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Sample records for encoding interleukin-15 superagonist

  1. Production of bioactive soluble interleukin-15 in complex with interleukin-15 receptor alpha from a conditionally-replicating oncolytic HSV-1.

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    David C Gaston

    Full Text Available Oncolytic type-1 herpes simplex viruses (oHSVs lacking the γ134.5 neurovirulence gene are being evaluated for treatment of a variety of malignancies. oHSVs replicate within and directly kill permissive cancer cells. To augment their anti-tumor activity, oHSVs have been engineered to express immunostimulatory molecules, including cytokines, to elicit tumor-specific immune responses. Interleukin-15 (IL-15 holds potential as an immunotherapeutic cytokine because it has been demonstrated to promote both natural killer (NK cell-mediated and CD8(+ T cell-mediated cytotoxicity against cancer cells. The purpose of these studies was to engineer an oHSV producing bioactive IL-15. Two oHSVs were constructed encoding murine (mIL-15 alone (J100 or with the mIL-15 receptor α (mIL-15Rα, J100D to determine whether co-expression of these proteins is required for production of bioactive mIL-15 from oHSV. The following were demonstrated: i both oHSVs retain replication competence and cytotoxicity in permissive tumor cell lines. ii Enhanced production of mIL-15 was detected in cell lysates of neuro-2a cells following J100D infection as compared to J100 infection, suggesting that mIL-15Rα improved mIL-15 production. iii Soluble mIL-15 in complex with mIL-15Rα was detected in supernates from J100D-infected, but not J100-infected, neuro-2a, GL261, and CT-2A cells. These cell lines vary in permissiveness to oHSV replication and cytotoxicity, demonstrating soluble mIL-15/IL-15Rα complex production from J100D was independent of direct oHSV effects. iv The soluble mIL-15/IL-15Rα complex produced by J100D was bioactive, stimulating NK cells to proliferate and reduce the viability of syngeneic GL261 and CT-2A cells. v J100 and J100D were aneurovirulent inasmuch as no neuropathologic effects were documented following direct inoculation into brains of CBA/J mice at up to 1x10(7 plaque forming units. The production of mIL-15/mIL-15Rα from multiple tumor lines, as well

  2. Targeting interleukin-15 in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a proof-of-concept study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baslund, Bo; Tvede, Niels; Danneskiold-Samsoe, Bente

    2005-01-01

    Interleukin-15 (IL-15) is a proinflammatory, innate response cytokine that mediates pleiotropic effector function in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) inflammatory synovitis. Our objective was to study the ability of HuMax-IL15, a human IgG1 anti-IL-15 monoclonal antibody, to neutralize exogenous and end...

  3. Interleukin-15-mediated inflammation promotes non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cepero-Donates, Yuneivy; Lacraz, Grégory; Ghobadi, Farnaz; Rakotoarivelo, Volatiana; Orkhis, Sakina; Mayhue, Marian; Chen, Yi Guang; Rola-Pleszczynski, Marek; Menendez, Alfredo; Ilangumaran, Subburaj; Ramanathan, Sheela

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin-15 (IL-15) is essential for the homeostasis of lymphoid cells particularly memory CD8+ T cells and NK cells. These cells are abundant in the liver, and are implicated in obesity-associated pathogenic processes. Here we characterized obesity-associated metabolic and cellular changes in

  4. Endurance training enhances skeletal muscle interleukin-15 in human male subjects

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    Rinnov, Anders; Yfanti, Christina; Nielsen, Søren

    2014-01-01

    Regular endurance exercise promotes metabolic and oxidative changes in skeletal muscle. Overexpression of interleukin-15 (IL-15) in mice exerts similar metabolic changes in muscle as seen with endurance exercise. Muscular IL-15 production has been shown to increase in mice after weeks of regular...... endurance running. With the present study we aimed to determine if muscular IL-15 production would increase in human male subjects following 12 weeks of endurance training. In two different studies we obtained plasma and muscle biopsies from young healthy subjects performing: (1) 12 weeks of ergometer...... weeks of regular endurance training induced a 40% increase in basal skeletal muscle IL-15 protein content (p...

  5. Therapeutic administration of IL-15 superagonist complex ALT-803 leads to long-term survival and durable antitumor immune response in a murine glioblastoma model.

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    Mathios, Dimitrios; Park, Chul-Kee; Marcus, Warren D; Alter, Sarah; Rhode, Peter R; Jeng, Emily K; Wong, Hing C; Pardoll, Drew M; Lim, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma is the most aggressive primary central nervous system malignancy with a poor prognosis in patients. Despite the need for better treatments against glioblastoma, very little progress has been made in discovering new therapies that exhibit superior survival benefit than the standard of care. Immunotherapy has been shown to be a promising treatment modality that could help improve clinical outcomes of glioblastoma patients by assisting the immune system to overcome the immunosuppressive tumor environment. Interleukin-15 (IL-15), a cytokine shown to activate several effector components of the immune system, may serve as an excellent immunotherapeutic candidate for the treatment of glioblastoma. Thus, we evaluated the efficacy of an IL-15 superagonist complex (IL-15N72D:IL-15RαSu-Fc; also known as ALT-803) in a murine GL261-luc glioblastoma model. We show that ALT-803, as a single treatment as well as in combination with anti-PD-1 antibody or stereotactic radiosurgery, exhibits a robust antitumor immune response resulting in a prolonged survival including complete remission in tumor bearing mice. In addition, ALT-803 treatment results in long-term immune memory against glioblastoma tumor rechallenge. Flow cytometric analysis of tumor infiltrating immune cells shows that ALT-803 leads to increased percentage of CD8+-cell infiltration, but not the NK cells, and IFN-γ production into the tumor microenvironment. Cell depletion studies, in accordance with the flow cytometric results, show that the ALT-803 therapeutic effect is dependent on CD4+ and CD8+ cells. These results provide a rationale for evaluating the therapeutic activity of ALT-803 against glioblastoma in the clinical setting. © 2015 UICC.

  6. High concentrations of interleukin 15 in breast milk are associated with protection against postnatal HIV transmission.

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    Walter, Jan; Ghosh, Mrinal K; Kuhn, Louise; Semrau, Katherine; Sinkala, Moses; Kankasa, Chipepo; Thea, Donald M; Aldrovandi, Grace M

    2009-11-15

    Given the central role that interleukin 15 (IL-15) plays in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) immunity, we hypothesized that IL-15 in breast milk may protect against postnatal HIV transmission. In a nested case-control study, we compared breast milk IL-15 levels in 22 HIV-infected women who transmitted HIV to their infants to those in 72 nontransmitters. Samples were collected in the first month of life, prior to HIV infection. IL-15 concentrations were associated with a decreased risk of HIV transmission in unadjusted analysis and after adjusting for milk viral load, CD4 cell count, and other cytokines in breast milk. IL-15-mediated immunity may protect against HIV transmission during breast-feeding.

  7. Selenium status and over-expression of interleukin-15 in celiac disease and autoimmune thyroid diseases

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    Anna Velia Stazi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In celiac disease (CD, for its multifactorial nature, the target organs are not limited to the gut, but include thyroid, liver, skin and reproductive and nervous systems. Between the extraintestinal symptoms associated with CD, autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITDs are more evident, underlining as CD-related autoimmune alterations can be modulated not only by gluten but also by various concurrent endogenous (genetic affinity, over-expression of cytokines and exogenous (environment, nutritional deficiency factors. In their pathogenesis a central role for over-expression of interleukin-15 (IL-15 is shown, by inhibiting apoptosis, leading to the perpetuation of inflammation and tissue destruction. Thyroid is particularly sensitive to selenium deficiency because selenoproteins are significant in biosynthesis and activity of thyroid hormones; besides, some selenoproteins as glutathione peroxidase are involved in inhibiting apoptosis. Thus, selenium malabsorption in CD can be thought as a key factor directly leading to thyroid and intestinal damage. Considering the complexity of this interaction and on the basis of available evidence, the aim of this review is to assess as preventive and therapeutic target the role of IL-15 and selenium in the pathogeneses of both CD and AITD.

  8. Interleukin-15 promotes intestinal dysbiosis with butyrate deficiency associated with increased susceptibility to colitis

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    Meisel, Marlies; Mayassi, Toufic; Fehlner-Peach, Hannah; Koval, Jason C.; O' Brien, Sarah L.; Hinterleitner, Reinhard; Lesko, Kathryn; Kim, Sangman; Bouziat, Romain; Chen, Li; Weber, Christopher R.; Mazmanian, Sarkis K.; Jabri, Bana; Antonopoulos, Dionysios A.

    2016-09-20

    Dysbiosis resulting in gut-microbiome alterations with reduced butyrate production are thought to disrupt intestinal immune homeostasis and promote complex immune disorders. However, whether and how dysbiosis develops before the onset of overt pathology remains poorly defined. Interleukin 15 (IL-15) is upregulated in distressed tissue and its overexpression is thought to predispose susceptible individuals to and play a role in the pathogenesis of celiac disease and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). While the immunological roles of IL-15 have been largely studied, its potential impact on the microbiota remains unexplored. Analysis of 16S rRNA-based inventories of bacterial communities in mice overexpressing IL-15 in the intestinal epithelium (v-IL-15tg mice) shows distinct changes in the composition of the intestinal bacteria. While some alterations are specific to individual intestinal compartments, others are found across the ileum, cecum, and feces. In particular, IL-15 overexpression restructures the composition of the microbiota with a decrease in butyrate producing bacteria that is associated with a reduction in luminal butyrate levels across all intestinal compartments. Fecal microbiota transplant experiments of wild-type and v-IL-15tg microbiota into germ-free mice further indicate that diminishing butyrate concentration observed in the intestinal lumen of v-IL-15tg mice is the result of intrinsic alterations in the microbiota induced by IL-15. This reconfiguration of the microbiota is associated with increased susceptibility to dextran sodium sulfate induced colitis. Altogether, this study reveals that IL-15 impacts butyrate-producing bacteria and lowers butyrate levels in the absence of overt pathology, which represent events that precede and promote intestinal inflammatory diseases.

  9. Oncolytic effects of a novel influenza A virus expressing interleukin-15 from the NS reading frame.

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    Marijke van Rikxoort

    Full Text Available Oncolytic influenza A viruses with deleted NS1 gene (delNS1 replicate selectively in tumour cells with defective interferon response and/or activated Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK signalling pathway. To develop a delNS1 virus with specific immunostimulatory properties, we used an optimised technology to insert the interleukin-15 (IL-15 coding sequence into the viral NS gene segment (delNS1-IL-15. DelNS1 and delNS1-IL-15 exerted similar oncolytic effects. Both viruses replicated and caused caspase-dependent apoptosis in interferon-defective melanoma cells. Virus replication was required for their oncolytic activity. Cisplatin enhanced the oncolytic activity of delNS1 viruses. The cytotoxic drug increased delNS1 replication and delNS1-induced caspase-dependent apoptosis. Interference with MEK/ERK signalling by RNAi-mediated depletion or the MEK inhibitor U0126 did not affect the oncolytic effects of the delNS1 viruses. In oncolysis sensitive melanoma cells, delNS1-IL-15 (but not delNS1 infection resulted in the production of IL-15 levels ranging from 70 to 1140 pg/mL in the cell culture supernatants. The supernatants of delNS1-IL-15-infected (but not of delNS1-infected melanoma cells induced primary human natural killer cell-mediated lysis of non-infected tumour cells. In conclusion, we constructed a novel oncolytic influenza virus that combines the oncolytic activity of delNS1 viruses with immunostimulatory properties through production of functional IL-15. Moreover, we showed that the oncolytic activity of delNS1 viruses can be enhanced in combination with cytotoxic anti-cancer drugs.

  10. Myokine interleukin-15 expression profile is different in suckling and weaning piglets

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    Yehui Duan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Interleukin-15 (IL-15 is a cytokine highly expressed in skeletal muscle. The objective of the present study was to investigate the development of muscle IL-15 expression in suckling piglets and in early weaning piglets (day 14 at each level, that is, mRNA, protein, and secretion. Eight litters (eight piglets per litter of newborn healthy piglets (Large × White × Landrace with a similar initial weight (1618.0 ± 140.1 g were chosen and divided into two groups. Group one used suckling piglets that were killed, respectively, at days 1, 7, 14, 21, and group two used early (day 14 weaning piglets that were killed respectively, at days 15, 17, 19, 21. In group one, IL-15 gene expression levels increased significantly (P  0.05 among piglets at other ages. These findings indicated that increased IL-15 mRNA expression did not result in a corresponding increase of its protein expression. In group two, which used early weaning piglets from days 15–19, IL-15 mRNA and protein expression levels increased constantly (P  0.05 compared with suckling piglets at day 14 of age. However, IL-15 protein expression levels in early weaning piglets at day 21 of age dropped significantly (P < 0.05 to the levels as suckling piglets at day 21 of age, while body weight increased (P < 0.05 markedly to the levels as suckling piglets at day 21 of age. In both groups, the serum IL-15 levels of piglets decreased significantly (P < 0.01 over time. Taken together, our results indicate that IL-15 expression differs in suckling piglets and in weaning piglets. It is speculated that IL-15 may play an important role in counteracting the effects of early weaning stress.

  11. Effect of Treadmill Exercise on Interleukin-15 Expression and Glucose Tolerance in Zucker Diabetic Fatty Rats

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    Hee-Jae Kim

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundInterleukin-15 (IL-15, a well-known myokine, is highly expressed in skeletal muscle and is involved in muscle-fat crosstalk. Recently, a role of skeletal muscle-derived IL-15 in the improvement of glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity has been proposed. However, little is known regarding the influence of endurance training on IL-15 expression in type 2 diabetic skeletal muscles. We investigated the effect of endurance exercise training on glucose tolerance and IL-15 expression in skeletal muscles using type 2 diabetic animal models.MethodsMale Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF and ZDF lean control (ZLC rats were randomly divided into three groups: sedentary ZLC, sedentary ZDF (ZDF-Con, and exercised ZDF (ZDF-Ex. The ZDF-Ex rats were forced to run a motor-driven treadmill for 60 minutes once a day 5 times per week for 12 weeks. Intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test (IPGTT was performed after 12 weeks. Expression of IL-15 was measured using ELISA in extracted soleus (SOL and gastrocnemius medial muscles.ResultsAfter 12 weeks of treadmill training, reduction of body weight was observed in ZDF-Ex compared to ZDF-Con rats. Glucose tolerance using IPGTT in diabetic rats was significantly improved in ZDF-Ex rats. Furthermore, the expression of IL-15 was significantly increased (P<0.01 only in the SOL of ZDF-Ex rats compared to ZDF-Con. Additionally, IL-15 expression in SOL muscles was negatively correlated with change of body weight (R=-0.424, P=0.04.ConclusionThe present study results suggest that 12 weeks of progressive endurance training significantly improved glucose tolerance with concomitant increase of IL-15 expression in SOL muscles of type 2 diabetic rats.

  12. Expression of bovine interleukin 15 and evaluation of its biological activity in vitro

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    N. Vijay

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim: Recent studies have shown that interleukin-15 (IL-15is a critical factor for the development and proliferation of CD8+ memory T cells. The aim of present study is to study the role bovine IL-15 (bIL-15in activation pathway of bovine CD8+ T cells if any, which will be useful in designing the adjuvant to increase the duration of immunity of the vaccine preparations. Materials and Methods: Coding region of bIL-15 (489 was amplified from cDNA of lipopolysaccharide-induced bovine peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs using gene specific primers and cloned into pcDNA3.1+. Mature length of bIL-15 was amplified using gene specific primers and cloned into pET32a for expression studies. Expressed fusion protein was purified using Ni-Nitrilotriacetic acid agarose affinity chromatography and analyzed by SDS-Polyacryamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE and western blotting. Biological activity of purified protein was analyzed by quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR for an increase in levels of Bcl2, STAT3 and STAT5a using cDNA synthesized from RNA of PBMCs induced with different concentrations of purified bIL-15. Role of IL-15 in inducing memory CD8+ T cells was analyzed by qPCR for increase in the level of Carnitine Palmitoyl Transferase 1a (CPT1a using cDNA synthesized from RNA of PBMCs induced with different concentrations of purified bIL-15. Results: Bovine IL-15 was amplified and analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis, which showed a specific product of ~490bp, mature sequence was amplified using full-length as a template to get a product of ~350bp. The protein was expressed, purified and analyzed by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting, which showed a specific product of 32kDa. Biological activity of purified bIL-15 fusion protein showed an increase in levels of Bcl2, STAT3 and STAT5a with 5 fold, 9 fold, and 10 fold increases as analyzed by qPCR, respectively. Role of IL-15 in inducing memory T cells showed an increase in expression

  13. Insights into the Quorum Sensing Regulon of the Acidophilic Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans Revealed by Transcriptomic in the Presence of an Acyl Homoserine Lactone Superagonist Analog.

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    Mamani, Sigde; Moinier, Danielle; Denis, Yann; Soulère, Laurent; Queneau, Yves; Talla, Emmanuel; Bonnefoy, Violaine; Guiliani, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    While a functional quorum sensing system has been identified in the acidophilic chemolithoautotrophic Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans ATCC 23270(T) and shown to modulate cell adhesion to solid substrates, nothing is known about the genes it regulates. To address the question of how quorum sensing controls biofilm formation in A. ferrooxidans (T), the transcriptome of this organism in conditions in which quorum sensing response is stimulated by a synthetic superagonist AHL (N-acyl homoserine lactones) analog has been studied. First, the effect on biofilm formation of a synthetic AHL tetrazolic analog, tetrazole 9c, known for its agonistic QS activity, was assessed by fluorescence and electron microscopy. A fast adherence of A. ferrooxidans (T) cells on sulfur coupons was observed. Then, tetrazole 9c was used in DNA microarray experiments that allowed the identification of genes regulated by quorum sensing signaling, and more particularly, those involved in early biofilm formation. Interestingly, afeI gene, encoding the AHL synthase, but not the A. ferrooxidans quorum sensing transcriptional regulator AfeR encoding gene, was shown to be regulated by quorum sensing. Data indicated that quorum sensing network represents at least 4.5% (141 genes) of the ATCC 23270(T) genome of which 42.5% (60 genes) are related to biofilm formation. Finally, AfeR was shown to bind specifically to the regulatory region of the afeI gene at the level of the palindromic sequence predicted to be the AfeR binding site. Our results give new insights on the response of A. ferrooxidans to quorum sensing and on biofilm biogenesis.

  14. IL-15 super-agonist (ALT-803) enhances natural killer (NK) cell function against ovarian cancer.

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    Felices, M; Chu, S; Kodal, B; Bendzick, L; Ryan, C; Lenvik, A J; Boylan, K L M; Wong, H C; Skubitz, A P N; Miller, J S; Geller, M A

    2017-06-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells represent a powerful immunotherapeutic target as they lyse tumors directly, do not require differentiation, and can elicit potent inflammatory responses. The objective of these studies was to use an IL-15 super-agonist complex, ALT-803 (Altor BioScience Corporation), to enhance the function of both normal and ovarian cancer patient derived NK cells by increasing cytotoxicity and cytokine production. NK cell function from normal donor peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and ovarian cancer patient ascites was assessed using flow cytometry and chromium release assays ±ALT-803 stimulation. To evaluate the ability of ALT-803 to enhance NK cell function in vivo against ovarian cancer, we used a MA148-luc ovarian cancer NOD scid gamma (NSG) xenogeneic mouse model with transferred human NK cells. ALT-803 potently enhanced functionality of NK cells against all ovarian cancer cell lines with significant increases seen in CD107a, IFNγ and TNFα expression depending on target cell line. Function was also rescued in NK cells derived from ovarian cancer patient ascites. Finally, only animals treated with intraperitoneal ALT-803 displayed an NK dependent significant decrease in tumor. ALT-803 enhances NK cell cytotoxicity against ovarian cancer in vitro and in vivo and is able to rescue functionality of NK cells derived from ovarian cancer patient ascites. These findings suggest that ALT-803 has the potential to enhance NK cell-based immunotherapeutic approaches for the treatment of ovarian cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. First-in-Human Study of Interleukin-15 as Immunotherapy for Metastatic Cancer | Center for Cancer Research

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    One of the hallmarks of cancer that is now more clearly recognized is tumors’ ability to avoid recognition and destruction by the immune system. A novel class of treatments, dubbed immunotherapy, attempts to overcome this aspect by stimulating the immune system to attack cancer cells. The cytokine interleukin-2 (IL-2), which is approved for the treatment of renal cancer and melanoma, is the prototypic immunotherapy. Treatment with IL-2 enhances the proliferation of effector immune cells, such as cytotoxic T lymphocytes and natural killer (NK) cells. Unfortunately, IL-2 also exerts immunosuppressive activity through maintenance of regulatory T cells and activation-induced cell death. The related cytokine, interleukin-15 (IL-15), displays similar immune cell stimulatory activity, but without the inhibitory effects of IL-2. These findings, suggest that IL-15 may have greater potential as an immunotherapeutic agent and is consistent with the results seen in melanoma and prostate and colon cancer mouse models.

  16. Comparison of the Superagonist Complex, ALT-803, to IL15 as Cancer Immunotherapeutics in Animal Models.

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    Rhode, Peter R; Egan, Jack O; Xu, Wenxin; Hong, Hao; Webb, Gabriela M; Chen, Xiaoyue; Liu, Bai; Zhu, Xiaoyun; Wen, Jinghai; You, Lijing; Kong, Lin; Edwards, Ana C; Han, Kaiping; Shi, Sixiang; Alter, Sarah; Sacha, Jonah B; Jeng, Emily K; Cai, Weibo; Wong, Hing C

    2016-01-01

    IL15, a potent stimulant of CD8(+) T cells and natural killer (NK) cells, is a promising cancer immunotherapeutic. ALT-803 is a complex of an IL15 superagonist mutant and a dimeric IL15 receptor αSu/Fc fusion protein that was found to exhibit enhanced biologic activity in vivo, with a substantially longer serum half-life than recombinant IL15. A single intravenous dose of ALT-803, but not IL15, eliminated well-established tumors and prolonged survival of mice bearing multiple myeloma. In this study, we extended these findings to demonstrate the superior antitumor activity of ALT-803 over IL15 in mice bearing subcutaneous B16F10 melanoma tumors and CT26 colon carcinoma metastases. Tissue biodistribution studies in mice also showed much greater retention of ALT-803 in the lymphoid organs compared with IL15, consistent with its highly potent immunostimulatory and antitumor activities in vivo. Weekly dosing with 1 mg/kg ALT-803 in C57BL/6 mice was well tolerated, yet capable of increasing peripheral blood lymphocyte, neutrophil, and monocyte counts by >8-fold. ALT-803 dose-dependent stimulation of immune cell infiltration into the lymphoid organs was also observed. Similarly, cynomolgus monkeys treated weekly with ALT-803 showed dose-dependent increases of peripheral blood lymphocyte counts, including NK, CD4(+), and CD8(+) memory T-cell subsets. In vitro studies demonstrated ALT-803-mediated stimulation of mouse and human immune cell proliferation and IFNγ production without inducing a broad-based release of other proinflammatory cytokines (i.e., cytokine storm). Based on these results, a weekly dosing regimen of ALT-803 has been implemented in multiple clinical studies to evaluate the dose required for effective immune cell stimulation in humans. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  17. Interleukin-15 plays a central role in human kidney physiology and cancer through the γc signaling pathway.

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    Julien Giron-Michel

    Full Text Available The ability of Interleukin-15 (IL-15 to activate many immune antitumor mechanisms renders the cytokine a good candidate for the therapy of solid tumors, particularly renal cell carcinoma. Although IL-15 is being currently used in clinical trials, the function of the cytokine on kidney's components has not been extensively studied; we thus investigated the role of IL-15 on normal and tumor renal epithelial cells. Herein, we analyzed the expression and the biological functions of IL-15 in normal renal proximal tubuli (RPTEC and in their neoplastic counterparts, the renal clear cell carcinomas (RCC. This study shows that RPTEC express a functional heterotrimeric IL-15Rαβγc complex whose stimulation with physiologic concentrations of rhIL-15 is sufficient to inhibit epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT commitment preserving E-cadherin expression. Indeed, IL-15 is not only a survival factor for epithelial cells, but it can also preserve the renal epithelial phenotype through the γc-signaling pathway, demonstrating that the cytokine possess a wide range of action in epithelial homeostasis. In contrast, in RCC in vitro and in vivo studies reveal a defect in the expression of γc-receptor and JAK3 associated kinase, which strongly impacts IL-15 signaling. Indeed, in the absence of the γc/JAK3 couple we demonstrate the assembly of an unprecedented functional high affinity IL-15Rαβ heterodimer, that in response to physiologic concentrations of IL-15, triggers an unbalanced signal causing the down-regulation of the tumor suppressor gene E-cadherin, favoring RCC EMT process. Remarkably, the rescue of IL-15/γc-dependent signaling (STAT5, by co-transfecting γc and JAK3 in RCC, inhibits EMT reversion. In conclusion, these data highlight the central role of IL-15 and γc-receptor signaling in renal homeostasis through the control of E-cadherin expression and preservation of epithelial phenotype both in RPTEC (up-regulation and RCC (down-regulation.

  18. Myxoma virus expressing a fusion protein of interleukin-15 (IL15 and IL15 receptor alpha has enhanced antitumor activity.

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    Vesna Tosic

    Full Text Available Myxoma virus, a rabbit poxvirus, can efficiently infect various types of mouse and human cancer cells. It is a strict rabbit-specific pathogen, and is thought to be safe as a therapeutic agent in all non-rabbit hosts tested including mice and humans. Interleukin-15 (IL15 is an immuno-modulatory cytokine with significant potential for stimulating anti-tumor T lymphocytes and NK cells. Co-expression of IL15 with the α subunit of IL15 receptor (IL15Rα greatly enhances IL15 stability and bioavailability. Therefore, we engineered a new recombinant myxoma virus (vMyx-IL15Rα-tdTr, which expresses an IL15Rα-IL15 fusion protein plus tdTomato red fluorescent reporter protein. Permissive rabbit kidney epithelial (RK-13 cells infected with vMyx-IL15Rα-tdTr expressed and secreted the IL15Rα-IL15 fusion protein. Functional activity was confirmed by demonstrating that the secreted fusion protein stimulated proliferation of cytokine-dependent CTLL-2 cells. Multi-step growth curves showed that murine melanoma (B16-F10 and B16.SIY cell lines were permissive to vMyx-IL15Rα-tdTr infection. In vivo experiments in RAG1-/- mice showed that subcutaneous B16-F10 tumors treated with vMyx-IL15Rα-tdTr exhibited attenuated tumor growth and a significant survival benefit for the treated group compared to the PBS control and the control viruses (vMyx-IL15-tdTr and vMyx-tdTr. Immunohistological analysis of the subcutaneous tumors showed dramatically increased infiltration of NK cells in vMyx-IL15Rα-tdTr treated tumors compared to the controls. In vivo experiments with immunocompetent C57BL/6 mice revealed a strong infiltrate of both NK cells and CD8+ T cells in response to vMyx-IL15Rα-tdTr, and prolonged survival. We conclude that delivery of IL15Rα-IL15 in a myxoma virus vector stimulates both innate and adaptive components of the immune system.

  19. Dysregulation of metabolic-associated pathways in muscle of breast cancer patients: preclinical evaluation of interleukin-15 targeting fatigue.

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    Bohlen, Joseph; McLaughlin, Sarah L; Hazard-Jenkins, Hannah; Infante, Aniello M; Montgomery, Cortney; Davis, Mary; Pistilli, Emidio E

    2018-03-26

    Breast cancer patients report a perception of increased muscle fatigue, which can persist following surgery and standardized therapies. In a clinical experiment, we tested the hypothesis that pathways regulating skeletal muscle fatigue are down-regulated in skeletal muscle of breast cancer patients and that different muscle gene expression patterns exist between breast tumour subtypes. In a preclinical study, we tested the hypothesis that mammary tumour growth in mice induces skeletal muscle fatigue and that overexpression of the cytokine interleukin-15 (IL-15) can attenuate mammary tumour-induced muscle fatigue. Early stage non-metastatic female breast cancer patients (n = 14) and female non-cancer patients (n = 6) provided a muscle biopsy of the pectoralis major muscle during mastectomy, lumpectomy, or breast reconstruction surgeries. The breast cancer patients were diagnosed with either luminal (ER + /PR + , n = 6), triple positive (ER + /PR + /Her2/neu + , n = 5), or triple negative (ER - /PR - /Her2/neu - , n = 3) breast tumours and were being treated with curative intent either with neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by surgery or surgery followed by standard post-operative therapy. Biopsies were used for RNA-sequencing to compare the skeletal muscle gene expression patterns between breast cancer patients and non-cancer patients. The C57BL/6 mouse syngeneic mammary tumour cell line, E0771, was used to induce mammary tumours in immunocompetent mice, and isometric muscle contractile properties and fatigue properties were analysed following 4 weeks of tumour growth. RNA-sequencing and subsequent bioinformatics analyses revealed a dysregulation of canonical pathways involved in oxidative phosphorylation, mitochondrial dysfunction, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor signalling and activation, and IL-15 signalling and production. In a preclinical mouse model of breast cancer, the rate of muscle fatigue was greater in mice exposed to mammary tumour

  20. Co-expression of Interleukin-15 Enhances the Protective Immune Responses Induced by Immunization with a Murine Malaria MVA-Based Vaccine Encoding the Circumsporozoite Protein.

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    Parra, Marcela; Liu, Xia; Derrick, Steven C; Yang, Amy; Molina-Cruz, Alvaro; Barillas-Mury, Carolina; Zheng, Hong; Thao Pham, Phuong; Sedegah, Martha; Belmonte, Arnel; Litilit, Dianne D; Waldmann, Thomas A; Kumar, Sanjai; Morris, Sheldon L; Perera, Liyanage P

    2015-01-01

    Malaria remains a major global public health problem with an estimated 200 million cases detected in 2012. Although the most advanced candidate malaria vaccine (RTS,S) has shown promise in clinical trials, its modest efficacy and durability have created uncertainty about the impact of RTS,S immunization (when used alone) on global malaria transmission. Here we describe the development and characterization of a novel modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA)-based malaria vaccine which co-expresses the Plasmodium yoelii circumsporozoite protein (CSP) and IL-15. Vaccination/challenge studies showed that C57BL/6 mice immunized with the MVA-CSP/IL15 vaccine were protected significantly better against a P. yoelii 17XNL sporozoite challenge than either mice immunized with an MVA vaccine expressing only CSP or naïve controls. Importantly, the levels of total anti-CSP IgG were elevated about 100-fold for the MVA-CSP/IL15 immunized group compared to mice immunized with the MVA-CSP construct that does not express IL-15. Among the IgG subtypes, the IL-15 expressing MVA-CSP vaccine induced levels of IgG1 (8 fold) and IgG2b (80 fold) higher than the MVA-CSP construct. The significantly enhanced humoral responses and protection detected after immunization with the MVA-CSP/IL15 vaccine suggest that this IL-15 expressing MVA construct could be considered in the development of future malaria immunization strategies.

  1. The interleukin-15 system suppresses T cell-mediated autoimmunity by regulating negative selection and nT(H)17 cell homeostasis in the thymus.

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    Hou, Mau-Sheng; Huang, Shih-Ting; Tsai, Ming-Han; Yen, Ching-Cheng; Lai, Yein-Gei; Liou, Yae-Huei; Lin, Chih-Kung; Liao, Nan-Shih

    2015-01-01

    The interleukin-15 (IL-15) system is important for regulating both innate and adaptive immune responses, however, its role in autoimmune disease remained unclear. Here we found that Il15(-/-) and Il15ra(-/-) mice spontaneously developed late-onset autoimmune phenotypes. CD4(+) T cells of the knockout mice showed elevated autoreactivity as demonstrated by the induction of lymphocyte infiltration in the lacrimal and salivary glands when transferred into nude mice. The antigen-presenting cells in the thymic medullary regions expressed IL-15 and IL-15Rα, whose deficiency resulted in insufficient negative selection and elevated number of natural IL-17A-producing CD4(+) thymocytes. These findings reveal previously unknown functions of the IL-15 system in thymocyte development, and thus a new layer of regulation in T cell-mediated autoimmunity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Clinical manufacturing of recombinant human interleukin 15. I. Production cell line development and protein expression in E. coli with stop codon optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Vinay V; Esposito, Dominic; Sumpter, Terry L; Broadt, Trevor L; Hartley, James; Knapp, George C; Cheng, Wei; Jiang, Man-Shiow; Roach, John M; Yang, Xiaoyi; Giardina, Steven L; Mitra, George; Yovandich, Jason L; Creekmore, Stephen P; Waldmann, Thomas A; Zhu, Jianwei

    2012-01-01

    Interleukin 15 (IL-15) has shown remarkable biological properties of promoting NK- and T-cell activation and proliferation, as well as enhancing antitumor immunity of CD8(+) T cells in preclinical models. Here, we report the development of an E. coli cell line to express recombinant human Interleukin-15 (rhIL-15) for clinical manufacturing. Human IL-15 cDNA sequence was inserted into a pET28b plasmid and expressed in several E. coli BL21 strains. Through product quality comparisons among several E. coli strains, including E. coli BL21(DE3), BL21(DE3)pLysS, BLR(DE3)pLysS, and BL21-AI, E. coli BL21-AI was selected for clinical manufacturing. Expression optimization was carried out at shake flask and 20-L fermenter scales, and the product was expressed as inclusion bodies that were solubilized, refolded, and purified to yield active rhIL-15. Stop codons of the expression construct were further investigated after 15-20% of the purified rhIL-15 showed an extraneous peak corresponding to an extra tryptophan residue based on peptide mapping and mass spectrometry analysis. It was determined that the presence of an extra tryptophan was due to a stop codon wobble effect, which could be eliminated by replacing TGA (opal) stop codon with TAA (ochre). As a novel strategy, a simple method of demonstrating lack of tRNA suppressors in the production host cells was developed to validate the cells in this study. The E. coli BL21-AI cells containing the rhIL-15 coding sequence with a triplet stop codon TAATAATGA were banked for further clinical manufacturing. Copyright © 2011 American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE).

  3. Whole transcriptome data of primary human NK cells under hypoxia and interleukin 15 priming: A 2×2 factorial design experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, Ana Sofia; Killian, Doreen; Schulte, Jutta; Sticht, Carsten; Lindner, Holger A

    2017-10-01

    Natural Killer (NK) cells mediate innate immunity against cancer and intracellular infection, at that, operating in often oxygen-deprived environments. We performed a microarray experiment with a 2×2 factorial design to profile gene expression in human NK cells (Velasquez et al., 2016) [1]. In this experiment, NK cells from 5 healthy volunteers were primed or not for 6 h with the survival factor and inflammatory cytokine interleukin 15 (IL-15) under hypoxic or normoxic culture conditions (20 samples in total). Here, we provide details on the culture setup that govern the actual O 2 partial pressure (pO 2 ) experienced by the cells, as well as on the RNA extraction procedure used, which we optimized from commercial spin column protocols to obtain highly concentrated total RNA. We present a quality control analysis of the normalized microarray data, as well as overviews for differentially regulated genes. These data provide insights into NK cell transcriptional responses to immune stimulation under physiologically relevant low oxygen conditions. This dataset is deposited in the Gene Expression Omnibus database (accession number GSE70214).

  4. First-in-human Phase 1 Clinical Study of the IL-15 Superagonist Complex ALT-803 to Treat Relapse after Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romee, Rizwan; Cooley, Sarah; Berrien-Elliott, Melissa M; Westervelt, Peter; Verneris, Michael R; Wagner, John E; Weisdorf, Daniel J; Blazar, Bruce R; Ustun, Celalettin; DeFor, Todd E; Vivek, Sithara; Peck, Lindsey; DiPersio, John F; Cashen, Amanda F; Kyllo, Rachel; Musiek, Amy; Schaffer, András; Anadkat, Milan J; Rosman, Ilana; Miller, Daniel; Egan, Jack O; Jeng, Emily K; Rock, Amy; Wong, Hing C; Fehniger, Todd A; Miller, Jeffrey S

    2018-02-20

    New therapies for patients with hematologic malignancies who relapse after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT) are needed. Interleukin (IL)-15 is a cytokine that stimulates CD8 + T cell and NK cell anti-tumor responses, and we hypothesized this cytokine may augment anti-leukemia/lymphoma immunity in vivo. To test this, we performed a first-in-human multi-center phase 1 trial (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01885897) of the IL-15 superagonist complex ALT-803 in patients who relapsed >60 days after allo-HCT. ALT-803 was administered to 33 patients via the intravenous (IV) or subcutaneous (SQ) routes once weekly for 4 doses (dose levels of 1, 3, 6, and 10 mcg/kg). ALT-803 was well-tolerated, and no dose-limiting toxicities or treatment-emergent graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD) requiring systemic therapy were observed in this clinical setting. Adverse events following IV administration included constitutional symptoms temporally related to increased serum IL-6 and IFN-γ. To mitigate these effects the subcutaneous (SQ) route was tested. SQ delivery resulted in self-limited injection site rashes infiltrated with lymphocytes without acute constitutional symptoms. PK analysis revealed a prolonged (>96 hours) serum concentrations following SQ, but not IV injection. ALT-803 stimulated activation, proliferation, and expansion of NK cells and CD8 + T cells without increasing regulatory T cells. Responses were observed in 19% of evaluable patients, including one complete remission lasting 7 months. Thus, ALT-803 is a safe, well-tolerated agent that significantly increased NK and CD8 + T cell number and function. This immunostimulatory IL-15 superagonist warrants further investigation to augment anti-tumor immunity alone and combined with other immunotherapies. Copyright © 2018 American Society of Hematology.

  5. Evaluation of the biological activities of the IL-15 superagonist complex, ALT-803, following intravenous versus subcutaneous administration in murine models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bai; Jones, Monica; Kong, Lin; Noel, Terra; Jeng, Emily K; Shi, Sixiang; England, Christopher G; Alter, Sarah; Miller, Jeffrey S; Cai, Weibo; Rhode, Peter R; Wong, Hing C

    2018-02-13

    ALT-803 is a fusion protein complex consisting of an interleukin (IL)-15 superagonist and a dimeric IL-15 receptor alpha sushi domain IgG1 Fc fusion protein. When administered to mice, ALT-803 is capable of inducing natural killer (NK) and CD8 + T cell proliferation and activation, and effectively promoting potent anti-tumor responses. Currently, ALT-803 is in clinical trials for treatment of various solid tumors and hematological malignancies. In the initial phase of these clinical studies, intravenous (iv) injection was used according to the route used in pre-clinical efficacy studies. In order to evaluate the possible advantage of subcutaneous (sc) injection versus iv injection, this study compared the biological activity of the two treatment regimens of ALT-803 in pre-clinical in vivo models. The pharmacokinetics, immune stimulation, and anti-tumor efficacy of iv and sc injection routes of ALT-803 in C57BL/6 mice were compared. The half-life of ALT-803 was 7.5 h for iv versus 7.7 h for sc with the maximal detected serum concentration of ALT-803 to be 3926 ng/ml at 0.5 h time-point following iv injection versus 495 ng/ml at 16 h post sc injection. Biodistribution studies indicated that sc ALT-803, similarly to iv ALT-803 as previously reported, has a greater tissue distribution and longer residence time in lymphoid tissues compared to recombinant IL-15. Notably, ALT-803 when administered either iv or sc induced comparable proliferation and activation of CD8 + T and NK cells and resulted in similar reductions of tumor burden. A toxicity study of mice receiving multiple injections of ALT-803 for 4 weeks by iv or sc routes revealed equivalent immune-related changes. The gradual absorbance into the blood stream and lower maximal blood levels of ALT-803 in sc-injected mice, along with similar anti-tumor efficacy support the administration of ALT-803 by sc injection in patients with various malignancies and infectious diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier

  6. Identification of a gene for an ancient cytokine, interleukin 15-like, in mammals; interleukins 2 and 15 co-evolved with this third family member, all sharing binding motifs for IL-15Rα.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkstra, Johannes M; Takizawa, Fumio; Fischer, Uwe; Friedrich, Maik; Soto-Lampe, Veronica; Lefèvre, Christophe; Lenk, Matthias; Karger, Axel; Matsui, Taei; Hashimoto, Keiichiro

    2014-02-01

    Interleukins 2 and 15 (IL-2 and IL-15) are highly differentiated but related cytokines with overlapping, yet also distinct functions, and established benefits for medical drug use. The present study identified a gene for an ancient third IL-2/15 family member in reptiles and mammals, interleukin 15-like (IL-15L), which hitherto was only reported in fish. IL-15L genes with intact open reading frames (ORFs) and evidence of transcription, and a recent past of purifying selection, were found for cattle, horse, sheep, pig and rabbit. In human and mouse the IL-15L ORF is incapacitated. Although deduced IL-15L proteins share only ~21 % overall amino acid identity with IL-15, they share many of the IL-15 residues important for binding to receptor chain IL-15Rα, and recombinant bovine IL-15L was shown to interact with IL-15Rα indeed. Comparison of sequence motifs indicates that capacity for binding IL-15Rα is an ancestral characteristic of the IL-2/15/15L family, in accordance with a recent study which showed that in fish both IL-2 and IL-15 can bind IL-15Rα. Evidence reveals that the species lineage leading to mammals started out with three similar cytokines IL-2, IL-15 and IL-15L, and that later in evolution (1) IL-2 and IL-2Rα receptor chain acquired a new and specific binding mode and (2) IL-15L was lost in several but not all groups of mammals. The present study forms an important step forward in understanding this potent family of cytokines, and may help to improve future strategies for their application in veterinarian and human medicine.

  7. Association between Interleukin-15 and Obesity: Interleukin-15 as a Potential Regulator of Fat Mass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anders Rinnov; Hojman, Pernille; Erikstrup, Christian

    2008-01-01

    regulate adipose tissue mass. Design: The relation between skeletal muscle IL-15 mRNA expression, plasma IL-15, and adipose tissue mass was studied in 199 humans divided into four groups on the basis of obesity and type 2 diabetes. Furthermore, using a DNA electrotransfer model, we assessed the effect...... of IL-15 overexpression in skeletal muscle of mice. Results: In humans, multiple regression analysis showed a negative association between plasma IL-15 and total fat mass (P associations were...... also found between muscle IL-15 mRNA and obesity parameters. IL-15 overexpression in skeletal muscle of mice reduced trunk fat mass but not sc fat mass. Conclusions: Our results indicate that IL-15 may be a regulator of trunk fat mass....

  8. Assessment of Interleukin 15 (IL-15) Gene Polymorphism in Adult ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    From its beginnings two decades ago with the analysis of chromosomal translocation break points, research into the molecular pathogenesis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) has now progressed to the large scale sequencing of candidate genes that might be linked to the pathogenesis of leukemia. Interleukon-15 ...

  9. Interleukin-15 is required for maximal lipopolysaccharide-induced abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Amanda J; Kandiah, Nalaayini; Karimi, Khalil; Clark, David A; Ashkar, Ali A

    2013-06-01

    The maternal immune response during pregnancy is critical for the survival of the fetus yet can be detrimental during infection and inflammation. Previously, IL-15 has been observed to mediate inflammation during LPS-induced sepsis. Therefore, we sought to determine whether IL-15 mediates the inflammatory process during LPS-induced abortion through the use of IL-15(-/-) and WT mice. Administration of 2.5 μg LPS i.p. on gd 7.5 drastically reduced fetal viability in WT mice, whereas it had a minimal effect on fetal survival in IL-15(-/-) mice. The uteroplacental sites of LPS-treated WT mice were characterized by vast structural degradation and inflammation compared with treated IL-15(-/-) and untreated controls. This suggests that IL-15 may mediate the inflammation responsible for LPS-induced resorption. As IL-15(-/-) mice are deficient in NK cells and resistant to LPS-induced abortion, these effects suggest that IL-15 may mediate abortion through their homeostatic and/or activation effects on NK cells. WT uteroplacental units exposed to LPS had an increase in the overall number and effector number of NK cells compared with their control counterparts. Furthermore, NK cell depletion before administration of LPS in WT mice partially restored fetal viability. Overall, this paper suggests that IL-15 mediates the inflammatory environment during LPS-induced fetal resorption, primarily through its effects on NK cells.

  10. Time-Encoded Imagers.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marleau, Peter; Brubaker, Erik

    2014-11-01

    This report provides a short overview of the DNN R&D funded project, Time-Encoded Imagers. The project began in FY11 and concluded in FY14. The Project Description below provides the overall motivation and objectives for the project as well as a summary of programmatic direction. It is followed by a short description of each task and the resulting deliverables.

  11. Encoders and Fault Detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Persis, Claudio De

    2003-01-01

    Monitoring large-scale systems is of fundamental importance in modern infrastructures. Many of these large-scale systems are complex interconnections of sub-components which interact by means of communication channels with limited bandwidth. Therefore the information must be encoded in order to be

  12. Neural Semantic Encoders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munkhdalai, Tsendsuren; Yu, Hong

    2017-04-01

    We present a memory augmented neural network for natural language understanding: Neural Semantic Encoders. NSE is equipped with a novel memory update rule and has a variable sized encoding memory that evolves over time and maintains the understanding of input sequences through read , compose and write operations. NSE can also access multiple and shared memories. In this paper, we demonstrated the effectiveness and the flexibility of NSE on five different natural language tasks: natural language inference, question answering, sentence classification, document sentiment analysis and machine translation where NSE achieved state-of-the-art performance when evaluated on publically available benchmarks. For example, our shared-memory model showed an encouraging result on neural machine translation, improving an attention-based baseline by approximately 1.0 BLEU.

  13. Disorders of phonological encoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterworth, B

    1992-03-01

    Studies of phonological disturbances in aphasic speech are reviewed. It is argued that failure to test for error consistency in individual patients makes it generally improper to draw inferences about specific disorders of phonological encoding. A minimalist interpretation of available data on phonological errors is therefore proposed that involves variable loss of information in transmission between processing subsystems. Proposals for systematic loss or corruption of phonological information in lexical representations or in translation subsystems is shown to be inadequately grounded. The review concludes with some simple methodological prescriptions for future research.

  14. Time encoded radiation imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marleau, Peter; Brubaker, Erik; Kiff, Scott

    2014-10-21

    The various technologies presented herein relate to detecting nuclear material at a large stand-off distance. An imaging system is presented which can detect nuclear material by utilizing time encoded imaging relating to maximum and minimum radiation particle counts rates. The imaging system is integrated with a data acquisition system that can utilize variations in photon pulse shape to discriminate between neutron and gamma-ray interactions. Modulation in the detected neutron count rates as a function of the angular orientation of the detector due to attenuation of neighboring detectors is utilized to reconstruct the neutron source distribution over 360 degrees around the imaging system. Neutrons (e.g., fast neutrons) and/or gamma-rays are incident upon scintillation material in the imager, the photons generated by the scintillation material are converted to electrical energy from which the respective neutrons/gamma rays can be determined and, accordingly, a direction to, and the location of, a radiation source identified.

  15. Encoding the Factorisation Calculus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reuben N. S. Rowe

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Jay and Given-Wilson have recently introduced the Factorisation (or SF- calculus as a minimal fundamental model of intensional computation. It is a combinatory calculus containing a special combinator, F, which is able to examine the internal structure of its first argument. The calculus is significant in that as well as being combinatorially complete it also exhibits the property of structural completeness, i.e. it is able to represent any function on terms definable using pattern matching on arbitrary normal forms. In particular, it admits a term that can decide the structural equality of any two arbitrary normal forms. Since SF-calculus is combinatorially complete, it is clearly at least as powerful as the more familiar and paradigmatic Turing-powerful computational models of Lambda Calculus and Combinatory Logic. Its relationship to these models in the converse direction is less obvious, however. Jay and Given-Wilson have suggested that SF-calculus is strictly more powerful than the aforementioned models, but a detailed study of the connections between these models is yet to be undertaken. This paper begins to bridge that gap by presenting a faithful encoding of the Factorisation Calculus into the Lambda Calculus preserving both reduction and strong normalisation. The existence of such an encoding is a new result. It also suggests that there is, in some sense, an equivalence between the former model and the latter. We discuss to what extent our result constitutes an equivalence by considering it in the context of some previously defined frameworks for comparing computational power and expressiveness.

  16. Selecting Operations for Assembler Encoding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Praczyk

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Assembler Encoding is a neuro-evolutionary method in which a neural network is represented in the form of a simple program called Assembler Encoding Program. The task of the program is to create the so-called Network Definition Matrix which maintains all the information necessary to construct the network. To generate Assembler Encoding Programs and the subsequent neural networks evolutionary techniques are used.
    The performance of Assembler Encoding strongly depends on operations used in Assembler Encoding Programs. To select the most effective operations, experiments in the optimization and the predator-prey problem were carried out. In the experiments, Assembler Encoding Programs equipped with different types of operations were tested. The results of the tests are presented at the end of the paper.

  17. Peri-encoding predictors of memory encoding and consolidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Noga; Pell, Liat; Edelson, Micah G; Ben-Yakov, Aya; Pine, Alex; Dudai, Yadin

    2015-03-01

    We review reports of brain activations that occur immediately prior to the onset or following the offset of to-be-remembered information and can predict subsequent mnemonic success. Memory-predictive pre-encoding processes, occurring from fractions of a second to minutes prior to event onset, are mainly associated with activations in the medial temporal lobe (MTL), amygdala and midbrain, and with enhanced theta oscillations. These activations may be considered as the neural correlates of one or more cognitive operations, including contextual processing, attention, and the engagement of distinct computational modes associated with prior encoding or retrieval. Post-encoding activations that correlate with subsequent memory performance are mainly observed in the MTL, sensory cortices and frontal regions. These activations may reflect binding of elements of the encoded information and initiation of memory consolidation. In all, the findings reviewed here illustrate the importance of brain states in the immediate peri-encoding time windows in determining encoding success. Understanding these brain states and their specific effects on memory may lead to optimization of the encoding of desired memories and mitigation of undesired ones. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Peptide Signals Encode Protein Localization▿

    OpenAIRE

    Russell, Jay H.; Keiler, Kenneth C.

    2007-01-01

    Many bacterial proteins are localized to precise intracellular locations, but in most cases the mechanism for encoding localization information is not known. Screening libraries of peptides fused to green fluorescent protein identified sequences that directed the protein to helical structures or to midcell. These peptides indicate that protein localization can be encoded in 20-amino-acid peptides instead of complex protein-protein interactions and raise the possibility that the location of a ...

  19. Analysing and Comparing Encodability Criteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirstin Peters

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Encodings or the proof of their absence are the main way to compare process calculi. To analyse the quality of encodings and to rule out trivial or meaningless encodings, they are augmented with quality criteria. There exists a bunch of different criteria and different variants of criteria in order to reason in different settings. This leads to incomparable results. Moreover it is not always clear whether the criteria used to obtain a result in a particular setting do indeed fit to this setting. We show how to formally reason about and compare encodability criteria by mapping them on requirements on a relation between source and target terms that is induced by the encoding function. In particular we analyse the common criteria full abstraction, operational correspondence, divergence reflection, success sensitiveness, and respect of barbs; e.g. we analyse the exact nature of the simulation relation (coupled simulation versus bisimulation that is induced by different variants of operational correspondence. This way we reduce the problem of analysing or comparing encodability criteria to the better understood problem of comparing relations on processes.

  20. Multidimensionally encoded magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Fa-Hsuan

    2013-07-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) typically achieves spatial encoding by measuring the projection of a q-dimensional object over q-dimensional spatial bases created by linear spatial encoding magnetic fields (SEMs). Recently, imaging strategies using nonlinear SEMs have demonstrated potential advantages for reconstructing images with higher spatiotemporal resolution and reducing peripheral nerve stimulation. In practice, nonlinear SEMs and linear SEMs can be used jointly to further improve the image reconstruction performance. Here, we propose the multidimensionally encoded (MDE) MRI to map a q-dimensional object onto a p-dimensional encoding space where p > q. MDE MRI is a theoretical framework linking imaging strategies using linear and nonlinear SEMs. Using a system of eight surface SEM coils with an eight-channel radiofrequency coil array, we demonstrate the five-dimensional MDE MRI for a two-dimensional object as a further generalization of PatLoc imaging and O-space imaging. We also present a method of optimizing spatial bases in MDE MRI. Results show that MDE MRI with a higher dimensional encoding space can reconstruct images more efficiently and with a smaller reconstruction error when the k-space sampling distribution and the number of samples are controlled. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Fly Photoreceptors Encode Phase Congruency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uwe Friederich

    Full Text Available More than five decades ago it was postulated that sensory neurons detect and selectively enhance behaviourally relevant features of natural signals. Although we now know that sensory neurons are tuned to efficiently encode natural stimuli, until now it was not clear what statistical features of the stimuli they encode and how. Here we reverse-engineer the neural code of Drosophila photoreceptors and show for the first time that photoreceptors exploit nonlinear dynamics to selectively enhance and encode phase-related features of temporal stimuli, such as local phase congruency, which are invariant to changes in illumination and contrast. We demonstrate that to mitigate for the inherent sensitivity to noise of the local phase congruency measure, the nonlinear coding mechanisms of the fly photoreceptors are tuned to suppress random phase signals, which explains why photoreceptor responses to naturalistic stimuli are significantly different from their responses to white noise stimuli.

  2. Fly Photoreceptors Encode Phase Congruency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friederich, Uwe; Billings, Stephen A; Hardie, Roger C; Juusola, Mikko; Coca, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    More than five decades ago it was postulated that sensory neurons detect and selectively enhance behaviourally relevant features of natural signals. Although we now know that sensory neurons are tuned to efficiently encode natural stimuli, until now it was not clear what statistical features of the stimuli they encode and how. Here we reverse-engineer the neural code of Drosophila photoreceptors and show for the first time that photoreceptors exploit nonlinear dynamics to selectively enhance and encode phase-related features of temporal stimuli, such as local phase congruency, which are invariant to changes in illumination and contrast. We demonstrate that to mitigate for the inherent sensitivity to noise of the local phase congruency measure, the nonlinear coding mechanisms of the fly photoreceptors are tuned to suppress random phase signals, which explains why photoreceptor responses to naturalistic stimuli are significantly different from their responses to white noise stimuli.

  3. Virally encoded 7TM receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, M M; Waldhoer, M; Lüttichau, H R

    2001-01-01

    expression of this single gene in certain lymphocyte cell lineages leads to the development of lesions which are remarkably similar to Kaposi's sarcoma, a human herpesvirus 8 associated disease. Thus, this and other virally encoded 7TM receptors appear to be attractive future drug targets....

  4. Encoding information into precipitation structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martens, Kirsten; Bena, Ioana; Droz, Michel; Rácz, Zoltan

    2008-01-01

    Material design at submicron scales would be profoundly affected if the formation of precipitation patterns could be easily controlled. It would allow the direct building of bulk structures, in contrast to traditional techniques which consist of removing material in order to create patterns. Here, we discuss an extension of our recent proposal of using electrical currents to control precipitation bands which emerge in the wake of reaction fronts in A + + B – → C reaction–diffusion processes. Our main result, based on simulating the reaction–diffusion–precipitation equations, is that the dynamics of the charged agents can be guided by an appropriately designed time-dependent electric current so that, in addition to the control of the band spacing, the width of the precipitation bands can also be tuned. This makes straightforward the encoding of information into precipitation patterns and, as an amusing example, we demonstrate the feasibility by showing how to encode a musical rhythm

  5. Hall effect encoding of brushless dc motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berard, C. A.; Furia, T. J.; Goldberg, E. A.; Greene, R. C.

    1970-01-01

    Encoding mechanism integral to the motor and using the permanent magnets embedded in the rotor eliminates the need for external devices to encode information relating the position and velocity of the rotating member.

  6. Engineering Genetically Encoded FRET Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindenburg, Laurens; Merkx, Maarten

    2014-01-01

    Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) between two fluorescent proteins can be exploited to create fully genetically encoded and thus subcellularly targetable sensors. FRET sensors report changes in energy transfer between a donor and an acceptor fluorescent protein that occur when an attached sensor domain undergoes a change in conformation in response to ligand binding. The design of sensitive FRET sensors remains challenging as there are few generally applicable design rules and each sensor must be optimized anew. In this review we discuss various strategies that address this shortcoming, including rational design approaches that exploit self-associating fluorescent domains and the directed evolution of FRET sensors using high-throughput screening. PMID:24991940

  7. SnoVault and encodeD: A novel object-based storage system and applications to ENCODE metadata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitz, Benjamin C; Rowe, Laurence D; Podduturi, Nikhil R; Glick, David I; Baymuradov, Ulugbek K; Malladi, Venkat S; Chan, Esther T; Davidson, Jean M; Gabdank, Idan; Narayana, Aditi K; Onate, Kathrina C; Hilton, Jason; Ho, Marcus C; Lee, Brian T; Miyasato, Stuart R; Dreszer, Timothy R; Sloan, Cricket A; Strattan, J Seth; Tanaka, Forrest Y; Hong, Eurie L; Cherry, J Michael

    2017-01-01

    The Encyclopedia of DNA elements (ENCODE) project is an ongoing collaborative effort to create a comprehensive catalog of functional elements initiated shortly after the completion of the Human Genome Project. The current database exceeds 6500 experiments across more than 450 cell lines and tissues using a wide array of experimental techniques to study the chromatin structure, regulatory and transcriptional landscape of the H. sapiens and M. musculus genomes. All ENCODE experimental data, metadata, and associated computational analyses are submitted to the ENCODE Data Coordination Center (DCC) for validation, tracking, storage, unified processing, and distribution to community resources and the scientific community. As the volume of data increases, the identification and organization of experimental details becomes increasingly intricate and demands careful curation. The ENCODE DCC has created a general purpose software system, known as SnoVault, that supports metadata and file submission, a database used for metadata storage, web pages for displaying the metadata and a robust API for querying the metadata. The software is fully open-source, code and installation instructions can be found at: http://github.com/ENCODE-DCC/snovault/ (for the generic database) and http://github.com/ENCODE-DCC/encoded/ to store genomic data in the manner of ENCODE. The core database engine, SnoVault (which is completely independent of ENCODE, genomic data, or bioinformatic data) has been released as a separate Python package.

  8. SnoVault and encodeD: A novel object-based storage system and applications to ENCODE metadata.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin C Hitz

    Full Text Available The Encyclopedia of DNA elements (ENCODE project is an ongoing collaborative effort to create a comprehensive catalog of functional elements initiated shortly after the completion of the Human Genome Project. The current database exceeds 6500 experiments across more than 450 cell lines and tissues using a wide array of experimental techniques to study the chromatin structure, regulatory and transcriptional landscape of the H. sapiens and M. musculus genomes. All ENCODE experimental data, metadata, and associated computational analyses are submitted to the ENCODE Data Coordination Center (DCC for validation, tracking, storage, unified processing, and distribution to community resources and the scientific community. As the volume of data increases, the identification and organization of experimental details becomes increasingly intricate and demands careful curation. The ENCODE DCC has created a general purpose software system, known as SnoVault, that supports metadata and file submission, a database used for metadata storage, web pages for displaying the metadata and a robust API for querying the metadata. The software is fully open-source, code and installation instructions can be found at: http://github.com/ENCODE-DCC/snovault/ (for the generic database and http://github.com/ENCODE-DCC/encoded/ to store genomic data in the manner of ENCODE. The core database engine, SnoVault (which is completely independent of ENCODE, genomic data, or bioinformatic data has been released as a separate Python package.

  9. Optimal Achievable Encoding for Brain Machine Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-22

    AFRL-RH-WP-TP-2017-0001 Optimal Achievable Encoding for Brain- Machine Interface Eduardo Chichilnisky Leland Stanford Junior...Oct 2016 – 30 Sep 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Optimal Achievable Encoding for Brain- Machine Interface 5b...required. First, we developed novel models of retinal encoding that improve upon the state of the art, by using machine learning methods to

  10. The ENCODE project: missteps overshadowing a success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddy, Sean R

    2013-04-08

    Two clichés of science journalism have now played out around the ENCODE project. ENCODE's publicity first presented a misleading "all the textbooks are wrong" narrative about noncoding human DNA. Now several critiques of ENCODE's narrative have been published, and one was so vitriolic that it fueled "undignified academic squabble" stories that focused on tone more than substance. Neither story line does justice to our actual understanding of genomes, to ENCODE's results, or to the role of big science in biology. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Encoder designed to work in harsh environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toop, L.

    2007-05-15

    Dynapar has developed the Acuro AX71 absolute encoder for use on offshore or land-based oil rig operations. It provides feedback on the operation of automated systems such as draw works, racking systems, rotary tables and top drives. By ensuring that automated systems function properly, this encoder responds to a need by the oil and gas industry to keep workers safe and improve efficiency, particularly for operations in rugged situations. The encoder provides feedback from motor systems to controllers, giving information about position and speed of downhole drill bits. This newly developed encoder is better than commonly used incremental encoders which are not precise in strong electrical noise environments. Rather, the absolute encoder uses a different method of reporting to the controller. A digital signal is transmitted constantly as the device operates. It is less susceptible to noise issues. It is highly accurate, tolerant of noise and is not affected by power outages. However, the absolute encoder is generally more delicate in drilling applications with high ambient temperatures and shock levels. Dynapar addressed this issue by developing compact stainless steel housing that is useful for corrosion resistance in marine applications. The AX71 absolute encoder can withstand up to 100 G of mechanical shock and ambient temperatures of up to 60 degrees C. The encoder is ATEX certified without barriers, and offers the high resolution feedback of 4,000 counts of multiturn rotation and 16,000 counts of position. 1 fig.

  12. Universal dynamic goniometer for rotary encoders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, Nikolai V.; Latyev, Svjatoslav M.; Naumova, Anastasiia I.

    2017-06-01

    A novel dynamic goniometer for the accuracy of rotary encoders has been developed on the base of the method of comparison with the reference encoder. The set-up of the goniometer considers all constructive and informative characteristics of measured encoders. The novel goniometer construction uses the new compensating method of instrumental errors in automatic working process. The advantages of the dynamic goniometer in combination with an optical rotary encoder at the reduction of the measuring time and a simultaneous increase of the accuracy.

  13. 47 CFR 11.32 - EAS Encoder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... encoder programming shall be protected by a lock or other security measures and be configured so that... for either manual or automatic operation. (2) Inputs. The encoder shall have two inputs, one for audio... initiating the automatic generation of the simultaneous tones shall be protected to prevent accidental...

  14. Effects of diazepam on encoding processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gorissen, M.; Eling, P.; Luijtelaar, G. van; Coenen, A.

    1995-01-01

    Benzodiazepines are known to induce amnesic effects. To specify these effects more precisely, 40 healthy volunteers were given 15 mg diazepam or placebo. Effects on a chain of encoding operations were investigated: activation of memory representations, spreading of activation, semantic encoding and

  15. The Arabic Diatessaron Project: Digitalizing, Encoding, Lemmatization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuliano Lancioni

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The Arabic Diatessaron Project (henceforth ADP is an international research project in Digital Humanities that aims to collect, digitalise and encode all known manuscripts of the Arabic Diatessaron (henceforth AD, a text that has been relatively neglected in scholarly research. ADP’s final goal is to provide a number of tools that can enable scholars to effectively query, compare and investigate all known variants of the text that will be encoded as far as possible in compliance with the Text Encoding Initiative (TEI guidelines. The paper addresses a number of issues involved in the process of digitalising manuscripts included in the two existing editions (Ciasca 1888 and Marmardji 1935, adding variants in unedited manuscripts, encoding and lemmatising the text. Issues involved in the design of the ADP include presentation of variants, choice of the standard text, applicability of TEI guidelines, automatic translation between different encodings, cross-edition concordances and principles of lemmatisation.

  16. A model for visual memory encoding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolphe Nenert

    Full Text Available Memory encoding engages multiple concurrent and sequential processes. While the individual processes involved in successful encoding have been examined in many studies, a sequence of events and the importance of modules associated with memory encoding has not been established. For this reason, we sought to perform a comprehensive examination of the network for memory encoding using data driven methods and to determine the directionality of the information flow in order to build a viable model of visual memory encoding. Forty healthy controls ages 19-59 performed a visual scene encoding task. FMRI data were preprocessed using SPM8 and then processed using independent component analysis (ICA with the reliability of the identified components confirmed using ICASSO as implemented in GIFT. The directionality of the information flow was examined using Granger causality analyses (GCA. All participants performed the fMRI task well above the chance level (>90% correct on both active and control conditions and the post-fMRI testing recall revealed correct memory encoding at 86.33 ± 5.83%. ICA identified involvement of components of five different networks in the process of memory encoding, and the GCA allowed for the directionality of the information flow to be assessed, from visual cortex via ventral stream to the attention network and then to the default mode network (DMN. Two additional networks involved in this process were the cerebellar and the auditory-insular network. This study provides evidence that successful visual memory encoding is dependent on multiple modules that are part of other networks that are only indirectly related to the main process. This model may help to identify the node(s of the network that are affected by a specific disease processes and explain the presence of memory encoding difficulties in patients in whom focal or global network dysfunction exists.

  17. A model for visual memory encoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nenert, Rodolphe; Allendorfer, Jane B; Szaflarski, Jerzy P

    2014-01-01

    Memory encoding engages multiple concurrent and sequential processes. While the individual processes involved in successful encoding have been examined in many studies, a sequence of events and the importance of modules associated with memory encoding has not been established. For this reason, we sought to perform a comprehensive examination of the network for memory encoding using data driven methods and to determine the directionality of the information flow in order to build a viable model of visual memory encoding. Forty healthy controls ages 19-59 performed a visual scene encoding task. FMRI data were preprocessed using SPM8 and then processed using independent component analysis (ICA) with the reliability of the identified components confirmed using ICASSO as implemented in GIFT. The directionality of the information flow was examined using Granger causality analyses (GCA). All participants performed the fMRI task well above the chance level (>90% correct on both active and control conditions) and the post-fMRI testing recall revealed correct memory encoding at 86.33 ± 5.83%. ICA identified involvement of components of five different networks in the process of memory encoding, and the GCA allowed for the directionality of the information flow to be assessed, from visual cortex via ventral stream to the attention network and then to the default mode network (DMN). Two additional networks involved in this process were the cerebellar and the auditory-insular network. This study provides evidence that successful visual memory encoding is dependent on multiple modules that are part of other networks that are only indirectly related to the main process. This model may help to identify the node(s) of the network that are affected by a specific disease processes and explain the presence of memory encoding difficulties in patients in whom focal or global network dysfunction exists.

  18. Encoding of coordination complexes with XML.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinoth, P; Sankar, P

    2017-09-01

    An in-silico system to encode structure, bonding and properties of coordination complexes is developed. The encoding is achieved through a semantic XML markup frame. Composition of the coordination complexes is captured in terms of central atom and ligands. Structural information of central atom is detailed in terms of electron status of valence electron orbitals. The ligands are encoded with specific reference to the electron environment of ligand centre atoms. Behaviour of ligands to form low or high spin complexes is accomplished by assigning a Ligand Centre Value to every ligand based on the electronic environment of ligand centre atom. Chemical ontologies are used for categorization purpose and to control different hybridization schemes. Complexes formed by the central atoms of transition metal, non-transition elements belonging to s-block, p-block and f-block are encoded with a generic encoding platform. Complexes of homoleptic, heteroleptic and bridged types are also covered by this encoding system. Utility of the encoded system to predict redox electron transfer reaction in the coordination complexes is demonstrated with a simple application. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Efficient reverse time migration with amplitude encoding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jiangtao; Wang, Huazhong; Zhao, Lei; Shao, Yu; Wang, Meixia; Osen, Are

    2015-08-01

    Reverse time migration (RTM) is an accurate seismic imaging method for imaging the complex subsurface structure. Traditional common shot RTM suffers from low efficiency due to the large number of single shot gathers, especially for marine seismic data. Phase encoding is commonly used to reduce the computational cost of RTM. Phase encoding in the frequency domain is usually related to time shift in the time domain. Therefore, phase-encoding-based RTM needs time padding to avoid information loss which degrades the efficiency of the time-domain wavefield extrapolator. In this paper, an efficient time-domain RTM scheme based on the amplitude encoding is proposed. This scheme uses the orthogonal cosine basis as the encoding function, which has similar physical meaning to plane wave encoding (i.e. plane-wave components with different surface shooting angles). The proposed scheme can generate a qualified imaging result as well as common shot RTM but with less computational cost. Since this scheme does not need time padding, it is more efficient than the phase encoding schemes and can be conveniently implemented in the time domain. Numerical examples on the Sigsbee2a synthetic dataset demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed method.

  20. Using XML to encode TMA DES metadata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyttleton, Oliver; Wright, Alexander; Treanor, Darren; Lewis, Paul

    2011-01-01

    The Tissue Microarray Data Exchange Specification (TMA DES) is an XML specification for encoding TMA experiment data. While TMA DES data is encoded in XML, the files that describe its syntax, structure, and semantics are not. The DTD format is used to describe the syntax and structure of TMA DES, and the ISO 11179 format is used to define the semantics of TMA DES. However, XML Schema can be used in place of DTDs, and another XML encoded format, RDF, can be used in place of ISO 11179. Encoding all TMA DES data and metadata in XML would simplify the development and usage of programs which validate and parse TMA DES data. XML Schema has advantages over DTDs such as support for data types, and a more powerful means of specifying constraints on data values. An advantage of RDF encoded in XML over ISO 11179 is that XML defines rules for encoding data, whereas ISO 11179 does not. We created an XML Schema version of the TMA DES DTD. We wrote a program that converted ISO 11179 definitions to RDF encoded in XML, and used it to convert the TMA DES ISO 11179 definitions to RDF. We validated a sample TMA DES XML file that was supplied with the publication that originally specified TMA DES using our XML Schema. We successfully validated the RDF produced by our ISO 11179 converter with the W3C RDF validation service. All TMA DES data could be encoded using XML, which simplifies its processing. XML Schema allows datatypes and valid value ranges to be specified for CDEs, which enables a wider range of error checking to be performed using XML Schemas than could be performed using DTDs.

  1. Using XML to encode TMA DES metadata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Lyttleton

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Tissue Microarray Data Exchange Specification (TMA DES is an XML specification for encoding TMA experiment data. While TMA DES data is encoded in XML, the files that describe its syntax, structure, and semantics are not. The DTD format is used to describe the syntax and structure of TMA DES, and the ISO 11179 format is used to define the semantics of TMA DES. However, XML Schema can be used in place of DTDs, and another XML encoded format, RDF, can be used in place of ISO 11179. Encoding all TMA DES data and metadata in XML would simplify the development and usage of programs which validate and parse TMA DES data. XML Schema has advantages over DTDs such as support for data types, and a more powerful means of specifying constraints on data values. An advantage of RDF encoded in XML over ISO 11179 is that XML defines rules for encoding data, whereas ISO 11179 does not. Materials and Methods: We created an XML Schema version of the TMA DES DTD. We wrote a program that converted ISO 11179 definitions to RDF encoded in XML, and used it to convert the TMA DES ISO 11179 definitions to RDF. Results: We validated a sample TMA DES XML file that was supplied with the publication that originally specified TMA DES using our XML Schema. We successfully validated the RDF produced by our ISO 11179 converter with the W3C RDF validation service. Conclusions: All TMA DES data could be encoded using XML, which simplifies its processing. XML Schema allows datatypes and valid value ranges to be specified for CDEs, which enables a wider range of error checking to be performed using XML Schemas than could be performed using DTDs.

  2. Staphylococcus enterotoxin A modulates interleukin 15-induced signaling and mitogenesis in human T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerwien, J; Kaltoft, K; Nielsen, M

    1998-01-01

    the anti-mitogenic effect of SEA on cytokine-induced proliferation and the pro-mitogenic effect of PMA. In contrast, inhibitors of PP1, PP2A, protein kinase C (PKC), phosphatidyl-inositol-3-kinase (PI-3K) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) are unable to inhibit the effects of SEA. In a SEA "non...

  3. Expression and correlation of matrix metalloproteinase-7 and interleukin-15 in human osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Yulei; Qiu, Xianxing; Xu, Changbo; Sun, Bo; Shi, Changxiu

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the expression and correlation of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-7 and interleukin (IL)-15 in human osteoarthritis (OA). From October 2013 to December 2014, 30 patients with OA were enrolled. In addition, anther 30 patients with simple meniscus injury were collected as a control group. There were no significant differences in age and gender between the two groups. Articular cartilage tissue was obtained from both OA patients and control group patients. Protein, mRNA, and serum expression levels of MMP-7 and IL-15 in the both two groups were determined by immunohistochemical (IHC), in situ hybridization, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) assay, respectively. Additionally, correlation between MMP-7 and IL-15 expression level in cartilage tissue and serum was assessed using Pearson correlation analysis. Protein, mRNA, and serum expression levels of MMP-7 and IL-15 in patients with OA were all significantly increased in OA patients compared with the control group. Besides, there were strong positive relationships between articular MMP-7 level and serum MMP-7 level (R(2) = 0.573, P = 0.018), between articular IL-15 level and serum IL-15 level (R(2) = 0.861, P = 0.023), and between serum IL-15 level and serum MMP-7 level (R(2) = 0.602, P = 0.012). These results suggest that MMP-7 and IL-15 might play important roles in the pathogenesis of OA, and IL-15 and MMP-7 has positive correlation in OA.

  4. Possible interplay between interleukin-15 and interleukin-17 into the pathogenesis of idiopathic inflammatory myopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Notarnicola

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the serum levels of interleukin (IL-15 and IL-17 in patients with idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM and correlate them with IL-6, IL-10, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1, macrophage inflammatory protein-1α (MIP-1α, MIP-1β levels. Possible correlations with disease activity parameters were also evaluated. Sera from 14 polymyositis (PM, 10 dermatomyositis (DM, 7 anti-synthetase syndrome new onset patients and 19 healthy controls (HCs were analyzed by multiplex immunoassay. Sera from 19 patients were analyzed after 5 months median follow-up. All patients underwent physical examination, the 5-points manual muscle test (MMT, the health assessment questionnaire and serum creatine kinase measurement. All patients received glucocorticoids, and 13 were taking also immunosuppressive therapy. At baseline, serum levels of IL-15, IL-17, MCP-1 and MIP-1β were significantly higher in IIM patients than in HCs. IL-17 serum levels were directly correlated with disease duration (r=0.39, P=0.02, while a significant inverse correlation was detected between IL-17 levels and MMT scores (r=-0.4, P=0.02. The highest IL-15 levels were present in DM patients (P=0.02 vs PM. The most striking finding was the strong correlation between IL-15 and IL-17 levels (r=0.60, P=0.0001, and this correlation was even stronger in DM patients (r=0.82, P=0.006. The strong correlation between IL-15 and IL-17 in IIM patients, and especially in DM, suggests that there may be a interplay between the two cytokines in the pathogenesis of myositis. Further studies of larger patient cohorts and muscle biopsies are needed to confirm these preliminary data.

  5. Possible interplay between interleukin-15 and interleukin-17 into the pathogenesis of idiopathic inflammatory myopathies

    OpenAIRE

    A. Notarnicola; G. Lapadula; D. Natuzzi; F. Iannone

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the serum levels of interleukin (IL)-15 and IL-17 in patients with idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM) and correlate them with IL-6, IL-10, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), macrophage inflammatory protein-1α (MIP-1α), MIP-1β levels. Possible correlations with disease activity parameters were also evaluated. Sera from 14 polymyositis (PM), 10 dermatomyositis (DM), 7 anti-synthetase syndrome new onset patients and 19 healthy controls (HCs) wer...

  6. Exercise-stimulated interleukin-15 is controlled by AMPK and regulates skin metabolism and aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Justin D; MacNeil, Lauren G; Lally, James S; Ford, Rebecca J; Bujak, Adam L; Brar, Ikdip K; Kemp, Bruce E; Raha, Sandeep; Steinberg, Gregory R; Tarnopolsky, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    Aging is commonly associated with a structural deterioration of skin that compromises its barrier function, healing, and susceptibility to disease. Several lines of evidence show that these changes are driven largely by impaired tissue mitochondrial metabolism. While exercise is associated with numerous health benefits, there is no evidence that it affects skin tissue or that endocrine muscle-to-skin signaling occurs. We demonstrate that endurance exercise attenuates age-associated changes to skin in humans and mice and identify exercise-induced IL-15 as a novel regulator of mitochondrial function in aging skin. We show that exercise controls IL-15 expression in part through skeletal muscle AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a central regulator of metabolism, and that the elimination of muscle AMPK causes a deterioration of skin structure. Finally, we establish that daily IL-15 therapy mimics some of the anti-aging effects of exercise on muscle and skin in mice. Thus, we elucidate a mechanism by which exercise confers health benefits to skin and suggest that low-dose IL-15 therapy may prove to be a beneficial strategy to attenuate skin aging. PMID:25902870

  7. Staphylococcus enterotoxin A modulates interleukin 15-induced signaling and mitogenesis in human T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerwien, J; Kaltoft, K; Nielsen, M

    1998-01-01

    the anti-mitogenic effect of SEA on cytokine-induced proliferation and the pro-mitogenic effect of PMA. In contrast, inhibitors of PP1, PP2A, protein kinase C (PKC), phosphatidyl-inositol-3-kinase (PI-3K) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) are unable to inhibit the effects of SEA. In a SEA "non......-mediated mitogenesis correlates with an inhibition of IL-2Rbeta expression and ligand-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of IL-2R. Cyclosporin A (CyA), an inhibitor of the protein phosphatase (PP2B) calcineurin, strongly inhibits the SEA-induced modulations of cytokine receptor expression. Moreover, CyA inhibits both...... is mediated via a PP2B-dependent and PP1/PP2A-, PKC-, PI-3 kinase- and mTOR-independent pathway in human T-cell lines....

  8. Induction of cytotoxic CD8+CD56+ T cells from human thymocytes by interleukin-15

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thulesen, S; Nissen, Mogens Holst; Ødum, N

    2001-01-01

    CD8(+) CD56(+) cells isolated from human peripheral blood lymphocytes have been shown recently to represent a population of cytotoxic active T cells. However, it is not known if these cells are intrathymically or extrathymically developed or how these cells are influenced by growth factors....... In the present study, we investigated the effects of interleukin-2 (IL-2) and IL-15 on human thymocytes with respect to development of CD8(+) CD56(+) T cells. Freshly isolated thymocytes contain few CD8(+) CD56(+) cells, but the number of these cells increases significantly when thymocytes are grown...... in the presence of IL-15 or IL-2. However, IL-15 induced a significantly higher fraction of CD8(+) CD56(+) cells compared with IL-2. Thus, although IL-2 and IL-15 are known to have a number of redundant functions, we here demonstrate that IL-15 is superior to IL-2 in inducing CD8(+) CD56(+) T cells from cultures...

  9. Interleukin 15 is a growth factor for human thymocytes with preferential effect on CD8(+)cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thulesen, S; Nielsen, M; Petersen, T R

    2000-01-01

    The effects of IL-15, as compared to IL-2, on growth of human thymocytes has been evaluated. Expression of comparable amounts of receptor chains was found on IL-2 and IL-15 cultured thymocytes, as well as comparable receptor signalling. However, IL-15 was superior to IL-2 in promoting CD8...

  10. Encoder: a connectionist model of how learning to visually encode fixated text images improves reading fluency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Gale L

    2004-07-01

    This article proposes that visual encoding learning improves reading fluency by widening the span over which letters are recognized from a fixated text image so that fewer fixations are needed to cover a text line. Encoder is a connectionist model that learns to convert images like the fixated text images human readers encode into the corresponding letter sequences. The computational theory of classification learning predicts that fixated text-image size makes this learning difficult but that reducing image variability and biasing learning should help. Encoder confirms these predictions. It fails to learn as image size increases but achieves humanlike visual encoding accuracy when image variability is reduced by regularities in fixation positions and letter sequences and when learning is biased to discover mapping functions based on the sequential, componential structure of text. After training, Encoder exhibits many humanlike text familiarity effects. ((c) 2004 APA, all rights reserved)

  11. An encyclopedia of mouse DNA elements (Mouse ENCODE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamatoyannopoulos, John A; Snyder, Michael; Hardison, Ross; Ren, Bing; Gingeras, Thomas; Gilbert, David M; Groudine, Mark; Bender, Michael; Kaul, Rajinder; Canfield, Theresa; Giste, Erica; Johnson, Audra; Zhang, Mia; Balasundaram, Gayathri; Byron, Rachel; Roach, Vaughan; Sabo, Peter J; Sandstrom, Richard; Stehling, A Sandra; Thurman, Robert E; Weissman, Sherman M; Cayting, Philip; Hariharan, Manoj; Lian, Jin; Cheng, Yong; Landt, Stephen G; Ma, Zhihai; Wold, Barbara J; Dekker, Job; Crawford, Gregory E; Keller, Cheryl A; Wu, Weisheng; Morrissey, Christopher; Kumar, Swathi A; Mishra, Tejaswini; Jain, Deepti; Byrska-Bishop, Marta; Blankenberg, Daniel; Lajoie, Bryan R; Jain, Gaurav; Sanyal, Amartya; Chen, Kaun-Bei; Denas, Olgert; Taylor, James; Blobel, Gerd A; Weiss, Mitchell J; Pimkin, Max; Deng, Wulan; Marinov, Georgi K; Williams, Brian A; Fisher-Aylor, Katherine I; Desalvo, Gilberto; Kiralusha, Anthony; Trout, Diane; Amrhein, Henry; Mortazavi, Ali; Edsall, Lee; McCleary, David; Kuan, Samantha; Shen, Yin; Yue, Feng; Ye, Zhen; Davis, Carrie A; Zaleski, Chris; Jha, Sonali; Xue, Chenghai; Dobin, Alex; Lin, Wei; Fastuca, Meagan; Wang, Huaien; Guigo, Roderic; Djebali, Sarah; Lagarde, Julien; Ryba, Tyrone; Sasaki, Takayo; Malladi, Venkat S; Cline, Melissa S; Kirkup, Vanessa M; Learned, Katrina; Rosenbloom, Kate R; Kent, W James; Feingold, Elise A; Good, Peter J; Pazin, Michael; Lowdon, Rebecca F; Adams, Leslie B

    2012-08-13

    To complement the human Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) project and to enable a broad range of mouse genomics efforts, the Mouse ENCODE Consortium is applying the same experimental pipelines developed for human ENCODE to annotate the mouse genome.

  12. Single echo acquisition MRI using RF encoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Steven M; McDougall, Mary Preston

    2009-11-01

    Encoding of spatial information in magnetic resonance imaging is conventionally accomplished by using magnetic field gradients. During gradient encoding, the position in k-space is determined by a time-integral of the gradient field, resulting in a limitation in imaging speed due to either gradient power or secondary effects such as peripheral nerve stimulation. Partial encoding of spatial information through the sensitivity patterns of an array of coils, known as parallel imaging, is widely used to accelerate the imaging, and is complementary to gradient encoding. This paper describes the one-dimensional limit of parallel imaging in which all spatial localization in one dimension is performed through encoding by the radiofrequency (RF) coil. Using a one-dimensional array of long and narrow parallel elements to localize the image information in one direction, an entire image is obtained from a single line of k-space, avoiding rapid or repeated manipulation of gradients. The technique, called single echo acquisition (SEA) imaging, is described, along with the need for a phase compensation gradient pulse to counteract the phase variation contained in the RF coil pattern which would otherwise cause signal cancellation in each imaging voxel. Image reconstruction and resolution enhancement methods compatible with the speed of the technique are discussed. MR movies at frame rates of 125 frames per second are demonstrated, illustrating the ability to monitor the evolution of transverse magnetization to steady state during an MR experiment as well as demonstrating the ability to image rapid motion. Because this technique, like all RF encoding approaches, relies on the inherent spatially varying pattern of the coil and is not a time-integral, it should enable new applications for MRI that were previously inaccessible due to speed constraints, and should be of interest as an approach to extending the limits of detection in MR imaging.

  13. Enhanced double patterning decomposition using lines encoding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled M. Soradi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Double patterning photolithography (DPL is considered one of the best solutions used for enabling 32 nm/22 nm technology. In this paper, we propose a new technique for double patterning post decomposition conflict resolution. The algorithm is based on lines positions encoding followed by code pattern matching. Experimental results show that the usage of encoded patterns decreases the time needed for pattern matching and increases the matching accuracy. The overall manual problem solution time is reduced to about 1%.

  14. KOGNAC : Efficient encoding of large knowledge graphs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Urbani, Jacopo; Dutta, Sourav; Gurajada, Sairam; Weikum, Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    Many Web applications require efficient querying of large Knowledge Graphs (KGs). We propose KOGNAC, a dictionary-encoding algorithm designed to improve SPARQL querying with a judicious combination of statistical and semantic techniques. In KOGNAC, frequent terms are detected with a frequency

  15. Phenotypic and Molecular Characterization of Plasmid- Encoded ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the distribution of plasmid-encoded extended spectrum beta-lacatamases (ESBLs) in Lahore, Pakistan using different phenotypic and molecular methods. Methods: Escherichia coli and Klebsiella spp were obtained over a period of nineteen months (June 2007 to December 2008). Both were tested ...

  16. in rice encoding a flavin monooxygenase

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cloning, characterization and expression of OsFMO(t) in rice encoding a flavin monooxygenase. Jicai Yi, Lanna Liu, Youpei Cao, Jiazuo Li and Mantong Mei. J. Genet. 92, 471–480. Figure 1. Examples of PCR analysis of the presence of the genes for HPT and GUS in transgenic plants. Genomic DNA of putative.

  17. RNAi suppressors encoded by pathogenic human viruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Walter; Berkhout, Ben

    2008-01-01

    RNA silencing or RNAi interference (RNAi) serves as an innate antiviral mechanism in plants, fungi and animals. Human viruses, like plant viruses, encode suppressor proteins or RNAs that block or modulate the RNAi pathway. This review summarizes the mechanisms by which pathogenic human viruses

  18. Visual Memory : The Price of Encoding Details

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenstein, Mark; Kromm, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Studies on visual long-term memory have shown that we have a tremendous capacity for remembering pictures of objects, even at a highly detailed level. What remains unclear, however, is whether encoding objects at such a detailed level comes at any cost. In the current study, we examined how the

  19. Implicit false memory in the DRM paradigm: effects of amnesia, encoding instructions, and encoding duration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Damme, Ilse; d'Ydewalle, Géry

    2009-09-01

    Recent studies with the Deese/Roediger-McDermott (Deese 1959; Roediger & McDermott, 1995) paradigm have revealed that amnesic patients do not only show impaired veridical memory, but also diminished false memory for semantically related lure words. Due to the typically used explicit retrieval instructions, however, this finding may reflect problems at encoding, at recollection, or both. Therefore, the present experiments examined implicit as well as explicit false memory in patients suffering from Korsakoff's syndrome and controls. In Experiment 1, encoding instructions either focused on remembering individual list words, or on discovering semantic relationships among the words. In Experiment 2, different presentation durations were used. Results emphasize the distinction between automatic and intentional retrieval: Korsakoff patients' veridical and false memory scores were diminished when explicit recollection was required, but not when memory was tested implicitly. Encoding manipulations only significantly affected veridical memory: Priming was reduced with thematic encoding, and explicit retrieval was facilitated when given more study time.

  20. Configural face encoding and spatial frequency information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutet, Isabelle; Collin, Charles; Faubert, Jocelyn

    2003-10-01

    Configural relations and a critical band of spatial frequencies (SFs) in the middle range are particularly important for face recognition. We report the results of four experiments in which the relationship between these two types of information was examined. In Experiments 1, 2A, and 2B, the face inversion effect (FIE) was used to probe configural face encoding. Recognition of upright and inverted faces and nonface objects was measured in four conditions: a no-filter condition and three SF conditions (low, medium, and high frequency). We found significant FIEs of comparable magnitudes for all frequency conditions. In Experiment 3, discrimination of faces on the basis of either configural or featural modifications was measured under the same four conditions. Although the ability to discriminate configural modifications was superior in the medium-frequency condition, so was the ability to discriminate featural modifications. We conclude that the band of SF that is critical for face recognition does not contribute preferentially to configural encoding.

  1. Bacillus caldolyticus prs gene encoding phosphoribosyldiphosphate synthase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krath, Britta N.; Hove-Jensen, Bjarne

    1996-01-01

    The prs gene, encoding phosphoribosyl-diphosphate (PRPP) synthase, as well as the flanking DNA sequences were cloned and sequenced from the Gram-positive thermophile, Bacillus caldolyticus. Comparison with the homologous sequences from the mesophile, Bacillus subtilis, revealed a gene (gca......D) encoding N-acetylglucosamine-l-phosphate uridyltransferase upstream of prs, and a gene homologous to ctc downstream of prs. cDNA synthesis with a B. caldolyticus gcaD-prs-ctc-specified mRNA as template, followed by amplification utilising the polymerase chain reaction indicated that the three genes are co......-transcribed. Comparison of amino acid sequences revealed a high similarity among PRPP synthases across a wide phylogenetic range. An E. coli strain harbouring the B. caldolyticus prs gene in a multicopy plasmid produced PRPP synthase activity 33-fold over the activity of a haploid B. caldolyticus strain. B. caldolyticus...

  2. Storing data encoded DNA in living organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong,; Pak C. , Wong; Kwong K. , Foote; Harlan, P [Richland, WA

    2006-06-06

    Current technologies allow the generation of artificial DNA molecules and/or the ability to alter the DNA sequences of existing DNA molecules. With a careful coding scheme and arrangement, it is possible to encode important information as an artificial DNA strand and store it in a living host safely and permanently. This inventive technology can be used to identify origins and protect R&D investments. It can also be used in environmental research to track generations of organisms and observe the ecological impact of pollutants. Today, there are microorganisms that can survive under extreme conditions. As well, it is advantageous to consider multicellular organisms as hosts for stored information. These living organisms can provide as memory housing and protection for stored data or information. The present invention provides well for data storage in a living organism wherein at least one DNA sequence is encoded to represent data and incorporated into a living organism.

  3. Nucleic acid compositions and the encoding proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, III, James F.; Chow, Virginia; Nong, Guang; Rice, John D.; St. John, Franz J.

    2014-09-02

    The subject invention provides at least one nucleic acid sequence encoding an aldouronate-utilization regulon isolated from Paenibacillus sp. strain JDR-2, a bacterium which efficiently utilizes xylan and metabolizes aldouronates (methylglucuronoxylosaccharides). The subject invention also provides a means for providing a coordinately regulated process in which xylan depolymerization and product assimilation are coupled in Paenibacillus sp. strain JDR-2 to provide a favorable system for the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to biobased products. Additionally, the nucleic acid sequences encoding the aldouronate-utilization regulon can be used to transform other bacteria to form organisms capable of producing a desired product (e.g., ethanol, 1-butanol, acetoin, 2,3-butanediol, 1,3-propanediol, succinate, lactate, acetate, malate or alanine) from lignocellulosic biomass.

  4. An Intensional Concurrent Faithful Encoding of Turing Machines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Given-Wilson

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The benchmark for computation is typically given as Turing computability; the ability for a computation to be performed by a Turing Machine. Many languages exploit (indirect encodings of Turing Machines to demonstrate their ability to support arbitrary computation. However, these encodings are usually by simulating the entire Turing Machine within the language, or by encoding a language that does an encoding or simulation itself. This second category is typical for process calculi that show an encoding of lambda-calculus (often with restrictions that in turn simulates a Turing Machine. Such approaches lead to indirect encodings of Turing Machines that are complex, unclear, and only weakly equivalent after computation. This paper presents an approach to encoding Turing Machines into intensional process calculi that is faithful, reduction preserving, and structurally equivalent. The encoding is demonstrated in a simple asymmetric concurrent pattern calculus before generalised to simplify infinite terms, and to show encodings into Concurrent Pattern Calculus and Psi Calculi.

  5. Audio Cartography: Visual Encoding of Acoustic Parameters

    OpenAIRE

    Kornfeld, A.; Schiewe, J.; Dykes, J.

    2011-01-01

    Our sonic environment is the matter of subject in multiple domains which developed individual means of its description. As a result, it lacks an established visual language through which knowledge can be connected and insights shared. We provide a visual communication framework for the systematic and coherent documentation of sound in large-scale environments. This consists of visual encodings and mappings of acoustic parameters into distinct graphic variables that present plausible solutions...

  6. Toward Chemical Implementation of Encoded Combinatorial Libraries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, John; Janda, Kim D.

    1994-01-01

    The recent application of "combinatorial libraries" to supplement existing drug screening processes might simplify and accelerate the search for new lead compounds or drugs. Recently, a scheme for encoded combinatorial chemistry was put forward to surmount a number of the limitations possessed by...... by existing methodologies. Here we detail the synthesis of several matrices and the necessary chemistry to implement the conceptual scheme. In addition, we disclose how this novel technology permits a controlled ′dendritic" display of the chemical libraries....

  7. ChIP-seq guidelines and practices of the ENCODE and modENCODE consortia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landt, Stephen G.; Marinov, Georgi K.; Kundaje, Anshul; Kheradpour, Pouya; Pauli, Florencia; Batzoglou, Serafim; Bernstein, Bradley E.; Bickel, Peter; Brown, James B.; Cayting, Philip; Chen, Yiwen; DeSalvo, Gilberto; Epstein, Charles; Fisher-Aylor, Katherine I.; Euskirchen, Ghia; Gerstein, Mark; Gertz, Jason; Hartemink, Alexander J.; Hoffman, Michael M.; Iyer, Vishwanath R.; Jung, Youngsook L.; Karmakar, Subhradip; Kellis, Manolis; Kharchenko, Peter V.; Li, Qunhua; Liu, Tao; Liu, X. Shirley; Ma, Lijia; Milosavljevic, Aleksandar; Myers, Richard M.; Park, Peter J.; Pazin, Michael J.; Perry, Marc D.; Raha, Debasish; Reddy, Timothy E.; Rozowsky, Joel; Shoresh, Noam; Sidow, Arend; Slattery, Matthew; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A.; Tolstorukov, Michael Y.; White, Kevin P.; Xi, Simon; Farnham, Peggy J.; Lieb, Jason D.; Wold, Barbara J.; Snyder, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) followed by high-throughput DNA sequencing (ChIP-seq) has become a valuable and widely used approach for mapping the genomic location of transcription-factor binding and histone modifications in living cells. Despite its widespread use, there are considerable differences in how these experiments are conducted, how the results are scored and evaluated for quality, and how the data and metadata are archived for public use. These practices affect the quality and utility of any global ChIP experiment. Through our experience in performing ChIP-seq experiments, the ENCODE and modENCODE consortia have developed a set of working standards and guidelines for ChIP experiments that are updated routinely. The current guidelines address antibody validation, experimental replication, sequencing depth, data and metadata reporting, and data quality assessment. We discuss how ChIP quality, assessed in these ways, affects different uses of ChIP-seq data. All data sets used in the analysis have been deposited for public viewing and downloading at the ENCODE (http://encodeproject.org/ENCODE/) and modENCODE (http://www.modencode.org/) portals. PMID:22955991

  8. Evaluating standard terminologies for encoding allergy information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goss, Foster R; Zhou, Li; Plasek, Joseph M; Broverman, Carol; Robinson, George; Middleton, Blackford; Rocha, Roberto A

    2013-01-01

    Allergy documentation and exchange are vital to ensuring patient safety. This study aims to analyze and compare various existing standard terminologies for representing allergy information. Five terminologies were identified, including the Systemized Nomenclature of Medical Clinical Terms (SNOMED CT), National Drug File-Reference Terminology (NDF-RT), Medication Dictionary for Regulatory Activities (MedDRA), Unique Ingredient Identifier (UNII), and RxNorm. A qualitative analysis was conducted to compare desirable characteristics of each terminology, including content coverage, concept orientation, formal definitions, multiple granularities, vocabulary structure, subset capability, and maintainability. A quantitative analysis was also performed to compare the content coverage of each terminology for (1) common food, drug, and environmental allergens and (2) descriptive concepts for common drug allergies, adverse reactions (AR), and no known allergies. Our qualitative results show that SNOMED CT fulfilled the greatest number of desirable characteristics, followed by NDF-RT, RxNorm, UNII, and MedDRA. Our quantitative results demonstrate that RxNorm had the highest concept coverage for representing drug allergens, followed by UNII, SNOMED CT, NDF-RT, and MedDRA. For food and environmental allergens, UNII demonstrated the highest concept coverage, followed by SNOMED CT. For representing descriptive allergy concepts and adverse reactions, SNOMED CT and NDF-RT showed the highest coverage. Only SNOMED CT was capable of representing unique concepts for encoding no known allergies. The proper terminology for encoding a patient's allergy is complex, as multiple elements need to be captured to form a fully structured clinical finding. Our results suggest that while gaps still exist, a combination of SNOMED CT and RxNorm can satisfy most criteria for encoding common allergies and provide sufficient content coverage.

  9. The ENCODE (ENCyclopedia Of DNA Elements) Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-10-22

    The ENCyclopedia Of DNA Elements (ENCODE) Project aims to identify all functional elements in the human genome sequence. The pilot phase of the Project is focused on a specified 30 megabases (approximately 1%) of the human genome sequence and is organized as an international consortium of computational and laboratory-based scientists working to develop and apply high-throughput approaches for detecting all sequence elements that confer biological function. The results of this pilot phase will guide future efforts to analyze the entire human genome.

  10. Rapidly-Indexing Incremental-Angle Encoder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christon, Philip R.; Meyer, Wallace W.

    1989-01-01

    Optoelectronic system measures relative angular position of shaft or other device to be turned, also measures absolute angular position after device turned through small angle. Relative angular position measured with fine resolution by optoelectronically counting finely- and uniformly-spaced light and dark areas on encoder disk as disk turns past position-sensing device. Also includes track containing coarsely- and nonuniformly-spaced light and dark areas, angular widths varying in proportion to absolute angular position. This second track provides gating and indexing signal.

  11. Dual beam encoded extended fractional Fourier transform security ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This paper describes a simple method for making dual beam encoded extended fractional Fourier transform (EFRT) security holograms. The hologram possesses different stages of encoding so that security features are concealed and remain invisible to the counterfeiter. These concealed and encoded anticounterfeit ...

  12. Dual beam encoded extended fractional Fourier transform security ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. This paper describes a simple method for making dual beam encoded ex- tended fractional Fourier transform (EFRT) security holograms. The hologram possesses different stages of encoding so that security features are concealed and remain invisible to the counterfeiter. These concealed and encoded ...

  13. How can survival processing improve memory encoding?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Meng; Geng, Haiyan

    2013-11-01

    We investigated the psychological mechanism of survival processing advantage from the perspective of false memory in two experiments. Using a DRM paradigm in combination with analysis based on signal detection theory, we were able to separately examine participants' utilization of verbatim representation and gist representation. Specifically, in Experiment 1, participants rated semantically related words in a survival scenario for a survival condition but rated pleasantness of words in the same DRM lists for a non-survival control condition. The results showed that participants demonstrated more gist processing in the survival condition than in the pleasantness condition; however, the degree of item-specific processing in the two encoding conditions did not significantly differ. In Experiment 2, the control task was changed to a category rating task, in which participants were asked to make category ratings of words in the category lists. We found that the survival condition involved more item-specific processing than did the category condition, but we found no significant difference between the two encoding conditions at the level of gist processing. Overall, our study demonstrates that survival processing can simultaneously promote gist and item-specific representations. When the control tasks only promoted either item-specific representation or gist representation, memory advantages of survival processing occurred.

  14. V123 Beam Synchronous Encoder Module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerner, T.; Conkling, C. R.; Oerter, B.

    1999-01-01

    The V123 Synchronous Encoder Module transmits events to distributed trigger modules and embedded decoders around the RHIC rings where they are used to provide beam instrumentation triggers [1,2,3]. The RHIC beam synchronous event link hardware is mainly comprised of three VMEbus board designs, the central input modules (V201), and encoder modules (V123), and the distributed trigger modules (V124). Two beam synchronous links, one for each ring, are distributed via fiberoptic and fanned out via twisted wire pair cables. The V123 synchronizes with the RF system clock derived from the beam bucket frequency and a revolution fiducial pulse. The RF system clock is used to create the beam synchronous event link carrier and events are synchronized with the rotation fiducial. A low jitter RF clock is later recovered from this carrier by phase lock loops in the trigger modules. Prioritized hardware and software triggers fill up to 15 beam event code transmission slots per revolution while tracking the ramping RF acceleration frequency and storage frequency. The revolution fiducial event is always the first event transmitted which is used to synchronize the firing of the abort kicker and to locate the first bucket for decoders distributed about the ring

  15. Negative base encoding in optical linear algebra processors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlee, C.; Casasent, D.

    1986-01-01

    In the digital multiplication by analog convolution algorithm, the bits of two encoded numbers are convolved to form the product of the two numbers in mixed binary representation; this output can be easily converted to binary. Attention is presently given to negative base encoding, treating base -2 initially, and then showing that the negative base system can be readily extended to any radix. In general, negative base encoding in optical linear algebra processors represents a more efficient technique than either sign magnitude or 2's complement encoding, when the additions of digitally encoded products are performed in parallel.

  16. A New Quantum Gray-Scale Image Encoding Scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naseri, Mosayeb; Abdolmaleky, Mona; Parandin, Fariborz; Fatahi, Negin; Farouk, Ahmed; Nazari, Reza

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, a new quantum images encoding scheme is proposed. The proposed scheme mainly consists of four different encoding algorithms. The idea behind of the scheme is a binary key generated randomly for each pixel of the original image. Afterwards, the employed encoding algorithm is selected corresponding to the qubit pair of the generated randomized binary key. The security analysis of the proposed scheme proved its enhancement through both randomization of the generated binary image key and altering the gray-scale value of the image pixels using the qubits of randomized binary key. The simulation of the proposed scheme assures that the final encoded image could not be recognized visually. Moreover, the histogram diagram of encoded image is flatter than the original one. The Shannon entropies of the final encoded images are significantly higher than the original one, which indicates that the attacker can not gain any information about the encoded images. Supported by Kermanshah Branch, Islamic Azad University, Kermanshah, IRAN

  17. Premotor and Motor Cortices Encode Reward.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavan Ramkumar

    Full Text Available Rewards associated with actions are critical for motivation and learning about the consequences of one's actions on the world. The motor cortices are involved in planning and executing movements, but it is unclear whether they encode reward over and above limb kinematics and dynamics. Here, we report a categorical reward signal in dorsal premotor (PMd and primary motor (M1 neurons that corresponds to an increase in firing rates when a trial was not rewarded regardless of whether or not a reward was expected. We show that this signal is unrelated to error magnitude, reward prediction error, or other task confounds such as reward consumption, return reach plan, or kinematic differences across rewarded and unrewarded trials. The availability of reward information in motor cortex is crucial for theories of reward-based learning and motivational influences on actions.

  18. Encoding !-tensors as !-graphs with neighbourhood orders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Quick

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Diagrammatic reasoning using string diagrams provides an intuitive language for reasoning about morphisms in a symmetric monoidal category. To allow working with infinite families of string diagrams, !-graphs were introduced as a method to mark repeated structure inside a diagram. This led to !-graphs being implemented in the diagrammatic proof assistant Quantomatic. Having a partially automated program for rewriting diagrams has proven very useful, but being based on !-graphs, only commutative theories are allowed. An enriched abstract tensor notation, called !-tensors, has been used to formalise the notion of !-boxes in non-commutative structures. This work-in-progress paper presents a method to encode !-tensors as !-graphs with some additional structure. This will allow us to leverage the existing code from Quantomatic and quickly provide various tools for non-commutative diagrammatic reasoning.

  19. Radiofrequency encoded angular-resolved light scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buckley, Brandon W.; Akbari, Najva; Diebold, Eric D.

    2015-01-01

    The sensitive, specific, and label-free classification of microscopic cells and organisms is one of the outstanding problems in biology. Today, instruments such as the flow cytometer use a combination of light scatter measurements at two distinct angles to infer the size and internal complexity...... of cells at rates of more than 10,000 per second. However, by examining the entire angular light scattering spectrum it is possible to classify cells with higher resolution and specificity. Current approaches to performing these angular spectrum measurements all have significant throughput limitations...... Encoded Angular-resolved Light Scattering (REALS), this technique multiplexes angular light scattering in the radiofrequency domain, such that a single photodetector captures the entire scattering spectrum from a particle over approximately 100 discrete incident angles on a single shot basis. As a proof...

  20. Brain Circuits Encoding Reward from Pain Relief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navratilova, Edita; Atcherley, Christopher W; Porreca, Frank

    2015-11-01

    Relief from pain in humans is rewarding and pleasurable. Primary rewards, or reward-predictive cues, are encoded in brain reward/motivational circuits. While considerable advances have been made in our understanding of reward circuits underlying positive reinforcement, less is known about the circuits underlying the hedonic and reinforcing actions of pain relief. We review findings from electrophysiological, neuroimaging, and behavioral studies supporting the concept that the rewarding effect of pain relief requires opioid signaling in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), activation of midbrain dopamine neurons, and the release of dopamine in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). Understanding of circuits that govern the reward of pain relief may allow the discovery of more effective and satisfying therapies for patients with acute or chronic pain.

  1. Measurement strategy for spatially encoded photonic qubits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solis-Prosser, M. A.; Neves, L.

    2010-01-01

    We propose a measurement strategy which can, probabilistically, reproduce the statistics of any observable for spatially encoded photonic qubits. It comprises the implementation of a two-outcome positive operator-valued measure followed by a detection in a fixed transverse position, making the displacement of the detection system unnecessary, unlike previous methods. This strategy generalizes a scheme recently demonstrated by one of us and co-workers, restricted to measurement of observables with equatorial eigenvectors only. The method presented here can be implemented with the current technology of programmable multipixel liquid-crystal displays. In addition, it can be straightforwardly extended to high-dimensional qudits and may be a valuable tool in optical implementations of quantum information protocols with spatial qubits and qudits.

  2. Ultrathin Nonlinear Metasurface for Optical Image Encoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Felicitas; Li, Guixin; Meier, Cedrik; Zhang, Shuang; Zentgraf, Thomas

    2017-05-10

    Security of optical information is of great importance in modern society. Many cryptography techniques based on classical and quantum optics have been widely explored in the linear optical regime. Nonlinear optical encryption in which encoding and decoding involve nonlinear frequency conversions represents a new strategy for securing optical information. Here, we demonstrate that an ultrathin nonlinear photonic metasurface, consisting of meta-atoms with 3-fold rotational symmetry, can be used to hide optical images under illumination with a fundamental wave. However, the hidden image can be read out from second harmonic generation (SHG) waves. This is achieved by controlling the destructive and constructive interferences of SHG waves from two neighboring meta-atoms. In addition, we apply this concept to obtain gray scale SHG imaging. Nonlinear metasurfaces based on space variant optical interference open new avenues for multilevel image encryption, anticounterfeiting, and background free image reconstruction.

  3. Encoding by synchronization in the primate striatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Avital; Finkes, Inna; Katabi, Shiran; Prut, Yifat; Bergman, Hagai

    2013-03-13

    Information is encoded in the nervous system through the discharge and synchronization of single neurons. The striatum, the input stage of the basal ganglia, is divided into three territories: the putamen, the caudate, and the ventral striatum, all of which converge onto the same motor pathway. This parallel organization suggests that there are multiple and competing systems in the basal ganglia network controlling behavior. To explore which mechanism(s) enables the different striatal domains to encode behavioral events and to control behavior, we compared the neural activity of phasically active neurons [medium spiny neurons (MSNs), presumed projection neurons] and tonically active neurons (presumed cholinergic interneurons) across striatal territories from monkeys during the performance of a well practiced task. Although neurons in all striatal territories displayed similar spontaneous discharge properties and similar temporal modulations of their discharge rates to the behavioral events, their correlation structure was profoundly different. The distributions of signal and noise correlation of pairs of putamen MSNs were strongly shifted toward positive correlations and these two measures were correlated. In contrast, MSN pairs in the caudate and ventral striatum displayed symmetrical, near-zero signal and noise correlation distributions. Furthermore, only putamen MSN pairs displayed different noise correlation dynamics to rewarding versus neutral/aversive cues. Similarly, the noise correlation between tonically active neuron pairs was stronger in the putamen than in the caudate. We suggest that the level of synchronization of the neuronal activity and its temporal dynamics differentiate the striatal territories and may thus account for the different roles that striatal domains play in behavioral control.

  4. Encoding and Decoding Models in Cognitive Electrophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdgraf, Christopher R; Rieger, Jochem W; Micheli, Cristiano; Martin, Stephanie; Knight, Robert T; Theunissen, Frederic E

    2017-01-01

    Cognitive neuroscience has seen rapid growth in the size and complexity of data recorded from the human brain as well as in the computational tools available to analyze this data. This data explosion has resulted in an increased use of multivariate, model-based methods for asking neuroscience questions, allowing scientists to investigate multiple hypotheses with a single dataset, to use complex, time-varying stimuli, and to study the human brain under more naturalistic conditions. These tools come in the form of "Encoding" models, in which stimulus features are used to model brain activity, and "Decoding" models, in which neural features are used to generated a stimulus output. Here we review the current state of encoding and decoding models in cognitive electrophysiology and provide a practical guide toward conducting experiments and analyses in this emerging field. Our examples focus on using linear models in the study of human language and audition. We show how to calculate auditory receptive fields from natural sounds as well as how to decode neural recordings to predict speech. The paper aims to be a useful tutorial to these approaches, and a practical introduction to using machine learning and applied statistics to build models of neural activity. The data analytic approaches we discuss may also be applied to other sensory modalities, motor systems, and cognitive systems, and we cover some examples in these areas. In addition, a collection of Jupyter notebooks is publicly available as a complement to the material covered in this paper, providing code examples and tutorials for predictive modeling in python. The aim is to provide a practical understanding of predictive modeling of human brain data and to propose best-practices in conducting these analyses.

  5. Modular verification of chemical reaction network encodings via serializability analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakin, Matthew R.; Stefanovic, Darko; Phillips, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Chemical reaction networks are a powerful means of specifying the intended behaviour of synthetic biochemical systems. A high-level formal specification, expressed as a chemical reaction network, may be compiled into a lower-level encoding, which can be directly implemented in wet chemistry and may itself be expressed as a chemical reaction network. Here we present conditions under which a lower-level encoding correctly emulates the sequential dynamics of a high-level chemical reaction network. We require that encodings are transactional, such that their execution is divided by a “commit reaction” that irreversibly separates the reactant-consuming phase of the encoding from the product-generating phase. We also impose restrictions on the sharing of species between reaction encodings, based on a notion of “extra tolerance”, which defines species that may be shared between encodings without enabling unwanted reactions. Our notion of correctness is serializability of interleaved reaction encodings, and if all reaction encodings satisfy our correctness properties then we can infer that the global dynamics of the system are correct. This allows us to infer correctness of any system constructed using verified encodings. As an example, we show how this approach may be used to verify two- and four-domain DNA strand displacement encodings of chemical reaction networks, and we generalize our result to the limit where the populations of helper species are unlimited. PMID:27325906

  6. Modular verification of chemical reaction network encodings via serializability analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakin, Matthew R; Stefanovic, Darko; Phillips, Andrew

    2016-06-13

    Chemical reaction networks are a powerful means of specifying the intended behaviour of synthetic biochemical systems. A high-level formal specification, expressed as a chemical reaction network, may be compiled into a lower-level encoding, which can be directly implemented in wet chemistry and may itself be expressed as a chemical reaction network. Here we present conditions under which a lower-level encoding correctly emulates the sequential dynamics of a high-level chemical reaction network. We require that encodings are transactional, such that their execution is divided by a "commit reaction" that irreversibly separates the reactant-consuming phase of the encoding from the product-generating phase. We also impose restrictions on the sharing of species between reaction encodings, based on a notion of "extra tolerance", which defines species that may be shared between encodings without enabling unwanted reactions. Our notion of correctness is serializability of interleaved reaction encodings, and if all reaction encodings satisfy our correctness properties then we can infer that the global dynamics of the system are correct. This allows us to infer correctness of any system constructed using verified encodings. As an example, we show how this approach may be used to verify two- and four-domain DNA strand displacement encodings of chemical reaction networks, and we generalize our result to the limit where the populations of helper species are unlimited.

  7. ENCODE whole-genome data in the UCSC Genome Browser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbloom, Kate R.; Dreszer, Timothy R.; Pheasant, Michael; Barber, Galt P.; Meyer, Laurence R.; Pohl, Andy; Raney, Brian J.; Wang, Ting; Hinrichs, Angie S.; Zweig, Ann S.; Fujita, Pauline A.; Learned, Katrina; Rhead, Brooke; Smith, Kayla E.; Kuhn, Robert M.; Karolchik, Donna; Haussler, David; Kent, W. James

    2010-01-01

    The Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) project is an international consortium of investigators funded to analyze the human genome with the goal of producing a comprehensive catalog of functional elements. The ENCODE Data Coordination Center at The University of California, Santa Cruz (UCSC) is the primary repository for experimental results generated by ENCODE investigators. These results are captured in the UCSC Genome Bioinformatics database and download server for visualization and data mining via the UCSC Genome Browser and companion tools (Rhead et al. The UCSC Genome Browser Database: update 2010, in this issue). The ENCODE web portal at UCSC (http://encodeproject.org or http://genome.ucsc.edu/ENCODE) provides information about the ENCODE data and convenient links for access. PMID:19920125

  8. Three-dimensional MRI with independent slab excitation and encoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eissa, Amir; Wilman, Alan H

    2012-02-01

    Three-dimensional MRI is typically performed with the same orientation for radiofrequency slab excitation and slab select phase encoding. We introduce independent slab excitation and encoding to create a new degree of freedom in three-dimensional MRI, which is the angular relationship between the prescribed excitation volume and the voxel encoding grid. By separating the directions of slab excitation and slab phase encoding, the independent slab excitation and encoding method allows choice of optimal voxel orientation, while maintaining volume excitation based on anatomic landmarks. The method requires simple pulse sequence modifications and uses standard image reconstruction followed by removal of aliasing and image reformatting. The independent slab excitation and encoding method enables arbitrary oblique angle imaging using fixed voxel encoding gradients to maintain similar eddy current, concomitant field, or magnetic dipole effects independent of the oblique angle of excitation. We apply independent slab excitation and encoding to phase and susceptibility-weighted imaging using fixed voxel encoding aligned with the main magnetic field to demonstrate its value in both standardizing and improving image contrast, when using arbitrary oblique imaging volumes. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Exploring the influence of encoding format on subsequent memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turney, Indira C; Dennis, Nancy A; Maillet, David; Rajah, M Natasha

    2017-05-01

    Distinctive encoding is greatly influenced by gist-based processes and has been shown to suffer when highly similar items are presented in close succession. Thus, elucidating the mechanisms underlying how presentation format affects gist processing is essential in determining the factors that influence these encoding processes. The current study utilised multivariate partial least squares (PLS) analysis to identify encoding networks directly associated with retrieval performance in a blocked and intermixed presentation condition. Subsequent memory analysis for successfully encoded items indicated no significant differences between reaction time and retrieval performance and presentation format. Despite no significant behavioural differences, behaviour PLS revealed differences in brain-behaviour correlations and mean condition activity in brain regions associated with gist-based vs. distinctive encoding. Specifically, the intermixed format encouraged more distinctive encoding, showing increased activation of regions associated with strategy use and visual processing (e.g., frontal and visual cortices, respectively). Alternatively, the blocked format exhibited increased gist-based processes, accompanied by increased activity in the right inferior frontal gyrus. Together, results suggest that the sequence that information is presented during encoding affects the degree to which distinctive encoding is engaged. These findings extend our understanding of the Fuzzy Trace Theory and the role of presentation format on encoding processes.

  10. An optimal dissipative encoder for the toric code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dengis, John; König, Robert; Pastawski, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    We consider the problem of preparing specific encoded resource states for the toric code by local, time-independent interactions with a memoryless environment. We propose the construction of such a dissipative encoder which converts product states to topologically ordered ones while preserving logical information. The corresponding Liouvillian is made up of four local Lindblad operators. For a qubit lattice of size L × L, we show that this process prepares encoded states in time O(L), which is optimal. This scaling compares favorably with known local unitary encoders for the toric code which take time of order Ω(L2) and require active time-dependent control.

  11. Temporal encoding in a nervous system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zane N Aldworth

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available We examined the extent to which temporal encoding may be implemented by single neurons in the cercal sensory system of the house cricket Acheta domesticus. We found that these neurons exhibit a greater-than-expected coding capacity, due in part to an increased precision in brief patterns of action potentials. We developed linear and non-linear models for decoding the activity of these neurons. We found that the stimuli associated with short-interval patterns of spikes (ISIs of 8 ms or less could be predicted better by second-order models as compared to linear models. Finally, we characterized the difference between these linear and second-order models in a low-dimensional subspace, and showed that modification of the linear models along only a few dimensions improved their predictive power to parity with the second order models. Together these results show that single neurons are capable of using temporal patterns of spikes as fundamental symbols in their neural code, and that they communicate specific stimulus distributions to subsequent neural structures.

  12. Dynamical encoding of looming, receding, and focussing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longtin, Andre; Clarke, Stephen Elisha; Maler, Leonard; CenterNeural Dynamics Collaboration

    This talk will discuss a non-conventional neural coding task that may apply more broadly to many senses in higher vertebrates. We ask whether and how a non-visual sensory system can focus on an object. We present recent experimental and modeling work that shows how the early sensory circuitry of electric sense can perform such neuronal focusing that is manifested behaviorally. This sense is the main one used by weakly electric fish to navigate, locate prey and communicate in the murky waters of their natural habitat. We show that there is a distance at which the Fisher information of a neuron's response to a looming and receding object is maximized, and that this distance corresponds to a behaviorally relevant one chosen by these animals. Strikingly, this maximum occurs at a bifurcation between tonic firing and bursting. We further discuss how the invariance of this distance to signal attributes can arise, a process that first involves power-law spike frequency adaptation. The talk will also highlight the importance of expanding the classic dual neural encoding of contrast using ON and OFF cells in the context of looming and receding stimuli. The authors acknowledge support from CIHR and NSERC.

  13. Comparative genomics of Shiga toxin encoding bacteriophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Darren L

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stx bacteriophages are responsible for driving the dissemination of Stx toxin genes (stx across their bacterial host range. Lysogens carrying Stx phages can cause severe, life-threatening disease and Stx toxin is an integral virulence factor. The Stx-bacteriophage vB_EcoP-24B, commonly referred to as Ф24B, is capable of multiply infecting a single bacterial host cell at a high frequency, with secondary infection increasing the rate at which subsequent bacteriophage infections can occur. This is biologically unusual, therefore determining the genomic content and context of Ф24B compared to other lambdoid Stx phages is important to understanding the factors controlling this phenomenon and determining whether they occur in other Stx phages. Results The genome of the Stx2 encoding phage, Ф24B was sequenced and annotated. The genomic organisation and general features are similar to other sequenced Stx bacteriophages induced from Enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC, however Ф24B possesses significant regions of heterogeneity, with implications for phage biology and behaviour. The Ф24B genome was compared to other sequenced Stx phages and the archetypal lambdoid phage, lambda, using the Circos genome comparison tool and a PCR-based multi-loci comparison system. Conclusions The data support the hypothesis that Stx phages are mosaic, and recombination events between the host, phages and their remnants within the same infected bacterial cell will continue to drive the evolution of Stx phage variants and the subsequent dissemination of shigatoxigenic potential.

  14. Holographic encoding of universality in corner spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ching-Yu; Wei, Tzu-Chieh; Orús, Román

    2017-05-01

    In numerical simulations of classical and quantum lattice systems, 2D corner transfer matrices (CTMs) and 3D corner tensors (CTs) are a useful tool to compute approximate contractions of infinite-size tensor networks. In this paper we show how the numerical CTMs and CTs can be used, additionally, to extract universal information from their spectra. We provide examples of this for classical and quantum systems, in 1D, 2D, and 3D. Our results provide, in particular, practical evidence for a wide variety of models of the correspondence between d -dimensional quantum and (d +1 ) -dimensional classical spin systems. We show also how corner properties can be used to pinpoint quantum phase transitions, topological or not, without the need for observables. Moreover, for a chiral topological PEPS we show by examples that corner tensors can be used to extract the entanglement spectrum of half a system, with the expected symmetries of the S U (2) k Wess-Zumino-Witten model describing its gapless edge for k =1 ,2 . We also review the theory behind the quantum-classical correspondence for spin systems and provide a numerical scheme for quantum state renormalization in 2D using CTs. Our results show that bulk information of a lattice system is encoded holographically in efficiently-computable properties of its corners.

  15. Peafowl antipredator calls encode information about signalers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorzinski, Jessica L

    2014-02-01

    Animals emit vocalizations that convey information about external events. Many of these vocalizations, including those emitted in response to predators, also encode information about the individual that produced the call. The relationship between acoustic features of antipredator calls and information relating to signalers (including sex, identity, body size, and social rank) were examined in peafowl (Pavo cristatus). The "bu-girk" antipredator calls of male and female peafowl were recorded and 20 acoustic parameters were automatically extracted from each call. Both the bu and girk elements of the antipredator call were individually distinctive and calls were classified to the correct signaler with over 90% and 70% accuracy in females and males, respectively. Females produced calls with a higher fundamental frequency (F0) than males. In both females and males, body size was negatively correlated with F0. In addition, peahen rank was related to the duration, end mean frequency, and start harmonicity of the bu element. Peafowl antipredator calls contain detailed information about the signaler and can potentially be used by receivers to respond to dangerous situations.

  16. Stress as a mnemonic filter: Interactions between medial temporal lobe encoding processes and post-encoding stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchey, Maureen; McCullough, Andrew M; Ranganath, Charan; Yonelinas, Andrew P

    2017-01-01

    Acute stress has been shown to modulate memory for recently learned information, an effect attributed to the influence of stress hormones on medial temporal lobe (MTL) consolidation processes. However, little is known about which memories will be affected when stress follows encoding. One possibility is that stress interacts with encoding processes to selectively protect memories that had elicited responses in the hippocampus and amygdala, two MTL structures important for memory formation. There is limited evidence for interactions between encoding processes and consolidation effects in humans, but recent studies of consolidation in rodents have emphasized the importance of encoding "tags" for determining the impact of consolidation manipulations on memory. Here, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging in humans to test the hypothesis that the effects of post-encoding stress depend on MTL processes observed during encoding. We found that changes in stress hormone levels were associated with an increase in the contingency of memory outcomes on hippocampal and amygdala encoding responses. That is, for participants showing high cortisol reactivity, memories became more dependent on MTL activity observed during encoding, thereby shifting the distribution of recollected events toward those that had elicited relatively high activation. Surprisingly, this effect was generally larger for neutral, compared to emotionally negative, memories. The results suggest that stress does not uniformly enhance memory, but instead selectively preserves memories tagged during encoding, effectively acting as mnemonic filter. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Olfactory bulb encoding during learning under anaesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alister U Nicol

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Neural plasticity changes within the olfactory bulb are important for olfactory learning, although how neural encoding changes support new associations with specific odours and whether they can be investigated under anaesthesia, remain unclear. Using the social transmission of food preference olfactory learning paradigm in mice in conjunction with in vivo microdialysis sampling we have shown firstly that a learned preference for a scented food odour smelled on the breath of a demonstrator animal occurs under isofluorane anaesthesia. Furthermore, subsequent exposure to this cued odour under anaesthesia promotes the same pattern of increased release of glutamate and GABA in the olfactory bulb as previously found in conscious animals following olfactory learning, and evoked GABA release was positively correlated with the amount of scented food eaten. In a second experiment, multiarray (24 electrodes electrophysiological recordings were made from olfactory bulb mitral cells under isofluorane anaesthesia before, during and after a novel scented food odour was paired with carbon disulfide. Results showed significant increases in overall firing frequency to the cued-odour during and after learning and decreases in response to an uncued odour. Analysis of patterns of changes in individual neurons revealed that a substantial proportion (>50% of them significantly changed their response profiles during and after learning with most of those previously inhibited becoming excited. A large number of cells exhibiting no response to the odours prior to learning were either excited or inhibited afterwards. With the uncued odour many previously responsive cells became unresponsive or inhibited. Learning associated changes only occurred in the posterior part of the olfactory bulb. Thus olfactory learning under anaesthesia promotes extensive, but spatially distinct, changes in mitral cell networks to both cued and uncued odours as well as in evoked glutamate and

  18. Olfactory bulb encoding during learning under anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicol, Alister U.; Sanchez-Andrade, Gabriela; Collado, Paloma; Segonds-Pichon, Anne; Kendrick, Keith M.

    2014-01-01

    Neural plasticity changes within the olfactory bulb are important for olfactory learning, although how neural encoding changes support new associations with specific odors and whether they can be investigated under anesthesia, remain unclear. Using the social transmission of food preference olfactory learning paradigm in mice in conjunction with in vivo microdialysis sampling we have shown firstly that a learned preference for a scented food odor smelled on the breath of a demonstrator animal occurs under isofluorane anesthesia. Furthermore, subsequent exposure to this cued odor under anesthesia promotes the same pattern of increased release of glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the olfactory bulb as previously found in conscious animals following olfactory learning, and evoked GABA release was positively correlated with the amount of scented food eaten. In a second experiment, multiarray (24 electrodes) electrophysiological recordings were made from olfactory bulb mitral cells under isofluorane anesthesia before, during and after a novel scented food odor was paired with carbon disulfide. Results showed significant increases in overall firing frequency to the cued-odor during and after learning and decreases in response to an uncued odor. Analysis of patterns of changes in individual neurons revealed that a substantial proportion (>50%) of them significantly changed their response profiles during and after learning with most of those previously inhibited becoming excited. A large number of cells exhibiting no response to the odors prior to learning were either excited or inhibited afterwards. With the uncued odor many previously responsive cells became unresponsive or inhibited. Learning associated changes only occurred in the posterior part of the olfactory bulb. Thus olfactory learning under anesthesia promotes extensive, but spatially distinct, changes in mitral cell networks to both cued and uncued odors as well as in evoked glutamate and GABA

  19. Encoding and Decoding Models in Cognitive Electrophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher R. Holdgraf

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive neuroscience has seen rapid growth in the size and complexity of data recorded from the human brain as well as in the computational tools available to analyze this data. This data explosion has resulted in an increased use of multivariate, model-based methods for asking neuroscience questions, allowing scientists to investigate multiple hypotheses with a single dataset, to use complex, time-varying stimuli, and to study the human brain under more naturalistic conditions. These tools come in the form of “Encoding” models, in which stimulus features are used to model brain activity, and “Decoding” models, in which neural features are used to generated a stimulus output. Here we review the current state of encoding and decoding models in cognitive electrophysiology and provide a practical guide toward conducting experiments and analyses in this emerging field. Our examples focus on using linear models in the study of human language and audition. We show how to calculate auditory receptive fields from natural sounds as well as how to decode neural recordings to predict speech. The paper aims to be a useful tutorial to these approaches, and a practical introduction to using machine learning and applied statistics to build models of neural activity. The data analytic approaches we discuss may also be applied to other sensory modalities, motor systems, and cognitive systems, and we cover some examples in these areas. In addition, a collection of Jupyter notebooks is publicly available as a complement to the material covered in this paper, providing code examples and tutorials for predictive modeling in python. The aim is to provide a practical understanding of predictive modeling of human brain data and to propose best-practices in conducting these analyses.

  20. Stereoscopic radiographic images with gamma source encoding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strocovsky, S.G.; Otero, D

    2012-01-01

    Conventional radiography with X-ray tube has several drawbacks, as the compromise between the size of the focal spot and the fluence. The finite dimensions of the focal spot impose a limit to the spatial resolution. Gamma radiography uses gamma-ray sources which surpass in size, portability and simplicity to X-ray tubes. However, its low intrinsic fluence forces to use extended sources that also degrade the spatial resolution. In this work, we show the principles of a new radiographic technique that overcomes the limitations associated with the finite dimensions of X-ray sources, and that offers additional benefits to conventional techniques. The new technique called coding source imaging (CSI), is based on the use of extended sources, edge-encoding of radiation and differential detection. The mathematical principles and the method of images reconstruction with the new proposed technique are explained in the present work. Analytical calculations were made to determine the maximum spatial resolution and the variables on which it depends. The CSI technique was tested by means of Monte Carlo simulations with sets of spherical objects. We show that CSI has stereoscopic capabilities and it can resolve objects smaller than the source size. The CSI decoding algorithm reconstructs simultaneously four different projections from the same object, while conventional radiography produces only one projection per acquisition. Projections are located in separate image fields on the detector plane. Our results show it is possible to apply an extremely simple radiographic technique with extended sources, and get 3D information of the attenuation coefficient distribution for simple geometry objects in a single acquisition. The results are promising enough to evaluate the possibility of future research with more complex objects typical of medical diagnostic radiography and industrial gamma radiography (author)

  1. Encoded Archival Description: An Introduction and Overview | Pitti ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Encoded Archival Description (EAD) is an emerging standard used internationally in an increasing number of archives and manuscripts libraries to encode data describing corporate records and personal papers. The individual descriptions are variously called finding aids, guides, handlists, or catalogues. While archival ...

  2. On The Designed And Constructed Feedback Shift-Register Encoder

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An encoder capable of cyclical shifting of data, and which can therefore be used for Bose-Chaudhuri and Hocquenghem (BCH) coding, has been designed and constructed using discrete components. It comprises basically four bistable multivibrators and an exclusive-OR device. On completion, the encoder performed ...

  3. What is a "good" encoding of guarded choice?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nestmann, Uwe

    2000-01-01

    into the latter that preserves divergence-freedom and symmetries. This paper argues that there are nevertheless "good" encodings between these calculi. In detail, we present a series of encodings for languages with (1) input-guarded choice, (2) both input and output-guarded choice, and (3) mixed-guarded choice...

  4. Polypeptides having laccase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ye; Tang, Lan; Duan, Junxin; Zhang, Yu

    2017-08-22

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having laccase activity and polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides and polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  5. On The Designed And Constructed Feedback Shift-Register Encoder

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Information transmission in noisy channels can be achieved with vanishingly small probability of error by proper coding of the information as long as the encoding rate is less than the channel capacity. An encoder capable of cyclical shifting of data, and which can therefore be used for Bose-Chaudhuri and Hocquenghem ...

  6. A SSVEP Stimuli Encoding Method Using Trinary Frequency-Shift Keying Encoded SSVEP (TFSK-SSVEP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing Zhao

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available SSVEP is a kind of BCI technology with advantage of high information transfer rate. However, due to its nature, frequencies could be used as stimuli are scarce. To solve such problem, a stimuli encoding method which encodes SSVEP signal using Frequency Shift–Keying (FSK method is developed. In this method, each stimulus is controlled by a FSK signal which contains three different frequencies that represent “Bit 0,” “Bit 1” and “Bit 2” respectively. Different to common BFSK in digital communication, “Bit 0” and “Bit 1” composited the unique identifier of stimuli in binary bit stream form, while “Bit 2” indicates the ending of a stimuli encoding. EEG signal is acquired on channel Oz, O1, O2, Pz, P3, and P4, using ADS1299 at the sample rate of 250 SPS. Before original EEG signal is quadrature demodulated, it is detrended and then band-pass filtered using FFT-based FIR filtering to remove interference. Valid peak of the processed signal is acquired by calculating its derivative and converted into bit stream using window method. Theoretically, this coding method could implement at least 2n−1 (n is the length of bit command stimulus while keeping the ITR the same. This method is suitable to implement stimuli on a monitor and where the frequency and phase could be used to code stimuli is limited as well as implementing portable BCI devices which is not capable of performing complex calculations.

  7. What is a "good" encoding of guarded choice?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nestmann, Uwe

    2000-01-01

    The pi-calculus with synchronous output and mixed-guarded choices is strictly more expressive than the pi-calculus with asynchronous output and no choice. This result was recently proved by C. Palamidessi and, as a corollary, she showed that there is no fully compositional encoding from the former...... into the latter that preserves divergence-freedom and symmetries. This paper argues that there are nevertheless "good" encodings between these calculi. In detail, we present a series of encodings for languages with (1) input-guarded choice, (2) both input and output-guarded choice, and (3) mixed-guarded choice......, and investigate them with respect to compositionality and divergence-freedom. The first and second encoding satisfy all of the above criteria, but various "good" candidates for the third encoding-inspired by an existing distributed implementation-invalidate one or the other criterion, While essentially confirming...

  8. Convolutional over Recurrent Encoder for Neural Machine Translation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dakwale Praveen

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Neural machine translation is a recently proposed approach which has shown competitive results to traditional MT approaches. Standard neural MT is an end-to-end neural network where the source sentence is encoded by a recurrent neural network (RNN called encoder and the target words are predicted using another RNN known as decoder. Recently, various models have been proposed which replace the RNN encoder with a convolutional neural network (CNN. In this paper, we propose to augment the standard RNN encoder in NMT with additional convolutional layers in order to capture wider context in the encoder output. Experiments on English to German translation demonstrate that our approach can achieve significant improvements over a standard RNN-based baseline.

  9. Absolute scale-based imaging position encoder with submicron accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anisimov, Andrey G.; Pantyushin, Anton V.; Lashmanov, Oleg U.; Vasilev, A. S.; Timofeev, Alexander N.; Korotaev, Valery V.; Gordeev, Sergey V.

    2013-04-01

    Study is devoted to experimental research and development of absolute imaging position encoder based on standard calibrated scale of invar alloy with 1 mm spacing. The encoder uses designed imaging system as a vernier and absolute magnetic encoder as a rough indication. The features of optical design, choice and use of imaging system as long as indexes images processing algorithm are described. A shadow method was implemented: indexes images on a CCD array are formed by the lens focused at the scale surface; the laser module lights up the scale through a beam-splitting prism by a parallel beam. Further dark indexes images on a light scale background are detected and analyzed to estimate the encoder position. Full range of experimental tests was set to calibrate the encoder and to estimate the accuracy. As a result, accuracy close to 1 μm at 1 m was achieved.

  10. Review of Random Phase Encoding in Volume Holographic Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Chia Su

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Random phase encoding is a unique technique for volume hologram which can be applied to various applications such as holographic multiplexing storage, image encryption, and optical sensing. In this review article, we first review and discuss diffraction selectivity of random phase encoding in volume holograms, which is the most important parameter related to multiplexing capacity of volume holographic storage. We then review an image encryption system based on random phase encoding. The alignment of phase key for decryption of the encoded image stored in holographic memory is analyzed and discussed. In the latter part of the review, an all-optical sensing system implemented by random phase encoding and holographic interconnection is presented.

  11. Role of sleep for encoding of emotional memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaida, Kosuke; Niki, Kazuhisa; Born, Jan

    2015-05-01

    Total sleep deprivation (TSD) has been consistently found to impair encoding of information during ensuing wakefulness, probably through suppressing NonREM (non-rapid eye movement) sleep. However, a possible contribution of missing REM sleep to this encoding impairment after TSD has so far not been systematically examined in humans, although such contribution might be suspected in particular for emotional information. Here, in two separate experiments in young healthy men, we compared effects of TSD and of selective REM sleep deprivation (REMD), relative to respective control conditions of undisturbed sleep, on the subsequent encoding of neutral and emotional pictures. The pictures were presented in conjunction with colored frames to also assess related source memory. REMD was achieved by tones presented contingently upon initial signs of REM sleep. Encoding capabilities were examined in the evening (18:00h) after the experimental nights, by a picture recognition test right after encoding. TSD significantly decreased both the rate of correctly recognized pictures and of recalled frames associated with the pictures. The TSD effect was robust and translated into an impaired long term memory formation, as it was likewise observed on a second recognition testing one week after the encoding phase. Contrary to our expectation, REMD did not affect encoding in general, or particularly of emotional pictures. Also, REMD did not affect valence ratings of the encoded pictures. However, like TSD, REMD distinctly impaired vigilance at the time of encoding. Altogether, these findings indicate an importance of NonREM rather than REM sleep for the encoding of information that is independent of the emotionality of the materials. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. High-resolution MRI encoding using radiofrequency phase gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Jonathan C; King, Scott B; Deng, Qunli; Volotovskyy, Vyacheslav; Tomanek, Boguslaw

    2013-11-01

    Although MRI offers highly diagnostic medical imagery, patient access to this modality worldwide is very limited when compared with X-ray or ultrasound. One reason for this is the expense and complexity of the equipment used to generate the switched magnetic fields necessary for MRI encoding. These field gradients are also responsible for intense acoustic noise and have the potential to induce nerve stimulation. We present results with a new MRI encoding principle which operates entirely without the use of conventional B0 field gradients. This new approach--'Transmit Array Spatial Encoding' (TRASE)--uses only the resonant radiofrequency (RF) field to produce Fourier spatial encoding equivalent to conventional MRI. k-space traversal (image encoding) is achieved by spin refocusing with phase gradient transmit fields in spin echo trains. A transmit coil array, driven by just a single transmitter channel, was constructed to produce four phase gradient fields, which allows the encoding of two orthogonal spatial axes. High-resolution two-dimensional-encoded in vivo MR images of hand and wrist were obtained at 0.2 T. TRASE exploits RF field phase gradients, and offers the possibility of very low-cost diagnostics and novel experiments exploiting unique capabilities, such as imaging without disturbance of the main B0 magnetic field. Lower field imaging (moving through k space, there are many close analogies between it and conventional B0 -encoded techniques. TRASE is compatible with both B0 gradient encoding and parallel imaging, and so hybrid sequences containing all three spatial encoding approaches are possible. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Can natural selection encode Bayesian priors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, Juan Camilo; Marshall, James A R

    2017-08-07

    The evolutionary success of many organisms depends on their ability to make decisions based on estimates of the state of their environment (e.g., predation risk) from uncertain information. These decision problems have optimal solutions and individuals in nature are expected to evolve the behavioural mechanisms to make decisions as if using the optimal solutions. Bayesian inference is the optimal method to produce estimates from uncertain data, thus natural selection is expected to favour individuals with the behavioural mechanisms to make decisions as if they were computing Bayesian estimates in typically-experienced environments, although this does not necessarily imply that favoured decision-makers do perform Bayesian computations exactly. Each individual should evolve to behave as if updating a prior estimate of the unknown environment variable to a posterior estimate as it collects evidence. The prior estimate represents the decision-maker's default belief regarding the environment variable, i.e., the individual's default 'worldview' of the environment. This default belief has been hypothesised to be shaped by natural selection and represent the environment experienced by the individual's ancestors. We present an evolutionary model to explore how accurately Bayesian prior estimates can be encoded genetically and shaped by natural selection when decision-makers learn from uncertain information. The model simulates the evolution of a population of individuals that are required to estimate the probability of an event. Every individual has a prior estimate of this probability and collects noisy cues from the environment in order to update its prior belief to a Bayesian posterior estimate with the evidence gained. The prior is inherited and passed on to offspring. Fitness increases with the accuracy of the posterior estimates produced. Simulations show that prior estimates become accurate over evolutionary time. In addition to these 'Bayesian' individuals, we also

  14. Development of a reflective optical encoder with submicron accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Guoyong; Liu, Hongzhong; Ban, Yaowen; Shi, Yongsheng; Yin, Lei; Lu, Bingheng

    2018-03-01

    Signal distortion is a key issue that limits the measurement resolution and accuracy of optical encoders. In this paper, an optical encoder based on generalized grating imaging using a two-dimensional index grating is presented. The general expression of intensity distribution for generalized grating imaging including the relative displacement between the scale grating and the reading head is derived, and the formation of the signal distortion of the optical encoder is analyzed. Then, a two-dimensional index grating, which consists of multiple grating tracks with defined offsets, is proposed to suppress the dominant third and fifth order harmonic signals. The operating principle of the two-dimensional index grating is explained in detail and a reflective optical encoder is developed. In the experiment, approximately ideal Lissajous figure of the encoder signals is obtained. Fourier analysis of the encoder signals shows that both the third and fifth order harmonic distortions are below 0.6%. Experimental results show that the interpolation error of the optical encoder is within ± 0 . 18 μm, and the accuracy is better than ± 0 . 3 μm over 255 mm travel range with a maximum variation of 0.136 μm.

  15. High-Efficient Parallel CAVLC Encoders on Heterogeneous Multicore Architectures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Y. Su

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This article presents two high-efficient parallel realizations of the context-based adaptive variable length coding (CAVLC based on heterogeneous multicore processors. By optimizing the architecture of the CAVLC encoder, three kinds of dependences are eliminated or weaken, including the context-based data dependence, the memory accessing dependence and the control dependence. The CAVLC pipeline is divided into three stages: two scans, coding, and lag packing, and be implemented on two typical heterogeneous multicore architectures. One is a block-based SIMD parallel CAVLC encoder on multicore stream processor STORM. The other is a component-oriented SIMT parallel encoder on massively parallel architecture GPU. Both of them exploited rich data-level parallelism. Experiments results show that compared with the CPU version, more than 70 times of speedup can be obtained for STORM and over 50 times for GPU. The implementation of encoder on STORM can make a real-time processing for 1080p @30fps and GPU-based version can satisfy the requirements for 720p real-time encoding. The throughput of the presented CAVLC encoders is more than 10 times higher than that of published software encoders on DSP and multicore platforms.

  16. Interleukin-15 Increases Vaccine Efficacy through a Mechanism Linked to Dendritic Cell Maturation and Enhanced Antibody Titers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-26

    of STEBVax, 143 g of alhydrogel ( Alh ), and 0.1 g, 0.5 g, or 5 g of IL-15/mouse in a 200-l volume of PBS. The ratio of vaccine to alhydrogel was 1...Coadministration of IL-15 with STEBVax and alhydrogel ( Alh ) increased the protection of mice from lethal SEB toxin chal- lenge. (A) BALB/c mice were vaccinated with

  17. Epithelium derived interleukin 15 regulates intraepithelial lymphocyte Th1 cytokine production, cytotoxicity, and survival in coeliac disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatino, A Di; Ciccocioppo, R; Cupelli, F; Cinque, B; Millimaggi, D; Clarkson, M M; Paulli, M; Cifone, M G; Corazza, G R

    2006-01-01

    Background and aims Epithelium derived interleukin (IL)‐15 signalling via IL‐15Rα is critical for the development, activation, and survival of intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL). We aimed to better understand the IL‐15 driven effects on IEL underlying mucosal damage and lymphomagenesis in coeliac disease (CD). Methods Enterocytes, IEL, and lamina propria mononuclear cells (LPMC) were isolated from 46 patients with uncomplicated CD (25 untreated and 21 treated) and 22 controls. IL‐15 and IL‐15Rα expression were determined by immunoblotting. Secretion of IL‐15, interferon γ (IFN‐γ), tumour necrosis factor α (TNF‐α), and granzyme B into cell culture supernatants was assessed by ELISA. The ability of IL‐15 to regulate IEL proliferation, perforin/granzyme dependent cytotoxicity, and apoptosis was tested by adding different combinations of IL‐15, IL‐15 blocking antibody, or chloroquine to IEL cultured alone or with Caco‐2 cells as target. IL‐15 mucosal levels were also determined by ELISA in five patients with complicated CD (two ulcerative jejunoileites, one refractory sprue, and two enteropathy associated T cell lymphomas) tested for T cell receptor γ chain clonality. Results IL‐15 was overexpressed in untreated CD enterocytes and LPMC, and in the mucosa of complicated CD patients and uncomplicated untreated CD patients, where its levels correlated with the degree of mucosal damage. Enterocytes from untreated, but not treated, CD patients and controls secreted IL‐15. Untreated CD IEL, characterised by higher IL‐15Rα expression, showed increased proliferation, production of IFN‐γ and TNF‐α, and perforin/granzyme dependent cytotoxicity, and a decreased propensity to apoptosis in response to IL‐15. Conclusions Our findings suggest that IL‐15 plays a crucial role in the generation of epithelial damage in active CD. Its promotion of IEL survival in CD may predispose to the emergence of T cell clonal proliferations. Blocking IL‐15, by suppressing uncontrolled IEL activation and survival, has the potential to provide new therapeutic tools to prevent tissue damage and lymphomagenesis in CD. PMID:16105889

  18. Deficiency of Interleukin-15 Confers Resistance to Obesity by Diminishing Inflammation and Enhancing the Thermogenic Function of Adipose Tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory Lacraz

    Full Text Available IL-15 is an inflammatory cytokine secreted by many cell types. IL-15 is also produced during physical exercise by skeletal muscle and has been reported to reduce weight gain in mice. Contrarily, our findings on IL-15 knockout (KO mice indicate that IL-15 promotes obesity. The aim of this study is to investigate the mechanisms underlying the pro-obesity role of IL-15 in adipose tissues.Control and IL-15 KO mice were maintained on high fat diet (HFD or normal control diet. After 16 weeks, body weight, adipose tissue and skeletal mass, serum lipid levels and gene/protein expression in the adipose tissues were evaluated. The effect of IL-15 on thermogenesis and oxygen consumption was also studied in primary cultures of adipocytes differentiated from mouse preadipocyte and human stem cells.Our results show that IL-15 deficiency prevents diet-induced weight gain and accumulation of lipids in visceral and subcutaneous white and brown adipose tissues. Gene expression analysis also revealed elevated expression of genes associated with adaptive thermogenesis in the brown and subcutaneous adipose tissues of IL-15 KO mice. Accordingly, oxygen consumption was increased in the brown adipocytes from IL-15 KO mice. In addition, IL-15 KO mice showed decreased expression of pro-inflammatory mediators in their adipose tissues.Absence of IL-15 results in decreased accumulation of fat in the white adipose tissues and increased lipid utilization via adaptive thermogenesis. IL-15 also promotes inflammation in adipose tissues that could sustain chronic inflammation leading to obesity-associated metabolic syndrome.

  19. Differential effects of interleukin-2 and interleukin-15 versus interleukin-21 on CD4+ cutaneous T-cell lymphoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marzec, Michal; Halasa, Krzysztof; Kasprzycka, Monika

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we compared the effects of interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-15, and IL-21 on gene expression, activation of cell signaling pathways, and functional properties of cells derived from CD4+ cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL). Whereas both IL-2 and IL-15 modulated, in a CTCL cell line...... two novel therapeutic approaches to CTCL and, possibly, other CD4+ T-cell lymphomas: inhibition of the Jak1/Jak3 kinase complex and, given the known strong immunostimulatory properties of IL-21 on CD8+ T, natural killer, and B cells, application of this cytokine to boost an immune response against...... malignant CD4+ T cells. Udgivelsesdato: 2008-Feb-15...

  20. Interleukin-15 Is Associated with Severity and Mortality in Stevens-Johnson Syndrome/Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Shih-Chi; Mockenhaupt, Maja; Wolkenstein, Pierre; Dunant, Ariane; Le Gouvello, Sabine; Chen, Chun-Bing; Chosidow, Olivier; Valeyrie-Allanore, Laurence; Bellon, Teresa; Sekula, Peggy; Wang, Chuang-Wei; Schumacher, Martin; Kardaun, Sylvia H; Hung, Shuen-Iu; Roujeau, Jean-Claude; Chung, Wen-Hung

    2017-05-01

    Early diagnosis and prognosis monitoring for Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) still remain a challenge. This study aims to explore any cytokine/chemokine with prognostic potential in Stevens-Johnson syndrome/TEN. Through screening a panel of 28 serological factors, IL-6, IL-8, IL-15, tumor necrosis factor-α, and granulysin were upregulated in patients with Stevens-Johnson syndrome/TEN and selected for the further validation in total 155 patients with Stevens-Johnson syndrome/TEN, including 77 from Taiwan and 78 from the Registry of Severe Cutaneous Adverse Reactions. Among these factors evaluated, the levels of IL-15 (r = 0.401; P < 0.001) and granulysin (r = 0.223; P = 0.026) were significantly correlated with the disease severity in 112 samples after excluding patients with insufficient data to calculate the score of TEN. In addition, IL-15 was also associated with mortality (P = 0.002; odds ratio, 1.09; 95% confidence interval, 1.03-1.14; P = 0.001; adjusted odds ratio, 1.10; 95% confidence interval, 1.04-1.16). Consistent results were obtained after the exclusion of Taiwanese patients with sepsis to rule out possible confounders. Moreover, IL-15 was shown to enhance cytotoxicity of cultured natural killer cells and blister cells from patients with TEN. Our findings highlight a usefulness of IL-15 in prognosis monitoring and therapeutic intervention of this devastating condition. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Interleukin-15 Is Associated with Severity and Mortality in Stevens-Johnson Syndrome/Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Su, Shih-Chi; Mockenhaupt, Maja; Wolkenstein, Pierre; Dunant, Ariane; Le Gouvello, Sabine; Chen, Chun-Bing; Chosidow, Olivier; Valeyrie-Allanore, Laurence; Bellon, Teresa; Sekula, Peggy; Wang, Chuang-Wei; Schumacher, Martin; Kardaun, Sylvia H.; Hung, Shuen-Iu; Roujeau, Jean-Claude; Chung, Wen-Hung

    Early diagnosis and prognosis monitoring for Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) still remain a challenge. This study aims to explore any cytokine/chemokine with prognostic potential in StevensJohnson syndrome/TEN. Through screening a panel of 28 serological factors, IL-6,

  2. Datacube Interoperability, Encoding Independence, and Analytics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Peter; Hirschorn, Eric; Maso, Joan

    2017-04-01

    representations. Further, CIS 1.1 offers a unified model for any kind of regular and irregular grids, also allowing sensor models as per SensorML. Encodings include ASCII formats like GML, JSON, RDF as well as binary formats like GeoTIFF, NetCDF, JPEG2000, and GRIB2; further, a container concept allows mixed representations within one coverage file utilizing zip or other convenient package formats. Through the tight integration with the Sensor Web Enablement (SWE), a lossless "transport" from sensor into coverage world is ensured. The corresponding service model of WCS supports datacube operations ranging from simple data extraction to complex ad-hoc analytics with WPCS. Notably, W3C is working has set out on a coverage model as well; it has been designed relatively independently from the abovementioned standards, but there is informal agreement to link it into the CIS universe (which allows for different, yet interchangeable representations). Particularly interesting in the W3C proposal is the detailed semantic modeling of metadata; as CIS 1.1 supports RDF, a tight coupling seems feasible.

  3. Wavelength-encoded OCDMA system using opto-VLSI processors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljada, Muhsen; Alameh, Kamal

    2007-07-01

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a 2.5 Gbits/sper user wavelength-encoded optical code-division multiple-access encoder-decoder structure based on opto-VLSI processing. Each encoder and decoder is constructed using a single 1D opto-very-large-scale-integrated (VLSI) processor in conjunction with a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) array of different Bragg wavelengths. The FBG array spectrally and temporally slices the broadband input pulse into several components and the opto-VLSI processor generates codewords using digital phase holograms. System performance is measured in terms of the autocorrelation and cross-correlation functions as well as the eye diagram.

  4. pENCODE: a plant encyclopedia of DNA elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Amanda K; Niederhuth, Chad E; Ji, Lexiang; Schmitz, Robert J

    2014-01-01

    ENCODE projects exist for many eukaryotes, including humans, but as of yet no defined project exists for plants. A plant ENCODE would be invaluable to the research community and could be more readily produced than its metazoan equivalents by capitalizing on the preexisting infrastructure provided from similar projects. Collecting and normalizing plant epigenomic data for a range of species will facilitate hypothesis generation, cross-species comparisons, annotation of genomes, and an understanding of epigenomic functions throughout plant evolution. Here, we discuss the need for such a project, outline the challenges it faces, and suggest ways forward to build a plant ENCODE.

  5. Integrated source and channel encoded digital communications system design study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huth, G. K.

    1974-01-01

    Studies on the digital communication system for the direct communication links from ground to space shuttle and the links involving the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS). Three main tasks were performed:(1) Channel encoding/decoding parameter optimization for forward and reverse TDRS links,(2)integration of command encoding/decoding and channel encoding/decoding; and (3) modulation coding interface study. The general communication environment is presented to provide the necessary background for the tasks and to provide an understanding of the implications of the results of the studies.

  6. Wavelength-encoded OCDMA system using opto-VLSI processors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljada, Muhsen; Alameh, Kamal

    2007-07-01

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a 2.5 Gbits/sper user wavelength-encoded optical code-division multiple-access encoder-decoder structure based on opto-VLSI processing. Each encoder and decoder is constructed using a single 1D opto-very-large-scale-integrated (VLSI) processor in conjunction with a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) array of different Bragg wavelengths. The FBG array spectrally and temporally slices the broadband input pulse into several components and the opto-VLSI processor generates codewords using digital phase holograms. System performance is measured in terms of the autocorrelation and cross-correlation functions as well as the eye diagram.

  7. Latency Performance of Encoding with Random Linear Network Coding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lars; Hansen, René Rydhof; Lucani Rötter, Daniel Enrique

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we present a performance study of the impact of generation and symbol sizes on latency for encoding with Random Linear Network Coding (RLNC). This analysis is important for low latency applications of RLNC as well as data storage applications that use large blocks of data, where...... the encoding process can be parallelized based on system requirements to reduce data access time within the system. Using a counting argument, we focus on predicting the effect of changes of generation (number of original packets) and symbol size (number of bytes per data packet) configurations on the encoding...

  8. Universal Quantum Computing with Arbitrary Continuous-Variable Encoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Hoi-Kwan; Plenio, Martin B

    2016-09-02

    Implementing a qubit quantum computer in continuous-variable systems conventionally requires the engineering of specific interactions according to the encoding basis states. In this work, we present a unified formalism to conduct universal quantum computation with a fixed set of operations but arbitrary encoding. By storing a qubit in the parity of two or four qumodes, all computing processes can be implemented by basis state preparations, continuous-variable exponential-swap operations, and swap tests. Our formalism inherits the advantages that the quantum information is decoupled from collective noise, and logical qubits with different encodings can be brought to interact without decoding. We also propose a possible implementation of the required operations by using interactions that are available in a variety of continuous-variable systems. Our work separates the "hardware" problem of engineering quantum-computing-universal interactions, from the "software" problem of designing encodings for specific purposes. The development of quantum computer architecture could hence be simplified.

  9. A user's guide to the encyclopedia of DNA elements (ENCODE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    The mission of the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) Project is to enable the scientific and medical communities to interpret the human genome sequence and apply it to understand human biology and improve health. The ENCODE Consortium is integrating multiple technologies and approaches in a collective effort to discover and define the functional elements encoded in the human genome, including genes, transcripts, and transcriptional regulatory regions, together with their attendant chromatin states and DNA methylation patterns. In the process, standards to ensure high-quality data have been implemented, and novel algorithms have been developed to facilitate analysis. Data and derived results are made available through a freely accessible database. Here we provide an overview of the project and the resources it is generating and illustrate the application of ENCODE data to interpret the human genome.

  10. Polypeptides having catalase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ye; Duan, Junxin; Zhang, Yu; Tang, Lan

    2017-05-02

    Provided are isolated polypeptides having catalase activity and polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. Also provided are nucleic acid constructs, vectors and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  11. Statistical Characterization of MP3 Encoders for Steganalysis: 'CHAMP3'

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Westfeld, Andreas

    2004-01-01

    ...). As detailed in the technical proposal the research consists of three parts. The first task is to survey the discipline to identify the available MP3 encoders and generate a data pool for analysis...

  12. Two Genes Encoding Uracil Phosphoribosyltransferase Are Present in Bacillus subtilis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinussen, Jan; Glaser, Philippe; Andersen, Paal S.

    1995-01-01

    Uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (UPRTase) catalyzes the key reaction in the salvage of uracil in many microorganisms. Surprisingly, two genes encoding UPRTase activity were cloned from Bacillus subtilis by complementation of an Escherichia coli mutant. The genes were sequenced, and the putative...

  13. Polypeptides having cellobiohydrolase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spodsberg, Nikolaj

    2015-07-14

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellobiohydrolase activity and polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  14. Noise and neuronal populations conspire to encode simple waveforms reliably

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parnas, B. R.

    1996-01-01

    Sensory systems rely on populations of neurons to encode information transduced at the periphery into meaningful patterns of neuronal population activity. This transduction occurs in the presence of intrinsic neuronal noise. This is fortunate. The presence of noise allows more reliable encoding of the temporal structure present in the stimulus than would be possible in a noise-free environment. Simulations with a parallel model of signal processing at the auditory periphery have been used to explore the effects of noise and a neuronal population on the encoding of signal information. The results show that, for a given set of neuronal modeling parameters and stimulus amplitude, there is an optimal amount of noise for stimulus encoding with maximum fidelity.

  15. Hybrid polypeptides having cellobiohydrolase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ye; Shaghasi, Tarana

    2016-11-01

    The present invention provides hybrid polypeptides having cellobiohydrolase activity. The present invention also provides polynucleotides encoding the hybrid polypeptides; nucleic acid constructs, vectors and host cells comprising the polynucleotides; and processes of using the hybrid polypeptides.

  16. Polypeptides having beta-xylosidase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ye; Tang, Lan; Zhang, Yu; Duan, Junxin

    2017-04-18

    Provided are isolated polypeptides having beta-xylosidase activity and polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. Also provided are nucleic acid constructs, vectors and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  17. Polypeptides having beta-glucosidase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ye; Duan, Junxin; Zhang, Yu; Tang, Lan

    2017-09-26

    Provided are isolated polypeptides having beta-glucosidase activity and polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. Also provided are nucleic acid constructs, vectors and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  18. Polypeptides having cellobiohydrolase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spodsberg, Nikolaj

    2016-06-28

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellobiohydrolase activity and polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  19. Polypeptides having cellobiohydrolase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spodsberg, Nikolaj

    2016-12-13

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellobiohydrolase activity and polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  20. Polypeptides having cellobiohydrolase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spodsberg, Nikolaj

    2017-11-21

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellobiohydrolase activity and polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  1. Polypeptides having endoglucanase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yu; Liu, Ye; Duan, Junxin; Tang, Lan

    2017-07-18

    Provided are isolated polypeptides having endoglucanase activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. Also provided are nucleic acid constructs, vectors and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  2. Polypeptides having cellobiohydrolase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spodsberg, Nikolaj

    2015-11-17

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellobiohydrolase activity and polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  3. Polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yu; Tang, Lan; Henriksen, Svend Hostgaard Bang

    2016-05-17

    The present invention provides isolated polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also provides nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  4. Polypeptides having xylanase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spodsberg, Nikolaj

    2017-05-02

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having xylanase activity and polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  5. Polypeptides having cellobiohydrolase activitiy and polynucleotides encoding same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ye; Tang, Lan; Duan, Junxin

    2015-12-15

    The present invention provides isolated polypeptides having cellobiohydrolase activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also provides nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  6. Polypeptides having xylanase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spodsberg, Nikolaj

    2018-02-06

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having xylanase activity and polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  7. Isolated menthone reductase and nucleic acid molecules encoding same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croteau, Rodney B; Davis, Edward M; Ringer, Kerry L

    2013-04-23

    The present invention provides isolated menthone reductase proteins, isolated nucleic acid molecules encoding menthone reductase proteins, methods for expressing and isolating menthone reductase proteins, and transgenic plants expressing elevated levels of menthone reductase protein.

  8. Spatial working memory encoding type modulates prefrontal cortical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oi, Yuhei; Kita, Yosuke; Suzuki, Kota; Okumura, Yasuko; Okuzumi, Hideyuki; Shinoda, Haruo; Inagaki, Masumi

    2017-05-03

    Spatial working memory (SWM) involves both simultaneous and sequential encoding, but the differences in their neural correlates are unclear. We investigated the differences in prefrontal cortex activity related to these SWM encoding types. We also examined the patterns of brain activity influencing individual visuospatial abilities (VSA). We conducted SWM tasks with two different conditions, sequential and simultaneous encoding, and examined hemodynamic activity in 39 healthy adults using near-infrared spectroscopy. The bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex was activated more strongly in the sequential condition compared with the simultaneous condition. This suggests that prefrontal cortex activity underlying SWM is modulated by the type of encoding. We also found that individuals with high VSA showed weaker activation in the right-dorsolateral prefrontal cortex compared with those with lower VSA during the simultaneous condition. This hypoactivation is thought to reflect neural efficiency in the individuals with high ability. These findings are expected to lead to a better understanding of neural substrates for SWM.

  9. Multiple-stage pure phase encoding with biometric information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen

    2018-01-01

    In recent years, many optical systems have been developed for securing information, and optical encryption/encoding has attracted more and more attention due to the marked advantages, such as parallel processing and multiple-dimensional characteristics. In this paper, an optical security method is presented based on pure phase encoding with biometric information. Biometric information (such as fingerprint) is employed as security keys rather than plaintext used in conventional optical security systems, and multiple-stage phase-encoding-based optical systems are designed for generating several phase-only masks with biometric information. Subsequently, the extracted phase-only masks are further used in an optical setup for encoding an input image (i.e., plaintext). Numerical simulations are conducted to illustrate the validity, and the results demonstrate that high flexibility and high security can be achieved.

  10. Neonatal intramuscular injection of plasmid encoding glucagon-like ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    -A) was significantly elevated in GP rats. These results suggest that neonatal intramuscular injection of plasmid DNA encoding GLP-1 affects anxiety behaviour in adolescent rats, probably through NGFI-A-activated upregulation of hippocampal ...

  11. Perbandingan Kinerja Algoritma Fixed Length Binary Encoding (FLBE) Dengan Variable Length Binary Encoding (VLBE) Dalam Kompresi Text File

    OpenAIRE

    Viliana, Debora

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to design a computer application that can compress text files and compare the performance of the algorithm. Compression is done with a text file using a text encoding algorithms Fixed Length Binary Encoding (FLBE) and Variable Length Binary Encoding algorithm, then do the compression process.The end result are a compression of the file extension *. flbe and *.vlbe which can be decompressed. The output of the decompression is a new file that consists of a file header and body f...

  12. Data encoding using periodic nano-optical features

    OpenAIRE

    Vosoogh-Grayli, Siamack

    2012-01-01

    Successful trials have been made through a designed algorithm to quantize, compress and optically encode unsigned 8 bit integer values in the form of images using Nano optical features. The periodicity of the Nano-scale features (Nano-gratings) have been designed and investigated both theoretically and experimentally to create distinct states of variation (three on states and one off state). The use of easy to manufacture and machine readable encoded data in secured authentication media has b...

  13. Hybrid image encoding based on wavelet transform and DPCM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jinwen; Liu, Bin; Liu, Jianguo

    1998-09-01

    In this paper, our purposes are image compression code by wavelet transformation, and develop a novel encoding algorithm structure of DPCM/WT on the basis of the DPCM/DCT. We have proposed a new encoding algorithm structure of DPCM/WT based on object driving and data flow driving, the novel algorithm in property is superior to DPCM/DCT in compression ratio, fidelity and real time processing.

  14. Permutations as a means to encode order in word space

    OpenAIRE

    Sahlgren, Magnus; Holst, Anders; Kanerva, Pentti

    2008-01-01

    We show that sequence information can be encoded into high-dimensional fixed-width vectors using permutations of coordinates. Computational models of language often represent words with high-dimensional semantic vectors compiled from word-use statistics. A word's semantic vector usually encodes the contexts in which the word appears in a large body of text but ignores word order. However, word order often signals a word's grammatical role in a sentence and thus tells of the word's meaning. Jo...

  15. An Optimal Dissipative Encoder for the Toric Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-16

    corresponding Liouvillian is made up of four local Lindblad operators . For a qubit lattice of size L × L , we show that this process prepares encoded...this work may be used under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 licence . Any further distribution of this work must maintain attribution to...associated correction operations . For the toric code, an encoding procedure of this form was given [7]. It involves active error correction operations

  16. Mnemonic Encoding and Cortical Organization in Parietal and Prefrontal Cortices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masse, Nicolas Y; Hodnefield, Jonathan M; Freedman, David J

    2017-06-21

    Persistent activity within the frontoparietal network is consistently observed during tasks that require working memory. However, the neural circuit mechanisms underlying persistent neuronal encoding within this network remain unresolved. Here, we ask how neural circuits support persistent activity by examining population recordings from posterior parietal (PPC) and prefrontal (PFC) cortices in two male monkeys that performed spatial and motion direction-based tasks that required working memory. While spatially selective persistent activity was observed in both areas, robust selective persistent activity for motion direction was only observed in PFC. Crucially, we find that this difference between mnemonic encoding in PPC and PFC is associated with the presence of functional clustering: PPC and PFC neurons up to ∼700 μm apart preferred similar spatial locations, and PFC neurons up to ∼700 μm apart preferred similar motion directions. In contrast, motion-direction tuning similarity between nearby PPC neurons was much weaker and decayed rapidly beyond ∼200 μm. We also observed a similar association between persistent activity and functional clustering in trained recurrent neural network models embedded with a columnar topology. These results suggest that functional clustering facilitates mnemonic encoding of sensory information. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Working memory refers to our ability to temporarily store and manipulate information. Numerous studies have observed that, during working memory, neurons in higher cortical areas, such as the parietal and prefrontal cortices, mnemonically encode the remembered stimulus. However, several recent studies have failed to observe mnemonic encoding during working memory, raising the question as to why mnemonic encoding is observed during some, but not all, conditions. In this study, we show that mnemonic encoding occurs when a cortical area is organized such that nearby neurons preferentially respond to the same

  17. Security enhanced BioEncoding for protecting iris codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouda, Osama; Tsumura, Norimichi; Nakaguchi, Toshiya

    2011-06-01

    Improving the security of biometric template protection techniques is a key prerequisite for the widespread deployment of biometric technologies. BioEncoding is a recently proposed template protection scheme, based on the concept of cancelable biometrics, for protecting biometric templates represented as binary strings such as iris codes. The main advantage of BioEncoding over other template protection schemes is that it does not require user-specific keys and/or tokens during verification. Besides, it satisfies all the requirements of the cancelable biometrics construct without deteriorating the matching accuracy. However, although it has been shown that BioEncoding is secure enough against simple brute-force search attacks, the security of BioEncoded templates against more smart attacks, such as record multiplicity attacks, has not been sufficiently investigated. In this paper, a rigorous security analysis of BioEncoding is presented. Firstly, resistance of BioEncoded templates against brute-force attacks is revisited thoroughly. Secondly, we show that although the cancelable transformation employed in BioEncoding might be non-invertible for a single protected template, the original iris code could be inverted by correlating several templates used in different applications but created from the same iris. Accordingly, we propose an important modification to the BioEncoding transformation process in order to hinder attackers from exploiting this type of attacks. The effectiveness of adopting the suggested modification is validated and its impact on the matching accuracy is investigated empirically using CASIA-IrisV3-Interval dataset. Experimental results confirm the efficacy of the proposed approach and show that it preserves the matching accuracy of the unprotected iris recognition system.

  18. Molecular cloning and functional analysis of the gene encoding ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Here we report for the first time the cloning of a full-length cDNA encoding GGPPS (Jc-GGPPS) from Jatropha curcas L. The full-length cDNA was 1414 base pair (bp), with an 1110-bp open reading frame (ORF) encoding a 370- amino-acids polypeptide. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that Jc-GGPPS is a member of the ...

  19. Theory of multisource crosstalk reduction by phase-encoded statics

    KAUST Repository

    Schuster, Gerard T.

    2011-03-01

    Formulas are derived that relate the strength of the crosstalk noise in supergather migration images to the variance of time, amplitude and polarity shifts in encoding functions. A supergather migration image is computed by migrating an encoded supergather, where the supergather is formed by stacking a large number of encoded shot gathers. Analysis reveals that for temporal source static shifts in each shot gather, the crosstalk noise is exponentially reduced with increasing variance of the static shift and the square of source frequency. This is not too surprising because larger time shifts lead to less correlation between traces in different shot gathers, and so should tend to reduce the crosstalk noise. Analysis also reveals that combining both polarity and time statics is a superior encoding strategy compared to using either polarity statics or time statics alone. Signal-to-noise (SNR) estimates show that for a standard migration image and for an image computed by migrating a phase-encoded supergather; here, G is the number of traces in a shot gather, I is the number of stacking iterations in the supergather and S is the number of encoded/blended shot gathers that comprise the supergather. If the supergather can be uniformly divided up into Q unique sub-supergathers, then the resulting SNR of the final image is, which means that we can enhance image quality but at the expense of Q times more cost. The importance of these formulas is that they provide a precise understanding between different phase encoding strategies and image quality. Finally, we show that iterative migration of phase-encoded supergathers is a special case of passive seismic interferometry. We suggest that the crosstalk noise formulas can be helpful in designing optimal strategies for passive seismic interferometry and efficient extraction of Green\\'s functions from simulated supergathers. © 2011 The Authors Geophysical Journal International © 2011 RAS.

  20. The Encyclopedia of DNA elements (ENCODE): data portal update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Carrie A; Hitz, Benjamin C; Sloan, Cricket A; Chan, Esther T; Davidson, Jean M; Gabdank, Idan; Hilton, Jason A; Jain, Kriti; Baymuradov, Ulugbek K; Narayanan, Aditi K; Onate, Kathrina C; Graham, Keenan; Miyasato, Stuart R; Dreszer, Timothy R; Strattan, J Seth; Jolanki, Otto; Tanaka, Forrest Y; Cherry, J Michael

    2018-01-04

    The Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) Data Coordinating Center has developed the ENCODE Portal database and website as the source for the data and metadata generated by the ENCODE Consortium. Two principles have motivated the design. First, experimental protocols, analytical procedures and the data themselves should be made publicly accessible through a coherent, web-based search and download interface. Second, the same interface should serve carefully curated metadata that record the provenance of the data and justify its interpretation in biological terms. Since its initial release in 2013 and in response to recommendations from consortium members and the wider community of scientists who use the Portal to access ENCODE data, the Portal has been regularly updated to better reflect these design principles. Here we report on these updates, including results from new experiments, uniformly-processed data from other projects, new visualization tools and more comprehensive metadata to describe experiments and analyses. Additionally, the Portal is now home to meta(data) from related projects including Genomics of Gene Regulation, Roadmap Epigenome Project, Model organism ENCODE (modENCODE) and modERN. The Portal now makes available over 13000 datasets and their accompanying metadata and can be accessed at: https://www.encodeproject.org/. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  1. Secret key rates for an encoded quantum repeater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratzik, Sylvia; Kampermann, Hermann; Bruß, Dagmar

    2014-03-01

    We investigate secret key rates for the quantum repeater using encoding [L. Jiang et al., Phys. Rev. A 79, 032325 (2009), 10.1103/PhysRevA.79.032325] and compare them to the standard repeater scheme by Briegel, Dür, Cirac, and Zoller. The former scheme has the advantage of a minimal consumption of classical communication. We analyze the trade-off in the secret key rate between the communication time and the required resources. For this purpose we introduce an error model for the repeater using encoding which allows for input Bell states with a fidelity smaller than one, in contrast to the model given by L. Jiang et al. [Phys. Rev. A 79, 032325 (2009), 10.1103/PhysRevA.79.032325]. We show that one can correct additional errors in the encoded connection procedure of this repeater and develop a suitable decoding algorithm. Furthermore, we derive the rate of producing entangled pairs for the quantum repeater using encoding and give the minimal parameter values (gate quality and initial fidelity) for establishing a nonzero secret key. We find that the generic quantum repeater is optimal regarding the secret key rate per memory per second and show that the encoded quantum repeater using the simple three-qubit repetition code can even have an advantage with respect to the resources compared to other recent quantum repeater schemes with encoding.

  2. Analysis of Program Obfuscation Schemes with Variable Encoding Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Kazuhide; Kiyomoto, Shinsaku; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Sakurai, Kouichi

    Program analysis techniques have improved steadily over the past several decades, and software obfuscation schemes have come to be used in many commercial programs. A software obfuscation scheme transforms an original program or a binary file into an obfuscated program that is more complicated and difficult to analyze, while preserving its functionality. However, the security of obfuscation schemes has not been properly evaluated. In this paper, we analyze obfuscation schemes in order to clarify the advantages of our scheme, the XOR-encoding scheme. First, we more clearly define five types of attack models that we defined previously, and define quantitative resistance to these attacks. Then, we compare the security, functionality and efficiency of three obfuscation schemes with encoding variables: (1) Sato et al.'s scheme with linear transformation, (2) our previous scheme with affine transformation, and (3) the XOR-encoding scheme. We show that the XOR-encoding scheme is superior with regard to the following two points: (1) the XOR-encoding scheme is more secure against a data-dependency attack and a brute force attack than our previous scheme, and is as secure against an information-collecting attack and an inverse transformation attack as our previous scheme, (2) the XOR-encoding scheme does not restrict the calculable ranges of programs and the loss of efficiency is less than in our previous scheme.

  3. Mental reinstatement of encoding context improves episodic remembering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramão, Inês; Karlsson, Anna; Johansson, Mikael

    2017-09-01

    This study investigates context-dependent memory retrieval. Previous work has shown that physically re-experiencing the encoding context at retrieval improves memory accessibility. The current study examined if mental reconstruction of the original encoding context would yield parallel memory benefits. Participants performed a cued-recall memory task, preceded either by a mental or by a physical context reinstatement task, and we manipulated whether the context reinstated at retrieval overlapped with the context of the target episode. Both behavioral and electrophysiological measures of brain activity showed strong encoding-retrieval (E-R) overlap effects, with facilitated episodic retrieval when the encoding and retrieval contexts overlapped. The electrophysiological E-R overlap effect was more sustained and involved more posterior regions when context was mentally compared with physically reinstated. Additionally, a time-frequency analysis revealed that context reinstatement alone engenders recollection of the target episode. However, while recollection of the target memory is readily prompted by a physical reinstatement, target recollection during mental reinstatement is delayed and depends on the gradual reconstruction of the context. Taken together, our results show facilitated episodic remembering also when mentally reinstating the encoding context; and that such benefits are supported by both shared and partially non-overlapping neural mechanisms when the encoding context is mentally reconstructed as compared with physically presented at the time of retrieval. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Low Complexity HEVC Encoder for Visual Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaoqing Pan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Visual sensor networks (VSNs can be widely applied in security surveillance, environmental monitoring, smart rooms, etc. However, with the increased number of camera nodes in VSNs, the volume of the visual information data increases significantly, which becomes a challenge for storage, processing and transmitting the visual data. The state-of-the-art video compression standard, high efficiency video coding (HEVC, can effectively compress the raw visual data, while the higher compression rate comes at the cost of heavy computational complexity. Hence, reducing the encoding complexity becomes vital for the HEVC encoder to be used in VSNs. In this paper, we propose a fast coding unit (CU depth decision method to reduce the encoding complexity of the HEVC encoder for VSNs. Firstly, the content property of the CU is analyzed. Then, an early CU depth decision method and a low complexity distortion calculation method are proposed for the CUs with homogenous content. Experimental results show that the proposed method achieves 71.91% on average encoding time savings for the HEVC encoder for VSNs.

  5. Quantum control mechanism analysis through field based Hamiltonian encoding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitra, Abhra; Rabitz, Herschel

    2006-01-01

    Optimal control of quantum dynamics in the laboratory is proving to be increasingly successful. The control fields can be complex, and the mechanisms by which they operate have often remained obscure. Hamiltonian encoding (HE) has been proposed as a method for understanding mechanisms in quantum dynamics. In this context mechanism is defined in terms of the dominant quantum pathways leading to the final state of the controlled system. HE operates by encoding a special modulation into the Hamiltonian and decoding its signature in the dynamics to determine the dominant pathway amplitudes. Earlier work encoded the modulation directly into the Hamiltonian operators. This present work introduces the alternative scheme of field based HE, where the modulation is encoded into the control field and not directly into the Hamiltonian operators. This distinct form of modulation yields a new perspective on mechanism and is computationally faster than the earlier approach. Field based encoding is also an important step towards a laboratory based algorithm for HE as it is the only form of encoding that may be experimentally executed. HE is also extended to cover systems with noise and uncertainty and finally, a hierarchical algorithm is introduced to reveal mechanism in a stepwise fashion of ever increasing detail as desired. This new hierarchical algorithm is an improvement over earlier approaches to HE where the entire mechanism was determined in one stroke. The improvement comes from the use of less complex modulation schemes, which leads to fewer evaluations of Schroedinger's equation. A number of simulations are presented on simple systems to illustrate the new field based encoding technique for mechanism assessment

  6. Two Pathways to Stimulus Encoding in Category Learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Tyler; Love, Bradley C.; Maddox, W. Todd

    2008-01-01

    Category learning theorists tacitly assume that stimuli are encoded by a single pathway. Motivated by theories of object recognition, we evaluate a dual-pathway account of stimulus encoding. The part-based pathway establishes mappings between sensory input and symbols that encode discrete stimulus features, whereas the image-based pathway applies holistic templates to sensory input. Our experiments use rule-plus-exception structures in which one exception item in each category violates a salient regularity and must be distinguished from other items. In Experiment 1, we find that discrete representations are crucial for recognition of exceptions following brief training. Experiments 2 and 3 involve multi-session training regimens designed to encourage either part or image-based encoding. We find that both pathways are able to support exception encoding, but have unique characteristics. We speculate that one advantage of the part-based pathway is the ability to generalize across domains, whereas the image-based pathway provides faster and more effortless recognition. PMID:19460948

  7. Direct encoding of orientation variance in the visual system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Liam J; Heywood, Charles A; Kentridge, Robert W

    2015-01-01

    Our perception of regional irregularity, an example of which is orientation variance, seems effortless when we view two patches of texture that differ in this attribute. Little is understood, however, of how the visual system encodes a regional statistic like orientation variance, but there is some evidence to suggest that it is directly encoded by populations of neurons tuned broadly to high or low levels. The present study shows that selective adaptation to low or high levels of variance results in a perceptual aftereffect that shifts the perceived level of variance of a subsequently viewed texture in the direction away from that of the adapting stimulus (Experiments 1 and 2). Importantly, the effect is durable across changes in mean orientation, suggesting that the encoding of orientation variance is independent of global first moment orientation statistics (i.e., mean orientation). In Experiment 3 it was shown that the variance-specific aftereffect did not show signs of being encoded in a spatiotopic reference frame, similar to the equivalent aftereffect of adaptation to the first moment orientation statistic (the tilt aftereffect), which is represented in the primary visual cortex and exists only in retinotopic coordinates. Experiment 4 shows that a neuropsychological patient with damage to ventral areas of the cortex but spared intact early areas retains sensitivity to orientation variance. Together these results suggest that orientation variance is encoded directly by the visual system and possibly at an early cortical stage.

  8. Emotion suppression reduces hippocampal activity during successful memory encoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, Julia; de Quervain, Dominique J-F; Friese, Malte; Luechinger, Roger; Boesiger, Peter; Rasch, Björn

    2012-10-15

    People suppressing their emotions while facing an emotional event typically remember it less well. However, the neural mechanisms underlying the impairing effect of emotion suppression on successful memory encoding are not well understood. Because successful memory encoding relies on the hippocampus and the amygdala, we hypothesized that memory impairments due to emotion suppression are associated with down-regulated activity in these brain areas. 59 healthy females were instructed either to simply watch the pictures or to down-regulate their emotions by using a response-focused emotion suppression strategy. Brain activity was recorded using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), and free recall of pictures was tested afterwards. As expected, suppressing one's emotions resulted in impaired recall of the pictures. On the neural level, the memory impairments were associated with reduced activity in the right hippocampus during successful encoding. No significant effects were observed in the amygdala. In addition, functional connectivity between the hippocampus and the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex was strongly reduced during emotion suppression, and these reductions predicted free-recall performance. Our results indicate that emotion suppression interferes with memory encoding on the hippocampal level, possibly by decoupling hippocampal and prefrontal encoding processes, suggesting that response-focused emotion suppression might be an adaptive strategy for impairing hippocampal memory formation in highly arousing situations. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Graph Regularized Auto-Encoders for Image Representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiyi Liao; Yue Wang; Yong Liu

    2017-06-01

    Image representation has been intensively explored in the domain of computer vision for its significant influence on the relative tasks such as image clustering and classification. It is valuable to learn a low-dimensional representation of an image which preserves its inherent information from the original image space. At the perspective of manifold learning, this is implemented with the local invariant idea to capture the intrinsic low-dimensional manifold embedded in the high-dimensional input space. Inspired by the recent successes of deep architectures, we propose a local invariant deep nonlinear mapping algorithm, called graph regularized auto-encoder (GAE). With the graph regularization, the proposed method preserves the local connectivity from the original image space to the representation space, while the stacked auto-encoders provide explicit encoding model for fast inference and powerful expressive capacity for complex modeling. Theoretical analysis shows that the graph regularizer penalizes the weighted Frobenius norm of the Jacobian matrix of the encoder mapping, where the weight matrix captures the local property in the input space. Furthermore, the underlying effects on the hidden representation space are revealed, providing insightful explanation to the advantage of the proposed method. Finally, the experimental results on both clustering and classification tasks demonstrate the effectiveness of our GAE as well as the correctness of the proposed theoretical analysis, and it also suggests that GAE is a superior solution to the current deep representation learning techniques comparing with variant auto-encoders and existing local invariant methods.

  10. Validation of a Real-time AVS Encoder on FPGA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qun Fang Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A whole I frame AVS real-time video encoder is designed and implemented on FPGA platform in this paper. The system uses the structure of the flow calculation, coupled with a dual-port RAM memory between/among the various functional modules. Reusable design and pipeline design are used to optimize various encoding module and to ensure the efficient operation of the pipeline. Through the simulation of ISE software and the verification of Xilinx Vritex-4 pro platform, it can be seen that the highest working frequency can be up to 110 MHz, meeting the requirements of the whole I frame real- time encoding of AVS in CIF resolution.

  11. Splice variants of porcine PPHLN1 encoding periphilin-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Knud Erik; Momeni, Jamal; Farajzadeh, Leila

    2017-01-01

    splice variants hereof. RT-PCR cloning using oligonucleotide primers derived from in silico sequences resulted in three PPHLN1 transcripts: a full-length mRNA and two transcript variant resulting in shorter proteins. The longest encoded periphilin-1, consisting of 373 amino acids, displays a high......The periphilin-1 protein is encoded by the PPHLN1 gene. Periphilin-1 is found in the cornified cell envelope during the terminal differentiation of keratinocyte at the outer layer of epidermis. In the current study we report on the cloning and characterization of the porcine PPHLN1 cDNA and two...... homology to the human periphilin-1 protein coded by the transcript variant 2 (91%). A shorter transcript variant (PPHLN1Sp1) contains a 1065-codon ORF, which is consistent with that of the authentic PPHLN1, but lacks a region of 57 bp spanning exon 7. Hence, the encoded polypeptide periphilin-1Sp1 consists...

  12. Human Transcriptome and Chromatin Modifications: An ENCODE Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Shen

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A decade-long project, led by several international research groups, called the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE, recently released an unprecedented amount of data. The ambitious project covers transcriptome, cistrome, epigenome, and interactome data from more than 1,600 sets of experiments in human. To make use of this valuable resource, it is important to understand the information it represents and the techniques that were used to generate these data. In this review, we introduce the data that ENCODE generated, summarize the observations from the data analysis, and revisit a computational approach that ENCODE used to predict gene expression, with a focus on the human transcriptome and its association with chromatin modifications.

  13. Encoding, training and retrieval in ferroelectric tunnel junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hanni; Xia, Yidong; Xu, Bo; Yin, Jiang; Yuan, Guoliang; Liu, Zhiguo

    2016-05-01

    Ferroelectric tunnel junctions (FTJs) are quantum nanostructures that have great potential in the hardware basis for future neuromorphic applications. Among recently proposed possibilities, the artificial cognition has high hopes, where encoding, training, memory solidification and retrieval constitute a whole chain that is inseparable. However, it is yet envisioned but experimentally unconfirmed. The poor retention or short-term store of tunneling electroresistance, in particular the intermediate states, is still a key challenge in FTJs. Here we report the encoding, training and retrieval in BaTiO3 FTJs, emulating the key features of information processing in terms of cognitive neuroscience. This is implemented and exemplified through processing characters. Using training inputs that are validated by the evolution of both barrier profile and domain configuration, accurate recalling of encoded characters in the retrieval stage is demonstrated.

  14. Distinctiveness and encoding effects in online sentence comprehension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip eHofmeister

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In explicit memory recall and recognition tasks, elaboration and contextual isolation both facilitate memory performance. Here, we investigate these effects in the context of sentence processing: targets for retrieval during online sentence processing of English object relative clause constructions differ in the amount of elaboration associated with the target noun phrase, or the homogeneity of superficial features (text color. Experiment 1 shows that greater elaboration for targets during the encoding phase reduces reading times at retrieval sites, but elaboration of non-targets has considerably weaker effects. Experiment 2 illustrates that processing isolated superficial features of target noun phrases --- here, a green word in a sentence with words colored white --- does not lead to enhanced memory performance, despite triggering longer encoding times. These results are interpreted in the light of the memory models of Nairne 1990, 2001, 2006, which state that encoding remnants contribute to the set of retrieval cues that provide the basis for similarity-based interference effects.

  15. Enzymes and Enzyme Activity Encoded by Nonenveloped Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azad, Kimi; Banerjee, Manidipa; Johnson, John E

    2017-09-29

    Viruses are obligate intracellular parasites that rely on host cell machineries for their replication and survival. Although viruses tend to make optimal use of the host cell protein repertoire, they need to encode essential enzymatic or effector functions that may not be available or accessible in the host cellular milieu. The enzymes encoded by nonenveloped viruses-a group of viruses that lack any lipid coating or envelope-play vital roles in all the stages of the viral life cycle. This review summarizes the structural, biochemical, and mechanistic information available for several classes of enzymes and autocatalytic activity encoded by nonenveloped viruses. Advances in research and development of antiviral inhibitors targeting specific viral enzymes are also highlighted.

  16. Deep Marginalized Sparse Denoising Auto-Encoder for Image Denoising

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hongqiang; Ma, Shiping; Xu, Yuelei; Zhu, Mingming

    2018-01-01

    Stacked Sparse Denoising Auto-Encoder (SSDA) has been successfully applied to image denoising. As a deep network, the SSDA network with powerful data feature learning ability is superior to the traditional image denoising algorithms. However, the algorithm has high computational complexity and slow convergence rate in the training. To address this limitation, we present a method of image denoising based on Deep Marginalized Sparse Denoising Auto-Encoder (DMSDA). The loss function of Sparse Denoising Auto-Encoder is marginalized so that it satisfies both sparseness and marginality. The experimental results show that the proposed algorithm can not only outperform SSDA in the convergence speed and training time, but also has better denoising performance than the current excellent denoising algorithms, including both the subjective and objective evaluation of image denoising.

  17. Subversion of cytokine networks by virally encoded decoy receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epperson, Megan L; Lee, Chung A; Fremont, Daved H

    2012-11-01

    During the course of evolution, viruses have captured or created a diverse array of open reading frames, which encode for proteins that serve to evade and sabotage the host innate and adaptive immune responses that would otherwise lead to their elimination. These viral genomes are some of the best textbooks of immunology ever written. The established arsenal of immunomodulatory proteins encoded by viruses is large and growing, and includes specificities for virtually all known inflammatory pathways and targets. The focus of this review is on herpes and poxvirus-encoded cytokine and chemokine-binding proteins that serve to undermine the coordination of host immune surveillance. Structural and mechanistic studies of these decoy receptors have provided a wealth of information, not only about viral pathogenesis but also about the inner workings of cytokine signaling networks. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  18. Genetically-encoded biosensors for monitoring cellular stress in bioprocessing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polizzi, Karen M; Kontoravdi, Cleo

    2015-02-01

    With the current wealth of transcriptomic data, it is possible to design genetically-encoded biosensors for the detection of stress responses and apply these to high-throughput bioprocess development and monitoring of cellular health. Such biosensors can sense extrinsic factors such as nutrient or oxygen deprivation and shear stress, as well as intrinsic stress factors like oxidative damage and unfolded protein accumulation. Alongside, there have been developments in biosensing hardware and software applicable to the field of genetically-encoded biosensors in the near future. This review discusses the current state-of-the-art in biosensors for monitoring cultures during biological manufacturing and the future challenges for the field. Connecting the individual achievements into a coherent whole will enable the application of genetically-encoded biosensors in industry. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Performance study of large area encoding readout MRPC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Chen, G.; Han, D.; Wang, X.; Zeng, M.; Zeng, Z.; Zhao, Z.; Guo, B.

    2018-02-01

    Muon tomography system built by the 2-D readout high spatial resolution Multi-gap Resistive Plate Chamber (MRPC) detector is a project of Tsinghua University. An encoding readout method based on the fine-fine configuration has been used to minimize the number of the readout electronic channels resulting in reducing the complexity and the cost of the system. In this paper, we provide a systematic comparison of the MRPC detector performance with and without fine-fine encoding readout. Our results suggest that the application of the fine-fine encoding readout leads us to achieve a detecting system with slightly worse spatial resolution but dramatically reduce the number of electronic channels.

  20. Prefrontal activity and impaired memory encoding strategies in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimond, Synthia; Hawco, Colin; Lepage, Martin

    2017-08-01

    Schizophrenia patients have significant memory difficulties that have far-reaching implications in their daily life. These impairments are partly attributed to an inability to self-initiate effective memory encoding strategies, but its core neurobiological correlates remain unknown. The current study addresses this critical gap in our knowledge of episodic memory impairments in schizophrenia. Schizophrenia patients (n = 35) and healthy controls (n = 23) underwent a Semantic Encoding Memory Task (SEMT) during an fMRI scan. Brain activity was examined for conditions where participants were a) prompted to use semantic encoding strategies, or b) not prompted but required to self-initiate such strategies. When prompted to use semantic encoding strategies, schizophrenia patients exhibited similar recognition performance and brain activity as healthy controls. However, when required to self-initiate these strategies, patients had significant reduced recognition performance and brain activity in the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, as well as in the left temporal gyrus, left superior parietal lobule, and cerebellum. When patients were divided based on performance on the SEMT, the subgroup with more severe deficits in self-initiation also showed greater reduction in left dorsolateral prefrontal activity. These results suggest that impaired self-initiation of elaborative encoding strategies is a driving feature of memory deficits in schizophrenia. We also identified the neural correlates of impaired self-initiation of semantic encoding strategies, in which a failure to activate the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex plays a key role. These findings provide important new targets in the development of novel treatments aiming to improve memory and ultimately patients' outcome. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN ENCODING ABILITY AND AGGRESSIVE BEHAVIOR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsamis, Vasiliki J; Rebok, George W; Montague, David R

    2009-03-26

    While past research efforts have reported a relationship between encoding ability and aggressive behavior in children, the relationship between encoding ability and adult aggressiveness has not been examined. Encoding, an element of attention, refers to the ability to recall and reorder information stored in memory. Using selected cognitive tests and a self-report measure of aggressive behavior in a sample of community college students (n=55), this study investigated the relationship between encoding ability and aggressive behavior, (i.e., physical aggression, verbal aggression, anger, hostility, indirect aggression, and total aggression). Aggressive behavior was assessed by the Aggression Questionnaire of the Buss-Durkee Hostility Inventory, a widely-used measure of aggressive behavior. Encoding was measured using the WAIS-III Digit Span and Arithmetic subtests. Initial analyses showed no significant correlations between the cognitive measures and the five scales of aggressive behavior. However, there was a significant age-related association between scores on the cognitive measures and the indices of aggressive behavior. Two groups were created, those who reported attention problems and those who did not report attention problems. When the two groups were compared, participants who had a history of attention problems were verbally more aggressive than participants with a negative history of attention problems, and they were generally more aggressive. A composite score, called an "encoding score," was related to scores on the aggressive behavior scales. Moreover, the age-related relationship between these two variables suggests that the relationship is maturational and may disappear as an individual ages. Concerning the latter, participants in the current study were enrolled in junior college. Therefore, persons who had attention problems and were aggressive may not have pursued higher education.

  2. Negative affect promotes encoding of and memory for details at the expense of the gist: affect, encoding, and false memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storbeck, Justin

    2013-01-01

    I investigated whether negative affective states enhance encoding of and memory for item-specific information reducing false memories. Positive, negative, and neutral moods were induced, and participants then completed a Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM) false-memory task. List items were presented in unique spatial locations or unique fonts to serve as measures for item-specific encoding. The negative mood conditions had more accurate memories for item-specific information, and they also had fewer false memories. The final experiment used a manipulation that drew attention to distinctive information, which aided learning for DRM words, but also promoted item-specific encoding. For the condition that promoted item-specific encoding, false memories were reduced for positive and neutral mood conditions to a rate similar to that of the negative mood condition. These experiments demonstrated that negative affective cues promote item-specific processing reducing false memories. People in positive and negative moods encode events differently creating different memories for the same event.

  3. Hybrid architecture for encoded measurement-based quantum computation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwerger, M; Briegel, H J; Dür, W

    2014-06-20

    We present a hybrid scheme for quantum computation that combines the modular structure of elementary building blocks used in the circuit model with the advantages of a measurement-based approach to quantum computation. We show how to construct optimal resource states of minimal size to implement elementary building blocks for encoded quantum computation in a measurement-based way, including states for error correction and encoded gates. The performance of the scheme is determined by the quality of the resource states, where within the considered error model a threshold of the order of 10% local noise per particle for fault-tolerant quantum computation and quantum communication.

  4. Signal Encoding and Telemetry Systems for Space Vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-05-01

    first application in which this design encoder was flown on two Brazilian Sonda III rockets. These encoders were programmed for the following operating...State University (OSU). The depletion sensing vehicles will be Sonda III rockets and will be instrumented by Northeastern University. The experiments...Preamp. Gain 400 Polarization Loss 3 dB Safety Factor 3 dB Xmtr. Power 3, 5 or 8 W RESULTS Xmtr. Power CNR at IF 3 watts 9.7 dB 5 12.0 8 14.0 Sonda III

  5. Ordering of diagnostic information in encoded medical images. Accuracy progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przelaskowski, A.; Jóźwiak, R.; Krzyżewski, T.; Wróblewska, A.

    2008-03-01

    A concept of diagnostic accuracy progression for embedded coding of medical images was presented. Implementation of JPEG2000 encoder with a modified PCRD optimization algorithm was realized and initially verified as a tool for accurate medical image streaming. Mean square error as a distortion measure was replaced by other numerical measures to revise quality progression according to diagnostic importance of successively encoded image information. A faster increment of image diagnostic importance during reconstruction of initial packets of code stream was reached. Modified Jasper code was initially tested on a set of mammograms containing clusters of microcalcifications and malignant masses, and other radiograms. Teleradiologic applications were considered as the first area of interests.

  6. Accelerated radial Fourier-velocity encoding using compressed sensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilbert, Fabian; Han, Dietbert

    2014-01-01

    Purpose:Phase Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a tool for non-invasive determination of flow velocities inside blood vessels. Because Phase Contrast MRI only measures a single mean velocity per voxel, it is only applicable to vessels significantly larger than the voxel size. In contrast, Fourier Velocity Encoding measures the entire velocity distribution inside a voxel, but requires a much longer acquisition time. For accurate diagnosis of stenosis in vessels on the scale of spatial resolution, it is important to know the velocity distribution of a voxel. Our aim was to determine velocity distributions with accelerated Fourier Velocity Encoding in an acquisition time required for a conventional Phase Contrast image. Materials and Methods:We imaged the femoral artery of healthy volunteers with ECG - triggered, radial CINE acquisition. Data acquisition was accelerated by undersampling, while missing data were reconstructed by Compressed Sensing. Velocity spectra of the vessel were evaluated by high resolution Phase Contrast images and compared to spectra from fully sampled and undersampled Fourier Velocity Encoding. By means of undersampling, it was possible to reduce the scan time for Fourier Velocity Encoding to the duration required for a conventional Phase Contrast image. Results:Acquisition time for a fully sampled data set with 12 different Velocity Encodings was 40 min. By applying a 12.6 - fold retrospective undersampling, a data set was generated equal to 3:10 min acquisition time, which is similar to a conventional Phase Contrast measurement. Velocity spectra from fully sampled and undersampled Fourier Velocity Encoded images are in good agreement and show the same maximum velocities as compared to velocity maps from Phase Contrast measurements. Conclusion: Compressed Sensing proved to reliably reconstruct Fourier Velocity Encoded data. Our results indicate that Fourier Velocity Encoding allows an accurate determination of the velocity

  7. Accelerated radial Fourier-velocity encoding using compressed sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilbert, Fabian; Wech, Tobias; Hahn, Dietbert; Köstler, Herbert

    2014-09-01

    Phase Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a tool for non-invasive determination of flow velocities inside blood vessels. Because Phase Contrast MRI only measures a single mean velocity per voxel, it is only applicable to vessels significantly larger than the voxel size. In contrast, Fourier Velocity Encoding measures the entire velocity distribution inside a voxel, but requires a much longer acquisition time. For accurate diagnosis of stenosis in vessels on the scale of spatial resolution, it is important to know the velocity distribution of a voxel. Our aim was to determine velocity distributions with accelerated Fourier Velocity Encoding in an acquisition time required for a conventional Phase Contrast image. We imaged the femoral artery of healthy volunteers with ECG-triggered, radial CINE acquisition. Data acquisition was accelerated by undersampling, while missing data were reconstructed by Compressed Sensing. Velocity spectra of the vessel were evaluated by high resolution Phase Contrast images and compared to spectra from fully sampled and undersampled Fourier Velocity Encoding. By means of undersampling, it was possible to reduce the scan time for Fourier Velocity Encoding to the duration required for a conventional Phase Contrast image. Acquisition time for a fully sampled data set with 12 different Velocity Encodings was 40 min. By applying a 12.6-fold retrospective undersampling, a data set was generated equal to 3:10 min acquisition time, which is similar to a conventional Phase Contrast measurement. Velocity spectra from fully sampled and undersampled Fourier Velocity Encoded images are in good agreement and show the same maximum velocities as compared to velocity maps from Phase Contrast measurements. Compressed Sensing proved to reliably reconstruct Fourier Velocity Encoded data. Our results indicate that Fourier Velocity Encoding allows an accurate determination of the velocity distribution in vessels in the order of the voxel size. Thus

  8. Accelerated radial Fourier-velocity encoding using compressed sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilbert, Fabian; Han, Dietbert [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Radiology; Wech, Tobias; Koestler, Herbert [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Radiology; Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Comprehensive Heart Failure Center (CHFC)

    2014-10-01

    Purpose:Phase Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a tool for non-invasive determination of flow velocities inside blood vessels. Because Phase Contrast MRI only measures a single mean velocity per voxel, it is only applicable to vessels significantly larger than the voxel size. In contrast, Fourier Velocity Encoding measures the entire velocity distribution inside a voxel, but requires a much longer acquisition time. For accurate diagnosis of stenosis in vessels on the scale of spatial resolution, it is important to know the velocity distribution of a voxel. Our aim was to determine velocity distributions with accelerated Fourier Velocity Encoding in an acquisition time required for a conventional Phase Contrast image. Materials and Methods:We imaged the femoral artery of healthy volunteers with ECG - triggered, radial CINE acquisition. Data acquisition was accelerated by undersampling, while missing data were reconstructed by Compressed Sensing. Velocity spectra of the vessel were evaluated by high resolution Phase Contrast images and compared to spectra from fully sampled and undersampled Fourier Velocity Encoding. By means of undersampling, it was possible to reduce the scan time for Fourier Velocity Encoding to the duration required for a conventional Phase Contrast image. Results:Acquisition time for a fully sampled data set with 12 different Velocity Encodings was 40 min. By applying a 12.6 - fold retrospective undersampling, a data set was generated equal to 3:10 min acquisition time, which is similar to a conventional Phase Contrast measurement. Velocity spectra from fully sampled and undersampled Fourier Velocity Encoded images are in good agreement and show the same maximum velocities as compared to velocity maps from Phase Contrast measurements. Conclusion: Compressed Sensing proved to reliably reconstruct Fourier Velocity Encoded data. Our results indicate that Fourier Velocity Encoding allows an accurate determination of the velocity

  9. Straight to the point: how people encode linear discontinuations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo I. Mora

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Spatial discontinuations, as those found in cities and buildings, are everyday events. But, how do we encode and classify such misalignments? This is the topic of this paper. Twenty participants were asked to classify a total of 51 icons showing an upward-moving line being misaligned to the right, left and straight down. The results show that subjects were very sensitive to slight discontinuations occurring to vertical lines and that there was not exact symmetry between the left and right axis, meaning that the pieces slightly misaligned to the left were encoded differently than those misaligned to the right

  10. Solving traveling salesman problems with DNA molecules encoding numerical values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji Youn; Shin, Soo-Yong; Park, Tai Hyun; Zhang, Byoung-Tak

    2004-12-01

    We introduce a DNA encoding method to represent numerical values and a biased molecular algorithm based on the thermodynamic properties of DNA. DNA strands are designed to encode real values by variation of their melting temperatures. The thermodynamic properties of DNA are used for effective local search of optimal solutions using biochemical techniques, such as denaturation temperature gradient polymerase chain reaction and temperature gradient gel electrophoresis. The proposed method was successfully applied to the traveling salesman problem, an instance of optimization problems on weighted graphs. This work extends the capability of DNA computing to solving numerical optimization problems, which is contrasted with other DNA computing methods focusing on logical problem solving.

  11. submitter Linear encoder based low frequency inertial sensor

    CERN Document Server

    Hellegouarch, Sylvain; Artoos, Kurt; Lambert, Pierre; Collette, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we present a novel concept of inertial sensor, based on a linear encoder. Compared to other interferometric sensors, the encoder is much more easy to mount, and the calibration more stable. A prototype has been built and validated experimentally by comparison with a commercial seismometer. It has a resolution of about 10 pm/√Hz. In order to further improve the resolution, two concepts of mechanical amplifiers have been studied and compared. One of them is shown to be extremely promising, provided that the amplifier does not stiffen the sensor.

  12. Authentication of gold nanoparticle encoded pharmaceutical tablets using polarimetric signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnicer, Artur; Arteaga, Oriol; Suñé-Negre, Josep M; Javidi, Bahram

    2016-10-01

    The counterfeiting of pharmaceutical products represents concerns for both industry and the safety of the general public. Falsification produces losses to companies and poses health risks for patients. In order to detect fake pharmaceutical tablets, we propose producing film-coated tablets with gold nanoparticle encoding. These coated tablets contain unique polarimetric signatures. We present experiments to show that ellipsometric optical techniques, in combination with machine learning algorithms, can be used to distinguish genuine and fake samples. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report using gold nanoparticles encoded with optical polarimetric classifiers to prevent the counterfeiting of pharmaceutical products.

  13. Beta-glucosidase variants and polynucleotides encoding same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wogulis, Mark; Harris, Paul; Osborn, David

    2017-06-27

    The present invention relates to beta-glucosidase variants, e.g. beta-glucosidase variants of a parent Family GH3A beta-glucosidase from Aspergillus fumigatus. The present invention also relates to polynucleotides encoding the beta-glucosidase variants; nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides; and methods of using the beta-glucosidase variants.

  14. Method of implementing frequency-encoded NOT, OR and NOR ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-11-27

    Nov 27, 2015 ... Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 73; Issue 5. Method of implementing frequency-encoded NOT, OR and NOR logic operations using lithium niobate waveguide and reflecting semiconductor optical amplifiers. Sisir Kumar Garai Sourangshu Mukhopadhyay. Volume 73 Issue 5 ...

  15. EGVII endoglucanase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel [Los Gatos, CA; Goedegebuur, Frits [Vlaardingen, NL; Ward, Michael [San Francisco, CA; Yao, Jian [Sunnyvale, CA

    2012-02-14

    The present invention provides a novel endoglucanase nucleic acid sequence, designated egl7, and the corresponding EGVII amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding EGVII, recombinant EGVII proteins and methods for producing the same.

  16. A spoonful of sugar: encoding and publishing in the classroom

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spadini, E.

    2017-01-01

    This paper pursues the use of text encoding and digital publication in teaching textual criticism. A number of concepts and rules of textual criticism can be put into practice during a course thanks to the use of digital resources and tools. In dealing with original materials (text sources), the

  17. Practical Programming with Higher-Order Encodings and Dependent Types

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poswolsky, Adam; Schürmann, Carsten

    2008-01-01

    utilizing HOAS free the programmer from concerns of handling explicit contexts and substitutions, our system permits programming over such encodings without making these constructs explicit, leading to concise and elegant programs. To this end our system distinguishes bindings of variables intended...

  18. Robust EPI Nyquist ghost elimination via spatial and temporal encoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoge, W Scott; Tan, Huan; Kraft, Robert A

    2010-12-01

    Nyquist ghosts are an inherent artifact in echo planar imaging acquisitions. An approach to robustly eliminate Nyquist ghosts is presented that integrates two previous Nyquist ghost correction techniques: temporal domain encoding (phase labeling for additional coordinate encoding: PLACE and spatial domain encoding (phased array ghost elimination: PAGE). Temporal encoding modulates the echo planar imaging acquisition trajectory from frame to frame, enabling one to interleave data to remove inconsistencies that occur between sampling on positive and negative gradient readouts. With PLACE, one can coherently combine the interleaved data to cancel residual Nyquist ghosts. If the level of ghosting varies significantly from image to image, however, the signal cancellation that occurs with PLACE can adversely affect SNR-sensitive applications such as perfusion imaging with arterial spin labeling. This work proposes integrating PLACE into a PAGE-based reconstruction process to yield significantly better Nyquist ghost correction that is more robust than PLACE or PAGE alone. The robustness of this method is demonstrated in the presence of magnetic field drift with an in-vivo arterial spin labeling perfusion experiment. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Neurospora crassa fmf-1 encodes the homologue of the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Neurospora crassa fmf-1 encodes the homologue of the. Schizosaccharomyces pombe Ste11p regulator of sexual development. Srividhya V. Iyer, Mukund Ramakrishnan and Durgadas P. Kasbekar. J. Genet. 88, 33–39. Figure 1. Sequence at the junction of the proximal breakpoint of T(AR173) has homology with Cen-VII ...

  20. Extraordinarily adaptive properties of the genetically encoded amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilardo, Melissa; Meringer, Markus; Freeland, Stephen; Rasulev, Bakhtiyor; Cleaves, H James

    2015-03-24

    Using novel advances in computational chemistry, we demonstrate that the set of 20 genetically encoded amino acids, used nearly universally to construct all coded terrestrial proteins, has been highly influenced by natural selection. We defined an adaptive set of amino acids as one whose members thoroughly cover relevant physico-chemical properties, or "chemistry space." Using this metric, we compared the encoded amino acid alphabet to random sets of amino acids. These random sets were drawn from a computationally generated compound library containing 1913 alternative amino acids that lie within the molecular weight range of the encoded amino acids. Sets that cover chemistry space better than the genetically encoded alphabet are extremely rare and energetically costly. Further analysis of more adaptive sets reveals common features and anomalies, and we explore their implications for synthetic biology. We present these computations as evidence that the set of 20 amino acids found within the standard genetic code is the result of considerable natural selection. The amino acids used for constructing coded proteins may represent a largely global optimum, such that any aqueous biochemistry would use a very similar set.

  1. Superior memorizers employ different neural networks for encoding and recall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallow, Johannes; Bernarding, Johannes; Luchtmann, Michael; Bethmann, Anja; Brechmann, André

    2015-01-01

    Superior memorizers often employ the method of loci (MoL) to memorize large amounts of information. The MoL, known since ancient times, relies on a complex process where information to be memorized is bound to landmarks along mental routes in a previously memorized environment. However, functional magnetic resonance imaging data on groups of trained superior memorizer are rare. Based on the memorizing strategy reported by superior memorizers, we developed a scheme of the processes successively employed during memorizing and recalling digits and relate these to brain activation that is specific for the encoding and recall period. In the examined superior memorizers several regions, suggested to be involved in mental navigation and digit-to-word processing, were specifically activated during encoding: bilateral early visual cortex, retrosplenial cortex, left parahippocampus, left visual cortex, and left superior parietal cortex. Although the scheme suggests that some steps during encoding and recall seem to be analog, none of the encoding areas were specifically activated during the recall. Instead, we found strong activation in left anterior superior temporal gyrus, which we relate to recalling the sequential order of the digits, and right motor cortex that may be related to reciting the digits.

  2. Transposon Tn5 encodes streptomycin resistance in nonenteric bacteria.

    OpenAIRE

    O'Neill, E A; Kiely, G M; Bender, R A

    1984-01-01

    Strains of Caulobacter crescentus, Pseudomonas putida, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, Rhizobium meliloti, and Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides carrying the kanamycin resistance-encoding transposon Tn5 were 15 to 500 times more resistant to streptomycin than transposon-free strains. The streptomycin resistance determinant, which is separable from the kanamycin resistance determinant of Tn5, was not expressed in Escherichia coli or Klebsiella aerogenes.

  3. Polypeptides having xylanase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spodsberg, Nikolaj; Shaghasi, Tarana

    2017-06-20

    The present invention relates to polypeptides having xylanase activity, catalytic domains, and carbohydrate binding domains, and polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides, catalytic domains, and carbohydrate binding domains. The present invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides, catalytic domains, and carbohydrate binding domains.

  4. The ternary-encoded fuzzy-neural networks

    OpenAIRE

    Semenova, Olena; Semenov, Andriy; Koval, Kostyantyn; Galka, Andriy

    2012-01-01

    When combining fuzzy logic and neural networks it is possible to get a hybrid system that can process uncertain values and can be trained. Fuzzy logic elements can be regarded as fuzzy-neural networks. In order to present a set of fuzzy values the ternary encoding is used.

  5. A Permutation Encoding Technique Applied to Genetic Algorithm ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper, a permutation chromosome encoding scheme is proposed for obtaining solution to resource constrained project scheduling problem. The proposed chromosome coding method is applied to Genetic algorithm procedure and implemented through object oriented programming. The method is applied to a ...

  6. A CNOT gate between multiphoton qubits encoded in two cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblum, S; Gao, Y Y; Reinhold, P; Wang, C; Axline, C J; Frunzio, L; Girvin, S M; Jiang, Liang; Mirrahimi, M; Devoret, M H; Schoelkopf, R J

    2018-02-13

    Entangling gates between qubits are a crucial component for performing algorithms in quantum computers. However, any quantum algorithm must ultimately operate on error-protected logical qubits encoded in high-dimensional systems. Typically, logical qubits are encoded in multiple two-level systems, but entangling gates operating on such qubits are highly complex and have not yet been demonstrated. Here we realize a controlled NOT (CNOT) gate between two multiphoton qubits in two microwave cavities. In this approach, we encode a qubit in the high-dimensional space of a single cavity mode, rather than in multiple two-level systems. We couple two such encoded qubits together through a transmon, which is driven by an RF pump to apply the gate within 190 ns. This is two orders of magnitude shorter than the decoherence time of the transmon, enabling a high-fidelity gate operation. These results are an important step towards universal algorithms on error-corrected logical qubits.

  7. RNAi-based silencing of genes encoding the vacuolar- ATPase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RNAi-based silencing of genes encoding the vacuolar- ATPase subunits a and c in pink bollworm (Pectinophora gossypiella). Ahmed M. A. Mohammed. Abstract. RNA interference is a post- transcriptional gene regulation mechanism that is predominantly found in eukaryotic organisms. RNAi demonstrated a successful ...

  8. Isolation and characterization of the rat gene encoding glutamate dehydrogenase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Das, A. T.; Arnberg, A. C.; Malingré, H.; Moerer, P.; Charles, R.; Moorman, A. F.; Lamers, W. H.

    1993-01-01

    The concentration of glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) varies strongly between different organs and between different regions within organs. To permit further studies on the regulation of GDH expression, we isolated and characterized the rat gene encoding the GDH protein. This gene contains 13 exons and

  9. Encoding Requests to Web Service Compositions as Constraints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lazovik, Alexander; Aiello, Marco; Gennari, Rosella; van Beek, P.

    2005-01-01

    Interacting with a web service enabled marketplace in order to achieve a complex task involves sequencing a set of individual service operations, gathering information from the services, and making choices. We propose to encode the problem of issuing requests to a composition of web services as a

  10. The Role of Specificity in the Lexical Encoding of Participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conklin, Kathy; Koenig, Jean-Pierre; Mauner, Gail

    2004-01-01

    In addition to information about phonology, morphology and syntax, lexical entries contain semantic information about participants (e.g., Agent). However, the traditional criteria for determining how much participant information is lexically encoded have proved unreliable. We have proposed two semantic criteria (obligatoriness and selectivity)…

  11. Cytotoxic Escherichia coli strains encoding colibactin colonize 1 laboratory mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Alexis; Mannion, Anthony; Feng, Yan; Madden, Carolyn M.; Bakthavatchalu, Vasudevan; Shen, Zeli; Ge, Zhongming; Fox, James G.

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli strains have not been fully characterized in laboratory mice and are not currently excluded from mouse colonies. Colibactin (Clb), a cytotoxin, has been associated with inflammation and cancer in humans and animals. We performed bacterial cultures utilizing rectal swab, fecal, and extra intestinal samples from clinically unaffected or affected laboratory mice. Fifty-one E. coli were isolated from 45 laboratory mice, identified biochemically, and selected isolates were serotyped. The 16S rRNA gene was amplified and sequenced for specific isolates, PCR used for clbA and clbQ gene amplification, and phylogenetic group identification was performed on all 51 E. coli strains. Clb genes were sequenced and selected E. coli isolates were characterized using a HeLa cell cytotoxicity assay. Forty-five of the 51 E. coli isolates (88 %) encoded clbA and clbQ and belonged to phylogenetic group B2. Mouse E. coli serotypes included: O2:H6, O−:H−, OM:H+, and O22:H−. Clb-encoding O2:H6 mouse E. coli isolates were cytotoxic in vitro. A Clb-encoding E. coli was isolated from a clinically affected genetically modified mouse with cystic endometrial hyperplasia. Our findings suggest that Clb-encoding E. coli colonize laboratory mice and may induce clinical and subclinical diseases that may impact experimental mouse models. PMID:27480057

  12. Encoded Extended Spectrum Beta-Lactamases Produced by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the distribution of plasmid-encoded extended spectrum beta-lacatamases. (ESBLs) in Lahore, Pakistan using different phenotypic and molecular methods. Methods: Escherichia coli and Klebsiella spp were obtained over a period of nineteen months (June. 2007 to December 2008). Both were tested ...

  13. Polypeptides having endoglucanase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spodsberg, Nikolaj

    2016-02-23

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having endoglucanase activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  14. Polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnorr, Kirk; Kramer, Randall

    2016-04-05

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  15. Practical Programming with Higher-Order Encodings and Dependent Types

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poswolsky, Adam; Schürmann, Carsten

    2008-01-01

    , tedious, and error-prone. In this paper, we describe the underlying calculus of Delphin. Delphin is a fully implemented functional-programming language supporting reasoning over higher-order encodings and dependent types, while maintaining the benefits of HOAS. More specifically, just as representations...

  16. Multiplexed Sequence Encoding: A Framework for DNA Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakeri, Bijan; Carr, Peter A.; Lu, Timothy K.

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic DNA has great propensity for efficiently and stably storing non-biological information. With DNA writing and reading technologies rapidly advancing, new applications for synthetic DNA are emerging in data storage and communication. Traditionally, DNA communication has focused on the encoding and transfer of complete sets of information. Here, we explore the use of DNA for the communication of short messages that are fragmented across multiple distinct DNA molecules. We identified three pivotal points in a communication—data encoding, data transfer & data extraction—and developed novel tools to enable communication via molecules of DNA. To address data encoding, we designed DNA-based individualized keyboards (iKeys) to convert plaintext into DNA, while reducing the occurrence of DNA homopolymers to improve synthesis and sequencing processes. To address data transfer, we implemented a secret-sharing system—Multiplexed Sequence Encoding (MuSE)—that conceals messages between multiple distinct DNA molecules, requiring a combination key to reveal messages. To address data extraction, we achieved the first instance of chromatogram patterning through multiplexed sequencing, thereby enabling a new method for data extraction. We envision these approaches will enable more widespread communication of information via DNA. PMID:27050646

  17. Learning from Number Board Games: You Learn What You Encode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laski, Elida V.; Siegler, Robert S.

    2014-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that encoding the numerical-spatial relations in a number board game is a key process in promoting learning from playing such games. Experiment 1 used a microgenetic design to examine the effects on learning of the type of counting procedure that children use. As predicted, having kindergartners count-on from their current…

  18. Topological quantum error correction with optimal encoding rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bombin, H.; Martin-Delgado, M. A.

    2006-01-01

    We prove the existence of topological quantum error correcting codes with encoding rates k/n asymptotically approaching the maximum possible value. Explicit constructions of these topological codes are presented using surfaces of arbitrary genus. We find a class of regular toric codes that are optimal. For physical implementations, we present planar topological codes

  19. Extraordinarily Adaptive Properties of the Genetically Encoded Amino Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilardo, Melissa; Meringer, Markus; Freeland, Stephen; Rasulev, Bakhtiyor; Cleaves II, H. James

    2015-01-01

    Using novel advances in computational chemistry, we demonstrate that the set of 20 genetically encoded amino acids, used nearly universally to construct all coded terrestrial proteins, has been highly influenced by natural selection. We defined an adaptive set of amino acids as one whose members thoroughly cover relevant physico-chemical properties, or “chemistry space.” Using this metric, we compared the encoded amino acid alphabet to random sets of amino acids. These random sets were drawn from a computationally generated compound library containing 1913 alternative amino acids that lie within the molecular weight range of the encoded amino acids. Sets that cover chemistry space better than the genetically encoded alphabet are extremely rare and energetically costly. Further analysis of more adaptive sets reveals common features and anomalies, and we explore their implications for synthetic biology. We present these computations as evidence that the set of 20 amino acids found within the standard genetic code is the result of considerable natural selection. The amino acids used for constructing coded proteins may represent a largely global optimum, such that any aqueous biochemistry would use a very similar set. PMID:25802223

  20. How Does Intentionality of Encoding Affect Memory for Episodic Information?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Michael; Butterworth, Karla; Nilsson, Jonna; Hamilton, Colin J.; Gallagher, Peter; Smulders, Tom V.

    2016-01-01

    Episodic memory enables the detailed and vivid recall of past events, including target and wider contextual information. In this paper, we investigated whether/how encoding intentionality affects the retention of target and contextual episodic information from a novel experience. Healthy adults performed (1) a "What-Where-When"…

  1. Encoding, Memory, and Transcoding Deficits in Childhood Apraxia of Speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shriberg, Lawrence D.; Lohmeier, Heather L.; Strand, Edythe A.; Jakielski, Kathy J.

    2012-01-01

    A central question in Childhood Apraxia of Speech (CAS) is whether the core phenotype is limited to transcoding (planning/programming) deficits or if speakers with CAS also have deficits in auditory-perceptual "encoding" (representational) and/or "memory" (storage and retrieval of representations) processes. We addressed this and other questions…

  2. PROTOTIPE KOMPRESI LOSSLESS AUDIO CODEC MENGGUNAKAN ENTROPY ENCODING

    OpenAIRE

    Andreas Soegandi

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to perform lossless compression on the uncompress audio file audio to minimize file size without reducing the quality. The application is developed using the entropy encoding compression method with rice coding technique. For the result, the compression ratio is good enough and easy to be developed because the algorithm is quite simple. 

  3. Prototipe Kompresi Lossless Audio Codec Menggunakan Entropy Encoding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Soegandi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to perform lossless compression on the uncompress audio file audio to minimize file size without reducing the quality. The application is developed using the entropy encoding compression method with rice coding technique. For the result, the compression ratio is good enough and easy to be developed because the algorithm is quite simple. 

  4. Overexpression of BrSAC1 encoding a phosphoinositide ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study demonstrates the isolation and characterization of cDNA encoding a phosphoinositide phosphatase (PIP) from a stem cell cDNA library of Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa) seedling. The full length gene (BrSAC1; GenBank accession no., GU434275) contained 1999 base pairs (bp), with an open reading frame of ...

  5. Successful Scene Encoding in Presymptomatic Early-Onset Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroz, Yakeel T; Willment, Kim Celone; Castrillon, Gabriel; Muniz, Martha; Lopera, Francisco; Budson, Andrew; Stern, Chantal E

    2015-01-01

    Brain regions critical to episodic memory are altered during the preclinical stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, reliable means of identifying cognitively-normal individuals at higher risk to develop AD have not been established. To examine whether functional MRI can detect early functional changes associated with scene encoding in a group of presymptomatic presenilin-1 (PSEN1) E280A mutation carriers. Participants were 39 young, cognitively-normal individuals from an autosomal dominant early-onset AD kindred, located in Antioquia, Colombia. Participants performed a functional MRI scene encoding task and a post-scan subsequent memory test. PSEN1 mutation carriers exhibited hyperactivation within medial temporal lobe regions (hippocampus,parahippocampal formation) during successful scene encoding compared to age-matched non-carriers. Hyperactivation in medial temporal lobe regions during scene encoding is seen in individuals genetically-determined to develop AD years before their clinical onset. Our findings will guide future research with the ultimate goal of using functional neuroimaging in the early detection of preclinical AD.

  6. Transcriptional modulation of genes encoding nitrate reductase in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-10-26

    Oct 26, 2016 ... The free aluminum (Al) content in soil can reach levels that are toxic to plants, and this has frequently limited increased productivity of cultures. Four genes encoding nitrate reductase (NR) were identified, named ZmNR1–4. With the aim of evaluating NR activity and the transcriptional modulation of the.

  7. Transcriptional modulation of genes encoding nitrate reductase in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The free aluminum (Al) content in soil can reach levels that are toxic to plants, and this has frequently limited increased productivity of cultures. Four genes encoding nitrate reductase (NR) were identified, named ZmNR1–4. With the aim of evaluating NR activity and the transcriptional modulation of the ZmNR1, ZmNR2, ...

  8. Polypeptides having beta-glucosidase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Paul; Golightly, Elizabeth

    2007-07-17

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having beta-glucosidase activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods for producing and using the polypeptides.

  9. Polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnorr, Kirk; Kramer, Randall

    2017-08-08

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  10. Polypeptides having beta-xylosidase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yu; Liu, Ye; Duan, Junxin; Tang, Lan; McBrayer, Brett

    2017-07-04

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having beta-xylosidase activity and polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  11. Polypeptides having xylanase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez de Leon, Alfredo; Rey, Michael

    2017-09-26

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having xylanase activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  12. Polypeptides having cellobiohydrolase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ye; Tang, Lan; Duan, Junxin

    2017-02-07

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellobiohydrolase activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  13. Polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and polynucleotides encoding the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Junxin; Schnorr, Kirk Matthew; Wu, Wenping

    2013-11-19

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  14. Chimeric polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wogulis, Mark; Sweeney, Matthew; Heu, Tia

    2017-06-14

    The present invention relates to chimeric GH61 polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity. The present invention also relates to polynucleotides encoding the chimeric GH61 polypeptides; nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides; and methods of using the chimeric GH61 polypeptides.

  15. Polypeptides having cellobiohydrolase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stringer, Mary Ann; McBrayer, Brett

    2016-11-29

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellobiohydrolase activity, catalytic domains, and cellulose binding domains and polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides, catalytic domains, and cellulose binding domains. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides, catalytic domains, or cellulose binding domains.

  16. Polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Lan; Liu, Ye; Duan, Junxin; Zhang, Yu; Joergensen, Christian; Kramer, Randall

    2016-11-29

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  17. Polypeptides having xylanase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Lan; Liu, Ye; Duan, Junxin; Hanshu, Ding

    2012-10-30

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having xylanase activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  18. Polynucleotides encoding polypeptides having beta-glucosidase activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Paul; Golightly, Elizabeth

    2010-03-02

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having beta-glucosidase activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods for producing and using the polypeptides.

  19. Polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiyuran, Suchindra; Kramer, Randall; Harris, Paul

    2013-10-29

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  20. Polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yu; Duan, Junxin; Tang, Lan; Wu, Wenping

    2016-11-22

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  1. Polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and nucleic acids encoding same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kimberly; Harris, Paul; Zaretsky, Elizabeth; Re, Edward; Vlasenko, Elena; McFarland, Keith; Lopez de Leon, Alfredo

    2012-10-16

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods for producing and using the polypeptides.

  2. Polypeptides having xylanase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez de Leon, Alfredo; Rey, Michael

    2016-05-31

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having xylanase activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  3. Polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yu; Duan, Junxin; Tang, Lan; Wu, Wenping

    2016-06-14

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  4. Polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Lan; Liu, Ye; Duan, Junxin; Wu, Wenping; Kramer, Randall

    2017-09-19

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  5. Polypeptides having endoglucanase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spodsberg, Nikolaj; Shagasi, Tarana

    2017-05-30

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having endoglucanase activity, catalytic domains, cellulose binding domains and polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides, catalytic domains or cellulose binding domains. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides, catalytic domains or cellulose binding domains.

  6. Polypeptides having endoglucanase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Paul; Lopez de Leon, Alfredo; Rey, Michael; Ding, Hanshu; Vlasenko, Elena

    2010-11-02

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having endoglucanase activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods for producing and using the polypeptides.

  7. Polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and nucleic acids encoding same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Kimberly; Harris, Paul; Zaretsky, Elizabeth; Re, Edward; Vlasenko, Elena; McFarland, Keith; Lopez de Leon, Alfredo

    2016-08-09

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods for producing and using the polypeptides.

  8. Polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and nucleic acids encoding same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Kimberly; Harris, Paul; Zaretsky, Elizabeth; Re, Edward; Vlasenko, Elena; McFarland, Keith; Lopez de Leon, Alfredo

    2017-09-05

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods for producing and using the polypeptides.

  9. Polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnorr, Kirk; Kramer, Randall

    2016-08-09

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  10. Polypeptides having xylanase activity and polynucleotides encoding the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spodsberg, Nikolaj [Bagsvaed, DK

    2014-01-07

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having xylanase activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The inventino also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  11. Neural Activity during Encoding Predicts False Memories Created by Misinformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okado, Yoko; Stark, Craig E. L.

    2005-01-01

    False memories are often demonstrated using the misinformation paradigm, in which a person's recollection of a witnessed event is altered after exposure to misinformation about the event. The neural basis of this phenomenon, however, remains unknown. The authors used fMRI to investigate encoding processes during the viewing of an event and…

  12. Polypeptides having beta-glucosidase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morant, Marc Dominique

    2014-10-14

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having beta-glucosidase activity, beta-xylosidase activity, or beta-glucosidase and beta-xylosidase activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  13. Measurement of safety rod trajectory using digital optical encoder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milovanovic, S.; Pesic, M.; Milovanovic, T.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper a rod drop position - time function z(t) is measured using new method - with a digital displacement transducer and digital optical incremental encoder connected to a serial communication port of a personal computer. Some improvements, comparing to the previously proposed method are explained. Also, some possible applications in analysis of reactor dynamics and kinetics are proposed. (author)

  14. Assessment of a DNA Vaccine Encoding Burkholderia pseudomallei Bacterioferritin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-08-01

    excised by restriction enzyme digestion with Xba I and subcloned into the mammalian expression vector pcDNA3.1start, to create the DNA vaccine...Lewis, J. T. August, and E. T. Marques. 2006. DNA Encoding an HIV -1 Gag/Human Lysosome-Associated Membrane Protein-1 Chimera Elicits a Broad

  15. EGVI endoglucanase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel [Los Gatos, CA; Goedegebuur, Frits [Vlaardingen, NL; Ward, Michael [San Francisco, CA; Yao, Jian [Sunnyvale, CA

    2008-04-01

    The present invention provides a novel endoglucanase nucleic acid sequence, designated egl6, and the corresponding EGVI amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding EGVI, recombinant EGVI proteins and methods for producing the same.

  16. EGVII endoglucanase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel [Los Gatos, CA; Goedegebuur, Frits [Vlaardingen, NL; Ward, Michael [San Francisco, CA; Yao, Jian [Sunnyvale, CA

    2009-05-05

    The present invention provides an endoglucanase nucleic acid sequence, designated egl7, and the corresponding EGVII amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding EGVII, recombinant EGVII proteins and methods for producing the same.

  17. Amsacta moorei entomopoxvirus encodes a functional DNA photolyase (AMV025)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nalcacioglu, R.; Dizman, Y.A.; Vlak, J.M.; Demirbag, Z.; Oers, van M.M.

    2010-01-01

    The major damage induced in DNA by ultraviolet light is the induction of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs). Amsacta moorei entomopoxvirus (AMEV) encodes a CPD photolyase (AMV025) with a putative role in converting these dimers back into monomers. In infected Lymantria dispar cells transcription

  18. Cloning, expression and characterisation of a novel gene encoding ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cloning, expression and characterisation of a novel gene encoding a chemosensory protein from Bemisia tabaci Gennadius (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) ... The BtabCSP amino acid residues deduced from the respective full-length cDNA shares four conserved cysteine motifs with known CSPs from other insects. Homology ...

  19. RNAi-based silencing of genes encoding the vacuolar- ATPase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-11-09

    Nov 9, 2016 ... Spodoptera exigua larval development by silencing chitin synthase gene with RNA interference. Bull. Entomol. Res. 98:613-619. Dow JAT (1999). The Multifunctional Drosophila melanogaster V-. ATPase is encoded by a multigene family. J. Bioenerg. Biomembr. 31:75-83. Fire A, Xu SQ, Montgomery MK, ...

  20. EGVII endoglucanase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Goedegebuur, Frits; Ward, Michael; Yao, Jian

    2013-07-16

    The present invention provides a novel endoglucanase nucleic acid sequence, designated egl7, and the corresponding EGVII amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding EGVII, recombinant EGVII proteins and methods for producing the same.

  1. EGVI endoglucanase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Goedegebuur, Frits; Ward, Michael; Yao, Jian

    2006-06-06

    The present invention provides a novel endoglucanase nucleic acid sequence, designated egl6, and the corresponding EGVI amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding EGVI, recombinant EGVI proteins and methods for producing the same.

  2. EGVIII endoglucanase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Goedegebuur, Frits; Ward, Michael; Yao, Jian

    2006-05-23

    The present invention provides a novel endoglucanase nucleic acid sequence, designated egl8, and the corresponding EGVIII amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding EGVIII, recombinant EGVIII proteins and methods for producing the same.

  3. Molecular cloning and characterization of a gene encoding RING ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR G

    Molecular cloning and characterization of a gene encoding RING zinc finger ankyrin protein from drought-tolerant Artemisia desertorum. XIUHONG YANG, CHAO SUN, YUANLEI HU and ZHONGPING LIN. *. College of Life Sciences, National Key Laboratory of Protein Engineering and Plant Genetic Engineering, Peking.

  4. Polypeptides having endoglucanase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yu; Liu, Ye; Duan, Junxin; Tang, Lan

    2018-01-30

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having endoglucanase activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  5. A MPEG-4 encoder based on TMS320C6416

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gui-ju; Liu, Wei-ning

    2013-08-01

    Engineering and products need to achieve real-time video encoding by DSP, but the high computational complexity and huge amount of data requires that system has high data throughput. In this paper, a real-time MPEG-4 video encoder is designed based on TMS320C6416 platform. The kernel is the DSP of TMS320C6416T and FPGA chip f as the organization and management of video data. In order to control the flow of input and output data. Encoded stream is output using the synchronous serial port. The system has the clock frequency of 1GHz and has up to 8000 MIPS speed processing capacity when running at full speed. Due to the low coding efficiency of MPEG-4 video encoder transferred directly to DSP platform, it is needed to improve the program structure, data structures and algorithms combined with TMS320C6416T characteristics. First: Design the image storage architecture by balancing the calculation spending, storage space cost and EDMA read time factors. Open up a more buffer in memory, each buffer cache 16 lines of video data to be encoded, reconstruction image and reference image including search range. By using the variable alignment mode of the DSP, modifying the definition of structure variables and change the look-up table which occupy larger space with a direct calculation array to save memory space. After the program structure optimization, the program code, all variables, buffering buffers and the interpolation image including the search range can be placed in memory. Then, as to the time-consuming process modules and some functions which are called many times, the corresponding modules are written in parallel assembly language of TMS320C6416T which can increase the running speed. Besides, the motion estimation algorithm is improved by using a cross-hexagon search algorithm, The search speed can be increased obviously. Finally, the execution time, signal-to-noise ratio and compression ratio of a real-time image acquisition sequence is given. The experimental

  6. Identification and validation of human papillomavirus encoded microRNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kui Qian

    Full Text Available We report here identification and validation of the first papillomavirus encoded microRNAs expressed in human cervical lesions and cell lines. We established small RNA libraries from ten human papillomavirus associated cervical lesions including cancer and two human papillomavirus harboring cell lines. These libraries were sequenced using SOLiD 4 technology. We used the sequencing data to predict putative viral microRNAs and discovered nine putative papillomavirus encoded microRNAs. Validation was performed for five candidates, four of which were successfully validated by qPCR from cervical tissue samples and cell lines: two were encoded by HPV 16, one by HPV 38 and one by HPV 68. The expression of HPV 16 microRNAs was further confirmed by in situ hybridization, and colocalization with p16INK4A was established. Prediction of cellular target genes of HPV 16 encoded microRNAs suggests that they may play a role in cell cycle, immune functions, cell adhesion and migration, development, and cancer. Two putative viral target sites for the two validated HPV 16 miRNAs were mapped to the E5 gene, one in the E1 gene, two in the L1 gene and one in the LCR region. This is the first report to show that papillomaviruses encode their own microRNA species. Importantly, microRNAs were found in libraries established from human cervical disease and carcinoma cell lines, and their expression was confirmed in additional tissue samples. To our knowledge, this is also the first paper to use in situ hybridization to show the expression of a viral microRNA in human tissue.

  7. Human visual system automatically encodes sequential regularities of discrete events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Motohiro; Schröger, Erich; Czigler, István; Ohira, Hideki

    2010-06-01

    For our adaptive behavior in a dynamically changing environment, an essential task of the brain is to automatically encode sequential regularities inherent in the environment into a memory representation. Recent studies in neuroscience have suggested that sequential regularities embedded in discrete sensory events are automatically encoded into a memory representation at the level of the sensory system. This notion is largely supported by evidence from investigations using auditory mismatch negativity (auditory MMN), an event-related brain potential (ERP) correlate of an automatic memory-mismatch process in the auditory sensory system. However, it is still largely unclear whether or not this notion can be generalized to other sensory modalities. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the contribution of the visual sensory system to the automatic encoding of sequential regularities using visual mismatch negativity (visual MMN), an ERP correlate of an automatic memory-mismatch process in the visual sensory system. To this end, we conducted a sequential analysis of visual MMN in an oddball sequence consisting of infrequent deviant and frequent standard stimuli, and tested whether the underlying memory representation of visual MMN generation contains only a sensory memory trace of standard stimuli (trace-mismatch hypothesis) or whether it also contains sequential regularities extracted from the repetitive standard sequence (regularity-violation hypothesis). The results showed that visual MMN was elicited by first deviant (deviant stimuli following at least one standard stimulus), second deviant (deviant stimuli immediately following first deviant), and first standard (standard stimuli immediately following first deviant), but not by second standard (standard stimuli immediately following first standard). These results are consistent with the regularity-violation hypothesis, suggesting that the visual sensory system automatically encodes sequential

  8. Electroencephalographic brain dynamics of memory encoding in emotionally arousing context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Enrique eUribe

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Emotional content/context enhances declarative memory through modulation of encoding and retrieval mechanisms. At encoding, neurophysiological data have consistently demonstrated the subsequent memory effect in theta and gamma oscillations. Yet, the existing studies were focused on the emotional content effect and let the emotional context effect unexplored. We hypothesized that theta and gamma oscillations show higher evoked/induced activity during the encoding of visual stimuli when delivered in an emotionally arousing context. Twenty-five healthy volunteers underwent evoked potentials recordings using a 21 scalp electrodes montage. They attended to an audiovisual test of emotional declarative memory being randomly assigned to either emotionally arousing or neutral context. Visual stimulus presentation was used as the time-locking event. Grand-averages of the evoked potentials and evoked spectral perturbations were calculated for each volunteer. Evoked potentials showed a higher negative deflection from 80 to 140 ms for the emotional condition. Such effect was observed over central, frontal and prefrontal locations bilaterally. Evoked theta power was higher in left parietal, central, frontal and prefrontal electrodes from -50 to 300 ms in the emotional condition. Evoked gamma power was higher in the emotional condition with a spatial distribution that overlapped at some points with the theta topography. The early theta power increase could be related to expectancy induced by auditory information processing that facilitates visual encoding in emotional contexts. Together, our results suggest that declarative memory enhancement for both emotional content and emotional context are supported by similar neural mechanisms at encoding, and offer new evidence about the brain processing of relevant environmental stimuli.

  9. [ENCODE apophenia or a panglossian analysis of the human genome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casane, Didier; Fumey, Julien; Laurenti, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    In September 2012, a batch of more than 30 articles presenting the results of the ENCODE (Encyclopaedia of DNA Elements) project was released. Many of these articles appeared in Nature and Science, the two most prestigious interdisciplinary scientific journals. Since that time, hundreds of other articles dedicated to the further analyses of the Encode data have been published. The time of hundreds of scientists and hundreds of millions of dollars were not invested in vain since this project had led to an apparent paradigm shift: contrary to the classical view, 80% of the human genome is not junk DNA, but is functional. This hypothesis has been criticized by evolutionary biologists, sometimes eagerly, and detailed refutations have been published in specialized journals with impact factors far below those that published the main contribution of the Encode project to our understanding of genome architecture. In 2014, the Encode consortium released a new batch of articles that neither suggested that 80% of the genome is functional nor commented on the disappearance of their 2012 scientific breakthrough. Unfortunately, by that time many biologists had accepted the idea that 80% of the genome is functional, or at least, that this idea is a valid alternative to the long held evolutionary genetic view that it is not. In order to understand the dynamics of the genome, it is necessary to re-examine the basics of evolutionary genetics because, not only are they well established, they also will allow us to avoid the pitfall of a panglossian interpretation of Encode. Actually, the architecture of the genome and its dynamics are the product of trade-offs between various evolutionary forces, and many structural features are not related to functional properties. In other words, evolution does not produce the best of all worlds, not even the best of all possible worlds, but only one possible world. © 2015 médecine/sciences – Inserm.

  10. Task-selective memory effects for successfully implemented encoding strategies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric D Leshikar

    Full Text Available Previous behavioral evidence suggests that instructed strategy use benefits associative memory formation in paired associate tasks. Two such effective encoding strategies--visual imagery and sentence generation--facilitate memory through the production of different types of mediators (e.g., mental images and sentences. Neuroimaging evidence suggests that regions of the brain support memory reflecting the mental operations engaged at the time of study. That work, however, has not taken into account self-reported encoding task success (i.e., whether participants successfully generated a mediator. It is unknown, therefore, whether task-selective memory effects specific to each strategy might be found when encoding strategies are successfully implemented. In this experiment, participants studied pairs of abstract nouns under either visual imagery or sentence generation encoding instructions. At the time of study, participants reported their success at generating a mediator. Outside of the scanner, participants further reported the quality of the generated mediator (e.g., images, sentences for each word pair. We observed task-selective memory effects for visual imagery in the left middle occipital gyrus, the left precuneus, and the lingual gyrus. No such task-selective effects were observed for sentence generation. Intriguingly, activity at the time of study in the left precuneus was modulated by the self-reported quality (vividness of the generated mental images with greater activity for trials given higher ratings of quality. These data suggest that regions of the brain support memory in accord with the encoding operations engaged at the time of study.

  11. Tape measuring system using linear encoder and digital camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Tae Bong; Jeong, Don Young; Kim, Myung Soon; Kim, Jae Wan; Kim, Jong Ahn

    2013-04-01

    We have designed and constructed the calibration system of line standards such as tape and rule for the secondary calibration laboratories. The system consists of the main body with linear stage and linear encoder, the optical microscope with digital camera, and the computer. The base of the system is a aluminum profile with 2.9 m length, 0.09 m height and 0.18 m width. The linear stage and the linear encoder are fixed on the aluminum profile. The micro-stage driven by micrometer is fixed on the carriage of the long linear stage, and the optical microscope with digital camera and the tablet PC are on the this stage. The linear encoder counts the moving distance of the linear stage with resolution of 1 μm and its counting value is transferred to the tablet PC. The image of the scale mark of the tape is captured by the CCD camera of optical microscope and transferred to the PC through USB interface. The computer automatically determines the center of the scale mark by image processing technique and at the same time reads the moving distance of the linear stage. As a result, the computer can calculate the interval between the scale marks of the tape. In order to achieve the high accuracy, the linear encoder should be calibrated using the laser interferometer or the rigid steel rule. This calibration data of the linear encoder is stored at the computer and the computer corrects the reading value of the linear encoder. In order to determine the center of the scale mark, we use three different algorithms. First, the image profile over specified threshold level is fitted in even order polynomial and the axis of the polynomial is used as the center of the line. Second, the left side and right side areas at the center of the image profile are calculated so that two areas are same. Third, the left and right edges of the image profile are determined at every intensity level of the image and the center of the graduation is calculated as an average of the centers of the left

  12. Local Patch Vectors Encoded by Fisher Vectors for Image Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuangshuang Chen

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work is image classification, whose purpose is to group images into corresponding semantic categories. Four contributions are made as follows: (i For computational simplicity and efficiency, we directly adopt raw image patch vectors as local descriptors encoded by Fisher vector (FV subsequently; (ii For obtaining representative local features within the FV encoding framework, we compare and analyze three typical sampling strategies: random sampling, saliency-based sampling and dense sampling; (iii In order to embed both global and local spatial information into local features, we construct an improved spatial geometry structure which shows good performance; (iv For reducing the storage and CPU costs of high dimensional vectors, we adopt a new feature selection method based on supervised mutual information (MI, which chooses features by an importance sorting algorithm. We report experimental results on dataset STL-10. It shows very promising performance with this simple and efficient framework compared to conventional methods.

  13. Power calculation of linear and angular incremental encoders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokofev, Aleksandr V.; Timofeev, Aleksandr N.; Mednikov, Sergey V.; Sycheva, Elena A.

    2016-04-01

    Automation technology is constantly expanding its role in improving the efficiency of manufacturing and testing processes in all branches of industry. More than ever before, the mechanical movements of linear slides, rotary tables, robot arms, actuators, etc. are numerically controlled. Linear and angular incremental photoelectric encoders measure mechanical motion and transmit the measured values back to the control unit. The capabilities of these systems are undergoing continual development in terms of their resolution, accuracy and reliability, their measuring ranges, and maximum speeds. This article discusses the method of power calculation of linear and angular incremental photoelectric encoders, to find the optimum parameters for its components, such as light emitters, photo-detectors, linear and angular scales, optical components etc. It analyzes methods and devices that permit high resolutions in the order of 0.001 mm or 0.001°, as well as large measuring lengths of over 100 mm. In linear and angular incremental photoelectric encoders optical beam is usually formulated by a condenser lens passes through the measuring unit changes its value depending on the movement of a scanning head or measuring raster. Past light beam is converting into an electrical signal by the photo-detecter's block for processing in the electrical block. Therefore, for calculating the energy source is a value of the desired value of the optical signal at the input of the photo-detecter's block, which reliably recorded and processed in the electronic unit of linear and angular incremental optoelectronic encoders. Automation technology is constantly expanding its role in improving the efficiency of manufacturing and testing processes in all branches of industry. More than ever before, the mechanical movements of linear slides, rotary tables, robot arms, actuators, etc. are numerically controlled. Linear and angular incremental photoelectric encoders measure mechanical motion and

  14. Context dependent prediction and category encoding for DPCM image compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudet, Paul R.

    1989-01-01

    Efficient compression of image data requires the understanding of the noise characteristics of sensors as well as the redundancy expected in imagery. Herein, the techniques of Differential Pulse Code Modulation (DPCM) are reviewed and modified for information-preserving data compression. The modifications include: mapping from intensity to an equal variance space; context dependent one and two dimensional predictors; rationale for nonlinear DPCM encoding based upon an image quality model; context dependent variable length encoding of 2x2 data blocks; and feedback control for constant output rate systems. Examples are presented at compression rates between 1.3 and 2.8 bits per pixel. The need for larger block sizes, 2D context dependent predictors, and the hope for sub-bits-per-pixel compression which maintains spacial resolution (information preserving) are discussed.

  15. Intonational speech prosody encoding in the human auditory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, C; Hamilton, L S; Chang, E F

    2017-08-25

    Speakers of all human languages regularly use intonational pitch to convey linguistic meaning, such as to emphasize a particular word. Listeners extract pitch movements from speech and evaluate the shape of intonation contours independent of each speaker's pitch range. We used high-density electrocorticography to record neural population activity directly from the brain surface while participants listened to sentences that varied in intonational pitch contour, phonetic content, and speaker. Cortical activity at single electrodes over the human superior temporal gyrus selectively represented intonation contours. These electrodes were intermixed with, yet functionally distinct from, sites that encoded different information about phonetic features or speaker identity. Furthermore, the representation of intonation contours directly reflected the encoding of speaker-normalized relative pitch but not absolute pitch. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  16. Enhanced tactile encoding and memory recognition in congenital blindness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Angiulli, Amedeo; Waraich, Paul

    2002-06-01

    Several behavioural studies have shown that early-blind persons possess superior tactile skills. Since neurophysiological data show that early-blind persons recruit visual as well as somatosensory cortex to carry out tactile processing (cross-modal plasticity), blind persons' sharper tactile skills may be related to cortical re-organisation resulting from loss of vision early in their life. To examine the nature of blind individuals' tactile superiority and its implications for cross-modal plasticity, we compared the tactile performance of congenitally totally blind, low-vision and sighted children on raised-line picture identification test and re-test, assessing effects of task familiarity, exploratory strategy and memory recognition. What distinguished the blind from the other children was higher memory recognition and higher tactile encoding associated with efficient exploration. These results suggest that enhanced perceptual encoding and recognition memory may be two cognitive correlates of cross-modal plasticity in congenital blindness.

  17. A Novel Audio Cryptosystem Using Chaotic Maps and DNA Encoding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. J. Sheela

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Chaotic maps have good potential in security applications due to their inherent characteristics relevant to cryptography. This paper introduces a new audio cryptosystem based on chaotic maps, hybrid chaotic shift transform (HCST, and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA encoding rules. The scheme uses chaotic maps such as two-dimensional modified Henon map (2D-MHM and standard map. The 2D-MHM which has sophisticated chaotic behavior for an extensive range of control parameters is used to perform HCST. DNA encoding technology is used as an auxiliary tool which enhances the security of the cryptosystem. The performance of the algorithm is evaluated for various speech signals using different encryption/decryption quality metrics. The simulation and comparison results show that the algorithm can achieve good encryption results and is able to resist several cryptographic attacks. The various types of analysis revealed that the algorithm is suitable for narrow band radio communication and real-time speech encryption applications.

  18. Advanced Encoding for Multilingual Access in a Terminological Data Base

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leroyer, Patrick; L'Homme, Marie-Claude; Robichaud, Benoît

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes new functionalities implemented in a terminological database (TDB) in order to allow efficient editing of and access to multilingual data. The functionalities are original in the sense that they allow users of the database to retrieve the equivalents not only of headwords......, but also of semantically related terms (especially collocations) that appear within the articles. The methods we developed are based on a formal encoding of lexical relationships, namely lexical functions (LFs). Since LFs are language-independent and are designed to capture semantic distinctions, links...... between equivalents can be established automatically. Examples are taken from the fields of computing and the Internet and focus on English and French. However, the model can easily be extended to other fields and languages provided that the data is available and encoded properly....

  19. The encoding complexity of two dimensional range minimum data structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodal, Gerth Stølting; Brodnik, Andrej; Davoodi, Pooya

    2013-01-01

    In the two-dimensional range minimum query problem an input matrix A of dimension m ×n, m ≤ n, has to be preprocessed into a data structure such that given a query rectangle within the matrix, the position of a minimum element within the query range can be reported. We consider the space complexity...... of the encoding variant of the problem where queries have access to the constructed data structure but can not access the input matrix A, i.e. all information must be encoded in the data structure. Previously it was known how to solve the problem with space O(mn min {m,logn}) bits (and with constant query time...

  20. Encoded diffractive optics for full-spectrum computational imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Heide, Felix

    2016-09-16

    Diffractive optical elements can be realized as ultra-thin plates that offer significantly reduced footprint and weight compared to refractive elements. However, such elements introduce severe chromatic aberrations and are not variable, unless used in combination with other elements in a larger, reconfigurable optical system. We introduce numerically optimized encoded phase masks in which different optical parameters such as focus or zoom can be accessed through changes in the mechanical alignment of a ultra-thin stack of two or more masks. Our encoded diffractive designs are combined with a new computational approach for self-calibrating imaging (blind deconvolution) that can restore high-quality images several orders of magnitude faster than the state of the art without pre-calibration of the optical system. This co-design of optics and computation enables tunable, full-spectrum imaging using thin diffractive optics.

  1. The olfactory tubercle encodes odor valence in behaving mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadziola, Marie A; Tylicki, Kate A; Christian, Diana L; Wesson, Daniel W

    2015-03-18

    Sensory information acquires meaning to adaptively guide behaviors. Despite odors mediating a number of vital behaviors, the components of the olfactory system responsible for assigning meaning to odors remain unclear. The olfactory tubercle (OT), a ventral striatum structure that receives monosynaptic input from the olfactory bulb, is uniquely positioned to transform odor information into behaviorally relevant neural codes. No information is available, however, on the coding of odors among OT neurons in behaving animals. In recordings from mice engaged in an odor discrimination task, we report that the firing rate of OT neurons robustly and flexibly encodes the valence of conditioned odors over identity, with rewarded odors evoking greater firing rates. This coding of rewarded odors occurs before behavioral decisions and represents subsequent behavioral responses. We predict that the OT is an essential region whereby odor valence is encoded in the mammalian brain to guide goal-directed behaviors. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/354515-13$15.00/0.

  2. Parallel H.263 Encoder in Normal Coding Mode

    OpenAIRE

    Cosmas, J; Paker, Y; Pearmain, A

    1998-01-01

    A parallel H.263 video encoder, which utilises spatial para1 elism, has been modelled using a multi-threaded program. Spatial parallelism is a technique where an image is subdivided into equal parts (as far as physically possible) and each part is proces!;ed by a separate processor by computing motion and texture mding with all processors cach acting on a different part of thc ]mag. This method leads to a performance increase, which is roughly in proportion to the number ...

  3. Wavelength encoding technique for particle analyses in hematology analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rongeat, Nelly; Brunel, Patrick; Gineys, Jean-Philippe; Cremien, Didier; Couderc, Vincent; Nérin, Philippe

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this study is to combine multiple excitation wavelengths in order to improve accuracy of fluorescence characterization of labeled cells. The experimental demonstration is realized with a hematology analyzer based on flow cytometry and a CW laser source emitting two visible wavelengths. A given optical encoding associated to each wavelength allows fluorescence identification coming from specific fluorochromes and avoiding the use of noisy compensation method.

  4. Exhaustive search of linear information encoding protein-peptide recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelil, Abdellali; Dubreuil, Benjamin; Levy, Emmanuel D; Michnick, Stephen W

    2017-04-01

    High-throughput in vitro methods have been extensively applied to identify linear information that encodes peptide recognition. However, these methods are limited in number of peptides, sequence variation, and length of peptides that can be explored, and often produce solutions that are not found in the cell. Despite the large number of methods developed to attempt addressing these issues, the exhaustive search of linear information encoding protein-peptide recognition has been so far physically unfeasible. Here, we describe a strategy, called DALEL, for the exhaustive search of linear sequence information encoded in proteins that bind to a common partner. We applied DALEL to explore binding specificity of SH3 domains in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Using only the polypeptide sequences of SH3 domain binding proteins, we succeeded in identifying the majority of known SH3 binding sites previously discovered either in vitro or in vivo. Moreover, we discovered a number of sites with both non-canonical sequences and distinct properties that may serve ancillary roles in peptide recognition. We compared DALEL to a variety of state-of-the-art algorithms in the blind identification of known binding sites of the human Grb2 SH3 domain. We also benchmarked DALEL on curated biological motifs derived from the ELM database to evaluate the effect of increasing/decreasing the enrichment of the motifs. Our strategy can be applied in conjunction with experimental data of proteins interacting with a common partner to identify binding sites among them. Yet, our strategy can also be applied to any group of proteins of interest to identify enriched linear motifs or to exhaustively explore the space of linear information encoded in a polypeptide sequence. Finally, we have developed a webserver located at http://michnick.bcm.umontreal.ca/dalel, offering user-friendly interface and providing different scenarios utilizing DALEL.

  5. Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) impairs encoding but not retrieval of verbal information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranganathan, Mohini; Radhakrishnan, Rajiv; Addy, Peter H; Schnakenberg-Martin, Ashley M; Williams, Ashley H; Carbuto, Michelle; Elander, Jacqueline; Pittman, Brian; Andrew Sewell, R; Skosnik, Patrick D; D'Souza, Deepak Cyril

    2017-10-03

    Cannabis and agonists of the brain cannabinoid receptor (CB 1 R) produce acute memory impairments in humans. However, the extent to which cannabinoids impair the component processes of encoding and retrieval has not been established in humans. The objective of this analysis was to determine whether the administration of Δ 9 -Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the principal psychoactive constituent of cannabis, impairs encoding and/or retrieval of verbal information. Healthy subjects were recruited from the community. Subjects were administered the Rey-Auditory Verbal Learning Test (RAVLT) either before administration of THC (experiment #1) (n=38) or while under the influence of THC (experiment #2) (n=57). Immediate and delayed recall on the RAVLT was compared. Subjects received intravenous THC, in a placebo-controlled, double-blind, randomized manner at doses known to produce behavioral and subjective effects consistent with cannabis intoxication. Total immediate recall, short delayed recall, and long delayed recall were reduced in a statistically significant manner only when the RAVLT was administered to subjects while they were under the influence of THC (experiment #2) and not when the RAVLT was administered prior. THC acutely interferes with encoding of verbal memory without interfering with retrieval. These data suggest that learning information prior to the use of cannabis or cannabinoids is not likely to disrupt recall of that information. Future studies will be necessary to determine whether THC impairs encoding of non-verbal information, to what extent THC impairs memory consolidation, and the role of other cannabinoids in the memory-impairing effects of cannabis. Cannabinoids, Neural Synchrony, and Information Processing (THC-Gamma) http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/study/NCT00708994 NCT00708994 Pharmacogenetics of Cannabinoid Response http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00678730 NCT00678730. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Designing waveforms for temporal encoding using a frequency sampling method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gran, Fredrik; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2007-01-01

    In this paper a method for designing waveforms for temporal encoding in medical ultrasound imaging is described. The method is based on least squares optimization and is used to design nonlinear frequency modulated signals for synthetic transmit aperture imaging. By using the proposed design method...... are shown for both methods, wherein the common carotid artery on a 27-year-old healthy male was scanned...

  7. Role of local field potentials in encoding hand movement kinematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witte, Matthias

    2011-10-01

    How the brain orchestrates the musculoskeletal system to produce complex three-dimensional movements is still poorly understood. Despite first promising results in brain-machine interfaces that translate cortical activity to control output, there is an ongoing debate about which brain signals provide richest information related to movement planning and execution. Novel results by Bansal and colleagues (2011) now suggest that neuronal spiking and local field potentials jointly encode kinematics during skilled reach and grasp movements.

  8. Gene cluster encoding cholate catabolism in Rhodococcus spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohn, William W; Wilbrink, Maarten H; Casabon, Israël; Stewart, Gordon R; Liu, Jie; van der Geize, Robert; Eltis, Lindsay D

    2012-12-01

    Bile acids are highly abundant steroids with important functions in vertebrate digestion. Their catabolism by bacteria is an important component of the carbon cycle, contributes to gut ecology, and has potential commercial applications. We found that Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 grows well on cholate, as well as on its conjugates, taurocholate and glycocholate. The transcriptome of RHA1 growing on cholate revealed 39 genes upregulated on cholate, occurring in a single gene cluster. Reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR confirmed that selected genes in the cluster were upregulated 10-fold on cholate versus on cholesterol. One of these genes, kshA3, encoding a putative 3-ketosteroid-9α-hydroxylase, was deleted and found essential for growth on cholate. Two coenzyme A (CoA) synthetases encoded in the cluster, CasG and CasI, were heterologously expressed. CasG was shown to transform cholate to cholyl-CoA, thus initiating side chain degradation. CasI was shown to form CoA derivatives of steroids with isopropanoyl side chains, likely occurring as degradation intermediates. Orthologous gene clusters were identified in all available Rhodococcus genomes, as well as that of Thermomonospora curvata. Moreover, Rhodococcus equi 103S, Rhodococcus ruber Chol-4 and Rhodococcus erythropolis SQ1 each grew on cholate. In contrast, several mycolic acid bacteria lacking the gene cluster were unable to grow on cholate. Our results demonstrate that the above-mentioned gene cluster encodes cholate catabolism and is distinct from a more widely occurring gene cluster encoding cholesterol catabolism.

  9. Polarization encoded all-optical multi-valued shift operators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Jitendra Nath; Bhowmik, Panchatapa

    2014-08-01

    Polarization encoded multi-valued (both ternary and quaternary logic) shift operators have been designed using linear optical devices only. There are six ternary and 24 quaternary shift operators in multi-valued system. These are also known as reversible literals. This circuit will be useful in future all-optical multi-valued logic based information processing system. Different states of polarization of light are taken as different logic states.

  10. Sparse encoding of automatic visual association in hippocampal networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hulme, Oliver J; Skov, Martin; Chadwick, Martin J

    2014-01-01

    by these stimuli. Using multivariate Bayesian decoding, we show that human hippocampal and temporal neocortical structures host sparse associative representations that are automatically triggered by visual input. Furthermore, as predicted theoretically, there was a significant increase in sparsity in the Cornu...... for the sparse encoding of associative density. In the absence of reportability or attentional confounds, this charts a distribution of visual associative representations within hippocampal populations and their temporal lobe afferent fields, and demonstrates the viability of retrospective associative sampling...

  11. Geranyl diphosphate synthase molecules, and nucleic acid molecules encoding same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croteau, Rodney Bruce [Pullman, WA; Burke, Charles Cullen [Moscow, ID

    2008-06-24

    In one aspect, the present invention provides isolated nucleic acid molecules that each encode a geranyl diphosphate synthase protein, wherein each isolated nucleic acid molecule hybridizes to a nucleic acid molecule consisting of the sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO:1 under conditions of 5.times.SSC at 45.degree. C. for one hour. The present invention also provides isolated geranyl diphosphate synthase proteins, and methods for altering the level of expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase protein in a host cell.

  12. A deep auto-encoder model for gene expression prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Rui; Wen, Jia; Quitadamo, Andrew; Cheng, Jianlin; Shi, Xinghua

    2017-11-17

    Gene expression is a key intermediate level that genotypes lead to a particular trait. Gene expression is affected by various factors including genotypes of genetic variants. With an aim of delineating the genetic impact on gene expression, we build a deep auto-encoder model to assess how good genetic variants will contribute to gene expression changes. This new deep learning model is a regression-based predictive model based on the MultiLayer Perceptron and Stacked Denoising Auto-encoder (MLP-SAE). The model is trained using a stacked denoising auto-encoder for feature selection and a multilayer perceptron framework for backpropagation. We further improve the model by introducing dropout to prevent overfitting and improve performance. To demonstrate the usage of this model, we apply MLP-SAE to a real genomic datasets with genotypes and gene expression profiles measured in yeast. Our results show that the MLP-SAE model with dropout outperforms other models including Lasso, Random Forests and the MLP-SAE model without dropout. Using the MLP-SAE model with dropout, we show that gene expression quantifications predicted by the model solely based on genotypes, align well with true gene expression patterns. We provide a deep auto-encoder model for predicting gene expression from SNP genotypes. This study demonstrates that deep learning is appropriate for tackling another genomic problem, i.e., building predictive models to understand genotypes' contribution to gene expression. With the emerging availability of richer genomic data, we anticipate that deep learning models play a bigger role in modeling and interpreting genomics.

  13. An encoding methodology for medical knowledge using SNOMED CT ontology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaker El-Sappagh

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge-Intensive Case Based Reasoning (KI-CBR systems mainly depend on ontology. Using ontology as domain knowledge supports the implementation of semantically-intelligent case retrieval algorithms. The case-based knowledge must be encoded with the same concepts of the domain ontology. Standard medical ontologies, such as SNOMED CT (SCT, can play the role of domain ontology to enhance case representation and retrieval. This study has three stages. First, we propose an encoding methodology using SCT. Second, this methodology is used to encode the case-based knowledge. Third, all the used SCT concepts are collected in a reference set, and an OWL2 ontology of 550 pre-coordinated concepts is proposed. A diabetes diagnosis is chosen as a case study of our proposed framework. SCT is used to provide a pre-coordination concept coverage of ∼75% for diabetes diagnosis terms. Whereas, the uncovered concepts in SCT are proposed. The resulting OWL2 ontology will be used as domain knowledge representation in diabetes diagnosis CBR systems. The proposed framework is tested by using 60 real cases.

  14. Adult ADHD and working memory: neural evidence of impaired encoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soyeon; Liu, Zhongxu; Glizer, Daniel; Tannock, Rosemary; Woltering, Steven

    2014-08-01

    To investigate neural and behavioural correlates of visual encoding during a working memory (WM) task in young adults with and without Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). A sample of 30 college students currently meeting a diagnosis of ADHD and 25 typically developing students, matched on age and gender, performed a delayed match-to-sample task with low and high memory load conditions. Dense-array electroencephalography was recorded. Specifically, the P3, an event related potential (ERP) associated with WM, was examined because of its relation with attentional allocation during WM. Task performance (accuracy, reaction time) as well as performance on other neuropsychological tasks of WM was analyzed. Neural differences were found between the groups. Specifically, the P3 amplitude was smaller in the ADHD group compared to the comparison group for both load conditions at parietal-occipital sites. Lower scores on behavioural working memory tasks were suggestive of impaired behavioural WM performance in the ADHD group. Findings from this study provide the first evidence of neural differences in the encoding stage of WM in young adults with ADHD, suggesting ineffective allocation of attentional resources involved in encoding of information in WM. These findings, reflecting alternate neural functioning of WM, may explain some of the difficulties related to WM functioning that college students with ADHD report in their every day cognitive functioning. Copyright © 2013 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Chlorella viruses contain genes encoding a complete polyamine biosynthetic pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Sascha; Sander, Adrianne; Gurnon, James R.; Yanai-Balser, Giane; VanEtten, James L.; Piotrowski, Markus

    2007-01-01

    Two genes encoding the putative polyamine biosynthetic enzymes agmatine iminohydrolase (AIH) and N-carbamoylputrescine amidohydrolase (CPA) were cloned from the chloroviruses PBCV-1, NY-2A and MT325. They were expressed in Escherichia coli to form C-terminal (His)6-tagged proteins and the recombinant proteins were purified by Ni2+- binding affinity chromatography. The biochemical properties of the two enzymes are similar to AIH and CPA enzymes from Arabidopsis thaliana and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Together with the previously known virus genes encoding ornithine/arginine decarboxlyase (ODC/ADC) and homospermidine synthase, the chloroviruses have genes that encode a complete set of functional enzymes that synthesize the rare polyamine homospermidine from arginine via agmatine, N-carbamoylputrescine and putrescine. The PBCV-1 aih and cpa genes are expressed early during virus infection together with the odc/adc gene, suggesting that biosynthesis of putrescine is important in early stages of viral replication. The aih and cpa genes are widespread in the chlorella viruses. PMID:17101165

  16. ENCODE: A Sourcebook of Epigenomes and Chromatin Language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Yavartanoo

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Until recently, since the Human Genome Project, the general view has been that the majority of the human genome is composed of junk DNA and has little or no selective advantage to the organism. Now we know that this conclusion is an oversimplification. In April 2003, the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI launched an international research consortium called Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE to uncover non-coding functional elements in the human genome. The result of this project has identified a set of new DNA regulatory elements, based on novel relationships among chromatin accessibility, histone modifications, nucleosome positioning, DNA methylation, transcription, and the occupancy of sequence-specific factors. The project gives us new insights into the organization and regulation of the human genome and epigenome. Here, we sought to summarize particular aspects of the ENCODE project and highlight the features and data that have recently been released. At the end of this review, we have summarized a case study we conducted using the ENCODE epigenome data.

  17. Learning from number board games: you learn what you encode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laski, Elida V; Siegler, Robert S

    2014-03-01

    We tested the hypothesis that encoding the numerical-spatial relations in a number board game is a key process in promoting learning from playing such games. Experiment 1 used a microgenetic design to examine the effects on learning of the type of counting procedure that children use. As predicted, having kindergartners count-on from their current number on the board while playing a 0-100 number board game facilitated their encoding of the numerical-spatial relations on the game board and improved their number line estimates, numeral identification, and count-on skill. Playing the same game using the standard count-from-1 procedure led to considerably less learning. Experiment 2 demonstrated that comparable improvement in number line estimation does not occur with practice encoding the numerals 1-100 outside of the context of a number board game. The general importance of aligning learning activities and physical materials with desired mental representations is discussed. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  18. QR encoded smart oral dosage forms by inkjet printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edinger, Magnus; Bar-Shalom, Daniel; Sandler, Niklas; Rantanen, Jukka; Genina, Natalja

    2018-01-30

    The use of inkjet printing (IJP) technology enables the flexible manufacturing of personalized medicine with the doses tailored for each patient. In this study we demonstrate, for the first time, the applicability of IJP in the production of edible dosage forms in the pattern of a quick response (QR) code. This printed pattern contains the drug itself and encoded information relevant to the patient and/or healthcare professionals. IJP of the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API)-containing ink in the pattern of QR code was performed onto a newly developed porous and flexible, but mechanically stable substrate with a good absorption capacity. The printing did not affect the mechanical properties of the substrate. The actual drug content of the printed dosage forms was in accordance with the encoded drug content. The QR encoded dosage forms had a good print definition without significant edge bleeding. They were readable by a smartphone even after storage in harsh conditions. This approach of efficient data incorporation and data storage combined with the use of smart devices can lead to safer and more patient-friendly drug products in the future. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Identification of a Novel UTY‐Encoded Minor Histocompatibility Antigen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, B. K.; Rasmussen, A. H.; Larsen, Malene Erup

    2012-01-01

    Minor histocompatibility antigens (mHags) encoded by the Y‐chromosome (H‐Y‐mHags) are known to play a pivotal role in allogeneic haematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) involving female donors and male recipients. We present a new H‐Y‐mHag, YYNAFHWAI (UTY139–147), encoded by the UTY gene...... obtained post‐HCT from male recipients of female donor grafts. In one of these recipients, a CD8+ T cell response was observed against a peptide stretch encoded by the UTY gene. Another bioinformatics tool, HLArestrictor, was used to identify the optimal peptide and HLA‐restriction element. Using peptide....../HLA tetramers, the specificity of the CD8+ T cell response was successfully validated as being HLA‐A*24:02‐restricted and directed against the male UTY139–147 peptide. Functional analysis of these T cells demonstrated male UTY139–147 peptide‐specific cytokine secretion (IFNγ, TNFα and MIP‐1β) and cytotoxic...

  20. Copyright Protection of Color Imaging Using Robust-Encoded Watermarking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Cedillo-Hernandez

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present a robust-encoded watermarking method applied to color images for copyright protection, which presents robustness against several geometric and signal processing distortions. Trade-off between payload, robustness and imperceptibility is a very important aspect which has to be considered when a watermark algorithm is designed. In our proposed scheme, previously to be embedded into the image, the watermark signal is encoded using a convolutional encoder, which can perform forward error correction achieving better robustness performance. Then, the embedding process is carried out through the discrete cosine transform domain (DCT of an image using the image normalization technique to accomplish robustness against geometric and signal processing distortions. The embedded watermark coded bits are extracted and decoded using the Viterbi algorithm. In order to determine the presence or absence of the watermark into the image we compute the bit error rate (BER between the recovered and the original watermark data sequence. The quality of the watermarked image is measured using the well-known indices: Peak Signal to Noise Ratio (PSNR, Visual Information Fidelity (VIF and Structural Similarity Index (SSIM. The color difference between the watermarked and original images is obtained by using the Normalized Color Difference (NCD measure. The experimental results show that the proposed method provides good performance in terms of imperceptibility and robustness. The comparison among the proposed and previously reported methods based on different techniques is also provided.

  1. Grey-level encoding of openings and closings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, James R.; Horsley, D.

    1993-12-01

    A distance transform will convert a bi-level image into a gray scale image, where the intensity of the object pixels is proportional to their distance from the nearest back-ground pixel. This can be computed in two passes through an image, and has been used to encode all binary erosions and dilations into one `globally eroded' image. It is also possible to encode all possible binary openings and closings as gray levels, allowing any particular opening or closing to be achieved through a simple thresholding operation, or by non-destructive comparisons. We define nodal points in the distance transform as those which have no neighbors having the maximum possible value (For example, 7 for diagonal pixels, and 12 for others using Euclidean distance). At each of these points a digital circle can be drawn, whose values equal that of the significant point. A simple histogram of the thus encoded image yields the roughness spectrum, but the spectrum found using only the significant points may be just as useful.

  2. Binary encoded computer generated holograms for temporal phase shifting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amphawan, Angela

    2011-11-07

    The trend towards real-time optical applications predicates the need for real-time interferometry. For real-time interferometric applications, rapid processing of computer generated holograms is crucial as the intractability of rapid phase changes may compromise the input to the system. This paper introduces the design of a set of binary encoded computer generated holograms (CGHs) for real-time five-frame temporal phase shifting interferometry using a binary amplitude spatial light modulator. It is suitable for portable devices with constraints in computational power. The new set of binary encoded CGHs is used for measuring the phase of the generated electric field for a real-time selective launch in multimode fiber. The processing time for the new set of CGHs was reduced by up to 65% relative to the original encoding scheme. The results obtained from the new interferometric technique are in good agreement with the results obtained by phase shifting by means of a piezo-driven flat mirror.

  3. Contribution of stress and sex hormones to memory encoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merz, Christian J

    2017-08-01

    Distinct stages of the menstrual cycle and the intake of oral contraceptives (OC) affect sex hormone levels, stress responses, and memory processes critically involved in the pathogenesis of mental disorders. To characterize the interaction of sex and stress hormones on memory encoding, 30 men, 30 women in the early follicular phase of the menstrual cycle (FO), 30 women in the luteal phase (LU), and 30 OC women were exposed to either a stress (socially evaluated cold-pressor test) or a control condition prior to memory encoding and immediate recall of neutral, positive, and negative words. On the next day, delayed free and cued recall was tested. Sex hormone levels verified distinct estradiol, progesterone, and testosterone levels between groups. Stress increased blood pressure, cortisol concentrations, and ratings of stress appraisal in all four groups as well as cued recall performance of negative words in men. Stress exposure in OC women led to a blunted cortisol response and rather enhanced cued recall of neutral words. Thus, pre-encoding stress facilitated emotional cued recall performance in men only, but not women with different sex hormone statuses pointing to the pivotal role of circulating sex hormones in modulation of learning and memory processes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Bioinformatics analysis and detection of gelatinase encoded gene in Lysinibacillussphaericus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repin, Rul Aisyah Mat; Mutalib, Sahilah Abdul; Shahimi, Safiyyah; Khalid, Rozida Mohd.; Ayob, Mohd. Khan; Bakar, Mohd. Faizal Abu; Isa, Mohd Noor Mat

    2016-11-01

    In this study, we performed bioinformatics analysis toward genome sequence of Lysinibacillussphaericus (L. sphaericus) to determine gene encoded for gelatinase. L. sphaericus was isolated from soil and gelatinase species-specific bacterium to porcine and bovine gelatin. This bacterium offers the possibility of enzymes production which is specific to both species of meat, respectively. The main focus of this research is to identify the gelatinase encoded gene within the bacteria of L. Sphaericus using bioinformatics analysis of partially sequence genome. From the research study, three candidate gene were identified which was, gelatinase candidate gene 1 (P1), NODE_71_length_93919_cov_158.931839_21 which containing 1563 base pair (bp) in size with 520 amino acids sequence; Secondly, gelatinase candidate gene 2 (P2), NODE_23_length_52851_cov_190.061386_17 which containing 1776 bp in size with 591 amino acids sequence; and Thirdly, gelatinase candidate gene 3 (P3), NODE_106_length_32943_cov_169.147919_8 containing 1701 bp in size with 566 amino acids sequence. Three pairs of oligonucleotide primers were designed and namely as, F1, R1, F2, R2, F3 and R3 were targeted short sequences of cDNA by PCR. The amplicons were reliably results in 1563 bp in size for candidate gene P1 and 1701 bp in size for candidate gene P3. Therefore, the results of bioinformatics analysis of L. Sphaericus resulting in gene encoded gelatinase were identified.

  5. New Complexity Scalable MPEG Encoding Techniques for Mobile Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Mietens

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Complexity scalability offers the advantage of one-time design of video applications for a large product family, including mobile devices, without the need of redesigning the applications on the algorithmic level to meet the requirements of the different products. In this paper, we present complexity scalable MPEG encoding having core modules with modifications for scalability. The interdependencies of the scalable modules and the system performance are evaluated. Experimental results show scalability giving a smooth change in complexity and corresponding video quality. Scalability is basically achieved by varying the number of computed DCT coefficients and the number of evaluated motion vectors but other modules are designed such they scale with the previous parameters. In the experiments using the “Stefan” sequence, the elapsed execution time of the scalable encoder, reflecting the computational complexity, can be gradually reduced to roughly 50% of its original execution time. The video quality scales between 20 dB and 48 dB PSNR with unity quantizer setting, and between 21.5 dB and 38.5 dB PSNR for different sequences targeting 1500 kbps. The implemented encoder and the scalability techniques can be successfully applied in mobile systems based on MPEG video compression.

  6. Associative polarization-encoded optical shadow casting: gray-level image encoding for serial and parallel operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awwal, A A; Karim, M A

    1989-01-15

    An efficient algorithm for designing a serial and parallel multioutput logic unit using an associative polarization-encoded optical shadow-casting technique is presented. Devices designed as such have a unique contentaddressable associative memory where each of the memory locations has dual addresses. For illustration, the proposed algorithm has been used to design a serial-output and a parallel-output 2-bit gray adder.

  7. Yeast PAH1-encoded phosphatidate phosphatase controls the expression of CHO1-encoded phosphatidylserine synthase for membrane phospholipid synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Gil-Soo; Carman, George M

    2017-08-11

    The PAH1 -encoded phosphatidate phosphatase (PAP), which catalyzes the committed step for the synthesis of triacylglycerol in Saccharomyces cerevisiae , exerts a negative regulatory effect on the level of phosphatidate used for the de novo synthesis of membrane phospholipids. This raises the question whether PAP thereby affects the expression and activity of enzymes involved in phospholipid synthesis. Here, we examined the PAP-mediated regulation of CHO1 -encoded phosphatidylserine synthase (PSS), which catalyzes the committed step for the synthesis of major phospholipids via the CDP-diacylglycerol pathway. The lack of PAP in the pah1 Δ mutant highly elevated PSS activity, exhibiting a growth-dependent up-regulation from the exponential to the stationary phase of growth. Immunoblot analysis showed that the elevation of PSS activity results from an increase in the level of the enzyme encoded by CHO1 Truncation analysis and site-directed mutagenesis of the CHO1 promoter indicated that Cho1 expression in the pah1 Δ mutant is induced through the inositol-sensitive upstream activation sequence (UAS INO ), a cis -acting element for the phosphatidate-controlled Henry (Ino2-Ino4/Opi1) regulatory circuit. The abrogation of Cho1 induction and PSS activity by a CHO1 UAS INO mutation suppressed pah1 Δ effects on lipid synthesis, nuclear/endoplasmic reticulum membrane morphology, and lipid droplet formation, but not on growth at elevated temperature. Loss of the DGK1 -encoded diacylglycerol kinase, which converts diacylglycerol to phosphatidate, partially suppressed the pah1 Δ-mediated induction of Cho1 and PSS activity. Collectively, these data showed that PAP activity controls the expression of PSS for membrane phospholipid synthesis. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. An Oral DNA Vaccine Encoding Endoglin Eradicates Breast Tumors by Blocking Their Blood Supply

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Reisfeld, Ralph A

    2006-01-01

    .... We attained our goals for the second fiscal year, first, by constructing unique expression plasmids encoding endoglin and co-expressing IL-15 or encoding IL-7, the latter to be co-expressed with endoglin...

  9. Impact of a Computer System and the Encoding Staff Organization on the Encoding Stays and on Health Institution Financial Production in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarazin, Marianne; El Merini, Amine; Staccini, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    In France, medicalization of information systems program (PMSI) is an essential tool for the management planning and funding of health. The performance of encoding data inherent to hospital stays has become a major challenge for health institutions. Some studies have highlighted the impact of organizations set up on encoding quality and financial production. The aim of this study is to evaluate a computerized information system and new staff organization impact for treatment of the encoded information.

  10. Aphid-encoded variability in susceptibility to a parasitoid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Adam J; Ritter, Shannon G; Doremus, Matthew R; Russell, Jacob A; Oliver, Kerry M

    2014-06-10

    Many animals exhibit variation in resistance to specific natural enemies. Such variation may be encoded in their genomes or derived from infection with protective symbionts. The pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum, for example, exhibits tremendous variation in susceptibility to a common natural enemy, the parasitic wasp Aphidius ervi. Pea aphids are often infected with the heritable bacterial symbiont, Hamiltonella defensa, which confers partial to complete resistance against this parasitoid depending on bacterial strain and associated bacteriophages. That previous studies found that pea aphids without H. defensa (or other symbionts) were generally susceptible to parasitism, together with observations of a limited encapsulation response, suggested that pea aphids largely rely on infection with H. defensa for protection against parasitoids. However, the limited number of uninfected clones previously examined, and our recent report of two symbiont-free resistant clones, led us to explicitly examine aphid-encoded variability in resistance to parasitoids. After rigorous screening for known and unknown symbionts, and microsatellite genotyping to confirm clonal identity, we conducted parasitism assays using fifteen clonal pea aphid lines. We recovered significant variability in aphid-encoded resistance, with variation levels comparable to that contributed by H. defensa. Because resistance can be costly, we also measured aphid longevity and cumulative fecundity of the most and least resistant aphid lines under permissive conditions, but found no trade-offs between higher resistance and these fitness parameters. These results indicate that pea aphid resistance to A. ervi is more complex than previously appreciated, and that aphids employ multiple tactics to aid in their defense. While we did not detect a tradeoff, these may become apparent under stressful conditions or when resistant and susceptible aphids are in direct competition. Understanding sources and amounts of

  11. Dynamic encoding of speech sequence probability in human temporal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Matthew K; Bouchard, Kristofer E; Tang, Claire; Chang, Edward F

    2015-05-06

    Sensory processing involves identification of stimulus features, but also integration with the surrounding sensory and cognitive context. Previous work in animals and humans has shown fine-scale sensitivity to context in the form of learned knowledge about the statistics of the sensory environment, including relative probabilities of discrete units in a stream of sequential auditory input. These statistics are a defining characteristic of one of the most important sequential signals humans encounter: speech. For speech, extensive exposure to a language tunes listeners to the statistics of sound sequences. To address how speech sequence statistics are neurally encoded, we used high-resolution direct cortical recordings from human lateral superior temporal cortex as subjects listened to words and nonwords with varying transition probabilities between sound segments. In addition to their sensitivity to acoustic features (including contextual features, such as coarticulation), we found that neural responses dynamically encoded the language-level probability of both preceding and upcoming speech sounds. Transition probability first negatively modulated neural responses, followed by positive modulation of neural responses, consistent with coordinated predictive and retrospective recognition processes, respectively. Furthermore, transition probability encoding was different for real English words compared with nonwords, providing evidence for online interactions with high-order linguistic knowledge. These results demonstrate that sensory processing of deeply learned stimuli involves integrating physical stimulus features with their contextual sequential structure. Despite not being consciously aware of phoneme sequence statistics, listeners use this information to process spoken input and to link low-level acoustic representations with linguistic information about word identity and meaning. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/357203-12$15.00/0.

  12. Automatic encoding of polyphonic melodies in musicians and nonmusicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujioka, Takako; Trainor, Laurel J; Ross, Bernhard; Kakigi, Ryusuke; Pantev, Christo

    2005-10-01

    In music, multiple musical objects often overlap in time. Western polyphonic music contains multiple simultaneous melodic lines (referred to as "voices") of equal importance. Previous electrophysiological studies have shown that pitch changes in a single melody are automatically encoded in memory traces, as indexed by mismatch negativity (MMN) and its magnetic counterpart (MMNm), and that this encoding process is enhanced by musical experience. In the present study, we examined whether two simultaneous melodies in polyphonic music are represented as separate entities in the auditory memory trace. Musicians and untrained controls were tested in both magnetoencephalogram and behavioral sessions. Polyphonic stimuli were created by combining two melodies (A and B), each consisting of the same five notes but in a different order. Melody A was in the high voice and Melody B in the low voice in one condition, and this was reversed in the other condition. On 50% of trials, a deviant final (5th) note was played either in the high or in the low voice, and it either went outside the key of the melody or remained within the key. These four deviations occurred with equal probability of 12.5% each. Clear MMNm was obtained for most changes in both groups, despite the 50% deviance level, with a larger amplitude in musicians than in controls. The response pattern was consistent across groups, with larger MMNm for deviants in the high voice than in the low voice, and larger MMNm for in-key than out-of-key changes, despite better behavioral performance for out-of-key changes. The results suggest that melodic information in each voice in polyphonic music is encoded in the sensory memory trace, that the higher voice is more salient than the lower, and that tonality may be processed primarily at cognitive stages subsequent to MMN generation.

  13. An Unusual Phage Repressor Encoded by Mycobacteriophage BPs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerie M Villanueva

    Full Text Available Temperate bacteriophages express transcription repressors that maintain lysogeny by down-regulating lytic promoters and confer superinfection immunity. Repressor regulation is critical to the outcome of infection-lysogenic or lytic growth-as well as prophage induction into lytic replication. Mycobacteriophage BPs and its relatives use an unusual integration-dependent immunity system in which the phage attachment site (attP is located within the repressor gene (33 such that site-specific integration leads to synthesis of a prophage-encoded product (gp33103 that is 33 residues shorter at its C-terminus than the virally-encoded protein (gp33136. However, the shorter form of the repressor (gp33103 is stable and active in repression of the early lytic promoter PR, whereas the longer virally-encoded form (gp33136 is inactive due to targeted degradation via a C-terminal ssrA-like tag. We show here that both forms of the repressor bind similarly to the 33-34 intergenic regulatory region, and that BPs gp33103 is a tetramer in solution. The BPs gp33103 repressor binds to five regulatory regions spanning the BPs genome, and regulates four promoters including the early lytic promoter, PR. BPs gp33103 has a complex pattern of DNA recognition in which a full operator binding site contains two half sites separated by a variable spacer, and BPs gp33103 induces a DNA bend at the full operator site but not a half site. The operator site structure is unusual in that one half site corresponds to a 12 bp palindrome identified previously, but the other half site is a highly variable variant of the palindrome.

  14. Cortical pattern separation and item-specific memory encoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pidgeon, Laura M; Morcom, Alexa M

    2016-05-01

    Pattern separation and pattern completion are fundamental brain processes thought to be critical for episodic memory encoding and retrieval, and for discrimination between similar memories. These processes are best understood in the hippocampus, but are proposed to occur throughout the brain, in particular in sensory regions. Cortical, as well as hippocampal, pattern separation may therefore support formation of event-unique memory traces. Using fMRI, we investigated cortical pattern separation and pattern completion and their relationship to encoding activity predicting subsequent item-specific compared to gist memory. During scanning, participants viewed images of novel objects, repeated objects, and objects which were both perceptually and conceptually similar to previously presented images, while performing a size judgement task. In a later surprise recognition test, they judged whether test items were 'same' 'similar' or 'new' relative to studied items. Activity consistent with pattern separation - responses to similar items as if novel - was observed in bilateral occipito-temporal cortex. Activity consistent with pattern completion - responses to similar items as if repeated - was observed in left prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. Curve fitting analysis further revealed that graded responses to change in image conceptual and perceptual similarity in bilateral prefrontal and right parietal regions met specific computational predictions for pattern separation for one or both of these similarity dimensions. Functional overlap between encoding activity predicting subsequent item-specific recognition and pattern separation activity was also observed in left occipital cortex and bilateral inferior frontal cortex. The findings suggest that extrahippocampal regions including sensory and prefrontal cortex contribute to pattern separation and pattern completion of visual input, consistent with the proposal that cortical pattern separation contributes to formation of

  15. Encoding of temporal intervals in the rat hindlimb sensorimotor cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Bean Knudsen

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The gradual buildup of neural activity over experimentally imposed delay periods, termed climbing activity, is well documented and is a potential mechanism by which interval time is encoded by distributed cortico-thalamico-striatal networks in the brain. Additionally, when multiple delay periods are incorporated, this activity has been shown to scale its rate of climbing proportional to the delay period. However, it remains unclear whether these patterns of activity occur within areas of motor cortex dedicated to hindlimb movement. Moreover, the effects of behavioral training (e.g. motor tasks under different reward conditions but with similar behavioral output are not well addressed. To address this, we recorded activity from the hindlimb sensorimotor cortex (HLSMC of two groups of rats performing a skilled hindlimb press task. In one group, rats were trained only to a make a valid press within a finite window after cue presentation for reward (non-interval trained, nIT; n=5, while rats in the second group were given duration-specific cues in which they had to make presses of either short or long duration to receive reward (interval trained, IT; n=6. Using PETH analyses, we show that cells recorded from both groups showed climbing activity during the task in similar proportions (35% IT and 47% nIT, however only climbing activity from IT rats was temporally scaled to press duration. Furthermore, using single trial decoding techniques (Wiener filter, we show that press duration can be inferred using climbing activity from IT animals (R=0.61 significantly better than nIT animals (R=0.507, p<0.01, suggesting IT animals encode press duration through temporally scaled climbing activity. Thus, if temporal intervals are behaviorally relevant then the activity of climbing neurons is temporally scaled to encode the passage of time.

  16. Slant-tilt: the visual encoding of surface orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, K A

    1983-01-01

    A specific form for the internal representation of local surface orientation is proposed, which is similar to Gibson's (1950) "amount and direction of slant". Slant amount is usually quantified by the angle sigma between the surface normal and the line of sight (0 degrees less than or equal to sigma less than or equal to 90 degrees). Slant direction corresponds to the direction of the gradient of distance from the viewer to the surface, and may be defined by the image direction tau to which the surface normal would project (0 degrees less than or equal to tau less than or equal to 360 degrees). Since the direction of slant is specified by the tilt of the projected surface normal, it is referred to as surface tilt (Stevens, 1979; Marr, 1982). The two degrees of freedom of orientation are therefore quantified by slant, an angle measured perpendicular to the image plane, and tilt, an angle measured in the image plane. The slant-tilt form provides several computational advantages relative to some other proposals and is consistent with various psychological phenomena. Slant might be encoded by various means, e.g. by the cosine of the angle, by the tangent, or linearly by the angle itself. Experimental results are reported that suggest that slant is encoded by an internal parameter that varies linearly with slant angle, with resolution of roughly one part in 100. Thus we propose that surface orientation is encoded in human vision by two quantities, one varying linearly with slant angle, the other varying linearly with tilt angle.

  17. Plasmid-encoded diacetyl (acetoin) reductase in Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rattray, Fergal P; Myling-Petersen, Dorte; Larsen, Dianna

    2003-01-01

    A plasmid-borne diacetyl (acetoin) reductase (butA) from Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides CHCC2114 was sequenced and cloned. Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed an open reading frame encoding a protein of 257 amino acids which had high identity at the amino acid level to diacetyl (acetoin...... diacetyl (acetoin) reductase activity with NADH as coenzyme, but not with NADPH as coenzyme, suggesting the presence of another diacetyl (acetoin)-reducing activity in L. pseudomesenteroides. Plasmid-curing experiments demonstrated that the butA gene is carried on a 20-kb plasmid in L. pseudomesenteroides....

  18. Multiple genes encode the major surface glycoprotein of Pneumocystis carinii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kovacs, J A; Powell, F; Edman, J C

    1993-01-01

    this antigen is a good candidate for development as a vaccine to prevent or control P. carinii infection. We have cloned and sequenced seven related but unique genes encoding the major surface glycoprotein of rat P. carinii. Partial amino acid sequencing confirmed the identity of these genes. Based on Southern...... blot studies using chromosomal or restricted DNA, the major surface glycoproteins are the products of a multicopy family of genes. The predicted protein has an M(r) of approximately 123,000, is relatively rich in cysteine residues (5.5%) that are very strongly conserved, and contains a well conserved...

  19. Polarization-encoded optical shadow-casting logic units: design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, M A; Awwal, A A; Cherri, A K

    1987-07-15

    A general design algorithm is presented for the multioutput polarization-encoded optical shadow-casting scheme. A set of POSC equations is obtained from the truth table of the desired logic unit and is solved in terms of four possible pixel characteristics (transparent, opaque, vertically polarized, and horizontally polarized) and four possible source characteristics (off, unpolarized, vertically polarized, and horizontally polarized). To demonstrate its feasibility, the algorithm is used to determine the input pixel characteristics of a full adder and a full subtracter.

  20. Towards the digital encoding of Hispanic white mensural notation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Rizo Valero

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the elements necessary for digitally encoding music contained in manuscripts from the centuries 16th to 17th are introduced. The solutions proposed to overcome the difficulties that generate some of the aspects that make this notation different from the modern Western notation are presented. Problems faced are, for example, the absence of bar lines or the duration of notes that are based on the context. The new typographic font “Capitán”, created specifically to represent this type of early notation, is also presented.

  1. Identification and use of genes encoding amatoxin and phallotoxin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallen, Heather E.; Walton, Jonathan D.; Luo, Hong; Scott-Craig, John S.

    2016-12-13

    The present invention relates to compositions and methods comprising genes and peptides associated with cyclic peptide toxins and toxin production in mushrooms. In particular, the present invention relates to using genes and proteins from Amanita species encoding Amanita peptides, specifically relating to amatoxins and phallotoxins. In a preferred embodiment, the present invention also relates to methods for detecting Amanita peptide toxin genes for identifying Amanita peptide-producing mushrooms and for diagnosing suspected cases of mushroom poisoning. Further, the present inventions relate to providing kits for diagnosing and monitoring suspected cases of mushroom poisoning in patients.

  2. Key-length analysis of double random phase encoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Kazuya; Takeda, Masafumi; Suzuki, Hiroyuki

    2017-05-20

    Double random phase encoding (DRPE) is a classical optical symmetric-key encryption method. DRPE prevents the key length from being determined because of its redundancy between encryption and decryption, unlike digital symmetric-key cryptographies. In our study, we numerically analyzed the key length of DRPE based on key-space analysis. We estimated the key length of DRPE by calculating the inverse value of the cumulative probability of the normal distribution that was estimated from samples of DRPE and then discuss security against brute-force attacks.

  3. Multiple genes encode the major surface glycoprotein of Pneumocystis carinii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kovacs, J A; Powell, F; Edman, J C

    1993-01-01

    The major surface antigen of Pneumocystis carinii, a life-threatening opportunistic pathogen in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients, is an abundant glycoprotein that functions in host-organism interactions. A monoclonal antibody to this antigen is protective in animals, and thus...... hydrophobic region at the carboxyl terminus. The presence of multiple related msg genes encoding the major surface glycoprotein of P. carinii suggests that antigenic variation is a possible mechanism for evading host defenses. Further characterization of this family of genes should allow the development...... of novel approaches to the control of this pathogen....

  4. Spatio-Temporal Encoding in Medical Ultrasound Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gran, Fredrik

    2005-01-01

    In this dissertation two methods for spatio-temporal encoding in medical ultrasound imaging are investigated. The first technique is based on a frequency division approach. Here, the available spectrum of the transducer is divided into a set of narrow bands. A waveform is designed for each band...... the signal to noise ratio and simultaneously the penetration depth so that the medical doctor can image deeper lying structures. The method is tested both experimentally and in simulation and has also evaluated for the purpose of blood flow estimation. The work presented is based on four papers which...

  5. Neural Correlates of Encoding within- and across-Domain Inter-Item Associations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Heekyeong; Rugg, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    The neural correlates of the encoding of associations between pairs of words, pairs of pictures, and word-picture pairs were compared. The aims were to determine, first, whether the neural correlates of associative encoding vary according to study material and, second, whether encoding of across- versus within-material item pairs is associated…

  6. ParA encoded on chromosome II of Deinococcus radiodurans binds ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2013-07-22

    Jul 22, 2013 ... Chromosome I encodes majority of the functions required for normal growth while other replicons encode mostly the proteins involved in ... encodes the majority of proteins required for normal growth of this bacterium ..... duced with only arabinose, showed complete FtsZ ring forma- tion in most of the cells ...

  7. Encoding of Auditory Temporal Gestalt in the Human Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notter, Michael P; Hanke, Michael; Murray, Micah M; Geiser, Eveline

    2018-01-20

    The perception of an acoustic rhythm is invariant to the absolute temporal intervals constituting a sound sequence. It is unknown where in the brain temporal Gestalt, the percept emerging from the relative temporal proximity between acoustic events, is encoded. Two different relative temporal patterns, each induced by three experimental conditions with different absolute temporal patterns as sensory basis, were presented to participants. A linear support vector machine classifier was trained to differentiate activation patterns in functional magnetic resonance imaging data to the 2 different percepts. Across the sensory constituents the classifier decoded which percept was perceived. A searchlight analysis localized activation patterns specific to the temporal Gestalt bilaterally to the temporoparietal junction, including the planum temporale and supramarginal gyrus, and unilaterally to the right inferior frontal gyrus (pars opercularis). We show that auditory areas not only process absolute temporal intervals, but also integrate them into percepts of Gestalt and that encoding of these percepts persists in high-level associative areas. The findings complement existing knowledge regarding the processing of absolute temporal patterns to the processing of relative temporal patterns relevant to the sequential binding of perceptual elements into Gestalt. © The Author 2018. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Multi-Temporal Land Cover Classification with Sequential Recurrent Encoders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Rußwurm

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Earth observation (EO sensors deliver data at daily or weekly intervals. Most land use and land cover classification (LULC approaches, however, are designed for cloud-free and mono-temporal observations. The increasing temporal capabilities of today’s sensors enable the use of temporal, along with spectral and spatial features.Domains such as speech recognition or neural machine translation, work with inherently temporal data and, today, achieve impressive results by using sequential encoder-decoder structures. Inspired by these sequence-to-sequence models, we adapt an encoder structure with convolutional recurrent layers in order to approximate a phenological model for vegetation classes based on a temporal sequence of Sentinel 2 (S2 images. In our experiments, we visualize internal activations over a sequence of cloudy and non-cloudy images and find several recurrent cells that reduce the input activity for cloudy observations. Hence, we assume that our network has learned cloud-filtering schemes solely from input data, which could alleviate the need for tedious cloud-filtering as a preprocessing step for many EO approaches. Moreover, using unfiltered temporal series of top-of-atmosphere (TOA reflectance data, our experiments achieved state-of-the-art classification accuracies on a large number of crop classes with minimal preprocessing, compared to other classification approaches.

  9. Shot-Noise Limited Time-Encoded Raman Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Karpf

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Raman scattering, an inelastic scattering mechanism, provides information about molecular excitation energies and can be used to identify chemical compounds. Albeit being a powerful analysis tool, especially for label-free biomedical imaging with molecular contrast, it suffers from inherently low signal levels. This practical limitation can be overcome by nonlinear enhancement techniques like stimulated Raman scattering (SRS. In SRS, an additional light source stimulates the Raman scattering process. This can lead to orders of magnitude increase in signal levels and hence faster acquisition in biomedical imaging. However, achieving a broad spectral coverage in SRS is technically challenging and the signal is no longer background-free, as either stimulated Raman gain (SRG or loss (SRL is measured, turning a sensitivity limit into a dynamic range limit. Thus, the signal has to be isolated from the laser background light, requiring elaborate methods for minimizing detection noise. Here, we analyze the detection sensitivity of a shot-noise limited broadband stimulated time-encoded Raman (TICO-Raman system in detail. In time-encoded Raman, a wavelength-swept Fourier domain mode locking (FDML laser covers a broad range of Raman transition energies while allowing a dual-balanced detection for lowering the detection noise to the fundamental shot-noise limit.

  10. Manchester encoder-decoder for optical data communication links.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sammak, A J; Al-Ruwaihi, K; Al-Kooheji, I

    1992-04-20

    A new encoder-decoder (CODEC) design of a Manchester coding scheme suitable for optical data communication links is presented. The design is simple and uses off-the-shelf digital electronic components and subsystems. The CODEC can be used for high data rate transmissions, typical of opticalfiber systems and local area networks. The decoder is insensitive to variations in the clock rates within the range of +/-33%, whereas the encoder, which is a simple XOR logic gate, is not affected by clock variations. During high-frequency operation (e.g., at 100 MHz), the CODEC can be operated at a wide range of frequencies (from 66.6 to 133.3 MHz) without modification to the CODEC circuitry. Furthermore, the CODEC can be made to operate at any data rate by a simple change of a single capacitor or a single resistor in the decoder circuit. The CODEC was built in the laboratory by using transistor-transistor logicintegrated circuits. It was experimentally found that with this decoder the transmitted data, as well as the cloc, can be recovered from the Manchester coded signal without being affected by clock variations within the designed range.

  11. Encoding audio motion: spatial impairment in early blind individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara eFinocchietti

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The consequence of blindness on auditory spatial localization has been an interesting issue of research in the last decade providing mixed results. Enhanced auditory spatial skills in individuals with visual impairment have been reported by multiple studies, while some aspects of spatial hearing seem to be impaired in the absence of vision. In this study, the ability to encode the trajectory of a 2 dimensional sound motion, reproducing the complete movement, and reaching the correct end-point sound position, is evaluated in 12 early blind individuals, 8 late blind individuals, and 20 age-matched sighted blindfolded controls. Early blind individuals correctly determine the direction of the sound motion on the horizontal axis, but show a clear deficit in encoding the sound motion in the lower side of the plane. On the contrary, late blind individuals and blindfolded controls perform much better with no deficit in the lower side of the plane. In fact the mean localization error resulted 271 ± 10 mm for early blind individuals, 65 ± 4 mm for late blind individuals, and 68 ± 2 mm for sighted blindfolded controls.These results support the hypothesis that i it exists a trade-off between the development of enhanced perceptual abilities and role of vision in the sound localization abilities of early blind individuals, and ii the visual information is fundamental in calibrating some aspects of the representation of auditory space in the brain.

  12. Alpha oscillations and early stages of visual encoding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang eKlimesch

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available For a long time alpha oscillations have been functionally linked to the processing of visual information. Here we propose an new theory about the functional meaning of alpha. The central idea is that synchronized alpha reflects a basic processing mode that controls access to information stored in a complex long-term memory system, which we term knowledge system (KS in order to emphasize that it comprises not only declarative memories but any kind of knowledge comprising also procedural information. Based on this theoretical background, we assume that during early stages of perception, alpha ‘directs the flow of information’ to those neural structures which represent information that is relevant for encoding. The physiological function of alpha is interpreted in terms of inhibition. We assume that alpha enables access to stored information by inhibiting task irrelevant neuronal structures and by timing cortical activity in task relevant neuronal structures. We discuss a variety findings showing that evoked alpha and phase locking reflect successful encoding of global stimulus features in an early poststimulus interval of about 0 - 150 ms.

  13. Stress at encoding, context at retrieval, and children's narrative content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemfuss, J Zoe; Milojevich, Helen M; Yim, Ilona S; Rush, Elizabeth B; Quas, Jodi A

    2013-11-01

    Research concerning the relations between stress and children's memory has been primarily correlational and focused on memory volume and accuracy. In the current study, we experimentally manipulated 7- and 8-year-olds' and 12- to 14-year-olds' experienced stress during a to-be-remembered event to examine the effects of stress on the content of their memory. We further manipulated the degree of interviewer support at retrieval to determine whether it moderated the effects of stress at encoding on memory. Children's age, gender, stress at encoding, and interviewer support all influenced the type of information included in their narrative reports. Most notably, across ages, children who experienced a more stressful event but were questioned in a supportive manner provided the largest ratio of terms representing internal states such as those about cognitions and emotions. Results suggest that how children process past events may be influenced by both the nature of the event itself and the context within which it is recalled. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Encoding mechano-memories in filamentous-actin networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Sayantan; Foucard, Louis; Levine, Alex; Gardel, Margaret L.

    History-dependent adaptation is a central feature of learning and memory. Incorporating such features into `adaptable materials' that can modify their mechanical properties in response to external cues, remains an outstanding challenge in materials science. Here, we study a novel mechanism of mechano-memory in cross-linked F-actin networks, the essential determinants of the mechanical behavior of eukaryotic cells. We find that the non-linear mechanical response of such networks can be reversibly programmed through induction of mechano-memories. In particular, the direction, magnitude, and duration of previously applied shear stresses can be encoded into the network architecture. The `memory' of the forcing history is long-lived, but it can be erased by force applied in the opposite direction. These results demonstrate that F-actin networks can encode analog read-write mechano-memories which can be used for adaptation to mechanical stimuli. We further show that the mechano-memory arises from changes in the nematic order of the constituent filaments. Our results suggest a new mechanism of mechanical sensing in eukaryotic cells and provide a strategy for designing a novel class of materials. S.M. acknowledges U. Chicago MRSEC for support through a Kadanoff-Rice fellowship.

  15. Neural Encoding of Auditory Features during Music Perception and Imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Stephanie; Mikutta, Christian; Leonard, Matthew K; Hungate, Dylan; Koelsch, Stefan; Shamma, Shihab; Chang, Edward F; Millán, José Del R; Knight, Robert T; Pasley, Brian N

    2017-10-27

    Despite many behavioral and neuroimaging investigations, it remains unclear how the human cortex represents spectrotemporal sound features during auditory imagery, and how this representation compares to auditory perception. To assess this, we recorded electrocorticographic signals from an epileptic patient with proficient music ability in 2 conditions. First, the participant played 2 piano pieces on an electronic piano with the sound volume of the digital keyboard on. Second, the participant replayed the same piano pieces, but without auditory feedback, and the participant was asked to imagine hearing the music in his mind. In both conditions, the sound output of the keyboard was recorded, thus allowing precise time-locking between the neural activity and the spectrotemporal content of the music imagery. This novel task design provided a unique opportunity to apply receptive field modeling techniques to quantitatively study neural encoding during auditory mental imagery. In both conditions, we built encoding models to predict high gamma neural activity (70-150 Hz) from the spectrogram representation of the recorded sound. We found robust spectrotemporal receptive fields during auditory imagery with substantial, but not complete overlap in frequency tuning and cortical location compared to receptive fields measured during auditory perception. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Characterization of a gene encoding cellulase from uncultured soil bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo-Jin; Lee, Chang-Muk; Han, Bo-Ram; Kim, Min-Young; Yeo, Yun-Soo; Yoon, Sang-Hong; Koo, Bon-Sung; Jun, Hong-Ki

    2008-05-01

    To detect cellulases encoded by uncultured microorganisms, we constructed metagenomic libraries from Korean soil DNAs. Screenings of the libraries revealed a clone pCM2 that uses carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) as a sole carbon source. Further analysis of the insert showed two consecutive ORFs (celM2 and xynM2) encoding proteins of 226 and 662 amino acids, respectively. A multiple sequence analysis with the deduced amino acid sequences of celM2 showed 36% sequence identity with cellulase from the Synechococcus sp., while xynM2 had 59% identity to endo-1,4-beta-xylanase A from Cellulomonas pachnodae. The highest enzymatic CMC hydrolysis was observable at pH 4.0 and 45 degrees C with recombinant CelM2 protein. Although the enzyme CelM2 additionally hydrolyzed avicel and xylan, no substrate hydrolysis was observed on oligosaccharides such as cellobiose, pNP-beta-cellobioside, pNP-beta-glucoside, and pNP-beta-xyloside. These results showed that CelM2 is a novel endo-type cellulase.

  17. Environmental cycle of antibiotic resistance encoded genes: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. ghanbari

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic-resistant bacteria and genes enter the environment in different ways. The release of these factors into the environment has increased concerns related to public health. The aim of the study was to evaluate the antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs in the environmental resources. In this systematic review, the data were extracted from valid sources of information including ScienceDirect, PubMed, Google Scholar and SID. Evaluation and selection of articles were conducted on the basis of the PRISMA checklist. A total of 39 articles were included in the study, which were chosen from a total of 1249 papers. The inclusion criterion was the identification of genes encoding antibiotic resistance against the eight important groups of antibiotics determined by using the PCR technique in the environmental sources including municipal and hospital wastewater treatment plants, animal and agricultural wastes, effluents from treatment plants, natural waters, sediments, and drinking waters. In this study, 113 genes encoding antibiotic resistance to eight groups of antibiotics (beta-lactams, aminoglycosides, tetracyclines, macrolides, sulfonamides, chloramphenicol, glycopeptides and quinolones were identified in various environments. Antibiotic resistance genes were found in all the investigated environments. The investigation of microorganisms carrying these genes shows that most of the bacteria especially gram-negative bacteria are effective in the acquisition and the dissemination of these pollutants in the environment. Discharging the raw wastewaters and effluents from wastewater treatments acts as major routes in the dissemination of ARGs into environment sources and can pose hazards to public health.

  18. Object recognition memory: neurobiological mechanisms of encoding, consolidation and retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters, Boyer D; Saksida, Lisa M; Bussey, Timothy J

    2008-07-01

    Tests of object recognition memory, or the judgment of the prior occurrence of an object, have made substantial contributions to our understanding of the nature and neurobiological underpinnings of mammalian memory. Only in recent years, however, have researchers begun to elucidate the specific brain areas and neural processes involved in object recognition memory. The present review considers some of this recent research, with an emphasis on studies addressing the neural bases of perirhinal cortex-dependent object recognition memory processes. We first briefly discuss operational definitions of object recognition and the common behavioural tests used to measure it in non-human primates and rodents. We then consider research from the non-human primate and rat literature examining the anatomical basis of object recognition memory in the delayed nonmatching-to-sample (DNMS) and spontaneous object recognition (SOR) tasks, respectively. The results of these studies overwhelmingly favor the view that perirhinal cortex (PRh) is a critical region for object recognition memory. We then discuss the involvement of PRh in the different stages--encoding, consolidation, and retrieval--of object recognition memory. Specifically, recent work in rats has indicated that neural activity in PRh contributes to object memory encoding, consolidation, and retrieval processes. Finally, we consider the pharmacological, cellular, and molecular factors that might play a part in PRh-mediated object recognition memory. Recent studies in rodents have begun to indicate the remarkable complexity of the neural substrates underlying this seemingly simple aspect of declarative memory.

  19. How the visual brain encodes and keeps track of time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvioni, Paolo; Murray, Micah M; Kalmbach, Lysiann; Bueti, Domenica

    2013-07-24

    Time is embedded in any sensory experience: the movements of a dance, the rhythm of a piece of music, the words of a speaker are all examples of temporally structured sensory events. In humans, if and how visual cortices perform temporal processing remains unclear. Here we show that both primary visual cortex (V1) and extrastriate area V5/MT are causally involved in encoding and keeping time in memory and that this involvement is independent from low-level visual processing. Most importantly we demonstrate that V1 and V5/MT come into play simultaneously and seem to be functionally linked during interval encoding, whereas they operate serially (V1 followed by V5/MT) and seem to be independent while maintaining temporal information in working memory. These data help to refine our knowledge of the functional properties of human visual cortex, highlighting the contribution and the temporal dynamics of V1 and V5/MT in the processing of the temporal aspects of visual information.

  20. Identification and characterization of sORF-encoded polypeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Qian; Ma, Jiao; Saghatelian, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Molecular biology, genomics and proteomics methods have been utilized to reveal a non-annotated class of endogenous polypeptides (small proteins and peptides) encoded by short open reading frames (sORFs), or small open reading frames (smORFs). We refer to these polypeptides as s(m)ORF-encoded polypeptides or SEPs. The early SEPs were identified via genetic screens, and many of the RNAs that contain s(m)ORFs were originally considered to be non-coding; however, elegant work in bacteria and flies demonstrated that these s(m)ORFs code for functional polypeptides as small as 11-amino acids in length. The discovery of these initial SEPs led to search for these molecules using methods such as ribosome profiling and proteomics, which have revealed the existence of many SEPs, including novel human SEPs. Unlike screens, omics methods do not necessarily link a SEP to a cellular or biological function, but functional genomic and proteomic strategies have demonstrated that at least some of these newly discovered SEPs have biochemical and cellular functions. Here, we provide an overview of these results and discuss the future directions in this emerging field.

  1. Novel Intermode Prediction Algorithm for High Efficiency Video Coding Encoder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan-seob Park

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The joint collaborative team on video coding (JCT-VC is developing the next-generation video coding standard which is called high efficiency video coding (HEVC. In the HEVC, there are three units in block structure: coding unit (CU, prediction unit (PU, and transform unit (TU. The CU is the basic unit of region splitting like macroblock (MB. Each CU performs recursive splitting into four blocks with equal size, starting from the tree block. In this paper, we propose a fast CU depth decision algorithm for HEVC technology to reduce its computational complexity. In 2N×2N PU, the proposed method compares the rate-distortion (RD cost and determines the depth using the compared information. Moreover, in order to speed up the encoding time, the efficient merge SKIP detection method is developed additionally based on the contextual mode information of neighboring CUs. Experimental result shows that the proposed algorithm achieves the average time-saving factor of 44.84% in the random access (RA at Main profile configuration with the HEVC test model (HM 10.0 reference software. Compared to HM 10.0 encoder, a small BD-bitrate loss of 0.17% is also observed without significant loss of image quality.

  2. Encoding of reward expectation by monkey anterior insular neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuhiki, Takashi; Richmond, Barry J; Shidara, Munetaka

    2012-06-01

    The insula, a cortical brain region that is known to encode information about autonomic, visceral, and olfactory functions, has recently been shown to encode information during reward-seeking tasks in both single neuronal recording and functional magnetic resonance imaging studies. To examine the reward-related activation, we recorded from 170 single neurons in anterior insula of 2 monkeys during a multitrial reward schedule task, where the monkeys had to complete a schedule of 1, 2, 3, or 4 trials to earn a reward. In one block of trials a visual cue indicated whether a reward would or would not be delivered in the current trial after the monkey successfully detected that a red spot turned green, and in other blocks the visual cue was random with respect to reward delivery. Over one-quarter of 131 responsive neurons were activated when the current trial would (certain or uncertain) be rewarded if performed correctly. These same neurons failed to respond in trials that were certain, as indicated by the cue, to be unrewarded. Another group of neurons responded when the reward was delivered, similar to results reported previously. The dynamics of population activity in anterior insula also showed strong signals related to knowing when a reward is coming. The most parsimonious explanation is that this activity codes for a type of expected outcome, where the expectation encompasses both certain and uncertain rewards.

  3. Encoder-decoder optimization for brain-computer interfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josh Merel

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Neuroprosthetic brain-computer interfaces are systems that decode neural activity into useful control signals for effectors, such as a cursor on a computer screen. It has long been recognized that both the user and decoding system can adapt to increase the accuracy of the end effector. Co-adaptation is the process whereby a user learns to control the system in conjunction with the decoder adapting to learn the user's neural patterns. We provide a mathematical framework for co-adaptation and relate co-adaptation to the joint optimization of the user's control scheme ("encoding model" and the decoding algorithm's parameters. When the assumptions of that framework are respected, co-adaptation cannot yield better performance than that obtainable by an optimal initial choice of fixed decoder, coupled with optimal user learning. For a specific case, we provide numerical methods to obtain such an optimized decoder. We demonstrate our approach in a model brain-computer interface system using an online prosthesis simulator, a simple human-in-the-loop pyschophysics setup which provides a non-invasive simulation of the BCI setting. These experiments support two claims: that users can learn encoders matched to fixed, optimal decoders and that, once learned, our approach yields expected performance advantages.

  4. Evidence for a Mechanism Encoding Audiovisual Spatial Separation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Orchard-Mills

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Auditory and visual spatial representations are produced by distinct processes, drawing on separate neural inputs and occurring in different regions of the brain. We tested for a bimodal spatial representation using a spatial increment discrimination task. Discrimination thresholds for synchronously presented but spatially separated audiovisual stimuli were measured for base separations ranging from 0° to 45°. In a dark anechoic chamber, the spatial interval was defined by azimuthal separation of a white-noise burst from a speaker on a movable robotic arm and a checkerboard patch 5° wide projected onto an acoustically transparent screen. When plotted as a function of base interval, spatial increment thresholds exhibited a J-shaped pattern. Thresholds initially declined, the minimum occurring at base separations approximately equal to the individual observer's detection threshold and thereafter rose log-linearly according to Weber's law. This pattern of results, known as the ‘dipper function’, would be expected if the auditory and visual signals defining the spatial interval converged onto an early sensory filter encoding audiovisual space. This mechanism could be used to encode spatial separation of auditory and visual stimuli.

  5. A new heterogeneous family of telomerically encoded Cryptosporidium proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzid, Maha; Hunter, Paul R; McDonald, Vincent; Elwin, Kristin; Chalmers, Rachel M; Tyler, Kevin M

    2013-01-01

    Cryptosporidiosis is predominantly caused by two closely related species of protozoan parasites the zoonotic Cryptosporidium parvum and anthroponotic Cryptosporidium hominis which diverge phenotypically in respect to host range and virulence. Using comparative genomics we identified two genes displaying overt heterogeneity between species. Although initial work suggested both were species specific, Cops-1 for C. parvum and Chos-1 for C. hominis, subsequent study identified an abridged ortholog of Cops-1 in C. hominis. Cops-1 and Chos-1 showed limited, but significant, similarity to each other and share common features: (i) telomeric location: Cops-1 is the last gene on chromosome 2, whilst Chos-1 is the first gene on chromosome 5, (ii) encode circa 50-kDa secreted proteins with isoelectric points above 10, (iii) are serine rich, and (iv) contain internal nucleotide repeats. Importantly, Cops-1 sequence contains specific SNPs with good discriminatory power useful epidemiologically. C. parvum-infected patient sera recognized a 50-kDa protein in antigen preparations of C. parvum but not C. hominis, consistent with Cops-1 being antigenic for patients. Interestingly, anti-Cops-1 monoclonal antibody (9E1) stained oocyst content and sporozoite surface of C. parvum only. This study provides a new example of protozoan telomeres as rapidly evolving contingency loci encoding putative virulence factors. PMID:23467513

  6. QualityML: a dictionary for quality metadata encoding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ninyerola, Miquel; Sevillano, Eva; Serral, Ivette; Pons, Xavier; Zabala, Alaitz; Bastin, Lucy; Masó, Joan

    2014-05-01

    The scenario of rapidly growing geodata catalogues requires tools focused on facilitate users the choice of products. Having quality fields populated in metadata allow the users to rank and then select the best fit-for-purpose products. In this direction, we have developed the QualityML (http://qualityml.geoviqua.org), a dictionary that contains hierarchically structured concepts to precisely define and relate quality levels: from quality classes to quality measurements. Generically, a quality element is the path that goes from the higher level (quality class) to the lowest levels (statistics or quality metrics). This path is used to encode quality of datasets in the corresponding metadata schemas. The benefits of having encoded quality, in the case of data producers, are related with improvements in their product discovery and better transmission of their characteristics. In the case of data users, particularly decision-makers, they would find quality and uncertainty measures to take the best decisions as well as perform dataset intercomparison. Also it allows other components (such as visualization, discovery, or comparison tools) to be quality-aware and interoperable. On one hand, the QualityML is a profile of the ISO geospatial metadata standards providing a set of rules for precisely documenting quality indicator parameters that is structured in 6 levels. On the other hand, QualityML includes semantics and vocabularies for the quality concepts. Whenever possible, if uses statistic expressions from the UncertML dictionary (http://www.uncertml.org) encoding. However it also extends UncertML to provide list of alternative metrics that are commonly used to quantify quality. A specific example, based on a temperature dataset, is shown below. The annual mean temperature map has been validated with independent in-situ measurements to obtain a global error of 0.5 ° C. Level 0: Quality class (e.g., Thematic accuracy) Level 1: Quality indicator (e.g., Quantitative

  7. Properties of virion transactivator proteins encoded by primate cytomegaloviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barry Peter A

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV is a betaherpesvirus that causes severe disease in situations where the immune system is immature or compromised. HCMV immediate early (IE gene expression is stimulated by the virion phosphoprotein pp71, encoded by open reading frame (ORF UL82, and this transactivation activity is important for the efficient initiation of viral replication. It is currently recognized that pp71 acts to overcome cellular intrinsic defences that otherwise block viral IE gene expression, and that interactions of pp71 with the cell proteins Daxx and ATRX are important for this function. A further property of pp71 is the ability to enable prolonged gene expression from quiescent herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 genomes. Non-human primate cytomegaloviruses encode homologs of pp71, but there is currently no published information that addresses their effects on gene expression and modes of action. Results The UL82 homolog encoded by simian cytomegalovirus (SCMV, strain Colburn, was identified and cloned. This ORF, named S82, was cloned into an HSV-1 vector, as were those from baboon, rhesus monkey and chimpanzee cytomegaloviruses. The use of an HSV-1 vector enabled expression of the UL82 homologs in a range of cell types, and permitted investigation of their abilities to direct prolonged gene expression from quiescent genomes. The results show that all UL82 homologs activate gene expression, and that neither host cell type nor promoter target sequence has major effects on these activities. Surprisingly, the UL82 proteins specified by non-human primate cytomegaloviruses, unlike pp71, did not direct long term expression from quiescent HSV-1 genomes. In addition, significant differences were observed in the intranuclear localization of the UL82 homologs, and in their effects on Daxx. Strikingly, S82 mediated the release of Daxx from nuclear domain 10 substructures much more rapidly than pp71 or the other proteins tested. All

  8. Are animacy effects in episodic memory independent of encoding instructions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelin, Margaux; Bugaiska, Aurélia; Méot, Alain; Bonin, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    The adaptive view of human memory [Nairne, J. S. 2010. Adaptive memory: Evolutionary constraints on remembering. In B. H. Ross (Ed.), The psychology of learning and motivation (Vol. 53 pp. 1-32). Burlington: Academic Press; Nairne, J. S., & Pandeirada, J. N. S. 2010a. Adaptive memory: Ancestral priorities and the mnemonic value of survival processing. Cognitive Psychology, 61, 1-22, 2010b; Memory functions. In The Corsini encyclopedia of psychology and behavioral science, (Vol 3, 4th ed. pp. 977-979). Hokoben, NJ: John Wiley & Sons] assumes that animates (e.g., baby, rabbit presented as words or pictures) are better remembered than inanimates (e.g., bottle, mountain) because animates are more important for fitness than inanimates. In four studies, we investigated whether the animacy effect in episodic memory (i.e., the better remembering of animates over inanimates) is independent of encoding instructions. Using both a factorial (Studies 1 and 3) and a multiple regression approach (Study 2), three studies tested whether certain contexts drive people to attend to inanimate more than to animate things (or the reverse), and therefore lead to differential animacy effects. The findings showed that animacy effects on recall performance were observed in the grassland-survival scenario used by Nairne, Thompson, and Pandeirada (2007. Adaptive memory: Survival processing enhances retention. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, & Cognition, 33, 263-273) (Studies 1-3), when words were rated for their pleasantness (Study 2), and in explicit learning (Study 3). In the non-survival scenario of moving to a foreign land (Studies 1-2), animacy effects on recall rates were not reliable in Study 1, but were significant in Study 2, whereas these effects were reliable in the non-survival scenario of planning a trip as a tour guide (Study 3). A final (control) study (Study 4) was conducted to test specifically whether animacy effects are related to the more organised

  9. Multiple genes encode the major surface glycoprotein of Pneumocystis carinii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kovacs, J A; Powell, F; Edman, J C

    1993-01-01

    hydrophobic region at the carboxyl terminus. The presence of multiple related msg genes encoding the major surface glycoprotein of P. carinii suggests that antigenic variation is a possible mechanism for evading host defenses. Further characterization of this family of genes should allow the development......The major surface antigen of Pneumocystis carinii, a life-threatening opportunistic pathogen in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients, is an abundant glycoprotein that functions in host-organism interactions. A monoclonal antibody to this antigen is protective in animals, and thus...... blot studies using chromosomal or restricted DNA, the major surface glycoproteins are the products of a multicopy family of genes. The predicted protein has an M(r) of approximately 123,000, is relatively rich in cysteine residues (5.5%) that are very strongly conserved, and contains a well conserved...

  10. Velocity estimation using recursive ultrasound imaging and spatially encoded signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolov, Svetoslav; Gammelmark, Kim; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2000-01-01

    is subtracted yielding a new frame at every pulse emission. In this paper the method is extended to blood velocity estimation, where a new color flow mapping (CFM) image is created after every pulse emission. The underlying assumption is that the velocity is constant between two pulse emissions and the current...... estimates can therefore be used for compensation of the motion artifacts in the data acquired in the next emission. Two different transmit strategies are investigated in this paper: (a) using a single defocused active aperture in transmit, and (b) emitting with all active transmit sub-apertures at the same...... time using orthogonal spatial encoding signals. The method was applied on data recorded by an experimental system. The estimates of the blood velocity for both methods had a bias less than 3% and a standard deviation around 2% making them a feasible approach for blood velocity estimations...

  11. Polymeric peptide pigments with sequence-encoded properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lampel, Ayala; McPhee, Scott A.; Park, Hang-Ah; Scott, Gary G.; Humagain, Sunita; Hekstra, Doeke R.; Yoo, Barney; Frederix, Pim W. J. M.; Li, Tai-De; Abzalimov, Rinat R.; Greenbaum, Steven G.; Tuttle, Tell; Hu, Chunhua; Bettinger, Christopher J.; Ulijn, Rein V.

    2017-06-08

    Melanins are a family of heterogeneous polymeric pigments that provide ultraviolet (UV) light protection, structural support, coloration, and free radical scavenging. Formed by oxidative oligomerization of catecholic small molecules, the physical properties of melanins are influenced by covalent and noncovalent disorder. We report the use of tyrosine-containing tripeptides as tunable precursors for polymeric pigments. In these structures, phenols are presented in a (supra-)molecular context dictated by the positions of the amino acids in the peptide sequence. Oxidative polymerization can be tuned in a sequence-dependent manner, resulting in peptide sequence–encoded properties such as UV absorbance, morphology, coloration, and electrochemical properties over a considerable range. Short peptides have low barriers to application and can be easily scaled, suggesting near-term applications in cosmetics and biomedicine.

  12. "Being there" and remembering it: Presence improves memory encoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makowski, Dominique; Sperduti, Marco; Nicolas, Serge; Piolino, Pascale

    2017-08-01

    Few studies have investigated the link between episodic memory and presence: the feeling of "being there" and reacting to a stimulus as if it were real. We collected data from 244 participants after they had watched the movie Avengers: Age of Ultron. They answered questions about factual (details of the movie) and temporal memory (order of the scenes) about the movie, as well as their emotion experience and their sense of presence during the projection. Both higher emotion experience and sense of presence were related to better factual memory, but not to temporal order memory. Crucially, the link between emotion and factual memory was mediated by the sense of presence. We interpreted the role of presence as an external absorption of the attentional focus toward the stimulus, thus enhancing memory encoding. Our findings could shed light on the cognitive processes underlying memory impairments in psychiatric conditions characterized by an altered sense of reality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Engineering Genetically-Encoded Mineralization and Magnetism via Directed Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xueliang; Lopez, Paola A; Giessen, Tobias W; Giles, Michael; Way, Jeffrey C; Silver, Pamela A

    2016-11-29

    Genetically encoding the synthesis of functional nanomaterials such as magnetic nanoparticles enables sensitive and non-invasive biological sensing and control. Via directed evolution of the natural iron-sequestering ferritin protein, we discovered key mutations that lead to significantly enhanced cellular magnetism, resulting in increased physical attraction of ferritin-expressing cells to magnets and increased contrast for cellular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The magnetic mutants further demonstrate increased iron biomineralization measured by a novel fluorescent genetic sensor for intracellular free iron. In addition, we engineered Escherichia coli cells with multiple genomic knockouts to increase cellular accumulation of various metals. Lastly to explore further protein candidates for biomagnetism, we characterized members of the DUF892 family using the iron sensor and magnetic columns, confirming their intracellular iron sequestration that results in increased cellular magnetization.

  14. Cryptanalysis of an image encryption algorithm based on DNA encoding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhavan, A.; Samsudin, A.; Akhshani, A.

    2017-10-01

    Recently an image encryption algorithm based on DNA encoding and the Elliptic Curve Cryptography (ECC) is proposed. This paper aims to investigate the security the DNA-based image encryption algorithm and its resistance against chosen plaintext attack. The results of the analysis demonstrate that security of the algorithm mainly relies on one static shuffling step, with a simple confusion operation. In this study, a practical plain image recovery method is proposed, and it is shown that the images encrypted with the same key could easily be recovered using the suggested cryptanalysis method with as low as two chosen plain images. Also, a strategy to improve the security of the algorithm is presented in this paper.

  15. Design studies of a depth encoding large aperture PET camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moisan, C.; Rogers, J.G.; Buckley, K.R.; Ruth, T.J.; Stazyk, M.W.; Tsang, G.

    1994-10-01

    The feasibility of a wholebody PET tomograph with the capacity to correct for the parallax error induced by the Depth-Of-Interaction of γ-rays is assessed through simulation. The experimental energy, depth, and transverse position resolutions of BGO block detector candidates are the main inputs to a simulation that predicts the point source resolution of the Depth Encoding Large Aperture Camera (DELAC). The results indicate that a measured depth resolution of 7 mm (FWHM) is sufficient to correct a substantial part of the parallax error for a point source at the edge of the Field-Of-View. A search for the block specifications and camera ring radius that would optimize the spatial resolution and its uniformity across the Field-Of-View is also presented. (author). 10 refs., 1 tab., 5 figs

  16. Expression analysis of a ''Cucurbita'' cDNA encoding endonuclease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szopa, J.

    1995-01-01

    The nuclear matrices of plant cell nuclei display intrinsic nuclease activity which consists in nicking supercoiled DNA. A cDNA encoding a 32 kDa endonuclease has been cloned and sequenced. The nucleotide and deduced amino-acid sequences show high homology to known 14-3-3-protein sequences from other sources. The amino-acid sequence shows agreement with consensus sequences for potential phosphorylation by protein kinase A and C and for calcium, lipid and membrane-binding sites. The nucleotide-binding site is also present within the conserved part of the sequence. By Northern blot analysis, the differential expression of the corresponding mRNA was detected; it was the strongest in sink tissues. The endonuclease activity found on DNA-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis coincided with mRNA content and was the highest in tuber. (author). 22 refs, 6 figs

  17. Recombinant vectors construction for cellobiohydrolase encoding gene constitutive expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leontina GURGU

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Cellobiohydrolases (EC 3.2.1.91 are important exo enzymes involved in cellulose hydrolysis alongside endoglucanases (EC 3.2.1.4 and β-glucosidases (EC 3.2.1.21. Heterologous cellobiohydrolase gene expression under constitutive promoter control using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as host system is of great importance for a successful SSF process. From this point of view, the main objective of the work was to use Yeplac181 expression vector as a recipient for cellobiohdrolase - cbhB encoding gene expression under the control of the actin promoter, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Two hybridvectors, YEplac-Actp and YEplac-Actp-CbhB, were generated usingEscherichia coli XLI Blue for the cloning experiments. Constitutive cbhB gene expression was checked by proteine gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE after insertion of these constructs into Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  18. Millisecond-scale motor encoding in a cortical vocal area.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Tang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Studies of motor control have almost universally examined firing rates to investigate how the brain shapes behavior. In principle, however, neurons could encode information through the precise temporal patterning of their spike trains as well as (or instead of through their firing rates. Although the importance of spike timing has been demonstrated in sensory systems, it is largely unknown whether timing differences in motor areas could affect behavior. We tested the hypothesis that significant information about trial-by-trial variations in behavior is represented by spike timing in the songbird vocal motor system. We found that neurons in motor cortex convey information via spike timing far more often than via spike rate and that the amount of information conveyed at the millisecond timescale greatly exceeds the information available from spike counts. These results demonstrate that information can be represented by spike timing in motor circuits and suggest that timing variations evoke differences in behavior.

  19. Analyzing Influenza Virus Sequences using Binary Encoding Approach

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    Ham Ching Lam

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Capturing mutation patterns of each individual influenza virus sequence is often challenging; in this paper, we demonstrated that using a binary encoding scheme coupled with dimension reduction technique, we were able to capture the intrinsic mutation pattern of the virus. Our approach looks at the variance between sequences instead of the commonly used p-distance or Hamming distance. We first convert the influenza genetic sequences to a binary strings and form a binary sequence alignment matrix and then apply Principal Component Analysis (PCA to this matrix. PCA also provides identification power to identify reassortant virus by using data projection technique. Due to the sparsity of the binary string, we were able to analyze large volume of influenza sequence data in a very short time. For protein sequences, our scheme also allows the incorporation of biophysical properties of each amino acid. Here, we present various encouraging results from analyzing influenza nucleotide, protein and genome sequences using the proposed approach.

  20. Feature-specific encoding flexibility in visual working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Aki; Saiki, Jun

    2012-01-01

    The current study examined selective encoding in visual working memory by systematically investigating interference from task-irrelevant features. The stimuli were objects defined by three features (color, shape, and location), and during a delay period, any of the features could switch between two objects. Additionally, single- and whole-probe trials were randomized within experimental blocks to investigate effects of memory retrieval. A series of relevant-feature switch detection tasks, where one feature was task-irrelevant, showed that interference from the task-irrelevant feature was only observed in the color-shape task, suggesting that color and shape information could be successfully filtered out, but location information could not, even when location was a task-irrelevant feature. Therefore, although location information is added to object representations independent of task demands in a relatively automatic manner, other features (e.g., color, shape) can be flexibly added to object representations.

  1. Feature-specific encoding flexibility in visual working memory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aki Kondo

    Full Text Available The current study examined selective encoding in visual working memory by systematically investigating interference from task-irrelevant features. The stimuli were objects defined by three features (color, shape, and location, and during a delay period, any of the features could switch between two objects. Additionally, single- and whole-probe trials were randomized within experimental blocks to investigate effects of memory retrieval. A series of relevant-feature switch detection tasks, where one feature was task-irrelevant, showed that interference from the task-irrelevant feature was only observed in the color-shape task, suggesting that color and shape information could be successfully filtered out, but location information could not, even when location was a task-irrelevant feature. Therefore, although location information is added to object representations independent of task demands in a relatively automatic manner, other features (e.g., color, shape can be flexibly added to object representations.

  2. Cloning of Salmonella typhimurium DNA encoding mutagenic DNA repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, S.M.; Sedgwick, S.G.

    1989-01-01

    Mutagenic DNA repair in Escherichia coli is encoded by the umuDC operon. Salmonella typhimurium DNA which has homology with E. coli umuC and is able to complement E. coli umuC122::Tn5 and umuC36 mutations has been cloned. Complementation of umuD44 mutants and hybridization with E. coli umuD also occurred, but these activities were much weaker than with umuC. Restriction enzyme mapping indicated that the composition of the cloned fragment is different from the E. coli umuDC operon. Therefore, a umu-like function of S. typhimurium has been found; the phenotype of this function is weaker than that of its E. coli counterpart, which is consistent with the weak mutagenic response of S. typhimurium to UV compared with the response in E. coli

  3. Method of generating ploynucleotides encoding enhanced folding variants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradbury, Andrew M.; Kiss, Csaba; Waldo, Geoffrey S.

    2017-05-02

    The invention provides directed evolution methods for improving the folding, solubility and stability (including thermostability) characteristics of polypeptides. In one aspect, the invention provides a method for generating folding and stability-enhanced variants of proteins, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins, chromophoric proteins and enzymes. In another aspect, the invention provides methods for generating thermostable variants of a target protein or polypeptide via an internal destabilization baiting strategy. Internally destabilization a protein of interest is achieved by inserting a heterologous, folding-destabilizing sequence (folding interference domain) within DNA encoding the protein of interest, evolving the protein sequences adjacent to the heterologous insertion to overcome the destabilization (using any number of mutagenesis methods), thereby creating a library of variants. The variants in the library are expressed, and those with enhanced folding characteristics selected.

  4. Rapid Automatic Motor Encoding of Competing Reach Options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason P. Gallivan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Mounting neural evidence suggests that, in situations in which there are multiple potential targets for action, the brain prepares, in parallel, competing movements associated with these targets, prior to implementing one of them. Central to this interpretation is the idea that competing viewed targets, prior to selection, are rapidly and automatically transformed into corresponding motor representations. Here, by applying target-specific, gradual visuomotor rotations and dissociating, unbeknownst to participants, the visual direction of potential targets from the direction of the movements required to reach the same targets, we provide direct evidence for this provocative idea. Our results offer strong empirical support for theories suggesting that competing action options are automatically represented in terms of the movements required to attain them. The rapid motor encoding of potential targets may support the fast optimization of motor costs under conditions of target uncertainty and allow the motor system to inform decisions about target selection.

  5. Calibration transfer via an extreme learning machine auto-encoder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wo-Ruo; Bin, Jun; Lu, Hong-Mei; Zhang, Zhi-Min; Liang, Yi-Zeng

    2016-03-21

    In order to solve the spectra standardization problem in near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy, a Transfer via Extreme learning machine Auto-encoder Method (TEAM) has been proposed in this study. A comparative study among TEAM, piecewise direct standardization (PDS), generalized least squares (GLS) and calibration transfer methods based on canonical correlation analysis (CCA) was conducted, and the performances of these algorithms were benchmarked with three spectral datasets: corn, tobacco and pharmaceutical tablet spectra. The results show that TEAM is a stable method and can significantly reduce prediction errors compared with PDS, GLS and CCA. TEAM can also achieve the best RMSEPs in most cases with a small number of calibration sets. TEAM is implemented in Python language and available as an open source package at https://github.com/zmzhang/TEAM.

  6. Synthesis and nanoscale thermal encoding of phase-change nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Xuhui; Yu Bin; Meyyappan, M.

    2007-01-01

    Low-dimensional phase-change nanostructures provide a valuable research platform for understanding the phase-transition behavior and thermal properties at nanoscale and their potential in achieving superdense data storage. Ge 2 Sb 2 Te 5 nanowires have been grown using a vapor-liquid-solid technique and shown to exhibit distinctive properties that may overcome the present data storage scaling barrier. Local heating of an individual nanowire with a focused electron beam was used to shape a nano-bar-code on a Ge 2 Sb 2 Te 5 nanowire. The data encoding on Ge 2 Sb 2 Te 5 nanowire may promote novel device concepts to implement ultrahigh density, low energy, high speed data storage using phase-change nanomaterials with diverse thermal-programing strategies

  7. Cloning and detection of HIV-1-encoded microRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omoto, Shinya; Fujii, Yoichi R

    2006-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are 21-to 25-nucleotides (nt) long and interact with messenger RNAs to trigger either translational repression or RNA cleavage through RNA interference (RNAi). We have shown that HIV-1 nef double-stranded RNA from AIDS patients who are long-term nonprogressors, inhibits HIV-1 transcription; and that nef-derived miRNA, miR-N367, is produced in human T-cells persistently infected with HIV-1. The miR-N367 can block HIV-1 Nef expression and long terminal repeat (LTR) transcription, suggesting that miR-N367 might suppress both Nef function and HIV-1 transcription through the RNAi pathway. Protocols are presented here for cloning HIV-1-encoded miRNA and confirming miRNA expression by Northern blot hybridization.

  8. Indistinguishable encoding for bidirectional quantum key distribution: Theory to experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamsul Shaari, Jesni; Soekardjo, Suryadi

    2017-12-01

    We present a bidirectional quantum key distribution protocol with minimal encoding operations derived from the use of only two “nonorthogonal” unitary transformations selected from two mutually unbiased unitary bases. Differently from many bidirectional protocols, these transformations are indistinguishable in principle for a single use. Along with its decoding procedure, it is unique compared to its “orthogonal encoding” predecessors. Given the nature of such protocols where key rates are usually dependent on two different types of error rates, we define a more relevant notion of security threshold for such protocols to allow for proper comparisons to be made. The current protocol outperforms its predecessor in terms of security as the amount of information an eavesdropper can glean is limited by the indistinguishability of the transformations. We further propose adaptations for a practical scenario and report on a proof of concept experimental scheme based on polarised photons from an attenuated pulsed laser for qubits, demonstrating the feasibility of such a protocol.

  9. Content identification: binary content fingerprinting versus binary content encoding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferdowsi, Sohrab; Voloshynovskiy, Svyatoslav; Kostadinov, Dimche

    2014-02-01

    In this work, we address the problem of content identification. We consider content identification as a special case of multiclass classification. The conventional approach towards identification is based on content fingerprinting where a short binary content description known as a fingerprint is extracted from the content. We propose an alternative solution based on elements of machine learning theory and digital communications. Similar to binary content fingerprinting, binary content representation is generated based on a set of trained binary classifiers. We consider several training/encoding strategies and demonstrate that the proposed system can achieve the upper theoretical performance limits of content identification. The experimental results were carried out both on a synthetic dataset with different parameters and the FAMOS dataset of microstructures from consumer packages.

  10. Computational approach to quantum encoder design for purity optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Naoki; Fazel, Maryam

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we address the problem of designing a quantum encoder that maximizes the minimum output purity of a given decohering channel, where the minimum is taken over all possible pure inputs. This problem is cast as a max-min optimization problem with a rank constraint on an appropriately defined matrix variable. The problem is computationally very hard because it is nonconvex with respect to both the objective function (output purity) and the rank constraint. Despite this difficulty, we provide a tractable computational algorithm that produces the exact optimal solution for codespace of dimension 2. Moreover, this algorithm is easily extended to cover the general class of codespaces, in which case the solution is suboptimal in the sense that the suboptimized output purity serves as a lower bound of the exact optimal purity. The algorithm consists of a sequence of semidefinite programmings and can be performed easily. Two typical quantum error channels are investigated to illustrate the effectiveness of our method

  11. Acquiring, encoding, and re-using clinical knowledge in PRODIGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Hall

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available The development, implementation and maintenance of computer-executable clinical guidelines encompass a series of complex processes. As they are often performed by more than one organisation, this introduces further complexity. Within the PRODIGY project we attempt to control as many aspects of the process as possible, in order to increase the likelihood of achieving success. To illustrate the complexity of the process and many of the inherent problems and solutions, this paper describes the evolution of the PRODIGY knowledge base, describing the steps from acquiring knowledge, through encoding, to the execution of guidelines, and 'closing the loop' by discussing an approach to knowledge re-use. We will also consider some of the wider implications of our work and propose directions for future research and development activities.

  12. 3-D reconstruction using an efficient Octree encoding scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh, H.J.; Jagadeesh, J.M.

    1986-01-01

    Reconstruction of a three dimensional (3-D) model of biological objects from their thin section 2-D slices is a valuable tool for biomedical research. The goal of a 3-D reconstruction routine is to find the 3-D structure from a set of sliced images and display the 3-D view on a 2-D screen. Octree has been widely used as a powerful data structure to represent 3-D objects in computer. The encoding technique is specially useful for the representation of objects with irregular shape, such as biomedical objects. A method called level-wise pointerless representation which can offer much less storage requirement has been developed. In addition, a complete software package has been designed using the efficient data structure to reconstruct 3-D objects from 2-D sliced images and to display the 3-D objects on 2-D screen

  13. XOR-FREE Implementation of Convolutional Encoder for Reconfigurable Hardware

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav Purohit

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel XOR-FREE algorithm to implement the convolutional encoder using reconfigurable hardware. The approach completely removes the XOR processing of a chosen nonsystematic, feedforward generator polynomial of larger constraint length. The hardware (HW implementation of new architecture uses Lookup Table (LUT for storing the parity bits. The design implements architectural reconfigurability by modifying the generator polynomial of the same constraint length and code rate to reduce the design complexity. The proposed architecture reduces the dynamic power up to 30% and improves the hardware cost and propagation delay up to 20% and 32%, respectively. The performance of the proposed architecture is validated in MATLAB Simulink and tested on Zynq-7 series FPGA.

  14. Frequency encoded optical assessment of human retinal physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitgeb, Rainer A.; Michaely, Roland; Bachmann, Adrian; Lassner, Theo; Blatter, Cedric

    2008-02-01

    We demonstrate in-vivo functional imaging of the human retina with Fourier domain optical coherence tomography employing frequency encoding of an excitation pattern. The principle is based on projecting a modulated rectangular pattern across the foveal region and acquiring a time series of B-Scans at the same vertical position across the pattern. The idea is to modulate the excitation with a frequency that is distinct from the heartbeat and irregular motion artifacts. Fourier analysis of the time series at each transverse position in the B-scan series allows assessing the retinal response as change in the FDOCT reflectivity signal exactly at the pattern modulation frequency. We observe a change in retinal reflectivity within the region of the outer segment photoreceptor layer exactly at the pattern modulation frequency.

  15. Natural biased coin encoded in the genome determines cell strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorri, Faezeh; Mahini, Hamid; Sharifi-Zarchi, Ali; Totonchi, Mehdi; Tusserkani, Ruzbeh; Pezeshk, Hamid; Sadeghi, Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    Decision making at a cellular level determines different fates for isogenic cells. However, it is not yet clear how rational decisions are encoded in the genome, how they are transmitted to their offspring, and whether they evolve and become optimized throughout generations. In this paper, we use a game theoretic approach to explain how rational decisions are made in the presence of cooperators and competitors. Our results suggest the existence of an internal switch that operates as a biased coin. The biased coin is, in fact, a biochemical bistable network of interacting genes that can flip to one of its stable states in response to different environmental stimuli. We present a framework to describe how the positions of attractors in such a gene regulatory network correspond to the behavior of a rational player in a competing environment. We evaluate our model by considering lysis/lysogeny decision making of bacteriophage lambda in E. coli.

  16. Direct Pathogenic Effects of HERV-encoded Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Dorte Tranberg; Møller-Larsen, Anné; Petersen, Thor

    in increased amounts on B cells from MS patients. Furthermore, the amount of anti-HERV antibodies in serum and cerebrospinal fluid from patients with MS is increased when compared with healthy controls. Aim: The overall aim of this project is to investigate the potential role of HERVs in the development of MS......Background: Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a demyelinating, inflammatory disease of the central nervous system (CNS). MS is mediated by the immune system but the etiology of the disease remains unknown. Retroviral envelope (Env) proteins, encoded by human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs), are expressed...... of Env-induced apoptosis/necrosis in CNS cells will be performed by both DNA fragmentation ELISA and qPCR. Furthermore, the cellular localization of HERV-antigens on cells from patients with MS will be determined by confocal microscopy. A flow cytometric/confocal method has been optimized...

  17. Encoded expansion: an efficient algorithm to discover identical string motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azmi, Aqil M; Al-Ssulami, Abdulrakeeb

    2014-01-01

    A major task in computational biology is the discovery of short recurring string patterns known as motifs. Most of the schemes to discover motifs are either stochastic or combinatorial in nature. Stochastic approaches do not guarantee finding the correct motifs, while the combinatorial schemes tend to have an exponential time complexity with respect to motif length. To alleviate the cost, the combinatorial approach exploits dynamic data structures such as trees or graphs. Recently (Karci (2009) Efficient automatic exact motif discovery algorithms for biological sequences, Expert Systems with Applications 36:7952-7963) devised a deterministic algorithm that finds all the identical copies of string motifs of all sizes [Formula: see text] in theoretical time complexity of [Formula: see text] and a space complexity of [Formula: see text] where [Formula: see text] is the length of the input sequence and [Formula: see text] is the length of the longest possible string motif. In this paper, we present a significant improvement on Karci's original algorithm. The algorithm that we propose reports all identical string motifs of sizes [Formula: see text] that occur at least [Formula: see text] times. Our algorithm starts with string motifs of size 2, and at each iteration it expands the candidate string motifs by one symbol throwing out those that occur less than [Formula: see text] times in the entire input sequence. We use a simple array and data encoding to achieve theoretical worst-case time complexity of [Formula: see text] and a space complexity of [Formula: see text] Encoding of the substrings can speed up the process of comparison between string motifs. Experimental results on random and real biological sequences confirm that our algorithm has indeed a linear time complexity and it is more scalable in terms of sequence length than the existing algorithms.

  18. Bubble masks for time-encoded imaging of fast neutrons.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brubaker, Erik; Brennan, James S.; Marleau, Peter; Nowack, Aaron B.; Steele, John T.; Sweany, Melinda; Throckmorton, Daniel J.

    2013-09-01

    Time-encoded imaging is an approach to directional radiation detection that is being developed at SNL with a focus on fast neutron directional detection. In this technique, a time modulation of a detected neutron signal is inducedtypically, a moving mask that attenuates neutrons with a time structure that depends on the source position. An important challenge in time-encoded imaging is to develop high-resolution two-dimensional imaging capabilities; building a mechanically moving high-resolution mask presents challenges both theoretical and technical. We have investigated an alternative to mechanical masks that replaces the solid mask with a liquid such as mineral oil. Instead of fixed blocks of solid material that move in pre-defined patterns, the oil is contained in tubing structures, and carefully introduced air gapsbubblespropagate through the tubing, generating moving patterns of oil mask elements and air apertures. Compared to current moving-mask techniques, the bubble mask is simple, since mechanical motion is replaced by gravity-driven bubble propagation; it is flexible, since arbitrary bubble patterns can be generated by a software-controlled valve actuator; and it is potentially high performance, since the tubing and bubble size can be tuned for high-resolution imaging requirements. We have built and tested various single-tube mask elements, and will present results on bubble introduction and propagation as a function of tubing size and cross-sectional shape; real-time bubble position tracking; neutron source imaging tests; and reconstruction techniques demonstrated on simple test data as well as a simulated full detector system.

  19. Hexagonal pixel detector with time encoded binary readout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoedlmoser, H.; Varner, G.; Cooney, M.

    2009-01-01

    The University of Hawaii is developing continuous acquisition pixel (CAP) detectors for vertexing applications in lepton colliding experiments such as SuperBelle or ILC. In parallel to the investigation of different technology options such as MAPS or SOI, both analog and binary readout concepts have been tested. First results with a binary readout scheme in which the hit information is time encoded by means of a signal shifting mechanism have recently been published. This paper explains the hit reconstruction for such a binary detector with an emphasis on fake hit reconstruction probabilities in order to evaluate the rate capability in a high background environment such as the planned SuperB factory at KEK. The results show that the binary concept is at least comparable to any analog readout strategy if not better in terms of occupancy. Furthermore, we present a completely new binary readout strategy in which the pixel cells are arranged in a hexagonal grid allowing the use of three independent output directions to reduce reconstruction ambiguities. The new concept uses the same signal shifting mechanism for time encoding, however, in dedicated transfer lines on the periphery of the detector, which enables higher shifting frequencies. Detailed Monte Carlo simulations of full size pixel matrices including hit and BG generation, signal generation, and data reconstruction show that by means of multiple signal transfer lines on the periphery the pixel can be made smaller (higher resolution), the number of output channels and the data volume per triggered event can be reduced dramatically, fake hit reconstruction is lowered to a minimum and the resulting effective occupancies are less than 10 -4 . A prototype detector has been designed in the AMS 0.35μm Opto process and is currently under fabrication.

  20. Bacteriophage-encoded shiga toxin gene in atypical bacterial host

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casas Veronica

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Contamination from fecal bacteria in recreational waters is a major health concern since bacteria capable of causing human disease can be found in animal feces. The Dog Beach area of Ocean Beach in San Diego, California is a beach prone to closures due to high levels of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB. A potential source of these FIB could be the canine feces left behind by owners who do not clean up after their pets. We tested this hypothesis by screening the DNA isolated from canine feces for the bacteriophage-encoded stx gene normally found in the virulent strains of the fecal bacterium Escherichia coli. Results Twenty canine fecal samples were collected, processed for total and bacterial fraction DNA, and screened by PCR for the stx gene. The stx gene was detected in the total and bacterial fraction DNA of one fecal sample. Bacterial isolates were then cultivated from the stx-positive fecal sample. Eighty nine of these canine fecal bacterial isolates were screened by PCR for the stx gene. The stx gene was detected in five of these isolates. Sequencing and phylogenetic analyses of 16S rRNA gene PCR products from the canine fecal bacterial isolates indicated that they were Enterococcus and not E. coli. Conclusions The bacteriophage-encoded stx gene was found in multiple species of bacteria cultivated from canine fecal samples gathered at the shoreline of the Dog Beach area of Ocean Beach in San Diego, California. The canine fecal bacteria carrying the stx gene were not the typical E. coli host and were instead identified through phylogenetic analyses as Enterococcus. This suggests a large degree of horizontal gene transfer of exotoxin genes in recreational waters.

  1. Supervised Learning in Spiking Neural Networks for Precise Temporal Encoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Brian; Grüning, André

    2016-01-01

    Precise spike timing as a means to encode information in neural networks is biologically supported, and is advantageous over frequency-based codes by processing input features on a much shorter time-scale. For these reasons, much recent attention has been focused on the development of supervised learning rules for spiking neural networks that utilise a temporal coding scheme. However, despite significant progress in this area, there still lack rules that have a theoretical basis, and yet can be considered biologically relevant. Here we examine the general conditions under which synaptic plasticity most effectively takes place to support the supervised learning of a precise temporal code. As part of our analysis we examine two spike-based learning methods: one of which relies on an instantaneous error signal to modify synaptic weights in a network (INST rule), and the other one relying on a filtered error signal for smoother synaptic weight modifications (FILT rule). We test the accuracy of the solutions provided by each rule with respect to their temporal encoding precision, and then measure the maximum number of input patterns they can learn to memorise using the precise timings of individual spikes as an indication of their storage capacity. Our results demonstrate the high performance of the FILT rule in most cases, underpinned by the rule's error-filtering mechanism, which is predicted to provide smooth convergence towards a desired solution during learning. We also find the FILT rule to be most efficient at performing input pattern memorisations, and most noticeably when patterns are identified using spikes with sub-millisecond temporal precision. In comparison with existing work, we determine the performance of the FILT rule to be consistent with that of the highly efficient E-learning Chronotron rule, but with the distinct advantage that our FILT rule is also implementable as an online method for increased biological realism.

  2. Superconducting magnetic Wollaston prism for neutron spin encoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, F; Parnell, S R; Hamilton, W A; Maranville, B B; Wang, T; Semerad, R; Baxter, D V; Cremer, J T; Pynn, R

    2014-05-01

    A magnetic Wollaston prism can spatially split a polarized neutron beam into two beams with different neutron spin states, in a manner analogous to an optical Wollaston prism. Such a Wollaston prism can be used to encode the trajectory of neutrons into the Larmor phase associated with their spin degree of freedom. This encoding can be used for neutron phase-contrast radiography and in spin echo scattering angle measurement (SESAME). In this paper, we show that magnetic Wollaston prisms with highly uniform magnetic fields and low Larmor phase aberration can be constructed to preserve neutron polarization using high temperature superconducting (HTS) materials. The Meissner effect of HTS films is used to confine magnetic fields produced electromagnetically by current-carrying HTS tape wound on suitably shaped soft iron pole pieces. The device is cooled to ~30 K by a closed cycle refrigerator, eliminating the need to replenish liquid cryogens and greatly simplifying operation and maintenance. A HTS film ensures that the magnetic field transition within the prism is sharp, well-defined, and planar due to the Meissner effect. The spin transport efficiency across the device was measured to be ~98.5% independent of neutron wavelength and energizing current. The position-dependent Larmor phase of neutron spins was measured at the NIST Center for Neutron Research facility and found to agree well with detailed simulations. The phase varies linearly with horizontal position, as required, and the neutron beam shows little depolarization. Consequently, the device has advantages over existing devices with similar functionality and provides the capability for a large neutron beam (20 mm × 30 mm) and an increase in length scales accessible to SESAME to beyond 10 μm. With further improvements of the external coupling guide field in the prototype device, a larger neutron beam could be employed.

  3. Organization of the gene encoding human lysosomal beta-galactosidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morreau, H; Bonten, E; Zhou, X Y; D'Azzo, A

    1991-09-01

    Human beta-galactosidase precursor mRNA is alternatively spliced into an abundant 2.5-kb transcript and a minor 2.0-kb species. These templates direct the synthesis of the classic lysosomal beta-D-galactosidase enzyme and of a beta-galactosidase-related protein with no enzymatic activity. Mutations in the beta-galactosidase gene result in the lysosomal storage disorders GM1-gangliosidosis and Morquio B syndrome. To analyze the genetic lesions underlying these syndromes we have isolated the human beta-galactosidase gene and determined its organization. The gene spans greater than 62.5 kb and contains 16 exons. Promoter activity is located on a 236-bp Pst I fragment which works in a direction-independent manner. A second Pst I fragment of 851 bp located upstream from the first negatively regulates initiation of transcription. The promoter has characteristics of a housekeeping gene with GC-rich stretches and five potential SP1 transcription elements on two strands. We identified multiple cap sites of the mRNA, the major of which maps 53 bp upstream from the translation initiation codon. The portion of the human pre-mRNA undergoing alternative splicing is encoded by exons II-VII. Sequence analysis of equivalent mouse exons showed an identical genomic organization. However, translation of the corresponding differentially spliced murine transcript is interrupted in its reading frame. Thus, the mouse gene cannot encode a beta-galactosidase-related protein in a manner similar to the human counterpart. Differential expression of the murine beta-galactosidase transcript is observed in different mouse tissues.

  4. Superconducting magnetic Wollaston prism for neutron spin encoding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, F., E-mail: fankli@indiana.edu; Parnell, S. R.; Wang, T.; Baxter, D. V. [Center for Exploration of Energy and Matter, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47408 (United States); Hamilton, W. A. [Neutron Sciences Directorate, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 (United States); Maranville, B. B. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Semerad, R. [Ceraco Ceramic Coating GmbH, Ismaning 85737 (Germany); Cremer, J. T. [Adelphi Technology Inc., Redwood City, California 94063 (United States); Pynn, R. [Center for Exploration of Energy and Matter, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47408 (United States); Neutron Sciences Directorate, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    A magnetic Wollaston prism can spatially split a polarized neutron beam into two beams with different neutron spin states, in a manner analogous to an optical Wollaston prism. Such a Wollaston prism can be used to encode the trajectory of neutrons into the Larmor phase associated with their spin degree of freedom. This encoding can be used for neutron phase-contrast radiography and in spin echo scattering angle measurement (SESAME). In this paper, we show that magnetic Wollaston prisms with highly uniform magnetic fields and low Larmor phase aberration can be constructed to preserve neutron polarization using high temperature superconducting (HTS) materials. The Meissner effect of HTS films is used to confine magnetic fields produced electromagnetically by current-carrying HTS tape wound on suitably shaped soft iron pole pieces. The device is cooled to ∼30 K by a closed cycle refrigerator, eliminating the need to replenish liquid cryogens and greatly simplifying operation and maintenance. A HTS film ensures that the magnetic field transition within the prism is sharp, well-defined, and planar due to the Meissner effect. The spin transport efficiency across the device was measured to be ∼98.5% independent of neutron wavelength and energizing current. The position-dependent Larmor phase of neutron spins was measured at the NIST Center for Neutron Research facility and found to agree well with detailed simulations. The phase varies linearly with horizontal position, as required, and the neutron beam shows little depolarization. Consequently, the device has advantages over existing devices with similar functionality and provides the capability for a large neutron beam (20 mm × 30 mm) and an increase in length scales accessible to SESAME to beyond 10 μm. With further improvements of the external coupling guide field in the prototype device, a larger neutron beam could be employed.

  5. Artificial theta stimulation impairs encoding of contextual fear memory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arto Lipponen

    Full Text Available Several experiments have demonstrated an intimate relationship between hippocampal theta rhythm (4-12 Hz and memory. Lesioning the medial septum or fimbria-fornix, a fiber track connecting the hippocampus and the medial septum, abolishes the theta rhythm and results in a severe impairment in declarative memory. To assess whether there is a causal relationship between hippocampal theta and memory formation we investigated whether restoration of hippocampal theta by electrical stimulation during the encoding phase also restores fimbria-fornix lesion induced memory deficit in rats in the fear conditioning paradigm. Male Wistar rats underwent sham or fimbria-fornix lesion operation. Stimulation electrodes were implanted in the ventral hippocampal commissure and recording electrodes in the septal hippocampus. Artificial theta stimulation of 8 Hz was delivered during 3-min free exploration of the test cage in half of the rats before aversive conditioning with three foot shocks during 2 min. Memory was assessed by total freezing time in the same environment 24 h and 28 h after fear conditioning, and in an intervening test session in a different context. As expected, fimbria-fornix lesion impaired fear memory and dramatically attenuated hippocampal theta power. Artificial theta stimulation produced continuous theta oscillations that were almost similar to endogenous theta rhythm in amplitude and frequency. However, contrary to our predictions, artificial theta stimulation impaired conditioned fear response in both sham and fimbria-fornix lesioned animals. These data suggest that restoration of theta oscillation per se is not sufficient to support memory encoding after fimbria-fornix lesion and that universal theta oscillation in the hippocampus with a fixed frequency may actually impair memory.

  6. Does long-term object priming depend on the explicit detection of object identity at encoding?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Carlos A.; Mayes, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    It is currently unclear whether objects have to be explicitly identified at encoding for reliable behavioral long-term object priming to occur. We conducted two experiments that investigated long-term object and non-object priming using a selective-attention encoding manipulation that reduces explicit object identification. In Experiment 1, participants either counted dots flashed within an object picture (shallow encoding) or engaged in an animacy task (deep encoding) at study, whereas, at test, they performed an object-decision task. Priming, as measured by reaction times (RTs), was observed for both types of encoding, and was of equivalent magnitude. In Experiment 2, non-object priming (faster RTs for studied relative to unstudied non-objects) was also obtained under the same selective-attention encoding manipulation as in Experiment 1, and the magnitude of the priming effect was equivalent between experiments. In contrast, we observed a linear decrement in recognition memory accuracy across conditions (deep encoding of Experiment 1 > shallow encoding Experiment 1 > shallow encoding of Experiment 2), suggesting that priming was not contaminated by explicit memory strategies. We argue that our results are more consistent with the identification/production framework than the perceptual/conceptual distinction, and we conclude that priming of pictures largely ignored at encoding can be subserved by the automatic retrieval of two types of instances: one at the motor level and another at an object-decision level. PMID:25852594

  7. A hybrid bit-encoding for SAT planning based on clique-partitioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia, Cristóbal; San Segundo, Pablo; Galán, Ramón

    2017-09-01

    Planning as satisfiability is one of the most efficient ways to solve classic automated planning problems. In SAT planning, the encoding used to convert the problem to a SAT formula is critical for the performance of the SAT solver. This paper presents a novel bit-encoding that reduces the number of bits required to represent actions in a SAT-based automated planning problem. To obtain such encoding we first build a conflict graph, which represents incompatibilities of pairs of actions, and bitwise encode the subsets of actions determined by a clique partition. This reduces the number of Boolean variables and clauses of the SAT encoding, while preserving the possibility of parallel execution of compatible (non-neighbor) actions. The article also describes an appropriate algorithm for selecting the clique partition for this application and compares the new encodings obtained over some standard planning problems.

  8. A 10 Gbit/s OCDMA system based on electric encoding and optical transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chuan-qi; Hu, Jin-lin; He, Dong-dong; Chen, Mei-juan; Wang, Da-chi; Chen, Yan

    2013-11-01

    An electric encoded/optical transmission system of code division multiple access (CDMA) is proposed. It encodes the user signal in electric domain, and transfers the different code slice signals via the different wavelengths of light. This electric domain encoder/decoder is compared with current traditional encoder/decoder. Four-user modulation/demodulation optical CDMA (OCDMA) system with rate of 2.5 Gbit/s is simulated, which is based on the optical orthogonal code (OCC) designed in our laboratory. The results show that the structure of electric encoding/optical transmission can encode/decode signal correctly, and can achieve the chip rate equal to the user data rate. It can overcome the rate limitation of electronic bottleneck, and bring some potential applications in the electro-optical OCDMA system.

  9. Cortical encoding of timbre changes in cochlear implant users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fawen; Benson, Chelsea; Cahn, Steven J

    2013-01-01

    Most cochlear implant (CI) users describe music as a noise-like and unpleasant sound. Using behavioral tests, most prior studies have shown that perception of pitch-based melody and timbre is poor in CI users. This article will focus on cortical encoding of timbre changes in CI users, which may allow us to find solutions to further improve CI benefits. Furthermore, the value of using objective measures to reveal neural encoding of timbre changes may be reflected in this study. A case-control study of the mismatch negativity (MMN) using electrophysiological technique was conducted. To derive MMNs, three randomly arranged oddball paradigms consisting of standard/deviant instrumental pairs: saxophone/piano, cello/trombone, and flute/French horn, respectively, were presented. Ten CI users and ten normal-hearing (NH) listeners participated in this study. After filtering, epoching, and baseline correction, independent component analysis (ICA) was performed to remove artifacts. The averaged waveforms in response to the standard stimuli (STANDARD waveform) and the deviant stimuli (DEVIANT waveform) in each condition were separately derived. The responses from nine electrodes in the fronto-central area were averaged to form one waveform. The STANDARD waveform was subtracted from the DEVIANT waveform to derive the difference waveform, for which the MMN was judged to be present or absent. The measures used to evaluate the MMN included the MMN peak latency and amplitude as well as MMN duration. The MMN, which reflects the ability to automatically detect acoustic changes, was present in all NH listeners but only approximately half of CI users. In CI users with present MMNs, the MMN peak amplitude and duration were significantly smaller and shorter compared to those in NH listeners. Our electrophysiological results were consistent with prior behavioral results that CI users' performance in timbre perception was significantly poorer than that in NH listeners. Our results may

  10. Rejection-free stochastic simulation of BNGL-encoded models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hlavacek, William S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Monine, Michael I [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Colvin, Joshua [TRANSLATIONAL GENOM; Posner, Richard G [NORTHERN ARIZONA UNIV.; Von Hoff, Daniel D [TRANSLATIONAL GENOMICS RESEARCH INSTIT.

    2009-01-01

    Formal rules encoded using the BioNetGen language (BNGL) can be used to represent the system-level dynamics of molecular interactions. Rules allow one to compactly and implicitly specify the reaction network implied by a set of molecules and their interactions. Typically, the reaction network implied by a set of rules is large, which makes generation of the underlying rule-defined network expensive. Moreover, the cost of conventional simulation methods typically depends on network size. Together these factors have limited application of the rule-based modeling approach. To overcome this limitation, several methods have recently been developed for determining the reaction dynamics implied by rules while avoiding the expensive step of network generation. The cost of these 'network-free' simulation methods is independent of the number of reactions implied by rules. Software implementing such methods is needed for the analysis of rule-based models of biochemical systems. Here, we present a software tool called RuleMonkey that implements a network-free stochastic simulation method for rule-based models. The method is rejection free, unlike other network-free methods that introduce null events (i.e., steps in the simulation procedure that do not change the state of the reaction system being simulated), and the software is capable of simulating models encoded in BNGL, a general-purpose model-specification language. We verify that RuleMonkey produces correct simulation results, and we compare its performance against DYNSTOC, another BNGL-compliant general-purpose simulator for rule-based models, as well as various problem-specific codes that implement network-free simulation methods. RuleMonkey enables the simulation of models defined by rule sets that imply large-scale reaction networks. It is faster than DYNSTOC for stiff problems, although it requires the use of more computer memory. RuleMonkey is freely available for non-commercial use as a stand

  11. Drug-Encoded Biomarkers for Monitoring Biological Therapies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desislava Tsoneva

    Full Text Available Blood tests are necessary, easy-to-perform and low-cost alternatives for monitoring of oncolytic virotherapy and other biological therapies in translational research. Here we assessed three candidate proteins with the potential to be used as biomarkers in biological fluids: two glucuronidases from E. coli (GusA and Staphylococcus sp. RLH1 (GusPlus, and the luciferase from Gaussia princeps (GLuc. The three genes encoding these proteins were inserted individually into vaccinia virus GLV-1h68 genome under the control of an identical promoter. The three resulting recombinant viruses were used to infect tumor cells in cultures and human tumor xenografts in nude mice. In contrast to the actively secreted GLuc, the cytoplasmic glucuronidases GusA and GusPlus were released into the supernatants only as a result of virus-mediated oncolysis. GusPlus resulted in the most sensitive detection of enzyme activity under controlled assay conditions in samples containing as little as 1 pg/ml of GusPlus, followed by GusA (25 pg/ml and GLuc (≥375 pg/ml. Unexpectedly, even though GusA had a lower specific activity compared to GusPlus, the substrate conversion in the serum of tumor-bearing mice injected with the GusA-encoding virus strains was substantially higher than that of GusPlus. This was attributed to a 3.2 fold and 16.2 fold longer half-life of GusA in the blood stream compared to GusPlus and GLuc respectively, thus a more sensitive monitor of virus replication than the other two enzymes. Due to the good correlation between enzymatic activity of expressed marker gene and virus titer, we conclude that the amount of the biomarker protein in the body fluid semiquantitatively represents the amount of virus in the infected tumors which was confirmed by low light imaging. We found GusA to be the most reliable biomarker for monitoring oncolytic virotherapy among the three tested markers.

  12. The visual encoding of tool-object affordances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natraj, N; Pella, Y M; Borghi, A M; Wheaton, L A

    2015-12-03

    The perception of tool-object pairs involves understanding their action-relationships (affordances). Here, we sought to evaluate how an observer visually encodes tool-object affordances. Eye-movements were recorded as right-handed participants freely viewed static, right-handed, egocentric tool-object images across three contexts: correct (e.g. hammer-nail), incorrect (e.g. hammer-paper), spatial/ambiguous (e.g. hammer-wood), and three grasp-types: no hand, functional grasp-posture (grasp hammer-handle), non-functional/manipulative grasp-posture (grasp hammer-head). There were three areas of interests (AOI): the object (nail), the operant tool-end (hammer-head), the graspable tool-end (hammer-handle). Participants passively evaluated whether tool-object pairs were functionally correct/incorrect. Clustering of gaze scanpaths and AOI weightings grouped conditions into three distinct grasp-specific clusters, especially across correct and spatial tool-object contexts and to a lesser extent within the incorrect tool-object context. The grasp-specific gaze scanpath clusters were reasonably robust to the temporal order of gaze scanpaths. Gaze was therefore automatically primed to grasp-affordances though the task required evaluating tool-object context. Participants also primarily focused on the object and the operant tool-end and sparsely attended to the graspable tool-end, even in images with functional grasp-postures. In fact, in the absence of a grasp, the object was foveally weighted the most, indicative of a possible object-oriented action priming effect wherein the observer may be evaluating how the tool engages on the object. Unlike the functional grasp-posture, the manipulative grasp-posture caused the greatest disruption in the object-oriented priming effect, ostensibly as it does not afford tool-object action due to its non-functional interaction with the operant tool-end that actually engages with the object (e.g., hammer-head to nail). The enhanced attention

  13. Error-free holographic frames encryption with CA pixel-permutation encoding algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaowei; Xiao, Dan; Wang, Qiong-Hua

    2018-01-01

    The security of video data is necessary in network security transmission hence cryptography is technique to make video data secure and unreadable to unauthorized users. In this paper, we propose a holographic frames encryption technique based on the cellular automata (CA) pixel-permutation encoding algorithm. The concise pixel-permutation algorithm is used to address the drawbacks of the traditional CA encoding methods. The effectiveness of the proposed video encoding method is demonstrated by simulation examples.

  14. On the Properties of Neural Machine Translation: Encoder-Decoder Approaches

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Kyunghyun; van Merrienboer, Bart; Bahdanau, Dzmitry; Bengio, Yoshua

    2014-01-01

    Neural machine translation is a relatively new approach to statistical machine translation based purely on neural networks. The neural machine translation models often consist of an encoder and a decoder. The encoder extracts a fixed-length representation from a variable-length input sentence, and the decoder generates a correct translation from this representation. In this paper, we focus on analyzing the properties of the neural machine translation using two models; RNN Encoder--Decoder and...

  15. Encoding Sequential Information in Semantic Space Models: Comparing Holographic Reduced Representation and Random Permutation

    OpenAIRE

    Recchia, Gabriel; Sahlgren, Magnus; Kanerva, Pentti; Jones, Michael N.

    2015-01-01

    Circular convolution and random permutation have each been proposed as neurally plausible binding operators capable of encoding sequential information in semantic memory. We perform several controlled comparisons of circular convolution and random permutation as means of encoding paired associates as well as encoding sequential information. Random permutations outperformed convolution with respect to the number of paired associates that can be reliably stored in a single memory trace. Perform...

  16. Neural correlates of long-term memory: the interplay between encoding and retrieval

    OpenAIRE

    Bauch, E. M.

    2012-01-01

    Neural correlates of human long-term memory encoding and retrieval have been studied in relative isolation. Memory performance, however, benefits from an overlap between processes engaged at encoding and retrieval. This thesis sought to determine how encoding-retrieval overlap affects neural correlates of memory. Four studies were conducted using electrical brain activity recorded from the scalps of healthy adults. The first experiment addressed whether congruency in mode of pr...

  17. Results from laboratory tests of the two-dimensional Time-Encoded Imaging System.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marleau, Peter; Brennan, James S.; Brubaker, Erik; Gerling, Mark D; Le Galloudec, Nathalie Joelle

    2014-09-01

    A series of laboratory experiments were undertaken to demonstrate the feasibility of two dimensional time-encoded imaging. A prototype two-dimensional time encoded imaging system was designed and constructed. Results from imaging measurements of single and multiple point sources as well as extended source distributions are presented. Time encoded imaging has proven to be a simple method for achieving high resolution two-dimensional imaging with potential to be used in future arms control and treaty verification applications.

  18. Re-engaging with the past: recapitulation of encoding operations during retrieval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexa eMorcom

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Recollection of events is accompanied by selective reactivation of cortical regions which responded to specific sensory and cognitive dimensions of the original events. This reactivation is thought to reflect the reinstatement of stored memory representations and therefore to reflect memory content, but it may also reveal processes which support both encoding and retrieval. The present study used event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI to investigate whether regions selectively engaged in encoding face and scene context with studied words are also re-engaged when the context is later retrieved. As predicted, encoding face and scene context with visually presented words elicited activity in distinct, context-selective regions. Retrieval of face and scene context also re-engaged some of the regions which had shown successful encoding effects. However, this recapitulation of encoding activity did not show the same context selectivity observed at encoding. Successful retrieval of both face and scene context re-engaged regions which had been associated with encoding of the other type of context, as well as those associated with encoding the same type of context. This recapitulation may reflect retrieval attempts which are not context-selective, but use shared retrieval cues to re-engage encoding operations in service of recollection.

  19. Mnemons: encoding memory by protein super-assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrice Caudron

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Memory is mainly understood as the recollection of past events. The human brain and its simplest unit, the synapse, belong to the places in which such memories are physically stored. From an experimental point of view, memory can be tested in humans by recall. However, in other organisms, memory is reflected in its use by individuals to learn about and adapt their behavior to their environment. Under this criterion, even unicellular organisms are able to learn from their environments and show the ability to adapt their responses to repeating stimuli. This indicates that they are able to keep track of their histories and use these traces to elaborate adapted responses, making these traces akin to memory encodings. Understanding these phenomena may even help us to dissect part of the rather complex molecular orchestration happening in our synapses. When exposed unsuccessfully to mating pheromone, i.e. when mating does not happen, budding yeast cells become refractory to the mating signal. This refractory state is restricted to the mother cell and not inherited by the daughter cells, even though it is stable for most if not the entire life span of the mother cell. Interestingly, both stability and asymmetric segregation of the acquired state are explained by the molecular mechanism underlying its establishment, which shows important analogies and distinctions to prions. Here we discuss these similarities and differences

  20. Myocardial strains from 3D displacement encoded magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kindberg Katarina

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ability to measure and quantify myocardial motion and deformation provides a useful tool to assist in the diagnosis, prognosis and management of heart disease. The recent development of magnetic resonance imaging methods, such as harmonic phase analysis of tagging and displacement encoding with stimulated echoes (DENSE, make detailed non-invasive 3D kinematic analyses of human myocardium possible in the clinic and for research purposes. A robust analysis method is required, however. Methods We propose to estimate strain using a polynomial function which produces local models of the displacement field obtained with DENSE. Given a specific polynomial order, the model is obtained as the least squares fit of the acquired displacement field. These local models are subsequently used to produce estimates of the full strain tensor. Results The proposed method is evaluated on a numerical phantom as well as in vivo on a healthy human heart. The evaluation showed that the proposed method produced accurate results and showed low sensitivity to noise in the numerical phantom. The method was also demonstrated in vivo by assessment of the full strain tensor and to resolve transmural strain variations. Conclusions Strain estimation within a 3D myocardial volume based on polynomial functions yields accurate and robust results when validated on an analytical model. The polynomial field is capable of resolving the measured material positions from the in vivo data, and the obtained in vivo strains values agree with previously reported myocardial strains in normal human hearts.

  1. Myocardial strains from 3D displacement encoded magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kindberg, Katarina; Haraldsson, Henrik; Sigfridsson, Andreas; Engvall, Jan; Ingels, Neil B Jr; Ebbers, Tino; Karlsson, Matts

    2012-01-01

    The ability to measure and quantify myocardial motion and deformation provides a useful tool to assist in the diagnosis, prognosis and management of heart disease. The recent development of magnetic resonance imaging methods, such as harmonic phase analysis of tagging and displacement encoding with stimulated echoes (DENSE), make detailed non-invasive 3D kinematic analyses of human myocardium possible in the clinic and for research purposes. A robust analysis method is required, however. We propose to estimate strain using a polynomial function which produces local models of the displacement field obtained with DENSE. Given a specific polynomial order, the model is obtained as the least squares fit of the acquired displacement field. These local models are subsequently used to produce estimates of the full strain tensor. The proposed method is evaluated on a numerical phantom as well as in vivo on a healthy human heart. The evaluation showed that the proposed method produced accurate results and showed low sensitivity to noise in the numerical phantom. The method was also demonstrated in vivo by assessment of the full strain tensor and to resolve transmural strain variations. Strain estimation within a 3D myocardial volume based on polynomial functions yields accurate and robust results when validated on an analytical model. The polynomial field is capable of resolving the measured material positions from the in vivo data, and the obtained in vivo strains values agree with previously reported myocardial strains in normal human hearts

  2. Developmentally distinct MYB genes encode functionally equivalent proteins in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M M; Schiefelbein, J

    2001-05-01

    The duplication and divergence of developmental control genes is thought to have driven morphological diversification during the evolution of multicellular organisms. To examine the molecular basis of this process, we analyzed the functional relationship between two paralogous MYB transcription factor genes, WEREWOLF (WER) and GLABROUS1 (GL1), in Arabidopsis. The WER and GL1 genes specify distinct cell types and exhibit non-overlapping expression patterns during Arabidopsis development. Nevertheless, reciprocal complementation experiments with a series of gene fusions showed that WER and GL1 encode functionally equivalent proteins, and their unique roles in plant development are entirely due to differences in their cis-regulatory sequences. Similar experiments with a distantly related MYB gene (MYB2) showed that its product cannot functionally substitute for WER or GL1. Furthermore, an analysis of the WER and GL1 proteins shows that conserved sequences correspond to specific functional domains. These results provide new insights into the evolution of the MYB gene family in Arabidopsis, and, more generally, they demonstrate that novel developmental gene function may arise solely by the modification of cis-regulatory sequences.

  3. Characterization of a cDNA encoding cottonseed catalase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, W; Turley, R B; Trelease, R N

    1990-06-21

    A 1.7 kb cDNA clone was isolated from our lambda gt11 library constructed from poly(A) RNA of 24-h-old cotyledons. The cDNA encodes a full-length catalase peptide (492 amino acid residues). The calculated molecular mass is 56,800, similar to that determined for purified enzyme (57,000 SDS-PAGE). Among higher plant catalases, this cotton catalase shows the highest amino acid sequence identity (85%) to the subunit of homotetrameric maize CAT 1, a developmental counterpart to the homotetrameric CAT A isoform of cotton seeds. Comparison of sequences from cotton, sweet potato, maize CAT 1, and yeast with bovine catalase revealed that the amino acid residues and regions that are involved in catalytic activity and/or required to maintain basic catalase structure, are highly conserved. The C-terminus region, which has the lowest nucleotide sequence identity between plant and mammalian catalases, does not terminate with a tripeptide, S-K/R/H-L, a putative targeting signal for peroxisomal proteins.

  4. Spatial Specificity in Spatiotemporal Encoding and Fourier Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goerke, Ute

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Ultrafast imaging techniques based on spatiotemporal-encoding (SPEN), such as RASER (rapid acquisition with sequential excitation and refocusing), is a promising new class of sequences since they are largely insensitive to magnetic field variations which cause signal loss and geometric distortion in EPI. So far, attempts to theoretically describe the point-spread-function (PSF) for the original SPEN-imaging techniques have yielded limited success. To fill this gap a novel definition for an apparent PSF is proposed. Theory Spatial resolution in SPEN-imaging is determined by the spatial phase dispersion imprinted on the acquired signal by a frequency-swept excitation or refocusing pulse. The resulting signal attenuation increases with larger distance from the vertex of the quadratic phase profile. Methods Bloch simulations and experiments were performed to validate theoretical derivations. Results The apparent PSF quantifies the fractional contribution of magnetization to a voxel’s signal as a function of distance to the voxel. In contrast, the conventional PSF represents the signal intensity at various locations. Conclusion The definition of the conventional PSF fails for SPEN-imaging since only the phase of isochromats, but not the amplitude of the signal varies. The concept of the apparent PSF is shown to be generalizable to conventional Fourier- imaging techniques. PMID:26712657

  5. Divided attention disrupts perceptual encoding during speech recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattys, Sven L; Palmer, Shekeila D

    2015-03-01

    Performing a secondary task while listening to speech has a detrimental effect on speech processing, but the locus of the disruption within the speech system is poorly understood. Recent research has shown that cognitive load imposed by a concurrent visual task increases dependency on lexical knowledge during speech processing, but it does not affect lexical activation per se. This suggests that "lexical drift" under cognitive load occurs either as a post-lexical bias at the decisional level or as a secondary consequence of reduced perceptual sensitivity. This study aimed to adjudicate between these alternatives using a forced-choice task that required listeners to identify noise-degraded spoken words with or without the addition of a concurrent visual task. Adding cognitive load increased the likelihood that listeners would select a word acoustically similar to the target even though its frequency was lower than that of the target. Thus, there was no evidence that cognitive load led to a high-frequency response bias. Rather, cognitive load seems to disrupt sublexical encoding, possibly by impairing perceptual acuity at the auditory periphery.

  6. A redesign of OGC Symbology Encoding standard for sharing cartography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erwan Bocher

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite most Spatial Data Infrastructures offering service-based visualization of geospatial data, requirements are often at a very basic level leading to poor quality of maps. This is a general observation for any geospatial architecture as soon as open standards as those of the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC are applied. To improve the situation, this paper does focus on improvements at the portrayal interoperability side by considering standardization aspects. We propose two major redesign recommendations. First to consolidate the cartographic theory at the core of the OGC Symbology Encoding standard. Secondly to build the standard in a modular way so as to be ready to be extended with upcoming future cartographic requirements. Thus, we start by defining portrayal interoperability by means of typical-use cases that frame the concept of sharing cartography. Then we bring to light the strengths and limits of the relevant open standards to consider in this context. Finally we propose a set of recommendations to overcome the limits so as to make these use cases a true reality. Even if the definition of a cartographic-oriented standard is not able to act as a complete cartographic design framework by itself, we argue that pushing forward the standardization work dedicated to cartography is a way to share and disseminate good practices and finally to improve the quality of the visualizations.

  7. Transmembrane signaling through major histocompatibility complex (MHC) encoded molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newell, M.K.

    1987-01-01

    The importance of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) encoded molecules has traditionally been ascribed to the role these molecules play as restriction elements for T lymphocytes. This is, in order for T cell activation to occur the T cell must recognize antigen in association with MHC molecules. More controversial, however, is the potential role MHC molecules play as signal transducing receptors/acceptors to the B lymphocyte. In other words, do class II MHC molecules (Ia antigens) actively transduce a signal to the B cell which drives its differentiation into an antibody secreting cell? Two approaches to this question are described. The first involves biochemical characterization of those molecules which consistently copurify with I-A/sup k/ by two dimensional gel electrophoresis. The second approach utilizes two types of analyses: first, an examination of the biochemical changes which occur in the cell as a result of Ia ligation; and second, analysis of changes in the B cell's physiological response as a result of Ia perturbation. Molecules were examined which may couple the antigen binding event in the B lymphocyte to the antigen driven signal transduction cascade which ultimately leads to immunoglobulin secretion. In these experiments, cells were labelled with [ 32 P] and stimulated cells with phorbol myristate acetate. The membrane form of immunoglobulin was then isolated from detergent lysates of whole cells and passed over an anti-k affinity column. The eluates were analyzed by SDS-PAGE

  8. Encoding the identity and location of objects in human LOC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cichy, Radoslaw Martin; Chen, Yi; Haynes, John-Dylan

    2011-02-01

    We are able to recognize objects independent of their location in the visual field. At the same time, we also keep track of the location of objects to orient ourselves and to interact with the environment. The lateral occipital complex (LOC) has been suggested as the prime cortical region for representation of object identity. However, the extent to which LOC also represents object location has remained debated. In this study we used high-resolution fMRI in combination with multivoxel pattern classification to investigate the cortical encoding of three object exemplars from four different categories presented in two different locations. This approach allowed us to study location-tolerant object information and object-tolerant location information in LOC, both at the level of categories and exemplars. We found evidence for both location-tolerant object information and object-tolerant location information in LOC at the level of categories and exemplars. Our results further highlight the mixing of identity and location information in the ventral visual pathway. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. CDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raikhel, Natasha V.; Broekaert, Willem F.; Chua, Nam-Hai; Kush, Anil

    1995-03-21

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74-79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli.

  10. Optogenetic monitoring of synaptic activity with genetically encoded voltage indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryuichi Nakajima

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The age of genetically encoded voltage indicators has matured to the point that changes in membrane potential can now be observed optically in vivo. Improving the signal size and speed of these voltage sensors has been the primary driving forces during this maturation process. As a result, there is a wide range of probes using different voltage detecting mechanisms and fluorescent reporters. As the use of these probes transitions from optically reporting membrane potential in single, cultured cells to imaging populations of cells in slice and/or in vivo, a new challenge emerges – optically resolving the different types of neuronal activity. While improvements in speed and signal size are still needed, optimizing the voltage range and the subcellular expression (ie., soma only of the probe are becoming more important. In this review, we will examine the ability of recently developed probes to report synaptic activity in slice and in vivo. The VSFP family of voltage sensors, ArcLight, ASAP-1, and the rhodopsin family of probes are all good at reporting changes in membrane potential, but all have difficulty distinguishing subthreshold depolarizations from action potentials and detecting neuronal inhibition when imaging populations of cells. Finally, we will offer a few possible ways to improve the optical resolution of the various types of neuronal activities.

  11. Co-transcriptional folding is encoded within RNA genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miklós István

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most of the existing RNA structure prediction programs fold a completely synthesized RNA molecule. However, within the cell, RNA molecules emerge sequentially during the directed process of transcription. Dedicated experiments with individual RNA molecules have shown that RNA folds while it is being transcribed and that its correct folding can also depend on the proper speed of transcription. Methods The main aim of this work is to study if and how co-transcriptional folding is encoded within the primary and secondary structure of RNA genes. In order to achieve this, we study the known primary and secondary structures of a comprehensive data set of 361 RNA genes as well as a set of 48 RNA sequences that are known to differ from the originally transcribed sequence units. We detect co-transcriptional folding by defining two measures of directedness which quantify the extend of asymmetry between alternative helices that lie 5' and those that lie 3' of the known helices with which they compete. Results We show with statistical significance that co-transcriptional folding strongly influences RNA sequences in two ways: (1 alternative helices that would compete with the formation of the functional structure during co-transcriptional folding are suppressed and (2 the formation of transient structures which may serve as guidelines for the co-transcriptional folding pathway is encouraged. Conclusions These findings have a number of implications for RNA secondary structure prediction methods and the detection of RNA genes.

  12. Impact of anxiety on prefrontal cortex encoding of cognitive flexibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Junchol; Moghaddam, Bita

    2017-03-14

    Anxiety often is studied as a stand-alone construct in laboratory models. But in the context of coping with real-life anxiety, its negative impacts extend beyond aversive feelings and involve disruptions in ongoing goal-directed behaviors and cognitive functioning. Critical examples of cognitive constructs affected by anxiety are cognitive flexibility and decision making. In particular, anxiety impedes the ability to shift flexibly between strategies in response to changes in task demands, as well as the ability to maintain a strategy in the presence of distractors. The brain region most critically involved in behavioral flexibility is the prefrontal cortex (PFC), but little is known about how anxiety impacts PFC encoding of internal and external events that are critical for flexible behavior. Here we review animal and human neurophysiological and neuroimaging studies implicating PFC neural processing in anxiety-induced deficits in cognitive flexibility. We then suggest experimental and analytical approaches for future studies to gain a better mechanistic understanding of impaired cognitive inflexibility in anxiety and related disorders. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Artificial neural networks using complex numbers and phase encoded weights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Howard E; Awwal, Abdul Ahad S

    2010-04-01

    The model of a simple perceptron using phase-encoded inputs and complex-valued weights is proposed. The aggregation function, activation function, and learning rule for the proposed neuron are derived and applied to Boolean logic functions and simple computer vision tasks. The complex-valued neuron (CVN) is shown to be superior to traditional perceptrons. An improvement of 135% over the theoretical maximum of 104 linearly separable problems (of three variables) solvable by conventional perceptrons is achieved without additional logic, neuron stages, or higher order terms such as those required in polynomial logic gates. The application of CVN in distortion invariant character recognition and image segmentation is demonstrated. Implementation details are discussed, and the CVN is shown to be very attractive for optical implementation since optical computations are naturally complex. The cost of the CVN is less in all cases than the traditional neuron when implemented optically. Therefore, all the benefits of the CVN can be obtained without additional cost. However, on those implementations dependent on standard serial computers, CVN will be more cost effective only in those applications where its increased power can offset the requirement for additional neurons.

  14. Hippocampal encoding of interoceptive context during fear conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, S-W; Bae, M; Tovar-Y-Romo, L B; Haughey, N J

    2017-01-03

    Rodent models of auditory fear conditioning are often used to understand the molecular mechanisms regulating fear- and anxiety-related behaviors. Conditioning and extinction memories are influenced by contextual cues, and the reinstatement of conditioned fear occurs when the conditioning stimulus is presented in a context different from the extinction context. Although it has been proposed that internal state is a feature of context that could influence extinction, contributions of interoception to conditioning have not been experimentally addressed. Here we use ethanol (EtOH) to show that interoceptive cues are encoded through the hippocampus by mechanisms that involve increased phosphorylation of GluR1 on serine 845, and biophysical alterations in neuronal membranes that facilitate stabilization of surface-located calcium-permeable n-2-amino-3-(5-methyl-3-oxo-1,2-oxazol-4-yl) propanoic acid (AMPA) receptor (AMPAR) into membrane microdomains. Conflicting interoceptive cues during extinction and fear relapse testing resulted in a failure to consolidate extinction that was reversed by the administration of AMPAR antagonists immediately following the retrieval cue.

  15. Nonmotor regions encode path-related information during movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breault, Macauley S; Sacre, Pierre; Johnson, Jacob J; Kerr, Matthew; Johnson, Matthew D; Bulacio, Juan; Gonzalez-Martinez, Jorge; Sarma, Sridevi V; Gale, John T

    2017-07-01

    Sensorimotor control and the involvement of motor brain regions has been extensively studied, but the role nonmotor brain regions play during movements has been overlooked. This is particularly due to the difficulty of recording from multiple regions in the brain during motor control. In this study, we utilize stereoelectroencephalography (SEEG) recording techniques to explore the role nonmotor brain areas have on the way we move. Nine humans were implanted with SEEG depth electrodes for clinical purposes, which rendered access to local field potential (LFP) activity in deep and peripheral nonmotor structures. Participants performed fast and slow arm reaching movements using a robotic manipulandum. In this study, we explored whether neural activity in a given nonmotor brain structure correlated to movement path metrics including: path length, path deviation, and path speed. Statistical analysis revealed correlations between averaged neural activity in middle temporal gyrus, supramarginal gyrus, and fusiform gyrus and our path metrics both within and across the subjects. Furthermore, we split trials across subjects into two groups: one group consisted of trials with high values of each path metric and the other with low values. We then found significant differences in LFP power in specific frequency bands (e.g. beta) during movement between each group. These results suggest that nonmotor regions may dynamically encode path-related information during movement.

  16. Encoding visual information in retinal ganglion cells with prosthetic stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Daniel K.; Rizzo, Joseph F., III; Fried, Shelley I.

    2011-06-01

    Retinal prostheses aim to restore functional vision to those blinded by outer retinal diseases using electric stimulation of surviving retinal neurons. The ability to replicate the spatiotemporal pattern of ganglion cell spike trains present under normal viewing conditions is presumably an important factor for restoring high-quality vision. In order to replicate such activity with a retinal prosthesis, it is important to consider both how visual information is encoded in ganglion cell spike trains, and how retinal neurons respond to electric stimulation. The goal of the current review is to bring together these two concepts in order to guide the development of more effective stimulation strategies. We review the experiments to date that have studied how retinal neurons respond to electric stimulation and discuss these findings in the context of known retinal signaling strategies. The results from such in vitro studies reveal the advantages and disadvantages of activating the ganglion cell directly with the electric stimulus (direct activation) as compared to activation of neurons that are presynaptic to the ganglion cell (indirect activation). While direct activation allows high temporal but low spatial resolution, indirect activation yields improved spatial resolution but poor temporal resolution. Finally, we use knowledge gained from in vitro experiments to infer the patterns of elicited activity in ongoing human trials, providing insights into some of the factors limiting the quality of prosthetic vision.

  17. Ribosomes slide on lysine-encoding homopolymeric A stretches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutmou, Kristin S; Schuller, Anthony P; Brunelle, Julie L; Radhakrishnan, Aditya; Djuranovic, Sergej; Green, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    Protein output from synonymous codons is thought to be equivalent if appropriate tRNAs are sufficiently abundant. Here we show that mRNAs encoding iterated lysine codons, AAA or AAG, differentially impact protein synthesis: insertion of iterated AAA codons into an ORF diminishes protein expression more than insertion of synonymous AAG codons. Kinetic studies in E. coli reveal that differential protein production results from pausing on consecutive AAA-lysines followed by ribosome sliding on homopolymeric A sequence. Translation in a cell-free expression system demonstrates that diminished output from AAA-codon-containing reporters results from premature translation termination on out of frame stop codons following ribosome sliding. In eukaryotes, these premature termination events target the mRNAs for Nonsense-Mediated-Decay (NMD). The finding that ribosomes slide on homopolymeric A sequences explains bioinformatic analyses indicating that consecutive AAA codons are under-represented in gene-coding sequences. Ribosome ‘sliding’ represents an unexpected type of ribosome movement possible during translation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05534.001 PMID:25695637

  18. Current View on Phytoplasma Genomes and Encoded Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Kube

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Phytoplasmas are specialised bacteria that are obligate parasites of plant phloem tissue and insects. These bacteria have resisted all attempts of cell-free cultivation. Genome research is of particular importance to analyse the genetic endowment of such bacteria. Here we review the gene content of the four completely sequenced ‘Candidatus Phytoplasma’ genomes that include those of ‘Ca. P. asteris’ strains OY-M and AY-WB, ‘Ca. P. australiense,’ and ‘Ca. P. mali’. These genomes are characterized by chromosome condensation resulting in sizes below 900 kb and a G + C content of less than 28%. Evolutionary adaption of the phytoplasmas to nutrient-rich environments resulted in losses of genetic modules and increased host dependency highlighted by the transport systems and limited metabolic repertoire. On the other hand, duplication and integration events enlarged the chromosomes and contribute to genome instability. Present differences in the content of membrane and secreted proteins reflect the host adaptation in the phytoplasma strains. General differences are obvious between different phylogenetic subgroups. ‘Ca. P. mali’ is separated from the other strains by its deviating chromosome organization, the genetic repertoire for recombination and excision repair of nucleotides or the loss of the complete energy-yielding part of the glycolysis. Apart from these differences, comparative analysis exemplified that all four phytoplasmas are likely to encode an alternative pathway to generate pyruvate and ATP.

  19. Spatial encoding of visual words for image classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dong; Wang, Shengsheng; Porikli, Fatih

    2016-05-01

    Appearance-based bag-of-visual words (BoVW) models are employed to represent the frequency of a vocabulary of local features in an image. Due to their versatility, they are widely popular, although they ignore the underlying spatial context and relationships among the features. Here, we present a unified representation that enhances BoVWs with explicit local and global structure models. Three aspects of our method should be noted in comparison to the previous approaches. First, we use a local structure feature that encodes the spatial attributes between a pair of points in a discriminative fashion using class-label information. We introduce a bag-of-structural words (BoSW) model for the given image set and describe each image with this model on its coarsely sampled relevant keypoints. We then combine the codebook histograms of BoVW and BoSW to train a classifier. Rigorous experimental evaluations on four benchmark data sets demonstrate that the unified representation outperforms the conventional models and compares favorably to more sophisticated scene classification techniques.

  20. Interdependent processing and encoding of speech and concurrent background noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Angela; Brouwer, Susanne; Bradlow, Ann R

    2015-05-01

    Speech processing can often take place in adverse listening conditions that involve the mixing of speech and background noise. In this study, we investigated processing dependencies between background noise and indexical speech features, using a speeded classification paradigm (Garner, 1974; Exp. 1), and whether background noise is encoded and represented in memory for spoken words in a continuous recognition memory paradigm (Exp. 2). Whether or not the noise spectrally overlapped with the speech signal was also manipulated. The results of Experiment 1 indicated that background noise and indexical features of speech (gender, talker identity) cannot be completely segregated during processing, even when the two auditory streams are spectrally nonoverlapping. Perceptual interference was asymmetric, whereby irrelevant indexical feature variation in the speech signal slowed noise classification to a greater extent than irrelevant noise variation slowed speech classification. This asymmetry may stem from the fact that speech features have greater functional relevance to listeners, and are thus more difficult to selectively ignore than background noise. Experiment 2 revealed that a recognition cost for words embedded in different types of background noise on the first and second occurrences only emerged when the noise and the speech signal were spectrally overlapping. Together, these data suggest integral processing of speech and background noise, modulated by the level of processing and the spectral separation of the speech and noise.

  1. cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raikhel, N.V.; Broekaert, W.F.; Chua, N.H.; Kush, A.

    2000-07-04

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74--79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli.

  2. Atypical Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli Secretes Plasmid Encoded Toxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita C. Ruiz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Plasmid encoded toxin (Pet is a serine protease originally described in enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC prototype strain 042 whose entire characterization was essentially obtained from studies performed with the purified toxin. Here we show that Pet is not exclusive to EAEC. Atypical enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (aEPEC strains, isolated from diarrhea cases, express Pet and its detection in supernatants of infected HEp-2 cells coincides with the appearance of cell damage, which, in turn, were similar to those described with purified Pet. Pet secretion and the cytotoxic effects are time and culture medium dependent. In presence of DMEM supplemented with tryptone cell rounding and detachment were observed after just 5 h of incubation with the bacteria. In the absence of tryptone, the cytotoxic effects were detected only after 24 h of infection. We also show that, in addition to the prototype EAEC, other pet+ EAEC strains, also isolated from diarrhea cases, induce cellular damage in the same degree as the aEPEC. The cytotoxic effects of EAEC and aEPEC strains were significantly reduced in the presence of a serine protease inhibitor or anti-Pet IgG serum. Our results show a common aspect between the aEPEC and EAEC and provide the first evidence pointing to a role of Pet in aEPEC pathogenesis.

  3. Fluorescent proteins as genetically encoded FRET biosensors in life sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochreiter, Bernhard; Garcia, Alan Pardo; Schmid, Johannes A

    2015-10-16

    Fluorescence- or Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) is a measurable physical energy transfer phenomenon between appropriate chromophores, when they are in sufficient proximity, usually within 10 nm. This feature has made them incredibly useful tools for many biomedical studies on molecular interactions. Furthermore, this principle is increasingly exploited for the design of biosensors, where two chromophores are linked with a sensory domain controlling their distance and thus the degree of FRET. The versatility of these FRET-biosensors made it possible to assess a vast amount of biological variables in a fast and standardized manner, allowing not only high-throughput studies but also sub-cellular measurements of biological processes. In this review, we aim at giving an overview over the recent advances in genetically encoded, fluorescent-protein based FRET-biosensors, as these represent the largest and most vividly growing group of FRET-based sensors. For easy understanding, we are grouping them into four categories, depending on their molecular mechanism. These are based on: (a) cleavage; (b) conformational-change; (c) mechanical force and (d) changes in the micro-environment. We also address the many issues and considerations that come with the development of FRET-based biosensors, as well as the possibilities that are available to measure them.

  4. Fluorescent Proteins as Genetically Encoded FRET Biosensors in Life Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernhard Hochreiter

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescence- or Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET is a measurable physical energy transfer phenomenon between appropriate chromophores, when they are in sufficient proximity, usually within 10 nm. This feature has made them incredibly useful tools for many biomedical studies on molecular interactions. Furthermore, this principle is increasingly exploited for the design of biosensors, where two chromophores are linked with a sensory domain controlling their distance and thus the degree of FRET. The versatility of these FRET-biosensors made it possible to assess a vast amount of biological variables in a fast and standardized manner, allowing not only high-throughput studies but also sub-cellular measurements of biological processes. In this review, we aim at giving an overview over the recent advances in genetically encoded, fluorescent-protein based FRET-biosensors, as these represent the largest and most vividly growing group of FRET-based sensors. For easy understanding, we are grouping them into four categories, depending on their molecular mechanism. These are based on: (a cleavage; (b conformational-change; (c mechanical force and (d changes in the micro-environment. We also address the many issues and considerations that come with the development of FRET-based biosensors, as well as the possibilities that are available to measure them.

  5. Identification of chromatin marks at TERRA promoter and encoding region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negishi, Yutaka; Kawaji, Hideya; Minoda, Aki; Usui, Kengo

    2015-11-27

    TERRA is a long non-coding RNA that is essential for telomere integrity. Although it is transcribed from subtelomeres and telomeres, how it is expressed in heterochromatic region is currently unknown. In this study, we focused our analysis on TERRA-encoding region TelBam3.4 and TelBam3.4-like sequences, and determined their transcription start sites, as well as enrichment of RNA polymerase II and histone modifications. We found that H3K4me3 and H3K9me3 are present at TERRA promoters, whereas H3K27ac and H3K9me3 are present at telomeric repeats. Consistently, we show that presence of active histone modifications H3K4me3 and H3K27ac are correlated to TERRA expression. These results mark an important step towards understanding telomere maintenance and transcription. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Cationic Antimicrobial Peptides Inactivate Shiga Toxin-Encoding Bacteriophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel E. Del Cogliano

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Shiga toxin (Stx is the principal virulence factor during Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC infections. We have previously reported the inactivation of bacteriophage encoding Stx after treatment with chitosan, a linear polysaccharide polymer with cationic properties. Cationic antimicrobial peptides (cAMPs are short linear aminoacidic sequences, with a positive net charge, which display bactericidal or bacteriostatic activity against a wide range of bacterial species. They are promising novel antibiotics since they have shown bactericidal effects against multiresistant bacteria. To evaluate whether cationic properties are responsible for bacteriophage inactivation, we tested seven cationic peptides with proven antimicrobial activity as anti-bacteriophage agents, and one random sequence cationic peptide with no antimicrobial activity as a control. We observed bacteriophage inactivation after incubation with five cAMPs, but no inactivating activity was observed with the random sequence cationic peptide or with the non-alpha helical cAMP Omiganan. Finally, to confirm peptide-bacteriophage interaction, zeta potential was analyzed by following changes on bacteriophage surface charges after peptide incubation. According to our results we could propose that: (1 direct interaction of peptides with phage is a necessary step for bacteriophage inactivation, (2 cationic properties are necessary but not sufficient for bacteriophage inactivation, and (3 inactivation by cationic peptides could be sequence (or structure specific. Overall our data suggest that these peptides could be considered a new family of molecules potentially useful to decrease bacteriophage replication and Stx expression.

  7. Independent encoding of surface orientation and surface curvature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, A; Passmore, P J

    1994-11-01

    Marr [(1982) Vision, San Francisco, Calif.: Freeman] proposed that we represent surface geometry in terms of a viewer-centred description of surface orientation and distance. This description is computed by a range of independent processing systems which take as input particular kinds of information present in images, like surface texture, shading, retinal disparity and motion parallax. The outputs of these modules are integrated in order to provide a unitary representation of the layout of visible surfaces. Higher order properties of surface geometry, like surface curvature, might be computed from this symbolic representation or might be encoded independently from the visual information available at the retinae. We measured surface slant and surface curvature discrimination thresholds for surface patches defined by shading, texture and retinal disparity as a function of the elevation of the illumination. We found that observers judgements about the curvature of local surface patches were too precise to be based on a symbolic representation of surface orientation and we conclude that surface curvature is computed directly from depth cues present in the retinal images.

  8. Encoding and analyzing aerial imagery using geospatial semantic graphs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, Jean-Paul; Strip, David R.; McLendon, William Clarence,; Parekh, Ojas D.; Diegert, Carl F.; Martin, Shawn Bryan; Rintoul, Mark Daniel

    2014-02-01

    While collection capabilities have yielded an ever-increasing volume of aerial imagery, analytic techniques for identifying patterns in and extracting relevant information from this data have seriously lagged. The vast majority of imagery is never examined, due to a combination of the limited bandwidth of human analysts and limitations of existing analysis tools. In this report, we describe an alternative, novel approach to both encoding and analyzing aerial imagery, using the concept of a geospatial semantic graph. The advantages of our approach are twofold. First, intuitive templates can be easily specified in terms of the domain language in which an analyst converses. These templates can be used to automatically and efficiently search large graph databases, for specific patterns of interest. Second, unsupervised machine learning techniques can be applied to automatically identify patterns in the graph databases, exposing recurring motifs in imagery. We illustrate our approach using real-world data for Anne Arundel County, Maryland, and compare the performance of our approach to that of an expert human analyst.

  9. New recombinant bacterium comprises a heterologous gene encoding glycerol dehydrogenase and/or an up-regulated native gene encoding glycerol dehydrogenase, useful for producing ethanol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    TECHNOLOGY FOCUS - BIOTECHNOLOGY - Preparation (claimed): Producing recombinant bacterium having enhanced ethanol production characteristics when cultivated in growth medium comprising glycerol comprises: (a) transforming a parental bacterium by (i) the insertion of a heterologous gene encoding...

  10. Eddy current-nulled convex optimized diffusion encoding (EN-CODE) for distortion-free diffusion tensor imaging with short echo times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliotta, Eric; Moulin, Kévin; Ennis, Daniel B

    2018-02-01

    To design and evaluate eddy current-nulled convex optimized diffusion encoding (EN-CODE) gradient waveforms for efficient diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) that is free of eddy current-induced image distortions. The EN-CODE framework was used to generate diffusion-encoding waveforms that are eddy current-compensated. The EN-CODE DTI waveform was compared with the existing eddy current-nulled twice refocused spin echo (TRSE) sequence as well as monopolar (MONO) and non-eddy current-compensated CODE in terms of echo time (TE) and image distortions. Comparisons were made in simulations, phantom experiments, and neuro imaging in 10 healthy volunteers. The EN-CODE sequence achieved eddy current compensation with a significantly shorter TE than TRSE (78 versus 96 ms) and a slightly shorter TE than MONO (78 versus 80 ms). Intravoxel signal variance was lower in phantoms with EN-CODE than with MONO (13.6 ± 11.6 versus 37.4 ± 25.8) and not different from TRSE (15.1 ± 11.6), indicating good robustness to eddy current-induced image distortions. Mean fractional anisotropy values in brain edges were also significantly lower with EN-CODE than with MONO (0.16 ± 0.01 versus 0.24 ± 0.02, P current-induced image distortions in DTI with a TE comparable to MONO and substantially shorter than TRSE. Magn Reson Med 79:663-672, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  11. Fibroblast Growth Factor 2 Dimer with Superagonist In Vitro Activity Improves Granulation Tissue Formation During Wound Healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Caitlin G.; Wang, Yu; Paluck, Samantha J.; Shen, Lu; Loo, Joseph A.; Levine, Alex J.; Miller, Lloyd S.; Maynard, Heather D.

    2015-01-01

    Site-specific chemical dimerization of fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) with the optimal linker length resulted in a FGF2 homodimer with improved granulation tissue formation and blood vessel formation at exceptionally low concentrations. Homodimers of FGF2 were synthesized through site-specific linkages to both ends of different molecular weight poly(ethylene glycols) (PEGs). The optimal linker length was determined by screening dimer-induced metabolic activity of human dermal fibroblasts and found to be that closest to the inter-cysteine distance, 70 Å, corresponding to 2 kDa PEG. A straightforward analysis of the kinetics of second ligand binding as a function of tether length showed that, as the polymerization index (the number of monomer repeat units in the polymer, N) of the tether decreases, the mean time for second ligand capture decreases as ~N3/2, leading to an enhancement of the number of doubly bound ligands in steady-state for a given (tethered) ligand concentration. FGF2-PEG2k-FGF2 induced greater fibroblast metabolic activity than FGF2 alone, all other dimers, and all monoconjugates, at each concentration tested, with the greatest difference observed at low (0.1 ng/mL) concentration. FGF2-PEG2k-FGF2 further exhibited superior activity compared to FGF2 for both metabolic activity and migration in human umbilical vein endothelial cells, as well as improved angiogenesis in a coculture model in vitro. Efficacy in an in vivo wound healing model was assessed in diabetic mice. FGF2-PEG2k-FGF2 increased granulation tissue and blood vessel density in the wound bed compared to FGF2. The results suggest that this rationally designed construct may be useful for improving the fibroblast matrix formation and angiogenesis in chronic wound healing. PMID:26731578

  12. WE-DE-206-03: MRI Image Formation - Slice Selection, Phase Encoding, Frequency Encoding, K-Space, SNR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, C. [Indiana University School of Medicine (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an essential part of clinical imaging due to its ability to render high soft tissue contrast. Instead of ionizing radiation, MRI use strong magnetic field, radio frequency waves and field gradients to create diagnostic useful images. It can be used to image the anatomy and also functional and physiological activities within the human body. Knowledge of the basic physical principles underlying MRI acquisition is vitally important to successful image production and proper image interpretation. This lecture will give an overview of the spin physics, imaging principle of MRI, the hardware of the MRI scanner, and various pulse sequences and their applications. It aims to provide a conceptual foundation to understand the image formation process of a clinical MRI scanner. Learning Objectives: Understand the origin of the MR signal and contrast from the spin physics level. Understand the main hardware components of a MRI scanner and their purposes Understand steps for MR image formation including spatial encoding and image reconstruction Understand the main kinds of MR pulse sequences and their characteristics.

  13. WE-DE-206-03: MRI Image Formation - Slice Selection, Phase Encoding, Frequency Encoding, K-Space, SNR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, C.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an essential part of clinical imaging due to its ability to render high soft tissue contrast. Instead of ionizing radiation, MRI use strong magnetic field, radio frequency waves and field gradients to create diagnostic useful images. It can be used to image the anatomy and also functional and physiological activities within the human body. Knowledge of the basic physical principles underlying MRI acquisition is vitally important to successful image production and proper image interpretation. This lecture will give an overview of the spin physics, imaging principle of MRI, the hardware of the MRI scanner, and various pulse sequences and their applications. It aims to provide a conceptual foundation to understand the image formation process of a clinical MRI scanner. Learning Objectives: Understand the origin of the MR signal and contrast from the spin physics level. Understand the main hardware components of a MRI scanner and their purposes Understand steps for MR image formation including spatial encoding and image reconstruction Understand the main kinds of MR pulse sequences and their characteristics.

  14. Encoding of Shath on the basis of Rhetoric

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Goli

    2015-03-01

    Rhetoric encodes ambiguities and complexities of "Shath" by systematic literary ways and detects internal real-related meaning. Undoubtedly, sentences’ implicit meanings exist by circumstances, states, exigencies and rhetoric interprets sentences on the basis of this way (on the basis of concordance of speech with exigencies of states. Rhetoric has made this capacity in terms of aesthetic relation between the text and addressee to be considered the literary and routine language by the addressee and to enjoy from this difference. Meanwhile, the discovery of secondary meaning (implicit meaning has another pleasure. The interpretation of shathiyat based on Rhetoric is performed by considering of shathiyat’s relation with three influential branches: the relation of shath with religion, social conditions and mystic’s spiritual conditions. However, always there is a critique about the shath which is based on Rhetoric: variety of spiritual experiences among mystics and unavailability of spiritual areas (because of to be beyond of these areas from the scale of veracity and falsity. Rhetoric wasn’t efficient in the determining of mystics claims. According to what is said, it appears to be appropriate to revise the definition of shath and then to accept that shath often is a saying which is intentional and meaningful from the divinity resource that its paradoxical aspects are its capacity and location which are humane. Holy sayings are in the frame of mundane words, covering of divine message in the frame of humane expression. The key of encoding codes in this paradoxical, divinity/mundane and divine/humane relation is Rhetoric. This article extends this present theory.

  15. Genetic code redundancy and its influence on the encoded polypeptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paige S Spencer

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The genetic code is said to be redundant in that the same amino acid residue can be encoded by multiple, so-called synonymous, codons. If all properties of synonymous codons were entirely equivalent, one would expect that they would be equally distributed along protein coding sequences. However, many studies over the last three decades have demonstrated that their distribution is not entirely random. It has been postulated that certain codons may be translated by the ribosome faster than others and thus their non-random distribution dictates how fast the ribosome moves along particular segments of the mRNA. The reasons behind such segmental variability in the rates of protein synthesis, and thus polypeptide emergence from the ribosome, have been explored by theoretical and experimental approaches. Predictions of the relative rates at which particular codons are translated and their impact on the nascent chain have not arrived at unequivocal conclusions. This is probably due, at least in part, to variation in the basis for classification of codons as “fast” or “slow”, as well as variability in the number and types of genes and proteins analyzed. Recent methodological advances have allowed nucleotide-resolution studies of ribosome residency times in entire transcriptomes, which confirm the non-uniform movement of ribosomes along mRNAs and shed light on the actual determinants of rate control. Moreover, experiments have begun to emerge that systematically examine the influence of variations in ribosomal movement and the fate of the emerging polypeptide chain.

  16. GENETIC CODE REDUNDANCY AND ITS INFLUENCE ON THE ENCODED POLYPEPTIDES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paige S. Spencer

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The genetic code is said to be redundant in that the same amino acid residue can be encoded by multiple, so-called synonymous, codons. If all properties of synonymous codons were entirely equivalent, one would expect that they would be equally distributed along protein coding sequences. However, many studies over the last three decades have demonstrated that their distribution is not entirely random. It has been postulated that certain codons may be translated by the ribosome faster than others and thus their non-random distribution dictates how fast the ribosome moves along particular segments of the mRNA. The reasons behind such segmental variability in the rates of protein synthesis, and thus polypeptide emergence from the ribosome, have been explored by theoretical and experimental approaches. Predictions of the relative rates at which particular codons are translated and their impact on the nascent chain have not arrived at unequivocal conclusions. This is probably due, at least in part, to variation in the basis for classification of codons as “fast” or “slow”, as well as variability in the number and types of genes and proteins analyzed. Recent methodological advances have allowed nucleotide-resolution studies of ribosome residency times in entire transcriptomes, which confirm the non-uniform movement of ribosomes along mRNAs and shed light on the actual determinants of rate control. Moreover, experiments have begun to emerge that systematically examine the influence of variations in ribosomal movement and the fate of the emerging polypeptide chain.

  17. Encoding of aversion by dopamine and the nucleus accumbens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Edgar Mccutcheon

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Adaptive motivated behavior requires rapid discrimination between beneficial and harmful stimuli. Such discrimination leads to the generation of either an approach or rejection response, as appropriate, and enables organisms to maximize reward and minimize punishment. Classically, the nucleus accumbens (NAc and the dopamine projection to it are considered an integral part of the brain’s reward circuit, i.e., they direct approach and consumption behaviors and underlie positive reinforcement. This reward-centered framing ignores important evidence about the role of this system in encoding aversive events. One reason for bias towards reward is the difficulty in designing experiments in which animals repeatedly experience punishments; another is the challenge in dissociating the response to an aversive stimulus itself from the reward/relief experienced when an aversive stimulus is terminated. Here, we review studies that employ techniques with sufficient time resolution to measure responses in ventral tegmental area (VTA and NAc to aversive stimuli as they are delivered. We also present novel findings showing that the same stimulus – intraoral infusion of sucrose – has differing effects on NAc shell dopamine release depending on the prior experience. Here, for some rats, sucrose was rendered aversive by explicitly pairing it with malaise in a conditioned taste aversion paradigm. Thereafter, sucrose infusions led to a suppression of dopamine with a similar magnitude and time course to intra-oral infusions of a bitter quinine solution. The results are discussed in the context of regional differences in dopamine signaling and the implications of a pause in phasic dopamine release within the NAc shell. Together with our data, the emerging literature suggests an important role for differential phasic dopamine signaling in aversion versus reward.

  18. Mobile antibiotic resistance encoding elements promote their own diversity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geneviève Garriss

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Integrating conjugative elements (ICEs are a class of bacterial mobile genetic elements that disseminate via conjugation and then integrate into the host cell genome. The SXT/R391 family of ICEs consists of more than 30 different elements that all share the same integration site in the host chromosome but often encode distinct properties. These elements contribute to the spread of antibiotic resistance genes in several gram-negative bacteria including Vibrio cholerae, the agent of cholera. Here, using comparative analyses of the genomes of several SXT/R391 ICEs, we found evidence that the genomes of these elements have been shaped by inter-ICE recombination. We developed a high throughput semi-quantitative method to explore the genetic determinants involved in hybrid ICE formation. Recombinant ICE formation proved to be relatively frequent, and to depend on host (recA and ICE (s065 and s066 loci, which can independently and potentially cooperatively mediate hybrid ICE formation. s065 and s066, which are found in all SXT/R391 ICEs, are orthologues of the bacteriophage lambda Red recombination genes bet and exo, and the s065/s066 recombination system is the first Red-like recombination pathway to be described in a conjugative element. Neither ICE excision nor conjugative transfer proved to be essential for generation of hybrid ICEs. Instead conjugation facilitates the segregation of hybrids and could provide a means to select for functional recombinant ICEs containing novel combinations of genes conferring resistance to antibiotics. Thus, ICEs promote their own diversity and can yield novel mobile elements capable of disseminating new combinations of antibiotic resistance genes.

  19. Encoding of whisker input by cerebellar Purkinje cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosman, Laurens W J; Koekkoek, Sebastiaan K E; Shapiro, Jöel; Rijken, Bianca F M; Zandstra, Froukje; van der Ende, Barry; Owens, Cullen B; Potters, Jan-Willem; de Gruijl, Jornt R; Ruigrok, Tom J H; De Zeeuw, Chris I

    2010-10-01

    The cerebellar cortex is crucial for sensorimotor integration. Sensorimotor inputs converge on cerebellar Purkinje cells via two afferent pathways: the climbing fibre pathway triggering complex spikes, and the mossy fibre–parallel fibre pathway, modulating the simple spike activities of Purkinje cells. We used, for the first time, the mouse whisker system as a model system to study the encoding of somatosensory input by Purkinje cells.We show that most Purkinje cells in ipsilateral crus 1 and crus 2 of awake mice respond to whisker stimulation with complex spike and/or simple spike responses. Single-whisker stimulation in anaesthetised mice revealed that the receptive fields of complex spike and simple spike responses were strikingly different. Complex spike responses, which proved to be sensitive to the amplitude, speed and direction of whisker movement, were evoked by only one or a few whiskers. Simple spike responses, which were not affected by the direction of movement, could be evoked by many individual whiskers. The receptive fields of Purkinje cells were largely intermingled, and we suggest that this facilitates the rapid integration of sensory inputs from different sources. Furthermore, we describe that individual Purkinje cells, at least under anaesthesia, may be bound in two functional ensembles based on the receptive fields and the synchrony of the complex spike and simple spike responses. The ‘complex spike ensembles’ were oriented in the sagittal plane, following the anatomical organization of the climbing fibres, while the ‘simple spike ensembles’ were oriented in the transversal plane, as are the beams of parallel fibres.

  20. Endoscopic probe optics for spectrally encoded confocal microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Dongkyun; Carruth, Robert W; Kim, Minkyu; Schlachter, Simon C; Shishkov, Milen; Woods, Kevin; Tabatabaei, Nima; Wu, Tao; Tearney, Guillermo J

    2013-01-01

    Spectrally encoded confocal microscopy (SECM) is a form of reflectance confocal microscopy that can achieve high imaging speeds using relatively simple probe optics. Previously, the feasibility of conducting large-area SECM imaging of the esophagus in bench top setups has been demonstrated. Challenges remain, however, in translating SECM into a clinically-useable device; the tissue imaging performance should be improved, and the probe size needs to be significantly reduced so that it can fit into luminal organs of interest. In this paper, we report the development of new SECM endoscopic probe optics that addresses these challenges. A custom water-immersion aspheric singlet (NA = 0.5) was developed and used as the objective lens. The water-immersion condition was used to reduce the spherical aberrations and specular reflection from the tissue surface, which enables cellular imaging of the tissue deep below the surface. A custom collimation lens and a small-size grating were used along with the custom aspheric singlet to reduce the probe size. A dual-clad fiber was used to provide both the single- and multi- mode detection modes. The SECM probe optics was made to be 5.85 mm in diameter and 30 mm in length, which is small enough for safe and comfortable endoscopic imaging of the gastrointestinal tract. The lateral resolution was 1.8 and 2.3 µm for the single- and multi- mode detection modes, respectively, and the axial resolution 11 and 17 µm. SECM images of the swine esophageal tissue demonstrated the capability of this device to enable the visualization of characteristic cellular structural features, including basal cell nuclei and papillae, down to the imaging depth of 260 µm. These results suggest that the new SECM endoscopic probe optics will be useful for imaging large areas of the esophagus at the cellular scale in vivo.

  1. Whisker encoding of mechanical events during active tactile exploration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yves eBoubenec

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Rats use their whiskers to extract a wealth of information about their immediate environment, such as the shape, position or texture of an object. The information is conveyed to mechanoreceptors located within the whisker follicle in the form of a sequence of whisker deflections induced by the whisker/object contact interaction. How the whiskers filter and shape the mechanical information and effectively participate in the coding of tactile features remains an open question to date. In the present article, a biomechanical model was developed that provides predictions of the whisker dynamics during active tactile exploration, amenable to quantitative experimental comparison. This model is based on a decomposition of the whisker profile into a slow, quasi-static sequence and rapid resonant small-scale vibrations. It was applied to the typical situation of a rat whisking across an object. Having derived the quasi-static sequence of whisker deformation, the resonant properties of the whisker were analyzed, taking into account the boundary conditions imposed by the whisker/surface contact. We then focused on two elementary mechanical events that are expected to trigger neural responses, namely (i the whisker/object first contact and (ii the whisker detachment from the object. Both events were found to trigger a deflection wave propagating upward to the mystacial pad at constant velocity of 3-5m/s. This yielded a characteristic mechanical signature at the whisker base, in the form of a large peak of negative curvature occurring 4ms after the event was triggered. The dependence in amplitude and lag of this mechanical signal with the main contextual parameters (such as radial or angular distance was investigated. The model was validated experimentally by comparing its predictions to high-speed video recordings of shock-induced whisker deflections performed on anesthetized rats. The consequences of these results on possible tactile encoding schemes are

  2. Genome-wide identification of structural variants in genes encoding drug targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Berg; Dahmcke, Christina Mackeprang

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to identify structural variants of drug target-encoding genes on a genome-wide scale. We also aimed at identifying drugs that are potentially amenable for individualization of treatments based on knowledge about structural variation in the genes encoding...

  3. Least-squares reverse time migration of marine data with frequency-selection encoding

    KAUST Repository

    Dai, Wei

    2013-06-24

    The phase-encoding technique can sometimes increase the efficiency of the least-squares reverse time migration (LSRTM) by more than one order of magnitude. However, traditional random encoding functions require all the encoded shots to share the same receiver locations, thus limiting the usage to seismic surveys with a fixed spread geometry. We implement a frequency-selection encoding strategy that accommodates data with a marine streamer geometry. The encoding functions are delta functions in the frequency domain, so that all the encoded shots have unique nonoverlapping frequency content, and the receivers can distinguish the wavefield from each shot with a unique frequency band. Because the encoding functions are orthogonal to each other, there will be no crosstalk between different shots during modeling and migration. With the frequency-selection encoding method, the computational efficiency of LSRTM is increased so that its cost is comparable to conventional RTM for the Marmousi2 model and a marine data set recorded in the Gulf of Mexico. With more iterations, the LSRTM image quality is further improved by suppressing migration artifacts, balancing reflector amplitudes, and enhancing the spatial resolution. We conclude that LSRTM with frequency-selection is an efficient migration method that can sometimes produce more focused images than conventional RTM. © 2013 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  4. On the relationships between generative encodings, regularity, and learning abilities when evolving plastic artificial neural networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Tonelli

    Full Text Available A major goal of bio-inspired artificial intelligence is to design artificial neural networks with abilities that resemble those of animal nervous systems. It is commonly believed that two keys for evolving nature-like artificial neural networks are (1 the developmental process that links genes to nervous systems, which enables the evolution of large, regular neural networks, and (2 synaptic plasticity, which allows neural networks to change during their lifetime. So far, these two topics have been mainly studied separately. The present paper shows that they are actually deeply connected. Using a simple operant conditioning task and a classic evolutionary algorithm, we compare three ways to encode plastic neural networks: a direct encoding, a developmental encoding inspired by computational neuroscience models, and a developmental encoding inspired by morphogen gradients (similar to HyperNEAT. Our results suggest that using a developmental encoding could improve the learning abilities of evolved, plastic neural networks. Complementary experiments reveal that this result is likely the consequence of the bias of developmental encodings towards regular structures: (1 in our experimental setup, encodings that tend to produce more regular networks yield networks with better general learning abilities; (2 whatever the encoding is, networks that are the more regular are statistically those that have the best learning abilities.

  5. Variational Gaussian Process Auto-Encoder for Ordinal Prediction of Facial Action Units

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eleftheriadis, Stefanos; Rudovic, Ognjen; Deisenroth, Marc Peter; Pantic, Maja; Lai, Shang-Hong; Lepetit, Vincent; Nishino, Ko; Sato, Yoichi

    2016-01-01

    We address the task of simultaneous feature fusion and modeling of discrete ordinal outputs. We propose a novel Gaussian process (GP) auto-encoder modeling approach. In particular, we introduce GP encoders to project multiple observed features onto a latent space, while GP decoders are responsible

  6. 47 CFR 11.12 - Two-tone Attention Signal encoder and decoder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Two-tone Attention Signal encoder and decoder... SYSTEM (EAS) General § 11.12 Two-tone Attention Signal encoder and decoder. Existing two-tone Attention... Attention Signal decoder will no longer be required and the two-tone Attention Signal will be used to...

  7. Content-Specific Source Encoding in the Human Medial Temporal Lobe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awipi, T.; Davachi, L.

    2008-01-01

    Although the medial temporal lobe (MTL) is known to be essential for episodic encoding, the contributions of individual MTL subregions remain unclear. Data from recognition memory studies have provided evidence that the hippocampus supports relational encoding important for later episodic recollection, whereas the perirhinal cortex has been linked…

  8. Encoding mutually unbiased bases in orbital angular momentum for quantum key distribution

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dudley, Angela L

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We encode mutually unbiased bases (MUBs) using the higher-dimensional orbital angular momentum (OAM) degree of freedom associated with optical fields. We illustrate how these states are encoded with the use of a spatial light modulator (SLM). We...

  9. Effects of Modality on the Neural Correlates of Encoding Processes Supporting Recollection and Familiarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, Lauren J.; Rugg, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    Prior research has demonstrated that the neural correlates of successful encoding ("subsequent memory effects") partially overlap with neural regions selectively engaged by the on-line demands of the study task. The primary goal of the present experiment was to determine whether this overlap is associated solely with encoding processes supporting…

  10. Genomewide analysis of NBS-encoding genes in kiwi fruit (Actinidia ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    YINGJUN LI

    Identification of NBS-encodings and gene family classification of kiwi fruit. Kiwi fruit (A. chinensis) assembly and annotation ... There were three criteria to classify gene family. Both the coverage (aligned sequence/gene lengths) and iden- ... Number of identified NBS-encoding genes in kiwi fruit. Predicted protein domain.

  11. Isolated gene encoding an enzyme with UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and phosphoglucomutase activities from Cyclotella cryptica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, Eric E.; Roessler, Paul G.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention relates to a cloned gene which encodes an enzyme, the purified enzyme, and the applications and products resulting from the use of the gene and enzyme. The gene, isolated from Cyclotella cryptica, encodes a multifunctional enzyme that has both UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and phosphoglucomutase activities.

  12. The Role of Memory Activation in Creating False Memories of Encoding Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, Jason

    2010-01-01

    Using 3 experiments, I examined false memory for encoding context by presenting Deese-Roediger-McDermott themes (Deese, 1959; Roediger & McDermott, 1995) in usual-looking fonts and by testing related, but unstudied, lure items in a font that was shown during encoding. In 2 of the experiments, testing lure items in the font used to study their…

  13. The Role of Executive Control of Attention and Selective Encoding for Preschoolers' Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roderer, Thomas; Krebs, Saskia; Schmid, Corinne; Roebers, Claudia M.

    2012-01-01

    Selectivity in encoding, aspects of attentional control and their contribution to learning performance were explored in a sample of preschoolers. While the children are performing a learning task, their encoding of relevant and attention towards irrelevant information was recorded through an eye-tracking device. Recognition of target items was…

  14. What Limits the Encoding Effect of Note-Taking? A Meta-Analytic Examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, K.

    2005-01-01

    Previous meta-analyses indicate that the overall encoding effect of note-taking is positive but modest. This meta-analysis of 57 note-taking versus no note-taking comparison studies explored what limits the encoding effect by examining the moderating influence of seven variables: intervention, schooling level, presentation mode and length, test…

  15. Assessment of Low-Rate Turbo Encoding to Extend Coverage in WCDMA/HSDPA Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pérez Riverola, Ignasi; Sørensen, Troels Bundgaard; Kolding, T.E.

    2005-01-01

    a spectral efficiency loss compared to the use of dedicated low data rate encoding. In this paper we consider an alternative scheme with rate 1/5 turbo encoding and rate matching to achieve increased performance at the cell edge. We find a 1.2 dB link-gain in the coverage region, which in a data...

  16. Effects of deoxycycline induced lentivirus encoding FasL gene on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Fas/Fas ligand (FasL)-mediated apoptosis plays a critical role in deletion of activated T cells. This study aimed to construct the lentivirus encoding FasL gene induced by deoxycycline and evaluate its effects on apoptosis of Th1 cells. A plasmid expression system encoding FasL was constructed through utilizing the ...

  17. Encoding of compatible micro-operations in LUT-based FSMs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielcarek, Kamil; Barkalov, Alexander; Titarenko, Larysa

    2017-08-01

    This article shows a method of encoding of microoperations for LUT-based Mealy FSMs. The proposed design approach is based on two methods of structural decomposition of FSMs for diminishing the number of arguments for input memory functions in output functions. This method is viewed as an alternative to the encoding of collections of output functions. An example of design is given.

  18. Physical Exercise during Encoding Improves Vocabulary Learning in Young Female Adults: A Neuroendocrinological Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt-Kassow, Maren; Deusser, Marie; Thiel, Christian; Otterbein, Sascha; Montag, Christian; Reuter, Martin; Banzer, Winfried; Kaiser, Jochen

    2013-01-01

    Acute physical activity has been repeatedly shown to improve various cognitive functions. However, there have been no investigations comparing the effects of exercise during verbal encoding versus exercise prior to encoding on long-term memory performance. In this current psychoneuroendocrinological study we aim to test whether light to moderate ergometric bicycling during vocabulary encoding enhances subsequent recall compared to encoding during physical rest and encoding after being physically active. Furthermore, we examined the kinetics of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in serum which has been previously shown to correlate with learning performance. We also controlled for the BDNF val66met polymorphism. We found better vocabulary test performance for subjects that were physically active during the encoding phase compared to sedentary subjects. Post-hoc tests revealed that this effect was particularly present in initially low performers. BDNF in serum and BDNF genotype failed to account for the current result. Our data indicates that light to moderate simultaneous physical activity during encoding, but not prior to encoding, is beneficial for subsequent recall of new items. PMID:23700461

  19. On the relationships between generative encodings, regularity, and learning abilities when evolving plastic artificial neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonelli, Paul; Mouret, Jean-Baptiste

    2013-01-01

    A major goal of bio-inspired artificial intelligence is to design artificial neural networks with abilities that resemble those of animal nervous systems. It is commonly believed that two keys for evolving nature-like artificial neural networks are (1) the developmental process that links genes to nervous systems, which enables the evolution of large, regular neural networks, and (2) synaptic plasticity, which allows neural networks to change during their lifetime. So far, these two topics have been mainly studied separately. The present paper shows that they are actually deeply connected. Using a simple operant conditioning task and a classic evolutionary algorithm, we compare three ways to encode plastic neural networks: a direct encoding, a developmental encoding inspired by computational neuroscience models, and a developmental encoding inspired by morphogen gradients (similar to HyperNEAT). Our results suggest that using a developmental encoding could improve the learning abilities of evolved, plastic neural networks. Complementary experiments reveal that this result is likely the consequence of the bias of developmental encodings towards regular structures: (1) in our experimental setup, encodings that tend to produce more regular networks yield networks with better general learning abilities; (2) whatever the encoding is, networks that are the more regular are statistically those that have the best learning abilities.

  20. Recombinant Interleukin-15 in Treating Patients With Advanced Melanoma, Kidney Cancer, Non-small Cell Lung Cancer, or Squamous Cell Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-14

    Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Head and Neck Carcinoma; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Skin Carcinoma; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IIIA Cutaneous Melanoma AJCC v7; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIB Cutaneous Melanoma AJCC v7; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIC Cutaneous Melanoma AJCC v7; Stage IV Cutaneous Melanoma AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer

  1. Identification of Relationships Between Interleukin 15 mRNA and Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor II mRNA Levels With Formal Components of Temperament in Asthmatic Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panek, Michał; Jonakowski, Mateusz; Zioło, Jan; Pietras, Tadeusz; Wieteska, Łukasz; Małachowska, Beata; Mokros, Łukasz; Szemraj, Janusz; Kuna, Piotr

    2017-04-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory and heterogeneous disease developing mostly through allergic inflammation, which modifies the expression of various cytokines and neurotrophins. Previous studies suggest the involvement of interleukin (IL)-15 in the regulation of immune response in asthma. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) II plays an important role as a regulator of development and survival of neurons as well as maintenance of their physiological activity. Chronic stress associated with asthma and elevated IL-15 mRNA and BDNFII mRNA levels may affect the mood and a subjective sensation of dyspnoea-inducing anxiety. Psychopathological variables and numerous cytokine/neurotrophin interactions influence the formation of temperament and strategies of coping with stress. The aim of the study was to identify the role of IL-15 mRNA and BDNFII mRNA expressions and their effect on components of temperament and strategies of coping with stress in asthmatics. A total of 352 subjects (176 healthy volunteers and 176 asthmatic patients) participated in the study. The Formal Characteristic of Behaviour-Temperament Inventory (FCB-TI), Coping Inventory for Stressful Situations (CISS), Beck Depression Inventory, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, and Borg Rating of Perceived Exertion (RPE) Scale were applied in all the subjects. The expression of IL-15 and BDNFII gene was measured using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Different levels of IL-15 and BDNFII expressions between healthy volunteers and patients were revealed in the study. IL-15 enhanced the BDNFII mRNA expression among patients with bronchial asthma. The depression level negatively correlated with the BDNFII mRNA expression. This neurotrophin modified the temperament variable. BDNFII significantly affected (proportional relationship) the level of briskness in asthmatic patients. BDNFII might influence the level and style of coping with stress (emotion-oriented style). This hypothesis requires further studies on protein functional models. The obtained data confirms the role of IL-15 and BDNFII in the pathomechanisms of depression and formation of selected traits defining the temperament in asthmatics.

  2. Interleukin-15-activated natural killer cells kill autologous osteoclasts via LFA-1, DNAM-1 and TRAIL, and inhibit osteoclast-mediated bone erosion in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feng, Shan; Madsen, Suzi H; Viller, Natasja N

    2015-01-01

    as well as to inflammatory sites associated with enhanced bone erosion, including the joints of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, little is known about the impact NK cells may have on mature osteoclasts and bone erosion. We studied the interaction between human NK cells and autologous monocyte......Osteoclasts reside on bone and are the main bone resorbing cells playing an important role in bone homeostasis, while natural killer (NK) cells are bone-marrow-derived cells known to play a crucial role in immune defence against viral infections. Although mature NK cells traffic through bone marrow...... decreased bone erosion. Suppression of bone erosion requires contact between NK cells and osteoclasts, but soluble factors also play a minor role. Antibodies masking leucocyte function-associated antigen-1, DNAX accessory molecule-1 or tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand enhance...

  3. Antibiotics with Interleukin-15 inhibition reduces joint inflammation and bone erosions but not cartilage destruction inStaphylococcus aureus-induced arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Berglind; Jirholt, Pernilla; Henning, Petra; Lindholm, Catharina; Ohlsson, Claes; McInnes, Iain B; Lerner, Ulf H; Gjertsson, Inger

    2018-02-12

    Background: Staphylococcus aureus -induced arthritis causes rapid joint destruction, often leading to disabling joint damage despite antibiotics. We have previously shown that IL-15 inhibition without antibiotics is beneficial in S. aureus -induced arthritis. We therefore hypothesized that inhibition of IL-15, in combination with antibiotics, might represent a useful therapy that would both reduce inflammation and joint destruction, but preserve the host's ability to clear the infection. Methods: Female wildtype C57BL/6 mice were intravenously inoculated with the TSST-1-producing LS-1 strain of S. aureus with 0.8x10 8 S. aureus LS-1/mouse. Three days later the treatment was started consisting of cloxacillin followed by flucloxacillin, together with either anti-IL-15 antibodies (aIL-15ab) or control antibodies. Outcomes included survival, weight change, bacterial clearance, and joint damage. Results: The addition of aIL-15ab to antibiotics in S. aureus -induced arthritis reduced synovitis and bone erosions compared to controls. The number of bone-resorbing osteoclasts in the joints was reduced, whereas cartilage destruction was not significantly altered. Importantly, the combination therapy did not adversely affect the clinical outcome of S. aureus- induced arthritis, such as survival, weight change or compromise the host's ability to clear the infection. Conclusions: As the clinical outcome of S. aureus- induced arthritis was not affected, the addition of aIL-15ab to antibiotics ought to be safe. Taken together, the combination of aIL-15ab and antibiotics is a beneficial, but not optimal, treatment of S. aureus -induced arthritis as it reduces synovitis and bone erosions but has a limited effect on cartilage destruction. Copyright © 2018 Bergmann et al.

  4. Determining the Neural Substrate for Encoding a Memory of Human Pain and the Influence of Anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Ming-Tsung; Kong, Yazhuo; Eippert, Falk; Tracey, Irene

    2017-12-06

    To convert a painful stimulus into a briefly maintainable construct when the painful stimulus is no longer accessible is essential to guide human behavior and avoid dangerous situations. Because of the aversive nature of pain, this encoding process might be influenced by emotional aspects and could thus vary across individuals, but we have yet to understand both the basic underlying neural mechanisms as well as potential interindividual differences. Using fMRI in combination with a delayed-discrimination task in healthy volunteers of both sexes, we discovered that brain regions involved in this working memory encoding process were dissociable according to whether the to-be-remembered stimulus was painful or not, with the medial thalamus and the rostral anterior cingulate cortex encoding painful and the primary somatosensory cortex encoding nonpainful stimuli. Encoding of painful stimuli furthermore significantly enhanced functional connectivity between the thalamus and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). With regards to emotional aspects influencing encoding processes, we observed that more anxious participants showed significant performance advantages when encoding painful stimuli. Importantly, only during the encoding of pain, the interindividual differences in anxiety were associated with the strength of coupling between medial thalamus and mPFC, which was furthermore related to activity in the amygdala. These results indicate not only that there is a distinct signature for the encoding of a painful experience in humans, but also that this encoding process involves a strong affective component. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT To convert the sensation of pain into a briefly maintainable construct is essential to guide human behavior and avoid dangerous situations. Although this working memory encoding process is implicitly contained in the majority of studies, the underlying neural mechanisms remain unclear. Using fMRI in a delayed-discrimination task, we found that the

  5. Processing and display of three-dimensional arrays of numerical data using octree encoding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amans, J.L.; Antoine, M.; Darier, P.

    1986-04-01

    The analysis of three-dimensional (3-D) arrays of numerical data from medical, industrial or scientific imaging, by synthetic generation of realistic images, has been widely developed. The Octree encoding, that organizes the volume data in a hierarchical tree structure, has some interesting features for 3-D arrays of data processing. The Octree encoding method, based on the recursive subdivision of a 3-D array, is an extension of the Quadtree encoding in the two-dimensional plane. We have developed a software package to validate the basic Octree encoding methodology for some manipulation and display operations of volume data. The contribution introduces the technique we have used (called ''overlay technique'') to make the projection operation of an Octree on a Quadtree encoded image plane. The application of this technique to the hidden surface display is presented [fr

  6. Chemical ligation methods for the tagging of DNA-encoded chemical libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefe, Anthony D; Clark, Matthew A; Hupp, Christopher D; Litovchick, Alexander; Zhang, Ying

    2015-06-01

    The generation of DNA-encoded chemical libraries requires the unimolecular association of multiple encoding oligonucleotides with encoded chemical entities during combinatorial synthesis processes. This has traditionally been achieved using enzymatic ligation. We discuss a range of chemical ligation methods that provide alternatives to enzymatic ligation. These chemical ligation methods include the generation of modified internucleotide linkages that support polymerase translocation and other modified linkages that while not supporting the translocation of polymerases can also be used to generate individual cDNA molecules containing encoded chemical information specifying individual library members. We also describe which of these approaches have been successfully utilized for the preparation of DNA-encoded chemical libraries and those that were subsequently used for the discovery of inhibitors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Encoding and decoding of digital spiral imaging based on bidirectional transformation of light's spatial eigenmodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wuhong; Chen, Lixiang

    2016-06-15

    Digital spiral imaging has been demonstrated as an effective optical tool to encode optical information and retrieve topographic information of an object. Here we develop a conceptually new and concise scheme for optical image encoding and decoding toward free-space digital spiral imaging. We experimentally demonstrate that the optical lattices with ℓ=±50 orbital angular momentum superpositions and a clover image with nearly 200 Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) modes can be well encoded and successfully decoded. It is found that an image encoded/decoded with a two-index LG spectrum (considering both azimuthal and radial indices, ℓ and p) possesses much higher fidelity than that with a one-index LG spectrum (only considering the ℓ index). Our work provides an alternative tool for the image encoding/decoding scheme toward free-space optical communications.

  8. Encoding efficiency of suprathreshold stochastic resonance on stimulus-specific information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan, Fabing; Chapeau-Blondeau, François; Abbott, Derek

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we evaluate the encoding efficiency of suprathreshold stochastic resonance (SSR) based on a local information-theoretic measure of stimulus-specific information (SSI), which is the average specific information of responses associated with a particular stimulus. The theoretical and numerical analyses of SSIs reveal that noise can improve neuronal coding efficiency for a large population of neurons, which leads to produce increased information-rich responses. The SSI measure, in contrast to the global measure of average mutual information, can characterize the noise benefits in finer detail for describing the enhancement of neuronal encoding efficiency of a particular stimulus, which may be of general utility in the design and implementation of a SSR coding scheme. - Highlights: • Evaluating the noise-enhanced encoding efficiency via stimulus-specific information. • New form of stochastic resonance based on the measure of encoding efficiency. • Analyzing neural encoding schemes from suprathreshold stochastic resonance detailedly.

  9. CAG-encoded polyglutamine length polymorphism in the human genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayden Michael R

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Expansion of polyglutamine-encoding CAG trinucleotide repeats has been identified as the pathogenic mutation in nine different genes associated with neurodegenerative disorders. The majority of individuals clinically diagnosed with spinocerebellar ataxia do not have mutations within known disease genes, and it is likely that additional ataxias or Huntington disease-like disorders will be found to be caused by this common mutational mechanism. We set out to determine the length distributions of CAG-polyglutamine tracts for the entire human genome in a set of healthy individuals in order to characterize the nature of polyglutamine repeat length variation across the human genome, to establish the background against which pathogenic repeat expansions can be detected, and to prioritize candidate genes for repeat expansion disorders. Results We found that repeats, including those in known disease genes, have unique distributions of glutamine tract lengths, as measured by fragment analysis of PCR-amplified repeat regions. This emphasizes the need to characterize each distribution and avoid making generalizations between loci. The best predictors of known disease genes were occurrence of a long CAG-tract uninterrupted by CAA codons in their reference genome sequence, and high glutamine tract length variance in the normal population. We used these parameters to identify eight priority candidate genes for polyglutamine expansion disorders. Twelve CAG-polyglutamine repeats were invariant and these can likely be excluded as candidates. We outline some confusion in the literature about this type of data, difficulties in comparing such data between publications, and its application to studies of disease prevalence in different populations. Analysis of Gene Ontology-based functions of CAG-polyglutamine-containing genes provided a visual framework for interpretation of these genes' functions. All nine known disease genes were involved in DNA

  10. Force encoding in muscle spindles during stretch of passive muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Kyle P; Lamotte D'Incamps, Boris; Zytnicki, Daniel; Ting, Lena H

    2017-09-01

    Muscle spindle proprioceptive receptors play a primary role in encoding the effects of external mechanical perturbations to the body. During externally-imposed stretches of passive, i.e. electrically-quiescent, muscles, the instantaneous firing rates (IFRs) of muscle spindles are associated with characteristics of stretch such as length and velocity. However, even in passive muscle, there are history-dependent transients of muscle spindle firing that are not uniquely related to muscle length and velocity, nor reproduced by current muscle spindle models. These include acceleration-dependent initial bursts, increased dynamic response to stretch velocity if a muscle has been isometric, and rate relaxation, i.e., a decrease in tonic IFR when a muscle is held at a constant length after being stretched. We collected muscle spindle spike trains across a variety of muscle stretch kinematic conditions, including systematic changes in peak length, velocity, and acceleration. We demonstrate that muscle spindle primary afferents in passive muscle fire in direct relationship to muscle force-related variables, rather than length-related variables. Linear combinations of whole muscle-tendon force and the first time derivative of force (dF/dt) predict the entire time course of transient IFRs in muscle spindle Ia afferents during stretch (i.e., lengthening) of passive muscle, including the initial burst, the dynamic response to lengthening, and rate relaxation following lengthening. Similar to acceleration scaling found previously in postural responses to perturbations, initial burst amplitude scaled equally well to initial stretch acceleration or dF/dt, though later transients were only described by dF/dt. The transient increase in dF/dt at the onset of lengthening reflects muscle short-range stiffness due to cross-bridge dynamics. Our work demonstrates a critical role of muscle cross-bridge dynamics in history-dependent muscle spindle IFRs in passive muscle lengthening conditions

  11. Force encoding in muscle spindles during stretch of passive muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle P Blum

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Muscle spindle proprioceptive receptors play a primary role in encoding the effects of external mechanical perturbations to the body. During externally-imposed stretches of passive, i.e. electrically-quiescent, muscles, the instantaneous firing rates (IFRs of muscle spindles are associated with characteristics of stretch such as length and velocity. However, even in passive muscle, there are history-dependent transients of muscle spindle firing that are not uniquely related to muscle length and velocity, nor reproduced by current muscle spindle models. These include acceleration-dependent initial bursts, increased dynamic response to stretch velocity if a muscle has been isometric, and rate relaxation, i.e., a decrease in tonic IFR when a muscle is held at a constant length after being stretched. We collected muscle spindle spike trains across a variety of muscle stretch kinematic conditions, including systematic changes in peak length, velocity, and acceleration. We demonstrate that muscle spindle primary afferents in passive muscle fire in direct relationship to muscle force-related variables, rather than length-related variables. Linear combinations of whole muscle-tendon force and the first time derivative of force (dF/dt predict the entire time course of transient IFRs in muscle spindle Ia afferents during stretch (i.e., lengthening of passive muscle, including the initial burst, the dynamic response to lengthening, and rate relaxation following lengthening. Similar to acceleration scaling found previously in postural responses to perturbations, initial burst amplitude scaled equally well to initial stretch acceleration or dF/dt, though later transients were only described by dF/dt. The transient increase in dF/dt at the onset of lengthening reflects muscle short-range stiffness due to cross-bridge dynamics. Our work demonstrates a critical role of muscle cross-bridge dynamics in history-dependent muscle spindle IFRs in passive muscle

  12. Least-squares reverse time migration of marine data with frequency-selection encoding

    KAUST Repository

    Dai, Wei

    2013-08-20

    The phase-encoding technique can sometimes increase the efficiency of the least-squares reverse time migration (LSRTM) by more than one order of magnitude. However, traditional random encoding functions require all the encoded shots to share the same receiver locations, thus limiting the usage to seismic surveys with a fixed spread geometry. We implement a frequency-selection encoding strategy that accommodates data with a marine streamer geometry. The encoding functions are delta functions in the frequency domain, so that all the en- coded shots have unique non-overlapping frequency content, and the receivers can distinguish the wavefield from each shot with a unique frequency band. Since the encoding functions are orthogonal to each other, there will be no crosstalk between different shots during modeling and migration. With the frequency-selection encoding method, the computational efficiency of LSRTM is increased so that its cost is compara- ble to conventional RTM for both the Marmousi2 model and a marine data set recorded in the Gulf of Mexico. With more iterations, the LSRTM image quality is further improved. We conclude that LSRTM with frequency-selection is an efficient migration method that can sometimes produce more focused images than conventional RTM.

  13. A fast improved fat tree encoder for wave union TDC in an FPGA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Qi; Zhao Lei; Liu Shubin; Qi Binxiang; Hu Xueye; An Qi; Liao Shengkai; Peng Chengzhi

    2013-01-01

    Up to now, the wave union method can achieve the best timing performance in FPGA-based TDC designs. However, it should be guaranteed in such a structure that the non-thermometer code to binary code (NTH2B) encoding process should be finished within just one system clock cycle. So the implementation of the NTH2B encoder is quite challenging considering the high speed requirement. Besides, the high resolution wave union TDC also demands that the encoder convert an ultra-wide input code to a binary code. We present a fast improved fat tree encoder (IFTE) to fulfill such requirements, in which bubble error suppression is also integrated. With this encoder scheme, a wave union TDC with 7.7 ps RMS and 3.8 ps effective bin size was implemented in an FPGA from Xilinx Virtex 5 family. An encoding time of 8.33 ns was achieved for a 276-bit non-thermometer code to a 9-bit binary code conversion. We conducted a series of tests on the oscillating period of the wave union launcher, as well as the overall performance of the TDC; test results indicate that the IFTE works well. In fact, in the implementation of this encoder, no manual routing or special constraints were required; therefore, this IFTE structure could also be further applied in other delay-chain-based FPGA TDCs. (authors)

  14. On the edge of language acquisition: inherent constraints on encoding multisyllabic sequences in the neonate brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferry, Alissa L; Fló, Ana; Brusini, Perrine; Cattarossi, Luigi; Macagno, Francesco; Nespor, Marina; Mehler, Jacques

    2016-05-01

    To understand language, humans must encode information from rapid, sequential streams of syllables - tracking their order and organizing them into words, phrases, and sentences. We used Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) to determine whether human neonates are born with the capacity to track the positions of syllables in multisyllabic sequences. After familiarization with a six-syllable sequence, the neonate brain responded to the change (as shown by an increase in oxy-hemoglobin) when the two edge syllables switched positions but not when two middle syllables switched positions (Experiment 1), indicating that they encoded the syllables at the edges of sequences better than those in the middle. Moreover, when a 25 ms pause was inserted between the middle syllables as a segmentation cue, neonates' brains were sensitive to the change (Experiment 2), indicating that subtle cues in speech can signal a boundary, with enhanced encoding of the syllables located at the edges of that boundary. These findings suggest that neonates' brains can encode information from multisyllabic sequences and that this encoding is constrained. Moreover, subtle segmentation cues in a sequence of syllables provide a mechanism with which to accurately encode positional information from longer sequences. Tracking the order of syllables is necessary to understand language and our results suggest that the foundations for this encoding are present at birth. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. The effect of encoding duration on implicit and explicit eyewitness memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carol, Rolando N; Schreiber Compo, Nadja

    2018-02-23

    The present study investigated the effect of encoding duration on implicit and explicit eyewitness memory. Participants (N = 227) viewed a mock crime (brief, 15-s vs. long, 30-s vs. irrelevant/control) and were then tested with both implicit and explicit memory prompts or with explicit memory prompts only. Brief-encoding participants revealed more critical details implicitly than long-encoding or control participants. Further, the number and percentage of accurate details recalled explicitly were higher for long-encoding than for brief-encoding participants. Implicit testing prior to explicit recall-as compared to completing a filler task-was detrimental to free recall performance. Interestingly, brief-encoding participants were significantly more likely to remember critical details implicitly but not explicitly than long-encoding participants. This is the first study to investigate implicit eyewitness memory for a multimodal mock crime. Findings are theoretically consistent with prior research on cognition while expanding upon the extant eyewitness memory and investigative interviewing literature. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Encoding methods for B1+ mapping in parallel transmit systems at ultra high field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Desmond H. Y.; Poole, Michael S.; Magill, Arthur W.; Felder, Jörg; Brenner, Daniel; Jon Shah, N.

    2014-08-01

    Parallel radiofrequency (RF) transmission, either in the form of RF shimming or pulse design, has been proposed as a solution to the B1+ inhomogeneity problem in ultra high field magnetic resonance imaging. As a prerequisite, accurate B1+ maps from each of the available transmit channels are required. In this work, four different encoding methods for B1+ mapping, namely 1-channel-on, all-channels-on-except-1, all-channels-on-1-inverted and Fourier phase encoding, were evaluated using dual refocusing acquisition mode (DREAM) at 9.4 T. Fourier phase encoding was demonstrated in both phantom and in vivo to be the least susceptible to artefacts caused by destructive RF interference at 9.4 T. Unlike the other two interferometric encoding schemes, Fourier phase encoding showed negligible dependency on the initial RF phase setting and therefore no prior B1+ knowledge is required. Fourier phase encoding also provides a flexible way to increase the number of measurements to increase SNR, and to allow further reduction of artefacts by weighted decoding. These advantages of Fourier phase encoding suggest that it is a good choice for B1+ mapping in parallel transmit systems at ultra high field.

  17. MAGNETIC RESONANCE WATER SELF-DIFFUSION TENSOR ENCODING OPTIMIZATION METHODS FOR FULL BRAIN ACQUISITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khader M Hasan

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Water diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI is a non-invasive and sensitive modality that is becoming increasingly popular in diagnostic radiology. DT-MRI provides in vivo directional information about the organization and microdynamics of deep brain tissue that is not available by other MRI relaxationbased methods. The DT-MRI experiment involves a host of imaging and diffusion parameters that influence the efficiency (signal-to-noise ratio per unit time, accuracy, and specificity of the information sought. These parameters may include typical imaging parameters such as TE, TR, slice thickness, sampling rate, etc. The DTI relevant parameter space includes pulse duration, separation, direction, number of directions (Ne, order, sign and strength of the diffusion encoding gradient pulses. The goal of this work is to present and compare different tensor encoding strategies used to obtain the DT-MRI information for the whole brain. In this paper an evaluation of tensor encoding advantage is presented using a multi-dimensional non-parametric Bootstrap resampling method. This work also explores the relationship between different tensor encoding schemes using the analytical encoding approach. This work shows that the minimum energy optimization approach can produce uniformly distributed tensor encoding that are comparable to the icosahedral sets. The minimum condition encoding sets are not uniformly distributed and are shown to be suboptimal and related to a commonly used heuristic tensor encoding set. This work shows that the icosahedral set is the only uniformly distributed set with Ne = 6. At equal imaging time, the Bootstrap experiments show that optimal tensor encoding sets can have 6 < Ne < 24.

  18. Comparative differential gene expression analysis of nucleus-encoded proteins for Rafflesia cantleyi against Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Siuk-Mun; Lee, Xin-Wei; Wan, Kiew-Lian; Firdaus-Raih, Mohd

    2015-09-01

    Regulation of functional nucleus-encoded proteins targeting the plastidial functions was comparatively studied for a plant parasite, Rafflesia cantleyi versus a photosynthetic plant, Arabidopsis thaliana. This study involved two species of different feeding modes and different developmental stages. A total of 30 nucleus-encoded proteins were found to be differentially-regulated during two stages in the parasite; whereas 17 nucleus-encoded proteins were differentially-expressed during two developmental stages in Arabidopsis thaliana. One notable finding observed for the two plants was the identification of genes involved in the regulation of photosynthesis-related processes where these processes, as expected, seem to be present only in the autotroph.

  19. Genome-wide comparative analysis of NBS-encoding genes between Brassica species and Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jingyin; Tehrim, Sadia; Zhang, Fengqi; Tong, Chaobo; Huang, Junyan; Cheng, Xiaohui; Dong, Caihua; Zhou, Yanqiu; Qin, Rui; Hua, Wei; Liu, Shengyi

    2014-01-03

    Plant disease resistance (R) genes with the nucleotide binding site (NBS) play an important role in offering resistance to pathogens. The availability of complete genome sequences of Brassica oleracea and Brassica rapa provides an important opportunity for researchers to identify and characterize NBS-encoding R genes in Brassica species and to compare with analogues in Arabidopsis thaliana based on a comparative genomics approach. However, little is known about the evolutionary fate of NBS-encoding genes in the Brassica lineage after split from A. thaliana. Here we present genome-wide analysis of NBS-encoding genes in B. oleracea, B. rapa and A. thaliana. Through the employment of HMM search and manual curation, we identified 157, 206 and 167 NBS-encoding genes in B. oleracea, B. rapa and A. thaliana genomes, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis among 3 species classified NBS-encoding genes into 6 subgroups. Tandem duplication and whole genome triplication (WGT) analyses revealed that after WGT of the Brassica ancestor, NBS-encoding homologous gene pairs on triplicated regions in Brassica ancestor were deleted or lost quickly, but NBS-encoding genes in Brassica species experienced species-specific gene amplification by tandem duplication after divergence of B. rapa and B. oleracea. Expression profiling of NBS-encoding orthologous gene pairs indicated the differential expression pattern of retained orthologous gene copies in B. oleracea and B. rapa. Furthermore, evolutionary analysis of CNL type NBS-encoding orthologous gene pairs among 3 species suggested that orthologous genes in B. rapa species have undergone stronger negative selection than those in B .oleracea species. But for TNL type, there are no significant differences in the orthologous gene pairs between the two species. This study is first identification and characterization of NBS-encoding genes in B. rapa and B. oleracea based on whole genome sequences. Through tandem duplication and whole genome

  20. BANDWIDTH AND EFFICIENT ENCODING SCHEME COMBINING TCM-UGM TO STBC

    OpenAIRE

    ABDELMOUNAIM MOULAY LAKHDAR; MOHAMMED BELADGHAM; ABDESSELAM BASSOU,; MOHAMED BENAISSA

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a bandwidth efficient encoding scheme is proposed. It combines the modified version of trellis coded-modulation (called trellis coded-modulation with Ungerboeck-Gray mapping, TCM-UGM) to space-time block code (STBC). The performance of this encoding scheme is investigated over memoryless Rayleigh fading (MRF) channel for throughput 2 bits/s/Hz. The simulation result, using 2/3 rate 16-state TCM-UGM encoder, two transmit antennas and two receive antennas, shows clearly that the ...