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Sample records for empress ceramic part

  1. Machinability of IPS Empress 2 framework ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, C; Weigl, P

    2000-01-01

    Using ceramic materials for an automatic production of ceramic dentures by CAD/CAM is a challenge, because many technological, medical, and optical demands must be considered. The IPS Empress 2 framework ceramic meets most of them. This study shows the possibilities for machining this ceramic with economical parameters. The long life-time requirement for ceramic dentures requires a ductile machined surface to avoid the well-known subsurface damages of brittle materials caused by machining. Slow and rapid damage propagation begins at break outs and cracks, and limits life-time significantly. Therefore, ductile machined surfaces are an important demand for machine dental ceramics. The machining tests were performed with various parameters such as tool grain size and feed speed. Denture ceramics were machined by jig grinding on a 5-axis CNC milling machine (Maho HGF 500) with a high-speed spindle up to 120,000 rpm. The results of the wear test indicate low tool wear. With one tool, you can machine eight occlusal surfaces including roughing and finishing. One occlusal surface takes about 60 min machining time. Recommended parameters for roughing are middle diamond grain size (D107), cutting speed v(c) = 4.7 m/s, feed speed v(ft) = 1000 mm/min, depth of cut a(e) = 0.06 mm, width of contact a(p) = 0.8 mm, and for finishing ultra fine diamond grain size (D46), cutting speed v(c) = 4.7 m/s, feed speed v(ft) = 100 mm/min, depth of cut a(e) = 0.02 mm, width of contact a(p) = 0.8 mm. The results of the machining tests give a reference for using IPS Empress(R) 2 framework ceramic in CAD/CAM systems. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  2. Use of the Empress all-ceramic restoration system.

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    Goulet, M K

    1997-01-01

    New dental materials and techniques have been introduced in the past few years to fabricate aesthetic ceramic restorations with improved strength, biocompatibility, resistance to wear, and better fit. Aesthetic concerns and increasing demand for tooth-colored posterior restorations have led to a number of all-ceramic restorations such as IPS Empress (Ivoclar-Williams, Amherst, NY). The Empress system offers superior aesthetics and physical properties. New generation ceramics along with the current adhesive techniques have resulted in the ability to provide higher strength, therefore indicating crowns for posterior restorations as well. These materials are being used more frequently and in more extensive oral prosthetic rehabilitations such as the case that will be presented. We discuss the different properties and advantages of IPS Empress.

  3. Fracture strength of three all-ceramic systems: Top-Ceram compared with IPS-Empress and In-Ceram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quran, Firas Al; Haj-Ali, Reem

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the fracture loads and mode of failure of all-ceramic crowns fabricated using Top-Ceram and compare it with all-ceramic crowns fabricated from well-established systems: IPS-Empress II, In-Ceram. Thirty all-ceramic crowns were fabricated; 10 IPS-Empress II, 10 In-Ceram alumina and 10 Top-Ceram. Instron testing machine was used to measure the loads required to introduce fracture of each crown. Mean fracture load for In-Ceram alumina [941.8 (± 221.66) N] was significantly (p > 0.05) higher than those of Top-Ceram and IPS-Empress II. There was no statistically significant difference between Top-Ceram and IPS-Empress II mean fracture loads; 696.20 (+222.20) and 534 (+110.84) N respectively. Core fracture pattern was highest seen in Top- Ceram specimens.

  4. A comparison of the microstructure and properties of the IPS Empress 2 and the IPS Empress glass-ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höland, W; Schweiger, M; Frank, M; Rheinberger, V

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this report is to analyze the microstructures of glass-ceramics of the IPS Empress 2 and IPS Empress systems by scanning electron microscopy. The main properties of the glass-ceramics were determined and compared to each other. The flexural strength of the pressed glass-ceramic (core material) was improved by a factor of more than three for IPS Empress 2 (lithium disilicate glass-ceramic) in comparison with IPS Empress (leucite glass-ceramic). For the fracture toughness, the K(IC) value was measured as 3.3 +/- 0.3 MPa. m(0.5) for IPS Empress 2 and 1.3 +/- 0.1 MPa. m(0.5) for IPS Empress. Abrasion behavior, chemical durability, and optical properties such as translucency of all glass-ceramics fulfill the dental standards. The authors concluded that IPS Empress 2 can be used to fabricate 3-unit bridges up to the second premolar. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  5. [Two years clinical observation of a kind of castable ceramic--IPS Empress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y; Li, Y; Nie, Y

    1999-03-01

    We used this material in clinic since 1995. Discussion on the prosthetic effects of the above-mentioned material to spreat it clinically. Through half to two years clinical observations to evaluate the effect of IPS Empress crowns in anterior teeth and inlays in posteriors. and Prosthesis made of this kind of material IPS Empress is one kind of excellent all-ceramic prosthetic material. IPS Empress also could be used in post crowns and the clinical effect was satisfactory.

  6. [Microstructure and mechanical property of a new IPS-Empress 2 dental glass-ceramic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiao-ping; Watts, D C; Wilson, N H F; Silsons, N; Cheng, Ya-qin

    2005-03-01

    To investigate the microstructure and mechanical properties of a new IPS-Empress 2 dental glass-ceramic. AFM, SEM and XRD were used to analyze the microstructure and crystal phase of IPS-Empress 2 glass-ceramic. The flexural strength and fracture toughness were tested using 3-point bending method and indentation method respectively. IPS-Empress 2 glass-ceramic mainly consisted of lithium disilicate crystal, lithium phosphate and glass matrix, which formed a continuous interlocking structure. The crystal phases were not changed before and after hot-pressed treatment. AFM showed nucleating agent particles of different sizes distributed on the highly polished ceramic surface. The strength and fracture toughness were 300 MPa and 3.1 MPam(1/2). The high strength and fracture toughness of IPS-Empress 2 glass ceramic are attributed to the fine lithium disilicate crystalline, interlocking microstructure and crack deflection.

  7. Investigations of subcritical crack propagation of the Empress 2 all-ceramic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitov, Gergo; Lohbauer, Ulrich; Rabbo, Mohammad Abed; Petschelt, Anselm; Pospiech, Peter

    2008-02-01

    The mechanical properties and slow crack propapagation of the all-porcelain system Empress 2 (Ivoclar Vivadent, Schaan, Liechtenstein) with its framework compound Empress 2 and the veneering compounds "Empress 2 and Eris were examined. For all materials, the fracture strength, Weibull parameter and elastic moduli were experimentally determined in a four-point-bending test. For the components of the Empress 2 system, the fracture toughness K(IC) was determined, and the crack propagation parameters n and A were determined in a dynamic fatigue method. Using these data, life data analysis was performed and lifetime diagrams were produced. The development of strength under static fatigue conditions was calculated for a period of 5 years. The newly developed veneering ceramic Eris showed a higher fracture strength (sigma(0)=66.1 MPa) at a failure probability of P(F)=63.2%, and crack growth parameters (n=12.9) compared to the veneering ceramic Empress 2 (sigma(0)=60.3 MPa). For Empress 2 veneer the crack propagation parameter n could only be estimated (n=9.5). This is reflected in the prognosis of long-term resistance presented in the SPT diagrams. For all materials investigated, the Weibull parameter m values (Empress 2 framework m=4.6; Empress 2 veneer m=7.9; Eris m=6.9) were much lower than the minimum demanded by the literature (m=15). The initial fracture strength value alone is not sufficient to characterize the mechanical resistance of ceramic materials, since their stressability is time-dependent. Knowledge about the crack propagation parameters n and A are of great importance when preclinically predicting the clinical suitability of dental ceramic materials. The use of SPT diagrams for lifetime calculation of ceramic materials is a valuable method for comparing different ceramics.

  8. [Manufacture and clinical application of 215 IPS-Empress casting ceramic restorations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Na; Zhou, Jian

    2008-08-01

    To explore the manufacture and clinical application of IPS-Empress casting ceramic restorations. The problems in manufacture and clinical operation of 215 casting ceramic restorations were analyzed. In 215 casting ceramic restorations, 12 (5.58%) casting ceramic restorations were affected by clinical design or application, 15 (6.98%) casting ceramic restorations were affected by some manufacture problems, and 14 (6.51%) casting ceramic restorations were affected by clinical try-in. Through 2-3 years' follow-up, the achievement ratio of 215 IPS-Empress casting ceramic restorations was 94.88%, and 11 casting ceramic restorations were affected by some problems. Beauty and simultaneous enamel wear are the characteristics of casting ceramic restorations. But because of its brittle, the indications should be strictly selected.

  9. A comparison of the marginal fit of In-Ceram, IPS Empress, and Procera crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaiman, F; Chai, J; Jameson, L M; Wozniak, W T

    1997-01-01

    The in vitro marginal fit of three all-ceramic crown systems (In-Ceram, Procera, and IPS Empress) was compared. All crown systems were significantly different from each other at P = 0.05. In-Ceram exhibited the greatest marginal discrepancy (161 microns), followed by Procera (83 microns), and IPS Empress (63 microns). There were no significant differences among the various stages of the crown fabrication: core fabrication, porcelain veneering, and glazing. The facial and lingual margins exhibited significantly larger marginal discrepancies than the mesial and distal margins.

  10. [Clinical application of IPS-empress 2 pressable all-ceramic crowns].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ai-jun; He, Xiao-ming; Liu, Li-xia; Zhang, Chao-biao; Zhang, Min; Shen, Bei-yong

    2007-02-01

    To evaluate the clinical prosthetic effect of IPS-Empress 2 pressahie ceramic crowns. 198 teeth of 70 patients were restored with IPS-Empress 2 pressahie ceramic crowns. The patients were asked to return in one week and every half year. The clinical prosthetic effect was evaluated. Through follow-up of 3-38 months, the veneer porcelain crowns of 3 teeth were broken. 2 crowns fall off due to teeth fracture, gingivitis occurred in 2 teeth, pulpitis or periapical periodontitis occurred in 3 teeth. The shades of 3 crowns were darkening. The prosthetic effect of 185 teeth was satisfied. The rate of satisfaction was 93.4%. IPS-Empress 2 pressable all-ceramic crown has the advantages of aesthetic effect, good hiocompatihility and simple fabrication. But its strength is not enough for posterior teeth and it can not cover the deep color of non-vital teeth and metal materials.

  11. The effect of veneering and heat treatment on the flexural strength of Empress 2 ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattell, M J; Palumbo, R P; Knowles, J C; Clarke, R L; Samarawickrama, D Y D

    2002-05-01

    The aims of the study were to test and compare the biaxial flexural strength and reliability of Empress 2 ceramics after heat treatment and the addition of the veneering material and to characterise their microstructures. Forty disc specimens (2 x 14 mm) and forty disc specimens (1 x 14 mm) were produced by heat pressing in the EP 500 press furnace. Group 1 (2 x 14 mm Empress 2 core) was as heat pressed and group 2 (2 x 14 mm Empress 2 core) was subjected to the recommended firing cycles. Groups 3 and 4 (1 x 14 mm Empress 2 core) were veneered with the dentine material and heat-treated as per group 2. Groups 1, 2 and 3 were lapped to 800 grit silicon carbide paper on the compressive surface only and group 4 on both the compressive and tensile test surfaces. Twenty disc specimens per group were tested using the biaxial flexure test at a crosshead speed of 0.15 mm/min. Specimens were characterised using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and secondary electron imaging (SEM). Mean biaxial flexural strengths (MPa+/-SD) were group 1: 265.5+/-25.7; group 2: 251.3+/-30.2; group 3: 258.6+/-21.4 and group 4: 308.6+/-37.7. There was no statistical difference between groups 1, 2 and 3 (p>0.05), but differences for group 4 (pEmpress 2 core material and an amorphous glass and some evidence of a crystalline phase in the dentine material. CONCLUSIONS; Veneering or heat treatment of Empress 2 ceramics did not significantly affect the mean biaxial flexural strength (p>0.05) or reliability. Surface modification of the Empress 2 core material increased the mean biaxial flexural strength (p<0.05).

  12. [Survival rate of IPS-Empress 2 all-ceramic crowns and bridges: three year's results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, Doris; Gerds, Thomas; Strub, Jörg R

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this prospective clinical study was to calculate the survival rate of IPS-Empress2 crowns and fixed partial dentures (FPD) over a three-year period. In 43 patients 27 IPS-Empress2 crowns and 31 fixed partial dentures were adhesively luted. Crowns were placed on premolars and molars and FPDs were inserted in the anterior and premolar area. Abutments were prepared with a circular 1.2 mm wide shoulder. The clinical follow-up examination took place after 6, 12, 24, 36 and 48 months. After a mean of 38 months, the survival rate (Kaplan-Meier) of all-ceramic crowns was 100% and of the three unit FDP 72.4%. There were a total of six complete failures which occurred only with the three-unit IPS-Empress2 FPDs. Three FPDs exhibited fractures of the framework for which the manufacturer's instructions of connector-dimension was not satisfied, and one FPD exhibited an irreparable incomplete veneer fracture. Further two FPDs showed biological failures. The accuracy of fit and esthetics were clinically satisfactory. The three-year results showed the IPS-Empress2-ceramic as an adequate all-ceramic material for single crowns. The use for FPD needs further critical consideration.

  13. The effect of zirconia on flexural strength of IPS Empress 2 ceramic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kermanshah H

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: All ceramic, inlay-retained resin bonded fixed partial denture is a conservative method for replacement of missing teeth, because of minimal tooth reduction. The connector between the retainer and the pontic is the weak point of these bridges. Reinforcement of ceramic core will increase the clinical longevity. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of zirconia on flexural strength of IPS Empress 2 core ceramic.Materials and Methods: In this experimental in vitro study, twenty eight bar shape specimens (17´3.1´3.1 mm were made of four different materials: (1 Slip casting in-ceram alumina core (control group (2 Hot-pressed lithium disilicate core ceramic (IPS Empress 2 (3 IPS Empress 2 with cosmopost (zirconia post inserted longitudinally in the center of the bar (4 IPS Empress 2 with cosmopost (zirconia post inserted longitudinally in bottom of the bar. Specimens were subjected to three-point flexure loading with the span of 15mm, at a cross-head speed of 0.5 mm/min. Failure loads were recorded and analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tomhane Post-hoc tests and p<0.05 was set as the level of significance. Fractured surfaces were then observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM. Four additional samples were made as the third group, and zirconia-IPS interface was observed by SEM before fracture.Results: Mean values and standard deviations of three point flexural strengths of groups 1 to 4, were: 378.4±44.6, 258.6±27.5, 144.3±51.7, 230±22.3 MPa respectively. All the groups were statistically different from each other (P<0.05, except groups 2 and 4. The flexural strengths of groups 2, 3, 4 were significantly lower than group 1. Group 3 had the lowest flexural strength. SEM analysis showed that the initiated cracks propagated in the interface of zirconia post and IPS Empress 2 ceramic.Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, inserting zirconia post (cosmopost in IPS Empress 2 ceramic does not reinforce all-ceramic

  14. The bonding effectiveness of five luting resin cements to the IPS Empress 2 all ceramic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bookhan, V; Essop, A R M; Du Preez, I C

    2005-04-01

    Variolink II is the only resin cement used for bonding IPS (Ivoclar Porcelain System) Empress 2 ceramic restorations. Alternative luting resin cements need to be investigated for their bonding effectiveness with the IPS Empress 2 ceramic. To determine the shear bond strength (SBS) and the effect of thermocycling, on the bonding effectiveness, of five resin cements to IPS Empress 2 ceramic. The projecting surfaces of one hundred ceramic discs were ground wet on silicone carbide paper. The specimens were divided into 5 groups of 20. The resin cements were bonded to the prepared ceramic surfaces, in the form of a stub. The specimens were stored under distilled water at 37 degrees C in an oven for 24 hours. Ten specimens in each group were thermocycled for 300 cycles between 5 degrees C and 55 degrees C. All the specimens were stressed to failure in an Instron Materials Testing Machine. The results were subjected to a one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). Statistically similar mean SBS values were grouped using the Bonferroni (Dunn) multiple comparison test. The means for the non-thermocycled group were: 26.21, 19.41, 17.69, 17.43, and 15.76. The means for the thermocycled group were: 22.90, 15.72, 14.34, 13.96 and 13.45. The differences between the means were highly significant (p Empress 2 ceramic was effective. Thermocycling had a significant effect on the mean SBS values of Calibra. Thermocycling had no significant effect on the mean SBS values of the other resin cements.

  15. Two-year clinical evaluation of IPS Empress II ceramic onlays/inlays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagtekin, D A; Ozyöney, G; Yanikoglu, F

    2009-01-01

    The stronger the ceramic material, the longer the restoration stays in the mouth. The current study evaluated the two-year clinical performance of a strong ceramic system, IPS Empress II, with increased strength on onlay/inlay restorations of molars. Teeth from 35 patients, including three premolars and 32 molars, were prepared for 28 onlay and seven inlay restorations with IPS Empress II ceramics. The restorations were cemented with a highly viscous, dual-curing luting composite cement (Bifix) and evaluated by two examiners using USPHS criteria at baseline (one week following insertion), six months, one year and two years. The baseline scores and recalls were assessed by Wilcoxon signed rank test. Statistically significant marginal discoloration at the Bravo level was found at the 12- and 24-month recalls (p=0.046). One debonding was statistically insignificant. No changes were observed with respect to anamnesis, such as any symptom from the TMJ or masticatory muscles. No restorations were replaced due to hypersensitivity or were missing at the two-year evaluation. Any wear on the restoration, antagonist tooth or any changes of proximal contacts were not observed. IPS Empress II Ceramics were found to be appropriate as onlay/inlay restorations for clinical use under the conditions of the current study.

  16. [A preliminary study on the color effect of IPS Empress all-ceramic veneers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi-yong; Cheng, Xiang-rong; Wang, Yi-ning

    2004-09-01

    To evaluate the opaquing capacity, color compatibility and stability of IPS Empress all-ceramic veneers. A total of 86 IPS Empress all-ceramic veneers were made for 18 patients. The patients were divided into three groups: Group A was tetracycline teeth, 64 veneers for 5 patients; Group B was non-tetracycline teeth, 22 veneers for 13 patients; Group C was 22 natural vital teeth with normal color as control group. Before and after veneers were inserted, ShadeEye NCC was employed to obtain L * a * b * values of each tooth. The values of cemented veneers used as the baseline, the L * a * b * values of each veneer were measured half a year, 1 year, and 2 years after restoration respectively. All L * a * b * values at different evaluation times were analyzed by SPSS 10.0. Before and after veneers were restored, the L * a * b * values of both Group A and Group B were significantly different, the color difference being 5.01 and 4.15 respectively. The color difference between Group A and selected shade guides was 2.45. Compared with the baseline value, the L * value of Group A significantly decreased 2 years after restoration, but the DeltaE of different evaluation times was not significantly different. The color difference between Group B and Group C was 0.22 and there was no significant color difference after restoration. IPS Empress all-ceramic veneers have excellent opaquing capacity, color compatibility and stability to non-tetracycline teeth. To tetracycline teeth IPS Empress all-ceramic veneers have a certain opaquing capacity, but they cannot completely match with shade guides; the L * value is significantly different after restoration and further studies are needed to evaluate its color effect.

  17. Clinical performance of IPS-Empress 2 ceramic crowns inserted by general dental practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, Yasar F; Al-Omiri, Mahmoud K; Khader, Yousef Saleh; Al-Wahadni, Ahed

    2008-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical performance of IPS-Empress 2(R) all-ceramic crowns placed by general dental practitioners. Eighty-two IPS-Empress 2 crowns placed in 64 patients (27 females and 37 males) were evaluated. These crowns had been in place for 15.2 to 57.2 months (mean 25.3 months, SD=9.3). Survival analysis was conducted using the Kaplan-Meier method. Of the 82 crowns 93.9% were rated satisfactory. In terms of the integrity of the restorations, fracture was observed in three crowns and two showed a crack upon transillumination. Five crowns were rated unsatisfactory for color match; one for marginal adaptation; and none for discoloration, secondary caries, or sensitivity. IPS-Empress 2(R) is a suitable material to fabricate all-ceramic crowns; when these all-ceramic crowns were inserted by general dental practitioners, they functioned satisfactorily with low failure rates during an observation period ranging between 15.2 to 57.2 months.

  18. Effect finishing and polishing procedures on the surface roughness of IPS Empress 2 ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boaventura, Juliana Maria Capelozza; Nishida, Rodrigo; Elossais, André Afif; Lima, Darlon Martins; Reis, José Mauricio Santos Nunes; Campos, Edson Alves; de Andrade, Marcelo Ferrarezi

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the surface roughness of IPS Empress 2 ceramic when treated with different finishing/polishing protocols. Sixteen specimens of IPS Empress 2 ceramic were made from wax patterns obtained using a stainless steel split mold. The specimens were glazed (Stage 0-S0, control) and divided into two groups. The specimens in Group 1 (G1) were finished/polished with a KG Sorensen diamond point (S1), followed by KG Sorensen siliconized points (S2) and final polishing with diamond polish paste (S3). In Group 2 (G2), the specimens were finished/polished using a Shofu diamond point (S1), as well as Shofu siliconized points (S2) and final polishing was performed using Porcelize paste (S3). After glazing (S0) and following each polishing procedure (S1, S2 or S3), the surface roughness was measured using TALYSURF Series 2. The average surface roughness results were analyzed using ANOVA followed by Tukey post-hoc tests (α = 0.01) RESULTS: All of the polishing procedures yielded higher surface roughness values when compared to the control group (S0). S3 yielded lower surface roughness values when compared to S1 and S2. The proposed treatments negatively affected the surface roughness of the glazed IPS Empress 2 ceramic.

  19. Periodontal response to all-ceramic crowns (IPS Empress) in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Wahadni, A M; Mansour, Y; Khader, Y

    2006-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the periodontal response to the presence of all-ceramic crowns (IPS Empress) in general practice patients. The convenience sample included 82 IPS Empress crowns placed in 64 patients. These crowns had been in place for an average of 16.27 (SD 9.26) months and ranged from 6.2 to 48.87 months at the time of clinical examination. Periodontal health status (as determined by dental plaque, gingival health status, periodontal pockets) was assessed around all crowned teeth and around matched contralateral teeth by one calibrated examiner. Periodontal indices utilized included the Plaque Index (PI), Gingival Index (GI) and pocket depth (PD) with calibrated probes graduated in millimetres. Plaque, gingival and PD values for crowned teeth were compared with those for control teeth using Wilcoxon signed-rank test for each clinical parameters. Chi-square was used to test the significance of the difference in their distribution between crowns and control teeth. Statistically, PI (0.35), GI (0.41) and mean PD scores (1.42) of IPS Empress crowned teeth compared less favourably with scores of the control teeth (0.27, 0.23 and 0.86 respectively). Teeth with IPS Empress crowns had poorer periodontal health and more clinically evident plaque than uncrowned teeth.

  20. [Chromatic study of all-ceramic crown--IPS Empress: difference of color by manufacturing technique and cements].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hata, Utako; Sadamitsu, Kenichiro; Yamamura, Osamu; Kawauchi, Daisuke; Fujii, Teruhisa

    2004-12-01

    In recent years,aesthetic appearance and function are called for and all-ceramic crowns are spreading. By choosing an all-ceramic crown the problem of metal ceramics is avoided. There are difficulties of color tone reproducibility of cervical margin and darkness of gingival margin. We examined IPS Empress also in various all-ceramic crowns. IPS Empress has high permeability a ceramic ingot of various color tones and excellent color tone reproducibility of natural teeth. Generally a layering technique is used for an anterior tooth and the staining technique is used for a molar. However the details are unknown We examined how differences of manufacturing method and cement affect the color tone of all ceramics clinically. Two kinds of Empress crown were fabricated for a 27 year-old woman's upper left-side central incisors:the staining technique of IPS Empress and the layering technique of IPS Empress II. Various try-in pastes(transparent opaque white white and yellow) of VariolinkII of the IPS Empress System were used for cementing. Color was measured using a spectrophotometer CMS 35FS. The L*a*b* color system was used for showing a color. The right-side central incisors on the opposite side of the same name teeth were used for comparison. We analyzed the color difference (DeltaE* ab)with a natural tooth. Consequently when it had no cement of staining technique and was tranceparent small values were obtained. It is considered that the color tone can be adjusted by color cement. It is effective to use the staining technique for an anterior tooth crown depending on the case. The crown manufactured using the layering technique is not easily influenced by cement. The crown manufactured by the staining technique tends to be influenced by cement.

  1. Influence of different post core materials on the color of Empress 2 full ceramic crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Jing; Wang, Xin-zhi; Feng, Hai-lan

    2006-10-20

    For esthetic consideration, dentin color post core materials were normally used for all-ceramic crown restorations. However, in some cases, clinicians have to consider combining a full ceramic crown with a metal post core. Therefore, this experiment was conducted to test the esthetical possibility of applying cast metal post core in a full ceramic crown restoration. The color of full ceramic crowns on gold and Nickel-Chrome post cores was compared with the color of the same crowns on tooth colored post cores. Different try-in pastes were used to imitate the influence of a composite cementation on the color of different restorative combinations. The majority of patients could not detect any color difference less than DeltaE 1.8 between the two ceramic samples. So, DeltaE 1.8 was taken as the objective evaluative criterion for the evaluation of color matching and patients' satisfaction. When the Empress 2 crown was combined with the gold alloy post core, the color of the resulting material was similar to that of a glass fiber reinforced resin post core (DeltaE = 0.3). The gold alloy post core and the try-in paste did not show a perceptible color change in the full ceramic crowns, which indicated that the color of the crowns might not be susceptible to change between lab and clinic as well as during the process of composite cementation. Without an opaque covering the Ni-Cr post core would cause an unacceptable color effect on the crown (DeltaE = 2.0), but with opaque covering, the color effect became more clinically satisfactory (DeltaE = 1.8). It may be possible to apply a gold alloy post core in the Empress 2 full ceramic crown restoration when necessary. If a non-extractible Ni-Cr post core exists in the root canal, it might be possible to restore the tooth with an Empress 2 crown after covering the labial surface of the core with one layer of opaque resin cement.

  2. Effect of esthetic core shades on the final color of IPS Empress all-ceramic crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azer, Shereen S; Ayash, Ghada M; Johnston, William M; Khalil, Moustafa F; Rosenstiel, Stephen F

    2006-12-01

    Clinically relevant assessment of all-ceramic crowns supported by esthetic composite resin foundations has not been evaluated with regard to color reproducibility. This in vitro study quantitatively evaluated the influence of different shades of composite resin foundations and resin cement on the final color of a leucite-reinforced all-ceramic material. A total of 128 disks were fabricated; 64 (20 x 1 mm) were made of all-ceramic material (IPS Empress) and 64 (20 x 4 mm) of 4 different shades composite resin (Tetric Ceram). The ceramic and composite resin disks were luted using 2 shades (A3 and Transparent) of resin cement (Variolink II). Color was measured using a colorimeter configured with a diffuse illumination/0-degree viewing geometry, and Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage (CIE) L( *)a( *)b( *) values were directly calculated. Descriptive statistical analysis was performed, and color differences (DeltaE) for the average L( *), a( *) and b( *) color parameters were calculated. Repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to compare mean values and SDs between the different color combinations (alpha=.05). The CIE L( *)a( *)b( *) color coordinate values showed no significant differences for variation in color parameters due to the effect of the different composite resin shades (P=.24) or cement shades (P=.12). The mean color difference (DeltaE) value between the groups was 0.8. Within the limitations of this study, the use of different shades for composite resin cores and resin cements presented no statistically significant effect on the final color of IPS Empress all-ceramic material.

  3. Remakes of Colorlogic and IPS Empress ceramic restorations in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hekland, Helge; Riise, Trond; Berg, Einar

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this article was to study frequencies and distribution of remakes of all-ceramic inlays/onlays, veneers, and crowns occurring before and after cementation. A total of 2,069 sintered feldspathic ceramic restorations (Colorlogic) and 1,136 pressure-molded ceramic restorations (IPS Empress 1 and 2) were produced during the study period by one dental laboratory. The laboratory gave an unqualified and unlimited guarantee for their ceramic restorations. The outcome variable was reports from the clinicians to the dental laboratory about any problems related to the restoration, necessitating remake. Problems occurring before cementation occurred in 4.4% of the restorations. Veneers were remade more frequently than the other types of restorations (6.6%). After cementation, the overall 2-year rate of remakes was 1%, indicating a survival rate of the ceramic restorations of 99%, with inlays/onlays exhibiting the highest (99.8%) and crowns the lowest (98.4%) rates. This difference in rates was significant. No significant differences in remakes between ceramics or tooth categories were found. There were few problems in a short- to medium-term perspective that, in the opinion of general practitioners, necessitated remakes of all-ceramic restorations.

  4. Finite Element Analysis of IPS Empress II Ceramic Bridge Reinforced by Zirconia Bar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kermanshah, H; Bitaraf, T; Geramy, A

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of trenched zirconia bar on the von Mises stress distribution of IPS -Empress II core ceramics. The three-dimensional model including a three-unit bridge from the second premolar to the second molar was designed. The model was reinforced with zirconia bar (ZB), zirconia bar with vertical trench (VZB) and zirconia bar with horizontal trench (HZB) (cross sections of these bars were circular). The model without zirconia bar was designed as the control. The bridges were loaded by 200 N and 500 N on the occlusal surface at the middle of the pontic component and von Mises stresses were evaluated along a defined path. IN THE CONNECTOR AREA, VON MISES STRESS IN MPA WERE APPROXIMATELY IDENTICAL IN THE SPECIMENS WITH ZB (AT MOLAR CONNECTOR (MC): 4.75 and at premolar connector (PC): 6.40) and without ZB (MC: 5.50, PC: 6.68), and considerable differences were not recognized. Whereas, Von-Mises stress (MPa) in the specimens with horizontal trenched Zirconia bar (HZB) (MC: 3.91, PC: 2.44) and Vertical trenched Zirconia bar (VZB) (MC: 2.53, PC: 2.56) was decreased considerably. Embeded trenched zirconia bar could reinforce IPS-Empress II at the connector area which is a main failure region in all ceramic fixed partial dentures.

  5. Finite Element Analysis of IPS –Empress II Ceramic Bridge Reinforced by Zirconia Bar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allahyar Geramy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the effect of trenched zirconia bar on the von Mises stress distribution of IPS –Empress II core ceramics.Material and Methods: The three-dimensional model including a three-unit bridge from the second premolar to the second molar was designed. The model was reinforced with zirconia bar (ZB, zirconia bar with vertical trench (VZB, and zirconia bar with horizontal trench (HZB (cross sections of these bars were circular. The model without zirconia bar was designed as the control. The bridges were loaded by 200 N and 500 N on the occlusal surface at the middle of the pontic component, and Von-Mises stresses were evaluated along a defined path.Result: In the connector area, VonMises stress in MPa were approximately identical in the specimens with ZB (at molar connector (MC: 4.75, and at premolar connector (PC: 6.40 and without ZB (MC: 5.50, PC: 6.68, and considerable differences were not recognized. Whereas, Von-Mises stress (MPa in the specimens with horizontal trenched Zirconia bar (HZB (MC: 3.91, PC: 2.44 and Vertical trenched Zirconia bar (VZB (MC: 2.53, PC: 2.56 was decreased considerably.Conclusion: Embeded trenched zirconia bar could reinforce IPS-Empress II at the connector area which is a main failure region in all ceramic fixed partial dentures.

  6. Strength and microstructure of IPS Empress 2 glass-ceramic after different treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, S C; Dong, J K; Lüthy, H; Schärer, P

    2000-01-01

    This investigation was designed to determine whether heat pressing and/or simulated heat treatments affect the flexure strength and microstructure of the lithium disilicate glass-ceramic of the IPS Empress 2 system. Four groups of the lithium disilicate glass-ceramic were prepared as follows: group 1 = as-received material; group 2 = heat-pressed material; group 3 = heat-pressed and stimulated initial heat-treated material; and group 4 = heat-pressed and simulated heat-treated material with full firings for a final restoration. Three-point bending tests and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis were conducted. The flexure strength of group 2 was significantly higher than that of group 1. However, there were no significant differences in strength among groups 2, 3, and 4, or between groups 1 and 4. The SEM micrographs of the lithium disilicate glass-ceramic showed a closely packed, multidirectionally interlocking microstructure of numerous lithium disilicate crystals protruding from the glass matrix. The crystals in the glass matrix of the heat-pressed materials (groups 2, 3, and 4) were a little more homogeneous and about 2 times bigger than those of the as-received material (group 1). These changes of the microstructure were greatest between groups 1 and 2. However, there were no marked differences among groups 2, 3, and 4. Although there were significant increases in the strength and some changes of the microstructure after the heat-pressing operation, the combination of heat pressing and simulated subsequent heat treatments did not produce an increase of strength of IPS Empress 2 glass-ceramic.

  7. Fracture rates of IPS Empress all-ceramic crowns--a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heintze, Siegward D; Rousson, Valentin

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical fracture rate of crowns fabricated with the pressable, leucite-reinforced ceramic IPS Empress, and relate the results to the type of tooth restored. The database SCOPUS was searched for clinical studies involving full-coverage crowns made of IPS Empress. To assess the fracture rate of the crowns in relation to the type of restored tooth and study, Poisson regression analysis was used. Seven clinical studies were identified involving 1,487 adhesively luted crowns (mean observation time: 4.5+/-1.7 years) and 81 crowns cemented with zinc-phosphate cement (mean observation time: 1.6+/-0.8 years). Fifty-seven of the adhesively luted crowns fractured (3.8%). The majority of fractures (62%) occurred between the third and sixth year after placement. There was no significant influence regarding the test center on fracture rate, but the restored tooth type played a significant role. The hazard rate (per year) for crowns was estimated to be 5 in every 1,000 crowns for incisors, 7 in every 1,000 crowns for premolars, 12 in every 1,000 crowns for canines, and 16 in every 1,000 crowns for molars. One molar crown in the zinc-phosphate group fractured after 1.2 years. Adhesively luted IPS Empress crowns showed a low fracture rate for incisors and premolars and a somewhat higher rate for molars and canines. The sample size of the conventionally luted crowns was too small and the observation period too short to draw meaningful conclusions.

  8. Influence of surface conditions and silane agent on the bond of resin to IPS Empress 2 ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spohr, Ana Maria; Sobrinho, Lourenço Correr; Consani, Simonides; Sinhoreti, Mario Alexandre Coelho; Knowles, Jonathan C

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different ceramic surface treatments on the tensile bond strength between IPS Empress 2 ceramic framework and Rely X adhesive resin cement, with or without the application of a silane coupling agent. One hundred twenty disks were made, embedded in resin, and randomly divided into six groups: group 1 = sandblasting (100 microm), no silanation; group 2 = sandblasting (100 microm), silane treatment; group 3 = sandblasting (50 microm), no silanation; group 4 = sandblasting (50 microm), silane treatment; group 5 = hydrofluoric acid etching, no silanation; and group 6 = hydrofluoric acid etching, silane treatment. The disks were bonded into pairs with adhesive resin cement. All samples were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 24 hours and then thermocycled. The samples were submitted to tensile testing. The use of silane improved the bond strength in relation to the groups in which silane was not applied (P Empress 2 ceramic framework and resin agent.

  9. AFM and SEM study of the effects of etching on IPS-Empress 2 TM dental ceramic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, X.-P.; Silikas, N.; Allaf, M.; Wilson, N. H. F.; Watts, D. C.

    2001-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of increasing etching time on the surface of the new dental material, IPS-Empress 2 TM glass ceramic. Twenty one IPS-Empress 2 TM glass ceramic samples were made from IPS-Empress 2 TM ingots through lost-wax, hot-pressed ceramic fabrication technology. All samples were highly polished and cleaned ultrasonically for 5 min in acetone before and after etching with 9.6% hydrofluoric acid gel. The etching times were 0, 10, 20, 30, 60, 90 and 120 s respectively. Microstructure was analysed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to evaluate the surface roughness and topography. Observations with SEM showed that etching with hydrofluoric acid resulted in preferential dissolution of glass matrix, and that partially supported crystals within the glass matrix were lost with increasing etching time. AFM measurements indicated that etching increased the surface roughness of the glass-ceramic. A simple least-squares linear regression was used to establish a relationship between surface roughness parameters ( Ra, RMS), and etching time, for which r2>0.94. This study demonstrates the benefits of combining two microscopic methods for a better understanding of the surface. SEM showed the mode of action of hydrofluoric acid on the ceramic and AFM provided valuable data regarding the extent of surface degradation relative to etching time.

  10. Effect of different surface treatments on roughness of IPS Empress 2 ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara, Haluk Baris; Dilber, Erhan; Koc, Ozlem; Ozturk, A Nilgun; Bulbul, Mehmet

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of different surface treatments (air abrasion, acid etching, laser irradiation) on the surface roughness of a lithium-disilicate-based core ceramic. A total of 40 discs of lithium disilicate-based core ceramic (IPS Empress 2; Ivoclar Vivadent, Schaan, Liechtenstein) were prepared (10 mm in diameter and 1 mm in thickness) according to the manufacturer's instructions. Specimens were divided into four groups (n = 10), and the following treatments were applied: air abrasion with alumina particles (50 μm), acid etching with 5% hydrofluoric acid, Nd:YAG laser irradiation (1 mm distance, 100 mJ, 20 Hz, 2 W) and Er:YAG laser irradiation (1 mm distance, 500 mJ, 20 Hz, 10 W). Following determination of surface roughness (R(a)) by profilometry, specimens were examined with atomic force microscopy. The data were analysed by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey HSD test (α = 0.05). One-way ANOVA indicated that surface roughness following air abrasion was significantly different from the surface roughness following laser irradiation and acid etching (P 0.05). Air abrasion increased surface roughness of lithium disilicate-based core ceramic surfaces more effectively than acid-etching and laser irradiation.

  11. Comparative evaluation of shear bond strength, between IPS-Empress2 ceramics and three dual-cured resin cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajimiragha H

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Cementation is one of the most critical steps of the porcelain restoration technique. However, limited information is available concerning the bond strength of current ceramic bonding systems. The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of three dual-cure resin cements to IPS-Empress2 ceramics. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 30 pairs of IPS-Empress 2 ceramic discs were fabricated with 10 and 8 mm diameters and 2.5 mm thickness. After sandblasting and ultrasonic cleaning, the surfaces of all specimens were etched with 9% hydrofluoric acid for 60 seconds. Then, the three groups of 10 bonded specimens were prepared ceramic bonding resin systems including Panavia F2, Variolink II and Rely X ARC. After storage in 37±1c water for 24 hours and thermocycling in 5c and 55c water for 500 cycles with 1-minute dwell time, the shear bond strengths were determined using Instron machine at speed of 0.5mm/min. Data were analyzed by One Way ANOVA test. For multiple paired comparisons, the Tukey HSD method was used. The mode of failure was evaluated by scanning electro microscope (SEM. P<0.05 was considered as the limit of significance. Result: Significant differences were found between different cement types (P<0.05. Variolink II provided the highest bonding values with IPS-Empress2. A combination of different modes of failure was observed. Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, according to the highest mode of cohesive failure, Variolink II seems to have the strongest bond with IPS-Empress2 ceramics.

  12. Real time neutron diffraction and NMR of the Empress II glass-ceramic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, M D; Hill, R G; Karpukhina, N; Law, R V

    2011-10-01

    This study reports real time neutron diffraction on the Empress II glass-ceramic system. The commercial glass-ceramics was characterized by real time neutron diffraction, ³¹P and ²⁹Si solid-state MAS-NMR, DSC and XRD. On heating, the as-received glass ceramic contained lithium disilicate (Li₂Si₂O₅), which melted with increasing temperature. This was revealed by neutron diffraction which showed the Bragg peaks for this phase had disappeared by 958°C in agreement with thermal analysis. On cooling lithium metasilicate (Li₂SiO₃) started to form at around 916°C and a minor phase of cristobalite at around 852°C. The unit cell volume of both Li-silicate phases increased linearly with temperature at a rate of +17×10⁻³ ų.°C⁻¹. Room temperature powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) of the material after cooling confirms presence of the lithium metasilicate and cristobalite as the main phases and shows, in addition, small amount of lithium disilicate and orthophosphate. ³¹P MAS-NMR reveals presence of the lithiorthophosphate (Li₃PO₄) before and after heat treatment. The melting of lithium disilicate on heating and crystallisation of lithium metasilicate on cooling agree with endothermic and exotermic features respectively observed by DSC. ²⁹Si MAS-NMR shows presence of lithium disilicate phase in the as-received glass-ceramic, though not in the major proportion, and lithium metasilicate in the material after heat treatment. Both phases have significantly long T₁ relaxation time, especially the lithium metasilicate, therefore, a quantitative analysis of the ²⁹Si MAS-NMR spectra was not attempted. Significance. The findings of the present work demonstrate importance of the commercially designed processing parameters in order to preserve desired characteristics of the material. Processing the Empress II at a rate slower than recommended 60°C min⁻¹ or long isothermal hold at the maximal processing temperature 920°C can cause

  13. A comparison of the fabrication times of all-ceramic partial crowns: Cerec 3D vs IPS Empress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gozdowski, S; Reich, S

    2009-01-01

    Apart from precision, the time factor plays a decisive role in the fabrication of all-ceramic dental restorations. Therefore, the aim of this study was to compare two all-ceramic systems with regard to the time required for the fabrication of partial crowns [MODB]. The null hypothesis tested was that the fabrication times of CAD/CAM generated partial crowns are shorter than the fabrication times of partial crowns manufactured in the laboratory. In sixteen model pairs mounted in the articulator, which corresponded to different clinical situations, tooth 36 was prepared for an all-ceramic partial crown [MODB]. With the Cerec3D method [CHAIR], the fabrication of the restoration was simulated directly on the "phantom patient". The IPS Empress system [LAB] was used forthe indirectfabrication method via an impression of the phantom patient. Both methods were used for each preparation. The adhesive luting procedure was not simulated and, therefore, not measured. The mean processing times [hh:mm:ss] were 00:35:05 (SD +/- 03:27 min) for the Cerec method and 04:17:54 (SD +/- 26:01 min) for the Empress method. The mean time on the phantom patient for process-induced activities was 11:47 minutes (SD +/- 02:08 min) for the Cerec method and 03:58 minutes (SD +/- 02:50 min) for the Empress method. Time expenditure for fabrication is only one aspect in order to assess the suitability of a restoration system. Both methods enable the dentist to provide high quality all ceramic restorations. Although the Empress method showed a time advantage of 65% during the fitting phase and occlusal grinding-in on the phantom patient in comparison to the Cerec method, the time spent during the laboratory phase has to be considered as well.

  14. Longevity and clinical performance of IPS-Empress ceramic restorations--a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Mowafy, Omar; Brochu, Jean-François

    2002-04-01

    A literature review of longevity and clinical performance of IPS-Empress restorations is presented. A MEDLINE search was conducted in fall 2000. Selection criteria were set so as to identify suitable clinical trials that were published in full and that had lasted more than 2 years. A total of 6 clinical trials on the performance of IPS-Empress inlays and onlays and a total of 3 clinical trials on the performance of IPS-Empress crowns were identified. Survival rates for IPS-Empress inlays and onlays ranged from 96% at 4.5 years to 91% at 7 years; most failures were due to bulk fracture. IPS-Empress crowns had a survival rate ranging from 92% to 99% at 3 to 3.5 years; crown failure was also mainly due to fracture. Dentists should inform their patients about these survival rates when offering such treatment. The use of IPS-Empress crowns in the posterior of the mouth is not recommended until the results of more long-term clinical trials are available.

  15. [Effect of core: dentin thickness ratio on the flexure strength of IPS Empress II heat-pressed all-ceramic restorative material].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi-hong; Feng, Hai-lan; Bao, Yi-wang; Qiu, Yan

    2007-02-18

    To evaluate the effect of core:dentin thickness ratio on the flexure strength, fracture mode and origin of bilayered IPS Empress II ceramic composite specimens. IPS Empress II core ceramic, dentin porcelain and bilayered composite specimens with core:dentin thickness ratio of 2:1 and 1:1 were tested in three-point flexure strength. Mean strengths and standard deviations were determined. The optical microscopy was employed for identification of the fracture mode and origin. The flexure strength of dentin porcelain was the smallest(62.7 MPa), and the strength of bilayered composite specimens was smaller than single-layered core ceramic(190.2 MPa). The core: dentin ratio did not influence the strength of bilayered composite specimens. The frequency of occurrence of bilayered specimen delaminations was higher in the group of core: dentin thickness ratio of 1:1 than in the group of 2:1. IPS Empress II core ceramic was significantly stronger than veneering dentin porcelain. Core:dentin thickness ratio could significantly influence the fracture mode and origin, and bilayered IPS Empress II ceramic composite specimens showed little influence in the fracture strength.

  16. Clinical examination of leucite-reinforced glass-ceramic crowns (Empress) in general practice: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjögren, G; Lantto, R; Granberg, A; Sundström, B O; Tillberg, A

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to retrospectively evaluate leucite reinforced-glass ceramic crowns (Empress) placed in patients who regularly visit general practices. One hundred ten Empress crowns, placed in 29 patients who visited a general practice on a regular basis, were evaluated according to the California Dental Association's (CDA) quality evaluation system. In addition, the occurrence of plaque and certain gingival conditions was evaluated. All crowns were luted with resin composite cement. The mean and median years in function for the crowns were 3.6 and 3.9 years, respectively. Based on the CDA criteria, 92% of the 110 crowns were rated "satisfactory." Eighty-six percent were given the CDA rating "excellent" for margin integrity. Fracture was registered in 6% of the 110 crowns. Of the remaining 103 crowns, the CDA rating excellent was given to 74% for anatomic form, 86% for color, and 90% for surface. No significant differences (P > 0.05) were observed regarding fracture rates between anterior and posterior crowns. With regard to the occurrence of plaque and bleeding on probing, no significant differences (P > 0.05) were observed between the Empress crowns and the controls. Most of the fractured crowns had been placed on molars or premolars. Although the difference between anterior and posterior teeth was not statistically significant with respect to the fracture rates obtained, the number of fractured crowns placed on posterior teeth exceeded that of those placed on anterior teeth. The difference between the fracture rates may have clinical significance, and the risk of fracture has to be taken into consideration when placing crowns on teeth that are likely to be subjected to high stress levels.

  17. The effect of different shades of specific luting agents and IPS empress ceramic thickness on overall color.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzioğlu, Hakan; Yilmaz, Burak; Yurdukoru, Bengul

    2009-10-01

    The color stability of both porcelain and luting materials is very important for the esthetics of laminate veneers and all-ceramic crowns. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of different shades of resin-based luting cement and the thickness of IPS Empress ceramics on the final color of the restorations. Resin-based dual-polymerized composite cement in two different shades (RelyX ARC) and ceramic disks of different thicknesses were selected for the study. Forty specimens (ten each of four different thicknesses: 0.5 mm, 1 mm, 2 mm, and 3 mm) were used for the evaluation. Initial specimen color parameters were determined in a Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage L*a*b* color order system with a colorimeter. Two different shades of the cement were prepared as polymerized layers and applied to one face of the specimens in order. Color changes were calculated between baseline color measurements and measurements after cementation. Color difference data were analyzed statistically. All specimens showed a significant color shift (DE > 3.7) after cementation regardless of the cement shade. However, the differences in the cement shade did not significantly affect the final color of the ceramic specimens for any thickness, and color shifts were not perceivable between the different shades of cement. (Int J Periodontics Restorative Dent 2009;29:499-505.).

  18. The influence of ceramic surface treatments on the micro-shear bond strength of composite resin to IPS Empress 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panah, Faride Gerami; Rezai, Sosan Mir Mohammad; Ahmadian, Leila

    2008-07-01

    An increasing demand for esthetic restorations has resulted in the development of new ceramic systems, but fracture of veneering ceramics still remains the primary cause of failure. Porcelain repair frequently involves replacement with composite resin, but the bond strength between composite resin and all-ceramic coping materials has not been studied extensively. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of different ceramic surface treatments on the micro-shear bond strength of composite resin to IPS Empress 2 coping material. Sixteen 7 x 7 x 1 mm(3) lithia disilicate-based core ceramic plates were fabricated using the lost wax technique. The plates were divided into eight groups, and eight different surface treatments were performed: (1) no treatment (NT); (2) airborne-particle abrasion with 50-mum alumina particles (Al); (3) acid etching with 9.6% hydrofluoric acid for 1 min (HF); (4) silane coating (S); (5) AlHF; (6) AlS; (7) HFS; and (8) AlHFS. Then, ten composite resin cylinders (0.8-mm diameter x 0.5-mm height) were light-polymerized onto the ceramic plates in each group. Each specimen was subjected to a shear load at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min until fracture occurred. The fracture sites were examined with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to determine the location of failure during debonding and to examine the surface treatment effects. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and multiple comparison (Dunnet T3) tests were used for statistical analysis of data. The mean micro-shear bond strength values (SD) in MPa were--NT: 4.10 (3.06), Al: 7.56 (4.11), HF: 14.04 (2.60), S: 14.58 (2.14), AlHF: 15.56 (3.36), AlS: 23.02 (4.17), HFS: 24.7 (4.43), AlHFS: 26.0 (3.71). ANOVA indicated the influence of surface treatment was significant (p Empress 2 was significantly different depending on the surface treatment method. Among the investigated methods, silane coating after airborne-particle abrasion and etching was the most effective surface treatment

  19. Survival rates of IPS empress 2 all-ceramic crowns and fixed partial dentures: results of a 5-year prospective clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquardt, Pascal; Strub, Jörg Rudolf

    2006-04-01

    The aim of this prospective clinical study was to evaluate the survival rates of IPS Empress 2 (Ivoclar Vivadent) all-ceramic crowns and fixed partial dentures (FPDs) after an observation period of up to 5 years. Forty-three patients (19 women and 24 men) were included in this study. The patients were treated with a total of 58 adhesive bonded IPS Empress 2 restorations. A total of 27 single crowns were placed on molars and premolars, and 31 three-unit FPDs were placed in the anterior and premolar regions. Clinical follow-up examinations took place at 6, 12, 24, 36, 48, and 60 months after insertion. Statistical analysis of the data was calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results of the 50-month analysis (interquartile range, 33 to 61 months) showed that the survival rate was 100% for crowns and 70% for FPDs. Six failures that occurred exclusively in the three-unit FPDs were observed. Framework fractures were recorded in three FPD units where the connector dimensions did not meet the manufacturer specifications. Only one FPD exhibited an irreparable partial veneer fracture, and 2 FPDs showed evidence of biologic failures. The accuracy of fit and esthetic parameters were clinically satisfactory for crowns and FPDs. The results of this 5-year clinical evaluation suggest that IPS Empress 2 ceramic is an appropriate material for the fabrication of single crowns. Because of the reduced survival rates, strict conditions should be considered before the use of IPS Empress 2 material for the fabrication of three-unit FPDs.

  20. Effect of water storage and surface treatments on the tensile bond strength of IPS Empress 2 ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvio, Luciana A; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço; Consani, Simonides; Sinhoreti, Mário A C; de Goes, Mario F; Knowles, Jonathan C

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of water storage (24 hours and 1 year) on the tensile bond strength between the IPS Empress 2 ceramic and Variolink II resin cement under different superficial treatments. One hundred and eighty disks with diameters of 5.3 mm at the top and 7.0 mm at the bottom, and a thickness of 2.5 mm were made, embedded in resin, and randomly divided into six groups: Groups 1 and 4 = 10% hydrofluoric acid for 20 seconds; Groups 2 and 5 = sandblasting for 5 seconds with 50 microm aluminum oxide; and Groups 3 and 6 = sandblasting for 5 seconds with 100 microm aluminum oxide. Silane was applied on the treated ceramic surfaces, and the disks were bonded into pairs with adhesive resin cement. The samples of Groups 1 to 3 were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 24 hours, and Groups 4 to 6 were stored for 1 year. The samples were subjected to a tensile strength test in an Instron universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min, until failure. The data were submitted to analysis of variance and Tukey's test (5%). The means of the tensile bond strength of Groups 1, 2, and 3 (15.54 +/- 4.53, 10.60 +/- 3.32, and 7.87 +/- 2.26 MPa) for 24-hour storage time were significantly higher than those observed for the 1-year storage (Groups 4, 5, and 6: 10.10 +/- 3.17, 6.34 +/- 1.06, and 2.60 +/- 0.41 MPa). The surface treatments with 10% hydrofluoric acid (15.54 +/- 4.53 and 10.10 +/- 3.17 MPa) showed statistically higher tensile bond strengths compared with sandblasting with 50 microm(10.60 +/- 3.32 and 6.34 +/- 1.06 MPa) and 100 microm (7.87 +/- 2.26 and 2.60 +/- 0.41 MPa) aluminum oxide for the storage time 24 hours and 1 year. Storage time significantly decreased the tensile bond strength for both ceramic surface treatments. The application of 10% hydrofluoric acid resulted in stronger tensile bond strength values than those achieved with aluminum oxide.

  1. Ceramic Parts for Turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, R. D.; Carpenter, Harry W.; Tellier, Jim; Rollins, Clark; Stormo, Jerry

    1987-01-01

    Abilities of ceramics to serve as turbine blades, stator vanes, and other elements in hot-gas flow of rocket engines discussed in report. Ceramics prime candidates, because of resistance to heat, low density, and tolerance of hostile environments. Ceramics considered in report are silicon nitride, silicon carbide, and new generation of such ceramic composites as transformation-toughened zirconia and alumina and particulate- or whisker-reinforced matrices. Report predicts properly designed ceramic components viable in advanced high-temperature rocket engines and recommends future work.

  2. Ceramic (Feldspathic & IPS Empress II) vs. laboratory composite (Gradia) veneers; a comparison between their shear bond strength to enamel; an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikzad, S; Azari, Abbas; Dehgan, S

    2010-07-01

    Patient demand for aesthetic dentistry is steadily growing. Laminates and free metal restorations have evolved in an attempt to overcome the invasiveness nature of full veneer restorations. Although many different materials have been used for making these restorations, there is no single material that fits best for all purposes. Two groups of ceramic material (Feldspathic and IPS Empress II) and one group of laboratory composite (Gradia) discs (10 discs in each group; 4 mm in diameter and 2 mm in thickness) were prepared according to the manufacturer's instruction. The surface of ceramic discs were etched and silanized. In Gradia group, liquid primer was applied on composite surfaces. Thirty freshly extracted sound human molars and premolars were randomly divided into three groups. The enamel surface of each tooth was slightly flattened (0.3 mm) on the buccal or lingual side and then primed and cemented to the prepared discs with the aid of a dental surveyor. The finishing specimens were thermocycled between 5 degrees C and 55 degrees C for 2500 cycles and then prepared for shear bond strength testing. The resulting data were analyzed by one-way anova and Tukey HSD test. The fractured surfaces of each specimen were inspected by means of stereomicroscope and SEM. There is significant difference between the bond strength of materials tested. The mean bond strengths obtained with Feldspathic ceramic, IPS Empress II and Gradia were 33.10 +/- 4.31 MPa, 26.04 +/- 7.61 MPa and 14.42 +/- 5.82 MPa, respectively. The fracture pattern was mainly mixed for ceramic groups. More scientific evidence needed for standardization of bonding protocols.

  3. Relative translucency of six all-ceramic systems. Part I: core materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffernan, Michael J; Aquilino, Steven A; Diaz-Arnold, Ana M; Haselton, Debra R; Stanford, Clark M; Vargas, Marcos A

    2002-07-01

    All-ceramic restorations have been advocated for superior esthetics. Various materials have been used to improve ceramic core strength, but it is unclear whether they affect the opacity of all-ceramic systems. This study compared the translucency of 6 all-ceramic system core materials at clinically appropriate thicknesses. Disc specimens 13 mm in diameter and 0.49 +/- 0.01 mm in thickness were fabricated from the following materials (n = 5 per group): IPS Empress dentin, IPS Empress 2 dentin, In-Ceram Alumina core, In-Ceram Spinell core, In-Ceram Zirconia core, and Procera AllCeram core. Empress and Empress 2 dentin specimens also were fabricated and tested at a thickness of 0.77 +/- 0.02 mm (the manufacturer's recommended core thickness is 0.8 mm). A high-noble metal-ceramic alloy (Porc. 52 SF) served as the control, and Vitadur Alpha opaque dentin was used as a standard. Sample reflectance (ratio of the intensity of reflected light to that of the incident light) was measured with an integrating sphere attached to a spectrophotometer across the visible spectrum (380 to 700 nm); 0-degree illumination and diffuse viewing geometry were used. Contrast ratios were calculated from the luminous reflectance (Y) of the specimens with a black (Yb) and a white (Yw) backing to give Yb/Yw with CIE illuminant D65 and a 2-degree observer function (0.0 = transparent, 1.0 = opaque). One-way analysis of variance and Tukey's multiple-comparison test were used to analyze the data (P In-Ceram Spinell > Empress, Procera, Empress 2 > In-Ceram Alumina > In-Ceram Zirconia, 52 SF alloy.

  4. Relative translucency of six all-ceramic systems. Part II: core and veneer materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffernan, Michael J; Aquilino, Steven A; Diaz-Arnold, Ana M; Haselton, Debra R; Stanford, Clark M; Vargas, Marcos A

    2002-07-01

    STATEMENT OF PROBLEM All-ceramic core materials with various strengthening compositions have a range of translucencies. It is unknown whether translucency differs when all-ceramic materials are fabricated similarly to the clinical restoration with a veneered core material. This study compared the translucency of 6 all-ceramic materials veneered and glazed at clinically appropriate thicknesses. Core specimens (n = 5 per group) of Empress dentin, Empress 2 dentin, In-Ceram Alumina, In-Ceram Spinell, In-Ceram Zirconia, and Procera AllCeram were fabricated as described in Part I of this study and veneered with their corresponding dentin porcelain to a final thickness of 1.47 +/- 0.01 mm. These specimens were compared with veneered Vitadur Alpha opaque dentin (as a standard), a clear glass disc (positive control), and a high-noble metal-ceramic alloy (Porc. 52 SF) veneered with Vitadur Omega dentin (negative control). Specimen reflectance was measured with an integrating sphere attached to a spectrophotometer across the visible spectrum (380 to 700 nm); 0-degree illumination and diffuse viewing geometry were used. Measurements were repeated after a glazing cycle. Contrast ratios were calculated from the luminous reflectance (Y) of the specimens with a black (Yb) and a white backing (Yw) to give Yb/Yw with CIE illuminant D65 and a 2-degree observer function (0.0 = transparent, 1.0 = opaque). One-way analysis of variance and Tukey's multiple-comparison test were used to analyze the data (P<.05). Significant differences in contrast ratios were found among the ceramic systems tested when they were veneered (P<.0001) and after the glazing cycle (P<.0001). Significant changes in contrast ratios (P<.0001) also were identified when the veneered specimens were glazed. Within the limitations of this study, a range of translucency was identified in the veneered all-ceramic systems tested. Such variability may affect their ability to match natural teeth. The glazing cycle resulted

  5. Empress 2. First year clinical results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culp, L

    1999-03-01

    As the search for perfect dental restorative materials continues, it seems we routinely return to ceramics as our standard. Current all-ceramic systems are state-of-the-art with regard to esthetics and function, but are limited in use to single unit restorations. Recently, an all-ceramic lithium disilicate-fluorapatite ceramic system was introduced (IPS Empress 2, Ivoclar North America, Amherst, NY), that allows multiple unit restorations to be fabricated and cemented using adhesive or traditional cementation techniques. This article will overview the technical procedures and advantages of this new ceramic system.

  6. The technical ceramics (second part)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auclerc, S.; Poulain, E.

    2004-01-01

    This work deals with ceramics used in the nuclear and the automotive industries. Concerning the nuclear sector, ceramics are particularly used in reactors, in the treatment of radioactive wastes and for the storage of the ultimate wastes. Details are given about the different ceramics used. In the automobile sector, aluminium is principally used for its lightness and cordierite, basic material of catalyst supports is especially used in the automobile devices of cleansing. (O.M.)

  7. Ceramic materials for porcelain veneers: part II. Effect of material, shade, and thickness on translucency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barizon, Karine T L; Bergeron, Cathia; Vargas, Marcos A; Qian, Fang; Cobb, Deborah S; Gratton, David G; Geraldeli, Saulo

    2014-10-01

    Information regarding the differences in translucency among new ceramic systems is lacking. The purpose of this study was to compare the relative translucency of the different types of ceramic systems indicated for porcelain veneers and to evaluate the effect of shade and thickness on translucency. Disk specimens 13 mm in diameter and 0.7-mm thick were fabricated for the following 9 materials (n=5): VITA VM9, IPS Empress Esthetic, VITA PM9, Vitablocks Mark II, Kavo Everest G-Blank, IPS Empress CAD, IPS e.max CAD, IPS e.maxPress, and Lava Zirconia. VITA VM9 served as the positive control and Lava as the negative control. The disks were fabricated with the shade that corresponds to A1. For IPS e.maxPress, additional disks were made with different shades (BL2, BL4, A1, B1, O1, O2, V1, V2, V3), thickness (0.3 mm), and translucencies (high translucency, low translucency). Color coordinates (CIE L∗ a∗ b∗) were measured with a tristimulus colorimeter. The translucency parameter was calculated from the color difference of the material on a black versus a white background. One-way ANOVA, the post hoc Tukey honestly significant difference, and the Ryan-Einot-Gabriel-Welsch multiple range tests were used to analyze the data (α=.05). Statistically significant differences in the translucency parameter were found among porcelains (PPM9, Empress Esthetic>Empress CAD>Mark II, Everest, e.max CAD>e.max Press>Lava. Significant differences also were noted when different shades and thickness were compared (Pceramic systems designed for porcelain veneers present varying degrees of translucency. The thickness and shade of lithium disilicate ceramic affect its translucency. Shade affects translucency parameter less than thickness. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. IPS Empress: a standard of excellence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornbrook, D S; Roberts, M

    1998-01-01

    For 10 years, clinicians have been able to provide patients with a proven aesthetic and functional restoration that exhibits wear-compatibility, durability, and marginal integrity. This leucite-reinforced, pressed ceramic (IPS Empress, Ivoclar Williams, Amherst, NY) presents to patients and dentists the option of a metal-free alternative which retains the functional advantages of a porcelain-fused-to-metal restoration. This article illustrates the importance of sound laboratory communication in the utilization of this restorative material, focusing upon three aspects: midline and incisal edge inclination, elimination of open gingival embrasures, and incisal edge translucency. Techniques are also presented in order to efficiently communicate details of each case presented to the laboratory.

  9. IPS Empress crown system: three-year clinical trial results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, J A; Choi, C; Fanuscu, M I; Mito, W T

    1998-02-01

    The IPS Empress system is a highly esthetic hot pressed glass ceramic material for fabrication of single crowns. Adhesive cementation of the system not only contributes to the esthetics but is necessary for increased strength of the crown. The purpose of this prospective clinical trials was to evaluate the longevity of 75 adhesively cemented Empress full crowns. An additional aim was to assess the adhesive cementation methodology and potential side effects. At the three-year point, one molar crown fractured for a 1.3 percent failure rate. The resin cementation technique that was employed exhibited a low incidence of microleakage with few clinical side effects. There was a 5.6 percent incidence of post-cementation sensitivity, with all symptoms subsiding by eight weeks. None of the crowns in the study required endodontic therapy.

  10. A short-term clinical evaluation of IPS Empress 2 crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toksavul, Suna; Toman, Muhittin

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical performance of all-ceramic crowns made with the IPS Empress 2 system after an observation period of 12 to 60 months. Seventy-nine IPS Empress 2 crowns were placed in 21 patients. The all-ceramic crowns were evaluated clinically, radiographically, and using clinical photographs. The evaluations took place at baseline (2 days after cementation) and at 6-month intervals for 12 to 60 months. Survival rate of the crowns was determined using Kaplan-Meier statistical analysis. Based on the US Public Health Service criteria, 95.24% of the crowns were rated satisfactory after a mean follow-up period of 58 months. Fracture was registered in only 1 crown. One endodontically treated tooth failed as a result of fracture at the cervical margin area. In this in vivo study, IPS Empress 2 crowns exhibited a satisfactory clinical performance during an observation period ranging from 12 to 60 months.

  11. Production of ceramic formed parts by means of plasma spraying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirner, K.

    1989-01-01

    Open and closed pipes and tubes, nozzles and crucibles, conical parts and other molded articles of ceramic materials such as aluminium oxide, magnesium-aluminium spinel, zirconium oxide, zirconium silicate and special ceramics can be fabricated by spray application to a core which is afterwards removed. Because at the same time these are mainly high temperature materials and high temperature application areas, plasma spraying is preferred. The process and examples of application are described, the advantages and disadvantages are pointed out. (orig.) [de

  12. An in-vitro investigation of the accuracy of fit of Procera and Empress crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Garry J R; Dobinson, Marie M; Landini, Gabriel; Harris, Jonathan J

    2005-09-01

    The current study aimed to investigate the accuracy of fit and the reproducibility of inner crown profile for two types of high strength ceramics, IPS Empress and Procera. Procera and Empress crowns with four different morphologies were cemented to dies using zinc phosphate dental cement. Vertical and horizontal sections were made through each of the crown/die preparations and images of the vertical sections were compared for curvature reproduction by alignment using image processing. Measurements were made on horizontal sections to determine cement layer thickness. Alignment of the crowns using image analysis identified quantifiable variations in the inner surface profile compared with the outer surface of the die. The largest differences occurred from the cusp tips to the occlusal adaptation area and differences in surface profile were less pronounced for Procera than Empress crowns. Marginal gap varied independently of ceramic or internal crown shape from 7-529 microm for Procera and 26-548 microm for Empress. IPS Empress has a superior ability to reproduce the inner surface profile of the crown morphologies investigated compared with Procera. The reduced reproduction of surface profile was associated with an increased cement thickness at the occlusal contact area that may inadvertently lead to failure of the crowns functional characteristics.

  13. Microleakage of IPS empress 2 inlay restorations luted with self-adhesive resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cal, E; Celik, E U; Turkun, M

    2012-01-01

    To assess the microleakage of three self-adhesive and one etch-and-rinse resin cements when luting IPS Empress 2 (Ivoclar Vivadent, Liechtenstein) all-ceramic inlay restorations to the prepared cavities in extracted human molars. The cylindrical Class V cavities were prepared on the buccal surfaces of 40 extracted human third molars using diamond burs. The IPS Empress 2 ceramic inlays were placed with Multilink Sprint (Ivoclar Vivadent), RelyX Unicem (3M ESPE, USA), G-Cem (GC, Japan), or Variolink II (Ivoclar Vivadent) as the control group. After storage in distilled water at 37°C for 24 hours, samples were subjected to 1000 thermal cycles between baths of 5°C and 55°C, with a dwell time of 30 seconds. The microleakage scores were examined on the occlusal and gingival margins at 30× magnification after each sample was stained with 0.5% basic fuchsin and sectioned into three parts using a thin diamond blade (Isomet, Buehler, USA) (n=40). The extent of microleakage on both occlusal and gingival margins of the restorations was scored and recorded. The microleakage data were analyzed using Kruskall-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U-tests. Statistically significant differences were observed between the groups in both margins according to the Kruskall-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U-tests (p<0.05). Microleakage scores on the occlusal margins were Variolink II < RelyX Unicem < G-Cem = Multilink Sprint. Microleakage scores on the gingival margins are Variolink II = RelyX Unicem < G-Cem < Multilink Sprint. Self-adhesive resin cements displayed higher microleakage scores on the occlusal margins, whereas on the gingival margins RelyX Unicem showed comparable microleakage results with the control samples.

  14. Experimental investigation on shrinkage and surface replication of injection moulded ceramic parts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Islam, Aminul; Giannekas, Nikolaos; Marhöfer, David Maximilian

    2014-01-01

    Ceramic moulded parts are increasingly being used in advanced components and devices due to their unprecedented material and performance attributes. The surface finish, replication quality and material shrinkage are of immense importance for moulded ceramic parts intended for precision applications....... The current paper presents a thorough investigation on the process of ceramic moulding where it systematically characterizes the surface replication and shrinkage behaviours of precision moulded ceramic components. The test parts are moulded from Catamold TZP-A which is Y2O3-stabilised ZrO2 having widespread...... distribution for the moulded ceramic parts is presented....

  15. Multidisciplinary approach to restoring anterior maxillary partial edentulous area using an IPS Empress 2 fixed partial denture: a clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dundar, Mine; Gungor, M Ali; Cal, Ebru

    2003-04-01

    Esthetics is a major concern during restoration of anterior partial edentulous areas. All-ceramic fixed partial dentures may provide better esthetics and biocompatibility in the restoration of anterior teeth. This clinic report describes a multidisciplinary approach and treatment procedures with an IPS Empress 2 fixed partial denture to restore missing anterior teeth.

  16. Effects of different surface-treatment methods on the bond strengths of resin cements to full-ceramic systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gülay Kansu

    2011-09-01

    Conclusions: The in vitro findings from this study indicate that surface-treatment procedures applied to the IPS Empress and the IPS Empress 2 full-ceramic systems are important when cement types are considered. In contrast, cement types and surface-treatment methods had no effect on changing the bond strength of the In-Ceram ceramic system.

  17. Sea Empress hydrocarbon data review and quality control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-11-01

    Three laboratories (Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food (MAFF), Environment Agency (Agency), and the National Environmental Technology Centre (NETCEN) of AEA Technology plc.), were heavily involved with hydrocarbon analytical chemistry during the response to the Sea Empress oil spill from February 1996. Arthur D. Little was asked by the Sea Empress Environmental Evaluation Committee (SEEEC) to review the laboratories to provide extra quality assurance for the data gathered and for future oil spill responses in the U.K. The objective of the review was to evaluate the general quality, technical defensibility, and interpretative value of analytical chemistry data generated as part of the Sea Empress oil spill response and monitoring programmes. The objectives of each of the three organisations within the overall spill response were different, and as a result the respective analytical programmes were designed to meet quite specific goals. Consequently, our comments on each group's performance are not intended to invite direct comparison between the three laboratories. The review was not a formal compliance audit, but rather is aimed at the U.K. government in an attempt to assist their preparations for future oil spills. (author)

  18. [Anterior bridges with the IPS-Empress-2 System after alveolar ridge augmentation. A case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawta, C; Bernhard, M

    2000-01-01

    The success of a prosthesis is judged according to optimal function, good chewing comfort, adequate phonetics and white and pink esthetics. The aim of a treatment is to approach the perfection of nature. For anterior bridgework, the all-ceramic System IPS Empress 2 offers light transmission and reflection comparable to that of natural teeth, provided that the pink esthetics are optimised in the preprosthetic phase. The provision of an anterior bridge in the IPS Empress 2-system is presented here in the form of a case report. After extraction of the anterior teeth, a ridge augmentation including preparation of the pontic bed was carried out. The type of post and core, preparation and cementation are important parameters for the success of all-ceramic restorations.

  19. Six-year follow-up with Empress veneers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fradeani, M

    1998-06-01

    This study reports on 6 years experience with IPS Empress laminate veneers. A total of 83 anterior veneers were positioned in 21 patients from January 1991 to December 1996 in the author's private practice. Final evaluation was carried out in May and June 1997. Color match, marginal discoloration, recurrent caries, contour, and marginal integrity were evaluated using the modified U.S. Public Health Service criteria at baseline and subsequent recall appointments. On the basis of the criteria used, a large percentage of veneers were rated Alfa. Only one failure was recorded, resulting in a success rate of 98.8%. A thorough description of clinical procedures and laboratory techniques through which anterior teeth can be successfully treated with ceramic veneers is supplied. A clinical case is presented to demonstrate the satisfactory esthetic results obtained using this very conservative restorative technique.

  20. Factors affecting the shear bond strength of metal and ceramic brackets bonded to different ceramic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Alhaija, Elham S J; Abu AlReesh, Issam A; AlWahadni, Ahed M S

    2010-06-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the shear bond strength (SBS) of metal and ceramic brackets bonded to two different all-ceramic crowns, IPS Empress 2 and In-Ceram Alumina, to compare the SBS between hydrofluoric acid (HFA), phosphoric acid etched, and sandblasted, non-etched all-ceramic surfaces. Ninety-six all-ceramic crowns were fabricated resembling a maxillary left first premolar. The crowns were divided into eight groups: (1) metal brackets bonded to sandblasted 9.6 per cent HFA-etched IPS Empress 2 crowns; (2) metal brackets bonded to sandblasted 9.6 per cent HFA-etched In-Ceram crowns; (3) ceramic brackets bonded to sandblasted 9.6 per cent HFA-etched IPS Empress 2 crowns; (4) ceramic brackets bonded to sandblasted 9.6 per cent HFA-etched In-Ceram crowns; (5) metal brackets bonded to sandblasted 37 per cent phosphoric acid-etched IPS Empress 2 crowns; (6) metal brackets bonded to sandblasted 37 per cent phosphoric acid-etched In-Ceram crowns; (7) metal brackets bonded to sandblasted, non-etched IPS Empress 2 crowns; and (8) metal brackets bonded to sandblasted, non-etched In-Ceram crowns. Metal and ceramic orthodontic brackets were bonded using a conventional light polymerizing adhesive resin. An Instron universal testing machine was used to determine the SBS at a crosshead speed of 0.1 mm/minute. Comparison between groups was performed using a univariate general linear model and chi-squared tests. The highest mean SBS was found in group 3 (120.15 +/- 45.05 N) and the lowest in group 8 (57.86 +/- 26.20 N). Of all the variables studied, surface treatment was the only factor that significantly affected SBS (P Empress 2 and In-Ceram groups.

  1. IPS Empress onlays luted with two dual-cured resin cements for endodontically treated teeth: a 3-year clinical evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atali, Pinar Yilmaz; Cakmakcioglu, Ozcan; Topbasi, Bulent; Turkmen, Cafer; Suslen, Ozlem

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of IPS Empress ceramic onlays luted with two dual-cured adhesive resin cements for endodontically treated teeth. Twenty molar teeth were restored with all-ceramic restorations luted randomly with Maxcem or Clearfil Esthetic Cement and DC Bond Kit luting systems (n = 10 each) in 20 patients. The restorations were assessed using modified US Public Health Service criteria at baseline, 6 months, and 1, 2, and 3 years. A statistically significant deterioration was found for the criteria marginal integrity, anatomical form, and surface roughness. For luting of ceramic onlays, no difference between the two luting systems was detected.

  2. Evaluation of Surface Characteristics and Shear Bond Strength of Metal Brackets Bonded to Two Different Porcelain Systems (Feldspathic/IPS-Empress-2 treated with Different Surface Conditioning Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amal S Nair

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: Surface conditioning with Co-Jet sand which produced silicatization resulted in a favorable bond strength in both feldspathic and IPS-Empress-2 ceramic surfaces. It was shown that it produced the least surface roughness among all the other surface conditioning groups.

  3. IPS Empress inlays and onlays after four years--a clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krämer, N; Frankenberger, R; Pelka, M; Petschelt, A

    1999-07-01

    Ceramic inlays are used as esthetic alternatives to amalgam and other metallic materials for the restoration of badly damaged teeth. However, only limited clinical data are available regarding adhesive inlays and onlays with proximal margins located in dentine. In a prospective, controlled clinical study, the performance of IPS Empress inlays and onlays with cuspal replacements and margins below the amelocemental junction was examined. Ninety-six IPS Empress fillings were placed in 34 patients by six clinicians. The restorations were luted with four different composite systems. The dentin bonding system Syntac Classic was used in addition to the acid-etch-technique. At baseline and after 6 months, one, two and four years after placement the restorations were assessed by two calibrated investigators using modified USPHS codes and criteria. A representative sample of the restorations was investigated by scanning electron microscopy to evaluate wear. Seven of the 96 restorations investigated had to be replaced (failure rate 7%; Kaplan-Meier). Four inlays had suffered cohesive bulk fractures and three teeth required endodontic treatment. After four years in clinical service, significant deterioration (Friedman 2-way Anova; p Empress inlays and onlays bonded with the dentin bonding system Syntac Classic were found to have a 7% failure rate with 79% of the remaining restorations having marginal deficiencies.

  4. [Influence of different types of posts and cores on color of IPS-Empress 2 crown].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dong-fang; Yang, Jing-yuan; Yang, Xing-mei; Yang, Liu; Xu, Qiang; Guan, Hong-yu; Wan, Qian-bing

    2007-10-01

    To evaluate the influence of different types of posts and cores on the final color of the IPS-Emperss 2 crown. Five types of posts and cores (Cerapost with Empress cosmo, Cerapost with composite resin, gilded Ni-Cr alloy, gold alloy and Ni-Cr alloy) were made. The shifts in color of three points of IPS-Empress 2 crown surface (cervical, middle and incisal) with different posts and cores was measured with a spectroradiometer (PR-650). The L* a* b* values of zirconium oxide and gilded Ni-Cr alloy posts and cores with ceramic crown were the highest. The L* a* values of zirconium oxide posts composite cores were higher while the b* values were lower. The L* a* b* values of Ni-Cr alloy were lower than that of gold alloy and were the lowest. In combination with IPS-Empress 2 crown, zirconium oxide posts are suitable for routine use in the anterior dentition, and gilded Ni-Cr alloy and gold alloy posts and cores can be recommended for clinical practice. Ni-Cr alloy posts and cores can not be recommended for clinical practice.

  5. Present status and future trends for ceramic parts and engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, H.

    1987-01-01

    The author feels that there have been subtle changes in the direction of ceramic engine research in years. Before then, the emphasis was to develop countermeasures to overcome the disappointing performance of adiabatic engines which were made using partially stabilized zirconia. Current interest focuses on finding appropriate applications, namely those which make effective use of ceramic properties, and developing new materials suitable for adiabatic engines. Partially stabilized zirconia in the adiabatic diesel loses its strength around 800 degrees C. On the other hand, silicon nitride has demonstrated the ability to withstand thermal shock because of its high rupture strength. Other new materials are alumina zirconia and alumina titanium (Al 2 TiO 3 ). The latter has both good thermal and rupture strength properties, making it suitable for adiabatic engines. Also important are new or improved metal-ceramic joining technologies needed for camshafts, pistons, rocker arms and supercharger rotor blades. Another reason for the failure of the previous ceramic adiabatic engine was the inherent inability of the engine design to make use of the excess heat generated in the combustion chamber. In order to overcome this difficulty, a new type of adiabatic turbo-compound engine has been considered. A turbocharger-type energy recovery system is installed at the engine exhaust, and its power output is fed back to the crankshaft through an elaborate generator/motor system in lieu of the traditional gear train system. The generator speed is regulated to achieve the maximum exhaust gas turbine efficiency

  6. Responding to the Sea Empress oil spill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonard, D.R.P.; Law, R.J.; Kelly, C.A.

    1999-01-01

    The Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food (MAFF) is a government department which has responsibility in England and in Wales (acting on behalf of the Secretary of State for Wales) for controlling deposits in the sea, including approving the use of dispersants in oil spill response. MAFF also has responsibility in relation to the management of sustainable commercial fish and shellfish fisheries. Following the grounding of the tanker Sea Empress on 15 February 1996, over 72,000 tonnes of crude oil and bunker fuel was lost. This paper summarises the involvement of MAFF staff in the response phase, and in the subsequent assessment of the environmental impact of the oil spill and the associated clean up operations on commercial fisheries. After two and a half years of environmental monitoring and complementary research, it is concluded that the oil spill has had an insignificant impact on these fisheries beyond their closure during the incident response phase. Suggestions for further work are discussed. (author)

  7. CERAMIC PROPERTIES OF PUGU KAOLIN CLAYS. PART 2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a

    PART 2: EFFECT OF PHASE COMPOSITION ON FLEXURAL STRENGTH ... working in this field have established factors controlling the various ... The raw materials selected were kaolin clays from Pugu deposit in Tanzania, Norfloat potash .... the total mullite contents present in the samples since the method used does.

  8. [A case of restoration using IPS empress (staining technique) for upper central incisors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hata, Utako

    2007-07-01

    The patient had esthetically unacceptable upper left central incisor crowns. The case was restored using Empress (staining technique) for the upper central incisors on both sides. In making all-ceramic crowns, it is necessary to reproduce the shape and color near to those of the natural tooth. We should not overlook the importance of diagnostic waxing-up, provisional restoration, tooth preparation, gingival retraction and others, to achieve excellent appearance, function and biocompatibility. It is effective to use the staining technique for an anterior tooth crown in order to obtain esthetically satisfactory results by the papilla being present in such cases as the distance from the base of the contact point to the crest of the bone is 5 mm or less.

  9. Formulation of nano-ceramic filters used in separation of heavy metals . Part II: Zirconia ceramic filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalil, T.; Labib, Sh.; Abou EI-Nour, F.H.; Abdel-Kbalik, M.

    2007-01-01

    Zirconia ceramic filters are prepared using polymeric sol-gel process. An optimization of synthesis parameters was studied to give cracked free coated nano porous film with high performance quality. Zirconia ceramic filters are characterized to select tbe optimized conditions that give tbe suitable zirconia filter used in heavy metal separation. The ceramic filters were characterized using BET method for surface measurements, mercury porosimeter for pore size distribution analysis and coating thickness measurements, SEM for microstructural studies and atomic absorption spectrophotometer (AAS) for metal analysis. The results indicated that zirconia ceramic filters. show high separation performance for cadmium, cupper, iron, manganese and lead

  10. The all-ceramic, inlay supported fixed partial denture. Part 1. Ceramic inlay preparation design: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, M C; Thompson, K M; Swain, M

    2010-06-01

    The effect of cavity design is a controversial and underrated factor in the clinical success of ceramic inlays and inlay supported prosthesis. Many articles and studies have been conducted into the advantages and disadvantages of isolated aspects of preparation design, but lacking is a review of the most relevant papers which bring together a consensus on all the critical features. Hence, a review and analysis of cavity depth, width, preparation taper and internal line angles is warranted in our attempts to formulate preparation guidelines that will lead to clinically successful, all-ceramic inlay restorations and ceramic inlay supported prosthesis.

  11. Welding lines formation in holes obtained by low pressure injection molding of ceramic parts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. A. Costa

    Full Text Available Abstract This work presents a study to evaluate the process of producing internal holes in ceramic disks produced by low pressure injection molding (LPIM process. Two process conditions defined as pre-injection and post-injection were used to test the proposition. In the first one the pin cores that produce the holes were positioned in the cavity before the injection of the feedstock; and in the second one, the pin cores were positioned in the cavity, just after the feeding phase of the injection mold. An experimental injection mold designed and manufactured to test both processes was developed to produce ceramic disk with Ø 50 x 2 mm with four holes of Ø 5 mm, equally and radially distributed through the disk. The feedstock was composed of 86 wt% alumina (Al2O3 and 14 wt% organic vehicle based on paraffin wax. Heating and cooling systems controlled by a data acquisition system were included in the mold. The results showed that there were no welding lines with the post-injection process, proving to be an option for creating holes in the ceramic parts produced by LPIM. It was observed that best results were obtained at 58 °C mold temperature. The pins extraction temperature was about 45 °C, and the injection pressure was 170 kPa.

  12. Mechanical analysis of ceramic heat being part of hip prosthesis with presence of cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravagli, E.

    1995-03-01

    This report still pursues the aim of carrying out a systematic mechanical analysis of a ceramic heat being part of a modular hig prosthesis, in order to characterize it exhaustively, i. e. to assess its performances and some of its main specifications. A mechanical analysis of a second case is carried out here, the presence of head cracks being taken into account. The evaluations made lead to the conclusion that the head should not show cracks bigger than 100 mm. This study is performed in the frame of the STRIDE-CETMA project, which is aimed at founding and developing a centre for technologically advanced materials in Brindisi technology park (Italy)

  13. Interfacial characterization of ceramic core materials with veneering porcelain for all-ceramic bi-layered restorative systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagmatarchis, Alexander; Tripodakis, Aris-Petros; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Zinelis, Spiros; Eliades, George

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to characterize the elemental distribution at the interface between all-ceramic core and veneering porcelain materials. Three groups of all-ceramic cores were selected: A) Glass-ceramics (Cergo, IPS Empress, IPS Empress 2, e-max Press, Finesse); B) Glass-infiltrated ceramics (Celay Alumina, Celay Zirconia) and C) Densely sintered ceramics (Cercon, Procera Alumina, ZirCAD, Noritake Zirconia). The cores were combined with compatible veneering porcelains and three flat square test specimens were produced for each system. The core-veneer interfaces were examined by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray microanalysis. The glass-ceramic systems showed interfacial zones reach in Si and O, with the presence of K, Ca, Al in core and Ca, Ce, Na, Mg or Al in veneer material, depending on the system tested. IPS Empress and IPS Empress 2 demonstrated distinct transitional phases at the core-veneer interface. In the glassinfiltrated systems, intermixing of core (Ce, La) with veneer (Na, Si) elements occurred, whereas an abrupt drop of the core-veneer elemental concentration was documented at the interfaces of all densely sintered ceramics. The results of the study provided no evidence of elemental interdiffusion at the core-veneer interfaces in densely sintered ceramics, which implies lack of primary chemical bonding. For the glass-containing systems (glassceramics and glass-infiltrated ceramics) interdiffusion of the glass-phase seems to play a critical role in establishing a primary bonding condition between ceramic core and veneering porcelain.

  14. Microstructural evolution during the synthesis of bulk components from nanocrystalline ceramic powder, part II: microstructure and properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ajaal, T. T.; Metak, A. M.

    2004-01-01

    Part I of this review, published in 5 /4th of Al-Nawah magazine, was devoted to the synthetic techniques used in the production processes of a bulk components of nanocrystalline materials. In this part, the microstructural evolution and its effect on the materials properties will be detailed. Minimizing grain growth and maximizing densification during the sintering stage of the ultrafine particles as well as the homogeneous densification in pressureless sintering, grain growth and rapid rate pressureless sintering will be discussed. Ceramics are well known for their high strength at elevated temperatures, as well as the extreme brittleness that prevents their application in many critical components. However, researchers have found that brittleness can be overcome by reducing particle sizes to nanometer levels. These fine grain structures are believed to provide improved ductility the individual grains can slide over one another without causing cracks. In addition, nanophase ceramics are more easily formed than their conventional counterparts, and easier to machine without cracking or breaking. Shrinkage during sintering is also greatly reduced in nanophase ceramics, and they can be sintered at lower temperatures than conventional ceramics. As a result, nanophase ceramics have the potential to deliver an ideal combination of ductility and high-temperature strength, allowing increased efficiency in applications ranging from automobile engines to jet aircraft. This part of the review covers the microstructural evolution during the synthetic process of nanocrystalline ceramic materials and its effects on the materials properties.(author)

  15. Effect of surface acid etching on the biaxial flexural strength of two hot-pressed glass ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooshmand, Tabassom; Parvizi, Shaghayegh; Keshvad, Alireza

    2008-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of surface acid etching on the biaxial flexural strength of two hot-pressed glass ceramics reinforced by leucite or lithium disilicate crystals. Forty glass ceramic disks (14-mm diameter, 2-mm thick) consisting of 20 leucite-based ceramic disks (IPS Empress) and 20 lithia disilicate-based ceramic (IPS Empress 2) were produced by hot-pressing technique. All specimens were polished and then cleaned ultrasonically in distilled water. Ten specimens of each ceramic group were then etched with 9% hydrofluoric (HF) acid gel for 2 minutes and cleaned ultrasonically again. The biaxial flexural strength was measured by the piston-on-three-ball test in a universal testing machine. Data based on ten specimens in each group were analyzed by two-way ANOVA (alpha= 0.05). Microstructure of ceramic surfaces before and after acid etching was also examined by a scanning electron microscope. The mean biaxial flexural strength values for each group tested were (in MPa): nonetched IPS Empress = 118.6 +/- 25.5; etched IPS Empress = 102.9 +/- 15.4; nonetched IPS Empress 2 = 283.0 +/- 48.5; and etched IPS Empress 2 = 250.6 +/- 34.6. The results showed that the etching process reduced the biaxial flexural strengths significantly for both ceramic types (p= 0.025). No significant interaction between the ceramic type and etching process was found (p= 0.407). From the results, it was concluded that surface HF acid etching could have a weakening effect on hot-pressed leucite or lithia disilicate-based glass ceramic systems.

  16. Macrobenthic monitoring in the Milford Haven waterway following the Sea Empress oil spill of February 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobbs, G.; Smith, J.

    1998-03-01

    Surveys were carried out in the Milford Haven waterway between Lawrenny and West Angle Bay in March 1996 and April 1997 as part of a programme to monitor the impact of the Sea Empress spill on the sea bed macrofauna within the Haven. Samples were taken at eleven locations for macrobenthos, sediment particle size analysis and determination of hydrocarbon content. Additional data was obtained from a larger scale survey of the waterway in October 1996 which included nine of the eleven stations designated for this sampling programme and 'baseline' data was taken from a similar survey carried out in October 1993. The most noticeable feature of the post-spill data is the low abundance and diversity of the amphipod fauna of the water compared with the October 1993 'baseline'. Although this cannot be ascribed with certainty to the Sea Empress oil spill due to the 21/2 year interval during which no monitoring occurred, depletion of the amphipod fauna is a consistent feature of many previous post-spill studies where there was definitive analytical evidence of oil contamination of the sediments. This project has provided a sound basis for monitoring the progress of the macrobenthic fauna of the Haven in the years after the incident. The greatest benefit in such programmes will only be realised in the long term and it is recommended that monitoring should continue. (author)

  17. Determination of the slow crack growth susceptibility coefficient of dental ceramics using different methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzaga, Carla Castiglia; Cesar, Paulo Francisco; Miranda, Walter Gomes; Yoshimura, Humberto Naoyuki

    2011-11-01

    This study compared three methods for the determination of the slow crack growth susceptibility coefficient (n) of two veneering ceramics (VM7 and d.Sign), two glass-ceramics (Empress and Empress 2) and a glass-infiltrated alumina composite (In-Ceram Alumina). Discs (n = 10) were prepared according to manufacturers' recommendations and polished. The constant stress-rate test was performed at five constant stress rates to calculate n(d) . For the indentation fracture test to determine n(IF) , Vickers indentations were performed and the crack lengths were measured under an optical microscope. For the constant stress test (performed only for d.Sign for the determination of n(s) ) four constant stresses were applied and held constant until the specimens' fracture and the time to failure was recorded. All tests were performed in artificial saliva at 37°C. The n(d) values were 17.2 for Empress 2, followed by d.Sign (20.5), VM7 (26.5), Empress (30.2), and In-Ceram Alumina (31.1). In-Ceram Alumina and Empress 2 showed the highest n(IF) values, 66.0 and 40.2, respectively. The n(IF) values determined for Empress (25.2), d.Sign (25.6), and VM7 (20.1) were similar. The n(s) value determined for d.Sign was 31.4. It can be concluded that the n values determined for the dental ceramics evaluated were significantly influenced by the test method used. 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. A clinical trial of Empress II porcelain inlays luted to vital teeth with a dual-curing adhesive system and a self-curing resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabianelli, Andrea; Goracci, Cecilia; Bertelli, Egidio; Davidson, Carel L; Ferrari, Marco

    2006-12-01

    The aim of the study was to clinically evaluate Empress II inlays cemented with a dual-curing bonding agent and a self-curing luting system. Forty patients were selected to receive one Empress II inlay. Empress II is a heat-pressed glass ceramic containing lithium disilicate and lithium orthophosphate crystals, purported to provide higher stress resistance and improved strength. The restorations were placed between March and May 2000. Recalls were performed after 6, 12, 24, and 36 months. At the 3-year recall, 7 patients were lost to follow-up. Inlays were evaluated for postoperative sensitivity, marginal integrity, marginal leakage, color stability, surface staining, retention, and surface crazing (microcracks). At the 3-year recall, all the restorations were in place and only one showed postoperative sensitivity (at the first recall, 1 week after placement). Only 3 inlays showed slight marginal staining, and 4 inlays showed gaps, with little surface staining or microcracks. No inlay debonded or fractured during theobservation period. All the evaluated inlays were in place and acceptable.

  19. Partial-coverage posterior ceramic restorations. Part 1: a return to diligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebenberg, W H

    2001-01-01

    The application of multisurfaced tooth-colored restorations in the posterior dentition is an exercise in risk tolerance when dentin occupies the bulk of the tooth substrate. Not only is interfacial integrity capricious, but also a recent in vivo study has confirmed that dentin bond strengths deteriorate with time. Although the literature is replete with esthetic guidelines for posterior restitution, most practicing clinicians appreciate the prime tenet that clinical success involves more than esthetic realism in the posterior dentition. Success with indirect ceramic restorations is dependent on interfacial integrity, which, although multitudinous, is contingently related to operative competence. Innovative clinical techniques are described in this two-part article, along with a discussion of the probationary status of current adhesive options and the need for excellence in all phases of this demanding restorative sequence. Restorative success in the posterior dentition is profoundly influenced by the variability of operative competence and diligence. This article discusses the precincts of posterior indirect ceramic restorations and submits a number of innovative solutions to the clinical challenge.

  20. Reliability Estimation for Single-unit Ceramic Crown Restorations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekesiz, H.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential of a survival prediction method for the assessment of ceramic dental restorations. For this purpose, fast-fracture and fatigue reliabilities for 2 bilayer (metal ceramic alloy core veneered with fluorapatite leucite glass-ceramic, d.Sign/d.Sign-67, by Ivoclar; glass-infiltrated alumina core veneered with feldspathic porcelain, VM7/In-Ceram Alumina, by Vita) and 3 monolithic (leucite-reinforced glass-ceramic, Empress, and ProCAD, by Ivoclar; lithium-disilicate glass-ceramic, Empress 2, by Ivoclar) single posterior crown restorations were predicted, and fatigue predictions were compared with the long-term clinical data presented in the literature. Both perfectly bonded and completely debonded cases were analyzed for evaluation of the influence of the adhesive/restoration bonding quality on estimations. Material constants and stress distributions required for predictions were calculated from biaxial tests and finite element analysis, respectively. Based on the predictions, In-Ceram Alumina presents the best fast-fracture resistance, and ProCAD presents a comparable resistance for perfect bonding; however, ProCAD shows a significant reduction of resistance in case of complete debonding. Nevertheless, it is still better than Empress and comparable with Empress 2. In-Ceram Alumina and d.Sign have the highest long-term reliability, with almost 100% survivability even after 10 years. When compared with clinical failure rates reported in the literature, predictions show a promising match with clinical data, and this indicates the soundness of the settings used in the proposed predictions. PMID:25048249

  1. EMPReSS: European mouse phenotyping resource for standardized screens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Eain C J; Gkoutos, Georgios V; Lad, Heena V; Blake, Andrew; Weekes, Joseph; Hancock, John M

    2005-06-15

    Standardized phenotyping protocols are essential for the characterization of phenotypes so that results are comparable between different laboratories and phenotypic data can be related to ontological descriptions in an automated manner. We describe a web-based resource for the visualization, searching and downloading of standard operating procedures and other documents, the European Mouse Phenotyping Resource for Standardized Screens-EMPReSS. Direct access: http://www.empress.har.mrc.ac.uk e.green@har.mrc.ac.uk.

  2. Mechanical analysis of a ceramic head being part of a modular hip prosthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravagli, Ermenegildo

    1998-04-01

    This report still pursues the aim of carrying out a systematic mechanical analysis of a ceramic head being part of a modular hip prosthesis, in order to characterize it exhaustively, i.e. to assess its performances and some of its main specifications. Here in particular the aim is to locate the stress of the head when it undergoes the load transferred by the stem, presuming that the stem-head mating is not perfect, but there is a conical error called of the 2. type, to which corresponds a stem summit angle smaller than the one in the head hole. This conical error changes considerably the head stress and therefore this study is considered decisive for a later correct assessment of its resistance to breaking. This study is performed in the frame of the STRIDE-CETMA Project, which is aimed at founding and developing a Centre for technologically advanced materials in Brindisi (Italy) Technology Park [it

  3. Net shape manufacturing of ceramic micro parts with tailored graded layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanin, H.; Jiang, K.

    2014-01-01

    Presented in this paper is a novel net shape manufacturing technology for making three-dimensional micro parts with functionally graded layers. Alumina/zirconia micro parts with either core-shell or top-bottom functionally graded material (FGM) profiles have been successfully fabricated by altering both the surface characteristics of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) micro moulds and ceramic suspensions composition. PDMS surface modifications were performed to achieve moulds with hydrophilic surfaces, which were used to form core/shell FGM green layers. On the other hand, moulds with hydrophobic surfaces were used to form top-bottom green layers. Cracks have been found between consecutive layers in both the green and sintered micro parts. It was found that, at dispersant concentration of about 9.0 mg g-1, the differences in the drying shrinkage between layers is less than 0.5%. In addition, layers of composition of 100% Al2O3-0% YSZ, 20% Al2O3-80% YSZ and 40% Al2O3-60% YSZ were found to produce less shrinkage difference during sintering. After optimization of both green and sintering layers, crack free core/shell and top-bottom alumina/zirconia FGM micro parts were successfully obtained. The proposed process enables the production of micro patterns tailored with functionally graded microstructures to locally enhance properties and performance.

  4. Evaluating the fracture toughness and flexural strength of pressable dental ceramics: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurram, Ravi; Krishna, C H Vamsi; Reddy, K Mahendranadh; Reddy, G V K Mohan; Shastry, Y Mahadev

    2014-12-01

    The study was undertaken to evaluate the biaxial flexural strength, biaxial flexural strength after etching with 9 % HF acid and fracture toughness of three commonly used pressable all ceramic core materials. Ninety glass ceramic specimens were fabricated from three commercially available leucite based core ceramic material (1) Esthetic Empress, (2) Cergo, and (3) Performance Plus. Thirty discs of each material were divided into three groups of 10 discs each. Biaxial flexural strength (30 discs,) Biaxial flexural strength for samples treated with 9 % HF acid (30 discs) and fracture toughness (30 discs) were evaluated. Core material Performance Plus had the lowest biaxial strength of 124.89 MPa, Cergo had strength of 152.22 MPa and the highest value of 163.95 was reported for Esthetic Empress. For samples treated 9 % HF, Performance Plus had the lowest biaxial strength of 98.37 MPa, Cergo had strength of 117.42 MPa and the highest value of 143.74 was reported for Esthetic Empress. Core material Performance Plus had the lowest fracture toughness of 1.063 MPa, Cergo had strength of 1.112 MPa and the highest value of 1.225 was reported for Esthetic Empress. The results shows that Esthetic Empress had better mechanical properties compared to Cergo had Performance Plus in relation to the parameters tested.

  5. Formulations development for improving the classification of ceramic tile manufactured in the Sergipe state - part one: mineralogical characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goes, J.R.; Azevedo, T.F.; Barreto, L.S.

    2011-01-01

    The ceramic tiles manufactured in Sergipe State are classified in Absorption 'BIIb' Group. Studies have been developed to obtain the classification 'BIIa' Group. This first part is about the mineralogical characterization of raw materials used for ceramics tiles, collected for three different fields. The mineralogical characterization was made with: X-ray Diffraction, Infrared, Thermogravimetric and Differential Thermal Analysis, and was also obtained clays plasticity indices. The samples were heated up to 500 deg C, 900° C and 1100° C. Clays were classified as highly plastics and moderately plastics with a large number of grain with size order smaller than 0,074 mm. The main minerals identified were: kaolinite, illite, montmorillonite, quartz, feldspar and calcite. Two of the three studied fields had high calcite content. The Calcite retards the sintering process causing higher porosity to the ceramic tiles. (author)

  6. Flexural resistance of Cerec CAD/CAM system ceramic blocks. Part 2: Outsourcing materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedda, Maurizio; Vichi, Alessandro; Del Siena, Francesco; Louca, Chris; Ferrari, Marco

    2014-02-01

    To test different Cerec CAD/CAM system ceramic blocks, comparing mean flexural strength (sigma), Weibull modulus (m), and Weibull characteristic strength (sigma0) in an ISO standardized set-up. Following the recent ISO Standard (ISO 6872:2008), 11 types of ceramic blocks were tested: IPS e.max CAD MO, IPS e.max CAD LT and IPS e.max CAD HT (lithium disilicate glass-ceramic); In-Ceram SPINELL, In-Ceram Alumina and In-Ceram Zirconia (glass-infiltrated materials); inCoris AL and In-Ceram AL (densely sintered alumina); In-Ceram YZ, IPS e.max Zir-CAD and inCoris ZI (densely sintered zirconia). Specimens were cut out from ceramic blocks, finished, crystallized/infiltrated/sintered, polished, and tested in a three-point bending test apparatus. Flexural strength, Weibull characteristic strength, and Weibull modulus were obtained. A statistically significant difference was found (P ceramic (sigma = 272.6 +/- 376.8 MPa, m = 6.2 +/- 11.3, sigma0 = 294.0 +/- 394.1 MPa) and densely sintered alumina (sigma = 441.8 +/- 541.6 MPa, m = 11.9 +/- 19.0, sigma0 = 454.2 +/- 565.2 MPa). No statistically significant difference was found (P = 0.254) in glass infiltrated materials (sigma = 376.9 +/- 405.5 MPa, m = 7.5 +/- 11.5, sigma0 = 393.7 +/- 427.0 MPa). No statistically significant difference was found (P = 0.160) in densely sintered zirconia (sigma = 1,060.8 +/- 1,227.8 MPa, m = 5.8 +/- 7.4, sigma0 = 1,002.4 +/- 1,171.0 MPa). Not all the materials tested fulfilled the requirements for the clinical indications recommended by the manufacturer.

  7. IPS-Empress II inlay-retained fixed partial denture reinforced with zirconia bar: three-dimensional finite element and in-vitro studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kermanshah, Hamid; Geramy, Allahyar; Ebrahimi, Shahram Farzin; Bitaraf, Tahereh

    2012-12-01

    This study evaluated von Mises stress distribution, flexural strength and interface micrographs of IPS-Empress II (IPS) inlay-retained fixed partial dentures (IRFPD) reinforced with Zirconia bars (Zb). In the Finite element analysis, six three-dimensional models of IRFPD were designed using Solid Works 2006. Five models were reinforced with different Zb and a model without Zb was considered as a control. The bridges were loaded by 200 and 500 N forces at the middle of the pontic on the occlusal surface. Subsequently, von Mises stress and displacement of the models were evaluated along a defined path. In the experimental part, 21 bar shape specimens were fabricated from lithium disilicate and zirconia ceramic in three different designs. The zirconia-IPS interfaces and the fractured surfaces of flexural test were observed using SEM. In the connector area, von Mises stress and displacement of the models with Zb under a load of 500 N were decreased compared to the model without the Zb; however, this difference was not considerable at a load of 200 N. In the mesial connector, Von Mises stress and displacement was decreased from 12.5 Mpa for the control model tested at 500 N to 7.0 Mpa for the model with Zb and from 0.0050-0.0041 mm, respectively. SEM analyses showed that, before fracture, interfacial gaps were not observed along the interfaces, but initiated cracks propagated along the interfaces after flexural loading. IPS IRFPD reinforced by Zb can tolerate higher stresses while still functioning effectively and the interfaces may have desirable adaption.

  8. Practical application of silicon nitride ceramics for sliding parts of rotary engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueki, M.; Sato, Y.; Fukuda, K.

    1994-01-01

    Research on ceramic substitutes for the apex seals of the rotary engine have been carrying out. The aim of the substitution of apex seals, the development of high strength silicon nitride ceramics, and the application of the ceramic to the apex seals are described. The properties of silicon nitride ceramics used as apex seals in rotary engines for racing cars are presented. The apex seals were recovered from the rotary engines of racing cars in the 1989 and 1990 Le Mans 24-hour Grand Prix races, and the damage of the seals was investigated and analyzed in detail. One problem was the adhesion to the seals of the hardened chromium plating detached from the inside surface of the rotor housing. The adhesion of chromium caused the fine cracking and subsequent chipping of the apex seals. (orig.)

  9. Empress Sissi and cardiac tamponade: an historical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Philippe; Keller, Pierre-Frédéric; Spodick, David H

    2008-11-01

    On September 10, 1898, Empress Elizabeth of Austria, known as Sissi, was stabbed with a stiletto knife in her chest by an Italian anarchist in Geneva, Switzerland, and died 1 hour later. The autopsy revealed a large clot in the pericardial sac due to a perforation of the left ventricular wall, and the report concluded, "Death was undoubtedly caused by a progressive and slow blood leak, sufficient to compress the heart and to suspend its functions." Since antiquity, wounds of the heart had been considered immediately fatal, until Paré observed a delayed death after a stab to the heart in the 16th century. The physiology of cardiac tamponade was then elucidated by Richard Lower in 1669. However, it was only in the 19th century that the main clinical features of cardiac tamponade were described and the first treatments attempted. Kussmaul identified its most important clinical hallmark, pulsus paradoxus, in 1873 and the term "tamponade of the heart" was coined for the first time by Rose in 1884. Romero and Larrey pioneered the open drainage of the pericardium early in the century, and Rehn performed the first successful surgical suture of a heart wound in 1896. In conclusion, logistics aside, medical knowledge at the end of the 19th century would have been theoretically sufficient to save the empress from death.

  10. Empress Elisabeth (‘Sisi’ of Austria and Patriotic Fashionism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher M. VanDemark

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In this article, Christopher VanDemark explores the intersections between nationalism, fashion, and the royal figure in Hungary between 1857 and the Compromise of 1867. Focusing on aesthetics as a vehicle for feminine power at a critical junction in Hungarian history, VanDemark contextualizes Empress Elisabeth’s role in engendering a revised political schema in the Habsburg sphere. Foreseeing the power of emblematic politics, the young Empress adeptly situated herself between the Hungarians and the Austrians to recast the Hungarian martyrology narrative promulgated after the failed revolution of 1848. Eminent Hungarian newspapers such as the Pesti Napló, Pester Lloyd, and the Vasárnapi Újság form the backbone of this article, as publications such as these facilitated the dissemination of patriotic sentiment while simultaneously exulting the efficacy of symbolic fashions. The topic of study engages with contemporary works on nationalism, which emphasize gender and aesthetics, and contributes to the emerging body of scholarship on important women in Hungarian history. Seminal texts by Catherine Brice, Sara Maza, Abby Zanger, and Lynn Hunt compliment the wider objective of this brief analysis, namely, the notion that the Queen’s body can both enhance and reform monarchical power within a nineteenth-century milieu.

  11. Reduction-oxidation Enabled Glass-ceramics to Stainless Steel Bonding Part II interfacial bonding analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Steve Xunhu [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Among glass-ceramic compositions modified with a variety of oxidants (AgO, FeO, NiO, PbO, SnO, CuO, CoO, MoO3 and WO3) only CuO and CoO doped glass-ceramics showed existence of bonding oxides through reduction-oxidation (redox) at the GC-SS interface. The CuO-modified glass-ceramics demonstrate the formation of a continuous layer of strong bonding Cr2O3 at the interface in low partial oxygen (PO2) atmosphere. However, in a local reducing atmosphere, the CuO is preferentially reduced at the surface of glass-ceramic rather than the GC-SS interface for redox. The CoO-modified glass-ceramics demonstrate improved GC-SS bonding. But the low mobility of Co++ ions in the GC limited the amount of CoO that can diffuse to and participate in redox at the interface.

  12. EuroPhenome and EMPReSS: online mouse phenotyping resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallon, Ann-Marie; Blake, Andrew; Hancock, John M

    2008-01-01

    EuroPhenome (http://www.europhenome.org) and EMPReSS (http://empress.har.mrc.ac.uk/) form an integrated resource to provide access to data and procedures for mouse phenotyping. EMPReSS describes 96 Standard Operating Procedures for mouse phenotyping. EuroPhenome contains data resulting from carrying out EMPReSS protocols on four inbred laboratory mouse strains. As well as web interfaces, both resources support web services to enable integration with other mouse phenotyping and functional genetics resources, and are committed to initiatives to improve integration of mouse phenotype databases. EuroPhenome will be the repository for a recently initiated effort to carry out large-scale phenotyping on a large number of knockout mouse lines (EUMODIC).

  13. The impact of the Sea Empress oil spill on the abundance of juvenile migratory salmonids in West Wales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, D.E.; Jones, F.H.; Wyatt, R.J.; Milner, N.J.

    1998-01-01

    No counting facilities for adult salmonids were operational in the rivers draining into the area of coast affected by the Sea Empress oil spill. There were therefore no direct means of determining any impact on the numbers of returning salmon and sea trout. However, a measure of salmon and trout fry abundance before and after (1997) the spill may provide evidence of an impact; on recruitment and abundance of adults. Approximately 10 years historical fry data were available from 53 sites on the Tywi and 41 sites on the Taf, as part of the Welsh Region Juvenile Salmonid Monitoring Programme (RJSMP). An assessment was undertaken by the Water Research Centre on the design of the survey and appropriate data analysis. Analysed data included: River Tywi salmon and trout fry densities 1985-1996, compared to 1997 and Teifi control 1986-1997. River Taf salmon and trout fry densities 1986-1996, compared to 1997 and Teifi control 1986-1997. The abundance of salmon and trout fry in 1997 were similar to previous years suggesting the Sea Empress oil spill did not have a major impact on recruitment. However, it is not possible to conclude unequivocally that returning salmon and sea trout were not affected by the spill. (author)

  14. Sowing the Seeds for Strong Relations: Seeds and Plants as Diplomatic Gifts for the Russian Empress Maria Fedorovna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina Heath

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The article examines the role of botany in diplomatic relationships between Britain and Russia around the turn of the nineteenth century by looking at three gifts of exotic seeds and plants sent by different British diplomats and officials to the Russian Empress Maria Fedorovna, wife of Tsar Paul I. Gifts of live plants were a new category of diplomatic presents fuelled by the rapidly growing popularity of botany across Europe. These gifts represented British imperial ambitions and desire to build a self-sufficient economy. They also indicated an element of Britain’s anxiety about its navy’s dependence on Russian natural resources and later on about Russia’s successes in the exploration of the Antarctic regions. Empress Maria Fedorovna displayed these plants in a prominent part of her garden at Pavlovsk, next to the plants from North America that she had procured independently. This was a deliberate strategy that worked to boost her prestige at court by showcasing her international relationships.

  15. Crack growth in non-homogeneous transformable ceramics. Part II : Crack deflection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stam, Geert; Giessen, Erik van der

    1996-01-01

    Crack growth in transformation toughened ceramics is studied using a micromechanics based continuum model which accounts for both dilatant and shear transformation strain components. In the computations, the transformable phase is taken to be distributed non-homogeneously in order to model Zirconia

  16. Bismuth oxide based ceramics with improved electrical and mechanical properties: Part II. Structural and mechanical properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruidhof, H.; Seshan, Kulathuiyer; van de Velde, G.M.H.; de Vries, K.J.; Burggraaf, A.J.

    1988-01-01

    Coprecipitation as a method of preparation for bismuth oxides based ceramics yields relatively strong and machineable materials in comparison with the solid state reaction. Compositions within the system (1−x)Bi2O3|xEr2O3 containing up to twenty five mole percent of erbium oxide show a slow

  17. High temperature corrosion of advanced ceramic materials for hot gas filters. Topical report for part 1 of high temperature corrosion of advanced ceramic materials for hot gas filters and heat exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spear, K.E.; Crossland, C.E.; Shelleman, D.L.; Tressler, R.E. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1997-12-11

    This program consists of two separate research areas. Part 1, for which this report is written, studied the high temperature corrosion of advanced ceramic hot gas filters, while Part 2 studied the long-term durability of ceramic heat exchangers to coal combustion environments. The objectives of Part 1 were to select two candidate ceramic filter materials for flow-through hot corrosion studies and subsequent corrosion and mechanical properties characterization. In addition, a thermodynamic database was developed so that thermochemical modeling studies could be performed to simulate operating conditions of laboratory reactors and existing coal combustion power plants, and to predict the reactions of new filter materials with coal combustion environments. The latter would make it possible to gain insight into problems that could develop during actual operation of filters in coal combustion power plants so that potential problems could be addressed before they arise.

  18. A Fully Nonmetallic Gas Turbine Engine Enabled by Additive Manufacturing of Ceramic Composites. Part III; Additive Manufacturing and Characterization of Ceramic Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbig, Michael C.; Grady, Joseph E.; Singh, Mrityunjay; Ramsey, Jack; Patterson, Clark; Santelle, Tom

    2015-01-01

    This publication is the third part of a three part report of the project entitled "A Fully Nonmetallic Gas Turbine Engine Enabled by Additive Manufacturing" funded by NASA Aeronautics Research Institute (NARI). The objective of this project was to conduct additive manufacturing to produce ceramic matrix composite materials and aircraft engine components by the binder jet process. Different SiC powders with median sizes ranging from 9.3 to 53.0 microns were investigated solely and in powder blends in order to maximize powder packing. Various infiltration approaches were investigated to include polycarbosilane (SMP-10), phenolic, and liquid silicon. Single infiltrations of SMP-10 and phenolic only slightly filled in the interior. When the SMP-10 was loaded with sub-micron sized SiC powders, the infiltrant gave a much better result of filling in the interior. Silicon carbide fibers were added to the powder bed to make ceramic matrix composite materials. Microscopy showed that the fibers were well distributed with no preferred orientation on the horizontal plane and fibers in the vertical plane were at angles as much as 45deg. Secondary infiltration steps were necessary to further densify the material. Two to three extra infiltration steps of SMP-10 increased the density by 0.20 to 0.55 g/cc. However, the highest densities achieved were 2.10 to 2.15 g/cc. Mechanical tests consisting of 4 point bend tests were conducted. Samples from the two CMC panels had higher strengths and strains to failure than the samples from the two nonfiber reinforced panels. The highest strengths were from Set N with 65 vol% fiber loading which had an average strength of 66 MPa. Analysis of the fracture surfaces did not reveal pullout of the reinforcing fibers. Blunt fiber failure suggested that there was not composite behavior. The binder jet additive manufacturing method was used to also demonstrate the fabrication of turbine engine vane components of two different designs and sizes. The

  19. Creep in ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    Pelleg, Joshua

    2017-01-01

    This textbook is one of its kind, since there are no other books on Creep in Ceramics. The book consist of two parts: A and B. In part A general knowledge of creep in ceramics is considered, while part B specifies creep in technologically important ceramics. Part B covers creep in oxide ceramics, carnides and nitrides. While covering all relevant information regarding raw materials and characterization of creep in ceramics, the book also summarizes most recent innovations and developments in this field as a result of extensive literature search.

  20. Fabrication and testing of ceramic UO2 fuel - I-III. Part I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novakovic, M.

    1961-12-01

    The task described consists of the following: fabrication of UO 2 with different granulation from uranyl nitrate by ammonia diuranate; determination of size and shape distributions of metal and ceramic powders; fabrication of sintered pressed samples UO 2 ; investigating the properties of sintered uranium dioxide dependent on the fabrication process; producing a vibrator for compacting UO 2 powder. This volume includes reports on the first two tasks

  1. Development of a dielectric ceramic based on diatomite-titania part two: dielectric properties characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medeiros Jamilson Pinto

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Dielectric properties of sintered diatomite-titania ceramics are presented. Specific capacitance, dissipation factor, quality factor and dielectric constant were determined as a function of sintering temperature, titania content and frequency; the temperature coefficient of capacitance was measured as a function of frequency. Besides leakage current, the dependence of the insulation resistance and the dielectric strength on the applied dc voltage were studied. The results show that diatomite-titania compositions can be used as an alternative dielectric.

  2. Adjusting dental ceramics: An in vitro evaluation of the ability of various ceramic polishing kits to mimic glazed dental ceramic surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, René; Beier, Ulrike S; Heiss-Kisielewsky, Irene; Engelmeier, Robert; Dumfahrt, Herbert; Dhima, Matilda

    2015-06-01

    During the insertion appointment, the practitioner is often faced with the need to adjust ceramic surfaces to fit a restoration to the adjacent or opposing dentition and soft tissues. The purpose of this study was to assess the ceramic surface smoothness achieved with various commercially available ceramic polishing kits on different commonly used ceramic systems. The reliability of the cost of a polishing kit as an indicator of improved surface smoothness was assessed. A total of 350 ceramic surfaces representing 5 commonly available ceramic systems (IPS Empress Esthetic, IPS e.max Press, Cergo Kiss, Vita PM 9, Imagine PressX) were treated with 5 types of ceramic polishing systems (Cerapreshine, 94006C, Ceramiste, Optrafine, Zenostar) by following the manufacturers' guidelines. The surface roughness was measured with a profilometer (Taylor Hobson; Precision Taylor Hobson Ltd). The effects of ceramic systems and polishing kits of interest on surface roughness were analyzed by 2-way ANOVA, paired t test, and Bonferroni corrected significance level. The ceramic systems and polishing kits statistically affected surface roughness (Pceramic surface. No correlation could be established between the high cost of the polishing kit and low surface roughness. None of the commonly used ceramic polishing kits could create a surface smoother than that of glazed ceramic (Pceramic polishing kits is not recommended as a reliable indicator of better performance of ceramic polishing kits (P>.30). Copyright © 2015 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Early Pottery Making in Northern Coastal Peru. Part IV: Moessbauer Study of Ceramics from Huaca Sialupe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimada, I.; Haeusler, W.; Jakob, M.; Montenegro, J.; Riederer, J.; Wagner, U.

    2003-01-01

    We report on an interdisciplinary study of ceramic material excavated in 1999 and 2001 at a 1000-year old ceramic and metal production site, located at Huaca Sialupe in the La Leche valley on the north coast of Peru and dating to the Middle Sican period (AD 900-1100). Sherds of Sican red- and blackware, numerous moulds, several kilns and other evidence of pottery making were found. The pottery, in particular, is famous for its fine texture and perfect black surface finish. In addition, some clay lumps and sherds of unfired Sican pottery were excavated. Within the same workshop several large inverted ceramic urns used as furnaces were found together with Middle Sican metal working tools and debris. Various physical methods were applied to investigate this material. The ancient firing procedures could be elucidated by comparing the spectra observed for the ancient sherds with model spectra of laboratory and field fired clay samples. This shows that the fine ware made at Huaca Sialupe was intentionally fired under strongly reducing conditions at temperatures up to 900 o C. Reoxidation at the end of the reducing firing took place only occasionally. Less care was taken in firing moulds used for pottery making.

  4. All-ceramic or metal-ceramic tooth-supported fixed dental prostheses (FDPs)? A systematic review of the survival and complication rates. Part I: Single crowns (SCs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sailer, Irena; Makarov, Nikolay Alexandrovich; Thoma, Daniel Stefan; Zwahlen, Marcel; Pjetursson, Bjarni Elvar

    2015-06-01

    To assess the 5-year survival of metal-ceramic and all-ceramic tooth-supported single crowns (SCs) and to describe the incidence of biological, technical and esthetic complications. Medline (PubMed), Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) searches (2006-2013) were performed for clinical studies focusing on tooth-supported fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) with a mean follow-up of at least 3 years. This was complimented by an additional hand search and the inclusion of 34 studies from a previous systematic review [1,2]. Survival and complication rates were analyzed using robust Poisson's regression models to obtain summary estimates of 5-year proportions. Sixty-seven studies reporting on 4663 metal-ceramic and 9434 all-ceramic SCs fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Seventeen studies reported on metal-ceramic crowns, and 54 studies reported on all-ceramic crowns. Meta-analysis of the included studies indicated an estimated survival rate of metal-ceramic SCs of 94.7% (95% CI: 94.1-96.9%) after 5 years. This was similar to the estimated 5-year survival rate of leucit or lithium-disilicate reinforced glass ceramic SCs (96.6%; 95% CI: 94.9-96.7%), of glass infiltrated alumina SCs (94.6%; 95% CI: 92.7-96%) and densely sintered alumina and zirconia SCs (96%; 95% CI: 93.8-97.5%; 92.1%; 95% CI: 82.8-95.6%). In contrast, the 5-year survival rates of feldspathic/silica-based ceramic crowns were lower (pceramic and zirconia crowns exhibited significantly lower survival rates in the posterior region (pceramic fractures than metal-ceramic SCs (pceramic SCs than for metal-ceramic SCs. Survival rates of most types of all-ceramic SCs were similar to those reported for metal-ceramic SCs, both in anterior and posterior regions. Weaker feldspathic/silica-based ceramics should be limited to applications in the anterior region. Zirconia-based SCs should not be considered as primary option due to their high incidence of technical problems. Copyright © 2015 Academy

  5. Rare earth oxide reinforced Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-TiO{sub 2} ceramics for inert coating of metallic parts for petroleum extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadava, Yoggendra Prasad; Rego, Sheila Alves Bezerra da Costa; Ferreira, Ricardo Artur Sanguinetti [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    } reinforced Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-20 wt% TiO{sub 2} ceramics for inert coating of metallic parts for petroleum extraction industry. (author)

  6. Fracture Resistance and Mode of Failure of Ceramic versus Titanium Implant Abutments and Single Implant-Supported Restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sghaireen, Mohd G

    2015-06-01

    The material of choice for implant-supported restorations is affected by esthetic requirements and type of abutment. This study compares the fracture resistance of different types of implant abutments and implant-supported restorations and their mode of failure. Forty-five Oraltronics Pitt-Easy implants (Oraltronics Dental Implant Technology GmbH, Bremen, Germany) (4 mm diameter, 10 mm length) were embedded in clear autopolymerizing acrylic resin. The implants were randomly divided into three groups, A, B and C, of 15 implants each. In group A, titanium abutments and metal-ceramic crowns were used. In group B, zirconia ceramic abutments and In-Ceram Alumina crowns were used. In group C, zirconia ceramic abutments and IPS Empress Esthetic crowns were used. Specimens were tested to failure by applying load at 130° from horizontal plane using an Instron Universal Testing Machine. Subsequently, the mode of failure of each specimen was identified. Fracture resistance was significantly different between groups (p Empress crowns supported by zirconia abutments had the lowest fracture loads (p = .000). Fracture modes of metal-ceramic crowns supported by titanium abutments included screw fracture and screw bending. Fracture of both crown and abutment was the dominant mode of failure of In-Ceram/IPS Empress crowns supported by zirconia abutments. Metal-ceramic crowns supported by titanium abutments were more resistant to fracture than In-Ceram crowns supported by zirconia abutments, which in turn were more resistant to fracture than IPS Empress crowns supported by zirconia abutments. In addition, failure modes of restorations supported by zirconia abutments were more catastrophic than those for restorations supported by titanium abutments. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Improved color matching of metal ceramic restorations. Part II: Procedures for visual communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, J A; Torres, T J

    1987-12-01

    Most ceramic restorations are fabricated in a location remote from the dental office. Successful fabrication of matching life-like ceramic restorations necessitates a collaborative effort between the dentist and the ceramist. To meet the demands for visual communication of shade and surface texture, the following steps are recommended. 1. A means of communicating and recording surface texture that facilitates blending the restorations with the natural dentition should be used. 2. The system should use an esthetics prescription form that functions with the Shade Indicator Chart system to relate the shade of opaque, body, and incisal porcelains and their arrangement to the ceramist. 3. An easily made identification mold to form shade tabs is needed. 4. Identification shade tabs should be made to verify and document shade formulations selected with the Shade Indicator Chart system. 5. Methods for precisely mapping and reproducing individual characterization patterns are needed. This information permits the visualization of the end result, allowing the artistic expression of the ceramist to create vital-appearing restorations intrinsically and in harmony with the natural dentition.

  8. Influence of ceramic thickness and ceramic materials on fracture resistance of posterior partial coverage restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakeman, E M; Rego, N; Chaiyabutr, Y; Kois, J C

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of ceramic thickness and ceramic materials on fracture resistance of posterior partial coverage ceramic restorations. Forty extracted molars were allocated into four groups (n=10) to test for two variables: 1) the thickness of ceramic (1 mm or 2 mm) and 2) the ceramic materials (a lithium disilicate glass-ceramic [IPS e.max] or leucite-reinforced glass ceramic [IPS Empress]). All ceramic restorations were luted with resin cement (Variolink II) on the prepared teeth. These luted specimens were loaded to failure in a universal testing machine, in the compression mode, with a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min. The data were analyzed using two-way analysis of variance and the Tukey Honestly Significantly Different multiple comparison test (α =0.05). The fracture resistance revealed a significant effect for materials (pceramic was not significant (p=0.074), and the interaction between the thickness of ceramic and the materials was not significant (p=0.406). Mean (standard deviation) fracture resistance values were as follows: a 2-mm thickness of a lithium disilicate bonded to tooth structure (2505 [401] N) revealed a significantly higher fracture resistance than did a 1-mm thickness of leucite-reinforced (1569 [452] N) and a 2-mm thickness of leucite-reinforced ceramic bonded to tooth structure (1716 [436] N) (pceramic at 1-mm thickness (2105 [567] N) and at 2-mm thickness. Using a lithium disilicate glass ceramic for partial coverage restoration significantly improved fracture resistance compared to using a leucite-reinforced glass ceramic. The thickness of ceramic had no significant effect on fracture resistance when the ceramics were bonded to the underlying tooth structure.

  9. [Pathography and biography of the Empress Maria Theresa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habek, D; Masić, I

    2001-01-01

    The empress and queen Maria Theresa Habsburg-Lorraine (May 13th, 1917-November 29th, 1780) bore sixteen children in the marriage with the emperor Franz I Stepha and was famous as "mother-in-law of Europe". Her brother Leopold died immediately after he was born, her sister Amalia died in the cradle and Maria Ana died of perinatal complications at the birth of a dead infant in 1744. The famous hereditary facial dysmorphia of the "Hasburg jawe" wasn't noticed in Maria Theresa's surviving children. In October of 1738, after giving birth to her daughter Ana, a manual lysis of the placenta was performed due to the retained placenta and postpartal bleeding. In 1741 her daughter Carolina died, and in 1767 her daughter Josepha died of small pox. Her daughter Elizabeth remained deformed by the pock marks, and Maria Christina got a puerperal sepsis, but surprisingly, didn't die. Maria Antoinette ended under a guillotine in France, along with her husband Luis XVI. Maria Theresa's father, Karl VI died of the cholecystopankreatitis and peritonitis, and her husband and co-ruler most probably died of acute coronary incident in August 18th, 1765. After her husband's death she started suffering from depression with steady necrophile obsessions. Maria Theresa suffered from a chronical obstructional pulmonary disease (asthma), rehumatic syndromes, hypertension and anxiodepressive syndromes. In 1767 she had small pox. In November 11th 1780 she caught a cold which grew into a pneumonia with high fever. She died of cardiopulmonal dedompensation preceded by pneumonia and asthma.

  10. Acute health effects of the Sea Empress oil spill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, R A; Temple, J M; Evans, D; Fone, D L; Palmer, S R

    1999-05-01

    To investigate whether residents in the vicinity of the Sea Empress tanker spill suffered an increase in self reported physical and psychological symptoms, which might be attributable to exposure to crude oil. Retrospective cohort study; postal questionnaire including demographic details, a symptom checklist, beliefs about health effects of oil and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression and SF-36 mental health scales. Populations living in four coastal towns on the exposed south Pembrokeshire coast and two control towns on the unexposed north coast. 539 exposed and 550 unexposed people sampled at random from the family health services authority age-sex register who completed questionnaires. Adjusted odds ratios for self reported physical symptoms; scores on the Hospital Anxiety and Depression and SF-36 mental health scales, in 1089 people who responded out of a possible 1585 (69%). Living in areas exposed to the crude oil spillage was significantly associated with higher anxiety and depression scores, worse mental health; and self reported headache (odds ratio = 2.35, 95% CI 1.56, 3.55), sore eyes (odds ratio = 1.96, 95% CI 1.06, 3.62), and sore throat (odds ratio = 1.70, 95% CI 1.12, 2.60) after adjusting for age, sex, smoking status, anxiety, and the belief that oil had affected health. People living in exposed areas reported higher rates of physical and psychological symptoms than control areas. Symptoms significantly associated with exposure after adjustment for anxiety and health beliefs were those expected from the known toxicological effect of oil, suggesting a direct health effect on the exposed population.

  11. [An in vitro study of the fracture strength of tooth preparations for Empress 2 veneers and crowns and mandibular incisors restored with Empress 2 veneers and crowns].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xue; Li, Yan

    2009-12-01

    To compare the fracture resistance of mandibular incisors' preparations for veneers and crowns, mandibular incisors restored with Empress 2 veneers and crowns. 50 human mandibular incisors were randomly divided into five groups. Each group consisted of ten teeth and the treatment obtained as follows: A, tooth preparations for veneers; B, tooth preparations for crowns; C, teeth restored with veneers; D, teeth restored with crowns; E, untreated group. The teeth received standardized preparation and the restorations were manufactured with Empress 2 system and cemented with resin luting agent. The fracture resistances of teeth were measured by Instron universal testing machine and statistically analyzed with one-way ANOVA. The fracture resistances of A, B, C, D, E were (576.11 +/- 91.53), (204.13 +/- 85.88), (451.50 +/- 116.81), (386.16 +/- 117.75) and (566.05 +/- 121.37) N, respectively. The statistical analysis demonstrated significant differences between five groups. There were no significant differences between group A and E, group C and D. Tooth preparations for veneers did not significantly reduce the fracture resistance of mandibular incisor. The fracture resistance of teeth restored with Empress 2 veneers and crowns did not significantly differ from each other.

  12. Rediscovery of the Empress, Sasakia funebris Leech (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae: Nymphalinae: Apaturini after 88 years in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.P. Singh

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The sighting of an Empress, Sasakia funebris, is reported from upper Debang Valley District, Arunachal Pradesh. This is the first record of this butterfly after almost nine decades in India. Observations on the habitat and habits of the species are given.

  13. The Empress Frederick and Female Education in the Late Nineteenth Century: Germany, England and Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albisetti, James C.

    2012-01-01

    The long-time Prussian/German Crown Princess Victoria (1840-1901), known after her husband's death as the Empress Frederick, played an important role as patroness of and advocate for many forms of academic and vocational education for girls and women. This article examines her work for various institutions in Berlin as well as her homeland. It…

  14. The fate of oil on cleaned and uncleaned beaches following the Sea Empress incident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swannell, R.P.J.; Mitchell, D.J.; Little, D.I.; Smith, J.

    1997-09-01

    This report summarises the results of surveys of areas affected by the Sea Empress oil spill, commissioned by the Welsh Office, to compare cleaned and untreated shorelines. Details are given of the preliminary assessment of five sites, field methods and analysis of the oil at each site. Recommendations are also given. (UK)

  15. Characterization of some archaeological ceramics and clay samples from Zamala - Far-northern part of Cameroon (West Central Africa)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ntah, Z.L. Epossi; Sobott, R.; Bente, K., E-mail: zoilaepossi@yahoo.fr [Institute of Mineralogy, Crystallography and Materials Science, University of Leipzig (Germany); Fabbri, B. [Institute of Science and Technology for Ceramics, National Research Council (CNR) of Italy, Faenza (Italy)

    2017-07-15

    Seventeen ceramics samples (515±95 BP, about 580 years old) and two clay raw materials from Zamala (Far-northern, Cameroon) were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermal analysis (DTA/TG) and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. The aim of the work was the deduction of the production technology and provenance of these ceramics. With the exception of one sample the analysed ceramics formed a homogeneous chemical and mineralogical group. The observed mineralogical phases were quartz, mica (biotite), potassium feldspar (microcline) and plagioclase (albite and oligoclase). The XRD study of two local clays yielded the presence of quartz, kaolinite, mica, feldspar and plagioclase. The presence of the broad endothermic peak in the DTA/TG curves of the clays and its absence in the curves of the ceramics indicated that the firing temperature of the ceramics was above 550-600 °C, which is the temperature of the kaolinite-metakaolinite transformation. The firing experiments of the clay between 400-1200 °C in oxidizing atmosphere showed that mica disappeared above 900 °C. Therefore, the firing temperature of the sherds should have been between 600-900 °C. The chemical correlation between ceramics and local clay materials pointed out to a local production of these ceramics. (author)

  16. Reduction-oxidation Enabled Glass-ceramics to Stainless Steel Bonding Part I: screening of doping oxidants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Steve Xunhu [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Lithium silicate-based glass-ceramics with high coefficients of thermal expansion, designed to form matched hermetic seals in 304L stainless steel housing, show little evidence of interfacial chemical bonding, despite extensive inter-diffusion at the glass-ceramic-stainless steel (GC-SS) interface. A series of glass-ceramic compositions modified with a variety of oxidants, AgO, FeO, NiO, PbO, SnO, CuO, CoO, MoO3 and WO3, are examined for the feasibility of forming bonding oxides through reduction-oxidation (redox) at the GC-SS interface. The oxidants were selected according to their Gibbs free energy to allow for oxidation of Cr/Mn/Si from stainless steel, and yet to prevent a reduction of P2O5 in the glass-ceramic where the P2O5 is to form Li3PO4 nuclei for growth of high expansion crystalline SiO2 phases. Other than the CuO and CoO modified glass-ceramics, bonding from interfacial redox reactions were not achieved in the modified glass-ceramics, either because of poor wetting on the stainless steel or a reduction of the oxidants at the surface of glass-ceramic specimens rather than the GC-SS interface.

  17. Towards the synthesis of an experimental bioactive dental ceramic. Part I: Crystallinity characterization and bioactive behavior evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goudouri, O.-M. [Physics Department, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Kontonasaki, E. [School of Dentistry, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Papadopoulou, L.; Kantiranis, N. [Department of Geology, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Lazaridis, N.K. [Chemistry Department, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Chrissafis, K.; Chatzistavrou, X. [Physics Department, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Koidis, P. [School of Dentistry, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Paraskevopoulos, K.M., E-mail: kpar@auth.gr [Physics Department, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2014-05-01

    An attachment between the dental ceramic and the surrounding marginal tissues in fixed prosthetic restorations could eliminate secondary carries prevalence. The development of dental ceramics with apatite forming ability could provide the biological surface required for selective spread and attachment of specific cell types able to promote tissue attachment. Dental ceramics/bioactive glass composites synthesized by the sol gel method have been previously reported to develop carbonated hydroxyapatite (HCAp) in biomimetic solutions, requiring though a high amount of bioactive glass, which resulted in the compromise of their mechanical integrity. Thus, the aim of the present work was the synthesis and characterization of an experimental sol–gel derived dental ceramic with low amount of bioactive glass and the evaluation of its in vitro bioactivity. Differential thermal and thermogravimetric analysis (TG–DTA), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray Diffractometry (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) were used to evaluate the crystal structure and the in vitro apatite forming ability of the synthesized material. The results of this study indicated the successful sol–gel synthesis of an experimental dental ceramic containing low amount of bioactive glass that presented similar structural and morphological characteristics with a commercial feldspathic dental ceramic, while exhibiting in vitro bioactivity. The apatite forming ability of the experimental sol–gel derived feldspathic dental ceramic may trigger the appropriate cellular mechanisms towards the establishment of attachment with the surrounding connective tissue. This attachment could provide a barrier to oral bacteria penetration, prolonging the life expectation of the restorations. - Highlights: • Synthesis of a bioactive sol–gel dental ceramic for fixed prosthetic restorations. • The sol–gel technique promoted the crystallization of

  18. Towards the synthesis of an experimental bioactive dental ceramic. Part I: Crystallinity characterization and bioactive behavior evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goudouri, O.-M.; Kontonasaki, E.; Papadopoulou, L.; Kantiranis, N.; Lazaridis, N.K.; Chrissafis, K.; Chatzistavrou, X.; Koidis, P.; Paraskevopoulos, K.M.

    2014-01-01

    An attachment between the dental ceramic and the surrounding marginal tissues in fixed prosthetic restorations could eliminate secondary carries prevalence. The development of dental ceramics with apatite forming ability could provide the biological surface required for selective spread and attachment of specific cell types able to promote tissue attachment. Dental ceramics/bioactive glass composites synthesized by the sol gel method have been previously reported to develop carbonated hydroxyapatite (HCAp) in biomimetic solutions, requiring though a high amount of bioactive glass, which resulted in the compromise of their mechanical integrity. Thus, the aim of the present work was the synthesis and characterization of an experimental sol–gel derived dental ceramic with low amount of bioactive glass and the evaluation of its in vitro bioactivity. Differential thermal and thermogravimetric analysis (TG–DTA), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray Diffractometry (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) were used to evaluate the crystal structure and the in vitro apatite forming ability of the synthesized material. The results of this study indicated the successful sol–gel synthesis of an experimental dental ceramic containing low amount of bioactive glass that presented similar structural and morphological characteristics with a commercial feldspathic dental ceramic, while exhibiting in vitro bioactivity. The apatite forming ability of the experimental sol–gel derived feldspathic dental ceramic may trigger the appropriate cellular mechanisms towards the establishment of attachment with the surrounding connective tissue. This attachment could provide a barrier to oral bacteria penetration, prolonging the life expectation of the restorations. - Highlights: • Synthesis of a bioactive sol–gel dental ceramic for fixed prosthetic restorations. • The sol–gel technique promoted the crystallization of

  19. FY 1998 report on the results of R and D projects by local consortiums for immediate effects. Development of woody ceramics and application to building parts; 1998 nendo woody ceramics no sosei to kenchiku buzai nado eno oyo seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    The R and D project has been implemented for developing materials for, e.g., light, highly heat-insulating and energy-saving type building parts (e.g., roofing tiles and tiles), and light tableware having warmness of wood. The stock materials for china and porcelain, roofing tile clay, tiles and cement are dispersed with hollow microcapsules as the filler, which are of glassy balloons thermally treated to be highly functional, in order to develop superlight, highly heat insulating and high-strength materials. For development of the woody ceramic materials, the microcapsules are investigated for size, thickness, thermal shrinkage, fusibility, compressive stress, reinforcing mechanisms, and monodispersibility. Also investigated are optimization of material formability, development of commercial ceramics and evaluation of their marketability, decoration techniques, antimicrobial membrane materials and their immobilization techniques, development of antimicrobial ceramic tiles, evaluation of the antimicrobial membranes, evaluation of resistance to microwaves, and so on. The efforts are also directed to researches on fundamental techniques for woody tile clay, and R and D of the application techniques and products of the woody cement. (NEDO)

  20. Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fareed, Ali [Honeywell Advanced Composites Inc. (HACI), Newark, DE (United States); Craig, Phillip A. [Honeywell Advanced Composites Inc. (HACI), Newark, DE (United States)

    2002-09-01

    Fiber-reinforced ceramic composites demonstrate the high-temperature stability of ceramics--with an increased fracture toughness resulting from the fiber reinforcement of the composite. The material optimization performed under the continuous fiber ceramic composites (CFCC) included a series of systematic optimizations. The overall goals were to define the processing window, to increase the robustinous of the process, to increase process yield while reducing costs, and to define the complexity of parts that could be fabricated.

  1. Randomized, Controlled Clinical Trial of Bilayer Ceramic and Metal-Ceramic Crown Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquivel-Upshaw, Josephine; Rose, William; Oliveira, Erica; Yang, Mark; Clark, Arthur E.; Anusavice, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Analyzing the clinical performance of restorative materials is important, as there is an expectation that these materials and procedures will restore teeth and do no harm. The objective of this research study was to characterize the clinical performance of metal-ceramic crowns, core ceramic crowns, and core ceramic/veneer ceramic crowns based on 11 clinical criteria. Materials and Methods An IRB-approved, randomized, controlled clinical trial was conducted as a single-blind pilot study. The following three types of full crowns were fabricated: (1) metal-ceramic crown (MC) made from a Pd-Au-Ag-Sn-In alloy (Argedent 62) and a glass-ceramic veneer (IPS d.SIGN veneer); (2) non-veneered (glazed) lithium disilicate glass-ceramic crown (LDC) (IPS e.max Press core and e.max Ceram Glaze); and (3) veneered lithia disilicate glass-ceramic crown (LDC/V) with glass-ceramic veneer (IPS Empress 2 core and IPS Eris). Single-unit crowns were randomly assigned. Patients were recalled for each of 3 years and were evaluated by two calibrated clinicians. Thirty-six crowns were placed in 31 patients. A total of 12 crowns of each of the three crown types were studied. Eleven criteria were evaluated: tissue health, marginal integrity, secondary caries, proximal contact, anatomic contour, occlusion, surface texture, cracks/chips (fractures), color match, tooth sensitivity, and wear (of crowns and opposing enamel). Numerical rankings ranged from 1 to 4, with 4 being excellent, and 1 indicating a need for immediate replacement. Statistical analysis of the numerical rankings was performed using a Fisher’s exact test. Results There was no statistically significant difference between performance of the core ceramic crowns and the two veneered crowns at year 1 and year 2 (p > 0.05). All crowns were rated either as excellent or good for each of the clinical criteria; however, between years 2 and 3, gradual roughening of the occlusal surface occurred in some of the ceramic-ceramic crowns

  2. IPS Empress inlays luted with a self-adhesive resin cement after 1 year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taschner, Michael; Frankenberger, Roland; García-Godoy, Franklin; Rosenbusch, Silke; Petschelt, Anselm; Krämer, Norbert

    2009-02-01

    To prospectively compare the clinical performance of two different resin composites for luting IPS Empress inlays and onlays. 83 IPS Empress restorations were placed in 30 subjects. All restorations were inserted under rubber dam. 43 inlays/onlays were luted with a self-adhesive resin cement [RelyX Unicem (RX)]. A multistep adhesive (Syntac) was used with Variolink II low viscosity (SV) and served as control (n=40). The restorations were evaluated after 2 weeks: Baseline = 1st recall (R1), after 6 months (R2) and after 1 year (R3) by two calibrated examiners using the modified USPHS criteria. From R1 to R3, one failure was noticed in the SV group (R2) due to marginal enamel chipping. After 1 year of clinical service, SV revealed significantly better results regarding color match and integrity inlay (Mann-Whitney U-test, P0.05).

  3. Comparative characterization of a novel cad-cam polymer-infiltrated-ceramic-network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albero, Alberto; Pascual, Agustín; Camps, Isabel; Grau-Benitez, María

    2015-10-01

    The field of dental ceramics for CAD-CAM is enriched with a new innovative material composition having a porous three-dimensional structure of feldspathic ceramic infiltrated with acrylic resins.The aim of this study is to determine the mechanical properties of Polymer-Infiltrated-Ceramic-Network (PICN) and compare its performance with other ceramics and a nano-ceramic resin available for CAD-CAM systems. In this study a total of five different materials for CAD-CAM were investigated. A polymer-infiltrated ceramic (Vita Enamic), a nano-ceramic resin (Lava Ultimate), a feldspathic ceramic (Mark II), a lithium disilicate ceramic (IPS-e max CAD) and finally a Leucite based ceramic (Empress - CAD). From CAD-CAM blocks, 120 bars (30 for each material cited above) were cut to measure the flexural strength with a three-point-bending test. Strain at failure, fracture stress and Weibull modulus was calculated. Vickers hardness of each material was also measured. IPS-EMAX presents mechanical properties significantly better from the other materials studied. Its strain at failure, flexural strength and hardness exhibited significantly higher values in comparison with the others. VITA ENAMIC and LAVA ULTIMATE stand out as the next most resistant materials. The flexural strength, elastic modulus similar to a tooth as well as having less hardness than ceramics make PICN materials an option to consider as a restorative material. Ceramic infiltrated with resin, CAD-CAM, Weibull modulus, flexural strength, micro hardness.

  4. Portfolio: Ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Jane; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Describes eight art activities using ceramics. Elementary students created ceramic tiles to depict ancient Egyptian and medieval European art, made ceramic cookie stamps, traced bisque plates on sketch paper, constructed clay room-tableaus, and designed clay relief masks. Secondary students pit-fired ceramic pots and designed ceramic Victorian…

  5. [Fractographic analysis of clinically failed anterior all ceramic crowns].

    Science.gov (United States)

    DU, Qian; Zhou, Min-bo; Zhang, Xin-ping; Zhao, Ke

    2012-04-01

    To identify the site of crack initiation and propagation path of clinically failed all ceramic crowns by fractographic analysis. Three clinically failed anterior IPS Empress II crowns and two anterior In-Ceram alumina crowns were retrieved. Fracture surfaces were examined using both optical stereo and scanning electron microscopy. Fractographic theory and fracture mechanics principles were applied to disclose the damage characteristics and fracture mode. All the crowns failed by cohesive failure within the veneer on the labial surface. Critical crack originated at the incisal contact area and propagated gingivally. Porosity was found within the veneer because of slurry preparation and the sintering of veneer powder. Cohesive failure within the veneer is the main failure mode of all ceramic crown. Veneer becomes vulnerable when flaws are present. To reduce the chances of chipping, multi-point occlusal contacts are recommended, and layering and sintering technique of veneering layer should also be improved.

  6. Playing with anthems: The formation of the cult of empress Elisabeth in Hungarian music

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Windhager Ákos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I reveal how the cult of Empress Elisabeth affected the reception of three different volumes of Hungarian music. These three works are: Erzsébet-emlény (Elisabeth Memorial Album, 1854 edited by Kornél Ábrányi; Erzsébet (Elisabeth, 1854 opera by Károly Doppler, Ferenc Doppler and Ferenc Erkel; and Die Legende von der heiligen Elisabeth (The Legend of Saint Elisabeth, 1865 by Franz Liszt. In spite of their high artistic level, the first two works were banned by the cultural elite who interpreted them as Habsburgian political music after the downfall of the dual state. On the other hand, the intentionally apolitical oratorio by Franz Liszt was regarded by the same cultural elite as the highest standard of artistic representation of the Empress. As a consequence of parallel distribution of both imperially and nationally constructed memories, a strange diffusion appeared in the social sphere, especially in Hungarian cultural memory. Conflicting memories emerged due to the discrepancy between the original Hungarian political myth (Kossuth-myth and Empress Elisabeth’s cult. Using the terminology introduced by Claude Lévi-Strauss, I have labeled this situation as the clash of the cold and hot society in Hungary during the 19th century.

  7. Fracture resistance of computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing ceramic crowns cemented on solid abutments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stona, Deborah; Burnett, Luiz Henrique; Mota, Eduardo Gonçalves; Spohr, Ana Maria

    2015-07-01

    Because no information was found in the dental literature regarding the fracture resistance of all-ceramic crowns using CEREC (Sirona) computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) system on solid abutments, the authors conducted a study. Sixty synOcta (Straumann) implant replicas and regular neck solid abutments were embedded in acrylic resin and randomly assigned (n = 20 per group). Three types of ceramics were used: feldspathic, CEREC VITABLOCS Mark II (VITA); leucite, IPS Empress CAD (Ivoclar Vivadent); and lithium disilicate, IPS e.max CAD (Ivoclar Vivadent). The crowns were fabricated by the CEREC CAD-CAM system. After receiving glaze, the crowns were cemented with RelyX U200 (3M ESPE) resin cement under load of 1 kilogram. For each ceramic, one-half of the specimens were subjected to the fracture resistance testing in a universal testing machine with a crosshead speed of 1 millimeter per minute, and the other half were subjected to the fractured resistance testing after 1,000,000 cyclic fatigue loading at 100 newtons. According to a 2-way analysis of variance, the interaction between the material and mechanical cycling was significant (P = .0001). According to a Tukey test (α = .05), the fracture resistance findings with or without cyclic fatigue loading were as follows, respectively: CEREC VITABLOCKS Mark II (405 N/454 N) was statistically lower than IPS Empress CAD (1169 N/1240 N) and IPS e.max CAD (1378 N/1025 N) (P Empress CAD and IPS e.max CAD did not differ statistically (P > .05). According to a t test, there was no statistical difference in the fracture resistance with and without cyclic fatigue loading for CEREC VITABLOCS Mark II and IPS Empress CAD (P > .05). For IPS e.max CAD, the fracture resistance without cyclic fatigue loading was statistically superior to that obtained with cyclic fatigue loading (P Empress CAD and IPS e.max CAD showed higher fracture resistance compared with CEREC VITABLOCS Mark II. The cyclic

  8. Eyebrow Shapes of Chinese Empresses of the Ming and Qing Dynasties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Kun; Yoo, Seong Kyung

    2018-03-14

    The aim of this study was to analyze eyebrow shapes in portraits of Chinese empresses of Ming and Qing dynasties.The frontal portraits of 20 Ming empresses and 24 of Qing in which the eye and eyebrows were identifiable were measured and analyzed. The arch shape did not differ significantly (P > 0.05) between Ming and Qing. The head-up type (66.6%) was significantly more common (P Qing empresses were classified as 5 arch types: L (Lamas), A (Anastasia), H (Hwang), M (Empress Ma), and D (Empress Du). In Ming, type-H (45.0%) was the most frequent, followed by type-D (25.0%). In Qing, type-L (45.8%) was the most frequent, followed by type-H (16.7%) and type-D (16.7%). The relative eyebrow width (REW) of Ming and Qing was 1.59 ± 0.28. The REW of Qing (1.63 ± 0.30) and Ming (1.55 ± 0.26) did not differ significantly. The relative medial height (RMH, 1.05 ± 0.20) and relative lateral height (RLH; 1.05 ± 0.21) were the same, and greater than the relative mid-pupillary height (RPH; 0.84 ± 0.19; P Qing (1.02 ± 0.16) did not differ significantly. The RLH likewise did not differ significantly between Ming (1.01 ± 0.21) and Qing (1.08 ± 0.22). However, the RPH of Ming (0.91 ± 0.21) was significantly (P = 0.042) greater than Qing (0.79 ± 0.17). The relative brow thickness (RBT) of Qing (0.13 ± 0.06) was significantly (p = 0.033) greater than Ming (0.17 ± 0.06). The RBT of Ming and Qing was 0.15 ± 0.06 and increased with time (P = 0.023).The results of this study may be useful for brow lift or the tattooing.

  9. Wear of MgO-CaO-SiO2-P2O5-F-Based Glass Ceramics Compared to Selected Dental Ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jongee Park

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Wear of a glass-ceramic produced through controlled crystallization of a glass in the MgO-CaO-SiO2-P2O5-F system has been evaluated and compared to various commercial dental ceramics including IPS Empress 2, Cergo Pressable Ceramic, Cerco Ceram, and Super porcelain EX-3. Wear tests were performed in accord with the ASTM G99 for wear testing with a pin-on-disk apparatus. The friction coefficient and specific wear rate of the materials investigated were determined at a load of 10 N and at ambient laboratory conditions. Microhardness of the materials was also measured to elucidate the appropriateness of these materials for dental applications.

  10. Wear Potential of Dental Ceramics and its Relationship with Microhardness and Coefficient of Friction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freddo, Rafael Augusto; Kapczinski, Myriam Pereira; Kinast, Eder Julio; de Souza Junior, Oswaldo Baptista; Rivaldo, Elken Gomes; da Fontoura Frasca, Luis Carlos

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate, by means of pin-on-disk testing, the wear potential of different dental ceramic systems as it relates to friction parameters, surface finish, and microhardness. Three groups of different ceramic systems (Noritake EX3, Eris, Empress II) with 20 disks each (10 glazed, 10 polished) were used. Vickers microhardness (Hv) was determined with a 200-g load for 30 seconds. Friction coefficients (μ) were determined by pin-on-disk testing (5 N load, 600 seconds, and 120 rpm). Wear patterns were assessed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test, with the significance level set at α = 0.05. The coefficients of friction were as follows: Noritake EX3 0.28 ± 0.12 (polished), 0.33 ± 0.08 (glazed); Empress II 0.38 ± 0.08 (polished), 0.45 ± 0.05 (glazed); Eris 0.49 ± 0.05 (polished), 0.49 ± 0.06 (glazed). Microhardness measurements were as follows: Noritake EX3 530.7 ± 8.7 (polished), 525.9 ± 6.2 (glazed); Empress II 534.1 ± 8 (polished), 534.7 ± 4.5 (glazed); Eris, 511.7 ± 6.5 (polished), 519.5 ± 4.1 (glazed). The polished and glazed Noritake EX3 and polished and glazed Eris specimens showed statistically different friction coefficients. SEM image analysis revealed more surface changes, such as small cracks and grains peeling off, in glazed ceramics. Wear potential may be related to the coefficient of friction in Noritake ceramics, which had a lower coefficient than Eris ceramics. Within-group analysis showed no differences in polished or glazed specimens. The differences observed were not associated with microhardness. © 2015 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  11. EFFECTIVE ELASTIC PROPERTIES OF ALUMINA-ZIRCONIA COMPOSITE CERAMICS - PART 4. TENSILE MODULUS OF POROUS ALUMINA AND ZIRCONIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Pabst

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available In this fourth paper of a series on the effective elastic properties of alumina-zirconia composite ceramics the influence of porosity on the effective tensile modulus of alumina and zirconia ceramics is discussed. The examples investigated are alumina and zirconia ceramics prepared from submicron powders by starch consolidation casting using two different types of starch, potato starch (median size D50 =47.2 µm and corn starch (median size D50 =13.7 µm. The dependence of effective tensile moduli E, on the porosity f, measured for porosities in the ranges of approx. 19-55 vol.% and 10-42 vol.% for alumina and zirconia, respectively, using a resonant frequency technique, was evaluated by fitting with various model relations, including newly developed ones. A detailed comparison of the fitting results suggests the superiority of the new relation E/E0 = (1 - f·(1 - f/fC, developed by the authors (with the tensile modulus of the dense ceramic material E0 and the critical porosity fC, over most other existing fit models. Only for special purposes and well-behaved data sets the recently proposed exponential relation E/E0 = exp [-Bf/(1 - f] and the well-known Phani-Niyogi relation E/E0 = (1 - f/fCN might be preferable.

  12. Surface modification of ceramics. Ceramics no hyomen kaishitsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hioki, T. (Toyota Central Research and Development Labs., Inc., Nagoya (Japan))

    1993-07-05

    Surface modification of ceramics and some study results using in implantation in surface modification are introduced. The mechanical properties (strength, fracture toughness, flaw resistance) of ceramics was improved and crack was repaired using surface modification by ion implantation. It is predicted that friction and wear properties are considerably affected because the hardness of ceramics is changed by ion implantation. Cementing and metalization are effective as methods for interface modification and the improvement of the adhesion power of the interface between metal and ceramic is their example. It was revealed that the improvement of mechanical properties of ceramics was achieved if appropriate surface modification was carried out. The market of ceramics mechanical parts is still small, therefore, the present situation is that the field of activities for surface modification of ceramics is also narrow. However, it is thought that in future, ceramics use may be promoted surely in the field like medicine and mechatronics. 8 refs., 4 figs.

  13. Comparison of two bond strength testing methodologies for bilayered all-ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dündar, Mine; Ozcan, Mutlu; Gökçe, Bülent; Cömlekoğlu, Erhan; Leite, Fabiola; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    2007-05-01

    This study compared the shear bond strength (SBS) and microtensile (MTBS) testing methodologies for core and veneering ceramics in four types of all-ceramic systems. Four different ceramic veneer/core combinations, three of which were feldspathic and the other a fluor-apatite to their respectively corresponding cores, namely leucite-reinforced ceramic ((IPS)Empress, Ivoclar), low leucite-reinforced ceramic (Finesse, Ceramco), glass-infiltrated alumina (In-Ceram Alumina, Vita) and lithium disilicate ((IPS)Empress 2, Ivoclar) were used for SBS and MTBS tests. Ceramic cores (N=40, n=10/group for SBS test method, N=5 blocks/group for MTBS test method) were fabricated according to the manufacturers' instructions (for SBS: thickness, 3mm; diameter, 5mm and for MTBS: 10 mm x 10 mm x 2 mm) and ultrasonically cleaned. The veneering ceramics (thickness: 2mm) were vibrated and condensed in stainless steel moulds and fired onto the core ceramic materials. After trying the specimens in the mould for minor adjustments, they were again ultrasonically cleaned and embedded in PMMA. The specimens were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 1 week and bond strength tests were performed in universal testing machines (cross-head speed: 1mm/min). The bond strengths (MPa+/-S.D.) and modes of failures were recorded. Significant difference between the two test methods and all-ceramic types were observed (P<0.05) (2-way ANOVA, Tukey's test and Bonferroni). The mean SBS values for veneering ceramic to lithium disilicate was significantly higher (41+/-8 MPa) than those to low leucite (28+/-4 MPa), glass-infiltrated (26+/-4 MPa) and leucite-reinforced (23+/-3 MPa) ceramics, while the mean MTBS for low leucite ceramic was significantly higher (15+/-2 MPa) than those of leucite (12+/-2 MPa), glass-infiltrated (9+/-1 MPa) and lithium disilicate ceramic (9+/-1 MPa) (ANOVA, P<0.05). Both the testing methodology and the differences in chemical compositions of the core and veneering ceramics

  14. Ceramic Technology Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-03-01

    The Ceramic Technology Project was developed by the USDOE Office of Transportation Systems (OTS) in Conservation and Renewable Energy. This project, part of the OTS's Materials Development Program, was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTS's automotive technology programs. Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the USDOE and NASA advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. These programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. A five-year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. In July 1990 the original plan was updated through the estimated completion of development in 1993. The objective is to develop the industrial technology base required for reliable ceramics for application in advanced automotive heat engines. The project approach includes determining the mechanisms controlling reliability, improving processes for fabricating existing ceramics, developing new materials with increased reliability, and testing these materials in simulated engine environments to confirm reliability. Although this is a generic materials project, the focus is on the structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to US industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities.

  15. [The anorectic life of Empress Elisabeth of Austria (1837-1898). Slenderness cult of the Habsburg family].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandereycken, W; Abatzi, T

    1996-07-01

    Empress Elisabeth of Austria (1837-1898), known for her beauty as well as for her opposition to the ceremonial court of the Austrian ruling family, suffered from a disease that has been termed typical for modern-day industrial nations. The biography of the Empress discloses information revealing symptoms of anorexia nervosa. Over a period of decades she developed strategies for weight reduction such as fasting rituals, gymnastics, hour-long horse-riding and forced marching. Numerous documents repeatedly describe her considerable fear of weight gain and the psychopathological changes specific for anorexia nervosa. Up to her death she succeeded in restricting to a minimum not only her body weight but also her social obligations. The documents on the life of Empress Elisabeth suggest that cultural, historical and psychodynamic factors play an important role in the genesis of this disorder.

  16. Study of potentiality of raw material of Crato/CE for use in structural ceramics - part I - technological characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, J.C.S.; Santos, G.M.; Saldanha, K.M.; Sales Junior, J.C.C.; Nascimento, R.M.; Paskocimas, C.A.

    2011-01-01

    The limitation of information on chemical, mineralogical and thermal characteristics of raw material used in process of manufacture of ceramic products in the region of Cariri, specifically the city of Crato, state of Ceara, motivated the development of this work, since this region ceramics exist that in a general context they appear as important productive chains in the state. The characteristics were evaluated by tests of limit of liquidity, limit of plasticity, index of plasticity, but also by chemical analysis for fluorescence of rays X, analysis of phases for diffraction of rays X, and thermal analysis (thermogratimetric analysis). The results showed that the raw material has excellent size distribution and characteristics acceptable to the processing of structural components of dark color the red, requiring a mixture of clay with coarse less plastic which granulation, that functions as reducer of plasticity. (author)

  17. Synthesis of Ceramic Protective Coatings for Chemical Plant Parts Operated in Hi-temperature and Corrosive/Erosive Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, M. C.; Park, J. R.; Hong, K. T.; Seok, H. K.

    2005-01-01

    Some feasibility studies are conducted to produce an advanced ceramic coating, which reveals superior chemical and mechanical strength, on metal base structure used in chemical plant. This advanced coating on metallic frame can replace ceramic delivery pipe and reaction chamber used in chemical plant, which are operated in hi-temperature and corrosive/erosive environment. An dual spraying is adopted to reduce the residual stress in order to increase the coating thickness and the residual stress is estimated by in-situ manner. Then new methodology is tried to form special coating of yttrium aluminum garnet(YAG), which reveals hi-strength and low-creep rates at hi-temperature, superior anti-corrosion property, hi-stability against Alkali-Vapor corrosion, and so on, on iron base structure. To verify the formation of YAG during thermal spraying, XRD(X ray diffraction) technique was used

  18. Early Pottery Making in Northern Coastal Peru. Part IV: Mössbauer Study of Ceramics from Huaca Sialupe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, I.; Häusler, W.; Jakob, M.; Montenegro, J.; Riederer, J.; Wagner, U.

    2003-09-01

    We report on an interdisciplinary study of ceramic material excavated in 1999 and 2001 at a 1000-year old ceramic and metal production site, located at Huaca Sialupe in the La Leche valley on the north coast of Peru and dating to the Middle Sicán period (AD 900-1100). Sherds of Sicán red- and blackware, numerous moulds, several kilns and other evidence of pottery making were found. The pottery, in particular, is famous for its fine texture and perfect black surface finish. In addition, some clay lumps and sherds of unfired Sicán pottery were excavated. Within the same workshop several large inverted ceramic urns used as furnaces were found together with Middle Sicán metal working tools and debris. Various physical methods were applied to investigate this material. The ancient firing procedures could be elucidated by comparing the spectra observed for the ancient sherds with model spectra of laboratory and field fired clay samples. This shows that the fine ware made at Huaca Sialupe was intentionally fired under strongly reducing conditions at temperatures up to 900°C. Reoxidation at the end of the reducing firing took place only occasionally. Less care was taken in firing moulds used for pottery making.

  19. On the interpretation of SAR imagery from the Sea Empress oil spill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, B.; Mitchelson-Jacob, E.G.

    1998-01-01

    A method for monitoring oil spills using SAR imagery is suggested, based on the simulation of the wave spectrum using modelled surface winds. A first order separation of the purely wind-driven backscatter distribution and its modifications due to surfactant was made by parametrizing the effect of surfactant on the wave growth rate and on the reflective properties of the sea surface. The technique was applied to an SAR image showing the Sea Empress oil spill, in south-west Wales, UK. (author)

  20. Satellite remote sensing at the Sea Empress spill - a help or potential hindrance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lunel, T.

    1996-01-01

    The application of satellite images in an oil spill response operation, was discussed. The oil movement and satellite imagery of the Sea Empress spill was described in detail. There were large discrepancies in the predictions by Radarsat satellite imagery and the actual oil movement, and in this instance, the satellite imagery proved to be more of a distraction than a useful tool. It was suggested that the greatest potential for satellite imagery is in detecting smaller releases of oil, such as from illegal tank washings, ballast waters from ships, or operational malfunctions at oil rigs. 4 refs., 10 figs

  1. Biomass yield and fuel characteristics of short-rotation coppice (willow, poplar, empress tree)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maier, J.; Vetter, R. [Institute for Land Management Compatible to Environmental Requirements, Muellheim (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    In two pedo-climatic different regions in the state of Baden-Wuerttemberg three shortrotation coppices willow, poplar and empress tree were tested with regard to their biomass productivity on arable land and to their properties for energetic use. Between 8 and 13 tons of dry matter per hectare and year could be produced under extensive cultivation conditions, over 15 tons with irrigation. Due to their composition, it can be assumed that their use as solid fuel in a biomass combustor is just as unproblematic as with forest timber. (orig.)

  2. All-ceramic or metal-ceramic tooth-supported fixed dental prostheses (FDPs)? A systematic review of the survival and complication rates. Part II: Multiple-unit FDPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pjetursson, Bjarni Elvar; Sailer, Irena; Makarov, Nikolay Alexandrovich; Zwahlen, Marcel; Thoma, Daniel Stefan

    2015-06-01

    To assess the 5-year survival of metal-ceramic and all-ceramic tooth-supported fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) and to describe the incidence of biological, technical and esthetic complications. Medline (PubMed), Embase and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) searches (2006-2013) were performed for clinical studies focusing on tooth-supported FDPs with a mean follow-up of at least 3 years. This was complemented by an additional hand search and the inclusion of 10 studies from a previous systematic review [1]. Survival and complication rates were analyzed using robust Poisson's regression models to obtain summary estimates of 5-year proportions. Forty studies reporting on 1796 metal-ceramic and 1110 all-ceramic FDPs fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Meta-analysis of the included studies indicated an estimated 5-year survival rate of metal-ceramic FDPs of 94.4% (95% CI: 91.2-96.5%). The estimated survival rate of reinforced glass ceramic FDPs was 89.1% (95% CI: 80.4-94.0%), the survival rate of glass-infiltrated alumina FDPs was 86.2% (95% CI: 69.3-94.2%) and the survival rate of densely sintered zirconia FDPs was 90.4% (95% CI: 84.8-94.0%) in 5 years of function. Even though the survival rate of all-ceramic FDPs was lower than for metal-ceramic FDPs, the differences did not reach statistical significance except for the glass-infiltrated alumina FDPs (p=0.05). A significantly higher incidence of caries in abutment teeth was observed for densely sintered zirconia FDPs compared to metal-ceramic FDPs. Significantly more framework fractures were reported for reinforced glass ceramic FDPs (8.0%) and glass-infiltrated alumina FDPs (12.9%) compared to metal-ceramic FDPs (0.6%) and densely sintered zirconia FDPs (1.9%) in 5 years in function. However, the incidence of ceramic fractures and loss of retention was significantly (p=0.018 and 0.028 respectively) higher for densely sintered zirconia FDPs compared to all other types of FDPs. Survival rates of all

  3. The impact of the 'Sea Empress' oil spill on seabass recruitment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lancaster, J.E.; Pawson, M.G.; Pickett, G.D.; Jennings, S.

    1998-01-01

    Young-of-the-year (O-group) sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax L.) were collected during 1996 from 12 inshore sites in the Bristol Channel in order to investigate possible effects of the Sea Empress oil spill on their growth and survival. O-group bass were more abundant on the south side of the Bristol Channel than in South Wales nurseries, and particularly scarce within Milford Haven. Some bass caught in nursery areas on the north Cornish coast had spawned in early March, but only fish spawned after late April appeared in South Wales nurseries, where the first arrival data of bass post-larvae was later than in nursery areas in north Devon and Cornwall. O-group bass grew faster within the latter nurseries than in the north coast of the Bristol Channel, where a much higher proportion of fish failed to reach 60 mm, the critical length for survival through the first winter. There were no significant differences in fish condition or in the weight of their stomach contents between sites. Whilst the Sea Empress oil spill may have contributed to the differences in the survival of early-spawned bass larvae and the abundance of O-group bass in nursery areas on either side of the Bristol Channel, these differences are likely to be less significant than the year to year variation due to natural causes. (author)

  4. Electrolytic In-process Dressing (ELID) for high-efficiency, precision grinding of ceramic parts: An experiment study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandyopadhyay, B.P.

    1995-08-01

    This report describes Electrolytic In-process Dressing (ELID) as applied to the efficient, high-precision grinding of structural ceramics, and describes work performed jointly by Dr. B.P. Bandyopadhyay, University of North Dakota, and Dr. R. Ohmori, of the Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RINEN), Tokyo, Japan, from June through August, 1994. Dr. Ohmori pioneered the novel ELID grinding technology which incorporates electrolytically enhanced, in-process dressing of metal bonded superabrasive wheels. The principle of ELID grinding technology is discussed in the report as will its application for rough grinding and precision grinding. Two types of silicon nitride based ceramics (Kyocerals Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, and Eaton`s SRBSN) were ground under various conditions with ELID methods. Mirror surface finishes were obtained with {number_sign} 4000 mesh size wheel (average grain size = 4 {mu}m). Results of these investigations are presented in this report. These include the effects of wheel bond type, type of power supply, abrasive grit friability, and cooling fluid composition. The effects of various parameters are discussed in terms of the mechanisms of ELID grinding, and in particular, the manner of boundary layer formation on the wheels and abrasive grit protrusion.

  5. Particle size analysis of sediments used in studies of the distribution of oil-derived contaminants from the ''Sea Empress''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    Following the Sea Empress oil-spill, sediment samples were collected around the approaches to Milford Haven and analysed for PAHs. In order to facilitate the interpretation of these results it was decided to analyse the particle size distribution of the sediments. This report presents the results of particle-size measurements of 150 of those offshore samples. (author)

  6. Advanced Ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The First Florida-Brazil Seminar on Materials and the Second State Meeting about new materials in Rio de Janeiro State show the specific technical contribution in advanced ceramic sector. The others main topics discussed for the development of the country are the advanced ceramic programs the market, the national technic-scientific capacitation, the advanced ceramic patents, etc. (C.G.C.) [pt

  7. Cinza da lenha para aplicação em cerâmica vermelha. parte I: características da cinza Firewood ash for application in red ceramic. part I: characteristics of the ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. C. Borlini

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available A lenha de eucalipto constitui-se no principal combustível utilizado pelas indústrias de cerâmica vermelha do município de Campos dos Goytacazes, Estado do Rio de Janeiro. Em princípio, esta lenha tem características promissoras para adição em cerâmica. Assim, esse trabalho tem por objetivo caracterizar a cinza proveniente da combustão de lenha predominantemente de eucalipto visando a incorporação na massa de cerâmica vermelha processada em indústrias de Campos dos Goytacazes. Foram realizados ensaios de fluorescência de raios X, difração de raios X, distribuição de tamanho de partícula, análise térmica (ATD/TG, porosimetria de mercúrio e microscopia eletrônica de varredura. Os resultados mostraram que a cinza da lenha se apresenta como aglomerados de partículas, sendo constituída principalmente por Ca, Si, Mg, K e S.The eucalyptus firewood is one of the main fuels used by the industries of red ceramic in the municipal area of Campos of Goytacazes, State of Rio de Janeiro. In principle this firewood has promising characteristics for addition into ceramics. Thus, the present work has for objective to characterize the ash generated from burning firewood aiming at its incorporation into red ceramic products. The ash was submitted to X-ray diffraction, chemical composition, particle size distribution, thermal analysis (ATD/TG, mercury porosimetry and scanning electron microscopy tests. The results showed that the ash of the firewood comes as agglomerates of particles, being constituted mainly by Ca, Si, Mg, K and S.

  8. The effect of core material, veneering porcelain, and fabrication technique on the biaxial flexural strength and weibull analysis of selected dental ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wei-Shao; Ercoli, Carlo; Feng, Changyong; Morton, Dean

    2012-07-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the effect of veneering porcelain (monolithic or bilayer specimens) and core fabrication technique (heat-pressed or CAD/CAM) on the biaxial flexural strength and Weibull modulus of leucite-reinforced and lithium-disilicate glass ceramics. In addition, the effect of veneering technique (heat-pressed or powder/liquid layering) for zirconia ceramics on the biaxial flexural strength and Weibull modulus was studied. Five ceramic core materials (IPS Empress Esthetic, IPS Empress CAD, IPS e.max Press, IPS e.max CAD, IPS e.max ZirCAD) and three corresponding veneering porcelains (IPS Empress Esthetic Veneer, IPS e.max Ceram, IPS e.max ZirPress) were selected for this study. Each core material group contained three subgroups based on the core material thickness and the presence of corresponding veneering porcelain as follows: 1.5 mm core material only (subgroup 1.5C), 0.8 mm core material only (subgroup 0.8C), and 1.5 mm core/veneer group: 0.8 mm core with 0.7 mm corresponding veneering porcelain with a powder/liquid layering technique (subgroup 0.8C-0.7VL). The ZirCAD group had one additional 1.5 mm core/veneer subgroup with 0.7 mm heat-pressed veneering porcelain (subgroup 0.8C-0.7VP). The biaxial flexural strengths were compared for each subgroup (n = 10) according to ISO standard 6872:2008 with ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc multiple comparison test (p≤ 0.05). The reliability of strength was analyzed with the Weibull distribution. For all core materials, the 1.5 mm core/veneer subgroups (0.8C-0.7VL, 0.8C-0.7VP) had significantly lower mean biaxial flexural strengths (p Empress and e.max groups, regardless of core thickness and fabrication techniques. Comparing fabrication techniques, Empress Esthetic/CAD, e.max Press/CAD had similar biaxial flexural strength (p= 0.28 for Empress pair; p= 0.87 for e.max pair); however, e.max CAD/Press groups had significantly higher flexural strength (p Empress Esthetic/CAD groups. Monolithic core

  9. Survival of resin infiltrated ceramics under influence of fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboushelib, Moustafa N; Elsafi, Mohamed H

    2016-04-01

    to evaluate influence of cyclic fatigue on two resin infiltrated ceramics and three all-ceramic crowns manufactured using CAD/CAM technology. CAD/CAM anatomically shaped crowns were manufactured using two resin infiltrated ceramics (Lava Ultimate and Vita Enamic), two reinforced glass ceramic milling blocks ((IPS)Empress CAD and (IPS)e.max CAD) and a veneered zirconia core ((IPS)Zir CAD). (IPS)e.max CAD and (IPS)Zir CAD were milled into 0.5mm thick anatomically shaped core structure which received standardized press-on veneer ceramic. The manufactured crowns were cemented on standardized resin dies using a resin adhesive (Panavia F2.0). Initial fracture strength of half of the specimens was calculated using one cycle load to failure in a universal testing machine. The remaining crowns were subjected to 3.7 million chewing cycles (load range 50-200N at 3s interval) in a custom made pneumatic fatigue tester. Survival statistics were calculated and Weibull modulus was measured from fitted load-cycle-failure diagrams. Scanning electron microscopy was performed to fractographically analyze fractured surfaces. Data were analyzed using two way analysis of variance and Bonferroni post hoc tests (α=0.05). Dynamic fatigue resulted in significant reduction (F=7.54, Pceramics and (IPS)Empress demonstrated the highest percent of fracture incidences under the influence of fatigue (35-45% splitting). None of the tested veneered zirconia restorations were fractured during testing, however, chipping of the veneer ceramics was observed in 6 crowns. The lowest percent of failure was observed for (IPS)e.max crowns manifested as 3 cases of minor chipping in addition to two complete fracture incidences. SEM images demonstrated the internal structure of the tested materials and detected location and size of the critical crack. The internal structure of the tested materials significantly influenced their fatigue behavior. Resin infiltrated ceramics were least influenced by fatigue while

  10. Influence of CAD/CAM all-ceramic materials on cell viability, migration ability and adenylate kinase release of human gingival fibroblasts and oral keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabst, A M; Walter, C; Grassmann, L; Weyhrauch, M; Brüllmann, D D; Ziebart, T; Scheller, H; Lehmann, K M

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the influence of four CAD/CAM all-ceramic materials on cell viability, migration ability and adenylate kinase (ADK) release of human gingival fibroblasts (HGF) and oral keratinocytes (HOK). HGF and HOK were cultured on disc-shaped CAD/CAM all-ceramic materials (e.max CAD LT, e.max CAD HT, Empress CAD and Mark II) and on discs made of tissue culture polystyrene surface (TCPS) serving as control. Cell viability was analyzed by using an MTT assay, and migration ability was investigated by a scratch assay. A ToxiLight assay has been performed to analyze the effect of all-ceramic materials on ADK release and cell apoptosis. At MTT assay for HGF, no significant decrease of cell viability could be detected at all points of measurement (p each > 0.05), while HOK demonstrated a significant decrease in cell viability especially on Empress CAD and Mark II at each point of measurement (p each materials at all points of measurement (between -36 % and -71 %; p each ceramic materials could be investigated. This study disclosed significant differences in cell viability and migration ability of HGF and HOK on CAD/CAM all-ceramic materials. CAD/CAM all-ceramic materials can influence oral cell lines responsible for soft tissue creation which may affect the esthetic outcome.

  11. Ceramic breeder materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, C.E.

    1990-01-01

    The breeding blanket is a key component of the fusion reactor because it directly involves tritium breeding and energy extraction, both of which are critical to development of fusion power. The lithium ceramics continue to show promise as candidate breeder materials. This promise was recognized by the International Thermonuclear Reactor (ITER) design team in its selection of ceramics as the first option for the ITER breeder material. Blanket design studies have indicated properties in the candidate materials data base that need further investigation. Current studies are focusing on tritium release behavior at high burnup, changes in thermophysical properties with burnup, compatibility between the ceramic breeder and beryllium multiplier, and phase changes with burnup. Laboratory and in-reactor tests, some as part of an international collaboration for development of ceramic breeder materials, are underway. 32 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  12. Ceramic injection molding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agueda, Horacio; Russo, Diego

    1988-01-01

    Interest in making complex net-shape ceramic parts with good surface finishing and sharp tolerances without machining is a driving force for studying the injection molding technique. This method consists of softhening the ceramic material by means of adding some plastic and heating in order to inject the mixture under pressure into a relatively cold mold where solidification takes place. Essentially, it is the same process used in thermoplastic industry but, in the present case, the ceramic powder load ranges between 80 to 90 wt.%. This work shows results obtained from the fabrication of pieces of different ceramic materials (alumina, barium titanate ferrites, etc.) in a small scale, using equipments developed and constructed in the laboratory. (Author) [es

  13. Avaliação da tenacidade à fratura de diferentes sistemas cerâmicos Relative fracture toughness of differents dental ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clovis Pagani

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Embora as cerâmicas possuam alta resistência à compressão, apresentam friabilidade devido à sua baixa resistência à tração e, desta forma, possuem menor capacidade de absorver impactos. Este trabalho avaliou a tenacidade à fratura de diferentes sistemas cerâmicos, que refere-se à medida da habilidade de absorção da energia de deformação de um material friável. Foram confeccionados 30 corpos-de-prova em forma de discos (5mmx3mm utilizando-se três diferentes materiais cerâmicos, os quais foram divididos em 3 grupos: G1-10 amostras confeccionadas com a cerâmica Vitadur Alpha (Vita-Zahnfabrik; G2-10 amostras confeccionadas com a cerâmica IPS Empress 2 (Ivoclar-Vivadent e G3-10 amostras confeccionadas com a cerâmica In-Ceram Alumina (Vita-Zahnfabrik. Para a obtenção dos valores de tenacidade foi utilizada a técnica da indentação que se baseia na série de fissuras que se formam sob uma carga pesada. Foram realizadas 4 impressões por amostra, utilizado um microdurômetro (Digital Microhardness Tester FM com uma carga de 500gf, durante 10 segundos. A análise estatística dos dados (Testes ANOVA de Kruskal-Wallis e Dunn, indica que a cerâmica In-Ceram Alumina apresentou valor mediano (2,96N/m3/2, estatisticamente diferente do apresentado pela IPS Empress 2 (1,05N/m3/2, enquanto que a cerâmica Vitadur Alpha apresentou valores intermediários (2,08N/m3/2, sem diferenças estatísticas dos outros dois materiais. Conclui-se que as cerâmicas apresentam diferentes desempenhos de tenacidade à fratura, sendo a In-Ceram capaz de absorver maior energia comparada a Vitadur Alpha e ao IPS Empress2.Although ceramics present high compressive strength, they are brittle materials due to their low tensile strength so they have lower capacity to absorb shocks. This study evaluated the fracture toughness of different ceramic systems, which refers to the ability of a friable material to absorb defformation energy. Three ceramic systems were

  14. The effects of the Sea Empress oil spill on the plankton of the southern Irish Sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batten, S.; Allen, R.; Wotton, C.

    1997-07-01

    This report describes the methodology used to determine any effects of the Sea Empress oil spill on the plankton communities of the southern Irish Sea. The Continuous Plankton Recorder (CPR) survey has monitored the plankton in this area since 1970 so there is a long time series of data collected before the spill, almost 2000 samples, with which to compare the post-spill data. The analytical procedures applied and results obtained are presented and reveal that in the majority of cases no significant effects were evident. Some exceptions are also described. The results suggest that no further analysis of the plankton communities is necessary, unless other studies reveal that other marine habitats which may have an influence on the plankton of this area are continuing to display effects of the spill. There is scope for further investigation of the trends and events described in this report but this is outside the remit of the project. (author)

  15. The effects of the Sea Empress oil spill on the plankton of the Southern Irish Sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batten, S.D.; Allen, R.J.S.; Wotton, C.O.M.

    1998-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of the Sea Empress oil spill on the local plankton communities which are an important component of the marine ecosystem. The Continuous Plankton Recorder survey has monitored the plankton in this area since 1970 giving an extensive time series for comparison with post-spill samples. The analytical procedures applied and results obtained are presented and reveal that, with some exceptions, no significant effects were evident. Barnacle larvae were not recorded post-spill and the spring zooplankton community was somewhat different to the previous year. A long-term trend is apparent in the community but the most common taxa showed no significant changes, suggesting a minor shift in species composition rather than a dramatic change. (author)

  16. Modulations in cell-mediated immunity of Mytilus edulis following the 'Sea Empress' oil spill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyrynda, E.A.; Dyrynda, P.E.J.; Ratcliffe, N.A.; Pipe, R.K.

    1997-01-01

    The 'Sea Empress' oil tanker grounded outside Milford Haven (Wales, UK) in February 1996, spilling ∼ 70,000 tonnes of crude oil and contaminating over 100 km of coastline, causing mass mortalities and strandings of at least 11 mollusc species. Intensive field monitoring commenced after the spill, examining immunity and hydrocarbon levels in the mussel, Mytilus edulis (Mollusca: Bivalvia), a commercially-harvested species which can accumulate contaminants. Comparisons of mussels from oiled and reference sites revealed significant modulations in cell-mediated immunity. Elevations in blood cell (haemocyte) numbers and decreases in superoxide generation and phagocytosis were identified in contaminated animals. The immune response of contaminated mussels gradually improved and generally showed no significant differences compared with clean mussels after 11 weeks. By then, total hydrocarbon content in contaminated mussels had declined by 70-90%, while polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon content had decreased by over 90%. (author)

  17. Contamination of limpets (Patella vulgata) following the Sea Empress oil spill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glegg, G.A.; Hickman, L.; Rowland, S.J.

    1999-01-01

    Following the grounding of the Sea Empress oil tanker at the entrance to Milford Haven, UK, in February 1997, samples of limpets (Patella vulgata) were collected from local coastal sites (after 2 weeks and 4 and 7 months) and analysed for oil contamination. Initially, relatively high concentrations of volatile two and three ring aromatic hydrocarbons (up to 86 μg g -1 dry weight) were found which decreased by order of magnitude between surveys. These results are compared with a similar rapid decrease in concentrations of volatile hydrocarbons while loss of heavier components is slower. An assessment of the non-volatile fingerprint sterane hydrocarbons showed limpet samples to be contaminated with hydrocarbons but was inconclusive about the source of those hydrocarbons. Another common fingerprint, the pristane:phytane ratio was investigated but this was found to be masked by the presence of natural biogenic compounds. (Author)

  18. Optical properties of CAD-CAM ceramic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Bona, Alvaro; Nogueira, Audrea D; Pecho, Oscar E

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate the direct transmittance (T%), translucency, opacity and opalescence of CAD-CAM ceramic systems and the correlation between the translucency parameter (TP) and the contrast ratio (CR). Specimens of shades A1, A2 and A3 (n=5) were fabricated from CAD-CAM ceramic blocks (IPS e.max(®) CAD HT and LT, IPS Empress(®) CAD HT and LT, Paradigm™ C, and VITABLOCS(®) Mark II) and polished to 1.0±0.01mm in thickness. A spectrophotometer (Lambda 20) was used to measure T% on the wavelength range of 400-780nm. Another spectrophotometer (VITA Easyshade(®) Advance) was used to measure the CIE L(*)a(*)b(*) coordinates and the reflectance value (Y) of samples on white and black backgrounds. TP, CR and the opalescence parameter (OP) were calculated. Data were statistically analysed using VAF (variance accounting for) coefficient with Cauchy-Schwarz inequality, one-way ANOVA, Tukey's test, Bonferroni correction and Pearson's correlation. T% of some ceramic systems is dependent on the wavelength. The spectral behaviour showed a slight and constant increase in T% up to approximately 550nm, then some ceramics changed the behaviour as the wavelength gets longer. TP and CR values ranged, respectively, from 16.79 to 21.69 and from 0.52 to 0.64 (r(2)=-0.97). OP values ranged from 3.01 to 7.64. The microstructure of CAD-CAM ceramic systems influenced the optical properties. TP and CR showed a strong correlation for all ceramic systems evaluated. Yet, all ceramics showed some degree of light transmittance. In addition to shade, this study showed that other optical properties influence on the natural appearance of dental ceramics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The Byzantine Empress Zoe Porphyrogenita and the quest for eternal youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panas, Marios; Poulakou-Rebelakou, Effie; Kalfakis, Nicoalos; Vassilopoulos, Dimitrios

    2012-09-01

    The diachronically continuous struggle for eternal youth as represented by the Byzantine Empress Zoe Porphyrogenita (978-1050). The presentation of a beautiful empress, trying to keep her youth appearance until a prolonged age, applying on herself cosmetic essences and fragrances made in her personal laboratory into the imperial palace. The review of the relevant literature and the historical evidence derived from the historians and chroniclers of her era, as well as the surviving images of Zoe. The eye-witness chroniclers of the era describe her as blonde, with bright white skin, lack of wrinkles, and a very young girl appearance, preserving her beauty even into her 60s. All the historical sources agree that her main occupation was the manufacture of cosmetic essences, and for this purpose, she had installed a laboratory (myrepseion) in her private quarters, where she prepared various drugs and perfumes, spending much of her time for these activities. It is noteworthy that her first two husbands died under circumstances that aroused suspicions of Zoe's involvement in their deaths, as she had parallel love affairs. The best known image of Zoe is the mosaic panel in Saint Sophia, the cathedral Church of Constantinople and her representation has been long discussed, as she was 64 years old at the time of the scene apparently depicted in the panel, and maybe she took the opportunity of adding a more pleasing portrait of herself. The preservation of beauty is a timeless quest and cosmetic dermatology has its origins in antiquity and medieval times. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Ceramic joining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loehman, R.E. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-04-01

    This paper describes the relation between reactions at ceramic-metal interfaces and the development of strong interfacial bonds in ceramic joining. Studies on a number of systems are described, including silicon nitrides, aluminium nitrides, mullite, and aluminium oxides. Joints can be weakened by stresses such as thermal expansion mismatch. Ceramic joining is used in a variety of applications such as solid oxide fuel cells.

  1. Sensitive Ceramics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    Sensitive Ceramics is showing an interactive digital design tool for designing wall like composition with 3d ceramics. The experiment is working on two levels. One which has to do with designing compositions and patterns in a virtual 3d universe based on a digital dynamic system that responds on ...... with realizing the modules in ceramics by 3d printing directly in porcelain with a RapMan printer that coils up the 3d shape in layers. Finally the ceramic modules are mounted in a laser cut board that reflects the captured composition of the movement of the hands....

  2. Shoreline clean up during the Sea Empress incident: the role of surf washing (clay-oil flocculation), dispersants and bioremediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lunel, T.; Lee, K.

    1996-01-01

    An outline of the at sea operations which took place in response to the Sea Empress oil spill, was presented. The grounding of the Sea Empress resulted in the release of 70,000 tonnes of blended crude oil into the environment. A qualitative account of the events which followed the incident were described. The early mobilization of a monitoring team has demonstrated the importance of scientific measurements to identify and maximize the efficiency of various cleanup operations. One of the important responses to this incident was the application of dispersants which by inducing flocculation, thereby reducing contact of oil directly with the substrate, and by reducing adhesion of the oil to the shoreline, contributed greatly to minimizing shoreline impact. 19 refs., 7 figs

  3. The genetic and potential carcinogenic consequences of the Sea Empress incident 1.10.96 to 31.12.97

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parry, J.M.

    1998-01-01

    This report summarises the results of a study into the effect of the Sea Empress oil spill off the Pembrokeshire coast in 1996 on the indicator species blennies, mussels and sponges. Details are given of the collection of samples, the transplantation of mussels from a clean area into a contaminated area, DNA extraction, the determination of the levels of DNA adducts, the assessment of chromosome damage using a micronuclei assay, and a statistical analysis of the data. The DNA damage leading to the production of DNA adducts and chromosome damage in the exposed marine species studied as a result of the exposure to the crude oil derived from the Sea Empress is discussed, and the use of DNA adduct profiles for indicating exposure of aquatic organisms to potential genotoxins is considered. (UK)

  4. Crystallization of high-strength nano-scale leucite glass-ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theocharopoulos, A; Chen, X; Wilson, R M; Hill, R; Cattell, M J

    2013-11-01

    Fine-grained, high strength, translucent leucite dental glass-ceramics are synthesized via controlled crystallization of finely milled glass powders. The objectives of this study were to utilize high speed planetary milling of an aluminosilicate glass for controlled surface crystallization of nano-scale leucite glass-ceramics and to test the biaxial flexural strength. An aluminosilicate glass was synthesized, attritor or planetary milled and heat-treated. Glasses and glass-ceramics were characterized using particle size analysis, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Experimental (fine and nanoscale) and commercial (Ceramco-3, IPS Empress Esthetic) leucite glass-ceramics were tested using the biaxial flexural strength (BFS) test. Gaussian and Weibull statistics were applied. Experimental planetary milled glass-ceramics showed an increased leucite crystal number and nano-scale median crystal sizes (0.048-0.055 μm(2)) as a result of glass particle size reduction and heat treatments. Experimental materials had significantly (p0.05) strength difference. All other groups' mean BFS and characteristic strengths were found to be significantly different (pglass-ceramics with high flexural strength. These materials may help to reduce problems associated with brittle fracture of all-ceramic restorations and give reduced enamel wear. Copyright © 2013 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Acid Etching as Surface Treatment Method for Luting of Glass-Ceramic Restorations, part 1: Acids, Application Protocol and Etching Effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilija Barjaktarova-Valjakova

    2018-03-01

    CONCLUSION: Acid etching of the bonding surface of glass - ceramic restorations is considered as the most effective treatment method that provides a reliable bond with composite cement. Selective removing of the glassy matrix of silicate ceramics results in a micromorphological three-dimensional porous surface that allows micromechanical interlocking of the luting composite.

  6. [Ceramic posts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainjot, Amélie; Legros, Caroline; Vanheusden, Alain

    2006-01-01

    As a result of ceramics and all-ceram technologies development esthetic inlay core and abutments flooded the market. Their tooth-colored appearance enhances restoration biomimetism principally on the marginal gingiva area. This article reviews indications and types of cores designed for natural teeth and implants.

  7. Diffusion in ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    Pelleg, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    This textbook provides an introduction to changes that occur in solids such as ceramics, mainly at high temperatures, which are diffusion controlled, as well as presenting research data. Such changes are related to the kinetics of various reactions such as precipitation, oxidation and phase transformations, but are also related to some mechanical changes, such as creep. The book is composed of two parts, beginning with a look at the basics of diffusion according to Fick's Laws. Solutions of Fick’s second law for constant D, diffusion in grain boundaries and dislocations are presented along with a look at the atomistic approach for the random motion of atoms. In the second part, the author discusses diffusion in several technologically important ceramics. The ceramics selected are monolithic single phase ones, including: A12O3, SiC, MgO, ZrO2 and Si3N4. Of these, three refer to oxide ceramics (alumina, magnesia and zirconia). Carbide based ceramics are represented by the technologically very important Si-ca...

  8. Characterization techniques to predict mechanical behaviour of green ceramic bodies fabricated by ceramic microstereolithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adake, Chandrashekhar V.; Bhargava, Parag; Gandhi, Prasanna

    2018-02-01

    Ceramic microstereolithography (CMSL) has emerged as solid free form (SFF) fabrication technology in which complex ceramic parts are fabricated from ceramic suspensions which are formulated by dispersing ceramic particles in UV curable resins. Ceramic parts are fabricated by exposing ceramic suspension to computer controlled UV light which polymerizes resin to polymer and this polymer forms rigid network around ceramic particles. A 3-dimensional part is created by piling cured layers one over the other. These ceramic parts are used to build microelectromechanical (MEMS) devices after thermal treatment. In many cases green ceramic parts can be directly utilized to build MEMS devices. Hence characterization of these parts is essential in terms of their mechanical behaviour prior to their use in MEMS devices. Mechanical behaviour of these green ceramic parts depends on cross link density which in turn depends on chemical structure of monomer, concentrations of photoinitiator and UV energy dose. Mechanical behaviour can be determined with the aid of nanoindentation. And extent of crosslinking can be verified with the aid of DSC. FTIR characterization is used to analyse (-C=C-) double bond conversion. This paper explains characterization tools to predict the mechanical behaviour of green ceramic bodies fabricated in CMSL

  9. Influence of implant abutment material and ceramic thickness on optical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirajariyavej, Bundhit; Wanapirom, Peeraphorn; Anunmana, Chuchai

    2018-05-01

    Anterior shade matching is an essential factor influencing the esthetics of a ceramic restoration. Dentists face a challenge when the color of an implant abutment creates an unsatisfactory match with the ceramic restoration or neighboring teeth. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the influence of abutment material and ceramic thickness on the final color of different ceramic systems. Four experimental and control ceramic specimens in shade A3 were cut from IPS e.max CAD, IPS Empress CAD, and VITA Suprinity PC blocks. These specimens had thicknesses of 1.0 mm, 1.5 mm, 2.0 mm, and 2.5 mm, respectively, for the experimental groups, and 4 mm for the controls. Background abutment specimens were fabricated to yield 3 different shades: white zirconia, yellow zirconia, and titanium at a 3-mm thickness. All 3 ceramic specimens in each thickness were placed in succession on different abutment backgrounds with glycerin optical fluid in between, and the color was measured. A digital spectrophotometer was used to record the specimen color value in the Commission Internationale De L'éclairage (CIELab) color coordinates system and to calculate the color difference (ΔE) between the control and experimental groups. The Kruskal-Wallis test was used to analyze the effect of ceramic thickness on different abutments, and the pair-wise test was used to evaluate within the group (α=.05). The color differences between the test groups and the control decreased with increasing ceramic thickness for every background material. In every case, significant differences were found between 1.0- and 2.5-mm ceramic thicknesses. Only certain 2.5-mm e.max CAD, VITA Suprinity PC, and Empress CAD specimens on yellow-shade zirconia or VITA Suprinity PC on titanium were identified as clinically acceptable (ΔEabutment background decreased the color mismatch. Increasing the thickness of ceramic on a yellow-shaded zirconia abutment rather than on titanium or white zirconia yielded a more

  10. Oxide ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryshkewitch, E.; Richerson, D.W.

    1985-01-01

    The book explores single-phase ceramic oxide systems from the standpoint of physical chemistry and technology. This second edition also focuses on advances in technology since publication of the original edition. These include improvements in raw materials and forming and sintering techniques, and the major role that oxide ceramics have had in development of advanced products and processes. The text is divided into five major sections: general fundamentals of oxide ceramics, advances in aluminum oxide technology, advances in zirconia technology, and advances in beryllium oxide technology

  11. Ceramic combustor mounting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Melvin G.; Janneck, Frank W.

    1982-01-01

    A combustor for a gas turbine engine includes a metal engine block including a wall portion defining a housing for a combustor having ceramic liner components. A ceramic outlet duct is supported by a compliant seal on the metal block and a reaction chamber liner is stacked thereon and partly closed at one end by a ceramic bypass swirl plate which is spring loaded by a plurality of circumferentially spaced, spring loaded guide rods and wherein each of the guide rods has one end thereof directed exteriorly of a metal cover plate on the engine block to react against externally located biasing springs cooled by ambient air and wherein the rod spring support arrangement maintains the stacked ceramic components together so that a normal force is maintained on the seal between the outlet duct and the engine block under all operating conditions. The support arrangement also is operative to accommodate a substantial difference in thermal expansion between the ceramic liner components of the combustor and the metal material of the engine block.

  12. ON THE HISTORY AND RECENT APPLICATIONS OF HYPERFREE ENERGY DESCRIBING THERMODYNAMICS OF MOBILE COMPONENTS IN PARTLY OPEN CERAMIC SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Sedmidubsky

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Nonstoichiometric oxides form a new chapter in tailored materials. Founding and construction of thermodynamic functions related to solid (geologic materials is traced showing interactions between Czech Professor F. Wald and Russians R.S. Kurnakov and D.S. Korzhinskiy in the early definition of phases and characterization of partly open systems. Development of thermodynamic concepts regarding solid-state description is reviewed. For the associated definition of a mobile component the hyperfree energy was invented and recently applied on several systems. A novel term plutability is put forward as a measure of material susceptibility towards free component uptake as a result of varying predictors such as temperature, pressure and activity. Ehrenfest-like equations involving the changes of plutabilities were derived.

  13. Effect of resin shades on opacity of ceramic veneers and polymerization efficiency through ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öztürk, Elif; Chiang, Yu-Chih; Coşgun, Erdal; Bolay, Şükran; Hickel, Reinhard; Ilie, Nicoleta

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of different resin cement shades on the opacity and color difference of ceramics and to determine the polymerization efficiency of the resin cement at different shades after curing through ceramics. Two different ceramics (IPS e.max Press and IPS Empress(®)CAD, Ivoclar Vivadent) were used for this study. A light-cured veneer luting resin (Variolink Veneer, Ivoclar Vivadent) in four different shades of HV+1, HV+3, LV-1, and LV-3 was used for the colorimetric measurements. The color and spectral reflectance of the ceramics were measured according to the CIELab color scale relative to the standard illuminant D65 on a reflection spectrophotometer (ColorEye7000A, USA). Color differences (ΔE values) and the contrast ratios (CR) of the different groups of samples were calculated. In order to analyse the polymerization efficiency of the resin cements, the micromechanical properties of the resins were measured with an automatic microhardness indenter (Fisherscope H100C, Germany). The results were analysed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey's HSD post hoc tests (SPSS 18.0). The one-way ANOVA test showed that the values of ΔE and CR of the different specimen groups were significantly different (p<0.05). Group 1 (20.7 ± 0.5) (IPS-CAD without resin cement) exhibited the highest and group 10 (14.8 ± 0.5) (e.max:HV+3) exhibited the lowest ΔE value. Significant differences in the micromechanical properties were identified among the tested resin cements in different shades (p<0.05). Resin cement shade is an important factor for the opacity of a restoration. Furthermore, the resin shade affects the micromechanical properties of the underlying resin cement. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Impact of the Sea Empress oil spill on lysosomal stability in mussel blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernley, P W; Moore, M N; Lowe, D M; Donkin, P; Evans, S

    2000-01-01

    Coastal zones are among the most productive and vulnerable areas on the planet. An example of impact on these fragile environments was shown in the case of the "Sea Empress" oil tanker, which ran aground in the Bristol Channel in 1996, spilling 72,000 tons of "Forties" crude oil. The objective was to investigate the sub-lethal cellular pathology and tissue hydrocarbon contamination in marine mussel populations, 4 months after the initial spill, using the neutral red retention (NRR) assay for lysosomal stability in blood cells. NRR was reduced in mussels, and indicative of cell injury, from the two sites closest to the spill in comparison with more distant and reference sites. Lysosomal stability was inversely correlated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations in mussel tissues. Reduced lysosomal stability has previously been shown to contribute to impaired immunocompetence and to autophagic loss of body tissues. The use of this type of technique is discussed in the context of cost-effective, ecotoxicological tools for Integrated Coastal Zone Management.

  15. Impact of the Sea Empress oil spill on lysosomal stability in mussel blood cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernley, P.W.; Lowe, D.M.; Donkin, P.; Evans, S.

    2000-01-01

    Coastal zones are among the most productive and vulnerable areas on the planet. An example of impact on these fragile environments was shown in the case of the Sea Empress oil tanker, which ran aground in the Bristol Channel in 1996, spilling 72,000 tonnes of Forties crude oil. The objective was to investigate the sub-lethal cellular pathology and tissue hydrocarbon contamination in marine mussel populations, 4 months after the initial spill, using the neutral red retention (NRR) assay for lysosomal stability in blood cells. NRR was reduced in mussels, and indicative of cell injury, from the two sites closest to the spill in comparison with more distant and reference sites. Lysosomal stability was inversely correlated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations in mussel tissues. Reduced lysosomal stability has previously been shown to contribute to impaired immunocompetence and to autophagic loss of body tissues. The use of this type of technique is discussed in the context of cost-effective, ecotoxicological tools for Integrated Coastal Zone Management. (Author)

  16. Impact of the Sea Empress oil spill on lysosomal stability in mussel blood cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernley, P.W.; Lowe, D.M.; Donkin, P.; Evans, S. [Plymouth Marine Lab. (United Kingdom). Centre for Coastal and Marine Sciences; Moore, M.N. [Plymouth Marine Lab. (United Kingdom). Centre for Coastal and Marine Sciences; UNIDO, SES/PEM, Vienna International Centre (Austria)

    2000-07-01

    Coastal zones are among the most productive and vulnerable areas on the planet. An example of impact on these fragile environments was shown in the case of the Sea Empress oil tanker, which ran aground in the Bristol Channel in 1996, spilling 72,000 tonnes of Forties crude oil. The objective was to investigate the sub-lethal cellular pathology and tissue hydrocarbon contamination in marine mussel populations, 4 months after the initial spill, using the neutral red retention (NRR) assay for lysosomal stability in blood cells. NRR was reduced in mussels, and indicative of cell injury, from the two sites closest to the spill in comparison with more distant and reference sites. Lysosomal stability was inversely correlated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations in mussel tissues. Reduced lysosomal stability has previously been shown to contribute to impaired immunocompetence and to autophagic loss of body tissues. The use of this type of technique is discussed in the context of cost-effective, ecotoxicological tools for Integrated Coastal Zone Management. (Author)

  17. Clay-oil flocculation during surf washing at the Sea Empress incident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, P.; Lunel, T.; Bailey, N.; Lee, K.

    1997-01-01

    Results of investigations into clay-oil flocculation during surf washing of oiled cobbles at Marros Beach, as a response to oiling during the Sea Empress incident, were summarized. Stranded oil on the cobble storm beach was found to associate with fine minerals and form flocs when introduced into sea water. The emulsions persisted for about 14 days after the oiling, after which it begun to disintegrate. After 50 days the remaining emulsion was found to be unstable and penetrated the beach to depths of up to three meters. Since no evidence of biodegradation was found during this period, oil reduction was attributed to sheening, facilitated by tidal fluctuations. Surf washing operation was undertaken over a seven day period beginning 47 days after the spill. Some 8150 tonnes of oiled cobbles were moved a distance of between 12 and 18 m seaward along a length of 850 m. Analysis of samples after two days following surf washing showed that oil concentration did not exceed 22 ppm, compared to 700 ppm before relocation. The significant reduction was considered to have been the result of enhanced oil dispersion coupled with the effects of the surf washing operations. 10 refs., 7 tabs., 10 figs

  18. EMPRESS: A European Project to Enhance Process Control Through Improved Temperature Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, J. V.; Edler, F.; Elliott, C. J.; Rosso, L.; Sutton, G.; Andreu, A.; Machin, G.

    2017-08-01

    A new European project called EMPRESS, funded by the EURAMET program `European Metrology Program for Innovation and Research,' is described. The 3 year project, which started in the summer of 2015, is intended to substantially augment the efficiency of high-value manufacturing processes by improving temperature measurement techniques at the point of use. The project consortium has 18 partners and 5 external collaborators, from the metrology sector, high-value manufacturing, sensor manufacturing, and academia. Accurate control of temperature is key to ensuring process efficiency and product consistency and is often not achieved to the level required for modern processes. Enhanced efficiency of processes may take several forms including reduced product rejection/waste; improved energy efficiency; increased intervals between sensor recalibration/maintenance; and increased sensor reliability, i.e., reduced amount of operator intervention. Traceability of temperature measurements to the International Temperature Scale of 1990 (ITS-90) is a critical factor in establishing low measurement uncertainty and reproducible, consistent process control. Introducing such traceability in situ (i.e., within the industrial process) is a theme running through this project.

  19. Masking properties of ceramics for veneer restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skyllouriotis, Andreas L; Yamamoto, Hideo L; Nathanson, Dan

    2017-10-01

    The translucency and opacity of ceramics play a significant role in emulating the natural color of teeth, but studies of the masking properties and limitations of dental ceramics when used as monolayer restorations are lacking. The purpose of this in vitro study was to determine the translucency of 6 materials used for veneer restorations by assessing their translucency parameters (TPs), contrast ratios (CRs), and potential to mask dark tooth colors. Ten square- or disk-shaped specimens (0.5-mm thickness, shade A2) were fabricated from Vitablocks Mark II (VMII; Vita Zahnfabrik), IPS e.max CAD LT (EMXC LT; Ivoclar Vivadent AG), IPS e.max CAD HT (EMXC HT; Ivoclar Vivadent AG), IPS Empress CAD LT (EMP LT; Ivoclar Vivadent AG), IPS e.max Press LT (EMXP LT; Ivoclar Vivadent AG), and CZR (CZR; Kuraray Noritake Dental Inc). Their luminance (Y) values over black and over white tiles were measured, followed by their color (CIELab) over black tiles and white tiles and shaded A2 (control group), A3.5, A4, and B4 acrylic resin blocks. All measurements were performed using a spectrophotometer in 2 different areas on each specimen. Then CRs, TPs, and color differences (over shaded backgrounds) were determined. Data were subjected to 1-way and 2-way ANOVA (α=.05) for analysis. Mean CR values of EMXP LT were significantly higher than those of the other tested materials, whereas VMII and EMXC HT had the lowest values (Pmasking properties against the A4 background. The color differences of most tested ceramics were more acceptable when tested against the B4 background (ΔE*≤3.3). Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The medical treatment of Maria, Dowager Empress of the Russian Empire: an analysis of her prescription book from 1807 and 1808.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudienè, V

    2016-11-02

    This study analyzes the medicines that were used to treat the Dowager Russian Empress Maria, widow of Tsar Paul I, and describes the doctors who cared for her health in 1807 and 1808. The source for this research was the imperial court pharmacy prescription book 1807-1811. Hypotheses about the diseases and medical problems of the Empress and how treatment for her differed according to circumstances, particularly after the loss of her granddaughter Princess Elizabeth, have been made based on the prescriptions recorded in the book. The content of the prescriptions suggests that the Empress suffered from gastrointestinal tract disorders, skin and eye diseases, neuralgic pains and insomnia. Foreign physicians educated in European universities worked at the imperial court and implemented European medical traditions. They took high positions in the administration and the medical education system, and gradually spread their experience and modern knowledge to Tsarist Russian society.

  1. Oxygen diffusion in glasses and ceramic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolitsch, A.; Richter, E.; Wolf, M.

    1978-10-01

    A survey is given on the published works to study oxygen diffusion in glasses and ceramic materials in the last years. In the first part methods are described for the measurement of oxygen diffusion coefficients and in the second part the published reports on oxygen diffusion in glasses, ceramic and other oxides are discussed. The most important results are summarized in different tables. (author)

  2. The slag from ELCOGAS IGCC thermal power plant as raw material for the synthesis of glass-ceramic materials. Part 2: Synthesis and characterization of the glass-ceramic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aineto, M.; Acosta, A.; Rincon, J.M.A.; Romero, M. [University of Castilla La Mancha, Ciudad Real (Spain)

    2006-01-15

    There are here reported the result of the second phase of the investigation on the melting behavior of the slag and the process followed to synthesize glass-ceramic materials using this slag as raw component. Starting from a vitrifying mixture based on slag, glass cullet and precipitated calcium carbonate coming from sugar refining, we have obtained the parent glass named ECSCP, which exhibit a surface tendency of crystallization. Pressed specimens of 40 mm diameter and 7 mm height were conformed with the powdered ECSCP glass. The specimens were heat treated for crystalline phases development at temperatures between 800 and 1100{sup o}C during time intervals from 5 to 60 minutes. A series of wollastonite-anorthite-gehlenite glass-ceramics has been synthesized of different characteristics depending on the time and temperature of devitrification.

  3. Influence of Different Ceramic Systems on Marginal Misfit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, S P; Neves, A C C; Vitti, R; Amaral, M; Henrique, M N; Silva-Concílio, L R

    2017-09-01

    the aim of this study was to evaluate the marginal misfit at the interface between a ceramic coping and its abutment. Twenty-four specimens were made with solid abutments. The specimens were divided into 3 groups according to the ceramic system (n = 8): Lava (zirconia), IPS e.max Press (lithium disilicate), and IPS Empress Esthetic (leucite). All copings were cemented with resin luting agent (RelyX U200) and the marginal misfit were evaluated at 3 different times: initial, after cementation, and after mechanical cycling using a linear measuring microscope (Measuring Microscope STM-Olympus) at a magnification of 40x. All specimens were subjected to mechanical cycling (1 million cycles) by an universal testing machine (Instron 8800). The results were statistically analyzed using Analysis of Variance and Student's t-test (α = 0.05). all groups showed an increase in the marginal misfit after cementation. The lithium disilicate group demonstrated the lowest interacial gap values at each evaluation (p = 0.001). The zirconia and leucite groups showed similar interfacial gap values (initial, p = 0.244; and post cementation, p = 0.751). the cementation increase the marginal misfit, but the mechanical cycling did not influence the marginal misfit of the ceramics systems evaluated. Copyright© 2017 Dennis Barber Ltd.

  4. The slag from ELCOGAS IGCC thermal power plant as raw material for the synthesis of glass-ceramic materials. Part I: Thermal behavior of the IGCC slag and synthesis of the parent glass.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aineto, M.; Acosta, A. [University of Castilla La Mancha, Ciudad Real (Spain)

    2005-12-01

    We report here the results of the first phase of investigation on the melting behavior of the IGCC slag, and the use of this slag as raw component to produce glass ceramics. The vitrifying mixture named ECSCP, is composed of 40% slag, 30% glass cullet and 30% precipitated calcium carbonate obtained as a by-product in a sugar refining plant. This mixture was melted at 1450{sup o}C to obtain the ECSCP parent glass, that was then characterized and its crystallization kinetics studied by thermal analysis. The ECSCP glass exhibit a surface mechanism of crystallization, and will be used to produce anorthite/wollastonite glass ceramics in the second part of the investigation.

  5. Ten-year survival and complication rates of lithium-disilicate (Empress 2) tooth-supported crowns, implant-supported crowns, and fixed dental prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teichmann, Maren; Göckler, Fabian; Weber, Volker; Yildirim, Murat; Wolfart, Stefan; Edelhoff, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    To prospectively evaluate the clinical long-term outcome of tooth-supported crowns (SCs), implant-supported crowns (ISCs), and fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) made of a lithium-disilicate glass-ceramic framework material (IPS Empress 2). Between 1997 and 1999, a total of 184 restorations (106 SCs, 32 ISCs, 33 FDPs, and 13 diverse restorations) were placed in 73 patients. Kaplan-Meier estimation was applied for survival and chipping-free rates. Inter-group comparison of both rates was realized by a log rank test and a 2×2 contingency table. Also, SCs and FDPs were compared regarding adhesive vs. conventional cementation, and anterior vs. posterior positioning, for impact on survival. Due to 14 dropouts (34 restorations) and reasonable exclusion of 19 other restorations, the final dataset included: i) 87 SCs [37 patients, mean observation time 11.4 (±3.8)years]; ii) 17 ISCs [12 patients, mean observation time 13.3 (±2.3)years; and iii) 27 FDPs [19 patients, mean observation time 8.9 (±5.4)years]. The 10-year survival rate/chipping-free rate for SCs were 86.1%/83.4%, for ISCs 93.8%/94.1%, and for FDPs were 51.9%/90.8%. Both ISCs and SCs had a significantly higher survival than FDPs (ISCs vs. FDPs: both tests p=0.001; SCs vs. FDPs: p=0.001 and p=0.005). Differences in the chipping-free rates did not reach significance. Also, neither the cementation mode nor positioning of the restoration had an impact on survival. SCs had a slightly lower outcome than can generally be expected from single crowns. In contrast, ICSs had a favorable outcome and the FDPs predominantly failed. The practitioner's choice of dental materials is based (at best) on long-term experience. The present 10-year results are based on comprehensive data analyses and show the high potential of lithium-disilicate as a reliable material, especially for single-unit restoration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Ceramic Seal.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smartt, Heidi A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Romero, Juan A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Custer, Joyce Olsen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hymel, Ross W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Krementz, Dan [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Gobin, Derek [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Harpring, Larry [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Martinez-Rodriguez, Michael [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Varble, Don [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); DiMaio, Jeff [Tetramer Technologies, Pendleton, SC (United States); Hudson, Stephen [Tetramer Technologies, Pendleton, SC (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Containment/Surveillance (C/S) measures are critical to any verification regime in order to maintain Continuity of Knowledge (CoK). The Ceramic Seal project is research into the next generation technologies to advance C/S, in particular improving security and efficiency. The Ceramic Seal is a small form factor loop seal with improved tamper-indication including a frangible seal body, tamper planes, external coatings, and electronic monitoring of the seal body integrity. It improves efficiency through a self-securing wire and in-situ verification with a handheld reader. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), under sponsorship from the U.S. National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development (DNN R&D), have previously designed and have now fabricated and tested Ceramic Seals. Tests have occurred at both SNL and SRNL, with different types of tests occurring at each facility. This interim report will describe the Ceramic Seal prototype, the design and development of a handheld standalone reader and an interface to a data acquisition system, fabrication of the seals, and results of initial testing.

  7. Ceramic Seal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smartt, Heidi A.; Romero, Juan A.; Custer, Joyce Olsen; Hymel, Ross W.; Krementz, Dan; Gobin, Derek; Harpring, Larry; Martinez-Rodriguez, Michael; Varble, Don; DiMaio, Jeff; Hudson, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Containment/Surveillance (C/S) measures are critical to any verification regime in order to maintain Continuity of Knowledge (CoK). The Ceramic Seal project is research into the next generation technologies to advance C/S, in particular improving security and efficiency. The Ceramic Seal is a small form factor loop seal with improved tamper-indication including a frangible seal body, tamper planes, external coatings, and electronic monitoring of the seal body integrity. It improves efficiency through a self-securing wire and in-situ verification with a handheld reader. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), under sponsorship from the U.S. National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development (DNN R&D), have previously designed and have now fabricated and tested Ceramic Seals. Tests have occurred at both SNL and SRNL, with different types of tests occurring at each facility. This interim report will describe the Ceramic Seal prototype, the design and development of a handheld standalone reader and an interface to a data acquisition system, fabrication of the seals, and results of initial testing.

  8. Influence of light curing unit and ceramic thickness on temperature rise during resin cement photo-activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiraldo, Ricardo Danil; Consani, Simonides; Mastrofrancisco, Sarina; Consani, Rafael Leonardo Xediek; Sinhoreti, Mario Alexandre Coelho; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço

    2008-11-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of different ceramic thickness on heat generation during resin cement photo-activation by QTH (quartz-tungsten-halogen), LED (light emitting diode), and PAC (plasma arc-curing) LCUs (light curing units). The resin cement used was Rely X ARC (3M-ESPE), and the ceramic was IPS Empress Esthetic (Ivoclar-Vivadent), of which 0.7-, 1.4- and 2.0-mm thick disks, 0.8 mm in diameter were made. Temperature increase was recorded with a type-K thermocouple connected to a digital thermometer (Iopetherm 46). An acrylic resin base was built to guide the thermocouple and support the 1.0-mm thick dentin disk. A 0.1-mm thick black adhesive paper matrix with a perforation 6 mm in diameter was placed on the dentin to contain the resin cement and support the ceramic disks of different thicknesses. Three LCUs were used: QTH, LED and PAC. Nine groups were formed (n=10) according to the interaction: 3 ceramic thicknesses, 1 resin cement and 3 photo-activation methods. Temperature increase data were submitted to Tukey's test (5%). For all ceramic thicknesses, a statistically significant difference in temperature increase was observed among the LCUs, with the highest mean value for the QTH LCU (p0.05). The interaction of higher energy density with smaller ceramic thickness showed higher temperature increase values.

  9. Industrial ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mengelle, Ch.

    1999-04-01

    After having given the definition of the term 'ceramics', the author describes the different manufacturing processes of these compounds. These materials are particularly used in the fields of 1)petroleum industry (in primary and secondary reforming units, in carbon black reactors and ethylene furnaces). 2)nuclear industry (for instance UO 2 and PuO 2 as fuels; SiC for encapsulation; boron carbides for control systems..)

  10. Gradient porous hydroxyapatite ceramics fabricated by freeze casting method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuo Kaihui; Zhang Yuan; Jiang Dongliang; Zeng Yuping

    2011-01-01

    By controlling the cooling rates and the composition of slurries, the gradient porous hydroxyapatite ceramics are fabricated by the freeze casting method. According to the different cooling rate, the pores of HAP ceramics fabricated by gradient freeze casting are divided into three parts: one is lamellar pores, another is column pore and the last one is fine round pores. The laminated freeze casting is in favour of obtaining the gradient porous ceramics composed of different materials and the ceramics have unclear interfaces.

  11. Mechanical properties and porosity of dental glass-ceramics hot-pressed at different temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Castiglia Gonzaga

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate biaxial-flexural-strength (σf, Vickers hardness (HV, fracture toughness (K Ic, Young's modulus (E, Poisson's ratio (ν and porosity (P of two commercial glass-ceramics, Empress (E1 and Empress 2 (E2, as a function of the hot-pressing temperature. Ten disks were hot-pressed at 1065, 1070, 1075 and 1080 °C for E1; and at 910, 915, 920 and 925 °C for E2. The porosity was measured by an image analyzer software and s f was determined using the piston-on-three-balls method. K Ic and HV were determined by an indentation method. Elastic constants were determined by the pulse-echo method. For E1 samples treated at different temperatures, there were no statistical differences among the values of all evaluated properties. For E2 samples treated at different temperatures, there were no statistical differences among the values of σf, E, and ν, however HV and K Ic were significantly higher for 910 and 915 °C, respectively. Regarding P, the mean value obtained for E2 for 925 °C was significantly higher compared to other temperatures.

  12. Ceramic Technology for Advanced Heat Engines Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-08-01

    The Ceramic Technology for Advanced Heat Engines Project was developed by the Department of Energy's Office of Transportation Systems (OTS) in Conservation and Renewable Energy. This project, part of the OTS's Advanced Materials Development Program, was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTS's automotive technology programs. Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the Department of Energy (DOE), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and Department of Defense (DoD) advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. However, these programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially.

  13. Time-dependent fracture probability of bilayer, lithium-disilicate-based glass-ceramic molar crowns as a function of core/veneer thickness ratio and load orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anusavice, Kenneth J.; Jadaan, Osama M.; Esquivel–Upshaw, Josephine

    2013-01-01

    Recent reports on bilayer ceramic crown prostheses suggest that fractures of the veneering ceramic represent the most common reason for prosthesis failure. Objective The aims of this study were to test the hypotheses that: (1) an increase in core ceramic/veneer ceramic thickness ratio for a crown thickness of 1.6 mm reduces the time-dependent fracture probability (Pf) of bilayer crowns with a lithium-disilicate-based glass-ceramic core, and (2) oblique loading, within the central fossa, increases Pf for 1.6-mm-thick crowns compared with vertical loading. Materials and methods Time-dependent fracture probabilities were calculated for 1.6-mm-thick, veneered lithium-disilicate-based glass-ceramic molar crowns as a function of core/veneer thickness ratio and load orientation in the central fossa area. Time-dependent fracture probability analyses were computed by CARES/Life software and finite element analysis, using dynamic fatigue strength data for monolithic discs of a lithium-disilicate glass-ceramic core (Empress 2), and ceramic veneer (Empress 2 Veneer Ceramic). Results Predicted fracture probabilities (Pf) for centrally-loaded 1,6-mm-thick bilayer crowns over periods of 1, 5, and 10 years are 1.2%, 2.7%, and 3.5%, respectively, for a core/veneer thickness ratio of 1.0 (0.8 mm/0.8 mm), and 2.5%, 5.1%, and 7.0%, respectively, for a core/veneer thickness ratio of 0.33 (0.4 mm/1.2 mm). Conclusion CARES/Life results support the proposed crown design and load orientation hypotheses. Significance The application of dynamic fatigue data, finite element stress analysis, and CARES/Life analysis represent an optimal approach to optimize fixed dental prosthesis designs produced from dental ceramics and to predict time-dependent fracture probabilities of ceramic-based fixed dental prostheses that can minimize the risk for clinical failures. PMID:24060349

  14. Time-dependent fracture probability of bilayer, lithium-disilicate-based, glass-ceramic, molar crowns as a function of core/veneer thickness ratio and load orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anusavice, Kenneth J; Jadaan, Osama M; Esquivel-Upshaw, Josephine F

    2013-11-01

    Recent reports on bilayer ceramic crown prostheses suggest that fractures of the veneering ceramic represent the most common reason for prosthesis failure. The aims of this study were to test the hypotheses that: (1) an increase in core ceramic/veneer ceramic thickness ratio for a crown thickness of 1.6mm reduces the time-dependent fracture probability (Pf) of bilayer crowns with a lithium-disilicate-based glass-ceramic core, and (2) oblique loading, within the central fossa, increases Pf for 1.6-mm-thick crowns compared with vertical loading. Time-dependent fracture probabilities were calculated for 1.6-mm-thick, veneered lithium-disilicate-based glass-ceramic molar crowns as a function of core/veneer thickness ratio and load orientation in the central fossa area. Time-dependent fracture probability analyses were computed by CARES/Life software and finite element analysis, using dynamic fatigue strength data for monolithic discs of a lithium-disilicate glass-ceramic core (Empress 2), and ceramic veneer (Empress 2 Veneer Ceramic). Predicted fracture probabilities (Pf) for centrally loaded 1.6-mm-thick bilayer crowns over periods of 1, 5, and 10 years are 1.2%, 2.7%, and 3.5%, respectively, for a core/veneer thickness ratio of 1.0 (0.8mm/0.8mm), and 2.5%, 5.1%, and 7.0%, respectively, for a core/veneer thickness ratio of 0.33 (0.4mm/1.2mm). CARES/Life results support the proposed crown design and load orientation hypotheses. The application of dynamic fatigue data, finite element stress analysis, and CARES/Life analysis represent an optimal approach to optimize fixed dental prosthesis designs produced from dental ceramics and to predict time-dependent fracture probabilities of ceramic-based fixed dental prostheses that can minimize the risk for clinical failures. Copyright © 2013 Academy of Dental Materials. All rights reserved.

  15. Patterns in benthic populations in the Milford Haven waterway following the 'Sea Empress' oil spill with special reference to amphipods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitik, Christopher C S; Robinson, Andrew W

    2003-09-01

    The macrobenthic fauna of the Milford Haven Waterway was studied in detail following the 'Sea Empress' oil spill in 1996. Contamination patterns indicated heaviest contamination of sediments by oil to have occurred in the lower reaches of the waterway, although water borne hydrocarbons are likely to have penetrated throughout the Haven. Generally, the communities showed little impact of contamination by oil, although some changes were evident at the population level. A decline in the amphipod fauna was observed throughout the Haven, with the genera Ampelisca and Harpinia and the family Isaeidae particularly affected. This was accompanied by increases in both the diversity and abundance of polychaete populations as opportunist species took advantage of the decline of the amphipod fauna. However, within five years of the spill the amphipod fauna has shown clear signs of recovery. The use of the polychaete/amphipod ratio as an indicator of oil pollution is discussed.

  16. Ceramic technology for Advanced Heat Engines Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, D.R.

    1991-07-01

    Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. However, these programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and database and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. An assessment of needs was completed, and a five year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. The project approach includes determining the mechanisms controlling reliability, improving processes for fabricating existing ceramics, developing new materials with increased reliability, and testing these materials in simulated engine environments to confirm reliability. Although this is a generic materials project, the focus is on the structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to US industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities. This project is managed by ORNL for the Office of Transportation Technologies, Office of Transportation Materials, and is closely coordinated with complementary ceramics tasks funded by other DOE offices, NASA, DOD, and industry.

  17. Ceramic Technology For Advanced Heat Engines Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-12-01

    Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the Department of Energy (DOE), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and Department of Defense (DoD) advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. However, these programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. The objective of the project is to develop the industrial technology base required for reliable ceramics for application in advanced automotive heat engines. The project approach includes determining the mechanisms controlling reliability, improving processes for fabricating existing ceramics, developing new materials with increased reliability, and testing these materials in simulated engine environments to confirm reliability. Although this is a generic materials project, the focus is on the structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines. This advanced materials technology is being developed in parallel and close coordination with the ongoing DOE and industry proof of concept engine development programs. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to U.S. industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities. Abstracts prepared for appropriate papers.

  18. Development of high-density ceramic composites for ballistic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rupert, N.L.; Burkins, M.S.; Gooch, W.A.; Walz, M.J.; Levoy, N.F.; Washchilla, E.P.

    1993-01-01

    The application of ceramic composites for ballistic application has been generally developed with ceramics of low density, between 2.5 and 4.5 g/cm 2 . These materials have offered good performance in defeating small-caliber penetrators, but can suffer time-dependent degradation effects when thicker ceramic tiles are needed to defeat modem, longer, heavy metal penetrators that erode rather than break up. This paper addresses the ongoing development, fabrication procedures, analysis, and ballistic evaluation of thinner, denser ceramics for use in armor applications. Nuclear Metals Incorporated (NMI) developed a process for the manufacture of depleted uranium (DU) ceramics. Samples of the ceramics have been supplied to the US Army Research Laboratory (ARL) as part of an unfunded cooperative study agreement. The fabrication processes used, characterization of the ceramic, and a ballistic comparison between the DU-based ceramic with baseline Al 2 O 3 will be presented

  19. Study of potentiality of raw material of Crato/CE for use in structural ceramics - part I - technological characterization; Estudo da potencialidade da materia-prima do Crato/CE para utilizacao em ceramica estrutural - parte I - caracterizacao tecnologica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, J.C.S.; Santos, G.M.; Saldanha, K.M.; Sales Junior, J.C.C.; Nascimento, R.M.; Paskocimas, C.A., E-mail: jean@ufrnet.br [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal RN (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The limitation of information on chemical, mineralogical and thermal characteristics of raw material used in process of manufacture of ceramic products in the region of Cariri, specifically the city of Crato, state of Ceara, motivated the development of this work, since this region ceramics exist that in a general context they appear as important productive chains in the state. The characteristics were evaluated by tests of limit of liquidity, limit of plasticity, index of plasticity, but also by chemical analysis for fluorescence of rays X, analysis of phases for diffraction of rays X, and thermal analysis (thermogratimetric analysis). The results showed that the raw material has excellent size distribution and characteristics acceptable to the processing of structural components of dark color the red, requiring a mixture of clay with coarse less plastic which granulation, that functions as reducer of plasticity. (author)

  20. The Melting Point of Palladium Using Miniature Fixed Points of Different Ceramic Materials: Part II—Analysis of Melting Curves and Long-Term Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edler, F.; Huang, K.

    2016-12-01

    Fifteen miniature fixed-point cells made of three different ceramic crucible materials (Al2O3, ZrO2, and Al2O3(86 %)+ZrO2(14 %)) were filled with pure palladium and used to calibrate type B thermocouples (Pt30 %Rh/Pt6 %Rh). A critical point by using miniature fixed points with small amounts of fixed-point material is the analysis of the melting curves, which are characterized by significant slopes during the melting process compared to flat melting plateaus obtainable using conventional fixed-point cells. The method of the extrapolated starting point temperature using straight line approximation of the melting plateau was applied to analyze the melting curves. This method allowed an unambiguous determination of an electromotive force (emf) assignable as melting temperature. The strict consideration of two constraints resulted in a unique, repeatable and objective method to determine the emf at the melting temperature within an uncertainty of about 0.1 μ V. The lifetime and long-term stability of the miniature fixed points was investigated by performing more than 100 melt/freeze cycles for each crucible of the different ceramic materials. No failure of the crucibles occurred indicating an excellent mechanical stability of the investigated miniature cells. The consequent limitation of heating rates to values below {± }3.5 K min^{-1} above 1100° C and the carefully and completely filled crucibles (the liquid palladium occupies the whole volume of the crucible) are the reasons for successfully preventing the crucibles from breaking. The thermal stability of the melting temperature of palladium was excellent when using the crucibles made of Al2O3(86 %)+ZrO2(14 %) and ZrO2. Emf drifts over the total duration of the long-term investigation were below a temperature equivalent of about 0.1 K-0.2 K.

  1. The Sea Empress oil spill: cytochrome P450 levels, ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase activity and bile metabolites in migrating sea trout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bird, D.J.; Rotchell, J.M.; Newton, L.C.

    1997-06-01

    Following concern that migrating sea trout in the Afon Tywi and Eastern Cleddau in Wales may have been exposed to oil from the Sea Empress, either directly or via their food, biomarkers of oil pollution were investigated in 14 fish from these rivers and compared with 8 fish from that of a control on the River Dee in North Wales. Sea trout 'whitling' were collected by electrofishing from the tidal limits of each river in later August/early September, 1996. The mean total cytochrome P450 content in the livers were not significantly different between fish from the Tywi (341 pmol mg -1 protein), Cleddau (212 pmol mg -1 protein) or from those caught in the Dee (121 pmol mg -1 protein). The report concludes that some individual sea trout from the rivers Tywi and Cleddau may have been exposed to oil from the Sea Empress while feeding in estuarine waters. However, by the time they were captured in these rivers, compared to control fish caught in the Dee, differences between the mean P450 content, mean EROD activity and the bile metabolite profiles were not apparent. There was no evidence that the Sea Empress oil spill had serious detrimental effects on populations of migrating sea trout in Welsh rivers. (author)

  2. Influence of full-contour zirconia surface roughness on wear of glass-ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luangruangrong, Palika; Cook, N Blaine; Sabrah, Alaa H; Hara, Anderson T; Bottino, Marco C

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of full-contour (Y-TZP) zirconia surface roughness (glazed vs. as-machined) on the wear behavior of glass-ceramics. Thirty-two full contour Y-TZP (Diazir®) specimens (hereafter referred to as zirconia sliders) (ϕ = 2 mm, 1.5 mm in height) were fabricated using CAD/CAM and sintered according to the manufacturer's instructions. Zirconia sliders were embedded in brass holders using acrylic resin and then randomly assigned (n = 16) according to the surface treatment received, that is, as-machined or glazed. Glass-ceramic antagonists, Empress/EMP and e.max/EX, were cut into tabs (13 × 13 × 2 mm(3) ), wet-finished, and similarly embedded in brass holders. Two-body pin-on-disk wear testing was performed at 1.2 Hz for 25,000 cycles under a 3 kg load. Noncontact profilometry was used to measure antagonist height (μm) and volume loss (mm(3) ). Qualitative data of the zirconia testing surfaces and wear tracks were obtained using SEM. Statistics were performed using ANOVA with a significance level of 0.05. As-machined yielded significantly higher mean roughness values (Ra = 0.83 μm, Rq = 1.09 μm) than glazed zirconia (Ra = 0.53 μm, Rq = 0.78 μm). Regarding glass-ceramic antagonist loss, as-machined zirconia caused significantly less mean height and volume loss (68.4 μm, 7.6 mm(3) ) for EMP than the glazed group (84.9 μm, 9.9 mm(3) ), while no significant differences were found for EX. Moreover, EMP showed significantly lower mean height and volume loss than EX (p glass-ceramics tested. e.max wear was not affected by zirconia surface roughness; however, Empress wear was greater when opposing glazed zirconia. Overall, surface glazing on full-contour zirconia did not minimize glass-ceramic wear when compared with as-machined zirconia. © 2013 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  3. Effect of Ti:sapphire laser on shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets to ceramic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdur, Emire Aybuke; Basciftci, Faruk Ayhan

    2015-08-01

    With increasing demand for orthodontic treatments in adults, orthodontists continue to debate the optimal way to prepare ceramic surfaces for bonding. This study evaluated the effects of a Ti:sapphire laser on the shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets bonded to two ceramic surfaces (feldspathic and IPS Empress e-Max) and the results were compared with those using two other lasers (Er:YAG and Nd:YAG) and 'conventional' techniques, i.e., sandblasting (50 µm) and hydrofluoric (HF) acid. In total, 150 ceramic discs were prepared and divided into two groups. In each group, the following five subgroups were prepared: Ti:sapphire laser, Nd:YAG laser, Er:YAG laser, sandblasting, and HF acid. Mandibular incisor brackets were bonded using a light-cured adhesive. The samples were stored in distilled water for 24 hours at 37°C and then thermocycled. Extra samples were prepared and examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). SBS testing was performed and failure modes were classified. ANOVA and Tukey's HSD tests were used to compare SBS among the five subgroups (P < 0.05). Feldspathic and IPS Empress e-Max ceramics had similar SBS values. The Ti:sapphire femtosecond laser (16.76 ± 1.37 MPa) produced the highest mean bond strength, followed by sandblasting (12.79 ± 1.42 MPa) and HF acid (11.28 ± 1.26 MPa). The Er:YAG (5.43 ± 1.21 MPa) and Nd:YAG laser (5.36 ± 1.04 MPa) groups were similar and had the lowest SBS values. More homogeneous and regular surfaces were observed in the ablation pattern with the Ti:sapphire laser than with the other treatments by SEM analysis. Within the limitations of this in vitro study, Ti:sapphire laser- treated surfaces had the highest SBS values. Therefore, this technique may be useful for the pretreatment of ceramic surfaces as an alternative to 'conventional' techniques. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Ceramic Technology for Advanced Heat Engines Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-08-01

    The Ceramic Technology For Advanced Heat Engines Project was developed by the Department of Energy's Office of Transportation Systems (OTS) in Conservation and Renewable Energy. This project, part of the OTS's Advanced Materials Development Program, was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTS's automotive technology programs. Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the Department of Energy (DOE), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and Department of Defense (DOD) advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. However, these programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. An assessment of needs was completed, and a five year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. The objective of the project is to develop the industrial technology base required for reliable ceramics for application in advanced automotive heat engines. The project approach includes determining the mechanisms controlling reliability, improving processes for fabricating existing ceramics, developing new materials with increased reliability, and testing these materials in simulated engine environments to confirm reliability. Although this is a generic materials project, the focus is on structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic hearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines.

  5. Influence of ceramic thickness and type on micromechanical properties of light-cured adhesive bonding agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öztürk, Elif; Bolay, Sükran; Hickel, Reinhard; Ilie, Nicoleta

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the micromechanical properties of different adhesive bonding agents when polymerized through ceramics. Sixty sound extracted human third molars were selected and the crowns were sectioned perpendicular to the long axis in order to obtain dentin slices to be bonded with one of the following adhesives: Syntac/Heliobond (Ivoclar-Vivadent) or Adper-Scotchbond-1XT (3M-ESPE). The adhesives were cured by using a LED-unit (Bluephase®, Ivoclar Vivadent) with three different curing times (10 s, 20 s and 30 s) under two ceramics (IPS-e.max-Press, Ivoclar-Vivadent; IPS-Empress®CAD, Ivoclar-Vivadent) of different thicknesses (0 mm, 0.75 mm, 2 mm). Thirty groups were included, each containing 60 measurements. Micromechanical properties (Hardness, HV; indentation modulus, E; and creep, Cr) of the adhesives were measured with an automatic microhardness indenter (Fisherscope H100C, Germany). Data were statistically analyzed by using one-way ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc test, as well as a multivariate analysis to test the influence of the study parameters (SPSS 18.0). Significant differences were observed between the micromechanical properties of the adhesives (p ceramic type showed the highest effect on HV (Partial-eta squared (η(2)) = 0.109) of the tested adhesives, while E (η(2) = 0.275) and Cr (η(2) = 0.194) were stronger influenced by the adhesive type. Ceramic thickness showed no effect on the E and Cr of the adhesives. The adhesive bonding agents used in this study performed well by curing through different thicknesses of ceramics. The micromechanical properties of the adhesives were determined by the adhesive type and were less influenced by ceramic type and curing time.

  6. Ceramic Technology Project semiannual progress report, April 1992--September 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, D.R.

    1993-07-01

    This project was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the DOE Office of Transportation Systems` automotive technology programs. Significant progress in fabricating ceramic components for DOE, NASA, and DOE advanced heat engine programs show that operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engines is feasible; however, addition research is needed in materials and processing, design, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base for producing reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. A 5-yr project plan was developed, with focus on structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines.

  7. Electrospun Ceramic Nanofiber Mats Today: Synthesis, Properties, and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esfahani, Hamid; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2017-01-01

    Ceramic nanofibers (NFs) have recently been developed for advanced applications due to their unique properties. In this article, we review developments in electrospun ceramic NFs with regard to their fabrication process, properties, and applications. We find that surface activity of electrospun ceramic NFs is improved by post pyrolysis, hydrothermal, and carbothermal processes. Also, when combined with another surface modification methods, electrospun ceramic NFs result in the advancement of properties and widening of the application domains. With the decrease in diameter and length of a fiber, many properties of fibrous materials are modified; characteristics of such ceramic NFs are different from their wide and long (bulk) counterparts. In this article, electrospun ceramic NFs are reviewed with an emphasis on their applications as catalysts, membranes, sensors, biomaterials, fuel cells, batteries, supercapacitors, energy harvesting systems, electric and magnetic parts, conductive wires, and wearable electronic textiles. Furthermore, properties of ceramic nanofibers, which enable the above applications, and techniques to characterize them are briefly outlined. PMID:29077074

  8. Electrospun Ceramic Nanofiber Mats Today: Synthesis, Properties, and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Esfahani

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Ceramic nanofibers (NFs have recently been developed for advanced applications due to their unique properties. In this article, we review developments in electrospun ceramic NFs with regard to their fabrication process, properties, and applications. We find that surface activity of electrospun ceramic NFs is improved by post pyrolysis, hydrothermal, and carbothermal processes. Also, when combined with another surface modification methods, electrospun ceramic NFs result in the advancement of properties and widening of the application domains. With the decrease in diameter and length of a fiber, many properties of fibrous materials are modified; characteristics of such ceramic NFs are different from their wide and long (bulk counterparts. In this article, electrospun ceramic NFs are reviewed with an emphasis on their applications as catalysts, membranes, sensors, biomaterials, fuel cells, batteries, supercapacitors, energy harvesting systems, electric and magnetic parts, conductive wires, and wearable electronic textiles. Furthermore, properties of ceramic nanofibers, which enable the above applications, and techniques to characterize them are briefly outlined.

  9. Ceramic Laser Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Villalobos

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Ceramic laser materials have come a long way since the first demonstration of lasing in 1964. Improvements in powder synthesis and ceramic sintering as well as novel ideas have led to notable achievements. These include the first Nd:yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG ceramic laser in 1995, breaking the 1 KW mark in 2002 and then the remarkable demonstration of more than 100 KW output power from a YAG ceramic laser system in 2009. Additional developments have included highly doped microchip lasers, ultrashort pulse lasers, novel materials such as sesquioxides, fluoride ceramic lasers, selenide ceramic lasers in the 2 to 3 μm region, composite ceramic lasers for better thermal management, and single crystal lasers derived from polycrystalline ceramics. This paper highlights some of these notable achievements.

  10. Ceramic Laser Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanghera, Jasbinder; Kim, Woohong; Villalobos, Guillermo; Shaw, Brandon; Baker, Colin; Frantz, Jesse; Sadowski, Bryan; Aggarwal, Ishwar

    2012-01-01

    Ceramic laser materials have come a long way since the first demonstration of lasing in 1964. Improvements in powder synthesis and ceramic sintering as well as novel ideas have led to notable achievements. These include the first Nd:yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) ceramic laser in 1995, breaking the 1 KW mark in 2002 and then the remarkable demonstration of more than 100 KW output power from a YAG ceramic laser system in 2009. Additional developments have included highly doped microchip lasers, ultrashort pulse lasers, novel materials such as sesquioxides, fluoride ceramic lasers, selenide ceramic lasers in the 2 to 3 μm region, composite ceramic lasers for better thermal management, and single crystal lasers derived from polycrystalline ceramics. This paper highlights some of these notable achievements. PMID:28817044

  11. Techniques for ceramic sintering using microwave energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimrey, H.D.; Janney, M.A.; Becher, P.F.

    1987-01-01

    The use of microwave energy for ceramic sintering offers exciting new possibilities for materials processing. Based on experience gathered in microwave processing associated with the heating of fusion plasmas, we have developed hardware and methods for uniformly heating ceramic parts of large volume and irregular shape to temperatures in excess of 1600 0 C, in vacuum or pressurized atmosphere. Microwave processing at 28 GHz yields enhanced densification rates with a corresponding reduction in sintering temperatures. 6 refs

  12. Visual field structure in the Empress Leilia, Asterocampa leilia (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae): dimensions and regional variation in acuity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutowski, Ronald L; Warrant, Eric J

    2002-02-01

    Male Empress Leilia butterflies ( Asterocampa leilia) use a sit-and-wait tactic to locate mates. To see how vision might influence male behavior, we studied the morphology, optics, and receptor physiology of their eyes and found the following. (1) Each eye's visual field is approximately hemispherical with at most a 10 degrees overlap in the fields of the eyes. There are no large sexual differences in visual field dimensions. (2) In both sexes, rhabdoms in the frontal and dorsal ommatidia are longer than those in other eye regions. (3) Interommatidial angles are smallest frontally and around the equator of the eye. Minimum interommatidial angles are 0.9-1 degrees in males and 1.3-1.4 degrees in females. (4) Acceptance angles of ommatidia closely match interommatidial angles in the frontal region of the eye. We conclude that vision in these butterflies is mostly monocular and that males have more acute vision than females, especially in the frontal region (large facets, small interommatidial angles, small acceptance angles, long rhabdoms, and a close match between interommatidial angles and acceptance angles). This study also suggests that perched males direct their most acute vision where females are likely to appear but show no eye modifications that appear clearly related to a mate-locating tactic.

  13. A comparison of visual observations of surface oil with Synthetic Aperture Radar imagery of the Sea Empress oil spill

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, B.

    2001-06-15

    A comparison has been made between the visual observations of surface oil and four satellite-borne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images taken during the Sea Empress oil spill in February 1996. Whilst the basic oil slick imaging capabilities of SAR are well documented, to be of use at the time of a major oil spill, the imagery must be able to provide information on the thickness of oil. This analysis suggests that, under certain environmental conditions, this is possible. The optimum wind speed for the identification of heavy surface oil is around 5-6 m s{sup -1}. At this wind speed, light and medium sheen is not evident in the imagery and there is a distinction between the backscatter reductions due to heavy sheen and thick brown/black oil. At higher wind speeds, even thick oil slicks readily mix into the water column and their SAR signature weakens. In light winds, pattern recognition is very important to the identification of oil sticks. The images are more sensitive to the presence of sheen within the sheltered waters of Milford Haven than in the open coastal waters, indicating a possible relationship between sheen visibility in satellite-borne SAR and sea state. (author)

  14. A field demonstration of the efficacy of bioremediation to treat oiled shorelines following the Sea Empress incident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swannell, R.P.J.; Mitchell, D. [AEA Technology Environment, National Environmental Technology Centre, Culham (United Kingdom); Lethbridge, G. [Texaco Ltd., Environment, Health and Safety, Pembroke (GB)] (and others)

    1999-08-01

    Bioremediation was investigated as a method of treating a mixture of Forties Crude Oil and Heavy Fuel Oil stranded on Bullwell Bay, Milford Haven, UK after the grounding of the Sea Empress in 1996. A randomised block design in triplicate was used to test the efficacy of two bioremediation treatments: a weekly application of mineral nutrient dissolved in sea water and a single application of a slow-release fertiliser. Each treatment supplied an equivalent amount of nitrogen and phosphorus. Concentrations of residual hydrocarbon normalised to the biomarker 17{alpha}(H),21{beta}(H)-hopane showed that after two months the oil was significantly (p<0.001) more biodegraded in the treated plots than in the controls. On average, the oil in the nutrient amended plots was 37% more degraded than that found in the controls. There was no evidence that the bioremediation treatment increased the toxicity of the oiled sediment. The results confirm that bioremediation can be used to treat a mixture of crude and heavy fuel oil on a pebble beach. In particular, the data suggest that the application of a slow-release fertiliser alone may be a cost-effective method of treating low-energy, contaminated shorelines after a spill incident. (Author)

  15. A field demonstration of the efficacy of bioremediation to treat oiled shorelines following the Sea Empress incident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swannell, R.P.J.; Mitchell, D.; Lethbridge, G.

    1999-01-01

    Bioremediation was investigated as a method of treating a mixture of Forties Crude Oil and Heavy Fuel Oil stranded on Bullwell Bay, Milford Haven, UK after the grounding of the Sea Empress in 1996. A randomised block design in triplicate was used to test the efficacy of two bioremediation treatments: a weekly application of mineral nutrient dissolved in sea water and a single application of a slow-release fertiliser. Each treatment supplied an equivalent amount of nitrogen and phosphorus. Concentrations of residual hydrocarbon normalised to the biomarker 17α(H),21β(H)-hopane showed that after two months the oil was significantly (p<0.001) more biodegraded in the treated plots than in the controls. On average, the oil in the nutrient amended plots was 37% more degraded than that found in the controls. There was no evidence that the bioremediation treatment increased the toxicity of the oiled sediment. The results confirm that bioremediation can be used to treat a mixture of crude and heavy fuel oil on a pebble beach. In particular, the data suggest that the application of a slow-release fertiliser alone may be a cost-effective method of treating low-energy, contaminated shorelines after a spill incident. (Author)

  16. Advanced ceramic materials and their potential impact on the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laren, M.G.M.

    1989-01-01

    This article reviews the types of advanced ceramic materials that are being used today and their potential for even greater utilization in the future. Market analysis and projections have been developed from a number of sources both foreign and domestic are referenced and given in the text. Projection on the future use of advanced ceramics to the year 2000 indicate a potential growth of the total world market approaching 187 billion dollars. This paper describes advanced ceramic materials by their functionality, i.e. structural, electronic, chemical, thermal, biological, nuclear, etc. It also refers to specific engineering uses of advanced ceramics and include automotive ceramic materials with physical data for the most likely ceramic materials to be used for engine parts. This family of materials includes silicon carbides, silicon nitride, partially stabilized zirconia and alumina. Fiber reinforced ceramic composites are discussed with recognition of the research on fiber coating chemistry and the compatibility of the coating with the fiber and the matrix. Another class of advanced ceramics is toughened ceramics. The transformation toughened alumina is recognized as an example of this technology. The data indicate that electronic ceramic materials will always have the largest portion of the advanced ceramic market and the critical concepts of a wide range of uses is reviewed. (Auth.)

  17. Forming of superplastic ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesuer, D.R.; Wadsworth, J.; Nieh, T.G.

    1994-05-01

    Superplasticity in ceramics has now advanced to the stage that technologically viable superplastic deformation processing can be performed. In this paper, examples of superplastic forming and diffusion bonding of ceramic components are given. Recent work in biaxial gas-pressure forming of several ceramics is provided. These include yttria-stabilized, tetragonal zirconia (YTZP), a 20% alumina/YTZP composite, and silicon. In addition, the concurrent superplastic forming and diffusion bonding of a hybrid ceramic-metal structure are presented. These forming processes offer technological advantages of greater dimensional control and increased variety and complexity of shapes than is possible with conventional ceramic shaping technology.

  18. Ceramic gas turbine shroud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jun; Green, Kevin E.

    2014-07-22

    An example gas turbine engine shroud includes a first annular ceramic wall having an inner side for resisting high temperature turbine engine gasses and an outer side with a plurality of radial slots. A second annular metallic wall is positioned radially outwardly of and enclosing the first annular ceramic wall and has a plurality of tabs in communication with the slot of the first annular ceramic wall. The tabs of the second annular metallic wall and slots of the first annular ceramic wall are in communication such that the first annular ceramic wall and second annular metallic wall are affixed.

  19. Thin film ceramic thermocouples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Otto (Inventor); Fralick, Gustave (Inventor); Wrbanek, John (Inventor); You, Tao (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A thin film ceramic thermocouple (10) having two ceramic thermocouple (12, 14) that are in contact with each other in at least on point to form a junction, and wherein each element was prepared in a different oxygen/nitrogen/argon plasma. Since each element is prepared under different plasma conditions, they have different electrical conductivity and different charge carrier concentration. The thin film thermocouple (10) can be transparent. A versatile ceramic sensor system having an RTD heat flux sensor can be combined with a thermocouple and a strain sensor to yield a multifunctional ceramic sensor array. The transparent ceramic temperature sensor that could ultimately be used for calibration of optical sensors.

  20. Survival of inlays and partial crowns made of IPS empress after a 10-year observation period and in relation to various treatment parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoll, Richard; Cappel, I; Jablonski-Momeni, Anahita; Pieper, K; Stachniss, V

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluated the long-term survival of inlays and partial crowns made of IPS Empress. For this purpose, the patient data of a prospective study were examined in retrospect and statistically evaluated. All of the inlays and partial crowns fabricated of IPS-Empress within the Department of Operative Dentistry at the School of Dental Medicine of Philipps University, Marburg, Germany were systematically recorded in a database between 1991 and 2001. The corresponding patient files were revised at the end of 2001. The information gathered in this way was used to evaluate the survival of the restorations using the method described by Kaplan and Meyer. A total of n = 1624 restorations were fabricated of IPS-Empress within the observation period. During this time, n = 53 failures were recorded. The remaining restorations were observed for a mean period of 18.77 months. The failures were mainly attributed to fractures, endodontic problems and cementation errors. The last failure was established after 82 months. At this stage, a cumulative survival probability of p = 0.81 was registered with a standard error of 0.04. At this time, n = 30 restorations were still being observed. Restorations on vital teeth (n = 1588) showed 46 failures, with a cumulative survival probability of p = 0.82. Restorations performed on non-vital teeth (n = 36) showed seven failures, with a cumulative survival probability of p = 0.53. Highly significant differences were found between the two groups (p < 0.0001) in a log-rank test. No significant difference (p = 0.41) was found between the patients treated by students (n = 909) and those treated by qualified dentists (n = 715). Likewise, no difference (p = 0.13) was established between the restorations seated with a high viscosity cement (n = 295) and those placed with a low viscosity cement (n = 1329).

  1. Ceramic Integration Technologies for Advanced Energy Systems: Critical Needs, Technical Challenges, and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mrityunjay

    2010-01-01

    Advanced ceramic integration technologies dramatically impact the energy landscape due to wide scale application of ceramics in all aspects of alternative energy production, storage, distribution, conservation, and efficiency. Examples include fuel cells, thermoelectrics, photovoltaics, gas turbine propulsion systems, distribution and transmission systems based on superconductors, nuclear power generation and waste disposal. Ceramic integration technologies play a key role in fabrication and manufacturing of large and complex shaped parts with multifunctional properties. However, the development of robust and reliable integrated systems with optimum performance requires the understanding of many thermochemical and thermomechanical factors, particularly for high temperature applications. In this presentation, various needs, challenges, and opportunities in design, fabrication, and testing of integrated similar (ceramic ceramic) and dissimilar (ceramic metal) material www.nasa.gov 45 ceramic-ceramic-systems have been discussed. Experimental results for bonding and integration of SiC based Micro-Electro-Mechanical-Systems (MEMS) LDI fuel injector and advanced ceramics and composites for gas turbine applications are presented.

  2. Composite glass ceramics - a promising material for aviation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    М. В. Дмитрієв

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of the technical and technological characteristics of the composite ceramic as a material for electrical and structural parts in aircraft. The economic and technological advantages compared to ceramic pottery and proposed options for development of production in Ukraine

  3. Analyses of fine paste ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabloff, J.A.

    1980-01-01

    Four chapters are included: history of Brookhaven fine paste ceramics project, chemical and mathematical procedures employed in Mayan fine paste ceramics project, and compositional and archaeological perspectives on the Mayan fine paste ceramics

  4. Science and Technology of Ceramics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 5; Issue 2. Science and Technology of Ceramics - Advanced Ceramics: Structural Ceramics and Glasses. Sheela K Ramasesha. Series Article Volume 5 Issue 2 February 2000 pp 4-11 ...

  5. Analyses of fine paste ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabloff, J A [ed.

    1980-01-01

    Four chapters are included: history of Brookhaven fine paste ceramics project, chemical and mathematical procedures employed in Mayan fine paste ceramics project, and compositional and archaeological perspectives on the Mayan fine paste ceramics. (DLC)

  6. Colour parameters and shade correspondence of CAD-CAM ceramic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Bona, Alvaro; Pecho, Oscar E; Ghinea, Razvan; Cardona, Juan C; Pérez, María M

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate colour differences between (1) CAD-CAM ceramic systems considering shades A1, A2 and A3 and the corresponding nominal shade of VC (Vita Classical shade guide) and (2) shades A1-A2, A2-A3 and A1, A2 and A3 within the same ceramic system. Samples of shades A1, A2 and A3 were fabricated (n=5) from CAD-CAM ceramic blocks (IPS e.max(®) CAD LT and HT, IPS Empress(®) CAD LT and HT, Paradigm™ C, and VITABLOCS(®) Mark II) and polished to 1.0±0.01mm in thickness. Spectral reflectance and colour coordinates were measured using a spectroradiometer inside a viewing booth using the CIE D65 illuminant and the d/0° geometry. Spectral reflectance curves were compared using VAF coefficient and were statistically analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and the Mann-Whitney U test (α=0.05). Colour coordinates were statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA, Tukey's test with Bonferroni correction (α=0.001). All colour differences (ΔEab(*) and ΔE00) were analyzed through comparisons with the PT - perceptibility and AT - acceptability thresholds for dental ceramics. ΔE between ceramic systems and its corresponding shade ranged from 6.32 to 13.42 (ΔEab(*)) and 4.48 to 9.30 (ΔE00). ΔE between shades A1-A2, A2-A3 and A1, A2 and A3 ranged, respectively, 1.93-4.82, 1.22-5.59 and 3.63-8.84 (ΔEab(*)); 1.54-3.87, 1.03-3.90 and 2.95-6.51 (ΔE00). Considering the corresponding nominal shade from VC, none of the ceramic systems showed colour differences below the AT. In addition, some ceramic systems showed colour differences below AT (shades A1-A2 and A2-A3) and below PT (shades A2-A3). Careful adjustments should be made to the final shade of CAD-CAM ceramic restorations to reach a clinically acceptable shade match. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. [Ceramic inlays and onlays].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Pelt, A W; de Kloet, H J; van der Kuy, P

    1996-11-01

    Large direct composite restorations can induce shrinkage related postoperative sensitivity. Indirect resin-bonded (tooth colored) restorations may perhaps prevent these complaints. Indirect bonded ceramics are especially attractive because of their biocompatibility and esthetic performance. Several procedures and techniques are currently available for the fabrication of ceramic restorations: firing, casting, heat-pressing and milling. In this article the different systems are described. Advantages, disadvantages and clinical performance of ceramic inlays are compared and discussed.

  8. Ceramic Electron Multiplier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comby, G.

    1996-01-01

    The Ceramic Electron Multipliers (CEM) is a compact, robust, linear and fast multi-channel electron multiplier. The Multi Layer Ceramic Technique (MLCT) allows to build metallic dynodes inside a compact ceramic block. The activation of the metallic dynodes enhances their secondary electron emission (SEE). The CEM can be used in multi-channel photomultipliers, multi-channel light intensifiers, ion detection, spectroscopy, analysis of time of flight events, particle detection or Cherenkov imaging detectors. (auth)

  9. Displacive Transformation in Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-02-28

    PZT ), ceramics have attracted natural abundance. much attention for use in nonvolatile semiconductor mem- We attribute the observed spectra in Fig. I to...near a crack tip in piezoelectric ceramics of lead zirconate titanate ( PZT ) and barium titanate. They reasoned that the poling of ferroelectric... Texture in Ferroelastic Tetragonal Zirconia," J. Am. Ceram . Soc., 73 (1990) no. 6: 1777-1779. 27. J. F. Jue and A. Virkar, "Fabrication, Microstructural

  10. Piezo-electrostrictive ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ho Gi; Shin, Byeong Cheol

    1991-09-01

    This book deals with principle and the case of application of piezo-electrostrictive ceramics, which includes definition of piezoelectric materials and production and development of piezoelectric materials, coexistence of Pb(zr, Ti)O 3 ceramics on cause of coexistence in MPB PZT ceramics, electrostrictive effect of oxide type perovskite, practical piezo-electrostrictive materials, and breaking strength, evaluation technique of piezoelectric characteristic, and piezoelectric accelerometer sensor like printer head, ink jet and piezoelectric relay.

  11. Method of sintering ceramic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcombe, Cressie E.; Dykes, Norman L.

    1992-01-01

    A method for sintering ceramic materials is described. A ceramic article is coated with layers of protective coatings such as boron nitride, graphite foil, and niobium. The coated ceramic article is embedded in a container containing refractory metal oxide granules and placed within a microwave oven. The ceramic article is heated by microwave energy to a temperature sufficient to sinter the ceramic article to form a densified ceramic article having a density equal to or greater than 90% of theoretical density.

  12. Defect production in ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinkle, S.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Kinoshita, C. [Kyushu Univ. (Japan)

    1997-08-01

    A review is given of several important defect production and accumulation parameters for irradiated ceramics. Materials covered in this review include alumina, magnesia, spinel silicon carbide, silicon nitride, aluminum nitride and diamond. Whereas threshold displacement energies for many ceramics are known within a reasonable level of uncertainty (with notable exceptions being AIN and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}), relatively little information exists on the equally important parameters of surviving defect fraction (defect production efficiency) and point defect migration energies for most ceramics. Very little fundamental displacement damage information is available for nitride ceramics. The role of subthreshold irradiation on defect migration and microstructural evolution is also briefly discussed.

  13. Ceramic piezoelectric materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaszuwara, W.

    2004-01-01

    Ceramic piezoelectric materials conert reversibility electric energy into mechanical energy. In the presence of electric field piezoelectric materials exhibit deformations up to 0.15% (for single crystals up to 1.7%). The deformation energy is in the range of 10 2 - 10 3 J/m 3 and working frequency can reach 10 5 Hz. Ceramic piezoelectric materials find applications in many modern disciplines such as: automatics, micromanipulation, measuring techniques, medical diagnostics and many others. Among the variety of ceramic piezoelectric materials the most important appear to be ferroelectric materials such as lead zirconate titanate so called PZT ceramics. Ceramic piezoelectric materials can be processed by methods widely applied for standard ceramics, i.e. starting from simple precursors e.g. oxides. Application of sol-gel method has also been reported. Substantial drawback for many applications of piezoelectric ceramics is their brittleness, thus much effort is currently being put in the development of piezoelectric composite materials. Other important research directions in the field of ceramic piezoelectric materials composite development of lead free materials, which can exhibit properties similar to the PZT ceramics. Among other directions one has to state processing of single crystals and materials having texture or gradient structure. (author)

  14. Corrosion of Ceramic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opila, Elizabeth J.; Jacobson, Nathan S.

    1999-01-01

    Non-oxide ceramics are promising materials for a range of high temperature applications. Selected current and future applications are listed. In all such applications, the ceramics are exposed to high temperature gases. Therefore it is critical to understand the response of these materials to their environment. The variables to be considered here include both the type of ceramic and the environment to which it is exposed. Non-oxide ceramics include borides, nitrides, and carbides. Most high temperature corrosion environments contain oxygen and hence the emphasis of this chapter will be on oxidation processes.

  15. Prospects of ceramic tritium breeder materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, E.; Roux, N.; Conservatoire National des Arts et Metiers; CEA Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette

    1989-01-01

    In this paper the authors examine the prospects of the main ceramics proposed as breeder materials for fusion reactors, i.e. Li-2O, Li-2ZrO-3, LiAlO-2, Li-4SiO-4. To do so they review terms of reference of contemplated blankets for NET, ITER and DEMO, and the proposed blanket concepts and materials. Issues respective to the use of each breeder material are examined, and from this review it is concluded that ceramics are the most favorable breeder materials whose use can be contemplated as well for a driver blanket for NET or ITER and for a DEMO blanket. Ceramics are then compared between themselves and it is seen that, subject to the confirmation of recent experimental results, lithium zirconate could be used with advantage in any of the present blanket concepts, except in those employing lithium at its natural isotopic abundance, in which case only Li-2O can be used. However in specific cases, or in parts of a blanket, other ceramics may be profitably employed. As a general conclusion suggestions are made to further improve ceramic breeder performances, and it is recommended to intensify also work on problems that have to be solved in order to operate ceramic breeder blankets e.g. tritium extraction and recovery systems and conditions of beryllium use. (author). 37 refs.; 12 tabs

  16. Report of the Chief Inspector of Marine Accidents into the grounding of the tanker Sea Empress at Milford Haven between 15 and 21 February 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The motor tanker, Sea Empress, was loaded with cargo of 130,018 tonnes of light crude oil when she went aground while entering the harbour at Milford Haven in the United Kingdom on 15th February 1996. About 2,500 tonnes of crude oil were released from damaged cargo tanks when the vessel first grounded. In preparation for a lightening operation, the Sea Empress was first manoeuvred into deeper water then, on 17th February, turned in order to be re-anchored head to wind in the deteriorating weather conditions. Control was lost and the vessel grounded again. Over the next four days the tanker went aground on a number of occasions before being successfully re-floated, taken to a berth within the Haven and the remainder of the cargo discharged. A further 69,300 tonnes of oil were lost to the sea over the period of salvage. The initial grounding and the salvage operation are analysed. The cause of the initial grounding was found to be pilot error. In addition to the bad weather, the lack of tugs of sufficient power and manoeuvrability, and inadequate understanding of the local tidal currents have been identified as the factors which extended the time taken to carry out the salvage operation. Recommendations are made in the light of the findings. (UK)

  17. Development of Advanced Ceramic Manufacturing Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pujari, V.K.

    2001-04-05

    Advanced structural ceramics are enabling materials for new transportation engine systems that have the potential for significantly reducing energy consumption and pollution in automobiles and heavy vehicles. Ceramic component reliability and performance have been demonstrated in previous U.S. DOE initiatives, but high manufacturing cost was recognized as a major barrier to commercialization. Norton Advanced Ceramics (NAC), a division of Saint-Gobain Industrial Ceramics, Inc. (SGIC), was selected to perform a major Advanced Ceramics Manufacturing Technology (ACMT) Program. The overall objectives of NAC's program were to design, develop, and demonstrate advanced manufacturing technology for the production of ceramic exhaust valves for diesel engines. The specific objectives were (1) to reduce the manufacturing cost by an order of magnitude, (2) to develop and demonstrate process capability and reproducibility, and (3) to validate ceramic valve performance, durability, and reliability. The program was divided into four major tasks: Component Design and Specification, Component Manufacturing Technology Development, Inspection and Testing, and Process Demonstration. A high-power diesel engine valve for the DDC Series 149 engine was chosen as the demonstration part for this program. This was determined to be an ideal component type to demonstrate cost-effective process enhancements, the beneficial impact of advanced ceramics on transportation systems, and near-term commercialization potential. The baseline valve material was NAC's NT451 SiAION. It was replaced, later in the program, by an alternate silicon nitride composition (NT551), which utilized a lower cost raw material and a simplified powder-processing approach. The material specifications were defined based on DDC's engine requirements, and the initial and final component design tasks were completed.

  18. New ceramic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno, R.; Dominguez-Rodriguez, A.

    2010-01-01

    This article is to provide a new ceramic materials in which, with a control of their processing and thus their microstructural properties, you can get ceramic approaching ever closer to a metal, both in its structural behavior at low as at high temperatures. (Author) 30 refs.

  19. Mounting for ceramic scroll

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petty, Jack D.

    1993-01-01

    A mounting for a ceramic scroll on a metal engine block of a gas turbine engine includes a first ceramic ring and a pair of cross key connections between the first ceramic ring, the ceramic scroll, and the engine block. The cross key connections support the scroll on the engine block independent of relative radial thermal growth and for bodily movement toward an annular mounting shoulder on the engine. The scroll has an uninterrupted annular shoulder facing the mounting shoulder on the engine block. A second ceramic ring is captured between mounting shoulder and the uninterrupted shoulder on the scroll when the latter is bodily shifted toward the mouting shoulder to define a gas seal between the scroll and the engine block.

  20. Ceramic heat exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaHaye, Paul G.; Rahman, Faress H.; Lebeau, Thomas P. E.; Severin, Barbara K.

    1998-01-01

    A tube containment system. The tube containment system does not significantly reduce heat transfer through the tube wall. The contained tube is internally pressurized, and is formed from a ceramic material having high strength, high thermal conductivity, and good thermal shock resistance. The tube containment system includes at least one ceramic fiber braid material disposed about the internally pressurized tube. The material is disposed about the tube in a predetermined axial spacing arrangement. The ceramic fiber braid is present in an amount sufficient to contain the tube if the tube becomes fractured. The tube containment system can also include a plurality of ceramic ring-shaped structures, in contact with the outer surface of the tube, and positioned between the tube and the ceramic fiber braid material, and/or at least one transducer positioned within tube for reducing the internal volume and, therefore, the energy of any shrapnel resulting from a tube fracture.

  1. Ceramic Technology Project. Semiannual progress report, April 1991--September 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-03-01

    The Ceramic Technology Project was developed by the USDOE Office of Transportation Systems (OTS) in Conservation and Renewable Energy. This project, part of the OTS`s Materials Development Program, was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTS`s automotive technology programs. Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the USDOE and NASA advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. These programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. A five-year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. In July 1990 the original plan was updated through the estimated completion of development in 1993. The objective is to develop the industrial technology base required for reliable ceramics for application in advanced automotive heat engines. The project approach includes determining the mechanisms controlling reliability, improving processes for fabricating existing ceramics, developing new materials with increased reliability, and testing these materials in simulated engine environments to confirm reliability. Although this is a generic materials project, the focus is on the structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to US industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities.

  2. Effect of airborne particle abrasion protocols on surface topography of Y-TZP ceramic Efeito do protocolo de jateamento com partículas na topografia da superfície de uma cerâmica Y-TZP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. R. C. Queiroz

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate Y-TZP surface after different airborne particle abrasion protocols. Seventy-six Y-TZP ceramic blocks (5×4×4 mm³ were sintered and polished. Specimens were randomly divided into 19 groups (n=4 according to control group and 3 factors: a protocol duration (2 and 4 s; b particle size (30 µm, alumina coated silica particle; 45 µm, alumina particle; and 145 µm, alumina particle and; c pressure (1.5, 2.5 and 4.5 bar. Airborne particle abrasion was performed following a strict protocol. For qualitative and quantitative results, topography surfaces were analyzed in a digital optical profilometer (Interference Microscopic, using different roughness parameters (Ra, Rq, Rz, X-crossing, Mr1, Mr2 and Sdr and 3D images. Surface roughness also was analyzed following the primer and silane applications on Y-TZP surfaces. One-way ANOVA revealed that treatments (application period, particle size and pressure of particle blasting provided significant difference for all roughness parameters. The Tukey test determined that the significant differences between groups were different among roughness parameters. In qualitative analysis, the bonding agent application reduced roughness, filing the valleys in the surface. The protocols performed in this study verified that application period, particle size and pressure influenced the topographic pattern and amplitude of roughness.O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar a superfície de uma cerâmica à base de zircônia tetragonal estabilizada por ítria (Y-TZP após diferentes protocolos de jateamento com partículas. Setenta e seis blocos cerâmicos de Y-TZP (5 x 4 x 4 mm³ foram sinterizados e polidos. As amostras foram randomicamente divididas em 19 grupos (n=4 sendo um controle e 18 grupos utilizando 3 fatores: a tempo (2 e 4 s; b tamanho de partícula (30 µm - partículas de alumina revestida por sílica; 45 µm - partículas de alumina; 145 µm - partículas de alumina e; c pressão (1

  3. Use of waste ceramics in adsorption technologies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Doušová, B.; Koloušek, D.; Keppert, M.; Machovic, V.; Lhotka, M.; Urbanová, Martina; Brus, Jiří; Holcova, L.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 134, Part 2 (2016), s. 145-152 ISSN 0169-1317 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA13-24155S Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : waste ceramics * brick dust * toxic cations Subject RIV: JN - Civil Engineering Impact factor: 3.101, year: 2016

  4. Aspectos da Reologia e da Estabilidade de Suspensões Cerâmicas. Parte III: Mecanismo de Estabilização Eletroestérica de Suspensões com Alumina Aspects of Rheology and Stability of Ceramic Suspensions. Part III: Electrosteric Stabilization Mechanism of Alumina Suspensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. S. Ortega

    1997-08-01

    Full Text Available Esta terceira e última parte da revisão sobre os aspectos reológicos e de estabilização de suspensões com pós cerâmicos vem reunir a aplicação dos conhecimentos adquiridos nas primeiras duas partes publicadas anteriormente. Aqui, os fenômenos eletrostático devido à dupla camada elétrica, e estérico, relacionado à adsorção de moléculas poliméricas, são combinados para explicar o mecanismo eletroestérico de estabilização de suspensões cerâmicas. Os defloculantes que atuam através desse mecanismo abrangem uma classe específica de polímero denominada polieletrólitos, a qual é constituída por macromoléculas ionizáveis quando em solução. O estudo da forma com que os polieletrólitos atuam justifica-se devido à larga utilização desta classe de polímeros na indústria cerâmica. Os ácidos poliacrílico (PAA e polimetacrílico (PMAA são exemplos de polieletrólitos amplamente utilizados no processo de materiais à base de alumina. Dá-se destaque à influência do pH do meio e da presença de íons, sendo novamente aqui importante o conceito de força iônica da suspensão. Como aplicação prática, apresenta-se a estabilidade do sistema alumina-PMAA, reportando-se sobre o comportamento da viscosidade e da efetiva defloculação da suspensão. Este estudo é concluído apresentando resultados do efeito do peso molecular sobre a viscosidade, chamando atenção para o fato de que não basta definir apenas a classe de polímero a ser usada, sendo também fundamental especificar o peso molecular médio do polímero selecionado.The third and last part of this review about stabilization and rheological aspects of ceramic suspension gathers the knowledge in the two parts previously published. Here, the electrostatic and steric phenomena, related to the electrical double layer and polymeric molecules adsorption, respectively, are combined to explain the electrosteric stabilization mechanism of ceramic suspensions. The

  5. Building ceramics with improved thermal insulation parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rzepa Karol

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important performance characteristics of masonry units is their high thermal insulation. There are many different ways to improve this parameter, however the most popular methods in case of ceramic masonry units are: addition of pore-creating raw materials and application of proper hole pattern. This study was an attempt to improve thermal insulation of ceramics by applying thermal insulation additives. Perlite dust created as a subgrain from expansion of perlite rock was used. Perlite subgrain is not very popular among consumers, that’s why it’s subjected to granulation to obtain coarse grain. The authors presented concept of direct application of perlite dust for the production of building ceramics with improved thermal insulation. Fineness of this additive is asset for molding of ceramic materials from plastic masses. Based on the results it was found that about 70% perlite by volume can be added to obtain material with a coefficient of heat conductivity of 0,37 W/mK. Higher content of this additive in ceramic mass causes deterioration of its rheological properties. Mass loses its plasticity, it tears up and formed green bodies are susceptible to deformation. During sintering perlite takes an active part in compaction process. Higher sintering dynamics is caused by: high content of alkali oxides in perlite and glass nature of perlite. Alkali oxides generate creation of liquid phase which intensifies mass compaction processes. Active role of perlite in sintering process causes good connection of its grains with clay groundwork which is important factor for mechanical parameters of ceramic materials. It was also noted that addition of perlite above 40% by volume of mass effectively neutralized negative effect of efflorescence in ceramic materials.

  6. Inclusion-initiated fracture model for ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sung, J.; Nicholson, P.S.

    1990-01-01

    The fracture of ceramics initiating from a typical inclusion is analyzed. The inclusion is considered to have a thermal expansion coefficient and fracture toughness lower than those of the matrix and a Young's modulus higher than that of the matrix. Inclusion-initiated fracture is modeled for a spherical inclusion using a weight function method to compute the residual stress intensity factor for a part-through elliptical crack. The results are applied to an α-Al 2 O 3 inclusion embedded in a tetragonal ZrO 2 ceramic. The strength predictions agree well with experimental data

  7. Modelling of Tape Casting for Ceramic Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jabbari, Masoud

    was increased by improving the steady state model with a quasi-steady state analytical model. In order to control the most important process parameter, tape thickness, the two-doctor blade configuration was also modeled analytically. The model was developed to control the tape thickness based on the machine...... for magnetic refrigeration applications. Numerical models were developed to track the migration of the particles inside the ceramic slurry. The results showed the presence of some areas inside the ceramic in which the concentration of the particles is higher compared to other parts, creating the resulting...

  8. Industrial ceramics - Properties, forming and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fantozzi, Gilbert; Niepce, Jean-Claude; Bonnefont, Guillaume; Alary, J.A.; Allard, B.; Ayral, A.; Bassat, J.M.; Elissalde, C.; Maglione, M.; Beauvy, M.; Bertrand, G.; Bignon, A.; Billieres, D.; Blanc, J.J.; Blumenfeld, P.; Bonnet, J.P.; Bougoin, M.; Bourgeon, M.; Boussuge, M.; Thorel, A.; Bruzek, C.E.; Cambier, F.; Carrerot, H.; Casabonne, J.M.; Chaix, J.M.; Chevalier, J.; Chopinet, M.H.; Couque, H.; Courtois, C.; Leriche, A.; Dhaler, D.; Denape, J.; Euzen, P.; Ganne, J.P.; Gauffinet, S.; Girard, A.; Gonon, M.; Guizard, C.; Hampshire, S.; Joulin, J.P.; Julbe, A.; Ferrato, M.; Fontaine, M.L.; Lebourgeois, R.; Lopez, J.; Maquet, M.; Marinel, S.; Marrony, M.; Martin, J.F.; Mougin, J.; Pailler, R.; Pate, M.; Petitpas, E.; Pijolat, C.; Pires-Franco, P.; Poirier, C.; Poirier, J.; Pourcel, F.; Potier, A.; Tulliani, J.M.; Viricelle, J.P.; Beauger, A.

    2013-01-01

    After a general introduction to ceramics (definition, general properties, elaboration, applications, market data), this book address conventional ceramics (elaboration, material types), thermo-structural ceramics (oxide based ceramics, non-oxide ceramics, fields of application, functional coatings), refractory ceramics, long fibre and ceramic matrix composites, carbonaceous materials, ceramics used for filtration, catalysis and the environment, ceramics for biomedical applications, ceramics for electronics and electrical engineering (for capacitors, magnetic, piezoelectric, dielectric ceramics, ceramics for hyper-frequency resonators), electrochemical ceramics, transparent ceramics (forming and sintering), glasses, mineral binders. The last chapter addresses ceramics used in the nuclear energy sector: in nuclear fuels and fissile material, absorbing ceramics and shields, in the management of nuclear wastes, new ceramics for reactors under construction or for future nuclear energy

  9. Ceramic technologies for automotive industry: Current status and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, Akira

    2009-01-01

    The automotive industry has developed substantially through advances in mechanical technologies, and technologies such as electronics and advanced materials have also contributed to further advances in automobiles. The contribution of ceramic materials to automobile technologies ranges over driving performance, exhaust gas purification, and fuel efficiency improvements. Several ceramic components, such as knock sensors, oxygen sensors, exhaust gas catalysts, and silicon nitride parts for automotive engines, have been successfully applied to automobiles. This paper focuses on the contribution of ceramics to automotive technologies. It also mentions potential contributions in the future, including adiabatic turbo-compound diesels, ceramic gas turbines, fuel cells, and electric vehicles because ceramic technologies have been intensively involved in the challenge to achieve advanced power sources.

  10. High temperature strengthening of zirconium-toughened ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claussen, N.

    1986-01-01

    Transformation-toughened (i.e. ZrO/sub 2/-toughened) ceramics represent a new class of high performance ceramics with spectacular strength properties at low and intermediate temperatures. However, at temperatures above about 700 0 C, most of these tough oxide-base ceramics can no longer be used as load-bearing engineering parts because of characteristic deficiencies. The aim of the present paper is to provide and discuss microstructural design strategies which may enable ZrO/sub 2/-toughened ceramics to be applied at higher temperatures. From the various strategies suggested, three appear to show good prospects, namely (a) the prevention of glassy intergranular films, (b) the addition of hard high modulus particles and (c) whikser or fibre reinforcement. Experimental approaches are presented from some ZrO/sub 2/-toughened ceramics, elg. tetragonal ZrO/sub 2/ polycrystals and ZrO/sub 2/-toughened cordierite, spinel and mullite

  11. Development of small ceramic gas turbines for cogeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    Details of the project at NEDO to develop 300 kW ceramic gas turbines with a thermal efficiency of ≥42% at a turbine inlet temperature (TIT) of 1,350 o C. The project is part of the 'New Sunshine Projects' promoted by Japan's Agency of Industrial Science and Technology and the Ministry of International Trade and Industry. So far, a thermal efficiency of 37% at a TIT of 1,280 o C has been achieved by a basic ceramic gas turbine (CGT). Work to develop pilot CGTs to achieve the final target is being carried out alongside research and development of ceramic parts and improved performance of ceramic components for CGTs. One group of engine and ceramic manufacturers is developing a single shaft regenerative cycle CGT (CGT 301) and a second group a double shaft type (CGT 302). The heat-resistant ceramic parts, nitrogen oxide emissions and performance of these two prototypes are outlined and the properties of the ceramic materials used are indicated. Market estimates and economics are noted

  12. The Sea Empress oil spill (Wales, UK): effects on Common Scoter Melanitta nigra in Carmarthen Bay and status ten years later.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, A N; Sanderson, W G; Hughes, B; Cranswick, P A; Smith, L E; Whitehead, S; Musgrove, A J; Haycock, B; Fairney, N P

    2008-05-01

    Carmarthen Bay, UK, regularly supports internationally important numbers (>16,000) of non-breeding Common Scoters Melanitta nigra. The spill of 72,000 tonnes of crude oil from the Sea Empress in 1996 affected birds both through direct mortality and likely pollution of key food resources. Numbers were greatly reduced following the spill, whilst changes in the distribution of birds within Carmarthen Bay suggested that potentially sub-optimal foraging zones were used. However, ten years after the incident, numbers of Common Scoter were no different to those recorded immediately before the spill. Compared to some other spills, rapid revival is evident. Numbers increased to pre-spill levels within three winters and distributional changes suggested a concurrent return to previously contaminated feeding areas, implying that the ecosystem had regenerated sufficiently to support its top predator. The importance of prolonged, standardised monitoring of bird numbers and distribution as indicators of ecological recovery from environmental damage is emphasised.

  13. Corrosion resistant ceramic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaun, T.D.

    1996-07-23

    Ceramic materials are disclosed which exhibit stability in severely-corrosive environments having high alkali-metal activity, high sulfur/sulfide activity and/or molten halides at temperatures of 200--550 C or organic salt (including SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}) at temperatures of 25--200 C. These sulfide ceramics form stoichiometric (single-phase) compounds with sulfides of Ca, Li, Na, K, Al, Mg, Si, Y, La, Ce, Ga, Ba, Zr and Sr and show melting-points that are sufficiently low and have excellent wettability with many metals (Fe, Ni, Mo) to easily form metal/ceramic seals. Ceramic compositions are also formulated to adequately match thermal expansion coefficient of adjacent metal components. 1 fig.

  14. Applications of Piezoelectric Ceramics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Applications of Piezoelectric Ceramics. Piezoelectric Actuators. Nano and Micropositioners. Vibration Control Systems. Computer Printers. Piezoelectric Transformers,Voltage Generators, Spark Plugs, Ultrasonic Motors,. Ultrasonic Generators and Sensors. Sonars, Medical Diagnostic. Computer Memories. NVFRAM ...

  15. Corrosion resistant ceramic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaun, Thomas D.

    1996-01-01

    Ceramic materials which exhibit stability in severely-corrosive environments having high alkali-metal activity, high sulfur/sulfide activity and/or molten halides at temperatures of 200.degree.-550.degree. C. or organic salt (including SO.sub.2 and SO.sub.2 Cl.sub.2) at temperatures of 25.degree.-200.degree. C. These sulfide ceramics form stoichiometric (single-phase) compounds with sulfides of Ca, Li, Na, K, Al, Mg, Si, Y, La, Ce, Ga, Ba, Zr and Sr and show melting-points that are sufficiently low and have excellent wettability with many metals (Fe, Ni, Mo) to easily form metal/ceramic seals. Ceramic compositions are also formulated to adequately match thermal expansion coefficient of adjacent metal components.

  16. Making Ceramic Cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squibb, Matt

    2009-01-01

    This article describes how to make a clay camera. This idea of creating functional cameras from clay allows students to experience ceramics, photography, and painting all in one unit. (Contains 1 resource and 3 online resources.)

  17. An assessment of the genotoxic impact of the Sea Empress oil spill by the measurement of DNA adduct levels in selected invertebrate and vertebrate species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, J S; Lyons, B P; Page, T S; Stewart, C; Parry, J M

    1999-04-26

    The grounding of the Sea Empress oil tanker resulted in the release of 72,000 tonnes of crude oil into Milford Haven, Wales, UK. Our initial studies indicated that this contamination resulted in elevated levels of DNA adducts in one of the area's native marine species Lipophrys pholis [B.P. Lyons, J.S. Harvey, J.M. Parry, An initial assessment of the genotoxic impact of the Sea Empress oil spill by the measurement of DNA adduct levels in the intertidal teleost Lipophrys pholis, Mutat. Res. 390 (1997) 263-268]. These original studies were extended and the genotoxic impact of the oil contamination was investigated in the invertebrates Halichondria panicea and Mytilus edulis, along with the vertebrate fish species L. pholis, Pleuronectes platessa and Limanda limanda. DNA adduct levels were assessed in these species over a period of 2-17 months after the incident. The studies indicate differences in the impact of acute oil contamination upon vertebrate and invertebrate species. The oil contamination did not induce any detectable elevations in adduct levels in the invertebrate species H. panicea and M. edulis. In contrast, the oil contamination did appear to induce adducts in the vertebrate teleost species L. pholis, P. platessa and Lim. limanda. Despite some difficulties in sampling, the data obtained 12-17 months after the spill suggested that the affected species recovered from the oil contamination. While the studies indicate that the genetic impact of the oil contamination was less severe than might have been expected, it remains possible that the DNA adducts detected in the teleosts could lead to genetic changes in these species in the future. Copyright 1999 Elsevier Science B.V.

  18. Selecting Ceramics - Introduction

    OpenAIRE

    Cassidy, M.

    2002-01-01

    AIM OF PRESENTATION: To compare a number of materials for extracoronal restoration of teeth with particular reference to CAD-CAM ceramics. CASE DESCRIPTION AND TREATMENT CARRIED OUT: This paper will be illustrated using clinical examples of patients treated using different ceramic restorations to present the advantages and disadvantages and each technique. The different requirements of tooth preparation, impression taking and technical procedures of each system will be presented and compar...

  19. Cavitation damage of ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovalenko, V.I.; Marinin, V.G.

    1988-01-01

    Consideration is given to results of investigation of ceramic material damage under the effect of cavitation field on their surface, formed in water under the face of exponential concentrator, connected with ultrasonic generator UZY-3-0.4. Amplitude of vibrations of concentrator face (30+-2)x10 -6 m, frequency-21 kHz. It was established that ceramics resistance to cavitation effect correlated with the product of critical of stress intensity factor and material hardness

  20. Dental ceramics: a review of new materials and processing methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Lucas Hian da; Lima, Erick de; Miranda, Ranulfo Benedito de Paula; Favero, Stéphanie Soares; Lohbauer, Ulrich; Cesar, Paulo Francisco

    2017-08-28

    The evolution of computerized systems for the production of dental restorations associated to the development of novel microstructures for ceramic materials has caused an important change in the clinical workflow for dentists and technicians, as well as in the treatment options offered to patients. New microstructures have also been developed by the industry in order to offer ceramic and composite materials with optimized properties, i.e., good mechanical properties, appropriate wear behavior and acceptable aesthetic characteristics. The objective of this literature review is to discuss the main advantages and disadvantages of the new ceramic systems and processing methods. The manuscript is divided in five parts: I) monolithic zirconia restorations; II) multilayered dental prostheses; III) new glass-ceramics; IV) polymer infiltrated ceramics; and V) novel processing technologies. Dental ceramics and processing technologies have evolved significantly in the past ten years, with most of the evolution being related to new microstructures and CAD-CAM methods. In addition, a trend towards the use of monolithic restorations has changed the way clinicians produce all-ceramic dental prostheses, since the more aesthetic multilayered restorations unfortunately are more prone to chipping or delamination. Composite materials processed via CAD-CAM have become an interesting option, as they have intermediate properties between ceramics and polymers and are more easily milled and polished.

  1. Dental ceramics: a review of new materials and processing methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Hian da SILVA

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The evolution of computerized systems for the production of dental restorations associated to the development of novel microstructures for ceramic materials has caused an important change in the clinical workflow for dentists and technicians, as well as in the treatment options offered to patients. New microstructures have also been developed by the industry in order to offer ceramic and composite materials with optimized properties, i.e., good mechanical properties, appropriate wear behavior and acceptable aesthetic characteristics. The objective of this literature review is to discuss the main advantages and disadvantages of the new ceramic systems and processing methods. The manuscript is divided in five parts: I monolithic zirconia restorations; II multilayered dental prostheses; III new glass-ceramics; IV polymer infiltrated ceramics; and V novel processing technologies. Dental ceramics and processing technologies have evolved significantly in the past ten years, with most of the evolution being related to new microstructures and CAD-CAM methods. In addition, a trend towards the use of monolithic restorations has changed the way clinicians produce all-ceramic dental prostheses, since the more aesthetic multilayered restorations unfortunately are more prone to chipping or delamination. Composite materials processed via CAD-CAM have become an interesting option, as they have intermediate properties between ceramics and polymers and are more easily milled and polished.

  2. Integration Science and Technology of Silicon-Based Ceramics and Composites:Technical Challenges and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, M.

    2013-01-01

    Ceramic integration technologies enable hierarchical design and manufacturing of intricate ceramic and composite parts starting with geometrically simpler units that are subsequently joined to themselves and/or to metals to create components with progressively higher levels of complexity and functionality. However, for the development of robust and reliable integrated systems with optimum performance for high temperature applications, detailed understanding of various thermochemical and thermomechanical factors is critical. Different technical approaches are required for the integration of ceramic to ceramic and ceramic to metal systems. Active metal brazing, in particular, is a simple and cost-effective method to integrate ceramic to metallic components. Active braze alloys usually contain a reactive filler metal (e.g., Ti, Cr, V, Hf etc) that promotes wettability and spreading by inducing chemical reactions with the ceramics and composites. In this presentation, various examples of brazing of silicon nitride to themselves and to metallic systems are presented. Other examples of joining of ceramic composites (C/SiC and SiC/SiC) using ceramic interlayers and the resulting microstructures are also presented. Thermomechanical characterization of joints is presented for both types of systems. In addition, various challenges and opportunities in design, fabrication, and testing of integrated similar (ceramic-ceramic) and dissimilar (ceramic-metal) material systems will be discussed. Potential opportunities and need for the development of innovative design philosophies, approaches, and integrated system testing under simulated application conditions will also be presented.

  3. Large ceramics for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauth, W.E.; Stoddard, S.D.

    1979-01-01

    Prominent ceramic raw materials and products manufacturers were surveyed to determine the state of the art for alumina ceramic fabrication. This survey emphasized current capabilities and limitations for fabrication of large, high-density, high-purity, complex shapes. Some directions are suggested for future needs and development. Ceramic-to-ceramic sealing has applications for several technologies that require large and/or complex vacuum-tight ceramic shapes. Information is provided concerning the assembly of complex monolithic ceramic shapes by bonding of subassemblies at temperatures ranging from 450 to 1500 0 C. Future applications and fabrication techniques for various materials are presented

  4. Clinical application of bio ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anu, Sharma, E-mail: issaranu@gmail.com; Gayatri, Sharma, E-mail: sharmagayatri@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Govt. College of Engineering & Technology, Bikaner, Rajasthan (India)

    2016-05-06

    Ceramics are the inorganic crystalline material. These are used in various field such as biomedical, electrical, electronics, aerospace, automotive and optical etc. Bio ceramics are the one of the most active areas of research. Bio ceramics are the ceramics which are biocompatible. The unique properties of bio ceramics make them an attractive option for medical applications and offer some potential advantages over other materials. During the past three decades, a number of major advances have been made in the field of bio ceramics. This review focuses on the use of these materials in variety of clinical scenarios.

  5. The history of ceramic filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujishima, S

    2000-01-01

    The history of ceramic filters is surveyed. Included is the history of piezoelectric ceramics. Ceramic filters were developed using technology similar to that of quartz crystal and electro-mechanical filters. However, the key to this development involved the theoretical analysis of vibration modes and material improvements of piezoelectric ceramics. The primary application of ceramic filters has been for consumer-market use. Accordingly, a major emphasis has involved mass production technology, leading to low-priced devices. A typical ceramic filter includes monolithic resonators and capacitors packaged in unique configurations.

  6. Clinical application of bio ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anu, Sharma; Gayatri, Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Ceramics are the inorganic crystalline material. These are used in various field such as biomedical, electrical, electronics, aerospace, automotive and optical etc. Bio ceramics are the one of the most active areas of research. Bio ceramics are the ceramics which are biocompatible. The unique properties of bio ceramics make them an attractive option for medical applications and offer some potential advantages over other materials. During the past three decades, a number of major advances have been made in the field of bio ceramics. This review focuses on the use of these materials in variety of clinical scenarios.

  7. [Ceramic-on-ceramic bearings in total hip arthroplasty (THA)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sentürk, U; Perka, C

    2015-04-01

    The main reason for total hip arthroplasty (THA) revision is the wear-related aseptic loosening. Younger and active patients after total joint replacement create high demands, in particular, on the bearings. The progress, especially for alumina ceramic-on-ceramic bearings and mixed ceramics have solved many problems of the past and lead to good in vitro results. Modern ceramics (alumina or mixed ceramics containing alumina) are extremely hard, scratch-resistant, biocompatible, offer a low coefficient of friction, superior lubrication and have the lowest wear rates in comparison to all other bearings in THA. The disadvantage of ceramic is the risk of material failure, i.e., of ceramic fracture. The new generation of mixed ceramics (delta ceramic), has reduced the risk of head fractures to 0.03-0.05 %, but the risk for liner fractures remains unchanged at about 0.02 %. Assuming a non-impinging component implantation, ceramic-on-ceramic bearings have substantial advantages over all other bearings in THA. Due to the superior hardness, ceramic bearings produce less third body wear and are virtually impervious to damage from instruments during the implantation process. A specific complication for ceramic-on-ceramic bearings is "squeaking". The high rate of reported squeaking (0.45 to 10.7 %) highlights the importance of precise implant positioning and the stem and patient selection. With precise implant positioning this problem is rare with many implant designs and without clinical relevance. The improved tribology and the presumable resulting implant longevity make ceramic-on-ceramic the bearing of choice for young and active patients. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Nonaqueous slip casting of high temperature ceramic superconductors using an investment casting technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooker, Matthew W. (Inventor); Taylor, Theodore D. (Inventor); Wise, Stephanie A. (Inventor); Buckley, John D. (Inventor); Vasquez, Peter (Inventor); Buck, Gregory M. (Inventor); Hicks, Lana P. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A process for slip casting ceramic articles that does not employ parting agents and affords the casting of complete, detailed, precision articles that do not possess parting lines is presented. This process is especially useful for high temperature superconductors and water-sensitive ceramics. A wax pattern for a shell mold is provided, and an aqueous mixture of a calcium sulfate-bonded investment material is applied as a coating to the wax pattern. The coated wax pattern is then dried, followed by curing to vaporize the wax pattern and leave a shell mold of the calcium sulfate-bonded investment material. The shell mold is cooled to room temperature, and a ceramic slip, created by dispersing a ceramic powder in an organic liquid, is poured therein. After a ceramic shell of desired thickness or a solid article has set up in the shell mold, excess ceramic slip is poured out. The shell mold is misted with water and peeled away from the ceramic article, after which the ceramic is fired to provide a complete, detailed, precision, high temperature superconductive ceramic article without parting lines. The casting technique may take place in the presence of a magnetic field to orient the ceramic powders during the casting process.

  9. The effects of the Sea Empress oil spill on the sub-tidal macrobenthos of the Milford Haven waterway: a comparison of survey data from October 1993 and October 1996. V. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobbs, G.; Smith, J.; Law, R.J.

    1997-12-01

    This report presents the results of the October 1996 Milford Haven Macrobenthic survey which was conducted eight months after the Sea Empress oil spill, and provides a comparison with the macrobenthic survey of three years previously. The primary aim of this study was to assess the effect of the Sea Empress oil spill upon the benthic macrofauna of the Milford Haven Waterway. In order that direct comparison with the 1993 study could be made wherever possible, there has been consistency in the timing and methodologies employed in the field and in the laboratory. Comparison of individual species distributions and densities indicate changes in several species that can be ascribed to minor positional differences in sample location and to natural variability. However, some taxa, notably amongst the Amphipoda, show widespread declines in their distribution and densities. The balance of evidence suggests that these changes are an acute response to the oil spill. (author)

  10. The effects of the Sea Empress oil spill on the sub-tidal macrobenthos of the Milford Haven waterway: a comparison of survey data from October 1993 and October 1996. V. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobbs, G.; Smith, J.; Law, R.J.

    1997-12-01

    This report presents the results of the October 1996 Milford Haven Macrobenthic survey which was conducted eight months after the Sea Empress oil spill, and provides a comparison with the macrobenthic survey of three years previously. The primary aim of this study was to assess the effect of the Sea Empress oil spill upon the benthic macrofauna of the Milford Haven Waterway. In order that direct comparison with the 1993 study could be made wherever possible, there has been consistency in the timing and methodologies employed in the field and in the laboratory. Comparison of individual species distributions and densities indicate changes in several species that can be ascribed to minor positional differences in sample location and to natural variability. However, some taxa, notably amongst the Amphipoda, show widespread declines in their distribution and densities. The balance of evidence suggests that these changes are an acute response to the oil spill. (author)

  11. ATTAP/AGT101 - Year 2 progress in ceramic technology development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidwell, J. R.; Lindberg, L. J.; Morey, R. E.

    1990-01-01

    The progress made by the Advanced Turbine Technology Applications Project (ATTAP) is summarized, with emphasis on the following areas: ceramic materials assessment and characterization, ceramic impact damage assessment, ceramic combustor evaluation, turbine inlet particle separator development, impact-tolerant turbine designs, and net-shape ceramic component fabrications. In the evolutionary ceramics development in the Automotive Gas Turbine (AGT101) and ATTAP programs initial designs were conceived to reduce stresses by using well-established criteria: bodies of revolution were preferred over nonaxisymmetric geometries, sharp corners were avoided, the contact area between components was kept as large as possible, and small parts were preferred over large when feasible. Projects discussed include: initial ceramic component fabrication by ceramic suppliers in 1990, engine test to 1371 C in 1991, 100-hr test bed engine durability test in 1991, and 300-hr test bed engine durability in 1992.

  12. Superplastic forging nitride ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, P.C.; Seydel, E.R.; Raj, R.

    1988-03-22

    A process is disclosed for preparing silicon nitride ceramic parts which are relatively flaw free and which need little or no machining, said process comprising the steps of: (a) preparing a starting powder by wet or dry mixing ingredients comprising by weight from about 70% to about 99% silicon nitride, from about 1% to about 30% of liquid phase forming additive and from 1% to about 7% free silicon; (b) cold pressing to obtain a preform of green density ranging from about 30% to about 75% of theoretical density; (c) sintering at atmospheric pressure in a nitrogen atmosphere at a temperature ranging from about 1,400 C to about 2,200 C to obtain a density which ranges from about 50% to about 100% of theoretical density and which is higher than said preform green density, and (d) press forging workpiece resulting from step (c) by isothermally uniaxially pressing said workpiece in an open die without initial contact between said workpiece and die wall perpendicular to the direction of pressing and so that pressed workpiece does not contact die wall perpendicular to the direction of pressing, to substantially final shape in a nitrogen atmosphere utilizing a temperature within the range of from about 1,400 C to essentially 1,750 C and strain rate within the range of about 10[sup [minus]7] to about 10[sup [minus]1] seconds[sup [minus]1], the temperature and strain rate being such that surface cracks do not occur, said pressing being carried out to obtain a shear deformation greater than 30% whereby superplastic forging is effected.

  13. Standards of teeth preparations for anterior resin bonded all-ceramic crowns in private dental practice in Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziad Nawaf AL-Dwairi

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To investigate if general dental practitioners (GDPs in private practice in Jordan follow universal guidelines for preparation of anterior teeth for resin bonded all-ceramic crowns (RBCs. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A sample (n=100 of laboratory models containing 208 tooth preparations for IPS Empress and In Ceram, featuring work from different GDPs, was obtained from 8 commercial dental laboratories. Aspects of preparations were quantified and compared with accepted criteria defined following a review of the literature and recommendations of the manufactures' guidelines. RESULTS: Subgingival margins on the buccal aspect were noticed in 36% of the preparations, 54% demonstrated overpreparation with a tendency to overprepare the teeth on the mesiodistal plane more than buccolingual plane. Twenty percent of samples presented a shoulder finish line while a chamfer margin design was noticed in 39%. Twenty-nine percent and 12% of samples had either a feathered or no clear margin design respectively. Incisal underpreparation was observed in 18% of dies of each type. Only 17% of all preparations were found to follow the recommended anatomical labial preparations while 29% of the RBC preparations were found to have the recommended axial convergence angle. In total, 43% of preparations were found to have the recommended depth of the finish line. CONCLUSIONS: It was found that relevant guidelines for RBC preparations were not being fully adhered to in private practice in Jordan.

  14. Testing method for ceramic armour and bare ceramic tiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carton, E.P.; Roebroeks, G.H.J.J.

    2016-01-01

    TNO developed an alternative, more configuration independent ceramic test method than the Depth-of-Penetration test method. In this alternative test ceramic tiles and ceramic based armour are evaluated as target without a semi-infinite backing layer. An energy approach is chosen to evaluate and rank

  15. Testing method for ceramic armor and bare ceramic tiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carton, E.P.; Roebroeks, G.H.J.J.

    2014-01-01

    TNO has developed an alternative, more configuration independent ceramic test method than the standard Depth-of-Penetration test method. In this test ceramic tiles and ceramic based armor are evaluated as target without a semi-infinite backing layer. An energy approach is chosen to evaluate and rank

  16. Bioactive and inert dental glass-ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montazerian, Maziar; Zanotto, Edgar Dutra

    2017-02-01

    The global market for dental materials is predicted to exceed 10 billion dollars by 2020. The main drivers for this growth are easing the workflow of dentists and increasing the comfort of patients. Therefore, remarkable research projects have been conducted and are currently underway to develop improved or new dental materials with enhanced properties or that can be processed using advanced technologies, such as CAD/CAM or 3D printing. Among these materials, zirconia, glass or polymer-infiltrated ceramics, and glass-ceramics (GCs) are of great importance. Dental glass-ceramics are highly attractive because they are easy to process and have outstanding esthetics, translucency, low thermal conductivity, high strength, chemical durability, biocompatibility, wear resistance, and hardness similar to that of natural teeth, and, in certain cases, these materials are bioactive. In this review article, we divide dental GCs into the following two groups: restorative and bioactive. Most restorative dental glass-ceramics (RDGCs) are inert and biocompatible and are used in the restoration and reconstruction of teeth. Bioactive dental glass-ceramics (BDGCs) display bone-bonding ability and stimulate positive biological reactions at the material/tissue interface. BDGCs are suggested for dentin hypersensitivity treatment, implant coating, bone regeneration and periodontal therapy. Throughout this paper, we elaborate on the history, processing, properties and applications of RDGCs and BDGCs. We also report on selected papers that address promising types of dental glass-ceramics. Finally, we include trends and guidance on relevant open issues and research possibilities. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 105A: 619-639, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Stereolithographic processing of ceramics: Photon diffusion in colloidal dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Rajeev

    The technique of ceramic stereolithography (CSL) has been developed for fabricating near net shape ceramic objects. In stereolithography, the three-dimensional computer design file of the object is sliced into thin layers. Each layer is physically fabricated by photocuring the surface of a liquid photo-polymerizable resin bath by raster scanning an ultra-violet laser across the surface of the resin. In CSL, the liquid resin is a high concentration colloidal dispersion in a solution of ultraviolet curable polymers. The ceramic green body fabricated by ceramic stereolithography technique is subjected to the post processing steps of drying, binder burnout and sintering to form a dense ceramic object. An aqueous alumina dispersion in photocuring polymers with particle volume fraction greater than 0.5 was formulated for CSL process. Low molecular weight solution polymers were found to be best suited for formulating ceramic resins due to their inherently low viscosity and favorable interactions with the ceramic dispersant. A hydroxyapatite ceramic resin was also developed for the use in the CSL technique. A model is developed to describe the photocuring process in concentrated ceramic dispersion. The curing profile in ceramic dispersion is governed by multiple scattering from the ceramic particles and absorption by the photocuring polymers. Diffusion theory of light transport is used to model the multiple scattering and absorption phenomena. It is found that diffusive transport adequately describes the phenomena of laser pulse propagation in highly concentrated colloidal dispersions. A model was developed to describe the absorption in highly concentrated ceramic dispersion. Various complex-shaped monolithic alumina and hydroxyapatite objects were fabricated by CSL and shown to possess uniform microstructure. The mechanical properties and sintering behavior of the parts fabricated by CSL are shown to be comparable to those fabricated by other ceramic processing technique

  18. Mechanical properties of ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    Pelleg, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    This book discusses the mechanical properties of ceramics and aims to provide both a solid background for undergraduate students, as well as serving as a text to bring practicing engineers up to date with the latest developments in this topic so they can use and apply these to their actual engineering work.  Generally, ceramics are made by moistening a mixture of clays, casting it into desired shapes and then firing it to a high temperature, a process known as 'vitrification'. The relatively late development of metallurgy was contingent on the availability of ceramics and the know-how to mold them into the appropriate forms. Because of the characteristics of ceramics, they offer great advantages over metals in specific applications in which hardness, wear resistance and chemical stability at high temperatures are essential. Clearly, modern ceramics manufacturing has come a long way from the early clay-processing fabrication method, and the last two decades have seen the development of sophisticated technique...

  19. Fatigue of dental ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Sailer, Irena; Lawn, Brian R

    2013-12-01

    Clinical data on survival rates reveal that all-ceramic dental prostheses are susceptible to fracture from repetitive occlusal loading. The objective of this review is to examine the underlying mechanisms of fatigue in current and future dental ceramics. The nature of various fatigue modes is elucidated using fracture test data on ceramic layer specimens from the dental and biomechanics literature. Failure modes can change over a lifetime, depending on restoration geometry, loading conditions and material properties. Modes that operate in single-cycle loading may be dominated by alternative modes in multi-cycle loading. While post-mortem examination of failed prostheses can determine the sources of certain fractures, the evolution of these fractures en route to failure remains poorly understood. Whereas it is commonly held that loss of load-bearing capacity of dental ceramics in repetitive loading is attributable to chemically assisted 'slow crack growth' in the presence of water, we demonstrate the existence of more deleterious fatigue mechanisms, mechanical rather than chemical in nature. Neglecting to account for mechanical fatigue can lead to gross overestimates in predicted survival rates. Strategies for prolonging the clinical lifetimes of ceramic restorations are proposed based on a crack-containment philosophy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2000-10-01

    This is the third quarterly report on oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes. In the following, the report describes the progress made by our university partners in Tasks 1 through 6, experimental apparatus that was designed and built for various tasks of this project, thermodynamic calculations, where applicable and work planned for the future. (Task 1) Design, fabricate and evaluate ceramic to metal seals based on graded ceramic powder/metal braze joints. (Task 2) Evaluate the effect of defect configuration on ceramic membrane conductivity and long term chemical and structural stability. (Task 3) Determine materials mechanical properties under conditions of high temperatures and reactive atmospheres. (Task 4) Evaluate phase stability and thermal expansion of candidate perovskite membranes and develop techniques to support these materials on porous metal structures. (Task 5) Assess the microstructure of membrane materials to evaluate the effects of vacancy-impurity association, defect clusters, and vacancy-dopant association on the membrane performance and stability. (Task 6) Measure kinetics of oxygen uptake and transport in ceramic membrane materials under commercially relevant conditions using isotope labeling techniques.

  1. Ceramic impregnated superabrasives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radtke, Robert P.; Sherman, Andrew

    2009-02-10

    A superabrasive fracture resistant compact is formed by depositing successive layers of ceramic throughout the network of open pores in a thermally stable self-bonded polycrystalline diamond or cubic boron nitride preform. The void volume in the preform is from approximately 2 to 10 percent of the volume of the preform, and the average pore size is below approximately 3000 nanometers. The preform is evacuated and infiltrated under at least about 1500 pounds per square inch pressure with a liquid pre-ceramic polymerizable precursor. The precursor is infiltrated into the preform at or below the boiling point of the precursor. The precursor is polymerized into a solid phase material. The excess is removed from the outside of the preform, and the polymer is pyrolized to form a ceramic. The process is repeated at least once more so as to achieve upwards of 90 percent filling of the original void volume. When the remaining void volume drops below about 1 percent the physical properties of the compact, such as fracture resistance, improve substantially. Multiple infiltration cycles result in the deposition of sufficient ceramic to reduce the void volume to below 0.5 percent. The fracture resistance of the compacts in which the pores are lined with formed in situ ceramic is generally at least one and one-half times that of the starting preforms.

  2. Reduction in thermal conductivity of ceramics due to radiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klemens, P.G.; Hurley, G.F.; Clinard, F.W. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Ceramics are required for a number of applications in fusion reactors. In several of these applications, the thermal conductivity is an important design parameter as it affects the level of temperature and thermal stress in service. Ceramic insulators are known to suffer substantial reduction in thermal conductivity due to neutron irradiation damage. The present study estimates the reduction in thermal conductivity at high temperature due to radiation induced defects. Point, extended, and extended partly transparent defects are considered

  3. High flow ceramic pot filters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Halem, D.; van der Laan, H.; Soppe, A. I.A.; Heijman, S.G.J.

    2017-01-01

    Ceramic pot filters are considered safe, robust and appropriate technologies, but there is a general consensus that water revenues are limited due to clogging of the ceramic element. The objective of this study was to investigate the potential of high flow ceramic pot filters to produce more

  4. Ceramic composites: Enabling aerospace materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, S. R.

    1992-01-01

    Ceramics and ceramic matrix composites (CMC) have the potential for significant impact on the performance of aerospace propulsion and power systems. In this paper, the potential benefits are discussed in broad qualitative terms and are illustrated by some specific application case studies. The key issues in need of resolution for the potential of ceramics to be realized are discussed.

  5. Fabrication and testing of ceramic UO{sub 2} fuel - I-III. Part I; Izrada i ispitivanje keramickog goriva na bazi UO{sub 2}- I-III, I Deo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novakovic, M [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Laboratorija za termotehniku reaktora, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1961-12-15

    The task described consists of the following: fabrication of UO{sub 2} with different granulation from uranyl nitrate by ammonia diuranate; determination of size and shape distributions of metal and ceramic powders; fabrication of sintered pressed samples UO{sub 2}; investigating the properties of sintered uranium dioxide dependent on the fabrication process; producing a vibrator for compacting UO{sub 2} powder. This volume includes reports on the first two tasks.

  6. Verification of Ceramic Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behar-Lafenetre, Stephanie; Cornillon, Laurence; Rancurel, Michael; De Graaf, Dennis; Hartmann, Peter; Coe, Graham; Laine, Benoit

    2012-07-01

    In the framework of the “Mechanical Design and Verification Methodologies for Ceramic Structures” contract [1] awarded by ESA, Thales Alenia Space has investigated literature and practices in affiliated industries to propose a methodological guideline for verification of ceramic spacecraft and instrument structures. It has been written in order to be applicable to most types of ceramic or glass-ceramic materials - typically Cesic®, HBCesic®, Silicon Nitride, Silicon Carbide and ZERODUR®. The proposed guideline describes the activities to be performed at material level in order to cover all the specific aspects of ceramics (Weibull distribution, brittle behaviour, sub-critical crack growth). Elementary tests and their post-processing methods are described, and recommendations for optimization of the test plan are given in order to have a consistent database. The application of this method is shown on an example in a dedicated article [7]. Then the verification activities to be performed at system level are described. This includes classical verification activities based on relevant standard (ECSS Verification [4]), plus specific analytical, testing and inspection features. The analysis methodology takes into account the specific behaviour of ceramic materials, especially the statistical distribution of failures (Weibull) and the method to transfer it from elementary data to a full-scale structure. The demonstration of the efficiency of this method is described in a dedicated article [8]. The verification is completed by classical full-scale testing activities. Indications about proof testing, case of use and implementation are given and specific inspection and protection measures are described. These additional activities are necessary to ensure the required reliability. The aim of the guideline is to describe how to reach the same reliability level as for structures made of more classical materials (metals, composites).

  7. Cyclic mechanical fatigue in ceramic-ceramic composites: an update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, D. III

    1983-01-01

    Attention is given to cyclic mechanical fatigue effects in a number of ceramics and ceramic composites, including several monolithic ceramics in which significant residual stresses should be present as a result of thermal expansion mismatches and anisotropy. Fatigue is also noted in several BN-containing ceramic matrix-particulate composites and in SiC fiber-ceramic matrix composites. These results suggest that fatigue testing is imperative for ceramics and ceramic composites that are to be used in applications subject to cyclic loading. Fatigue process models are proposed which provide a rationale for fatigue effect observations, but do not as yet provide quantitative results. Fiber composite fatigue damage models indicate that design stresses in these materials may have to be maintained below the level at which fiber pullout occurs

  8. Bonding silicon nitride using glass-ceramic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobedoe, R.S.

    1995-01-01

    Silicon nitride has been successfully bonded to itself using magnesium-aluminosilicate glass and glass-ceramic. For some samples, bonding was achieved using a diffusion bonder, but in other instances, following an initial degassing hold, higher temperatures were used in a nitrogen atmosphere with no applied load. For diffusion bonding, a small applied pressure at a temperature below which crystallisation occurs resulted in intimate contact. At slightly higher temperatures, the extent of the reaction at the interface and the microstructure of the glass-ceramic joint was highly sensitive to the bonding temperature. Bonding in a nitrogen atmosphere resulted in a solution-reprecipitation reaction. A thin layer of glass produced a ''dry'', glass-free joint, whilst a thicker layer resulted in a continuous glassy join across the interface. The chromium silicide impurities within the silicon nitride react with the nucleating agent in the glass ceramic, which may lead to difficulty in producing a fine glass-ceramic microstructure. Slightly lower temperatures in nitrogen resulted in a polycrystalline join but the interfacial contact was poor. It is hoped that one of the bonds produced may be developed to eventually form part of a graded joint between silicon nitride and a high temperature nickel alloy. (orig.)

  9. Assessment of the Possibility of Applying Ceramic Materials in Common Rail Injection Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateusz Bor

    2018-03-01

    The second part concerns analysis conduct by means of the finite element method and a specialized simulation environment, based on comparing ceramic materials and bearing steel. This comparison was conducted by using a CAD strength model of a piston in a specific application, being a pump with CP3 design. Simulation results confirmed the beneficial qualities of ceramic materials – the level of material deformation is lower for ceramics in comparison to steel.

  10. Erosion resistance and adhesion of composite metal/ceramic coatings produced by plasma spraying

    OpenAIRE

    Ramm , D.; Hutchings , I.; Clyne , T.

    1993-01-01

    Ceramic coatings can exhibit greater erosion resistance than most metallic coatings. Such coatings are conveniently produced by thermal spraying. Unfortunately, thermally sprayed ceramic coatings often exhibit poor adhesion, partly as a consequence of the development of residual stresses during spraying and subsequent cooling. Composite coatings have been studied using aluminium/alumina deposits on steel substrates. The incorporation of ceramics within a ductile matrix has potential for sharp...

  11. Distorting the ceramic familiar: materiality and non-ceramic intervention, Conference, Keramik Museum, Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Livingstone, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Invited conference speaker, Westerwald Keramik Museum, August 2009. Paper title: Distorting the ceramic familiar: materiality and non-ceramic intervention.\\ud \\ud This paper will examine the integration of non-ceramic media into the discourse of ceramics.

  12. Piezoelectric displacement in ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, M.; Cain, M.; Gee, M.

    1999-01-01

    This Good Practice Guide is intended to aid a user to perform displacement measurements on piezoelectric ceramic materials such as PZT (lead zirconium titanate) in either monolithic or multilayer form. The various measurement issues that the user must consider are addressed, and good measurement practise is described for the four most suitable methods. (author)

  13. Dense ceramic articles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cockbain, A.G.

    1976-01-01

    A method is described for the manufacture of articles of substantially pure dense ceramic materials, for use in severe environments. Si N is very suitable for use in such environments, but suffers from the disadvantage that it is not amenable to sintering. Some disadvantages of the methods normally used for making articles of Si N are mentioned. The method described comprises mixing a powder of the substantially pure ceramic material with an additive that promotes densification, and which is capable of nuclear transmutation into a gas when exposed to radiation, and hot pressing the mixture to form a billet. The billet is then irradiated to convert the additive into a gas which is held captive in the billet, and it is then subjected to a hot forging operation, during which the captive gas escapes and an article of substantially pure dense ceramic material is forged. The method is intended primarily for use for Si N, but may be applied to other ceramic materials. The additive may be Li or Be or their compounds, to the extent of at least 5 ppm and not more than 5% by weight. Irradiation is effected by proton or neutron bombardment. (UK)

  14. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendfra Nagabhushana

    2001-07-01

    The mechanical properties of model systems were analyzed. A reasonably accurate finite element model was implemented and a rational metric to predict the strength of ceramic/metal concentrical joints was developed. The mode of failure of the ceramic/metal joints was determined and the importance of the mechanical properties of the braze material was assessed. Thermal cycling experiments were performed on the model systems and the results were discussed. Additionally, experiments using the concept of placing diffusion barriers on the ceramic surface to limit the extent of the reaction with the braze were performed. It was also observed that the nature and morphology of the reaction zone depends greatly on the nature of the perovskite structure being used. From the experiments, it is observed that the presence of Cr in the Fe-occupied sites decreases the tendency of Fe to segregate and to precipitate out of the lattice. In these new experiments, Ni was observed to play a major role in the decomposition of the ceramic substrate.

  15. Dissolution of crystalline ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, W.B.

    1982-01-01

    The present program objectives are to lay out the fundamentals of crystalline waste form dissolution. Nuclear waste ceramics are polycrystalline. An assumption of the work is that to the first order, the release rate of a particular radionuclide is the surface-weighted sum of the release rates of the radionuclide from each crystalline form that contains it. In the second order, of course, there will be synergistic effects. There will be also grain boundary and other microstructural influences. As a first approximation, we have selected crystalline phases one at a time. The sequence of investigations and measurements is: (i) Identification of the actual chemical reactions of dissolution including identification of the solid reaction products if such occur. (ii) The rates of these reactions are then determined empirically to give what may be called macroscopic kinetics. (iii) Determination of the rate-controlling mechanisms. (iv) If the rate is controlled by surface reactions, the final step would be to determine the atomic kinetics, that is the specific atomic reactions that occur at the dissolving interface. Our concern with the crystalline forms are in two areas: The crystalline components of the reference ceramic waste form and related ceramics and the alumino-silicate phases that appear in some experimental waste forms and as waste-rock interaction products. Specific compounds are: (1) Reference Ceramic Phases (zirconolite, magnetoplumbite, spinel, Tc-bearing spinel and perovskite); (2) Aluminosilicate phases (nepheline, pollucite, CsAlSi 5 O 12 , Sr-feldspar). 5 figures, 1 table

  16. Ceramic analysis in Greece

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilditch, J.

    2016-01-01

    Scientific, analytical or ‘archaeometric’ techniques for investigating ceramic material have been used within archaeology for over 50 years and now constitute an indispensable tool for archaeologists in the Aegean world (see Jones 1986 for a detailed summary of early work in Greece and Italy) and

  17. Ceramic solid electrolytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodenough, John B. [Center for Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX (United States)

    1997-02-15

    Strategies for the design of ceramic solid electrolytes are reviewed. Problems associated with stoichiometric and doped compounds are compared. In the illustration of design principles, emphasis is given to oxide-ion electrolytes for use in solid-oxide fuel cells, oxygen pumps, and oxygen sensors

  18. Coated ceramic breeder materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Shiu-Wing; Johnson, Carl E.

    1987-01-01

    A breeder material for use in a breeder blanket of a nuclear reactor is disclosed. The breeder material comprises a core material of lithium containing ceramic particles which has been coated with a neutron multiplier such as Be or BeO, which coating has a higher thermal conductivity than the core material.

  19. Improved ceramic slip casting technique. [application to aircraft model fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Gregory M. (Inventor); Vasquez, Peter (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A primary concern in modern fluid dynamics research is the experimental verification of computational aerothermodynamic codes. This research requires high precision and detail in the test model employed. Ceramic materials are used for these models because of their low heat conductivity and their survivability at high temperatures. To fabricate such models, slip casting techniques were developed to provide net-form, precision casting capability for high-purity ceramic materials in aqueous solutions. In previous slip casting techniques, block, or flask molds made of plaster-of-paris were used to draw liquid from the slip material. Upon setting, parts were removed from the flask mold and cured in a kiln at high temperatures. Casting detail was usually limited with this technique -- detailed parts were frequently damaged upon separation from the flask mold, as the molded parts are extremely delicate in the uncured state, and the flask mold is inflexible. Ceramic surfaces were also marred by 'parting lines' caused by mold separation. This adversely affected the aerodynamic surface quality of the model as well. (Parting lines are invariably necessary on or near the leading edges of wings, nosetips, and fins for mold separation. These areas are also critical for flow boundary layer control.) Parting agents used in the casting process also affected surface quality. These agents eventually soaked into the mold, the model, or flaked off when releasing the case model. Different materials were tried, such as oils, paraffin, and even an algae. The algae released best, but some of it remained on the model and imparted an uneven texture and discoloration on the model surface when cured. According to the present invention, a wax pattern for a shell mold is provided, and an aqueous mixture of a calcium sulfate-bonded investment material is applied as a coating to the wax pattern. The coated wax pattern is then dried, followed by curing to vaporize the wax pattern and leave a shell

  20. Glass-ceramic material and method of making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinhardt, Kerry D [Richland, WA; Vienna, John D [West Richland, WA; Armstrong, Timothy R [Pasco, WA; Pederson, Larry R [Kennewick, WA

    2002-08-13

    The present invention is a glass-ceramic material and method of making useful for joining at least two solid ceramic parts. The seal is a blend of M.sub.A O--M.sub.B O.sub.y --SiO.sub.2 that substantially matches a coefficient of thermal expansion of the solid electrolyte. According to the present invention, a series of glass ceramics in the M.sub.A O--M.sub.B O.sub.y --SiO.sub.2 system can be used to join or seal both tubular and planar ceramic solid oxide fuel cells, oxygen electrolyzers, and membrane reactors for the production of syngas, commodity chemicals and other products.

  1. Method of producing monolithic ceramic cross-flow filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, David A.; Bacchi, David P.; Connors, Timothy F.; Collins, III, Edwin L.

    1998-01-01

    Ceramic filter of various configuration have been used to filter particulates from hot gases exhausted from coal-fired systems. Prior ceramic cross-flow filters have been favored over other types, but those previously horn have been assemblies of parts somehow fastened together and consequently subject often to distortion or delamination on exposure hot gas in normal use. The present new monolithic, seamless, cross-flow ceramic filters, being of one-piece construction, are not prone to such failure. Further, these new products are made by novel casting process which involves the key steps of demolding the ceramic filter green body so that none of the fragile inner walls of the filter is cracked or broken.

  2. Microstructure and defect chemistry of yttrium aluminium garnet ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuh, L.H.

    1989-01-01

    This thesis describes basic aspects concerning the defect chemistry and the microstructure of yttrium aluminium garnet ceramics. The work consists of three parts: a literature study, an experimental part and a section giving computer simulation data of defects. (author). 320 refs.; 68 figs.; 72 schemes; 32 tabs

  3. Additive Manufacturing of SiC Based Ceramics and Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbig, Michael Charles; Singh, Mrityunjay

    2015-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) ceramics and SiC fiber reinforcedSiC ceramic matrix composites (SiCSiC CMCs) offer high payoff as replacements for metals in turbine engine applications due to their lighter weight, higher temperature capability, and lower cooling requirements. Additive manufacturing approaches can offer game changing technologies for the quick and low cost fabrication of parts with much greater design freedom and geometric complexity. Four approaches for developing these materials are presented. The first two utilize low cost 3D printers. The first uses pre-ceramic pastes developed as feed materials which are converted to SiC after firing. The second uses wood containing filament to print a carbonaceous preform which is infiltrated with a pre-ceramic polymer and converted to SiC. The other two approaches pursue the AM of CMCs. The first is binder jet SiC powder processing in collaboration with rp+m (Rapid Prototyping+Manufacturing). Processing optimization was pursued through SiC powder blending, infiltration with and without SiC nano powder loading, and integration of nanofibers into the powder bed. The second approach was laminated object manufacturing (LOM) in which fiber prepregs and laminates are cut to shape by a laser and stacked to form the desired part. Scanning electron microscopy was conducted on materials from all approaches with select approaches also characterized with XRD, TGA, and bend testing.

  4. Prediction of ambient concentration of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from the Sea Empress oil spill using vapour and oil property models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carruthers, D.J.; Ellis, K.L.

    1997-09-01

    Modelling has been used to estimate concentrations of benzene, toluene, ethyl benzene and xylene (BTEX), 1,3 butadiene and total hydrocarbons due to evaporation of volatiles from the Sea Empress oil spill. This involved estimating the release rates of oil during each tidal cycle, calculating the spread and evaporation rate of the oil and then using the dispersion model ADMS to determine concentrations in air of the species. The calculations generally show that the highest concentrations occur directly above recently released oil (released within the last 12 hours). Concentrations on land were generally small as the predominant wind directions were seaward throughout the period when the oil spill would have been evaporating. However, total hydrocarbon concentrations measured at various land sites were significant during the spill period even when the wind was blowing away from the monitoring sites. The measured concentrations were also high for a further period after the spill when evaporation of the spilled oil would have decreased to small levels. This suggests that much of the measured hydrocarbons were emitted from other sources (e.g. the oil refineries). (author)

  5. But what about the Empress of Racnoss? The allocation of attention to spiders and Doctor Who in a visual search task is predicted by fear and expertise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purkis, Helena M; Lester, Kathryn J; Field, Andy P

    2011-12-01

    If there is a spider in the room, then the spider phobic in your group is most likely to point it out to you. This phenomenon is believed to arise because our attentional systems are hardwired to attend to threat in our environment, and, to a spider phobic, spiders are threatening. However, an alternative explanation is simply that attention is quickly drawn to the stimulus of most personal relevance in the environment. Our research examined whether positive stimuli with no biological or evolutionary relevance could be allocated preferential attention. We compared attention to pictures of spiders with pictures from the TV program Doctor Who, for people who varied in both their love of Doctor Who and their fear of spiders. We found a double dissociation: interference from spider and Doctor-Who-related images in a visual search task was predicted by spider fear and Doctor Who expertise, respectively. As such, allocation of attention reflected the personal relevance of the images rather than their threat content. The attentional system believed to have a causal role in anxiety disorders is therefore likely to be a general system that responds not to threat but to stimulus relevance; hence, nonevolutionary images, such as those from Doctor Who, captured attention as quickly as fear-relevant spider images. Where this leaves the Empress of Racnoss, we are unsure. (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved.

  6. Wonderland of ceramics superplasticity; Ceramics chososei no sekai

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wakai, F. [National Industrial Research Inst. of Nagoya, Nagoya (Japan)

    1995-07-01

    It has been ten years since it was found that ceramics, which is strong and hard at room temperatures and does not deform at all, may exhibit a superplasticity phenomenon at high temperatures that it endlessly elongates when pulled as if it were chewing gum. This phenomenon is one of peculiar behaviours which nano-crystal ceramics, pulverized to an extent that the crystalline particle size is on the order of nanometers, show. The application of superplasticity made the material engineers`s old dream come true that hard ceramics are arbitrarily deformed and machined like metal. Using as models materials such as silicone nitride, alumina and zirconia, this paper describes the history and deformation mechanism of ceramics superplasticity, material design aiming at superplasticization and application of ceramics superplasticity to the machining technology. Furthermore, it describes the trend and future development of international joint researches on the basic surveys on ceramics superplasticity. 25 refs., 11 figs.

  7. FIBROUS CERAMIC-CERAMIC COMPOSITE MATERIALS PROCESSING AND PROPERTIES

    OpenAIRE

    Naslain , R.

    1986-01-01

    The introduction of continuous fibers in a ceramic matrix can improve its toughness, if the fiber-matrix bonding is weak enough, due to matrix microcracking and fiber pull-out. Ceramic-ceramic composite materials are processed according to liquid or gas phase techniques. The most important are made of glass, carbide, nitride or oxide matrices reinforced with carbon, SiC or Al2O3 fibers.

  8. Effect of Taper on Stress Distribution of All Ceramic Fixed Partial Dentures: a 3D-FEA Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Gerami-Panah

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Mechanical failure of ceramic materials is controlled by brittle fracture, mostly occurred in tension. In 3-unit all-ceramic FPDs the connector area is considered to be at fracture risk because of tensile stress concentrations.Purpose: The aim of this FE analysis was to evaluate the effect of taper on stress distribution in all-ceramic FPDs.Materials and Methods: In this experimental study two 3-D finite element models of thee-unit IPS-Empress 2 FPDs replacing mandible second premolar were created by means of finite element software. The digital images were obtained from CT scan of human skull. Abutment was reduced with 12 and 22 degrees of taper. The cement layer,PDL, cancellous bone and cortical bone were also modeled. Frameworks of core material were fabricated. A static load of 100 N was applied at mid pontic area.Resolved stresses were calculated according to the Von Mises criterion and principal stresses.Results: In both models stresses were concentrated at the connectors. The maximum stresses were lower in the model with larger taper. The maximum Von Mises stress was recorded at the connector region of the premolar and the pontic. In model with larger taper the patterns of stresses were also more distributed and less concentrated.Conclusion: The highest Von Mises and principal stress were recorded at the connectors. Tensile stresses developed at the gingival connector of premolar and pontic was higher than molar. The stress level in model with 22-degree taper was lower compare to 12-degree and the stress pattern was more distributed, lowered the risk ofconcentrations.

  9. The influence of silane evaporation procedures on microtensile bond strength between a dental ceramic and a resin cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira Carolina

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To assess the influence of silane evaporation procedures on bond strength between a dental ceramic and a chemically activated resin cement. Materials and Methods: Eighteen blocks (6 mm Χ 14 mm Χ 14 mm of ceramic IPS Empress 2 were cemented (C and B to composite resin (InTen-S blocks using a chemical adhesive system (Lok. Six groups were analyzed, each with three blocks divided according to ceramic surface treatment: two control groups (no treatment, NT; 10% hydrofluoric acid plus silane Monobond-S dried at room temperature, HFS; the other four groups comprised different evaporation patterns (silane rinsed and dried at room temperature, SRT; silane rinsed in boiling water and dried as before, SBRT; silane rinsed with boiling water and heat dried at 50°C, SBH; silane dried at 50 ± 5°C, rinsed in boiling water and dried at room temperature, SHBRT. The cemented blocks were sectioned to obtain specimens for microtensile test 7 days after cementation and were stored in water for 30 days prior to testing. Fracture patterns were analyzed by optical and scanning electron microscopy. Statistics and Results: All blocks of NT debonded during sectioning. One way ANOVA tests showed higher bond strengths for HFS than for the other groups. SBRT and SBH were statistically similar, with higher bond strengths than SRT and SHBRT. Failures were 100% adhesive in SRT and SHBRT. Cohesive failures within the "adhesive zone" were detected in HFS (30%, SBRT (24% and SBH (40%. Conclusion: Silane treatment enhanced bond strength in all conditions evaluated, showing best results with HF etching.

  10. Effectiveness of Bilateral Superficial Cervical Plexus Block as Part of Postoperative Analgesia for Patients Undergoing Thyroidectomy in Empress Zewditu Memorial Hospital, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aweke, Zemedu; Sahile, Wosenyeleh A; Abiy, Sileshi; Ayalew, Nugusu; Kassa, Adugna A

    2018-01-01

    The pain after thyroid surgery is considered of moderate intensity and short duration. Most trials showed significant reduction in pain intensity and severity of pain in patients for whom bilateral superficial cervical plexus block (BSCPB) was done. To assess the postoperative analgesic effect of BSCPB for thyroid surgery. Sixty six euthyroid patients were recruited and assigned to two groups (33 patients each). Group 1 BSCPB and Group 2 standard analgesia. The unpaired Student's t -test and Mann-Whitney test were used for comparison. Statistical significance was stated at p value < 0.05. The median postoperative pain score (NRS) was 3 in the BSCPB group and 5 in the control group ( p =0.002). There was also statistically significant difference at 6th, 12th, and 24th hour showing a lower median pain score in the BSCPB group compared to the control group. The median time was (360 minutes) in the treatment group and (180 minutes) in the control group ( p =0.0006). The median tramadol consumption within 24 hours is 0 mg in the BSCPB group compared to 100 mg in the control group ( p =0.001). BSCPB done for thyroidectomy under general anesthesia decreases the postoperative pain score, total analgesia consumption, and time to first analgesia request.

  11. Effectiveness of Bilateral Superficial Cervical Plexus Block as Part of Postoperative Analgesia for Patients Undergoing Thyroidectomy in Empress Zewditu Memorial Hospital, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zemedu Aweke

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The pain after thyroid surgery is considered of moderate intensity and short duration. Most trials showed significant reduction in pain intensity and severity of pain in patients for whom bilateral superficial cervical plexus block (BSCPB was done. Objective. To assess the postoperative analgesic effect of BSCPB for thyroid surgery. Methods. Sixty six euthyroid patients were recruited and assigned to two groups (33 patients each. Group 1 BSCPB and Group 2 standard analgesia. The unpaired Student’s t-test and Mann–Whitney test were used for comparison. Statistical significance was stated at p value < 0.05. Results. The median postoperative pain score (NRS was 3 in the BSCPB group and 5 in the control group (p=0.002. There was also statistically significant difference at 6th, 12th, and 24th hour showing a lower median pain score in the BSCPB group compared to the control group. The median time was (360 minutes in the treatment group and (180 minutes in the control group (p=0.0006. The median tramadol consumption within 24 hours is 0 mg in the BSCPB group compared to 100 mg in the control group (p=0.001. Conclusion and Recommendation. BSCPB done for thyroidectomy under general anesthesia decreases the postoperative pain score, total analgesia consumption, and time to first analgesia request.

  12. Light curing through glass ceramics: effect of curing mode on micromechanical properties of dual-curing resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flury, Simon; Lussi, Adrian; Hickel, Reinhard; Ilie, Nicoleta

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate micromechanical properties of five dual-curing resin cements after different curing modes including light curing through glass ceramic materials. Vickers hardness (VH) and indentation modulus (Y HU) of Panavia F2.0, RelyX Unicem 2 Automix, SpeedCEM, BisCem, and BeautiCem SA were measured after 1 week of storage (37 °C, 100 % humidity). The resin cements were tested following self-curing or light curing with the second-generation light-emitting diode (LED) curing unit Elipar FreeLight 2 in Standard Mode (1,545 mW/cm(2)) or with the third-generation LED curing unit VALO in High Power Mode (1,869 mW/cm(2)) or in XtraPower Mode (3,505 mW/cm(2)). Light curing was performed directly or through glass ceramic discs of 1.5 or 3 mm thickness of IPS Empress CAD or IPS e.max CAD. VH and Y HU were analysed with Kruskal-Wallis tests followed by pairwise Wilcoxon rank sum tests (α = 0.05). RelyX Unicem 2 Automix resulted in the highest VH and Y HU followed by BeautiCem SA, BisCem, SpeedCEM, and finally Panavia F2.0. Self-curing of RelyX Unicem 2 Automix and SpeedCEM lowered VH and Y HU compared to light curing whereas self-curing of Panavia F2.0, BisCem, and BeautiCem SA led to similar or significantly higher VH and Y HU compared to light curing. Generally, direct light curing resulted in similar or lower VH and Y HU compared to light curing through 1.5-mm-thick ceramic discs. Light curing through 3-mm-thick discs of IPS e.max CAD generally reduced VH and Y HU for all resin cements except SpeedCEM, which was the least affected by light curing through ceramic discs. The resin cements responded heterogeneously to changes in curing mode. The applied irradiances and light curing times adequately cured the resin cements even through 1.5-mm-thick ceramic discs. When light curing resin cements through thick glass ceramic restorations, clinicians should consider to prolong the light curing times even with LED curing units providing high

  13. Experimentqal and analytical study on thermocracking of alumina ceramic ring in a mechanical seal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komiya, M.; Matsuda, K.; Kaneta, M.

    1994-04-01

    A mechanism of thermocracking, which occurs in an alumina ceramic ring of a mechanical face seal, is proposed based on experimental and analytical results. Methods for its prevention are also discussed. The experiments were conducted using an external type mechanical face seal composed of a carbon ring and three kinds of alumina ceramic rings, with distilled water as the liquid to be sealed. By using a layer of gold vacuum deposited onto the surface of the ceramic ring as a part of a DC circuit, the moment of crack initiation was identified. The thermal stresses produced in the ceramic ring by frictional heating were calculated using finite element analysis.

  14. Possibilities of special cements in ceramic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capmas, A.; Bier, T.A.

    1993-01-01

    About 25 years ago, the only way to have confinement material for high temperature applications was to prepare a ceramic by sintering or fusion at high temperature. A new technology came, with the production of Low Cement Castables. This new product was obtained by a careful choice of the granulometry of the aggregates, an optimization of the defloculation of fine particles, including the cement (Calcium Aluminate Cement) and the addition of silica fume. Silica fume brought two improvements: a) a fluidifying effect, due partly to the low sensitivity of viscosity to pH, and partly to the geometric effect of the nicely spherical particle, b) a chemical effect, brought by the reaction of silica and Calcium Aluminate Cement to give a coherent zeolithic structure, through which water could escape during the first firing. From a ceramist point of view, it is interesting to understand how this components, nearly colloidal system mixed in water can be heated up to ceramization without any noticeable change in mechanical characteristics and shrinkage. From a more practical point of view, it is also interesting to realize that some characteristics, usually attributed only to ceramics, also apply with low cement castables technology: high compressive strength, flexural strength, corrosion resistance, abrasion resistance, impact resistance. (orig.)

  15. Positron annihilation in transparent ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husband, P.; Bartošová, I.; Slugeň, V.; Selim, F. A.

    2016-01-01

    Transparent ceramics are emerging as excellent candidates for many photonic applications including laser, scintillation and illumination. However achieving perfect transparency is essential in these applications and requires high technology processing and complete understanding for the ceramic microstructure and its effect on the optical properties. Positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) is the perfect tool to study porosity and defects. It has been applied to investigate many ceramic structures; and transparent ceramics field may be greatly advanced by applying PAS. In this work positron lifetime (PLT) measurements were carried out in parallel with optical studies on yttrium aluminum garnet transparent ceramics in order to gain an understanding for their structure at the atomic level and its effect on the transparency and light scattering. The study confirmed that PAS can provide useful information on their microstructure and guide the technology of manufacturing and advancing transparent ceramics.

  16. Positron annihilation in transparent ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Husband, P; Selim, F A; Bartošová, I; Slugeň, V

    2016-01-01

    Transparent ceramics are emerging as excellent candidates for many photonic applications including laser, scintillation and illumination. However achieving perfect transparency is essential in these applications and requires high technology processing and complete understanding for the ceramic microstructure and its effect on the optical properties. Positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) is the perfect tool to study porosity and defects. It has been applied to investigate many ceramic structures; and transparent ceramics field may be greatly advanced by applying PAS. In this work positron lifetime (PLT) measurements were carried out in parallel with optical studies on yttrium aluminum garnet transparent ceramics in order to gain an understanding for their structure at the atomic level and its effect on the transparency and light scattering. The study confirmed that PAS can provide useful information on their microstructure and guide the technology of manufacturing and advancing transparent ceramics. (paper)

  17. Ceramic hot-gas filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, E.S.; Forsythe, G.D.; Domanski, D.M.; Chambers, J.A.; Rajendran, G.P.

    1999-05-11

    A ceramic hot-gas candle filter is described having a porous support of filament-wound oxide ceramic yarn at least partially surrounded by a porous refractory oxide ceramic matrix, and a membrane layer on at least one surface thereof. The membrane layer may be on the outer surface, the inner surface, or both the outer and inner surface of the porous support. The membrane layer may be formed of an ordered arrangement of circularly wound, continuous filament oxide ceramic yarn, a ceramic filler material which is less permeable than the filament-wound support structure, or some combination of continuous filament and filler material. A particularly effective membrane layer features circularly wound filament with gaps intentionally placed between adjacent windings, and a filler material of ceramic particulates uniformly distributed throughout the gap region. The filter can withstand thermal cycling during back pulse cleaning and is resistant to chemical degradation at high temperatures.

  18. Ceramic hot-gas filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Elizabeth Sokolinski; Forsythe, George Daniel; Domanski, Daniel Matthew; Chambers, Jeffrey Allen; Rajendran, Govindasamy Paramasivam

    1999-01-01

    A ceramic hot-gas candle filter having a porous support of filament-wound oxide ceramic yarn at least partially surrounded by a porous refractory oxide ceramic matrix, and a membrane layer on at least one surface thereof. The membrane layer may be on the outer surface, the inner surface, or both the outer and inner surface of the porous support. The membrane layer may be formed of an ordered arrangement of circularly wound, continuous filament oxide ceramic yarn, a ceramic filler material which is less permeable than the filament-wound support structure, or some combination of continuous filament and filler material. A particularly effective membrane layer features circularly wound filament with gaps intentionally placed between adjacent windings, and a filler material of ceramic particulates uniformly distributed throughout the gap region. The filter can withstand thermal cycling during backpulse cleaning and is resistant to chemical degradation at high temperatures.

  19. Ceramics for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinard, F.W. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Ceramics are required for a variety of uses in both near-term fusion devices and in commercial powerplants. These materials must retain adequate structural and electrical properties under conditions of neutron, particle and ionizing irradiation; thermal and applied stresses; and physical and chemical sputtering. Ceramics such as Al 2 O 3 , MgAl 2 O 4 , BeO, Si 3 N 4 and SiC are currently under study for fusion applications, and results to date show widely-varying responses to the fusion environment. Materials can be identified today that will meet initial operating requirements, but improvements in physical properties are needed to achieve satisfactory lifetimes for critical applications. (author)

  20. Ceramics for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinard, F.W. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Ceramics are required for a variety of uses in both near-term fusion devices and in commercial powerplants. These materials must retain adequate structural and electrical properties under conditions of neutron, particle, and ionizing irradiation; thermal and applied stresses; and physical and chemical sputtering. Ceramics such as Al 2 O 3 , MgAl 2 O 4 , BeO, Si 3 N 4 and SiC are currently under study for fusion applications, and results to date show widely-varying response to the fusion environment. Materials can be identified today which will meet initial operating requirements, but improvements in physical properties are needed to achieve satisfactory lifetimes for critical applications

  1. Ceramic Composite Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruoff, Rodney S. (Inventor); Stankovich, Sasha (Inventor); Dikin, Dmitriy A. (Inventor); Nguyen, SonBinh T. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A ceramic composite thin film or layer includes individual graphene oxide and/or electrically conductive graphene sheets dispersed in a ceramic (e.g. silica) matrix. The thin film or layer can be electrically conductive film or layer depending the amount of graphene sheets present. The composite films or layers are transparent, chemically inert and compatible with both glass and hydrophilic SiOx/silicon substrates. The composite film or layer can be produced by making a suspension of graphene oxide sheet fragments, introducing a silica-precursor or silica to the suspension to form a sol, depositing the sol on a substrate as thin film or layer, at least partially reducing the graphene oxide sheets to conductive graphene sheets, and thermally consolidating the thin film or layer to form a silica matrix in which the graphene oxide and/or graphene sheets are dispersed.

  2. Electrical resistivity measurements in superconducting ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muccillo, R.; Bressiani, A.H.A.; Muccillo, E.N.S.; Bressiani, J.C.

    1988-01-01

    Electrical resistivity measurements have been done in (Y, Ba, Cu, O) - and (Y, A1, Ba, Cu, O) - based superconducting ceramics. The sintered specimens were prepared by applying gold electrodes and winding on the non-metalized part with a copper strip to be immersed in liquid nitrogen for cooling. The resistivity measurements have been done by the four-probe method. A copper-constantan or chromel-alumel thermocouple inserted between the specimen and the copper cold finger has been used for the determination of the critical temperature T c . Details of the experimental set-up and resistivity versus temperature plots in the LNT-RT range for the superconducting ceramics are the major contributions of this communication. (author) [pt

  3. Electrical resistivity measurements in superconducting ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muccillo, R.; Bressiani, A.H.A.; Muccillo, E.N.S.; Bressian, J.C.

    1988-01-01

    Electrical resistivity measurements have been done in (Y,Ba,Cu,O)- and (Y,Al,Ba,Cu,O)-based superconducting ceramics. The sintered specimens were prepared by applying gold electrodes and winding on the non-metalized part with a copper strip to be immersed in liquid nitrogen for cooling. The resistivity measurements have been done by the four-probe method. A copper constantan or chromel-alumel thermocouple inserted between the specimen and the copper cold finger has been used for the determination of the critical temperature T c . Details of the experimental set-up and resistivity versus temperature plots in the LNT-RT range for the superconducting ceramics are the major contributions of this communication. (author) [pt

  4. Advanced ceramic in structural engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Alonso Rodea, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    The work deals with "Advanced Ceramics in Structural Engineering”. Throughout this work we present the different types of ceramic that are currently in wider use, and the main research lines that are being followed. Ceramics have very interesting properties, both mechanical and electrical and refractory where we can find some of the most interesting points of inquiry. Through this work we try tounderstand this complex world, analyzing both general and specific properties of ...

  5. Ceramic superconductors II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, M.F.

    1988-01-01

    This volume compiles papers on ceramic superconductors. Topics include: structural patterns in High-Tc superconductors, phase equilibria of barium oxide superconductors, localized electrons in tetragonal YBa/sub 2/Cu/sub 3/O/sub 7-δ/, lattice and defect structure and properties of rare earth/alkaline earth-copper-oxide superconductors, alternate candidates for High-Tc superconductors, perovskite-structure superconductors; superconductive thin film fabrication, and superconductor/polymer composites

  6. Piezoelectric Ceramics Characterization

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jordan, T

    2001-01-01

    ... the behavior of a piezoelectric material. We have attempted to cover the most common measurement methods as well as introduce parameters of interest. Excellent sources for more in-depth coverage of specific topics can be found in the bibliography. In most cases, we refer to lead zirconate titanate (PZT) to illustrate some of the concepts since it is the most widely used and studied piezoelectric ceramic to date.

  7. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2001-01-01

    Conversion of natural gas to liquid fuels and chemicals is a major goal for the Nation as it enters the 21st Century. Technically robust and economically viable processes are needed to capture the value of the vast reserves of natural gas on Alaska's North Slope, and wean the Nation from dependence on foreign petroleum sources. Technologies that are emerging to fulfill this need are all based syngas as an intermediate. Syngas (a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide) is a fundamental building block from which chemicals and fuels can be derived. Lower cost syngas translates directly into more cost-competitive fuels and chemicals. The currently practiced commercial technology for making syngas is either steam methane reforming (SMR) or a two-step process involving cryogenic oxygen separation followed by natural gas partial oxidation (POX). These high-energy, capital-intensive processes do not always produce syngas at a cost that makes its derivatives competitive with current petroleum-based fuels and chemicals. This project has the following 6 main tasks: Task 1--Design, fabricate and evaluate ceramic to metal seals based on graded ceramic powder/metal braze joints. Task 2--Evaluate the effect of defect configuration on ceramic membrane conductivity and long term chemical and structural stability. Task 3--Determine materials mechanical properties under conditions of high temperatures and reactive atmospheres. Task 4--Evaluate phase stability and thermal expansion of candidate perovskite membranes and develop techniques to support these materials on porous metal structures. Task 5--Assess the microstructure of membrane materials to evaluate the effects of vacancy-impurity association, defect clusters, and vacancy-dopant association on the membrane performance and stability. Task 6--Measure kinetics of oxygen uptake and transport in ceramic membrane materials under commercially relevant conditions using isotope labeling techniques

  8. Ion conductivity of nasicon ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoj, J.W.; Engell, J.

    1989-01-01

    The Nasicon ss ,Na 1 + X Zr 2 Si X P 3 - X O 12 o , X , 3, includes some of the best solid state sodium conductors known today. Compositions in the interval 1.6 , X , 2.6 show conductivities comparable to the best β double-prime-alumina ceramics. It is well known that the ion conductivity of β-alumina is strongly dependent on the texture of the ceramic. Here a similar behavior is reported for Nasicon ceramics. Ceramics of the bulk composition Na 2.94 Zr 1.49 Si 2.20 P 0.80 O 10.85 were prepared by a gel method. The final ceramics consist of Nasicon crystals with x = 2.14 and a glass phase. The grain size and texture of the ceramics were controlled by varying the thermal history of the gel based raw materials and the sintering conditions. The room temperature resistivity of the resulting ceramics varies from 3.65*10 3 ohm cm to 1.23*10 3 ohm cm. Using the temperature comparison method and estimates of the area of grain boundaries in the ceramics, the resistivity of the Nasicon phase is estimated to be 225 ohm cm at 25 degrees C. B 2 O 3 - or Al 2 O 3 -doping of the glass bearing Nasicon ceramic lower the room temperature resistivity by a factor 2 to 5. The dopants do not substitute into the Nasicon phase in substantial amounts

  9. Filtração de aerossóis em altas temperaturas utilizando filtros cerâmicos de dupla camada: influência do diâmetro de partícula na eficiência de coleta Filtration of aerosols at high temperatures using a double layer ceramic filter: influence of the particle diameter in the collection efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. L de Freitas

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Neste trabalho foram utilizados filtros cerâmicos para filtração de aerossóis, constituídos por dupla camada, onde a primeira camada é formada por um suporte celular de elevada porosidade com diâmetro de poro controlado e a segunda formada por uma película filtrante. A camada suporte foi obtida pela técnica de replicação cerâmica de espuma poliuretânica, por meio da impregnação de uma suspensão aquosa de Al2O3. Foram utilizados suportes de 45 e 75 poros/polegada. A membrana filtrante (Al2O3 e argila foi a mesma para ambos os suportes, sendo composta por uma massa granular cerâmica de baixa porosidade. Os experimentos de filtração foram realizados em temperaturas de 25 a 700 ºC onde mediu-se a capacidade dos filtros de limpar um aerossol de partículas finas polidispersas (diâmetro mediano de 4,6 µm e calculou-se a eficiência de coleta para diâmetros de partícula entre 0,4 e 8,5 µm. Os resultados mostraram que a eficiência diminuiu com o aumento da temperatura e aumentou com o diâmetro da partícula.In this work, ceramic filters were used for aerosol filtration. The filters were constituted by two layers, where the first layer was formed by of a highly porous ceramic support with controlled pore size and the second layer constituted by a fine membrane. The ceramic support was obtained from polymeric foams utilizing a technique of alumina impregnation. The supports had 45 and 75 pores per inch (ppi. The membrane (a mixture of alumina and clay was the same for the two supports, with much smaller pore sizes. The filtration experiments were accomplished at temperatures varying from 25 to 700 ºC, where the ability of the filters for cleaning an aerosol constituted by fine particles (median diameter of 4.6 µm was measured. The collection efficiency was calculated for particle diameters between 0.4 and 8.5 µm. The results showed that the collection efficiency decreased with the increase of the temperature and increased

  10. Thermal Conductivity Measurement and Analysis of Fully Ceramic Microencapsulated fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H. G.; Kim, D. J.; Park, J. Y.; Kim, W. J.; Lee, S. J.

    2015-01-01

    FCM nuclear fuel is composed of tristructural isotropic(TRISO) fuel particle and SiC ceramic matrix. SiC ceramic matrix play an essential part in protecting fission product. In the FCM fuel concept, fission product is doubly protected by TRISO coating layer and SiC ceramic matrix in comparison with the current commercial UO2 fuel system of LWR. In addition to a safety enhancement of FCM fuel, thermal conductivity of SiC ceramic matrix is better than that of UO2 fuel. Because the centerline temperature of FCM fuel is lower than that of the current UO2 fuel due to the difference of thermal conductivity of fuel, an operational release of fission products from the fuel can be reduced. SiC ceramic has attracted for nuclear fuel application due to its high thermal conductivity properties with good radiation tolerant properties, a low neutron absorption cross-section and a high corrosion resistance. Thermal conductivity of ceramic matrix composite depends on the thermal conductivity of each component and the morphology of reinforcement materials such as fibers and particles. There are many results about thermal conductivity of fiber-reinforced composite like as SiCf/SiC composite. Thermal conductivity of SiC ceramics and FCM pellets with the volume fraction of TRISO particles were measured and analyzed by analytical models. Polycrystalline SiC ceramics and FCM pellets with TRISO particles were fabricated by hot press sintering with sintering additives. Thermal conductivity of the FCM pellets with TRISO particles of 0 vol.%, 10 vol.%, 20 vol.%, 30 vol.% and 40 vol.% show 68.4, 52.3, 46.8, 43.0 and 34.5 W/mK, respectively. As the volume fraction of TRISO particles increased, the measured thermal conductivity values closely followed the prediction of Maxwell's equation

  11. Deodorant ceramic catalyst. Dasshu ceramics shokubai

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arai, K. (Kobe Steel Ltd., Kobe (Japan)); Naka, R. (Hitachi Ltd., Tokyo (Japan))

    1993-07-01

    Concerning debromination to be used for the filter of deodorizing device, those of long life and high deodorizing performance are demanded a great deal. As one of this kind of debromination, a deodorant ceramic catalyst (mangantid) has been developed and put for practical use as deodorant for refrigerator. In this article, the information and knowledge obtained by the development of mangantid, the features as well as several properties of the product are stated. The deodorizing methods currently used practically are roughly divided into 6 kinds such as the adsorption method, the direct combustion method, the catalytic method and the oxidation method, but each of them has its own merit and demerit, hence it is necessary to select the method in accordance with the kind of odor and its generating condition. Mangantid is a compound body of high deodorant material in a honeycomb configuration, and has the features that in comparison with the existing deordorants, its pressure loss is smaller, its deodorizing rate is bigger, and acidic, neutral and basic gaseous components can be removed in a well-balanced manner. Deodorization with mangantid has the mechanism to let the odorous component contact and react with the catalyst and change the component to the non-odorous component in the temperature range from room temperature to the low temperature region. 5 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Flowering time response of Nasturtium (Tropaeolum majus L. cultivar ‘Empress of India’ to photoperiod, light integral and temperature using photo-thermal model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Munir

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Experiments were carried out to study flowering response of Nasturtium under four distinct controlled photoperiods (8, 11, 14, and 17 h.d-1, shading materials (0, 20, 30 and 40% and five temperature regimes (10, 15, 20, 25, and 30°C. A curvilinear facultative response was observed in all experiments. Cultivar ‘Empress of India’ took minimum time to flower when grown under a 17 hr-photoperiod (57 days however, it was significantly (P<0.05 increased when photoperiod decreased to 8h (83 days. Similarly, days taken to flowering were increased significantly (P<0.05 when plants were grown under low light integrals (40%, 30%, and 20% shade. Flowering was delayed up to 17 days when plants were grown under intense shade (40%. Temperature also had a significant effect on the developmental phases of flower as low temperature (10°C decreased flowering up to 46 days as compared to plants grown at 25°C. However, the quality of flowering plant (including plant height, spread and leaf number, data not shown was decreased at higher temperatures (25 and 30°C. Best quality plants were obtained when grown between 15 to 20°C. These findings revealed a prospect of plant scheduling of the flowering time of Nasturtium grown under short day photoperiod to extend their marketing period. A steady supply of this flowering annual can be maintained in the market by grown them under different shades (low light integrals. Similarly, an optimum growing temperature between 15-20°C would also be a beneficial effect on the quality of plant in the market.

  13. Micromolding for ceramic microneedle arrays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Nieuwkasteele-Bystrova, Svetlana Nikolajevna; Lüttge, Regina

    2011-01-01

    The fabrication process of ceramic microneedle arrays (MNAs) is presented. This includes the manufacturing of an SU-8/Si-master, its double replication resulting in a PDMS mold for production by micromolding and ceramic sintering. The robustness of the replicated structures was tested by means of

  14. Ceramics in nuclear waste management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chikalla, T D; Mendel, J E [eds.

    1979-05-01

    Seventy-three papers are included, arranged under the following section headings: national programs for the disposal of radioactive wastes, waste from stability and characterization, glass processing, ceramic processing, ceramic and glass processing, leaching of waste materials, properties of nuclear waste forms, and immobilization of special radioactive wastes. Separate abstracts were prepared for all the papers. (DLC)

  15. Science and Technology of Ceramics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 4; Issue 12. Science and Technology of Ceramics - Functional Ceramics. Sheela K Ramasesha. Series Article Volume 4 Issue 12 December 1999 pp 21-30. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  16. Science and Technology of Ceramics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 4; Issue 8. Science and Technology of Ceramics - Traditional Ceramics. Sheela K Ramasesha. Series Article Volume 4 Issue 8 August 1999 pp 16-24. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  17. Zirconia toughened ceramics for heat engine applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossi, G.A.; Blum, J.B.; Manwiller, K.E.; Knapp, C.E.

    1986-01-01

    Three classes of zirconia toughened ceramics (ZTC) were studied, i.e. Mg-PSZ (MgO-partially stabilized zirconia), Y-TZP (Y/sub 2/O/sub 3/-tetragonal zirconia polycrystals) and ZTA (zirconia toughened alumina). The main objective was to improve the high temperature strength and toughness, which are not satisfactory in the ''state of the art'' ZTC materials. Powders prepared by melting/rapid solidification and by chemical routes were used. The green parts were made by both dry and wet shape forming methods. Fine grained Mg-PSZ ceramics with unique microstructures were produced using the rapidly solidified powders. The Y-TZP materials were improved mainly through microstructure control and by addition of alpha alumina as a dispersed phase. Preliminary results on ZTA ceramics made with the rapidly solidified powders were also obtained. It is concluded that the Al/sub 2/O/sub 3//Y-TZP composites offer a good chance of meeting the program objectives

  18. Low thermal expansion glass ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    1995-01-01

    This book is one of a series reporting on international research and development activities conducted by the Schott group of companies With the series, Schott aims to provide an overview of its activities for scientists, engineers, and managers from all branches of industry worldwide where glasses and glass ceramics are of interest Each volume begins with a chapter providing a general idea of the current problems, results, and trends relating to the subjects treated This volume describes the fundamental principles, the manufacturing process, and applications of low thermal expansion glass ceramics The composition, structure, and stability of polycrystalline materials having a low thermal expansion are described, and it is shown how low thermal expansion glass ceramics can be manufactured from appropriately chosen glass compositions Examples illustrate the formation of this type of glass ceramic by utilizing normal production processes together with controlled crystallization Thus glass ceramics with thermal c...

  19. Ceramic membrane development in NGK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araki, Kiyoshi; Sakai, Hitoshi, E-mail: kinsakai@ngk.co.jp [Corporate R and D, NGK Insulators, Ltd., Nagoya 467-8530 (Japan)

    2011-05-15

    NGK Insulators, Ltd. was established in 1919 to manufacture the electric porcelain insulators for power transmission lines. Since then, our business has grown as one of the world-leading ceramics manufacturing companies and currently supply with the various environmentally-benign ceramic products to worldwide. In this paper, ceramic membrane development in NGK is described in detail. We have been selling ceramic microfiltration (MF) membranes and ultra-filtration (UF) membranes for many years to be used for solid/liquid separation in various fields such as pharmaceutical, chemical, food and semiconductor industries. In Corporate R and D, new ceramic membranes with sub-nanometer sized pores, which are fabricated on top of the membrane filters as support, are under development for gas and liquid/liquid separation processes.

  20. Ceramic membrane development in NGK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Kiyoshi; Sakai, Hitoshi

    2011-05-01

    NGK Insulators, Ltd. was established in 1919 to manufacture the electric porcelain insulators for power transmission lines. Since then, our business has grown as one of the world-leading ceramics manufacturing companies and currently supply with the various environmentally-benign ceramic products to worldwide. In this paper, ceramic membrane development in NGK is described in detail. We have been selling ceramic microfiltration (MF) membranes and ultra-filtration (UF) membranes for many years to be used for solid/liquid separation in various fields such as pharmaceutical, chemical, food and semiconductor industries. In Corporate R&D, new ceramic membranes with sub-nanometer sized pores, which are fabricated on top of the membrane filters as support, are under development for gas and liquid/liquid separation processes.

  1. Investigations on the performance of ultrasonic drilling process with special reference to precision machining of advanced ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adithan, M.; Laroiya, S.C.

    1997-01-01

    Advanced ceramics are assuming an important role in modern industrial technology. The applications and advantages of using advanced ceramics are many. There are several reasons why we should go in for machining of advanced ceramics after their compacting and sintering. These are discussed in this paper. However, precision machining of advanced ceramics must be economical. Critical technological issues to be addressed in cost effective machining of ceramics include design of machine tools, tooling arrangements, improved yield and precision, relationship of part dimensions and finish specifications to functional performance, and on-line inspection. Considering the above ultrasonic drilling is an important process used for the precision machining of advanced ceramics. Extensive studies on tool wear occurring in the ultrasonic machining of advanced ceramics have been carried out. In addition, production accuracy of holes drilled, surface finish obtained and surface integrity aspects in the machining of advanced ceramics have also been investigated. Some specific findings with reference to surface integrity are: a) there were no cracks or micro-cracks developed during or after ultrasonic machining of advanced ceramics, b) while machining Hexoloy alpha silicon carbide a recast layer is formed as a result of ultrasonic machining. This is attributed to the viscous heating resulting from high energy impacts during ultrasonic machining. While machining all other types of ceramics no such formation of recast layer was observed, and , c) there is no change in the microstructure of the advanced ceramics as a result of ultrasonic machining

  2. Method of forming a ceramic matrix composite and a ceramic matrix component

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Diego, Peter; Zhang, James

    2017-05-30

    A method of forming a ceramic matrix composite component includes providing a formed ceramic member having a cavity, filling at least a portion of the cavity with a ceramic foam. The ceramic foam is deposited on a barrier layer covering at least one internal passage of the cavity. The method includes processing the formed ceramic member and ceramic foam to obtain a ceramic matrix composite component. Also provided is a method of forming a ceramic matrix composite blade and a ceramic matrix composite component.

  3. Zirconia based ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bressiani, J.C.; Bressiani, A.H.A.

    1989-05-01

    Within the new generation of ceramic materials, zirconia continues to attract ever increasing attention of scients, technologists and users by virtue of its singular combination of properties and being able to perform thermo-mechanical, electroeletronic, chemico-biological functions. Nevertheless, in order to obtain these properties, a through understanding of the phase transformation mechanisms and microstructural changes is necessary. This paper discusses the main parameters that require control during fabrication of these materials to obtain desired properties for a specific application. (author) [pt

  4. Directionally Solidified Multifunctional Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-12-01

    Vidrio , Vol. 44 [5] (2005) pp 347 - 352. 9. F. W. Dynys and A. Sayir, "Self Assemble Silicide Architectures by Directional Solidification," Journal...Sociedad Espanola de Ceramica y Vidrio , Vol. 43 [4] (2004) pp 753 - 758. 21. A. Sayir and F. S. Lowery, "Combustion-Resistance of Silicon-Based Ceramics...Espafiola de Cerdmica y Vidrio , Vol. 43 [3], 2004. ISSN-0366-3175-BSCVB9. 14 37. P. Berger, A. Sayir and M. H. Berger, "Nuclear Microprobe using Elastic

  5. Formulation and synthesis by melting process of titanate enriched glass-ceramics and ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advocat, T.; Fillet, C.; Lacombe, J.; Bonnetier, A.; McGlinn, P.

    1999-01-01

    The main objective of this work is to provide containment for the separated radionuclides in stable oxide phases with proven resistance to leaching and irradiation damage and in consequence to obtain a glass ceramic or a ceramic material using a vitrification process. Sphene glass ceramic, zirconolite glass ceramic and zirconolite enriched ceramic have been fabricated and characterized by XRD, SEM/EDX and DTA

  6. Nano-ceramics and its molding technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jian; Xu Yunshu

    2007-01-01

    Nano-ceramics and its related knowledge were introduced. Fabrication of nano-ceramic powder, as well as the molding and sintering technologies of nano-ceramics were reviewed. Features of the present molding technologies were analyzed. The applications of nano-ceramics were prospected. (authors)

  7. Preparation of 147Pm ceramic source core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mielcarski, M.

    1989-01-01

    Preparation of ceramic pellets containing fixed promethium-147 is described. Incorporation rate of 147 Pm into the ceramic material was determined. The leachability and vaporization of promethium from the obtained ceramics was investigated. The ceramic pellets prepared by the described procedure, mounted in special holders, can be applied as point sources in beta backscatter thickness gauges. (author)

  8. Fibrous monolithic ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovar, D.; King, B.H.; Trice, R.W.; Halloran, J.W.

    1997-01-01

    Fibrous monolithic ceramics are an example of a laminate in which a controlled, three-dimensional structure has been introduced on a submillimeter scale. This unique structure allows this all-ceramic material to fail in a nonbrittle manner. Materials have been fabricated and tested with a variety of architectures. The influence on mechanical properties at room temperature and at high temperature of the structure of the constituent phases and the architecture in which they are arranged are discussed. The elastic properties of these materials can be effectively predicted using existing models. These models also can be extended to predict the strength of fibrous monoliths with an arbitrary orientation and architecture. However, the mechanisms that govern the energy absorption capacity of fibrous monoliths are unique, and experimental results do not follow existing models. Energy dissipation occurs through two dominant mechanisms--delamination of the weak interphases and then frictional sliding after cracking occurs. The properties of the constituent phases that maximize energy absorption are discussed. In this article, the authors examine the structure of Si 3 N 4 -BN fibrous monoliths from the submillimeter scale of the crack-deflecting cell-cell boundary features to the nanometer scale of the BN cell boundaries

  9. Ceramic fiber reinforced filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinton, David P.; McLaughlin, Jerry C.; Lowden, Richard A.

    1991-01-01

    A filter for removing particulate matter from high temperature flowing fluids, and in particular gases, that is reinforced with ceramic fibers. The filter has a ceramic base fiber material in the form of a fabric, felt, paper of the like, with the refractory fibers thereof coated with a thin layer of a protective and bonding refractory applied by chemical vapor deposition techniques. This coating causes each fiber to be physically joined to adjoining fibers so as to prevent movement of the fibers during use and to increase the strength and toughness of the composite filter. Further, the coating can be selected to minimize any reactions between the constituents of the fluids and the fibers. A description is given of the formation of a composite filter using a felt preform of commercial silicon carbide fibers together with the coating of these fibers with pure silicon carbide. Filter efficiency approaching 100% has been demonstrated with these filters. The fiber base material is alternately made from aluminosilicate fibers, zirconia fibers and alumina fibers. Coating with Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 is also described. Advanced configurations for the composite filter are suggested.

  10. Strength and corrosion behavior of SiC - based ceramics in hot coal combustion environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breder, K.; Parten, R.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-08-01

    As part of an effort to evaluate the use of advanced ceramics in a new generation of coal-fired power plants, four SiC-based ceramics have been exposed to corrosive coal slag in a laboratory furnace and two pilot scale combustors. Initial results indicate that the laboratory experiments are valuable additions to more expensive pilot plant experiments. The results show increased corrosive attack with increased temperature, and that only slight changes in temperature may significantly alter the degree of strength degradation due to corrosive attack. The present results are part of a larger experimental matrix evaluating the behavior of ceramics in the coal combustion environment.

  11. Mechanical properties of resin-ceramic CAD/CAM restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awada, Abdallah; Nathanson, Dan

    2015-10-01

    The recent development of polymer-based computer-aided design and computer-aided manufactured (CAD/CAM) milling blocks and the limited availability of independent studies on these materials make it pertinent to evaluate their properties and identify potential strengths and limitations. The purpose of this in vitro study was to determine and compare mechanical properties (flexural strength, flexural modulus, modulus of resilience) and compare the margin edge quality of recently introduced polymer-based CAD/CAM materials with some of their commercially available composite resin and ceramic counterparts. The materials studied were Lava Ultimate Restorative (LVU; 3M ESPE), Enamic (ENA; Vita Zahnfabrik), Cerasmart (CES; GC Dental Products), IPS Empress CAD (EMP; Ivoclar Vivadent AG), Vitablocs Mark II (VM2; Vita Zahnfabrik), and Paradigm MZ100 Block (MZ1; 3M ESPE). Polished 4×1×13.5 mm bars (n=25) were prepared from standard-sized milling blocks of each tested material. The bars were subjected to a 3-point flexural test on a 10-mm span with a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. In addition, 42 conventional monolithic crowns (7 per material) were milled. Margin edge quality was observed by means of macrophotography and optical microscopy, providing a qualitative visual assessment and a measurement of existing roughness. The results were analyzed by ANOVA followed by the Tukey HSD test (α=.05). The mean flexural strength of the tested materials ranged from 105 ±9 MPa (VM2) to 219 ±20 MPa (CES). The mean flexural modulus ranged from 8 ±0.25 GPa (CES) to 32 ±1.9 GPa (EMP). The mean modulus of resilience ranged from 0.21 ±0.02 MPa (VM2) to 3.07 ±0.45 MPa (CES). The qualitative assessment of margin edge roughness revealed visible differences among the tested materials, with mean roughness measurements ranging from 60 ±16 μm (CES) to 190 ±15 μm (EMP). The material factor had a significant effect on the mean flexural strength (Pmaterials tested in this study exhibited

  12. Composite ceramic blade for a gas turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossmann, A; Hoffmueller, W; Krueger, W

    1980-06-26

    The gas turbine blade consists of a supporting metal core which has at its lower end a modelled root and a profile blade made of ceramics enclosing it at some distance. The invention deals with a reliable connection between these two parts of the rotor blade: from the top end of the blade core a head protrudes supporting the thin-walled profile blade from below with a projection each pointing into the interior. The design of the projections and supporting surfaces is described and illustrated by drawings.

  13. Ceramic drug-delivery devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasserre, A; Bajpai, P K

    1998-01-01

    A variety of ceramics and delivery systems have been used to deliver chemicals, biologicals, and drugs at various rates for desired periods of time from different sites of implantation. In vitro and in vivo studies have shown that ceramics can successfully be used as drug-delivery devices. Matrices, inserts, reservoirs, cements, and particles have been used to deliver a large variety of therapeutic agents such as antibiotics, anticancer drugs, anticoagulants, analgesics, growth factors, hormones, steroids, and vaccines. In this article, the advantages and disadvantages of conventional drug-delivery systems and the different approaches used to deliver chemical and biological agents by means of ceramic systems will be reviewed.

  14. High flow ceramic pot filters

    OpenAIRE

    van Halem, D.; van der Laan, H.; Soppe, A. I.A.; Heijman, S.G.J.

    2017-01-01

    Ceramic pot filters are considered safe, robust and appropriate technologies, but there is a general consensus that water revenues are limited due to clogging of the ceramic element. The objective of this study was to investigate the potential of high flow ceramic pot filters to produce more water without sacrificing their microbial removal efficacy. High flow pot filters, produced by increasing the rice husk content, had a higher initial flow rate (6–19 L h−1), but initial LRVs for E. coli o...

  15. Hardness of ion implanted ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliver, W.C.; McHargue, C.J.; Farlow, G.C.; White, C.W.

    1985-01-01

    It has been established that the wear behavior of ceramic materials can be modified through ion implantation. Studies have been done to characterize the effect of implantation on the structure and composition of ceramic surfaces. To understand how these changes affect the wear properties of the ceramic, other mechanical properties must be measured. To accomplish this, a commercially available ultra low load hardness tester has been used to characterize Al 2 O 3 with different implanted species and doses. The hardness of the base material is compared with the highly damaged crystalline state as well as the amorphous material

  16. Porous ceramics out of oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakunov, V.S.; Balkevich, V.L.; Vlasov, A.S.; Guzman, I.Ya.; Lukin, E.S.; Poluboyarinov, D.N.; Poliskij, R.Ya.

    1977-01-01

    A review is made of manufacturing procedures and properties of oxide ceramics intended for high-temperature thermal insulation and thermal protection applications. Presented are structural characteristics of porous oxide refractories and their properties. Strength and thermal conductivity was shown to depend upon porosity. Described is a procedure for manufacturing porous ceramic materials from aluminium oxide, zirconium dioxide, magnesium oxide, beryllium oxide. The thermal resistance of porous ceramics from BeO is considerably greater than that of other high-refractoriness oxides. Listed are areas of application for porous materials based on oxides

  17. Chairside CAD/CAM materials. Part 3: Cyclic fatigue parameters and lifetime predictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendler, Michael; Belli, Renan; Valladares, Diana; Petschelt, Anselm; Lohbauer, Ulrich

    2018-06-01

    Chemical and mechanical degradation play a key role on the lifetime of dental restorative materials. Therefore, prediction of their long-term performance in the oral environment should base on fatigue, rather than inert strength data, as commonly observed in the dental material's field. The objective of the present study was to provide mechanistic fatigue parameters of current dental CAD/CAM materials under cyclic biaxial flexure and assess their suitability in predicting clinical fracture behaviors. Eight CAD/CAM materials, including polycrystalline zirconia (IPS e.max ZirCAD), reinforced glasses (Vitablocs Mark II, IPS Empress CAD), glass-ceramics (IPS e.max CAD, Suprinity PC, Celtra Duo), as well as hybrid materials (Enamic, Lava Ultimate) were evaluated. Rectangular plates (12×12×1.2mm 3 ) with highly polished surfaces were prepared and tested in biaxial cyclic fatigue in water until fracture using the Ball-on-Three-Balls (B3B) test. Cyclic fatigue parameters n and A* were obtained from the lifetime data for each material and further used to build SPT diagrams. The latter were used to compare in-vitro with in-vivo fracture distributions for IPS e.max CAD and IPS Empress CAD. Susceptibility to subcritical crack growth under cyclic loading was observed for all materials, being more severe (n≤20) in lithium-based glass-ceramics and Vitablocs Mark II. Strength degradations of 40% up to 60% were predicted after only 1 year of service. Threshold stress intensity factors (K th ) representing the onset of subcritical crack growth (SCG), were estimated to lie in the range of 0.37-0.44 of K Ic for the lithium-based glass-ceramics and Vitablocs Mark II and between 0.51-0.59 of K Ic for the other materials. Failure distributions associated with mechanistic estimations of strength degradation in-vitro showed to be useful in interpreting failure behavior in-vivo. The parameter K th stood out as a better predictor of clinical performance in detriment to the SCG n

  18. Mechanical energy dissipation in natural ceramic composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, George

    2017-12-01

    Ceramics and glasses, in their monolithic forms, typically exhibit low fracture toughness values, but rigid natural marine ceramic and glass composites have shown remarkable resistance to mechanical failure. This has been observed in load-extension behavior by recognizing that the total area under the curve, notably the part beyond the yield point, often conveys substantial capacity to carry mechanical load. The mechanisms underlying the latter observations are proposed as defining factors for toughness that provide resistance to failure, or capability to dissipate energy, rather than fracture toughness. Such behavior is exhibited in the spicules of glass sponges and in mollusk shells. There are a number of similarities in the manner in which energy dissipation takes place in both sponges and mollusks. It was observed that crack diversion, a new form of crack bridging, creation of new surface area, and other important energy-dissipating mechanisms occur and aid in "toughening". Crack tolerance, key to energy dissipation in these natural composite materials, is assisted by promoting energy distribution over large volumes of loaded specimens by minor components of organic constituents that also serve important roles as adhesives. Viscoelastic deformation was a notable characteristic of the organic component. Some of these energy-dissipating modes and characteristics were found to be quite different from the toughening mechanisms that are utilized for more conventional structural composites. Complementary to those mechanisms found in rigid natural ceramic/organic composites, layered architectures and very thin organic layers played major roles in energy dissipation in these structures. It has been demonstrated in rigid natural marine composites that not only architecture, but also the mechanical behavior of the individual constituents, the nature of the interfaces, and interfacial bonding play important roles in energy dissipation. Additionally, the controlling

  19. Ageing of low-firing prehistoric ceramics in hydrothermal conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Zemenová

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Remains of a prehistoric ceramic object, a moon-shaped idol from the Bronze Age found in archaeological site Zdiby near Prague in the Czech Republic, were studied especially in terms of the firing temperature. Archaeological ceramics was usually fired at temperatures below 1000 °C. It contained unstable non-crystalline products, residua after calcination of clay components of a ceramic material. These products as metakaolinite can undergo a reverse rehydration to a structure close to kaolinite. The aim of this work was to prove whether the identified kaolinite in archaeological ceramics is a product of rehydration. The model compound containing high amount of kaolinite was prepared in order to follow its changes during calcination and hydrothermal treatment. Archaeological ceramics and the model compound were treated by hydrothermal ageing and studied by XRF, XRD and IR analyses. It was proved that the presence of kaolinite in the border-parts of the archaeological object was not a product of rehydration, but that it originated from the raw materials.

  20. Silicone Resin Applications for Ceramic Precursors and Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaki Narisawa

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews the applications of silicone resins as ceramic precursors. The historical background of silicone synthesis chemistry is introduced to explain the production costs and supply availability of various silicones. Thermal degradation processes of silicones are classified in terms of the main chain structure and cyclic oligomer expulsion process, which determine the resulting ceramic yield and the chemical composition. The high temperature decomposition of Si-O-C beyond 1,400 °C in an inert atmosphere and formation of a protective silica layer on material surfaces beyond 1,200 °C in an oxidative atmosphere are discussed from the viewpoints of the wide chemical composition of the Si-O-C materials. Applications of the resins for binding agents, as starting materials for porous ceramics, matrix sources with impregnation, fiber spinning and ceramic adhesions are introduced. The recent development of the process of filler or cross-linking agent additions to resin compounds is also introduced. Such resin compounds are useful for obtaining thick coatings, MEMS parts and bulk ceramics, which are difficult to obtain by pyrolysis of simple organometallic precursors without additives.

  1. SRNL CRP progress report [Development of Melt Processed Ceramics for Nuclear Waste Immobilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amoroso, J. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC (United States); Marra, J. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC (United States)

    2014-10-02

    A multi-phase ceramic waste form is being developed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for treatment of secondary waste streams generated by reprocessing commercial spent nuclear. The envisioned waste stream contains a mixture of transition, alkali, alkaline earth, and lanthanide metals. Ceramic waste forms are tailored (engineered) to incorporate waste components as part of their crystal structure based on knowledge from naturally found minerals containing radioactive and non-radioactive species similar to the radionuclides of concern in wastes from fuel reprocessing. The ability to tailor ceramics to mimic naturally occurring crystals substantiates the long term stability of such crystals (ceramics) over geologic timescales of interest for nuclear waste immobilization [1]. A durable multiphase ceramic waste form tailored to incorporate all the waste components has the potential to broaden the available disposal options and thus minimize the storage and disposal costs associated with aqueous reprocessing.

  2. Predictive Surface Roughness Model for End Milling of Machinable Glass Ceramic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddy, M Mohan; Gorin, Alexander [School of Engineering and Science, Curtin University of Technology, Sarawak (Malaysia); Abou-El-Hossein, K A, E-mail: mohan.m@curtin.edu.my [Mechanical and Aeronautical Department, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Port Elegebeth, 6031 (South Africa)

    2011-02-15

    Advanced ceramics of Machinable glass ceramic is attractive material to produce high accuracy miniaturized components for many applications in various industries such as aerospace, electronics, biomedical, automotive and environmental communications due to their wear resistance, high hardness, high compressive strength, good corrosion resistance and excellent high temperature properties. Many research works have been conducted in the last few years to investigate the performance of different machining operations when processing various advanced ceramics. Micro end-milling is one of the machining methods to meet the demand of micro parts. Selecting proper machining parameters are important to obtain good surface finish during machining of Machinable glass ceramic. Therefore, this paper describes the development of predictive model for the surface roughness of Machinable glass ceramic in terms of speed, feed rate by using micro end-milling operation.

  3. Predictive Surface Roughness Model for End Milling of Machinable Glass Ceramic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, M Mohan; Gorin, Alexander; Abou-El-Hossein, K A

    2011-01-01

    Advanced ceramics of Machinable glass ceramic is attractive material to produce high accuracy miniaturized components for many applications in various industries such as aerospace, electronics, biomedical, automotive and environmental communications due to their wear resistance, high hardness, high compressive strength, good corrosion resistance and excellent high temperature properties. Many research works have been conducted in the last few years to investigate the performance of different machining operations when processing various advanced ceramics. Micro end-milling is one of the machining methods to meet the demand of micro parts. Selecting proper machining parameters are important to obtain good surface finish during machining of Machinable glass ceramic. Therefore, this paper describes the development of predictive model for the surface roughness of Machinable glass ceramic in terms of speed, feed rate by using micro end-milling operation.

  4. Ceramic Technology Project. Semiannual progress report for April 1993 through September 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-04-01

    The Ceramic Technology Project was originally developed by the Department of Energy`s Office of Transportation Systems (OTS) in Conservation and Renewable Energy. This project, part of the OTS`s Materials Development Program, was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTS`s automotive technology programs. During the course of the Ceramic Technology Project, remarkable progress has been made in the development of reliable structural ceramics. However, further work is needed to reduce the cost of ceramics to facilitate their commercial introduction, especially in the highly cost-sensitive automotive market. The work described in this report is organized according to the following WBS project elements: Project Management and Coordination; Materials and Processing; Materials Design Methodology; Data Base and Life Prediction; and Technology Transfer. This report includes contributions from all currently active project participants. Separate abstracts were prepared for the 47 projects reported here.

  5. Optimization of the injection molding process for development of high performance calcium oxide -based ceramic cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, P. P.; Wu, G. Q.; Tao, Y.; Cheng, X.; Zhao, J. Q.; Nan, H.

    2018-02-01

    The binder composition used for ceramic injection molding plays a crucial role on the final properties of sintered ceramic and to avoid defects on green parts. In this study, the effects of binder compositions on the rheological, microstructures and the mechanical properties of CaO based ceramic cores were investigated. It was found that the optimized formulation for dispersant, solid loading was 1.5 wt% and 84 wt%, respectively. The microstructures, such as porosity, pore size distribution and grain boundary density were closely related to the plasticizer contents. The decrease of plasticizer contents can enhance the strength of the ceramic cores but with decreased shrinkage. Meanwhile, the creep resistance of ceramic cores was enhanced by decreasing of plasticizer contents. The flexural strength of the core was found to decrease with the increase of the porosity, the improvement of creep resistance is closely related to the decrease of porosity and grain boundary density.

  6. Erosion resistance and adhesion of composite metal/ceramic coatings produced by plasma spraying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramm, D.A.J.; Hutchings, I.M.; Clyne, T.W.

    1993-01-01

    Ceramic coatings can exhibit greater erosion resistance than most metallic coatings. Such coatings are conveniently produced by thermal spraying. Unfortunately, thermally sprayed ceramic coatings often exhibit poor adhesion, partly as a consequence of the development of residual stresses during spraying and subsequent cooling. Composite coatings have been studied using aluminium/alumina deposits on steel substrates. The incorporation of ceramics within a ductile matrix has potential for sharply reducing the erosive wear at high erodent impact angles, whilst retaining the good erosion resistance of ceramics at low angles. It is shown that the proportion of metal and ceramic at the free surface can be specified so as to optimise the erosion resistance. Experiments have also been carried out on the resistance of the coatings to debonding during four-point bending of the coated substrate. Progress is being made towards the tailoring of composition profiles in graded coatings so as to optimise the combination of erosion resistance and adhesion. (orig.)

  7. SRNL CRP progress report [Development of Melt Processed Ceramics for Nuclear Waste Immobilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amoroso, J.; Marra, J.

    2014-01-01

    A multi-phase ceramic waste form is being developed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for treatment of secondary waste streams generated by reprocessing commercial spent nuclear fuel. The envisioned waste stream contains a mixture of transition, alkali, alkaline earth, and lanthanide metals. Ceramic waste forms are tailored (engineered) to incorporate waste components as part of their crystal structure based on knowledge from naturally found minerals containing radioactive and non-radioactive species similar to the radionuclides of concern in wastes from fuel reprocessing. The ability to tailor ceramics to mimic naturally occurring crystals substantiates the long term stability of such crystals (ceramics) over geologic timescales of interest for nuclear waste immobilization [1]. A durable multiphase ceramic waste form tailored to incorporate all the waste components has the potential to broaden the available disposal options and thus minimize the storage and disposal costs associated with aqueous reprocessing

  8. Agglomeration of ceramic powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawley, James D.; Larosa, Judith; Dirkse, Fredrick

    1989-01-01

    A research program directed at a critical comparison of numerical models for power agglomeration with experimental observations is currently underway. Central to this program is the quantitative characterization of the distribution of mass within an agglomerate as a function of time. Current experiments are designed to restrict agglomeration to a surface, which is oriented perpendicular to the force of gravity. These experiments are discussed with reference to: their significance to ceramic processing; artifacts which may be avoided in microgravity experiments; and the comparison of information available in real space (from optical microscopy) to that in reciprocal space (from light scattering). The principle machine requirement appears to be a need to obtain information at small scattering angles.

  9. Creep in electronic ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Routbort, J. L.; Goretta, K. C.; Arellano-Lopez, A. R.

    2000-04-27

    High-temperature creep measurements combined with microstructural investigations can be used to elucidate deformation mechanisms that can be related to the diffusion kinetics and defect chemistry of the minority species. This paper will review the theoretical basis for this correlation and illustrate it with examples from some important electronic ceramics having a perovskite structure. Recent results on BaTiO{sub 3}, (La{sub 1{minus}x}Sr){sub 1{minus}y}MnO{sub 3+{delta}}, YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x}, Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub x}, (Bi,Pb){sub 2}Sr{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} and Sr(Fe,Co){sub 1.5}O{sub x} will be presented.

  10. Ceramics for fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinard, F.W. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Ceramics are required for a number of applications in fusion devices, among the most critical of which are magnetic coil insulators, windows for RF heating systems, and structural uses. Radiation effects dominate consideration of candidate materials, although good pre-irradiation properties are a requisite. Materials and components can be optimized by careful control of chemical and microstructural content, and application of brittle material design and testing techniques. Future directions for research and development should include further extension of the data base in the areas of electrical, structural, and thermal properties; establishment of a fission neutron/fusion neutron correlation including transmutation gas effects; and development of new materials tailored to meet the specific needs of fusion reactors

  11. Microstructure and fracture analysis of fully ceramic microencapsulated fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H. G.; Kim, D. J.; Park, J. Y.; Kim, W. J.; Lee, S. J.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear fuel enhancing the accident tolerance is satisfied two parts. First, the performance has to be retained compared to the existing UO 2 nuclear fuel and zircaloy cladding system under the normal operation condition. Second, under the severe accident condition, the high temperature structural integrity has to be kept and the generation rate of hydrogen has to be reduced largely. FCM nuclear fuel is composed of tristructural isotropic(TRISO) fuel particle and SiC ceramic matrix. SiC ceramic matrix play an essential part in protecting fission product. In the FCM fuel concept, fission product is doubly protected by TRISO coating layer and SiC ceramic matrix compared to the current commercial UO 2 fuel system. SiC ceramic has excellent properties for fuel application. SiC ceramic has low neutron absorption cross-section, excellent irradiation resistivity and high thermal conductivity. Additionally, the relative thermal conductivity of the SiC ceramic as compared to UO 2 is quite good, reducing operational release of fission products form the fuel. TRISO coating layer which is deposited on UO 2 kernel is consists of PyC/SiC/PyC trialyer and buffer PyC layer. SiC matrix composite with TRISO particle was fabricated by hot pressing. 3 to 20 wt.% of sintering additives were added to investigate reaction between sintering additives and outer PyC layer of TRISO coating layer. The relative densities of all specimens show above 92%. The reaction between sintering additives and PyC is observed in most TRISO particles, the thickness of reactants shows about ten micrometers. The thermal shock resistance of SiC matrix composite was investigated

  12. Moessbauer studies of Inca ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, U.; Wagner, F.E.; Marticorena, B.; Salazar, R.; Schwabe, R.; Riederer, J.

    1986-01-01

    To obtain information on the firing of Inca ceramics, 7 samples from different locations were studied by Moessbauer spectroscopy including a detailed laboratory refiring procedure. The glaze typical for the surface of this ware was studied by Moessbauer scattering. (Auth.)

  13. Non destructive evaluation of ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, R.E. Jr

    1992-01-01

    While monolithic and composite ceramics have been successfully manufactured, inconsistencies in processing and the unpredictable nature of their failure have limited their use as engineering materials. The optimization of the processing and properties of ceramics and the structures, devices and systems made from them demand the innovative application of modern nondestructive materials characterization techniques to monitor and control as many stages of the production process as possible. This paper will describe the state-of-the-art of nondestructive evaluation techniques for characterization of monolithic ceramics and ceramic composites. Among the techniques to be discussed are laser ultrasonics, acoustic microscopy, thermography, microfocus and x-ray tomography, and micro-photoelasticity. Application of these and other nondestructive evaluation techniques for more effective and efficient real-time process control will result in improved product quality and reliability. 27 refs

  14. Low Thermal Expansion Glass Ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    Bach, Hans

    2005-01-01

    This book appears in the authoritative series reporting the international research and development activities conducted by the Schott group of companies. This series provides an overview of Schott's activities for scientists, engineers, and managers from all branches of industry worldwide in which glasses and glass ceramics are of interest. Each volume begins with a chapter providing a general idea of the current problems, results, and trends relating to the subjects treated. This new extended edition describes the fundamental principles, the manufacturing process, and applications of low thermal expansion glass ceramics. The composition, structure, and stability of polycrystalline materials having a low thermal expansion are described, and it is shown how low thermal expansion glass ceramics can be manufactured from appropriately chosen glass compositions. Examples illustrate the formation of this type of glass ceramic by utilizing normal production processes together with controlled crystallization. Thus g...

  15. Inorganic glass ceramic slip rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glossbrenner, E. W.; Cole, S. R.

    1972-01-01

    Prototypes of slip rings have been fabricated from ceramic glass, a material which is highly resistant to deterioration due to high temperature. Slip ring assemblies were not structurally damaged by mechanical tests and performed statisfactorily for 200 hours.

  16. Metal-ceramic joint assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian

    2002-01-01

    A metal-ceramic joint assembly in which a brazing alloy is situated between metallic and ceramic members. The metallic member is either an aluminum-containing stainless steel, a high chromium-content ferritic stainless steel or an iron nickel alloy with a corrosion protection coating. The brazing alloy, in turn, is either an Au-based or Ni-based alloy with a brazing temperature in the range of 9500 to 1200.degree. C.

  17. Multiphase-Multifunctional Ceramic Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-30

    systems for high temperatura applications” “ Estudios de Ferroelasticidad en Sistemas Cerámicos Multifásicos para Aplicaciones en Alta Temperatura ...Ceramic Coatings Performing Organization names: Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional – Unidad Queretaro...materials, Cinvestav. Thesis: “Ferroelasticity studies in multiphase ceramic systems for high temperatura applications”. Her work mainly focused in the

  18. Nano-Ceramic Coated Plastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Junghyun

    2013-01-01

    Plastic products, due to their durability, safety, and low manufacturing cost, are now rapidly replacing cookware items traditionally made of glass and ceramics. Despite this trend, some still prefer relatively expensive and more fragile ceramic/glassware because plastics can deteriorate over time after exposure to foods, which can generate odors, bad appearance, and/or color change. Nano-ceramic coatings can eliminate these drawbacks while still retaining the advantages of the plastic, since the coating only alters the surface of the plastic. The surface coating adds functionality to the plastics such as self-cleaning and disinfectant capabilities that result from a photocatalytic effect of certain ceramic systems. These ceramic coatings can also provide non-stick surfaces and higher temperature capabilities for the base plastics without resorting to ceramic or glass materials. Titanium dioxide (TiO2) and zinc oxide (ZnO) are the candidates for a nano-ceramic coating to deposit on the plastics or plastic films used in cookware and kitchenware. Both are wide-bandgap semiconductors (3.0 to 3.2 eV for TiO2 and 3.2 to 3.3 eV for ZnO), so they exhibit a photocatalytic property under ultraviolet (UV) light. This will lead to decomposition of organic compounds. Decomposed products can be easily washed off by water, so the use of detergents will be minimal. High-crystalline film with large surface area for the reaction is essential to guarantee good photocatalytic performance of these oxides. Low-temperature processing (nano-ceramic coatings (TiO2, ZnO) on plastic materials (silicone, Teflon, PET, etc.) that can possess both photocatalytic oxide properties and flexible plastic properties. Processing cost is low and it does not require any expensive equipment investment. Processing can be scalable to current manufacturing infrastructure.

  19. Method for preparing ceramic composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, K.B.; Tiegs, T.N.; Becher, P.F.; Waters, S.B.

    1996-01-09

    A process is disclosed for preparing ceramic composite comprising blending TiC particulates, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particulates and nickel aluminide and consolidating the mixture at a temperature and pressure sufficient to produce a densified ceramic composite having fracture toughness equal to or greater than 7 MPa m{sup 1/2}, a hardness equal to or greater than 18 GPa. 5 figs.

  20. Fracture-dissociation of ceramic liner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Sung Kwan; Oh, Jin-Rok; Her, Man Seung; Shim, Young Jun; Cho, Tae Yeun; Kwon, Sung Min

    2008-08-01

    The use of BIOLOX delta ceramic (CeramTec AG, Plochingen, Germany) has been increasing. This ceramic prevents cracking by restraining the phase transformation due to the insertion of nano-sized, yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia into the alumina matrix. This restrains the progress of cracking through the formation of platelet-like crystal or whiskers due to the addition of an oxide additive. We observed a case of BIOLOX delta ceramic liner (CeramTec AG) rim fracture 4 months postoperatively. Radiographs showed that the ceramic liner was subluxated from the acetabular cup. Scratches on the acetabular cup and femoral neck were seen, and the fracture was visible on the rim of the liner. Under electron microscope, metal particle coatings from the ceramic liner were identified. The ceramic liner, fracture fragments, and adjacent tissues were removed and replaced with a ceramic liner and femoral head of the same size and design. We believe the mechanism of the fracture-dissociation of the ceramic liner in this case is similar to a case of separation of the ceramic liner from the polyethylene shell in a sandwich-type ceramic-ceramic joint. To prevent ceramic liner fracture-dissociation, the diameter of the femoral neck needs to be decreased in a new design, while the diameter of the femoral head needs to be increased to ensure an increase in range of motion.

  1. CAD/CAM glass ceramics for single-tooth implant crowns: a finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akça, Kvanç; Cavusoglu, Yeliz; Sagirkaya, Elcin; Aybar, Buket; Cehreli, Murat Cavit

    2013-12-01

    To evaluate the load distribution of CAD/CAM mono-ceramic crowns supported with single-tooth implants in functional area. A 3-dimensional numerical model of a soft tissue-level implant was constructed with cement-retained abutment to support glass ceramic machinable crown. Implant-abutment complex and the retained crown were embedded in a Ø 1.5 × 1.5 cm geometric matrix for evaluation of mechanical behavior of mono-ceramic CAD/CAM aluminosilicate and leucite glass crown materials. Laterally positioned axial load of 300 N was applied on the crowns. Resulting principal stresses in the mono-ceramic crowns were evaluated in relation to different glass ceramic materials. The highest compressive stresses were observed at the cervical region of the buccal aspect of the crowns and were 89.98 and 89.99 MPa, for aluminosilicate and leucite glass ceramics, respectively. The highest tensile stresses were observed at the collar of the lingual part of the crowns and were 24.54 and 25.39 MPa, respectively. Stresses induced upon 300 N static loading of CAD/CAM aluminosalicate and leucite glass ceramics are below the compressive strength of the materials. Impact loads may actuate the progress to end failure of mono-ceramic crowns supported by metallic implant abutments.

  2. Ceramics for Molten Materials Containment, Transfer and Handling on the Lunar Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standish, Evan; Stefanescu, Doru M.; Curreri, Peter A.

    2009-01-01

    As part of a project on Molten Materials Transfer and Handling on the Lunar Surface, molten materials containment samples of various ceramics were tested to determine their performance in contact with a melt of lunar regolith simulant. The test temperature was 1600 C with contact times ranging from 0 to 12 hours. Regolith simulant was pressed into cylinders with the approximate dimensions of 1.25 dia x 1.25cm height and then melted on ceramic substrates. The regolith-ceramic interface was examined after processing to determine the melt/ceramic interaction. It was found that the molten regolith wetted all oxide ceramics tested extremely well which resulted in chemical reaction between the materials in each case. Alumina substrates were identified which withstood contact at the operating temperature of a molten regolith electrolysis cell (1600 C) for eight hours with little interaction or deformation. This represents an improvement over alumina grades currently in use and will provide a lifetime adequate for electrolysis experiments lasting 24 hours or more. Two types of non-oxide ceramics were also tested. It was found that they interacted to a limited degree with the melt resulting in little corrosion. These ceramics, Sic and BN, were not wetted as well as the oxides by the melt, and so remain possible materials for molten regolith handling. Tests wing longer holding periods and larger volumes of regolith are necessary to determine the ultimate performance of the tested ceramics.

  3. Ceramics as nuclear reactor fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reeve, K.D.

    1975-01-01

    Ceramics are widely accepted as nuclear reactor fuel materials, for both metal clad ceramic and all-ceramic fuel designs. Metal clad UO 2 is used commercially in large tonnages in five different power reactor designs. UO 2 pellets are made by familiar ceramic techniques but in a reactor they undergo complex thermal and chemical changes which must be thoroughly understood. Metal clad uranium-plutonium dioxide is used in present day fast breeder reactors, but may eventually be replaced by uranium-plutonium carbide or nitride. All-ceramic fuels, which are necessary for reactors operating above about 750 0 C, must incorporate one or more fission product retentive ceramic coatings. BeO-coated BeO matrix dispersion fuels and silicate glaze coated UO 2 -SiO 2 have been studied for specialised applications, but the only commercial high temperature fuel is based on graphite in which small fuel particles, each coated with vapour deposited carbon and silicon carbide, are dispersed. Ceramists have much to contribute to many aspects of fuel science and technology. (author)

  4. Microwave sintering of ceramic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karayannis, V. G.

    2016-11-01

    In the present study, the potential of microwave irradiation as an innovative energy- efficient alternative to conventional heating technologies in ceramic manufacturing is reviewed, addressing the advantages/disadvantages, while also commenting on future applications of possible commercial interest. Ceramic materials have been extensively studied and used due to several advantages they exhibit. Sintering ceramics using microwave radiation, a novel technology widely employed in various fields, can be an efficient, economic and environmentally-friendlier approach, to improve the consolidation efficiency and reduce the processing cycle-time, in order to attain substantial energy and cost savings. Microwave sintering provides efficient internal heating, as energy is supplied directly and penetrates the material. Since energy transfer occurs at a molecular level, heat is generated throughout the material, thus avoiding significant temperature gradients between the surface and the interior, which are frequently encountered at high heating rates upon conventional sintering. Thus, rapid, volumetric and uniform heating of various raw materials and secondary resources for ceramic production is possible, with limited grain coarsening, leading to accelerated densification, and uniform and fine-grained microstructures, with enhanced mechanical performance. This is particularly important for manufacturing large-size ceramic products of quality, and also for specialty ceramic materials such as bioceramics and electroceramics. Critical parameters for the process optimization, including the electromagnetic field distribution, microwave-material interaction, heat transfer mechanisms and material transformations, should be taken into consideration.

  5. Method for Waterproofing Ceramic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagliostro, Domenick E. (Inventor); Hsu, Ming-Ta S. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    Hygroscopic ceramic materials which are difficult to waterproof with a silane, substituted silane or silazane waterproofing agent, such as an alumina containing fibrous, flexible and porous, fibrous ceramic insulation used on a reentry space vehicle, are rendered easy to waterproof if the interior porous surface of the ceramic is first coated with a thin coating of silica. The silica coating is achieved by coating the interior surface of the ceramic with a silica precursor converting the precursor to silica either in-situ or by oxidative pyrolysis and then applying the waterproofing agent to the silica coated ceramic. The silica precursor comprises almost any suitable silicon containing material such as a silane, silicone, siloxane, silazane and the like applied by solution, vapor deposition and the like. If the waterproofing is removed by e.g., burning, the silica remains and the ceramic is easily rewaterproofed. An alumina containing TABI insulation which absorbs more that five times its weight of water, absorbs less than 10 wt. % water after being waterproofed according to the method of the invention.

  6. Testando as previsões da Pecking Order Theory no financiamento das empress brasileiras: uma nova metodologia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina da Silva Borges de Araújo

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Considerando a existência de assimetria de informação entre gestores e investidores, Myers (1984 afirma que a formação da estrutura de capital por parte das empresas está baseada em uma hierarquia de captação conhecida como Pecking Order Theory (POT, favorecendo seqüencialmente a utilização de recursos internos, emissão de dívida e, por último, emissão de ações. A verificação empírica esbarra em questões metodológicas, sendo a POT por vezes confirmada e outras negada. Neste artigo, propõe-se uma metodologia diferente, reconhecendo as características das empresas como tamanho, lucratividade e crescimento, para explicar o financiamento do déficit, utilizando um modelo de dados em painel. Analisou-se uma amostra de 313 empresas listadas na Bovespa de 2000 a 2005. Os resultados indicam que unicamente as empresas de menor tamanho na amostra, de lucratividade negativa e baixo crescimento, apresentam aderência (fraca às previsões da POT. Assim, essa teoria não pode ser considerada uma teoria geral para explicar a estrutura de capital das empresas.

  7. Comparison of the microstructure and composition of aboriginal ceramics, from indigenous site Caninhas, with the obtained ones in the region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matos, C.C.; Nakano, F.P.; Taguchi, S.P.; Camargo-Vernilli, D.; Ribeiro, R.B.; Rosa, S.J. L.

    2009-01-01

    The archaeological site of Caninhas is made of funeral and combustion structures and various objects of aboriginal daily use. These parts and fragments were safe and inventoried, constituting approximately 4000 units. The objective of this project was to analyze the microstructure and composition of archaeological ceramics, and ceramics made of argil current of the zone. The crystalline phases were identified by X-Rays Diffraction (XRD), elementary composition was obtained by X-Rays Fluorescence (XRF) and Energy Dispersive Spectrometry (EDS), and the microstructure was evaluated by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Composition and microstructure of archaeological ceramics are different of current ceramics, indicating the effect of lixiviation in function of the time and the microstructural evolution due different ceramic processing. These results are valuable for the archaeological area studies, mainly for the cultural denoting which represents. The relation between some studies is basic to add knowledge: use of the ceramic materials engineering for archaeology application. (author)

  8. 76 FR 11275 - In the Matter of Certain Ceramic Capacitors and Products Containing Same; Notice of Commission...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 337-TA-692] In the Matter of Certain Ceramic Capacitors and Products Containing Same; Notice of Commission Determination To Review in Part A Final Initial... importation of certain ceramic capacitors and products containing the same by reason of infringement of...

  9. Design and In-Situ Processing of Metal-Ceramic and Ceramic-Ceramic Microstructures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sass, Stephen

    1997-01-01

    .... Metal-ceramic microstructures have been synthesized in situ by a variety of novel processing techniques, including the partial reduction of oxide compounds and displacement reactions and sol-gel...

  10. FOREWORD: Focus on Advanced Ceramics Focus on Advanced Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohashi, Naoki

    2011-06-01

    Much research has been devoted recently to developing technologies for renewable energy and improving the efficiency of the processes and devices used in industry and everyday life. Efficient solutions have been found using novel materials such as platinum and palladium-based catalysts for car exhaust systems, samarium-cobalt and neodymium-iron-boron permanent magnets for electrical motors, and so on. However, their realization has resulted in an increasing demand for rare elements and in their deficit, the development of new materials based on more abundant elements and new functionalities of traditional materials. Moreover, increasing environmental and health concerns demand substitution of toxic or hazardous substances with nature-friendly alternatives. In this context, this focus issue on advanced ceramics aims to review current trends in ceramics science and technology. It is related to the International Conference on Science and Technology of Advanced Ceramics (STAC) held annually to discuss the emerging issues in the field of ceramics. An important direction of ceramic science is the collaboration between experimental and theoretical sciences. Recent developments in density functional theory and computer technology have enabled the prediction of physical and chemical properties of ceramics, thereby assisting the design of new materials. Therefore, this focus issue includes articles devoted to theory and advanced characterization techniques. As mentioned above, the potential shortage of rare elements is becoming critical to the industry and has resulted in a Japanese government initiative called the 'Ubiquitous Element Strategy'. This focus issue also includes articles related to this strategy and to the associated topics of energy conversion, such as phosphors for high-efficiency lighting and photocatalysts for solar-energy harvesting. We hope that this focus issue will provide a timely overview of current trends and problems in ceramics science and

  11. All-ceramic crowns: bonding or cementing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pospiech, Peter

    2002-12-01

    Despite the wide variety of all-ceramic systems available today, the majority of dental practitioners hesitate to recommend and insert all-ceramic crowns. This article regards the nature of the ceramic materials, the principles of bonding and adhesion, and the clinical problems of the acid-etch technique for crowns. Advantages and disadvantages are discussed, and the influences of different factors on the strength of all-ceramic crowns are presented. Finally, the conclusion is drawn that conventional cementing of all-ceramic crowns is possible when the specific properties of the ceramics are taken into consideration.

  12. Exoelectron emission from magnesium borate glass ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamoto, Takamichi; Yanagisawa, Hideo; Nakamichi, Hiroshi; Kikuchi, Riichi; Kawanishi, Masaharu.

    1986-01-01

    Thermally stimulated exoelectron emission (TSEE) of a magnesium borate glass ceramics was investigated for its application to dosemetric use. It has been found that the TSEE glow patterns of the magnesium borate glass ceramics as well as a Li 2 B 4 O 7 glass ceramics depend on the kind of the radiation used and that the heat resistance of the magnesium borate glass ceramics is higher than that of the Li 2 B 4 O 7 glass ceramics. Therefore, the TSEE glow patterns of the magnesium borate glass ceramics indicate a possibility to be used as the dose measurement for each kind of radiation in the mixed radiation field. (author)

  13. Producing ceramic laminate composites by EPD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicholson, P.S.; Sarkar, P.; Datta, S.

    1996-01-01

    The search for tough structural ceramics to operate at high temperatures in hostile environments has led to the development of ceramic composites. This class of material includes laminar ceramic-ceramic composites, continuous-fiber-reinforced ceramic composites and functionally graded materials. The present authors developed electrophoretic deposition (EPD) to synthesize lamellar, fiber-reinforced and functionally graded composites. This paper briefly describes the synthesis and characterization of these EPD composites and introduces a novel class of lamellar composites with nonplanar layers. The synthesis of the latter demonstrates the facility of the EPD process for the synthesis of ceramic composites. The process is totally controllable via suspension concentration, deposition current, voltage and time

  14. Development of ceramic composites from mixture of alumina and ceramic precursor polymer poly (silsesquioxane))

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machado, Glauson Aparecido Ferreira

    2009-01-01

    Processing of ceramics materials, by polymer precursors pyrolysis, has been intensively researched over the past decades, due to advantages that this path provides, such as: lower temperature process compared to conventional techniques; structure control at molecular level; synthesis possibility of a wide range of ceramic compounds; obtaining parts with dimensions of the final product etc. The active filler controlled polymer pyrolysis (AFCOP) process, enables the synthesis of ceramic composites, by reaction between added filler (oxides, metals, intermetallic etc.) and solid and gaseous products, from polymer decomposition. In this study, based on this process, samples of alumina, with addition of 10 and 20 mass% of poly silsesquioxane polymer precursor, were manufactured. These samples were pyrolyzed at 900 degree C and thermal treated at temperatures of 1100, 1300 and 1500 degree C. The samples were characterized for bulk density, porosity and hardness, after each stage of thermal treatment. Structural transformations were analyzed by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and infrared spectroscopy. Samples treated until 1300 degree C resulted in composites of alumina and silicon oxycarbide, while those treated at 1500 degree C, formed composites of mullite and alumina. The samples with 20% of polymer added started to density around 800 degree C and high retraction rate was observed at 1400 degree C. (author)

  15. Fracture Toughness (KIC) of Lithography Based Manufactured Alumina Ceramic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nindhia, T. G. T.; Schlacher, J.; Lube, T.

    2018-04-01

    Precision shaped ceramic components can be obtained by an emerging technique called Lithography based Ceramic Manufacturing (LCM). A green part is made from a slurry consisting of a ceramic powder in a photocurable binder with addition of dispersant and plasticizer. Components are built in a layer–by-layer way by exposing the desired cross- sections to light. The parts are subsequently sintered to their final density. It is a challenge to produce ceramic component with this method that yield the same mechanical properties in all direction. The fracture toughness (KIc) of of LCM-alumina (prepared at LITHOZ GmbH, Austria) was tested by using the Single-Edge-V-Notched Beam (SEVNB) method. Notches are made into prismatic bend-bars in all three direction X, Y and Z to recognize the value of fracture toughness of the material in all three directions. The microstructure was revealed with optical microscopy as well as Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The results indicate that the fracture toughness in Y-direction has the highest value (3.10 MPam1/2) that is followed by the one in X-direction which is just a bit lower (2.90 MPam1/2). The Z-direction is found to have a similar fracture toughness (2.95 MPam1/2). This is supported by a homogeneous microstructure showing no hint of the layers used during production.

  16. Glass Ceramic Formulation Data Package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crum, Jarrod V.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; McCloy, John S.; Vienna, John D.; Chung, Chul-Woo

    2012-01-01

    A glass ceramic waste form is being developed for treatment of secondary waste streams generated by aqueous reprocessing of commercial used nuclear fuel (Crum et al. 2012b). The waste stream contains a mixture of transition metals, alkali, alkaline earths, and lanthanides, several of which exceed the solubility limits of a single phase borosilicate glass (Crum et al. 2009; Caurant et al. 2007). A multi-phase glass ceramic waste form allows incorporation of insoluble components of the waste by designed crystallization into durable heat tolerant phases. The glass ceramic formulation and processing targets the formation of the following three stable crystalline phases: (1) powellite (XMoO4) where X can be (Ca, Sr, Ba, and/or Ln), (2) oxyapatite Yx,Z(10-x)Si6O26 where Y is alkaline earth, Z is Ln, and (3) lanthanide borosilicate (Ln5BSi2O13). These three phases incorporate the waste components that are above the solubility limit of a single-phase borosilicate glass. The glass ceramic is designed to be a single phase melt, just like a borosilicate glass, and then crystallize upon slow cooling to form the targeted phases. The slow cooling schedule is based on the centerline cooling profile of a 2 foot diameter canister such as the Hanford High-Level Waste canister. Up to this point, crucible testing has been used for glass ceramic development, with cold crucible induction melter (CCIM) targeted as the ultimate processing technology for the waste form. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) will conduct a scaled CCIM test in FY2012 with a glass ceramic to demonstrate the processing behavior. This Data Package documents the laboratory studies of the glass ceramic composition to support the CCIM test. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) measured melt viscosity, electrical conductivity, and crystallization behavior upon cooling to identify a processing window (temperature range) for melter operation and cooling profiles necessary to crystallize the targeted phases in the

  17. Effect of machining fluid on the process performance of wire electrical discharge machining of nanocomposite ceramic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Chengmao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Wire electric discharge machining (WEDM promise to be effective and economical techniques for the production of tools and parts from conducting ceramic blanks. However, the manufacturing of nanocomposite ceramics blanks with these processes is a long and costly process. This paper presents a new process of machining nanocomposite ceramics using WEDM. WEDM uses water based emulsion, polyvinyl alcohol and distilled water as the machining fluid. Machining fluid is a primary factor that affects the material removal rate and surface quality of WEDM. The effects of emulsion concentration, polyvinyl alcohol concentration and distilled water of the machining fluid on the process performance have been investigated.

  18. Innovative grinding wheel design for cost-effective machining of advanced ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Licht, R.H.; Kuo, P.; Liu, S.; Murphy, D.; Picone, J.W.; Ramanath, S.

    2000-05-01

    This Final Report covers the Phase II Innovative Grinding Wheel (IGW) program in which Norton Company successfully developed a novel grinding wheel for cost-effective cylindrical grinding of advanced ceramics. In 1995, Norton Company successfully completed the 16-month Phase I technical effort to define requirements, design, develop, and evaluate a next-generation grinding wheel for cost-effective cylindrical grinding of advanced ceramics using small prototype wheels. The Phase II program was initiated to scale-up the new superabrasive wheel specification to larger diameters, 305-mm to 406-mm, required for most production grinding of cylindrical ceramic parts, and to perform in-house and independent validation grinding tests.

  19. Three-year clinical follow-up of posterior teeth restored with leucite-reinforced ips empress onlays and partial veneer crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murgueitio, Rafael; Bernal, Guillermo

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the survival rate and failure mode of IPS leucite-reinforced ceramic onlays and partial veneer crowns regarding thickness under the following clinical conditions: vital versus nonvital teeth, tooth location, and type of opposing dentition. Teeth were prepared according to established guidelines for ceramic onlays and partial veneer crowns. Before cementation, the restorations were measured for occlusal thickness at the central fossa, mesial, and distal marginal ridges, and functional and nonfunctional cusps. A total of 210 ceramic restorations were cemented in 99 patients within a mean observation period of 2.9 ± 1.89 years. The mode of failure was classified and evaluated as (1) adhesive, (2) cohesive, (3) combined failure, (4) decementation, (5) tooth sensitivity, and (6) pulpal necrosis. Kaplan, log-rank, and Cox regression tests were used for statistical analysis. The failure rate was 3.33% (7/210). Increased material thickness produced less probability of failures. Vital teeth were less likely to fail than nonvital teeth. Second molars were five times more susceptible to failure than first molars. Tooth sensitivity postcementation and the type of opposing dentition were not statistically significant in this study. In this study, thickness of the restorations, tooth vitality, and location of teeth in the dental arch influenced restoration failures. © 2012 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  20. Virtual Parts Engineering Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-20

    engineering 10 materials. High strength alloys , composites (polymer composites and metallic composites), and the like cannot merely be replaced by...ceramics, smart materials, shape memory alloys , super plastic materials and nano- structured materials may be more appropriate substitutes in a reverse...molding process using thermosetting Bakelite. For remanufacturing the part in small quantities, machining has been identified as the most economical

  1. Disc piezoelectric ceramic transformers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erhart, Jirií; Půlpán, Petr; Doleček, Roman; Psota, Pavel; Lédl, Vít

    2013-08-01

    In this contribution, we present our study on disc-shaped and homogeneously poled piezoelectric ceramic transformers working in planar-extensional vibration modes. Transformers are designed with electrodes divided into wedge, axisymmetrical ring-dot, moonie, smile, or yin-yang segments. Transformation ratio, efficiency, and input and output impedances were measured for low-power signals. Transformer efficiency and transformation ratio were measured as a function of frequency and impedance load in the secondary circuit. Optimum impedance for the maximum efficiency has been found. Maximum efficiency and no-load transformation ratio can reach almost 100% and 52 for the fundamental resonance of ring-dot transformers and 98% and 67 for the second resonance of 2-segment wedge transformers. Maximum efficiency was reached at optimum impedance, which is in the range from 500 Ω to 10 kΩ, depending on the electrode pattern and size. Fundamental vibration mode and its overtones were further studied using frequency-modulated digital holographic interferometry and by the finite element method. Complementary information has been obtained by the infrared camera visualization of surface temperature profiles at higher driving power.

  2. Bar piezoelectric ceramic transformers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erhart, Jiří; Pulpan, Půlpán; Rusin, Luboš

    2013-07-01

    Bar-shaped piezoelectric ceramic transformers (PTs) working in the longitudinal vibration mode (k31 mode) were studied. Two types of the transformer were designed--one with the electrode divided into two segments of different length, and one with the electrodes divided into three symmetrical segments. Parameters of studied transformers such as efficiency, transformation ratio, and input and output impedances were measured. An analytical model was developed for PT parameter calculation for both two- and three-segment PTs. Neither type of bar PT exhibited very high efficiency (maximum 72% for three-segment PT design) at a relatively high transformation ratio (it is 4 for two-segment PT and 2 for three-segment PT at the fundamental resonance mode). The optimum resistive loads were 20 and 10 kΩ for two- and three-segment PT designs for the fundamental resonance, respectively, and about one order of magnitude smaller for the higher overtone (i.e., 2 kΩ and 500 Ω, respectively). The no-load transformation ratio was less than 27 (maximum for two-segment electrode PT design). The optimum input electrode aspect ratios (0.48 for three-segment PT and 0.63 for two-segment PT) were calculated numerically under no-load conditions.

  3. Reliability of ceramics for heat engine applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    The advantages and disadvantages associated with the use of monolithic ceramics in heat engines are discussed. The principle gaps in the state of understanding of ceramic material, failure origins, nondestructive tests as well as life prediction are included.

  4. III Advanced Ceramics and Applications Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Gadow, Rainer; Mitic, Vojislav; Obradovic, Nina

    2016-01-01

    This is the Proceedings of III Advanced Ceramics and Applications conference, held in Belgrade, Serbia in 2014. It contains 25 papers on various subjects regarding preparation, characterization and application of advanced ceramic materials.

  5. Panel report on high temperature ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nolet, T C [ed.

    1979-01-01

    Fundamental research is reported concerning high temperature ceramics for application in turbines, engines, batteries, gasifiers, MHD, fuel cells, heat exchangers, and hot wall combustors. Ceramics microstructure and behavior are included. (FS)

  6. Ceramic Technology Project, semiannual progress report for October 1993 through March 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, D.R.

    1994-09-01

    The Ceramic Technology Project was originally developed by the Department of Energy`s Office of Transportation Systems (OTS) in Conservation and Renewable Energy. Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the Department of Energy (DOE), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and Department of Defense (DoD) advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. An assessment of needs was completed, and a five-year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. In July 1990, the original plan was updated through the estimated completion of development in 1993. The original objective of the project was to develop the industrial technology base required for reliable ceramics for application in advanced automotive heat engines. During the course of the Ceramic Technology Project, remarkable progress has been made in the development of reliable structural ceramics. The direction of the Ceramic Technology Project is now shifting toward reducing the cost of ceramics to facilitate commercial introduction of ceramic components for near-term engine applications. In response to extensive input from industry, the plan is to extend the engine types which were previously supported (advanced gas turbine and low-heat-rejection diesel engines) to include near-term (5-10 years) applications in conventional automobile and diesel truck engines. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to U.S. industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities. A systematic approach to reducing the cost of components is envisioned.

  7. Ceramics: past, present, and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemons, J E

    1996-07-01

    The selection and application of synthetic materials for surgical implants has been directly dependent upon the biocompatibility profiles of specific prosthetic devices. The early rationale for ceramic biomaterials was based upon the chemical and biochemical inertness (minimal bioreactivity) of elemental compounds constituted into structural forms (materials). Subsequently, mildly reactive (bioactive), and partially and fully degradable ceramics were identified for clinical uses. Structural forms have included bulk solids or particulates with and without porosities for tissue ingrowth, and more recently, coatings onto other types of biomaterial substrates. The physical shapes selected were application dependent, with advantages and disadvantages determined by: (1) the basic material and design properties of the device construct; and (2) the patient-based functional considerations. Most of the ceramics (bioceramics) selected in the 1960s and 1970s have continued over the long-term, and the science and technology for thick and thin coatings have evolved significantly over the past decade. Applications of ceramic biomaterials range from bulk (100%) ceramic structures as joint and bone replacements to fully or partially biodegradable substrates for the controlled delivery of pharmaceutical drugs, growth factors, and morphogenetically inductive substances. Because of the relatively unique properties of bioceramics, expanded uses as structural composites with other biomaterials and macromolecular biologically-derived substances are anticipated in the future.

  8. Shock compression profiles in ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grady, D.E.; Moody, R.L.

    1996-03-01

    An investigation of the shock compression properties of high-strength ceramics has been performed using controlled planar impact techniques. In a typical experimental configuration, a ceramic target disc is held stationary, and it is struck by plates of either a similar ceramic or by plates of a well-characterized metal. All tests were performed using either a single-stage propellant gun or a two-stage light-gas gun. Particle velocity histories were measured with laser velocity interferometry (VISAR) at the interface between the back of the target ceramic and a calibrated VISAR window material. Peak impact stresses achieved in these experiments range from about 3 to 70 GPa. Ceramics tested under shock impact loading include: Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, AlN, B{sub 4}C, SiC, Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, TiB{sub 2}, WC and ZrO{sub 2}. This report compiles the VISAR wave profiles and experimental impact parameters within a database-useful for response model development, computational model validation studies, and independent assessment of the physics of dynamic deformation on high-strength, brittle solids.

  9. Transparent ceramic lamp envelope materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, G C [OSRAM SYLVANIA, 71 Cherry Hill Drive, Beverly, MA 01915 (United States)

    2005-09-07

    Transparent ceramic materials with optical qualities comparable to single crystals of similar compositions have been developed in recent years, as a result of the improved understanding of powder-processing-fabrication- sintering-property inter-relationships. These high-temperature materials with a range of thermal and mechanical properties are candidate envelopes for focused-beam, short-arc lamps containing various fills operating at temperatures higher than quartz. This paper reviews the composition, structure and properties of transparent ceramic lamp envelope materials including sapphire, small-grained polycrystalline alumina, aluminium oxynitride, yttrium aluminate garnet, magnesium aluminate spinel and yttria-lanthana. A satisfactory thermal shock resistance is required for the ceramic tube to withstand the rapid heating and cooling cycles encountered in lamps. Thermophysical properties, along with the geometry, size and thickness of a transparent ceramic tube, are important parameters in the assessment of its resistance to fracture arising from thermal stresses in lamps during service. The corrosive nature of lamp-fill liquid and vapour at high temperatures requires that all lamp components be carefully chosen to meet the target life. The wide range of new transparent ceramics represents flexibility in pushing the limit of envelope materials for improved beamer lamps.

  10. High flow ceramic pot filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Halem, D; van der Laan, H; Soppe, A I A; Heijman, S G J

    2017-11-01

    Ceramic pot filters are considered safe, robust and appropriate technologies, but there is a general consensus that water revenues are limited due to clogging of the ceramic element. The objective of this study was to investigate the potential of high flow ceramic pot filters to produce more water without sacrificing their microbial removal efficacy. High flow pot filters, produced by increasing the rice husk content, had a higher initial flow rate (6-19 L h -1 ), but initial LRVs for E. coli of high flow filters was slightly lower than for regular ceramic pot filters. This disadvantage was, however, only temporarily as the clogging in high flow filters had a positive effect on the LRV for E. coli (from below 1 to 2-3 after clogging). Therefore, it can be carefully concluded that regular ceramic pot filters perform better initially, but after clogging, the high flow filters have a higher flow rate as well as a higher LRV for E. coli. To improve the initial performance of new high flow filters, it is recommended to further utilize residence time of the water in the receptacle, since additional E. coli inactivation was observed during overnight storage. Although a relationship was observed between flow rate and LRV of MS2 bacteriophages, both regular and high flow filters were unable to reach over 2 LRV. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Emerging Ceramic-based Materials for Dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denry, I.; Kelly, J.R.

    2014-01-01

    Our goal is to give an overview of a selection of emerging ceramics and issues for dental or biomedical applications, with emphasis on specific challenges associated with full-contour zirconia ceramics, and a brief synopsis on new machinable glass-ceramics and ceramic-based interpenetrating phase composites. Selected fabrication techniques relevant to dental or biomedical applications such as microwave sintering, spark plasma sintering, and additive manufacturing are also reviewed. Where appropriate, the authors have added their opinions and guidance. PMID:25274751

  12. Ion implantation and fracture toughness of ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, J.; Pollock, J.T.A.

    1985-01-01

    Ceramics generally lack toughness which is largely determined by the ceramic surface where stresses likely to cause failure are usually highest. Ion implantation has the capacity to improve the surface fracture toughness of ceramics. Significantly reduced ion size and reactivity restrictions exist compared with traditional methods of surface toughening. We are studying the effect of ion implantation on ceramic fracture toughness using indentation testing as the principal tool of analysis

  13. Ceramic cutting tools materials, development and performance

    CERN Document Server

    Whitney, E Dow

    1994-01-01

    Interest in ceramics as a high speed cutting tool material is based primarily on favorable material properties. As a class of materials, ceramics possess high melting points, excellent hardness and good wear resistance. Unlike most metals, hardness levels in ceramics generally remain high at elevated temperatures which means that cutting tip integrity is relatively unaffected at high cutting speeds. Ceramics are also chemically inert against most workmetals.

  14. Ferroelastic ceramic-reinforced metal matrix composites

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Composite materials comprising ferroelastic ceramic particulates dispersed in a metal matrix are capable of vibration damping. When the ferroelastic ceramic particulates are subjected to stress, such as the cyclic stress experienced during vibration of the material, internal stresses in the ceramic cause the material to deform via twinning, domain rotation or domain motion thereby dissipating the vibrational energy. The ferroelastic ceramic particulates may also act as reinforcements to impro...

  15. Development of advanced ceramics at AECL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, B.J.F.; MacEwen, S.R.; Sawicka, B.D.; Hayward, P.J.; Sridhar, S.

    1986-12-01

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) has a long history of developing ceramics for nuclear fission and fusion applications. AECL is now applying its multidisciplinary materials R and D capabilities, including unique capabilities in ceramic processing and nondestructive evaluation, to develop advanced ceramic materials for commercial and industrial applications. This report provides an overview of the facilities and programs associated with the development of advanced ceramics at AECL

  16. Ceramic/metal seals. [refractory materials for hermetic seals for lighium-metal sulfide batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredbenner, A. M.

    1977-01-01

    Design criteria are discussed for a hermetic seal capable of withstanding the 450 C operating temperature of a lithium-metal sulfide battery system. A mechanical seal consisting of two high strength alloy metal sleeves welded or brazed to a conductor assembly and pressed onto a ceramic is described. The conductor center passes through the ceramic but is not sealed to it. The seal is effected on the outside of the taper where the tubular part is pressed down over and makes contact.

  17. What every surgeon should know about Ceramic-on-Ceramic bearings in young patients

    OpenAIRE

    Hernigou, Philippe; Roubineau, Fran?ois; Bouthors, Charlie; Flouzat-Lachaniette, Charles-Henri

    2016-01-01

    Based on the exceptional tribological behaviour and on the relatively low biological activity of ceramic particles, Ceramic-on-Ceramic (CoC) total hip arthroplasty (THA) presents significant advantages CoC bearings decrease wear and osteolysis, the cumulative long-term risk of dislocation, muscle atrophy, and head-neck taper corrosion. However, there are still concerns regarding the best technique for implantation of ceramic hips to avoid fracture, squeaking, and revision of ceramic hips with...

  18. Durability of feldspathic veneering ceramic on glass-infiltrated alumina ceramics after long-term thermocycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesquita, A M M; Ozcan, M; Souza, R O A; Kojima, A N; Nishioka, R S; Kimpara, E T; Bottino, M A

    2010-01-01

    This study compared the bond strength durability of a feldspathic veneering ceramic to glass-infiltrated reinforced ceramics in dry and aged conditions. Disc shaped (thickness: 4 mm, diameter: 4 mm) of glass-infiltrated alumina (In-Ceram Alumina) and glass-infiltrated alumina reinforced by zirconia (In-Ceram Zirconia) core ceramic specimens (N=48, N=12 per groups) were constructed according to the manufacturers' recommendations. Veneering ceramic (VITA VM7) was fired onto the core ceramics using a mold. The core-veneering ceramic assemblies were randomly divided into two conditions and tested either immediately after specimen preparation (Dry) or following 30000 thermocycling (5-55 ºC±1; dwell time: 30 seconds). Shear bond strength test was performed in a universal testing machine (cross-head speed: 1 mm/min). Failure modes were analyzed using optical microscope (x20). The bond strength data (MPa) were analyzed using ANOVA (α=0.05). Thermocycling did not decrease the bond strength results for both In-Ceram Alumina (30.6±8.2 MPa; P=0.2053) and In-Ceram zirconia (32.6±9 MPa; P=0.3987) core ceramic-feldspathic veneering ceramic combinations when compared to non-aged conditions (28.1±6.4 MPa, 29.7±7.3 MPa, respectively). There were also no significant differences between adhesion of the veneering ceramic to either In-Ceram Alumina or In-Ceram Zirconia ceramics (P=0.3289). Failure types were predominantly a mixture of adhesive failure between the veneering and the core ceramic together with cohesive fracture of the veneering ceramic. Long-term thermocycling aging conditions did not impair the adhesion of the veneering ceramic to the glass-infiltrated alumina core ceramics tested.

  19. Dense high temperature ceramic oxide superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landingham, Richard L.

    1993-01-01

    Dense superconducting ceramic oxide articles of manufacture and methods for producing these articles are described. Generally these articles are produced by first processing these superconducting oxides by ceramic processing techniques to optimize materials properties, followed by reestablishing the superconducting state in a desired portion of the ceramic oxide composite.

  20. Ceramic component with reinforced protection against radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubuisson, J.; Laville, H.; Le Gal, P.

    1986-01-01

    Ceramic components hardened against radiations are claimed (for example capacitors or ceramic substrates for semiconductors). They are prepared with a sintered ceramic containing a high proportion of heavy atoms (for instance barium titanate and a bismuth salt) provided with a glass layer containing a high proportion of light atoms. The two materials are joined by vitrification producing a diffusion zone at the interface [fr

  1. Study of brazilian market of advanvced ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veiga, M.M.; Soares, P.S.M.; SIlva, A.P. da; Alvarinho, S.B.

    1989-01-01

    The brazilian actual market survey of advanced ceramics, divided in sectors according to their function is described. The electroelectronics, magnetics, optics, mechanics and nuclears ceramics are presented. A forecasting of the brazilian market in advanced ceramics are also mentioned. (C.G.C.) [pt

  2. Polymer-ceramic piezoelectric composites (PZT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bassora, L.A.; Eiras, J.A.

    1992-01-01

    Polymer-ceramic piezoelectric transducers, with 1-3 of connectivity were prepared with different concentration of ceramic material. Piezoelectric composites, with equal electromechanical coupling factor and acoustic impedance of one third from that ceramic transducer, were obtained when the fractionary volume of PZT reach 30%. (C.G.C.)

  3. Metallized ceramic vacuum pipe for particle beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, B.L.; Featherby, M.

    1990-01-01

    A ceramic vacuum chamber segment in the form of a long pipe of rectangular cross section has been assembled from standard shapes of alumina ceramic using glass bonding techniques. Prior to final glass bonding, the internal walls of the pipe are metallized using an electroplating technology. These advanced processes allow for precision patterning and conductivity control of surface conducting films. The ability to lay down both longitudinal and transverse conductor patterns separated by insulating layers of glass give the accelerator designer considerable freedom in tailoring longitudinal and transverse beam pipe impedances. Assembly techniques of these beam pipes are followed through two iterations of semi-scale pipe sections made using candidate materials and processes. These demonstrate the feasibility of the concepts and provide parts for electrical characterization and for further refinement of the approach. In a parallel effort, a variety of materials, joining processes and assembly procedures have been tried to assure flexibility and reliability in the construction of 10-meter long sections to any required specifications

  4. Ceramics technology for advanced industrial gas turbines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anson, D.; Sheppard, W.J.; DeCorso, M.; Parks, W.J. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Recent developments in the fabrication of high strength ceramic materials and in their application to automotive and aerospace gas turbine engines may lead also to significant improvements in the performance of industrial gas turbines. This paper presents a brief review of the improvements projected in a study initiated by the U.S. Department of Energy. The future costs of power generated by small gas turbines (up to 25 MW) are predicted, as well as the potential for fuel savings. Gas turbines in this size range are used extensively for gas compression and for cogeneration, as well as in a variety of more diverse applications. This paper includes results of analyses of the ways in which changes in gas turbine cost and performance are likely to affect market penetration. These results lead to predictions of future savings in U.S. fuel consumption in the industrial sector that would result. The paper also presents a brief overview of the scope of a suggested R and D program, with an appropriate schedule, which would provide a technical basis for achieving the projected results. Important parts of this program would cover ceramic design and fabrication technology, engine development and demonstration, and combustion technology

  5. Surface treatment of ceramic articles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komvopoulos, K.; Brown, I.G.; Wei, B.; Anders, S.; Anders, A.; Bhatia, C.S.

    1998-01-01

    A process is disclosed for producing an article with improved ceramic surface properties including providing an article having a ceramic surface, and placing the article onto a conductive substrate holder in a hermetic enclosure. Thereafter a low pressure ambient is provided in the hermetic enclosure. A plasma including ions of solid materials is produced the ceramic surface of the article being at least partially immersed in a macroparticle free region of the plasma. While the article is immersed in the macroparticle free region, a bias of the substrate holder is biased between a low voltage at which material from the plasma condenses on the surface of the article and a high negative voltage at which ions from the plasma are implanted into the article. 15 figs

  6. Dynamic properties of ceramic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grady, D.E.

    1995-02-01

    The present study offers new data and analysis on the transient shock strength and equation-of-state properties of ceramics. Various dynamic data on nine high strength ceramics are provided with wave profile measurements, through velocity interferometry techniques, the principal observable. Compressive failure in the shock wave front, with emphasis on brittle versus ductile mechanisms of deformation, is examined in some detail. Extensive spall strength data are provided and related to the theoretical spall strength, and to energy-based theories of the spall process. Failure waves, as a mechanism of deformation in the transient shock process, are examined. Strength and equation-of-state analysis of shock data on silicon carbide, boron carbide, tungsten carbide, silicon dioxide and aluminum nitride is presented with particular emphasis on phase transition properties for the latter two. Wave profile measurements on selected ceramics are investigated for evidence of rate sensitive elastic precursor decay in the shock front failure process

  7. Wear mechanisms of Al2O3/TiC/Mo/Ni ceramic wire-drawing dies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Jianxin; Yang Xuefeng; Wang Jinghai

    2006-01-01

    Al 2 O 3 /TiC/Mo/Ni ceramic composites were produced by hot-pressing for the use of wire drawing dies. The fundamental properties of these ceramic die materials were examined. Wire drawing tests were carried out on the 65Mn steel wire with these ceramic dies. Finite element method (FEM) was used as a means of numerically evaluating stress and its distribution inside the ceramic drawing dies. Worn bore surfaces of the ceramic drawing dies were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The wear mechanisms of the ceramic drawing dies were investigated. Detailed observations and analyses of the die wear surface have revealed that the most common failure of the ceramic drawing die is the wear at its approach zone. FEM analysis showed that the compressive stresses on both sides of the corners at the approach zone are higher than those of other parts of the ceramic drawing die. Abrasive and adhesive wear were found to be the predominant wear mechanisms through the whole approach zone owing to the greater compressive stresses. Examination of the center bore surface at the die bearing zone of the ceramic drawing dies demonstrated that the wear occurred by light abrasive, no adhesion wear was observed

  8. Chemical characterization of marajoara ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyota, Rosimeiri Galbiati

    2009-01-01

    In this study the elemental concentration of Ce, Co, Cr, Cs, Eu, Fe, Hf, K, La, Lu, Na, Nd, Rb, Sc, Sm, Ta, Tb, Th, U, Yb and Zn were determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) in 204 fragments of Marajoara archaeological ceramics, of which 156 were provided by the Archaeology and Ethnology Museum of Sao Paulo University (MAE) and 48 were provided by Dr. Denise Pahl Schaan, Marajo Museum curator. Also, 9 contemporary ceramics produced and marketed at Marajo Island were analyzed. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) analyses were performed in 8 archaeological samples and 1 contemporary sample in order to identify the burning temperature of the samples. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses were performed in 13 archaeological samples and 2 contemporary samples for the investigation of their mineralogical composition. Mahalanobis distance was used for the study of outlier while modified filter was used for the study of the temper added to the ceramic paste. Result interpretation was performed using cluster analysis, principal components analysis and discriminant analysis. Procrustes analysis was used for variable selection and it showed that the Ce, Fe, Eu, Hf, K and Th variables are adequate for the characterization of the analyzed samples. The comparative study among the archaeological and contemporary ceramics showed the arrangement of two well-defined and close groups for the archaeological samples and a third, distant group for the contemporary ones. This result indicates that the archaeological and contemporary ceramics differ in their composition. EPR and XRD analysis were inconclusive for the differentiation of archaeological and contemporary ceramics. (author)

  9. Uranium determination in dental ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobson, I.; Gamboa, I.; Espinosa, G.; Moreno, A.

    1984-01-01

    There are many reports of high uranium concentration in dental ceramics, so they require to be controlled. The SSNTD is an optional method to determine the uranium concentration. In this work the analysis of several commercial dental ceramics used regularly in Mexico by dentists is presented. The chemical and electrochemical processes are used and the optimal conditions for high sensitivity are determined. CR-39 (allyl diglycol polycarbonate) was used as detector. The preliminary results show some materials with high uranium concentrations. Next step will be the analysis of equivalent dose and the effects in the public health. (author)

  10. Fiscal 1999 achievement report on research and development of industrial technologies. Research and development of synergy ceramics; 1999 nendo sangyo kagaku gijutsu kenkyu kaihatsu seika hokokusho. Synergy ceramics no kenkyu kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    Efforts are conducted in the two fields of (1) survey and research and (2) development of technology for evaluating high temperature dynamic corrosion characteristics of heat resistant ceramics. In field (1), a comprehensive survey is conducted, an application study is conducted about high temperature gas separating ceramic membranes, and efforts are made to put to practical use ceramic parts manufactured by a low cost production process. In the application study of ceramic membranes, technologies are developed for a process of manufacturing high temperature gas separating porous ceramic membranes capable of separating and purifying gas emissions and gas ingredients, which involves the development of technologies for improving on gas separation and purification functions, development of technology of providing catalyst support function, technology of porous membrane formation, evaluation of separation characteristics, and so forth. In an application study for ceramic parts manufactured by a low cost manufacturing process, which involves structural ceramics, optimization is accomplished for materials synthesizing technologies by means of mechanical alloying, and cylinder liners are fabricated and evaluated for a natural gas engine made of silicon nitride based ceramics. In field (2), a high temperature dynamic corrosion testing device is built for heat shield coatings. (NEDO)

  11. Effect of ceramic calcium-phosphorus ratio on chondrocyte-mediated biosynthesis and mineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boushell, Margaret K; Khanarian, Nora T; LeGeros, Raquel Z; Lu, Helen H

    2017-10-01

    The osteochondral interface functions as a structural barrier between cartilage and bone, maintaining tissue integrity postinjury and during homeostasis. Regeneration of this calcified cartilage region is thus essential for integrative cartilage healing, and hydrogel-ceramic composite scaffolds have been explored for calcified cartilage formation. The objective of this study is to test the hypothesis that Ca/P ratio of the ceramic phase of the composite scaffold regulates chondrocyte biosynthesis and mineralization potential. Specifically, the response of deep zone chondrocytes to two bioactive ceramics with different calcium-phosphorus ratios (1.35 ± 0.01 and 1.41 ± 0.02) was evaluated in agarose hydrogel scaffolds over two weeks in vitro. It was observed that the ceramic with higher calcium-phosphorus ratio enhanced chondrocyte proliferation, glycosaminoglycan production, and induced an early onset of alkaline phosphorus activity, while the ceramic with lower calcium-phosphorus ratio performed similarly to the ceramic-free control. These results underscore the importance of ceramic bioactivity in directing chondrocyte response, and demonstrate that Ca/P ratio is a key parameter to be considered in osteochondral scaffold design. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 105A: 2694-2702, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Fracture mechanics of ceramics. Vol. 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradt, R.C.; Evans, A.G.; Hasselman, D.P.; Lange, F.F.

    1986-01-01

    This volume, together with volume 8, constitutes the proceedings of an international symposium on the fracture mechanics of ceramics. The topics discussed in this volume include the toughening of ceramics by whisker reinforcement; the mechanical properties of SiCwhisker-reinforced TZP; the fracture of brittle rock and oil shale under dynamic explosive loading; impact damage models of ceramic coatings used in gas turbine and diesel engines; the use of exploratory data analysis for the safety evaluation of structural ceramics; and proof testing methods for the reliability of structural ceramics used in gas turbines

  13. MHD oxidant intermediate temperature ceramic heater study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, A. W.; Chait, I. L.; Saari, D. P.; Marksberry, C. L.

    1981-09-01

    The use of three types of directly fired ceramic heaters for preheating oxygen enriched air to an intermediate temperature of 1144K was investigated. The three types of ceramic heaters are: (1) a fixed bed, periodic flow ceramic brick regenerative heater; (2) a ceramic pebble regenerative heater. The heater design, performance and operating characteristics under conditions in which the particulate matter is not solidified are evaluated. A comparison and overall evaluation of the three types of ceramic heaters and temperature range determination at which the particulate matter in the MHD exhaust gas is estimated to be a dry powder are presented.

  14. Ceramic nanostructures and methods of fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripley, Edward B [Knoxville, TN; Seals, Roland D [Oak Ridge, TN; Morrell, Jonathan S [Knoxville, TN

    2009-11-24

    Structures and methods for the fabrication of ceramic nanostructures. Structures include metal particles, preferably comprising copper, disposed on a ceramic substrate. The structures are heated, preferably in the presence of microwaves, to a temperature that softens the metal particles and preferably forms a pool of molten ceramic under the softened metal particle. A nano-generator is created wherein ceramic material diffuses through the molten particle and forms ceramic nanostructures on a polar site of the metal particle. The nanostructures may comprise silica, alumina, titania, or compounds or mixtures thereof.

  15. Fabrication and testing of ceramic UO{sub 2} fuel - I-III. Part II, Fabrication of sintered pressed samples UO{sub 2} (Final report); Izrada i ispitivanje keramickog goriva na bazi UO{sub 2}- I-III, II Deo - Dobijanje sinterovanih ispresaka UO{sub 2} (zavrsni izvestaj)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novakovic, M; Ristic, M M [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Laboratorija za termotehniku reaktora, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1961-12-15

    Procedure for fabrication of sintered ceramic UO{sub 2} pellets was developed in the Department of reactor materials. The tasks described in this report deal with design and construction of laboratory equipment for treatment of ceramic materials, and fabrication of UO{sub 2} pellets. The procedure was based on cold pressing of appropriately prepared powder and sintering of the of thus obtained pressed samples.

  16. Metallography and thermal analysis of ceramic nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tebaldi, V.

    1988-01-01

    The book contains two parts: the ceramography laboratory and the thermal treatment laboratory. After general remarks on sintering the first part includes sample preparation for ceramography (grinding, polishing, etching), microscopic examination and quantitative image analysis. The second part deals with temperature measurement, oxide/metal ratio determination, thermogravimetry, differential thermal analysis (DTA), melting point determination and constitution of phase diagrams. Installation of a Pu laboratory, sample decontamination, and research with a microprobe are described. 188 photomicrographs present the microstructure of ceramics based on U, Pu and higher actinides

  17. A new classification system for all-ceramic and ceramic-like restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gracis, Stefano; Thompson, Van P; Ferencz, Jonathan L; Silva, Nelson R F A; Bonfante, Estevam A

    2015-01-01

    Classification systems for all-ceramic materials are useful for communication and educational purposes and warrant continuous revisions and updates to incorporate new materials. This article proposes a classification system for ceramic and ceramic-like restorative materials in an attempt to systematize and include a new class of materials. This new classification system categorizes ceramic restorative materials into three families: (1) glass-matrix ceramics, (2) polycrystalline ceramics, and (3) resin-matrix ceramics. Subfamilies are described in each group along with their composition, allowing for newly developed materials to be placed into the already existing main families. The criteria used to differentiate ceramic materials are based on the phase or phases present in their chemical composition. Thus, an all-ceramic material is classified according to whether a glass-matrix phase is present (glass-matrix ceramics) or absent (polycrystalline ceramics) or whether the material contains an organic matrix highly filled with ceramic particles (resin-matrix ceramics). Also presented are the manufacturers' clinical indications for the different materials and an overview of the different fabrication methods and whether they are used as framework materials or monolithic solutions. Current developments in ceramic materials not yet available to the dental market are discussed.

  18. Industrial ceramics in Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regueiro, M.

    2000-02-01

    Full Text Available The Spanish ceramic industry has experienced a amazing growth in the last four years. Such expansion has affected all sector, but has been particularly noteworthy in those directly related to construction: tiles. glazes, bricks and roof tiles. A combination of an extraordinary exporting effort, together with a record figure in new housing projects (415 000 houses in 1999, are responsible for such outburst. Other sectors, such as refractories have undergone significant growths due to the high rate of steel production increase, also in historical record figures (15m t in 1999. All this sectors doubled altogether the growing rate of their main European competitors. Raw material production has had an even more effervescent trend, almost doubling 1995 production. Such dynamic growth has been associated to a remarkable quality increase and to an unparalleled technological innovation process.

    La industria española de la cerámica ha experimentado un notable crecimiento en los últimos cuatro años; expansión que ha alcanzado a todos los sectores, pero que ha sido especialmente notable en los mas directamente asociados a la construcción: revestimientos, esmaltes, tejas y ladrillos. La combinación de un extraordinario esfuerzo exportador unido a las cifras récord en la viviendas iniciadas, 415 000 en 1999, justifican este auge. Otros sectores como refractarios han experimentado crecimientos significativos ante el ritmo elevado en la producción de acero, que alcanzó asimismo un récord histórico, 15 Mt en 1999. Para el conjunto de estos sectores el ritmo de crecimiento ha duplicado el de los principales competidores europeos. La producción de materias primas han experimentado un dinamismo aún mas elevado duplicándose prácticamente las cifras respecto a 1995. Este crecimiento ha estado asociado a un notable incremento en la calidad y en los procesos de innovación tecnológica.

  19. Dispersion toughened silicon carbon ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, G.C.

    1984-01-01

    Fracture resistant silicon carbide ceramics are provided by incorporating therein a particulate dispersoid selected from the group consisting of (a) a mixture of boron, carbon and tungsten, (b) a mixture of boron, carbon and molybdenum, (c) a mixture of boron, carbon and titanium carbide, (d) a mixture of aluminum oxide and zirconium oxide, and (e) boron nitride. 4 figures.

  20. Microstructural Design for Tough Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-10-01

    or Rockwell cones) where the contact pressure (i.e. the ’hardness’) is effectively independent of load (Sperisen, Carry and Mocellin 1986, Makino...148. RrrcHM, R. 0., 1988, Mater. Sci. Engng, A, 103, 15. SPERmEN, T., CARRY, C., and MOCELLIN , A, 1986, Fracture Mechanics of Ceramics, Vol. 8, edited

  1. Electrical Degradation in Ceramic Dielectrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-09-09

    and D. M. Smyth, " Positron Annihilation in Calcium-Doped Barium Titanate", in Electro- Ceramics and Solid State Ionsi, H. L. Tuller and D. M. Smyth...2 with the formation of ompensating oxygen vacancies, and this causes an increase in the ioni conductivity: 2CaO CaC + Call + 20 + (5) TiO2 --- V

  2. Natural Radioactivity in Ceramic Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abu Khadra, S.A.; Kamel, N.H.

    2005-01-01

    Ceramics are one of the most important types of the industrial building materials. The raw materials of the ceramic are made of a mixture of clay, feldspar, silica, talc kaolin minerals together with zirconium silicates (ZrSiO4).The ceramic raw materials and the final products contain naturally occurring radionuclide mainly U-238 and, Th-232 series, and the radioactive isotope of potassium K-40. Six raw ceramic samples were obtained from the Aracemco Company at Egypt together with a floor tile sample (final product) for measuring radioactive concentration levels., The activity of the naturally U-238, Th-232, and K-40 were determined as (Bq/kg) using gamma spectroscopy (Hyperactive pure germanium detector). Concentration of U and Th were determined in (ppm) using spectrophotometer technique by Arsenazo 111 and Piridy l-Azo -Resorcinol (PAR) indicators. Sequential extraction tests were carried out in order to determine the quantity of the radionuclide associated with various fractions as exchangeable, carbonate, acid soluble and in the residue. The results evaluated were compared to the associated activity indices (AI) that were defined by former USSR and West Germany

  3. Radiation Effects in Nuclear Ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Thomé

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to outstanding physicochemical properties, ceramics are key engineering materials in many industrial domains. The evaluation of the damage created in ceramics employed in radiative media is a challenging problem for electronic, space, and nuclear industries. In this latter field, ceramics can be used as immobilization forms for radioactive wastes, inert fuel matrices for actinide transmutation, cladding materials for gas-cooled fission reactors, and structural components for fusion reactors. Information on the radiation stability of nuclear materials may be obtained by simulating the different types of interactions involved during the slowing down of energetic particles with ion beams delivered by various types of accelerators. This paper presents a review of the radiation effects occurring in nuclear ceramics, with an emphasis on recent results concerning the damage accumulation processes. Energetic ions in the KeV-GeV range are used to explore the nuclear collision (at low energy and electronic excitation (at high energy regimes. The recovery by electronic excitation of the damage created by ballistic collisions (SHIBIEC process is also addressed.

  4. Ceramic microspheres for cementing applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2011-01-01

    A method and apparatus for manufacturing ceramic microspheres from industrial slag. The microspheres have a particle size of about 38 microns to about 150 microns. The microspheres are used to create a cement slurry having a density of at least about 11 lbs/g. The resultant cement slurry may then be

  5. Ceramic microspheres for cementing applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2010-01-01

    A method and apparatus for manufacturing ceramic microspheres from industrial slag. The microspheres have a particle size of about 38 microns to about 150 microns. The microspheres are used to create a cement slurry having a density of at least about 11 lbs/g. The resultant cement slurry may then be

  6. Ceramic microspheres for cementing applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2012-01-01

    A method and apparatus for manufacturing ceramic microspheres from industrial slag. The microspheres have a particle size of about 38 microns to about 150 microns. The microspheres are used to create a cement slurry having a density of at least about 11 lbs/g. The resultant cement slurry may then be

  7. [Posterior ceramic bonded partial restorations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainjot, Amélie; Vanheusden, Alain

    2006-01-01

    Posterior ceramic bonded partial restorations are conservative and esthetic approaches for compromised teeth. Overlays constitute a less invasive alternative for tooth tissues than crown preparations. With inlays and onlays they are also indicated in case of full arch or quadrant rehabilitations including several teeth. This article screens indications and realization of this type of restorations.

  8. GEORGIAN PRODUCTION PREFABRICATED CERAMIC FIREPLACE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaprindashvili, G.; Chemia, M.; Kartozia, L.

    2006-01-01

    General description and basic working principles of new construction prefabricated ceramic fireplace are given. The presented fireplace represents a unique synthesis of various fireplaces distributed in Georgian and some European countries; however, it is distinguished for its higher efficiency and other advantages. (author)

  9. Monolithic Integrated Ceramic Waveguide Filters

    OpenAIRE

    Hunter, IC; Sandhu, MY

    2014-01-01

    Design techniques for a new class of integrated monolithic high permittivity ceramic waveguide filters are presented. These filters enable a size reduction of 50% compared to air-filled TEM filters with the same unloaded Q-Factor. Designs for both chebyshev and asymmetric generalized chebyshev filter are presented, with experimental results for an 1800 MHz chebyshev filter showing excellent agreement with theory.

  10. Compositionally Graded Multilayer Ceramic Capacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hyun-Cheol; Zhou, Jie E; Maurya, Deepam; Yan, Yongke; Wang, Yu U; Priya, Shashank

    2017-09-27

    Multilayer ceramic capacitors (MLCC) are widely used in consumer electronics. Here, we provide a transformative method for achieving high dielectric response and tunability over a wide temperature range through design of compositionally graded multilayer (CGML) architecture. Compositionally graded MLCCs were found to exhibit enhanced dielectric tunability (70%) along with small dielectric losses (filters and power converters.

  11. Soft lithography of ceramic patterns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Göbel, Ole; Nedelcu, M.; Steiner, U.

    2007-01-01

    Polymer-based precursor solutions are patterned using a soft-lithographic patterning technique to yield sub-micrometer-sized ceramic patterns. By using a polymer-metal-nitrate solution as a lithographic resist, we demonstrate a micromolding procedure using a simple rubber stamp that yields a

  12. Science and Technology of Ceramics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    These ceramics are developed by chemical synthesis, in other words, they ... Science in 1980 and was a post doctoral ... complex crystal structures that have anisotropic characteristics. (Box 1) .... is a rare-earth or transition metal ion) and hexagonal ferrites. .... dielectric loss factor and dielectric strength normally determine.

  13. Photovoltaic effect in ferroelectric ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, D. J.; Linz, A.; Jenssen, H. P.

    1982-01-01

    The ceramic structure was simulated in a form that is more tractable to correlation between experiment and theory. Single crystals (of barium titanate) were fabricated in a simple corrugated structure in which the pedestals of the corrugation simulated the grain while the intervening cuts could be filled with materials simulating the grain boundaries. The observed photovoltages were extremely small (100 mv).

  14. Doubled-ended ceramic thyratron

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    The double-ended ceramic thyratron CX 1171 B, with its coaxial voltage divider for the SPS. Such a switch, paralleled by three ignitrons in series forms the "thyragnitron" arrangement, and can switch 10 kA, 25 ms pulses, with very fast rise times.

  15. Ceramic matrix composite article and process of fabricating a ceramic matrix composite article

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairo, Ronald Robert; DiMascio, Paul Stephen; Parolini, Jason Robert

    2016-01-12

    A ceramic matrix composite article and a process of fabricating a ceramic matrix composite are disclosed. The ceramic matrix composite article includes a matrix distribution pattern formed by a manifold and ceramic matrix composite plies laid up on the matrix distribution pattern, includes the manifold, or a combination thereof. The manifold includes one or more matrix distribution channels operably connected to a delivery interface, the delivery interface configured for providing matrix material to one or more of the ceramic matrix composite plies. The process includes providing the manifold, forming the matrix distribution pattern by transporting the matrix material through the manifold, and contacting the ceramic matrix composite plies with the matrix material.

  16. Lodo gerado na estação de tratamento de água Tamanduá, Foz do Iguaçu, PR, como aditivo em argilas para cerâmica vermelha: Parte I: caracterização do lodo e de argilas do terceiro planalto paranaense Generated sludge at water treatment station Tamanduá, Foz do Iguaçu, PR, as additive in red clay for ceramics: Part I: characterization of sludge and clay Paraná third plateau

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Tartari

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Com a finalidade de pesquisar a incorporação do lodo gerado na ETA Tamanduá em massas para cerâmica vermelha, como método de destinação final, o presente artigo tem como objetivo caracterizar o lodo da ETA Tamanduá e quatro argilas da região Oeste do Paraná utilizadas na produção de cerâmica vermelha estrutural e de artesanato, visando avaliar o potencial tecnológico deste resíduo. Nessa primeira etapa experimental de caracterização, determinaram-se a umidade, composição química por fluorescência de raios X, compostos cristalinos por difração de raios X, limites de consistência de solos (Atterberg, distribuição granulométrica e a estrutura das partículas por microscopia eletrônica de varredura (MEV. Destaca-se que as argilas possuem propriedades favoráveis para produção de cerâmica vermelha. Já o lodo, possui características elementares de matéria-prima de baixa plasticidade, composto majoritariamente por SiO2, Al2O3 e Fe2O3, com perda ao fogo elevada (20,4%, baixo índice de plasticidade igual a (7,4, fração de argila correspondentes a 5,3%. As características observadas sugerem a possibilidade de, na segunda etapa, incorporar o lodo com umidade natural (75% como aditivo na massa cerâmica, visando reduzir a retração, bem como minimizar a adição de água às massas para produção de cerâmica vermelha.With a view to investigate the incorporation of sludge generated in ETA Tamanduá masses for red ceramics, such as disposal method, this paper aims to characterize the sludge ETA Tamanduá and four clays of western Paraná used to produce structural red ceramic and artistic ceramic, to evaluate the technological potential of this residue. In this first experimental phase of characterization, we determined the moisture, chemical composition by X-ray fluorescence, crystalline compounds by X-ray diffraction, Atterberg limits of soils (Atterberg, size distribution and structure of particles by electron

  17. Process Development of Porcelain Ceramic Material with Binder Jetting Process for Dental Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyanaji, Hadi; Zhang, Shanshan; Lassell, Austin; Zandinejad, Amirali; Yang, Li

    2016-03-01

    Custom ceramic structures possess significant potentials in many applications such as dentistry and aerospace where extreme environments are present. Specifically, highly customized geometries with adequate performance are needed for various dental prostheses applications. This paper demonstrates the development of process and post-process parameters for a dental porcelain ceramic material using binder jetting additive manufacturing (AM). Various process parameters such as binder amount, drying power level, drying time and powder spread speed were studied experimentally for their effect on geometrical and mechanical characteristics of green parts. In addition, the effects of sintering and printing parameters on the qualities of the densified ceramic structures were also investigated experimentally. The results provide insights into the process-property relationships for the binder jetting AM process, and some of the challenges of the process that need to be further characterized for the successful adoption of the binder jetting technology in high quality ceramic fabrications are discussed.

  18. Interface Oscillation in the Side-by-Side (SBS) Tape Casting of Functionally Graded Ceramics (FGCs)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jabbari, Masoud; Bulatova, Regina; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2012-01-01

    temperature of the magnetic regenerator varies along the paths. The main goal of this research is to study the multiple material flow in SBS tape casting and analyze its influence on the interface between the stripes. The materials used for the experimental part are La0.85Sr0.15MnO3 and Ce0.9Gd0.1O2ceramic...... is a common process in producing multilayer ceramics, which now is used for producing side-by-side (SBS) functionally graded ceramics (FGCs). These FGCs are mostly used in the magnetic refrigeration sectors due to the varying composition of the magnetocaloric materials so that the magnetic transition...... slurries. The rheological behavior of the slurries are extracted from experiments and used in the ANSYS FLUENT commercial code to develop a fluid flow model for the non-Newtonian ceramic slurries and evaluate the interface oscillation between the stripes in SBS tape casting. The Numerical results show...

  19. Effect of Powder Grain Size on Microstructure and Magnetic Properties of Hexagonal Barium Ferrite Ceramic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Li-Huan; Shen, Si-Yun; Zheng, Hui; Zheng, Peng; Wu, Qiong; Zheng, Liang

    2018-05-01

    Compact hexagonal barium ferrite (BaFe12O19, BaM) ceramics with excellent magnetic properties have been prepared from powder with the optimal grain size. The dependence of the microstructure and magnetic properties of the ceramics on powder grain size was studied in detail. Single-phase hexagonal barium ferrite powder with grain size of 177 nm, 256 nm, 327 nm, and 454 nm was obtained by calcination under different conditions. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that 327-nm powder was beneficial for obtaining homogeneous grain size and compact ceramic. In addition, magnetic hysteresis loops and complex permeability spectra demonstrated that the highest saturation magnetization (67.2 emu/g) and real part of the permeability (1.11) at 1 GHz were also obtained using powder with grain size of 327 nm. This relationship between the powder grain size and the properties of the resulting BaM ceramic could be significant for development of microwave devices.

  20. Low-pressure injection molding of alumina ceramics using a carnauba wax binder: preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quevedo Nogueira, R.E.F.; Bezerra, A.C.; Santos, F.C. dos [Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica, Centro de Tecnologia-UFC, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Sousa, M.R. de; Acchar, W. [Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica, Univ. Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, UFRN-Campus Univ., Natal, RN (Brazil)

    2001-07-01

    Carnauba wax, a natural product from Northeastern Brazil, has found application in the processing of ceramics. However, the use of pure carnauba wax is not recommended due to its narrow melting range and poor mechanical properties. In the present work carnauba wax based organic vehicles with the addition of low-density polyethylene and stearic acid were developed for use in the low-pressure injection molding of alumina ceramics. Viscosimetric testing was employed for the determination of optimal composition of the organic vehicle. The optimal content of ceramic powder in the mixture was also determined. All the materials used are easily available in the Brazilian market. A simple ceramic part was injected at low pressures (0.6 MPa) using a semi-automatic injection molding machine. For this purpose a double cavity mold was designed and built. Preliminary results demonstrate the technical viability of the process using the organic vehicle developed. (orig.)

  1. Fluorescent Lamp Glass Waste Incorporation into Clay Ceramic: A Perfect Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais, Alline Sardinha Cordeiro; Vieira, Carlos Maurício Fontes; Rodriguez, Rubén Jesus Sanchez; Monteiro, Sergio Neves; Candido, Veronica Scarpini; Ferreira, Carlos Luiz

    2016-09-01

    The mandatory use of fluorescent lamps as part of a Brazilian energy-saving program generates a huge number of spent fluorescent lamps (SFLs). After operational life, SFLs cannot be disposed as common garbage owing to mercury and lead contamination. Recycling methods separate contaminated glass tubes and promote cleaning for reuse. In this work, glass from decontaminated SFLs was incorporated into clay ceramics, not only as an environmental solution for such glass wastes and clay mining reduction but also due to technical and economical advantages. Up to 30 wt.% of incorporation, a significant improvement in fired ceramic flexural strength and a decrease in water absorption was observed. A prospective analysis showed clay ceramic incorporation as an environmentally correct and technical alternative for recycling the enormous amount of SFLs disposed of in Brazil. This could also be a solution for other world clay ceramic producers, such as US, China and some European countries.

  2. Application of neutron activation analysis in study of ancient ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Guoxia; Zhao Weijuan; Gao Zhengyao; Xie Jianzhong; Huang Zhongxiang; Jia Xiuqin; Han Song

    2000-01-01

    Trace-elements in ancient ceramics and imitative ancient ceramics were determined by neutron activation analysis (NAA). The NAA data are then analyzed by fuzzy cluster method and the trend cluster diagram is obtained. The raw material sources of ancient ceramics and imitative ancient ceramics are determined. The path for improving quality of imitative ancient ceramics is found

  3. Insulating Structural Ceramics Program, Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrews, Mark J.; Tandon, Raj; Ott, Eric; Hind, Abi Akar; Long, Mike; Jensen, Robert; Wheat, Leonard; Cusac, Dave; Lin, H. T.; Wereszczak, Andrew A.; Ferber, Mattison K.; Lee, Sun Kun; Yoon, Hyung K.; Moreti, James; Park, Paul; Rockwood, Jill; Boyer, Carrie; Ragle, Christie; Balmer-Millar, Marilou; Aardahl, Chris; Habeger, Craig; Rappe, Ken; Tran, Diana; Koshkarian, Kent; Readey, Michael

    2005-11-22

    New materials and corresponding manufacturing processes are likely candidates for diesel engine components as society and customers demand lower emission engines without sacrificing power and fuel efficiency. Strategies for improving thermal efficiency directly compete with methodologies for reducing emissions, and so the technical challenge becomes an optimization of controlling parameters to achieve both goals. Approaches being considered to increase overall thermal efficiency are to insulate certain diesel engine components in the combustion chamber, thereby increasing the brake mean effective pressure ratings (BMEP). Achieving higher BMEP rating by insulating the combustion chamber, in turn, requires advances in material technologies for engine components such as pistons, port liners, valves, and cylinder heads. A series of characterization tests were performed to establish the material properties of ceramic powder. Mechanical chacterizations were also obtained from the selected materials as a function of temperature utilizing ASTM standards: fast fracture strength, fatique resistance, corrosion resistance, thermal shock, and fracture toughness. All ceramic materials examined showed excellent wear properties and resistance to the corrosive diesel engine environments. The study concluded that the ceramics examined did not meet all of the cylinder head insert structural design requirements. Therefore we do not recommend at this time their use for this application. The potential for increased stresses and temperatures in the hot section of the diesel engine combined with the highly corrosive combustion products and residues has driven the need for expanded materials capability for hot section engine components. Corrosion and strength requirements necessitate the examination of more advanced high temperture alloys. Alloy developments and the understanding of processing, structure, and properties of supperalloy materials have been driven, in large part, by the gas

  4. A high temperature testing system for ceramic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemann, John

    1994-01-01

    Ceramic composites are presently being developed for high temperature use in heat engine and space power system applications. The operating temperature range is expected to be 1090 to 1650 C (2000 F to 3000 F). Very little material data is available at these temperatures and, therefore, it is desirable to thoroughly characterize the basic unidirectional fiber reinforced ceramic composite. This includes testing mainly for mechanical material properties at high temperatures. The proper conduct of such characterization tests requires the development of a tensile testing system includes unique gripping, heating, and strain measuring devices which require special considerations. The system also requires an optimized specimen shape. The purpose of this paper is to review various techniques for measuring displacements or strains, preferably at elevated temperatures. Due to current equipment limitations it is assumed that the specimen is to be tested at a temperature of 1430 C (2600F) in an oxidizing atmosphere. For the most part, previous high temperature material characterization tests, such as flexure and tensile tests, have been performed in inert atmospheres. Due to the harsh environment in which the ceramic specimen is to be tested, many conventional strain measuring techniques can not be applied. Initially a brief description of the more commonly used mechanical strain measuring techniques is given. Major advantages and disadvantages with their application to high temperature tensile testing of ceramic composites are discussed. Next, a general overview is given for various optical techniques. Advantages and disadvantages which are common to these techniques are noted. The optical methods for measuring strain or displacement are categorized into two sections. These include real-time techniques. Finally, an optical technique which offers optimum performance with the high temperature tensile testing of ceramic composites is recommended.

  5. Ceramic technology report. Semi-annual progress report, April 1994--September 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, D.R.

    1995-06-01

    The Ceramic Technology Project was originally developed by the Department of Energy`s Office of Transportation Systems (OTS) in Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. This project, part of the OTS`s Materials Development Program, was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTS`s automotive technology programs. Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the Department of Energy (DOE), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and Department of Defense (DoD) advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. However, these programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. In response to extensive input from industry, the plan is to extend the engine types which were previously supported (advanced gas turbine and low-heat-rejection diesel engines) to include near-term (5-10 years) applications in conventional automobile and diesel truck engines. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to U.S. industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities. A systematic approach to reducing the cost of components is envisioned. The work elements are as follows: economic cost modeling, ceramic machining, powder synthesis, alternative forming and densification processes, yield improvement, system design studies, standards development, low-expansion ceramics, and testing and data base development.

  6. Removing Pathogens Using Nano-Ceramic-Fiber Filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepper, Frederick; Kaledin, Leonid

    2005-01-01

    particle size is only 2 nanometers, about the size of a DNA molecule, yet the NanoCeram syringe filter is capable of retaining the dyes as the fluid is passed through the syringe, without much back-pressure. Endotoxins, which are contaminants that are part of the residue of destroyed bacteria, can cause toxic shock and are therefore of major concern in pharmaceutical products. The NanoCeram syringe filter is capable of removing greater than 99.96 percent of the endotoxins.

  7. Translucency of dental ceramics with different thicknesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fu; Takahashi, Hidekazu; Iwasaki, Naohiko

    2013-07-01

    The increased use of esthetic restorations requires an improved understanding of the translucent characteristics of ceramic materials. Ceramic translucency has been considered to be dependent on composition and thickness, but less information is available about the translucent characteristics of these materials, especially at different thicknesses. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between translucency and the thickness of different dental ceramics. Six disk-shaped specimens of 8 glass ceramics (IPS e.max Press HO, MO, LT, HT, IPS e.max CAD LT, MO, AvanteZ Dentin, and Trans) and 5 specimens of 5 zirconia ceramics (Cercon Base, Zenotec Zr Bridge, Lava Standard, Lava Standard FS3, and Lava Plus High Translucency) were prepared following the manufacturers' instructions and ground to a predetermined thickness with a grinding machine. A spectrophotometer was used to measure the translucency parameters (TP) of the glass ceramics, which ranged from 2.0 to 0.6 mm, and of the zirconia ceramics, which ranged from 1.0 to 0.4 mm. The relationship between the thickness and TP of each material was evaluated using a regression analysis (α=.05). The TP values of the glass ceramics ranged from 2.2 to 25.3 and the zirconia ceramics from 5.5 to 15.1. There was an increase in the TP with a decrease in thickness, but the amount of change was material dependent. An exponential relationship with statistical significance (Pceramics and zirconia ceramics. The translucency of dental ceramics was significantly influenced by both material and thickness. The translucency of all materials increased exponentially as the thickness decreased. All of the zirconia ceramics evaluated in the present study showed some degree of translucency, which was less sensitive to thickness compared to that of the glass ceramics. Copyright © 2013 The Editorial Council of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Method of forming a ceramic to ceramic joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutler, Raymond Ashton; Hutchings, Kent Neal; Kleinlein, Brian Paul; Carolan, Michael Francis

    2010-04-13

    A method of joining at least two sintered bodies to form a composite structure, includes: providing a joint material between joining surfaces of first and second sintered bodies; applying pressure from 1 kP to less than 5 MPa to provide an assembly; heating the assembly to a conforming temperature sufficient to allow the joint material to conform to the joining surfaces; and further heating the assembly to a joining temperature below a minimum sintering temperature of the first and second sintered bodies. The joint material includes organic component(s) and ceramic particles. The ceramic particles constitute 40-75 vol. % of the joint material, and include at least one element of the first and/or second sintered bodies. Composite structures produced by the method are also disclosed.

  9. Ceramic fiber reinforced glass-ceramic matrix composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Narottam P. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A slurry of BSAS glass powders is cast into tapes which are cut to predetermined sizes. Mats of continuous chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-SiC fibers are alternately stacked with these matrix tapes. This tape-mat stack is warm-pressed to produce a 'green' composite which is heated to burn out organic constituents. The remaining interim material is then hot-pressed to form a BSAS glass-ceramic fiber-reinforced composite.

  10. Evaluation of Monolithic Ceramics and Ceramic Thermal Barrier Coatings for Diesel Engine Applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Swab, Jeffrey J

    2001-01-01

    The Metals and Ceramics Research Branch (MCRB) of the Weapons and Materials Research Directorate is providing ceramic material characterization and evaluation to the Tank Automotive Research, Development, and Engineering Center (TARDEC...

  11. Microstructure examination of the interface of the glass-ceramic insulator of the molybdenum frame of a vacuum tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spears, R.K.

    1980-01-01

    A common technique used in examining the structural integrity of a glass-ceramic insulator-molybdenum cylinder bond in a vacuum tube subassembly is to slit the outer molybdenum cylinder and separate it from the glass-ceramic insulator. Typically, a black glassy layer (0.001 to 0.002 in. thick) remains on the cylinder. This layer has been interpreted as a requirement for an adequate seal. A subassembly was found that did not exhibit this feature. Further investigation of approximately 100 subassemblies revealed four more parts lacking a black glassy layer. These parts were found to be from two production runs and from three glass-ceramic lots. A microstructural analysis showed that on those parts having a black glassy layer, the crystalline phase in the glass-ceramic grew to within one to two microns of the metal interface and then terminated. A dark region existed in the insulator between the interface and the termination of the crystalline phase. This was attributed to molybdenum oxide dissolved in the glass. On those parts where the glass-ceramic broke clean from the cylinder, the crystalline phase extended up to the metal. Also observed on these parts was the appearance of a dark region adjacent to the metal that extended approximately one to two microns into the glass-ceramic. This was assumed to be an oxide of molybdenum. This report presents information concerning the microstructure of the interface

  12. Production and study of the behavior of ceramic sintering SR2ALWO5,5 to application on the oil industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, M.M.; Ferreira, R.A. Sanguinetti; Yadava, Y.P.

    2011-01-01

    The complex perovskita ceramics based on tungsten are highly inert corrosive environments. For this reason, this type of ceramic is used in the manufacture of parts and components for the oil industry where the hostile environment is constant problem. We are working in manufacturing temperature sensors encased in ceramic to petroleum industry. Produce ceramic Sr 2 AlWO 5,5 thermo-mechanical process using a ball mill and subsequently heat treatment temperature of 1200°C for 24 hours. Studied the sintering behavior in the temperature range from 1200 to 1350 °C. In this process, the ceramic powder had a high homogeneity in terms of size and distribution of particles, which facilitates sintering at low temperature and shorter time. Structure and microstructure of calcined ceramic was analyzed by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy and presented at the congress. (author)

  13. New approach to design of ceramic/polymer material compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todt, A; Nestler, D; Trautmann, M; Wagner, G

    2016-01-01

    The damage tolerance of carbon fibre-reinforced ceramic-matrix composite materials depends on their porosity and can be rather significant. Complex structures are difficult to produce. The integration of simple geometric structures of ceramic-matrix composite materials in complex polymer-based hybrid structures is a possible approach of realising those structures. These hybrid material compounds, produced in a cost-efficient way, combine the different advantages of the individual components in one hybrid material compound. In addition the individual parts can be designed to fit a specific application and the resulting forces. All these different advantages result in a significant reduction of not only the production costs and the production time, but also opens up new areas of application, such as the large-scale production of wear-resistant and chemically inert, energy dampening components for reactors or in areas of medicine. The low wettability of the ceramic component however is a disadvantage of this approach. During the course of this contribution, different C/C composite materials with a specific porosity were produced, while adjusting the resin/hardening agent-ratio, as well as the processing parameters. After the production, different penetration tests were conducted with a polymer component. The final part of the article is comprised of the microstructural analysis and the explanation of the mechanical relationships. (paper)

  14. A fractographic study of clinically retrieved zirconia–ceramic and metal–ceramic fixed dental prostheses

    OpenAIRE

    Pang, Zhen; Chughtai, Asima; Sailer, Irena; Zhang, Yu

    2015-01-01

    A recent 3-year randomized controlled trial (RCT) of tooth supported three- to five-unit zirconia-ceramic and metal-ceramic posterior fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) revealed that veneer chipping and fracture in zirconia-ceramic systems occurred more frequently than those in metal-ceramic systems [1]. This study seeks to elucidate the underlying mechanisms responsible for the fracture phenomena observed in this RCT using a descriptive fractographic analysis

  15. Werkstoffwoche 98. Vol. 7. Symposium 9: Ceramics. Symposium 14: Simulation of ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinrich, J.; Ziegler, G.; Hermel, W.; Riedel, H.

    1999-01-01

    The leading subject of this proceedings volume is ceramic materials, with papers on the following subject clusters: Processing (infiltration, sintering, forming) - Physics and chemistry of ceramics (functional ceramics, SiC, ceramic precursors, microstructural properties) - Novel concepts (composites, damage induced by oxidation and mechanical stress, performance until damage under mechanical and thermal stress, layers, nanocomposites). 28 of the conference papers have been prepared for individual retrieval from the ENERGY database. (orig./CB) [de

  16. Y-TZP ceramic processing from coprecipitated powders: a comparative study with three commercial dental ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazar, Dolores R R; Bottino, Marco C; Ozcan, Mutlu; Valandro, Luiz Felipe; Amaral, Regina; Ussui, Valter; Bressiani, Ana H A

    2008-12-01

    (1) To synthesize 3mol% yttria-stabilized zirconia (3Y-TZP) powders via coprecipitation route, (2) to obtain zirconia ceramic specimens, analyze surface characteristics, and mechanical properties, and (3) to compare the processed material with three reinforced dental ceramics. A coprecipitation route was used to synthesize a 3mol% yttria-stabilized zirconia ceramic processed by uniaxial compaction and pressureless sintering. Commercially available alumina or alumina/zirconia ceramics, namely Procera AllCeram (PA), In-Ceram Zirconia Block (CAZ) and In-Ceram Zirconia (IZ) were chosen for comparison. All specimens (6mmx5mmx5mm) were polished and ultrasonically cleaned. Qualitative phase analysis was performed by XRD and apparent densities were measured on the basis of Archimedes principle. Ceramics were also characterized using SEM, TEM and EDS. The hardness measurements were made employing Vickers hardness test. Fracture toughness (K(IC)) was calculated. Data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's test (alpha=0.05). ANOVA revealed that the Vickers hardness (pceramic materials composition. It was confirmed that the PA ceramic was constituted of a rhombohedral alumina matrix, so-called alpha-alumina. Both CAZ and IZ ceramics presented tetragonal zirconia and alpha-alumina mixture of phases. The SEM/EDS analysis confirmed the presence of aluminum in PA ceramic. In the IZ and CAZ ceramics aluminum, zirconium and cerium in grains involved by a second phase containing aluminum, silicon and lanthanum were identified. PA showed significantly higher mean Vickers hardness values (H(V)) (18.4+/-0.5GPa) compared to vitreous CAZ (10.3+/-0.2GPa) and IZ (10.6+/-0.4GPa) ceramics. Experimental Y-TZP showed significantly lower results than that of the other monophased ceramic (PA) (pceramics (pceramic processing conditions led to ceramics with mechanical properties comparable to commercially available reinforced ceramic materials.

  17. Report on the FY 1999 survey on long-term energy technology strategy/basic survey for working out industrial technology strategy. Part 1. Technology strategy by field - material technology field (fine ceramics technology field); 1999 nendo choki energy gijutsu senryaku ni kansuru chosa. 1. Sangyo gijutsu senryaku sakutei kiban chosa (bun'yabetsu gijutsu senryaku (zairyo gijutsu bun'ya (fine ceramics gijutsu bun'ya)))

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    The paper described the results of the survey of the fine ceramics technology field relating to the FY 1999 long-term energy technology strategy. The fine ceramics industry is a new industry for which the future development is expected. It has far-reaching effects on other industries. Japan has the advantage over other countries. As subjects to remarkably develop the industry, needed are the long-term basic preparation which promotes technology innovation such as the promotion of the fundamental/creative R and D, construction of an industry/university liaison system, and arrangement of the intellectual base. Preparation of the competitive environment and promotion of policies paying attention to the market are needed which make the development under the private control by creative study/corporate activities possible. Also important are the demonstration of leadership and secure international competitive force in the light of Japan's international position. For the private-control development, the role and course of various groups should be made clear from a long-term aspect. It is desirable that university/government will newly develop innovative technology, and industry will make the present technology force more developmental and competitive. Support from the nation is requested for researches large in scale. (NEDO)

  18. Salt splitting with ceramic membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurath, D.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this task is to develop ceramic membrane technologies for salt splitting of radioactively contaminated sodium salt solutions. This technology has the potential to reduce the low-level waste (LLW) disposal volume, the pH and sodium hydroxide content for subsequent processing steps, the sodium content of interstitial liquid in high-level waste (HLW) sludges, and provide sodium hydroxide free of aluminum for recycle within processing plants at the DOE complex. Potential deployment sites include Hanford, Savannah River, and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The technical approach consists of electrochemical separation of sodium ions from the salt solution using sodium (Na) Super Ion Conductors (NaSICON). As the name implies, sodium ions are transported rapidly through these ceramic crystals even at room temperatures

  19. Ceramics: Durability and radiation effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ewing, R.C.; Lutze, W. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Weber, W.J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-05-01

    At present, there are three seriously considered options for the disposition of excess weapons plutonium: (1) incorporation, partial burn-up and direct disposal of MOX-fuel; (2) vitrification with defense waste and disposal as glass {open_quotes}logs{close_quotes}; (3) deep borehole disposal. The first two options provide a safeguard due to the high activity of fission products in the irradiated fuel and the defense waste. The latter option has only been examined in a preliminary manner, and the exact form of the plutonium has not been identified. In this paper, we review the potential for the immobilization of plutonium in highly durable crystalline ceramics apatite, pyrochlore, zirconolite, monazite and zircon. Based on available data, we propose zircon as the preferred crystalline ceramic for the permanent disposition of excess weapons plutonium.

  20. Interfaces in ceramic nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reeve, K.D.

    Internal interfaces in all-ceramic dispersion fuels (such as these for HTGRs) are discussed for two classes: BeO-based dispersions, and coated particles for graphite-based fuels. The following points are made: (1) The strength of a two-phase dispersion is controlled by the weaker dispersed phase bonded to the matrix. (2) Differential expansion between two phases can be controlled by an intermediate buffer zone of low density. (3) A thin ceramic coating should be in compression. (4) Chemical reaction between coating and substrate and mass transfer in service should be minimized. The problems of the nuclear fuel designer are to develop coatings for fission product retention, and to produce radiation-resistant interfaces. 44 references, 18 figures

  1. Silsesquioxane-derived ceramic fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, F. I.; Farmer, S. C.; Terepka, F. M.; Leonhardt, T. A.

    1991-01-01

    Fibers formed from blends of silsesquioxane polymers were characterized to study the pyrolytic conversion of these precursors to ceramics. The morphology of fibers pyrolyzed to 1400 C revealed primarily amorphous glasses whose conversion to beta-SiC is a function of both blend composition and pyrolysis conditions. Formation of beta-SiC crystallites within the glassy phase is favored by higher than stoichiometric C/Si ratios, while carbothermal reduction of Si-O bonds to form SiC with loss of SiO and CO occurs at higher methyl/phenylpropyl silsesquioxane (lower C/Si) ratios. As the carbothermal reduction is assumed to be diffusion controlled, the fibers can serve as model systems to gain understanding of the silsesquioxane pyrolysis behavior, and therefore are useful in the development of polysilsesquioxane-derived ceramic matrices and coatings as well.

  2. Microimpurity composition of superconducting ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhiglov, Yu.S.; Poltoratskij, Yu.B.; Protsenko, A.N.; Tuchin, O.V.

    1989-01-01

    Using laser mass spectrometry, the microimpurity composition of YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-y superconducting ceramics, prepared by routine solid-phase synthesis from extremely pure yttrium and copper oxides and BaCO 3 , is determined. The presence of F, Na, Al, P, Cl, S, K, Ca impurities, which concentration in specimens varies within 10 -3 +5x10 -3 at.% and also Si, Sr, Fe of about 1x10 -1 at.% is established. It is difficult to determine concentrations of C, N, H 2 O impurities because of the presence of background signals of residual gases in the chamber. Using the method of Auger electron spectroscopy, a surface layer of HTSC ceramics grain is studied. The availability of chlorine impurity, which amount considerably exceeds its volume concentration, is determined in near the surface layer. 2 refs.; 2 figs

  3. Surface treatment of zirconia ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    A method of chemically micropitting and/or microcratering at least a portion of a smooth surface of an impervious zirconia-base ceramic is described, comprising (a) contacting the smooth surface with a liquid leachant selected from concentrated sulphuric acid, ammonium bisulphate, alkali metal bisulphates and mixtures thereof at a temperature of at least 250 0 C for a period of time sufficient to effect micropitting and/or microcratering generally uniformly distributed throughout the microstructure of the resultant leached surface; (b) removing the leached surface from contact with the leachant; (c) contacting the leached surface with hydrochloric acid to effect removal from the leached surface of a residue thereon comprising sulphate of metal elements including zirconium in the ceramic; (d) removing the leached surface from contact with the hydrochloric acid; and (e) rinsing the leached surface with water to effect removal of acid residue from that surface. (author)

  4. Degradation modeling of the ANL ceramic waste form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fanning, T. H.; Morss, L. R.

    2000-01-01

    A ceramic waste form composed of glass-bonded sodalite is being developed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for immobilization and disposition of the molten salt waste stream from the electrometallurgical treatment process for metallic DOE spent nuclear fuel. As part of the spent fuel treatment program at ANL, a model is being developed to predict the long-term release of radionuclides under repository conditions. Dissolution tests using dilute, pH-buffered solutions have been conducted at 40, 70, and 90 C to determine the temperature and pH dependence of the dissolution rate. Parameter values measured in these tests have been incorporated into the model, and preliminary repository performance assessment modeling has been completed. Results indicate that the ceramic waste form should be acceptable in a repository environment

  5. Absorption Voltages and Insulation Resistance in Ceramic Capacitors with Cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teverovsky, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Time dependence of absorption voltages (Vabs) in different types of low-voltage X5R and X7R ceramic capacitors was monitored for a maximum duration of hundred hours after polarization. To evaluate the effect of mechanical defects on Vabs, cracks in the dielectric were introduced either mechanically or by thermal shock. The maximum absorption voltage, time to roll-off, and the rate of voltage decrease are shown to depend on the crack-related leakage currents and insulation resistance in the parts. A simple model that is based on the Dow equivalent circuit for capacitors with absorption has been developed to assess the insulation resistance of capacitors. Standard measurements of the insulation resistance, contrary to the measurements based on Vabs, are not sensitive to the presence of mechanical defects and fail to reveal capacitors with cracks. Index Terms: Ceramic capacitor, insulation resistance, dielectric absorption, cracking.

  6. Assessment of application of 5S practices in ceramic industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danel Kleszcz

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Results of research connected with determining the degree of implementation of 5S practices in ceramics industry are discussed in this paper. Direct survey with employees of companies plus ex-pert interview was used in the research. A 21 point scale was used to assess the degree of implemen-tation the 5S practices at individual stages of the manufacturing process. The specificity of produc-tion in ceramics industry enforces maintaining the regime of cleanliness during production. The research revealed that the level of conscious implementation of the 5S practices in companies de-pends on the culture of organization and the degree of involvement of employees in the improvement actions in their company. The presented results are a part of the research aimed at determining refer-ence requirements for companies in terms of implementation and making use of the Lean Manage-ment (LM instruments.

  7. Density gradients in ceramic pellets measured by computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawicka, B.D.; Palmer, B.J.F.

    1986-07-01

    Density gradients are of fundamental importance in ceramic processing and computed tomography (CT) can provide accurate measurements of density profiles in sintered and unsintered ceramic parts. As a demonstration of this potential, the density gradients in an unsintered pellet pressed from an alumina powder were measured by CT scanning. To detect such small density gradients, the CT images must have good density resolution and be free from beam-hardening effects. This was achieved by measuring high-contrast (low-noise) images with the use of an Ir-192 isotopic source. A beam-hardening correction was applied. The resulting images are discussed relative to the transmission of forces through the powder mass during the pelletizing process

  8. Tensile Properties of Open Cell Ceramic Foams

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dlouhý, Ivo; Řehořek, Lukáš; Chlup, Zdeněk

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 409, - (2009), s. 168-175 ISSN 1013-9826. [Fractography of Advanced Ceramics /3./. Stará Lesná, 07.09.2008-10.09.2008] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA106/06/0724; GA ČR GD106/05/H008 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : tensile test * ceramics foam * open porosity * tensile strength Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass

  9. Acid-base properties of ceramic powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bleier, A.

    1983-01-01

    This chapter addresses the fundamental aspects of potentiometric titration, electrokinetics, and conductometric titration in evaluating surface and interfacial thermodynamic behavior. Emphasizes the characterization of aqueous systems which are pertinent to the processing of ceramic powders. Attempts to clarify the role of novel analytical techniques that will increasingly contribute to the advanced characterization of ceramic powders. Evaluates recently developed acid-base and complexation concepts and their applications to the processing of oxide ceramics

  10. Structure and conductivity of nanostructured YBCO ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palchayev, D. K.; Gadzhimagomedov, S. Kh; Murlieva, Zh Kh; Rabadanov, M. Kh; Emirov, R. M.

    2017-12-01

    Superconducting nanostructured ceramics based on YBa2Cu3O7-δ were made of nanopowder obtained by burning nitrate-organic precursors. The structure, morphology, electrical resistivity, and density of ceramics were studied. Various porosity values of the ceramics were achieved by preliminary heat treatment of the nanopowder. The features of conductivity and the reason for increase of the of the superconducting transition temperature in these materials are discussed.

  11. Advanced ceramics: the present and the perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freitas, C.T. de.

    1990-04-01

    Development in the Brazilian and international areas of advanced ceramics is described, emphasizing its economic perspectivas and industrial applications. Results obtained by national institutions are reviewed, mainly in the context of those that pioneered the required high technology in this ceramic field. The rapid growth of the interest for those special materials, made more evident by ample information related to the superconducting ceramics great pontential for important practical applications, is one of the most significant characteristics of the area. (author) [pt

  12. Piezoelectric ceramic-reinforced metal matrix composites

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    Composite materials comprising piezoelectric ceramic particulates dispersed in a metal matrix are capable of vibration damping. When the piezoelectric ceramic particulates are subjected to strain, such as the strain experienced during vibration of the material, they generate an electrical voltage that is converted into Joule heat in the surrounding metal matrix, thereby dissipating the vibrational energy. The piezoelectric ceramic particulates may also act as reinforcements to improve the mec...

  13. High temperature fracture of ceramic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiederhorn, S.M.

    1979-01-01

    A review is presented of fracture mechanisms and methods of lifetime prediction in ceramic materials. Techniques of lifetime prediction are based on the science of fracture mechanics. Application of these techniques to structural ceramics is limited by our incomplete understanding of fracture mechanisms in these materials, and by the occurrence of flaw generation in these materials at elevated temperatures. Research on flaw generation and fracture mechanisms is recommended as a way of improving the reliability of structural ceramics

  14. Performance characteristics of porous alumina ceramic structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latella, B.A.; Liu, T.

    2000-01-01

    Porous ceramics have found a wide range of applications as filters for liquids and gases. The suitability of materials for use in these types of applications depends on the microstructure (grain size, pore size and pore volume fraction) and hence the mechanical and thermal properties. In this study alumina ceramics with different levels of porosity and controlled pore sizes were fabricated and the surface damage and fracture properties were examined. Copyright (2000) The Australian Ceramic Society

  15. Strength and Microstructure of Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-11-01

    Forex - one particular alumina ceramic, I our own detailed crack ample, the relatively large values of r, and c* for the VI observations, and those of...particularly toughness indices, 1i71", indicating that there is sonic the c° , T parameters. However, the indentation mcth- kind of trade -o1Tbetwecn...macroscopic and microsnpic odology takes us closer to the strengths of specimens toughness levels, and that this trade -off is cont’olled by with natural

  16. Flash sintering of ceramic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dancer, C. E. J.

    2016-10-01

    During flash sintering, ceramic materials can sinter to high density in a matter of seconds while subjected to electric field and elevated temperature. This process, which occurs at lower furnace temperatures and in shorter times than both conventional ceramic sintering and field-assisted methods such as spark plasma sintering, has the potential to radically reduce the power consumption required for the densification of ceramic materials. This paper reviews the experimental work on flash sintering methods carried out to date, and compares the properties of the materials obtained to those produced by conventional sintering. The flash sintering process is described for oxides of zirconium, yttrium, aluminium, tin, zinc, and titanium; silicon and boron carbide, zirconium diboride, materials for solid oxide fuel applications, ferroelectric materials, and composite materials. While experimental observations have been made on a wide range of materials, understanding of the underlying mechanisms responsible for the onset and latter stages of flash sintering is still elusive. Elements of the proposed theories to explain the observed behaviour include extensive Joule heating throughout the material causing thermal runaway, arrested by the current limitation in the power supply, and the formation of defect avalanches which rapidly and dramatically increase the sample conductivity. Undoubtedly, the flash sintering process is affected by the electric field strength, furnace temperature and current density limit, but also by microstructural features such as the presence of second phase particles or dopants and the particle size in the starting material. While further experimental work and modelling is still required to attain a full understanding capable of predicting the success of the flash sintering process in different materials, the technique non-etheless holds great potential for exceptional control of the ceramic sintering process.

  17. Metallizing of machinable glass ceramic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seigal, P.K.

    1976-02-01

    A satisfactory technique has been developed for metallizing Corning (Code 9658) machinable glass ceramic for brazing. Analyses of several bonding materials suitable for metallizing were made using microprobe analysis, optical metallography, and tensile strength tests. The effect of different cleaning techniques on the microstructure and the effect of various firing temperatures on the bonding interface were also investigated. A nickel paste, used for thick-film application, has been applied to obtain braze joints with strength in excess of 2000 psi

  18. Early ceramic sites in southern Lau, Fiji

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, G.

    2009-01-01

    The Lau Group is a dispersed chain of islands in east Fiji trending north-south on the inactive Lau Ridge remnant volcanic arc, which is part of the convergent margin system comprising the Lau Basin and Tonga Ridge to the east. In the south of the Lau Group are several remote islands that are closer to Tangatapu than they are to the largest islands of Viti Levu and Vanua Levu in the Fiji Group. Two of these islands, Vatoa and Doi islands in the Ono-i-Lau Group, were visited briefly in 2006 after field work on Kabara when the government supply boat 'Sandy' made scheduled stops to unload and collect cargo. Lapita pottery and a fortification were recorded on Doi Island in the Ono Group, and on Vatoa Island a site with plain ware ceramics dating to c. 2000 cal. BP was located. The position of the two remote islands lying between the main islands of Fiji and Tongan archipelago suggests they were particularly subject to influence from population contacts and movements from islands to their east and west in prehistory. In the eighteenth and nineteenth century central and southern Lau were the centre of an important canoe building industry based on the hardwood Instia bijuga (vesi) used to construct large sailing canoes which were the prerogative of Tongan and Fijian chiefs. Archaeological and linguistic studies of the Lau Group suggest a complicated history of population movements earlier during Lapita (2900-2500 BP) and post-Lapita (∼2500-1000 BP) times, which can be examined from the study of ceramic sites in southern Lau. (author). 27 refs., 3 figs

  19. Electronic properties of lithium titanate ceramic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padilla-Campos, Luis; Buljan, Antonio

    2001-01-01

    Research on tritium breeder material is fundamental to the development of deuterium-tritium type fusion reactors for producing clean, non contaminating, electrical energy, since only energy and helium, a harmless gas, are produced from the fusion reaction. Lithium titanate ceramic is one of the possible candidates for the tritium breeder material. This last material is thought to form part of the first wall of the nucleus of the reactor which will provide the necessary tritium for the fusion and will also serve as a shield. Lithium titanate has advantageous characteristics compared to other materials. Some of these are low activation under the irradiation of neutrons, good thermal stability, high density of lithium atoms and relatively fast tritium release at low temperatures. However, there are still several physical and chemical properties with respect to the tritium release mechanism and mechanical properties that have not been studied at all. This work presents a theoretical study of the electronic properties of lithium titanate ceramic and the corresponding tritiated material. Band calculations using the Extended H kel Tight-Binding approach were carried out. Results show that after substituting lithium for tritium atoms, the electronic states for the latter appear in the middle of prohibited band gap which it is an indication that the tritiated material should behave as a semiconductor, contrary to Li 2 TiO 3 which is a dielectric isolator. A study was also carried out to determine the energetically most favorable sites for the substitution of lithium for tritium atoms. Additionally, we analyzed possible pathways for the diffusion of a tritium atom within the crystalline structure of the Li 2 TiO 3

  20. Energy storage in ceramic dielectrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Love, G.R.

    1990-01-01

    Historically, multilayer ceramic capacitors (MLC's) have not been considered for energy storage applications for two primary reasons. First, physically large ceramic capacitors were very expensive and, second, total energy density obtainable was not nearly so high as in electrolytic capacitor types. More recently, the fabrication technology for MLC's has improved significantly, permitting both significantly higher energy density and significantly lower costs. Simultaneously, in many applications, total energy storage has become smaller, and the secondary requirements of very low effective series resistance and effective series inductance (which, together, determine how efficiently the energy may be stored and recovered) have become more important. It is therefore desirable to reexamine energy storage in ceramics for contemporary commercial and near-commercial dielectrics. Stored energy is proportional to voltage squared only in the case of paraelectric insulators, because only they have capacitance that is independent of bias voltage. High dielectric constant materials, however, are ferroics (that is ferroelectric and/or antiferroelectric) and display significant variation of effective dielectric constant with bias voltage