within EDA strategies. Copyright © 2012 SETAC.

  4. Impact of climate change and population growth on a risk assessment for endocrine disruption in fish due to steroid estrogens in England and Wales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keller, V.D.J.; Lloyd, P.; Terry, J.A.; Williams, R.J.

    2015-01-01

    In England and Wales, steroid estrogens: estrone, estradiol and ethinylestradiol have previously been identified as the main chemicals causing endocrine disruption in male fish. A national risk assessment is already available for intersex in fish arising from estrogens under current flow conditions. This study presents, to our knowledge, the first set of national catchment-based risk assessments for steroid estrogen under future scenarios. The river flows and temperatures were perturbed using three climate change scenarios (ranging from relatively dry to wet). The effects of demographic changes on estrogen consumption and human population served by sewage treatment works were also included. Compared to the current situation, the results indicated increased future risk:the percentage of high risk category sites, where endocrine disruption is more likely to occur, increased. These increases were mainly caused by changes in human population. This study provides regulators with valuable information to prepare for this potential increased risk. - Highlights: • Risk assessment for the 2050's including climate change and population changes. • Three climate scenarios considered (changes in river flow and river temperature). • Increased risk from fish intersex across all scenarios in England and Wales. • Population is the main factor causing the risk increase for the 2050's. - The predicted increase in risk of endocrine disruption in fish due to steroid estrogens in England and Wales in the 2050's is mainly due to human population increase rather than climate change

  5. Current Limitations and Recommendations to Improve Testing for the Environmental Assessment of Endocrine Active Substances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coady, Katherine K; Biever, Ronald C; Denslow, Nancy D

    2017-01-01

    hazard and risk. These limitations include a lack of certainty regarding: 1) adequately sensitive species and life-stages, 2) mechanistic endpoints that are diagnostic for endocrine pathways of concern, and 3) the linkage between mechanistic responses and apical, adverse outcomes. Furthermore, some...... to prioritize chemicals for testing and provide insights as to the most appropriate assay(s) for characterizing hazard and risk. Other recommendations include adding endpoints for elucidating connections between mechanistic effects and adverse outcomes, identifying potentially sensitive taxa for which test...

  6. Assessment of Estrogenic Endocrine-Disrupting Chemical Actions in the Brain Using in Vivo Somatic Gene Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trudeau, Vance L.; Turque, Nathalie; Le Mével, Sébastien; Alliot, Caroline; Gallant, Natacha; Coen, Laurent; Pakdel, Farzad; Demeneix, Barbara

    2005-01-01

    Estrogenic endocrine-disrupting chemicals abnormally stimulate vitellogenin gene expression and production in the liver of many male aquatic vertebrates. However, very few studies demonstrate the effects of estrogenic pollutants on brain function. We have used polyethylenimine-mediated in vivo somatic gene transfer to introduce an estrogen response element–thymidine kinase–luciferase (ERE-TK-LUC) construct into the brain. To determine if waterborne estrogenic chemicals modulate gene transcription in the brain, we injected the estrogen-sensitive construct into the brains of Nieuwkoop-Faber stage 54 Xenopus laevis tadpoles. Both ethinylestradiol (EE2; p 0.05). The mixed antagonist/agonist tamoxifen was estrogenic in vivo and increased (p < 0.003) luciferase activity in the tadpole brain by 2.3-fold. There have been no previous reports of somatic gene transfer to the fish brain; therefore, it was necessary to optimize injection and transfection conditions for the adult goldfish (Carassius auratus). Following third brain ventricle injection of cytomegalovirus (CMV)-green fluorescent protein or CMV-LUC gene constructs, we established that cells in the telencephalon and optic tectum are transfected. Optimal transfections were achieved with 1 μg DNA complexed with 18 nmol 22 kDa polyethylenimine 4 days after brain injections. Exposure to EE2 increased brain luciferase activity by 2-fold in males (p < 0.05) but not in females. Activation of an ERE-dependent luciferase reporter gene in both tadpole and fish indicates that waterborne estrogens can directly modulate transcription of estrogen-responsive genes in the brain. We provide a method adaptable to aquatic organisms to study the direct regulation of estrogen-responsive genes in vivo. PMID:15743723

  7. Uterotrophic and Hershberger assays for endocrine disruption properties of plastic food contact materials polypropylene (PP) and polyethylene terephthalate (PET).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Bu Young; Kyung, Minji; Lim, Seong Kwang; Choi, Seul Min; Lim, Duck Soo; Kwack, Seung Jun; Kim, Hyung Sik; Lee, Byung-Mu

    2013-01-01

    Plasticizers or plastic materials such as phthalates, bisphenol-A (BPA), and styrene are widely used in the plastic industry and are suspected endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDC). Although plastic materials such as polypropylene (PP) and polyethylene terephthalate (PET) are not EDC and are considered to be safe, their potential properties as EDC have not been fully investigated. In this study, plastic samples eluted from plastic food containers (PP or PET) were investigated in Sprague-Dawley rats using Hershberger and uterotrophic assays. In the Hershberger assay, 6-wk-old castrated male rats were orally treated for 10 consecutive days with plastic effluent at 3 different doses (5 ml/kg) or vehicle control (corn oil, 1 ml/100 g) to determine the presence of both anti-androgenic and androgenic effects. Testosterone (0.4 mg/ml/kg) was subcutaneously administered for androgenic evaluation as a positive control, whereas testosterone (0.4 mg/ml/kg) and flutamide (3 mg/kg/day) were administered to a positive control group for anti-androgenic evaluation. The presence of any anti-androgenic or androgenic activities of plastic effluent was not detected. Sex accessory tissues such as ventral prostate or seminal vesicle showed no significant differences in weight between treated and control groups. For the uterotrophic assay, immature female rats were treated with plastic effluent at three different doses (5 ml/kg), with vehicle control (corn oil, 1 ml/100 g), or with ethinyl estradiol (3 μg/kg/d) for 3 d. There were no significant differences between test and control groups in vagina or uterine weight. Data suggest that effluents from plastic food containers do not appear to produce significant adverse effects according to Hershberger and uterotrophic assays.

  8. Endocrine disrupting pesticides impair the neuroendocrine regulation of reproductive behaviors and secondary sexual characters of red munia (Amandava amandava).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Surya Prakash; Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi; Mohanty, Banalata

    2017-05-01

    The exposure effects of two endocrine disrupting pesticides (EDPs), mancozeb/MCZ and imidacloprid/IMI of the group dithiocarbamate and neonicotinoid respectively, on reproductive behaviors and secondary sexual characters have been studied in a seasonally breeding wildlife bird, red munia (Amandava amandava). Adult male birds were exposed to both the pesticides individually (0.25% LD 50 of each) as well as co-exposed (MIX-I: 0.25% LD 50 of each and MIX-II: 0.5% LD 50 of each) through food for 30d in preparatory (July-August) and breeding (September-October) phase of reproductive cycle. Singing and pairing patterns started decreasing from 2nd week to complete disappearance during 4th week of pesticides exposures at both the phases of reproductive cycles. Similar trend was observed in the disappearance of spots on the plumage as well as color of both plumage and beak which turned black/gray from red. Pesticides caused impairment of the lactotropic as well as hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular (HPT) axes as there was increased plasma PRL and decreased LH, FSH and testosterone levels. Testicular expressions of GnRH and androgen receptor/AR were significantly decreased but that of GnIH significantly increased as compared to control. Significant differences among individually- and co-exposed groups were also present. Abnormalities in sexual behaviors and secondary sexual characteristics could be linked to inhibition of HPT axis and/or direct toxicity at the level of hypothalamus, pituitary and testis. In addition, pesticide-induced hyperprolactinemia as well as impaired thyroid hormones might have also affected maintenance of reproductive behaviors. On co-exposures, the more distinct impairments might be due to cumulative toxicity of pesticides. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. An improved SPE-LC-MS/MS method for multiclass endocrine disrupting compound determination in tropical estuarine sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Tuan Fauzan Tuan; Aris, Ahmad Zaharin; Yusoff, Fatimah Md; Mustafa, Shuhaimi

    2017-10-01

    Estuary sediments are one of the important components of coastal ecosystems and have been regarded as a sink for various types of organic pollutants. Organic pollutants such as endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) which have been associated with various environmental and human health effects were detected in the estuary sediment at trace level. Considering various interferences that may exist in the estuarine sediment, a sensitive and selective method, capable of detecting multiclass EDC pollutants at the trace levels, needs to be developed and optimized to be applied for environmental analysis. A combination of Soxhlet extraction followed by offline solid phase extraction (SPE) cleaned up with detection based on LC triple quadrupole MS was optimized and validated in this study. The targeted compounds consisted of ten multiclass EDCs, namely, diclofenac, primidone, bisphenol A, estrone (E1), 17β-estradiol (E2), 17α-ethynylestradiol (EE2), 4-octylphenol (4-OP), 4-nonylphenol (4-NP), progesterone, and testosterone. The method showed high extraction efficiency with percentage of recovery from 78% to 108% and excellent sensitivity with detection limit between 0.02ngg -1 and 0.81ngg -1 . Excellent linearity from 0.991 to 0.999 was achieved for the developed compounds and the relative standard deviation was less than 18%, an indication of good precision analysis. Evaluation of the matrix effects showed ionization suppression for all the developed compounds. Verification of the method was carried out by analyzing the estuarine sediment collected from Langat River. The analyzed estuarine sediments showed a trace concentration of diclofenac, bisphenol A, progesterone, testosterone, primidone, and E1. However, E2, EE2, 4-OP, and 4-NP were below the method's detection limit. Diclofenac exhibited the highest concentration at 2.67ngg -1 followed by bisphenol A (1.78ngg -1 ) while E1 showed the lowest concentration at 0.07ngg -1 . Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  10. Effects of TBEP on the induction of oxidative stress and endocrine disruption in Tm3 Leydig cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yuanxiang; Chen, Guanliang; Fu, Zhengwei

    2016-10-01

    The flame retardant tris (2-butoxyethyl) phosphate (TBEP) is a frequently detected contaminant in the environment. In the cultured TM3 cells (originated from ATCC), effects of TBEP on the induction of oxidative stress and endocrine disruption were evaluated. It was observed that exposure to 100 μg/mL TBEP for 24 h significantly reduced the viability of TM3 cells. The mRNA levels of genes related to oxidative stress including Sod, Gpx1, Cat, and Gsta1 were changed in a dose-dependent and/or time-dependent manner after exposure to 30 and 100 μg/mL TBEP for 6, 12, or 24 h. Moreover, notable decrease in glutathione (GSH) contents and increases in oxidized glutathione (GSSG) contents as well as the antioxidant enzyme activities like superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione S-transferase were found in the group treated with 100 μg/mL TBEP for 24 h, indicating that TBEP induced oxidative stress in TM3 Leydig cells. In addition, the expression of genes related to testosterone (T) synthesis including cytochrome P450 cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc), cytochrome P450 17α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (P450-17α), and 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17β-HSD) and T levels in medium were remarkably declined by the treatment of 100 μg/mL TBEP for 24 h. And TBEP could inhibit the expression of P450-17α and 17β-HSD and T levels up-regulated by hCG in TM3 cells. Taken together, these findings indicated that TBEP can induce oxidative stress and alter steroidogenesis in TM3 cells. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 31: 1276-1286, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Airborne particulate endocrine disrupting compounds in China: Compositions, size distributions and seasonal variations of phthalate esters and bisphenol A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianjun; Wang, Gehui

    2015-03-01

    Phthalate esters and bisphenol A (BPA) are endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) and ubiquitously occur in the environment. In the past decade we have characterized atmospheric organic aerosols from various environments (e.g., urban, rural, mountain and marine) of East Asia on a molecular level, but not investigated EDCs in the samples. In the current study we re-analyzed our database for concentrations, compositions and size distributions of phthalates and BPA and compared with those in the literature to improve the understanding on air pollution status in China. Our results showed that airborne particulate phthalates and BPA are 63-1162 ng m- 3 and 1.0-20 ng m- 3 in the urban regions in China, respectively, being one to two orders of magnitude higher than those in the developed countries. Among the detected phthalates in Chinese urban areas, bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (BEHP) is the predominant congener, contributing to 23-79% (ave. 53 ± 15%) of the total phthalates. Concentrations of phthalates and bisphenol A in Shanghai and Xi'an (two mega-cities in China) in 2009 were 3-84% lower than those in 2003, probably indicating a positive effect of the government's air pollution control in the recent years. Phthalates are higher in summer than in winter, because they are not chemically bonded to the polymeric matrix and more easily evaporate into the air under higher temperature conditions. Based on the size distribution observation, we found that diisobutyl and dibutyl phthalates mainly exist in coarse particles because of high volatilities, in contrast to BEHP and BPA, which are dominant in fine particles due to less volatility. Our results also indicate that BPA is mostly derived from the open burning of solid waste while phthalates are derived from both direct evaporation from the matrix and solid waste combustion.

  12. Occurrence and distribution of six selected endocrine disrupting compounds in surface- and groundwaters of the Romagna area (North Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pignotti, Emanuela; Farré, Marinella; Barceló, Damià; Dinelli, Enrico

    2017-09-01

    Endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) are a wide group of contaminants of emerging concern known to be harmful for organisms. The aim of the study was to assess the occurrence and distribution of six EDCs (estrone-E1, ß-estradiol-E2, 17α-ethinylestradiol-EE2, bisphenol A-BPA, perfluooctanoic acid-PFOA, perfluorooctane sulfonate-PFOS) in the Apenninic rivers and groundwaters of the Romagna area (North of Italy). Groundwaters were unaffected by EDC contamination, while all classes of compounds were detected at concentrations above the method quantification limit (MQL) in the majority of the river bodies. In detail, PFOA and PFOS concentrations varied between MQL and 17.7 ng/l (PFOA) and between MQL and 5.5 ng/l (PFOS), and their occurrence in the aquatic compartment was related to the discharge of wastewater treatment plant effluents. Concerning estrogens, EE2 was below the MQL in all samples, whereas E1 and E2 reached concentrations up to 39.7 ng/l (E2) and 28 ng/l (E1) in surface waters. The highest estrogen values were registered in those areas where livestock and farming are the main activities, indicating a close relation between these activities and estrogen release into the aquatic compartment. BPA (MQL-171.3 ng/l) distribution in river waters did not show any correlation with a specific anthropic activity; a mixture of sources of contamination (e.g., industries of food packaging and plastic production) is rather responsible for its detection in river bodies. Overall, the northern part of the Romagna area showed a higher contamination by EDCs, in contrast with the southern part, which was almost unaffected by this kind of microcontamination.

  13. Ecological risk assessment associated to the removal of endocrine-disrupting parabens and benzophenone-4 in wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molins-Delgado, Daniel; Díaz-Cruz, M Silvia; Barceló, Damià

    2016-06-05

    The occurrence of four widely used and endocrine disrupting parabens (PBs) (methylparaben, propylparaben, butylparaben and benzylparaben) and a polar UV filter (benzophenone-4) were determined in influent and effluent wastewater from the 19 major wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) of Catalonia, Spain. For their analysis an on-line solid-phase extraction-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (SPE-HPLC-MS/MS) method was developed and validated. Laboratory analysis revealed high levels for both PBs and BP4, with maximum concentrations of 5700ngL(-1) and 1806ngL(-1), respectively, in influent samples, and 137ngL(-1) and 1080ngL(-1), respectively in effluent wastewaters. Removal rates (RE%) for the target compounds in each WWTPs were calculated. RE% for parabens were almost 100%, whereas for BP4 values where in the range 5-91%. The half-life time (t1/2), hydraulic retention time (HRT), and annual mass load (ML) for each facility was estimated. Results indicated that there was no clear influence of HRT on the RE% of BP4. MLs for BP4 were in the range 0.9-110.1kgy(-1), with the highest values in the most populated areas. Finally, a risk assessment, estimated in terms of hazard quotients (HQs), was carried out for aquatic biota. HQs for the target compounds in effluent wastewaters indicated a negligible effect, whereas for some influent wastewaters' HQs pointed out that some species are at risk. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. In vitro and in vivo studies of the endocrine disrupting potency of cadmium in roach (Rutilus rutilus) liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerbron, M.; Geraudie, P.; Xuereb, B.; Marie, S.; Minier, C.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Ex vivo and in vivo experiments suggest estrogen receptor-driven effects of cadmium. • CdCl 2 is strongly anti-estrogenic when co-exposed to E2. • CdCl 2 + E2 significantly inhibit vtg and erα mRNA expressions. • CdCl 2 compromises the E2-mediated induction of the ar mRNA expression in vivo. - Abstract: Cadmium has been reported to exert estrogenic, antiestrogenic or both effects in vertebrate species. To elucidate the endocrine disrupting action of CdCl 2 , ex vivo and in vivo experiments were performed in roach (Rutilus rutilus). Roach liver explants were exposed to a range of CdCl 2 concentrations alone (0.1–50 μM) or with an effective concentration (100 nM) of 17β-estradiol (E2). In addition, juvenile roach were intraperitoneally injected with CdCl 2 (0.1–2.5 mg/kg) with or without 1 mg E2/kg. Subsequent analysis evaluated the effect of CdCl 2 on vitellogenin (VTG) synthesis both at the mRNA and protein level, on estrogen receptors (erα and erβ1) and on androgen receptor (ar) mRNA expression. Ex vivo and in vivo experiments indicated that CdCl 2 is strongly anti-estrogenic as, when co-exposed to E2, CdCl 2 significantly inhibited VTG production as well as vtg and erα mRNA expressions. Moreover, CdCl 2 compromised the E2-mediated induction of the ar mRNA expression in vivo

  15. TRIENNIAL REPRODUCTION SYMPOSIUM: Environmental programming of reproduction during fetal life: Effects of intrauterine position and the endocrine disrupting chemical bisphenol A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vom Saal, F S

    2016-07-01

    During critical periods in fetal life, there is an increased vulnerability to perturbations in endocrine function due to environmental factors. Small shifts in concentrations of hormones that regulate the differentiation of organs, such as estradiol and testosterone, can have permanent effects on morphology, enzymatic activity, and hormone receptors in tissues as well as neurobehavioral effects. These changes can lead to effects throughout life, including impacting the risk for various diseases (referred to as the Developmental Origins of Adult Health and Disease hypothesis). The intrauterine position phenomenon concerns the consequence for fetuses of randomly implanting next to embryos of the same or opposite sex. An intrauterine position next to males vs. females results in small differences in serum testosterone and estradiol during fetal life that are associated with marked effects on life history (such as lifetime fecundity) in both males and females born in litters (mice, rats, gerbils, rabbits, and swine) as well as human twins. Research with mice subsequently demonstrated that a very small experimental change in fetal serum estradiol levels altered organogenesis and caused permanent changes in organ function. Taken together, these findings led to the hypothesis that environmental chemicals that mimic or antagonize hormone action (e.g., endocrine disrupting chemicals) could also be causing harm at very low exposures (the "low dose" hypothesis) within the range of exposure of humans, domesticated animals, and wildlife. There is now extensive evidence from experimental laboratory animals, sheep, and humans that fetal exposure to very low (presumably safe) doses of the endocrine disrupting chemical bisphenol A (BPA), which exhibits estrogenic activity, can cause permanent changes that can increase the risk of a wide array of diseases. The reasons that federal regulatory agencies are ignoring the massive literature showing adverse effects of BPA and other

  16. On the rumors about the silent spring: review of the scientific evidence linking occupational and environmental pesticide exposure to endocrine disruption health effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cocco Pierluigi

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Occupational exposure to some pesticides, and particularly DBCP and chlordecone, may adversely affect male fertility. However, apart from the therapeutic use of diethylstilbestrol, the threat to human reproduction posed by "endocrine disrupting" environmental contaminants has not been supported by epidemiological evidence thus far. As it concerns other endocrine effects described in experimental animals, only thyroid inhibition following occupational exposure to amitrole and mancozeb has been confirmed in humans. Cancer of the breast, endometrium, ovary, prostate, testis, and thyroid are hormone-dependent, which fostered research on the potential risk associated with occupational and environmental exposure to the so-called endocrine-disrupting pesticides. The most recent studies have ruled out the hypothesis of DDT derivatives as responsible for excess risks of cancer of the reproductive organs. Still, we cannot exclude a role for high level exposure to o,p'-DDE, particularly in post-menopausal ER+ breast cancer. On the other hand, other organochlorine pesticides and triazine herbicides require further investigation for a possible etiologic role in some hormone-dependent cancers.

  17. Disruption?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    This is a short video on the theme disruption and entrepreneurship. It takes the form of an interview with John Murray......This is a short video on the theme disruption and entrepreneurship. It takes the form of an interview with John Murray...

  18. Early warning signs of endocrine disruption in adult fish from the ingestion of polyethylene with and without sorbed chemical pollutants from the marine environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rochman, Chelsea M.; Kurobe, Tomofumi; Flores, Ida; Teh, Swee J.

    2014-01-01

    Plastic debris is associated with several chemical pollutants known to disrupt the functioning of the endocrine system. To determine if the exposure to plastic debris and associated chemicals promotes endocrine-disrupting effects in fish, we conducted a chronic two-month dietary exposure using Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) and environmentally relevant concentrations of microplastic (< 1 mm) and associated chemicals. We exposed fish to three treatments: a no-plastic (i.e. negative control), virgin-plastic (i.e. virgin polyethylene pre-production pellets) and marine-plastic treatment (i.e. polyethylene pellets deployed in San Diego Bay, CA for 3 months). Altered gene expression was observed in male fish exposed to the marine-plastic treatment, whereas altered gene expression was observed in female fish exposed to both the marine- and virgin-plastic treatment. Significant down-regulation of choriogenin (Chg H) gene expression was observed in males and significant down-regulation of vitellogenin (Vtg I), Chg H and the estrogen receptor (ERα) gene expression was observed in females. In addition, histological observation revealed abnormal proliferation of germ cells in one male fish from the marine-plastic treatment. Overall, our study suggests that the ingestion of plastic debris at environmentally relevant concentrations may alter endocrine system function in adult fish and warrants further research. - Highlights: • We saw down-regulation of Chg H in males exposed to marine plastic. • We saw down-regulation of Vtg I, Chg H and ERα in females exposed to plastic. • We saw abnormal proliferation of germ cells in a male exposed to marine plastic. • Our results suggest that the ingestion of plastic may alter endocrine system function

  19. Early warning signs of endocrine disruption in adult fish from the ingestion of polyethylene with and without sorbed chemical pollutants from the marine environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rochman, Chelsea M., E-mail: cmrochman@ucdavis.edu; Kurobe, Tomofumi; Flores, Ida; Teh, Swee J.

    2014-09-15

    Plastic debris is associated with several chemical pollutants known to disrupt the functioning of the endocrine system. To determine if the exposure to plastic debris and associated chemicals promotes endocrine-disrupting effects in fish, we conducted a chronic two-month dietary exposure using Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) and environmentally relevant concentrations of microplastic (< 1 mm) and associated chemicals. We exposed fish to three treatments: a no-plastic (i.e. negative control), virgin-plastic (i.e. virgin polyethylene pre-production pellets) and marine-plastic treatment (i.e. polyethylene pellets deployed in San Diego Bay, CA for 3 months). Altered gene expression was observed in male fish exposed to the marine-plastic treatment, whereas altered gene expression was observed in female fish exposed to both the marine- and virgin-plastic treatment. Significant down-regulation of choriogenin (Chg H) gene expression was observed in males and significant down-regulation of vitellogenin (Vtg I), Chg H and the estrogen receptor (ERα) gene expression was observed in females. In addition, histological observation revealed abnormal proliferation of germ cells in one male fish from the marine-plastic treatment. Overall, our study suggests that the ingestion of plastic debris at environmentally relevant concentrations may alter endocrine system function in adult fish and warrants further research. - Highlights: • We saw down-regulation of Chg H in males exposed to marine plastic. • We saw down-regulation of Vtg I, Chg H and ERα in females exposed to plastic. • We saw abnormal proliferation of germ cells in a male exposed to marine plastic. • Our results suggest that the ingestion of plastic may alter endocrine system function.

  20. Characterization of endocrine disruption potentials of coastal sediments of Taean, Korea employing H295R and MVLN assays-Reconnaissance at 5years after Hebei Spirit oil spill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoshan; Jung, Dawoon; Zhou, Kairu; Lee, Sangwoo; Noh, Kiwan; Khim, Jong Seong; Giesy, John P; Yim, Un Hyuk; Shim, Won Joon; Choi, Kyungho

    2018-02-01

    Endocrine disrupting potentials were assessed for sediment samples collected near Hebei Spirit oil spill (HSOS) site, between December 2007 and January 2012. For comparison, major crude oil (CO) of HSOS, or its weathered form were assessed. Both raw extracts (REs) and their fractionated samples were tested using H295R and MVLNluc bioassays. In H295R cells, REs of crude and weathered oil (WO), and nine of 14 sediments significantly increased E2 levels, which were correlated with the concentrations of PAHs. Steroidogenic disruption potentials of the sediments generally decreased over time. Among silica fractions of all REs, aromatic hydrocarbons (F2) and polar compounds (F3) caused greater E2 levels. While, in MVLN cell bioassay, only three of 14 sediment REs showed estrogen receptor binding potencies, and no temporal trend was observed. In conclusion, oil spill can cause endocrine disruption in the affected ecosystem through steroidogenic alteration for years, and such potencies attenuate over time. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Male reproductive disorders, diseases, and costs of exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals in the European Union.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Russ; Skakkebaek, Niels E; Hass, Ulla; Toppari, Jorma; Juul, Anders; Andersson, Anna Maria; Kortenkamp, Andreas; Heindel, Jerrold J; Trasande, Leonardo

    2015-04-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) contribute to male reproductive diseases and disorders. To estimate the incidence/prevalence of selected male reproductive disorders/diseases and associated economic costs that can be reasonably attributed to specific EDC exposures in the European Union (EU). An expert panel evaluated evidence for probability of causation using the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change weight-of-evidence characterization. Exposure-response relationships and reference levels were evaluated, and biomarker data were organized from carefully identified studies from the peer-reviewed literature to represent European exposure and approximate burden of disease as it occurred in 2010. The cost-of-illness estimation utilized multiple peer-reviewed sources. The expert panel identified low epidemiological and strong toxicological evidence for male infertility attributable to phthalate exposure, with a 40-69% probability of causing 618,000 additional assisted reproductive technology procedures, costing €4.71 billion annually. Low epidemiological and strong toxicological evidence was also identified for cryptorchidism due to prenatal polybrominated diphenyl ether exposure, resulting in a 40-69% probability that 4615 cases result, at a cost of €130 million (sensitivity analysis, €117-130 million). A much more modest (0-19%) probability of causation in testicular cancer by polybrominated diphenyl ethers was identified due to very low epidemiological and weak toxicological evidence, with 6830 potential cases annually and costs of €848 million annually (sensitivity analysis, €313-848 million). The panel assigned 40-69% probability of lower T concentrations in 55- to 64-year-old men due to phthalate exposure, with 24 800 associated deaths annually and lost economic productivity of €7.96 billion. EDCs may contribute substantially to male reproductive disorders and diseases, with nearly €15 billion annual

  2. Neurobehavioral deficits, diseases, and associated costs of exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals in the European Union.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellanger, Martine; Demeneix, Barbara; Grandjean, Philippe; Zoeller, R Thomas; Trasande, Leonardo

    2015-04-01

    Epidemiological studies and animal models demonstrate that endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) contribute to cognitive deficits and neurodevelopmental disabilities. The objective was to estimate neurodevelopmental disability and associated costs that can be reasonably attributed to EDC exposure in the European Union. An expert panel applied a weight-of-evidence characterization adapted from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Exposure-response relationships and reference levels were evaluated for relevant EDCs, and biomarker data were organized from peer-reviewed studies to represent European exposure and approximate burden of disease. Cost estimation as of 2010 utilized lifetime economic productivity estimates, lifetime cost estimates for autism spectrum disorder, and annual costs for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. Setting, Patients and Participants, and Intervention: Cost estimation was carried out from a societal perspective, ie, including direct costs (eg, treatment costs) and indirect costs such as productivity loss. The panel identified a 70-100% probability that polybrominated diphenyl ether and organophosphate exposures contribute to IQ loss in the European population. Polybrominated diphenyl ether exposures were associated with 873,000 (sensitivity analysis, 148,000 to 2.02 million) lost IQ points and 3290 (sensitivity analysis, 3290 to 8080) cases of intellectual disability, at costs of €9.59 billion (sensitivity analysis, €1.58 billion to €22.4 billion). Organophosphate exposures were associated with 13.0 million (sensitivity analysis, 4.24 million to 17.1 million) lost IQ points and 59 300 (sensitivity analysis, 16,500 to 84,400) cases of intellectual disability, at costs of €146 billion (sensitivity analysis, €46.8 billion to €194 billion). Autism spectrum disorder causation by multiple EDCs was assigned a 20-39% probability, with 316 (sensitivity analysis, 126-631) attributable cases at a cost of €199 million

  3. Modulation of genotoxicity and endocrine disruptive effects of malathion by dietary honeybee pollen and propolis in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed M.M. Kandiel

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed at verifying the usefulness of dietary 2.5% bee-pollen (BP or propolis (PROP to overcome the genotoxic and endocrine disruptive effects of malathion polluted water in Oreochromis niloticus (O. niloticus. The acute toxicity test was conducted in O. niloticus in various concentrations (0–8 ppm; mortality rate was assessed daily for 96 h. The 96 h-LC50 was 5 ppm and therefore 1/5 of the median lethal concentration (1 ppm was used for chronic toxicity assessment. In experiment (1, fish (n = 8/group were kept on a diet (BP/PROP or without additive (control and exposed daily to malathion in water at concentration of 5 ppm for 96 h “acute toxicity experiment”. Protective efficiency against the malathion was verified through chromosomal aberrations (CA, micronucleus (MN and DNA-fragmentation assessment. Survival rate in control, BP and PROP groups was 37.5%, 50.0% and 100.0%, respectively. Fish in BP and PROP groups showed a significant (P < 0.05 reduction in the frequency of CA (57.14% and 40.66%, MN (53.13% and 40.63% and DNA-fragmentation (53.08% and 30.00%. In experiment (2, fish (10 males and 5 females/group were kept on a diet with/without BP for 21 days before malathion-exposure in water at concentration of 0 ppm (control or 1 ppm (Exposed for further 10 days “chronic toxicity experiment”. BP significantly (P < 0.05 reduced CA (86.33%, MN (82.22% and DNA-fragmentation (93.11%, prolonged the sperm motility when exposed to 0.01 ppm of pollutant in vitro and increased the estradiol level in females comparing to control. In conclusion, BP can be used as a feed additive for fish prone to be raised in integrated fish farms or cage culture due to its potency to chemo-protect against genotoxicity and sperm-teratogenicity persuaded by malathion-exposure.

  4. H2O2/UV-C oxidation of potential endocrine disrupting compounds: a case study with dimethyl phthalate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmez-Hanci, Tugba; Imren, Ceren; Arslan-Alaton, Idil; Kabdaşli, Işik; Tünay, Olcay

    2009-05-01

    This paper discusses the feasibility of the ultraviolet radiation-hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)/UV-C) process as an advanced oxidation process (AOP) in the treatment of endocrine disrupting compounds (EDC). Dimethyl phthalate (DMP) was chosen as the model compound owing to its classification as an EDC. Experiments have been conducted at various pH values (3.5, 6.0 and 9.0) and initial H(2)O(2) concentrations (0-60 mM) in a batch reactor equipped with a low-pressure mercury UV-C lamp in order to evaluate the optimal operation conditions of the H(2)O(2)/UV-C process. The most effective pH value for the degradation of DMP by H(2)O(2)/UV-C treatment was found as 6.0. DMP abatement increased with increasing H(2)O(2) concentrations from 5 to 30 mM. Further increase in initial H(2)O(2) concentration, however, reduced both the rate and extent of DMP removal as well as chemical oxygen demand (COD) and total organic carbon (TOC) removals. A simple kinetic model was proposed for DMP, COD and TOC abatements confirmed pseudo-first-order reaction. The electrical energy per order (EE/O) values for DMP oxidation and TOC mineralization were calculated as 3.3 and 19 kWh m(-3) order(-1) respectively for the optimum treatment conditions (H(2)O(2,o) = 30 mM, pH(o) = 6.0, DMP(o)= 100 mg L(-1)). Inhibition of oxygen uptake rate by activated sludge (ISO 8192) was evaluated as a tool for assessing the acute toxicity of untreated and H(2)O(2)/UV-C treated DMP. According to the results obtained in this work, the use of the H(2)O(2)/UV-C process is recommended to achieve a complete DMP oxidation and high mineralization degree of aqueous solution of DMP.

  5. Occurrence, fate and environmental risk assessment of endocrine disrupting compounds at the wastewater treatment works in Pietermaritzburg (South Africa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manickum, T; John, W

    2014-01-15

    Steroid hormone Endocrine Disrupting Compounds (EDCs) (natural estrogens (17-β-estradiol (E2), estrone (E1), estriol (E3), synthetic estrogen (17-α-ethinylestradiol (EE2)), natural androgen (testosterone) (tes) and natural progestogen (progesterone) (pro)) at an activated sludge wastewater works (WWW), were quantitated using Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The steroid hormone profile in the adjacent surface water was also determined. Pro was the most abundant (41%, 408 ng/L) in the influent, followed by tes (35%, 343 ng/L) and E2 (12%, 119 ng/L). E1 was the most abundant (35%, 23 ng/L) in effluent, followed by E2 (30%, 20 ng/L) and tes (17%, 11 ng/L). Chemical removal efficiencies of the steroid hormones by the WWW averaged 92%. High removal efficiency was observed for pro (98% ± 2) and tes (96% ± 1), compared to natural (72-100%) and synthetic estrogen (90% ± 3), with biodegradation being the major removal route for pro and tes. The lowest removal for E2 is in spring (65%), and maximum removal is in winter (95%). Natural (E2, E1) and synthetic estrogen (EE2) were major contributors to influent (E2 = 69%) and effluent (E2 = 73%) estrogenic potency. The estrogenic potency removal averaged 85% (range: 73-100). Risk assessment of the steroid hormones present in wastewater effluent, and surface water, indicated that EE2 and E2 pose the highest risk to human health and fish. EE2 was found to be much more resistant to biodegradation, compared to E2, in surface water. Estrone, as the breakdown product of E2 and EE2 in wastewater, appears to be suitable as an indicator of EDCs. The study suggests that a battery of tests: quantitative chemical assay, bioassay for estrogenic activity and risk assessment methods, collectively, are preferred in order to make meaningful, accurate conclusions regarding potential adverse effects of EDCs present in treated wastewater effluent or surface water, to the aquatic environment, human health, and wildlife systems. © 2013

  6. Reproductive toxicity of the endocrine disrupters vinclozolin and bisphenol A in the terrestrial isopod Porcellio scaber (Latreille, 1804).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lemos, M.F.L.; van Gestel, C.A.M.; Soares, A.M.V.M.

    2010-01-01

    Endocrine Disruptor Compounds (EDCs) have been largely studied concerning their effects on vertebrates. Nevertheless, invertebrates as targets for these chemicals have been neglected and few studies are available. Specifically for edaphic invertebrates, data concerning the effects of EDCs is

  7. Endocrine disrupting alkylphenolic chemicals and other contaminants in wastewater treatment plant effluents, urban streams, and fish in the Great Lakes and Upper Mississippi River Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Larry B.; Loyo-Rosales, Jorge E.; Rice, Clifford P.; Minarik, Thomas A.; Oskouie, Ali K.

    2015-01-01

    Urban streams are an integral part of the municipal water cycle and provide a point of discharge for wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents, allowing additional attenuation through dilution and transformation processes, as well as a conduit for transporting contaminants to downstream water supplies. Domestic and commercial activities dispose of wastes down-the-drain, resulting in wastewater containing complex chemical mixtures that are only partially removed during treatment. A key issue associated with WWTP effluent discharge into streams is the potential to cause endocrine disruption in fish. This study provides a long-term (1999-2009) evaluation of the occurrence of alkylphenolic endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) and other contaminants discharged from WWTPs into streams in the Great Lakes and Upper Mississippi River Regions (Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, Minnesota, and Ohio). The Greater Metropolitan Chicago Area Waterways, Illinois, were evaluated to determine contaminant concentrations in the major WWTP effluents and receiving streams, and assess the behavior of EDCs from their sources within the sewer collection system, through the major treatment unit processes at a WWTP, to their persistence and transport in the receiving stream. Water samples were analyzed for alkylphenolic EDCs and other contaminants, including 4-nonylphenol (NP), 4-nonylphenolpolyethoxylates (NPEO), 4-nonylphenolethoxycarboxylic acids (NPEC), 4-tert-octylphenol (OP), 4-tert-octylphenolpolyethoxylates (OPEO), bisphenol A, triclosan, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), and trace elements. All of the compounds were detected in all of the WWTP effluents, with EDTA and NPEC having the greatest concentrations. The compounds also were detected in the WWTP effluent dominated rivers. Multiple fish species were collected from river and lake sites and analyzed for NP, NPEO, NPEC, OP, and OPEO. Whole-body fish tissue analysis indicated widespread occurrence of alkylphenolic compounds

  8. Endocrine disrupting alkylphenolic chemicals and other contaminants in wastewater treatment plant effluents, urban streams, and fish in the Great Lakes and Upper Mississippi River Regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Larry B; Loyo-Rosales, Jorge E; Rice, Clifford P; Minarik, Thomas A; Oskouie, Ali K

    2015-06-01

    Urban streams are an integral part of the municipal water cycle and provide a point of discharge for wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents, allowing additional attenuation through dilution and transformation processes, as well as a conduit for transporting contaminants to downstream water supplies. Domestic and commercial activities dispose of wastes down-the-drain, resulting in wastewater containing complex chemical mixtures that are only partially removed during treatment. A key issue associated with WWTP effluent discharge into streams is the potential to cause endocrine disruption in fish. This study provides a long-term (1999-2009) evaluation of the occurrence of alkylphenolic endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) and other contaminants discharged from WWTPs into streams in the Great Lakes and Upper Mississippi River Regions (Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, Minnesota, and Ohio). The Greater Metropolitan Chicago Area Waterways, Illinois, were evaluated to determine contaminant concentrations in the major WWTP effluents and receiving streams, and assess the behavior of EDCs from their sources within the sewer collection system, through the major treatment unit processes at a WWTP, to their persistence and transport in the receiving stream. Water samples were analyzed for alkylphenolic EDCs and other contaminants, including 4-nonylphenol (NP), 4-nonylphenolpolyethoxylates (NPEO), 4-nonylphenolethoxycarboxylic acids (NPEC), 4-tert-octylphenol (OP), 4-tert-octylphenolpolyethoxylates (OPEO), bisphenol A, triclosan, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), and trace elements. All of the compounds were detected in all of the WWTP effluents, with EDTA and NPEC having the greatest concentrations. The compounds also were detected in the WWTP effluent dominated rivers. Multiple fish species were collected from river and lake sites and analyzed for NP, NPEO, NPEC, OP, and OPEO. Whole-body fish tissue analysis indicated widespread occurrence of alkylphenolic compounds

  9. Estarão alguns grupos populacionais brasileiros sujeitos à ação de disruptores endócrinos? Are some Brazilian population groups subject to endocrine disrupters?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando Meyer

    1999-10-01

    Full Text Available Várias substâncias químicas com atividade sobre o sistema endócrino têm sido amplamente utilizadas no Brasil tanto em atividades industriais quanto em outros ramos, como por exemplo, na agricultura. Alguns dados mostrando a contaminação de grupos populacionais brasileiros por substâncias supostamente possuidoras destas propriedades são apresentados neste trabalho. Entretanto, muito pouco, ou mesmo nada, se sabe sobre os efeitos que as mesmas têm sobre a saúde destas populações expostas, mostrando claramente a necessidade urgente de implementação de um programa destinado a esta finalidade.Several chemical substances suspected of endocrine disruption are currently being used in industrial and agricultural activities in Brazil. This paper presents analytical data showing contamination of some population groups by these substances. Virtually nothing is known about the related health effects, highlighting the need to implement a national program to evaluate such impacts.

  10. The effect of perinatal exposure to ethinyl oestradiol or a mixture of endocrine disrupting pesticides on kisspeptin neurons in the rat hypothalamus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Agnete; Holst, Klaus; Mandrup, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Early life exposure to endocrine disruptors is considered to disturb normal development of hormone sensitive parameters and contribute to advanced puberty and reduced fecundity in humans. Kisspeptin is a positive regulator of the hypothalamic–pituitary–gonadal axis, and plays a key role in the in......Early life exposure to endocrine disruptors is considered to disturb normal development of hormone sensitive parameters and contribute to advanced puberty and reduced fecundity in humans. Kisspeptin is a positive regulator of the hypothalamic–pituitary–gonadal axis, and plays a key role.......We find that perinatal EE2 exposure did not affect Kiss1 mRNA expression in this study designed to model human exposure to estrogenic compounds, and we find only minor effects on puberty onset. Further, the Kiss1 system does not exhibit persistent changes and puberty onset is not affected after perinatal...... exposure to a pesticide mixture in this experimental setting. However, we find that the pesticide mancozeb tends to increase Kiss1 expression in the ARC, presumably through neurotoxic mechanisms rather than via classical endocrine disruption, calling for increased awareness that Kiss1 expression can...

  11. Disruptores endocrinos. El caso particular de los xenobióticos estrogénicos. II Estrógenos sintéticos Endocrine disrupters. The case of oestrogenic xenobiotics II: synthetic oestrogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Martín Olmedo

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available En los últimos años se ha puesto en evidencia que muchas sustancias químicas de origen antropogénico son capaces de alterar el sistema endocrino de los seres vivos y se ha acuñado el nombre de disruptores endocrinos para definirlas. El número de disruptores endocrinos es una preocupación creciente si se añade a la inclusión de nuevos compuestos químicos, hasta ahora insospechados, la información generada sobre sus precursores, metabolitos y productos de degradación que tan solo ahora empiezan a conocerse. No se ha podido definir una estructura química única que permita clasificar a un compuesto químico como mimetizador de las hormonas sexuales femeninas, de tal manera que estructuras químicas similares a los estrógenos naturales, basados en el ciclopentanoperhidrofenantreno, comparten con los estilbenos, bisfenoles, bifenilos, alquilfenoles, dioxinas, furanos y parabenes su efecto hormonal estrogénico. El reconocimiento de la actividad estrogénica en diferentes modelos biológicos se ha utilizado para actualizar el censo de xenoestrógenos y poner de manifiesto fuentes de exposición humana hasta el momento insospechadas.In recent years, it has been demonstrated that endocrine systems of living beings can be altered by many chemical substances of anthropogenic origin, designated as endocrine disrupters. There are growing concerns about the number of these endocrine disrupters. It has not been possible to define a single chemical structure that allows the classification of a chemical compound as a mimic of female sex hormones, so that chemical structures similar to natural estrogens, based on cyclopentanoperhydrophenanthrene, share their hormonal effect with stilbenes, bisphenols, alkylphenols, dioxins, furans and parabenes. The recognition of estrogenic activity in different biological models has been used to update the list of xenoestrogens and reveal sources of human exposure that were previously unknown. New previously

  12. Impact of climate change and population growth on a risk assessment for endocrine disruption in fish due to steroid estrogens in England and Wales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, V D J; Lloyd, P; Terry, J A; Williams, R J

    2015-02-01

    In England and Wales, steroid estrogens: estrone, estradiol and ethinylestradiol have previously been identified as the main chemicals causing endocrine disruption in male fish. A national risk assessment is already available for intersex in fish arising from estrogens under current flow conditions. This study presents, to our knowledge, the first set of national catchment-based risk assessments for steroid estrogen under future scenarios. The river flows and temperatures were perturbed using three climate change scenarios (ranging from relatively dry to wet). The effects of demographic changes on estrogen consumption and human population served by sewage treatment works were also included. Compared to the current situation, the results indicated increased future risk:the percentage of high risk category sites, where endocrine disruption is more likely to occur, increased. These increases were mainly caused by changes in human population. This study provides regulators with valuable information to prepare for this potential increased risk. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. Combining passive samplers and biomonitors to evaluate endocrine disrupting compounds in a wastewater treatment plant by LC/MS/MS and bioassay analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liscio, C.; Magi, E.; Di Carro, M.; Suter, M.J.-F.; Vermeirssen, E.L.M.

    2009-01-01

    Two types of integrative sampling approaches (passive samplers and biomonitors) were tested for their sampling characteristics of selected endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs). Chemical analyses (LC/MS/MS) were used to determine the amounts of five EDCs (nonylphenol, bisphenol A, estrone, 17β-estradiol and 17α-ethinylestradiol) in polar organic chemical integrative samplers (POCIS) and freshwater mussels (Unio pictorum); both had been deployed in the influent and effluent of a municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) in Genoa, Italy. Estrogenicity of the POCIS samples was assessed using the yeast estrogen screen (YES). Estradiol equivalent values derived from the bioassay showed a positive correlation with estradiol equivalents calculated from chemical analyses data. As expected, the amount of estrogens and EEQ values in the effluent were lower than those in the influent. Passive sampling proved to be the preferred method for assessing the presence of these compounds since employing mussels had several disadvantages both in sampling efficiency and sample analyses. - Passive sampling and biomonitoring were used to determine the amounts of endocrine disrupting compounds in wastewaters.

  14. Persistence of endocrine disruption in zebrafish (Danio rerio) after discontinued exposure to the androgen 17β-trenbolone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baumann, Lisa; Knörr, Susanne; Keiter, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of the androgenic endocrine disruptor 17β-trenbolone on the sexual development of zebrafish (Danio rerio) with special emphasis on the question whether adverse outcomes of developmental exposure are reversible or persistent. An exposure...

  15. A Demonstration Study on Decomposition of Anntibiotics and Endocrine Disrupters Contained in Sewage Effluent by Mobile Electron Beam Accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Myun Joo; Kim, Tae Hoon; Jung, In Ha

    2012-01-01

    This report described a work plan on advanced sewage treatments focusing on reduction of antibiotics and endocrine disruptors and sterilization by radiation in Korea. It included a demonstration study on decomposition of antibiotics and endocrine disruptor contained in sewage effluent by MEB(Mobile Electron Beam accelerator). According to the KAERI’s national research plan, basic radiation application working on sterilization, decomposition of antibiotics and endocrine disruptor contained in effluent by using radiation were conducted in KAERI’s laboratory for three years. In 2011, a field study on advanced sewage treatment with a MEB was conducted and the results obtained from study played an important role in the acquiring a certification on advanced treatment of sewage effluent by radiation, NET(New Environmental Technology), which is issued by Korea ministry of environment. The field study was carried out over four seasons in order to observe the effect of seasonal temperature changes on decomposition of chemicals contained in effluent of sewage. The major antibiotics and endocrine disruptors with initial concentration of 0.5 mg/l were decomposed completely by the irradiation dose less than 1.5 kGy, and coli form and microorganisms were also sterilized under the same irradiation dose. Toxicity arising by antibiotics on algae was reduced according to irradiation dose. In a future, achievements from the field demonstration study will be transferred to industry. Research on by-products from irradiated antibiotics and toxicity before and after irradiation of antibiotics will be continued in the field with MEB. This information will be useful for the project by radiation treatment of wastewater for reuse, particularly focused on the wastewater containing organic pollutants. (author)

  16. In vitro bioassay investigations of the endocrine disrupting potential of steviol glycosides and their metabolite steviol, components of the natural sweetener Stevia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, Maeve; Rehfeld, Anders; Frizzell, Caroline; Livingstone, Christina; McGonagle, Caoimhe; Skakkebaek, Niels E; Wielogórska, Ewa; Connolly, Lisa

    2016-05-15

    The food industry is moving towards the use of natural sweeteners such as those produced by Stevia rebaudiana due to the number of health and safety concerns surrounding artificial sweeteners. Despite the fact that these sweeteners are natural; they cannot be assumed safe. Steviol glycosides have a steroidal structure and therefore may have the potential to act as an endocrine disruptor in the body. Reporter gene assays (RGAs), H295R steroidogenesis assay and Ca(2+) fluorimetry based assays using human sperm cells have been used to assess the endocrine disrupting potential of two steviol glycosides: stevioside and rebaudioside A, and their metabolite steviol. A decrease in transcriptional activity of the progestagen receptor was seen following treatment with 25,000 ng/ml steviol in the presence of progesterone (157 ng/ml) resulting in a 31% decrease in progestagen response (p=<0.01). At the level of steroidogenesis, the metabolite steviol (500-25,000 ng/ml) increased progesterone production significantly by 2.3 fold when exposed to 10,000 ng/ml (p=<0.05) and 5 fold when exposed to 25,000 ng/ml (p=<0.001). Additionally, steviol was found to induce an agonistic response on CatSper, a progesterone receptor of sperm, causing a rapid influx of Ca(2+). The response was fully inhibited using a specific CatSper inhibitor. These findings highlight the potential for steviol to act as a potential endocrine disruptor. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Short- and long-term temporal changes in soil concentrations of selected endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) following single or multiple applications of sewage sludge to pastures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhind, S M; Kyle, C E; Ruffie, H; Calmettes, E; Osprey, M; Zhang, Z L; Hamilton, D; McKenzie, C

    2013-10-01

    Temporal changes in soil burdens of selected endocrine disrupting compounds were determined following application to pasture of either sewage sludge or inorganic fertilizer. Soil polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon and polychlorinated biphenyl concentrations were not altered. Changes in concentrations of diethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) and PBDEs 47 and 99 differed with season but concentrations remained elevated for more than three weeks after application, when grazing animals are normally excluded from pasture. It is concluded that single applications of sewage sludge can increase soil concentrations of some, but not all classes of EDCs, possibly to concentrations sufficient to exert biological effects when different chemicals act in combination, but patterns of change depend on season and soil temperature. Analysis of soil from pasture subjected to repeated sludge applications, over 13 years, provided preliminary evidence of greater increases in soil burdens of all of the EDC groups measured, including all of the PBDE congeners measured. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Co-assembly of CdTe and Fe3O4 with molecularly imprinted polymer for recognition and separation of endocrine disrupting chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Limin; Chen, Shaona; Chu, Jia; Li, Xin

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we present a general protocol to fabricate imprinting matrix co-loaded with CdTe quantum dots and Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles for the recognition of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). The resultant composites were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The materials have been demonstrated to be characterized with spherical shape with a saturation magnetization value of 1.7 emu g −1 . Furthermore, the rebinding experiments show that the resultant materials have greater affinity and selectivity towards p-nitrophenol (model EDCs) over structurally related compounds. We believe that the effective method proposed in this work might provide a platform to prepare magnetic and fluorescent molecularly imprinted polymers for the recognition and separation of EDCs.

  19. Paternal Occupational Exposure to Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals as a Risk Factor for Leukaemia in Children: A Case-Control Study from the North of England

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark S. Pearce

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Occupations with exposures to a variety of chemicals, including those thought to be potential endocrine disruptors, have been associated with an increased risk of leukaemia in offspring. We investigated whether an association exists between paternal occupations at birth involving such exposures and risk of leukaemia in offspring. Cases (n=958 were matched, on sex and year of birth, to controls from two independent sources, one other cancers, one cancer-free live births. Paternal occupations at birth were classified, using an occupational exposure matrix, as having “very unlikely,” “possible,” or “likely” exposure to six groups of potential endocrine-disrupting chemicals. There was a significantly increased risk of acute nonlymphocytic leukaemia (ANLL for polychlorinated organic compounds (OR 1.95, 95% CI 1.08–3.54 only in comparison with cancer-free controls, and for phthalates (OR 1.61, 95% CI 1.00–2.61 only with registry controls. A number of other, including inverse, associations were seen, but limited to one control group only. No associations were seen with likely paternal exposure to heavy metals. The associations identified in this study require further investigation, with better exposure and potential confounding (for example maternal variables information, to evaluate the likelihood of true associations to assess whether they are real or due to chance.

  20. In Silico Identification and Pharmacological Evaluation of Novel Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals That Act via the Ligand-Binding Domain of the Estrogen Receptor α

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kufareva, Irina; Abagyan, Ruben

    2014-01-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) pose a significant threat to human health, society, and the environment. Many EDCs elicit their toxic effects through nuclear hormone receptors, like the estrogen receptor α (ERα). In silico models can be used to prioritize chemicals for toxicological evaluation to reduce the amount of costly pharmacological testing and enable early alerts for newly designed compounds. However, many of the current computational models are overly dependent on the chemistry of known modulators and perform poorly for novel chemical scaffolds. Herein we describe the development of computational, three-dimensional multi-conformational pocket-field docking, and chemical-field docking models for the identification of novel EDCs that act via the ligand-binding domain of ERα. These models were highly accurate in the retrospective task of distinguishing known high-affinity ERα modulators from inactive or decoy molecules, with minimal training. To illustrate the utility of the models in prospective in silico compound screening, we screened a database of over 6000 environmental chemicals and evaluated the 24 top-ranked hits in an ERα transcriptional activation assay and a differential scanning fluorimetry-based ERα binding assay. Promisingly, six chemicals displayed ERα agonist activity (32nM–3.98μM) and two chemicals had moderately stabilizing effects on ERα. Two newly identified active compounds were chemically related β-adrenergic receptor (βAR) agonists, dobutamine, and ractopamine (a feed additive that promotes leanness in cattle and poultry), which are the first βAR agonists identified as activators of ERα-mediated gene transcription. This approach can be applied to other receptors implicated in endocrine disruption. PMID:24928891

  1. The ectoparasitic wasp Eulophus pennicornis (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) uses instar-specific endocrine disruption strategies to suppress the development of its host Lacanobia oleracea (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, John P; Bell, Howard A; Audsley, Neil; Marris, Gay C; Kirkbride-Smith, Anne; Bryning, Gareth; Frisco, Caroline; Cusson, Michel

    2006-01-01

    To successfully complete its development, the gregarious ectoparasitoid Eulophus pennicornis must inhibit the moult of its host, Lacanobia oleracea. In the present study, we examined the possibility that moult- and metamorphosis-associated endocrine events may be disrupted in caterpillars parasitized as newly moulted last (sixth) instars. Juvenile hormone (JH) titres on days 2 and 5 of the final stadium were significantly higher (> 100 fold) in parasitized than in non-parasitized hosts, in which JH was essentially absent. Elevated JH levels were associated with reduced haemolymph JH esterase (JHE) activity (down by 99.8%) and enhanced in vitro JH biosynthesis by the corpora allata (CA) (up to 4.5 fold). Wasp adults and/or larvae, in which we measured high levels of JH III (up to 2.7 ng/g), but little or no JH I or JH II, were not seen as likely sources of JH in parasitized hosts, in which we found mostly JH I and JH II. In addition, removal of parasitoid eggs or larvae after oviposition did not prevent the rise in JH titres seen in parasitoid-laden hosts, suggesting that wasp venom may be responsible for the observed hormonal dysfunction. Host haemolymph 20-hydroxyecdysone (20-E) levels were largely unaffected by parasitism during the final stadium although they were observed to increase earlier and decrease more rapidly in parasitized insects. We compare these results with those reported earlier for L. oleracea larvae parasitized by E. pennicornis as penultimate (fifth) instars, which display significantly depressed 20-E titres relative to control larvae. We conclude that E. pennicornis employs host endocrine-disruption strategies that differ according to whether the host is parasitized as a penultimate or final-stadium larva.

  2. The fate of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs), endocrine disrupting contaminants (EDCs), metabolites and illicit drugs in a WWTW and environmental waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Edward; Petrie, Bruce; Kasprzyk-Hordern, Barbara; Wolfaardt, Gideon M

    2017-05-01

    A large number of emerging contaminants (ECs) are known to persist in surface waters, and create pressure on wastewater treatment works (WWTW) for their effective removal. Although a large database for the levels of these pollutants in water systems exist globally, there is still a lack in the correlation of the levels of these pollutants with possible long-term adverse health effects in wildlife and humans, such as endocrine disruption. The current study detected a total of 55 ECs in WWTW influent surface water, 41 ECs in effluent, and 40 ECs in environmental waters located upstream and downstream of the plant. A list of ECs persisted through the WWTW process, with 28% of all detected ECs removed by less than 50%, and 18% of all ECs were removed by less than 25%. Negative mass balances of some pharmaceuticals and metabolites were observed within the WWTW, suggesting possible back-transformation of ECs during wastewater treatment. Three parental illicit drug compounds were detected within the influent of the WWTW, with concentrations ranging between 27.6 and 147.0 ng L -1 for cocaine, 35.6-120.6 ng L -1 for mephedrone, and 270.9-450.2 ng L -1 for methamphetamine. The related environmental risks are also discussed for some ECs, with particular reference to their ability to disrupt endocrine systems. The current study propose the potential of the pharmaceuticals carbamazepine, naproxen, diclofenac and ibuprofen to be regarded as priority ECs for environmental monitoring due to their regular detection and persistence in environmental waters and their possible contribution towards adverse health effects in humans and wildlife. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Endocrine-disrupting potentials of equine estrogens equilin, equilenin, and their metabolites, in the medaka Oryzias latipes: in silico and DNA microarray studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Masaya; Ishibashi, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Ryoko; Koyanagi, Akiko; Kusano, Teruhiko; Tominaga, Nobuaki; Ishibashi, Yasuhiro; Arizono, Koji

    2015-09-01

    Although several previous studies have demonstrated the presence of equine estrogens in the aquatic environment, limited data are currently available on the endocrine-disrupting potentials in fish and the risks they pose to aquatic organisms. To investigate the interactions of major equine estrogens equilin (Eq) and equilenin (Eqn), as well as their metabolites 17α-dihydroequilin, 17β-dihydroequilin, 17α-dihydroequilenin and 17β-dihydroequilenin, with the estrogen receptor α (ERα) of medaka (Oryzias latipes), a three-dimensional model of the ligand-binding domain (LBD) of ERα was built in silico, and docking simulations were performed. The docking simulation analysis indicated that the interaction of 17β-dihydroequilenin with the ERα LBD is the most potent, followed by those of 17α-dihydroequilin and 17β-dihydroequilin, whereas those of Eq and Eqn were least potent. We further analyzed gene expression profiles in the livers of male medaka exposed to Eq and Eqn. A DNA microarray representing 6000 genes revealed that 24-h exposure to Eq and Eqn (100 ng/L) upregulated the expression of 6 and 34 genes in the livers of males, respectively. Genes upregulated by Eq included the estrogenic biomarker genes vitellogenins and choriogenins, suggesting the estrogenic potential of Eq. In contrast, Eqn exposure upregulated several cancer-related genes, such as mediator complex subunit 16 and RAS oncogene family members, suggesting a carcinogenic potential for Eqn. These results suggest that equine estrogens may have not only endocrine-disrupting potentials via the ERα signaling pathway but also carcinogenic potency in male medaka. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Evidence of estrogenic endocrine disruption in smallmouth and largemouth bass inhabiting Northeast U.S. national wildlife refuge waters: A reconnaissance study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwanowicz, L R; Blazer, V S; Pinkney, A E; Guy, C P; Major, A M; Munney, K; Mierzykowski, S; Lingenfelser, S; Secord, A; Patnode, K; Kubiak, T J; Stern, C; Hahn, C M; Iwanowicz, D D; Walsh, H L; Sperry, A

    2016-02-01

    Intersex as the manifestation of testicular oocytes (TO) in male gonochoristic fishes has been used as an indicator of estrogenic exposure. Here we evaluated largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) or smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu) form 19 National Wildlife Refuges (NWRs) in the Northeast U.S. inhabiting waters on or near NWR lands for evidence of estrogenic endocrine disruption. Waterbodies sampled included rivers, lakes, impoundments, ponds, and reservoirs. Here we focus on evidence of endocrine disruption in male bass evidenced by gonad histopathology including intersex or abnormal plasma vitellogenin (Vtg) concentrations. During the fall seasons of 2008-2010, we collected male smallmouth bass (n=118) from 12 sites and largemouth bass (n=173) from 27 sites. Intersex in male smallmouth bass was observed at all sites and ranged from 60% to 100%; in male largemouth bass the range was 0-100%. Estrogenicity, as measured using a bioluminescent yeast reporter, was detected above the probable no effects concentration (0.73ng/L) in ambient water samples from 79% of the NWR sites. Additionally, the presence of androgen receptor and glucocorticoid receptor ligands were noted as measured via novel nuclear receptor translocation assays. Mean plasma Vtg was elevated (>0.2mg/ml) in male smallmouth bass at four sites and in male largemouth bass at one site. This is the first reconnaissance survey of this scope conducted on US National Wildlife Refuges. The baseline data collected here provide a necessary benchmark for future monitoring and justify more comprehensive NWR-specific studies. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. A hybrid material as a sorbent phase for the disposable pipette extraction technique enhances efficiency in the determination of phenolic endocrine-disrupting compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corazza, Gabriela; Merib, Josias; Magosso, Hérica A; Bittencourt, Otávio R; Carasek, Eduardo

    2017-09-01

    In this study, the hybrid material 3-n-propyl(3-methylpyridinium) silsesquioxane chloride (Si3Py + Cl - ) was synthesized and investigated as a novel sorbent phase for the disposable pipette extraction (DPX) technique coupled to high-performance liquid chromatography-florescence detection. This sorbent phase was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Aqueous samples containing the phenolic endocrine-disrupting compounds bisphenol A (BPA), 17α-ethynylestradiol (EE2), 4-tert-octylphenol (4-t-OP), 4-octylphenol (4-OP) and 4-nonylphenol (4-NP) were subjected to DPX procedures and a series of optimizations was performed to determine the ideal extraction conditions using this approach. The proposed sorbent phase exhibited higher extraction efficiency than DPX-RP (reversed phase tips containing styrene-divinylbenzene), commonly used for the determination of the phenolic endocrine- disrupting-compounds under study. Satisfactory analytical performance was achieved with linear ranges from 2 to 100μgL -1 for 4-t-OP and 1-100μgL -1 for the other analytes. Limits of detection of 0.60μgL -1 for 4-t-OP and 0.30μgL -1 for other analytes, RSDs ranging from 1 to 20% and relative recoveries of 83-116% were obtained. Based on these satisfactory results, this sorbent phase represents a valuable alternative for the extraction of compounds with polar moieties in their structure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Evidence of estrogenic endocrine disruption in smallmouth and largemouth bass inhabiting Northeast U.S. National Wildlife Refuge waters: A reconnaissance study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwanowicz, Luke R.; Blazer, Vicki; Pinkney, A.E.; Guy, C.P.; Major, A.M.; Munney, K.; Mierzykowski, S.; Lingenfelser, S.; Secord, A.; Patnode, K.; Kubiak, T.J.; Stern, C.; Hahn, Cassidy M.; Iwanowicz, Deborah; Walsh, Heather L.; Sperry, Adam J.

    2016-01-01

    Intersex as the manifestation of testicular oocytes (TO) in male gonochoristic fishes has been used as an indicator of estrogenic exposure. Here we evaluated largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) or smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu) form 19 National Wildlife Refuges (NWRs) in the Northeast U.S. inhabiting waters on or near NWR lands for evidence of estrogenic endocrine disruption. Waterbodies sampled included rivers, lakes, impoundments, ponds, and reservoirs. Here we focus on evidence of endocrine disruption in male bass evidenced by gonad histopathology including intersex or abnormal plasma vitellogenin (Vtg) concentrations. During the fall seasons of 2008–2010, we collected male smallmouth bass (n=118) from 12 sites and largemouth bass (n=173) from 27 sites. Intersex in male smallmouth bass was observed at all sites and ranged from 60% to 100%; in male largemouth bass the range was 0–100%. Estrogenicity, as measured using a bioluminescent yeast reporter, was detected above the probable no effects concentration (0.73 ng/L) in ambient water samples from 79% of the NWR sites. Additionally, the presence of androgen receptor and glucocorticoid receptor ligands were noted as measured via novel nuclear receptor translocation assays. Mean plasma Vtg was elevated (>0.2 mg/ml) in male smallmouth bass at four sites and in male largemouth bass at one site. This is the first reconnaissance survey of this scope conducted on US National Wildlife Refuges. The baseline data collected here provide a necessary benchmark for future monitoring and justify more comprehensive NWR-specific studies.

  7. Electrochemical Aptasensor for Endocrine Disrupting 17β-Estradiol Based on a Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxylthiopene-Gold Nanocomposite Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Iwuoha

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available A simple and highly sensitive electrochemical DNA aptasensor with high affinity for endocrine disrupting 17β-estradiol, was developed. Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxylthiophene (PEDOT doped with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs was electrochemically synthesized and employed for the immobilization of biotinylated aptamer towards the detection of the target. The diffusion coefficient of the nanocomposite was 6.50 × 10−7 cm2 s−1, which showed that the nanocomposite was highly conducting. Electrochemical impedance investigation also revealed the catalytic properties of the nanocomposite with an exchange current value of 2.16 × 10−4 A, compared to 2.14 × 10−5 A obtained for the bare electrode. Streptavidin was covalently attached to the platform using carbodiimide chemistry and the aptamer immobilized via streptavidin—biotin interaction. The electrochemical signal generated from the aptamer–target molecule interaction was monitored electrochemically using cyclic voltammetry and square wave voltammetry in the presence of [Fe(CN6]−3/−4 as a redox probe. The signal observed shows a current decrease due to interference of the bound 17β-estradiol. The current drop was proportional to the concentration of 17β-estradiol. The PEDOT/AuNP platform exhibited high electroactivity, with increased peak current. The platform was found suitable for the immobilization of the DNAaptamer. The aptasensor was able to distinguish 17β-estradiol from structurally similar endocrine disrupting chemicals denoting its specificity to 17β-estradiol. The detectable concentration range of the 17β-estradiol was 0.1 nM–100 nM, with a detection limit of 0.02 nM.

  8. Endocrine disruptors and female fertility: focus on (bovine) ovarian follicular physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petro, E M L; Leroy, J L M R; Van Cruchten, S J M; Covaci, A; Jorssen, E P A; Bols, P E J

    2012-12-01

    Throughout the previous century, the production, use and, as a result, presence of chemicals in the environment increased enormously. Consequently, humans and animals are exposed to a wide variety of chemical substances of which some possess the ability to disrupt the endocrine system in the body, thereby denominated as "endocrine disrupting chemicals" (EDCs) or "endocrine disruptors". Because the reproductive system is a target organ for endocrine disruption, EDCs are postulated as one of the possible causes of human subfertility. Within the reproductive system, the ovarian follicle can be considered as an extremely fragile microenvironment where interactions between the oocyte and its surrounding somatic cells are essential to generate a fully competent oocyte. In this review, we explore how EDCs can interfere with the well-balanced conditions in the ovarian follicle. In addition, we highlight the bovine ovarian follicle as an alternative in vitro model for EDC and broader toxicology research. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Research on Endocrine Disruptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA researchers are developing innovative approaches, tools, models and data to improve the understanding of potential risks to human health and wildlife from chemicals that could disrupt the endocrine system.

  10. The hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis in teleosts and amphibians: Endocrine disruption and its consequences to natural populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, J.A.; Patino, R.

    2011-01-01

    Teleosts and pond-breeding amphibians may be exposed to a wide variety of anthropogenic, waterborne contaminants that affect the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis. Because thyroid hormone is required for their normal development and reproduction, the potential impact of HPT-disrupting contaminants on natural teleost and amphibian populations raises special concern. There is laboratory evidence indicating that persistent organic pollutants, heavy metals, pharmaceutical and personal care products, agricultural chemicals, and aerospace products may alter HPT activity, development, and reproduction in teleosts and amphibians. However, at present there is no evidence to clearly link contaminant-induced HPT alterations to impairments in teleost or amphibian population health in the field. Also, with the exception of perchlorate for which laboratory studies have shown a direct link between HPT disruption and adverse impacts on development and reproductive physiology, little is known about if or how other HPT-disrupting contaminants affect organismal performance. Future field studies should focus on establishing temporal associations between the presence of HPT-disrupting chemicals, the occurrence of HPT alterations, and adverse effects on development and reproduction in natural populations; as well as determining how complex mixtures of HPT contaminants affect organismal and population health. ?? 2010 Elsevier Inc.

  11. The hypothalamus–pituitary–thyroid axis in teleosts and amphibians: Endocrine disruption and its consequences to natural populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, J.A.; Patino, Reynaldo

    2011-01-01

    Teleosts and pond-breeding amphibians may be exposed to a wide variety of anthropogenic, waterborne contaminants that affect the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis. Because thyroid hormone is required for their normal development and reproduction, the potential impact of HPT-disrupting contaminants on natural teleost and amphibian populations raises special concern. There is laboratory evidence indicating that persistent organic pollutants, heavy metals, pharmaceutical and personal care products, agricultural chemicals, and aerospace products may alter HPT activity, development, and reproduction in teleosts and amphibians. However, at present there is no evidence to clearly link contaminant-induced HPT alterations to impairments in teleost or amphibian population health in the field. Also, with the exception of perchlorate for which laboratory studies have shown a direct link between HPT disruption and adverse impacts on development and reproductive physiology, little is known about if or how other HPT-disrupting contaminants affect organismal performance. Future field studies should focus on establishing temporal associations between the presence of HPT-disrupting chemicals, the occurrence of HPT alterations, and adverse effects on development and reproduction in natural populations; as well as determining how complex mixtures of HPT contaminants affect organismal and population health.

  12. Mood Fluctuation and Psychobiological Instability: The Same Core Functions Are Disrupted by Novel Psychoactive Substances and Established Recreational Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew C. Parrott

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Many novel psychoactive substances (NPS have entered the recreational drug scene in recent years, yet the problems they cause are similar to those found with established drugs. This article will debate the psychobiological effects of these newer and more traditional substances. It will show how they disrupt the same core psychobiological functions, so damaging well-being in similar ways. Every psychoactive drug causes mood states to fluctuate. Users feel better on-drug, then feel worse off-drug. The strength of these mood fluctuations is closely related to their addiction potential. Cyclical changes can occur with many other core psychobiological functions, such as information processing and psychomotor speed. Hence the list of drug-related impairments can include: homeostatic imbalance, HPA axis disruption, increased stress, altered sleep patterns, neurohormonal changes, modified brain rhythms, neurocognitive impairments, and greater psychiatric vulnerability. Similar patterns of deficit are found with older drugs such as cocaine, nicotine and cannabis, and newer substances such as 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, mephedrone and spice. All psychoactive drugs damage human well-being through similar basic neuropsychobiological mechanisms.

  13. Biomarkers of effect in endocrine disruption: how to link a functional assay to an adverse outcome pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Lorenzetti

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The development of in vitro testing strategies may achieve a cost-effective generation of comprehensive datasets on a large number of chemicals, according to the requirements of the European Regulation REACH. Much emphasis is placed on in vitro methods based on subcellular mechanisms (e.g., nuclear receptor interaction, but it is necessary to define the predictive value of molecular or biochemical changes within an adverse outcome pathway (AOP. AOP pivots on the description of the flow from a molecular initiating event through a cascade of intermediate events needed to produce a specific adverse effect at organism level: downstream responses at cell level are, therefore, essential to define an AOP. Several in vitro assays are based on human cell lines representative of endocrine-targeted tissues (e.g., prostate and on functional biomarkers of clinical relevance (e.g., PSA secretion in human prostate epithelial cells. We discuss the implementation of such functional biomarkers in the AOP context.

  14. Sleep and the endocrine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Dionne; Tsai, Sheila C

    2015-07-01

    In this article, the effect of sleep and sleep disorders on endocrine function and the influence of endocrine abnormalities on sleep are discussed. Sleep disruption and its associated endocrine consequences in the critically ill patient are also reviewed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The UV-filter benzophenone-1 inhibits 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 3: Virtual screening as a strategy to identify potential endocrine disrupting chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nashev, Lyubomir G; Schuster, Daniela; Laggner, Christian; Sodha, Seloni; Langer, Thierry; Wolber, Gerhard; Odermatt, Alex

    2010-04-15

    The prevalence of male reproductive disorders and testicular cancer is steadily increasing. Because the exposure to chemicals disrupting natural hormone action has been associated with these diseases, it is important to identify endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) and their targets of action. Here, a 3D-structural database that can be applied for virtual screening approaches to facilitate the identification of EDCs was constructed. The database was screened using pharmacophores of 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 3 (17beta-HSD3), which catalyzes the last step of testosterone synthesis in testicular Leydig cells and plays an essential role during male sexual development. Among other chemicals, benzophenone (BP) UV-filters were predicted as potential 17beta-HSD3 inhibitors. Biological analyses revealed (2,4-dihydroxyphenyl)-phenylmethanone (also known as benzophenone-1, BP-1) as an inhibitor of human 17beta-HSD3 (IC(50) 1.05microM). BP-1 also efficiently blocked conversion of androstenedione to testosterone by mouse and rat 17beta-HSD3 in whole-organ enzyme assays. Moreover, BP-1 antagonized the testosterone-dependent activation of androgen receptors (IC(50) 5.7microM), suggesting synergistic anti-androgenic effects of BP-1 by preventing testosterone formation and blocking receptor activation. In addition, analyses of several commonly used UV-filters on estrogen- and androgen-metabolizing 17beta-HSD enzymes revealed 3-benzylidene camphor (3-BC) and 4-methylbenzylidene camphor (4-MBC) as low micromolar 17beta-HSD2 inhibitors. In conclusion, screening of virtual chemical structure libraries can facilitate the identification of compounds interfering with hormone action. The potential disruption of 17beta-HSD enzyme function by the UV-filters BP-1, 3-BC and 4-MBC requires further investigation and should be considered for safety assessment of these chemicals. 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Developmental programming: Impact of fetal exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals on gonadotropin-releasing hormone and estrogen receptor mRNA in sheep hypothalamus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahoney, Megan M.; Padmanabhan, Vasantha

    2010-01-01

    Bisphenol-A (BPA) and methoxychlor (MXC), two endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) with estrogenic and antiandrogenic effects, disrupt the reproductive system. BPA has profound effects on luteinizing hormone (LH) surge amplitude, and MXC has profound effects on on LH surge timing in sheep. The neural mechanisms involved in the differential disruption of the LH surge by these two EDCs remain to be elucidated. We tested the hypothesis that the differential effects of BPA and MXC on LH surge system involved changes in hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and estrogen receptors (ESR), ESR1 and ESR2, mRNA expression. Pregnant sheep were given daily injections of cottonseed oil (controls), MXC, or BPA (5 mg/kg/day) from day 30 to 90 of gestation (term 147 d). Offspring from these animals were euthanized as adults, during the late follicular phase following synchronization of estrus with prostaglandin F 2α , just before the expected onset of preovulatory LH surge and changes in mRNA expression of hypothalamic GnRH, ESR1, and ESR2 quantified following in situ hybridization. GnRH mRNA expression was significantly lower in both groups of EDC-treated females compared to controls. ESR1 expression was increased in prenatal BPA- but not MXC-treated females in medial preoptic area relative to controls. In contrast, ESR2 expression was reduced in the medial preoptic area of both EDC-treated groups. Differences in expression of ESR1/ESR2 receptors may contribute to the differential effects of BPA and MXC on the LH surge system. These findings provide support that prenatal exposure to EDCs alters the neural developmental trajectory leading to long-term reproductive consequences in the adult female.

  17. Developmental programming: impact of fetal exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals on gonadotropin-releasing hormone and estrogen receptor mRNA in sheep hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, Megan M; Padmanabhan, Vasantha

    2010-09-01

    Bisphenol-A (BPA) and methoxychlor (MXC), two endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) with estrogenic and antiandrogenic effects, disrupt the reproductive system. BPA has profound effects on luteinizing hormone (LH) surge amplitude, and MXC has profound effects on on LH surge timing in sheep. The neural mechanisms involved in the differential disruption of the LH surge by these two EDCs remain to be elucidated. We tested the hypothesis that the differential effects of BPA and MXC on LH surge system involved changes in hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and estrogen receptors (ESR), ESR1 and ESR2, mRNA expression. Pregnant sheep were given daily injections of cottonseed oil (controls), MXC, or BPA (5mg/kg/day) from day 30 to 90 of gestation (term 147d). Offspring from these animals were euthanized as adults, during the late follicular phase following synchronization of estrus with prostaglandin F(2alpha), just before the expected onset of preovulatory LH surge and changes in mRNA expression of hypothalamic GnRH, ESR1, and ESR2 quantified following in situ hybridization. GnRH mRNA expression was significantly lower in both groups of EDC-treated females compared to controls. ESR1 expression was increased in prenatal BPA- but not MXC-treated females in medial preoptic area relative to controls. In contrast, ESR2 expression was reduced in the medial preoptic area of both EDC-treated groups. Differences in expression of ESR1/ESR2 receptors may contribute to the differential effects of BPA and MXC on the LH surge system. These findings provide support that prenatal exposure to EDCs alters the neural developmental trajectory leading to long-term reproductive consequences in the adult female. 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Neuroendocrine targets of endocrine disruptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gore, Andrea C

    2010-01-01

    The central neuroendocrine systems are responsible for the control of homeostatic processes in the body, including reproduction, growth, metabolism and energy balance, as well as stress responsiveness. These processes are initiated by signals in the central nervous system, specifically the hypothalamus, and are conveyed first by neural and then by endocrine effectors. The neuroendocrine systems, as the links between the brain and peripheral endocrine organs, play critical roles in the ability of an organism to respond to its environment under normal circumstances. When neuroendocrine homeostasis is disrupted by environmental endocrine-disrupting chemicals, a variety of perturbations can ensue, particularly when endocrine disruption occurs during critical developmental time periods. This article will discuss the evidence for environmental endocrine disruption of neuroendocrine systems and the effects on endocrine and reproductive functions.

  19. Determination of endocrine-disrupting compounds in waters from Rio das Velhas, Brazil, by liquid chromatography/high resolution mass spectrometry (ESI-LC-IT-TOF/MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Miriany; Aquino, Sérgio; Coutrim, Maurício; Silva, Júlio; Afonso, Robson

    2011-01-01

    Some organic microcontaminants, known as endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDC), are frequently found in surface waters and are of concern because of their ability to alter the normal functioning of the endocrine system. In this study five of these EDCs (estradiol, ethynylestradiol, bisphenol A, nonylphenol and diethylphthalate) in surface water samples, collected at the upper part of Rio das Velhas river (located between Ouro Preto and Nova Lima, Minas Gerais state, Brazil) were analysed. The analytical methodology, which employed solid-phase extraction and high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS), was properly validated and resulted in limits of quantification (LOQ, S/N = 10) of 4.3 ng/L for diethylphtalate, 3.9 ng/L for nonylphenol, 3.6 ng/L for estradiol, 4.7 ng/L for ethynylestradiol and 2.5 ng/L for bisphenol. The five compounds were monitored for eight months, from sites where the hormones were occasionally found. Ethynylestradiol and estradiol concentrations varied from 5.6 to 63.8 ng/L. Bisphenol was present in all samples in a concentration that ranged from 8.6 to 168.3 ng/L. The other two compounds were at quantifiable levels in all collected samples, with nonylphenol varying from 25.9 to 1435.3 ng/L and diethylphthalate from 5.0 to 410.9 ng/L. The study showed that nonylphenol pollution seemed to originate from agricultural run-off, while diethylphthalate pollution originated from the discharge of domestic sewage. Risk analysis studies showed that the environmental concentrations of nonylphenol and dicthylphthalate do not present risks to human health; however, the concentrations found for bisphenol and ethinylestradiol could be toxic to humans, especially infants, if such compounds are not effectively removed at water treatment plants.

  20. Occurrence of endocrine disrupting compounds in five estuaries of the northwest coast of Spain: Ecological and human health impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgueiro-González, N; Turnes-Carou, I; Viñas-Diéguez, L; Muniategui-Lorenzo, S; López-Mahía, P; Prada-Rodríguez, D

    2015-07-01

    The occurrence and spatial distribution of alkylphenols (4-tert-octylphenol, 4-n-octylphenol, 4-n-nonylphenol, nonylphenol) and bisphenol A were examined in five estuaries along the Northwest coastal area of Spain. As far as we know, no previous works about this topic could be found in the literature. A total of 98 seawater samples were collected during May 2011-July 2012 and analyzed by a highly sensitive DLLME-LC-MS/MS methodology recently developed. Results indicated nonylphenol was the most ubiquitous compound with maximal concentration of 0.337 μg L(-1) (Ría de Vigo). The environmental quality standards (EQS) established in Directive 2013/39/EU for 4-tert-octylphenol were slightly exceeded in some sampling points. Fishing harbours, water treatment plant and industrial discharges were supposed as the main sources of contamination. Low and medium ecological risk was determined in all estuaries. Possible endocrine effects on biota and population were estimated in terms of estrogenic activity and daily intake respectively, and no risk was found in any case. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Aroclor 1248 exposure leads to immunomodulation, decreased disease resistance and endocrine disruption in the brown bullhead, Ameiurus nebulosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwanowicz, L.R.; Blazer, V.S.; McCormick, S.D.; Van Veld, P.A.; Ottinger, C.A.

    2009-01-01

    The brown bullhead Ameiurus nebulosus is a species of the family Ictaluridae commonly used as a sentinel of environmental contamination. While these fish have been utilized for this purpose in areas contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), few controlled, laboratory-based studies have been designed to document the effects of PCB mixtures in this species. Here, brown bullhead were exposed to the PCB mixture, Aroclor 1248, via intraperitoneal injection and the effects on immune function, plasma hormones and disease resistance were evaluated. Exposure to this mixture led to a decrease in bactericidal activity and circulating antibodies to Edwardsiella ictaluri present from a previous exposure to this pathogen. A subsequent E. ictaluri disease challenge led to significantly higher mortality in A1248 treated fish compared to vehicle-control fish. The mitogenic response to the T-cell mitogen, phytohemaglutinin-P, was increased compared to vehicle-control fish. The steroid hormone, cortisol, and the thyroid hormone, T3, were also significantly lower in A1248 exposed fish. In summary, we have validated a number of functional immune assays for application in brown bullhead immunotoxicity studies. Additionally, we have demonstrated that the PCB mixture (A1248) modulates both immune function and endocrine physiology in brown bullhead. Such data may compliment the interpretation of data yielded from applied field studies conducted in PCB contaminated aquatic ecosystems.

  2. The use of metabolising systems for in vitro testing of endocrine disruptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, M.N.; Janssens, W.; Bernauer, U.; Brandon, E.; Coecke, S.; Combes, R.; Edwards, P.; Freidig, A.; Freyberger, A.; Kolanczyk, R.; Mc Ardie, C.; Mekenyan, O.; Schmieder, P.; Schrader, T.; Takeyoshi, M.; Burg, B. van der

    2008-01-01

    Legislation and prospective legislative proposals in for instance the USA, Europe, and Japan require, or may require that chemicals are tested for their ability to disrupt the hormonal systems of mammals. Chemicals found to test positive are considered to be endocrine active substances (EAS) and may

  3. A review on endocrine disruptors and their possible impacts on human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabir, Eva Rahman; Rahman, Monica Sharfin; Rahman, Imon

    2015-07-01

    Endocrine disruption is a named field of research which has been very active for over 10 years, although the effects of endocrine disruptors in wildlife have been studied mainly in vast since the 1940s. A large number of chemicals have been identified as endocrine disruptors and humans can be exposed to them either due to their occupations or through dietary and environmental exposure (water, soil and air). Endocrine disrupting chemicals are compounds that alter the normal functioning of the endocrine system of both humans and wildlife. In order to understand the vulnerability and risk factors of people due to endocrine disruptors as well as the remedies for these, methods need to be developed in order to predict effects on populations and communities from the knowledge of effects on individuals. For several years there have been a growing interest on the mechanism and effect of endocrine disruptors and their relation with environment and human health effect. This paper, based on extensive literature survey, briefly studies the progress mainly in human to provide information concerning causative substances, mechanism of action, ubiquity of effects and important issues related to endocrine disruptors. It also reviews the current knowledge of the potential impacts of endocrine disruptors on human health so that the effects can be known and remedies applied for the problem as soon as possible. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Sexually dimorphic gene regulation in brain as a target for endocrine disrupters: Developmental exposure of rats to 4-methylbenzylidene camphor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maerkel, Kirsten; Durrer, Stefan; Henseler, Manuel; Schlumpf, Margret; Lichtensteiger, Walter

    2007-01-01

    The developing neuroendocrine brain represents a potential target for endocrine active chemicals. The UV filter 4-methylbenzylidene camphor (4-MBC) exhibits estrogenic activity, but also interferes with the thyroid axis. We investigated effects of pre- and postnatal exposure to 4-MBC in the same rat offspring at brain and reproductive organ levels. 4-MBC (7, 24, 47 mg/kg/day) was administered in chow to the parent generation before mating, during gestation and lactation, and to the offspring until adulthood. mRNA of estrogen target genes involved in control of sexual behavior and gonadal functions was measured by real-time RT-PCR in ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus (VMH) and medial preoptic area (MPO) of adult offspring. 4-MBC exposure affected mRNA levels of ER alpha, progesterone receptor (PR), preproenkephalin (PPE) and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) in a sex- and region-specific manner. In order to assess possible changes in sensitivity of target genes to estrogens, offspring were gonadectomized on day 70, injected with estradiol (E2, 10 or 50 μg/kg s.c.) or vehicle on day 84, and sacrificed 6 h later. The acute induction of PR mRNA, and repression (at 6 h) of PPE mRNA by E2 was enhanced by 4-MBC in male and female VMH and female MPO, whereas male MPO exhibited reduced responsiveness of both genes. Steroid receptor coactivator SRC-1 mRNA levels were increased in female VMH and MPO. The data indicate profound sex- and region-specific alterations in the regulation of estrogen target genes at brain level. Effect patterns in baseline and E2-induced gene expression differ from those in uterus and prostate

  5. Proposal of how to update the standard information requirements in REACH, PPPR and BPR – a testing strategy for identification of endocrine disruptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holbech, Henrik; Bjerregaard, Poul; Hass, Ulla

    This presentation is based on a project prepared by the Danish Centre on Endocrine Disrupters (CEHOS) for the Danish EPA. The project aim to provide a science based input to the on-going work in EU with regard to endocrine disruptors, i.e. the development of criteria for identification, REACH...... review on EDs and the revised strategy for the future work on endocrine disruptors, focusing on adequate detection of substances with endocrine disrupting properties under various legislative frameworks, including REACH (EC No 1907/2006), the Plant Protection Products Regulation (PPPR) (EC No 1107....../2009) and the Biocidal Products Regulation (BPR) (EC No 528/2012). There are currently no specific information requirements or testing strategies with regard to endocrine disruption in REACH and other relevant legislations. However, in relation to biocides and recently also to plant protection products, indications...

  6. Biofilm biomass disruption by natural substances with potential for endodontic use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio Rodrigues Ferreira Alves

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the in vitro effects of four natural substances on the biomass of bacterial biofilms to assess their potential use as root canal irrigants. The following substances and their combinations were tested: 0.2% farnesol; 5% xylitol; 20% xylitol; 0.2% farnesol and 5% xylitol; 0.2% farnesol, 5% xylitol, and 0.1% lactoferrin; 5% xylitol and 0.1% lactoferrin; and 20 mM salicylic acid. The crystal violet assay was used to evaluate the effects of these substances on the biomass of biofilms formed by Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus epidermidis. All substances except for 20 mM salicylic acid and 20% xylitol reduced biofilm mass when compared to controls. The combination of farnesol and xylitol was the most effective agent against E. faecalis ATCC 29212 (p < 0.05. Farnesol combined with xylitol and lactoferrin was the most effective against biofilms of the endodontic strain of E. faecalis MB35 (p < 0.05. Similarly, combinations involving farnesol, xylitol, and lactoferrin reduced the biomass of S. epidermidis biofilms. In general, farnesol, xylitol, and lactoferrin or farnesol and xylitol reduced biofilm biomass most effectively. Therefore, it was concluded that combinations of antibiofilm substances have potential use in endodontic treatment to combat biofilms.

  7. Biosensors for environmental monitoring of endocrine disruptors: a review article

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez-Mozaz, Sara; Lopez de Alda, Maria J.; Barcelo, Damia [Department of Environmental Chemistry, IIQAB-CSIC, C/ Jordi Girona 18-26, 08034, Barcelona (Spain); Marco, Maria-Pilar [Department of Biological Organic Chemistry, IIQAB-CSIC, C/ Jordi Girona 18-26, 08034, Barcelona (Spain)

    2004-02-01

    This article provides an overview of the applications of biosensors in analysis and monitoring of endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs) in the environment. Special attention is devoted to the various types of physical-chemical signal transduction elements, biological mechanisms employed as sensing elements and techniques used for immobilisation of the bioreceptor molecules on the transducer surface. Two different classes of biosensors for EDCs are considered: biosensors that measure endocrine-disrupting effects, and biosensors that respond to the presence of a specific substance (or group of substances) based on the specific recognition of a biomolecule. Several examples of them are presented to illustrate the power of the biosensor technology for environmental applications. Future trends in the development of new, more advanced devices are also outlined. (orig.)

  8. Competing risks and the development of adaptive management plans for water resources: Field reconnaissance investigation of risks to fishes and other aquatic biota exposed to endocrine disrupting chemicals (edcs) in lake mead, Nevada USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linder, G.; Little, E.E.

    2009-01-01

    The analysis and characterization of competing risks for water resources rely on a wide spectrum of tools to evaluate hazards and risks associated with their management. For example, waters of the lower Colorado River stored in reservoirs such as Lake Mead present a wide range of competing risks related to water quantity and water quality. These risks are often interdependent and complicated by competing uses of source waters for sustaining biological resources and for supporting a range of agricultural, municipal, recreational, and industrial uses. USGS is currently conducting a series of interdisciplinary case-studies on water quality of Lake Mead and its source waters. In this case-study we examine selected constituents potentially entering the Lake Mead system, particularly endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). Worldwide, a number of environmental EDCs have been identified that affect reproduction, development, and adaptive behaviors in a wide range of organisms. Many EDCs are minimally affected by current treatment technologies and occur in treated sewage effluents. Several EDCs have been detected in Lake Mead, and several substances have been identified that are of concern because of potential impacts to the aquatic biota, including the sport fishery of Lake Mead and endangered razorback suckers (Xyrauchen texanus) that occur in the Colorado River system. For example, altered biomarkers relevant to reproduction and thyroid function in fishes have been observed and may be predictive of impaired metabolism and development. Few studies, however, have addressed whether such EDC-induced responses observed in the field have an ecologically significant effect on the reproductive success of fishes. To identify potential linkages between EDCs and species of management concern, the risk analysis and characterization in this reconnaissance study focused on effects (and attendant uncertainties) that might be expressed by exposed populations. In addition, risk reduction

  9. European medicinal and edible plants associated with subacute and chronic toxicity part I: Plants with carcinogenic, teratogenic and endocrine-disrupting effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristanc, Luka; Kreft, Samo

    2016-06-01

    In recent decades, the use of herbal medicines and food products has been widely embraced in many developed countries. These products are generally highly accepted by consumers who often believe that "natural" equals "safe". This is, however, an oversimplification because several botanicals have been found to contain toxic compounds in concentrations harmful to human health. Acutely toxic plants are in most cases already recognised as dangerous as a result of their traditional use, but plants with subacute and chronic toxicity are difficult or even impossible to detect by traditional use or by clinical research studies. In this review, we systematically address major issues including the carcinogenicity, teratogenicity and endocrine-disrupting effects associated with the use of herbal preparations with a strong focus on plant species that either grow natively or are cultivated in Europe. The basic information regarding the molecular mechanisms of the individual subtypes of plant-induced non-acute toxicity is given, which is followed by a discussion of the pathophysiological and clinical characteristics. We describe the genotoxic and carcinogenic effects of alkenylbenzenes, pyrrolizidine alkaloids and bracken fern ptaquiloside, the teratogenicity issues regarding anthraquinone glycosides and specific alkaloids, and discuss the human health concerns regarding the phytoestrogens and licorice consumption in detail. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Construction of amphiphilic segments on polypropylene nonwoven surface and its application in removal of endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) from aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Kai [State Key Laboratory of Hollow Fiber Membrane Materials and Processes, Tianjin Polytechnic University, Tianjin 300160 (China); School of Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Tianjin Polytechnic University, Tianjin 300160 (China); Wei, Junfu, E-mail: junfuwei1963@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Hollow Fiber Membrane Materials and Processes, Tianjin Polytechnic University, Tianjin 300160 (China); School of Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Tianjin Polytechnic University, Tianjin 300160 (China); Zhou, Xiangyu [State Key Laboratory of Hollow Fiber Membrane Materials and Processes, Tianjin Polytechnic University, Tianjin 300160 (China); School of Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Tianjin Polytechnic University, Tianjin 300160 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin Polytechnic University, Tianjin 300160 (China); Liu, Nana [State Key Laboratory of Hollow Fiber Membrane Materials and Processes, Tianjin Polytechnic University, Tianjin 300160 (China); School of Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Tianjin Polytechnic University, Tianjin 300160 (China)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • The amphiphilic segments on polypropylene nonwoven surface were constructed successfully. • The adsorption behavior for EDCs of the amphiphilic adsorption materials was systematically studied. • The novel amphiphilic adsorption materials have broad application prospects in EDCs removal from aqueous solution. - Abstract: The amphiphilic segments on polypropylene nonwoven (PP nonwoven) surface were constructed using the ultraviolet (UV) irradiation graft polymerization for the removal of endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) with different polarity from aqueous solution. The stearyl acrylate (SA) as hydrophobic functional monomer was introduced onto the surface of PP nonwoven fabric at first stage and then the hydroxyethyl acrylate (HEA) as hydrophilic functional monomer was introduced subsequently. The effect of functional monomer concentration and UV irradiation time on grafting ratio was studied and discussed. The novel amphiphilic structure was designed and constructed based on adsorption capacity for the target micropollutants. The structure and composition of the amphiphilic adsorption materials were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and contact angle (CA). The adsorption behaviors for EDCs of the amphiphilic adsorption materials were studied and the results indicated that the adsorption capacity and adsorption rate were superior to single SA grafted PP nonwoven (PP-g-SA) and single HEA grafted PP nonwoven (PP-g-HEA). The novel amphiphilic adsorption material was efficient for the removal of EDCs with different polarity and could be utilized as a potential adsorption material for removing EDCs from aqueous solution.

  11. Feminization of Longnose Dace (Rhinichthys cataractae in the Oldman River, Alberta, (Canada Provides Evidence of Widespread Endocrine Disruption in an Agricultural Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyce S. Evans

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We sampled an abundant, native minnow (Longnose dace—Rhinichthys cataractae throughout the Oldman River, Alberta, to determine physiological responses and possible population level consequences from exposure to compounds with hormone-like activity. Sex ratios varied between sites, were female-biased, and ranged from just over 50% to almost 90%. Histological examination of gonads revealed that at the sites with >60% females in the adult population, there was up to 38% occurrence of intersex gonads in fish identified through visual examination of the gonads as male. In the majority of intersex gonad cases, there was a large proportion (approx., 50% of oocytes within the testicular tissue. In male dace, vitellogenin mRNA expression generally increased with distance downstream. We analyzed river water for 28 endocrine disrupting compounds from eight functional classes, most with confirmed estrogen-like activity, including synthetic estrogens and hormone therapy drugs characteristic of municipal wastewater effluent, plus natural hormones and veterinary pharmaceuticals characteristic of livestock production. The spatial correlation between detected chemical residues and effects to dace physiology indicate that multiple land uses have a cumulative impact on dace in the Oldman River and effects range from altered gene regulation to severely female-biased sex ratios.

  12. Investigation of pharmaceuticals, personal care products and endocrine disrupting chemicals in a tropical urban catchment and the influence of environmental factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Luhua; Nguyen, Viet Tung; Pal, Amrita; Chen, Huiting; He, Yiliang; Reinhard, Martin; Gin, Karina Yew-Hoong

    2015-12-01

    Previous studies showed the presence of multiple emerging organic contaminants (EOCs) in urban surface waters of Singapore even though there are no obvious direct wastewater discharges. In this study, we investigated the occurrence and distribution of 17 pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) and endocrine disruptive compounds (EDCs) in a tropical urban catchment of Singapore. Monthly samples were collected from a reservoir and its 5 upstream tributaries during a 16-month period. Analysis of samples showed all sites had measurable PPCP and EDC concentrations, with caffeine (33.9-2980 ng/L), salicylic acid (5-838 ng/L), acetaminophen (caffeine, BPA, triclosan, fipronil and DEET in the reservoir. Ecological risk assessment showed that caffeine, acetaminophen, estrone, BPA, triclosan and fipronil may warrant further survey. In particular, BPA levels exceeded the literature-based Predicted No-Effect Concentration (PNEC) value, highlighting the need for source control and/or water remediation in this urban catchment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Potential toxicological hazard due to endocrine-disrupting chemicals on Mediterranean top predators: State of art, gender differences and methodological tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fossi, M.C.; Casini, S.; Marsili, L.

    2007-01-01

    Man-made endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) range across all continents and oceans. Some geographic areas are potentially more threatened than others: one of these is the Mediterranean Sea. Levels of some xenobiotics are much higher here than in other seas and oceans. In this paper we review the final results of a project supported by the Italian Ministry of the Environment, in which the hypothesis that Mediterranean top predator species (such as large pelagic fish and marine mammals) are potentially at risk due to EDCs was investigated. We illustrate the need to develop and apply sensitive methodological tools, such as biomarkers (Vitellogenin, Zona Radiata proteins and CYP1A activities) for evaluation of toxicological risk in large pelagic fish top predators (Swordfish (Xiphias gladius), Bluefin Tuna (Thunnus thynnus thynnus)) and nondestructive biomarkers (CYP1A activities and fibroblast cell culture in skin biopsy), for the hazard assessment of threatened marine mammals species (Striped Dolphin, (Stenella coeruleoalba), Bottlenose Dolphin (Tursiops truncatus), Common Dolphin (Delphinus delphis) and Fin Whale (Balaenoptera physalus))exposed to EDCs. Differential gender susceptibility to EDCs is also explored both in large pelagic fish and in cetaceans. In cetaceans, male specimens showed higher cytochrome P450 induction (BPMO in skyn biopsies, CYP2B in fibroblasts cell cultures) by xenobiotics with respect to females

  14. Bioconcentration and transfer of the organophorous flame retardant 1,3-dichloro-2-propyl phosphate causes thyroid endocrine disruption and developmental neurotoxicity in zebrafish larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiangwei; Lai, Nelson Lok-Shun; Wang, Xianfeng; Guo, Yongyong; Lam, Paul Kwan-Sing; Lam, James Chung-Wah; Zhou, Bingsheng

    2015-04-21

    Organophosphate flame retardants are emerging environmental contaminants, although knowledge of their health risks is limited. Here, thyroid hormone homeostasis and neuronal development was studied in the progeny of adult zebrafish exposed to tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TDCPP). Adult zebrafish were exposed to TDCPP (0, 4, 20, and 100 μg/L) for 3 months. Increased generation of reactive oxygen species and reduced survival rates was observed in exposed F1 larvae. We also observed a significant decrease in plasma thyroxine and 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine levels in F0 females and F1 eggs/larvae. The mRNA and protein expression of factors associated with neuronal development (e.g., α1-tubulin, myelin basic protein, and synapsin IIa) were significantly downregulated in exposed F1 larvae, as was the level of the neurotransmitters dopamine, serotonin, gamma amino butyric acid, and histamine. Larval locomotion was significantly decreased in exposed fish, but there was no effect on acetylcholinesterase activity. Bioconcentration of TDCPP was observed in F0 fish. TDCPP was also detected in F1 eggs following parental exposure, indicating maternal transfer of this compound. This study uniquely shows that TDCPP can be transferred to the offspring of exposed adults, causing thyroid endocrine disruption and developmental neurotoxicity.

  15. The role of phytoplankton composition, biomass and cell volume in accumulation and transfer of endocrine disrupting compounds in the Southern Baltic Sea (The Gulf of Gdansk).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staniszewska, Marta; Nehring, Iga; Zgrundo, Aleksandra

    2015-12-01

    Endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) like bisphenol A (BPA), 4-tert-octylphenol (OP) and 4-nonylphenol (NP) are introduced to the trophic webs through among others phytoplankton. This paper describes BPA, OP and NP concentrations in phytoplankton in the Gulf of Gdansk (Southern Baltic Sea) in the years 2011-2012. The assays of BPA, OP and NP in samples were performed using HPLC with fluorescence detection. The concentrations of BPA, the most commonly used of the three compounds, were over ten times higher than OP and NP concentrations. The concentrations of the studied EDCs in phytoplankton from the Gulf of Gdansk depended on anthropogenic factors and on phytoplankton properties (species composition, biomass, volume). An increase in phytoplankton biomass did not always result in an increase of BPA, OP and NP concentrations. However, the load of the studied EDCs accumulated in phytoplankton biomass increase with a rise of biomass. An increase in BPA, OP and NP concentrations was effected by biomass growth and the proportions ofciliates, dinoflagellates, diatoms and green algae. A strong positive correlation between OP and NP concentrations and negative correlation between BPA concentrations and biomass of organisms with cells measuring <1000 μm(3) in volume results from the differing properties of these compounds. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) and pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) in the aquatic environment: implications for the drinking water industry and global environmental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M F; Yanful, E K; Jasim, S Y

    2009-06-01

    Endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) and pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) are a group of chemical compounds with diverse physical and chemical properties. Recent studies have indicated undesired effects of EDCs and PPCPs at their reported trace concentrations (ng l(-1) to microg l(-1)). This paper reviews the current knowledge on the sources, properties, occurrence and health impacts of EDCs and PPCPs, and their removal from drinking water using ozonation and ozone/hydrogen peroxide-based advanced oxidation. The paper also examines the potential threats posed by these chemicals to drinking water and public health. While these compounds are known to have adverse effects on ecosystem health, notably in the fish population, a similar link is yet to be established between ingestion of these compounds through drinking water and human health. In addition, data on the effectiveness of existing methods for the removal of these compounds are not conclusive. Further studies are required to characterize risks, and also to evaluate and optimize existing removal processes. Also concerted international effort is urgent to cut down the risk of exposure and restrain the production and marketing of toxic chemicals.

  17. Occurrence and risk assessment of pharmaceuticals and personal care products and endocrine disrupting chemicals in reclaimed water and receiving groundwater in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhen; Xiang, Xi; Li, Miao; Ma, Yeping; Wang, Jihua; Liu, Xiang

    2015-09-01

    Groundwater recharge using reclaimed water is considered a promising method to alleviate groundwater depletion. However, pollutants in reclaimed water could be recharged into groundwater during this process, thereby posing a risk to groundwater and human health. In this study, 12 cities in northern China were selected for reclaimed water and groundwater sampling. Analysis of the samples revealed the presence of nine pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCPs) and five endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs). In reclaimed water, all the PPCPs and EDCs were found, with sulpiride (SP) and estriol (E3) being most frequently detected. In groundwater samples, only ketoprofen (KP), mefenamic acid (MA), nalidixic acid (NA) and SP were detected among PPCPs, while bisphenol-A (BPA) was dominant among the target EDCs. The risk quotients (RQs) of all target PPCPs and EDCs except 17α-ethinyl estradiol (EE2) and E3 were below 1 in groundwater samples, indicating that EE2 and E3 deserve priority preferential treatment before recharging. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Evaluation of a screening system for obesogenic compounds: screening of endocrine disrupting compounds and evaluation of the PPAR dependency of the effect.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Pereira-Fernandes

    Full Text Available Recently the environmental obesogen hypothesis has been formulated, proposing a role for endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs in the development of obesity. To evaluate this hypothesis, a screening system for obesogenic compounds is urgently needed. In this study, we suggest a standardised protocol for obesogen screening based on the 3T3-L1 cell line, a well-characterised adipogenesis model, and direct fluorescent measurement using Nile red lipid staining technique. In a first phase, we characterised the assay using the acknowledged obesogens rosiglitazone and tributyltin. Based on the obtained dose-response curves for these model compounds, a lipid accumulation threshold value was calculated to ensure the biological relevance and reliability of statistically significant effects. This threshold based method was combined with the well described strictly standardized mean difference (SSMD method for classification of non-, weak- or strong obesogenic compounds. In the next step, a range of EDCs, used in personal and household care products (parabens, musks, phthalates and alkylphenol compounds, were tested to further evaluate the obesogenicity screening assay for its discriminative power and sensitivity. Additionally, the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ (PPARγ dependency of the positive compounds was evaluated using PPARγ activation and antagonist experiments. Our results showed the adipogenic potential of all tested parabens, several musks and phthalate compounds and bisphenol A (BPA. PPARγ activation was associated with adipogenesis for parabens, phthalates and BPA, however not required for obesogenic effects induced by Tonalide, indicating the role of other obesogenic mechanisms for this compound.

  19. Evaluation of a Screening System for Obesogenic Compounds: Screening of Endocrine Disrupting Compounds and Evaluation of the PPAR Dependency of the Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira-Fernandes, Anna; Demaegdt, Heidi; Vandermeiren, Karine; Hectors, Tine L. M.; Jorens, Philippe G.; Blust, Ronny; Vanparys, Caroline

    2013-01-01

    Recently the environmental obesogen hypothesis has been formulated, proposing a role for endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) in the development of obesity. To evaluate this hypothesis, a screening system for obesogenic compounds is urgently needed. In this study, we suggest a standardised protocol for obesogen screening based on the 3T3-L1 cell line, a well-characterised adipogenesis model, and direct fluorescent measurement using Nile red lipid staining technique. In a first phase, we characterised the assay using the acknowledged obesogens rosiglitazone and tributyltin. Based on the obtained dose-response curves for these model compounds, a lipid accumulation threshold value was calculated to ensure the biological relevance and reliability of statistically significant effects. This threshold based method was combined with the well described strictly standardized mean difference (SSMD) method for classification of non-, weak- or strong obesogenic compounds. In the next step, a range of EDCs, used in personal and household care products (parabens, musks, phthalates and alkylphenol compounds), were tested to further evaluate the obesogenicity screening assay for its discriminative power and sensitivity. Additionally, the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ (PPARγ) dependency of the positive compounds was evaluated using PPARγ activation and antagonist experiments. Our results showed the adipogenic potential of all tested parabens, several musks and phthalate compounds and bisphenol A (BPA). PPARγ activation was associated with adipogenesis for parabens, phthalates and BPA, however not required for obesogenic effects induced by Tonalide, indicating the role of other obesogenic mechanisms for this compound. PMID:24155963

  20. Construction of amphiphilic segments on polypropylene nonwoven surface and its application in removal of endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) from aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Kai; Wei, Junfu; Zhou, Xiangyu; Liu, Nana

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The amphiphilic segments on polypropylene nonwoven surface were constructed successfully. • The adsorption behavior for EDCs of the amphiphilic adsorption materials was systematically studied. • The novel amphiphilic adsorption materials have broad application prospects in EDCs removal from aqueous solution. - Abstract: The amphiphilic segments on polypropylene nonwoven (PP nonwoven) surface were constructed using the ultraviolet (UV) irradiation graft polymerization for the removal of endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) with different polarity from aqueous solution. The stearyl acrylate (SA) as hydrophobic functional monomer was introduced onto the surface of PP nonwoven fabric at first stage and then the hydroxyethyl acrylate (HEA) as hydrophilic functional monomer was introduced subsequently. The effect of functional monomer concentration and UV irradiation time on grafting ratio was studied and discussed. The novel amphiphilic structure was designed and constructed based on adsorption capacity for the target micropollutants. The structure and composition of the amphiphilic adsorption materials were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and contact angle (CA). The adsorption behaviors for EDCs of the amphiphilic adsorption materials were studied and the results indicated that the adsorption capacity and adsorption rate were superior to single SA grafted PP nonwoven (PP-g-SA) and single HEA grafted PP nonwoven (PP-g-HEA). The novel amphiphilic adsorption material was efficient for the removal of EDCs with different polarity and could be utilized as a potential adsorption material for removing EDCs from aqueous solution

  1. Occurrence and distribution of pharmaceutically active and endocrine disrupting compounds in Singapore's marine environment: Influence of hydrodynamics and physical–chemical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayen, Stéphane; Zhang, Hui; Desai, Malan Manish; Ooi, Seng Keat; Kelly, Barry C.

    2013-01-01

    The fate and exposure risks of pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs) and endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in marine environments are not well-understood. In this study we developed a multi-residue analytical method for quantifying concentrations of forty target compounds in seawater from Singapore. Analyses of samples (n = 24) from eight sites showed the occurrence of several compounds, including gemfibrozil ( R ). Principal Components Analysis revealed a strong relationship between t R and contaminant concentrations. While source emissions are undoubtedly important, proximate distance to a wastewater treatment plant had little influence on concentrations. The site with the greatest t R , which exhibited the highest concentrations, is adjacent to Singapore's largest protected wetland reserve. The results highlight an important linkage between hydrodynamic behavior and contaminant exposure risks in complex coastal marine ecosystems. Highlights: •A field study of emerging contaminants in Singapore's coastal marine environment was conducted. •PhACs such as gemfibrozil, triclosan, carbamazepine and ibuprofen were frequently detected. •Site proximity to WWTP had little influence on ambient concentrations. •Contaminant concentrations were highly correlated to hydrodynamic residence time. •Coastal hydrodynamic behaviour greatly influences contaminant exposure risks. -- A field study demonstrates the influence of hydrodynamic residence time and physical–chemical properties on exposure risks of PhACs and EDCs in coastal marine ecosystems

  2. Pharmaceutically active compounds and endocrine disrupting chemicals in water, sediments and mollusks in mangrove ecosystems from Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayen, Stéphane; Estrada, Elvagris Segovia; Juhel, Guillaume; Kit, Lee Wei; Kelly, Barry C

    2016-08-30

    This study investigated the occurrence of bisphenol A (BPA), atrazine and selected pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs) in mangrove habitats in Singapore in 2012-2013, using multiple tools (sediment sampling, POCIS and filter feeder molluscs). Using POCIS, the same suite of contaminants (atrazine, BPA and eleven PhACs) was detected in mangrove waters in 28-days deployments in both 2012 and 2013. POCIS concentrations ranged from pg/L to μg/L. Caffeine, BPA, carbamazepine, E1, triclosan, sulfamerazine, sulfamethazine, and lincomycin were also detected in mangrove sediments from the low pg/g dw (e.g. carbamazepine) to ng/g dw (e.g. BPA). The detection of caffeine, carbamazepine, BPA, sulfamethoxazole or lincomycin in bivalve tissues also showed that these chemicals are bioavailable in the mangrove habitat. Since there are some indications that some pharmaceutically active substances may be biologically active in the low ppb range in marine species, further assessment should be completed based on ecotoxicological data specific to mangrove species. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Full automation of solid-phase microextraction/on-fiber derivatization for simultaneous determination of endocrine-disrupting chemicals and steroid hormones by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lihua; Lan, Chongyu; Liu, Hongtao; Dong, Jun; Luan, Tiangang

    2006-09-01

    A fully automated method using direct immersion solid-phase microextraction (DI-SPME) and headspace on-fiber silylation for simultaneous determinations of exogenous endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) and endogenous steroid hormones in environmental aqueous and biological samples by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was developed and compared to a previously reported manual method. Three EDCs and five endocrine steroid hormones were selected to evaluate this method. The extraction and derivatization time, ion strength, pH, incubation temperature, sample volume, and extraction solvent were optimized. Satisfactory results in pure water were obtained in terms of linearity of calibration curve (R2=0.9932-1.0000), dynamic range (3 orders of magnitude), precision (4-9% RSD), as well as LOD (0.001-0.124 microg L(-1)) and LOQ (0.004-0.413 microg L(-1)), respectively. These results were similar to those obtained using a manual method, and moreover, the precision was improved. This new automated method has been applied to the determinations of target compounds in real samples used in our previous study on a manual SPME method. Exogenous octylphenol (OP), technical grade nonylphenol (t-NP), and diethylstilbestrol (DES) were at 0.13, 5.03, and 0.02 microg L(-1) in river water and 3.76, 13.25, and 0.10 microg L(-1) in fish serum, respectively. Natural steroid hormones estrone (E1), 17beta-estradiol (E2), and testosterone (T) were at 0.19, 0.11, and 6.22 microg L(-1) in river water; and in female fish serum E1, E2, and pregnenolone (PREG) were at 1.37, 1.95, and 6.25 microg L(-1), respectively. These results were confirmed by the manual method. The developed fully automated SPME and on-fiber silylation procedures showed satisfactory applications in environmental analysis and the performances show improved precision and a reduced analysis time compared to the manual method.

  4. Effects of benzophenone-3 exposure on endocrine disruption and reproduction of Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes)—A two generation exposure study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sujin; Jung, Dawoon [School of Public Health, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Kho, Younglim [Department of Health, Environment and Safety, Eulji University, Seongnam 461-713 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Kyungho, E-mail: kyungho@snu.ac.kr [School of Public Health, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Exposure to BP-3 led to adverse reproduction effects on Japanese medaka at 26 μg/L. • Changes in sex hormones and steroidogenic gene transcription were observed. • Parental exposure to BP-3 influenced on the growth of second generation fish. - Abstract: Benzophenone-3 (BP-3) has been widely used in sunscreens and cosmetics to protect human skin from the harmful effects of UV irradiation. While BP-3 has been frequently detected in surface waters, sediments and biota, only limited information is available on its in vivo toxicity, particularly in fish. In the present study the endocrine disrupting capacity of BP-3 and its underlying mechanisms were investigated using Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes). Adult Japanese medaka pairs (F0) were exposed to 0, 4.7, 8.4, 26, or 90 μg/L (or 0, 15, 50, 150, or 500 μg/L of BP-3 based on nominal concentration) for 14 d and its effects on sex steroid hormones, and transcription of various associated genes were determined. Following additional 14 d of exposure, the F1 eggs reproduced were counted and were further exposed to 0, 5.4, 12, or 30 μg/L of BP-3 (or 0, 15, 50, or 150 μg/L based on nominal concentrations) until 30 d after hatching. Chemical analysis of the exposed media confirmed transformation of BP-3 to benzophenone-1 (BP-1), a more potent estrogen agonist. After 14 d of the adult fish exposure, plasma concentrations of testosterone (T) significantly increased in male fish. The 17β-estradiol (E2) to T (E2/T) ratio showed significant decreases in both male and female fish. Overall down-regulation of gonadal steroidogenic genes such as star, cyp11a, cyp17, hsd3b, hsd17b3, and cyp19a was also observed. After 28 d of exposure, the daily average egg reproduction per female was significantly reduced at 26 μg/L of BP-3. However, hatchability of F1 eggs was not affected by continuous exposure. After continued exposure until 30 dph, juvenile fish showed concentration-dependent decrease of condition factor

  5. Effects of water warming and acidification on bioconcentration, metabolization and depuration of pharmaceuticals and endocrine disrupting compounds in marine mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra-Compte, Albert; Maulvault, Ana Luisa; Camacho, Carolina; Álvarez-Muñoz, Diana; Barceló, Damià; Rodríguez-Mozaz, Sara; Marques, António

    2018-02-17

    Warming and acidification are expected impacts of climate change to the marine environment. Besides, organisms that live in coastal areas, such as bivalves, can also be exposed to anthropogenic pollutants like pharmaceuticals (PhACs) and endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs). In this study, the effects of warming and acidification on the bioconcentration, metabolization and depuration of five PhACs (sotalol, sulfamethoxazole, venlafaxine, carbamazepine and citalopram) and two EDCs (methylparaben and triclosan) were investigated in the mussel species (Mytilus galloprovincialis), under controlled conditions. Mussels were exposed to warming and acidification, as well as to the mixture of contaminants up to 15.7 μg L -1 during 20 days; followed by 20 days of depuration. All contaminants bioconcentrated in mussels with levels ranging from 1.8 μg kg -1 dry weight (dw) for methylparaben to 12889.4 μg kg -1 dw for citalopram. Warming increased the bioconcentration factor (BCF) of sulfamethoxazole and sotalol, whereas acidification increased the BCF of sulfamethoxazole, sotalol and methylparaben. In contrast, acidification decreased triclosan levels, while both stressors decreased venlafaxine and citalopram BCFs. Warming and acidification facilitated the elimination of some of the tested compounds (i.e. sotalol from 50% in control to 60% and 68% of elimination in acidification and warming respectively). However, acidification decreased mussels' capacity to metabolize contaminants (i.e. venlafaxine). This work provides a first insight in the understanding of aquatic organisms' response to emerging contaminants pollution under warming and acidification scenarios. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Analysis of Bio-Obtainable Endocrine Disrupting Metals in River Water and Sediment, Sewage Influent/Effluent, Sludge, Leachate, and Concentrated Leachate, in the Irish Midlands Shannon Catchment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoinette M. Reid

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The application of an acid digestion and subsequent solid-phase extraction (SPE procedure were implemented as preliminary treatments prior to quantifying the levels of potentially endocrine disrupting metals (EDMs in a variety of solid and liquid matrices. These included (solid river sediment, leachate sediment and sewage sludge and also (liquid river water, landfill leachate, concentrated leachate, sewage influent, and sewage effluent, sampled in the Irish Midlands. The total concentrations of cobalt (Co, cadmium (Cd, copper (Cu, chromium (Cr, nickel (Ni, lead (Pb, zinc (Zn, and manganese (Mn, after extraction and preconcentration, were determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS. Mercury (Hg in sediment and sludge was determined using cold-vapour atomic fluorescence spectroscopy (AFS. For sewage sludge maximum values (mg/kgdw of 4700 Ni, 1642 Mn, 100.0 Cd, 3400 Zn, 36.70 Co, 750.0 Pb, 485.8 Cr, and 1003 Cu were determined whilst in leachate sediment, maximum values (mg/kgdw of 32.10 Ni, 815.0 Mn, 32.78 Cd, 230.3 Zn, 26.73 Co, 3525 Pb, 124.9 Cr, and 50.13 Cu were found. Over several months, the data showed elevated levels in sewage influents, effluents, and sludges compared to a battery of adjacent river water samples and corresponding sediments. There was a definite trend for target values for sediments to be exceeded, while intervention values were only exceeded for cadmium. Overall the pattern in terms of concentration was sewage > leachate > river matrices. A nonparametric assessment of the effect of sewage treatment method on median metal levels in sludge revealed statistically significant differences at the 95% level of confidence for Co, Cr, and Hg and at the 90% level of confidence for Cd.

  7. Analysis of bio-obtainable endocrine disrupting metals in river water and sediment, sewage influent/effluent, sludge, leachate, and concentrated leachate, in the irish midlands shannon catchment.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Reid, Antoinette M

    2009-01-01

    The application of an acid digestion and subsequent solid-phase extraction (SPE) procedure were implemented as preliminary treatments prior to quantifying the levels of potentially endocrine disrupting metals (EDMs) in a variety of solid and liquid matrices. These included (solid) river sediment, leachate sediment and sewage sludge and also (liquid) river water, landfill leachate, concentrated leachate, sewage influent, and sewage effluent, sampled in the Irish Midlands. The total concentrations of cobalt (Co), cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), chromium (Cr), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), zinc (Zn), and manganese (Mn), after extraction and preconcentration, were determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). Mercury (Hg) in sediment and sludge was determined using cold-vapour atomic fluorescence spectroscopy (AFS). For sewage sludge maximum values (mg\\/kg(dw)) of 4700 Ni, 1642 Mn, 100.0 Cd, 3400 Zn, 36.70 Co, 750.0 Pb, 485.8 Cr, and 1003 Cu were determined whilst in leachate sediment, maximum values (mg\\/kg(dw)) of 32.10 Ni, 815.0 Mn, 32.78 Cd, 230.3 Zn, 26.73 Co, 3525 Pb, 124.9 Cr, and 50.13 Cu were found. Over several months, the data showed elevated levels in sewage influents, effluents, and sludges compared to a battery of adjacent river water samples and corresponding sediments. There was a definite trend for target values for sediments to be exceeded, while intervention values were only exceeded for cadmium. Overall the pattern in terms of concentration was sewage > leachate > river matrices. A nonparametric assessment of the effect of sewage treatment method on median metal levels in sludge revealed statistically significant differences at the 95% level of confidence for Co, Cr, and Hg and at the 90% level of confidence for Cd.

  8. Bioaccumulation of pharmaceutically active compounds and endocrine disrupting chemicals in aquatic macrophytes: Results of hydroponic experiments with Echinodorus horemanii and Eichhornia crassipes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pi, N; Ng, J Z; Kelly, B C

    2017-12-01

    Information regarding the bioaccumulation behaviour of pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs) and endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in aquatic plants is limited. The present study involved controlled hydroponic experiments to assess uptake and elimination rate constants (k u , k e ), bioconcentration factors (BCFs) and translocation factors (TFs) of several PhACs and EDCs in two aquatic macrophyte species, including one submerged species (Echinodorus horemanii) and one free-floating species (Eichhornia crassipes). The results revealed that the studied compounds are readily taken up in these aquatic plants. While bioconcentration factors (BCFs) and translocation factors (TFs) of the test compounds varied substantially, no discernible relationship with physicochemical properties such as octanol-water distribution coefficient (D ow ), membrane-water distribution coefficient (D mw ) and organic carbon-water partition coefficient (K oc ). Diphenhydramine and triclosan exhibited the highest degree of uptake and bioaccumulation potential. For example, the whole-plant BCF of triclosan in E. horemanii was 4390L/kg, while the whole-plant BCF of diphenhydramine in E. crassipes was 6130L/kg. BCFs of 17β-estradiol (E2), 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2), estrone (E1) and bisphenol A (BPA) were relatively low (2-150L/kg). BCFs were generally higher in free-floating aquatic macrophyte species compared to the submerged species. For the free-floating species, E. crassipes, the majority of PhACs and EDCs were more allocated in roots compared to leaves, with TFscaffeine, atrazine, diphenhydramine, E2 and carbamazepine were more allocated in leaf tissue (TFs>1). The study findings may be useful for design and implementation of phytoremediation systems, as well as aid future modeling and risk assessment initiatives for these emerging organic contaminants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Pregnant ewes exposed to multiple endocrine disrupting pollutants through sewage sludge-fertilized pasture show an anti-estrogenic effect in their trabecular bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lind, P. Monica; Oberg, Denise; Larsson, Sune; Kyle, Carol E.; Orberg, Jan; Rhind, Stewart M.

    2010-01-01

    Pregnant ewes were maintained on pastures fertilized, twice yearly, with either sewage sludge (2.25 tonnes dry matter/ha; Treated; T) or inorganic fertilizer containing equivalent amounts of nitrogen (Control; C), to determine effects on maternal and fetal bone structures, density and mechanical properties of exposure to environmental concentrations of multiple endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) and heavy metal pollutants. The ewes were maintained on the respective pastures from the age of about 8 months until they were 4-6 years of age and they were slaughtered at 110 d gestation. Metaphyseal parts of adult ewe femurs exhibited a significantly reduced mean, total cross sectional area (CSA, - 4%; p 3 , - 8.0%; p 2 , - 11.1%; p < 0.05) in T compared with C animals. Femurs of T ewes were stronger than those of C ewes but this may reflect greater body weights. At the mid-diaphyseal part of the fetal bones, there was a reduction in endosteal circumference (- 6.7%, p < 0.05) and marrow cavity area (- 13.8%, p < 0.05) in the female T fetuses compared with female C fetuses. In the male fetuses the mid-diaphyseal part total bone mineral content was higher (+ 3.0%, p < 0.05) in T than in C animals. No treatment difference in biomechanical bending was detected in the fetuses. It is concluded that ewes grazing pasture fertilized with sewage sludge exhibited an anti-estrogenic effect on their trabecular bone in the form of reduced mineral content and density, despite increased body weight. It is suggested that human exposure to low levels of multiple EDCs may have implications for bone structure and human health.

  10. Immobilisation of laccase on Eupergit supports and its application for the removal of endocrine disrupting chemicals in a packed-bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloret, L; Hollmann, F; Eibes, G; Feijoo, G; Moreira, M T; Lema, J M

    2012-06-01

    Laccase from Myceliophthora thermophila was covalently immobilised on Eupergit C and Eupergit C 250L yielding specific activities of up to 17 and 80 U/g, respectively. Due to its superior activity, Eupergit C 250L was chosen for further research. The somewhat lower catalytic efficiency (based on the ratio between the turnover number and the Michaelis constant, k(cat)/K(M)) of the immobilised enzyme in comparison with that of the free enzyme was balanced by its increased stability and broader operational window related to temperature and pH. The feasibility of the immobilised laccase was tested by using a packed bed reactor (PBR) operating in consecutive cycles for the removal of Acid Green 27 dye as model substrate. High degrees of elimination were achieved (88, 79, 69 and 57% in 4 consecutive cycles), while the levels of adsorption on the support varied from 18 to 6%, proving that dye removal took place mainly due to the action of the enzyme. Finally, a continuous PBR with the solid biocatalyst was applied for the treatment of a solution containing the following endocrine disrupting chemicals: estrone (E1), 17β-estradiol (E2) and 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2). At steady-state operation, E1 was degraded by 65% and E2 and EE2 were removed up to 80% and only limited adsorption of these compounds on the support, between 12 and 22%, was detected. In addition, a 79% decrease in estrogenic activity was detected in the effluent of the enzymatic reactor while only 14% was attained by inactivated laccase.

  11. Salinity and sensitivity to endocrine disrupting chemicals: A comparison of reproductive endpoints in small-bodied fish exposed under different salinities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosker, Thijs; Santoro, Giacomo; Melvin, Steven D

    2017-09-01

    The influence of salinity on toxicity outcomes has been demonstrated for various contaminants, but has received limited attention for endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). Short-term laboratory tests using small-bodied fish are an important tool for evaluating impacts of EDCs on reproduction. Tests have been developed for both freshwater and estuarine/marine species, providing an opportunity to assess whether concentrations at which small-bodied fish respond to EDCs may be influenced by salinity. We conducted a semi-quantitative review of short-term laboratory tests with small-bodied fish exposed to EDCs, including 59 studies under freshwater conditions (7 species) and 23 studies conducted under saline conditions (5 species). We focused on two model estrogens [17α-ethinylestradiol and 17β-estradiol (E2)], and three androgens (17β-trenbolone, 5α-dihydrotestosterone and 17α-methyltestosterone). The lowest observed adverse effect concentration (LOAEC LOW ) for key reproductive endpoints was recorded, including sex-steroid and vitellogenin (VTG) levels, fecundity and fertilization. In 65.2% of cases, responses occurred at lower doses under freshwater compared to saline conditions, compared to only 4.3% of cases where fish responded to lower doses under saline conditions. The potential influence of salinity was more pronounced when estrogenic compounds were considered separately, with fish responding to lower doses under fresh compared to saline conditions in 90.5% of cases. Fecundity and E2 level were identified as the most sensitive endpoints for evaluating EDCs regardless of salinity. Interestingly, female VTG levels were a sensitive endpoint under freshwater but not saline conditions. Overall, our results suggest that salinity may be an important factor influencing how small-bodied fish respond to environmental EDCs. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Extraction of endocrine disrupting phenols with iron-ferric oxide core-shell nanowires on graphene oxide nanosheets, followed by their determination by HPLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Feng; Cai, Cuicui; Cheng, Jing; Zhou, Hongbin; Ding, Kerong; Zhang, Lizhi

    2015-01-01

    We describe a novel magnetic nanosorbent that consists of nanowires consisting of a core of metallic iron and an iron (III) oxide shell. These nanowires were then deposited on graphene oxide to form a composite of the type Fe-Fe 2 O 3 /GO. Specifically, the magnetic composite is formed via electrostatic interaction between negatively charged GO nanosheets and positively charged Fe-Fe 2 O 3 nanowires in aqueous solution. The material was successfully applied to the extraction of the endocrine-disrupting phenols bisphenol A, triclosan and 2,4-dichlorophenol from water samples. Compared to neat graphene oxide, the composite material exhibits improved properties in terms of microextraction where both the hydrophilic graphene oxide and the Fe-Fe 2 O 3 nanowires participate in the adsorption of the hydrophilic analytes. The amount of adsorbent, pH of water sample, extraction time and desorption time, type and volume of desorption solution were optimized. Following extraction for the absorbent, the phenols were quantified by HPLC. The three phenols can be determined in 0.5 to 100 ng∙mL −1 concentration range, with limits of detection (at an S/N ratio of 3) ranging from 0.08 to 0.10 ng∙mL −1 . The repeatability was investigated by evaluating the intra- and inter-day precisions with relative standard deviations of lower than 7.5 % (n = 5). The recoveries from spiked real water samples were in the range from 84.8 to 92.0 %. The results indicate that the novel material can be successfully applied to the extraction and analysis of phenols from water samples. (author)

  13. Algal degradation of a known endocrine disrupting insecticide, alpha-endosulfan, and its metabolite, endosulfan sulfate, in liquid medium and soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethunathan, N; Megharaj, M; Chen, Z L; Williams, B D; Lewis, Gareth; Naidu, R

    2004-05-19

    The role of algae in the persistence, transformation, and bioremediation of two endocrine disrupting chemicals, alpha-endosulfan (a cyclodiene insecticide) and its oxidation product endosulfan sulfate, in soil (incubated under light or in darkness) and a liquid medium was examined. Incubation of soil under light dramatically decreased the persistence of alpha-endosulfan and enhanced its transformation to endosulfan sulfate, over that of dark-incubated soil samples, under both nonflooded and flooded conditions. This enhanced degradation of soil-applied alpha-endosulfan was associated with profuse growth of indigenous phototrophic organisms such as algae in soil incubated under light. Inoculation of soil with green algae, Chlorococcum sp. or Scenedesmus sp., further enhanced the degradation of alpha-endosulfan. The role of algae in alpha-endosulfan degradation was convincingly demonstrated when these algae degraded alpha-endosulfan to endosulfan sulfate, the major metabolite, and endosulfan ether, a minor metabolite, in a defined liquid medium. When a high density of the algal inoculum was used, both metabolites appeared to undergo further degradation as evident from their accumulation only in small amounts and the appearance of an endosulfan-derived aldehyde. Interestingly, beta-endosulfan was detected during degradation of alpha-endosulfan by high density algal cultures. These algae were also capable of degrading endosulfan sulfate but to a lesser extent than alpha-endosulfan. Evidence suggested that both alpha-endosulfan and endosulfan sulfate were immediately sorbed by the algae from the medium, which then effected their degradation. Biosorption, coupled with their biotransformation ability, especially at a high inoculum density, makes algae effective candidates for remediation of alpha-endosulfan-polluted environments.

  14. The role of activated carbon and disinfection on the removal of endocrine disrupting chemicals and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs from wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noutsopoulos, Constantinos; Mamais, Daniel; Mpouras, Thanasis; Kokkinidou, Despina; Samaras, Vasilios; Antoniou, Korina; Gioldasi, Marianna

    2014-01-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are two important groups of emerging pollutants due to their toxicological and chemical characteristics and their persistent detection in the aquatic environment. Wastewater treatment plants are a significant pathway for their transfer to the water courses. It is well evidenced that these chemicals are only partially removed through biological treatment of wastewater and therefore being detected in secondary effluents. This work focuses on the evaluation of the efficiency of two well-established disinfection technologies (chlorination and UV irradiation) along with UV/H2O2 and powdered activated carbon (PAC) to remove these chemicals from biologically treated wastewater. Based on the results it is shown that appreciable removal efficiencies due to chlorination should be expected for most of the target compounds, whereas this was not the case for ibuprofen and ketoprofen. With the exemption of diclofenac and ketoprofen direct UV irradiation did not efficiently removed target compounds for UV doses usually applied for disinfection purposes. The application of advanced UV treatment through the addition of H2O2 although resulted in increased removal of the target compounds is not sufficient at moderate UV and H2O2 doses to achieve satisfactory removal efficiencies. PAC use resulted in sufficient removal of target compounds although high PAC doses were required for some chemicals. Comparison of Freundlich isotherms of this study with those of other studies, derived employing water samples, suggested that the water matrix along with the target compounds concentration range can significantly affect the outcome of the experiments.

  15. Association between degradation of pharmaceuticals and endocrine-disrupting compounds and microbial communities along a treated wastewater effluent gradient in Lake Mead

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blunt, Susanna M.; Sackett, Joshua D.; Rosen, Michael R.; Benotti, Mark J.; Trenholm, Rebecca A.; Vanderford, Brett J.; Hedlund, Brian P.; Moser, Duane P.

    2018-01-01

    The role of microbial communities in the degradation of trace organic contaminants in the environment is little understood. In this study, the biotransformation potential of 27 pharmaceuticals and endocrine-disrupting compounds was examined in parallel with a characterization of the native microbial community in water samples from four sites variously impacted by urban run-off and wastewater discharge in Lake Mead, Nevada and Arizona, USA. Samples included relatively pristine Colorado River water at the upper end of the lake, nearly pure tertiary-treated municipal wastewater entering via the Las Vegas Wash, and waters of mixed influence (Las Vegas Bay and Boulder Basin), which represented a gradient of treated wastewater effluent impact. Microbial diversity analysis based on 16S rRNA gene censuses revealed the community at this site to be distinct from the less urban-impacted locations, although all sites were similar in overall diversity and richness. Similarly, Biolog EcoPlate assays demonstrated that the microbial community at Las Vegas Wash was the most metabolically versatile and active. Organic contaminants added as a mixture to laboratory microcosms were more rapidly and completely degraded in the most wastewater-impacted sites (Las Vegas Wash and Las Vegas Bay), with the majority exhibiting shorter half-lives than at the other sites or in a bacteriostatic control. Although the reasons for enhanced degradation capacity in the wastewater-impacted sites remain to be established, these data are consistent with the acclimatization of native microorganisms (either through changes in community structure or metabolic regulation) to effluent-derived trace contaminants. This study suggests that in urban, wastewater-impacted watersheds, prior exposure to organic contaminants fundamentally alters the structure and function of microbial communities, which in turn translates into greater potential for the natural attenuation of these compounds compared to more pristine

  16. Biomarker responses to estrogen and androgen exposure in the brook stickleback (Culaea inconstans): A new bioindicator species for endocrine disrupting compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muldoon, Breda M; Hogan, Natacha S

    2016-02-01

    Small-bodied freshwater fish are commonly used in regulatory testing for endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) but most lack a sensitive and quantifiable androgen-specific biomarker. Brook stickleback (Culaea inconstans) are a North American freshwater fish whose males produce an androgen-regulated glycoprotein in the kidney called spiggin. Although spiggin induction in females has been used as an androgen-specific biomarker of exposure in other stickleback species it has not been characterized in brook stickleback. Therefore, our objective was to develop a bioassay using brook stickleback to measure estrogenic and androgenic responses and establish the sensitivity of traditional and novel biomarkers of exposure. We first developed and optimized a qPCR assay to measure spiggin and vitellogenin transcript levels in kidney and liver tissue, respectively. Basal levels were differentially expressed in mature wild-caught male and female brook stickleback. To determine their sensitivity to EDCs, fish were exposed to nominal concentrations of 1, 10 and 100ng/L of 17α-methyltestosterone (MT) or 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2) for 21days (sampled at 7 and 21days) under semi-static renewal conditions. MT and EE2 exposure induced spiggin and vitellogenin transcripts in female kidneys and male livers, respectively. Exposure to EE2 also increased hepatosomatic index in both sexes and decreased gonadosomatic index in females. Histopathological alterations were observed in the kidney of EE2-exposed fish and an increase in kidney epithelium cell height occurred in MT-exposed females. Given the sensitivity of these endpoints, the brook stickleback is a promising new freshwater fish model for EDC evaluation and a potential bioindicator for EDCs in North American freshwater environments. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Endocrine disruption potentials of organophosphate flame retardants and related mechanisms in H295R and MVLN cell lines and in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoshan; Ji, Kyunghee; Choi, Kyungho

    2012-06-15

    Organophosphate flame retardants (OPFRs) are frequently detected in environment and biota. However, knowledge on their potential toxicological effects is limited. Endocrine disrupting potentials of six OPFRs, i.e., tris-(2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP), tris-(2-chloroisopropyl) phosphate (TCPP), tris-(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TDCPP), tris-(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate (TBEP), triphenyl phosphate (TPP), and tricresyl phosphate (TCP), were investigated using human cell lines as well as zebrafish (Danio rerio). Sex hormone synthesis and steroidogenic gene transcriptions were measured using H295R cells. With MVLN cells, estrogen receptor binding activities of OPFRs were evaluated. In zebrafish, sex hormones and related gene transcriptions were determined for each sex after 14d exposure to OPFRs. All six OPFRs increased both 17β-estradiol (E2) and testosterone (T) concentrations in H295R cells. In addition, transcription of four major steroidogenic genes was up-regulated and that of two sulfotransferase genes was down-regulated. In MVLN cells, no OPFRs acted as estrogen receptor agonists, while TDCPP, TPP, and TCP acted as antagonists inhibiting binding of E2 to estrogen receptor. After 14d of zebrafish exposure, TCP, TDCPP, or TPP significantly increased plasma T and E2 concentrations, but did not change 11-ketotestosterone (11-KT) among female fish. Among males, both T and 11-KT decreased and E2 increased. In general, transcription of CYP17 and CYP19a genes was significantly up-regulated in both sexes, while vitellogenin (VTG) 1 gene was down- and up-regulated in female and male fish, respectively. The results of this study showed that OPFRs could alter sex hormone balance through several mechanisms including alterations of steroidogenesis or estrogen metabolism. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Transcriptomic, cellular and life-history responses of Daphnia magna chronically exposed to benzotriazoles: Endocrine-disrupting potential and molting effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maeva Giraudo

    Full Text Available Benzotriazoles (BZTs are ubiquitous aquatic contaminants used in a wide range of industrial and domestic applications from aircraft deicers to dishwasher tablets. Acute toxicity has been reported in aquatic organisms for some of the BZTs but their mode of action remains unknown. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the transcriptomic response of D. magna exposed to sublethal doses of 1H-benzotriazole (BTR, 5-methyl-1H-benzotriazole (5MeBTR and 5-chloro-1H-benzotriazole (5ClBTR using RNA-sequencing and quantitative real-time PCR. Cellular and life-history endpoints (survival, number of neonates, growth were also investigated. Significant effects on the molting frequency were observed after 21-d exposure to 5MeBTR and 5ClBTR. No effects on molting frequency were observed for BTR but RNA-seq results indicated that this BZT induced the up-regulation of genes coding for cuticular proteins, which could have compensated the molting disruption. Molting in cladocerans is actively controlled by ecdysteroid hormones. Complementary short-term temporal analysis (4- and 8-d exposure of the transcription of genes related to molting and hormone-mediated processes indicated that the three compounds had specific modes of action. BTR induced the transcription of genes involved in 20-hydroxyecdysone synthesis, which suggests pro-ecdysteroid properties. 5ClBTR exposure induced protein activity and transcriptional levels of chitinase enzymes, associated with an impact on ecdysteroid signaling pathways, which could explain the decrease in molt frequency. Finally, 5MeBTR seemed to increase molt frequency through epigenetic processes. Overall, results suggested that molting effects observed at the physiological level could be linked to endocrine regulation impacts of BZTs at the molecular level.

  19. Polyaniline-coated chitosan-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles: Preparation for the extraction and analysis of endocrine-disrupting phenols in environmental water and juice samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xilan; Cheng, Jing; Zhou, Hongbin; Li, Feng; Wu, Wenlin; Ding, Kerong

    2015-08-15

    In the present study, chitosan (CHI) functionalized Fe3O4 magnetic microspheres coated with polyaniline (PANI) were synthesized for the first time. The chitosan-functionalized magnetic microspheres (Fe3O4@CHI) were synthesized by a co-precipitation method, and then aniline was polymerized on the magnetic core. The obtained Fe3O4@CHI@PANI microspheres were spherical core-shell structure with uniform size at about 100nm with 20-30nm diameter core. The microspheres had a high saturation magnetization of 32emu g(-)(1), which was sufficient for magnetic separation. The obtained Fe3O4@CHI@PANI magnetic microspheres were applied as magnetic adsorbents for the extraction of aromatic compounds via π-π interaction between polyaniline shell and aromatic compounds. Three endocrine-disrupting phenols, including bisphenol A (BPA), 2, 4-dichlorophenol (2, 4-DCP), and triclosan (TCS) were selected as the model analytes to verify the extraction ability of Fe3O4@CHI@PANI. The hydrophilic chitosan-functionalized Fe3O4 core (Fe3O4@CHI) improved the dispersibility of Fe3O4@CHI@PANI microspheres, and then improve its extraction efficiency. The dominant parameters affecting enrichment efficiency were investigated and optimized. Under optimal condition, the proposed method was evaluated, and applied to the analysis of phenols in real water and juice samples. The results demonstrated the method based on Fe3O4@CHI@PANI magnetic microspheres had good linearity (R(2)>0.996), and limits of detection (0.10-0.13ng mL(-1)), high repeatability (RSD<6.6%) and good recovery (85.0-106.7%). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. FY 1998 results of the intellectual basement project using functions of private companies (venture promotion type basement creation R and D project). Development of endocrine disrupter testing method and development of environmental assessment method; 1998 nendo naibunpi kakuran busshitsu ni taisuru shiken hoho kaihatsu oyobi eikyo hyoka shuho kaihatsu hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    For the purpose of assessing the risk in relation to endocrine disrupting chemicals, the following were conducted: development of testing/assessment method for endocrine disrupting chemicals, survey of the actual exposure assessment, development of measuring method for the concentration in the environment. In the development of the testing method, the following were carried out: development of a high-throughput screening method for evaluating endocrine disrupting chemicals; as screening testing method using mammals, uterotrophic assay, Hershberger assay using castrated male rats, thyroid hormone assay in pubertal rats, enhanced OECD 407 test guideline for 28-day toxicity test; study on yeast two-hybrid assay for endocrine disrupter; sex-reversal assay for suspected endocrine disrupting chemicals using S-rR strain medaka. In the development of exposure assessment method, estrogenic potency of individual nonylphenol congeners isolated from technical mixtures; determination of endocrine disrupters and related chemicals from industry and nature origin in river water and sediment; research for the flow of industrial origin chemicals; reconstruction of pollution history of chemicals using sediment cores. (NEDO)

  1. VALIDATION REPORT (PHASE 2) FOR THE FISH SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT TEST FOR THE DETECTION OF ENDOCRINE ACTIVE SUBSTANCES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holbech, Henrik; Kinnberg, Karin Lund; Petersen, Gitte

    This document presents the validation report (phase 2) of the Fish Sexual Development Test (FSDT). The Fish Sexual Development Test (FSDT) covers a life-stage where sexual development is particularly sensitive to perturbation caused by endocrine active chemicals. The chemical exposure lasts...... Guideline on the fish sexual development test to the Working Group of the National Coordinators of the Test Guidelines Programme (WNT). The project was included on the Test Guidelines workplan in 2003, and extensive validation of the test method was carried out until 2009. Two validation studies were...... for about 60 days, at the end of which endpoints of ecological relevance like the sex ratio of the exposed fish is calculated and the biomarker endpoint vitellogenin is measured in individual animals. In 2003, Denmark, on behalf of the European Nordic countries, proposed a new project o develop a Test...

  2. Novel in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo assays elucidating the effects of endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) on thyroid hormone action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schriks, M.

    2006-01-01

    The last years, both scientific and public concern about the possible threat of compounds in the environment that may affect endocrine functions has increased. Thus far, the majority of endocrine disruptor research has focused on the interference of compounds with the sex hormone homeostasis. Less

  3. Carcinogenetic mechanisms of endocrine disruptors in female cancers (Review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Pup, Lino; Mantovani, Alberto; Cavaliere, Carla; Facchini, Gaetano; Luce, Amalia; Sperlongano, Pasquale; Caraglia, Michele; Berretta, Massimiliano

    2016-08-01

    Endocrine disruptors (EDs) are pollutants that alter the endocrine system and are involved in carcinogenesis. EDs have multiple and complex levels of action. They can affect the synthesis, release and transport of natural hormones. In target tissues, EDs can reduce or increase the effects of natural hormones on their receptors and change signaling cascades. When ED exposure happens at critical periods of life, from embryo to puberty, they can act at doses considered safe for an adult. Furthermore, their epigenetic effects can also influence the cancer risk of future generations. The cancer mechanisms of known EDs are hereby reviewed, There are thousands of newly introduced substances whose potential endocrine-disrupting and cancer effects are completely unknown. Although there are still gaps in our knowledge, these data support the urgent need for health and environmental policies aimed at protecting the public and in particular, the developing fetus and women of reproductive age.

  4. Familiar and novel reproductive endocrine disruptors: xenoestrogens, dioxins and nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutz, R J; Carvan, M J; Larson, J K; Liu, Q; Stelzer, R V; King-Heiden, T C; Baldridge, M G; Shahnoor, N; Julien, K

    Environmental contaminants are known to exert endocrine-disrupting effects on the reproductive axis of animals. Many of these molecules can affect steroid biosynthesis or estrogen-receptor signaling by behaving as estrogen-like molecules ("xenoestrogens"), or by exerting estrogenmodulatory effects. Exposure to some compounds has been correlated with the skewing of sex ratios in aquatic species, feminization and demasculinization of male animals, declines in human sperm counts, and overall diminution in fertility of birds, fish, and mammals. We herein devote space to several classes of endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs), including estrogenic substances such as bisphenol A (BPA), molecules that can behave at times anti-estrogenically while activating the aromatic hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), such as dioxins (a known human carcinogen), and novel, ubiquitous molecules such as nanoparticles, particularly gold nanoparticles (GNPs), that appear to alter the sexsteroid biosynthetic pathway.

  5. Metabolism of UV-filter benzophenone-3 by rat and human liver microsomes and its effect on endocrine-disrupting activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Yoko, E-mail: y-watanabe@nichiyaku.ac.jp [Graduate School of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, Kasumi 1-2-3, Minami-ku, Hiroshima 734-8553 (Japan); Nihon Pharmaceutical University, Komuro 10281, Ina-machi, Saitama 362-0806 (Japan); Kojima, Hiroyuki; Takeuchi, Shinji [Hokkaido Institute of Public Health, Kita-19, Nishi-12, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-0819 (Japan); Uramaru, Naoto [Nihon Pharmaceutical University, Komuro 10281, Ina-machi, Saitama 362-0806 (Japan); Sanoh, Seigo [Graduate School of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, Kasumi 1-2-3, Minami-ku, Hiroshima 734-8553 (Japan); Sugihara, Kazumi [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Science, Hiroshima International University, Koshingai 5-1-1, Kure, Hiroshima 737-0112 (Japan); Kitamura, Shigeyuki [Nihon Pharmaceutical University, Komuro 10281, Ina-machi, Saitama 362-0806 (Japan); Ohta, Shigeru [Graduate School of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, Kasumi 1-2-3, Minami-ku, Hiroshima 734-8553 (Japan)

    2015-01-15

    Benzophenone-3 (2-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzophenone; BP-3) is widely used as sunscreen for protection of human skin and hair from damage by ultraviolet (UV) radiation. In this study, we examined the metabolism of BP-3 by rat and human liver microsomes, and the estrogenic and anti-androgenic activities of the metabolites. When BP-3 was incubated with rat liver microsomes in the presence of NADPH, 2,4,5-trihydroxybenzophenone (2,4,5-triOH BP) and 3-hydroxylated BP-3 (3-OH BP-3) were newly identified as metabolites, together with previously detected metabolites 5-hydroxylated BP-3 (5-OH BP-3), a 4-desmethylated metabolite (2,4-diOH BP) and 2,3,4-trihydroxybenzophenone (2,3,4-triOH BP). In studies with recombinant rat cytochrome P450, 3-OH BP-3 and 2,4,5-triOH BP were mainly formed by CYP1A1. BP-3 was also metabolized by human liver microsomes and CYP isoforms. In estrogen reporter (ER) assays using estrogen-responsive CHO cells, 2,4-diOH BP exhibited stronger estrogenic activity, 2,3,4-triOH BP exhibited similar activity, and 5-OH BP-3, 2,4,5-triOH BP and 3-OH BP-3 showed lower activity as compared to BP-3. Structural requirements for activity were investigated in a series of 14 BP-3 derivatives. When BP-3 was incubated with liver microsomes from untreated rats or phenobarbital-, 3-methylcholanthrene-, or acetone-treated rats in the presence of NADPH, estrogenic activity was increased. However, liver microsomes from dexamethasone-treated rats showed decreased estrogenic activity due to formation of inactive 5-OH BP-3 and reduced formation of active 2,4-diOH BP. Anti-androgenic activity of BP-3 was decreased after incubation with liver microsomes. - Highlights: • Metabolic modification of the endocrine-disrupting activity of BP-3 was examined. • 2,4,5-TriOH BP and 3-OH BP-3 were identified as new BP-3 metabolites. • 2,4-DiOH BP and 2,3,4-triOH BP exhibited high or similar estrogenic activities. • Estrogenic activity of BP-3 was enhanced by incubation with rat liver

  6. Cloning of circadian rhythmic pathway genes and perturbation of oscillation patterns in endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs)-exposed mangrove killifish Kryptolebias marmoratus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Jae-Sung; Kim, Bo-Mi; Lee, Bo-Young; Hwang, Un-Ki; Lee, Yong Sung; Lee, Jae-Seong

    2014-08-01

    To investigate the effect of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) on the circadian rhythm pathway, we cloned clock and circadian rhythmic pathway-associated genes (e.g. Per2, Cry1, Cry2, and BMAL1) in the self-fertilizing mangrove killifish Kryptolebias marmoratus. The promoter region of Km-clock had 1 aryl hydrocarbon receptor element (AhRE, GTGCGTGACA) and 8 estrogen receptor (ER) half-sites, indicating that the AhRE and ER half sites would likely be associated with regulation of clock protein activity during EDCs-induced cellular stress. The Km-clock protein domains (bHLH, PAS1, PAS2) were highly conserved in five additional fish species (zebrafish, Japanese medaka, Southern platyfish, Nile tilapia, and spotted green pufferfish), suggesting that the fish clock protein may play an important role in controlling endogenous circadian rhythms. The promoter regions of Km-BMAL1, -Cry1, -Cry2, and -Per2 were found to contain several xenobiotic response elements (XREs), indicating that EDCs may be able to alter the expression of these genes. To analyze the endogenous circadian rhythm in K. marmoratus, we measured expression of Km-clock and other circadian rhythmic genes (e.g. Per2, Cry1, Cry2, and BMAL1) in different tissues, and found ubiquitous expression, although there were different patterns of transcript amplification during different developmental stages. In an estrogen (E2)-exposed group, Km-clock expression was down-regulated, however, a hydroxytamoxifen (TMX, nonsteroid estrogen antagonist)-exposed group showed an upregulated pattern of Km-clock expression, suggesting that the expression of Km-clock is closely associated with exposure to EDCs. In response to the exposure of bisphenol A (BPA) and 4-tert-octyphenol (OP), Km-clock expression was down-regulated in the pituitary/brain, muscle, and skin in both gender types (hermaphrodite and secondary male). In juvenile K. marmoratus liver tissue, expression of Km-clock and other circadian rhythmic pathway

  7. Year-long evaluation on the occurrence and fate of pharmaceuticals, personal care products, and endocrine disrupting chemicals in an urban drinking water treatment plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padhye, Lokesh P; Yao, Hong; Kung'u, Francis T; Huang, Ching-Hua

    2014-03-15

    The occurrence and removal of thirty representative pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCPs) and endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in an urban drinking water treatment plant (DWTP) were investigated for a period of one year to evaluate current system's treatment efficacy and assess occurrence of PPCPs and EDCs in finished drinking water. Results showed that the average total PPCPs and EDCs concentration in the surface water source was around 360 ng/L (median concentration = 340 ng/L) with 57% coefficient of variation (CV). The median concentrations of most of the individual PPCPs and EDCs in the surface water were below 15 ng/L except for N,N-diethyltoluamide (DEET) and nonylphenol, which were at 122 and 83 ng/L, respectively. The compounds DEET, nonylphenol, ibuprofen, triclosan, atrazine, tris(2-chloroethyl)-phosphate (TCEP), bisphenol-A, and caffeine (in the order of decreasing median concentration) were among twenty compounds detected at least once in the surface water, while all of the above detected compounds, except two, were also detected in the finished drinking water. The average total PPCPs and EDCs concentration in the finished drinking water was around 98 ng/L (median concentration = 96 ng/L) with 66% CV. The median concentrations of most detected PPCPs and EDCs in drinking water were below 5 ng/L except for DEET and nonylphenol, which were at 12 and 20 ng/L, respectively. There was a strong correlation (r = 0.97) between PPCPs and EDCs' concentrations in the source water and in the drinking water over the one-year study period when data points from two sampling events with unusual removals were excluded. Individual water treatment unit processes showed greater temporal variations of PPCPs and EDCs removal efficiencies than the overall treatment processes. The removal efficiencies also varied greatly among different PPCPs and EDCs. The average removal for total PPCPs and EDCs was 76 ± 18% at the DWTP, with ozonation

  8. Utilization of cross-linked laccase aggregates in a perfusion basket reactor for the continuous elimination of endocrine-disrupting chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabana, Hubert; Jones, J Peter; Agathos, Spiros N

    2009-04-15

    A perfusion basket reactor (BR) was developed for the continuous utilization of insolubilized laccase as cross-linked enzyme aggregates (CLEAs). The BR consisted of an unbaffled basket made of a metallic filtration module filled with CLEAs and continuously agitated by a 3-blade marine propeller. The agitation conditions influenced both the apparent laccase activity in the reactor and the stability of the biocatalyst. Optimal laccase activity was obtained at a rotational speed of 12.5 rps and the highest stability was reached at speeds of 1.7 rps or lower. The activity and stability of the biocatalyst were affected drastically upon the appearance of vortices in the reaction medium. This reactor was used for the continuous elimination of the endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) nonylphenol (NP), bisphenol A (BPA), and triclosan (TCS). Optimization of EDC elimination by laccase CLEAs as a function of temperature and pH was achieved by response surface methodology using a central composite factorial design. The optimal conditions of pH and temperature were, respectively, 4.8 and 40.3 degrees C for the elimination of p353NP (a branched isomer of NP), 4.7 and 48.0 degrees C for BPA, and 4.9 and 41.2 degrees C for TCS. Finally, the BR was used for the continuous elimination of these EDCs from a 5 mg L(-1) aqueous solution using 1 mg of CLEAs at pH 5 and room temperature. Our results showed that at least 85% of these EDCs could be eliminated with a hydraulic retention time of 325 min. The performances of the BR were quite stable over a 7-day period of continuous treatment. Furthermore, this system could eliminate the same EDCs from a 100 mg L(-1) solution. Finally, a mathematical model combining the Michaelis-Menten kinetics of the laccase CLEAs and the continuous stirred tank reactor behavior of the BR was developed to predict the elimination of these xenobiotics. 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Urine, peritoneal fluid and omental fat proteomes of reproductive age women: Endometriosis-related changes and associations with endocrine disrupting chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Katherine E; Miroshnychenko, Olga; Johansen, Eric B; Niles, Richard K; Sundaram, Rajeshwari; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Albertolle, Matthew; Zhou, Yan; Prasad, Namrata; Drake, Penelope M; Giudice, Linda C; Hall, Steven C; Witkowska, H Ewa; Buck Louis, Germaine M; Fisher, Susan J

    2015-01-15

    Endometriosis, ectopic growth of the uterine lining (endometrium), which affects 6-11% of reproductive age women, is associated with pelvic pain and infertility. We investigated the peritoneal fluid (PF), urine and omental fat (OF) proteomes of women with endometriosis vs. individuals with no surgically visualized endometriosis. All participants were enrolled in the NICHD-funded ENDO Study. A two-step proteomic study was performed. The first, a broad survey, employed a semi-quantitative gel LC-mass spectrometry (MS) workflow: SDS PAGE fractionation, trypsin digestion and LC-MS/MS. The results showed sample integrity but failed to detect any differences between women with and without endometriosis. The second step was a quantitative analysis of OF samples. We employed another sample set (n=30) from women ± disease and isobaric mass-tag (iTRAQ) chemistry to label peptides and 2D LC-MS/MS for protein identification and quantification. Three proteins-matrix metalloproteinase-9, neutrophil elastase, and FAM49B-were significantly lower in abundance in samples from women with endometriosis. Interestingly, neutrophil elastase and FAM49B levels were associated with higher levels of a subset of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) that were previously measured in the same samples. The results of these experiments showed the feasibility of associating endometriosis with changes in the OF protein repertoire and EDC levels. Endometriosis, pathological growth of the uterine lining, is associated with significant morbidities, including pain and infertility. However, the causes of this common condition are poorly understood. This study determined whether endometriosis was associated with changes in the protein composition of peritoneal fluid, urine and/or omental fat. A protein of unknown function (FAM49B) and two proteinases (metalloproteinase-9, neutrophil elastase) were down regulated in OF samples from women with versus without endometriosis. These findings suggested

  10. In vitro profiling of toxic effects of prominent environmental lower-chlorinated PCB congeners linked with endocrine disruption and tumor promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pěnčíková, Kateřina; Svržková, Lucie; Strapáčová, Simona; Neča, Jiří; Bartoňková, Iveta; Dvořák, Zdeněk; Hýžďalová, Martina; Pivnička, Jakub; Pálková, Lenka; Lehmler, Hans-Joachim; Li, Xueshu; Vondráček, Jan; Machala, Miroslav

    2018-03-05

    The mechanisms contributing to toxic effects of airborne lower-chlorinated PCB congeners (LC-PCBs) remain poorly characterized. We evaluated in vitro toxicities of environmental LC-PCBs found in both indoor and outdoor air (PCB 4, 8, 11, 18, 28 and 31), and selected hydroxylated metabolites of PCB 8, 11 and 18, using reporter gene assays, as well as other functional cellular bioassays. We focused on processes linked with endocrine disruption, tumor promotion and/or regulation of transcription factors controlling metabolism of both endogenous compounds and xenobiotics. The tested LC-PCBs were found to be mostly efficient anti-androgenic (within nanomolar - micromolar range) and estrogenic (at micromolar concentrations) compounds, as well as inhibitors of gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) at micromolar concentrations. PCB 8, 28 and 31 were found to partially inhibit the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-mediated activity. The tested LC-PCBs were also partial constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and pregnane X receptor (PXR) agonists, with PCB 4, 8 and 18 being the most active compounds. They were inactive towards other nuclear receptors, such as vitamin D receptor, thyroid receptor α, glucocorticoid receptor or peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ. We found that only PCB 8 contributed to generation of oxidative stress, while all tested LC-PCBs induced arachidonic acid release (albeit without further modulations of arachidonic acid metabolism) in human lung epithelial cells. Importantly, estrogenic effects of hydroxylated (OH-PCB) metabolites of LC-PCBs (4-OH-PCB 8, 4-OH-PCB 11 and 4'-OH-PCB 18) were higher than those of the parent PCBs, while their other toxic effects were only slightly altered or suppressed. This suggested that metabolism may alter toxicity profiles of LC-PCBs in a receptor-specific manner. In summary, anti-androgenic and estrogenic activities, acute inhibition of GJIC and suppression of the AhR-mediated activity were

  11. A fungal P450 (CYP5136A3 capable of oxidizing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and endocrine disrupting alkylphenols: role of Trp(129 and Leu(324.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khajamohiddin Syed

    Full Text Available The model white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium, which is known for its versatile pollutant-biodegradation ability, possesses an extraordinarily large repertoire of P450 monooxygenases in its genome. However, the majority of these P450s have hitherto unknown function. Our initial studies using a genome-wide gene induction strategy revealed multiple P450s responsive to individual classes of xenobiotics. Here we report functional characterization of a cytochrome P450 monooxygenase, CYP5136A3 that showed common responsiveness and catalytic versatility towards endocrine-disrupting alkylphenols (APs and mutagenic/carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs. Using recombinant CYP5136A3, we demonstrated its oxidation activity towards APs with varying alkyl side-chain length (C3-C9, in addition to PAHs (3-4 ring size. AP oxidation involves hydroxylation at the terminal carbon of the alkyl side-chain (ω-oxidation. Structure-activity analysis based on a 3D model indicated a potential role of Trp(129 and Leu(324 in the oxidation mechanism of CYP5136A3. Replacing Trp(129 with Leu (W129L and Phe (W129F significantly diminished oxidation of both PAHs and APs. The W129L mutation caused greater reduction in phenanthrene oxidation (80% as compared to W129F which caused greater reduction in pyrene oxidation (88%. Almost complete loss of oxidation of C3-C8 APs (83-90% was observed for the W129L mutation as compared to W129F (28-41%. However, the two mutations showed a comparable loss (60-67% in C9-AP oxidation. Replacement of Leu(324 with Gly (L324G caused 42% and 54% decrease in oxidation activity towards phenanthrene and pyrene, respectively. This mutation also caused loss of activity towards C3-C8 APs (20-58%, and complete loss of activity toward nonylphenol (C9-AP. Collectively, the results suggest that Trp(129 and Leu(324 are critical in substrate recognition and/or regio-selective oxidation of PAHs and APs. To our knowledge, this is the first

  12. A Fungal P450 (CYP5136A3) Capable of Oxidizing Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons and Endocrine Disrupting Alkylphenols: Role of Trp129 and Leu324

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Khajamohiddin; Porollo, Aleksey; Lam, Ying Wai; Yadav, Jagjit S.

    2011-01-01

    The model white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium, which is known for its versatile pollutant-biodegradation ability, possesses an extraordinarily large repertoire of P450 monooxygenases in its genome. However, the majority of these P450s have hitherto unknown function. Our initial studies using a genome-wide gene induction strategy revealed multiple P450s responsive to individual classes of xenobiotics. Here we report functional characterization of a cytochrome P450 monooxygenase, CYP5136A3 that showed common responsiveness and catalytic versatility towards endocrine-disrupting alkylphenols (APs) and mutagenic/carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Using recombinant CYP5136A3, we demonstrated its oxidation activity towards APs with varying alkyl side-chain length (C3-C9), in addition to PAHs (3–4 ring size). AP oxidation involves hydroxylation at the terminal carbon of the alkyl side-chain (ω-oxidation). Structure-activity analysis based on a 3D model indicated a potential role of Trp129 and Leu324 in the oxidation mechanism of CYP5136A3. Replacing Trp129 with Leu (W129L) and Phe (W129F) significantly diminished oxidation of both PAHs and APs. The W129L mutation caused greater reduction in phenanthrene oxidation (80%) as compared to W129F which caused greater reduction in pyrene oxidation (88%). Almost complete loss of oxidation of C3-C8 APs (83–90%) was observed for the W129L mutation as compared to W129F (28–41%). However, the two mutations showed a comparable loss (60–67%) in C9-AP oxidation. Replacement of Leu324 with Gly (L324G) caused 42% and 54% decrease in oxidation activity towards phenanthrene and pyrene, respectively. This mutation also caused loss of activity towards C3-C8 APs (20–58%), and complete loss of activity toward nonylphenol (C9-AP). Collectively, the results suggest that Trp129 and Leu324 are critical in substrate recognition and/or regio-selective oxidation of PAHs and APs. To our knowledge, this is the first

  13. Review: Environmental endocrine disruptors of testicular function ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Many of these chemicals found in our environment and households have oestrogenic properties (“xenoestrogens”) and are toxic because they affect the endocrine system (“endocrine disruptors”). Evidence of the health hazards of endocrine disrupting chemicals continues to mount. In terms of male fertility, it now seems that ...

  14. Do endocrine disruptors cause hypospadias?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botta, Sisir; Cunha, Gerald R.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Endocrine disruptors or environmental agents, disrupt the endocrine system, leading to various adverse effects in humans and animals. Although the phenomenon has been noted historically in the cases of diethylstilbestrol (DES) and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), the term “endocrine disruptor” is relatively new. Endocrine disruptors can have a variety of hormonal activities such as estrogenicity or anti-androgenicity. The focus of this review concerns on the induction of hypospadias by exogenous estrogenic endocrine disruptors. This has been a particular clinical concern secondary to reported increased incidence of hypospadias. Herein, the recent literature is reviewed as to whether endocrine disruptors cause hypospadias. Methods A literature search was performed for studies involving both humans and animals. Studies within the past 5 years were reviewed and categorized into basic science, clinical science, epidemiologic, or review studies. Results Forty-three scientific articles were identified. Relevant sentinel articles were also reviewed. Additional pertinent studies were extracted from the reference of the articles that obtained from initial search results. Each article was reviewed and results presented. Overall, there were no studies which definitely stated that endocrine disruptors caused hypospadias. However, there were multiple studies which implicated endocrine disruptors as one component of a multifactorial model for hypospadias. Conclusions Endocrine