WorldWideScience

Sample records for encopresis

  1. Encopresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Starting toilet training when the child was too young Emotional problems, such as oppositional defiant disorder or conduct disorder Whatever the cause, the child may feel shame, guilt, or low self-esteem, and may hide signs of encopresis. Factors that ...

  2. [Encopresis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Gontard, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    Encopresis is defined as functional faecal incontinence at 4 years of age or older and affects 1-3% of all school children. The two most important subtypes are encopresis with and without constipation. In preschoolers toilet refusal syndrome can occur. Comorbid behavioural disorders and urinary incontinence are common. The current state-of-the-art regarding aetiology, assessment and therapy is presented in this overview. A symptom-oriented behavioural approach (toilet training) is most successful, with the addition of laxatives (polyethylene glycol) if constipation is present. Biofeedback is not effective. Other forms of psychotherapy are indicated only in case of comorbid behavioural disorders. The long-term outcome has been poor and needs improvement.

  3. Encopresis (Soiling)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... constipation after stressful life events such as a divorce or the death of a close relative. Although rectal surgery or birth defects such as Hirschsprung disease and spina bifida can cause constipation or encopresis without constipation, this is uncommon. ...

  4. Encopresis Plus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormier, DePorres; Reilly, Marie; Young, Amy; Augustyn, Marilyn

    Dexter is a 12-year-old boy who presents with his maternal grandmother for follow-up to primary care for secondary encopresis. Dexter presented, 18 months ago, with a 3-month history of secondary encopresis. At that time, a comprehensive assessment revealed functional constipation resulting in encopresis. Dexter's symptoms resolved with a combination of medication management and behavioral strategies; laxatives were discontinued 12 months ago.Dexter's grandmother reports that for the past 6 months, her grandson developed encopresis once again. However, she notes that, although Dexter had small-volume episodes of soiling in the past, he is now passing fully formed stools into his underwear. These episodes usually occur once a day, either at home or at school. Frustrated, Dexter's grandmother has transitioned him to adult diapers.Dexter denies hematochezia, pain, dysuria, hematuria, urinary incontinence, dietary changes, or weight loss. He passes soft stool in his underwear once daily without blood or pain. When interviewed alone, Dexter denies drug use, depression, or significant social stressors. Surprisingly, he seems unconcerned about depression, drugs and social stress, and frequently laughs when discussing them. His physical examination, including a rectal examination, is normal.Dexter's medical history is notable for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, treated with stimulant medication. He was toilet trained at 3 years without any difficulty. He lives with his grandmother, who is his legal guardian; his mother has chronic mental health problems and substance abuse. Dexter maintains regular contact with his mother and reports that their relationship is positive.Dexter's grandmother is extremely distressed by his current presentation and notably, Dexter is not. What would you do next?

  5. [Primary and secondary encopresis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang-Langer, Ellen

    2007-01-01

    While the difficulty of the child to part with its faeces in primary encopresis is linked to the incapability to experience the object as separated and independent from himself, secondary encopresis is a progressed psychical state of development. In this case we have to deal with regression caused by conflict. Two case-studies show clearly the differences.

  6. [Family therapy of encopresis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitczok von Brisinski, Ingo; Lüttger, Fred

    2007-01-01

    Encopresis is a taboo symptom, which is connected with great suffering from mental pressure not only for the children concerned, but also their relatives. Family related approaches are indispensable to understand encopresis, because as a result of high symptom persistence and psychological comorbidity in many cases a purely behavior-therapeutic, symptom focused approach is not sufficient, and further psychotherapeutic interventions are necessary. There is a strong temporal correlation between family interaction and frequency of soiling and changes of interaction influence changes in soiling more than the other way round. In a literature review different family relationship patterns and approaches of family therapy are represented regarding encopresis. Meaningful differences for family therapy are represented regarding primary/secondary encopresis, encopresis with/without comorbid psychiatric disorder as well as encopresis with/without dysfunctional family interaction. Distinctions are made between symptom focused, not-symptom focused and combined family therapeutic approaches, which are illustrated with case examples of outpatient and inpatient treatment. Symptom focused family therapy like e.g. externalizing of the soiling is helpful also if no dysfunctional family interaction patterns are present, because all family members can contribute to treatment success according to their own resources.

  7. Encopresis and anal masturbation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aruffo, R N; Ibarra, S; Strupp, K R

    2000-01-01

    Current pediatric and psychiatric studies on encopresis and its treatment are heavily influenced by mechanical, physiological, and behavioral considerations. Although psychodynamic treatment has generally been considered to be of little benefit, and its findings suspect, the authors suggest that a psychodynamic approach adds substantially to the understanding of some cases of encopresis; that the anal sensations and anal erotic feelings reported by a number of encopretic children are intense, and that the encopretic symptom, soiling, in these children is the result of a conscious form of anal masturbation in which the fecal mass is used for stimulation; and that any study of encopresis is incomplete that does not include what encopretic children, engaged in a sound therapeutic relationship, know and say about their soiling. The authors further suggest that physical treatments of those children whose encopresis is psychologically driven may be contraindicated. The presence of a large stool does not in itself substantiate a physical illness. Further research is needed to elucidate the prevalence of anal masturbation in encopretic children.

  8. Familial psychological factors are associated with encopresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akdemir, Devrim; Çengel Kültür, S Ebru; Saltık Temizel, İnci Nur; Zeki, Ayşe; Şenses Dinç, Gülser

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess maternal psychiatric symptoms, family functioning and parenting styles in children with encopresis. Forty-one children with encopresis were compared to 29 children without any psychiatric disorder. Higher maternal psychiatric symptoms were found in children with encopresis. The general family functioning and strictness/supervision in parenting were significant predictors of encopresis. Family functioning may be screened in children with encopresis, especially when standard interventions have had limited success. Identification and treatment of familial factors may enhance the treatment efficacy in encopresis. © 2014 Japan Pediatric Society.

  9. Encopresis: Not just an accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosca, Nancy W; Schatz, Mary L

    2013-09-01

    Encopresis is a medical condition that can be seen in the school setting with children of all ages, though primarily at the early childhood and elementary level. This condition can cause a great amount of frustration with the student, family, and teachers due to the child's inability to control elimination patterns. The school nurse must be aware of the warning signs that a student may be experiencing encopresis in order to promote treatment. This article will assist the school nurse in understanding typical causes for functional encopresis, knowing how to help a student who soils, and developing an individualized healthcare plan that assists a student to become continent of stool again. Encopresis is not just an accident.

  10. Constipation and encopresis in children

    OpenAIRE

    Aquilina, Samuel; Attard, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Chronic constipation is defined as a decrease in frequency or the painful passage of bowel movements present for several weeks. Retentive encopresis is the term reserved for the involuntary and uncontrollable soiling that occurs in children with chronic constipation. Constipation is a relatively common pediatric complaint accounting for up to 3% of general paediatirc outpatient visits and 25% of visits to a pediatric gastroenterologist. Encopresis is also common, occurring in at least 1.5% of...

  11. [Psychosomatic approach to encopresis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boige, N; Missonnier, S; Bellaïche, M; Foucaud, P

    1999-12-01

    Encopresis most often results from functional constipation and a behaviour disorder characterised by retention of faeces. Rarely it is a passive or active expulsion of normal faeces. It indicates a failure in the education of sphincter control, often with a preferential development of autoerotic versus relational investments. A depressive component is frequent. We propose a bidisciplinary approach with a somatic and psychological evaluation of the encopretic child from the first visit. The physical examination assesses constipation and stercoral stasis. Associated psychopathological symptoms or a pathogenic psychosocial situation must be sought. The therapeutic means must be directed towards the different etiologic features. Explanations of the physiopathology of the symptom and discussion with the child and the parents on the origin of the dysfunction must be accomplished first. A medical treatment of the constipation is generally indicated. Psychotherapy is initiated according to the background and associated psychopathological symptoms.

  12. Integrative approaches to childhood constipation and encopresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culbert, Timothy P; Banez, Gerard A

    2007-12-01

    Constipation and encopresis (fecal soiling) are common childhood disorders that may lead to significant functional impairment. The etiology and course of constipation and encopresis are increasingly conceptualized from a broad biopsychosocial perspective, and therefore a holistic approach to assessment and treatment is indicated. Many children experience symptoms of chronic constipation and/or encopresis that are only partially responsive to conventional medical therapy. Complementary/alternative therapies can often help in the treatment of constipation/encopresis and are well accepted by patients and families.

  13. Is encopresis always the result of constipation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benninga, M. A.; Büller, H. A.; Heymans, H. S.; Tytgat, G. N.; Taminiau, J. A.

    1994-01-01

    Encopresis is often the result of chronic constipation in the majority of paediatric patients. In clinical practice, however, encopresis is also seen without constipation and it is unknown whether these two clinical variants are based on similar or different pathophysiological mechanisms, requiring

  14. REHABILITATION OF CHILDREN WITH FUNCTIONAL (OBSTIPATIONAL) ENCOPRESIS

    OpenAIRE

    M.Yu. Denisov

    2010-01-01

    Author describes peculiarities of functional (obstipational) encopresis in children with prolonged chronic constipation. Disease relates to many predisposing factors; the most significant ones are perinatal pathology, disorders of nutritional behavior, psychological traumatic experience and social disadaptation of patient. Complex rehabilitation program of children with functional encopresis allows provision of optimal medical care. Key words: children, functional ecopresis, fecal incontinenc...

  15. Encopresis: a guide for psychiatric nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Lyons T

    2009-10-01

    Encopresis is an elimination disorder that involves symptoms of fecal incontinence in children. It affects an estimated 1.5% to 7.5% of children ages 6 to 12 and accounts for approximately 3% to 6% of psychiatric referrals. The etiology of encopresis is thought to be related to physiologic problems such as constipation; however, it is also a psychiatric diagnosis and anecdotally may have some association with psychiatric problems. Publications on this association and publications directed toward psychiatric nurses are limited. Encopresis is typically treated with nutritional and medical management along with behavioral modification. Psychiatric nurses working with patients who have encopresis in inpatient settings will have unique concerns and challenges. This article gives an overview of published literature from the past 10 years on the etiology and treatment of encopresis. Specific suggestions for inpatient psychiatric nurses based on published literature and the author's professional experience are provided.

  16. Is encopresis always the result of constipation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benninga, M A; Büller, H A; Heymans, H S; Tytgat, G N; Taminiau, J A

    1994-01-01

    Encopresis is often the result of chronic constipation in the majority of paediatric patients. In clinical practice, however, encopresis is also seen without constipation and it is unknown whether these two clinical variants are based on similar or different pathophysiological mechanisms, requiring different therapeutic approaches. We analysed clinical symptoms, colonic transit time (CTT), orocaecal transit time (OCTT), anorectal manometric profiles, and behavioural scores. Patients were divided into two groups, one consisted of 111 children with paediatric constipation, and another group of 50 children with encopresis and/or soiling without constipation. Significant clinical differences in children with encopresis/soiling existed compared with children with paediatric constipation regarding: bowel movements per week, the number of daytime soiling episodes, the presence of night time soiling, the presence and number of encopresis episodes, normal stools, pain during defecation, abdominal pain, and good appetite. Total and segmental CTT were significantly prolonged in paediatric constipation compared with encopresis/soiling, 62.4 (3.6-384) and 40.2 (10.8-104.4) hours, respectively. No significant differences were found in OCTT. Among the two groups, all manometric parameters were comparable, except for a significantly higher threshold of sensation in children with paediatric constipation. The defecation dynamics were abnormal in 59% and 46% in paediatric constipation and encopresis/soiling, respectively, and were significantly different from controls. Using the child behaviour checklist no significant differences were found when comparing children with paediatric constipation and encopresis/soiling, while both patient groups differed significantly from controls. In conclusion, our findings support the concept of the existence of encopresis as a distinct entity in children with defecation disorders. Identification of such children is based on clinical symptoms, that

  17. Randomised trial of biofeedback training for encopresis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Plas, R. N.; Benninga, M. A.; Redekop, W. K.; Taminiau, J. A.; Büller, H. A.

    1996-01-01

    To evaluate biofeedback training in children with encopresis and the effect on psychosocial function. Prospective controlled randomised study. PATIENT INTERVENTIONS: A multimodal treatment of six weeks. Children were randomised into two groups. Each group received dietary and toilet advice, enemas,

  18. REHABILITATION OF CHILDREN WITH FUNCTIONAL (OBSTIPATIONAL ENCOPRESIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.Yu. Denisov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Author describes peculiarities of functional (obstipational encopresis in children with prolonged chronic constipation. Disease relates to many predisposing factors; the most significant ones are perinatal pathology, disorders of nutritional behavior, psychological traumatic experience and social disadaptation of patient. Complex rehabilitation program of children with functional encopresis allows provision of optimal medical care. Key words: children, functional ecopresis, fecal incontinence, treatment.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. 2010;9(5:121-126

  19. PSYCHOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF ENCOPRESIS WITHOUT ORGANIC ETHIOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesna Košir

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Encopresis is defined as a voluntary or involuntary passage of stool in inappropriate places, causing soiling of clothes by a child aged four years or above whenbowelcontrolcannormally be expected. It affects 1 to 3% of paediatric population. This article focuses on retentive encopresis that is related to chronic constipation and overflow incontinence. Absence of bowel control has an important impact on physical health, psychosocial functioning and family life. Personal and contextual predisposing, precipitating, maintaining and protective factors for encopresis in a context of etiological hypotheses are discussed.Most children with encopresis have no physical problems to explain the disorder. Text is focusingon chronic constipation, chaotic family environment, parent-child interaction, developmental delay, and avoidance of defecation, the role of family, stressors and anxiety over toileting. Common causes of encopresis include a low fibre diet, lack of hydration, little or no exercise and premature toilet training.There is comorbidity with cognitive delays, learning disabilities, attention deficit disorder, conduct or oppositional disorders. In treatment the most effective outcome is shown cases where medical and psychological treatment programmes are used in conjoint manner. The main components are psychoeducation, clearing the faecal mass with laxative use and bowel retraining with toileting, accident management, diet and exercise. In cases, where children don't recognise when they are about to defecate, biofeedback may be a useful adjunct. With effective strategies encopresis can be eliminated, but relapses may occur.

  20. Primary encopresis: evaluation and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, S; Ross, L V; Christophersen, E R

    1986-01-01

    Cathartic and behavioral treatment procedures for eliminating diurnal and nocturnal primary encopresis were investigated using a multiple-baseline design across four children. The dependent and independent variables measured were appropriate bowel movements, soiling accidents, independent toiletings, and cathartic use. Over 177 reliability observations (home visits) were conducted. For two of the children, treatment with cathartics and child-time remedied their soiling accidents and increased their independent toiletings in 8 to 11 weeks. While the cathartics and child-time increased the rate of appropriate bowel movements, they did not eliminate the soiling accidents with the other two children. Independent toiletings for these two children were achieved after 32 to 39 weeks of treatment when punishment procedures (positive practice, time-out, and hourly toilet sits) were incorporated and the suppositories were faded systematically. PMID:3733585

  1. Early constipation and toilet training in children with encopresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Laurie; Rappaport, Leonard; Cousineau, Dominique; Nurko, Samuel

    2002-04-01

    To evaluate the frequency of predisposing factors for encopresis before and during toilet training, comparing children with primary and secondary encopresis. In this retrospective study, questionnaires from the initial evaluation at an encopresis clinic at a tertiary care pediatric hospital were reviewed for the presence or absence of factors in the first 2 years of life, for toilet training practices, and for disruptive events during the training process. Children younger than 48 months or those with organic defecation disorders were excluded. In 411 children with encopresis, the reported frequency of predisposing factors included constipation in 35%, and previous treatment for constipation in 24%. Toilet training was initiated before age 2 years in 26% and after age 3 years in 14%. Interruption of toilet training and punishment were seen more in primary encopresis than in secondary encopresis (50% versus 23%; P encopresis as was fear of the toilet (47% versus 10%; P encopresis, early difficult defecation, previous treatment for constipation, and early initiation of toilet training were less common than expected. Children with primary encopresis did not have an increased incidence of early constipation or invasive treatments compared with those with secondary encopresis. However, children with primary encopresis did have more difficult and disruptive toilet training experiences.

  2. Bacterial overgrowth and methane production in children with encopresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiby, Alycia; Mehta, Devendra; Gopalareddy, Vani; Jackson-Walker, Susan; Horvath, Karoly

    2010-05-01

    To assess the prevalence of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) and methane production in children with encopresis. Radiographic fecal impaction (FI) scores were assessed in children with secondary, retentive encopresis and compared with the breath test results. Breath tests with hypoosmotic lactulose solution were performed in both the study patients (n = 50) and gastrointestinal control subjects (n = 39) groups. The FI scores were significantly higher in the patients with encopresis who were methane producers (P encopresis and 9 of 39 (23%) of control subjects (P = .06). Methane was produced in 56% of the patients with encopresis versus 23.1% of the control subjects in the gastrointestinal group (P encopresis had a higher prevalence of SIBO, elevated basal methane levels, and higher methane production. Methane production was associated with more severe colonic impaction. Further study is needed to determine whether methane production is a primary or secondary factor in the pathogenesis of SIBO and encopresis.

  3. Psychological differences between children with and without chronic encopresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Daniel J; Morris, James B; Borowitz, Stephen M; Sutphen, James L

    2002-01-01

    To validate a theoretical model of encopresis in terms of psychological factors that differentiates children with and without chronic encopresis and to identify scales that demonstrate these differences. Eighty-six children with encopresis were compared to 62 nonsymptomatic children on five psychometric instruments. Differences in the mean scores and the percentages of children falling beyond preselected clinical thresholds were compared across the patient-control groups. Children with encopresis were found to have more anxiety/depression symptoms, family environments with less expressiveness and poorer organization, more attention difficulties, greater social problems, more disruptive behavior, and poorer school performance (ps =.01 encopresis differ from children without encopresis on a variety of psychological parameters. However, only a minority of children with encopresis demonstrated clinically significant elevations in these parameters. Identification and treatment of such clinical issues may enhance treatment efficacy.

  4. Functional fecal retention with encopresis in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loening-Baucke, Vera

    2004-01-01

    The most common cause of encopresis in children is functional fecal retention (FFR). An international working team suggested that FFR be defined by the following criteria: a history of >12 weeks of passage of encopresis; to compare these patients to those identified as having FFR by historical symptoms or physical examination; to determine whether 1-year treatment outcome varied depending on which definition for FFR was used; and to suggest improvements to the ROME II criteria, if necessary. Data were reviewed from the history and physical examination of 213 children with encopresis. One-year outcomes identified were failure, successful treatment, or full recovery. Only 88 (41%) of the patients with encopresis fit the ROME II criteria for FFR, whereas 181 (85%) had symptoms of FFR by history or physical examination. Thirty-two (15%) patients did not fit criteria for FFR, but only 6 (3%) appeared to have nonretentive fecal soiling. Rates of successful treatment (50%) and recovery (39%) were not significantly different in the two groups. The ROME II criteria for FFR are too restrictive and do not identify many children with encopresis who have symptoms of FFR. The author suggests that the ROME II criteria for FFR could be improved by including the following additional items: a history of BMs that obstruct the toilet, a history of chronic abdominal pain relieved by enemas or laxatives, and the presence of an abdominal fecal mass or rectal fecal mass.

  5. Randomised trial of biofeedback training for encopresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Plas, R N; Benninga, M A; Redekop, W K; Taminiau, J A; Büller, H A

    1996-01-01

    AIMS: To evaluate biofeedback training in children with encopresis and the effect on psychosocial function. DESIGN: Prospective controlled randomised study. PATIENT INTERVENTIONS: A multimodal treatment of six weeks. Children were randomised into two groups. Each group received dietary and toilet advice, enemas, oral laxatives, and anorectal manometry. One group also received five biofeedback training sessions. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Successful treatment was defined as less than two episodes of encopresis, regular bowel movements, and no laxatives. Psychosocial function after treatment was assessed using the Child Behaviour Checklist. RESULTS: Children given laxatives and biofeedback training had higher success rates than those who received laxatives alone (39% v 19%) at the end of the intervention period. At 12 and 18 months, however, approximately 50% of children in each group were successfully treated. Abnormal behaviour scores were initially observed in 35% of children. Most children had improved behaviour scores six months after treatment. Children with an initial abnormal behaviour score who were successfully treated had a significant improvement in their behavioural profiles. CONCLUSIONS: Biofeedback training had no additional effect on the success rate or behaviour scores. Psychosocial problems are present in a subgroup of children with encopresis. The relation between successful treatment and improvement in behavioural function supports the idea that encopresis has an aetiological role in the occurrence and maintenance of behavioural problems in children with encopresis. PMID:8957948

  6. Clinical significance of anismus in encopresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catto-Smith, A G; Nolan, T M; Coffey, C M

    1998-09-01

    Treatments designed to relieve paradoxical contraction of the anal sphincters during defecation (anismus) have had limited success in children with encopresis. This has raised doubts as to the clinical relevance of this diagnosis in childhood as anorectal dysfunction. Our aim was to determine whether, in patients who had treatment-resistant encopresis, the presence of electromyographic anismus was associated with increased faecal retention. Sixty-eight children with soiling (mean age 8.7+/-2.06 years) were assessed by clinical examination, abdominal radiography and then with anorectal manometry. Patients with electromyographic anismus (n=32; 47%) had significantly increased radiographic rectal faecal retention and were significantly less likely to be able to defecate water-filled balloons. There were no significant differences in response to prior therapy, history of primary encopresis, behavioural adjustment or in sociodemographic data. Our results suggest that electromyographic anismus is associated with obstructed defecation and faecal retention.

  7. [Encopresis revealing myotonic dystrophy in 2 children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avez-Couturier, J; Michaud, L; Cuisset, J-M; Lamblin, M-D; Dolhem, P; Turck, D; Vallée, L; Gottrand, F

    2009-05-01

    Gastrointestinal symptoms are very frequent in myotonic dystrophy but largely unrecognized. They can be the revealing factors of the disease. We report 2 cases of 10 and 17-year-old children with persistent encopresis starting at the age of 3 and 5 years in spite of laxative treatment. Neurological examination and anorectal manometry provided the diagnosis of myotonic dystrophy. Procainamide treatment was introduced and the digestive symptoms improved. Any child with encopresis should have complete evaluation to rule out the diagnosis of myotonic dystrophy and physicians should look for upper and/or lower gastrointestinal symptoms in every patient with myotonic dystrophy.

  8. Treatment of Childhood Encopresis: Full Cleanliness Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Susan; Doleys, Daniel M.

    1975-01-01

    Full Cleanliness Training (a procedure in which the trainee is required to correct the results of inappropriate toileting behavior by cleaning himself and his clothing) was used in combination with positive reinforcement to deal with a trainable retarded 8 year old boy with encopresis and a toilet phobia. (Author/CL)

  9. Management of constipation and encopresis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Diane F; Navarro, Fernando

    2008-01-01

    Constipation is a common problem in primary care. Nurse practitioners should be able to diagnose and treat constipation appropriately and to recognize which children require referral to a gastroenterologist. Referral to a gastroenterologist is necessary for the child with simple constipation or encopresis fails to respond to treatment, an organic etiology is suspected, or complex management is required.

  10. Encopresis in Children on the Autistic Spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radford, Jo; Anderson, Maggie

    2003-01-01

    Outlines problems faced by parents and caregivers of a child with encopresis. Differentiates between knowledge, skill, and volition issues when dealing with the encoprectic child; and suggests possible causal frameworks for the behavior. Concludes with suggestions for managing the teaching/learning situation arising from this behavior. (Author/KB)

  11. Enuresis and encopresis: ten years of progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkelsen, E J

    2001-10-01

    To review the progress made over the past decade with regard to the treatment of enuresis and encopresis, as well as advances in the understanding of etiological mechanisms. Separate computerized literature (English language only) searches of Medline and PsycINFO databases were conducted under the parameter of enuresis and children-adolescents, as well as encopresis and children-adolescents. There has been a substantial decrease in published research concerning the use of imipramine to treat enuresis compared with the prior two decades, accompanied by a corresponding increase in the number of papers concerning desmopressin acetate (DDAVP), which has become the primary pharmacological treatment. Genetic studies of large pedigrees have further confirmed the importance of heritable factors. With regard to encopresis, the research has focused primarily on pathophysiological factors related to the colon and anal sphincter. The widespread use of DDAVP has been the primary addition to treatment strategies over the past decade. The bell-and-pad method of conditioning, the only major treatment that has enduring benefit after being withdrawn, is the most cost-effective and appears to be underutilized. Research into etiological mechanisms has focused primarily on the mechanism of action of DDAVP and advances in the understanding of genetic factors. Advances in the treatment and etiological understanding of encopresis have been less impressive.

  12. The prevalence of encopresis in a multicultural population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Wal, M F; Benninga, M A; Hirasing, R A

    2005-03-01

    Population-based studies on the prevalence of encopresis in children are scarce and generally outdated. Prevalence estimates based on clinical studies are unreliable because parents tend to be reticent to seek medical help for this problem. Professional help is necessary, however, because encopresis can lead to serious psychosocial health problems. The authors examined the prevalence of encopresis in children, the frequency of visits made to general practitioners for encopresis and the psychosocial health problems of encopretic children. This population-based study involved 13,111 parents and their 5- to 6-year-old children and 9,780 parents and their 11- to 12-year-old children, all residents of Amsterdam, the Netherlands. The prevalence of encopresis was 4.1% in the 5-to-6 age group and 1.6% in the 11-to-12 age group. Encopresis was more frequent among boys and children from the very depressed areas of the city. Encopresis was less frequent among Moroccan and Turkish children. A defecation frequency of less than three per week was found in 3.8% of the 5- to 6-year-olds and 10.1% of the 11- to 12-year-olds with encopresis. Only 37.7% of the 5- to 6-year-olds and 27.4% of the 11- to 12-year-olds who had encopresis had ever been taken to see a doctor for this problem. Psychosocial problems were far more common among children with encopresis than among normal children. Encopresis is a common condition that is often associated with psychosocial health disorders but only a small proportion of the children with encopresis are taken to a general practitioner to discuss their problem.

  13. Encopresis: A Structural/Strategic Approach to Family Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McColgan, Edgar B.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Reports treatment of a 9-year-old boy with primary encopresis combining structural and strategic approaches. Describes organizational features of the family, the contextual approach to therapy, individual and collective responses to therapy, and follow-up at 3 months and 1 1/2 years. Discusses effects of therapy on encopresis and on other…

  14. Multimodal Counseling of Childhood Encopresis: A Case Example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumaer, Jim

    1990-01-01

    Provides information regarding childhood disorder of encopresis and presents multimodal therapy techniques for school counselors who cannot successfully refer clients. Presents a case study of a teenage boy suffering from encopresis who was referred for counseling. Suggests specific treatment strategies including behavior modification, nutrition…

  15. Elimination of Childhood Encopresis: A Family Systems Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Michael E.; Hinkle, J. Scott

    1990-01-01

    Describes case study in which family systems approach to treating childhood encopresis based on the hypothesis that problematic elements of the family system were contributing to the encopresis. Nuclear family members were included in a family counseling process that used strategic homework, predictions about family behavior, and restructuring…

  16. [Encopresis--predictive factors and outcome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehler-Wex, Claudia; Scheuerpflug, Peter; Peschke, Nicole; Roth, Michael; Reitzle, Karl; Warnke, Andreas

    2005-10-01

    comparison of diagnostic, clinical and therapeutic features and their predictive value for the outcome of encopresis in children and adolescents. 85 children and adolescents (aged 9.6 +/- 3.2 years) with severe encopresis (ICD 10: F98.1) were investigated during inpatient treatment and 35 of them again 5.5 +/- 1.8 years later. Mentally retarded patients were excluded. Inpatient therapy consisted of treating constipation and/or stool regulation by means of laxatives, behavioural approaches, and the specific therapy of comorbid psychiatric disorders. During inpatient treatment 22% of the patients experienced total remission, 8% an unchanged persistence of symptoms. Of the 35 patients studied at follow-up 5.5 years later, 40% were symptom-free. As main result, prognostic outcome depended significantly on sufficient treatment of obstipation. Another important factor was the specific therapeutic approach to psychiatric comorbidity, especially to ADHD. The outcome for patients with comorbid ICD 10: F43 was significantly better than for the other patients. Those who were symptom-free at discharge had significantly better long-term outcomes. Decisive to the success of encopresis treatment were the stool regulation and the specific therapy of associated psychiatric illnesses, in particular of ADHD. Inpatient treatment revealed significantly better long-term outcomes where total remission had been achieved by the time of discharge from hospital.

  17. Enuresis and encopresis in a south Indian population of children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackett, R; Hackett, L; Bhakta, P; Gowers, S

    2001-01-01

    Though bladder and bowel control are important developmental milestones in all cultures, the prevalence of enuresis and encopresis has rarely been studied in developing countries despite there being factors in these countries that could affect it. This study reports the prevalence and associations of enuresis and encopresis in children in Kerala, India. The parents of 1403 randomly selected 8-12-year-old children were interviewed. The prevalence of enuresis and encopresis was ascertained using Rutter's A2 scale. Subsamples of children underwent psychiatric, physical and psychometric evaluations. Of the children, 18.6% had had an episode of enuresis in the past year and 4.3% in the past week. Four per cent had had an episode of encopresis in the past year. Enuresis was associated with parents' education, physical and psychiatric symptoms in the child, poor academic achievement and lax parental attitudes to toilet training. Encopresis was associated with male sex, physical and psychiatric symptoms, poor academic achievement, early separation and not having a toilet. The prevalence of enuresis compares with western countries, but encopresis is commoner. The associations of enuresis suggested a multifactorial model in which parental competence was prominent. This study de-emphasized the importance of neurodevelopmental factors in enuresis and encopresis in this age group.

  18. Daytime encopresis associated with gland mal epileptic seizures: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyatsi, D P

    2005-08-01

    Sphincteric incontinence of stool and urine are not unusual features of generalised epileptic seizures. Isolated secondary encopresis as a manifestation of an epileptic seizure is unusual. This report is of, a four year old boy, with daytime secondary non-retentive encopresis. The onset of encopresis was preceded by several episodes of nocturnal generalised tonic clonic epileptic seizures. An electroencephalogram showed features consistent with complex partial seizures. He was commenced on anti-epileptic treatment with phenytoin sodium, and by the third day of treatment, the patient had achieved stool control.

  19. The Relationship Between Father-Absence and Encopresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaengold, Marilyn

    1977-01-01

    A review of the literature on encopresis shows strong emphasis on father-absence as a dominant factor. Other characteristics of patients and their families are listed, and theoretical considerations discussed. (MS)

  20. Treatment guidelines for primary nonretentive encopresis and stool toileting refusal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, B R; Marcus, B A; Pitner, S L

    1999-04-15

    Nonretentive encopresis refers to inappropriate soiling without evidence of fecal constipation and retention. This form of encopresis accounts for up to 20 percent of all cases. Characteristics include soiling accompanied by daily bowel movements that are normal in size and consistency. An organic cause for nonretentive encopresis is rarely identified. The medical assessment is usually normal, and signs of constipation are noticeably absent. A full developmental and behavioral assessment should be made to establish that the child is ready for intervention to correct encopresis and to identify any barriers to success, particularly disruptive behavior problems. Successful interventions depend on the presence of soft, comfortable bowel movements and addressing toilet refusal behavior. Daily scheduled positive toilet sits are recommended. Incentives may be used to reinforce successful defecation during these sits. A plan for management of stool withholding should be agreed on by the parents/caretakers and the family physician before intervention.

  1. Polyethylene glycol without electrolytes for children with constipation and encopresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loening-Baucke, Vera

    2002-04-01

    Children with functional constipation and encopresis benefit from behavior modification and from long-term laxative medication. Polyethylene glycol without electrolytes has become the first option for many pediatric gastroenterologists. Twenty-eight children treated with polyethylene glycol without electrolytes were compared with 21 children treated with milk of magnesia to evaluate the efficiency, acceptability, side effects, and treatment dosage of polyethylene glycol in long-term treatment of functional constipation and encopresis. Children were rated as "doing well," "improved," or "not doing well," depending on resolution of constipation and encopresis. At the 1-, 3-, 6-, and 12-month follow-ups, bowel movement frequency increased and soiling frequency decreased significantly in both groups. At the 1-month follow-up, children on polyethylene glycol were soiling more frequently (P encopresis.

  2. Treatment of Encopresis in a Classroom Setting: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, E.

    1977-01-01

    This study describes the procedure and results of a behavior modification program carried out in the classroom and aimed at eliminating encopresis (involuntary defecation) in an 8-year-old boy. (Editor/RK)

  3. Encopresis: long-term clinical outcome of 67 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unal, Fatih; Pehlivantürk, Berna

    2005-01-01

    In this study we attempted to investigate the outcome of encopresis and to determine factors affecting prognosis. The sample consisted of 52 boys (77.6%) and 15 girls (22.4%) diagnosed as encopresis according to DSM IV diagnostic criteria. These patients were evaluated six years after their initial examination in the Department of Child Psychiatry. Clinical and demographical data were compared between initial and follow-up interviews and between patients with complete recovery and others. Fifty-six patients (83.6%) recovered completely and 11 (16.4%) continued to be encopretic after six years. Good school performance (pEncopresis is a chronic disorder and complete recovery rates tend to increase with time. Families and primary health care providers should be informed about the treatment possibilities of encopresis for early intervention.

  4. Comorbid psychiatric disorders in 201 cases of encopresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unal, Fatih; Pehlivantürk, Berna

    2004-01-01

    Although encopresis is a common and complex disorder, relatively few studies have evaluated the comorbid psychiatric disorders in this condition. This study was performed to investigate the comorbid psychiatric disorders in encopresis. One hundred and sixty boys (79.6%) and 41 girls (20.4%) fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for encopresis according to DSM-IV. There was at least one comorbid diagnosis in 149 (74.1%) patients. The most frequent comorbid diagnosis was enuresis (55.2%). Clinical and demographical data were compared between patients with comorbid disorders and others. Primary encopresis was significantly more frequent in patients with comorbid disorders, and the mean age at admission was lower in these patients. The mean interval between the onset of symptoms and the diagnosis was significantly shorter in secondary encopretic patients with comorbid disorders. Furthermore, there were significantly more psychiatric disorders in the first-degree relatives of patients with comorbid disorders. Encopresis is frequently accompanied with a psychiatric disorder. Clinicians need to inquire about symptoms of other psychiatric disorders in patients who present with encopresis and vice versa.

  5. Assessment of behavioral mechanisms maintaining encopresis: Virginia Encopresis-Constipation Apperception Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Daniel J; Ritterband, Lee M; Quillian, Warren; Kovatchev, Boris; Morris, James; Sutphen, James; Borowitz, Stephen

    2003-09-01

    To develop and test a scale for parent and child, evaluating theoretical and clinical parameters relevant to children with encopresis. Encopretic children were hypothesized to have more bowel-specific, but not more generic, psychological problems, as compared with nonsymptomatic control children. In addition, mothers were also believed to be more discerning than children. The Virginia Encopresis-Constipation Apperception Test (VECAT) consists of 9 pairs of bowel-specific and 9 parallel generic drawings. Respondents selected the picture in each pair that best described them/their child. It was administered to encopretic children (N = 87), nonsymptomatic siblings (N = 27), and nonsymptomatic nonsiblings (N = 35). The mothers of all the participants also completed the VECAT. Encopretic children were retested 6 and 12 months posttreatment with Enhanced Toilet Training. The VECAT demonstrated good test-retest reliability and internal consistency. Encopretic children and their mothers reported more bowel-specific, but not more generic, problems. Bowel-specific scores improved significantly posttreatment only for those patients who demonstrated significant symptom improvement. Mothers were significantly more discerning than children. The VECAT is a reliable, valid, discriminating, and sensitive test. Bowel-specific problems appear to best differentiate children with and without encopresis.

  6. Encopresis in children. Outcome and predictive factors of successful management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Adnan A; Mekael, Farag M

    2012-06-01

    To elucidate our experience and outcome in the management of childhood encopresis, and to emphasize the factors that may predict successful management. This prospective study was carried out between September 2003 and September 2011 in the Department of Pediatric Surgery, Al-Thoura Teaching Hospital, Al-Beida and Al-Butnan Medical Teaching Center, Tobruk, Libya. One hundred and thirty-two patients (117 male, 15 female) took part of the study. The male and female ratio was 7.8:1. The participants were patients aged 4-9 years. There were 30 (22.7%) patients between 4-5 years, 61 (46.2%) between 6-7 years, and 41 (31%) between 8-9 years. Nonretentive encopresis patients were 36 (27.2%) (Group I) and 96 (72.8%) patients had retentive encopresis (Group II). Patients with low fluid intake were 87 (65.9%) and low fiber diet were 91 (68.9%). Patients with delayed toilet training were 99 (75%). The total rate of successful conservative treatment was 70.5%. The rate of successful treatment in Group I was 94.4% and in Group II was 61.5%. We observed 18.2% of the patients had recurrence of encopresis. The factors found to predict good resolution rate after medical treatment included: cooperation of the parent and patient, female gender, ages above 5 years, and non-retentive encopresis. Encopresis remains a problem for the parents and the patients. Clinical evaluation is indispensable. Good outcome can be achieved effectively. Cooperative parents and patient, female gender, age above 5 years, and nonretentive encopresis are predictors for good response to medical treatment.

  7. Encopresis: a medical and family approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coehlo, Deborah Padgett

    2011-01-01

    Bowel control is an important developmental milestone for children. Failure to achieve or loss of bowel control by five years of age threatens both physical and mental health. Most children are successful at achieving bowel control by age four, but up to 3% of the pediatric population suffer from encopresis. Three in-depth case studies were reviewed, including the causes, symptoms, and treatment of this condition, one of which is presented in this article. Results indicate that treatment was successful when a combined approach using medical and behavioral strategies within the context of a developmental model was used. These results can be used by pediatric nurses, nurse practitioners, and pediatricians to assure more children will be identified and obtain the support they need for successful treatment of this complex condition.

  8. Increased Frequency of Encopresis in a Child Diagnosed With Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder and Encopresis After Atomoxetine Use: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yektaş, Çiğdem; Cansiz, Mehmet Akif; Tufan, Ali Evren

    2016-01-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is among the most frequently reported coexisting psychiatric conditions in children with encopresis. Some case reports state that atomoxetine-a selective presynaptic norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor-approved for treatment of ADHD is also effective in the treatment of coexisting encopresis. Contrasting those reports, here we present a case diagnosed with ADHD and secondary encopresis without constipation whose encopretic symptoms increased after atomoxetine treatment and discuss possible mechanisms.

  9. A multidisciplinary treatment for encopresis in children with developmental disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Call, Nathan A; Mevers, Joanna Lomas; McElhanon, Barbara O; Scheithauer, Mindy C

    2017-04-01

    Achieving continence of one's bowel movements is a key step in development and failure to do so leads to many negative consequences. Treatments for encopresis appearing in the literature have employed behavioral strategies; medications such as suppositories, laxatives, or enemas; and in some studies a combination of these approaches. To date, attempts to extend successful treatments for encopresis in typically developing children to those with developmental disabilities have been limited. The current study included three participants diagnosed with developmental disabilities who had a history of encopresis. None of the participants had a continent bowel movement under baseline conditions. Continent bowel movements increased during treatment that included the addition of suppositories to elicit continent bowel movements. Two participants began having independent continent bowel movements (i.e., without requiring suppositories) and medication was successfully faded out for the remaining participant. Treatment took between 13 and 21 days. © 2017 Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior.

  10. Encopresis in Children: An Overview of Recent Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vuletic Biljana

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The term ‘encopresis’, derived from ancient Greek ἐγκόπρησις / egkóprēsis, which means stool, was first introduced in 1926 by Weissenberg to describe the loss of stool in underwear as the faecal equivalent of enuresis. The soiling of underwear is defined as the accidental passage of very small amounts of faeces into underpants. Quantitatively, the content of stool between encopresis and soiling is difficult to determine, and it is especially difficult for parents assess it. Therefore, a new term was adopted – faecal incontinence – that encompasses both encopresis and soiling.

  11. An Internet intervention as adjunctive therapy for pediatric encopresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritterband, Lee M; Cox, Daniel J; Walker, Lynn S; Kovatchev, Boris; McKnight, Lela; Patel, Kushal; Borowitz, Stephen; Sutphen, James

    2003-10-01

    This study evaluated the benefits of enhanced toilet training delivered through the Internet for children with encopresis. Twenty-four children with encopresis were randomly assigned to the Internet intervention group (Web) or no Internet intervention group (No-Web). All participants continued to receive routine care from their primary care physician. The Web participants demonstrated greater improvements in terms of reduced fecal soiling, increased defecation in the toilet, and increased unprompted trips to the toilet (ps<.02). Both groups demonstrated similar improvements in knowledge and toileting behaviors. Internet interventions may be an effective way of delivering sophisticated behavioral interventions to a large and dispersed population in a convenient format.

  12. The prevalence of encopresis in a multicultural population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wal, M. F.; Benninga, M. A.; Hirasing, R. A.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Population-based studies on the prevalence of encopresis in children are scarce and generally outdated. Prevalence estimates based on clinical studies are unreliable because parents tend to be reticent to seek medical help for this problem. Professional help is necessary, however,

  13. The Prevalence of Encopresis in a Multicultural Population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wal, M.F.; Benninga, M.A.; Hira Sing, R.A.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND:: Population-based studies on the prevalence of encopresis in children are scarce and generally outdated. Prevalence estimates based on clinical studies are unreliable because parents tend to be reticent to seek medical help for this problem. Professional help is necessary, however,

  14. Reflexology in the management of encopresis and chronic constipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Eileen; McKinnon, Evelyn; Weir, Evelyn; Brown, Denise W

    2003-04-01

    Encopresis or faecal incontinence in children is an extremely distressing condition that is usually secondary to chronic constipation/stool withholding. Traditional management with enemas may add to the child's distress. This study investigated the efficacy of treating patients with encopresis and chronic constipation with reflexology. An observational study was carried out of 50 children between three and 14 years of age who had a diagnosis of encopresis/chronic constipation. The children received six sessions of 30-minutes of reflexology to their feet. With the help of their parents they completed questionnaires on bowel motions and soiling patterns before, during and after the treatment. A further questionnaire was completed by parents pre and post treatment on their attitude towards reflexology. Forty-eight of the children completed the sessions. The number of bowel motions increased and the incidence of soiling decreased. Parents were keen to try the reflexology and were satisfied with the effect of reflexology on their child's condition. It appears that reflexology has been an effective method of treating encopresis and constipation over a six-week period in this cohort of patients.

  15. When the going gets tough: pediatric constipation and encopresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philichi, Lisa

    2008-01-01

    Constipation and encopresis are two common conditions seen in the pediatric gastroenterology setting. Organic causes cannot be excluded although they are rarely diagnosed in infants and children with defecation disorders. To successfully treat these disorders, a combination of family education, disimpaction and maintenance medications, a well-balanced diet, and behavior management is essential.

  16. Anorectal motility abnormalities in children with encopresis and chronic constipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghunath, Neeraj; Glassman, Mark S; Halata, Michael S; Berezin, Stuart H; Stewart, Julian M; Medow, Marvin S

    2011-02-01

    To evaluate the response to rectal distension in children with chronic constipation and children with chronic constipation and encopresis. We studied 27 children, aged 3 to 16 years, with chronic constipation; 12 had encopresis. Anorectal motility was measured with a solid state catheter. When the catheter was located in the internal sphincter, the balloon was inflated to 60 mL with air. There were no differences in age, sex distribution, and duration of constipation in the two groups. Comparing groups, anorectal manometry showed no differences in the resting sphincter pressure, recovery pressure, the lowest relaxation pressure, and percent relaxation. However, time to maximum relaxation, time to recovery to baseline pressure, and duration of relaxation were significantly higher in patients with constipation and encopresis, compared with patients who had constipation alone. There may be an imbalance in neuromuscular control of defecation in constipated patients with encopresis that results in incontinence as a consequence of the increased time to recovery and duration of relaxation of the internal anal sphincter. Copyright © 2011 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Controlled Study of Encopresis and Enuresis in Children with a Prepubertal and Early Adolescent Bipolar-I Disorder Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klages, Tricia; Geller, Barbara; Tillman, Rebecca; Bolhofner, Kristine; Zimerman, Betsy

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To examine the prevalence of encopresis/enuresis, relationship between maternal hostility and encopresis, parent-child concordance of reporting encopresis/enuresis, and familial aggregation of enuresis in subjects with a prepubertal and early adolescent bipolar-I disorder phenotype (PEA-BP), attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder…

  18. Effect of OROS methylphenidate on encopresis in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz, Savaş; Bilgiç, Ayhan; Hergüner, Sabri

    2014-04-01

    Although encopresis shows a high rate of comorbidity in patients with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), the etiologic origin of this relationship and the effect of ADHD drugs on encopresis are unclear. In this chart review, we explored the effect of OROS long-acting methylphenidate (MPH) treatment on encopresis in children with ADHD. We also evaluated the relationship between the clinical variables of ADHD and encopresis. The sample consisted of 21 children and adolescents (20 boys and 1 girl) with encopresis and coexisting ADHD 7-15 years of age. Their clinical characteristics and baseline (visit 1) and end of the second months' (visit 2) Conners' Parent Rating Scale (CPRS) subscores were recorded. Retrospective clinician determinations were made using the Clinical Global Impressions-Severity subscale (CGI-S) for encopresis severity and the Clinical Global Impressions-Improvement subscale (CGI-I) for encopresis response. According to the CGI-I, 14 subjects (71.4 %) showed much or very much improvement in their encopresis at the second visit. All of the CPRS scores showed a significant reduction during the second visit. No association was found between the CGI-I score and the changes in any of the CPRS scores. Baseline oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) and conduct disorder (CD) scores were correlated with the CGI-S score; however, no association was found between core ADHD symptom severity and the CGI-S score. With regard to the encopresis outcome, the baseline CD score was negatively correlated with the CGI-I score, and the baseline ODD score was prone to show a negative correlation with the CGI-I score. These results suggest that coexisting behavioral problems may be a vulnerability factor based on the severity of encopresis, and that MPH treatment may have a positive effect on encopresis in children and adolescents with ADHD.

  19. Functionele gastro-intestinale ziektebeelden op de kinderleeftijd. II. Obstipatie en solitaire encopresis; fysiologie en pathofysiologie

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ginkel, R.; Büller, H. A.; Heymans, H. S.; Taminiau, J. A.; Boeckxstaens, G. E.; Benninga, M. A.

    2003-01-01

    The childhood prevalences of constipation and encopresis are 0.3-8% and 1-3% respectively. Following a recent stricter definition and classification, constipation and solitary encopresis are now recognised to be two separate entities. Constipation is characterised by infrequent defecation, often in

  20. Managing Encopresis in the Elementary School Setting: The School Nurse's Role

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garman, Kimberly; Ficca, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    Encopresis is a medical condition that is associated with incontinence in children. It leads to frustration and anxiety in both parents and children due to the presenting symptoms and the inability to control elimination patterns. There is overwhelming concern among families that a child with encopresis will be ostracized from peers and will…

  1. [Behavioural psychotherapy for encopresis shown on a girl with chronic "toilet-refusal-syndrome"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Berit; Lehmkuhl, Ulrike

    2007-01-01

    Encopresis is one of the areas of the psychiatric diseases in childhood and adolescence that has been less researched. There is not much literature on the treatment of encopresis. The article describes a standard behavioural therapy including a case report on a 7, 9 year old girl with chronic "toilet-refusal-syndrome".

  2. Intervención en un caso de encopresis secundaria en el contexto educativo

    OpenAIRE

    López de la Llave, Juliana; Pérez-Llantada, María Carmen; López de la LLave, Andrés; López de la Llave, Lourdes

    1999-01-01

    Presentamos el caso de una niña de siete años tratada de encopresis secundaria mediante práctica positiva, moldeado, sobrecorrección y refuerzo positivo, minimizando el uso del castigo. Los episodios de encopresis quedaron reducidos a cero al quinto m

  3. Encopresis and Sexual Abuse in a Sample of Boys in Residential Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Jan; And Others

    1997-01-01

    This study of 23 boys (ages 6 to 14) in a residential psychiatric treatment program found nine of the boys were encopretic (27 times the incidence of encopresis in the general population of boys 10-12). Seven of the nine boys had histories of sexual abuse by males, suggesting that encopresis may be a marker of sexual abuse. (DB)

  4. Real world use of an Internet intervention for pediatric encopresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritterband, Lee M; Ardalan, Kaveh; Thorndike, Frances P; Magee, Joshua C; Saylor, Drew K; Cox, Daniel J; Sutphen, James L; Borowitz, Stephen M

    2008-06-30

    The Internet is a significant source of medical information and is now being shown to be an important conduit for delivering various health-related interventions. This paper aimed to examine the utility and impact of an Internet intervention for childhood encopresis as part of standard medical care in a "real world" setting. Patients diagnosed with encopresis were given a Web-based information prescription to use an Internet intervention for pediatric encopresis. A total of 22 families utilized the intervention between July 2004 and June 2006. A chart review and phone interview were undertaken to collect user characteristics; defecation-related information, including frequency of soiling, bowel movements (BMs) in the toilet, and amount of pain associated with defecation; and information on computer/Internet usage. Three questionnaires were used to examine the utility of, impact of, and adherence to the Internet intervention. Program utilization was obtained from a data tracking system that monitored usage in real time. Overall, parents rated the Internet intervention as enjoyable, understandable, and easy to use. They indicated that the Internet intervention positively affected their children, decreasing overall accidents and increasing child comfort on the toilet at home. Of the 20 children who initially reported fecal accidents, 19 (95%) experienced at least a 50% improvement, with a reduction of accident frequency from one fecal accident per day to one accident per week. Although it is not clear whether this improvement is directly related to the use of the Internet intervention, patient feedback suggests that the program was an important element, further establishing Internet interventions as a viable and desirable addition to standard medical care for pediatric encopresis. To our knowledge, this is the first time a pediatric Internet intervention has been examined as part of a "real world" setting. This is an important step toward establishing Internet

  5. [Classification of enuresis/encopresis according to DSM-5].

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Gontard, Alexander

    2014-03-01

    Elimination disorders are common in childhood and adolescence. Enuresis is traditionally defined as wetting from the age of 5 years and encopresis as soiling from 4 years onwards - after all organic causes have been excluded. In the past decades, many subtypes of elimination disorders have been identified with different symptoms, etiologies, and specific treatment options. Unfortunately, the DSM-5 criteria did not integrate these new approaches. In contrast, classification systems of the International Children's Incontinence Society (ICCS) for enuresis and urinary incontinence as well as the ROME-III criteria for fecal incontinence offer new and relevant suggestions for both clinical and research purposes.

  6. Short-Term Treatment of Children With Encopresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    FIREMAN, GARY; KOPLEWICZ, HAROLD S.

    1992-01-01

    To examine the effectiveness of a short-term behavioral treatment of encopresis, 52 encopretic children were evaluated and treated according to a standardized protocol. The treatment was highly effective, with a significant decrease in soiling during the first month (P < 0.01). Of the children who began treatment, 84.6% successfully reached the criterion of 2 consecutive weeks with no soiling accidents in a mean time of 28 days, and 78.8% successfully completed an additional 7-week phaseout period. The evaluations provided rich descriptive information regarding the characteristics of encopretic children. In agreement with the literature, no specific pattern of behavioral pathology was apparent. PMID:22700057

  7. Encopresis in Children: An Overview of Recent Findings

    OpenAIRE

    Vuletic Biljana

    2017-01-01

    The term ‘encopresis’, derived from ancient Greek ἐγκόπρησις / egkóprēsis, which means stool, was first introduced in 1926 by Weissenberg to describe the loss of stool in underwear as the faecal equivalent of enuresis. The soiling of underwear is defined as the accidental passage of very small amounts of faeces into underpants. Quantitatively, the content of stool between encopresis and soiling is difficult to determine, and it is especially difficult for parents assess it. Therefore, a new t...

  8. Physiopathology of megarectum: the association of megarectum with encopresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meunier, P; Mollard, P; Marechal, J M

    1976-01-01

    Studies of both rectosphincteric reflex threshold and conscious rectal sensitivity threshold were performed on 15 control subjects and 61 children with a radiological megarectum, 70% of whom were encopretics. In control subjects, the reflex threshold and the sensitivity threshold were obtained with a comparable volume of rectal distension. In the megarectum patients, sensitivity was often considerably reduced, the incidence of encopresis increasing proportionally with the decrease in conscious rectal sensitivity. Patients were segregated in three functional groups, according to measurements of the sensitivity threshold. PMID:1269991

  9. Comparison of familial and psychological factors in groups of encopresis patients with constipation and without constipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çengel-Kültür, S Ebru; Akdemir, Devrim; Saltık-Temizel, İnci N

    2014-01-01

    The study aimed to evaluate the differences between groups of encopresis patients with constipation and without constipation. The Symptom Checklist- 90-Revised, the COPE Questionnaire, the Relationship Scales Questionnaire, the McMaster Family Assessment Device and the Parenting Style Scale were used to evaluate, respectively, maternal psychiatric symptoms, coping abilities, attachment style, family functioning and children's perceptions of parenting behaviors. Psychiatric diagnoses were evaluated using the K-SADS. A higher level of maternal psychiatric symptoms, impaired role and affective involvement functioning of the family and less psychological autonomy were observed in the group of encopresis patients with constipation than in the group of encopresis patients without constipation. No significant differences were found between the groups in psychiatric comorbidities, maternal coping abilities and attachment style. The two groups had a similar pattern of comorbid psychiatric disorders and maternal psychological factors, although some familial factors-related mainly to parental authority-were differentiated in the encopresis with constipation group.

  10. [Functional childhood gastrointestinal disorders. II. Constipation and solitary encopresis: physiology and pathophysiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ginkel, R; Büller, H A; Heymans, H S; Taminiau, J A; Boeckxstaens, G E; Benninga, M A

    2003-06-28

    The childhood prevalences of constipation and encopresis are 0.3-8% and 1-3% respectively. Following a recent stricter definition and classification, constipation and solitary encopresis are now recognised to be two separate entities. Constipation is characterised by infrequent defecation, often in combination with involuntary loss of faeces. Solitary encopresis most often occurs once a day after school hours. When there is no defecation, the frequency of encopresis increases, the abdominal pain becomes more severe and the appetite becomes less, until a large quantity of faeces is produced (often once per week). The physiology of the defecation and continence mechanism is complex and has only been unravelled in part. The multiple physiological mechanisms involved have a complementary and compensatory effect on each other. This makes it difficult to determine the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms of these functional disorders.

  11. Self-care interventions for the school-aged child with encopresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitito, L M

    2000-01-01

    Encopresis, an elimination disorder in children, presents as a challenging problem for gastroenterology nurses working with patients and families confronted with this disorder. This article offers a summary of the literature on encopresis, including pathogenesis, causative factors, early treatment, and clinical interventions focused on self-care. The antecedent factors that facilitate the child's participation in self-care are summarized, along with the intended outcomes of the self-care intervention plan.

  12. Trends in referral to a single encopresis clinic over 20 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Laurie; Rappaport, Leonard; Schonwald, Alison; Nurko, Samuel

    2003-05-01

    To compare the characteristics of children with encopresis referred to a single encopresis clinic over the course of 20 years, including symptoms, previous diagnostic and therapeutic interventions, and parental attitudes. A retrospective study was conducted of an encopresis clinic at a tertiary care pediatric hospital. Questionnaires at initial evaluation elicited information about bowel habits, soiling, previous evaluations, previous treatments, and parental attitudes. In 503 children with encopresis, the average age of referral dropped from 115 months during the earliest 5 years to 77 months during the most recent 5 years. Children who had soiling for >3 years before referral decreased from 63% to 12%. The use of barium enema before referral decreased from 14% to 5%, as did psychological evaluation, from 25% to 14%. Previous therapy with enemas decreased from 45% to 27%. Mineral oil use remained at approximately 50%, and 20% of children had no previous treatment. Symptoms at referral and parental attitudes did not change across the years. Children are now referred at an earlier age to our tertiary encopresis clinic. The number of invasive and psychological evaluations has decreased before referral. However, treatment by many primary care providers before the referral has not changed. These data may suggest that pediatricians have increased awareness of encopresis and greater appreciation of its primarily physical rather than psychological nature. Additional studies will be needed to determine how these factors affect outcome.

  13. The effectiveness of methylphenidate in the treatment of encopresis independent from attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akça, Ömer Faruk; Yılmaz, Savaş

    2015-01-01

    Several medications are reported to be effective in treatment of encopresis. However, mechanisms of action related to these drugs are not known. We report a patient with ADHD and encopresis whose encopretic signs have disappeared with long acting methylphenidate while they have not changed with atomoxetine.

  14. The Effectiveness of Methylphenidate in the Treatment of Encopresis Independent from Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Symptoms

    OpenAIRE

    Ak?a, ?mer Faruk; Y?lmaz, Sava?

    2015-01-01

    Several medications are reported to be effective in treatment of encopresis. However, mechanisms of action related to these drugs are not known. We report a patient with ADHD and encopresis whose encopretic signs have disappeared with long acting methylphenidate while they have not changed with atomoxetine.

  15. Dysfunctional elimination syndromes--how closely linked are constipation and encopresis with specific lower urinary tract conditions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combs, Andrew J; Van Batavia, Jason P; Chan, Jennifer; Glassberg, Kenneth I

    2013-09-01

    It is recognized that there is a strong association between bladder and bowel dysfunction. We determined the association of constipation and/or encopresis with specific lower urinary tract conditions. We reviewed our database of children with lower urinary tract dysfunction and divided cases into 3 categories of bowel dysfunction (constipation, encopresis and constipation plus encopresis) and 4 lower urinary tract conditions (dysfunctional voiding, idiopathic detrusor overactivity disorder, detrusor underutilization disorder and primary bladder neck dysfunction). Associations between bowel dysfunction types and each lower urinary tract condition were determined. Of 163 males and 205 females with a mean age of 8.5 years constipation was the most common bowel dysfunction (27%). Although encopresis is generally thought to reflect underlying constipation, only half of children with encopresis in this series had constipation. Dysfunctional voiding was associated with the highest incidence of bowel dysfunction. All but 1 patient with encopresis had associated urgency and detrusor overactivity, and the encopresis resolved in 75% of patients after initiation of anticholinergic therapy. Constipation was significantly more common in girls (27%) than in boys (11%, p encopresis was more common in boys (9%) than in girls (3%, p = 0.02), likely reflecting the higher incidence of dysfunctional voiding in girls and idiopathic detrusor overactivity disorder in boys. Active bowel dysfunction was seen in half of the children with a lower urinary tract condition. Constipation was more common in patients with dysfunctional voiding, while encopresis was significantly increased in those with idiopathic detrusor overactivity disorder and in those with dysfunctional voiding, severe urgency and detrusor overactivity. Anticholinergics, despite their constipating effect, given for treatment of detrusor overactivity resolved encopresis in most children with this bowel dysfunction. Copyright

  16. Using the Internet to teach parents and children about constipation and encopresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowitz, S M; Ritterband, L

    2001-01-01

    Since 1995, we have maintained a tutorial about chronic childhood constipation and encopresis on our web site. The tutorial is directed at parents and older children and includes a feedback form comprised of six multiple-choice questions and a free-text comment field. Between 1 January 1998 and 30 April 2000, we received 1,142 completed feedback forms. The vast majority of respondents identified themselves as parents or guardians of a child with constipation or encopresis. All respondents felt the tutorial was clear and easy to understand. 98% of respondents felt the tutorial helped them understand why children develop constipation and/or encopresis and 91% of respondents felt the tutorial made them better able to take care of a child suffering from constipation and/or encopresis. More than 99% of respondents felt this type of tutorial was a good way to teach people about health problems. 74% of respondents sent us comments about the tutorial. Most often, the comments expressed thanks for having this information available in clear and understandable language, however a significant number of people inquired about a particular child's difficulties or asked a general question not clearly pertaining to a particular child. The results of this study indicate that many people are searching the Internet for information concerning childhood encopresis and that the World Wide Web can provide families with useful information about this common paediatric problem.

  17. Brief report: Adherence to fluid recommendations in children receiving treatment for retentive encopresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhl, Elizabeth S; Felt, Barbara T; Patton, Susana R

    2009-01-01

    Limited data are available regarding whether children being treated for retentive encopresis are adherent to recommendations to increase their daily fluid intake. The purpose of this study was to examine fluid adherence in children who received treatment for retentive encopresis. A retrospective chart review was performed using diet diary data for 26 children (ages 3-12) who completed a group behavioral intervention for retentive encopresis. Mean daily intake of clear fluid increased significantly during treatment and children relied primarily on water and juice to make this dietary change. However, adherence rates to clear fluid goals were <50%. Children's increased clear fluid intake did not equate to high fluid adherence. Children's high juice consumption is concerning as it could place them at risk for other negative health consequences. Future research should examine whether enhanced fluid education and use of behavior change strategies yield higher fluid adherence.

  18. Encopresis in children: a cyclical model of constipation and faecal retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanwick, T

    1991-01-01

    Encopresis afflicts one in 100 children causing considerable stigma and parental concern. General practitioners are in a position to help in most cases but are often deterred by the psychoanalytical theories which have been developed to explain this problem. It is currently accepted that children with encopresis tend to retain stools. This leads to constipation, overstretching of sphincters and resultant faecal soiling. Physical and psychological perpetuating factors result in retention once again, thus completing a cycle of constipation and retention. Various precipitant and predisposing factors can maintain this cycle. Once physical causes have been excluded a simple behavioural approach can be adopted aimed at retraining the bowel. By using laxatives to prevent retention, gaining the child's confidence, cooperation and understanding and involving both the family and school, encopresis can be successfully managed in general practice. PMID:1807329

  19. Abnormal rectoanal function in children recovered from chronic constipation and encopresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loening-Baucke, V A

    1984-12-01

    It is unknown if abnormal anal sphincter function as assessed by anorectal manometry is still present years after resolution of chronic constipation and encopresis. Twenty healthy controls, 12 children with constipation but no encopresis, and 20 children with chronic constipation and encopresis underwent anorectal manometric testing, using intraluminal pressure transducers and a balloon for rectal distention. Anorectal measurements were repeated in the 20 constipated and encopretic children 2.5-4 yr after treatment began; 11 children had recovered for at least 1 yr. The mean values of anal resting tone and of anal pull-through pressure were lower in the constipated and encopretic children than in the 20 control children (p less than 0.003). Percent relaxation of the rectosphincteric reflex after rectal distention of 30 and 60 ml was lower in constipated children with and without encopresis than in controls (p less than 0.003), whereas the means of rectosphincteric reflex threshold were comparable in the three groups of children. Three years after initiation of treatment with milk of magnesia, high-fiber diet, and bowel training techniques, the mean values of anal resting tone, anal pull-through pressure, and percent relaxation of rectosphincteric reflex remained significantly lower in both recovered and nonrecovered constipated and encopretic patients compared with controls. It was suggested that the underlying cause of chronic constipation is the decreased ability of the internal anal sphincter to relax with rectal distention, and the hypotonia of the anal canal is responsible for the encopresis. Abnormal anorectal functions were still present years after cessation of treatment and recovery and put the recovered patient at risk for recurrence of chronic constipation and encopresis.

  20. Chronic Functional Constipation and Encopresis in Children in Relationship with the Psychosocial Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Olaru

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Functional constipation is an issue for both the patient and his/her family, affecting the patient’s psychoemotional balance, social relations, and their harmonious integration in the school environment. We aimed to highlight the connection between chronic constipation and encopresis and the patient’s psychosocial and family-related situation. Material and Method. 57 patients with ages spanning from 6 to 15 were assessed within the pediatric gastroenterology ward. Sociodemographic, medical, and psychological data was recorded. The collected data was processed using the SPSS 20 software. Results. The study group consisted of 57 children diagnosed with encopresis (43 boys (75.44% and 14 girls (24.56%, M=10.82 years. It was determined that most of the children came from urban families with a poor socioeducational status. We identified a level of studies of 11.23±5.56 years in mothers, while fathers had an average number of 9.35±4.53 years of study. We also found a complex relationship between encopretic episodes and school performances (F=7.968, p=0.001, 95% Cl. Children with encopresis were found to have more anxiety/depression symptoms, greater social problems, more disruptive behavior, and poorer school performance. Conclusions. The study highlights the importance of the family environment and socioeconomic factors in manifestations of chronic constipation and encopresis.

  1. An 8-Year-Old Boy With Treatment-Resistant Encopresis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stein, Martin T.; Benninga, Marc A.; Felt, Barbara T.

    2010-01-01

    CASE: Paul is an 8-year-old boy with a long-standing history of encopresis and enuresis. Potty training was initiated when he was 21/2 years old. At this time, his mother was absent from the home for 6 weeks when she cared for her ill father in a different city. The process of teaching Paul to use

  2. An 8-Year-Old Boy With Treatment-Resistant Encopresis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stein, Martin T.; Benninga, Marc A.; Felt, Barbara T.

    2017-01-01

    Paul is an 8-year-old boy with a long-standing history of encopresis and enuresis. Potty training was initiated when he was 2 years old. At this time, his mother was absent from the home for 6 weeks when she cared for her ill father in a different city. The process of teaching Paul to use the

  3. A Biobehavioral Approach to the Treatment of Functional Encopresis in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friman, Patrick C.; Hofstadter, Kristi L.; Jones, Kevin M.

    2006-01-01

    Functional encopresis (FE) refers to the repeated passage of feces into inappropriate places at least once per month for at least 3 months. Treatment of FE targets the processes that cause or exacerbate the condition, including reduced colonic motility, constipation, and fecal impaction. The cardinal elements of successful treatment include…

  4. [In-patient psychoanalytical psychotherapy of a 12 year old boy with secondary encopresis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressel, Christine

    2007-01-01

    Case report on the in-patient psychoanalytical psychotherapy of a 12 year old boy, who developed a nonorganic encopresis at the age of nine after his mother died. One focal issue is his denial of this loss and the beginning of a process of mourning due to the treatment. The Operationalized Psychodynamic Diagnostics (OPD) for Children and Adolescents are illustrated for this case.

  5. Chronic Functional Constipation and Encopresis in Children in Relationship with the Psychosocial Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olaru, Claudia; Diaconescu, Smaranda; Trandafir, Laura; Gimiga, Nicoleta; Olaru, Radian A; Stefanescu, Gabriela; Ciubotariu, Gabriela; Burlea, Marin; Iorga, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    Functional constipation is an issue for both the patient and his/her family, affecting the patient's psychoemotional balance, social relations, and their harmonious integration in the school environment. We aimed to highlight the connection between chronic constipation and encopresis and the patient's psychosocial and family-related situation. Material and Method . 57 patients with ages spanning from 6 to 15 were assessed within the pediatric gastroenterology ward. Sociodemographic, medical, and psychological data was recorded. The collected data was processed using the SPSS 20 software. Results . The study group consisted of 57 children diagnosed with encopresis (43 boys (75.44%) and 14 girls (24.56%)), M = 10.82 years. It was determined that most of the children came from urban families with a poor socioeducational status. We identified a level of studies of 11.23 ± 5.56 years in mothers, while fathers had an average number of 9.35 ± 4.53 years of study. We also found a complex relationship between encopretic episodes and school performances ( F = 7.968, p = 0.001, 95% Cl). Children with encopresis were found to have more anxiety/depression symptoms, greater social problems, more disruptive behavior, and poorer school performance. Conclusions . The study highlights the importance of the family environment and socioeconomic factors in manifestations of chronic constipation and encopresis.

  6. A Case Study Using Child-Centered Play Therapy Approach to Treat Enuresis and Encopresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuddy-Casey, Maria

    1997-01-01

    Demonstrates an alternative method (nondirective child-centered therapy) in treating enuresis and encopresis resulting from emotional disturbances. Examines various etiologies and approaches to treating these conditions. Provides a case study example. Claims that professionals must differentiate between primary and secondary occurrences of these…

  7. Pharmacotherapy in the Management of Voiding and Storage Disorders, Including Enuresis and Encopresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiner, William G.

    2008-01-01

    Enuresis and encopresis are disorders of the bladder and rectum, and this article helps in understanding the neurobiology of lower urinary tract and anorectal function to help in the treatment of these disorders. Treatment for children with these disorders emphasizes either a psychological or pharmacological approach.

  8. A Collaborative Protocol for Encopresis Management in School-Aged Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaney, Carol A.

    1995-01-01

    Encopresis affects a small percentage of children, but most parents are unaware of the condition and react punitively. The lengthy, complex management program usually includes physiological and behavioral approaches. The collaborative management protocol focuses on medical clinicians, families, children, school nurses, and teachers, and can help…

  9. Encopresis, Soiling and Constipation in Children and Adults with Developmental Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matson, Johnny L.; LoVullo, Santino V.

    2009-01-01

    Children and adults with developmental disabilities are more likely to evince encopresis, soiling and constipation than the general population. This set of related behaviors can produce a great deal of stress and can be a major restriction in independent living. This paper provides a review of the current state of knowledge on the prevalence,…

  10. Positive Reinforcement and Logical Consequences in the Treatment of Classroom Encopresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Mark A.

    1984-01-01

    A child with a diagnosis of mild mental retardation was treated for encopresis. Positive reinforcement procedures for continence and logical consequences for soiling were effective in accomplishing complete continence during the final phase of treatment. An ABCDA design with a decelerating rate of reinforcement was utilized to assess treatment…

  11. The Systematic Use of Positive and Negative Consequences in Managing Classroom Encopresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Thomas W.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    This study reports a successful classroom intervention program which was designed to curb encopresis. It used positive consequences in combination with negative consequences, rather than negative consequences alone. Also it utilized a reversal strategy to evalulate the efficacy of the treatment variables. (Author)

  12. Exploring the relationship between parental worry about their children's health and usage of an internet intervention for pediatric encopresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magee, Joshua C; Ritterband, Lee M; Thorndike, Frances P; Cox, Daniel J; Borowitz, Stephen M

    2009-06-01

    To investigate whether parental worry about their children's health predicts usage of a pediatric Internet intervention for encopresis. Thirty-nine families with a child diagnosed with encopresis completed a national clinical trial of an Internet-based intervention for encopresis (www.ucanpooptoo.com). Parents rated worry about their children's health, encopresis severity, current parent treatment for depression, and parent comfort with the Internet. Usage indicators were collected while participants utilized the intervention. Regression analyses showed that parents who reported higher baseline levels of worry about their children's health showed greater subsequent intervention use (beta =.52, p =.002), even after accounting for other plausible predictors. Exploratory analyses indicated that this effect may be stronger for families with younger children. Characteristics of individuals using Internet-based treatment programs, such as parental worry about their children's health, can influence intervention usage, and should be considered by developers of Internet interventions.

  13. Long-term follow-up of behavioural treatment for primary encopresis in people with intellectual disability in the community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntley, E; Smith, L

    1999-12-01

    Encopresis is a major problem in high-dependency fields such as intellectual disability. Little information is available with respect to either the prevalence or aetiology of encopresis, probably because it is widely regarded as part and parcel of the handicapping condition. Consequently, treatment reports are rare and confined to a small number of case studies. There is a dearth of long-term follow-up on the behavioural treatment of encopresis in the general population, and no long-term follow-up studies are available for the treatment of encopresis in intellectual disability. The present report provides follow-up data for nine out of 10 people with mainly severe intellectual disability who had received behavioural treatment for primary retentive or non-retentive encopresis between 5 and 17 years previously. Six out of the nine subjects for whom data were available were accident-free and a further two clients were very substantially improved. Interestingly, those whose former encopresis was retentive in nature maintained more successfully, despite the severity of their original impaction. The limitations of the present study are discussed.

  14. Diagnostics Of Renal Hemodynamics Disturbance In Children And Teenagers With Chronic Constipation, Encopresis And Their Correction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.L. Malykh

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The article gives the detailed issue of results of complex inspection of 90 children and teenagers aged 4-17 with problems of chronic constipation, incontinence and encopresis. Ultrasonic screening has shown various pathology in the functional condition of arterial renal vessels. The method of biological feedback has been considered as prospective method of treatment excluding medication of bladder and small bowel dysfunction. The efficiency of the method was marked at combination of encopresis and incontinence. The purpose of the present research was the study of renal hemodynamics disturbances and working out methods of their correction. The examination included ultrasonic investigation, electromyography and uroflowmetry. The study of functional condition of anterior abdominal wall muscles and pelvic floor muscles was performed by means of «Miomed - 938». All patients received complex therapy on the basis of which the method of biological feedback was used

  15. Management of encopresis in early adolescence in a medical-psychiatric unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fennig, S; Fennig, S

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this work is to present the role of a medical-psychiatric unit in the treatment of chronic resistant encopresis in adolescence as an effective alternative to the standard approach. Four case reports are presented. The integrative program is based on full patient cooperation and involves separating the patient from the family environment and the use of medical intervention combined with modified behavioral therapy and parental education and guidance. The patient is given full responsibility for the cure. The median full hospital stay for our patients was 2 weeks, and outcome in all cases was complete remission. This experience suggests that chronic resistant encopresis in adolescents requires a different approach from the standard because of the patient's developmental stage and the often hostile family dynamics. A medical-psychiatric setting provides an excellent management milieu and can lead to a dramatic improvement in this chronic disabling condition.

  16. [Functional childhood gastrointestinal disorders. III. Constipation and solitary encopresis; diagnostic work-up and therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ginkel, R; Büller, H A; Heymans, H S; Taminiau, J A; Boeckxstaens, G E; Benninga, M A

    2003-06-28

    A detailed medical history in combination with a thorough physical examination, including rectal examination, form the cornerstone in the diagnostic work-up for children with functional defecation disorders. Additional investigations are often not informative and have only minor diagnostic or therapeutic implications. Medical therapy in children with functional constipation and solitary encopresis is primarily based on clinical experience. In both patient groups, the role of education, the use of diary cards and toilet training is important. In some patients behaviour interventions are important. Oral laxatives are the basis of treatment of children with functional constipation, whereas they are contra-indicated in children with solitary encopresis. In both groups, biofeedback training appears to be of little additional benefit. Long-term follow-up of children with functional defecation disorders shows that complaints continue far beyond puberty in many children.

  17. Randomised controlled trial of biofeedback training in persistent encopresis with anismus

    OpenAIRE

    Nolan, T.; Catto-Smith, T.; Coffey, C.; Wells, J.

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Paradoxical external anal sphincter contraction during attempted defecation (anismus) is thought to be an important contributor to chronic faecal retention and encopresis in children. Biofeedback training can be used to teach children to abolish this abnormal contraction.
METHODS—A randomised controlled trial in medical treatment resistant and/or treatment dependent children with anismus using surface electromyographic (EMG) biofeedback training to determine wh...

  18. Chronic Functional Constipation and Encopresis in Children in Relationship with the Psychosocial Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Olaru, Claudia; Diaconescu, Smaranda; Trandafir, Laura; Gimiga, Nicoleta; Olaru, Radian A.; Stefanescu, Gabriela; Ciubotariu, Gabriela; Burlea, Marin; Iorga, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    Functional constipation is an issue for both the patient and his/her family, affecting the patient's psychoemotional balance, social relations, and their harmonious integration in the school environment. We aimed to highlight the connection between chronic constipation and encopresis and the patient's psychosocial and family-related situation. Material and Method. 57 patients with ages spanning from 6 to 15 were assessed within the pediatric gastroenterology ward. Sociodemographic, medical, a...

  19. Diagnostics and Neuropsychological Correction of Children with Neurosis-Like Enuresis and Encopresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bereskin D.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The experience of a work with a group of children with enuresis (six patients and encopresis (one patient both of residual-organic origin is analyzed in this article. Work included psychological diagnostic techniques and psychological correction. Psychological diagnostic evaluation was directed to the measurements of different characteristics of sensorimotor reactions, memory, attention and cognitive functions. Functional characteristics of the central nervous system in children with enuresis and encopresis were approximated to those recorded in their healthy peers, while the cognitive functions in present group of children were lower. Psychological correction has included neuropsychological methods, which were aimed at the development of: visual-motor coordination, spatio-temporal organization relations and logic constructions understanding. Based on children's and parent's self-reports and based on medical records also it can be assumed that proposed psychological correction can be effective in enuresis and encopresis in children with similar characteristics, which can be observed. The significance of the functional indices evaluation of the central nervous system by measuring various characteristics of sensorimotor reactions substantiate by results obtained.

  20. Antegrade continence enemas improve quality of life in patients with medically-refractory encopresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, Joseph T; Simha, Sidd; Wild, Laurie C; Teitelbaum, Daniel H; Ehrlich, Peter F

    2017-05-01

    Fecal incontinence is a socially debilitating problem for many children. We hypothesized that in selected patients with medically-refractory encopresis, placement of an appendicostomy or cecostomy tube for administration of antegrade continence enemas (ACE) would improve quality of life (QOL). We reviewed all patients with encopresis who underwent appendicostomy or cecostomy placement from 2003 to 2014 at our institution. We contacted subjects' parents by phone and administered 3 surveys: a survey reflecting current stooling habits, a disease-specific QOL survey, and the PedsQL™ QOL survey. QOL surveys were completed twice by parents, once reflecting pre-operative QOL, then again reflecting current QOL. Pre-procedure and post-procedure scores were compared by paired t-test. Ten patients underwent appendicostomy/cecostomy for encopresis. Eight completed phone surveys. All procedures were performed laparoscopically. All patients experienced fecal soiling pre-operatively, whereas 5/8 surveyed patients (63%) noted complete resolution of soiling post-procedure (pencopresis, likely related to resolution of soiling. 4. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Mental and somatic health in a non-clinical sample 10 years after a diagnosis of encopresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hultén, Ib; Jonsson, Jakob; Jonsson, Carl-Otto

    2005-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the relation between the diagnosis of encopresis at 8 and 10 years of age, and mental and somatic health 10 years later. The importance of type of encopresis (primary or secondary) at 8 years was also studied. Subjects were a non-clinical encopretic sample (N=73) and control subjects (N=75) [2]. Seven assessment variables from conscription surveys provided information about mental and somatic health status at 18 years of age. Former encopretics (n=66) did not differ significantly from the controls (n=67) at 18 years of age, although there were consistent, small negative differences. The boys who at 10 years of age had still been encopretic did not differ significantly at 18 years of age from the boys who at 10 years had recovered from encopresis, and the signs indicating the small differences varied. For former primary and secondary encopretic boys, there were two significant differences, the men in the secondary group being more often exempted from conscription than the primary group and the control cases. The results indicate that boys with non-clinical encopresis show only small, if any, mental and somatic disturbances at the beginning of adulthood. Comprehensive investigations of encopretic patients are recommended as important clinical problems, in addition to encopresis, might be present.

  2. Long-term efficacy of polyethylene glycol 3350 for the treatment of chronic constipation in children with and without encopresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pashankar, Dinesh S; Bishop, Warren P; Loening-Baucke, Vera

    2003-01-01

    Seventy-four children (43 with chronic constipation, 31 with constipation and encopresis) treated with polyethylene glycol 3350 (PEG) for longer than 3 months were studied to assess long-term efficacy. The mean duration of PEG therapy was 8.4 months (range, 3-30). Weekly stool frequency, stool consistency, and symptoms associated with constipation improved significantly with PEG therapy in all 74 patients. In 31 children with encopresis, soiling ceased completely in 16 patients and frequency of soiling decreased significantly in all others. The average effective long-term dose of PEG was 0.7 g/kg/day. Long-term PEG therapy is effective for the treatment of chronic constipation with and without encopresis in children.

  3. [Utility of anorectal manometry in the diagnosis and treatment of encopresis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blesa Sierra, Ma; Núñez Núñez, R; Blesa Sánchez, E; Vargas, I; Cabrera García, R

    2004-04-01

    Biofeedback based on anomanometric techniques has been shown to be effective in the treatment of children with encopresis. The long-term efficacy of biofeedback and which variables of anorectal manometry (anorectal manometry) could help to establish biofeedback indications are currently the subject of debate. To identify which variables of anorectal manometry, in addition to symptoms, could be useful in deciding which patients could benefit from biofeedback therapy and to assess the outcome of this treatment. Anorectal manometry was performed in 88 patients, who were referred to our service complaining of soiling at least once a month for a minimum of 6 months after a period of normal continence of 1 year or more. The chronological and mental age of the patients was 4 years. All patients were otherwise in good health and had shown no response to medical treatment. The following variables were studied: anal canal profile, rectoanal inhibitory reflex (RAIR), continence reflex, rectal sensitivity, external anal sphincter (EAS) activity and defecatory maneuver. The patients were divided into two groups, according to clinical and anomanometric impairment, and the most affected patients (n = 41) underwent biofeedback therapy. The indications and outcome of biofeedback were assessed through clinical course and anorectal manometry. In the statistical analysis, the mean and standard deviation were calculated. The chi-squared test with Yates' correction was used to compare clinical and manometric qualitative parameters; Student's t-test was used to compare quantitative parameters; nonparametric tests consisted of the Mann-Whitney test and the Wilcoxon test was used for paired data. Patients treated with biofeedback therapy presented shorter anal canal, greater pressure in the rectal ampulla (P encopresis (P encopresis. Biofeedback therapy seems to produce favorable long-term results in the majority of the most severely affected patients.

  4. Incidence of Enuresis and Encopresis Among Children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder in a Population-Based Birth Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellon, Michael W.; Natchev, Brooke E.; Katusic, Slavica K.; Colligan, Robert C.; Weaver, Amy L.; Voigt, Robert G.; Barbaresi, William J.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This study reports the incidence of enuresis and encopresis among children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (AD/HD) versus those without AD/HD. METHOD Subjects included 358 (74.5% male) children with research-identified AD/HD from a 1976-1982 population-based birth cohort (N = 5718) and 729 (75.2% male) non-AD/HD control subjects from the same birth cohort, matched by gender and age. All subjects were retrospectively followed from birth until a diagnosis of enuresis or encopresis was made or last follow-up prior to 18 years of age. The complete medical record for each subject was reviewed to obtain information on age of initial diagnosis of an elimination disorder, frequency and duration of symptoms, identification of exclusionary criteria specified by DSM-IV, with confirmation of the diagnosis by expert consensus. RESULTS Children with AD/HD were 2.1 (95% CI, 1.3-3.4; p = 0.002) times more likely to meet DSM-IV criteria for enuresis than non-AD/HD controls; they were 1.8 (95% CI, 1.2 – 2.7; p = 0.006) times more likely to do so than non-AD/HD controls when less stringent criteria for a diagnosis of enuresis were employed. Though not significant, children with AD/HD were 1.8 (95% CI, 0.7-4.6; p = 0.23) times more likely to meet criteria for encopresis than non-AD/HD controls. The relative risk was 2.0 (95% CI, 1.0-4.1; p = 0.05) when a less stringent definition for encopresis was utilized. CONCLUSIONS The results of this population-based study demonstrate that children with AD/HD are more likely than their peers without AD/HD to develop enuresis with a similar trend for encopresis. PMID:23680296

  5. Incidence of enuresis and encopresis among children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in a population-based birth cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellon, Michael W; Natchev, Brooke E; Katusic, Slavica K; Colligan, Robert C; Weaver, Amy L; Voigt, Robert G; Barbaresi, William J

    2013-01-01

    This study reports the incidence of enuresis and encopresis among children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) versus those without ADHD. Subjects included 358 children (74.5% boys) with research-identified ADHD from a 1976 to 1982 population-based birth cohort (n = 5718) and 729 (75.2% boys) non-ADHD control subjects from the same birth cohort, matched by gender and age. All subjects were retrospectively followed from birth until a diagnosis of enuresis or encopresis was made or last follow-up before 18 years of age. The complete medical record for each subject was reviewed to obtain information on age of initial diagnosis of an elimination disorder, frequency and duration of symptoms, and identification of exclusionary criteria specified by DSM-IV, with confirmation of the diagnosis by expert consensus. Children with ADHD were 2.1 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.3-3.4; P = .002) times more likely to meet DSM-IV criteria for enuresis than non-ADHD controls; they were 1.8 (95% CI, 1.2-2.7; P = .006) times more likely to do so than non-ADHD controls when less stringent criteria for a diagnosis of enuresis were employed. Though not significant, children with ADHD were 1.8 (95% CI, 0.7-4.6; P = .23) times more likely to meet criteria for encopresis than non-ADHD controls. The relative risk was 2.0 (95% CI, 1.0-4.1; P = .05) when a less stringent definition for encopresis was utilized. Children with ADHD are more likely than their peers without ADHD to develop enuresis with a similar trend for encopresis. Copyright © 2013 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Treatment of childhood encopresis: a randomized trial comparing three treatment protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowitz, Stephen M; Cox, Daniel J; Sutphen, James L; Kovatchev, Boris

    2002-04-01

    To compare short- and long-term effectiveness of three additive treatment protocols in children experiencing chronic encopresis. Children, 6 to 15 years of age, who experienced at least weekly fecal soiling for 6 months or longer were eligible for the study. Children were randomly assigned to a group that received intensive medical therapy (IMT), a group that received intensive medical therapy plus a behavior management program called enhanced toilet training (ETT), or a group that received intensive medical therapy with enhanced toilet training and external anal sphincter electromyographic biofeedback (BF). Data concerning toileting habits were collected for 14 consecutive days before an initial visit, and at 3, 6, and 12 months after initiation of therapy. All data were collected using a computerized voice-mail system that telephoned the families each day. At 12 months, children were classified as significantly improved (reduction in soiling, P 0.90, P encopresis than either intensive medical therapy or anal sphincter biofeedback therapy. Although similar total cure rates at 1 year can be expected with these three forms of therapy, enhanced toilet training results in statistically significant decreases in the daily frequency of soiling for the greatest number of children.

  7. Primary care: constipation and encopresis treatment strategies and reasons to refer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philichi, Lisa; Yuwono, Melawati

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess constipation and encopresis treatment strategies of primary care providers and determine reasons to refer to a pediatric gastroenterology specialist. A closed-ended questionnaire was mailed to a convenience sampling of 237 pediatric primary care providers. Ninety-one questionnaires were returned with a 38% response rate: 74 (81%) pediatricians and 17 (19%) nurse practitioners. The majority of responders recommended pharmacologic treatment and diet changes. Many providers (73%) estimated a 75%-100% success rate when managing constipation, whereas 19% providers estimated a greater than 80% success rate with encopresis patients. The number one reason to refer was unresponsiveness to treatment (71%), followed by parents want a second opinion (15%), rule out organic cause (9%), and management is too time-consuming (5%). Both primary care providers and pediatric gastroenterologists use medication strategies, but diet recommendations are not the same. Unresponsiveness to treatment is the main reason for referral. If better management can occur in the primary care setting, costly specialty services may be avoided and possibly reduce healthcare costs.

  8. Comorbidity of functional urinary incontinence and encopresis: somatic and behavioral associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Gontard, Alexander; Hollmann, Elke

    2004-06-01

    Functional urinary incontinence and encopresis are common comorbid disorders in childhood. We analyze the specific somatic and behavioral symptoms associated with functional enuresis/urinary incontinence and encopresis when they occur together. A total of 167 consecutive children 5 to 10 year olds, with day and/or night wetting were examined prospectively with ultrasound, uroflowmetry, electroencephalography, the Child Behavior Checklist, Culture Fair Intelligence Test and ICD-10 child psychiatric diagnoses. The main findings for the comorbid group (20 patients) with wetting and soiling were a significantly higher rate of daytime incontinence and micturition problems, thickened bladder walls and pathological electroencephalography. There were higher, although not significant, rates of previous urinary tract infections, antibiotic prophylaxis, residual volume and abnormal uroflow curves in this group. Behaviorally, hyperkinetic syndromes, and emotional and conduct disorders (according to ICD-10) were more common. Of the 20 patients 65% had a Child Behavior Checklist total score (greater than 90th percentile) in the clinical range. The externalizing, internalizing, delinquent and anxious/depressed problem scales were also significantly higher. This risk group requires detailed assessment and specific treatment. In addition to the symptomatic treatment of the wetting and soiling, many of these children are in need of specific behavioral, psychotherapeutic and pharmacological treatment.

  9. Increasing daily water intake and fluid adherence in children receiving treatment for retentive encopresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhl, Elizabeth S; Hoodin, Flora; Rice, Jennifer; Felt, Barbara T; Rausch, Joseph R; Patton, Susana R

    2010-11-01

    To examine the efficacy of an enhanced intervention (EI) compared to standard care (SC) in increasing daily water intake and fluid goal adherence in children seeking treatment for retentive encopresis. Changes in beverage intake patterns and fluid adherence were examined by comparing 7-week diet diary data collected during participation in the EI to achieved data for families who had previously completed the SC. Compared to children in SC (n = 19), children in the EI (n = 18) demonstrated a significantly greater increase in daily water intake from baseline to the conclusion of treatment ( p ≤ .001), and were four and six times more likely to meet fluid targets in Phases 1 (Weeks 3-4) and 2 (Weeks 5-6) of fluid intervention, respectively (both p ≤ .001). Enhanced education and behavioral strategies were efficacious in increasing children's intake of water and improving fluid adherence. Future research should replicate the findings in a prospective randomized clinical trial to discern their effectiveness.

  10. The prevalence of abnormal genital findings, vulvovaginitis, enuresis and encopresis in children who present with allegations of sexual abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, B; Thimmesch, I; Aardsma, N; Ed D, M Terrell; Carstater, S; Schober, J

    2014-12-01

    To assess the prevalence of vulvovaginitis, enuresis and encopresis in children who were referred for allegations of sexual abuse. A retrospective chart review of 1280 children presenting for non-acute examination after allegations of sexual abuse during a 15-year time span. Interview documentation, physical examination documentation, urinalysis, urine and vaginal cultures were reviewed. Of the 1280 children, 73.3% were female and 26.7% male. The ages of the children ranged from 6 months to 18 years (median age was 6 years). Interviews revealed that fondling contact was the most common allegation, followed by oral, vaginal, and anal penetration. Interviews also disclosed lower urinary tract symptoms, UTI, constipation, encopresis and enuresis. Physical examination revealed no abnormal genital findings in 44.7% of cases. Examinations of the vagina noted: erythema (18.1%); hymenal notching (posterior 16.8%, anterior 4.4%); vuvlovaginitis (14.0%); laceration or transection (0.6%); and bruising (0.4%). Examination of the anus noted: anal fissure/tear (14.9%); loss of anal tone (10.6%); reflex anal dilatation (9.2%); venous congestion (3.8%); and proctitis (0.9%). Vulvovaginitis was noted in 14% (131/936) and encopresis in 2.3% (21/936). Enuresis according to age was reported in 13% of 5-9 year olds, 14.7% of 10-16 year olds and 18.2% of 17-18 year olds suspected of being abused. Prevalence of vulvovaginitis and enuresis were increased, and encopresis was decreased in children with allegations of sexual abuse when compared to the general pediatric population. Physicians should continue to be aware of the possibility of the presence of these conditions in children who have been sexually abused, and offer appropriate treatment. Copyright © 2014 Journal of Pediatric Urology Company. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Treatment of encopresis and chronic constipation in young children: clinical results from interactive parent-child guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Helen; Bahar, Ron J

    2006-03-01

    To describe the source of and treatment for encopresis in a series of 40 children under age 9 years. Referral for psychological based treatment followed upon limited success of standard gastroenterologic intervention. The treatment provided is defined as interactive parent-child family guidance. This includes a variety of specific psychologically based recommendations offered to parents, and, when indicated, direct interventions with the symptomatic child. These are different from various forms of behavioral corrective reward-punishment interventions frequently recommended for young children with encopresis. The pediatric and the psychological literature offer few reports of successful treatment of young children with this syndrome. Also, there are few specific descriptions of psychologically based interventions. The results reported here are of the successful treatment of 38 of 40 cases referred specifically for psychologically based intervention following the prior limited success of standard gastroenterologic treatment. The interactive parent-child family guidance intervention described in this report, differentiated from typical behavior therapies, is a notably successful mode of psychologically based therapy for these children. It offers an important alternative to standard pediatric gastroenterological treatment for encopresis, as well as to reward-punishment oriented behavioral therapies.

  12. Randomised controlled trial of biofeedback training in persistent encopresis with anismus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, T; Catto-Smith, T; Coffey, C; Wells, J

    1998-08-01

    Paradoxical external anal sphincter contraction during attempted defecation (anismus) is thought to be an important contributor to chronic faecal retention and encopresis in children. Biofeedback training can be used to teach children to abolish this abnormal contraction. A randomised controlled trial in medical treatment resistant and/or treatment dependent children with anismus using surface electromyographic (EMG) biofeedback training to determine whether such training produces sustained faecal continence. Up to four sessions of biofeedback training were conducted at weekly intervals for each patient. Anorectal manometry was performed before randomisation and six months later. Parents of patients completed the "child behaviour checklist" (CBCL) before randomisation and at follow up. Sixty eight children underwent anorectal manometry and EMG. Of these, 29 had anismus (ages 4-14 years) and were randomised to either EMG biofeedback training and conventional medical treatment (BFT) (n = 14) or to conventional medical treatment alone (n = 15). All but one child were able to learn relaxation of the external anal sphincter on attempted defecation. At six months' follow up, laxative free remission had been sustained in two of 14 patients in the BFT group and in two of 15 controls (95% confidence interval (CI) on difference, -24% to 26%). Remission or improvement occurred in four of 14 patients in the BFT group and six of 15 controls (95% CI on difference, -46% to 23%). Of subjects available for repeat anorectal manometry and EMG at six months, six of 13 in the BFT group still demonstrated anismus v 11 of 13 controls (95% CI on difference, -75% to -1%). Of the four patients in full remission at six months, only one (in the BFT group) did not exhibit anismus. Rectal hyposensitivity was not associated with remission or improvement in either of the groups. Mean CBCL total behaviour problem scores were not significantly different between the BFT and control groups, but there

  13. Persistent Encopresis, Enuresis, and Anxiety in a 7-Year-Old Girl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Theodora; Chae, Heekyung; Anbar, Ran D; Stein, Martin T

    2017-10-01

    Sonia is a 7-year-old old girl who was referred to the Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrics Clinic by the Pediatric Urology Clinic because of persistent wetting and soiling behaviors. Since age 3 years, she has had a history of encopresis (and wetting) for which she has seen gastroenterology and urology specialists. The mother reports that Sonia has accidents almost daily, and she is not upset when sitting in her urine or feces. She dislikes going into the bathroom or sitting on the toilet by herself. She participated in a behavior modification program associated with the pediatric urology clinic, which helps children learn healthy voiding habits and achieve continence.Sonia also has anxious behaviors. She bites her nails and chews on her hair or shirt. She is afraid of small spaces such as those between the bed and the wall and needs to have stuffed animals cover them. Other instances that trigger her anxious behaviors include loud noises, having a substitute teacher, being separated from her mother, and going to certain bathrooms or new places. She also has severe tantrums, which involve throwing and breaking objects, kicking, and hitting her head against doors.A cognitive behavioral therapy program was recommended to target anxiety symptoms, in addition to timed toileting after meals and polyethylene glycol. At a clinic visit several months later, symptoms of anxiety, encopresis, and enuresis persisted. Cognitive behavior therapy was continued and sertraline 25 mg was prescribed for anxiety. In addition, she was referred to a pediatrician who specializes in relaxation techniques and hypnotherapy.Sonia showed modest improvement with these interventions. There were fewer episodes of angry outbursts and a decrease in soiling and wetting, but at times, but she continued to have intermittent periods of wetting and soiling and fear of going to the bathroom by herself persisted.(This Challenging Case extends observations reviewed in a previous Challenging Case: J Dev

  14. Randomised controlled trial of biofeedback training in persistent encopresis with anismus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, T.; Catto-Smith, T.; Coffey, C.; Wells, J.

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Paradoxical external anal sphincter contraction during attempted defecation (anismus) is thought to be an important contributor to chronic faecal retention and encopresis in children. Biofeedback training can be used to teach children to abolish this abnormal contraction.
METHODS—A randomised controlled trial in medical treatment resistant and/or treatment dependent children with anismus using surface electromyographic (EMG) biofeedback training to determine whether such training produces sustained faecal continence. Up to four sessions of biofeedback training were conducted at weekly intervals for each patient. Anorectal manometry was performed before randomisation and six months later. Parents of patients completed the "child behaviour checklist" (CBCL) before randomisation and at follow up.
RESULTS—Sixty eight children underwent anorectal manometry and EMG. Of these, 29 had anismus (ages 4-14 years) and were randomised to either EMG biofeedback training and conventional medical treatment (BFT) (n = 14) or to conventional medical treatment alone (n = 15). All but one child were able to learn relaxation of the external anal sphincter on attempted defecation. At six months' follow up, laxative free remission had been sustained in two of 14 patients in the BFT group and in two of 15 controls (95% confidence interval (CI) on difference, −24% to 26%). Remission or improvement occurred in four of 14 patients in the BFT group and six of 15 controls (95% CI on difference, −46% to 23%). Of subjects available for repeat anorectal manometry and EMG at six months, six of 13 in the BFT group still demonstrated anismus v 11 of 13 controls (95% CI on difference, −75% to −1%). Of the four patients in full remission at six months, only one (in the BFT group) did not exhibit anismus. Rectal hyposensitivity was not associated with remission or improvement in either of the groups. Mean CBCL total behaviour problem scores were not significantly different

  15. Identifying Underlying Emotional Instability and Utilizing a Combined Intervention in the Treatment of Childhood Constipation and Encopresis-A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jamie L

    2016-06-01

    Childhood constipation is a common ailment that in certain cases can lead to encopresis or fecal incontinence. The literature suggests that standard care varies in effectiveness, especially in the long term. Fecal incontinence can lead to frustration, guilt, and shame for both the child and family and has untold long-term psychological and physical consequences. To address alternative treatment options for pediatric constipation and encopresis by using acupuncture and Chinese medicine. Patient and Setting: This is a case study of a 6-year-old girl seen in a private practice acupuncture clinic in the northwestern United States. Treatment involved acupuncture, massage, and Chinese herbal medicine. The patient in this study began to have regular bowel movements on her own, from a type 5 on the modified Bristol Stool Form Scale for Children to a type 3, with no laxative use and few to no fecal accidents. Emotional stability and support seem to play an important role in pediatric constipation and encopresis. Acupuncture may be an effective treatment option in the integrative care model to address both the emotional and physical components of childhood constipation.

  16. An 8-Year-Old Boy With Treatment-Resistant Encopresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Martin T; Benninga, Marc A; Felt, Barbara T

    Paul is an 8-year-old boy with a long-standing history of encopresis and enuresis. Potty training was initiated when he was 2 years old. At this time, his mother was absent from the home for 6 weeks when she cared for her ill father in a different city. The process of teaching Paul to use the bathroom was described as "inconsistent" due to multiple caretakers.Paul never successfully mastered bowel and bladder control. He continues to wet and soil his clothes on a daily basis at home and school. According to his parents, he does not accept responsibility and comments about his soiling such as, "I didn't do it; someone else must have put it there." One of Paul's teachers commented that she could tell at the beginning of the school day whether he would maintain bowel and bladder control. If he was "agitated and talkative" in the early morning, he would often soil that day.He had a pediatric gastroenterological evaluation at the age of 5 years when he was having daily episodes of stool soiling. Physical examination revealed normal anal tone, normal placement of the anus, and moderate stool in the rectal vault. An abdominal radiograph revealed moderate stool throughout the colon. He was treated with Miralax and instructed to sit on the toilet twice daily. Paul did not respond to these interventions and was diagnosed with "overflow incontinence secondary to stool withholding." When he was taking Miralax, he had a normal barium enema radiograph. He was admitted to the hospital for a cleanout with a polyethylene glycol/electrolyte solution.Although abdominal radiographs demonstrated absence of colonic stool for the following 5 months, he continued to soil his clothing. Play therapy and biofeedback did not change the chronic soiling and wetting pattern. An evaluation at the Continence Clinic resulted in a rigorous program including stooling after each meal, wearing a vibrating watch reminding him to void every 2 hours, drinking 60 ounces of water per day, tracking

  17. Avaliação manométrica anal de crianças com encoprese Anal manometric evaluation of children with encopresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Auxiliadora Prolungatti Cesar

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: A constipação crônica é doença comum na infância, ocorrendo em 5 a 10% dos pacientes pediátricos, considerada a segunda maior causa de procura nos consultórios de pediatria, sendo a encoprese decorrente de constipação grave associada à impactação fecal no reto. Dentre os exames diagnósticos, a manometria anal é utilizada para a avaliação de pacientes com distúrbios funcionais, como a constipação intestinal e a incontinência fecal, em alguns serviços para a avaliação de pacientes com encoprese, pois pode trazer informações sobre o mecanismo evacuatório e possíveis lesões esfincterianas anais. OBJETIVO: Verificar alterações manométricas em pacientes com encoprese. MÉTODOS: Foi realizado estudo de 40 manometrias anais de crianças constipadas com encoprese (G1 e 12 crianças constipados sem encoprese (G2. Foram obtidos os seguintes dados: pressões de repouso, contração e evacuação do canal anal e ampola retal, ponto de maior pressão, reflexo inibitório anal e sensibilidade retal. As manometrias foram realizadas com o aparelho Alacer de perfusão com 8 canais. RESULTADOS: Não foram encontradas diferenças nas pressões de repouso, contração e evacuação do canal anal entre os grupos. Chamou-nos a atenção a ausência de necessidade de maior volume retal para desencadear o reflexo inibitório anal. Não houve diferença da incidência de anismus entre os dois grupos, demonstrando que não se trata de fator importante na manutenção da encoprese, mas sim da constipação. CONCLUSÃO: Não houve necessidade de maior volume para desencadear o reflexo inibitório anal. O anismus não foi diferente entre os dois grupos, não sendo importante na manutenção da encoprese.INTRODUCTION: Chronic constipation is a common childhood disorder that affects 5 to 10% of pediatric patients, being the second most common cause for seeking medical help, with the encopresis arising out of severe constipation

  18. Assessment of the effectiveness of biofeedback in children with dyssynergic defecation and recalcitrant constipation/encopresis: does home biofeedback improve long-term outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croffie, Joseph M; Ammar, M Samer; Pfefferkorn, Marian D; Horn, Debra; Klipsch, Ann; Fitzgerald, Joseph F; Gupta, Sandeep K; Molleston, Jean P; Corkins, Mark R

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether biofeedback benefits children with dyssynergic defecation and constipation/encopresis, and whether home biofeedback improves long-term outcomes. Thirty-six patients with chronic constipation who had failed at least 6 months of conventional treatment and demonstrated dyssynergic defecation at anorectal manometry were randomized to biofeedback in the laboratory alone (group 1, n=24) or in the laboratory and at home (group 2, n=12) and followed up at 2, 4, and a mean of 44 months. Thirty patients were available for long-term follow-up. Bowel movements increased in all from a mean of 1.4/week to 5.1, 5.8, and 5.1 per week at 2 months, 4 months, and long-term, respectively (p < or = 0.001). Soiling decreased in all from a mean of 5.5/week to 0.6, 0.1, and 1 per week at 2 months, 4 months, and long-term, respectively (p < or = 0.001). Laxative use decreased from a mean of 4.1 days/week to 0.6, 0.3, and 0.7 per week at 2 months, 4 months, and long-term, respectively (p < or = 0.001). Twenty-seven of 30 parents ranked their satisfaction a mean of 2.2 (range 1-excellent to 3-good). There were no significant differences in outcomes between the laboratory alone group and the laboratory plus home group. Biofeedback is beneficial for some children with chronic constipation and dyssynergic defecation. Supplemental home biofeedback does not improve long-term outcomes.

  19. Anal manometric evaluation of children with encopresis

    OpenAIRE

    CESAR, Maria Auxiliadora Prolungatti; MOURA, Brenda C de; SILVA, Fernanda Perez Adorno da; BARBIERI, Dorina; BRUNO, Rodrigo Ciotolla; BERTOLI, Ciro João; ORTIZ, Jorge Alberto

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUÇÃO: A constipação crônica é doença comum na infância, ocorrendo em 5 a 10% dos pacientes pediátricos, considerada a segunda maior causa de procura nos consultórios de pediatria, sendo a encoprese decorrente de constipação grave associada à impactação fecal no reto. Dentre os exames diagnósticos, a manometria anal é utilizada para a avaliação de pacientes com distúrbios funcionais, como a constipação intestinal e a incontinência fecal, em alguns serviços para a avaliação de pacientes c...

  20. Treating Non-Retentive Encopresis with Rewarded Scheduled Toilet Visits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boles, Richard E; Roberts, Michael C; Vernberg, Eric M

    2008-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of rewarded scheduled toilet sits on non-retentive encopretic behavior of an elementary-school student receiving services for serious emotional disturbance. A multidisciplinary team implemented the 8-week intervention using a multiple baseline across settings design. The results showed an increase in sitting on the toilet and a decline in encopretic episodes in both school and home settings. These findings support the use of a behavioral intervention for children with significant behavioral disorders within a classroom setting. PMID:22477690

  1. Collaborative Assessment and Treatment of Children with Enuresis and Encopresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geroski, Anne M.; Rodgers, Kevin A.

    1998-01-01

    Signs, symptoms, and definitions that distinguish occasional incontinence of urine or bowel from more serious problems are reviewed, and interventions that may help are discussed. The importance of medical involvement is stressed. A case study involving a school counselor is presented for each type of incontinence. (EMK)

  2. Treating Retentive Encopresis: Dietary Modification and Behavioral Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabors, Laura; Morgan, Sam B.

    1995-01-01

    A home-based contingency management program, consisting of diet modification, laxatives, correction for soiling accidents, stimulus control training, and positive reinforcement, was implemented for treatment of a 4-year-old encopretic male. The findings provide evidence supporting the effectiveness of dietary modification combined with behavior…

  3. Functionele gastro-intestinale ziektebeelden op de kinderleeftijd. III. Obstipatie en solitaire encopresis; diagnostiek en therapie

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ginkel, R.; Büller, H. A.; Heymans, H. S.; Taminiau, J. A.; Boeckxstaens, G. E.; Benninga, M. A.

    2003-01-01

    A detailed medical history in combination with a thorough physical examination, including rectal examination, form the cornerstone in the diagnostic work-up for children with functional defecation disorders. Additional investigations are often not informative and have only minor diagnostic or

  4. Enhancing the management of secondary encopresis by assessing acceptability of treatment: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steege, M W; Harper, D C

    1989-12-01

    This clinical case study utilized a behavioral treatment sequence to assist an 11-year-old encopretic male who had been refractory to prior treatments. The sequence included: (1) positive reinforcement of bowel movements and the non-occurrence of soiling accidents; (2) self-evaluation; (3) positive practice; (4) milk of magnesia; (5) diet modifications; and (6) a numbered underwear strategy. The treatment was initiated on a pediatric inpatient unit and then generalized to the child's home environment. Parental acceptability of treatment was assessed during a three-day home visit while the procedure was implemented by the parents. The combination of behavioral treatment with milk of magnesia eliminated soiling accidents and increased the frequency of appropriate bowel movements. Results were maintained throughout a one-year follow-up.

  5. Diagnosis and management of urinary incontinence and functional fecal incontinence (encopresis) in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijman, Rien J. M.

    The ability to maintain normal continence for urine and stools is not achievable in all children by a certain age. Gaining control of urinary and fecal continence is a complex process, and not all steps and factors involved are fully understood. While normal development of anatomy and physiology are

  6. Diagnosis and management of urinary incontinence and functional fecal incontinence (encopresis) in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijman, Rien J M

    2008-09-01

    The ability to maintain normal continence for urine and stools is not achievable in all children by a certain age. Gaining control of urinary and fecal continence is a complex process, and not all steps and factors involved are fully understood. While normal development of anatomy and physiology are prerequisites to becoming fully continent, anatomic abnormalities, such as bladder exstrophy, epispadias, ectopic ureters, and neurogenic disturbances that can usually be recognized at birth and cause incontinence, will require specialist treatment, not only to restore continence but also to preserve renal function. Most forms of urinary incontinence are not caused by an anatomic or physiologic abnormality and, hence, are more difficult to diagnose and their management requires a sound knowledge of bladder and bowel function.

  7. Application of the Self-Regulatory Model in Dealing with Encopresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimes, Lynn

    1983-01-01

    Behavioral techniques along with a self-regulation methodology were used successfully to decrease encopretic behaviors in a 9-year-old male. Kanfer's self-regulatory model appears to be generalizable to any child with the cognitive ability to understand that he or she has a problem and to make decisions about treatment. (Author/PN)

  8. Efficacy and optimal dose of daily polyethylene glycol 3350 for treatment of constipation and encopresis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pashankar, D S; Bishop, W P

    2001-09-01

    To determine efficacy, safety, and optimal dose of a laxative, polyethylene glycol (PEG) 3350, in children with chronic constipation. Children with chronic constipation (n = 24) were treated with PEG for 8 weeks at an initial dose of 1 g/kg/d. The dose was adjusted every 3 days as required to achieve 2 soft stools per day. A diary was kept to monitor dose, stool frequency and consistency, soiling, and other symptoms. Stool consistency was rated from 1 (hard) to 5 (watery). Subjects were examined for fecal retention. The Student t test and the Fisher exact test were used for data analysis. All 20 children who completed the study found PEG to be palatable and were satisfied with the treatment. There were no significant adverse effects. Weekly stool frequency increased from 2.3 +/- 0.4 to 16.9 +/- 1.6 (P PEG at a mean dose of 0.8 g/kg is an effective, safe, and palatable treatment for constipation.

  9. Improving Toilet-Use (Encopresis) in a Nine-Year-Old Male through Full-Cleanliness Training and Token Reinforcement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akande, Adebowale

    1993-01-01

    Describes assessment and successful treatment of a preadolescent with erratic toileting behavior and related social skills difficulties. Treatment included monitoring of bowel movements, using a star chart, and applying rewards as positive reinforcement of acceptable behavior. (HTH)

  10. Toilet Training, Cueing, Praise, and Self-Cleaning in the Treatment of Classroom Encopresis: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Joe W.; Saudargas, Richard A.

    1980-01-01

    Reports a successful method of teaching toileting procedures to a young elementary student. Implications discussed for school psychologists were: (1) handling intervention through a consultation model; (2) using the simplest approach before attempting more powerful procedures; and (3) attempting treatment despite previously unsuccessful…

  11. Non-Reversed Appendicostomy for Antegrade Continence Enema ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background/Purpose: Constipation in children is considered when stool frequency is less than three times per week. Encopresis represents 80-90% of children with fecal incontinence. Operative strategy for management of encopresis ranges from resectional surgery to myotomy. The objective of the study was to evaluate ...

  12. MANAGEMENT OF BEDWETTING IN CHILDREN

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    tioner to recognise benign enuresis, and to treat children suffering from it with confidence and ... abnormally high nocturnal urine production (inadequate nocturnal increase ... encopresis (dysfunctional bowel is ... centiles and blood pressure).

  13. NJP Vol 39 no 3

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof Ezechukwu

    2011-11-02

    Nov 2, 2011 ... These purposes include bowel cleansing before radiologic ... encopresis in children.1 Enema preparations often used in paediatrics .... tip injury or increased intraluminal pressure. 7,8 We ... Constipation: Enemas versus High.

  14. FUNCTIONAL FECAL INCONTINENCE IN CHILDREN (DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSTICS AND TREATMENT APPROACHES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.N. Kopeikin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Impairment of the intestinal content continence, a common clinical situation with various pathogenetic mechanisms. Disease proceeds with the child’s maladjustment events. 33 cases of encopresis have been analyzed. This condition has various clinical and instrumental diagnostic criteria depending on the origin which simplifies differential diagnostics. Using a differential diagnostics table helps expedite the process of making a diagnosis and hence start an adequate treatment in a timely manner.Key words: encopresis, differential diagnostics, treatment, children.

  15. Nocturnal Enuresis Is Associated with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and Conduct Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Subin; Kim, Jae-Won; Hong, Soon-Beom; Shin, Min-Sup; Yoo, Hee Jeong; Cho, Soo-Churl

    2013-01-01

    Objective There are no published prevalence estimates of elimination disorders and their association with disruptive-behavior disorders among children in the Asian region using standardized diagnostic interviews. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence of elimination disorders and its association with disruptive-behavior disorders in a representative sample of children in Seoul, Korea. Methods The diagnosis of enuresis and encopresis was derived from parent-reported data for "enuresis and encopresis," collected using the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children, from a representative sample of 6- to 12-year-old children (n=1,645) who participated in the 2005 Seoul Child and Adolescent Mental Health Survey. Prevalence data for attention deficit and disruptive-behavior disorders were collected from the same sample. Results The overall 12-month prevalence of nocturnal enuresis and encopresis was 1.8% and 0.6%, respectively. Enuresis and encopresis prevalence in boys was significantly greater than that in girls. Enuresis and encopresis was most common at 7 to 9 years of age. Enuresis was significantly associated with ADHD (OR 2.6, 95% CI 1.0-6.9) and conduct disorder (CD; OR 4.7, 95% CI 1.0-22.4). Conclusion Enuresis is significantly associated with ADHD and CD, so these conditions must be assessed together during the evaluation of children with enuresis. PMID:24302948

  16. Use of Rome II criteria in childhood defecation disorders: Applicability in clinical and research practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voskuijl, Wieger P.; Heijmans, Jarom; Heijmans, Hugo S. A.; Taminiau, Jan A. J. M.; Benninga, Marc A.

    2004-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the prevalence of pediatric functional gastrointestinal disorders with the use of the Rome II criteria and to compare these data with the classic Iowa criteria. Study design Patients recorded defecation and encopresis frequency. A standard history was taken and a physical

  17. Improvements in Behavioral Symptoms following Antibiotic Therapy in a 14-Year-Old Male with Autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Lucas Ramirez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report describes the benefits of antibiotic and antifungal therapy on behavior in a child with autism undergoing treatment for encopresis. Over the course of treatment, the child exhibited a reduction in aberrant behaviors, increased gastrointestinal function, and improved quality of life.

  18. Improvements in Behavioral Symptoms following Antibiotic Therapy in a 14-Year-Old Male with Autism

    OpenAIRE

    Ramirez, P. Lucas; Barnhill, Kelly; Gutierrez, Alan; Schutte, Claire; Hewitson, Laura

    2013-01-01

    This case report describes the benefits of antibiotic and antifungal therapy on behavior in a child with autism undergoing treatment for encopresis. Over the course of treatment, the child exhibited a reduction in aberrant behaviors, increased gastrointestinal function, and improved quality of life.

  19. Pediatric Psychology: Applications to the Schools Needs of Children with Health Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Joseph D.; Flanagan, William K.

    1986-01-01

    A review of pediatric psychology considers interventions by school personnel to promote the school adjustment of children with serious medical illness. Psychosocial and educational impacts of cancer, spina bifida, enuresis, and encopresis are discussed; and suggestions for managing children with chronic health disorders, serious illness, and…

  20. Adlerian and Analytic Theory: A Case Presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Kathleen M.; Croake, James W.

    1984-01-01

    Makes a theoretical comparison between Adlerian and analytic formulations of family assessment in a case study involving a recently divorced couple and a child with encopresis. Discussed the family relationship in terms of object relations theory emphasizing intrapsychic experience, and Adlerian theory emphasizing the purposes of behavior. (JAC)

  1. A Primary Solution to Soiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigley, Veronica; Berger, Michael

    1982-01-01

    A five-and-one-half-year-old boy with encopresis (fecal soiling) was successfully treated by a cognitive behavior modification approach in which the child's lavatory time was scheduled and the situation was discussed in an accepting but positive manner. (CL)

  2. Evidence-Based Psychosocial Treatments for Pediatric Elimination Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepard, Jaclyn A; Poler, Joseph E; Grabman, Jesse H

    2017-01-01

    Pediatric elimination disorders are common in childhood, yet psychosocial correlates are generally unclear. Given the physiological concomitants of both enuresis and encopresis, and the fact that many children with elimination disorders are initially brought to their primary care physician for treatment, medical evaluation and management are crucial and may serve as the first-line treatment approach. Scientific investigation on psychological and behavioral interventions has progressed over the past couple of decades, resulting in the identification of effective treatments for enuresis and encopresis. However, the body of literature has inherent challenges, particularly given the multicomponent nature of many of the treatment packages. This review identified 25 intervention studies-18 for nocturnal enuresis and 7 for encopresis-over the past 15 years and classified them according to the guidelines set forth by the Task Force on the Promotion and Dissemination of Psychological Procedures. For nocturnal enuresis, the urine alarm and dry-bed training were identified as well-established treatments, Full Spectrum Home Therapy was probably efficacious, lifting was possibly efficacious, and hypnotherapy and retention control training were classified as treatments of questionable efficacy. For encopresis, only two probably efficacious treatments were identified: biofeedback and enhanced toilet training (ETT). Best practice recommendations and suggestions for future research are provided to address existing limitations, including heterogeneity and the multicomponent nature of many of the interventions for pediatric elimination disorders.

  3. Fecal overflow often affects children with chronic constipation that appears after the age of 2 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammacher Guerreiro, Mélissa; Bettinville, Aurore; Herzog, Denise

    2014-08-01

    Chronic functional constipation with or without encopresis is a common problem in the pediatric population, and the prevalence of encopresis may be underestimated. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence and risk factors for overflow incontinence in patients with chronic constipation seen at a pediatric gastroenterology consultation. A retrospective study of 270 files of patients seen between 1997 and 2012 was conducted, and a classification according to Rome III criteria was done. Among 145 (53.7%) boys and 125 (46.2%) girls, 117 had overflow incontinence (43.3%) - 41 (35%) girls and 76 (65%) boys. The first symptoms of chronic constipation appeared at a median age of 30 and 33 months in encopretic and 16 and 12 months in nonencopretic girls and boys, respectively. The first specialized consultation took place after a median disease duration of 26.5 and 24 months in encopretic and 16 and 9 months in nonencopretic girls and boys, respectively. A history of stool retention and the presence of scybala at examination, but not of pain at defecation or anal fissure, were associated with encopresis. The onset of chronic constipation after the age of 2 years, a longer disease duration, male gender, and a history of stool retention were seen as risk factors for the development of encopresis in patients with chronic functional constipation. © The Author(s) 2014.

  4. Health Care Psychology: Prospects for the Well-Being of Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Logan

    1979-01-01

    Health care psychology is distinguished from traditional child psychology in that it emphasizes clinical application and is concerned with primary mental health care. Diagnosis, classification, prediction, and treatment and control strategies in the field offer definite solutions to problems such as tracheotomy addiction, encopresis, psychogenic…

  5. Biofeedback training in chronic constipation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benninga, M. A.; Büller, H. A.; Taminiau, J. A.

    1993-01-01

    Twenty nine patients, aged 5-16 years, were studied to evaluate whether biofeedback training is effective in treating children with chronic constipation and encopresis; the clinical outcome at six weeks and 12 months was also evaluated. Patients received on average five biofeedback training

  6. Colon Transit Time Test in Korean Children with Chronic Functional Constipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Ha Yeong; Kim, Mock Ryeon; Park, Hye Won; Son, Jae Sung

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Each ethnic group has a unique life style, including diets. Life style affects bowel movement. The aim of this study is to describe the results of colon transit time (CTT) tests in Korean children who had chronic functional constipation based on highly refined data. Methods One hundred ninety (86 males) out of 415 children who performed a CTT test under the diagnosis of chronic constipation according to Rome III criteria at Konkuk University Medical Center from January 2006 through March 2015 were enrolled in this study. Two hundreds twenty-five children were excluded on the basis of CTT test result, defecation diary, and clinical setting. Shapiro-Wilk and Mann-Whitney U, and chi-square tests were used for statistical analysis. Results The median value and interquartile range (IQR) of CTT was 54 (37.5) hours in Encopresis group, and those in non-encopresis group was 40.2 (27.9) hours (pencopresis group and encopresis was statistically significant (p=0.002). The non-encopresis group (n=154, 81.1%) was divided into normal transit subgroup (n=84, 54.5%; median value and IQR of CTT=26.4 [9.6] hours), outlet obstruction subgroup (n=18, 11.7%; 62.4 [15.6] hours), and slow transit subgroup (n=52, 33.8%; 54.6 [21.0] hours]. The encopresis group (n=36, 18.9%) was divided into normal transit subgroup (n=8, 22.2%; median value and IQR of CTT=32.4 [9.9] hours), outlet obstruction subgroup (n=8, 22.2%; 67.8 [34.8] hours), and slow transit subgroup (n=20, 55.6%; 59.4 [62.7]hours). Conclusion This study provided the basic pattern and value of the CTT test in Korean children with chronic constipation. PMID:27064388

  7. Fecal impaction causing pelvic venous compression and edema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Naramore

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Chronic constipation is a common condition which may result in fecal impaction. A 13-year-old male with chronic constipation and encopresis presented with fecal impaction for three weeks. The impaction caused abdominal pain, distension, encopresis, and decreased oral intake. He was found in severe distress with non-pitting edema of his feet and ankles along with perineal edema. The pedal edema worsened after receiving a fluid bolus, so concern arose for venous compression or a thrombus. A Duplex Ultrasound demonstrated changes in the venous waveforms of the bilateral external iliac and common femoral veins without thrombosis. Manual disimpaction and polyethylene glycol 3350 with electrolytes resolved the pedal and perineal edema. Four months later, he had soft bowel movements without recurrence of the edema. A repeat Duplex Ultrasound was normal. We present a child in whom severe fecal impaction caused pelvic venous compression resulting in bilateral pedal and perineal edema.

  8. Verhaltenstherapie bei Enkopresis am Beispiel einer Patientin mit chronischem "Toiletten-Verweigerungssyndrom"

    OpenAIRE

    Hansen, Berit; Lehmkuhl, Ulrike

    2007-01-01

    Enkopresis gehört zu den wenig beforschten psychischen Störungen im Kindes- und Jugendalter. Auch Literatur zur psychotherapeutischen Behandlung der Störung findet man kaum. Das verhaltenstherapeutische Standardbehandlungsvorgehen soll beschrieben und anhand eines ausführlichen Fallbeispiels eines 7,9-jährigen Mädchens mit "Toilettenverweigerungssyndrom" erläutert werden. Schlagwörter Verhaltenstherapie - Kindesalter - Enkopresis- "Toilettenverweigerungssyndrom" Encopresis is one of...

  9. Biofeedback training in chronic constipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benninga, M A; Büller, H A; Taminiau, J A

    1993-01-01

    Twenty nine patients, aged 5-16 years, were studied to evaluate whether biofeedback training is effective in treating children with chronic constipation and encopresis; the clinical outcome at six weeks and 12 months was also evaluated. Patients received on average five biofeedback training sessions. The existence of external anal contraction or decreased rectal sensation in 16 (55%) and eight (27%) of the children, respectively was identified on manometry. After biofeedback training, 26 (90%) of the patients learned to relax the external anal sphincter; 18 (63%) normalised rectal sensation. The training resulted in a significant increase in defecation frequency and a significant decrease in encopresis. At six weeks, 16 (55%) of the patients were clinically symptom free. At follow up after 12 months the results were sustained. Only three patients showed a relapse within six months, of whom two were successfully treated with one extra training session. Biofeedback training might be a useful therapeutical approach in children with chronic constipation and encopresis. PMID:8434996

  10. PEG 3350 (Transipeg) versus lactulose in the treatment of childhood functional constipation: a double blind, randomised, controlled, multicentre trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voskuijl, W; de Lorijn, F; Verwijs, W; Hogeman, P; Heijmans, J; Mäkel, W; Taminiau, J; Benninga, M

    2004-11-01

    Recently, polyethylene glycol (PEG 3350) has been suggested as a good alternative laxative to lactulose as a treatment option in paediatric constipation. However, no large randomised controlled trials exist evaluating the efficacy of either laxative. To compare PEG 3350 (Transipeg: polyethylene glycol with electrolytes) with lactulose in paediatric constipation and evaluate clinical efficacy/side effects. One hundred patients (aged 6 months-15 years) with paediatric constipation were included in an eight week double blinded, randomised, controlled trial. After faecal disimpaction, patients PEG 3350 (2.95 g/sachet) or lactulose (6 g/sachet) while children > or =6 years started with 2 sachets/day. Primary outcome measures were: defecation and encopresis frequency/week and successful treatment after eight weeks. Success was defined as a defecation frequency > or =3/week and encopresis PEG 3350: 3 pre v 7 post treatment/week; lactulose: 3 pre v 6 post/week) and a significant decrease in encopresis frequency (PEG 3350: 10 pre v 3 post/week; lactulose: 8 pre v 3 post/week) was found in both groups (NS). However, success was significantly higher in the PEG group (56%) compared with the lactulose group (29%). PEG 3350 patients reported less abdominal pain, straining, and pain at defecation than children using lactulose. However, bad taste was reported significantly more often in the PEG group. PEG 3350 (0.26 (0.11) g/kg), compared with lactulose (0.66 (0.32) g/kg), provided a higher success rate with fewer side effects. PEG 3350 should be the laxative of first choice in childhood constipation.

  11. A RANDOMISED TRIAL OF LIQUID PARAFFIN VERSUS LACTULOSE IN THE TREATMENT OF CHRONIC FUNCTIONAL CONSTIPATION IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Farahmand

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available "nLiquid paraffin has been suggested as a good laxative comparing to lactulose as a treatment option in pediatric constipation. This study was performed to compare liquid paraffin with lactulose in pediatric constipation. A total of 247 patients (127 males and 120 females aged 2-12 years (mean 4.1 ± 2.7 years with chronic functional constipation were included in an 8 week, randomized, controlled trial. After faecal disimpaction, patients received oral liquid paraffin (1-2 cc/kg/day or lactulose (1-2 cc/kg/day. Primary outcome measures were: defecation and encopresis frequency per week and successful treatment after 8 weeks. Success was defined as a defecation frequency ≥ 3 per week and encopresis ≤ 1 every two weeks. Secondary outcome measures were side effects during 8 weeks of treatment. A significant increase in defecation frequency, liquid paraffin group, 3 pre, versus, 12 post treatment per week and lactulose group: 3 pre, versus 8 post, per week was found. A significant decrease in encopresis frequency, liquid paraffin: 10 pre, versus 1 post per week; lactulose: 9 pre, versus 3 post per week, was found in both groups. However success was significantly higher in the liquid paraffin group (85% compared with the lactulose group (29%. Liquid paraffin patients reported less abdominal pain, straining and pain at defecation than children using lactulose. Liquid paraffin is more effective than lactulose in the treatment of chronic functional constipation of childhood. It provided a higher success rate with fewer side effects. Liquid paraffin should be the laxative of first choice in childhood functional constipation.

  12. PEG 3350 (Transipeg) versus lactulose in the treatment of childhood functional constipation: a double blind, randomised, controlled, multicentre trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voskuijl, W; de Lorijn, F; Verwijs, W; Hogeman, P; Heijmans, J; Mäkel, W; Taminiau, J; Benninga, M

    2004-01-01

    Background: Recently, polyethylene glycol (PEG 3350) has been suggested as a good alternative laxative to lactulose as a treatment option in paediatric constipation. However, no large randomised controlled trials exist evaluating the efficacy of either laxative. Aims: To compare PEG 3350 (Transipeg: polyethylene glycol with electrolytes) with lactulose in paediatric constipation and evaluate clinical efficacy/side effects. Patients: One hundred patients (aged 6 months–15 years) with paediatric constipation were included in an eight week double blinded, randomised, controlled trial. Methods: After faecal disimpaction, patients encopresis frequency/week and successful treatment after eight weeks. Success was defined as a defecation frequency ⩾3/week and encopresis ⩽1 every two weeks. Secondary outcome measures were side effects after eight weeks of treatment. Results: A total of 91 patients (49 male) completed the study. A significant increase in defecation frequency (PEG 3350: 3 pre v 7 post treatment/week; lactulose: 3 pre v 6 post/week) and a significant decrease in encopresis frequency (PEG 3350: 10 pre v 3 post/week; lactulose: 8 pre v 3 post/week) was found in both groups (NS). However, success was significantly higher in the PEG group (56%) compared with the lactulose group (29%). PEG 3350 patients reported less abdominal pain, straining, and pain at defecation than children using lactulose. However, bad taste was reported significantly more often in the PEG group. Conclusions: PEG 3350 (0.26 (0.11) g/kg), compared with lactulose (0.66 (0.32) g/kg), provided a higher success rate with fewer side effects. PEG 3350 should be the laxative of first choice in childhood constipation. PMID:15479678

  13. A child death as a result of physical violence during toilet training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpaslan, Ahmet Hamdi; Coşkun, Kerem Şenol; Yeşil, Arda; Cobanoğlu, Cansu

    2014-11-01

    Enuresis and delayed bladder control are a common source of psychosocial concern for both parents and children. Different cultures have different norms with regard to parenting attitudes. The fact that in Turkey, parents consider enuresis or encopresis as a sign of laziness, misbehavior, or disobedience rather than a medical disorder may cause children to be exposed to physical and emotional violence and maltreatment by the family as a corrective strategy. We present a case in this paper which had a fatal outcome due to physical violence against a child as an educational measure and a toilet training method. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  14. THYROID HORMONE RECEPTOR BETA GENE MUTATION (P453A) IN A TURKISH FAMILY PRODUCING RESISTANCE TO THYROID HORMONE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayraktaroglu, Taner; Noel, Janet; Mukaddes, Nahit Motavalli; Refetoff, Samuel

    2018-01-01

    Two members of a Turkish family, a mother and son, had thyroid function tests suggestive of resistance to thyroid hormone (RTH). The clinical presentation was, however, different. The mother (proposita) had palpitation, weakness, tiredness, nervousness, dry mouth and was misdiagnosed as having multinodular toxic goiter which was treated with antithyroid drugs and partial thyroidectomy. Her younger son had attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and primary encopresis, but normal intellectual quotient. Both had elevated serum iodothyronine levels with nonsuppressed thyrotropin. A mutation in one allele of the thyroid hormone receptor beta gene (P453A) was identified, providing a genetic confirmation for the diagnosis of RTH. PMID:18561095

  15. Safety of polyethylene glycol 3350 for the treatment of chronic constipation in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pashankar, Dinesh S; Loening-Baucke, Vera; Bishop, Warren P

    2003-07-01

    To assess the clinical and biochemical safety profile of long-term polyethylene glycol 3350 (PEG) therapy in children with chronic constipation and to assess pediatric patient acceptance of PEG therapy. Prospective observational study. Pediatric clinics at a referral center. Patients Eighty-three children (44 with chronic constipation, 39 with constipation and encopresis) receiving PEG therapy for more than 3 months. Clinical adverse effects related to PEG therapy and acceptance and compliance with PEG therapy. Serum electrolyte levels, osmolality, albumin levels, and liver and renal function test results were measured. At the time of evaluation, the mean duration of PEG therapy was 8.7 months, and the mean PEG dose was 0.75 g/kg daily. There were no major clinical adverse effects. All blood test results were normal, except for transient minimal alanine aminotransferase elevation unrelated to therapy in 9 patients. All children preferred PEG to previously used laxatives, and daily compliance was measured as good in 90% of children. Long-term PEG therapy is safe and is well accepted by children with chronic constipation with and without encopresis.

  16. Anal sphincter electromyography in patients with Anorectal Dysfunctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trinchet Soler, Rafael; Hidalgo Marrero, Yanet; Espichicoque Megret, Arianne; Manzano Suarez, Jianeya; Perez Gonzales, Ruth Maite

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate the electromyography value of anal sphincter in patients with anorectal dysfunctions. Anorectal dysfunctions are frequent reason of pediatric consultation in children, especially with anal incontinence. A study of series of cases in patient with anorectal dysfunctions was carried out from January 2002 to January of 2006. 65 patients were studied. Anorectal malformations (ARM) represented the predominant affection with 38 patients (58.5%), prevailing the male sex in 25 patients (65.8%). Encopresis and intestinal agagliosis dicrease was observed. Sphincter was found before surgical treatment through electromyography in patients with anorectal malformations and colostomy; in those with definitive operation and open colostomy, it avoided the operation in a patient that did not have muscular activity of the external sphincter. In children already operated and with closed colostomy several electromyography changes were observed in correspondence with different incontinence grades. In encopresis cases the study was useful to rule out sphincter functional alterations. Electromyography was pathological in all the operated patients of intestinal aganglionosis. This procedure was very useful for anal incontinence study that helped to determine and establish the prognosis. (author)

  17. Prognosis of constipation: clinical factors and colonic transit time

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lorijn, F; van Wijk, M P; Reitsma, J; van Ginkel, R; Taminiau, J; Benninga, M

    2004-01-01

    Background: Measurement of colonic transit time (CTT) is sometimes used in the evaluation of patients with chronic constipation. Aim: To investigate the relation between symptoms and CTT, and to assess the importance of symptoms and CTT in predicting outcome. Methods: Between 1995 and 2000, 169 consecutive patients (median age 8.4 years, 65% boys) fulfilling the criteria for constipation were enrolled. During the intervention and follow up period, all kept a diary to record symptoms. CTT was measured at entry to the study. Results: At entry, defecation frequency was lower in girls than in boys, while the frequency of encopresis episodes was higher in boys. CTT values were significantly higher in those with a low defecation frequency (⩽1/week) and a high frequency of encopresis (⩾2/day). However, 50% had CTT values within the normal range. Successful outcome occurred more often in those with a rectal impaction. CTT results 100 hours were less likely to have had a successful outcome. Conclusion: The presence of a rectal impaction at presentation is associated with a better outcome at one year. A CTT >100 hours is associated with a poor outcome at one year. PMID:15269069

  18. Bladder and Bowel Control in Children with Cerebral Palsy: Case-Control Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Mustafa; Oktem, Faruk; Kisioglu, Nesimi; Demirci, Mustafa; Altuntas, Irfan; Kutluhan, Suleyman; Dogan, Malik

    2006-01-01

    Aim To determine the age of development of bladder and bowel control and the frequency of enuresis, encopresis, and urinary infections in children with cerebral palsy. Methods The study included 45 children with cerebral palsy who regularly attended a rehabilitation center in Isparta, Turkey, and two groups of age- and sex-matched children, 37 siblings of the children with cerebral palsy and 37 healthy children. Demographic data and information on the age of development of total bladder and bowel control and presence of possible urinary symptoms in children were collected from their caregivers by use of a questionnaire. Frequency of enuresis and encopresis was estimated among the children aged ≥5 years. A mid-way urinary sample was obtained from 40, 22, and 21 children in the cerebral palsy, siblings, and healthy children, respectively. Results The mean age of nighttime bladder and bowel control development was 47 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 35-58) and 45 (36-55) months, respectively, for the children with cerebral palsy, 35 months (95% CI, 24-46) and 26 months (95% CI, 24-28), respectively, for their siblings, and 27 months (95% CI, 22-33) and 25 months (95% CI, 23-27) months, respectively, for the healthy children. Among the children aged ≥5 years, enuresis was present in 11 of 34 children with cerebral palsy, 7 of 30 siblings, and 4 of 30 healthy children (P = 0.200), whereas encopresis was present in 5 children with cerebral palsy, one sibling, and one healthy child. Constipation was significantly more present in chidlren with cerebral palsy than in other two groups (P<0.001). Urine culture was positive in 13 children with cerebral palsy, 1 sibling, and 2 healthy chidlren (P = 0.024). There were no significant differences in other urinary symptoms and laboratory findings among the three groups. Conclusion The children with cerebral palsy gained bladder and bowel control at older age in comparison with their siblings and healthy children

  19. Uso de la terapia familiar en la psiquiatría infantil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Vasquez

    1986-07-01

    Full Text Available EI artículo muestra la experiencia del autor, en el empleo de la técnica de la terapia familiar sistémica, como auxiliar terapéutico en el manejo de las consultas más frecuentes, atendidas en los servicios psiquiátricos oficiales. Tales quejas, en orden de frecuencia son: bajo rendimiento escolar, inquietud, enuresis, encopresis y trastornos psicofisiológicos. EI trabajo contiene la experiencia con las cuatro primeras, por cuanto el manejo de los trastornos psicofisiológicos, demanda una técnica particular que no es objeto de esta comunicación. No se reporta una cuantificación de resultados, pero se describen como buenos. EI enfoque del manejo global del caso está dentro de los postulados generales de la teoría general de los sistemas y los desarrollos posteriores del método biopsicosocial.

  20. [REASONS AND CONSEQUENCES OF SOMATOFORM DISORDERS IN CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khundadze, M; Geladze, N; Mkheidze, R; Khachapuridze, N; Bakhtadze, S

    2016-12-01

    The aim of our study was to find the reason of various forms of somatoform disorders (phobias, behavioral disorders, insomnia, tics, stuttering, enuresis, encopresis) in children and adolescents of various social status for diagnosis and treatment. We have examined 202 patients who referred to our clinic from 2012-2016. The age range was 2-18 years. After examination we have concluded the following recommendations: - to implement neuropsychological rehabilitation in order to stimulate mental development; - to work with speech therapist to improvement the speech; - to work individually with psychotherapist to improve the behavior; - to train the parent to manage the behavior at home; - to give the personal card containing information about exercises, games and puzzles to stimulate the development and in some cases to give individual educational program; - to give separate information to parents and in some cases to teachers of kindergartens and schools.

  1. The use of relaxation-mental imagery (self-hypnosis) in the management of 505 pediatric behavioral encounters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohen, D P; Olness, K N; Colwell, S O; Heimel, A

    1984-02-01

    This report assessed outcomes of hypnotherapeutic interventions for 505 children and adolescents seen by four pediatricians over a period of one year and followed from four months to two years. Presenting problems included enuresis, acute pain, chronic pain, asthma, habit disorders, obesity, encopresis, and anxiety. Using strict criteria for determination of problem resolution (e.g., all beds dry) and recognizing that some conditions were intrinsically chronic, the authors found that 51% of these children and adolescents achieved complete resolution of the presenting problem; an additional 32% achieved significant improvement, 9% showed initial or some improvement; and 7% demonstrated no apparent change or improvement. Children as young as three years of age effectively applied self-hypnosis techniques. In general, facility in self-hypnosis increased with age. There was an inverse correlation (p less than 0.001) between clinical success and number of visits, suggesting that prediction of responsivity is possible after four visits or less.

  2. Clinical efficacy and safety of polyethylene glycol 3350 versus liquid paraffin in the treatment of pediatric functional constipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafati, Mr; Karami, H; Salehifar, E; Karimzadeh, A

    2011-01-01

    Functional constipation is prevalent in children. Recently polyethylene glycol has been introduced as an effective and safe drug to treat chronic constipation. There are only a few clinical trials on comparison of PEG and liquid paraffin in childhood constipation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate clinical efficacy and safety of PEG 3350 solution and liquid paraffin in the treatment of children with functional constipation in Sari Toba clinic during the period of 2008-2009. Children with a history of functional constipation were subjects of this study. One hundred and sixty children of 2-12 years old with functional constipation were randomized in two PEG and paraffin treatment groups. Patients received either 1.0-1.5 g/kg/day PEG 3350 or 1.0-1.5 ml/kg/day liquid paraffin for 4 months. Clinical efficacy was evaluated by stool and encopresis frequency/week and overall treatment success rate was compared in two groups. Compared with the baseline, defecation frequency/ week increased significantly and encopresis frequency meaningfully decreased in two groups during the period of the study. Patients using PEG 3350 had more success rate (mean: 95.3%±3.7) compared with the patients in paraffin group (mean: 87.2%±7.1) (p=0.087). Administration of PEG 3350 were associated with less adverse events than liquid paraffin. In conclusion in treatment of pediatric functional constipation, regarding clinical efficacy and safety, PEG 3350 were at least as effective as liquid paraffin and but less adverse drug events.

  3. Clinical efficacy and safety of polyethylene glycol 3350 versus liquid paraffin in the treatment of pediatric functional constipation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Salehifar

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and the purpose of the study: Functional constipation is prevalent in children. Recently has been introduced as an effective and safe drug to treat chronic constipation. There are only a few clinical trials on comparison of PEG and liquid paraffin in childhood constipation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate clinical efficacy and safety of PEG 3350 solution and liquid paraffin in the treatment of children with functional constipation in Sari Toba clinic during the period of 2008-2009. "nMethods: Children with a history of functional constipation were subjects of this study. One hundred and sixty children of 2-12 years old with functional constipation were randomized in two PEG and paraffin treatment groups. Patients received either 1.0-1.5 g/kg/day PEG 3350 or 1.0-1.5 ml/kg/day liquid paraffin for 4 months. Clinical efficacy was evaluated by stool and encopresis frequency/week and overall treatment success rate was compared in two groups. "nResults and major conclusion: Compared with the baseline, defecation frequency/ week increased significantly and encopresis frequency meaningfully decreased in two groups during the period of the study. Patients using PEG 3350 had more success rate (mean: 95.3%±3.7 compared with the patients in paraffin group (mean: 87.2%±7.1 (p=0.087. Administration of PEG 3350 was associated with less adverse events than liquid paraffin. In conclusion in treatment of pediatric functional constipation , regarding clinical efficacy and safety, PEG 3350 were at least as effective as liquid paraffin and but less adverse drug events.

  4. [Functional results of Hirschsprung's disease patients after Duhamel and De la Torre procedures].

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    Fernández Ibieta, M; Sánchez Morote, J M; Martínez Castaño, I; Reyes Ríos, P; Cabrejos Perotti, K; Rojas Ticona, J; Ruiz Pruneda, R; Aranda García, M J; Roqués Serradilla, J L; Trujillo Ascanio, A; Hernández Bermejo, J P; Ruiz Jiménez, J I

    2013-10-01

    Long term results of different surgical techniques in Hirschsprung's Disease (HD) are contradictory. There are still no long term large or multicentric reports about functional results of De la Torre technique. We have studied the mid term functional results of the patients operated on Duhamel (D) and De la Torre (dlT) pull-through procedures. We collected data from medical records and telephone interviews of the HD patients operated in our unit in the last 16 years. 38 patients were found. Ages ranged from 1.5 to 21 years. Mean age was 7.7 years. Median follow up was 5.9 years. 33 (86.8%) had rectosigmoid disease and 5 (13.2%) had long segment disease. D procedure was performed in 17 (44.7%), Soave in 1 (2.6%), Duhamel-Lester-Martin in 4 (10.5%) and dlT pull-through in 16(42%). In the last visit record, 12 (31.6%), had constipation, and fecal leaks were noted in 11 (33.3%) of the 33 patients > or = 4 years old.. 10 patients (29.4% of the > or = 4 years old group) referred encopresis along the follow-up. Patients from the D group referred higher rates of constipation than those in the dlT group (53.3% vs 20% p=0.048). dlT patients referred more frequency of leaks (46,1% vs 13,3%, p=0,05) Children with very short resections (Encopresis was similar in all groups. Both techniques show similar functional results in the mid term, although children in the D group were more prone to constipation and those in the dlT group presented more fecal leaks. All patients with EH need long follow-ups.

  5. Clinical efficacy and safety of polyethylene glycol 3350 versus liquid paraffin in the treatment of pediatric functional constipation

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    Rafati, MR.; Karami, H.; Salehifar, E.; Karimzadeh, A.

    2011-01-01

    Background and the purpose of the study Functional constipation is prevalent in children. Recently polyethylene glycol has been introduced as an effective and safe drug to treat chronic constipation. There are only a few clinical trials on comparison of PEG and liquid paraffin in childhood constipation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate clinical efficacy and safety of PEG 3350 solution and liquid paraffin in the treatment of children with functional constipation in Sari Toba clinic during the period of 2008–2009. Methods Children with a history of functional constipation were subjects of this study. One hundred and sixty children of 2–12 years old with functional constipation were randomized in two PEG and paraffin treatment groups. Patients received either 1.0–1.5 g/kg/day PEG 3350 or 1.0–1.5 ml/kg/day liquid paraffin for 4 months. Clinical efficacy was evaluated by stool and encopresis frequency/week and overall treatment success rate was compared in two groups. Results and major conclusion Compared with the baseline, defecation frequency/ week increased significantly and encopresis frequency meaningfully decreased in two groups during the period of the study. Patients using PEG 3350 had more success rate (mean: 95.3%±3.7) compared with the patients in paraffin group (mean: 87.2%±7.1) (p=0.087). Administration of PEG 3350 were associated with less adverse events than liquid paraffin. In conclusion in treatment of pediatric functional constipation, regarding clinical efficacy and safety, PEG 3350 were at least as effective as liquid paraffin and but less adverse drug events. PMID:22615652

  6. HIRSCHSPRUNG'S DISEASE—The Clinical Differentiation and Treatment of Children with Hirschsprung's Disease and Pseudo-Hirschsprung's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravitch, Mark M.

    1958-01-01

    Hirschsprung's disease is marked by constipation from the time of birth, with the development, if uncorrected, of a protuberant abdomen and flared costal margins. The rectal ampulla is empty and the abdomen is filled with fecal masses. Pain is not prominent. Flatus is passed in large amounts. Encopresis does not occur. Barium enema shows the characteristic narrowed distal rectal segment and biopsy of the rectum shows absence of the ganglion cells of the myenteric plexus. Treatment is operative resection of the distal narrow segment and a primary anastomosis. Hirschsprung's disease may be mimicked in children with: 1. Psychogenic constipation—pseudo-Hirschsprung's disease. Unlike Hirschsprung's disease, symptoms do not appear at birth, encopresis is common, and the barium enema shows no narrow distal segment. 2. Mental retardation and cerebral defect. 3. Corrected imperforate anus—on the basis of stenosis, imperfect innervation or poor habit training. 4. Cretinism—with severe constipation and intestinal dilatation perhaps the presenting symptoms. Treatment of these four groups of children with severe constipation not due to Hirschsprung's disease is: For Group 1, open discussion with parent and child. Assumption by the physician of full control of the details of treatment, and relegation of parent to the role of the physician's agent in following the prescribed regimen. For Group 2, an enema regimen. Whereas fairly rapid restoration (and then persistence) of normal bowel habit can be expected in Group 1, the basic defects in Group 2 may require indefinite continuation of treatment. For Group 3, regular enema regimen, in the less severe cases—one identical with that used in Group 1, and dilatation of strictures or anoplasty. In Group 4, thyroid hormone therapy relieves the constipation of hypothyroidism and causes reversion of radiographic changes in the colon and rectum. PMID:13561108

  7. Algunos aspectos fisiopatológicos, de prevención y tratamientos de la constipación en la infancia Some physiopathological aspects of prevention and treatment of constipation in childhood

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    Trini Fragoso Arbelo

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Se revisa el tema constipación en el niño, incluyendo la definición de constipación, encopresis e incontinencia fecal. Se citan algunos aspectos fisiopatológicos, así como las causas más frecuentes, evaluación clínica, indicaciones de pruebas especiales y algunos aspectos de tratamientos con dietas, laxantes y adiestramiento. Se muestran los resultados clínico-epidemiológicos en 115 pacientes tratados ambulatoriamente por un grupo multidiciplinario en consulta especializada. Se concluye que la constipación es una enfermedad frecuente en la infancia, con alta prevalencia en el menor de 5 años, en la que predominan los malos hábitos en la defecación y alimentación. En el menor de un año se deben tener en cuenta las causas anatómicas que no sean neurológicas, por lo que el tacto rectal es imprescindible en el examen físico. Se demuestra que el manejo multidisciplinario, la interrelación con la atención primaria de salud y el algoritmo de diagnóstico y tratamiento disminuyen el tiempo de evolución de la enfermedad.The topic of constipation in the child, including the definition of constipation, encopresis and fecal incontinence, is reviewed. Some physiopathological aspects, as well as the most frequent causes, clinical evaluation, indications of special tests and some aspects of treatments with diets, laxatives and training are dealt with. The clinicoepidemiological results in 115 outpatients treated by a multidisciplinary team at a specialized office are shown. It is concluded that constipation is a common disease in chldhood with a high prevalence in children under 5, among whom the bad habits in defecation and nutrition predominate. In the child under one year old, the anatomical causes that are not neurological should be taken into account. Therefore, the rectal manipulation is essential in the physical examination. It is proved that the multidisciplinary management, the interrelation with primary health care and the

  8. Development of the lower urinary tract and its functional disorders

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    Peco-Antić Amira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A normal development of lower urinary tract function control evolves from involuntary bladder empting (incontinence during infancy to daytime urinary continence, and finally a successful day and night continence that is generally achieved by the 5th to 7th year of age. This gradual process primarily depends on the progressive maturation of the neural control of the lower urinary tract, but it is also influenced by behavioral training that evolves through social support. Functional voiding disorders (bladder dysfunction are common problems during childhood. They are present in 5-15 % of general pediatric population, and in one-fifth of school-age children or in over one-third of patients of the pediatric urologist or nephrologist. More than half of children with bladder dysfunction have vesicoureteral reflux, and more than two-thirds have recurrent urinary tract infections. There is also a frequent association of bladder dysfunction with constipation and encopresis (dysfunctional elimination syndrome. Bladder dysfunction may cause a permanent damage to the upper urinary tract and kidneys. In addition, urinary incontinence, as the most common manifestation of bladder dysfunction can be the cause of major stress in schoolage children and have a negative effect on the child’s feeling of self-esteem. Thus, a timely detection and treatment of this group of disorders in children is highly significant.

  9. Abdominal Compartment Syndrome Secondary to Chronic Constipation

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    Helene Flageole

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS is defined as an elevated intraabdominal pressure with evidence of organ dysfunction. The majority of published reports of ACS are in neonates with abdominal wall defects and in adults following trauma or burns, but it is poorly described in children. We describe the unusual presentation of an 11-year-old boy with a long history of chronic constipation who developed acute ACS requiring resuscitative measures and emergent disimpaction. He presented with a 2-week history of increasing abdominal pain, nausea, diminished appetite and longstanding encopresis. On exam, he was emaciated with a massively distended abdomen with a palpable fecaloma. Abdominal XR confirmed these findings. Within 24 hours of presentation, he became tachycardic and oliguric with orthostatic hypotension. Following two enemas, he acutely deteriorated with severe hypotension, marked tachycardia, acute respiratory distress, and a declining mental status. Endotracheal intubation, fluid boluses, and vasopressors were commenced, followed by emergent surgical fecal disimpaction. This resulted in rapid improvement in vital signs. He has been thoroughly investigated and no other condition apart from functional constipation has been identified. Although ACS secondary to constipation is extremely unusual, this case illustrates the need to actively treat constipation and what can happen if it is not.

  10. The Frequency of Constipation and It's Causes in Iranian Children

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    Ali Bidari

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Background:Childhood constipation is a common problem, accounting for 3% of visits to pediatric clinics and up to 25% of visits to ediatric gastroenterologists.However,little is known about the prevalence of childhood constipation in developing countries and the frequency of its causes.We proposed to determine the frequency and causes of constipation in children presented to a gastroenterology clinic of a teaching pediatric hospital located in Tehran, Iran.Methods: All five hundred and fifty six children referred to a pediatric gastroenterology clinic were evaluated for gastrointestinal problems including difficulties in defecation.   After the detection of constipated children, a questionnare was completed including baseline characteristics, physical examination, paraclinic laboratory data and determination of the cause of constipation (organic or non-organic. Results:Out of all 556 children,constipation was diagnosed in 87 individuals (15.64%.Among children with constipation, 53% were girls and 47% were boys and only in 13% organ problems was the main cause.Urinary incontinence and encopresis were detected in 16.2% and 27% of constipated children,respectively. The prevalence of urinary tract infection in children with constipation was significantly higher in girls than boys(P<0.05.Conclusion: The results of our study show that the prevalence of constipation among Iranian children is high enough to emphasize it's importance.

  11. The association of age of toilet training and dysfunctional voiding

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    Hodges SJ

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Steve J Hodges, Kyle A Richards, Ilya Gorbachinsky, L Spencer KraneDepartment of Urology, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC, USAObjective: To determine whether age of toilet training is associated with dysfunctional voiding in children.Materials and methods: We compared patients referred to the urologic clinics for voiding dysfunction with age-matched controls without urinary complaints. Characteristics including age and reason for toilet training, method of training, and encopresis or constipation were compared between both groups.Results: Initiation of toilet training prior to 24 months and later than 36 months of age were associated with dysfunctional voiding. However, dysfunctional voiding due to late toilet training was also associated with constipation.Conclusion: Dysfunctional voiding may be due to delayed emptying of the bowel and bladder by children. The symptoms of dysfunctional voiding are more common when toilet training early, as immature children may be less likely to empty in a timely manner, or when training late due to (or in association with constipation.Keywords: voiding dysfunction, constipation

  12. Risk factors for urinary tract infection in children with urinary urgency.

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    Gondim, Rhaiana; Azevedo, Roberta; Braga, Ana Aparecida Nascimento Martinelli; Veiga, Maria Luiza; Barroso, Ubirajara

    2018-01-01

    To identify which independent variable would be strong predictor of febrile urinary tract infection (UTI) in children and adolescents with overactive bladder. A search was made of the institute's database for all patients diagnosed with overactive bladder over the preceding four years. Children and adolescents under 18 years of age with overactive bladder and no neurological or anatomical alterations of the lower urinary tract were included in the study. The independent variables were: sex, age, ethnicity (Brazilians of African descendence/others), the presence of urinary urgency, daytime incontinence, enuresis, frequent urination, infrequent voiding (≤3 voids/day), nocturia, holding maneuvers, straining to void, intermittent urinary flow, constipation and encopresis. An analysis was conducted to identify patients with febrile UTI and subsequently determine predictors of this condition. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. Overall, 326 patients (214 girls/112 boys) were evaluated. The mean age of the patients was 7.7±3.19 years (± standard deviation). The incidence of febrile UTI was 39.2%. Being female and infrequent voiding were factors significantly associated with febrile UTI, both in the univariate and multivariate analyses. These results show that being female and infrequent voiding constituted significant risk factors for a diagnosis of febrile UTI in these children. Copyright® by the International Brazilian Journal of Urology.

  13. Idiopathic constipation: A challenging but manageable problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischoff, Andrea; Brisighelli, Giulia; Dickie, Belinda; Frischer, Jason; Levitt, Marc A; Peña, Alberto

    2017-10-10

    A protocol to treat idiopathic constipation is presented. A contrast enema is performed in every patient and, when indicated, patients are initially submitted to a "clean out" protocol. All patients are started on a Senna-based laxative. The initial dosage is empirically determined and adjusted daily, during a one week period, based on history and abdominal radiographs, until the amount of Senna that empties the colon is reached. The management is considered successful when patients empty their colon daily and stop soiling. If the laxatives dose provokes abdominal cramping, distension, and vomiting, without producing bowel movements, patients are considered nonmanageable. From 2005 to 2012, 215 patients were treated. 121 (56%) were males. The average age was 8.2years (range: 1-20). 160 patients (74%) presented encopresis. 67 patients (32%) needed a clean out. After one week, 181 patients (84%) achieved successful management, with an average Senna dose of 67mg (range: 5-175mg). In 34 patients (16%) the treatment was unsuccessful: 19 were nonmanageable, 3 noncompliant, and 12 continued soiling. At a later follow-up (median: 329days) the success rate for 174 patients was 81%. We designed a successful protocol to manage idiopathic constipation. The key points are clean out before starting laxatives, individual adjustments of laxative, and radiological monitoring of colonic emptying. Level IV. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Selective mutism: a review of etiology, comorbidities, and treatment.

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    Wong, Priscilla

    2010-03-01

    Selective mutism is a rare and multidimensional childhood disorder that typically affects children entering school age. It is characterized by the persistent failure to speak in select social settings despite possessing the ability to speak and speak comfortably in more familiar settings. Many theories attempt to explain the etiology of selective mutism.Comorbidities and treatment. Selective mutism can present a variety of comorbidities including enuresis, encopresis, obsessive-compulsive disorder, depression, premorbid speech and language abnormalities, developmental delay, and Asperger's disorders. The specific manifestations and severity of these comorbidities vary based on the individual. Given the multidimensional manifestations of selective mutism, treatment options are similarly diverse. They include individual behavioral therapy, family therapy, and psychotherapy with antidepressants and anti-anxiety medications.Future directions. While studies have helped to elucidate the phenomenology of selective mutism, limitations and gaps in knowledge still persist. In particular, the literature on selective mutism consists primarily of small sample populations and case reports. Future research aims to develop an increasingly integrated, multidimensional framework for evaluating and treating children with selective mutism.

  15. [Evaluated treatment approaches in child and adolescent psychiatry I].

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    Baving, L; Schmidt, M H

    2001-08-01

    The principle of evidence-based medicine is to integrate data concerning the efficacy of interventions into clinical practice. This article assesses the level of evaluation of psychosocial, psychopharmacological and combined interventions for mental disorders in childhood and adolescence (autistic disorders, hyperkinetic disorders, conduct disorders, tic disorders, enuresis, and encopresis). Three different levels of evaluation were defined for both psychosocial and psychopharmacological interventions: A (> or = 2 randomized controlled studies), B (1 randomized controlled study), and C (open studies and case studies). The level of evaluation was judged on the basis of original papers found in a comprehensive literature search. For most disorders presented in this article there are several A-level treatments. The efficacy of both psychosocial and psychopharmacological interventions that target specific problem behaviors or symptoms, respectively, has been repeatedly demonstrated with regard to autistic disorders. Many studies have evaluated treatment approaches for hyperkinetic disorders and conduct disorders. With regard to the treatment of tic disorders in children and adolescents, far more studies evaluated the efficacy of pharmacotherapy than of psychotherapy. Further research should compare the efficacy of different treatment approaches, examine specific and differential treatment effects and investigate combined treatment approaches.

  16. Childhood onset diagnoses in a case series of teens at clinical high risk for psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzoni, Paola; Kimhy, David; Khan, Shamir; Posner, Kelly; Maayan, Lawrence; Eilenberg, Mara; Messinger, Julie; Kestenbaum, Clarice; Corcoran, Cheryl

    2009-12-01

    REASONS: Schizophrenia is typically an adult neurodevelopmental disorder that has its antecedents in childhood and adolescence. Little is known about disorders "usually first diagnosed in infancy, childhood and adolescence" (e.g., childhood-onset disorders) in "prodromal" teens at heightened clinical risk for psychotic disorder. Childhood-onset disorders were prevalent in putatively prodromal teens, including anxiety and disruptive disorders, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and, surprisingly, elimination disorders. These may reflect developmental antecedents in psychotic disorders such as schizophrenia. A case series of 9 teens (ages 13-17) identified as prodromal to psychosis were evaluated with the Kiddie Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia-Present and Lifetime Version (K-SADS-PL). Childhood-onset diagnoses commonly endorsed (threshold or subthreshold) included ADHD (5/9), oppositional defiant disorder (5/9), enuresis or encopresis (4/9), conduct disorder (2/9), separation anxiety (3/9), and transient tic disorder (2/9). Enuresis was identified in 3 of the 4 older teens (ages 15-17). An understanding of the childhood-onset disorders that occur in teens at risk for psychotic illnesses, such as schizophrenia, can shed light on the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and potentially inform early identification and intervention.

  17. Genitalia in human figure drawings: childrearing practices and child sexual abuse.

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    Hibbard, R A; Hartman, G

    1990-05-01

    To replicate and explore the associations of drawing genitalia on a human figure, child-rearing practices, and a history of alleged sexual abuse, we designed a cross-sectional study of 109 alleged child sexual abuse victims, ages 3 through 8 years, and a group of 109 comparison children matched for age, sex, race, and socioeconomic status but with no history of abuse. A standardized format was used to collect drawings, administer the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test, and gather background data on medical, developmental, and child-rearing issues. Seven alleged sexual abuse victims and one comparison child spontaneously drew genitalia (p = 0.02, one-tailed Fisher Exact Test, estimated relative risk 7.96). No differences in drawing maturity (Draw-A-Man score) were identified, although Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test scores were higher in comparison children (82.1 vs. 91.0, p less than 0.01). Neither drawing genitalia nor history of alleged sexual abuse were significantly associated with histories of medical problems, enuresis, encopresis, urinary tract infection, or child-rearing practices related to sleeping, nudity, bathing, sexual abuse education, or exposure to sexually explicit materials. The similar patterns of child-rearing practices in both samples should make professionals cautious in attributing allegations of abuse to specific child-rearing practices. This study confirms our previous report that the presence of genitalia spontaneously drawn on a child's drawing of a human figure is associated with alleged sexual abuse.

  18. Health related quality of life in disorders of defecation: the Defecation Disorder List

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voskuijl, W; van der Zaag-Loon..., H J; Ketel, I; Grootenhuis, M; Derkx, B; Benninga, M

    2004-01-01

    Background: Constipation and encopresis frequently cause problems with respect to emotional wellbeing, and social and family life. Instruments to measure Health Related Quality of Life (HRQoL) in these disorders are not available. Methods: A disease specific HRQoL instrument, the "Defecation Disorder List" (DDL) for children with constipation or functional non-retentive faecal soiling (FNRFS) was developed using accepted guidelines. For each phase of the process, different samples of patients were used. The final phase of development included 27 children. Reliability was assessed in two ways: internal consistency of domains with Cronbach's alpha, and test-retest reliability with intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC). To assess validity, comparable items and domains were correlated with Tacqol, a generic HRQoL instrument for children (TNO-AZL). Results: In the final phase of the development, 27 children completed the instrument. It consisted of 37 items in four domains. The response rate was 96%. Reliability was good for all domains, with Cronbach's alpha values ranging from 0.61 to 0.76. Measures of test-retest stability were good for all four domains with ICCs ranging from 0.82 to 0.92. Validity based on comparison with the Tacqol instrument was moderate. Conclusion: The DDL is promising as a measure of HRQoL in childhood defecation disorders. PMID:15557046

  19. Correlation between Colon Transit Time Test Value and Initial Maintenance Dose of Laxative in Children with Chronic Functional Constipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mock Ryeon; Park, Hye Won; Son, Jae Sung; Lee, Ran

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the correlation between colon transit time (CTT) test value and initial maintenance dose of polyethylene glycol (PEG) 4000 or lactulose. Methods Of 415 children with chronic functional constipation, 190 were enrolled based on exclusion criteria using the CTT test, defecation diary, and clinical chart. The CTT test was performed with prior disimpaction. The laxative dose for maintenance was determined on the basis of the defecation diary and clinical chart. The Shapiro-Wilk test and Pearson's and Spearman's correlations were used for statistical analysis. Results The overall group median value and interquartile range of the CTT test was 43.8 (31.8) hours. The average PEG 4000 dose for maintenance in the overall group was 0.68±0.18 g/kg/d; according to age, the dose was 0.73±0.16 g/kg/d (encopresis, abnormal CTT test subtype) for either laxative. Even in the largest group (overall, n=109, younger than 8 years and on PEG 4000), the correlation was weak (Pearson's correlation coefficient [R]=0.268, p=0.005). Within the abnormal transit group, subgroup (n=73, younger than 8 years and on PEG 4000) correlation was weak (R=0.267, p=0.022). Conclusion CTT test value cannot predict the initial maintenance dose of PEG 4000 or lactulose with linear correlation. PMID:27738600

  20. Importancia de la Manometría Anorrectalen la Infancia

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    Daisy Naranjo Hernández

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available RESUMEN Al registrar cambios de presión en órganos musculares huecos, el estudio manométrico anorrectal ha permitido llegar a conclusiones acerca del mecanismo de continencia anorrectal, la función esfinteriana y la sensación rectal. Se utilizó el método de catéteres perfundidos y balón intrarrectal para el estímulo por distensión. Se estudiaron 340 pacientes, 214 masculinos y 126 femeninos, con una edad promedio de 6,5 años. Se formaron 3 grupos: I. Constipación crónica, II. Crónica más encopresis y III. Incontinencia anal. Entre las variables manométricas que se estudiaron: presencia o no del reflejo rectoanal inhibitorio inducido (RRII, presión de reposo, longitud, tanto por ciento de relajación del mismo y volumen crítico capaz de desencadenar respuesta esfinteriana. Se realizó estudio de colon por enema y se halló mayor correlación entre megacolon radiográfico y el mayor porcentaje de ausencia manométrica del RRAI. El grupo II mostró mayor valor de presión basal del EAI con un menor tanto por ciento de relajación y un mayor número de casos con ausencia del RRAI. En el grupo III se obtuvo el valor más bajo de presión basal del EAI mayor por ciento de relajación y mayor número de casos con ausencia del EAI. Se demuestra la importancia del estudio en el manejo integral del niño con afecciones anorrectales, el que fue indispensable en el diagnóstico de la enfermedad de Hirschprung. Su empleo se recomienda en todos los servicios de Gastroenterología Pediátrica.On registering pressure changes in the muscular hollow organs, the anorectal manometric study has allowed to reach conclusions about the mechanism of anorectal continence, the sphincteral function and the anorectal sensation. The method of perfused catheters and intrarectal balloon was used to attain the stimulus by distention. 340 patients, 214 males and 126 females with an average age of 6.5 years old, were studied. Patients were divided into 3 groups

  1. Psychomotor approach in children affected by nonretentive fecal soiling (FNRFS: a new rehabilitative purpose

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    Esposito M

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Maria Esposito,1 Francesca Gimigliano,1,2 Maria Ruberto,2 Rosa Marotta,3 Beatrice Gallai,4 Lucia Parisi,5 Serena Marianna Lavano,3 Giovanni Mazzotta,6 Michele Roccella,5 Marco Carotenuto1 1Center for Childhood Headache, Clinic of Child and Adolescent Neuropsychiatry, Department of Mental Health, Physical and Preventive Medicine, Second University of Naples, Naples, Italy; 2Department of Odontostomathologic Disciplines, Head Pathology, Orthopedic Sciences, Second University of Naples, Italy; 3Department of Psychiatry, Magna Graecia University of Catanzaro, Catanzaro, Italy; 4Unit of Child and Adolescent Neuropsychiatry, University of Perugia, Perugia, Italy; 5Child Neuropsychiatry, Department of Psychology, University of Palermo, Palermo, Italy; 6Unit of Child and Adolescent Neuropsychiatry, AUSL Umbria, Terni, Italy Background: According to the Rome III criteria, encopresis without constipation was defined as nonretentive fecal soiling (FNRFS with not yet well understood etiology. Treatment approaches reported in the literature with varying results include biofeedback, hypnosis, reflexology, and Internet-based educational programs. In developmental age, another behavioral treatment could be identified in the psychomotor approach, which is called psychomotricity in the European countries, or is also known as play therapy. The aim of the present study was to verify the safety and efficacy of play therapy plus toilet training in a small sample of prepubertal children affected by FNRFS. Materials and methods: Twenty-six patients (group 1; 16 males, mean age of 5.92 ± 0.84 years underwent a psychomotor approach therapy program in association with toilet training for 6 months, and the other 26 subjects (group 2; 17 males, mean age of 5.76 ± 0.69 underwent the sole toilet training program for 6 months. During the observational time period (T0 and after 6 months (T1 of both treatments, the patients were evaluated for FNRFS frequency and for the

  2. Enuresis and overactive bladder in children: what is the relationship between these two conditions?

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    Ariane Sampaio Sousa

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: Evaluate clinical aspects associated with the presence of nocturnal enuresis (NE in children with a diagnosis of overactive bladder (OAB. Material and Methods: A data base of 200 children who were evaluated by a structured questionnaire was analysed retrospectively . OAB was defined as the presence of urinary urgency (n=183 cases and/or daytime urinary incontinence associated with holding maneuvers (n=168 cases. Inclusion criteria were a confirmed diagnosis of OAB, age 5-16 years, and no anatomical or neurological alterations of the urinary tract. Patients were divided into enuretics and non-enuretics. The two groups were compared with respect to sex, age, skin color, presence urinary infection, urgency, urge incontinence, non-urge incontinence, pollakiuria, urinary dysfunction, nocturia, holding maneuvers, number of episodes of enuresis and bowel alterations. In a univariate analysis, the chi-square test was used to compare proportions, with p-values <0.05 being considered significant. A multivariate analysis was conducted to identify independent predictive factors. Results: Enuresis was diagnosed in 141/200 children. The two groups were similar with respect to sex, age and skin color. No difference was found in relation to urinary infection, non-urge incontinence, urinary dysfunction, nocturia, encopresis or constipation. The two groups were significantly different with regard to some symptoms related to OAB such as urgency (p=0.001, urge incontinency (p=0.001 and holding maneuvers (p=0.033. Following multivariate analysis, only holding maneuvers (p=0.022 remained as an independent predictive factor. Conclusion: The only independent predictive factor for resolution of enuresis in children with OAB, as detected in the multivariate analysis, was holding maneuvers.

  3. Case series with literature review: Surgical approach to megarectum and/or megasigmoid in children with unremitting constipation

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    James G. Glasser

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The role of surgery in treating children with functional constipation (FC is controversial, because of the efficacy of bowel management programs. This case series is comprised of failures: 43 children, spanning 25 years' practice, who had megarectosigmoid (MRS and unremitting constipation. Purpose: To determine whether these children were helped by surgery, and to contribute to formulating a standard of care for children with megarectum (MR and/or redundancy of the sigmoid colon (MS who fail medical management. Method: We describe our selection criteria and the procedures we utilized – mucosal proctectomy and endorectal pull-through (MP or sigmoidectomy (SE with colorectal anastomosis at the peritoneal reflection. The internet (social media allowed us to contact most of these patients and obtain extremely long follow-up data. Results: 30/43 patients had MP and 13/43 had SE. Follow-up was obtained in 83% MP and 70% SE patients. 60% of MP and 78% of SE patients reported regular evacuations and no soiling. 20% MP patients had occasional urgency or soiling or episodic constipation. 12% MP and 22% SE patients required antegrade continence enemas (ACE or scheduled cathartics and/or stool softeners. 4% MP had no appreciable benefit, frequent loose stools and soiling, presumably from encopresis. Conclusion: MR is characterized by diminished sensation, poor compliance and defective contractility. Patients with MR do better with MP, which effectively removes the entire rectum versus SE, where normal caliber colon is anastomosed to MR at the peritoneal reflection; furthermore, MP reliably preserves continence; whereas total proctectomy (trans-anal or trans-abdominal may cause incontinence. Keywords: Functional Constipation, Megarectum, Megarectosigmoid, Proctectomy, Sigmoidectomy

  4. Mental Adaptation Problems of Children in a Primary School

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    Selma Dogan

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: This study was carried out on explanatory purposes to determine psychological compliance state of the children between age group 6-14, receiving education in a primary school province and how common some psychological infancy problems are. METHODS: The samples of the research consist of mothers and teachers of 255 children between age group 6-14, receiving education in a primary school in Sivas province. “Personal Information Form” and “Psychological Compliance Measurement” were used in the collection of data. RESULTS: According to the evaluation of teachers it was found out that while %27.5 of the children has psychological compliance problems. According to the evaluation of mothers, it was obtained that only 24.7% of the children has psychological compliance problems. The average compliance points were found higher in boys than girls, in younger age group than older age group, in group having physical disorders than not having any physical disorders. In the research a meaningful difference was not found when the average psychological compliance points and other variables were compared. When infancy psychological compliance problems evaluated, in 2.3% of the children stammer, in 3.1% habit-spasm disorder, in 7% finger sucking, in 1.9% encopresis, in 9% enuresis, and in 19.6 educational failures were determined. When the state of being problematical in behaviors and neurotic compared with the gender, it was traced that behavioral problems were higher in boys (59.5% than girls (40.5% and the neurotic problems were higher in girls (56. 3% than boys (56.3%. CONCLUSION: Consequently, it was recognized that improvement of the services for the psychological care of the children in the society and primary schools is crucially needed. [TAF Prev Med Bull. 2008; 7(1: 47-52

  5. Healthcare Utilization and Spending for Constipation in Children With Versus Without Complex Chronic Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, John R; Steiner, Michael J; DeJong, Neal; Rodean, Jonathan; Hall, Matt; Richardson, Troy; Berry, Jay G

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the prevalence of diagnosis and treatment for constipation among children receiving Medicaid and to compare healthcare utilization and spending for constipation among children based on number of complex chronic conditions (CCCs). Retrospective cohort study of 4.9 million children ages 1 to 17 years enrolled in Medicaid from 2009 to 2011 in 10 states in the Truven Marketscan Database. Constipation was identified using International Classification of Disease, 9th revision codes for constipation (564.0x), intestinal impaction (560.3x), or encopresis (307.7). Outpatient and inpatient utilization and spending for constipation were assessed. CCC status was identified using validated methodology. A total of 267,188 children (5.4%) were diagnosed with constipation. Total constipation spending was $79.5 million. Outpatient constipation spending was $66.8 million (84.1%) during 406,814 visits, mean spending $120/visit. Among children with constipation, 1363 (0.5%) received inpatient treatment, accounting for $12.2 million (15.4%) of constipation spending, mean spending $7815/hospitalization. Of children hospitalized for constipation, 552 (40.5%) did not have an outpatient visit for constipation before admission. Approximately 6.8% of children in the study had ≥1 CCC; these children accounted for 33.5% of total constipation spending, 70.3% of inpatient constipation spending, and 19.8% of emergency department constipation spending. Constipation prevalence was 11.0% for children with 1 CCC, 16.6% with 2 CCCs, and 27.1% with ≥3 CCCs. Although the majority of pediatric constipation treatment occurs in the outpatient setting, inpatient care accounts for a sizable percentage of spending. Children with CCCs have a higher prevalence of constipation and account for a disproportionate amount of constipation healthcare utilization and spending.

  6. Psychiatric disorders and symptoms severity in preschool children with atopic eczema.

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    Catal, F; Topal, E; Soylu, N; Ozel Ozcan, O; Celiksoy, M H; Babayiğit, A; Karakoç, H T E; Erge, D; Sancak, R

    2016-01-01

    To compare with a control group the frequency of psychiatric disorders and severity of psychiatric symptoms in preschool children with atopic eczema. The study included children between the ages of 3-5 who were diagnosed to have atopic eczema. The parents of the children with atopic eczema were interviewed in person and were asked to fill in "The Early Childhood Inventory-4" form. This form assesses the psychiatric disorders and symptoms severity in children between the ages of 3-5. The atopic eczema group included 80 patients (38 male, 42 female) with a mean age of 48.4 ± 15.7 months and the control group included 74 patients (41 male, 33 female) with a mean age of 49.9 ± 15.19 months. It was established that 68.8% of the group with atopic eczema received at least one psychiatric diagnosis. Between the psychiatric disorders, ADHD (Odds ratio: 2.57, 95% CI: 1.049-6.298, p=0.035), enuresis and encopresis (Odds ratio: 2.39, 95% CI: 1.121-5.097, p=0.022) and attachment disorder (Odds ratio: 2.03, 95% CI: 1.046-3.953, p=0.035) were found to be significantly higher when compared with the healthy control group. When the groups were compared in terms of psychiatric symptom severity scores calculated by using ECI-4, ADHD severity (p=0.043), conduct disorder severity (p=0.001), anxiety disorders severity (p<0.001), eating disorders severity (p=0.011) and tic disorder severity (p=0.01) were found to be higher in the atopic eczema group. Psychiatric illnesses are frequent in preschool children with atopic eczema. Copyright © 2015 SEICAP. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  7. Are We Using Abdominal Radiographs Appropriately in the Management of Pediatric Constipation?

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    Beinvogl, Beate; Sabharwal, Sabina; McSweeney, Maireade; Nurko, Samuel

    2017-12-01

    To identify the reasons why pediatric gastroenterologists obtain abdominal radiographs in the management of pediatric constipation. This was a prospective study surveying providers regarding their rationale, interpretation, resultant change, and confidence in their management before and after obtaining KUBs in patients seen for suspected constipation. Demographics and clinical findings were obtained from medical records. A total of 24 providers were surveyed after 72 patient encounters. Reasons for obtaining an abdominal radiograph included evaluation of stool burden (70%), need for a clean out (35%), fecal impaction (27%), cause of abdominal pain (24%), demonstration of stool burden to families (14%), assessment of response to therapy (13%), or encopresis (10%). The plan was changed in 47.6% of cases based on radiographic findings. In cases in which a plan was outlined before obtaining the radiograph (69%), the initial plan was implemented on average in 52.5%. In cases with no plans before obtaining the radiograph, previously unconsidered plans were implemented in 8.7%. Provider confidence in the management plan increased from 2.4 ± 2.7 to 4.1 ± 1.8 (P abdominal radiograph. Abdominal radiographs commonly are obtained by pediatric gastroenterologists in the evaluation and management of constipation. The majority used it to make a diagnosis, and nearly one-half changed their management based on the imaging findings. Overall, they reported an improved confidence in their management plan, despite evidence that radiographic findings poorly correlate with clinical severity. This study highlights the need for further provider education regarding the recommendations delineated in existing constipation guidelines. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Mental Adaptation Problems of Children in a Primary School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selma Dogan

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: This study was carried out on explanatory purposes to determine psychological compliance state of the children between age group 6-14, receiving education in a primary school province and how common some psychological infancy problems are. METHODS: The samples of the research consist of mothers and teachers of 255 children between age group 6-14, receiving education in a primary school in Sivas province. “Personal Information Form” and “Psychological Compliance Measurement” were used in the collection of data. RESULTS: According to the evaluation of teachers it was found out that while %27.5 of the children has psychological compliance problems. According to the evaluation of mothers, it was obtained that only 24.7% of the children has psychological compliance problems. The average compliance points were found higher in boys than girls, in younger age group than older age group, in group having physical disorders than not having any physical disorders. In the research a meaningful difference was not found when the average psychological compliance points and other variables were compared. When infancy psychological compliance problems evaluated, in 2.3% of the children stammer, in 3.1% habit-spasm disorder, in 7% finger sucking, in 1.9% encopresis, in 9% enuresis, and in 19.6 educational failures were determined. When the state of being problematical in behaviors and neurotic compared with the gender, it was traced that behavioral problems were higher in boys (59.5% than girls (40.5% and the neurotic problems were higher in girls (56. 3% than boys (56.3%. CONCLUSION: Consequently, it was recognized that improvement of the services for the psychological care of the children in the society and primary schools is crucially needed. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2008; 7(1.000: 47-52

  9. Parental alienation: the impact on men's mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sher, Leo

    2015-11-13

    Parental alienation is defined as a mental state in which a child, usually one whose parents are engaged in a high-conflict separation or divorce, allies himself strongly with one parent (the preferred parent) and rejects a relationship with the other parent (the alienated parent) without legitimate justification. Parental alienation may affect men's mental health: a) parental alienation negatively influences mental health of male children and adolescents who are victims of parental alienation. Alienated children/adolescents display guilt, sadness, and depressed mood; low self-esteem and lack of self-confidence; distress and frustration; lack of impulse control, substance abuse and delinquent behavior; separation anxiety, fears and phobias; hypochondria and increased tendency to develop psychosomatic illness; suicidal ideation and suicide attempt; sleep and eating disorders; educational problems; enuresis and encopresis; b) parental alienation negatively affects the mental health of adult men who were victims of parental alienation when they were children and/or adolescents. Long-term effects of parental alienation include low self-esteem, depression, drug/alcohol abuse, lack of trust, alienation from own children, divorce, problems with identity and not having a sense of belonging or roots, choosing not to have children to avoid being rejected by them, low achievement, anger and bitterness over the time lost with the alienated parent; c) parental alienation negatively influences mental health of men who are alienated from their children. Fathers who have lost some or all contact with their children for months or years following separation or divorce may be depressed and suicidal.

  10. Advancing Continence in Typically Developing Children: Adapting the Procedures of Foxx and Azrin for Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warzak, William J; Forcino, Stacy S; Sanberg, Sela Ann; Gross, Amy C

    2016-01-01

    To (1) identify and summarize procedures of Foxx and Azrin's classic toilet training protocol that continue to be used in training typically developing children and (2) adapt recent findings with the original Foxx and Azrin procedures to inform practical suggestions for the rapid toilet training of typically developing children in the primary care setting. Literature searches of PsychINFO and MEDLINE databases used the search terms "(toilet* OR potty* AND train*)." Selection criteria were only peer-reviewed experimental articles that evaluated intensive toilet training with typically developing children. Exclusion criteria were (1) nonpeer reviewed research, (2) studies addressing encopresis and/or enuresis, (3) studies excluding typically developing children, and (4) studies evaluating toilet training during infancy. In addition to the study of Foxx and Azrin, only 4 publications met the above criteria. Toilet training procedures from each article were reviewed to determine which toilet training methods were similar to components described by Foxx and Azrin. Common training elements include increasing the frequency of learning opportunities through fluid loading and having differential consequences for being dry versus being wet and for voiding in the toilet versus elsewhere. There is little research on intensive toilet training of typically developing children. Practice sits and positive reinforcement for voids in the toilet are commonplace, consistent with the Foxx and Azrin protocol, whereas positive practice as a corrective procedure for wetting accidents often is omitted. Fluid loading and differential consequences for being dry versus being wet and for voiding in the toilet also are suggested procedures, consistent with the Foxx and Azrin protocol.

  11. Comparative analysis of laparoscopic low rectal resections

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    I. L. Chernikovsky

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the immediate results of laparoscopic intersphincteric resection (ISR and ultralow anterior resection (ULAR of the rectum.Subjects and methods. The results of surgical treatment in 42 patients operated on in the Saint Petersburg Clinical Research-Practical Center for Specialized Medical (Oncology Cares in March 2014 to January 2015 are given. The inclusion criteria were the lower edge of cT1–3N0 adenocarcinoma 2-5 cm above the dentate line and no signs of invasion into the sphincter and levators. All the patients were divided into 2 groups: 1 24 patients who had undergone laparoscopic ISR; 2 18 patients who had laparoscopic ULAR. Both groups were matched for gender, age, body mass index, and CR-POSSUM predicted mortality scores. Thirty-two patients received neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Results. The mean duration of operations did not differ significantly in the groups: 206 ± 46 and 216 ± 24 min (р = 0.72. The differences in the mean volume of blood loss were also insignificant: 85 and 113 ml (р = 0.93. Circular and distal resection margins were intact in all the cases. In 18 (75 % patients in Group 1 and in 14 (77.8 % patients in Group 2, the quality of total mesorectumectomy (TME was rated as grade 3 according to the Quirk criteria (p = 0.83. In Group 1, complications requiring no reoperation occurred in 5 (20.8 % cases: anastomotic incompetence in 3 (12.5 % cases, anastomotic stricture with further bougienage in 1 (4.2 %, and urinary retention in 1 (4.2 %. In Group 2, postoperative coтplications were also observed in 5 (27.8 % cases: necrosis of the brought-out bowel in 2 (11.1 % patients and coloanal incompetence in 1 (5.6 % required reoperation; 2 (11.1 % patients underwent bougienage due to established anastomotic stricture. One month postoperatively, the Wexner constipation scoring system was used to rate the degree of encopresis: anal incontinence turned out to be significantly higher in Group 2 and amounted

  12. Psychomotor approach in children affected by nonretentive fecal soiling (FNRFS): a new rehabilitative purpose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Maria; Gimigliano, Francesca; Ruberto, Maria; Marotta, Rosa; Gallai, Beatrice; Parisi, Lucia; Lavano, Serena Marianna; Mazzotta, Giovanni; Roccella, Michele; Carotenuto, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Background According to the Rome III criteria, encopresis without constipation was defined as nonretentive fecal soiling (FNRFS) with not yet well understood etiology. Treatment approaches reported in the literature with varying results include biofeedback, hypnosis, reflexology, and Internet-based educational programs. In developmental age, another behavioral treatment could be identified in the psychomotor approach, which is called psychomotricity in the European countries, or is also known as play therapy. The aim of the present study was to verify the safety and efficacy of play therapy plus toilet training in a small sample of prepubertal children affected by FNRFS. Materials and methods Twenty-six patients (group 1; 16 males, mean age of 5.92 ± 0.84 years) underwent a psychomotor approach therapy program in association with toilet training for 6 months, and the other 26 subjects (group 2; 17 males, mean age of 5.76 ± 0.69) underwent the sole toilet training program for 6 months. During the observational time period (T0) and after 6 months (T1) of both treatments, the patients were evaluated for FNRFS frequency and for the behavioral assessment. Results At T0, the FNRFS mean frequency per month for group 1 was 20.115 episodes/month (standard deviation [SD] ± 3.024) and for group 2 was 20.423 (SD ± 1.879) (P = 0.661). At T1 the mean frequency per month was 6.461 (SD ± 1.333) episodes/month and 12.038 (SD ± 1.341), respectively (P < 0.001). Moreover, the delta percent average of the frequency between T0 and T1 was 67.121 ± 8.527 for group 1 and 40.518 ± 9.259 for group 2 (P < 0.001). At T1, a significant improvement in scores on the behavioral scale was identified. Conclusion Our preliminary results show the importance of a multidisciplinary approach, and suggest the positive effect of an additional psychomotor approach, as this holds a new and interesting rehabilitative purpose for children in a toilet training program, even if further research is

  13. Treinamento esfincteriano anal: estudo transversal em crianças de 3 a 6 anos de idade Bowel toilet training: a cross-sectional study in children between 3 and 6 years old

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    José Eduardo G. B. de Miranda

    2011-09-01

    , whereas 41% of the children mastered stool control earlier. Mothers with lower educational level and of social classes C, D and E initiated the training earlier and one of the related reasons was the cost of disposable diapers. Age in initiation or duration of toilet training was similar for boys and girls. Children presented most of the "readiness symptoms" for toilet training and only a small number of them used a seat reducer or a foot support. There was no increase in constipation prevalence after toilet training and there was no encopresis. CONCLUSIONS: Mothers were responsible for bowel toilet training and initiated it with no specialized help. In C-D-E social classes, the cost of diapers was determinant to initiate bowel toilet training.

  14. Treinamento esfincteriano: métodos, expectativas dos pais e morbidades associadas Toilet training: methods, parental expectations and associated dysfunctions

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    Denise M. Mota

    2008-02-01

    for achieving bladder and bowel control and associated morbidities. SOURCES: Articles published between 1960 and 2007, identified via the MEDLINE, Cochrane Collaboration, ERIC, Web of Science, LILACS and SciELO databases plus queries on the Google search engine; a search of related articles, references of articles, by author and of pediatrics societies. A total of 473 articles were examined and 85 of these were selected for this review. SUMMARY OF THE FINDINGS: Parents have unrealistic expectations about the age at which diapers can be withdrawn, not taking child development into account. Toilet training strategies have not changed over recent decades, and in the majority of countries the age at which children are trained has been postponed. Training methods are rarely used. Starting toilet training prematurely and stressful events during this period can extend the training process. Children who have not been trained correctly present with enuresis, urinary infection, voiding dysfunction, constipation, encopresis and refusal to go to the toilet more frequently. Literature intended for lay parents is both abundant and adequate, available in book form and on the Internet, but it is not widely available to the Brazilian population. Just three international pediatrics societies have published guidelines on toilet training. CONCLUSIONS: Toilet training is occurring later in the majority of countries. The training methods that exist are the same from decades ago and are rarely used by mothers and valued little by pediatricians; incorrect training can be a causative factor for bladder and bowel disorders, which in turn cause problems for children and their families.

  15. Comorbidity in school-aged children with autism disorder%学龄期儿童孤独障碍共患病研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余明; 刘靖; 李雪; 贾美香

    2013-01-01

    (13/62) and 17.7 % (11/62),combined type 29.0% (18/62) and 29.0% (18/62),oppositional defiant disorder 12.9% (8/62) and 11.3% (7/62),conduct disorder 4.8% (3/62) and 4.8% (3/62),Tic disorder 14.5% (9/62) and 11.3% (7/62),enuresis 16.1% (10/62)and 4.8% (3/62),encopresis 9.7% (6/62) and 1.6% (1/62).A increasing trend of number of current comorbidity with the increasing of age were found in children with autism (F =2.745,P =0.051).Conclusion Comorbidities in school-aged children with autism disorder are very common.It is very important to pay attention to comorbidity of autism disorder.%目的 了解学龄期儿童孤独障碍共患病的发生情况.方法 采用横断面研究,对2011年9-11月在北京大学精神卫生研究所儿科门诊连续就诊的62例年龄6~16周岁、符合《美国精神障碍诊断与统计手册(第4版)》(DSM-Ⅳ)中孤独障碍诊断标准的儿童进行调查和评定.内容包括:一般状况调查及《学龄儿童情感障碍和精神分裂症问卷》(K-SADS-PL)、《儿童总评评定问卷》(C-GAS)、《儿童孤独症评定量表》(CARS)、《中国修订韦氏儿童智力量表》(WISC)的评定(不能进行韦氏测查者进行瑞文标准推理测验、比奈测验或图词测验评定).结果 孤独障碍患儿共患病的终生共患率为100% (62/62),其中:7例(11.3%)患有1种共患病,16例(25.8%)患有2种共患病,11例(17.7%)患有3种共患病,28例(45.2%)患有4种或4种以上共患病.98.4%(61/62)目前存在共患病,其中:11例(17.7%)患有1种共患病,16例(25.8%)患有2种共患病,17例(27.4%)患有3种共患病,17例(27.4%)患有4种或4种以上共患病.各种共患病的终生患病率和现患率分别为:精神发育迟滞53.2%(33/62)、53.2%(33/62);未特定的精神病性障碍22.6% (14/62)、21.0%(13/62);情感障碍中抑郁障碍12.9%(8/62)、9.7%(6/62),双相障碍1.6%(1/62)、1.6% (1/62);焦虑