WorldWideScience

Sample records for empirical learning aided

  1. A Critique of the Theoretical and Empirical Literature of the Use of Diagrams, Graphs, and Other Visual Aids in the Learning of Scientific-Technical Content from Expository Texts and Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carifio, James; Perla, Rocco J.

    2009-01-01

    This article presents a critical review and analysis of key studies that have been done in science education and other areas on the effects and effectiveness of using diagrams, graphs, photographs, illustrations, and concept maps as "adjunct visual aids" in the learning of scientific-technical content. It also summarizes and reviews those studies…

  2. Reduced multiple empirical kernel learning machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhe; Lu, MingZhe; Gao, Daqi

    2015-02-01

    Multiple kernel learning (MKL) is demonstrated to be flexible and effective in depicting heterogeneous data sources since MKL can introduce multiple kernels rather than a single fixed kernel into applications. However, MKL would get a high time and space complexity in contrast to single kernel learning, which is not expected in real-world applications. Meanwhile, it is known that the kernel mapping ways of MKL generally have two forms including implicit kernel mapping and empirical kernel mapping (EKM), where the latter is less attracted. In this paper, we focus on the MKL with the EKM, and propose a reduced multiple empirical kernel learning machine named RMEKLM for short. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first to reduce both time and space complexity of the MKL with EKM. Different from the existing MKL, the proposed RMEKLM adopts the Gauss Elimination technique to extract a set of feature vectors, which is validated that doing so does not lose much information of the original feature space. Then RMEKLM adopts the extracted feature vectors to span a reduced orthonormal subspace of the feature space, which is visualized in terms of the geometry structure. It can be demonstrated that the spanned subspace is isomorphic to the original feature space, which means that the dot product of two vectors in the original feature space is equal to that of the two corresponding vectors in the generated orthonormal subspace. More importantly, the proposed RMEKLM brings a simpler computation and meanwhile needs a less storage space, especially in the processing of testing. Finally, the experimental results show that RMEKLM owns a much efficient and effective performance in terms of both complexity and classification. The contributions of this paper can be given as follows: (1) by mapping the input space into an orthonormal subspace, the geometry of the generated subspace is visualized; (2) this paper first reduces both the time and space complexity of the EKM-based MKL; (3

  3. Adaptive Machine Aids to Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starkweather, John A.

    With emphasis on man-machine relationships and on machine evolution, computer-assisted instruction (CAI) is examined in this paper. The discussion includes the background of machine assistance to learning, the current status of CAI, directions of development, the development of criteria for successful instruction, meeting the needs of users,…

  4. Operant Learning, Cognitive Development, and Job Aids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, N. Paul; King, David R.

    1979-01-01

    Examines the relationship between learning and development in the most general terms, discusses the developmental distinction between concrete and formal operational thought as manifested in adult behavior, and considers the implications of the concrete-formal dichotomy for the design and use of job aids. Notes and a bibliography are provided.…

  5. Empirical Evaluation of a Decision-Analytic Aid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-05-01

    Morris, Smallwood , Lansford, and Gibbons (1980) state: "In the traditional paradigm, the decision-maker must decide to accept or reject the model. If he... Smallwood , R. D., Langford, R. K., & Gibbons, R. S. Analytic Procedures for Evaluating Decision Aids. Applied Decision Analysis, Inc. (Menlo Park, CA...Menlo Park, CA 94025 Department of Psychology University of Oklahoma Dr. Jesse Orlansky 455 West Lindsey Institute for Defense Analyses Norman , OK 73069

  6. Empirical tests of the Gradual Learning Algorithm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boersma, P.; Hayes, B.

    1999-01-01

    The Gradual Learning Algorithm (Boersma 1997) is a constraint ranking algorithm for learning Optimality-theoretic grammars. The purpose of this article is to assess the capabilities of the Gradual Learning Algorithm, particularly in comparison with the Constraint Demotion algorithm of Tesar and

  7. Empirical tests of the Gradual Learning Algorithm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boersma, P.; Hayes, B.

    2001-01-01

    The Gradual Learning Algorithm (Boersma 1997) is a constraint-ranking algorithm for learning optimality-theoretic grammars. The purpose of this article is to assess the capabilities of the Gradual Learning Algorithm, particularly in comparison with the Constraint Demotion algorithm of Tesar and

  8. Gathering Empirical Evidence Concerning Links between Computer Aided Design (CAD) and Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musta'amal, Aede Hatib; Norman, Eddie; Hodgson, Tony

    2009-01-01

    Discussion is often reported concerning potential links between computer-aided designing and creativity, but there is a lack of systematic enquiry to gather empirical evidence concerning such links. This paper reports an indication of findings from other research studies carried out in contexts beyond general education that have sought evidence…

  9. Corpus-Aided Business English Collocation Pedagogy: An Empirical Study in Chinese EFL Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lidan

    2017-01-01

    This study reports an empirical study of an explicit instruction of corpus-aided Business English collocations and verifies its effectiveness in improving learners' collocation awareness and learner autonomy, as a result of which is significant improvement of learners' collocation competence. An eight-week instruction in keywords' collocations,…

  10. Organisational Learning and Performance--An Empirical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jyothibabu, C.; Pradhan, Bibhuti Bhusan; Farooq, Ayesha

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the important question "how the learning entities--individual, group or organisation--are affecting organisational performance". The answer is important for promoting learning and improving performance. This empirical study in the leading power utility in India found that there is a positive relation between…

  11. Learning style and confidence: an empirical investigation of Japanese employees

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshitaka Yamazaki

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to examine how learning styles relate to employees' confidence through a view of Kolb's experiential learning theory. For this aim, an empirical investigation was conducted using the sample of 201 Japanese employees who work for a Japanese multinational corporation. Results illustrated that the learning style group of acting orientation described a significantly higher level of job confidence than that of reflecting orientation, whereas the two groups of feeling and thinking o...

  12. Cognitive culture: theoretical and empirical insights into social learning strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rendell, Luke; Fogarty, Laurel; Hoppitt, William J E; Morgan, Thomas J H; Webster, Mike M; Laland, Kevin N

    2011-02-01

    Research into social learning (learning from others) has expanded significantly in recent years, not least because of productive interactions between theoretical and empirical approaches. This has been coupled with a new emphasis on learning strategies, which places social learning within a cognitive decision-making framework. Understanding when, how and why individuals learn from others is a significant challenge, but one that is critical to numerous fields in multiple academic disciplines, including the study of social cognition. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Empirical learning of children at kindergartens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valovičová, Ľubomíra; Sollárová, Eva

    2017-01-01

    In the report we propose some results of psychology research, associated with development of kindergarten children's creativity, which in the course of one school year in kindergarten completed activities related to physics. Experience shows that the children at this evolution stage are not only capable of but also interested in discovering and getting to know new things. To this end, it is needed to motivate children and enable them to discover the beauty of physics. One possibility is to create educational activities for kindergarten children. In such activities children can investigate, discover, and indirectly learn physics. The goal is to develop physical thinking, natural sciences knowledge, and their personality and intellectual potential. In realization of some of them children practice their motoric and logical thinking as well as some skills.

  14. Facebook's Effect on Learning in Higher Education: An Empirical Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Doris G.; Barczyk, Casimir C.

    2016-01-01

    Due in part to its widespread acceptance, Facebook has been adopted as a tool for higher education courses. Proponents claim that Facebook-enhanced courses facilitate an increased community of practice, sense of learning and sense of connectedness compared to non-enhanced courses. This empirical study uses a survey methodology in an independent…

  15. An empirical typology of hospital nurses' individual learning paths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poell, Rob F; Van der Krogt, Ferd J

    2014-03-01

    A relatively new theoretical concept is proposed in this paper, namely, the individual learning path. Learning paths are created by individual employees and comprise a set of learning-relevant activities that are both coherent as a whole and meaningful to them. To explore the empirical basis of this theoretical concept. A qualitative study involving semi-structured interviews. Two academic medical centers (university hospitals) and two general hospitals in the Netherlands. A total of 89 nurses were involved in the study. Semi-structured interviews were analyzed qualitatively; cluster analysis was then performed on quantified data from the interviews. Four types of learning path emerged, namely, the formal-external, self-directed, social-emotional, and information-oriented learning paths. The relatively new theoretical concept of an individual learning path can be observed in practice and a number of different learning-path types can be distinguished. Nurses were found to create their own learning paths, that is, select a theme that is relevant primarily to themselves, conduct a variety of learning activities around this theme, participate in social contexts that might help them, and mobilize learning facilities provided by their organization. These activities go way beyond the notion of employees as self-directed learners merely in a didactic sense (establishing learning goals, choosing the right learning activities for these goals, evaluating to what extent their goals have been met as a result). The findings can be interpreted as evidence of employees acting strategically when it comes to their professional development. Providers of continuing professional education/development need to take this into account. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Florida teenagers learn about AIDS, teach others.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-05-01

    1 of every 7 people living in one 5-block area of Belle Glade, Florida, is seropositive for HIV. The town has a population of 17,000 which almost doubles during harvest season as migrant workers arrive to cut cane or harvest vegetables. 97% of HIV cases are among Blacks and people from the Caribbean; transmission is mostly through heterosexual intercourse; and about 25% of infections are among children born to HIV-infected mothers or among adolescents. The nearest movie theater or shopping mall in which adolescents might be amused lies 45 minutes away by buses which do not run on weekends. Belle Glade does not even have a recreation center. Drug use, prostitution, gang membership, and unprotected sexual intercourse are therefore commonly practiced. Providing a constructive alternative, the Health Education Research Team (HEART) peer education project was implemented with the support of the American Foundation for AIDS Research and Family Health International to reduce risky sex behavior among these adolescents aged 13-18. The project assumes that youth will listen to their peers and trains teens to teach other teens about HIV prevention. Teenage participants advance over the levels of trainee, educator, and mentor. 51 had been recruited into the program since it began in fall 1992; 15 had reached the educator level by early 1993. Participants meet twice weekly for formal sessions at the health center which tend to be fun and innovative learning sessions complemented by work in training manuals and periodic tests. Participants also congregate informally at a common youth hangout. More than working to prevent the transmission of HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases, HEART fosters the development of self-esteem, leadership, and communication skills. The program operates a condom distribution system and referral service for treatment which distributed more than 22,000 free condoms over 4 months in late 1992. Understanding their success in being culturally

  17. Aids to Computer-Based Multimedia Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Richard E.; Moreno, Roxana

    2002-01-01

    Presents a cognitive theory of multimedia learning that draws on dual coding theory, cognitive load theory, and constructivist learning theory and derives some principles of instructional design for fostering multimedia learning. These include principles of multiple representation, contiguity, coherence, modality, and redundancy. (SLD)

  18. Chile: educational game, "Learning about AIDS: the Responsibility of All".

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    For more than 10 years, People's Health Education (EPES) has developed educational materials which call upon target audiences to integrate their practical experiences into a collective learning process based upon games. The methodology and materials aim to meet the needs of the most underprivileged sections of the population. EPES produced "Learning about AIDS: the responsibility of all," a game which can be used as it is or adapted to meet the needs of differing groups. The objectives of the game are to provide basic information on AIDS; to facilitate the expression of ideas, beliefs, and myths about AIDS; to promote forums for discussion in order to exchange opinions and views on sexuality and AIDS; to create awareness on how AIDS affects the community; and to create awareness of the need to prevent the disease. Played in couples to strengthen the level of interpersonal communication on such issues, the game is played because AIDS is a fact of everyday life which is affecting the community, because learning about AIDS will help people to protect themselves and their communities from the disease and groundless associated fears, and because open discussion is needed to help prevent more people from becoming infected with HIV.

  19. Predictable Locations Aid Early Object Name Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benitez, Viridiana L.; Smith, Linda B.

    2012-01-01

    Expectancy-based localized attention has been shown to promote the formation and retrieval of multisensory memories in adults. Three experiments show that these processes also characterize attention and learning in 16- to 18-month old infants and, moreover, that these processes may play a critical role in supporting early object name learning. The…

  20. Empirical Validation of the Importance of Employees' Learning Motivation for Workplace E-Learning in Taiwanese Organisations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsiu-Ju; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2012-01-01

    E-learning systems, adopted by organisations for employee training to enhance employees' performance, are characterised by self-directed, autonomous learning. Learning motivation is then of importance in the design of e-learning practices in workplace. However, empirical study of the alignment of e-learning with individual learning needs and…

  1. Planning Computer-Aided Distance Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadja Dobnik

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available Didactics of autonomous learning changes under the influence of new technologies. Computer technology can cover all the functions that a teacher develops in personal contact with the learner. People organizing distance learning must realize all the possibilities offered by computers. Computers can take over and also combine the functions of many tools and systems, e. g. type­ writer, video, telephone. This the contents can be offered in form of classic media by means of text, speech, picture, etc. Computers take over data pro­cessing and function as study materials. Computer included in a computer network can also function as a medium for interactive communication.

  2. Microcomputers in Schools as a Teaching and Learning Aid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotman-Dickenson, D. I.

    1986-01-01

    Presents the findings of a survey of comprehensive and independent schools' use of microcomputers as teaching and learning aids in economics. Results suggest that use is wide spread but not intensive. Teachers allocate few hours to computer programs per year, have difficulty finding suitable software, and fail to encourage use by girls. (JDH)

  3. Software Engineering Techniques for Computer-Aided Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Bertrand

    1989-01-01

    Describes the process for developing tutorials for computer-aided learning (CAL) using a programing language rather than an authoring system. The workstation used is described, the use of graphics is discussed, the role of a local area network (LAN) is explained, and future plans are discussed. (five references) (LRW)

  4. Psychological first aid: a consensus-derived, empirically supported, competency-based training model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, O Lee; Everly, George S; Brown, Lisa M; Wendelboe, Aaron M; Abd Hamid, Nor Hashidah; Tallchief, Vicki L; Links, Jonathan M

    2014-04-01

    Surges in demand for professional mental health services occasioned by disasters represent a major public health challenge. To build response capacity, numerous psychological first aid (PFA) training models for professional and lay audiences have been developed that, although often concurring on broad intervention aims, have not systematically addressed pedagogical elements necessary for optimal learning or teaching. We describe a competency-based model of PFA training developed under the auspices of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Association of Schools of Public Health. We explain the approach used for developing and refining the competency set and summarize the observable knowledge, skills, and attitudes underlying the 6 core competency domains. We discuss the strategies for model dissemination, validation, and adoption in professional and lay communities.

  5. Effects of External Learning Aids on Learning with Ill-Structured Hypertext.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astleitner, Hermann

    1997-01-01

    Describes three experiments with high school and college students concerning learning with ill-structured hypertext; in each study, one different kind of external learning aid (memo pads, learning time, and teaching objectives) was manipulated and examined for its effect on intentional and incidental knowledge acquisition. Findings are discussed…

  6. Empirical Models of Social Learning in a Large, Evolving Network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayşe Başar Bener

    Full Text Available This paper advances theories of social learning through an empirical examination of how social networks change over time. Social networks are important for learning because they constrain individuals' access to information about the behaviors and cognitions of other people. Using data on a large social network of mobile device users over a one-month time period, we test three hypotheses: 1 attraction homophily causes individuals to form ties on the basis of attribute similarity, 2 aversion homophily causes individuals to delete existing ties on the basis of attribute dissimilarity, and 3 social influence causes individuals to adopt the attributes of others they share direct ties with. Statistical models offer varied degrees of support for all three hypotheses and show that these mechanisms are more complex than assumed in prior work. Although homophily is normally thought of as a process of attraction, people also avoid relationships with others who are different. These mechanisms have distinct effects on network structure. While social influence does help explain behavior, people tend to follow global trends more than they follow their friends.

  7. Computer-aided auscultation learning system for nursing technique instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Chun-Ju; Chen, Yen-Ting; Hu, Ling-Chen; Chuang, Chih-Chieh; Chiu, Yu-Hsien; Tsai, Ming-Shih

    2008-01-01

    Pulmonary auscultation is a physical assessment skill learned by nursing students for examining the respiratory system. Generally, a sound simulator equipped mannequin is used to group teach auscultation techniques via classroom demonstration. However, nursing students cannot readily duplicate this learning environment for self-study. The advancement of electronic and digital signal processing technologies facilitates simulating this learning environment. This study aims to develop a computer-aided auscultation learning system for assisting teachers and nursing students in auscultation teaching and learning. This system provides teachers with signal recording and processing of lung sounds and immediate playback of lung sounds for students. A graphical user interface allows teachers to control the measuring device, draw lung sound waveforms, highlight lung sound segments of interest, and include descriptive text. Effects on learning lung sound auscultation were evaluated for verifying the feasibility of the system. Fifteen nursing students voluntarily participated in the repeated experiment. The results of a paired t test showed that auscultative abilities of the students were significantly improved by using the computer-aided auscultation learning system.

  8. Empirical Evidence of Priming, Transfer, Reinforcement, and Learning in the Real and Virtual Trillium Trails

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, M. C. R.

    2011-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, there has been a debate on the effectiveness of virtual reality used for learning with young children, producing many ideas but little empirical proof. This empirical study compared learning activity in situ of a real environment (Real) and a desktop virtual reality (Virtual) environment, built with video game technology,…

  9. Didactique des langues et TIC : les aides à l’apprentissage Language learning research and ICT: learning aids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Françoise Demaizière

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Le texte propose un parcours de la problématique des aides à l'apprentissage dans leur lien avec les TIC (Technologies de l'Information et de la Communication. La première partie s'appuie sur quelques repères de l'histoire du domaine depuis l'EAO (Enseignement Assisté par Ordinateur pour mettre en évidence la variété des aides possibles. La seconde partie met l'accent sur quelques décisions à prendre pour aider l'apprenant au mieux.The text focuses on learning aids in ICT (Information and Communication Technologies environments in order to show the connection between engineering, didactics and pedagogical practice. In the first part a historical survey of the field going back to classical CAL (Computer Assisted Learning helps point out the variety of possible learning aids. The second part pinpoints a few key decisions one has to make in order to try and best help the learner.

  10. Framework for Conducting Empirical Observations of Learning Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Hans Ernst; von Aufschnaiter, Stephan

    1993-01-01

    Reviews four hypotheses about learning: Comenius's transmission-reception theory, information processing theory, Gestalt theory, and Piagetian theory. Uses the categories preunderstanding, conceptual change, and learning processes to classify and assess investigations on learning processes. (PR)

  11. An Empirical Investigation of Individual Differences in Time to Learn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Lorin W.

    1976-01-01

    Results show that student differences in time-on-task to learn to criterion are alterable and can be minimized over a sequence of learning units given appropriate adaptive learning strategies. (Author/DEP)

  12. Organizational Learning, Strategic Flexibility and Business Model Innovation: An Empirical Research Based on Logistics Enterprises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yaodong; Cheng, Lin; Zhang, Jian

    Using the data of 237 Jiangsu logistics firms, this paper empirically studies the relationship among organizational learning capability, business model innovation, strategic flexibility. The results show as follows; organizational learning capability has positive impacts on business model innovation performance; strategic flexibility plays mediating roles on the relationship between organizational learning capability and business model innovation; interaction among strategic flexibility, explorative learning and exploitative learning play significant roles in radical business model innovation and incremental business model innovation.

  13. Learning to Read Empirical Articles in General Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sego, Sandra A.; Stuart, Anne E.

    2016-01-01

    Many students, particularly underprepared students, struggle to identify the essential information in empirical articles. We describe a set of assignments for instructing general psychology students to dissect the structure of such articles. Students in General Psychology I read empirical articles and answered a set of general, factual questions…

  14. Factors Influencing Beliefs for Adoption of a Learning Analytics Tool: An Empirical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Liaqat; Asadi, Mohsen; Gasevic, Dragan; Jovanovic, Jelena; Hatala, Marek

    2013-01-01

    Present research and development offer various learning analytics tools providing insights into different aspects of learning processes. Adoption of a specific tool for practice is based on how its learning analytics are perceived by educators to support their pedagogical and organizational goals. In this paper, we propose and empirically validate…

  15. Instructor Perspectives of Mobile Learning Platform: An Empirical Study

    OpenAIRE

    Alrasheedi, Muasaad; Capretz, Luiz Fernando; Raza, Arif

    2015-01-01

    Mobile learning (mLearning) is the cutting-edge learning platform to really gain traction, driven mostly by the huge uptake in smartphones and their ever increasing uses within the educational society. Education has long benefitted from the proliferation of technology; however, mLearning adoption has not proceeded at the pace one might expect. There is a disconnect between the rate of adoption of the underlying platform (smartphones) and the use of that technology within learning. The reasons...

  16. Deep learning aided decision support for pulmonary nodules diagnosing: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yixin; Feng, Xiaoyi; Chi, Wenhao; Li, Zhengyang; Duan, Wenzhe; Liu, Haiping; Liang, Wenhua; Wang, Wei; Chen, Ping; He, Jianxing; Liu, Bo

    2018-04-01

    Deep learning techniques have recently emerged as promising decision supporting approaches to automatically analyze medical images for different clinical diagnosing purposes. Diagnosing of pulmonary nodules by using computer-assisted diagnosing has received considerable theoretical, computational, and empirical research work, and considerable methods have been developed for detection and classification of pulmonary nodules on different formats of images including chest radiographs, computed tomography (CT), and positron emission tomography in the past five decades. The recent remarkable and significant progress in deep learning for pulmonary nodules achieved in both academia and the industry has demonstrated that deep learning techniques seem to be promising alternative decision support schemes to effectively tackle the central issues in pulmonary nodules diagnosing, including feature extraction, nodule detection, false-positive reduction, and benign-malignant classification for the huge volume of chest scan data. The main goal of this investigation is to provide a comprehensive state-of-the-art review of the deep learning aided decision support for pulmonary nodules diagnosing. As far as the authors know, this is the first time that a review is devoted exclusively to deep learning techniques for pulmonary nodules diagnosing.

  17. Creating a memory of causal relationships an integration of empirical and explanation-based learning methods

    CERN Document Server

    Pazzani, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    This book presents a theory of learning new causal relationships by making use of perceived regularities in the environment, general knowledge of causality, and existing causal knowledge. Integrating ideas from the psychology of causation and machine learning, the author introduces a new learning procedure called theory-driven learning that uses abstract knowledge of causality to guide the induction process. Known as OCCAM, the system uses theory-driven learning when new experiences conform to common patterns of causal relationships, empirical learning to learn from novel experiences, and expl

  18. Empirical Studies on English Vocabulary Learning Strategies in Mainland China over the Past Two Decades

    OpenAIRE

    Zhongxin Dai; Yao Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Wen and Wang (2004) reviewed the empirical studies over the past two decades (from 1984 to 2003) on learning strategies that Chinese EFL learners used. This article, following their methodological framework, reviews about 45 empirical studies on Chinese EFL learners’ English vocabulary learning strategies, conducted by Mainland Chinese scholars over the past two decades. The review shows that more than half of the Chinese scholars are interested in questionnaire investigation of EFL learners’...

  19. An empirical typology of hospital nurses' individual learning paths

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poell, R.F.; van der Krogt, F.J.

    2014-01-01

    Background A relatively new theoretical concept is proposed in this paper, namely, the individual learning path. Learning paths are created by individual employees and comprise a set of learning-relevant activities that are both coherent as a whole and meaningful to them. Objectives To explore the

  20. Teaching Psychology and Law: An Empirical Evaluation of Experiential Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelechoski, Amanda D.; Riggs Romaine, Christina L.; Wolbransky, Melinda

    2017-01-01

    Given the recent proliferation of undergraduate psychology and law courses, there is an increased need to empirically evaluate effective methods of teaching psycholegal material. The current study used a between- and within-subject design across four higher education institutions (N = 291 students) to evaluate the effectiveness of incorporating…

  1. On Combining Multiple-Instance Learning and Active Learning for Computer-Aided Detection of Tuberculosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melendez Rodriguez, J.C.; Ginneken, B. van; Maduskar, P.; Philipsen, R.H.H.M.; Ayles, H.; Sanchez, C.I.

    2016-01-01

    The major advantage of multiple-instance learning (MIL) applied to a computer-aided detection (CAD) system is that it allows optimizing the latter with case-level labels instead of accurate lesion outlines as traditionally required for a supervised approach. As shown in previous work, a MIL-based

  2. Learning Analytics and Educational Data Mining in Practice: A Systematic Literature Review of Empirical Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papamitsiou, Zacharoula; Economides, Anastasios A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims to provide the reader with a comprehensive background for understanding current knowledge on Learning Analytics (LA) and Educational Data Mining (EDM) and its impact on adaptive learning. It constitutes an overview of empirical evidence behind key objectives of the potential adoption of LA/EDM in generic educational strategic…

  3. Empirical Refinements of a Molecular Genetics Learning Progression: The Molecular Constructs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Amber; Kenyon, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    This article describes revisions to four of the eight constructs of the Duncan molecular genetics learning progression [Duncan, Rogat, & Yarden, (2009)]. As learning progressions remain hypothetical models until validated by multiple rounds of empirical studies, these revisions are an important step toward validating the progression. Our…

  4. Reply : Collective Action and the Empirical Content of Stochastic Learning Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Macy, M.W.; Flache, A.

    2007-01-01

    We are grateful for the opportunity that Bendor, Diermeier, and Ting (hereafter BDT) have provided to address important questions about the empirical content of learning theoretic solutions to the collective action problem. They discuss two well-known classes of adaptive models— stochastic learning

  5. Empirical Studies On Machine Learning Based Text Classification Algorithms

    OpenAIRE

    Shweta C. Dharmadhikari; Maya Ingle; Parag Kulkarni

    2011-01-01

    Automatic classification of text documents has become an important research issue now days. Properclassification of text documents requires information retrieval, machine learning and Natural languageprocessing (NLP) techniques. Our aim is to focus on important approaches to automatic textclassification based on machine learning techniques viz. supervised, unsupervised and semi supervised.In this paper we present a review of various text classification approaches under machine learningparadig...

  6. [Notes on the Indian Red Crescent aid and Dr. Ensari's contributions before the decline of the Ottoman Empire].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izgöer, Ahmet Zeki

    2002-01-01

    This article deals with the Indian Red Crescent aids and Dr. Ahmed Ensari's role in this activity during the wars in the early 20th century that led the Ottoman Empire to dismantle. The Indian Red Crescent presided by Dr. Ensari sent a medical team and sanitary material for the Ottomans battered during the war in Tripoli (1911) and the succeeding war at the Balkans (1912). The article also deals with the meetings of the above-mentioned medical team with the Ottoman statesmen and dignitaries; its success at the Tripoli front and its projects concerning the Ottoman immigrants from the Balkan region. The humanitarian aids of the Indian Red Crescent continued afterwards, especially during the World War II (1914-1918) and the War of Independence (1919-1922). On their return to India, Dr. Ensari and the members of the team held a series of meetings and spoke of their activities to the people in their country. They tried to spread their sympathy for the Ottoman-Turkish people even to the outposts of India. This article is an attempt to describe the sympathy of this brother nation (Pakistan of today) proved by their aids and support far away from their borders.

  7. Empirical Demonstration of Isoperformance Methodology Preparatory of an Interactive Expert Computerized Decision Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-11-01

    after modest amounts of 7 practi.ce. Moreover, the advant.ages of display aiding (e.g., Smith & Kennedy, 1976) or artificial intelligence may be largely...team performance in tanks is largely a function of the intelligence of the tank commmander (Wallace, 1932). In summary, individual differences such as...versus small CRT screen), and training on a videogame task which simulated a remotely piloted vehicle. This study was successful as an isoperformance

  8. Empirical Studies of Agile Software Development to Learn Programming Skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuyo Kofune

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a programming education support method based on Agile Development that encourages and builds on communication between students. Through mutual discussion, students using our approach transform their ideas into software and cooperate to write a program. The students complete the software through repetition and programming. Before completing the software program, the students learn to solve problems by working together. The students are encouraged to think and share ideas, and gain experience writing software. With this approach, students not only learn how to write programs, but also increase their logical thinking, problem-solving, and communication skills.

  9. Empirical Studies on English Vocabulary Learning Strategies in Mainland China over the Past Two Decades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongxin Dai

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Wen and Wang (2004 reviewed the empirical studies over the past two decades (from 1984 to 2003 on learning strategies that Chinese EFL learners used. This article, following their methodological framework, reviews about 45 empirical studies on Chinese EFL learners’ English vocabulary learning strategies, conducted by Mainland Chinese scholars over the past two decades. The review shows that more than half of the Chinese scholars are interested in questionnaire investigation of EFL learners’ preferences for vocabulary learning. The reports of the questionnaire investigations indicate that most Chinese EFL learners prefer rote learning of vocabulary to learning vocabulary in context or through language use. The experimental studies suggest that strategies-based instruction results in the learners’ vocabulary achievement. Cognitive and metacognitive strategies are the two groups of strategies that Chinese researchers show particular interest in.

  10. Machine Learning in Computer-Aided Synthesis Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coley, Connor W; Green, William H; Jensen, Klavs F

    2018-05-15

    Computer-aided synthesis planning (CASP) is focused on the goal of accelerating the process by which chemists decide how to synthesize small molecule compounds. The ideal CASP program would take a molecular structure as input and output a sorted list of detailed reaction schemes that each connect that target to purchasable starting materials via a series of chemically feasible reaction steps. Early work in this field relied on expert-crafted reaction rules and heuristics to describe possible retrosynthetic disconnections and selectivity rules but suffered from incompleteness, infeasible suggestions, and human bias. With the relatively recent availability of large reaction corpora (such as the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO), Reaxys, and SciFinder databases), consisting of millions of tabulated reaction examples, it is now possible to construct and validate purely data-driven approaches to synthesis planning. As a result, synthesis planning has been opened to machine learning techniques, and the field is advancing rapidly. In this Account, we focus on two critical aspects of CASP and recent machine learning approaches to both challenges. First, we discuss the problem of retrosynthetic planning, which requires a recommender system to propose synthetic disconnections starting from a target molecule. We describe how the search strategy, necessary to overcome the exponential growth of the search space with increasing number of reaction steps, can be assisted through a learned synthetic complexity metric. We also describe how the recursive expansion can be performed by a straightforward nearest neighbor model that makes clever use of reaction data to generate high quality retrosynthetic disconnections. Second, we discuss the problem of anticipating the products of chemical reactions, which can be used to validate proposed reactions in a computer-generated synthesis plan (i.e., reduce false positives) to increase the likelihood of experimental success

  11. Learning Theory and Equity Valuation: an Empirical Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Zoratto Sanvicente

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper tested the Pástor and Veronesi (2003 hypothesis that the market-to-book ratio (M/B is negatively related to the number of years (age during which a firm has had its stock traded on an Exchange. The predicted decline takes place as a result of a learning process by investors. The authors tested this implication in the U.S. market using the Fama-MacBeth (1973 methodology. In the present article a more general econometric approach is adopted, with the use of panel data and fixed-factor regressors, with data for stocks traded at the São Paulo Stock Exchange (BOVESPA. The evidence does not reject the Pástor and Veronesi hypothesis. Additional conjectures were tested regarding the learning process. These tests indicate that the greater availability of data on a company amplifies the effect of the age variable on the M/B ratio, implying a more accelerated learning process. This paper concludes that the evidence for the Brazilian market supports the theory that investors learn.

  12. Perceived Discrimination and International Students' Learning: An Empirical Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karuppan, Corinne M.; Barari, Mahua

    2011-01-01

    At a time when the number of internationally mobile students worldwide has been growing steadily, the US share of this market has been declining. Since, as it is often claimed, international students are the best ambassadors for their host countries, an effective recruitment strategy is to enhance their learning experience, with the expectation…

  13. AIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000594.htm HIV/AIDS To use the sharing features on this page, ... immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is the virus that causes AIDS. When a person becomes infected with HIV, the ...

  14. Empirical Evaluation of a Technology-rich Learning Environment

    OpenAIRE

    McCreary, Faith

    2001-01-01

    In the fall of 1996, the Computer Science Department at Virginia Tech initiated a joint project with a local school district, to determine how ready access to networked computing in the fifth grade would affect students. Called the PCs for Families (PCF) project, its goal was to learn what could be achieved if technology access, support, and curriculum integration could be eliminated as obstacles or constraints in the classroom and at home. A technology-rich classroom was created, with the cl...

  15. Discovery learning in the language-for-translation classroom: corpora as learning aids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Bernardini

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This contribution reviews the idea of discovery learning with corpora, proposed in the 1990s, evaluating its potential and its implications with reference to the education of translators today. The rationale behind this approach to data-driven learning, combining project-based and form-focused instruction within a socio-constructivistically inspired environment, is discussed. Examples are also provided of authentic, open-ended learning experiences, thanks to which students of translation share responsibility over the development of corpora and their consultation, and teachers can abandon the challenging role of omniscient knowledge providers and wear the more honest hat of "learning experts". Adding to the more straightforward uses of corpora in courses that aim to develop thematic, technological and information mining competences – i.e., in which training is offered in the use of corpora as professional aids –, attention is focused on foreign language teaching for translators and on corpora as learning aids, highlighting their potential for the development of the three other European Master's in Translation (EMT competences (translation service provision, language and intercultural ones.

  16. Discovery learning in the language-for-translation classroom: corpora as learning aids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Bernardini

    2016-04-01

    This contribution reviews the idea of discovery learning with corpora, proposed in the 1990s, evaluating its potential and its implications with reference to the education of translators today. The rationale behind this approach to data-driven learning, combining project-based and form-focused instruction within a socio-constructivistically inspired environment, is discussed. Examples are also provided of authentic, open-ended learning experiences, thanks to which students of translation share responsibility over the development of corpora and their consultation, and teachers can abandon the challenging role of omniscient knowledge providers and wear the more honest hat of "learning experts". Adding to the more straightforward uses of corpora in courses that aim to develop thematic, technological and information mining competences – i.e., in which training is offered in the use of corpora as professional aids –, attention is focused on foreign language teaching for translators and on corpora as learning aids, highlighting their potential for the development of the three other European Master's in Translation (EMT competences (translation service provision, language and intercultural ones.

  17. Empirical model development and validation with dynamic learning in the recurrent multilayer perception

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parlos, A.G.; Chong, K.T.; Atiya, A.F.

    1994-01-01

    A nonlinear multivariable empirical model is developed for a U-tube steam generator using the recurrent multilayer perceptron network as the underlying model structure. The recurrent multilayer perceptron is a dynamic neural network, very effective in the input-output modeling of complex process systems. A dynamic gradient descent learning algorithm is used to train the recurrent multilayer perceptron, resulting in an order of magnitude improvement in convergence speed over static learning algorithms. In developing the U-tube steam generator empirical model, the effects of actuator, process,and sensor noise on the training and testing sets are investigated. Learning and prediction both appear very effective, despite the presence of training and testing set noise, respectively. The recurrent multilayer perceptron appears to learn the deterministic part of a stochastic training set, and it predicts approximately a moving average response. Extensive model validation studies indicate that the empirical model can substantially generalize (extrapolate), though online learning becomes necessary for tracking transients significantly different than the ones included in the training set and slowly varying U-tube steam generator dynamics. In view of the satisfactory modeling accuracy and the associated short development time, neural networks based empirical models in some cases appear to provide a serious alternative to first principles models. Caution, however, must be exercised because extensive on-line validation of these models is still warranted

  18. Use of empirically based corrosion model to aid steam generator life management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angell, P.; Balakrishnan, P.V.; Turner, C.W

    2000-07-01

    Alloy 800 (N08800) tubes used in CANDU 6 steam generators have shown a low incidence of corrosion damage because of the good corrosion resistance of N08800 and successful water chemistry control strategies. However, N08800 is not immune to corrosion, especially pitting, under plausible SG conditions. Electrochemical potentials are critical in determining both susceptibility and rates of corrosion and are known to be a function of water-chemistry. Using laboratory data an empirical model for pitting and crevice corrosion has been developed for N08800. Combination of such a model with chemistry monitoring and diagnostic software makes it possible to arm the impact of plant operating conditions on SG tube corrosion for plant life management (PLIM). Possible transient chemistry regimes that could significantly shorten expected tube lifetimes have been identified and predictions continue to support the position dud under normal, low dissolved oxygen conditions, pitting of N08800 will not initiate. (author)

  19. Use of empirically based corrosion model to aid steam generator life management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angell, P.; Balakrishnan, P.V.; Turner, C.W.

    2000-01-01

    Alloy 800 (N08800) tubes used in CANDU 6 steam generators have shown a low incidence of corrosion damage because of the good corrosion resistance of N08800 and successful water chemistry control strategies. However, N08800 is not immune to corrosion, especially pitting, under plausible SG conditions. Electrochemical potentials are critical in determining both susceptibility and rates of corrosion and are known to be a function of water-chemistry. Using laboratory data an empirical model for pitting and crevice corrosion has been developed for N08800. Combination of such a model with chemistry monitoring and diagnostic software makes it possible to arm the impact of plant operating conditions on SG tube corrosion for plant life management (PLIM). Possible transient chemistry regimes that could significantly shorten expected tube lifetimes have been identified and predictions continue to support the position dud under normal, low dissolved oxygen conditions, pitting of N08800 will not initiate. (author)

  20. Inter-firm Networks, Organizational Learning and Knowledge Updating: An Empirical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Su-rong; Wang, Wen-ping

    In the era of knowledge-based economy which information technology develops rapidly, the rate of knowledge updating has become a critical factor for enterprises to gaining competitive advantage .We build an interactional theoretical model among inter-firm networks, organizational learning and knowledge updating thereby and demonstrate it with empirical study at last. The result shows that inter-firm networks and organizational learning is the source of knowledge updating.

  1. Dynamic gradient descent learning algorithms for enhanced empirical modeling of power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parlos, A.G.; Atiya, Amir; Chong, K.T.

    1991-01-01

    A newly developed dynamic gradient descent-based learning algorithm is used to train a recurrent multilayer perceptron network for use in empirical modeling of power plants. The two main advantages of the proposed learning algorithm are its ability to consider past error gradient information for future use and the two forward passes associated with its implementation, instead of one forward and one backward pass of the backpropagation algorithm. The latter advantage results in computational time saving because both passes can be performed simultaneously. The dynamic learning algorithm is used to train a hybrid feedforward/feedback neural network, a recurrent multilayer perceptron, which was previously found to exhibit good interpolation and extrapolation capabilities in modeling nonlinear dynamic systems. One of the drawbacks, however, of the previously reported work has been the long training times associated with accurate empirical models. The enhanced learning capabilities provided by the dynamic gradient descent-based learning algorithm are demonstrated by a case study of a steam power plant. The number of iterations required for accurate empirical modeling has been reduced from tens of thousands to hundreds, thus significantly expediting the learning process

  2. Augmented Reality-Based Simulators as Discovery Learning Tools: An Empirical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibáñez, María-Blanca; Di-Serio, Ángela; Villarán-Molina, Diego; Delgado-Kloos, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports empirical evidence on having students use AR-SaBEr, a simulation tool based on augmented reality (AR), to discover the basic principles of electricity through a series of experiments. AR-SaBEr was enhanced with knowledge-based support and inquiry-based scaffolding mechanisms, which proved useful for discovery learning in…

  3. An empirical study on the performance of spectral manifold learning techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mysling, Peter; Hauberg, Søren; Pedersen, Kim Steenstrup

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a surge of interest in spectral manifold learning techniques. Despite the interest, only little work has focused on the empirical behavior of these techniques. We construct synthetic data of variable complexity and observe the performance of the techniques as they ...

  4. Critical factors in the empirical performance of temporal difference and evolutionary methods for reinforcement learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Whiteson, S.; Taylor, M.E.; Stone, P.

    2010-01-01

    Temporal difference and evolutionary methods are two of the most common approaches to solving reinforcement learning problems. However, there is little consensus on their relative merits and there have been few empirical studies that directly compare their performance. This article aims to address

  5. A Learning Aid Tool for Power Electronics Converters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Bouketir

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available It is known that power electronics and its related subjects are not easy to understand for students taking them for first time. This is due to nature of the subjects which involve many areas and disciplines. The introduction of general purpose simulation package has helped the student a step further in understanding this subject. However, because of the generality of these tools and their drag-and drop and ad-hoc features, the students still face problems in designing a converter circuit. In this paper, the problem above is addressed by introducing a learning aid tool that guides the student over prescribed steps to design a power electronics circuit. The tool is knowledge-based system where its knowledge base encompasses two types of knowledge; topologies and switching devices. The first step in the design procedure is the selection of the application of the desired circuit. Then few steps are to be followed to come out with the appropriate topology with the optimum switching devices and parameters. System structure, its different modules and the detailed design procedure are explained in this paper

  6. The learning hearing aid: common-sense reasoning in hearing aid circuits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, T.M.H.; Ypma, A.; Vries, de B.; Leenen, J.R.G.M.

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses how hearing aid engineers have applied the Bayesian probability theory approach to the problem of hearing aid fitting. Currently more an art than a science, it is likely that probability theory will play a large role in future generations of fitting software used by dispensing

  7. An Adaptive E-Learning System Based on Students' Learning Styles: An Empirical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drissi, Samia; Amirat, Abdelkrim

    2016-01-01

    Personalized e-learning implementation is recognized as one of the most interesting research areas in the distance web-based education. Since the learning style of each learner is different one must fit e-learning with the different needs of learners. This paper presents an approach to integrate learning styles into adaptive e-learning hypermedia.…

  8. A Review of Empirical Studies Investigating Antecedents and Consequences of Collective Learning Behaviors in Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florina D. Spânu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is a systematic review of the field research conducted in medical settings investigating collective learning behaviors. The review was driven by several research foci. Our main interest was in identifying antecedents and consequences of collective learning in hospitals. We also report results on the types of research questions addressed, research designs used, and types of medical teams investigated. Twelve studies met our inclusion criteria. Our findings revealed that highly contextualized studies that use different ways of measuring learning, different ways of conceptualizing medical teams, and different research methodologies, discuss similar antecedents. Variables like leadership behaviors, unit interpersonal climate, and hierarchical position were found to play a role in explaining organizational learning in hospitals across studies. We also found that despite an intense public discourse on the link between collective learning processes and patients’ safety and medical organizations’ performance, few studies actually report empirical data supporting this relationship.

  9. Hispanic Families Learning and Teaching about AIDS: A Participatory Approach at the Community Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carpio, America Bracho; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Describes AIDS research-education strategy based on story-telling and problem solving being used among Hispanics in Detroit, Michigan. Community worker tells stories whose central characters are children learning AIDS risk behaviors. Listeners encouraged to advise characters. Family discussions follow. Results incorporated into educational…

  10. Mental health first aid training by e-learning: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorm, Anthony F; Kitchener, Betty A; Fischer, Julie-Anne; Cvetkovski, Stefan

    2010-12-01

    Mental Health First Aid training is a course for the public that teaches how to give initial help to a person developing a mental health problem or in a mental health crisis. The present study evaluated the effects of Mental Health First Aid training delivered by e-learning on knowledge about mental disorders, stigmatizing attitudes and helping behaviour. A randomized controlled trial was carried out with 262 members of the Australian public. Participants were randomly assigned to complete an e-learning CD, read a Mental Health First Aid manual or be in a waiting list control group. The effects of the interventions were evaluated using online questionnaires pre- and post-training and at 6-months follow up. The questionnaires covered mental health knowledge, stigmatizing attitudes, confidence in providing help to others, actions taken to implement mental health first aid and participant mental health. Both e-learning and the printed manual increased aspects of knowledge, reduced stigma and increased confidence compared to waiting list. E-learning also improved first aid actions taken more than waiting list, and was superior to the printed manual in reducing stigma and disability due to mental ill health. Mental Health First Aid information received by either e-learning or printed manual had positive effects, but e-learning was better at reducing stigma.

  11. Establish an e-learning system for radiation protection as a teaching aid at STTN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supriyono; Joko Susilo; Muhtadan

    2013-01-01

    A system e-learning of radiation protection lesson as a teaching aids has built, for lectures activities and teaching aids in deepening the course materials of radiation protection in STTN. This system contains learning materials of radiation protection lesson, they are : Basic radiation physics, Dosimetry, basic radiation protection, radiation measuring equipment, effects of radiation, radioactive waste management, transport of radioactive substances, etc. In building of this system, Moodle platform is used with the support from some softwares, they are : Apache web server, MySql, PHP in local host computer that use XAMPP 1.8.1. The one who has rights to access this system is an admin who has obligation to manage the system and to edit, add, and remove the materials and users that consist of teachers, students, and operators who have access to use that system, as a learning aids as well as teaching aids. The materials of E-learning displayed in the forms : lesson materials, animations, pictures, and simulations. The results of this system show that E-learning able to works well as a teaching aids. With this teaching aids, we hope it will increase the quality of learning and teaching process in STTN and also it will increase the accreditation of STTN. (author)

  12. Teacher Professional Learning: Developing with the Aid of Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyprianou, Marianna; Nikiforou, Eleni

    2016-01-01

    Education is a field that constantly changes, which dictates the need for continuing teacher professional learning and development. Teacher professional learning and development can be divided into two categories: formal learning/ development and informal learning/development. This paper focuses on the experience of the presenters as coordinators…

  13. Empirical evidence of the game-based learning advantages for online students persistence

    OpenAIRE

    A. Imbellone; G. Marinensi; C.M. Medaglia

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents the empirical results obtained from a study conducted on a game-based online course that took place in 2014 with 47 participants. The study evidenced the benefits of the learning games mechanics on learners’ willingness to continue the course. Assuming the interest for the subject of the course as a fundamental condition for student persistence within the course, it is shown how it can be significantly enhanced by the presence of both ludic and narrative game-based elements.

  14. Empirical Centroid Fictitious Play: An Approach For Distributed Learning In Multi-Agent Games

    OpenAIRE

    Swenson, Brian; Kar, Soummya; Xavier, Joao

    2013-01-01

    The paper is concerned with distributed learning in large-scale games. The well-known fictitious play (FP) algorithm is addressed, which, despite theoretical convergence results, might be impractical to implement in large-scale settings due to intense computation and communication requirements. An adaptation of the FP algorithm, designated as the empirical centroid fictitious play (ECFP), is presented. In ECFP players respond to the centroid of all players' actions rather than track and respo...

  15. An Empirical Evaluation of Puzzle-Based Learning as an Interest Approach for Teaching Introductory Computer Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrick, K. E.

    2010-01-01

    This correspondence describes an adaptation of puzzle-based learning to teaching an introductory computer programming course. Students from two offerings of the course--with and without the puzzle-based learning--were surveyed over a two-year period. Empirical results show that the synthesis of puzzle-based learning concepts with existing course…

  16. An Empathic Avatar in a Computer-Aided Learning Program to Encourage and Persuade Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gwo-Dong; Lee, Jih-Hsien; Wang, Chin-Yeh; Chao, Po-Yao; Li, Liang-Yi; Lee, Tzung-Yi

    2012-01-01

    Animated pedagogical agents with characteristics such as facial expressions, gestures, and human emotions, under an interactive user interface are attractive to students and have high potential to promote students' learning. This study proposes a convenient method to add an embodied empathic avatar into a computer-aided learning program; learners…

  17. The Film as Visual Aided Learning Tool in Classroom Management Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altinay Gazi, Zehra; Altinay Aksal, Fahriye

    2011-01-01

    This research aims to investigate the impact of the visual aided learning on pre-service teachers' co-construction of subject matter knowledge in teaching practice. The study revealed the examination of film as an active cognizing and learning tool in classroom management course within teacher education programme. Within the framework of action…

  18. Computer-Aided College Algebra: Learning Components that Students Find Beneficial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aichele, Douglas B.; Francisco, Cynthia; Utley, Juliana; Wescoatt, Benjamin

    2011-01-01

    A mixed-method study was conducted during the Fall 2008 semester to better understand the experiences of students participating in computer-aided instruction of College Algebra using the software MyMathLab. The learning environment included a computer learning system for the majority of the instruction, a support system via focus groups (weekly…

  19. The Use of Help Options in Multimedia Listening Environments to Aid Language Learning: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohsen, Mohammed Ali

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides a comprehensive review on the use of help options (HOs) in the multimedia listening context to aid listening comprehension (LC) and improve incidental vocabulary learning. The paper also aims to synthesize the research findings obtained from the use of HOs in Computer-Assisted Language Learning (CALL) literature and reveals the…

  20. Designing an Interactive Multimedia Environment for Learning and Aiding Troubleshooting

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kolodner, Janet

    1997-01-01

    .... However troubleshooting is a complex process both to learn and perform. This report examines the prospects for designing an interactive learning environment that helps users acquire and engage in effective troubleshooting...

  1. Student Perceptions of Facebook as a Learning Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Michael Aubrey

    2018-01-01

    Hybrid learning has been shown to enhance students' experiences in the classroom and can promote deeper learning when the tools used meet the students' particular learning needs. Many digital natives are familiar with Facebook and are able to navigate it with little difficulty. When used in an education setting in the place of traditional…

  2. A literature review of empirical research on learning analytics in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saqr, Mohammed

    2018-01-01

    The number of publications in the field of medical education is still markedly low, despite recognition of the value of the discipline in the medical education literature, and exponential growth of publications in other fields. This necessitates raising awareness of the research methods and potential benefits of learning analytics (LA). The aim of this paper was to offer a methodological systemic review of empirical LA research in the field of medical education and a general overview of the common methods used in the field in general. Search was done in Medline database using the term "LA." Inclusion criteria included empirical original research articles investigating LA using qualitative, quantitative, or mixed methodologies. Articles were also required to be written in English, published in a scholarly peer-reviewed journal and have a dedicated section for methods and results. A Medline search resulted in only six articles fulfilling the inclusion criteria for this review. Most of the studies collected data about learners from learning management systems or online learning resources. Analysis used mostly quantitative methods including descriptive statistics, correlation tests, and regression models in two studies. Patterns of online behavior and usage of the digital resources as well as predicting achievement was the outcome most studies investigated. Research about LA in the field of medical education is still in infancy, with more questions than answers. The early studies are encouraging and showed that patterns of online learning can be easily revealed as well as predicting students' performance.

  3. Ten years of CLIVE (Computer-Aided Learning in Veterinary Education) in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Vicki H M; McConnell, Gill; Short, Andrew; Sullivan, Martin

    2005-01-01

    This paper outlines the work of the CLIVE (Computer-Aided Learning in Veterinary Education) project over a 10-year period, set against the backdrop of changes in education policy and learning technology developments. The consortium of six UK veterinary schools and 14 international Associate Member Schools has been very successful. Sustaining these partnerships requires that the project redefine itself and adapt to cater to the diverse learning needs of today's students and to changing professional and societal needs on an international scale.

  4. Characterization of the teaching aids in the teaching-learning process in Physical Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César Perazas Zamora

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The aids and resources of teaching are an important didactic component inside of the teaching learning process, they are the material support of the teaching aids, its adequate use warrant the quality of the process. With the accelerated development of the science, technique and technologies the audiovisual aids has passed to form part of the teaching learning process humanizing the teacher’s work and favouring the transmission of knowledge with a truly scientific approach. The objective of this article is standing out the main concepts, definitions and advantages of the teaching aids more used nowadays, its importance as didactic component and its adequate use in the teaching learning process linked with the objective, method and content, ensuring the lasting learning that contributes to raise the integral general culture of the students. Besides it deals with the topic of audiovisual aids as one of the components of the teaching learning process, it is offered concepts and definitions from different authors and emphasized the advantages, use and importance of its systematic and planned use.

  5. Eliciting explanations: Constraints on when self-explanation aids learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittle-Johnson, Bethany; Loehr, Abbey M

    2017-10-01

    Generating explanations for oneself in an attempt to make sense of new information (i.e., self-explanation) is often a powerful learning technique. Despite its general effectiveness, in a growing number of studies, prompting for self-explanation improved some aspects of learning, but reduced learning of other aspects. Drawing on this recent research, as well as on research comparing self-explanation under different conditions, we propose four constraints on the effectiveness of self-explanation. First, self-explanation promotes attention to particular types of information, so it is better suited to promote particular learning outcomes in particular types of domains, such as transfer in domains guided by general principles or heuristics. Second, self-explaining a variety of types of information can improve learning, but explaining one's own solution methods or choices may reduce learning under certain conditions. Third, explanation prompts focus effort on particular aspects of the to-be-learned material, potentially drawing effort away from other important information. Explanation prompts must be carefully designed to align with target learning outcomes. Fourth, prompted self-explanation often promotes learning better than unguided studying, but alternative instructional techniques may be more effective under some conditions. Attention to these constraints should optimize the effectiveness of self-explanation as an instructional technique in future research and practice.

  6. Action Learning in ActionAid Nepal: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lustig, Patricia; Rai, Deep Ranjani

    2009-01-01

    This article describes an example of how action learning was used as a framework for an organisational intervention to fundamentally change the organisational culture over a period of time. It also identifies our learning over that period of time and what worked well (and not so well) in an International Non-Governmental Organisation in Nepal.

  7. Enhancing a Multi-body Mechanism with Learning-Aided Cues in an Augmented Reality Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidhu, Manjit Singh

    2013-01-01

    Augmented Reality (AR) is a potential area of research for education, covering issues such as tracking and calibration, and realistic rendering of virtual objects. The ability to augment real world with virtual information has opened the possibility of using AR technology in areas such as education and training as well. In the domain of Computer Aided Learning (CAL), researchers have long been looking into enhancing the effectiveness of the teaching and learning process by providing cues that could assist learners to better comprehend the materials presented. Although a number of works were done looking into the effectiveness of learning-aided cues, but none has really addressed this issue for AR-based learning solutions. This paper discusses the design and model of an AR based software that uses visual cues to enhance the learning process and the outcome perception results of the cues.

  8. Enhancing a Multi-body Mechanism with Learning-Aided Cues in an Augmented Reality Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh Sidhu, Manjit

    2013-06-01

    Augmented Reality (AR) is a potential area of research for education, covering issues such as tracking and calibration, and realistic rendering of virtual objects. The ability to augment real world with virtual information has opened the possibility of using AR technology in areas such as education and training as well. In the domain of Computer Aided Learning (CAL), researchers have long been looking into enhancing the effectiveness of the teaching and learning process by providing cues that could assist learners to better comprehend the materials presented. Although a number of works were done looking into the effectiveness of learning-aided cues, but none has really addressed this issue for AR-based learning solutions. This paper discusses the design and model of an AR based software that uses visual cues to enhance the learning process and the outcome perception results of the cues.

  9. Organisational learning capabilities as determinants of social innovation: An empirical study in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Urban

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: A critical reading of the human resource management (HRM literature finds limited contributions to understanding the organisational determinants of social enterprises and how these may contribute to higher levels of social innovativeness. Although innovation is a key theme in organisational research it has been acknowledged that the field needs more theory-based examinations of different types of innovativeness. Research purpose: To determine how different organisational capabilities are related to social innovation. Motivation for the study: Many social enterprises in developing countries do not have the requisite capabilities to efficiently manage all their programmes, which presents a major threat to organisational sustainability. Research design, approach and method: The empirical analysis is a cross-sectional study based on primary survey data. Hypotheses are tested using correlational and regression analysis. Main findings: The results show that the organisational learning capabilities of knowledge conversion, risk management, organisational dialogue and participative decision-making all have a significant and positive relationship with social innovation. Practical/managerial implications: Managers and practitioners can leverage the different organisational learning capabilities to improve social innovations in their social enterprises. Contribution/value-add: The study is one of the first in an African market context to empirically investigate social enterprises in terms of social innovation and organisational learning perspectives.

  10. Impact of Contextuality on Mobile Learning Acceptance: An Empirical Study Based on a Language Learning App

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhm, Stephan; Constantine, Georges Philip

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to focus on contextualized features for mobile language learning apps. The scope of this paper is to explore students' perceptions of contextualized mobile language learning. Design/Methodology/Approach: An extended Technology Acceptance Model was developed to analyze the effect of contextual app features on students'…

  11. Impediments of E-Learning Adoption in Higher Learning Institutions of Tanzania: An Empirical Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwakyusa, Wilson Pholld; Mwalyagile, Neema Venance

    2016-01-01

    It is experienced that most of the Higher Learning Institutions (HLIs) in developing countries including Tanzania fails to fully implement e-learning system as a an alternative method of delivering education to a large population in the universities. However, some of HLIs are practicing the blended method by which both elearning and traditional…

  12. Learning From Philadelphia: Topographies of HIV/AIDS Media Assemblages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartwright, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    For this contribution to the special issue on "Mapping Queer Bioethics," the author employs an array of public health and popular media texts (especially Jonathan Demme's film Philadelphia) to challenge the construction and reconstruction of HIV-positive bodies as sites of bioethical concern. In outlining notions of "digital restoration," the author argues that there has been of late a remapping of the first decade of the HIV/AIDS pandemic through media projects assembled from archived materials. Accordingly, the author suggests that in the first decades of the 2000s, we have witnessed a media-archaeological turn, whereby old materials have been reassembled for commemorative purposes that oftentimes perform a reshaping of the topography of the first decade of the AIDS pandemic.

  13. The Impact of HIV/AIDS on the Socio-Economic Development in Kenya's Cooperative Sector: An Empirical Analysis of Cooperatives in Nairobi Province

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyongesa, D.J.W.; M'mboyi, F.

    2002-01-01

    A lot of stigma is attached to HIV/AIDS pandemic in Kenya. Many organizations have tried and continue trying to educate the public on this scourge. However, none of these organizations has thought of the cooperative sector. This research is unique because it examines the Impact of HIV/AIDS on the Socio-economic Development of Kenya's Cooperative sector. It is an empirical analysis of Cooperatives in Nairobi Province with special reference to the Savings and Credit Cooperatives (SACCOS). It was a joint research that examined HIV/AIDS from a multidisciplinary approach. The general objective was to identify and quantify the effects of HIV/AIDS on the performance of cooperative societies, particularly the impact of HIV/AIDS on savings, share capital, age groups and gender. Questionnaires were administered to a randomly selected sample of cooperative societies in the province. PCGIVE computer package was used to run regressions on simultaneous and recursive models. The findings clearly show that between 1991 and 2000 cooperatives in Nairobi province lost approximately USD 479 million due to HIV/AIDS pandemic. Besides, though savings, share capital and assets increased significantly, the scourge was negative the gains. Of the dead and the infected, females and ages between 18-48 were more affected by the epidemic. Policy specify recommendations vital for containment of HIV/AIDS in the cooperative sub sector of the Kenyan economy are made. These are with a view to classifying the appropriate roles of both public and private sectors in fighting the HIV/AIDS pandemic within the cooperative sector. Last but not least further areas of research are suggested

  14. Empirical evidence of the game-based learning advantages for online students persistence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Imbellone

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the empirical results obtained from a study conducted on a game-based online course that took place in 2014 with 47 participants. The study evidenced the benefits of the learning games mechanics on learners’ willingness to continue the course. Assuming the interest for the subject of the course as a fundamental condition for student persistence within the course, it is shown how it can be significantly enhanced by the presence of both ludic and narrative game-based elements.

  15. Online Dictionary Learning Aided Target Recognition In Cognitive GPR

    OpenAIRE

    Giovanneschi, Fabio; Mishra, Kumar Vijay; Gonzalez-Huici, Maria Antonia; Eldar, Yonina C.; Ender, Joachim H. G.

    2017-01-01

    Sparse decomposition of ground penetration radar (GPR) signals facilitates the use of compressed sensing techniques for faster data acquisition and enhanced feature extraction for target classification. In this paper, we investigate the application of an online dictionary learning (ODL) technique in the context of GPR to bring down the learning time as well as improve identification of abandoned anti-personnel landmines. Our experimental results using real data from an L-band GPR for PMN/PMA2...

  16. Undergraduate teaching in geriatric medicine using computer-aided learning improves student performance in examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daunt, Laura A; Umeonusulu, Patience I; Gladman, John R F; Blundell, Adrian G; Conroy, Simon P; Gordon, Adam L

    2013-07-01

    computer-aided learning (CAL) is increasingly used to deliver teaching, but few studies have evaluated its impact on learning within geriatric medicine. We developed and implemented CAL packages on falls and continence, and evaluated their effect on student performance in two medical schools. traditional ward based and didactic teaching was replaced by blended learning (CAL package combined with traditional teaching methods). Examination scores were compared for cohorts of medical students receiving traditional learning and those receiving blended learning. Control questions were included to provide data on cohort differences. in both medical schools, there was a trend towards improved scores following blended learning, with a smaller number of students achieving low scores (P learning was associated with improvement in student examination performance, regardless of the setting or the methods adopted, and without increasing teaching time. Our findings support the use of CAL in teaching geriatric medicine, and this method has been adopted for teaching other topics in the undergraduate curriculum.

  17. Didactic Games as an Aid in Learning German

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodica Teodora BIRIŞ

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The didactic game in German classes reduces the student’s fear and uncertainty, facilitatesthe contact with his/her colleagues and develops communication skills in German language. In thisway four skills can be developed. Weaker students can prove their maximum potential doing suchgames and exercises or, the contrary, to embarrass themselves in front of their colleagues. This lastoption should be avoided by the teacher, who has to overlook that the game will become an aid inpracticing and developing skills. The game could be introduced in practicing vocabulary,pronunciation and intonation, in writing, reading, in grammar and text comprehension.

  18. Aided diagnosis methods of breast cancer based on machine learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yue; Wang, Nian; Cui, Xiaoyu

    2017-08-01

    In the field of medicine, quickly and accurately determining whether the patient is malignant or benign is the key to treatment. In this paper, K-Nearest Neighbor, Linear Discriminant Analysis, Logistic Regression were applied to predict the classification of thyroid,Her-2,PR,ER,Ki67,metastasis and lymph nodes in breast cancer, in order to recognize the benign and malignant breast tumors and achieve the purpose of aided diagnosis of breast cancer. The results showed that the highest classification accuracy of LDA was 88.56%, while the classification effect of KNN and Logistic Regression were better than that of LDA, the best accuracy reached 96.30%.

  19. AIDS e pauperização: principais conceitos e evidências empíricas AIDS and pauperization: principal concepts and empirical evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Inácio Bastos

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available O artigo discute as estratégias metodológicas que vêm sendo usadas na análise das inter-relações entre a vulnerabilidade ao HIV/AIDS e as desigualdades sociais, o preconceito e a marginalização, ressaltando-se as dificuldades metodológicas e as estratégias alternativas de investigação encontradas. Os principais achados da literatura internacional e brasileira foram revistos, enfatizando-se os temas: dimensões econômicas e macropolíticas da difusão do HIV/ AIDS; papel do consumo e da política de drogas; desigualdade e preconceito de gênero; desigualdade e preconceito racial/origem étnica; interação com as demais infecções sexualmente transmissíveis e sua relação com a pobreza; padrões de assistência à saúde e HIV/AIDS, em especial, acesso a anti-retrovirais; e violação dos direitos humanos. Apesar da restrita produção acadêmica brasileira e dos dilemas metodológicos envolvidos no exame das inter-relações entre variáveis psicossociais, culturais, sócio-políticas e vulnerabilidade ao HIV/AIDS, tais temas devem ser investigados em detalhe - considerando especificidades sociais e culturais do Brasil - e beneficiados pelas novas estratégias de pesquisa.This paper discusses methodologies for analyzing relations between social inequalities, marginalization, prejudice, and vulnerability to HIV/AIDS, highlighting current difficulties and alternative research strategies. It also reviews the international and Brazilian literature, emphasizing: economic and macropolitical dimensions in the spread of HIV/AIDS; the role of drug policies and consumption; gender inequalities and prejudice; racial/ethnic inequalities and prejudice; and interaction with other STIs and their relationship to poverty; HIV/AIDS and health care standards, especially access to antiretroviral therapy; and human rights violations. Despite current methodological dilemmas in analyzing relations between psychosocial, cultural, and sociopolitical

  20. Supervised neural network modeling: an empirical investigation into learning from imbalanced data with labeling errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoshgoftaar, Taghi M; Van Hulse, Jason; Napolitano, Amri

    2010-05-01

    Neural network algorithms such as multilayer perceptrons (MLPs) and radial basis function networks (RBFNets) have been used to construct learners which exhibit strong predictive performance. Two data related issues that can have a detrimental impact on supervised learning initiatives are class imbalance and labeling errors (or class noise). Imbalanced data can make it more difficult for the neural network learning algorithms to distinguish between examples of the various classes, and class noise can lead to the formulation of incorrect hypotheses. Both class imbalance and labeling errors are pervasive problems encountered in a wide variety of application domains. Many studies have been performed to investigate these problems in isolation, but few have focused on their combined effects. This study presents a comprehensive empirical investigation using neural network algorithms to learn from imbalanced data with labeling errors. In particular, the first component of our study investigates the impact of class noise and class imbalance on two common neural network learning algorithms, while the second component considers the ability of data sampling (which is commonly used to address the issue of class imbalance) to improve their performances. Our results, for which over two million models were trained and evaluated, show that conclusions drawn using the more commonly studied C4.5 classifier may not apply when using neural networks.

  1. Organizational learning in commercial nuclear power plant safety: An empirical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcus, A.A.; Bromiley, P.; Nichols, M.L.

    1989-01-01

    The need for knowledge in organizations that manage and run high risk technologies is very high. The acquisition of useful knowledge is referred to as organizational learning. The theoretical roots of this concept are well established in the academic literature and in practice, especially in manufacturing industries. This paper focuses on organizational problem solving and learning as it relates to the safe and efficient management of commercial nuclear power plants. The authors are co-investigators on a larger team working under contract with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to develop a logical framework that enables systematic examination of potential linkages between management and organizational factors and safety in nuclear power plant performance. Management and organizational factors that facilitate or impede organizational learning are only a part of the larger study, but are the major focus of this paper. In this paper, the theoretical roots of the concept of organizational learning are discussed, relationships to measures of safety and efficiency of commercial nuclear power plants are hypothesized, and empirical findings which provide partial tests of the hypotheses are discussed. This line of research appears promising; implications for further research, regulatory application, and nuclear power plant management are described

  2. A Computer-Aided Writing Program for Learning Disabled Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fais, Laurie; Wanderman, Richard

    The paper describes the application of a computer-assisted writing program in a special high school for learning disabled and dyslexic students and reports on a study of the program's effectiveness. Particular advantages of the Macintosh Computer for such a program are identified including use of the mouse pointing tool, graphic icons to identify…

  3. Learning, innovation and proximity : an empirical exploration of patterns of learning : a case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oerlemans, L.A.G.; Meeus, M.T.H.; Boekema, F.W.M.

    1998-01-01

    A growing body of theoretical research is addressing the importance of learning in the organisational and technological renewal of firms, and therefore in their efforts to improve competitiveness (Daft & Huber, 1987; Levitt & March, 1988; Huber, 1991; Dodgson, 1993; Blackler, 1995; Dodgson, 1996).

  4. Game-Based Learning as a Vehicle to Teach First Aid Content: A Randomized Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlier, Nathalie; De Fraine, Bieke

    2013-01-01

    Background: Knowledge of first aid (FA), which constitutes lifesaving treatments for injuries or illnesses, is important for every individual. In this study, we have set up a group-randomized controlled trial to assess the effectiveness of a board game for learning FA. Methods: Four class groups (120 students) were randomly assigned to 2…

  5. Using Video as Pedagogy for Globally Connected Learning about the HIV/AIDS Pandemic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowan, Diana; Kabwira, Davie; Mmatli, Tlamelo; Rankopo, Morena; Long, Dennis D.

    2012-01-01

    How might U.S. social work students' perceptions of HIV/AIDS differ from those of social work students in sub-Saharan Africa? Furthermore, what can students learn from hearing how students from other countries view them? Social work students in the United States, Botswana, and Malawi were video-recorded; they then viewed the videos of students at…

  6. CONTRIBUTIONS FOR DEVELOPING OF A COMPUTER AIDED LEARNING ENVIRONMENT OF DESCRIPTIVE GEOMETRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonescu Ion

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the authors’ contributions for developing a computer code for teaching of descriptive geometry using the computer aided learning techniques. The program was implemented using the programming interface and the 3D modeling capabilities of the AutoCAD system.

  7. Teaching Neuroanatomy Using Computer-Aided Learning: What Makes for Successful Outcomes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svirko, Elena; Mellanby, Jane

    2017-01-01

    Computer-aided learning (CAL) is an integral part of many medical courses. The neuroscience course at Oxford University for medical students includes CAL course of neuroanatomy. CAL is particularly suited to this since neuroanatomy requires much detailed three-dimensional visualization, which can be presented on screen. The CAL course was…

  8. Use of robotics as a learning aid for disabled children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teodiano Freire Bastos

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Severe disabled children have little chance of environmental and social exploration and discovery, and due to this lack of interaction and independency, it may lead to an idea that they are unable to do anything by themselves. Trying to help these children on this situation, educational robotics can offer and aid, once it can give them a certain degree of independency in exploration of environment. The system developed in this work allows the child to transmit the commands to a robot. Sensors placed on the child’s body can obtain information from head movement or muscle signals to command the robot to carry out tasks. With the use of this system, the disabled children get a better cognitive development and social interaction, balancing in a certain way, the negative effects of their disabilities.

  9. Educational aids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenkeit, S.

    1989-01-01

    Educational aids include printed matter, aural media, visual media, audiovisual media and objects. A distinction is made between learning aids, which include blackboards, overhead projectors, flipcharts, wallcharts and pinboards, and learning aids, which include textbooks, worksheets, documentation and experimental equipment. The various aids are described and their use explained. The aids available at the School for Nuclear Technology of the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Centre are described

  10. Rethinking Hearing Aid Fitting by Learning From Behavioral Patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Benjamin; Petersen, Michael Kai; Pontoppidan, Niels Henrik

    2017-01-01

    users to remotely enhance auditory focus and attenuate background noise to improve speech intelligibility. N=5, participants changed program settings and adjusted volume on their hearing instruments using their smartphones. We found that individual behavioral patterns affected the usage of the devices....... A significant difference between program usage, and weekdays versus weekends, were found. Users not only changed programs to modify aspects of directionality and noise reduction, but also continuously adjusted the volume. Rethinking hearing instruments as devices that adaptively learn behavioral patterns based...

  11. Empirically Derived Lessons Learned about What Makes Peer-Led Exercise Groups Flourish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Kathlyn E; Ertl, Kristyn; Ruffalo, Leslie; Harris, LaTamba; Whittle, Jeff

    2017-01-01

    Physical exercise confers many health benefits, but it is difficult to motivate people to exercise. Although community exercise groups may facilitate initiation and persistence in an exercise program, reports regarding factors that allow such groups to flourish are limited. We performed a prospective qualitative evaluation of our experience starting a program of community-based, peer-led exercise groups for military veterans to identify important lessons learned. We synthesized data from structured observations, post-observation debriefings, and focus groups. Our participants were trained peer leaders and exercise group members. Our main outcomes consisted of empirically derived lessons learned during the implementation of a peer-led group exercise program for veterans at multiple community sites. We collected and analyzed data from 40 observation visits (covering 14 sites), 7 transcribed debriefings, and 5 focus groups. We identified five lessons learned. (1) The camaraderie and social aspect of the exercise groups provided motivation for people to stay involved. (2) Shared responsibility and commitment to each other by the group members was instrumental to success. (3) Regular meeting times encouraged participation. (4) Variety, especially getting outdoors, was very popular for some groups. (5) Modest involvement of professionals encouraged ongoing engagement with the program. Both social and programmatic issues influence implementation of group exercise programs for older, predominantly male, veterans. These results should be confirmed in other settings.

  12. A Learning Health Care System Using Computer-Aided Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahan, Amos; Cimino, James J

    2017-03-08

    Physicians intuitively apply pattern recognition when evaluating a patient. Rational diagnosis making requires that clinical patterns be put in the context of disease prior probability, yet physicians often exhibit flawed probabilistic reasoning. Difficulties in making a diagnosis are reflected in the high rates of deadly and costly diagnostic errors. Introduced 6 decades ago, computerized diagnosis support systems are still not widely used by internists. These systems cannot efficiently recognize patterns and are unable to consider the base rate of potential diagnoses. We review the limitations of current computer-aided diagnosis support systems. We then portray future diagnosis support systems and provide a conceptual framework for their development. We argue for capturing physician knowledge using a novel knowledge representation model of the clinical picture. This model (based on structured patient presentation patterns) holds not only symptoms and signs but also their temporal and semantic interrelations. We call for the collection of crowdsourced, automatically deidentified, structured patient patterns as means to support distributed knowledge accumulation and maintenance. In this approach, each structured patient pattern adds to a self-growing and -maintaining knowledge base, sharing the experience of physicians worldwide. Besides supporting diagnosis by relating the symptoms and signs with the final diagnosis recorded, the collective pattern map can also provide disease base-rate estimates and real-time surveillance for early detection of outbreaks. We explain how health care in resource-limited settings can benefit from using this approach and how it can be applied to provide feedback-rich medical education for both students and practitioners. ©Amos Cahan, James J Cimino. Originally published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research (http://www.jmir.org), 08.03.2017.

  13. Empirically observed learning rates for concentrating solar power and their responses to regime change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilliestam, Johan; Labordena, Mercè; Patt, Anthony; Pfenninger, Stefan

    2017-07-01

    Concentrating solar power (CSP) capacity has expanded slower than other renewable technologies and its costs are still high. Until now, there have been too few CSP projects to derive robust conclusions about its cost development. Here we present an empirical study of the cost development of all operating CSP stations and those under construction, examining the roles of capacity growth, industry continuity, and policy support design. We identify distinct CSP expansion phases, each characterized by different cost pressure in the policy regime and different industry continuity. In 2008-2011, with low cost pressure and following industry discontinuity, costs increased. In the current phase, with high cost pressure and continuous industry development, costs decreased rapidly, with learning rates exceeding 20%. Data for projects under construction suggest that this trend is continuing and accelerating. If support policies and industrial structure are sustained, we see no near-term factors that would hinder further cost decreases.

  14. Brief report: Do children with autism gather information from social contexts to aid their word learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Wei; Fang, Junming

    2014-06-01

    Typically developing (TD) infants could capitalize on social eye gaze and social contexts to aid word learning. Although children with autism disorder (AD) are known to exhibit atypicality in word learning via social eye gaze, their ability to utilize social contexts for word learning is not well understood. We investigated whether verbal AD children exhibit word learning ability via social contextual cues by late childhood. We found that AD children, unlike TD controls, failed to infer the speaker’s referential intention through information gathered from the social context. This suggests that TD children can learn words in diverse social pragmatic contexts in as early as toddlerhood whereas AD children are still unable to do so by late childhood.

  15. Toward a Better Nutritional Aiding in Disasters: Relying on Lessons Learned during the Bam Earthquake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nekouie Moghadam, Mahmoud; Amiresmaieli, Mohammadreza; Hassibi, Mohammad; Doostan, Farideh; Khosravi, Sajad

    2017-08-01

    Introduction Examining various problems in the aftermath of disasters is very important to the disaster victims. Managing and coordinating food supply and its distribution among the victims is one of the most important problems after an earthquake. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to recognize problems and experiences in the field of nutritional aiding during an earthquake. This qualitative study was of phenomenological type. Using the purposive sampling method, 10 people who had experienced nutritional aiding during the Bam Earthquake (Iran; 2003) were interviewed. Colaizzi's method of analysis was used to analyze interview data. The findings of this study identified four main categories and 19 sub-categories concerning challenges in the nutritional aiding during the Bam Earthquake. The main topics included managerial, aiding, infrastructural, and administrative problems. The major problems in nutritional aiding include lack of prediction and development of a specific program of suitable nutritional pattern and nutritional assessment of the victims in critical conditions. Forming specialized teams, educating team members about nutrition, and making use of experts' knowledge are the most important steps to resolve these problems in the critical conditions; these measures are the duties of the relevant authorities. Nekouie Moghadam M , Amiresmaieli M , Hassibi M , Doostan F , Khosravi S . Toward a better nutritional aiding in disasters: relying on lessons learned during the Bam Earthquake. Prehosp Disaster Med. 2017;32(4):382-386.

  16. The Lazarus Effect of AIDS Treatment: Lessons Learned and Lives Saved

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mubanda Rasmussen, Louise; Richey, Lisa Ann

    2012-01-01

    -religious role in Western societies. Working on behalf of humanitarian organizations to combat modern emergencies is the contemporary embodiment of an ideal, pure notion of “the good” that is not linked to “old religion” but mimics many of its dispositions and practices. This analysis is based on empirical data...... gathered during fieldwork as participants and observers in a Catholic AIDS treatment clinic and through interviews with service providers in Uganda. We use these data to think both creatively and systematically about the meanings and limitations of pastoral power and therapeutic citizenship....

  17. Lessons Learned on Benchmarking from the International Human Reliability Analysis Empirical Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boring, Ronald L.; Forester, John A.; Bye, Andreas; Dang, Vinh N.; Lois, Erasmia

    2010-01-01

    The International Human Reliability Analysis (HRA) Empirical Study is a comparative benchmark of the prediction of HRA methods to the performance of nuclear power plant crews in a control room simulator. There are a number of unique aspects to the present study that distinguish it from previous HRA benchmarks, most notably the emphasis on a method-to-data comparison instead of a method-to-method comparison. This paper reviews seven lessons learned about HRA benchmarking from conducting the study: (1) the dual purposes of the study afforded by joining another HRA study; (2) the importance of comparing not only quantitative but also qualitative aspects of HRA; (3) consideration of both negative and positive drivers on crew performance; (4) a relatively large sample size of crews; (5) the use of multiple methods and scenarios to provide a well-rounded view of HRA performance; (6) the importance of clearly defined human failure events; and (7) the use of a common comparison language to 'translate' the results of different HRA methods. These seven lessons learned highlight how the present study can serve as a useful template for future benchmarking studies.

  18. Lessons Learned on Benchmarking from the International Human Reliability Analysis Empirical Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronald L. Boring; John A. Forester; Andreas Bye; Vinh N. Dang; Erasmia Lois

    2010-06-01

    The International Human Reliability Analysis (HRA) Empirical Study is a comparative benchmark of the prediction of HRA methods to the performance of nuclear power plant crews in a control room simulator. There are a number of unique aspects to the present study that distinguish it from previous HRA benchmarks, most notably the emphasis on a method-to-data comparison instead of a method-to-method comparison. This paper reviews seven lessons learned about HRA benchmarking from conducting the study: (1) the dual purposes of the study afforded by joining another HRA study; (2) the importance of comparing not only quantitative but also qualitative aspects of HRA; (3) consideration of both negative and positive drivers on crew performance; (4) a relatively large sample size of crews; (5) the use of multiple methods and scenarios to provide a well-rounded view of HRA performance; (6) the importance of clearly defined human failure events; and (7) the use of a common comparison language to “translate” the results of different HRA methods. These seven lessons learned highlight how the present study can serve as a useful template for future benchmarking studies.

  19. An Empirical Overview of the No Free Lunch Theorem and Its Effect on Real-World Machine Learning Classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, David; Rojas, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    A sizable amount of research has been done to improve the mechanisms for knowledge extraction such as machine learning classification or regression. Quite unintuitively, the no free lunch (NFL) theorem states that all optimization problem strategies perform equally well when averaged over all possible problems. This fact seems to clash with the effort put forth toward better algorithms. This letter explores empirically the effect of the NFL theorem on some popular machine learning classification techniques over real-world data sets.

  20. EMPIRICAL ANALYSIS OF CRISIS MANAGEMENT PRACTICES IN TOURISM ENTERPRISES IN TERMS OF ORGANIZATIONAL LEARNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gülsel ÇİFTÇİ

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, it is aimed to empirically analyze the crisis management practices of tourism enterprises in terms of their effects on organizational learning. It is aimed to determine the ways that the hotels in Turkey respond to previous crisis, what kind of precautions were taken and whether these crises had taught anything regarding the operation and performance of the enterprise. It is also aimed to contribute to related literature and to offer suggestions that will guide businesses and future studies. Within this context, taking account of 2016 (October data of the Ministry of Culture and Tourism of Turkey, Antalya, which embodies most certified 5-star hotels, and highest bed capacity and number of rooms in resort category, and Istanbul, which embodies most certified 5-star hotels, and highest bed capacity and number of rooms in urban hotels category, are included within the scope of this study. It’s decided to conduct this study on hotels, considering the effects of tourism industry on world economy. In this study, it is aimed to empirically analyze the crisis management practices of tourism enterprises in terms of their effects on organizational learning. It is aimed to determine the ways that the hotels in Turkey respond to previous crisis, what kind of precautions were taken and whether these crises had taught anything regarding the operation and performance of the enterprise. A comprehensive literature review was conducted in the first and second part of this three-part study; The concept of crisis management in the enterprises was examined and the applications on tourism enterprises were discussed. The last part of the study contains information on testing and analyzing hypotheses. The data obtained as a result of the questionnaires were analyzed in SPSS (Statistical Package for Social Sciences and LISREL (LInear Structural RELationships program. A Pearson Correlation analysis was conducted to examine the relationship between

  1. Learning and case-based reasoning for faults diagnosis-aiding in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolini, C.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is the design of a faults diagnosis-aiding system in a nuclear facility of the Cea. Actually the existing system allows the optimization of the production processes in regular operating conditions. Meanwhile during accidental events, the alarms, managed by threshold, are bringing no relevant information. To increase the reliability and the safety, the human operator needs a faults diagnosis-aiding system. The developed system, SECAPI, combines problem solving techniques and automatic learning techniques, that allow the diagnosis and the the simulation of various faults happening on nuclear facilities. Its reasoning principle uses case-based and rules-based techniques. SECAPI owns a learning module which reads out knowledge connected with faults. It can then simulate various faults, using the inductive logical computing. SECAPI has been applied on a radioactive tritium treatment operating channel, at the Cea with good results. (A.L.B.)

  2. APPLICATION OF INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES IN COMPUTER AIDED LANGUAGE LEARNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. B. Tampel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the various ways of application for automatic speech recognition, Text-to-Speech technology, pronunciation and communication skills training, vocabulary check of the taught person, audition skills training in computer aided language learning (CALL-system. In spite of some constraints such technologies application is effective both for education problems simplification and for comfort growth of the system application.

  3. Two Studies of the Empirical Basis of Two Learning Resource-Oriented Motivational Strategies for Gifted Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vladut, Anamaria; Vialle, Wilma; Ziegler, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Two learning resource-oriented motivational strategies for gifted educators are introduced: a homeostatic orientation that aims for balance and an allostatic orientation that aims at growth. In order to establish the empirical basis of these motivational strategies, two studies were conducted with samples of students from a specialized…

  4. An Empirical Study on the Application of Cooperative Learning to Comprehensive English Classes in a Chinese Independent College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Ji

    2017-01-01

    This research investigated a comparison between the effect of cooperative learning and lecture teaching on Comprehensive English classes in a Chinese Independent College. An empirical study for two semesters was carried out in the forms of pretest, posttest, questionnaire and interviews. While control class was taught in the conventional way,…

  5. The effects of supplemental online learning aids on student performance and student engagement in Medical Microbiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Kimberly

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of online learning aids on student performance and engagement. The thirty-five participants of the current study were students enrolled in two sections of a junior level Medical Microbiology laboratory. The experimental section was required to spend ten minutes each week on an online learning aid. The online program, StudyMate(TM), was used to present text and images in the form of flash cards, multiple choice questions, matching, and crossword puzzles. Both groups completed the Index of Learning Style survey, an initial engagement survey at the start of the course, and a final engagement survey at the end of the course. Statistical analysis showed no significant differences between the groups at the start of the course or after the course was completed for learning style, science grade point average, overall grade point average, initial engagement or final engagement. A moderate correlation was found between microbiology course and laboratory grades and a reflective learning style.

  6. Pengembangan Model Pembelajaran Project Based Learning pada Mata Kuliah Computer Aided Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoto Endar Nayono

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available One of the key competencies of graduates majoring in Civil Engineering and Planning Education, Faculty of Engineering, Yogyakarta State University (YSU is able to plan buildings. CAD courses aim to train students to be able to pour the planning concepts into the picture. One of the obstacles faced in the course are concepts and pictures that created by the students often do not correspond to the standards used in the field. This study aims to develop a model of project-based learning so that the students’ pictures are more in line with the actual conditions in the field. This study was carried out through the stages as follows: (1 Pre test, (2 Planning of learning, (3 Implementation of the learning model of project-based learning, (4 monitoring and evaluation (5 Reflection and revision, (6 Implementation of learning in the next cycle, and (7 Evaluation of the learning outcomes. This study was conducted for four months in 2012 in the Department of Civil Engineering and Planning Education, Faculty of Engineering, YSU. The subjects of this study are the students who took the course of Computer Aided Design. The analysis of the data used descriptive qualitative and descriptive statistics. The results of this study were: (1 The implementation of project based learning model was proven to increase the learning process and the learning outcomes of students in the subject of CAD through the provision of buildings planning pictures tasks of school buildings based on the real conditions in the field. The task was delivered in every meeting and improved based on the feedback from their lecturers, (2 the learning model of project based learning will be easier to be implemented if it is accompanied by the model of peer tutoring and the learning model of PAIKEM.

  7. Mobile learning for HIV/AIDS healthcare worker training in resource-limited settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zolfo Maria

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We present an innovative approach to healthcare worker (HCW training using mobile phones as a personal learning environment. Twenty physicians used individual Smartphones (Nokia N95 and iPhone, each equipped with a portable solar charger. Doctors worked in urban and peri-urban HIV/AIDS clinics in Peru, where almost 70% of the nation's HIV patients in need are on treatment. A set of 3D learning scenarios simulating interactive clinical cases was developed and adapted to the Smartphones for a continuing medical education program lasting 3 months. A mobile educational platform supporting learning events tracked participant learning progress. A discussion forum accessible via mobile connected participants to a group of HIV specialists available for back-up of the medical information. Learning outcomes were verified through mobile quizzes using multiple choice questions at the end of each module. Methods In December 2009, a mid-term evaluation was conducted, targeting both technical feasibility and user satisfaction. It also highlighted user perception of the program and the technical challenges encountered using mobile devices for lifelong learning. Results With a response rate of 90% (18/20 questionnaires returned, the overall satisfaction of using mobile tools was generally greater for the iPhone. Access to Skype and Facebook, screen/keyboard size, and image quality were cited as more troublesome for the Nokia N95 compared to the iPhone. Conclusions Training, supervision and clinical mentoring of health workers are the cornerstone of the scaling up process of HIV/AIDS care in resource-limited settings (RLSs. Educational modules on mobile phones can give flexibility to HCWs for accessing learning content anywhere. However lack of softwares interoperability and the high investment cost for the Smartphones' purchase could represent a limitation to the wide spread use of such kind mLearning programs in RLSs.

  8. Evaluation of Empirical and Machine Learning Algorithms for Estimation of Coastal Water Quality Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Nazeer

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Coastal waters are one of the most vulnerable resources that require effective monitoring programs. One of the key factors for effective coastal monitoring is the use of remote sensing technologies that significantly capture the spatiotemporal variability of coastal waters. Optical properties of coastal waters are strongly linked to components, such as colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM, chlorophyll-a (Chl-a, and suspended solids (SS concentrations, which are essential for the survival of a coastal ecosystem and usually independent of each other. Thus, developing effective remote sensing models to estimate these important water components based on optical properties of coastal waters is mandatory for a successful coastal monitoring program. This study attempted to evaluate the performance of empirical predictive models (EPM and neural networks (NN-based algorithms to estimate Chl-a and SS concentrations, in the coastal area of Hong Kong. Remotely-sensed data over a 13-year period was used to develop regional and local models to estimate Chl-a and SS over the entire Hong Kong waters and for each water class within the study area, respectively. The accuracy of regional models derived from EPM and NN in estimating Chl-a and SS was 83%, 93%, 78%, and 97%, respectively, whereas the accuracy of local models in estimating Chl-a and SS ranged from 60–94% and 81–94%, respectively. Both the regional and local NN models exhibited a higher performance than those models derived from empirical analysis. Thus, this study suggests using machine learning methods (i.e., NN for the more accurate and efficient routine monitoring of coastal water quality parameters (i.e., Chl-a and SS concentrations over the complex coastal area of Hong Kong and other similar coastal environments.

  9. Computer-based learning--an aid to successful teaching of pharmacology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    E Hughes, Ian

    2002-07-01

    Various types of software have been developed for use in pharmacology courses. These include: simple drill (question and answer) software; electronic books; video material; tutorial type programs; simulations; and electronic learning environments for course organisation and delivery. These different types of software can be used in different ways to achieve very different learning objectives and gains in teaching efficiency. For example, software can be used: in tutorial and small group teaching; in lectures; to better prepare students for practical work; as a replacement for practicals; to provide options within a limited course structure; to supplement lectures and enable students to work at their own pace; to provide ongoing access to self-assessment throughout a course; to aid distance learning; as remedial teaching and to extend the student learning experience in areas which are too expensive or too time consuming or for which staff expertise does not exist. Evidence indicates that it is insufficient simply to make computer based learning material available to students. Like a laboratory class, it must be fully integrated into a module if real benefits are to be obtained. Students need to be taught how to learn from computer-based learning materials and how to integrate this learning tool in their learning strategy. Teachers need to be supported not only with information about the availability of software but, equally importantly, about how it can be integrated into modules. We are all delivering teaching and facilitating learning in a changing environment and subject to a variety of increasing pressures. It may well be that computer based learning materials may help to maintain a high quality of pharmacology teaching within this changing environment but we need more pedagogical research at the discipline level to establish how this can best be done.

  10. Effect of HIV/AIDS on Children's Attitudes toward Learning: Voices of Teachers and Caregivers in Western Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jepkemboi, Grace; Aldridge, Jerry

    2014-01-01

    The well-being of children orphaned by HIV/AIDS is often significantly compromised, as they are prone to discrimination, victimization, and exclusion from social and familial structures. The present study examines the effect of HIV/AIDS on children's attitudes toward learning, as perceived by teachers and caregivers. Teachers and caregivers from…

  11. Manager’s decision-making in organizations –empirical analysis of bureaucratic vs. learning approach

    OpenAIRE

    Jana Frenová; Daniela Hrehová; Eva Bolfíková

    2010-01-01

    The paper is focused on the study of manager’s decision-making with respect to the basic model of learning organization, presented by P. Senge as a system model of management. On one hand, the empirical research was conducted in connection with key dimensions of organizational learning such as: 1. system thinking, 2. personal mastery, 3. mental models, 4. team learning, 5. building shared vision and 6. dynamics causes. On the other hand, the research was connected with the analysis of the bur...

  12. Effects of arousal on cognitive control: empirical tests of the conflict-modulated Hebbian-learning hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Stephen B R E; van Steenbergen, Henk; Kedar, Tomer; Nieuwenhuis, Sander

    2014-01-01

    An increasing number of empirical phenomena that were previously interpreted as a result of cognitive control, turn out to reflect (in part) simple associative-learning effects. A prime example is the proportion congruency effect, the finding that interference effects (such as the Stroop effect) decrease as the proportion of incongruent stimuli increases. While this was previously regarded as strong evidence for a global conflict monitoring-cognitive control loop, recent evidence has shown that the proportion congruency effect is largely item-specific and hence must be due to associative learning. The goal of our research was to test a recent hypothesis about the mechanism underlying such associative-learning effects, the conflict-modulated Hebbian-learning hypothesis, which proposes that the effect of conflict on associative learning is mediated by phasic arousal responses. In Experiment 1, we examined in detail the relationship between the item-specific proportion congruency effect and an autonomic measure of phasic arousal: task-evoked pupillary responses. In Experiment 2, we used a task-irrelevant phasic arousal manipulation and examined the effect on item-specific learning of incongruent stimulus-response associations. The results provide little evidence for the conflict-modulated Hebbian-learning hypothesis, which requires additional empirical support to remain tenable.

  13. Effects of arousal on cognitive control: Empirical tests of the conflict-modulated Hebbian-learning hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen B.R.E. Brown

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An increasing number of empirical phenomena that were previously interpreted as a result of cognitive control, turn out to reflect (in part simple associative-learning effects. A prime example is the proportion congruency effect, the finding that interference effects (such as the Stroop effect decrease as the proportion of incongruent stimuli increases. While this was previously regarded as strong evidence for a global conflict monitoring-cognitive control loop, recent evidence has shown that the proportion congruency effect is largely item-specific and hence must be due to associative learning. The goal of our research was to test a recent hypothesis about the mechanism underlying such associative-learning effects, the conflict-modulated Hebbian-learning hypothesis, which proposes that the effect of conflict on associative learning is mediated by phasic arousal responses. In Experiment 1, we examined in detail the relationship between the item-specific proportion congruency effect and an autonomic measure of phasic arousal: task-evoked pupillary responses. In Experiment 2, we used a task-irrelevant phasic arousal manipulation and examined the effect on item-specific learning of incongruent stimulus-response associations. The results provide little evidence for the conflict-modulated Hebbian-learning hypothesis, which requires additional empirical support to remain tenable.

  14. Do pre-trained deep learning models improve computer-aided classification of digital mammograms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboutalib, Sarah S.; Mohamed, Aly A.; Zuley, Margarita L.; Berg, Wendie A.; Luo, Yahong; Wu, Shandong

    2018-02-01

    Digital mammography screening is an important exam for the early detection of breast cancer and reduction in mortality. False positives leading to high recall rates, however, results in unnecessary negative consequences to patients and health care systems. In order to better aid radiologists, computer-aided tools can be utilized to improve distinction between image classifications and thus potentially reduce false recalls. The emergence of deep learning has shown promising results in the area of biomedical imaging data analysis. This study aimed to investigate deep learning and transfer learning methods that can improve digital mammography classification performance. In particular, we evaluated the effect of pre-training deep learning models with other imaging datasets in order to boost classification performance on a digital mammography dataset. Two types of datasets were used for pre-training: (1) a digitized film mammography dataset, and (2) a very large non-medical imaging dataset. By using either of these datasets to pre-train the network initially, and then fine-tuning with the digital mammography dataset, we found an increase in overall classification performance in comparison to a model without pre-training, with the very large non-medical dataset performing the best in improving the classification accuracy.

  15. Analogical scaffolding and the learning of abstract ideas in physics: Empirical studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noah S. Podolefsky

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Previously, we proposed a model of student reasoning which combines the roles of representation, analogy, and layering of meaning—analogical scaffolding [Podolefsky and Finkelstein, Phys. Rev. ST Phys. Educ. Res. 3, 010109 (2007]. The present empirical studies build on this model to examine its utility and demonstrate the vital intertwining of representation, analogy, and conceptual learning in physics. In two studies of student reasoning using analogy, we show that representations couple to students’ existing prior knowledge and also lead to the dynamic formation of new knowledge. Students presented with abstract, concrete, or blended (both abstract and concrete representations produced markedly different response patterns. In the first study, using analogies to scaffold understanding of electromagnetic (EM waves, students in the blend group were more likely to reason productively about EM waves than students in the abstract group by as much as a factor of 3 (73% vs 24% correct, p=0.002. In the second study, examining representation use within one domain (sound waves, the blend group was more likely to reason productively about sound waves than the abstract group by as much as a factor of 2 (48% vs 23% correct, p=0.002. Using the analogical scaffolding model we examine when and why students succeed and fail to use analogies and interpret representations appropriately.

  16. Analogical scaffolding and the learning of abstract ideas in physics: Empirical studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noah D. Finkelstein

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Previously, we proposed a model of student reasoning which combines the roles of representation, analogy, and layering of meaning—analogical scaffolding [Podolefsky and Finkelstein, Phys. Rev. ST Phys. Educ. Res. 3, 010109 (2007]. The present empirical studies build on this model to examine its utility and demonstrate the vital intertwining of representation, analogy, and conceptual learning in physics. In two studies of student reasoning using analogy, we show that representations couple to students’ existing prior knowledge and also lead to the dynamic formation of new knowledge. Students presented with abstract, concrete, or blended (both abstract and concrete representations produced markedly different response patterns. In the first study, using analogies to scaffold understanding of electromagnetic (EM waves, students in the blend group were more likely to reason productively about EM waves than students in the abstract group by as much as a factor of 3 (73% vs 24% correct, p=0.002 . In the second study, examining representation use within one domain (sound waves, the blend group was more likely to reason productively about sound waves than the abstract group by as much as a factor of 2 (48% vs 23% correct, p=0.002 . Using the analogical scaffolding model we examine when and why students succeed and fail to use analogies and interpret representations appropriately.

  17. Adaptation Criteria for the Personalised Delivery of Learning Materials: A Multi-Stage Empirical Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thalmann, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Personalised e-Learning represents a major step-change from the one-size-fits-all approach of traditional learning platforms to a more customised and interactive provision of learning materials. Adaptive learning can support the learning process by tailoring learning materials to individual needs. However, this requires the initial preparation of…

  18. Impact of Computer Aided Learning on Children with Specific Learning Disabilities

    OpenAIRE

    The Spastic Society Of Karnataka , Bangalore

    2004-01-01

    Study conducted by The Spastics Society of Karnataka on behalf of Azim Premji Foundation to assess the effectiveness of computers in enhancing learning for children with specific learning disabilities. Azim Premji Foundation is not liable for any direct or indirect loss or damage whatsoever arising from the use or access of any information, interpretation and conclusions that may be printed in this report.; Study to assess the effectiveness of computers in enhancing learning for children with...

  19. What International Aid Organizations Can Learn from International Adult Learning: Experiences from Cambodia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkvens, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Many countries receive international support to strengthen professional capacity. The effect of these professional development activities (PDAs), however, is often negligible. This article provides useful insights on how international aid organizations could improve their PDAs, by describing an intervention developed and applied in…

  20. Computer aided virtual manufacturing using Creo parametric easy to learn step by step guide

    CERN Document Server

    Kanife, Paul Obiora

    2016-01-01

    Providing a step-by-step guide for the implementation of virtual manufacturing using Creo Parametric software (formerly known as Pro-Engineer), this book creates an engaging and interactive learning experience for manufacturing engineering students. Featuring graphic illustrations of simulation processes and operations, and written in accessible English to promote user-friendliness, the book covers key topics in the field including: the engraving machining process, face milling, profile milling, surface milling, volume rough milling, expert machining, electric discharge machining (EDM), and area turning using the lathe machining process. Maximising reader insights into how to simulate material removal processes, and how to generate cutter location data and G-codes data, this valuable resource equips undergraduate, postgraduate, BTech and HND students in the fields of manufacturing engineering, computer aided design (CAD) and computer aided engineering (CAE) with transferable skills and knowledge. This book is...

  1. Sexuality of adolescents living with HIV/AIDS: sources of information defining learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graciela Dutra Sehnem

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To know the sources of information of adolescents living with HIV/AIDS that define learning about sexuality. Methods: A qualitative study was performed in a Specialized Care Service of a city in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Southern Brazil, with 15 adolescents living with HIV/AIDS. A semi-structured interview and thematic analysis were used. Results: Adolescents have built up their knowledge about sexuality, especially through relationships with friends and older family members, or through access to media sources. Schools and health services were spaces for sharing information about biological aspects of sexuality. Conclusion: Nurses need to address adolescent sexuality beyond the biological dimension and support it through critical and dialogical health education.

  2. Observation of Depictive Versus Tracing Gestures Selectively Aids Verbal Versus Visual-Spatial Learning in Primary School Children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wermeskerken, Margot; Fijan, Nathalie; Eielts, Charly; Pouw, Wim T. J. L.

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has established that gesture observation aids learning in children. The current study examined whether observation of gestures (i.e. depictive and tracing gestures) differentially affected verbal and visual-spatial retention when learning a route and its street names. Specifically,

  3. Addressing Ebola-related stigma: lessons learned from HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davtyan, Mariam; Brown, Brandon; Folayan, Morenike Oluwatoyin

    2014-01-01

    HIV/AIDS and Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) are contemporary epidemics associated with significant social stigma in which communities affected suffer from social rejection, violence, and diminished quality of life. To compare and contrast stigma related to HIV/AIDS and EVD, and strategically think how lessons learned from HIV stigma can be applied to the current EVD epidemic. To identify relevant articles about HIV/AIDS and EVD-related stigma, we conducted an extensive literature review using multiple search engines. PubMed was used to search for relevant peer-reviewed journal articles and Google for online sources. We also consulted the websites of the World Health Organization (WHO), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the National Institutes of Health to retrieve up-to-date information about EVD and HIV/AIDS. Many stigmatizing attitudes and behaviors directed towards those with EVD are strikingly similar to those with HIV/AIDS but there are significant differences worthy of discussion. Both diseases are life-threatening and there is no medical cure. Additionally misinformation about affected groups and modes of transmission runs rampant. Unlike in persons with EVD, historically criminalized and marginalized populations carry a disproportionately higher risk for HIV infection. Moreover, mortality due to EVD occurs within a shorter time span as compared to HIV/AIDS. Stigma disrupts quality of life, whether it is associated with HIV infection or EVD. When addressing EVD, we must think beyond the immediate clinical therapeutic response, to possible HIV implications of serum treatment. There are emerging social concerns of stigma associated with EVD infection and double stigma associated with EVD and HIV infection. Drawing upon lessons learned from HIV, we must work to empower and mobilize prominent members of the community, those who recovered from the disease, and organizations working at the grassroots level to disseminate clear and accurate

  4. Addressing Ebola-related Stigma: Lessons Learned from HIV/AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariam Davtyan

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: HIV/AIDS and Ebola Virus Disease (EVD are contemporary epidemics associated with significant social stigma in which communities affected suffer from social rejection, violence, and diminished quality of life. Objective: To compare and contrast stigma related to HIV/AIDS and EVD, and strategically think how lessons learned from HIV stigma can be applied to the current EVD epidemic. Methods: To identify relevant articles about HIV/AIDS and EVD-related stigma, we conducted an extensive literature review using multiple search engines. PubMed was used to search for relevant peer-reviewed journal articles and Google for online sources. We also consulted the websites of the World Health Organization (WHO, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC, and the National Institutes of Health to retrieve up-to-date information about EVD and HIV/AIDS. Results: Many stigmatizing attitudes and behaviors directed towards those with EVD are strikingly similar to those with HIV/AIDS but there are significant differences worthy of discussion. Both diseases are life-threatening and there is no medical cure. Additionally misinformation about affected groups and modes of transmission runs rampant. Unlike in persons with EVD, historically criminalized and marginalized populations carry a disproportionately higher risk for HIV infection. Moreover, mortality due to EVD occurs within a shorter time span as compared to HIV/AIDS. Conclusions: Stigma disrupts quality of life, whether it is associated with HIV infection or EVD. When addressing EVD, we must think beyond the immediate clinical therapeutic response, to possible HIV implications of serum treatment. There are emerging social concerns of stigma associated with EVD infection and double stigma associated with EVD and HIV infection. Drawing upon lessons learned from HIV, we must work to empower and mobilize prominent members of the community, those who recovered from the disease, and organizations

  5. An Empirical Evaluation of Critical Factors Influencing Learner Satisfaction in Blended Learning: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Won Sun; Yao, Adrian Yong Tat

    2016-01-01

    Blended learning, a convergence of e-learning approach and face-to-face learning, has been regarded as a new paradigm in modern education. The degree of learners' satisfaction with blended learning played a crucial role in evaluating the effectiveness of blended learning adoption. Therefore, this study examined the primary factors affecting…

  6. An Empirical Study on the Application of Cooperative Learning to English Listening Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Min

    2015-01-01

    Cooperative learning is a strategic instructional system applied by many educators the world over. Researchers of cooperative learning have carried out the study in this field and proved that cooperative learning can create a more interesting and relaxed learning atmosphere. It is generally acknowledged that cooperative learning can reduce…

  7. Modeling Students' Readiness to Adopt Mobile Learning in Higher Education: An Empirical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Adwan, Ahmad Samed; Al-Madadha, Amr; Zvirzdinaite, Zahra

    2018-01-01

    Mobile devices are increasingly coming to penetrate people's daily lives. Mobile learning (m-learning) is viewed as key to the coming era of electronic learning (e-learning). In the meantime, the use of mobile devices for learning has made a significant contribution to delivering education among higher education students worldwide. However, while…

  8. Machine Learning in Ultrasound Computer-Aided Diagnostic Systems: A Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qinghua; Zhang, Fan; Li, Xuelong

    2018-01-01

    The ultrasound imaging is one of the most common schemes to detect diseases in the clinical practice. There are many advantages of ultrasound imaging such as safety, convenience, and low cost. However, reading ultrasound imaging is not easy. To support the diagnosis of clinicians and reduce the load of doctors, many ultrasound computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) systems are proposed. In recent years, the success of deep learning in the image classification and segmentation led to more and more scholars realizing the potential of performance improvement brought by utilizing the deep learning in the ultrasound CAD system. This paper summarized the research which focuses on the ultrasound CAD system utilizing machine learning technology in recent years. This study divided the ultrasound CAD system into two categories. One is the traditional ultrasound CAD system which employed the manmade feature and the other is the deep learning ultrasound CAD system. The major feature and the classifier employed by the traditional ultrasound CAD system are introduced. As for the deep learning ultrasound CAD, newest applications are summarized. This paper will be useful for researchers who focus on the ultrasound CAD system.

  9. Machine Learning in Ultrasound Computer-Aided Diagnostic Systems: A Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinghua Huang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The ultrasound imaging is one of the most common schemes to detect diseases in the clinical practice. There are many advantages of ultrasound imaging such as safety, convenience, and low cost. However, reading ultrasound imaging is not easy. To support the diagnosis of clinicians and reduce the load of doctors, many ultrasound computer-aided diagnosis (CAD systems are proposed. In recent years, the success of deep learning in the image classification and segmentation led to more and more scholars realizing the potential of performance improvement brought by utilizing the deep learning in the ultrasound CAD system. This paper summarized the research which focuses on the ultrasound CAD system utilizing machine learning technology in recent years. This study divided the ultrasound CAD system into two categories. One is the traditional ultrasound CAD system which employed the manmade feature and the other is the deep learning ultrasound CAD system. The major feature and the classifier employed by the traditional ultrasound CAD system are introduced. As for the deep learning ultrasound CAD, newest applications are summarized. This paper will be useful for researchers who focus on the ultrasound CAD system.

  10. The fourth dimension of tool use: temporally enduring artefacts aid primates learning to use tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragaszy, D M; Biro, D; Eshchar, Y; Humle, T; Izar, P; Resende, B; Visalberghi, E

    2013-11-19

    All investigated cases of habitual tool use in wild chimpanzees and capuchin monkeys include youngsters encountering durable artefacts, most often in a supportive social context. We propose that enduring artefacts associated with tool use, such as previously used tools, partly processed food items and residual material from previous activity, aid non-human primates to learn to use tools, and to develop expertise in their use, thus contributing to traditional technologies in non-humans. Therefore, social contributions to tool use can be considered as situated in the three dimensions of Euclidean space, and in the fourth dimension of time. This notion expands the contribution of social context to learning a skill beyond the immediate presence of a model nearby. We provide examples supporting this hypothesis from wild bearded capuchin monkeys and chimpanzees, and suggest avenues for future research.

  11. Deep learning for cardiac computer-aided diagnosis: benefits, issues & solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, Brian C S; Then, Patrick H H

    2017-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are one of the top causes of deaths worldwide. In developing nations and rural areas, difficulties with diagnosis and treatment are made worse due to the deficiency of healthcare facilities. A viable solution to this issue is telemedicine, which involves delivering health care and sharing medical knowledge at a distance. Additionally, mHealth, the utilization of mobile devices for medical care, has also proven to be a feasible choice. The integration of telemedicine, mHealth and computer-aided diagnosis systems with the fields of machine and deep learning has enabled the creation of effective services that are adaptable to a multitude of scenarios. The objective of this review is to provide an overview of heart disease diagnosis and management, especially within the context of rural healthcare, as well as discuss the benefits, issues and solutions of implementing deep learning algorithms to improve the efficacy of relevant medical applications.

  12. The Effectiveness of E-Learning Systems: A Review of the Empirical Literature on Learner Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorgenfrei, Christian; Smolnik, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    E-learning systems are considerably changing education and organizational training. With the advancement of online-based learning systems, learner control over the instructional process has emerged as a decisive factor in technology-based forms of learning. However, conceptual work on the role of learner control in e-learning has not advanced…

  13. Influence Factors of Satisfaction with Mobile Learning APP: An Empirical Analysis of China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liqiong Liu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this study is to construct the user satisfaction structure model of mobile learning APP (software designed that run on mobile devices from the perspective of the mobile learning participants, and to analyze the influence factors of satisfaction with mobile learning APP. The results of this study show that perceived responsiveness and perceived content are both the important factors that affect user satisfaction with mobile learning APP. Users have high satisfaction with the content conforming to the mobile learning context. Users expect to get immediate feedback in the process of learning, which can improve the learning methods and efficiency.

  14. Embracing Service-Learning Opportunities: Student Perceptions of Service-Learning as an Aid to Effectively Learn Course Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie-Mueller, Jenna L.; Littlefield, Robert S.

    2018-01-01

    Educators are aware of the benefits of service learning such as retention or application of course concepts. Students enrolled in courses with a service learning assignment may not be aware of the benefits or may not view the assignment as beneficiary. This study examined student perceptions of service learning to determine if students'…

  15. Development of a Computer-aided Learning System for Graphical Analysis of Continuous-Time Control Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. F. Opadiji

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available We present the development and deployment process of a computer-aided learning tool which serves as a training aid for undergraduate control engineering courses. We show the process of algorithm construction and implementation of the software which is also aimed at teaching software development at undergraduate level. The scope of this project is limited to graphical analysis of continuous-time control systems.

  16. Exhibitions as learning environments: a review of empirical research on students’ science learning at Natural History Museums, Science Museums and Science Centres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nils Petter Hauan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available One aim for many natural history museums, science museums and science centres is to contribute to school-related learning in science. In this article we review published empirical studies of this challenging area. The review indicates that the effectiveness of educational activities at different types of science-communication venues (SCV in supporting students’ science learning varies. There is also evidence of interesting differences between activities, depending on how these activities are designed. Firstly, these activities can stimulate interest and conceptual focus through a well-designed combination of structure and openness. Secondly, they can stimulate talks and explorations related to the presented topics. We have identified two possible areas which might prove fruitful in guiding further research: an exploration of the effects of different designs for guided exploratory learning, and an evaluation of the effectiveness of educational activities by studying the presence and quality of the learning processes visitors are engaged in. 

  17. Manager’s decision-making in organizations –empirical analysis of bureaucratic vs. learning approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Frenová

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper is focused on the study of manager’s decision-making with respect to the basic model of learning organization, presented by P. Senge as a system model of management. On one hand, the empirical research was conducted in connection with key dimensions of organizational learning such as: 1. system thinking, 2. personal mastery, 3. mental models, 4. team learning, 5. building shared vision and 6. dynamics causes. On the other hand, the research was connected with the analysis of the bureaucratic logic of decision-making process, characterized by non-functional stability, inflexibility, individualism, power, authority and hierarchy, centralization, vagueness, fragmentariness. The objective of the research was to analyse to what extent manager’s decision–making is based on bureaucratic tools or organizational learning in either complex problem-solving or non-problemsolving decision-making. (MANOVA, method of the repeated measure, intersubject factor – situation: 1. non problematic, 2. problematic. The conclusion of analysis is that there are significant differences in character of solving of problem situation and non-problem situation decision-making: the bureaucratic attributes of decision-making are more intensive in problematic situations while learning approach is more actual in non-problematic situations. The results of our analysis have shown that managers who apply the learning organization attributes in their decision-making. are more successful in problem-solving.

  18. An Empirical Study of Instructor Adoption of Web-Based Learning Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei-Tsong; Wang, Chun-Chieh

    2009-01-01

    For years, web-based learning systems have been widely employed in both educational and non-educational institutions. Although web-based learning systems are emerging as a useful tool for facilitating teaching and learning activities, the number of users is not increasing as fast as expected. This study develops an integrated model of instructor…

  19. Is the Learning Community of Economics and Accounting Effective? Empirical Assessment of Class Achievements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stumph, Carolyn Fabian; Kim, Myeong Hwan; Han, Yongseung; Minke, Susan

    2017-01-01

    Learning communities are increasingly used at colleges and universities, as one of the goals of a learning community is to increase interaction among students and teach them how to apply knowledge. The goal of this research is to assess the learning community of the economics and accounting students in their class performance measured by class…

  20. Do Simulations Enhance Student Learning? An Empirical Evaluation of an IR Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shellman, Stephen M.; Turan, Kursad

    2006-01-01

    There is a nascent literature on the question of whether active learning methods, and in particular simulation methods, enhance student learning. In this article, the authors evaluate the utility of an international relations simulation in enhancing learning objectives. Student evaluations provide evidence that the simulation process enhances…

  1. Game-based learning as a vehicle to teach first aid content: a randomized experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlier, Nathalie; De Fraine, Bieke

    2013-07-01

    Knowledge of first aid (FA), which constitutes lifesaving treatments for injuries or illnesses, is important for every individual. In this study, we have set up a group-randomized controlled trial to assess the effectiveness of a board game for learning FA. Four class groups (120 students) were randomly assigned to 2 conditions, a board game or a traditional lecture method (control condition). The effect of the learning environment on students' achievement was examined through a paper-and-pencil test of FA knowledge. Two months after the intervention, the participants took a retention test and completed a questionnaire assessing enjoyment, interest, and motivation. An analysis of pre- and post-test knowledge scores showed that both conditions produced significant increases in knowledge. The lecture was significantly more effective in increasing knowledge, as compared to the board game. Participants indicated that they liked the game condition more than their fellow participants in the traditional lecture condition. These results suggest that traditional lectures are more effective in increasing student knowledge, whereas educational games are more effective for student enjoyment. From this case study we recommend alteration or a combination of these teaching methods to make learning both effective and enjoyable. © 2013, American School Health Association.

  2. "We Had a Blast!": An Empirical Affirmation of Blended Learning as the Preferred Learning Mode for Adult Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asunka, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    As many important issues pertaining to blended learning within the Sub-Saharan African context remain unexplored, this study implemented a blended learning approach in a graduate level course at a private university in Ghana, with the objective of exploring adult learners' attitudes, experiences and behaviors towards this learning approach, as…

  3. Evaluating E-Learning Systems: An Empirical Investigation on Students' Perception in Higher Education Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muneer Abbad

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In search of better, traditional learning universities have expanded their ways to deliver knowledge and integrate cost effective e-learning systems. Universities' use of information and communication technologies has grown tremendously over the last decade. To ensure efficient use of the e-learning system, the Arab Open University (AOU in Bahrain was the first to use e-learning system there, aimed to evaluate the good and bad practices, detect errors and determine areas for further improvements in usage. This study critically evaluated the students' perception of the elearning system in Bahrain and recommended changes to improve students' e-learning usage. Results of the study indicated that, in general, students have favourable perceptions toward using the e-learning system. This study has shown that technology acceptance is the most variable, factor that contributes to students' perception and satisfaction of the e-learning system.

  4. Computer-aided classification of lung nodules on computed tomography images via deep learning technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua KL

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Kai-Lung Hua,1 Che-Hao Hsu,1 Shintami Chusnul Hidayati,1 Wen-Huang Cheng,2 Yu-Jen Chen3 1Department of Computer Science and Information Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, 2Research Center for Information Technology Innovation, Academia Sinica, 3Department of Radiation Oncology, MacKay Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan Abstract: Lung cancer has a poor prognosis when not diagnosed early and unresectable lesions are present. The management of small lung nodules noted on computed tomography scan is controversial due to uncertain tumor characteristics. A conventional computer-aided diagnosis (CAD scheme requires several image processing and pattern recognition steps to accomplish a quantitative tumor differentiation result. In such an ad hoc image analysis pipeline, every step depends heavily on the performance of the previous step. Accordingly, tuning of classification performance in a conventional CAD scheme is very complicated and arduous. Deep learning techniques, on the other hand, have the intrinsic advantage of an automatic exploitation feature and tuning of performance in a seamless fashion. In this study, we attempted to simplify the image analysis pipeline of conventional CAD with deep learning techniques. Specifically, we introduced models of a deep belief network and a convolutional neural network in the context of nodule classification in computed tomography images. Two baseline methods with feature computing steps were implemented for comparison. The experimental results suggest that deep learning methods could achieve better discriminative results and hold promise in the CAD application domain. Keywords: nodule classification, deep learning, deep belief network, convolutional neural network

  5. Implementation of E-Learning and Corporate Performance: An Empirical Investigation

    OpenAIRE

    Chang-Yen Lai; Wen-Ching Liou

    2010-01-01

    Research indicates that successful adoption of information systems (IS) to support business strategy can help the organizations gain superior financial performance. e-Learning can be defined as learning through information and communication technologies and it should include a mechanism for forecasting the actual expected benefits, converted to monetary values, and then comparing the benefits to the projected cost. This study focuses on the relationship between the e-Learning and organization...

  6. HIV/AIDS Coinfection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Coinfection Hepatitis C Coinfection HIV/AIDS Coinfection HIV/AIDS Coinfection Approximately 10% of the HIV-infected population ... Control and Prevention website to learn about HIV/AIDS and Viral Hepatitis guidelines and resources. Home About ...

  7. Analysis of problem solving on project based learning with resource based learning approach computer-aided program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuncoro, K. S.; Junaedi, I.; Dwijanto

    2018-03-01

    This study aimed to reveal the effectiveness of Project Based Learning with Resource Based Learning approach computer-aided program and analyzed problem-solving abilities in terms of problem-solving steps based on Polya stages. The research method used was mixed method with sequential explanatory design. The subject of this research was the students of math semester 4. The results showed that the S-TPS (Strong Top Problem Solving) and W-TPS (Weak Top Problem Solving) had good problem-solving abilities in each problem-solving indicator. The problem-solving ability of S-MPS (Strong Middle Problem Solving) and (Weak Middle Problem Solving) in each indicator was good. The subject of S-BPS (Strong Bottom Problem Solving) had a difficulty in solving the problem with computer program, less precise in writing the final conclusion and could not reflect the problem-solving process using Polya’s step. While the Subject of W-BPS (Weak Bottom Problem Solving) had not been able to meet almost all the indicators of problem-solving. The subject of W-BPS could not precisely made the initial table of completion so that the completion phase with Polya’s step was constrained.

  8. Information Security in eLearning: A Discussion of Empirical Data on Information Security and eLearning

    OpenAIRE

    Alwi, Najwa Hayaati Mohd; Fan, Ip-Shing

    2010-01-01

    ELearning systems are increasingly used by educational institutions to support their academic activities. A simple use of an eLearning system is to make materials and notes available to students at anytime and anywhere; more sophisticated uses of eLearning support the interaction and assessment processes. Depending on how eLearning systems are used, information security issues such as intellectual property protection, personal data protection and continuity of service can become significant f...

  9. Learning AIDS in Singapore: Examining the Effectiveness of HIV/AIDS Efficacy Messages for Adolescents Using ICTs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arul Indrasen Chib

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to assess adolescents‘ receptivity to the use of new interactive media for dissemination of sensitive health messages. We propose a conceptual framework based on the Extended Parallel Process Model (EPPM to design a game-based HIV/AIDS intervention for adolescents. Amongst key findings, we found that Game Play led to changes in attitudes and intentions.

  10. "Asian Learners" Re-Examined: An Empirical Study of Language Learning Attitudes, Strategies and Motivation among Mainland Chinese and Hong Kong Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Zhengdong

    2009-01-01

    Although cultural stereotypes of Asian students as being prone to rote learning, passive and teacher-dependent have been under criticism, the issue of the extent to which Asian heritage culture impacts on Asian students' learning attitudes and behaviour warrants further investigation. This paper reports on an empirical study which compares…

  11. The Effects of Cooperative and Individualistic Learning Structures on Achievement in a College-Level Computer-Aided Drafting Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swab, A. Geoffrey

    2012-01-01

    This study of cooperative learning in post-secondary engineering education investigated achievement of engineering students enrolled in two intact sections of a computer-aided drafting (CAD) course. Quasi-experimental and qualitative methods were employed in comparing student achievement resulting from out-of-class cooperative and individualistic…

  12. Growing of the mathematical thinking imaginative to students in designing of the teaching aids for CWD towards to joyful learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiman; Sugiharti, E.; Kurniawati, N. F.

    2018-03-01

    Government and the private parties had also organized of Special School (SS) and Inclusive School. SS requires of math teachers who were professional in the material, but also master the needs of Children with Disabilities (CwD) in teaching-learning process. The problem: How to design the Teaching Aids for CwD through Extra-Curriculum Training (ECT) activities to Joyful Learning? The purposes of this research: (1) To find new ways how to grow the imaginative in mathematical thinking for students of Mathematics Education. (2) To find a Teaching Aids Design that suitable for CwD who studying in SS. (3) In order to create a Teaching Aids for CwD through activities based on ECT to Joyful Learning. The research method was done by qualitative approach. The research subjects were 6 students of Mathematics Education Study Program of FMIPA UNNES who were interested in attending of the training activities based on ECT. The results: (1) ECT can be a place to grow an Imaginative in Mathematical Thinking of students, (2) created the design of the teaching aids for CwD through activities based on ECT to Joyful Learning as a mirror of the imaginative growth in mathematical thinking for students.

  13. Exploring the Possibilities and Limitations of Service-Learning: A Critical Analysis of College Student Narratives about HIV/AIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Susan Robb; LePeau, Lucy A.; Robbins, Claire K.

    2013-01-01

    This article reports the results of a study that explored the possibilities and limitations of service-learning by deconstructing the narratives about HIV/AIDS that emerged from five college students who participated in an alternative spring break program. Employing a critical (Rhoads, 1997) and anti-foundational (Butin, 2010) approach to inquiry,…

  14. Influence of Web-Aided Cooperative Learning Environment on Motivation and on Self-Efficacy Belief in Biology Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hevedanli, Murat

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the influence of the web-aided cooperative learning environment on biology preservice teachers' motivation and on their self-efficacy beliefs in biology teaching. The study was carried out with 30 biology preservice teachers attending a state university in Turkey. In the study, the pretest-posttest…

  15. The Determinants of Students' Perceived Learning Outcomes and Satisfaction in University Online Education: An Empirical Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Sean B.; Wen, H. Joseph; Ashill, Nicholas

    2006-01-01

    In this study, structural equation modeling is applied to examine the determinants of students' satisfaction and their perceived learning outcomes in the context of university online courses. Independent variables included in the study are course structure, instructor feedback, self-motivation, learning style, interaction, and instructor…

  16. Perceptions of the Effectiveness of System Dynamics-Based Interactive Learning Environments: An Empirical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qudrat-Ullah, Hassan

    2010-01-01

    The use of simulations in general and of system dynamics simulation based interactive learning environments (SDILEs) in particular is well recognized as an effective way of improving users' decision making and learning in complex, dynamic tasks. However, the effectiveness of SDILEs in classrooms has rarely been evaluated. This article describes…

  17. Insights in reinforcement rearning : formal analysis and empirical evaluation of temporal-difference learning algorithms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hasselt, H.P.

    2011-01-01

    A key aspect of artificial intelligence is the ability to learn from experience. If examples of correct solutions exist, supervised learning techniques can be used to predict what the correct solution will be for future observations. However, often such examples are not readily available. The field

  18. iLOG: A Framework for Automatic Annotation of Learning Objects with Empirical Usage Metadata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, L. D.; Soh, Leen-Kiat; Samal, Ashok; Nugent, Gwen

    2012-01-01

    Learning objects (LOs) are digital or non-digital entities used for learning, education or training commonly stored in repositories searchable by their associated metadata. Unfortunately, based on the current standards, such metadata is often missing or incorrectly entered making search difficult or impossible. In this paper, we investigate…

  19. Student Performance in Computing Education: An Empirical Analysis of Online Learning in Programming Education Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Belle Selene; Liitiäinen, Elia

    2017-01-01

    The benefits of using online exercises have been analysed in terms of distance learning, automatic assessment and self-regulated learning. In this study, we have not found a direct proportional relationship between student performance in the course exercises that use online technologies and the exam grades. We see that the average submission rate…

  20. Predicting Digital Informal Learning: An Empirical Study among Chinese University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Tao; Zhu, Chang; Questier, Frederik

    2018-01-01

    Although the adoption of digital technology has gained considerable attention in higher education, currently research mainly focuses on implementation in formal learning contexts. Investigating what factors influence students' digital informal learning is still unclear and limited. To understand better university students' digital informal…

  1. The Development and Empirical Validation of a Multidimensional Measurement Instrument for Team Learning Behaviors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Savelsbergh, Chantal M.J.H.; van der Heijden, Beatrice; Poell, Rob F.

    2009-01-01

    The importance of teamwork to organizational success in today’s economy has been emphasized in literature for well over a decade. Effective teamwork can only be sustained, however, if it is supported by a process of team learning. Following Edmondson, the authors regard team learning as a group

  2. An Empirical Investigation of Student Acceptance of Synchronous E-Learning in an Online University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Minseok; Shin, Won sug

    2015-01-01

    This study proposes an extended technology acceptance model to predict acceptance of synchronous e-learning by examining relationships among variables associated with factors influencing the technology acceptance of synchronous e-learning. Learners at an online university participated through an online survey; there were 251 respondents in all.…

  3. An Empirical Analysis of Chinese College Learners' Obstacles to MOOC Learning in an English Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liangxing

    2017-01-01

    This article reports a study applying an exploratory factor analysis to discovering the underlying factor structure of Chinese college students' obstacles to learning MOOC in an English context. Seven obstacle factors are identified: 1. academic and language skills; 2. internet skills; 3. course instruction/management; 4. learning motivations; 5.…

  4. Forecasting spot electricity prices : Deep learning approaches and empirical comparison of traditional algorithms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lago Garcia, J.; De Ridder, Fjo; De Schutter, B.H.K.

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, a novel modeling framework for forecasting electricity prices is proposed. While many predictive models have been already proposed to perform this task, the area of deep learning algorithms remains yet unexplored. To fill this scientific gap, we propose four different deep learning

  5. An Empirical Consideration of a Balanced Amalgamation of Learning Strategies in Graduate Introductory Statistics Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn, Brandon K.

    2009-01-01

    This study considers the effectiveness of a "balanced amalgamated" approach to teaching graduate level introductory statistics. Although some research stresses replacing traditional lectures with more active learning methods, the approach of this study is to combine effective lecturing with active learning and team projects. The results of this…

  6. Effects of Annotations and Homework on Learning Achievement: An Empirical Study of Scratch Programming Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Addison Y. S.; Huang, Chester S. J.; Yang, Stephen J. H.; Ding, T. J.; Hsieh, Y. Z.

    2015-01-01

    In Taiwan elementary schools, Scratch programming has been taught for more than four years. Previous studies have shown that personal annotations is a useful learning method that improve learning performance. An annotation-based Scratch programming (ASP) system provides for the creation, share, and review of annotations and homework solutions in…

  7. Sectoral patterns of interactive learning : an empirical exploration using an extended resource based model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meeus, M.T.H.; Oerlemans, L.A.G.; Hage, J.

    1999-01-01

    This paper pursues the development of a theoretical framework that explains interactive learning between innovating firms and external actors in the knowledge infrastructure and the production chain. The research question is: what kinds of factors explain interactive learning of innovating firms

  8. Sectoral patterns of interactive learning : an empirical exploration of a case in a Dutch region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meeus, M.T.H.; Oerlemans, L.A.G.; Hage, J.

    2001-01-01

    This paper pursues the development of a theoretical framework that explains interactive learning between innovator firms and external actors in both the knowledge infrastructure and the production chain. The research question is: What kinds of factors explain the interactive learning of innovator

  9. Student performance in computing education: an empirical analysis of online learning in programming education environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Belle Selene; Liitiäinen, Elia

    2017-11-01

    The benefits of using online exercises have been analysed in terms of distance learning, automatic assessment and self-regulated learning. In this study, we have not found a direct proportional relationship between student performance in the course exercises that use online technologies and the exam grades. We see that the average submission rate to these online exercises is not positively correlated with the exercise points. Yet, our results confirm that doing exercises along supports student learning and skill accumulation equipping them with the knowledge of programming. While the student performance in programming courses is affected by factors such as prior background in programming, cognitive skills and the quality of teaching, completing the course exercises via learning-by-doing is an indispensable part of teaching. Based on the student feedback from the course survey, the students are highly satisfied with using online technologies as part of learning.

  10. How task characteristics and social support relate to managerial learning: empirical evidence from Dutch home care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouweneel, A P Else; Taris, Toon W; Van Zolingen, Simone J; Schreurs, Paul J G

    2009-01-01

    Researchers have revealed that managers profit most from informal and on-the-job learning. Moreover, research has shown that task characteristics and social support affect informal learning. On the basis of these insights, the authors examined the effects of task characteristics (psychological job demands, job control) and social support from the supervisor and colleagues on informal on-the-job learning among 1588 managers in the Dutch home-care sector. A regression analysis revealed that high demands, high control, and high colleague and supervisor support were each associated with high levels of informal learning. The authors found no evidence for statistical interactions among the effects of these concepts. They concluded that to promote managers' informal workplace learning, employers should especially increase job control.

  11. Theoretical Implementations of Various Mobile Applications Used in English Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Melissa

    2014-01-01

    This review of the theoretical framework for Mastery Learning Theory and Sense of Community theories is provided in conjunction with a review of the literature for mobile technology in relation to language learning. Although empirical research is minimal for mobile phone technology as an aid for language learning, the empirical research that…

  12. Empirical investigation of e-learning acceptance and assimilation: A structural equation model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Said S. Al-Gahtani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available E-learning has become progressively more vital for academia and corporate training and has potentially become one of the most significant developments and applications in Information Technologies (ITs. This study used a quantitative approach seeking a causative explanation of the decision behavior of individuals toward the acceptance and assimilation of e-learning in academic settings. A survey of 286 participants (students was conducted to collect the research data. Our study framework was based on the third version of the Technology Acceptance Model (i.e., TAM3 and the data were analyzed using structural equation modeling in order to determine the factors that influence the learners’ intention to use e-learning. Results show the predicting (promoting/inhibiting factors of e-learning technology acceptance, while also examining some related post-implementation interventions expected to contribute to the acceptance and assimilation of e-learning systems. Our results also indicate that TAM3 holds well in the Arabian culture and also outline valuable outcomes such as: managerial interventions and controls for better organizational e-learning management that can lead to greater acceptance and effective utilization. Hopefully, this study provides a roadmap to more understanding of the success factors and post-implementation interventions contributing to the acceptance and assimilation of e-learning systems in developing countries.

  13. An Empirical Study of AI Population Dynamics with Million-agent Reinforcement Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Yaodong; Yu, Lantao; Bai, Yiwei; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Weinan; Wen, Ying; Yu, Yong

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we conduct an empirical study on discovering the ordered collective dynamics obtained by a population of artificial intelligence (AI) agents. Our intention is to put AI agents into a simulated natural context, and then to understand their induced dynamics at the population level. In particular, we aim to verify if the principles developed in the real world could also be used in understanding an artificially-created intelligent population. To achieve this, we simulate a large-sc...

  14. Aides stratégiques dans un environnement d'apprentissage en FLE Strategic aids in a learning environment for French as a Foreign Language - FFL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Laure Foucher

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Aider à apprendre, pour peu que l'on choisisse de se situer dans un paradigme d'apprentissage, et, qui plus est, dans une perspective constructiviste, devrait, selon nous, impliquer de prendre en compte les savoirs et les savoir-faire de l'apprenant, ses habitudes et ses manières d'apprendre tout en proposant des interventions didactiques portant, non pas tant sur les savoirs à acquérir, mais sur le processus même de l'apprentissage. Ce sont, en tout cas, ces orientations que nous retenons pour la médiatisation de notre environnement multimédia pour la compréhension orale du FLE en direction d'adultes, en proposant des interventions didactiques, que nous appelons "aides stratégiques", car elles veulent induire de nouvelles stratégies d'apprentissage.Dans cet article, nous tenterons de montrer la cohérence entre nos choix didactiques, fondés sur une vision dynamique de l'apprentissage qui met l'accent sur le processus d'apprentissage, l'individualisation et l'autonomisation de l'apprenant, et les réalisations concrètes auxquelles nous avons abouti en nous appuyant sur des phases de travail médiatisées de notre environnement.Helping to learn, if we place ourselves in a paradigm for teaching and learning within a constructivist perspective, should imply taking into account the learner's knowledge and skills, encouraging the learner to construct his own understanding through real-world experience and helping him promote learning strategies under the teacher's guidance. These are the orientations that we have adopted so as to devise our multimedia learning environment for oral comprehension of FFL with adult learners, by providing didactic interventions which we call "strategic aids" since they aim to induce new learning strategies.In the present paper, we will attempt to show how consistent our didactic choices are, based on a dynamic vision of language learning which focuses on the learning process, individualisation and learner

  15. Development of Computer-Aided Learning Programs on Nuclear Nonproliferation and Control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyun Chul

    2011-01-01

    The fulfillment of international norms for nuclear nonproliferation is indispensable to the promotion of nuclear energy. The education and training for personnel and mangers related to the nuclear material are one of crucial factors to avoid unintended non-compliance to international norms. Korea Institute of Nuclear Nonproliferation and Control (KINAC) has been providing education and training on nuclear control as its legal duty. One of the legally mandatory educations is 'nuclear control education' performed since 2006 for the observation of the international norms on nuclear nonproliferation and the spread of the nuclear control culture. The other is 'physical protection education' performed since 2010 for maintaining the national physical protection regime effectively and the spread of the nuclear security culture. The 2010 Nuclear Security Summit was held in Washington, DC to enhance international cooperation to prevent nuclear terrorism. During the Summit, the South Korea was chosen to host the second Nuclear Summit in 2012. South Korean President announced that South Korea would share its expertise and support the Summit's mission by setting up an international education and training center on nuclear security in 2014. KINAC is making a full effort to set up the center successfully. An important function of the center is education and training in the subjects of nuclear nonproliferation, nuclear safeguards, nuclear security, and nuclear export/import control. With increasing importance of education and training education on nuclear nonproliferation and control, KINAC has been developing computer-aided learning programs on nuclear nonproliferation and control to overcome the weaknesses in classroom educations. This paper shows two learning programs. One is an e-learning system on the nuclear nonproliferation and control and the other is a virtual reality program for training nuclear material accountancy inspection of light water reactor power plants

  16. Development of Computer-Aided Learning Programs on Nuclear Nonproliferation and Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun Chul [Korea Institute of Nuclear Nonproliferation and Control, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    The fulfillment of international norms for nuclear nonproliferation is indispensable to the promotion of nuclear energy. The education and training for personnel and mangers related to the nuclear material are one of crucial factors to avoid unintended non-compliance to international norms. Korea Institute of Nuclear Nonproliferation and Control (KINAC) has been providing education and training on nuclear control as its legal duty. One of the legally mandatory educations is 'nuclear control education' performed since 2006 for the observation of the international norms on nuclear nonproliferation and the spread of the nuclear control culture. The other is 'physical protection education' performed since 2010 for maintaining the national physical protection regime effectively and the spread of the nuclear security culture. The 2010 Nuclear Security Summit was held in Washington, DC to enhance international cooperation to prevent nuclear terrorism. During the Summit, the South Korea was chosen to host the second Nuclear Summit in 2012. South Korean President announced that South Korea would share its expertise and support the Summit's mission by setting up an international education and training center on nuclear security in 2014. KINAC is making a full effort to set up the center successfully. An important function of the center is education and training in the subjects of nuclear nonproliferation, nuclear safeguards, nuclear security, and nuclear export/import control. With increasing importance of education and training education on nuclear nonproliferation and control, KINAC has been developing computer-aided learning programs on nuclear nonproliferation and control to overcome the weaknesses in classroom educations. This paper shows two learning programs. One is an e-learning system on the nuclear nonproliferation and control and the other is a virtual reality program for training nuclear material accountancy inspection of light water

  17. The use of computer-aided learning in chemistry laboratory instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allred, Brian Robert Tracy

    This research involves developing and implementing computer software for chemistry laboratory instruction. The specific goal is to design the software and investigate whether it can be used to introduce concepts and laboratory procedures without a lecture format. This would allow students to conduct an experiment even though they may not have been introduced to the chemical concept in their lecture course. This would also allow for another type of interaction for those students who respond more positively to a visual approach to instruction. The first module developed was devoted to using computer software to help introduce students to the concepts related to thin-layer chromatography and setting up and running an experiment. This was achieved through the use of digitized pictures and digitized video clips along with written information. A review quiz was used to help reinforce the learned information. The second module was devoted to the concept of the "dry lab". This module presented students with relevant information regarding the chemical concepts and then showed them the outcome of mixing solutions. By these observations, they were to determine the composition of unknown solutions based on provided descriptions and comparison with their written observations. The third piece of the software designed was a computer game. This program followed the first two modules in providing information the students were to learn. The difference here, though, was incorporating a game scenario for students to use to help reinforce the learning. Students were then assessed to see how much information they retained after playing the game. In each of the three cases, a control group exposed to the traditional lecture format was used. Their results were compared to the experimental group using the computer modules. Based upon the findings, it can be concluded that using technology to aid in the instructional process is definitely of benefit and students were more successful in

  18. Problems, Challenges and Benefits of Implementing E-learning in Nigerian Universities: An Empirical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manir Abdullahi Kamba

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper tries to examine and discuss the problems, challenges and Benefits of implementing E-Learning in Nigeria by reviewing the consciousness and willingness of the selected Universities. This study also identifies the enabling factors, the traffic-jam and, forecasts the future growth of E-learning in Nigeria. Survey research method was adopted for the study, and questionnaire was the only instrument used for the data collection. The findings of the study show that out of the 18 universities selected from different specialization areas, i.e three universities from each Geopolitical zone, only 12 responded with usable answers. The response rate was 67%, which is an expected rate for such surveys. Awareness of e-learning among the Universities is very high but investment and commitment to develop an e-learning application is very poor and below expectation according to the study. Most of the staff and students in the universities only use Internet related e- learning site just for the sake of finding related information for their researches, since their libraries cannot afford to provide them with adequate and current materials but not for the sake of real online learning. The study also found out that some of the universities have web page and others are in the trend of creating a web page, which is usually for advertisement of the universities but not for the e-leaning activities. Furthermore, the findings also reveal that staff and the students have also been using e-mail and Internet in addition to developing web pages for transaction of students. The Universities are planning to invest number of funds in future in the selected areas of the e-learning application. The Statistical analysis result shows that there are significant differences across both forms of e-learning activities and type of universities in Nigeria.

  19. Online learning: An alternative for STD/HIV/AIDS knowledge update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, M Erika; San Martín, V Ana María; Reyes, A Cecilia

    2006-01-01

    The experience of the e-learning diploma "Specialist in management for control and prevention of STD/HIV/AIDS" for Latin-American health professionals is presented. It was developed by eminent advisory Chilean experts using a web CT platform with the support of the, Global Development Learning Network (GDLN) of World Bank and certificated by the Austral University of Chile, Virtual University and REUNA. The design, development, results of learning, and the opinion of the quality of the course are described. The purpose of this research was to know the opinion of the participants about the quality of diploma on line, and to orient the decision making with respect to the optimization for future versions of this diploma. The universe and sample correspond to first cohort of the diploma during year 2005, was conformed by 33 students. The instrument of data collection used was a survey of opinion applied when finalizing of the diploma. The data were process in SPSS 13.0. The measured criteria of quality were classified like high quality when 80% or more of the participants answered that the evaluated aspect was excellent, medium quality (61 and 79%) and low quality at least of 60% thought that was excellent. The results emphasize that the quality of the contents of the diploma it considers a 95% of the participants excellent. A 100% consider the roll carried out by the tutor excellent and 91.3% excellent the roll of the academic secretary. The means of support to the student were evaluated like excellent by 58.3% of the users. The system of communication by means of internal mail of the diploma was considered excellent by 67% of the students the forums were evaluated like excellent by 84.8% of the people. In relation to the Web site 84.5% consider it excellent, the learning activities were considered as excellent by 75% and the system of evaluation of the diploma was considered adapted by 83.3% of the participants. The 100% would recommend the diploma to other

  20. Using the theory of planned behaviour to understand the motivation to learn about HIV/AIDS prevention among adolescents in Tigray, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebreeyesus Hadera, H; Boer, H; Kuiper, W A J M

    2007-08-01

    Various studies indicate that school- or university-based HIV prevention curricula can reduce the prevalence of sexual risk behaviour among adolescent youth in Sub-Saharan Africa. However, effective HIV/AIDS prevention education may be problematic, if the needs of youth are not served adequately. To date, little attention has been given to the motivation of youth to learn about HIV/AIDS and about their preferences for HIV/AIDS curriculum design options. The aim of this study was to get insight into the determinants of the motivation of youth to learn about HIV/AIDS prevention and to assess their curriculum design preferences. Students from a university in Tigray, Ethiopia, filled out a structured questionnaire, which assessed demographics, variables that according to the Theory of Planned Behaviour are related to the motivation to learn, and their preferences for independent, carrier and integrated HIV/AIDS curriculum designs. On average, participants were highly motivated to learn about HIV/AIDS. Motivation to learn was primarily related to social norms and was not related to self-efficacy to discuss HIV/AIDS in class. The often discussed reluctance to discuss sexuality and condom use in curricula in Sub-Saharan Africa, seems to be more related to existing negative social norms, than to lack of self-efficacy. Participants revealed a high preference for the independent, carrier and integrated curriculum design options. However, students with a higher motivation to learn about HIV/AIDS were more attracted to the independent course design.

  1. An Empirical Study of the Attention in the Interface of Learning Management System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Etcheverry

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to communicate the preliminary results of the Research taken forward by a UESiglo21 Research Group (Cordoba, Argentina. The same one focuses on the attention as cognitive process of renewed format, linked to the learning, from tools of the Platform Learning Management System (LMS, of two matters of the Bachelor in Computer Science and Software Engineering of the University. The methodological design applied is mixed, called DexPlis, of quantitative and qualitative phases. The quantitative preliminary phase has proved a differential performance of the attention according to support, text and video, from which limits are defined for the qualitative stage in order to interpret the motivations that all the statisticians sublie to, and at the same time, justify the renewed attentional format, framed in an imaginary social effect of the telematic environment, where learning is supported by Information and Communication Technologies (ICT.

  2. Effects of information processing speed on learning, memory, and executive functioning in people living with HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fellows, Robert P; Byrd, Desiree A; Morgello, Susan

    2014-01-01

    It is unclear whether or to what degree literacy, aging, and other neurologic abnormalities relate to cognitive deficits among people living with HIV/AIDS in the combined antiretroviral therapy (CART) era. The primary aim of this study was to simultaneously examine the association of age, HIV-associated motor abnormalities, major depressive disorder, and reading level with information processing speed, learning, memory, and executive functions, and to determine whether processing speed mediated any of the relationships between cognitive and noncognitive variables. Participants were 186 racially and ethnically diverse men and women living with HIV/AIDS who underwent comprehensive neurological, neuropsychological, and medical evaluations. Structural equation modeling was utilized to assess the extent to which information processing speed mediated the relationship between age, motor abnormalities, major depressive disorder, and reading level with other cognitive abilities. Age, motor dysfunction, reading level, and current major depressive disorder were all significantly associated with information processing speed. Information processing speed fully mediated the effects of age on learning, memory, and executive functioning and partially mediated the effect of major depressive disorder on learning and memory. The effect of motor dysfunction on learning and memory was fully mediated by processing speed. These findings provide support for information processing speed as a primary deficit, which may account, at least in part, for many of the other cognitive abnormalities recognized in complex HIV/AIDS populations. The association of age and information processing speed may account for HIV/aging synergies in the generation of CART-era cognitive abnormalities.

  3. An empirical investigation of intellectual capital components on each others and organizational learning capabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabi ollah Nejatizadeh

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available During the past few years, there have been growing interests on intellectual capital due to industrial changes on the market. Thus, identifying different ways to create, manage, and evaluate the impact of intellectual capital has remained an open area of research. One of the most important organizational capabilities, which could help organizations create and share knowledge is to effectively use knowledge to create competitive advantage. The primary objective of this study is to investigate the effects of intellectual capital on other components and their impacts on organizational learning capability using structural equation modeling. The statistical population includes 500 employees of an Iranian organization. The study uses a sample size including 273 people using Morgan statistical table. In our survey, human capital influences positively (0.330 on structural capital, human capital influences positively on relational capital (0.47 and relational capital influences positively on structural capital (0.455. In addition human capital influences positively on learning capabilities (0.06, structural capital impacts learning capabilities (0.355 and relational capital on learning capabilities (0.545.

  4. Global Culture, Learning Style, and Outcome: An Interdisciplinary Empirical Study of International University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strang, Kenneth David

    2010-01-01

    The study examined 2500 business degree students from 21 countries, enrolled at an Australian university, using a survey to assess learning style, which was integrated into a global culture taxonomy. The research hypothesis was that academic outcome could be explained through an interdisciplinary model, by integrating proven theories from…

  5. The Learning Transfer Approach To Estimating the Benefits of Training: Empirical Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Paul; Hannigan, Kevin; Crowe, Deirdre

    2001-01-01

    The Learning Transfer Systems Inventory provides a systematic approach for predicting training effectiveness through needs assessment, organizational analysis to determine issues affecting training outcomes, and assessment of needed resources. Data from 158 management trainers demonstrated its effectiveness in assessing how well an organization…

  6. Two New Empirically Derived Reasons To Use the Assessment of Basic Learning Abilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, David F.; Williams, W. Larry; Follette, William C.

    2002-01-01

    Scores on the Assessment of Basic Learning Abilities (ABLA), Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales, and the Wechsler Intelligences Scale-Revised (WAIS-R) were obtained for 30 adults with mental retardation. Correlations between the Vineland domains and ABLA were all significant. No participants performing below ABLA Level 6 were testable on the…

  7. Determinants of Learning Achievements: Empirical Analysis of Seven Schools in Cambodian Primary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiguro, Kaoru

    2018-01-01

    This paper examines the determinants of learning achievements in Cambodian primary schools. Both student factors and family factors are evaluated. The student factors consist of student age, enrollment age, frequency of homework completion, and number of questions to ask in class. The family factors include the father's educational background,…

  8. Drawings in computer-supported collaborative learning - Empirical and technical results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bollen, Lars; Gijlers, Aaltje H.; van Joolingen, Wouter

    2015-01-01

    Self-constructed external representations are thought to be beneficial in teaching and learning, especially when embedded in peer interactions, and can positively affect the course and type of reasoning, for example by providing grounding for explanations and self-explanations, by helping to

  9. A Total Quality Management Approach to Assurance of Learning in the Accounting Classroom: An Empirical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Mary Ellen; Eisner, Susan

    2011-01-01

    The research presented in this paper seeks to discern which combination of pedagogical tools most positively impact student learning of the introductory Accounting curriculum in the Principles of Accounting courses in a 4-year U.S. public college. This research topic is relevant because it helps address a quandary many instructors experience: how…

  10. Empirically Derived Learning Disability Subtypes: A Replication Attempt and Longitudinal Patterns over 15 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spreen, Otfried; Haaf, Robert G.

    1986-01-01

    Test scores of two groups of learning disabled children (N=63 and N=96) were submitted to cluster analysis in an attempt to replicate previously described subtypes. All three subtypes (visuo-perceptual, linguistic, and articulo-graphomotor types) were identified along with minimally and severely impaired subtypes. Similar clusters in the same…

  11. Asian Students' Voices: An Empirical Study of Asian Students' Learning Experiences at a New Zealand University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Jacqui; Li, Mingsheng

    2008-01-01

    More than 85% of the international students in New Zealand are Asian in origin. The level of satisfaction of Asian international students with their learning experiences in New Zealand has been of enormous concern for the New Zealand export education industry. The results of this current research, based on a qualitative research study conducted at…

  12. The Efficiency of Different Online Learning Media--An Empirical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köbler, Franziska J.; Nitzschner, Marco M.

    2014-01-01

    In the current study, it was examined whether successful learning is related to using different types of media. We compared the comprehension of an economic concept in novices (N = 82) under three conditions: a Wikipedia article, a funny, and a serious YouTube video. The media were presented in English which is a foreign language to most of the…

  13. Empirical validation of characteristics of design-based learning in higher education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gómez Puente, S.M.; Eijck, van M.W.; Jochems, W.M.G.

    2013-01-01

    Design-based learning (DBL) is an educational approach in which students gather and process theoretical knowledge while working on the design of artifacts, systems, and innovative solutions in project settings. Whereas DBL has been employed in the practice of teaching science in secondary education,

  14. The Relationship between Global Competence and Language Learning Motivation: An Empirical Study in Critical Language Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semaan, Gaby; Yamazaki, Kasumi

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the relationship between global competence and second language learning motivation in critical language classrooms. Data were collected from 137 participants who were studying critical languages (Arabic, Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Persian) at two universities on the East and West Coasts of the United States, using a 30-item…

  15. An analytic tableaux model for Deductive Mastermind empirically tested with a massively used online learning system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gierasimczuk, N.; van der Maas, H.L.J.; Raijmakers, M.E.J.

    2013-01-01

    The paper is concerned with the psychological relevance of a logical model for deductive reasoning. We propose a new way to analyze logical reasoning in a deductive version of the Mastermind game implemented within a popular Dutch online educational learning system (Math Garden). Our main goal is to

  16. Coordinated Implicitly? An Empirical Study on the Role of Social Media in Collaborative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xi; Chen, Hui; Ordóñez de Pablos, Patricia; Lytras, Miltiadis D.; Sun, Yongqiang

    2016-01-01

    As social media is widely adopted in collaborative learning, which places teams in a virtual environment, it is critical for teams to identify and leverage the knowledge of their members. Yet little is known about how social media influences teams to coordinate their knowledge and collaborate effectively. In this research, we explore the roles of…

  17. Machine learning techniques for breast cancer computer aided diagnosis using different image modalities: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yassin, Nisreen I R; Omran, Shaimaa; El Houby, Enas M F; Allam, Hemat

    2018-03-01

    The high incidence of breast cancer in women has increased significantly in the recent years. Physician experience of diagnosing and detecting breast cancer can be assisted by using some computerized features extraction and classification algorithms. This paper presents the conduction and results of a systematic review (SR) that aims to investigate the state of the art regarding the computer aided diagnosis/detection (CAD) systems for breast cancer. The SR was conducted using a comprehensive selection of scientific databases as reference sources, allowing access to diverse publications in the field. The scientific databases used are Springer Link (SL), Science Direct (SD), IEEE Xplore Digital Library, and PubMed. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were defined and applied to each retrieved work to select those of interest. From 320 studies retrieved, 154 studies were included. However, the scope of this research is limited to scientific and academic works and excludes commercial interests. This survey provides a general analysis of the current status of CAD systems according to the used image modalities and the machine learning based classifiers. Potential research studies have been discussed to create a more objective and efficient CAD systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The "EyeCane", a new electronic travel aid for the blind: Technology, behavior & swift learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maidenbaum, Shachar; Hanassy, Shlomi; Abboud, Sami; Buchs, Galit; Chebat, Daniel-Robert; Levy-Tzedek, Shelly; Amedi, Amir

    2014-01-01

    Independent mobility is one of the most pressing problems facing people who are blind. We present the EyeCane, a new mobility aid aimed at increasing perception of environment beyond what is provided by the traditional White Cane for tasks such as distance estimation, navigation and obstacle detection. The "EyeCane" enhances the traditional White Cane by using tactile and auditory output to increase detectable distance and angles. It circumvents the technical pitfalls of other devices, such as weight, short battery life, complex interface schemes, and slow learning curve. It implements multiple beams to enables detection of obstacles at different heights, and narrow beams to provide active sensing that can potentially increase the user's spatial perception of the environment. Participants were tasked with using the EyeCane for several basic tasks with minimal training. Blind and blindfolded-sighted participants were able to use the EyeCane successfully for distance estimation, simple navigation and simple obstacle detection after only several minutes of training. These results demonstrate the EyeCane's potential for mobility rehabilitation. The short training time is especially important since available mobility training resources are limited, not always available, and can be quite expensive and/or entail long waiting periods.

  19. Effectiveness of computer-aided learning in oral health among patients and caregivers: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ab Malik, Normaliza; Zhang, Jiaguan; Lam, Otto Lok Tao; Jin, Lijian; McGrath, Colman

    2017-01-01

    Computer-aided learning (CAL) offers enormous potential in disseminating oral health care information to patients and caregivers. The effectiveness of CAL, however, remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to systematically review published evidence on the effectiveness of CAL in disseminating oral health care information to patients and caregivers. A structured comprehensive search was undertaken among 7 electronic databases (PUBMED, CINAHL Plus, EMBASE, SCOPUS, WEB of SCIENCE, the Cochrane Library, and PsycINFO) to identify relevant studies. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and observational studies were included in this review. Papers were screened by 2 independent reviewers, and studies that met the inclusion criteria were selected for further assessment. A total of 2915 papers were screened, and full texts of 53 potentially relevant papers (κ = 0.885) were retrieved. A total of 5 studies that met the inclusion criteria (1 RCT, 1 quasi-experimental study, and 3 post-intervention studies) were identified. Outcome measures included knowledge, attitude, behavior, and oral health. Significant improvements in clinical oral health parameters (P effectiveness of CAL interventions for oral health care among patients and caregivers. Synthesis of the data suggests that CAL has positive impacts on knowledge, attitude, behavior, and oral health. Further high- quality studies on the effectiveness of CAL in promoting oral health are warranted. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Multiple-instance learning for computer-aided detection of tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melendez, J.; Sánchez, C. I.; Philipsen, R. H. H. M.; Maduskar, P.; van Ginneken, B.

    2014-03-01

    Detection of tuberculosis (TB) on chest radiographs (CXRs) is a hard problem. Therefore, to help radiologists or even take their place when they are not available, computer-aided detection (CAD) systems are being developed. In order to reach a performance comparable to that of human experts, the pattern recognition algorithms of these systems are typically trained on large CXR databases that have been manually annotated to indicate the abnormal lung regions. However, manually outlining those regions constitutes a time-consuming process that, besides, is prone to inconsistencies and errors introduced by interobserver variability and the absence of an external reference standard. In this paper, we investigate an alternative pattern classi cation method, namely multiple-instance learning (MIL), that does not require such detailed information for a CAD system to be trained. We have applied this alternative approach to a CAD system aimed at detecting textural lesions associated with TB. Only the case (or image) condition (normal or abnormal) was provided in the training stage. We compared the resulting performance with those achieved by several variations of a conventional system trained with detailed annotations. A database of 917 CXRs was constructed for experimentation. It was divided into two roughly equal parts that were used as training and test sets. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was utilized as a performance measure. Our experiments show that, by applying the investigated MIL approach, comparable results as with the aforementioned conventional systems are obtained in most cases, without requiring condition information at the lesion level.

  1. OVERVIEW OF THE OBSTACLES AND FACILITATORS OF LEARNING AND ACQUIRING KNOWLEDGE IN STRATEGIC ALLIANCES – AN EMPIRICAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Klindzic

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we address the issue of knowledge transfer between organizations in partnerships as well as the role of the knowledge exchange in building successful cooperation. Given its many positive effects on the business performance, such as creativity, innovativeness and flexibility needed in modern business environment, it was of the utmost importance to investigate different factors that either contribute or constrain learning in alliances. After the theoretical background on the aforementioned topic was given, an empirical research and its main conclusions were described in the paper. A study of the alliances in Croatian context revealed that organizational characteristics exhibit the most pronounced influence on the knowledge transfer success which was especially highlighted in domestic alliances. The level of integration, the primary area of cooperation and the previous experience in forming alliances between partners did not change the extent to which different factors influenced knowledge transfer.

  2. E-learning in engineering education: a theoretical and empirical study of the Algerian higher education institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benchicou, Soraya; Aichouni, Mohamed; Nehari, Driss

    2010-06-01

    Technology-mediated education or e-learning is growing globally both in scale and delivery capacity due to the large diffusion of the ubiquitous information and communication technologies (ICT) in general and the web technologies in particular. This statement has not yet been fully supported by research, especially in developing countries such as Algeria. The purpose of this paper was to identify directions for addressing the needs of academics in higher education institutions in Algeria in order to adopt the e-learning approach as a strategy to improve quality of education. The paper will report results of an empirical study that measures the readiness of the Algerian higher education institutions towards the implementation of ICT in the educational process and the attitudes of faculty members towards the application of the e-learning approach in engineering education. Three main objectives were targeted, namely: (a) to provide an initial evaluation of faculty members' attitudes and perceptions towards web-based education; (b) reporting on their perceived requirements for implementing e-learning in university courses; (c) providing an initial input for a collaborative process of developing an institutional strategy for e-learning. Statistical analysis of the survey results indicates that the Algerian higher education institution, which adopted the Licence - Master and Doctorate educational system, is facing a big challenge to take advantage of emerging technological innovations and the advent of e-learning to further develop its teaching programmes and to enhance the quality of education in engineering fields. The successful implementation of this modern approach is shown to depend largely on a set of critical success factors that would include: 1. The extent to which the institution will adopt a formal and official e-learning strategy. 2. The extent to which faculty members will adhere and adopt this strategy and develop ownership of the various measures in the

  3. EUROPEAN LABOUR PRODUCTIVITY AND CORPORATE E-LEARNING ACTIVITIES: AN EMPIRICAL ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muratore Fabrizio

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this analysis is to test the hypothesis which growth in workers’ competency level is affected by educational, training and workplace features. We focused above all on the corporate e-learning activities and labour productivity, in order to identify differences between European countries. Our findings showed some statistical significances related to six variables concerning a macro view of knowledge and innovation in the workplace, whereby we highlighted the comparison of mutual positions of European countries on the basis of a potential component of investments in human capital which is e-learning. According to statistical significativity we specifically noted that most Northern European countries have a comparative advantage in terms of labour productivity and direct investments than those in the south.

  4. A pilot randomised controlled study of the mental health first aid eLearning course with UK medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, E Bethan; Beever, Emmeline; Glazebrook, Cris

    2018-03-21

    Medical students face many barriers to seeking out professional help for their mental health, including stigma relating to mental illness, and often prefer to seek support and advice from fellow students. Improving medical students' mental health literacy and abilities to support someone experiencing a mental health problem could reduce barriers to help seeking and improve mental health in this population. Mental Health First Aid (MHFA) is an evidence-based intervention designed to improve mental health literacy and ability to respond to someone with a mental health problem. This pilot randomised controlled trial aims to evaluate the MHFA eLearning course in UK medical students. Fifty-five medical students were randomised to receive six weeks access to the MHFA eLearning course (n = 27) or to a no-access control group (n = 28). Both groups completed baseline (pre-randomisation) and follow-up (six weeks post-randomisation) online questionnaires measuring recognition of a mental health problem, mental health first aid intentions, confidence to help a friend experiencing a mental health problem, and stigmatising attitudes. Course feedback was gathered at follow-up. More participants were lost follow-up in the MHFA group (51.9%) compared to control (21.4%). Both intention-to-treat (ITT) and non-ITT analyses showed that the MHFA intervention improved mental health first aid intentions (p = first aid actions at follow-up (p = .006). Feedback about the MHFA course was generally positive, with participants stating it helped improve their knowledge and confidence to help someone. This pilot study demonstrated the potential for the MHFA eLearning course to improve UK medical students' mental health first aid skills, confidence to help a friend and stigmatising attitudes. It could be useful in supporting their own and others' mental health while studying and in their future healthcare careers. Retrospectively registered ( ISRCTN11219848 ).

  5. FACTORS INFLUENCING MOBILE-LEARNING ADOPTION INTENTION: AN EMPIRICAL INVESTIGATION IN HIGH EDUCATION

    OpenAIRE

    Ngo Tan Vu Khanh; Gwangyong Gim

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the use of mobile phones and tablets for learning purposes among university students in Vietnam. For this purpose, the research is based on relevant technology acceptance literature and the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) is proposed to analyze the adoption of mobile devices and smart phones by Vietnam students for accessing course materials, searching the web for information related to their discipline, sharing knowledge, conducting assignments etc. Employing struct...

  6. Experiential learning and critical reflection as a tool for transfer of business knowledge: an empirical case study of a start-up simulation intervention for nascent entrepreneurs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Le Roux

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the impact of venture start-up simulation on participants’ learning; it is concerned specifically with the relationship between experiential learning theory and critical reflection within venture start-up simulation. This was carried out in empirical investigation of a simulation training game used to train entrepreneurs in a formal setting. The findings show significant improvement in their knowledge of finance, marketing operations and information use. Participants reported increased skills and intended behavioural changes in their own ventures. Finally, there was empirical support for the fact that critical reflection during experiential learning can greatly improve the standard of learning and has an immediate effect on  participants’ behaviour.

  7. An empirical comparison of popular structure learning algorithms with a view to gene network inference

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Djordjilović, V.; Chiogna, M.; Vomlel, Jiří

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 88, č. 1 (2017), s. 602-613 ISSN 0888-613X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-12010S Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : Bayesian networks * Structure learning * Reverse engineering * Gene networks Subject RIV: JD - Computer Applications, Robotics OBOR OECD: Computer sciences, information science, bioinformathics (hardware development to be 2.2, social aspect to be 5.8) Impact factor: 2.845, year: 2016 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2017/MTR/vomlel-0477168.pdf

  8. Exploring Lecturers' Perceptions of Learning Management System: An Empirical Study Based on TAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wei Goh

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available With the pervasive take-up and presence of digital technologies, learning management system (LMS is popular for its open accessibility and its interactive nature. Implementation of LMS has become part of the strategic plan in higher education institution to enhance the flexibility in teaching and learning. It is essential to explore the perceptions of users in using the LMS in order to inform stakeholders the positive influencing aspects and improve the negative factors in the future. This study investigates the perception of lecturers in using LMS in term of perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use for teaching purposes. Technology Acceptance Model (TAM is used as the research framework to design the questionnaire. An online questionnaire was created to address the research questions. The results reveal that lecturers do not react positively towards perceived ease of use of Moodle for teaching. Lecturers treat Moodle as content repository and do not fully utilize the interactive features in Moodle. It was found that usability issues, interaction and communication issues had a negative impact on the lecturers' perception.

  9. A tale of two "forests": random forest machine learning AIDS tropical forest carbon mapping.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Mascaro

    Full Text Available Accurate and spatially-explicit maps of tropical forest carbon stocks are needed to implement carbon offset mechanisms such as REDD+ (Reduced Deforestation and Degradation Plus. The Random Forest machine learning algorithm may aid carbon mapping applications using remotely-sensed data. However, Random Forest has never been compared to traditional and potentially more reliable techniques such as regionally stratified sampling and upscaling, and it has rarely been employed with spatial data. Here, we evaluated the performance of Random Forest in upscaling airborne LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging-based carbon estimates compared to the stratification approach over a 16-million hectare focal area of the Western Amazon. We considered two runs of Random Forest, both with and without spatial contextual modeling by including--in the latter case--x, and y position directly in the model. In each case, we set aside 8 million hectares (i.e., half of the focal area for validation; this rigorous test of Random Forest went above and beyond the internal validation normally compiled by the algorithm (i.e., called "out-of-bag", which proved insufficient for this spatial application. In this heterogeneous region of Northern Peru, the model with spatial context was the best preforming run of Random Forest, and explained 59% of LiDAR-based carbon estimates within the validation area, compared to 37% for stratification or 43% by Random Forest without spatial context. With the 60% improvement in explained variation, RMSE against validation LiDAR samples improved from 33 to 26 Mg C ha(-1 when using Random Forest with spatial context. Our results suggest that spatial context should be considered when using Random Forest, and that doing so may result in substantially improved carbon stock modeling for purposes of climate change mitigation.

  10. A reflective learning report about the implementation and impacts of Psychological First Aid (PFA) in Gaza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafer, Alison; Snider, Leslie; Sammour, Rania

    2016-01-01

    Psychological First Aid (PFA) is the recommended immediate psychosocial response during crises. As PFA is now widely implemented in crises worldwide, there are increasing calls to evaluate its effectiveness. World Vision used PFA as a fundamental component of their emergency response following the 2014 conflict in Gaza. Anecdotal reports from Gaza suggest a range of benefits for those who received PFA. Though not intending to undertake rigorous research, World Vision explored learnings about PFA in Gaza through Focus Group Discussions with PFA providers, Gazan women, men and children and a Key Informant Interview with a PFA trainer. The qualitative analyses aimed to determine if PFA helped individuals to feel safe, calm, connected to social supports, hopeful and efficacious - factors suggested by the disaster literature to promote coping and recovery (Hobfoll et al., 2007). Results show positive psychosocial benefits for children, women and men receiving PFA, confirming that PFA contributed to: safety, reduced distress, ability to engage in calming practices and to support each other, and a greater sense of control and hopefulness irrespective of their adverse circumstances. The data shows that PFA formed an important part of a continuum of care to meet psychosocial needs in Gaza and served as a gateway for addressing additional psychosocial support needs. A "whole-of-family" approach to PFA showed particularly strong impacts and strengthened relationships. Of note, the findings from World Vision's implementation of PFA in Gaza suggests that future PFA research go beyond a narrow focus on clinical outcomes, to a wider examination of psychosocial, familial and community-based outcomes.

  11. A tale of two "forests": random forest machine learning AIDS tropical forest carbon mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascaro, Joseph; Asner, Gregory P; Knapp, David E; Kennedy-Bowdoin, Ty; Martin, Roberta E; Anderson, Christopher; Higgins, Mark; Chadwick, K Dana

    2014-01-01

    Accurate and spatially-explicit maps of tropical forest carbon stocks are needed to implement carbon offset mechanisms such as REDD+ (Reduced Deforestation and Degradation Plus). The Random Forest machine learning algorithm may aid carbon mapping applications using remotely-sensed data. However, Random Forest has never been compared to traditional and potentially more reliable techniques such as regionally stratified sampling and upscaling, and it has rarely been employed with spatial data. Here, we evaluated the performance of Random Forest in upscaling airborne LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging)-based carbon estimates compared to the stratification approach over a 16-million hectare focal area of the Western Amazon. We considered two runs of Random Forest, both with and without spatial contextual modeling by including--in the latter case--x, and y position directly in the model. In each case, we set aside 8 million hectares (i.e., half of the focal area) for validation; this rigorous test of Random Forest went above and beyond the internal validation normally compiled by the algorithm (i.e., called "out-of-bag"), which proved insufficient for this spatial application. In this heterogeneous region of Northern Peru, the model with spatial context was the best preforming run of Random Forest, and explained 59% of LiDAR-based carbon estimates within the validation area, compared to 37% for stratification or 43% by Random Forest without spatial context. With the 60% improvement in explained variation, RMSE against validation LiDAR samples improved from 33 to 26 Mg C ha(-1) when using Random Forest with spatial context. Our results suggest that spatial context should be considered when using Random Forest, and that doing so may result in substantially improved carbon stock modeling for purposes of climate change mitigation.

  12. The Gender Lens: Development of a learning aid to introduce gender medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weyers, Simone

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and aim: Gender medicine takes into account biological and social differences between men and women in terms of prevalence and course of disease, diagnosis and therapy. Medical students should be made aware of this in the early stages of medical education. However, there is hardly any teaching material currently available. This article presents the adaption and first use of the German “Gender Lens,” a tool to introduce gender medicine to medical students. Method: The original Canadian ”Gender Lens Tool” was translated into German, tested by (n=5 teachers and adapted based on current scientific concepts. The instrument was applied and evaluated using qualitative methods in a student focus group (n=4. It was then piloted in a cohort of fourth-semester students (n=247 in a seminar addressing gender medicine. These experiences were evaluated using quantitative methods.Results: The German translation of the Gender Lens offers students a framework with which to analyze sex and gender differences in terms of the “prevalence, diagnosis, course, therapy and prevention” of a specific disease. Furthermore, it enables a refined search for causes such as “biological disposition, attitudes and behaviors, family and social networks, occupational and material circumstances and experiences with the health care system.” Recommendations were received from the student groups regarding teaching methods. Male and female fourth-semester students agreed that the Gender Lens is useful as an introduction to gender medicine. Discussion: Initial experiences with the Gender Lens adapted for the German curriculum suggest that such a learning aid can contribute to raising awareness of gender medicine in medical students.

  13. Deep learning of contrast-coated serrated polyps for computer-aided detection in CT colonography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Näppi, Janne J.; Pickhardt, Perry; Kim, David H.; Hironaka, Toru; Yoshida, Hiroyuki

    2017-03-01

    Serrated polyps were previously believed to be benign lesions with no cancer potential. However, recent studies have revealed a novel molecular pathway where also serrated polyps can develop into colorectal cancer. CT colonography (CTC) can detect serrated polyps using the radiomic biomarker of contrast coating, but this requires expertise from the reader and current computer-aided detection (CADe) systems have not been designed to detect the contrast coating. The purpose of this study was to develop a novel CADe method that makes use of deep learning to detect serrated polyps based on their contrast-coating biomarker in CTC. In the method, volumetric shape-based features are used to detect polyp sites over soft-tissue and fecal-tagging surfaces of the colon. The detected sites are imaged using multi-angular 2D image patches. A deep convolutional neural network (DCNN) is used to review the image patches for the presence of polyps. The DCNN-based polyp-likelihood estimates are merged into an aggregate likelihood index where highest values indicate the presence of a polyp. For pilot evaluation, the proposed DCNN-CADe method was evaluated with a 10-fold cross-validation scheme using 101 colonoscopy-confirmed cases with 144 biopsy-confirmed serrated polyps from a CTC screening program, where the patients had been prepared for CTC with saline laxative and fecal tagging by barium and iodine-based diatrizoate. The average per-polyp sensitivity for serrated polyps >=6 mm in size was 93+/-7% at 0:8+/-1:8 false positives per patient on average. The detection accuracy was substantially higher that of a conventional CADe system. Our results indicate that serrated polyps can be detected automatically at high accuracy in CTC.

  14. Perception-Based Personalization of Hearing Aids Using Gaussian Processes and Active Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Brehm; Nielsen, Jakob; Larsen, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Personalization of multi-parameter hearing aids involves an initial fitting followed by a manual knowledge-based trial-and-error fine-tuning from ambiguous verbal user feedback. The result is an often suboptimal HA setting whereby the full potential of modern hearing aids is not utilized. This ar...

  15. The application of brain-based learning principles aided by GeoGebra to improve mathematical representation ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priatna, Nanang

    2017-08-01

    The use of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) in mathematics instruction will help students in building conceptual understanding. One of the software products used in mathematics instruction is GeoGebra. The program enables simple visualization of complex geometric concepts and helps improve students' understanding of geometric concepts. Instruction applying brain-based learning principles is one oriented at the efforts of naturally empowering the brain potentials which enable students to build their own knowledge. One of the goals of mathematics instruction in school is to develop mathematical communication ability. Mathematical representation is regarded as a part of mathematical communication. It is a description, expression, symbolization, or modeling of mathematical ideas/concepts as an attempt of clarifying meanings or seeking for solutions to the problems encountered by students. The research aims to develop a learning model and teaching materials by applying the principles of brain-based learning aided by GeoGebra to improve junior high school students' mathematical representation ability. It adopted a quasi-experimental method with the non-randomized control group pretest-posttest design and the 2x3 factorial model. Based on analysis of the data, it is found that the increase in the mathematical representation ability of students who were treated with mathematics instruction applying the brain-based learning principles aided by GeoGebra was greater than the increase of the students given conventional instruction, both as a whole and based on the categories of students' initial mathematical ability.

  16. Promoting Learning Achievement, Problem Solving, and Learning Curiosity of High School Students: Empirical Thai Study of Self-directed Learning in Physics Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wittaya Worapun

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Three phases of this research were employed to study learning achievement, problem solving, and learning curiosity among 43 students in the 11th grade through self-directed learning in a Physics course. Research instruments included: a learning achievement test, a test of curiosity, observations using anecdotal evidence of curiosity, and a test of problem solving ability. The findings show that six components of self-directed learning were evident, i.e. principles and basic concepts, syntax, social system, principle of reaction, and support system. It was found that five main procedures of self-directed learning were applicable in a management model: diagnosis, strategies, growth in habit, taking action, and summarizing and assessing. Students gained in their learning achievement ; furthermore, their posttest scores in problem solving were greater than their pretest scores at .05 level of statistical significance.

  17. Relationships among Learning Styles and Motivation with Computer-Aided Instruction in an Agronomy Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAndrews, Gina M.; Mullen, Russell E.; Chadwick, Scott A.

    2005-01-01

    Multi-media learning tools were developed to enhance student learning for an introductory agronomy course at Iowa State University. During fall 2002, the new interactive computer program, called Computer Interactive Multimedia Program for Learning Enhancement (CIMPLE) was incorporated into the teaching, learning, and assessment processes of the…

  18. An empirical investigation on the effects of spiritual leadership components on organizational learning capacity: A case study of Payame Noor University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Hossein

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an empirical investigation on the effects of spiritual leadership components on organizational learning capacity for a case study of Payame Noor University, Iran. The proposed study uses a standard questionnaire for measuring spirituality leadership proposed by Fry (2003 [Fry, L. W. (2003. Toward a theory of spiritual leadership. The leadership quarterly, 14(6, 693-727.] and for measuring the impact of organizational learning capacity, the proposed study uses another questionnaire proposed by Teo et al. (2006 [Teo, H. H., Wang, X., Wei, K. K., Sia, C. L., & Lee, M. K. (2006. Organizational learning capacity and attitude toward complex technological innovations: an empirical study. Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, 57(2, 264-279.]. The results of our survey have indicated that all components of spiritual leadership, except love and altruism as meaningful, influence spirituality leadership, significantly.

  19. Digital Learning Aids for Nynorsk Pupils in School: - A Politically Sensitive Area or a Question of a Deeper Scientific Understanding of Learning?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rune Johan Krumsvik

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This position paper focuses on Nynorsk in the digital era and the need for research-based knowledge about it in school settings in Norway. The Norwegian language situation is exceptional because Norway has two written standards, Bokmål (majority variety and Nynorsk (minority variety, and both the Education Act and the Norwegian Directorate of Education require that publishers provide parallel editions of all paper-based and digital learning aids for pupils. However, a national report by Skjær,Eiksund, Fretland, Holen & Netteland(2008 revealed that few publishers have developed and offered digital learning aids in Nynorsk. In 2015 the situation appears to be largely unchanged, even though the authorities, language organisations and “leadings lights” have taken several initiatives to encourage compliance with the Education Act; however, what is needed is further research into the situation of parallel editions of digital learning aids. This is of particular interest today since the pupils in the county with the highest rate (97% of Nynorsk-pupils has consistently been at the top of the list as one of the best performing counties in Norway in national tests since 2006 (Directorate of Education 2015. In addition, Vangsnes, Söderlund & Blekesaune (2015 find that municipalities in Norway with more than 50% Nynorsk-pupils achieve better in National tests when compared to Bokmål municipalities. The main message in our position paper is that the digital revolution might have changed some underlying premises for how we understand and use language and dialects, and the need for parallel editions of digital learning aids in Bokmål and Nynorsk is no longer a question of economics or of political statements for or against Nynorsk, etc., but is instead a question of a more nuanced scientific understanding of learning and achievement in today’s digitized school. The achievements of Nynorsk pupils in national tests is one indicator of school

  20. Exploring Constructivist Social Learning Practices in Aiding Russian-Speaking Teachers to Learn Estonian: An Action Research Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiilo, Tatjana; Kutsar, Dagmar

    2012-01-01

    Based on appreciative inquiry and threshold concepts from an intercultural learning perspective, the article makes insights into the constructivist social learning practice of Estonian language learning amongst Russian-speaking teachers in Estonia. The application of educational action research methodology, more specifically that of Bridget…

  1. Head injury - first aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000028.htm Head injury - first aid To use the sharing features on this page, ... a concussion can range from mild to severe. First Aid Learning to recognize a serious head injury and ...

  2. Gender and Children as the Moderators of the Relationship between Social Support and Quality of Life: An Empirical Study of People Living with HIV/AIDS in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrefa-Gyan, Tina; Cornelius, Llewellyn; Okundaye, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Although gender differences persist in the receipt of social support and the report of quality of life among people living with HIV/AIDS in Sub-Saharan Africa, the knowledge base on this topic is scant. For those living with HIV/AIDS, women tend to participate more than men in support group activities, but their gender predisposes them to lower quality of life. Therefore, this study seeks to determine what demographic factors moderate the relationship between social support and quality of life among those living with HIV/AIDS in Ghana. A convenience sample of 300 HIV/AIDS support group members who have experience participating in research studies and was obtained for use via cross-sectional design survey in September and October 2013. The Medical Outcome Studies (MOS) HIV Health Survey, the MOS Social Support Survey, and demographic questionnaire instruments were used to assess quality of life, social support, and demographic information respectively. Gender (male) F(3, 296) = 66.04, t = 2.26, p = .024) and having children (have children) (F(5, 294) = 40.34, t = 2.50, p = .013) moderated the relationship between social support and quality of life. Implications of the findings for practice, policy, and research in Ghana and the rest of the developing world were discussed.

  3. What Makes You Tick? An Empirical Study of Space Science Related Social Media Communications Using Machine Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwong, Y. L.; Oliver, C.; Van Kranendonk, M. J.

    2016-12-01

    The rise of social media has transformed the way the public engages with scientists and science organisations. `Retweet', `Like', `Share' and `Comment' are a few ways users engage with messages on Twitter and Facebook, two of the most popular social media platforms. Despite the availability of big data from these digital footprints, research into social media science communication is scant. This paper presents the results of an empirical study into the processes and outcomes of space science related social media communications using machine learning. The study is divided into two main parts. The first part is dedicated to the use of supervised learning methods to investigate the features of highly engaging messages., e.g. highly retweeted tweets and shared Facebook posts. It is hypothesised that these messages contain certain psycholinguistic features that are unique to the field of space science. We built a predictive model to forecast the engagement levels of social media posts. By using four feature sets (n-grams, psycholinguistics, grammar and social media), we were able to achieve prediction accuracies in the vicinity of 90% using three supervised learning algorithms (Naive Bayes, linear classifier and decision tree). We conducted the same experiments on social media messages from three other fields (politics, business and non-profit) and discovered several features that are exclusive to space science communications: anger, authenticity, hashtags, visual descriptions and a tentative tone. The second part of the study focuses on the extraction of topics from a corpus of texts using topic modelling. This part of the study is exploratory in nature and uses an unsupervised method called Latent Dirichlet Allocation (LDA) to uncover previously unknown topics within a large body of documents. Preliminary results indicate a strong potential of topic model algorithms to automatically uncover themes hidden within social media chatters on space related issues, with

  4. 76 FR 15311 - Legacy Learning Systems, Inc.; Analysis of Proposed Consent Order To Aid Public Comment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-21

    ... FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION [File No. 102 3055] Legacy Learning Systems, Inc.; Analysis of Proposed... electronically or in paper form. Comments should refer to ``Legacy Learning Systems, File No. 102 3055'' to... it. A comment filed in paper form should include the ``Legacy Learning Systems, File No. 102 3055...

  5. Learning by Thinking during Play: The Power of Reflection to Aid Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, Angela K.

    2016-01-01

    Coupled with reflection, play leads to the development of thinking dispositions and promotes deep learning and understanding. The twenty-first century world demands that children learn how to learn by becoming reflective, self-regulating inquirers capable of metacognition (thinking about thinking). This manuscript aims to analyse how young minds…

  6. The interaction of economic and pedagogical ideals in the context of workplace learning in Germany: a framework for empirical research - inspired by business ethics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina Röbel

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available As an effect of marketisation, the importance of workplace learning in Germany has increased. The article follows up on the long-standing discourse around the question of how economic and pedagogical ideals interact in this context. In order to develop a theoretical framework for empirical research, three major positions of the discipline of business ethics are introduced. Business ethics in more abstract ways deals with the very same question, namely how do ideas such as profit orientation interact with other norms and values? The new perspectives show that the discourse has been hitherto based on a specific understanding of economy. In order to derive an empirical answer to the research question, the question is re-formulated as follows: Which values are inherent in the decisions taken? Consequently, it suggests using the concept of "rationalities of justification" for empirical research. The article shows how this concept can be applied by conducting a test run.

  7. Designing an Assistive Learning Aid for Writing Acquisition: A Challenge for Children with Dyslexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latif, Seemab; Tariq, Rabbia; Tariq, Shehla; Latif, Rabia

    2015-01-01

    In Pakistan, the biggest challenge is to provide high quality education to the individuals with learning disabilities. Besides the well known affordance issue, there is a lack of awareness regarding the term dyslexia and remedial teaching training that causes the identification as well as remediation of the dyslexic individuals at early stages in Pakistan. The research was focused to exploit the benefits of using the modern mobile technology features in providing a learning platform for young dyslexic writers. Based on potential usability requirements of young dyslexic writers stated by remedial teachers of dyslexics, an android based application is designed and implemented using the usability engineering process model to encourage the learning process and help dyslexic children improve their fundamental handwriting skill. In addition, a handwriting learning algorithm based on concepts of machine learning is designed and implemented to decide the learning content, evaluate the learning performance, display the performance results and record the learning growth to show the strengths and weaknesses of a dyslexic child. The research was also aimed to assess the usability of the learner-centered application by the targeted population by conducting a user acceptance test to evaluate their learning experience and benefits of the developed application to dyslexic users. The results of the evaluation provided by the participants revealed that application has potential benefits to foster the learning process and help children with dyslexia by improving their foundational writing skills.

  8. Management's Perspective on Critical Success Factors Affecting Mobile Learning in Higher Education Institutions--An Empirical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alrasheedi, Muasaad; Capretz, Luiz Fernando; Raza, Arif

    2016-01-01

    Mobile learning (m-Learning) is considered to be one of the fastest growing learning platforms. The immense interest in m-Learning is attributed to the incredible rate of growth of mobile technology and its proliferation into every aspect of modern life. Despite this, m-Learning has not experienced a similar adoption rate in the education sector,…

  9. The interaction of economic and pedagogical ideals in the context of workplace learning in Germany: a framework for empirical research – inspired by business ethics

    OpenAIRE

    Röbel, Tina

    2016-01-01

    As an effect of marketisation, the importance of workplace learning in Germany has increased. The article follows up on the long-standing discourse around the question of how economic and pedagogical ideals interact in this context. In order to develop a theoretical framework for empirical research, three major positions of the discipline of business ethics are introduced. Business ethics in more abstract ways deals with the very same question, namely how do ideas such as profit orientation i...

  10. Corporate social capital, market orientation, organizational learning and service innovation performance: an empirical survey in the Pearl river delta of China

    OpenAIRE

    Jian, Zhaoquan; Zhou, Yu Lu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Service innovation performance (SIP) is an important driver of growth and wealth of service firms in wide range of industries. Yet, few research studies have been done to explore the influencing factors. The purpose of this study intends to identify the impacts of corporate social capital, market orientation and organizational learning on service innovation in the Pearl River Delta of China.Design/methodology/approach: The paper mainly adopted the empirical research. A Structure Equa...

  11. Impact of Visual Aids in Enhancing the Learning Process Case Research: District Dera Ghazi Khan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabiralyani, Ghulam; Hasan, Khuram Shahzad; Hamad, Naqvi; Iqbal, Nadeem

    2015-01-01

    This research explores teachers' opinions on the use of visual aids (e.g., pictures, animation videos, projectors and films) as a motivational tool in enhancing students' attention in reading literary texts. To accomplish the aim of the research, a closed ended questionnaire was used to collect the required data. The targeted population for this…

  12. Learning about HIV/AIDS in Uganda: Digital Resources and Language Learner Identities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Bonny; Jones, Shelley; Ahimbisibwe, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    While the HIV/AIDS epidemic has wrought havoc in the lives of millions of people in sub-Saharan Africa, access to information about the causes, symptoms, and treatment of the disease remains a challenge for many, and particularly for young people. This article reports on an action research study undertaken in a rural Ugandan village in 2006.…

  13. Study Navigator: An Algorithmically Generated Aid for Learning from Electronic Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Rakesh; Gollapudi, Sreenivas; Kannan, Anitha; Kenthapadi, Krishnaram

    2014-01-01

    We present "study navigator," an algorithmically-generated aid for enhancing the experience of studying from electronic textbooks. The study navigator for a section of the book consists of helpful "concept references" for understanding this section. Each concept reference is a pair consisting of a concept phrase explained…

  14. AIDS: An ICT Model for Integrating Teaching, Learning and Research in Technical University Education in Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asabere, Nana; Togo, Gilbert; Acakpovi, Amevi; Torby, Wisdom; Ampadu, Kwame

    2017-01-01

    Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) has changed the way we communicate and carry out certain daily activities. Globally, ICT has become an essential means for disseminating information. Using Accra Technical University in Ghana as a case study, this paper proposes an ICT model called Awareness Incentives Demand and Support (AIDS). Our…

  15. Learning Science Is About Facts and Language Learning Is About Being Discursive”—An Empirical Investigation of Students' Disciplinary Beliefs in the Context of Argumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitmann, Patricia; Hecht, Martin; Scherer, Ronny; Schwanewedel, Julia

    2017-01-01

    Argumentation is considered crucial in numerous disciplines in schools and universities because it constitutes an important proficiency in peoples' daily and professional lives. However, it is unclear whether argumentation is understood and practiced in comparable ways across disciplines. This study consequently examined empirically how students perceive argumentation in science and (first) language lessons. Specifically, we investigated students' beliefs about the relevance of discourse and the role of facts. Data from 3,258 high school students from 85 German secondary schools were analyzed with multigroup multilevel structural equation modeling in order to disentangle whether or not differences in argumentation across disciplines exist and the extent to which variation in students' beliefs can be explained by gender and school track. Results showed that students perceived the role of facts as highly relevant for science lessons, whereas discursive characteristics were considered significantly less important. In turn, discourse played a central role in language lessons, which was believed to require less knowledge of facts. These differences were independent of students' gender. In contrast, school track predicted the differences in beliefs significantly. Our findings lend evidence on the existence of disciplinary school cultures in argumentation that may be the result of differences in teachers' school-track-specific classroom practice and education. Implications in terms of a teacher's role in establishing norms for scientific argumentation as well as the impact of students' beliefs on their learning outcomes are discussed. PMID:28642727

  16. Learning from diverse contexts: equity and inclusion in the responses to AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loewenson, R

    2007-01-01

    This paper situates the findings of the diverse studies reported in this journal supplement in a global context that both fuels the epidemic through inequality and poverty and also provides new opportunities for global commitments, solidarity and resources. The studies in this issue signal that, while information and awareness about HIV and AIDS is now high, there is still poor access to services for people to know their own risk and a deeper need to address the asymmetries of power and access to resources that influence the control people have over their sexual relationships and lives. The studies in this supplement describe, in very different contexts, responses to the impact of AIDS that are grounded within the actions of individuals, households and extended families, against a background of existing disadvantage in assets, endowment and access to state and private sector resources. Community networks reduce social isolation and provide solidarity to households struggling to respond to AIDS. The extra work involved is often done by women, particularly where the weakening of the state has left communities disadvantaged. The paper argues that connections across communities to support survival need vertical links to national and global resources, services and markets to support, sustain and transform lives. The studies demonstrate the positive effect of this through primary healthcare systems, non-government organisation support and the social movements of people living with HIV and AIDS. If the first wave of the global response to AIDS built awareness and an emergency response to prevention, treatment and care, there is now need for a 'second wave' that provides strong measures to connect communities to social, national and global resources. Elements of this 'second wave' include people's--especially women and young people's--access to services to know their individual risk, measures that enhance their autonomy and the need for a massive increase in investment in

  17. From a Gloss to a Learning Tool: Does Visual Aids Enhance Better Sentence Comprehension?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Takeshi; Suzuki, Akio

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to optimize CALL environments as a learning tool rather than a gloss, focusing on the learning of polysemous words which refer to spatial relationship between objects. A lot of research has already been conducted to examine the efficacy of visual glosses while reading L2 texts and has reported that visual glosses can be…

  18. Anxiety symptoms and disorders among adults living with HIV and AIDS: A critical review and integrative synthesis of the empirical literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Charles; Zvolensky, Michael J; Woods, Steven P; Gonzalez, Adam; Safren, Steven A; O'Cleirigh, Conall M

    2017-02-01

    There are over 35 million people worldwide infected with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and its progression to Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS; WHO, 2014). With the advent of combined antiretroviral therapy (i.e., cART) in 1996, persons living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) now have much longer life expectancies. However, living with HIV remains challenging, as it is associated with a number of significant and recurrent (chronic) stressors including physical pain, side effects of cART, social stigma, and discrimination, among other social stressors. Presumably, as a result of these types of stressors, a disproportionately high number of PLWHA struggle with clinically-significant psychiatric symptoms and disorders. Although much scientific and clinical attention has focused on depressed mood and psychopathology among PLWHA, there has been comparably less focus on anxiety and its disorders. The paucity of work in this area is concerning from a public health perspective, as anxiety symptoms and disorders are the most common class of psychiatric disorders and often maintain a large negative impact on life functioning. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Anxiety symptoms and disorders among adults living with HIV and AIDS: A critical review and integrative synthesis of the empirical literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Charles; Zvolensky, Michael J.; Woods, Steven P.; Gonzalez, Adam; Safren, Steven A.; O’Cleirigh, Conall M.

    2016-01-01

    There are over 35 million people worldwide infected with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and its progression to Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS; WHO, 2014). With the advent of combined antiretroviral therapy (i.e., cART) in 1996, persons living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) now have much longer life expectancies. However, living with HIV remains challenging, as it is associated with a number of significant and recurrent (chronic) stressors including physical pain, side effects of cART, social stigma, and discrimination, among other social stressors. Presumably, as a result of these types of stressors, a disproportionately high number of PLWHA struggle with clinically-significant psychiatric symptoms and disorders. Although much scientific and clinical attention has focused on depressed mood and psychopathology among PLWHA, there has been comparably less focus on anxiety and its disorders. The paucity of work in this area is concerning from a public health perspective, as anxiety symptoms and disorders are the most common class of psychiatric disorders and often maintain a large negative impact on life functioning. PMID:27939443

  20. The Learning Loss Scale as an Assessment Tool: An Empirical Examination of Convergent Validity with Performative Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooker, John; Denker, Katherine

    2014-01-01

    Higher education has placed an increasingly greater value on assessment. The Learning Loss Scale may be an appropriate tool to assess learning across disciplines. In this paper, we review the culture of assessment, conceptualizations of cognitive learning, the Learning Loss Scale, and a theoretical explanation, and then we test this measure to…

  1. Music mnemonics aid Verbal Memory and Induce Learning - Related Brain Plasticity in Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaut, Michael H; Peterson, David A; McIntosh, Gerald C; Hoemberg, Volker

    2014-01-01

    Recent research on music and brain function has suggested that the temporal pattern structure in music and rhythm can enhance cognitive functions. To further elucidate this question specifically for memory, we investigated if a musical template can enhance verbal learning in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and if music-assisted learning will also influence short-term, system-level brain plasticity. We measured systems-level brain activity with oscillatory network synchronization during music-assisted learning. Specifically, we measured the spectral power of 128-channel electroencephalogram (EEG) in alpha and beta frequency bands in 54 patients with MS. The study sample was randomly divided into two groups, either hearing a spoken or a musical (sung) presentation of Rey's auditory verbal learning test. We defined the "learning-related synchronization" (LRS) as the percent change in EEG spectral power from the first time the word was presented to the average of the subsequent word encoding trials. LRS differed significantly between the music and the spoken conditions in low alpha and upper beta bands. Patients in the music condition showed overall better word memory and better word order memory and stronger bilateral frontal alpha LRS than patients in the spoken condition. The evidence suggests that a musical mnemonic recruits stronger oscillatory network synchronization in prefrontal areas in MS patients during word learning. It is suggested that the temporal structure implicit in musical stimuli enhances "deep encoding" during verbal learning and sharpens the timing of neural dynamics in brain networks degraded by demyelination in MS.

  2. musical mnemonics aid verbal memory and induce learning related brain plasticity in multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eThaut

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent research in music and brain function has suggested that the temporal pattern structure in music andrhythm can enhance cognitive functions. To further elucidate this question specifically for memory weinvestigated if a musical template can enhance verbal learning in patients with multiple sclerosis and ifmusic assisted learning will also influence short-term, system-level brain plasticity. We measuredsystems-level brain activity with oscillatory network synchronization during music assisted learning.Specifically, we measured the spectral power of 128-channel electroencephalogram (EEG in alpha andbeta frequency bands in 54 patients with multiple sclerosis (MS. The study sample was randomlydivided into 2 groups, either hearing a spoken or musical (sung presentation of Rey’s Auditory VerbalLearning Test (RAVLT. We defined the learning-related synchronization (LRS as the percent changein EEG spectral power from the first time the word was presented to the average of the subsequent wordencoding trials. LRS differed significantly between the music and spoken conditions in low alpha andupper beta bands. Patients in the music condition showed overall better word memory and better wordorder memory and stronger bilateral frontal alpha LRS than patients in the spoken condition. Theevidence suggests that a musical mnemonic recruits stronger oscillatory network synchronization inprefrontal areas in MS patients during word learning. It is suggested that the temporal structure implicitin musical stimuli enhances ‘deep encoding’ during verbal learning and sharpens the timing of neuraldynamics in brain networks degraded by demyelination in MS

  3. The Macroeconomics of Aid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Addison, Tony; Morrissey, Oliver; Tarp, Finn

    2017-01-01

    This Special Issue explores macroeconomic effects of aid from various perspectives through a blend of studies, both conceptual and empirical in nature. The overall aim is to enhance the understanding of the macroeconomic dimensions of aid in the policy and research communities, and to inspire...

  4. Aid and Income

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lof, Matthijs; Mekasha, Tseday Jemaneh; Tarp, Finn

    2015-01-01

    to nonrandom omission of a large proportion of observations. Furthermore, we show that NDHKM’s use of co-integrated regressions is not a suitable empirical strategy for estimating the causal effect of aid on income. Evidence from a Panel VAR model estimated on the dataset of NDHKM, suggests a positive...... and statistically significant long-run effect of aid on income....

  5. The Aid Effectiveness Literature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doucouliagos, Hristos; Paldam, Martin

    The AEL consists of empirical macro studies of the effects of development aid. At the end of 2004 it had reached 97 studies of three families, which we have summarized in one study each using meta-analysis. Studies of the effect on investments show that they rise by 1/3 of the aid – the rest is c...

  6. Applying Web Analytics to Online Finding Aids: Page Views, Pathways, and Learning about Users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark R. O'English

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Online finding aids, Internet search tools, and increased access to the World Wide Web have greatly changed how patrons find archival collections. Through analyzing eighteen months of access data collected via Web analytics tools, this article examines how patrons discover archival materials. Contrasts are drawn between access from library catalogs and from online search engines, with the latter outweighing the former by an overwhelming margin, and argues whether archival description practices should change accordingly.

  7. Video research: documenting and learning from HIV and AIDS communication strategies for social change in Ghana

    OpenAIRE

    Decosas, Heiko

    2010-01-01

    The dynamic landscape of global communications continually presents new challenges for the design and analysis of media and communication within international development projects. This Masters project uses video and web technology to document, explore and extend the role of communication in a CIDA funded HIV and AIDS stigma reduction project in Ghana, West Africa. The project includes a documentary video entitled: The Challenge of Stigma, Reflections on community education as a pathway to ch...

  8. Music mnemonics aid Verbal Memory and Induce Learning – Related Brain Plasticity in Multiple Sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Thaut, Michael H.; Peterson, David A.; McIntosh, Gerald C.; Hoemberg, Volker

    2014-01-01

    Recent research on music and brain function has suggested that the temporal pattern structure in music and rhythm can enhance cognitive functions. To further elucidate this question specifically for memory, we investigated if a musical template can enhance verbal learning in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and if music-assisted learning will also influence short-term, system-level brain plasticity. We measured systems-level brain activity with oscillatory network synchronization during ...

  9. Learning sung lyrics aids retention in normal ageing and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussard, Aline; Bigand, Emmanuel; Belleville, Sylvie; Peretz, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that presenting to-be-memorised lyrics in a singing mode, instead of a speaking mode, may facilitate learning and retention in normal adults. In this study, seven healthy older adults and eight participants with mild Alzheimer's disease (AD) learned and memorised lyrics that were either sung or spoken. We measured the percentage of words recalled from these lyrics immediately and after 10 minutes. Moreover, in AD participants, we tested the effect of successive learning episodes for one spoken and one sung excerpt, as well as long-term retention after a four week delay. Sung conditions did not influence lyrics recall in immediate recall but increased delayed recall for both groups. In AD, learning slopes for sung and spoken lyrics did not show a significant difference across successive learning episodes. However, sung lyrics showed a slight advantage over spoken ones after a four week delay. These results suggest that singing may increase the load of initial learning but improve long-term retention of newly acquired verbal information. We further propose some recommendations on how to maximise these effects and make them relevant for therapeutic applications.

  10. Music mnemonics aid Verbal Memory and Induce Learning – Related Brain Plasticity in Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaut, Michael H.; Peterson, David A.; McIntosh, Gerald C.; Hoemberg, Volker

    2014-01-01

    Recent research on music and brain function has suggested that the temporal pattern structure in music and rhythm can enhance cognitive functions. To further elucidate this question specifically for memory, we investigated if a musical template can enhance verbal learning in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and if music-assisted learning will also influence short-term, system-level brain plasticity. We measured systems-level brain activity with oscillatory network synchronization during music-assisted learning. Specifically, we measured the spectral power of 128-channel electroencephalogram (EEG) in alpha and beta frequency bands in 54 patients with MS. The study sample was randomly divided into two groups, either hearing a spoken or a musical (sung) presentation of Rey’s auditory verbal learning test. We defined the “learning-related synchronization” (LRS) as the percent change in EEG spectral power from the first time the word was presented to the average of the subsequent word encoding trials. LRS differed significantly between the music and the spoken conditions in low alpha and upper beta bands. Patients in the music condition showed overall better word memory and better word order memory and stronger bilateral frontal alpha LRS than patients in the spoken condition. The evidence suggests that a musical mnemonic recruits stronger oscillatory network synchronization in prefrontal areas in MS patients during word learning. It is suggested that the temporal structure implicit in musical stimuli enhances “deep encoding” during verbal learning and sharpens the timing of neural dynamics in brain networks degraded by demyelination in MS. PMID:24982626

  11. Aid and sectoral growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selaya, Pablo; Thiele, Rainer

    2010-01-01

    This article examines empirically the proposition that aid to poor countries is detrimental for external competitiveness, giving rise to Dutch disease type effects. At the aggregate level, aid is found to have a positive effect on growth. A sectoral decomposition shows that the effect is (i......) significant and positive in the tradable and the nontradable sectors, and (ii) equally strong in both sectors. The article thus provides no empirical support for the hypothesis that aid reduces external competitiveness in developing countries. A possible reason for this finding is the existence of large idle...

  12. Hashtags and retweets: using Twitter to aid Community, Communication and Casual (informal learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Reed

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Since the evolution of Web 2.0, or the Social Web, the way in which users interact with/on the Internet has seen a massive paradigm shift. Web 2.0 tools and technologies have completely changed the dynamics of the Internet, enabling users to create content; be it text, photographs or video; and furthermore share and collaborate across massive geographic boundaries. As part of this revolution, arguably the most significant tools have been those employing social media. This research project set out to investigate student's attitudes, perceptions and activity toward the use of Twitter in supporting learning and teaching. In so doing, this paper touches on a number of current debates in higher education, such as the role (and perceived rise of informal learning; and debates around Digital Natives/Immigrants vs. Digital Residents/Visitors. In presenting early research findings, the author considers the 3Cs of Twitter (T3c: Community, Communication and Casual (informal learning. Data suggests that students cannot be classed as Digital Natives purely on age and suggests a rethinking of categorisations is necessary. Furthermore, the data suggests students are developing their own personal learning environments (PLEs based on user choice. Those students who voluntarily engaged with Twitter during this study positively evaluated the tool for use within learning and teaching.

  13. Does AIDS involve some collusion by the neuro-immune system because of positive learning of the disarmament strategy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoz, Patrick

    2013-04-01

    Korzybski's general semantics recommends considering living beings as organisms-as-a-whole in their environment. Our cognitive abilities, specific to the human species, have thus to be taken into account. In this framework we establish a semantic similarity between particular stressful events of the 20th century and AIDS in which the immune-deficiency-caused is semiotically seen as a biological state of disarmament of the organism. It then appears that: These observations suggest that AIDS could benefit from some collusion by the neuro-immune system because of positive learning of the semiotic concept of disarmament, thus making the terrain favorable to the germ in response to intense stress. The disease would then result from a conditioning process based on semiotics and involve some confusion at the level of the unconscious cognitive system between disarmament toward outside the body and disarmament toward inside the body. This hypothesis is discussed within a multidisciplinary perspective considering the specificities of our modern lifestyles, the cybernetic ability of signs to control metabolism and behavior, and the recent advances of epigenetics and cognition sciences. This hypothesis may explain the multiple cross-species transmissions of the immunodeficiency virus into humans during the 20th century. Further research is suggested for evaluating this hypothesis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. ATTITUDES TOWARDS LEARNING ENGLISH: A STUDY OF MOTIVATION AND RESPONSIBILITY AS AIDS TO HUMAN RESOURCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica-Ariana Sim

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of a survey carried out at the Faculty of Economic Sciences, University of Oradea, in order to identify attitudes, beliefs, motivation and self-responsibility among students when it comes to learning the English language. The main issue investigated was motivation set at the basis of the learning process together with students’ attitudes regarding the use of English in the Romanian social and educational context, as well as the use of the English language in general. A valid questionnaire was designed and tried to a convenient sample of students; the results of the study are discussed in terms of the principal components that were established including attitude towards motivation, self-responsibility, and language learning approaches. Research and experience show that English is of utmost importance in the academic and future professional lives of students majoring in economics. Therefore, this paper provides some theoretical aspects of motivation, beliefs and responsibility in the context of second language acquisition.Among the important achievements of the study we should mention the observations of students’ behaviour concerning responsibility. It appears that most students are not ready to take complete responsibility for learning. They are either afraid of the teacher, or feel embarrassed, and are ashamed to openly utter their ideas. Thus, teamwork and pair-work facilitate the effective learning of the foreign language and encourage students’ collaboration. The teacher is not the central actor, the controller anymore; s/he becomes the facilitator and source of knowledge. It is important for the teacher to know the basic needs of his/her students and cater for these according to level of their importance, to be aware of the reasons that propel students towards learning, improving or just surviving English as a foreign language.

  15. The Impact of CMS Quality on the Outcomes of E-Learning Systems in Higher Education: An Empirical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kihyun; Trimi, Silvana; Park, Hyesung; Rhee, Shanggeun

    2012-01-01

    Course Management Systems (CMSs) in higher education have emerged as one of the most widely adopted e-learning platforms. This study examines the success of e-learning CMSs based on user satisfaction and benefits. Using DeLone and McLean's information system success model as a theoretical framework, we analyze the success of e-learning CMSs in…

  16. Organizational Factors' Effects on the Success of E-Learning Systems and Organizational Benefits: An Empirical Study in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying Chieh; Huang, Yu-An; Lin, Chad

    2012-01-01

    E-learning development for enterprises is still in its infancy in that scholars are still working on identifying the critical success factors for e-learning in organizational contexts. This study presents a framework considering how organizational factors affect the quality and service of e-learning systems and how these factors influence…

  17. Employability Enhancement through Formal and Informal Learning: An Empirical Study among Dutch Non-Academic University Staff Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Heijden, Beatrice; Boon, Jo; van der Klink, Marcel; Meijs, Ely

    2009-01-01

    Although learning is generally perceived as a way to improve employees' current job performance, so far, no research has been conducted to explore the possible relationships between formal and informal learning, on the one hand, and employability, on the other. Though contemporary views stress the importance of the job as a powerful learning site,…

  18. Empirical Study on the Effect of Digital Game-Based Instruction on Students' Learning Motivation and Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yen-Chun

    2017-01-01

    As pupils are largely increased the opportunities to contact digital games, the effect of digital games has been broadly discussed and studied. Digital games no longer play the function of entertainment, but could assist students in more active learning and deeper and broader learning, when being applied to instruction. It is limited to learn in…

  19. A Structural Model for Students' Adoption of Learning Management Systems: An Empirical Investigation in the Higher Education Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findik-Coskunçay, Duygu; Alkis, Nurcan; Özkan-Yildirim, Sevgi

    2018-01-01

    With the recent advances in information technologies, Learning Management Systems have taken on a significant role in providing educational resources. The successful use of these systems in higher education is important for the implementation, management and continuous improvement of e-learning services to increase the quality of learning. This…

  20. Distributional learning aids linguistic category formation in school-age children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Jessica; Owen VAN Horne, Amanda; Farmer, Thomas

    2018-05-01

    The goal of this study was to determine if typically developing children could form grammatical categories from distributional information alone. Twenty-seven children aged six to nine listened to an artificial grammar which contained strategic gaps in its distribution. At test, we compared how children rated novel sentences that fit the grammar to sentences that were ungrammatical. Sentences could be distinguished only through the formation of categories of words with shared distributional properties. Children's ratings revealed that they could discriminate grammatical and ungrammatical sentences. These data lend support to the hypothesis that distributional learning is a potential mechanism for learning grammatical categories in a first language.

  1. A new approach to develop computer-aided diagnosis scheme of breast mass classification using deep learning technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Yuchen; Yan, Shiju; Gundreddy, Rohith Reddy; Wang, Yunzhi; Cheng, Samuel; Liu, Hong; Zheng, Bin

    2017-01-01

    To develop and test a deep learning based computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) scheme of mammograms for classifying between malignant and benign masses. An image dataset involving 560 regions of interest (ROIs) extracted from digital mammograms was used. After down-sampling each ROI from 512×512 to 64×64 pixel size, we applied an 8 layer deep learning network that involves 3 pairs of convolution-max-pooling layers for automatic feature extraction and a multiple layer perceptron (MLP) classifier for feature categorization to process ROIs. The 3 pairs of convolution layers contain 20, 10, and 5 feature maps, respectively. Each convolution layer is connected with a max-pooling layer to improve the feature robustness. The output of the sixth layer is fully connected with a MLP classifier, which is composed of one hidden layer and one logistic regression layer. The network then generates a classification score to predict the likelihood of ROI depicting a malignant mass. A four-fold cross validation method was applied to train and test this deep learning network. The results revealed that this CAD scheme yields an area under the receiver operation characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.696±0.044, 0.802±0.037, 0.836±0.036, and 0.822±0.035 for fold 1 to 4 testing datasets, respectively. The overall AUC of the entire dataset is 0.790±0.019. This study demonstrates the feasibility of applying a deep learning based CAD scheme to classify between malignant and benign breast masses without a lesion segmentation, image feature computation and selection process.

  2. A New Approach to Develop Computer-aided Diagnosis Scheme of Breast Mass Classification Using Deep Learning Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Yuchen; Yan, Shiju; Gundreddy, Rohith Reddy; Wang, Yunzhi; Cheng, Samuel; Liu, Hong; Zheng, Bin

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE To develop and test a deep learning based computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) scheme of mammograms for classifying between malignant and benign masses. METHODS An image dataset involving 560 regions of interest (ROIs) extracted from digital mammograms was used. After down-sampling each ROI from 512×512 to 64×64 pixel size, we applied an 8 layer deep learning network that involves 3 pairs of convolution-max-pooling layers for automatic feature extraction and a multiple layer perceptron (MLP) classifier for feature categorization to process ROIs. The 3 pairs of convolution layers contain 20, 10, and 5 feature maps, respectively. Each convolution layer is connected with a max-pooling layer to improve the feature robustness. The output of the sixth layer is fully connected with a MLP classifier, which is composed of one hidden layer and one logistic regression layer. The network then generates a classification score to predict the likelihood of ROI depicting a malignant mass. A four-fold cross validation method was applied to train and test this deep learning network. RESULTS The results revealed that this CAD scheme yields an area under the receiver operation characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.696±0.044, 0.802±0.037, 0.836±0.036, and 0.822±0.035 for fold 1 to 4 testing datasets, respectively. The overall AUC of the entire dataset is 0.790±0.019. CONCLUSIONS This study demonstrates the feasibility of applying a deep learning based CAD scheme to classify between malignant and benign breast masses without a lesion segmentation, image feature computation and selection process. PMID:28436410

  3. Prevention of White-Collar Crime by Knowledge and Learning in Business Organizations: An Empirical Study of Chief Financial Officer Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Solli-Soether

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge and learning are important in combating financial crime generallyand white-collar crime in particular. The purpose of this research is to generateinsights into prevention approaches in practice that may reflect on acontingent approach. The five hundred largest business companies in termsof annual turnover were identified in Norway for our empirical study of whitecollarcrime. A paper letter was mailed to the chief financial officer (CFOasking him or her to fill in the questionnaire to be found on a web site usinga password found in the letter. The open-ended question in the questionnaireto CFOs about prevention of white-collar crime was formulated as follows:How can white-collar crime best be prevented in your company? Survey resultsindicate an even distribution of respondents emphasizing control and respondentsemphasizing influence. This empirical research steps back from manybest practice articles and provides insights into preferences of chief financialofficers on how to prevent white-collar crime in the company.

  4. Communicative Learning Aided by AR for Activity with Students within a Group HCI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez-Warden, Fernando; Barrera, Salvador

    2017-01-01

    Communicative learning progress in industry and education must gain focus and commitment otherwise innovation efforts by new technologies and recent researches will produce scarce results. Frequently, it appears gaps in quality and efficiency due to lack of ideas assimilation, matter that can be noticed. Investigators may discourse about platforms…

  5. Visuospatial working memory training facilitates visually-aided explicit sequence learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, John S Y; Wu, Qiaofeng; Liang, Danxia; Yan, Jin H

    2015-10-01

    Finger sequence learning requires visuospatial working memory (WM). However, the dynamics between age, WM training, and motor skill acquisition are unclear. Therefore, we examined how visuospatial WM training improves finger movement sequential accuracy in younger (n=26, 21.1±1.37years) and older adults (n=22, 70.6±4.01years). After performing a finger sequence learning exercise and numerical and spatial WM tasks, participants in each age group were randomly assigned to either the experimental (EX) or control (CO) groups. For one hour daily over a 10-day period, the EX group practiced an adaptive n-back spatial task while those in the CO group practiced a non-adaptive version. As a result of WM practice, the EX participants increased their accuracy in the spatial n-back tasks, while accuracy remained unimproved in the numerical n-back tasks. In all groups, reaction times (RT) became shorter in most numerical and spatial n-back tasks. The learners in the EX group - but not in the CO group - showed improvements in their retention of finger sequences. The findings support our hypothesis that computerized visuospatial WM training improves finger sequence learning both in younger and in older adults. We discuss the theoretical implications and clinical relevance of this research for motor learning and functional rehabilitation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Utterance-final position and pitch marking aid word learning in school-age children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippi, Piera; Laaha, Sabine; Fitch, W Tecumseh

    2017-08-01

    We investigated the effects of word order and prosody on word learning in school-age children. Third graders viewed photographs belonging to one of three semantic categories while hearing four-word nonsense utterances containing a target word. In the control condition, all words had the same pitch and, across trials, the position of the target word was varied systematically within each utterance. The only cue to word-meaning mapping was the co-occurrence of target words and referents. This cue was present in all conditions. In the Utterance-final condition, the target word always occurred in utterance-final position, and at the same fundamental frequency as all the other words of the utterance. In the Pitch peak condition, the position of the target word was varied systematically within each utterance across trials, and produced with pitch contrasts typical of infant-directed speech (IDS). In the Pitch peak + Utterance-final condition, the target word always occurred in utterance-final position, and was marked with a pitch contrast typical of IDS. Word learning occurred in all conditions except the control condition. Moreover, learning performance was significantly higher than that observed with simple co-occurrence ( control condition) only for the Pitch peak + Utterance-final condition. We conclude that, for school-age children, the combination of words' utterance-final alignment and pitch enhancement boosts word learning.

  7. Evaluation of Sports Trainers Perceptions on Computer Aided Education Related to the Attitudes toward Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murathan, Talha; Kaya, Oktay

    2016-01-01

    Technologic developments have--the same as they have done it in every sector--influenced the education system. These influences have forced to use the computer in the education-training applications within the education system. The aim of this research is to determine, compare, and examine the influences on the conduct for learning of sport…

  8. Blocked learning in development aid? Reporting success rather than failure in Andhra Pradesh, India

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saito, Moeko; Pasgaard, Maya

    2014-01-01

    This article aims to understand why development organizations tend to report project success rather than failure which blocks learning from project problems. Drawing on the case of a World Bank forestry project in Andhra Pradesh, India, the article analyses different interlinked sites of project...

  9. A Functional Specification for a Programming Language for Computer Aided Learning Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa (Ontario).

    In 1972 there were at least six different course authoring languages in use in Canada with little exchange of course materials between Computer Assisted Learning (CAL) centers. In order to improve facilities for producing "transportable" computer based course materials, a working panel undertook the definition of functional requirements of a user…

  10. Why Sketching May Aid Learning From Science Texts: Contrasting Sketching With Written Explanations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheiter, Katharina; Schleinschok, Katrin; Ainsworth, Shaaron

    2017-10-01

    The goal of this study was to explore two accounts for why sketching during learning from text is helpful: (1) sketching acts like other constructive strategies such as self-explanation because it helps learners to identify relevant information and generate inferences; or (2) that in addition to these general effects, sketching has more specific benefits due to the pictorial representation that is constructed. Seventy-three seventh-graders (32 girls, M = 12.82 years) were first taught how to either create sketches or self-explain while studying science texts. During a subsequent learning phase, all students were asked to read an expository text about the greenhouse effect. Finally, they were asked to write down everything they remembered and then answer transfer questions. Strategy quality during learning was assessed as the number of key concepts that had either been sketched or mentioned in the self-explanations. The results showed that at an overall performance level there were only marginal group differences. However, a more in-depth analysis revealed that whereas no group differences emerged for students implementing either strategy poorly, the sketching group clearly outperformed the self-explanation group for students who applied the strategies with higher quality. Furthermore, higher sketching quality was strongly related to better learning outcomes. Thus, the study's results are more in line with the second account: Sketching can have a beneficial effect on learning above and beyond generating written explanations; at least, if well deployed. Copyright © 2017 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  11. Computer-aided assessment of breast density: comparison of supervised deep learning and feature-based statistical learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Songfeng; Wei, Jun; Chan, Heang-Ping; Helvie, Mark A.; Roubidoux, Marilyn A.; Lu, Yao; Zhou, Chuan; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Samala, Ravi K.

    2018-01-01

    Breast density is one of the most significant factors that is associated with cancer risk. In this study, our purpose was to develop a supervised deep learning approach for automated estimation of percentage density (PD) on digital mammograms (DMs). The input ‘for processing’ DMs was first log-transformed, enhanced by a multi-resolution preprocessing scheme, and subsampled to a pixel size of 800 µm  ×  800 µm from 100 µm  ×  100 µm. A deep convolutional neural network (DCNN) was trained to estimate a probability map of breast density (PMD) by using a domain adaptation resampling method. The PD was estimated as the ratio of the dense area to the breast area based on the PMD. The DCNN approach was compared to a feature-based statistical learning approach. Gray level, texture and morphological features were extracted and a least absolute shrinkage and selection operator was used to combine the features into a feature-based PMD. With approval of the Institutional Review Board, we retrospectively collected a training set of 478 DMs and an independent test set of 183 DMs from patient files in our institution. Two experienced mammography quality standards act radiologists interactively segmented PD as the reference standard. Ten-fold cross-validation was used for model selection and evaluation with the training set. With cross-validation, DCNN obtained a Dice’s coefficient (DC) of 0.79  ±  0.13 and Pearson’s correlation (r) of 0.97, whereas feature-based learning obtained DC  =  0.72  ±  0.18 and r  =  0.85. For the independent test set, DCNN achieved DC  =  0.76  ±  0.09 and r  =  0.94, while feature-based learning achieved DC  =  0.62  ±  0.21 and r  =  0.75. Our DCNN approach was significantly better and more robust than the feature-based learning approach for automated PD estimation on DMs, demonstrating its potential use for automated density reporting as

  12. Computer-aided assessment of breast density: comparison of supervised deep learning and feature-based statistical learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Songfeng; Wei, Jun; Chan, Heang-Ping; Helvie, Mark A; Roubidoux, Marilyn A; Lu, Yao; Zhou, Chuan; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M; Samala, Ravi K

    2018-01-09

    Breast density is one of the most significant factors that is associated with cancer risk. In this study, our purpose was to develop a supervised deep learning approach for automated estimation of percentage density (PD) on digital mammograms (DMs). The input 'for processing' DMs was first log-transformed, enhanced by a multi-resolution preprocessing scheme, and subsampled to a pixel size of 800 µm  ×  800 µm from 100 µm  ×  100 µm. A deep convolutional neural network (DCNN) was trained to estimate a probability map of breast density (PMD) by using a domain adaptation resampling method. The PD was estimated as the ratio of the dense area to the breast area based on the PMD. The DCNN approach was compared to a feature-based statistical learning approach. Gray level, texture and morphological features were extracted and a least absolute shrinkage and selection operator was used to combine the features into a feature-based PMD. With approval of the Institutional Review Board, we retrospectively collected a training set of 478 DMs and an independent test set of 183 DMs from patient files in our institution. Two experienced mammography quality standards act radiologists interactively segmented PD as the reference standard. Ten-fold cross-validation was used for model selection and evaluation with the training set. With cross-validation, DCNN obtained a Dice's coefficient (DC) of 0.79  ±  0.13 and Pearson's correlation (r) of 0.97, whereas feature-based learning obtained DC  =  0.72  ±  0.18 and r  =  0.85. For the independent test set, DCNN achieved DC  =  0.76  ±  0.09 and r  =  0.94, while feature-based learning achieved DC  =  0.62  ±  0.21 and r  =  0.75. Our DCNN approach was significantly better and more robust than the feature-based learning approach for automated PD estimation on DMs, demonstrating its potential use for automated density reporting as well as

  13. Computer-Aided Diagnosis for Breast Ultrasound Using Computerized BI-RADS Features and Machine Learning Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Juan; Alam, S Kaisar; Garra, Brian; Zhang, Yingtao; Ahmed, Tahira

    2016-04-01

    This work identifies effective computable features from the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS), to develop a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system for breast ultrasound. Computerized features corresponding to ultrasound BI-RADs categories were designed and tested using a database of 283 pathology-proven benign and malignant lesions. Features were selected based on classification performance using a "bottom-up" approach for different machine learning methods, including decision tree, artificial neural network, random forest and support vector machine. Using 10-fold cross-validation on the database of 283 cases, the highest area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC) was 0.84 from a support vector machine with 77.7% overall accuracy; the highest overall accuracy, 78.5%, was from a random forest with the AUC 0.83. Lesion margin and orientation were optimum features common to all of the different machine learning methods. These features can be used in CAD systems to help distinguish benign from worrisome lesions. Copyright © 2016 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. All rights reserved.

  14. Metric Learning Method Aided Data-Driven Design of Fault Detection Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoyang Yan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fault detection is fundamental to many industrial applications. With the development of system complexity, the number of sensors is increasing, which makes traditional fault detection methods lose efficiency. Metric learning is an efficient way to build the relationship between feature vectors with the categories of instances. In this paper, we firstly propose a metric learning-based fault detection framework in fault detection. Meanwhile, a novel feature extraction method based on wavelet transform is used to obtain the feature vector from detection signals. Experiments on Tennessee Eastman (TE chemical process datasets demonstrate that the proposed method has a better performance when comparing with existing methods, for example, principal component analysis (PCA and fisher discriminate analysis (FDA.

  15. MATLAB-aided teaching and learning in optics and photonics using the methods of computational photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhili; Li, Xiaoyan; Zhu, Daqing; Pu, Jixiong

    2017-08-01

    Due to the nature of light fields of laser waves and pulses as vector quantities with complex spatial distribution and temporal dependence, the optics and photonics courses have always been difficult to teach and learn without the support of graphical visualization, numerical simulations and hands-on experiments. One of the state-of-the-art method of computational photonics, the finite-difference time-domain(FDTD) method, is applied with MATLAB simulations to model typical teaching cases in optics and photonics courses. The obtained results with graphical visualization in the form of animated pictures allow students to more deeply understand the dynamic process of light interaction with classical optical structures. The discussed teaching methodology is aimed to enhance the teaching effectiveness of optics and photonics courses and arousing the students' learning interest.

  16. Empirical Model for Mobile Learning and their Factors. Case Study: Universities Located in the Urban City of Guadalajara, México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Mejía Trejo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Information and communication technologies (ICT are producing new and innovative teaching-learning processes. The research question we focused on is: Which is the empirical model and the factors for mobile learning at universities located within the Metropolitan Zone of Guadalajara, in Jalisco, México? Our research is grounded on a documentary study that chose variables used by specialists in m-learning using Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP. The factors discovered were three: Technology (TECH; Contents Teaching-Learning Management and Styles (CTLMS; and Professor and Student Role (PSR. We used 13 dimensions and 60 variables. 20 professors and 800 students in social sciences courses participated in the study; they came from 7 universities located in the Urban City of Guadalajara, during 2013-2014 school cycles (24 months. We applied questionnaires and the data were analyzed by structural equations modeling (SEM, using EQS 6.1 software. The results suggest that there are 9/60 variables that have the most influence to improve the interaction with m-Learning model within the universities.

  17. Robotic Fish to Aid Animal Behavior Studies and Informal Science Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phamduy, Paul

    The application of robotic fish in the fields of animal behavior and informal science learning are new and relatively untapped. In the context of animal behavior studies, robotic fish offers a consistent and customizable stimulus that could contribute to dissect the determinants of social behavior. In the realm of informal science learning, robotic fish are gaining momentum for the possibility of educating the general public simultaneously on fish physiology and underwater robotics. In this dissertation, the design and development of a number of robotic fish platforms and prototypes and their application in animal behavioral studies and informal science learning settings are presented. Robotic platforms for animal behavioral studies focused on the utilization replica or same scale prototypes. A novel robotic fish platform, featuring a three-dimensional swimming multi-linked robotic fish, was developed with three control modes varying in the level of robot autonomy offered. This platform was deployed at numerous science festivals and science centers, to obtain data on visitor engagement and experience.

  18. The use of popular movies during lectures to aid the teaching and learning of undergraduate pharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura, Sab; Onsman, Andrys

    2009-07-01

    The role of the lecturer has changed to one where they must engage and motivate students to learn the subject material. To investigate whether the use of short movie references to pharmacology during lectures could stimulate learning in undergraduate students. One- to two-min film clips from popular movies containing a reference to the subject being covered were incorporated into Powerpoint presentations and shown at different times during pharmacology lectures. At the end of the lecture series, a student survey was conducted to assess the impact of the movies on student motivation, engagement and learning. Three positive effects were noted. First, students related theory to (simulated) practice by recognising that what they had learnt was actually being used. Second, students were motivated to attend lectures to see what clip would be used. Third, the clips provided a sectioning break, which helped to maintain the engagement of students throughout the lecture as well as the organisation of the lecture by the lecturer. The use of short popular movie references was a novel way to motivate and maintain the interest of large classes of undergraduate students throughout lectures.

  19. Empirical investigation to explore factors that achieve high quality of mobile learning system based on students’ perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Amin Almaiah

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This study presents three frameworks for mobile learning system based on quality factors derived from the updated DeLone and McLean information system success model. This study used the questionnaire as a quantitative method to explore quality factors for mobile learning system based on perspectives of 392 students. This study opens future work for using the identified quality factors as guidelines for researchers and designers to design and develop mobile learning applications.

  20. Instructional Skills for On-the-Job Training and Experiential Learning: An Empirical Study of Japanese Firms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    Despite the effectiveness of on-the-job training (OJT), few systematic empirical studies have been conducted on how OJT trainers instruct trainees in firms. The primary goal of this study was to investigate the characteristics of the trainer's instructional skills for OJT using survey data collected from 715 employees covering 22 firms. Results…

  1. [The effects of multimedia-assisted instruction on the skin care learning of nurse aides in long-term care facilities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yu-Ling; Kao, Yu-Hsiu

    2014-08-01

    Skin care is an important responsibility of nurse aides in long-term care facilities, and the nursing knowledge, attitudes, and skills of these aides significantly affects quality of care. However, the work schedule of nurse aides often limits their ability to obtain further education and training. Therefore, developing appropriate and effective training programs for nurse aides is critical to maintaining and improving quality of care in long-term care facilities. This study investigates the effects of multimedia assisted instruction on the skin care learning of nurse aides working in long-term care facilities. A quasi-experimental design and convenient sampling were adopted in this study. Participants included 96 nurse aides recruited from 5 long-term care facilities in Taoyuan County, Taiwan. The experimental group received 3 weeks of multimedia assisted instruction. The control group did not receive this instruction. The Skin Care Questionnaire for Nurse Aides in Long-term Care Facilities and the Skin Care Behavior Checklist were used for assessment before and after the intervention. (1) Posttest scores for skin care knowledge, attitudes, behavior, and the skin care checklist were significantly higher than pretest scores for the intervention group. There was no significant difference between pretest and posttest scores for the control group. (2) A covariance analysis of pretest scores for the two groups showed that the experimental group earned significantly higher average scores than their control group peers for skin care knowledge, attitudes, behavior, and the skin care checklist. The multimedia assisted instruction demonstrated significant and positive effects on the skin care leaning of nurse aides in long-term care facilities. This finding supports the use of multimedia assisted instruction in the education and training of nurse aides in long-term care facilities in the future.

  2. Educational psychology in medical learning: a randomised controlled trial of two aide memoires for the recall of causes of electromechanical dissociation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyson, E; Voisey, S; Hughes, S; Higgins, B; McQuillan, P J

    2004-07-01

    Although mnemonics are commonly used in medical education there are few data on their effectiveness. A RCT was undertaken to test the hypothesis that a new aide memoire, "EMD-aide", would be superior to the conventional "4Hs+4Ts" mnemonic in facilitating recall of causes of electromechanical dissociation (EMD) among house officers. "EMD-aide", organises causes of EMD by frequency of occurrence and ease of reversibility: four groups organised by shape, colour, position, numbering, clockwise sequence, and use of arrows. Eight hospitals were randomised in a controlled trial and 149 house officers were then recruited by telephone. Baseline ability to recall causes of EMD was recorded at one minute and overall. House officers were then sent a copy of either "4Hs+4Ts" or "EMD-aide" according to randomisation group. Recall ability was retested at one month. 68 of 80 and 51 of 69 house officers completed the study in the "4Hs+4Ts" and "EMD-aide" groups respectively (NS) with similar baseline recall. After intervention median number of recalled causes was greater in the "EMD-aide" group, eight compared with seven at one minute (p = 0.034) and eight compared with seven overall, p = 0.067. Recall of all eight causes was more common in "EMD-aide" group, 54% compared with 35%, p = 0.054, and these house officers spent longer examining their aide memoire, pEducational psychology of medical learning and the use of aide memoires in general are worthy of further study.

  3. Collaborative Learning with Screen-Based Simulation in Health Care Education: An Empirical Study of Collaborative Patterns and Proficiency Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, L. O.; Soderstrom, T.; Ahlqvist, J.; Nilsson, T.

    2011-01-01

    This article is about collaborative learning with educational computer-assisted simulation (ECAS) in health care education. Previous research on training with a radiological virtual reality simulator has indicated positive effects on learning when compared to a more conventional alternative. Drawing upon the field of Computer-Supported…

  4. Employability enhancement through formal and informal learning: An empirical study among Dutch non-academic university staff members

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijden, Beatrice; Boon, Jo; van der Klink, Marcel; Meijs, Ely

    2009-01-01

    Although learning is generally perceived as a way to improve employees' current job performance, so far, no research has been conducted to explore the possible relationships between formal and informal learning, on the one hand, and employability, on the other. Though contemporary views stress the

  5. Examining the Potential of Web-Based Multimedia to Support Complex Fine Motor Skill Learning: An Empirical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papastergiou, Marina; Pollatou, Elisana; Theofylaktou, Ioannis; Karadimou, Konstantina

    2014-01-01

    Research on the utilization of the Web for complex fine motor skill learning that involves whole body movements is still scarce. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of the introduction of a multimedia web-based learning environment, which was targeted at a rhythmic gymnastics routine consisting of eight fine motor skills, into an…

  6. What Kind of Employee Wants to Use Corporate E-Learning: An Empirical Case Study in the Financial Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luor, Tainyi; Lu, Hsi-Peng; Lin, Judy Chuan-Chuan; Yu, Hueiju

    2014-01-01

    Despite the plethora of previous studies on the various uses of e-learning, there is a dearth of research on employees' action to use corporate e-learning (ACE). The present study attempts to address this lack in literature by investigating whether individual factors such as self-esteem and need for cognition, and job factors such as job hygiene…

  7. Design and Empirical Validation of Effectiveness of LANGA, an Online Game-Based Platform for Second Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usai, Francesco; O'Neil, Kiera G. R.; Newman, Aaron J.

    2018-01-01

    Computer and smartphone-based applications for second language (L2) learning have become popular tools, being integrated in many classroom-based courses and adopted by the public at large. Yet, despite a significant body of research that suggests that individuals differ in their ability to learn L2, it is still unclear what factors predict…

  8. Irreversible Wash Aid Additive for Cesium Mitigation. Small-Scale Demonstration and Lessons Learned

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaminski, Michael [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The Irreversible Wash Aid Additive process has been under development by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne). This process for radioactive cesium mitigation consists of a solution to wash down contaminated structures, roadways, and vehicles and a sequestering agent to bind the radionuclides from the wash water and render them environmentally immobile. The purpose of this process is to restore functionality to basic services and immediately reduce the consequences of a radiologically-contaminated urban environment. Research and development have resulted in a down-selection of technologies for integration and demonstration at the pilot-scale level as part of the Wide Area Recovery and Resiliency Program (WARRP) under the Department of Homeland Security and the Denver Urban Area Security Initiative. As part of developing the methods for performing a pilot-scale demonstration at the WARRP conference in Denver in 2012, Argonne conducted small-scale field experiments at Separmatic Systems. The main purpose of these experiments was to refine the wash water collection and separations systems and demonstrate key unit operations to help in planning for the large scale demonstration in Denver. Since the purpose of these tests was to demonstrate the operations of the system, we used no radioactive materials. After a brief set of experiments with the LAKOS unit to familiarize ourselves with its operation, two experiments were completed on two separate dates with the Separmatic systems.

  9. Deep learning application: rubbish classification with aid of an android device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sijiang; Jiang, Bo; Zhan, Jie

    2017-06-01

    Deep learning is a very hot topic currently in pattern recognition and artificial intelligence researches. Aiming at the practical problem that people usually don't know correct classifications some rubbish should belong to, based on the powerful image classification ability of the deep learning method, we have designed a prototype system to help users to classify kinds of rubbish. Firstly the CaffeNet Model was adopted for our classification network training on the ImageNet dataset, and the trained network was deployed on a web server. Secondly an android app was developed for users to capture images of unclassified rubbish, upload images to the web server for analyzing backstage and retrieve the feedback, so that users can obtain the classification guide by an android device conveniently. Tests on our prototype system of rubbish classification show that: an image of one single type of rubbish with origin shape can be better used to judge its classification, while an image containing kinds of rubbish or rubbish with changed shape may fail to help users to decide rubbish's classification. However, the system still shows promising auxiliary function for rubbish classification if the network training strategy can be optimized further.

  10. What Role Does Knowledge Quality Play in Online Students' Satisfaction, Learning and Loyalty? An Empirical Investigation in an eLearning Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waheed, M.; Kaur, K.; Kumar, S.

    2016-01-01

    Quality knowledge has an impact on online students learning outcomes and loyalty. A framework that delineates the perceived eLearning knowledge quality (KQ) and its relationship with learning outcomes and loyalty is currently absent. Grounded in the KQ and information system success framework--this study presents the indicators of perceived…

  11. Inglorious Empire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khair, Tabish

    2017-01-01

    Review of 'Inglorious Empire: What the British did to India' by Shashi Tharoor, London, Hurst Publishers, 2017, 296 pp., £20.00......Review of 'Inglorious Empire: What the British did to India' by Shashi Tharoor, London, Hurst Publishers, 2017, 296 pp., £20.00...

  12. Use of Social Media in Higher Education Institutions – an Empirical Study Based on Bulgarian Learning Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Parusheva

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Social media have enormous power and trigger changes in whole spectrum of businesses, as well as learning and education. A study of students’ adoption of social media at the University of Economics – Varna (UE-Varna, Bulgaria, has proven its significant impact on young people. Using online questionnaire among 378 students, the high popularity of social media has been confirmed. An important research question is whether higher education institutions teaching students mainly in the fields of social, economic and legal sciences use the benefits of the social media in the context of Learning Management Systems (LMSs and integrated social media tools. The majority of the examined 24 universities use two LMSs - Moodle and Blackboard Learn. Both possess tools like forums, chat, wikis, internal messaging, blogs, learning groups, collaboration tools. The study of the two Moodle platforms implemented at the UE-Varna shows use of discussion forums, chat, and internal messaging.

  13. Corporate social capital, market orientation, organizational learning and service innovation performance: An empirical survey in the Pearl river delta of China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaoquan Jian

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Service innovation performance (SIP is an important driver of growth and wealth of service firms in wide range of industries. Yet, few research studies have been done to explore the influencing factors. The purpose of this study intends to identify the impacts of corporate social capital, market orientation and organizational learning on service innovation in the Pearl River Delta of China.Design/methodology/approach: The paper mainly adopted the empirical research. A Structure Equation Model containing an intermediary variable was established to explore the relationships of SIP.Findings and Originality/value: The main findings of the research support some of the propositions: (1 Both corporate social capital, market orientation and organizational learning have distinct positive impact on service innovation performance; (2 Corporate social capital, market orientation has a positive effect on organizational learning respectively, and (3 organizational learning plays a mediating role between the corporate social capital, market orientation and service innovation performance.Research limitations/implications: The research object of this paper has been restricted to the enterprises in Pearl River Delta of China. By contrast, variables and theories all come from western research, which was not adequate in explaining some results in the context of China. Given the limited theoretical and empirical research to service innovation, future research studies might widen their examinations to include other potential factors.Practical implications: This study has significant implications to enterprises. The results of this study suggest that enterprises should establish the social networks accommodated by the development of organization. In addition, more attention should be paid to focus on market orientation to enhance the ability to respond to changes in the market environment. It’s particularly necessary to strengthen organizational learning to

  14. Hearing Aid Use and Mild Hearing Impairment: Learnings from Big Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmer, Barbra H B; Hickson, Louise; Launer, Stefan

    2017-09-01

    Previous research, mostly reliant on self-reports, has indicated that hearing aid (HA) use is related to the degree of hearing impairment (HI). No large-scale investigation of the relationship between data-logged HA use and HI has been conducted to date. This study aimed to investigate if objective measures of overall daily HA use and HA use in various listening environments are different for adults with mild HI compared to adults with moderate HI. This retrospective study used data extracted from a database of fitting appointments from an international group of HA providers. Only data from the participants' most recent fitting appointment were included in the final dataset. A total of 8,489 bilateral HA fittings of adults over the age of 18 yr, conducted between January 2013 and June 2014, were included. Participants were subsequently allocated to HI groups, based on British Society of Audiology and American Speech-Language-Hearing Association audiometric descriptors. Fitting data from participating HA providers were regularly transferred to a central server. The data, with all personal information except age and gender removed, contained participants' four-frequency average (at 500, 1000, 2000, and 4000 Hz) as well as information on HA characteristics and usage. Following data cleaning, bivariate and post hoc statistical analyses were conducted. The total sample of adults' average daily HA use was 8.52 hr (interquartile range [IQR] = 5.49-11.77) in the left ear and 8.51 hr (IQR = 5.49-11.72) in the right ear. With a few exceptions, there were no statistical differences between hours of HA use for participants with mild HI compared to those with moderate impairment. Across all mild and moderate HI groups, the most common overall HA usage was between 8 and 12 hr per day. Other factors such as age, gender, and HA style also showed no relationship to hours of use. HAs were used, on average, for 7 hr (IQR = 4.27-9.96) per day in quiet and 1 hr (IQR = 0.33-1.41) per

  15. Is Video Podcast Supplementation as a Learning Aid Beneficial to Dental Students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalludi, Shivananda; Punja, Dhiren; Rao, Raghavendra; Dhar, Murali

    2015-12-01

    Podcasting has recently emerged as an important information technology tool for health professionals. Podcasts can be viewed online or downloaded to a user computer or a handheld multimedia device like a portable MP3 player, smart phone and tablet device. The principal advantage of the podcast is that the presentation of information need not be linked with any particular time or location. Since students are familiar with newer technology tools and may be using it on a regular basis, video podcast could serve as a convenient tool for students to help remember both conceptual and factual information. The purpose of this study was to assess the attitude of first year dental students towards video podcast supplementation and to assess the efficacy of video podcast as a teaching aid in comparison to text book reading. First year dental students were recruited for this study. A didactic lecture class was conducted for the students (n=100). The students were then randomly divided into two groups. Students present in group A (n=46) underwent a video podcast session followed by a multiple choice question test. This was followed by student feedback to assess the usefulness of video podcast. Students belonging to group B (n=54) had a study session for 20 minutes followed by the MCQ test. Students then underwent the video podcast session followed by feedback to assess the utility of video podcast. Mann-Whitney U test was applied to compare the difference in the median MCQ score between the two groups. The findings revealed a significant gain in the median MCQ score in the intervention group (group A) when compared to control group (Group B). In the feedback form, 89% of students agreed that the video podcast might be useful as it would enable them to view slides and hear the lectures repeatedly. Students who underwent the video podcast session performed significantly better in the MCQ test compared to students who underwent text book reading alone. This demonstrates an

  16. The Role of Learning in Health Technology Assessments: An Empirical Assessment of Endovascular Aneurysm Repairs in German Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varabyova, Yauheniya; Blankart, Carl Rudolf; Schreyögg, Jonas

    2017-02-01

    Changes in performance due to learning may dynamically influence the results of a technology evaluation through the change in effectiveness and costs. In this study, we estimate the effect of learning using the example of two minimally invasive treatments of abdominal aortic aneurysms: endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) and fenestrated EVAR (fEVAR). The analysis is based on the administrative data of over 40,000 patients admitted with unruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm to more than 500 different hospitals over the years 2006 to 2013. We examine two patient outcomes, namely, in-hospital mortality and length of stay using hierarchical regression models with random effects at the hospital level. The estimated models control for patient and hospital characteristics and take learning interdependency between EVAR and fEVAR into account. In case of EVAR, we observe a significant decrease both in the in-hospital mortality and length of stay with experience accumulated at the hospital level; however, the learning curve for fEVAR in both outcomes is effectively flat. To foster the consideration of learning in health technology assessments of medical devices, a general framework for estimating learning effects is derived from the analysis. © 2017 The Authors. Health Economics published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. © 2017 The Authors. Health Economics published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Empirical evidence of the effectiveness of concept mapping as a learning intervention for nuclear medicine technology students in a distance learning radiation protection and biology course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passmore, Gregory G; Owen, Mary Anne; Prabakaran, Krishnan

    2011-12-01

    Metacognitive learning strategies are based on instructional learning theory, which promotes deep, meaningful learning. Educators in a baccalaureate-level nuclear medicine technology program demonstrated that students enrolled in an online, distance learning section of an introductory radiation protection and radiobiology course performed better when traditional instruction was supplemented with nontraditional metacognitive learning strategies. The metacognitive learning strategy that was used is best known as concept mapping. The concept map, in addition to the standard homework problem assignment and opportunity for question-answer sessions, became the template for misconception identification and remediation interactions between the instructor and the student. The control group relied on traditional homework problems and question-answer sessions alone. Because students in both the "treatment" groups (i.e., students who used concept mapping) and the control group were distance learning students, all personal communications were conducted via e-mail or telephone. The final examination of the course was used to facilitate a quantitative comparison of the performance of students who used concept mapping and the performance of students who did not use concept mapping. The results demonstrated a significantly higher median final examination score for the concept mapping group than for the non-concept mapping group (z = -2.0381, P = 0.0415), with an appropriately large effect size (2.65). Concept mapping is a cognitive learning intervention that effectively enables meaningful learning and is suitable for use in the independent learner-oriented distance learning environments used by some nuclear medicine technology programs.

  18. Objective Prediction of Hearing Aid Benefit Across Listener Groups Using Machine Learning: Speech Recognition Performance With Binaural Noise-Reduction Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schädler, Marc R.; Warzybok, Anna; Kollmeier, Birger

    2018-01-01

    The simulation framework for auditory discrimination experiments (FADE) was adopted and validated to predict the individual speech-in-noise recognition performance of listeners with normal and impaired hearing with and without a given hearing-aid algorithm. FADE uses a simple automatic speech recognizer (ASR) to estimate the lowest achievable speech reception thresholds (SRTs) from simulated speech recognition experiments in an objective way, independent from any empirical reference data. Empirical data from the literature were used to evaluate the model in terms of predicted SRTs and benefits in SRT with the German matrix sentence recognition test when using eight single- and multichannel binaural noise-reduction algorithms. To allow individual predictions of SRTs in binaural conditions, the model was extended with a simple better ear approach and individualized by taking audiograms into account. In a realistic binaural cafeteria condition, FADE explained about 90% of the variance of the empirical SRTs for a group of normal-hearing listeners and predicted the corresponding benefits with a root-mean-square prediction error of 0.6 dB. This highlights the potential of the approach for the objective assessment of benefits in SRT without prior knowledge about the empirical data. The predictions for the group of listeners with impaired hearing explained 75% of the empirical variance, while the individual predictions explained less than 25%. Possibly, additional individual factors should be considered for more accurate predictions with impaired hearing. A competing talker condition clearly showed one limitation of current ASR technology, as the empirical performance with SRTs lower than −20 dB could not be predicted. PMID:29692200

  19. Objective Prediction of Hearing Aid Benefit Across Listener Groups Using Machine Learning: Speech Recognition Performance With Binaural Noise-Reduction Algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schädler, Marc R; Warzybok, Anna; Kollmeier, Birger

    2018-01-01

    The simulation framework for auditory discrimination experiments (FADE) was adopted and validated to predict the individual speech-in-noise recognition performance of listeners with normal and impaired hearing with and without a given hearing-aid algorithm. FADE uses a simple automatic speech recognizer (ASR) to estimate the lowest achievable speech reception thresholds (SRTs) from simulated speech recognition experiments in an objective way, independent from any empirical reference data. Empirical data from the literature were used to evaluate the model in terms of predicted SRTs and benefits in SRT with the German matrix sentence recognition test when using eight single- and multichannel binaural noise-reduction algorithms. To allow individual predictions of SRTs in binaural conditions, the model was extended with a simple better ear approach and individualized by taking audiograms into account. In a realistic binaural cafeteria condition, FADE explained about 90% of the variance of the empirical SRTs for a group of normal-hearing listeners and predicted the corresponding benefits with a root-mean-square prediction error of 0.6 dB. This highlights the potential of the approach for the objective assessment of benefits in SRT without prior knowledge about the empirical data. The predictions for the group of listeners with impaired hearing explained 75% of the empirical variance, while the individual predictions explained less than 25%. Possibly, additional individual factors should be considered for more accurate predictions with impaired hearing. A competing talker condition clearly showed one limitation of current ASR technology, as the empirical performance with SRTs lower than -20 dB could not be predicted.

  20. Large scale deep learning for computer aided detection of mammographic lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooi, Thijs; Litjens, Geert; van Ginneken, Bram; Gubern-Mérida, Albert; Sánchez, Clara I; Mann, Ritse; den Heeten, Ard; Karssemeijer, Nico

    2017-01-01

    Recent advances in machine learning yielded new techniques to train deep neural networks, which resulted in highly successful applications in many pattern recognition tasks such as object detection and speech recognition. In this paper we provide a head-to-head comparison between a state-of-the art in mammography CAD system, relying on a manually designed feature set and a Convolutional Neural Network (CNN), aiming for a system that can ultimately read mammograms independently. Both systems are trained on a large data set of around 45,000 images and results show the CNN outperforms the traditional CAD system at low sensitivity and performs comparable at high sensitivity. We subsequently investigate to what extent features such as location and patient information and commonly used manual features can still complement the network and see improvements at high specificity over the CNN especially with location and context features, which contain information not available to the CNN. Additionally, a reader study was performed, where the network was compared to certified screening radiologists on a patch level and we found no significant difference between the network and the readers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. A novel computer-aided diagnosis system for breast MRI based on feature selection and ensemble learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wei; Li, Zhe; Chu, Jinghui

    2017-04-01

    Breast cancer is a common cancer among women. With the development of modern medical science and information technology, medical imaging techniques have an increasingly important role in the early detection and diagnosis of breast cancer. In this paper, we propose an automated computer-aided diagnosis (CADx) framework for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The scheme consists of an ensemble of several machine learning-based techniques, including ensemble under-sampling (EUS) for imbalanced data processing, the Relief algorithm for feature selection, the subspace method for providing data diversity, and Adaboost for improving the performance of base classifiers. We extracted morphological, various texture, and Gabor features. To clarify the feature subsets' physical meaning, subspaces are built by combining morphological features with each kind of texture or Gabor feature. We tested our proposal using a manually segmented Region of Interest (ROI) data set, which contains 438 images of malignant tumors and 1898 images of normal tissues or benign tumors. Our proposal achieves an area under the ROC curve (AUC) value of 0.9617, which outperforms most other state-of-the-art breast MRI CADx systems. Compared with other methods, our proposal significantly reduces the false-positive classification rate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. High engagement, high quality: A guiding framework for developing empirically informed asynchronous e-learning programs for health professional educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Peter M; Levett-Jones, Tracey; Morris, Amanda; Carter, Ben; Bennett, Paul N; Kable, Ashley

    2017-03-01

    E-learning involves the transfer of skills and knowledge via technology so that learners can access meaningful and authentic educational materials. While learner engagement is important, in the context of healthcare education, pedagogy must not be sacrificed for edu-tainment style instructional design. Consequently, health professional educators need to be competent in the use of current web-based educational technologies so that learners are able to access relevant and engaging e-learning materials without restriction. The increasing popularity of asynchronous e-learning programs developed for use outside of formal education institutions has made this need more relevant. In these contexts, educators must balance design and functionality to deliver relevant, cost-effective, sustainable, and accessible programs that overcome scheduling and geographic barriers for learners. This paper presents 10 guiding design principles and their application in the development of an e-learning program for general practice nurses focused on behavior change. Consideration of these principles will assist educators to develop high quality, pedagogically sound, engaging, and interactive e-learning resources. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  3. The acceptance and use of a virtual learning environment in higher education: an empirical study in Turkey, and the UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özlem Efiloğlu Kurt

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study evaluated the acceptance and use of a virtual learning environment in higher education by using the unified theory of acceptance and use of technology (UTAUT model. Study data were collected by means of a questionnaire form, completed by 1032 students receiving undergraduate education in Turkey and the United Kingdom, who currently use similar virtual learning environments. The role of performance expectancy, effort expectancy, social influence and facilitating conditions were evaluated and tested for both countries. The study results demonstrated that the behavioral intention and use behavior regarding the utilization of a virtual learning environment in higher education differed between the two countries, and that the level of impact of the factors that shape behavioral intention and use behavior also differed from one factor to another.

  4. An Empirical Examination of the Association between Multiple Intelligences and Language Learning Self-Efficacy among TEFL University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moafian, Fatemeh; Ebrahimi, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    The current study investigated the association between multiple intelligences and language learning efficacy expectations among TEFL (Teaching English as a Foreign Language) university students. To fulfill the aim of the study, 108 junior and senior TEFL students were asked to complete the "Multiple Intelligence Developmental Assessment…

  5. The Effects of the Use of Activity-Based Costing Software in the Learning Process: An Empirical Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Andrea; Ferreira, Aldónio

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the influence of the use of accounting software in teaching activity-based costing (ABC) on the learning process. It draws upon the Theory of Planned Behaviour and uses the end-user computer satisfaction (EUCS) framework to examine students' satisfaction with the ABC software. The study examines students' satisfaction with…

  6. An Empirical Study on Alleviating Career English Writing Anxiety through Cooperative Learning in a Chinese Polytechnic Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Dongmei

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of cooperative learning on writing anxiety alleviation through a pre-test/post-test assessment. 120 EFL learners from a Chinese polytechnic institute were assigned into two groups: one experimental (cooperative writing) and the other comparison (solitary writing). Results revealed that cooperative learning…

  7. Organizational Learning, Knowledge Management Practices and Firm's Performance: An Empirical Study of a Heavy Engineering Firm in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Ajay K.; Moreno, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The study aims at investigating the impact of organizational learning (OL) on the firm's performance and knowledge management (KM) practices in a heavy engineering organization in India. Design/Methodology/Approach: The data were collected from 205 middle and senior executives working in the project engineering management division of a…

  8. Do We All Apologize the Same?--An Empirical Study on the Act of Apologizing by Spanish Speakers Learning English.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mir, Montserrat

    1992-01-01

    A study examined the production of English apology strategies by Spanish speakers learning English, by analyzing the remedial move in native and non-native social interactions. To restore harmony when an offensive act has been committed, remedial exchanges are performed according to the rules of speaking and the social norms of the speech…

  9. Low-literates’ support needs for societal participation learning : Empirical grounding of theory- and model-based design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, D.G.M.; Paulissen, R.T.; Hanekamp, M.; Groot, A.; Neerincx, M.A.; Cremers, A.H.M.

    2017-01-01

    Specialized learning support software can address the low societal participation of low-literate Dutch citizens. We use the situated Cognitive Engineering method to iteratively create a design specification for the envisioned system VESSEL: a Virtual Environment to Support the Societal participation

  10. Towards the Acceptance of RSS to Support Learning: An Empirical Study to Validate the Technology Acceptance Model in Lebanon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarhini, Ali; Hassouna, Mohammad; Abbasi, Muhammad Sharif; Orozco, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Simpler is better. There are a lot of "needs" in e-Learning, and there's often a limit to the time, talent, and money that can be thrown at them individually. Contemporary pedagogy in technology and engineering disciplines, within the higher education context, champion instructional designs that emphasize peer instruction and rich…

  11. Does team stability mediate the relationship between leadership and team learning? An empirical study among Dutch project teams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Savelsbergh, Chantal M.J.H.; Poell, Rob F.; van der Heijden, Beatrice

    2014-01-01

    An exploratory field study was conducted among 30 project teams in the sectors of building and utilities, engineering and construction, infrastructure, and area decontamination and development in the Netherlands. It examined the influence of leadership on team learning behaviors and included team

  12. Does team stability mediate the relationship between leadership and team learning? : An empirical study among Dutch project teams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Savelsbergh, C.; Poell, R.F.; van der Heijden, B.

    2015-01-01

    An exploratory field study was conducted among 30 project teams in the sectors of building and utilities, engineering and construction, infrastructure, and area decontamination and development in the Netherlands. It examined the influence of leadership on team learning behaviors and included team

  13. A faith-based community partnership to address HIV/AIDS in the southern United States: implementation, challenges, and lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abara, Winston; Coleman, Jason D; Fairchild, Amanda; Gaddist, Bambi; White, Jacob

    2015-02-01

    Though race and region are not by themselves risk factors for HIV infection, regional and racial disparities exist in the burden of HIV/AIDS in the US. Specifically, African Americans in the southern US appear to bear the brunt of this burden due to a complex set of upstream factors like structural and cultural influences that do not facilitate HIV/AIDS awareness, HIV testing, or sexual risk-reduction techniques while perpetuating HIV/AIDS-related stigma. Strategies proposed to mitigate the burden among this population have included establishing partnerships and collaborations with non-traditional entities like African American churches and other faith-based organizations. Though efforts to partner with the African American church are not necessarily novel, most of these efforts do not present a model that focuses on building the capacity of the African American church to address these upstream factors and sustain these interventions. This article will describe Project Fostering AIDS Initiatives That Heal (F.A.I.T.H), a faith-based model for successfully developing, implementing, and sustaining locally developed HIV/AIDS prevention interventions in African American churches in South Carolina. This was achieved by engaging the faith community and the provision of technical assistance, grant funding and training for project personnel. Elements of success, challenges, and lessons learned during this process will also be discussed.

  14. A Further Characterization of Empirical Research Related to Learning Outcome Achievement in Remote and Virtual Science Labs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinson, James R.

    2017-10-01

    This paper further characterizes recently reviewed literature related to student learning outcome achievement in non-traditional (virtual and remote) versus traditional (hands-on) science labs, as well as factors to consider when evaluating the state and progress of research in this field as a whole. Current research is characterized according to (1) participant nationality and culture, (2) participant education level, (3) participant demography, (4) scientific discipline, and (5) research methodology, which could provide avenues for further research and useful dialog regarding the measurement and interpretation of data related to student learning outcome achievement in, and thus the efficacy of, non-traditional versus traditional science labs. Current research is also characterized by (6) research publication media and (7) availability of non-traditional labs used, which demonstrate some of the obstacles to progress and consensus in this research field.

  15. An empirical study of ensemble-based semi-supervised learning approaches for imbalanced splice site datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanescu, Ana; Caragea, Doina

    2015-01-01

    Recent biochemical advances have led to inexpensive, time-efficient production of massive volumes of raw genomic data. Traditional machine learning approaches to genome annotation typically rely on large amounts of labeled data. The process of labeling data can be expensive, as it requires domain knowledge and expert involvement. Semi-supervised learning approaches that can make use of unlabeled data, in addition to small amounts of labeled data, can help reduce the costs associated with labeling. In this context, we focus on the problem of predicting splice sites in a genome using semi-supervised learning approaches. This is a challenging problem, due to the highly imbalanced distribution of the data, i.e., small number of splice sites as compared to the number of non-splice sites. To address this challenge, we propose to use ensembles of semi-supervised classifiers, specifically self-training and co-training classifiers. Our experiments on five highly imbalanced splice site datasets, with positive to negative ratios of 1-to-99, showed that the ensemble-based semi-supervised approaches represent a good choice, even when the amount of labeled data consists of less than 1% of all training data. In particular, we found that ensembles of co-training and self-training classifiers that dynamically balance the set of labeled instances during the semi-supervised iterations show improvements over the corresponding supervised ensemble baselines. In the presence of limited amounts of labeled data, ensemble-based semi-supervised approaches can successfully leverage the unlabeled data to enhance supervised ensembles learned from highly imbalanced data distributions. Given that such distributions are common for many biological sequence classification problems, our work can be seen as a stepping stone towards more sophisticated ensemble-based approaches to biological sequence annotation in a semi-supervised framework.

  16. Empirical likelihood

    CERN Document Server

    Owen, Art B

    2001-01-01

    Empirical likelihood provides inferences whose validity does not depend on specifying a parametric model for the data. Because it uses a likelihood, the method has certain inherent advantages over resampling methods: it uses the data to determine the shape of the confidence regions, and it makes it easy to combined data from multiple sources. It also facilitates incorporating side information, and it simplifies accounting for censored, truncated, or biased sampling.One of the first books published on the subject, Empirical Likelihood offers an in-depth treatment of this method for constructing confidence regions and testing hypotheses. The author applies empirical likelihood to a range of problems, from those as simple as setting a confidence region for a univariate mean under IID sampling, to problems defined through smooth functions of means, regression models, generalized linear models, estimating equations, or kernel smooths, and to sampling with non-identically distributed data. Abundant figures offer vi...

  17. Improved Student Reasoning About Carbon-Transforming Processes Through Inquiry-Based Learning Activities Derived from an Empirically Validated Learning Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    JW, Schramm; Jin, H.; Keeling, EG; Johnson, M.; Shin, HJ

    2017-05-01

    This paper reports on our use of a fine-grained learning progression to assess secondary students' reasoning through carbon-transforming processes (photosynthesis, respiration, biosynthesis). Based on previous studies, we developed a learning progression with four progress variables: explaining mass changes, explaining energy transformations, explaining subsystems, and explaining large-scale systems. For this study, we developed a 2-week teaching module integrating these progress variables. Students were assessed before and after instruction, with the learning progression framework driving data analysis. Our work revealed significant overall learning gains for all students, with the mean post-test person proficiency estimates higher by 0.6 logits than the pre-test proficiency estimates. Further, instructional effects were statistically similar across all grades included in the study (7th-12th) with students in the lowest third of initial proficiency evidencing the largest learning gains. Students showed significant gains in explaining the processes of photosynthesis and respiration and in explaining transformations of mass and energy, areas where prior research has shown that student misconceptions are prevalent. Student gains on items about large-scale systems were higher than with other variables (although absolute proficiency was still lower). Gains across each of the biological processes tested were similar, despite the different levels of emphasis each had in the teaching unit. Together, these results indicate that students can benefit from instruction addressing these processes more explicitly. This requires pedagogical design quite different from that usually practiced with students at this level.

  18. Aid Supplies Over Time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, Edward Samuel

    The recent financial crisis has rekindled interest in the foreign aid supply behaviour of bilateral donors. Using the latest data covering the period 1960-2009, this paper examines how such behaviour is related to domestic factors. Based on a simple empirical model, a distinction is made between...

  19. Aid and Sectoral Labour Productivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selaya, Pablo; Thiele, Rainer

    2008-01-01

    The paper examines empirically the proposition that aid to poor countries is detrimental for external competitiveness, giving rise to Dutch disease type effects. At the aggregate level, aid is found to have a positive effect on growth of labour productivity. A sectoral decomposition shows...

  20. Anisotropic interaction rules in circular motions of pigeon flocks: An empirical study based on sparse Bayesian learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Duxin; Xu, Bowen; Zhu, Tao; Zhou, Tao; Zhang, Hai-Tao

    2017-08-01

    Coordination shall be deemed to the result of interindividual interaction among natural gregarious animal groups. However, revealing the underlying interaction rules and decision-making strategies governing highly coordinated motion in bird flocks is still a long-standing challenge. Based on analysis of high spatial-temporal resolution GPS data of three pigeon flocks, we extract the hidden interaction principle by using a newly emerging machine learning method, namely the sparse Bayesian learning. It is observed that the interaction probability has an inflection point at pairwise distance of 3-4 m closer than the average maximum interindividual distance, after which it decays strictly with rising pairwise metric distances. Significantly, the density of spatial neighbor distribution is strongly anisotropic, with an evident lack of interactions along individual velocity. Thus, it is found that in small-sized bird flocks, individuals reciprocally cooperate with a variational number of neighbors in metric space and tend to interact with closer time-varying neighbors, rather than interacting with a fixed number of topological ones. Finally, extensive numerical investigation is conducted to verify both the revealed interaction and decision-making principle during circular flights of pigeon flocks.

  1. Learning analytics: Dataset for empirical evaluation of entry requirements into engineering undergraduate programs in a Nigerian university.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odukoya, Jonathan A; Popoola, Segun I; Atayero, Aderemi A; Omole, David O; Badejo, Joke A; John, Temitope M; Olowo, Olalekan O

    2018-04-01

    In Nigerian universities, enrolment into any engineering undergraduate program requires that the minimum entry criteria established by the National Universities Commission (NUC) must be satisfied. Candidates seeking admission to study engineering discipline must have reached a predetermined entry age and met the cut-off marks set for Senior School Certificate Examination (SSCE), Unified Tertiary Matriculation Examination (UTME), and the post-UTME screening. However, limited effort has been made to show that these entry requirements eventually guarantee successful academic performance in engineering programs because the data required for such validation are not readily available. In this data article, a comprehensive dataset for empirical evaluation of entry requirements into engineering undergraduate programs in a Nigerian university is presented and carefully analyzed. A total sample of 1445 undergraduates that were admitted between 2005 and 2009 to study Chemical Engineering (CHE), Civil Engineering (CVE), Computer Engineering (CEN), Electrical and Electronics Engineering (EEE), Information and Communication Engineering (ICE), Mechanical Engineering (MEE), and Petroleum Engineering (PET) at Covenant University, Nigeria were randomly selected. Entry age, SSCE aggregate, UTME score, Covenant University Scholastic Aptitude Screening (CUSAS) score, and the Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA) of the undergraduates were obtained from the Student Records and Academic Affairs unit. In order to facilitate evidence-based evaluation, the robust dataset is made publicly available in a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet file. On yearly basis, first-order descriptive statistics of the dataset are presented in tables. Box plot representations, frequency distribution plots, and scatter plots of the dataset are provided to enrich its value. Furthermore, correlation and linear regression analyses are performed to understand the relationship between the entry requirements and the

  2. The Relationship between the Learning Organization Concept and Firms' Financial Performance: An Empirical Assessment. [and] Invited Reaction: Linking Learning with Financial Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellinger, Andrea D.; Ellinger, Alexander E.; Yang, Baiyin; Howton, Shelly W.

    2002-01-01

    Reports on a study of 208 manufacturing managers that found a positive correlation between the seven dimensions of learning organizations and four measures of business financial performance. "Invited Reaction" by Timothy T. Baldwin and Camden C. Danielson critiques the use of key respondent perceptions and bottom-line performance.…

  3. Empirical Hamiltonians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peggs, S.; Talman, R.

    1987-01-01

    As proton accelerators get larger, and include more magnets, the conventional tracking programs which simulate them run slower. The purpose of this paper is to describe a method, still under development, in which element-by-element tracking around one turn is replaced by a single man, which can be processed far faster. It is assumed for this method that a conventional program exists which can perform faithful tracking in the lattice under study for some hundreds of turns, with all lattice parameters held constant. An empirical map is then generated by comparison with the tracking program. A procedure has been outlined for determining an empirical Hamiltonian, which can represent motion through many nonlinear kicks, by taking data from a conventional tracking program. Though derived by an approximate method this Hamiltonian is analytic in form and can be subjected to further analysis of varying degrees of mathematical rigor. Even though the empirical procedure has only been described in one transverse dimension, there is good reason to hope that it can be extended to include two transverse dimensions, so that it can become a more practical tool in realistic cases

  4. Improving Students' Language Performance Through Consistent Use of E-Learning: An Empirical Study in Japanese, Korean, Hindi and Sanskrit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara LIBRENJAK

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the backing theories, methodology, and results of a two-semester long case study of the application of technology in teaching four Asian languages (Japanese, Korean, Hindi, and Sanskrit to Croatian students. We have developed e-learning materials to follow the curriculum in Croatia and deployed them in Asian language classrooms. Students who agreed to participate in the study were tested before using the materials, and after each semester, and their progress was surveyed. In the case of Japanese students (N=53, we have thoroughly monitored their usage and compared the progress of students who have diligently studied vocabulary and grammar using our materials on Memrise, and those who have neglected their studies. This was measured through their scores on the Memrise, which shows the user's activity. Also, their progress was measured using standardized tests that were designed in such a manner to resemble Japanese Language Proficiency Test. We have found that frequent users progressed averagely 20,3% after each semester, while non-frequent users have progressed only 11,6%, proving this method to be related to stable and constant use of e-materials.

  5. Recruiting Chinese American adolescents to HIV/AIDS-related research: a lesson learned from a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yi-Hui; Salman, Ali; Wang, Fan

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this article was to report identified barriers and challenges experienced in the recruiting process of Chinese American adolescents to a cross-sectional HIV/AIDS-related study. Snowball sampling method was used to recruit Chinese American adolescents from Chinese American communities in a U.S. Midwestern state. Barriers and challenges to recruitment were reviewed and analyzed from Chinese cultural perspectives in the hope of aiding researchers and health care providers understand and facilitate future recruitment of Chinese Americans for HIV/AIDS prevention studies. Barriers to recruitment were found related to the taboo topic of sexual issues in Chinese culture, unawareness and denial of HIV/AIDS risks, authoritarian parenting style in Chinese culture, and the required active consents. Facilitating factors of recruiting Chinese American adolescents to future HIV/AIDS prevention research or intervention programs are discussed. Information provided in this article may increase nurses' awareness of various barriers that they might encounter when they conduct research or address HIV/AIDS-related topics of Chinese American adolescents. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Research on the relationship of institutional innovation, organizational learning and synergistic effect: An empirical study of chineses university spin-offs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Hao

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: At present, the Central Government of China pays more attention to the synergistic innovation, and the national strategy policy of “innovation driven development” are made to implementations. Thus, the university plays an important role in the national innovation system, so that how the university gets involved in innovative activities becomes the primary problem of innovation strategy. This paper utilizes Chinese university spin-offs survey data to identify the influence process from institutional innovation and organizational learning to synergistic effect of organization. Design/methodology/approach: Firstly, we found that following the procedural view, each one of these three elements can be divided into two parts. Then, we established structural equation modeling with the connections between these six subdivisions. Secondly, by taking 270 university Spin-offs in China as samples, we verified the fit of the model through statistical data on the questionnaire survey. Thirdly, we analyzed the relationship and influence path of the institutional innovation, organizational learning and synergistic effect. Findings: The results of empirical research show that institutional implementation process is positive correlation on both sides of synergistic effect, and, the intermediary role is obvious that external organizational learning played a regulatory role between institutional innovation synergistic effects. Research limitations/implications: A large-scale questionnaire survey showed that the influence path of “institutions -organization-innovation performance" are existed. Therefore, the system analysis framework should be introduced to the emergence and development of University spin-offs, and further explored the synergistic process of institutional change and organizational evolution. Practical implications: University spin-offs are a mode of university - industry cooperation, and it takes participation in market competition

  7. Experience in a Climate Microworld: Influence of Surface and Structure Learning, Problem Difficulty, and Decision Aids in Reducing Stock-Flow Misconceptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medha Kumar

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Research shows that people’s wait-and-see preferences for actions against climate change are a result of several factors, including cognitive misconceptions. The use of simulation tools could help reduce these misconceptions concerning Earth’s climate. However, it is still unclear whether the learning in these tools is of the problem’s surface features (dimensions of emissions and absorptions and cover-story used or of the problem’s structural features (how emissions and absorptions cause a change in CO2 concentration under different CO2 concentration scenarios. Also, little is known on how problem’s difficulty in these tools (the shape of CO2 concentration trajectory, as well as the use of these tools as a decision aid influences performance. The primary objective of this paper was to investigate how learning about Earth’s climate via simulation tools is influenced by problem’s surface and structural features, problem’s difficulty, and decision aids. In experiment 1, we tested the influence of problem’s surface and structural features in a simulation called Dynamic Climate Change Simulator (DCCS on subsequent performance in a paper-and-pencil Climate Stabilization (CS task (N = 100 across four between-subject conditions. In experiment 2, we tested the effects of problem’s difficulty in DCCS on subsequent performance in the CS task (N = 90 across three between-subject conditions. In experiment 3, we tested the influence of DCCS as a decision aid on subsequent performance in the CS task (N = 60 across two between-subject conditions. Results revealed a significant reduction in people’s misconceptions in the CS task after performing in DCCS compared to when performing in CS task in the absence of DCCS. The decrease in misconceptions in the CS task was similar for both problems’ surface and structural features, showing both structure and surface learning in DCCS. However, the proportion of misconceptions was similar across

  8. Does Foreign Aid increase Foreign Direct Investment?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selaya, Pablo; Sunesen, Eva Rytter

    2012-01-01

    We examine the idea that aid and FDI are complementary sources of foreign capital. We argue that the relationship between aid and FDI is theoretically ambiguous: aid raises the marginal productivity of capital when used to finance complementary inputs (like public infrastructure and human capital...... investments), but aid may crowd out private investments when it comes in the shape of pure physical capital transfers. Empirically, we find that aid invested in complementary inputs draws in FDI, while aid invested in physical capital crowds it out. The paper shows that the composition of aid matters for its...

  9. Life skills as a behaviour change strategy in the prevention of HIV and AIDS: Perceptions of students in an open and distance learning institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapi, B J; Pitsoane, E M

    2017-12-01

    The prevention of HIV and AIDS, especially amongst young people, is very important, as they are the future leaders. South Africa carries a high burden of the HIV and AIDS disease, and efforts at the prevention of the disease need to be intensified. University students are also at risk, and prevention efforts need to be intensified to ensure that students graduate and enter the world of work to become productive citizens. Failure to pay attention to preventative behaviour amongst university students may have negative socio-economic consequences for the country. The paper presents a quantitative study undertaken amongst students at the University of South Africa, an Open and Distance Learning Institution in South Africa. The aim of the study was to explore the perceptions of students regarding life skills as a behaviour change strategy at Unisa. The study was conducted in the three regions of the University: Midlands region, Gautengregion and Limpopo region. Data were collected by means of self-administered questionnaires and were analysed by using the Statistical Programme for Social Sciences. The findings revealed that students have a need to attend life skills workshops, which are facilitated by trained student counsellors since they believe that the life skills training will assist them to be assertive and practise behaviours which will not make them vulnerable to the HIV and AIDS infection.

  10. Multi-task transfer learning deep convolutional neural network: application to computer-aided diagnosis of breast cancer on mammograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samala, Ravi K.; Chan, Heang-Ping; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Helvie, Mark A.; Cha, Kenny H.; Richter, Caleb D.

    2017-12-01

    Transfer learning in deep convolutional neural networks (DCNNs) is an important step in its application to medical imaging tasks. We propose a multi-task transfer learning DCNN with the aim of translating the ‘knowledge’ learned from non-medical images to medical diagnostic tasks through supervised training and increasing the generalization capabilities of DCNNs by simultaneously learning auxiliary tasks. We studied this approach in an important application: classification of malignant and benign breast masses. With Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval, digitized screen-film mammograms (SFMs) and digital mammograms (DMs) were collected from our patient files and additional SFMs were obtained from the Digital Database for Screening Mammography. The data set consisted of 2242 views with 2454 masses (1057 malignant, 1397 benign). In single-task transfer learning, the DCNN was trained and tested on SFMs. In multi-task transfer learning, SFMs and DMs were used to train the DCNN, which was then tested on SFMs. N-fold cross-validation with the training set was used for training and parameter optimization. On the independent test set, the multi-task transfer learning DCNN was found to have significantly (p  =  0.007) higher performance compared to the single-task transfer learning DCNN. This study demonstrates that multi-task transfer learning may be an effective approach for training DCNN in medical imaging applications when training samples from a single modality are limited.

  11. The Effects of Computer-Aided Instruction on Learning and Attitudes in Economic Principles Courses: Revised Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Mark

    1979-01-01

    Recounts statistical inaccuracies in an article on computer-aided instruction in economics courses on the college level. The article, published in the J. Econ. Ed (Fall 1978), erroneously placed one student in the TIPS group instead of the control group. Implications of this alteration are discussed. (DB)

  12. A Study of the Use of Ontologies for Building Computer-Aided Control Engineering Self-Learning Educational Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Isaías; Benavides, Carmen; Alaiz, Héctor; Alonso, Angel

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes research on the use of knowledge models (ontologies) for building computer-aided educational software in the field of control engineering. Ontologies are able to represent in the computer a very rich conceptual model of a given domain. This model can be used later for a number of purposes in different software applications. In…

  13. The Effects of a Technology-Aided Learning Environment on the Improvement of a Primary Special Education School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karal, Hasan

    2015-01-01

    The changes demanded by technology are reshaping people's expectations of education. These changing demands and expectations have introduced certain concepts, such as individuals who have become skilled at learning and the learning organization. Individuals and schools, as the most basic unit of educational organizations, should demonstrate a…

  14. Aid Effectiveness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arndt, Channing; Jones, Edward Samuel; Tarp, Finn

    of the main relationships; (ii) estimating the impact of aid on a range of final and intermediate outcomes; and (iii) quantifying a simplied representation of the full structural form, where aid impacts on growth through key intermediate outcomes. A coherent picture emerges: aid stimulates growth and reduces......Controversy over the aggregate impact of foreign aid has focused on reduced form estimates of the aid-growth link. The causal chain, through which aid affects developmental outcomes including growth, has received much less attention. We address this gap by: (i) specifying a structural model...... poverty through physical capital investment and improvements in health....

  15. Learned Effectiveness: An Empirical Validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Tracey L.

    All too often when issues arise concerning the "underclass," African Americans, and more specifically African American males are disproportionately represented in that description. Black males have been referred to as endangered in areas of education, economics, health and overall self-efficacy. This data would suggest hopelessness in…

  16. Empirical Hamiltonians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peggs, S.; Talman, R.

    1986-08-01

    As proton accelerators get larger, and include more magnets, the conventional tracking programs which simulate them run slower. At the same time, in order to more carefully optimize the higher cost of the accelerators, they must return more accurate results, even in the presence of a longer list of realistic effects, such as magnet errors and misalignments. For these reasons conventional tracking programs continue to be computationally bound, despite the continually increasing computing power available. This limitation is especially severe for a class of problems in which some lattice parameter is slowly varying, when a faithful description is only obtained by tracking for an exceedingly large number of turns. Examples are synchrotron oscillations in which the energy varies slowly with a period of, say, hundreds of turns, or magnet ripple or noise on a comparably slow time scale. In these cases one may with to track for hundreds of periods of the slowly varying parameter. The purpose of this paper is to describe a method, still under development, in which element-by-element tracking around one turn is replaced by a single map, which can be processed far faster. Similar programs have already been written in which successive elements are ''concatenated'' with truncation to linear, sextupole, or octupole order, et cetera, using Lie algebraic techniques to preserve symplecticity. The method described here is rather more empirical than this but, in principle, contains information to all orders and is able to handle resonances in a more straightforward fashion

  17. AIDS (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    AIDS (acquired immune deficiency syndrome) is caused by HIV (human immunodeficiency virus), and is a syndrome that ... life-threatening illnesses. There is no cure for AIDS, but treatment with antiviral medicine can suppress symptoms. ...

  18. Foreign aid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarp, Finn

    2008-01-01

    Foreign aid has evolved significantly since the Second World War in response to a dramatically changing global political and economic context. This article (a) reviews this process and associated trends in the volume and distribution of foreign aid; (b) reviews the goals, principles and instituti......Foreign aid has evolved significantly since the Second World War in response to a dramatically changing global political and economic context. This article (a) reviews this process and associated trends in the volume and distribution of foreign aid; (b) reviews the goals, principles...... and institutions of the aid system; and (c) discusses whether aid has been effective. While much of the original optimism about the impact of foreign aid needed modification, there is solid evidence that aid has indeed helped further growth and poverty reduction...

  19. Application of a kernel-based online learning algorithm to the classification of nodule candidates in computer-aided detection of CT lung nodules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, S.; Ohno, Y.; Takenaka, D.; Sugimura, K.; Yamagata, H.

    2007-01-01

    Classification of the nodule candidates in computer-aided detection (CAD) of lung nodules in CT images was addressed by constructing a nonlinear discriminant function using a kernel-based learning algorithm called the kernel recursive least-squares (KRLS) algorithm. Using the nodule candidates derived from the processing by a CAD scheme of 100 CT datasets containing 253 non-calcified nodules or 3 mm or larger as determined by the consensus of two thoracic radiologists, the following trial were carried out 100 times: by randomly selecting 50 datasets for training, a nonlinear discriminant function was obtained using the nodule candidates in the training datasets and tested with the remaining candidates; for comparison, a rule-based classification was tested in a similar manner. At the number of false positives per case of about 5, the nonlinear classification method showed an improved sensitivity of 80% (mean over the 100 trials) compared with 74% of the rule-based method. (orig.)

  20. Learning Designs using Flipped Classroom Instruction | Conception d’apprentissage à l’aide de l’instruction en classe inversée

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amber Danielle Mazur

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The flipped classroom is an instructional model that leverages technology-enhanced instruction outside of class time in order to maximize student engagement and learning during class time. As part of an action research study, the authors synthesize reflections about three learning designs and how the flipped classroom model can support teaching, learning and assessment through: (1 guided collaborative discussion, (2 tabletop white boarding and (3 the development of augmented reality auras. Principles for teaching effectiveness are used as a lens to guide the reflection on the benefits and challenges with each of the learning designs. Findings suggest that flipped classroom models that emphasize collaborative learning, group work and accessibility can enable and support inquiry-based learning. Recommendations are provided for educators interested in designing learning using a flipped classroom instructional model, as well as suggestions for future action research agendas. La classe inversée est un modèle pédagogique qui met à profit l’apprentissage hors des heures en classe et qui est rehaussé par la technologie pour maximiser l’engagement et l’apprentissage des apprenants en classe. Dans le cadre de cette étude de recherche-action, les auteurs résument les réflexions sur la façon dont le modèle de la classe inversée peut appuyer l’enseignement, l’apprentissage et l’évaluation par la mise en œuvre de trois conceptions d’apprentissage par investigation : 1 discussion collaborative guidée, 2 tableau blanc de table et 3 développement d’auras en réalité augmentée. Les principes d’enseignement de l’efficacité sont utilisés comme optique guidant la réflexion sur les avantages et les défis de chacune des conceptions d’apprentissage. Les conclusions suggèrent que les modèles de classes inversées qui mettent l’accent sur l’apprentissage collaboratif, le travail en groupe et l’accessibilité peuvent

  1. More than First Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoessler, Sally

    2011-01-01

    The school nurse is an important member of the school team since school health services keep students in school, in the classroom, and ready to learn. Although school nurses are often seen as the people who deliver first aid at school, their role is much deeper and has such breadth that only a registered, professional nurse has the skill set to…

  2. The origins of AIDS

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pepin, Jacques

    2011-01-01

    ... urbanisation, prostitution and large-scale colonial medical campaigns intended to eradicate tropical diseases combined to disastrous effect to fuel the spread of the virus from its origins in Léopoldville to the rest of Africa, the Caribbean and ultimately worldwide. This is an essential new perspective on HIV/ AIDS and on the lessons that must be learned if we are to avoi...

  3. Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR): First Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... learn CPR properly, take an accredited first-aid training course, including CPR and how to use an automated external defibrillator ( ... and Research. © 1998-2018 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research (MFMER). All rights reserved.

  4. Basic HIV/AIDS Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... HIV Syndicated Content Website Feedback HIV/AIDS Basic Statistics Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir HIV and ... HIV. Interested in learning more about CDC's HIV statistics? Terms, Definitions, and Calculations Used in CDC HIV ...

  5. Author Languages, Authoring Systems, and Their Relation to the Changing Focus of Computer-Aided Language Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussex, Roland

    1991-01-01

    Considers how the effectiveness of computer-assisted language learning (CALL) has been hampered by language teachers who lack programing and software engineering expertise, and explores the limitations and potential contributions of author languages, programs, and environments in increasing the range of options for language teachers who are not…

  6. Experiences in applying skills learned in a mental health first aid training course: a qualitative study of participants' stories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kitchener Betty A

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Given the high prevalence of mental disorders and the comparatively low rate of professional help-seeking, it is useful for members of the public to have some skills in how to assist people developing mental disorders. A Mental Health First Aid course has been developed to provide these skills. Two randomized controlled trials of this course have shown positive effects on participants' knowledge, attitudes and behavior. However, these trials have provided limited data on participants' subsequent experiences in providing first aid. To remedy this, a study was carried out gathering stories from participants in one of the trials, 19–21 months post-training. Methods Former course participants were contacted and sent a questionnaire either by post or via the internet. Responses were received from 94 out of the 131 trainees who were contacted. The questionnaire asked about whether the participant had experienced a post-training situation where someone appeared to have a mental health problem and, if so, asked questions about that experience. Results Post-training experiences were reported by 78% of respondents. Five key points emerged from the qualitative data: (1 the majority of respondents had had some direct experience of a situation where mental health issues were salient and the course enabled them to take steps that led to better effects than otherwise might have been the case; (2 positive effects were experienced in terms of increased empathy and confidence, as well as being better able to handle crises; (3 the positive effects were experienced by a wide range of people with varied expectations and needs; (4 there was no evidence of people over-reaching themselves because of over-confidence and (5 those who attended were able to identify quite specific benefits and many thought the course not only very useful, but were keen to see it repeated and extended. Conclusion The qualitative data confirm that most members of the

  7. Exploring the Effectiveness of Interdisciplinary Instruction on Learning: A Case Study in a College Level Course on Culture, Aid, and Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Frank

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The opportunity for higher education students to study a topic through multiple, integrated angles is rare even though life outside of the classroom is filled with problems that require blending of knowledge areas to make appropriate decisions. The authors created a course at the United States Air Force Academy called Foreign Area Studies (FAS 495 in the Spring 2012 semester that integrated African studies, economics, history, political science, literature, project management, military strategy, language, culture, and environmental engineering in the study of how foreign aid has affected Mozambique and how an engineering technology along with cultural consciousness can be effectively used for good. To determine effectiveness of the interdisciplinary approach, qualitative data from student reflection papers and in-class discussions were collected and analyzed. The intent of this paper is to highlight the challenges and lessons learned from developing a project based interdisciplinary course. Results suggest a project based course with interdisciplinary pedagogy can be effective in meeting course goals and increasing meaningful student learning.

  8. Computer-Aided Diagnosis with Deep Learning Architecture: Applications to Breast Lesions in US Images and Pulmonary Nodules in CT Scans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jie-Zhi; Ni, Dong; Chou, Yi-Hong; Qin, Jing; Tiu, Chui-Mei; Chang, Yeun-Chung; Huang, Chiun-Sheng; Shen, Dinggang; Chen, Chung-Ming

    2016-04-15

    This paper performs a comprehensive study on the deep-learning-based computer-aided diagnosis (CADx) for the differential diagnosis of benign and malignant nodules/lesions by avoiding the potential errors caused by inaccurate image processing results (e.g., boundary segmentation), as well as the classification bias resulting from a less robust feature set, as involved in most conventional CADx algorithms. Specifically, the stacked denoising auto-encoder (SDAE) is exploited on the two CADx applications for the differentiation of breast ultrasound lesions and lung CT nodules. The SDAE architecture is well equipped with the automatic feature exploration mechanism and noise tolerance advantage, and hence may be suitable to deal with the intrinsically noisy property of medical image data from various imaging modalities. To show the outperformance of SDAE-based CADx over the conventional scheme, two latest conventional CADx algorithms are implemented for comparison. 10 times of 10-fold cross-validations are conducted to illustrate the efficacy of the SDAE-based CADx algorithm. The experimental results show the significant performance boost by the SDAE-based CADx algorithm over the two conventional methods, suggesting that deep learning techniques can potentially change the design paradigm of the CADx systems without the need of explicit design and selection of problem-oriented features.

  9. In Support of Coaching Models of Management and Leadership: A Comparative Study of Empirically Derived Managerial Coaching/Facilitating Learning Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamlin, Bob; Ellinger, Andrea D.; Beattie, Rona S.

    2004-01-01

    The concept of managers assuming developmental roles such as coaches and learning facilitators has gained considerable attention in recent years as organizations seek to leverage learning by creating infrastructures that foster employee learning and development. Despite the increased focus on coaching, the literature base remains atheoretical.…

  10. Multiple Learning Approaches in the Professional Development of School Leaders -- Theoretical Perspectives and Empirical Findings on Self-assessment and Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Stephan Gerhard

    2013-01-01

    This article investigates the use of multiple learning approaches and different modes and types of learning in the (continuous) professional development (PD) of school leaders, particularly the use of self-assessment and feedback. First, formats and multiple approaches to professional learning are described. Second, a possible approach to…

  11. Empirical Assessment of College Student-Athletes' Persistence in E-Learning Courses: A Case Study of a U.S. National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA) Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Anthony J.; Levy, Yair

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, the application of Information Technologies (IT) has fostered a tremendous growth in e-learning courses at colleges and universities in the United States. Subsequently, some colleges and universities have reported dropout rates of over 60% in e-learning courses. This research investigated persistence in e-learning courses of 187…

  12. Design, Development and Preliminary Student Evaluation of Virtual Field Guides as aids to teaching and learning in the Earth sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stott, Tim

    2010-05-01

    In Universities the benefits of teaching and learning through fieldwork has been brought under closer examination in recent years (e.g. Andrews et al., 2003) and the notion of supporting fieldwork in the Geography, Earth and Environmental Science (GEES) disciplines has been gathering momentum over the past decade as evidenced by conferences on ‘Supporting fieldwork using information technology' (Maskall et al., 2007) and a Higher Education Academy GEES Virtual Fieldwork Conference at University of Worcester (May 2007). Virtual environments and e-learning resources have been shown to help students become active rather than passive learners by appealing to their multi-sensory learning ability with interactive media (Fletcher et al., 2002; 2007). Research on glacial and fluvial processes has been conducted since 2003 by Liverpool John Moores University (LJMU) staff, sometimes in collaboration with other Universities, at field sites in the French Alps, Swiss Alps and Cariboo Mountains in British Columbia. A virtual field guide (VFG) (www.virtualalps.co.uk) has been developed which uses maps, site photos, panorama movies, video clips, a google earth tour, student exercises using hydrological and glacial datasets collected in the field and revision exercises. A preliminary evaluation of this learning resource has been carried out with two groups of LJMU students and an article written (Stott et al. 2009a). The Ingleton Waterfalls VFG (http://www.ljmu.ac.uk/BIE/ingleton/) was developed by LJMU staff to meet the needs of Foundation degree and undergraduate students. A workshop was presented at the Earth Science Teachers Association 2008 Annual Conference at LJMU, and a subsequent article written (Stott et al. 2009b). The final section of this presentation will summarise some staff perspectives and raises some questions and issues concerned with development and accessibility of VFGs in the light of new developments of a ‘semantic web' at LJMU (Carmichael, 2009). Andrews

  13. Applications of Speech-to-Text Recognition and Computer-Aided Translation for Facilitating Cross-Cultural Learning through a Learning Activity: Issues and Their Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadiev, Rustam; Wu, Ting-Ting; Sun, Ai; Huang, Yueh-Min

    2018-01-01

    In this study, 21 university students, who represented thirteen nationalities, participated in an online cross-cultural learning activity. The participants were engaged in interactions and exchanges carried out on Facebook® and Skype® platforms, and their multilingual communications were supported by speech-to-text recognition (STR) and…

  14. Hearing Aid Personalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Brehm; Nielsen, Jakob; Jensen, Bjørn Sand

    2013-01-01

    Modern digital hearing aids require and offer a great level of personalization. Today, this personalization is not performed based directly on what the user actually perceives, but on a hearing-care professional’s interpretation of what the user explains about what is perceived. In this paper......, an interactive personalization system based on Gaussian process regression and active learning is proposed, which personalize the hearing aids based directly on what the user perceives. Preliminary results demonstrate a significant difference between a truly personalized setting obtained with the proposed system...

  15. Brand Aid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richey, Lisa Ann; Ponte, Stefano

    A critical account of the rise of celebrity-driven “compassionate consumption” Cofounded by the rock star Bono in 2006, Product RED exemplifies a new trend in celebrity-driven international aid and development, one explicitly linked to commerce, not philanthropy. Brand Aid offers a deeply informed...

  16. Foreign aid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarp, Finn

    2008-01-01

    Foreign aid has evolved significantly since the Second World War in response to a dramatically changing global political and economic context. This article (a) reviews this process and associated trends in the volume and distribution of foreign aid; (b) reviews the goals, principles...

  17. Governance and Human Development: Empirical Evidence from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study empirically investigates the effects of governance on human development in Nigeria. Using annual time series data covering the period 1998 to 2010, obtained from various sources, and employing the classical least squares estimation technique, the study finds that corruption, foreign aid and government ...

  18. Lessons learned from early implementation of option B+: the Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation experience in 11 African countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieffer, Mary Pat; Mattingly, Meghan; Giphart, Anja; van de Ven, Roland; Chouraya, Caspian; Walakira, Moses; Boon, Alexandre; Mikusova, Silvia; Simonds, R J

    2014-12-01

    "Option B+" is a World Health Organization-recommended approach to prevent mother-to-child HIV transmission whereby all HIV-positive pregnant and lactating women initiate lifelong antiretroviral therapy (ART). This review of early Option B+ implementation experience is intended to inform Ministries of Health and others involved in implementing Option B+. This implementation science study analyzed data from 11 African countries supported by the Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation (EGPAF) to describe early experience implementing Option B+. Data are from 4 sources: (1) national guidelines for prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission and Option B+ implementation plans, (2) aggregated service delivery data between January 2013 and March 2014 from EGPAF-supported sites, (3) field visits to Option B+ implementation sites, and (4) relevant EGPAF research, quality improvement, and evaluation studies. Rapid adoption of Option B+ led to large increases in percentage of HIV-positive pregnant women accessing ART in antenatal care. By the end of 2013, most programs reached at least 50% of HIV-positive women in antenatal care with ART, even in countries using a phased approach to implementation. Scaling up Option B+ through integrating ART in maternal and child health settings has required expansion of the workforce, and task shifting to allow nurse-led ART initiation has created staffing pressure on lower-level cadres for counseling and community follow-up. Complex data collection needs may be impairing data quality. Early experiences with Option B+ implementation demonstrate promise. Continued program evaluation is needed, as is specific attention to counseling and support around initiation of lifetime ART in the context of pregnancy and lactation.

  19. Aid and good governance: Examining aggregate unintended effects of aid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkstra, Geske

    2018-06-01

    Although donors generally aim to improve governance in recipient countries by various means, critics claim that the aggregate effect of large aid flows is the deterioration of governance. Aid is said to weaken domestic accountability, sustain authoritarian regimes, increase political instability, weaken government capacities, and increase corruption. Conducting a systematic search in Web of Science, this paper reviews the empirical evidence for these unintended aggregate effects of aid on the political, administrative, and judicial dimensions of good governance. It finds that the negative effects of aid on governance are much exaggerated. The aggregate effect of aid on democracy has become more positive after the Cold War, and the effect of aid on government capacity and on reducing corruption has also improved over time. Furthermore, most studies show a positive effect of aid on political stability. These findings imply that donor intentions matter: donors that are serious about their intended effects on governance are able to mitigate the possible negative unintended effects of their aid. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A Hybrid Computer-aided-diagnosis System for Prediction of Breast Cancer Recurrence (HPBCR Using Optimized Ensemble Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad R. Mohebian

    Full Text Available Cancer is a collection of diseases that involves growing abnormal cells with the potential to invade or spread to the body. Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death among women. A method for 5-year breast cancer recurrence prediction is presented in this manuscript. Clinicopathologic characteristics of 579 breast cancer patients (recurrence prevalence of 19.3% were analyzed and discriminative features were selected using statistical feature selection methods. They were further refined by Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO as the inputs of the classification system with ensemble learning (Bagged Decision Tree: BDT. The proper combination of selected categorical features and also the weight (importance of the selected interval-measurement-scale features were identified by the PSO algorithm. The performance of HPBCR (hybrid predictor of breast cancer recurrence was assessed using the holdout and 4-fold cross-validation. Three other classifiers namely as supported vector machines, DT, and multilayer perceptron neural network were used for comparison. The selected features were diagnosis age, tumor size, lymph node involvement ratio, number of involved axillary lymph nodes, progesterone receptor expression, having hormone therapy and type of surgery. The minimum sensitivity, specificity, precision and accuracy of HPBCR were 77%, 93%, 95% and 85%, respectively in the entire cross-validation folds and the hold-out test fold. HPBCR outperformed the other tested classifiers. It showed excellent agreement with the gold standard (i.e. the oncologist opinion after blood tumor marker and imaging tests, and tissue biopsy. This algorithm is thus a promising online tool for the prediction of breast cancer recurrence. Keywords: Breast cancer, Cancer recurrence, Computer-assisted diagnosis, Machine learning, Prognosis

  1. Modelling the Factors that Affect Individuals' Utilisation of Online Learning Systems: An Empirical Study Combining the Task Technology Fit Model with the Theory of Planned Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tai-Kuei; Yu, Tai-Yi

    2010-01-01

    Understanding learners' behaviour, perceptions and influence in terms of learner performance is crucial to predict the use of electronic learning systems. By integrating the task-technology fit (TTF) model and the theory of planned behaviour (TPB), this paper investigates the online learning utilisation of Taiwanese students. This paper provides a…

  2. The Influence of E-Learning on Individual and Collective Empowerment in the Public Sector: An Empirical Study of Korean Government Employees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hur, Mann Hyung; Im, Yeonwook

    2013-01-01

    Our study explores the influence of e-learning on individual and collective empowerment by using data collected from e-learning class participants of Korea's Cyber-Education Center. For the survey, a questionnaire was sent to each of the 41 central ministries' education and training officers (ETO) via email. The ETOs distributed the questionnaire…

  3. A two-stage multi-view learning framework based computer-aided diagnosis of liver tumors with contrast enhanced ultrasound images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Le-Hang; Wang, Dan; Qian, Yi-Yi; Zheng, Xiao; Zhao, Chong-Ke; Li, Xiao-Long; Bo, Xiao-Wan; Yue, Wen-Wen; Zhang, Qi; Shi, Jun; Xu, Hui-Xiong

    2018-04-04

    With the fast development of artificial intelligence techniques, we proposed a novel two-stage multi-view learning framework for the contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) based computer-aided diagnosis for liver tumors, which adopted only three typical CEUS images selected from the arterial phase, portal venous phase and late phase. In the first stage, the deep canonical correlation analysis (DCCA) was performed on three image pairs between the arterial and portal venous phases, arterial and delayed phases, and portal venous and delayed phases respectively, which then generated total six-view features. While in the second stage, these multi-view features were then fed to a multiple kernel learning (MKL) based classifier to further promote the diagnosis result. Two MKL classification algorithms were evaluated in this MKL-based classification framework. We evaluated proposed DCCA-MKL framework on 93 lesions (47 malignant cancers vs. 46 benign tumors). The proposed DCCA-MKL framework achieved the mean classification accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, Youden index, false positive rate, and false negative rate of 90.41 ± 5.80%, 93.56 ± 5.90%, 86.89 ± 9.38%, 79.44 ± 11.83%, 13.11 ± 9.38% and 6.44 ± 5.90%, respectively, by soft margin MKL classifier. The experimental results indicate that the proposed DCCA-MKL framework achieves best performance for discriminating benign liver tumors from malignant liver cancers. Moreover, it is also proved that the three-phase CEUS image based CAD is feasible for liver tumors with the proposed DCCA-MKL framework.

  4. ATHENA AIDE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, R.K.; Callow, R.A.; Larson, T.K.; Ransom, V.H.

    1987-01-01

    An expert system called the ATHENA AIDE that assists in the preparation of input models for the ATHENA thermal-hydraulics code has been developed by researchers at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The ATHENA AIDE uses a menu driven graphics interface and rule-based and object-oriented programming techniques to assist users of the ATHENA code in performing the tasks involved in preparing the card image input files required to run ATHENA calculations. The ATENA AIDE was developed and currently runs on single-user Xerox artificial intelligence workstations. Experience has shown that the intelligent modeling environment provided by the ATHENA AIDE expert system helps ease the modeling task by relieving the analyst of many mundane, repetitive, and error prone procedures involved in the construction of an input model. This reduces errors in the resulting models, helps promote standardized modeling practices, and allows models to be constructed more quickly than was previously possible

  5. HIV / AIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Relations Cyber Infrastructure Computational Biology Equal Employment Opportunity Ethics Global Research Office of Mission Integration and Financial Management Strategic Planning Workforce Effectiveness Workplace Solutions Technology Transfer Intellectual Property Division of AIDS ...

  6. AIDS guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, R

    1986-04-30

    The Sun article, "Employers finding that AIDS in the workplace is a managerial nightmare" (April 3), did not accurately portray the status of AIDS in the workplace. The AIDS virus, HTLV III, is transmitted by body fluids, primarily semen and blood, and there is no known risk of transmitting the virus by casual contact in the workplace. The Center for Disease Control (CDC) released guidelines for child care workers last August. Guidelines on preventing transmission of AIDS in the workplace were issued by CDC in November 1985. These guidelines specifically discussed health care, personal service, and food service workers. The recommendations were against routine screening. Furthermore, employment should not be restricted on the basis of a positive HTLV III antibody test. A person with HTLV III infection should be exempt from the workplace only if there are circumstances interfering with job performance. In Maryland, the Governor's Task Force on AIDS has gone on record as endorsing CDC guidelines related to employment. Furthermore, the task force condemns discrimination based on the disease AIDS, AIDS Related Complex (ARC), or HTLV III infection. Increasingly AIDS patients are being considered legally disabled and therefore are protected by federal and state laws prohibiting discrimination on the basis of a handicap. Marylanders who are subjected to mandatory HTLV III screening in the workplace, or if discriminated against on the basis of HTLV III inefction, should contact the Maryland Commission on Human Relations, the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, or the Health Education Resource Organization (HERO). All 3 of these resources guarantee confidentiality. It is only by employees reporting incidents that a nightmare in the workplace can be avoided in Maryland. full text

  7. Widget, widget as you lead, I am performing well indeed! Using results from an exploratory offline study to inform an empirical online study about a learning analytics widget in a collaborative learning environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheffel, Maren; Drachsler, Hendrik; Kreijns, Karel; De Kraker, Joop; Specht, Marcus

    2017-01-01

    The collaborative learning processes of students in online learning environments can be supported by providing learning analytics-based visualisations that foster awareness and reflection about an individual's as well as the team's behaviour and their learning and collaboration processes. For this

  8. Polyphyletic migration operator and orthogonal learning aided biogeography-based optimization for dynamic economic dispatch with valve-point effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong, Guojiang; Li, Yinhong; Chen, Jinfu; Shi, Dongyuan; Duan, Xianzhong

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • New method for dynamic economic dispatch problem using POLBBO. • Considering valve-point effects, ramp rate limits, transmission network losses. • POLBBO is able to balance the global exploration and the local exploitation. • An effective simultaneous constraints handling technique is proposed. • The achieved results by POLBBO are better than those reported in other literatures. - Abstract: Shortage of energy resources, rising power generation cost, and increasing electric energy demand make the dynamic economic dispatch (DED) increasingly necessary in today’s competitive electricity market. In this paper, an enhanced biogeography-based optimization (BBO) referred to as POLBBO is proposed to solve the DED problem with valve-point effects. BBO is a relatively new powerful population-based meta-heuristic algorithm inspired by biogeography and has been extensively applied to many scientific and engineering problems. However, its direct-copying-based migration and random mutation operators make BBO possess good local exploitation ability but lack enough global exploration ability. To remedy the defect, on one hand, an efficient operator named polyphyletic migration operator is proposed to enhance the search ability of POLBBO. This operator can not only generate new features from more promising areas in the search space, but also effectively increase the population diversity. On the other hand, an orthogonal learning (OL) strategy based on orthogonal experimental design is presented. The OL strategy can quickly discover useful information from the search experiences and effectively utilize the information to construct a more promising solution, and thereby provide a systematic and elaborate reasoning method to guide the search directions of POLBBO. In addition, an effective simultaneous constraints handling technique without penalty factor settings is developed to handle various complicated constraints of the DED problem. Finally, four test

  9. A Hybrid Computer-aided-diagnosis System for Prediction of Breast Cancer Recurrence (HPBCR) Using Optimized Ensemble Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohebian, Mohammad R; Marateb, Hamid R; Mansourian, Marjan; Mañanas, Miguel Angel; Mokarian, Fariborz

    2017-01-01

    Cancer is a collection of diseases that involves growing abnormal cells with the potential to invade or spread to the body. Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death among women. A method for 5-year breast cancer recurrence prediction is presented in this manuscript. Clinicopathologic characteristics of 579 breast cancer patients (recurrence prevalence of 19.3%) were analyzed and discriminative features were selected using statistical feature selection methods. They were further refined by Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) as the inputs of the classification system with ensemble learning (Bagged Decision Tree: BDT). The proper combination of selected categorical features and also the weight (importance) of the selected interval-measurement-scale features were identified by the PSO algorithm. The performance of HPBCR (hybrid predictor of breast cancer recurrence) was assessed using the holdout and 4-fold cross-validation. Three other classifiers namely as supported vector machines, DT, and multilayer perceptron neural network were used for comparison. The selected features were diagnosis age, tumor size, lymph node involvement ratio, number of involved axillary lymph nodes, progesterone receptor expression, having hormone therapy and type of surgery. The minimum sensitivity, specificity, precision and accuracy of HPBCR were 77%, 93%, 95% and 85%, respectively in the entire cross-validation folds and the hold-out test fold. HPBCR outperformed the other tested classifiers. It showed excellent agreement with the gold standard (i.e. the oncologist opinion after blood tumor marker and imaging tests, and tissue biopsy). This algorithm is thus a promising online tool for the prediction of breast cancer recurrence.

  10. The Influence of E-Learning on Individual and Collective Empowerment in the Public Sector: An Empirical Study of Korean Government Employees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mann Hyung Hur

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Our study explores the influence of e-learning on individual and collective empowerment by using data collected from e-learning class participants of Korea’s Cyber-Education Center. For the survey, a questionnaire was sent to each of the 41 central ministries’ education and training officers (ETO via email. The ETOs distributed the questionnaire to individuals in their ministries who have taken e-learning classes offered by the Cyber-Education Center during the first half of 2012. Out of more than 1,000 e-learning class attendees, 161 responded to the questionnaire survey. A set of multiple regression models was employed to explore significant predictors of government employees’ individual and collective empowerment in e-learning environments. Using existing literature on empowerment theories, a set of 16 questions was developed. A factor analysis was conducted to condense 16 individual variables into several large categories. Four factors including meaning, competence, self-determination, and collective empowerment were extracted from the 16 questions. The first three equations stood for individual empowerment and the last one for collective empowerment. Each of the four factors was utilized as a dependent variable in the multiple regression analysis. Each regression model uncovered its own set of variables that played a role in empowerment. The predictor variables of the meaning dimension were more widely split than those of the competence dimension or the self-determination dimension and collective empowerment. Only one independent variable—preference of e-learning class to offline class—was associated with all four dependent variables. However, modalities of e-learning activity, which were expected to be a significant predictor of empowerment, were not associated with any of the four dependent variables. In addition, lecture types of the e-learning class were also expected to be a significant predictor of empowerment but were only

  11. Does Foreign Aid Increase Foreign Direct Investment?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selaya, Pablo; Sunesen, Eva Rytter

      The notion that foreign aid and foreign direct investment (FDI) are complementary sources of capital is conventional among governments and international cooperation agencies. This paper argues that the notion is incomplete. Within the framework of an open economy Solow model we show...... that the theoretical relationship between foreign aid and FDI is indeterminate. Aid may raise the marginal productivity of capital by financing complementary inputs, such as public infrastructure projects and human capital investment. However, aid may also crowd out productive private investments if it comes...... in the shape of physical capital transfers. We therefore turn to an empirical analysis of the relationship between FDI and disaggregated aid flows. Our results strongly support the hypotheses that aid invested in complementary inputs draws in foreign capital while aid invested in physical capital crowds out...

  12. AIDS wars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Several evidences were presented during the meeting in London entitled "Origins of AIDS and the HIV epidemic," debating the idea that AIDS was an accidental result of a polio vaccination campaign conducted by a virologist, Hilary Koprowski, and colleagues in the late 1950s among thousands of people in the Belgian Congo. The meeting carefully examined the CHAT theory presented by a writer, Edward Hooper, in his book "The River" and has raised questions on the correlation between vaccination sites and early records of HIV-1, and on the estimated amount of HIV particles that would get through each stage of the process of creating CHAT. Overall, the meeting agreed to reject the CHAT theory of AIDS for it has no basis, since Koprowski and colleagues denied the use of chimpanzee kidneys, which Hooper openly suggests in his book. The meeting noted that the disease's origins remain a mystery.

  13. Do Visual Aids Really Matter?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristine Fish

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Educational webcasts or video lectures as a teaching tool and a form of visual aid have become widely used with the rising prevalence of online and blended courses and with the increase of web-based video materials. Thus, research pertaining to factors enhancing the effectiveness of video lectures, such as number of visual aids, is critical. This study compared student evaluations before and after embedding additional visual aids throughout video lectures in an online course. Slide transitions occurred on average every 40 seconds for the pre-treatment group with approximately 600 visuals total, compared to slide transitions every 10 seconds for the post-treatment group with approximately 2,000 visuals total. All students received the same audio recordings. Research questions addressed are: (1 Are student perceptions of the effectiveness of examples used to illustrate concepts affected by number of visual aids? (2 Is the extent to which students feel engaged during the lectures affected by number of visual aids? (3 Are students’ perceived overall learning experiences affected by number of visual aids? Surprisingly, results indicate that for questions #1 and #3, student ratings of those who viewed videos with fewer visuals rated their experiences higher than students who viewed more visuals. There was no significant difference found for question #2. Conclusion: Although some visuals have been shown to enhance learning, too many visuals may be a deterrent to learning.

  14. An Empirical Verification of a-priori Learning Models on Mailing Archives in the Context of Online Learning Activities of Participants in Free\\Libre Open Source Software (FLOSS) Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukala, Patrick; Cerone, Antonio; Turini, Franco

    2017-01-01

    Free\\Libre Open Source Software (FLOSS) environments are increasingly dubbed as learning environments where practical software engineering skills can be acquired. Numerous studies have extensively investigated how knowledge is acquired in these environments through a collaborative learning model that define a learning process. Such a learning…

  15. TEACHING AIDS – CONTINUITY, INTEGRATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ABRUDAN Ovidiu

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available For the authors of this paper, the teaching aids were and will always be a priority in their teaching activity. The contents of this paper is the result of a long strained period of efforts made to improve the teaching process, a period in which the teaching aids were permanently improved – as a result of attentively monitoring the students’ results. We can say that motivated students, who wanted to become mechanical engineers, used these teaching aids successfully in their learning activity.

  16. Empathic Technologies for Distance/Mobile Learning: An Empirical Research Based on the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaias, Pedro; Reis, Francisco; Coutinho, Clara; Lencastre, Jose Alberto

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This paper examines the acceptance, of a group of 79 students, of an educational forum, used for mobile and distance learning, that has been modified to include empathic characteristics and affective principles. Design/Methodology/Approach: With this study is proposed that the introduction of empathic and affective principles in…

  17. "Mind the Gap": An Empirical Study of the Gap between Intention and Actual Usage of Corporate E-Learning Programmes in the Financial Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luor, Tainyi; Hu, Changya; Lu, His-Peng

    2009-01-01

    While numerous previous studies have focused on the use of some corporate e-learning programmes (CELP), little is known about the difference between users' pre-installation reactions to CELP and user's post-installation reactions to CELP. This study narrows the above gap with two investigations into a financial company's CELP. In the…

  18. What Leads People to Keep on E-Learning? An Empirical Analysis of Users' Experiences and Their Effects on Continuance Intention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Ardura, Inma; Meseguer-Artola, Antoni

    2016-01-01

    User retention is a major goal for higher education institutions running their teaching and learning programmes online. This is the first investigation into how the senses of presence and flow, together with perceptions about two central elements of the virtual education environment (didactic resource quality and instructor attitude), facilitate…

  19. Negotiating Aid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Whitfield, Lindsay; Fraser, Alastair

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a new analytical approach to the study of aid negotiations. Building on existing approaches but trying to overcome their limitations, it argues that factors outside of individual negotiations (or the `game' in game-theoretic approaches) significantly affect the preferences...

  20. A FACTOR ANALYSIS OF ATTITUDE OF EDUCATION FRATERNITY TOWARDS THE ROLE OF TECHNOLOGY IN EFFECTIVE LEARNING: AN EMPIRICAL STUDY IN HIGHER EDUCATION INSTITUTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapoor Toran

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Use of Technology is empowering teachers and students, and enhancing teaching and students’ achievement which has been highlighted in several studies. Well planned lessons integrating technology are often more engaging, memorable and inspiring to students (Tornabene, 1998. Attitudes refer to one’s positive or negative judgment about a concrete subject. Attitude is a major predictor of future use of technology. Student teachers have positive attitude and are highly enthusiastic about interactive whiteboards as an important feature of teaching and learning, and this motivated them to practice using the technology (Kennewell, & Morgan, 2003. The purpose is to create new opportunities in teaching and learning by integrating computer, multimedia, and network technologies. However, it is not clear whether use of this new technology will automatically result in effective learning or make students dependent on technology to learn. Will Students use Technology appropriately? The same doubts prevailed with the invention of the printing press, radio, and television. All of them have positively contributed in access to information that can be transformed into knowledge and wisdom thereafter. Proper use of technology can become an effective tool to enhance learning. This research is an attempt in understanding the attitude of teachers as well as students towards the role of technology in higher education. The study is based on primary data collected through a sample size of 130 units consisting of 100 students and 30 teachers from universities located in NCR, India. Factor analysis has been conducted to measure the attitude of the teachers and the students. The study was been conducted in NCR, India and leaves the scope of further research in Higher Education across the globe.

  1. Orthogonal Projector Kit (OPK) as a new teaching aids with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... as a new teaching aids with innovation ICT in teaching and learning 21 st century. ... Mathematics education filled with abstract concepts, the use of teaching aids is ... This article aims to introduce and express the importance of Orthogonal ...

  2. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... can suppress the virus and prevent or decrease symptoms of illness. To learn about current statistics of HIV in the United States, please visit: https://www.aids.gov/hiv-aids-basics/hiv-aids-101/statistics/ . ...

  3. Performance Aided Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parigi, Dario

    2014-01-01

    paradigm where the increasing integration of parametric tools and performative analysis is changing the way we learn and design. The term Performance Aided Architectural Design (PAD) is proposed at the Master of Science of Architecture and Design at Aalborg University, with the aim of extending a tectonic...... tradition of architecture with computational tools, preparing the basis for the creation of the figure of a modern master builder, sitting at the boundary of the disciplines of architecture and engineering. Performance Aided Design focuses on the role of performative analysis, embedded tectonics......, and computational methods tools to trigger creativity and innovative understanding of relation between form material and a increasingly wide range of performances in architectural design. The ultimate goal is to pursue a design approach that aims at embracing rather than excluding the complexity implicit...

  4. Tactile Aids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohtaramossadat Homayuni

    1996-04-01

    Full Text Available Tactile aids, which translate sound waves into vibrations that can be felt by the skin, have been used for decades by people with severe/profound hearing loss to enhance speech/language development and improve speechreading.The development of tactile aids dates from the efforts of Goults and his co-workers in the 1920s; Although The power supply was too voluminous and it was difficult to carry specially by children, it was too huge and heavy to be carried outside the laboratories and its application was restricted to the experimental usage. Nowadays great advances have been performed in producing this instrument and its numerous models is available in markets around the world.

  5. Democracy Aid and Electoral Accountability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinrich, Tobias; Loftis, Matthew

    2017-01-01

    for this by analyzing incumbent turnover in elections following poor economic performance – the economic vote – as a measure of voting to achieve performance accountability. In our analysis of over 1,100 elections in 114 developing countries between 1975 and 2010, we find distinct evidence that increasing receipt......Although foreign policies often fail to successfully promote democracy, over a decade of empirical research indicates that foreign aid specifically for democracy promotion is remarkably successful at improving the survival and institutional strength of fragile democracies. However, these measures...... cannot tell us how well democracy aid supports the central promise of democracy: accountable government. Since institutions can be subverted in various ways that undermine accountability, it is vital to know whether democracy aid supports accountability to assess its overall success. We provide evidence...

  6. Empirical Test Case Specification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalyanova, Olena; Heiselberg, Per

    This document includes the empirical specification on the IEA task of evaluation building energy simulation computer programs for the Double Skin Facades (DSF) constructions. There are two approaches involved into this procedure, one is the comparative approach and another is the empirical one. I....... In the comparative approach the outcomes of different software tools are compared, while in the empirical approach the modelling results are compared with the results of experimental test cases....

  7. First aid in mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Sulley, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Achieve the best possible standard with this bestselling book of traditional practice and guidance - now in colour!. First Aid in Mathematics provides all the help and support needed for learning and practising Mathematics. It offers comprehensive coverage of core mathematical topics in clear and accessible language. It is suitable for both native English speakers and students of English as a second language and can be used in class, or as a reference and revision book. - Develops a strong basis of understanding with core topics covered in clear and accessible language. - Improves student's ab

  8. Evolution of HIV and AIDS Programmes in an African Institution of Higher Learning: The Case of the Copperbelt University in Zambia

    OpenAIRE

    Sanjobo, Nawa; Lukwesa, Matilda; Kaziya, Charity; Tepa, Cornwell; Puta, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Background: Universities present the foundation for socio-economic and political development. Without structures and processes to fight HIV, there is no prospect of enhancing treatment, prevention, care and support services. Copperbelt University HIV and AIDS response was initiated in 2003 with the aim of building capacity of students and employees in HIV and AIDS. Objectives: The main objective of this paper is to demonstrate how the CBU HIV response has evolved over time and provide a timel...

  9. Reframing Serial Murder Within Empirical Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurian, Elizabeth A

    2017-04-01

    Empirical research on serial murder is limited due to the lack of consensus on a definition, the continued use of primarily descriptive statistics, and linkage to popular culture depictions. These limitations also inhibit our understanding of these offenders and affect credibility in the field of research. Therefore, this comprehensive overview of a sample of 508 cases (738 total offenders, including partnered groups of two or more offenders) provides analyses of solo male, solo female, and partnered serial killers to elucidate statistical differences and similarities in offending and adjudication patterns among the three groups. This analysis of serial homicide offenders not only supports previous research on offending patterns present in the serial homicide literature but also reveals that empirically based analyses can enhance our understanding beyond traditional case studies and descriptive statistics. Further research based on these empirical analyses can aid in the development of more accurate classifications and definitions of serial murderers.

  10. JPRS Report, Epidemiology, AIDS

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1993-01-01

    Partial Contents: AIDS in Burundi, Rwanda AIDS Situation in Country Examined, Estimated Over 750,000 HIV Positive, In 3 Years 4 Million May Be AIDS Carriers, Events at National AIDS Convention Analyzed, Senior Army...

  11. Your Most Essential Audiovisual Aid--Yourself!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamp-Lyons, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Acknowledging that an interested and enthusiastic teacher can create excitement for students and promote learning, the author discusses how teachers can improve their appearance, and, consequently, how their students perceive them. She offers concrete suggestions on how a teacher can be both a "visual aid" and an "audio aid" in the classroom.…

  12. Empirical Philosophy of Science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mansnerus, Erika; Wagenknecht, Susann

    2015-01-01

    knowledge takes place through the integration of the empirical or historical research into the philosophical studies, as Chang, Nersessian, Thagard and Schickore argue in their work. Building upon their contributions we will develop a blueprint for an Empirical Philosophy of Science that draws upon...... qualitative methods from the social sciences in order to advance our philosophical understanding of science in practice. We will regard the relationship between philosophical conceptualization and empirical data as an iterative dialogue between theory and data, which is guided by a particular ‘feeling with......Empirical insights are proven fruitful for the advancement of Philosophy of Science, but the integration of philosophical concepts and empirical data poses considerable methodological challenges. Debates in Integrated History and Philosophy of Science suggest that the advancement of philosophical...

  13. Teaching Empirical Software Engineering Using Expert Teams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhrmann, Marco

    2017-01-01

    Empirical software engineering aims at making software engineering claims measurable, i.e., to analyze and understand phenomena in software engineering and to evaluate software engineering approaches and solutions. Due to the involvement of humans and the multitude of fields for which software...... is crucial, software engineering is considered hard to teach. Yet, empirical software engineering increases this difficulty by adding the scientific method as extra dimension. In this paper, we present a Master-level course on empirical software engineering in which different empirical instruments...... an extra specific expertise that they offer as service to other teams, thus, fostering cross-team collaboration. The paper outlines the general course setup, topics addressed, and it provides initial lessons learned....

  14. Empirically Exploring Higher Education Cultures of Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Matthew B.; Skidmore, Susan T.; Bustamante, Rebecca M.; Holzweiss, Peggy C.

    2016-01-01

    Although touted as beneficial to student learning, cultures of assessment have not been examined adequately using validated instruments. Using data collected from a stratified, random sample (N = 370) of U.S. institutional research and assessment directors, the models tested in this study provide empirical support for the value of using the…

  15. Talking about AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the significance of social relationships to two important stages in the process of sexual behavioral change in response to increased HIV/AIDS risk in rural Africa: the perceived risk of becoming HIV-infected through unprotected sexual intercourse and the preferred methods of protection either through sexual fidelity, or through condom use. The empirical analyses are based on cross-sectional data from the 'Kenyan Diffusion and Ideational Change Project' (KDICP which provides information about AIDS-related, ego-centered communication networks of Kenyan men and women. The results show that perceived risks, as well as preferred methods of protection against HIV-infection, depend in general on the prevailing perceptions and favored protective methods within personal communication networks. However, different influential network properties can be found. The risk-perceptions of women are shaped by strong relationships and cohesive network structures. Male's risk perception depends more on the number of risk-perceivers in their communication networks. Heterogeneous relationships of various kinds are influential on women's and men's probability of favoring sexual faithfulness as a method of protection against HIV-infection.

  16. Does food aid disrupt local food market?

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrière, Nathalie; Suwa-Eisenmann, Akiko

    2014-01-01

    This paper analyses empirically the impact of food aid on production, sales and purchases. We estimate the discrete choice and the level choice using the Ethiopian rural household survey. The panel dimension allows us to deal with food aid selection. Running a panel Tobit with sample selection and endogeneity we find that food aid reduces the probability of being a producer. It increases the one of being a seller and decreases the one of being a buyer only after 2004 that corresponds to chang...

  17. Enhancing the effectiveness of HIV/AIDS prevention programs targeted to unique population groups in Thailand: lessons learned from applying concepts of diffusion of innovation and social marketing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svenkerud, P J; Singhal, A

    1998-01-01

    Diffusion of innovations theory and social marketing theory have been criticized for their limited applicability in influencing unique population groups (e.g., female commercial sex workers (CSWs) working in low-class brothels). This study investigated the applicability of these two theoretical frameworks in outreach efforts directed to unique populations at high risk for HIV/AIDS in Bangkok, Thailand. Further, this study examined Thai cultural characteristics that influence communication about HIV/AIDS prevention. The results suggest that certain concepts and strategies drawn from the two frameworks were used more or less by effective outreach programs, providing several policy-relevant lessons. Cultural constraints, such as the lack of visibility of the disease and traditional sexual practices, influenced communication about HIV/AIDS prevention.

  18. Life Writing After Empire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    A watershed moment of the twentieth century, the end of empire saw upheavals to global power structures and national identities. However, decolonisation profoundly affected individual subjectivities too. Life Writing After Empire examines how people around the globe have made sense of the post...... in order to understand how individual life writing reflects broader societal changes. From far-flung corners of the former British Empire, people have turned to life writing to manage painful or nostalgic memories, as well as to think about the past and future of the nation anew through the personal...

  19. Theological reflections on empire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan A. Boesak

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Since the meeting of the World Alliance of Reformed Churches in Accra, Ghana (2004, and the adoption of the Accra Declaration, a debate has been raging in the churches about globalisation, socio-economic justice, ecological responsibility, political and cultural domination and globalised war. Central to this debate is the concept of empire and the way the United States is increasingly becoming its embodiment. Is the United States a global empire? This article argues that the United States has indeed become the expression of a modern empire and that this reality has considerable consequences, not just for global economics and politics but for theological refl ection as well.

  20. Empirical Evidence from Kenya

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FIRST LADY

    2011-01-18

    Jan 18, 2011 ... Empirical results reveal that consumption of sugar in. Kenya varies ... experiences in trade in different regions of the world. Some studies ... To assess the relationship between domestic sugar retail prices and sugar sales in ...

  1. The Usage of Programming Software “The Library of Electronic Visual Aids “Algebra 7-9” During Algebra Learning in 7-9 Forms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.A. Kreknin

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The Programming software “The Library of Electronic Visual Aids “Algebra 7-9” for secondary institutions was developed for the computer support of algebra classes in 7-9 forms of secondary school. The present article describes the data about its basic characteristics features and possibilities.

  2. Using the theory of planned behaviour to understand the motivation to learn about HIV/AIDS prevention among adolescents in Tigray, Ethiopia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gebreeyesus Hadera, H.; Boer, Hendrik; Kuiper, Wilmad

    2007-01-01

    Various studies indicate that school- or university-based HIV prevention curricula can reduce the prevalence of sexual risk behaviour among adolescent youth in Sub-Saharan Africa. However, effective HIV/AIDS prevention education may be problematic, if the needs of youth are not served adequately. To

  3. DINAMIKA DEPRESI PADA PENDERITA AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imadduddin Parhani

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Depression is a major mental health problem today. This is very important because people with depression productivity will decrease and this is very bad for a society and a country that is building. There are at least four chronic diseases that allow the depression sufferer, one of which is HIV and AIDS. Given the uncertainty over the fate of people living with HIV and AIDS had the potential to give rise to feelings of anxiety and depression. Someone who is infected with HIV and AIDS will be overcome by a feeling of dying, guilt about the behavior that makes infection, and taste sequestered by others.The cause of depression in people with HIV and AIDS by cognitive approach that is the mindset of people who deviate from the pattern of the logical interpretation or misinterprets an event or events, focusing on the negative situations that happened to him, and hope that pessimistic and negative about the future. Symptoms are raised is their depressed mood, decreased interest or pleasure in absolute terms, average of worthlessness or excessive guilt, thoughts of death. Response or reaction that occurs is refused, angry, and depressed when he learned he was infected with HIV and AIDS, and eventually be able to accept his situation. Efforts are being made to reduce depression are manifold. One is through social support to colleagues who also have HIV and AIDS.

  4. Animal Bites: First Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    First aid Animal bites: First aid Animal bites: First aid By Mayo Clinic Staff These guidelines can help you care for a minor animal bite, such ... 26, 2017 Original article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/first-aid/first-aid-animal-bites/basics/ART-20056591 . Mayo ...

  5. Chest Pain: First Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    First aid Chest pain: First aid Chest pain: First aid By Mayo Clinic Staff Causes of chest pain can vary from minor problems, such as indigestion ... 26, 2018 Original article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/first-aid/first-aid-chest-pain/basics/ART-20056705 . Mayo ...

  6. Head Trauma: First Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    First aid Head trauma: First aid Head trauma: First aid By Mayo Clinic Staff Most head trauma involves injuries that are minor and don't require ... 21, 2015 Original article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/first-aid/first-aid-head-trauma/basics/ART-20056626 . Mayo ...

  7. HIV/AIDS - resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resources - HIV/AIDS ... information on AIDS : AIDS.gov -- www.aids.gov AIDS Info -- aidsinfo.nih.gov The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation -- www.kff.org/hivaids US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention -- www.cdc.gov/hiv

  8. Student Aid Simplification: Looking Back and Looking Ahead

    OpenAIRE

    Dynarski, Susan; Wiederspan, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Each year, 14 million households seeking federal aid for college complete a detailed questionnaire about their finances, the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). With 116 questions, the FAFSA is almost as long as IRS Form 1040 and substantially longer than Forms 1040EZ and 1040A. Aid for college is intended to increase college attendance by reducing its price and loosening liquidity constraints. Economic theory, empirical evidence, and common sense suggest that complexity in appl...

  9. Macroeconomic Issues in Foreign Aid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjertholm, Peter; Laursen, Jytte; White, Howard

    foreign aid, macroeconomics of aid, gap models, aid fungibility, fiscal response models, foreign debt,......foreign aid, macroeconomics of aid, gap models, aid fungibility, fiscal response models, foreign debt,...

  10. Gastroenteritis: First Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    First aid Gastroenteritis: First aid Gastroenteritis: First aid By Mayo Clinic Staff Gastroenteritis is an inflammation of your stomach and intestines. Common causes are: Viruses. Food or water contaminated by ...

  11. Snakebites: First Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    First aid Snakebites: First aid Snakebites: First aid By Mayo Clinic Staff Most North American snakes aren't dangerous to humans. Some exceptions include the rattlesnake, coral snake, water moccasin ...

  12. HIV and AIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español HIV and AIDS KidsHealth / For Kids / HIV and AIDS ... actually the virus that causes the disease AIDS. HIV Hurts the Immune System People who are HIV ...

  13. Buying a Hearing Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the aids? Start using your hearing aids in quiet surroundings, gradually building up to noisier environments. Then eventually work up to wearing your hearing aids all waking hours. Keep a diary to help you remember your ...

  14. Heart attack first aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    First aid - heart attack; First aid - cardiopulmonary arrest; First aid - cardiac arrest ... A heart attack occurs when the blood flow that carries oxygen to the heart is blocked. The heart muscle ...

  15. Vectorization of optically sectioned brain microvasculature: learning aids completion of vascular graphs by connecting gaps and deleting open-ended segments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufhold, John P; Tsai, Philbert S; Blinder, Pablo; Kleinfeld, David

    2012-08-01

    A graph of tissue vasculature is an essential requirement to model the exchange of gasses and nutriments between the blood and cells in the brain. Such a graph is derived from a vectorized representation of anatomical data, provides a map of all vessels as vertices and segments, and may include the location of nonvascular components, such as neuronal and glial somata. Yet vectorized data sets typically contain erroneous gaps, spurious endpoints, and spuriously merged strands. Current methods to correct such defects only address the issue of connecting gaps and further require manual tuning of parameters in a high dimensional algorithm. To address these shortcomings, we introduce a supervised machine learning method that (1) connects vessel gaps by "learned threshold relaxation"; (2) removes spurious segments by "learning to eliminate deletion candidate strands"; and (3) enforces consistency in the joint space of learned vascular graph corrections through "consistency learning." Human operators are only required to label individual objects they recognize in a training set and are not burdened with tuning parameters. The supervised learning procedure examines the geometry and topology of features in the neighborhood of each vessel segment under consideration. We demonstrate the effectiveness of these methods on four sets of microvascular data, each with >800(3) voxels, obtained with all optical histology of mouse tissue and vectorization by state-of-the-art techniques in image segmentation. Through statistically validated sampling and analysis in terms of precision recall curves, we find that learning with bagged boosted decision trees reduces equal-error error rates for threshold relaxation by 5-21% and strand elimination performance by 18-57%. We benchmark generalization performance across datasets; while improvements vary between data sets, learning always leads to a useful reduction in error rates. Overall, learning is shown to more than halve the total error

  16. What the United States can learn from Brazil in response to HIV/AIDS: international reputation and strategic centralization in a context of health policy devolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Eduardo J

    2010-11-01

    Contrary to what many may expect, this article argues that Brazil did a better job than the USA when it came to responding to HIV/AIDS. Because of the Brazilian government's concern about its international reputation and the partnerships it has forged with international donors and civil society, the government has been committed to strengthening decentralization processes by introducing both formal and informal re-centralization measures that strengthen health policy devolution, while effectively targeting the biggest at-risk groups. The US, in contrast, has not achieved these objectives, due to its lack of interest in increasing its international reputation and its focus on bi-lateral aid rather than investing in domestic policy. The paper closes by explaining the lessons that Brazil can teach the US and other large federations seeking to ensure that decentralization and prevention policy work more effectively.

  17. Aid and AIDS: a delicate cocktail

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dalen, H.P.; Reuser, M.

    2008-01-01

    Development assistance targeting health overwhelmingly concentrates on HIV/AIDS. This column argues that that focus neglects critical demographic issues and degrades health infrastructure, particularly in Sub-Saharan Africa. The prime rule for AIDS aid should be “First, do no harm”.

  18. Empirical philosophy of science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagenknecht, Susann; Nersessian, Nancy J.; Andersen, Hanne

    2015-01-01

    A growing number of philosophers of science make use of qualitative empirical data, a development that may reconfigure the relations between philosophy and sociology of science and that is reminiscent of efforts to integrate history and philosophy of science. Therefore, the first part...... of this introduction to the volume Empirical Philosophy of Science outlines the history of relations between philosophy and sociology of science on the one hand, and philosophy and history of science on the other. The second part of this introduction offers an overview of the papers in the volume, each of which...... is giving its own answer to questions such as: Why does the use of qualitative empirical methods benefit philosophical accounts of science? And how should these methods be used by the philosopher?...

  19. AIDS and human rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarantola, D; Mann, J

    1995-01-01

    HIV/AIDS is a health problem that is inseparable from individual and collective behavior and social forces, particularly linked with societal respect for human rights and dignity. In its second decade, the HIV/AIDS pandemic continues to thrive. Where organized communities have access to adequate information, education, and services, the incidence of infection has begun to decline. Elsewhere, HIV continues to reach new populations and new geographic areas. Lessons learned in more than a decade of prevention work point to new directions for expanding national responses, at a time when the UNAIDS program, to be launched in January 1996, offers opportunities for innovative, broad-based, coordinated, and expanded global action. Prevention activities have shown that the spread of HIV can be effectively reduced. Public health interventions, including providing information and applying prevention methods, reduce the probability of infection, the risk of transmission, and the chances of not accessing appropriate care or support once infection has set in. These are proximal interventions that yield the short-term benefits of the decline of incidence and improved quality and duration of life for those infected. Societal vulnerability translates today into the focus the pandemic has on individuals, communities, and nations that are disadvantaged, marginalized, or discriminated against for reasons of gender, age, race, sexual orientation, economic status, or cultural, religious, or political affiliation. A fully expanded response to HIV/AIDS requires a combination of risk-reduction (proximal) and contextual interventions--those directed at reducing vulnerability through social change to enable people to exert control over their own health. Contextual actions can be implemented in the short term (changing laws, policies, practices that discriminate, promoting human rights, developing the most vulnerable communities) and in the long term (cultural changes, gender equality in

  20. Empire vs. Federation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gravier, Magali

    2011-01-01

    The article discusses the concepts of federation and empire in the context of the European Union (EU). Even if these two concepts are not usually contrasted to one another, the article shows that they refer to related type of polities. Furthermore, they can be used at a time because they shed light...... on different and complementary aspects of the European integration process. The article concludes that the EU is at the crossroads between federation and empire and may remain an ‘imperial federation’ for several decades. This could mean that the EU is on the verge of transforming itself to another type...

  1. Empirical comparison of theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Opp, K.D.; Wippler, R.

    1990-01-01

    The book represents the first, comprehensive attempt to take an empirical approach for comparative assessment of theories in sociology. The aims, problems, and advantages of the empirical approach are discussed in detail, and the three theories selected for the purpose of this work are explained. Their comparative assessment is performed within the framework of several research projects, which among other subjects also investigate the social aspects of the protest against nuclear power plants. The theories analysed in this context are the theory of mental incongruities and that of the benefit, and their efficiency in explaining protest behaviour is compared. (orig./HSCH) [de

  2. Empirical Music Aesthetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grund, Cynthia M.

    The toolbox for empirically exploring the ways that artistic endeavors convey and activate meaning on the part of performers and audiences continues to expand. Current work employing methods at the intersection of performance studies, philosophy, motion capture and neuroscience to better understand...... musical performance and reception is inspired by traditional approaches within aesthetics, but it also challenges some of the presuppositions inherent in them. As an example of such work I present a research project in empirical music aesthetics begun last year and of which I am a team member....

  3. Equifinality in empirical studies of cultural transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Brendan J

    2018-01-31

    Cultural systems exhibit equifinal behavior - a single final state may be arrived at via different mechanisms and/or from different initial states. Potential for equifinality exists in all empirical studies of cultural transmission including controlled experiments, observational field research, and computational simulations. Acknowledging and anticipating the existence of equifinality is important in empirical studies of social learning and cultural evolution; it helps us understand the limitations of analytical approaches and can improve our ability to predict the dynamics of cultural transmission. Here, I illustrate and discuss examples of equifinality in studies of social learning, and how certain experimental designs might be prone to it. I then review examples of equifinality discussed in the social learning literature, namely the use of s-shaped diffusion curves to discern individual from social learning and operational definitions and analytical approaches used in studies of conformist transmission. While equifinality exists to some extent in all studies of social learning, I make suggestions for how to address instances of it, with an emphasis on using data simulation and methodological verification alongside modern statistical approaches that emphasize prediction and model comparison. In cases where evaluated learning mechanisms are equifinal due to non-methodological factors, I suggest that this is not always a problem if it helps us predict cultural change. In some cases, equifinal learning mechanisms might offer insight into how both individual learning, social learning strategies and other endogenous social factors might by important in structuring cultural dynamics and within- and between-group heterogeneity. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. [AIDS prevention in Germany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pott, E

    2007-04-01

    In 1987 the national AIDS prevention campaign "Gib AIDS keine Chance" (Don't give AIDS a chance) was started in Germany. After a very difficult and controversial political debate about a probably successful response to AIDS, in the end a political decision was made in favour of the implementation of a long term "social learning strategy". Thus, since then the Bundeszentrale für gesundheitliche Aufklärung (Federal Centre for Health Education, BZgA) has been running the campaign on behalf of the Federal Ministry of Health. The result of this prevention program is a low rate of infections. In Germany there were 2600 newly diagnosed infections in 2005: 59 % in homosexual men, 16 % by heterosexual contacts, 17 % in people from high prevalence countries and 7 % in i.v. drug users. In comparison to the international situation Germany has a relatively low HIV-prevalence even nowadays. However, Germany has also been confronted with an increasing number of newly diagnosed infections in the last few years. When the prevention program was started it was very important to build new structures for a successful implementation of the campaign. That meant for instance to build up an effective infrastructure for cooperation between the governmental and the nongovernmental sector, including organising the coordinated action among the partners at the federal, regional and local levels. Likewise, international networking was of great importance. A key element, relevant for the success of the campaign was the close cooperation at the federal level between the BZgA and the Deutsche AIDS Hilfe (German AIDS Help, DAH), to combine the highreach intervention in low-prevalence populations with intensive interventions for high prevalence groups. An effective national AIDS prevention campaign must reach the whole population; inform the public about the main risks of infection, about methods of protection and about what is not infectious. Moreover groups with a higher level of risk of

  5. Families, children, migration and AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haour-Knipe, Mary

    2009-01-01

    Migration is very often a family affair, and often involves children, directly or indirectly. It may give rise to better quality of life for an entire family, or to bitter disappointment, and may also increase vulnerability to HIV and AIDS. This review, carried out for the Joint Learning Initiative on Children and AIDS, links the literature on "migration", on "HIV and AIDS" and on "families". Three themes are sketched: (1) As both HIV prevalence and circular migration increase, former migrant workers affected by AIDS may return to their families for care and support, especially at the end of life, often under crisis conditions. Families thus lose promising members, as well as sources of support. However, very little is known about the children of such migrants. (2) Following patterns of migration established for far different reasons, children may have to relocate to different places, sometimes over long distances, if their AIDS-affected parents can no longer care for them. They face the same adaptation challenges as other children who move, but complicated by loss of parent(s), AIDS stigma, and often poverty. (3) The issue of migrant families living with HIV has been studied to some extent, but mainly in developed countries with a long history of migration, and with little attention paid to the children in such families. Difficulties include involuntary separation from family members, isolation and lack of support, disclosure and planning for children's care should the parent(s) die and differences in treatment access within the same family. Numerous research and policy gaps are defined regarding the three themes, and a call is made for thinking about migration, families and AIDS to go beyond description to include resilience theory, and to go beyond prevention to include care.

  6. Empirical research through design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keyson, D.V.; Bruns, M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the empirical research through design method (ERDM), which differs from current approaches to research through design by enforcing the need for the designer, after a series of pilot prototype based studies, to a-priori develop a number of testable interaction design hypothesis

  7. Essays in empirical microeconomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Péter, A.N.

    2016-01-01

    The empirical studies in this thesis investigate various factors that could affect individuals' labor market, family formation and educational outcomes. Chapter 2 focuses on scheduling as a potential determinant of individuals' productivity. Chapter 3 looks at the role of a family factor on

  8. Worship, Reflection, Empirical Research

    OpenAIRE

    Ding Dong,

    2012-01-01

    In my youth, I was a worshipper of Mao Zedong. From the latter stage of the Mao Era to the early years of Reform and Opening, I began to reflect on Mao and the Communist Revolution he launched. In recent years I’ve devoted myself to empirical historical research on Mao, seeking the truth about Mao and China’s modern history.

  9. Trade and Empire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Peter Fibiger

    2007-01-01

    This articles seeks to establish a new set of organizing concepts for the analysis of the Roman imperial economy from Republic to late antiquity: tributary empire, port-folio capitalism and protection costs. Together these concepts explain better economic developments in the Roman world than the...

  10. Empirically sampling Universal Dependencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schluter, Natalie; Agic, Zeljko

    2017-01-01

    Universal Dependencies incur a high cost in computation for unbiased system development. We propose a 100% empirically chosen small subset of UD languages for efficient parsing system development. The technique used is based on measurements of model capacity globally. We show that the diversity o...

  11. Deepening Learning through Learning-by-Inventing

    OpenAIRE

    Apiola, Mikko; Tedre, Matti

    2013-01-01

    It has been shown that deep approaches to learning, intrinsic motivation, and self-regulated learning have strong positive effects on learning. How those pedagogical theories can be integrated in computing curricula is, however, still lacking empirically grounded analyses. This study integrated, in a robotics-based programming class, a method of learning-by-inventing, and studied its qualitative effects on students’ learning through 144 interviews. Five findings were related with learning the...

  12. Learning about Learning: A Conundrum and a Possible Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Ronald

    2011-01-01

    What is it to learn in the modern world? We can identify four "learning epochs" through which our understanding of learning has passed: a metaphysical view; an empirical view; an experiential view; and, currently, a "learning-amid-contestation" view. In this last and current view, learning has its place in a world in which, the more one learns,…

  13. Efficient individualization of hearing aid processed sound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Brehm; Nielsen, Jakob

    2013-01-01

    Due to the large amount of options offered by the vast number of adjustable parameters in modern digital hearing aids, it is becoming increasingly daunting—even for a fine-tuning professional—to perform parameter fine tuning to satisfactorily meet the preference of the hearing aid user. In addition......, the communication between the fine-tuning professional and the hearing aid user might muddle the task. In the present paper, an interactive system is proposed to ease and speed up fine tuning of hearing aids to suit the preference of the individual user. The system simultaneously makes the user conscious of his own...... preferences while the system itself learns the user’s preference. Since the learning is based on probabilistic modeling concepts, the system handles inconsistent user feedback efficiently. Experiments with hearing impaired subjects show that the system quickly discovers individual preferred hearing...

  14. The Master Hearing Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, James R.

    2013-01-01

    As early as the 1930s the term Master Hearing Aid (MHA) described a device used in the fitting of hearing aids. In their original form, the MHA was a desktop system that allowed for simulated or actual adjustment of hearing aid components that resulted in a changed hearing aid response. Over the years the MHA saw many embodiments and contributed to a number of rationales for the fitting of hearing aids. During these same years, the MHA was viewed by many as an inappropriate means of demonstrating hearing aids; the audio quality of the desktop systems was often superior to the hearing aids themselves. These opinions and the evolution of the MHA have molded the modern perception of hearing aids and the techniques used in the fitting of hearing aids. This article reports on a history of the MHA and its influence on the fitting of hearing aids. PMID:23686682

  15. Evolution of HIV and AIDS Programmes in an African Institution of Higher Learning: The Case of the Copperbelt University in Zambia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanjobo, Nawa; Lukwesa, Matilda; Kaziya, Charity; Tepa, Cornwell; Puta, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Background: Universities present the foundation for socio-economic and political development. Without structures and processes to fight HIV, there is no prospect of enhancing treatment, prevention, care and support services. Copperbelt University HIV and AIDS response was initiated in 2003 with the aim of building capacity of students and employees in HIV and AIDS. Objectives: The main objective of this paper is to demonstrate how the CBU HIV response has evolved over time and provide a timeline of important milestones in the development process. Method: Peer educators and counsellors conduct sensitization campaigns through one on one discussion, workshops, and drama performances, distribution of Information, Education and Communication (IEC) materials. Results: HIV Programme has been set up with players from policy, programme and community levels. Strategic processes, collaborations, funding, medical insurance schemes, prevention, treatment, care and support services, training of peer educators and counsellors have been established. Conclusion: Copperbelt University HIV initiative has demonstrated potential to reduce new infections in the university, and is currently expanding her programme to encompass wellness and also spearhead the integration of HIV in the university curriculum. PMID:27347269

  16. Evolution of HIV and AIDS Programmes in an African Institution of Higher Learning: The Case of the Copperbelt University in Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanjobo, Nawa; Lukwesa, Matilda; Kaziya, Charity; Tepa, Cornwell; Puta, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Universities present the foundation for socio-economic and political development. Without structures and processes to fight HIV, there is no prospect of enhancing treatment, prevention, care and support services. Copperbelt University HIV and AIDS response was initiated in 2003 with the aim of building capacity of students and employees in HIV and AIDS. The main objective of this paper is to demonstrate how the CBU HIV response has evolved over time and provide a timeline of important milestones in the development process. Peer educators and counsellors conduct sensitization campaigns through one on one discussion, workshops, and drama performances, distribution of Information, Education and Communication (IEC) materials. HIV Programme has been set up with players from policy, programme and community levels. Strategic processes, collaborations, funding, medical insurance schemes, prevention, treatment, care and support services, training of peer educators and counsellors have been established. Copperbelt University HIV initiative has demonstrated potential to reduce new infections in the university, and is currently expanding her programme to encompass wellness and also spearhead the integration of HIV in the university curriculum.

  17. Comparison of Two Modes of Delivery of First Aid Training Including Basic Life Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippmann, John; Livingston, Patricia; Craike, Melinda J.

    2011-01-01

    Aims: Flexible-learning first aid courses are increasingly common due to reduced classroom contact time. This study compared retention of first aid knowledge and basic life support (BLS) skills three months after a two-day, classroom-based first aid course (STD) to one utilizing on-line theory learning at home followed by one day of classroom…

  18. Using Gloss to Help Fifth and Sixth Graders Comprehend Social Studies Text: An Informal Study of a Learning Aid. Working Paper No. 295.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witte, Pauline

    A two-part study examined the effectiveness of glossing (writing comments or questions in text to improve comprehension) when students use it in social studies texts in combination with discussions and other activities. Students were divided into two groups, one of which learned glossing while the other engaged in assigned workbook activities.…

  19. Autobiography After Empire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasch, Astrid

    of the collective, but insufficient attention has been paid to how individuals respond to such narrative changes. This dissertation examines the relationship between individual and collective memory at the end of empire through analysis of 13 end of empire autobiographies by public intellectuals from Australia......Decolonisation was a major event of the twentieth century, redrawing maps and impacting on identity narratives around the globe. As new nations defined their place in the world, the national and imperial past was retold in new cultural memories. These developments have been studied at the level......, the Anglophone Caribbean and Zimbabwe. I conceive of memory as reconstructive and social, with individual memory striving to make sense of the past in the present in dialogue with surrounding narratives. By examining recurring tropes in the autobiographies, like colonial education, journeys to the imperial...

  20. Gazprom: the new empire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillemoles, A.; Lazareva, A.

    2008-01-01

    Gazprom is conquering the world. The Russian industrial giant owns the hugest gas reserves and enjoys the privilege of a considerable power. Gazprom edits journals, owns hospitals, airplanes and has even built cities where most of the habitants work for him. With 400000 workers, Gazprom represents 8% of Russia's GDP. This inquiry describes the history and operation of this empire and show how its has become a masterpiece of the government's strategy of russian influence reconquest at the world scale. Is it going to be a winning game? Are the corruption affairs and the expected depletion of resources going to weaken the empire? The authors shade light on the political and diplomatic strategies that are played around the crucial dossier of the energy supply. (J.S.)

  1. Teaching Basic First-Aid Skills against Home Accidents to Children with Autism through Video Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergenekon, Yasemin

    2012-01-01

    It is known that children with DD can learn first-aid skills and use whenever needed. Applying first-aid skills was taught to three inclusion students with autism through "first-aid skills training package". In the study multiple probe design with probe trials across behaviors was used. The findings indicated that first-aid skills…

  2. Prevention of sexually transmitted HIV infections through the President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief: a history of achievements and lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Caroline A; Conly, Shanti R; Stanton, David L; Hasen, Nina S

    2012-08-15

    HIV prevention in the President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) began when both data on HIV prevalence and the toolbox of interventions for prevention of sexual transmission were relatively limited. PEPFAR's early focus was on scaling-up information, education, and communication programs that included messaging on abstinence for youth and faithfulness primarily through nongovernmental organizations, including faith-based organizations. Additional activities included condom promotion, distribution, and social marketing. In epidemics concentrated within key populations, PEPFAR's prevention efforts focused on a minimum package of services including outreach, information, education, and communication programs, STI treatment (where appropriate), and condom promotion and distribution. As more epidemiological data became available and with experience gleaned in these early efforts, the need for tailored and flexible approaches became evident. The next iteration of prevention efforts still emphasized behavioral interventions, but incorporated a sharper focus on key epidemic drivers, especially multiple partners; a data-driven emphasis on high transmission areas and populations, including prevention with people living with HIV; and a more strategic and coordinated approach at the national level. Recently, the paradigm for prevention efforts has shifted yet again. Evidence that biomedical interventions such as male circumcision, treatment for prevention of vertical and horizontal transmission, and treatment itself could lead to declines in incidence has refocused PEPFAR's prevention portfolio. New guidance on sexually transmitted HIV focuses on combination prevention, emphasizing biomedical, behavioral and structural approaches. Landmark speeches by the President and the Secretary of State and new ambitious targets for PEPFAR point toward a new goal: an AIDS-free generation.

  3. Intelligent hearing aids: the next revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao Zhang; Mustiere, Fred; Micheyl, Christophe

    2016-08-01

    The first revolution in hearing aids came from nonlinear amplification, which allows better compensation for both soft and loud sounds. The second revolution stemmed from the introduction of digital signal processing, which allows better programmability and more sophisticated algorithms. The third revolution in hearing aids is wireless, which allows seamless connectivity between a pair of hearing aids and with more and more external devices. Each revolution has fundamentally transformed hearing aids and pushed the entire industry forward significantly. Machine learning has received significant attention in recent years and has been applied in many other industries, e.g., robotics, speech recognition, genetics, and crowdsourcing. We argue that the next revolution in hearing aids is machine intelligence. In fact, this revolution is already quietly happening. We will review the development in at least three major areas: applications of machine learning in speech enhancement; applications of machine learning in individualization and customization of signal processing algorithms; applications of machine learning in improving the efficiency and effectiveness of clinical tests. With the advent of the internet of things, the above developments will accelerate. This revolution will bring patient satisfactions to a new level that has never been seen before.

  4. Experience in a Climate Microworld: Influence of Surface and Structure Learning, Problem Difficulty, and Decision Aids in Reducing Stock-Flow Misconceptions

    OpenAIRE

    Medha Kumar; Varun Dutt; Varun Dutt

    2018-01-01

    Research shows that people’s wait-and-see preferences for actions against climate change are a result of several factors, including cognitive misconceptions. The use of simulation tools could help reduce these misconceptions concerning Earth’s climate. However, it is still unclear whether the learning in these tools is of the problem’s surface features (dimensions of emissions and absorptions and cover-story used) or of the problem’s structural features (how emissions and absorptions cause a ...

  5. Cultural Learning Redux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasello, Michael

    2016-01-01

    M. Tomasello, A. Kruger, and H. Ratner (1993) proposed a theory of cultural learning comprising imitative learning, instructed learning, and collaborative learning. Empirical and theoretical advances in the past 20 years suggest modifications to the theory; for example, children do not just imitate but overimitate in order to identify and…

  6. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Campaign Overview The Learn the Link campaign uses TV, print, and Web public service announcements (PSAs), as ... CW BET NBC ABC FOX LATV My Network TV Organizations: AIDS.gov AIDS Alliance for Children, Youth ...

  7. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in the spread of HIV infection in the United States. Drugs can change the way the brain works, ... learn about current statistics of HIV in the United States, please visit: https://www.aids.gov/hiv-aids- ...

  8. Quelles aides les formations hybrides en langues proposent-elles à l'apprenant pour favoriser son autonomie ? What kind of assistance do blended language learning courses provide to learners in order to foster their autonomy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elke Nissen

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available L'apprenant qui suit une formation hybride en langues travaille partiellement à distance, ce qui lui demande une certaine autonomie. La question alors est de savoir si ces formations soutiennent l'apprenant dans le développement de son autonomie et si oui, comment. Les réponses des concepteurs de huit formations hybrides à un questionnaire auto-administré montrent que les nécessaires développement et soutien de l'autonomie sont toujours respectés ; ainsi, ces huit formations proposent des aides pour favoriser l'autonomie dans les domaines technique, méthodologique, social et, bien sûr, langagier. Développer ces autonomies semble donc être devenu un standard dans le cadre des formations observées. En revanche, les autonomies de type psycho-affectif, informationnel, cognitif et métacognitif ne sont pas prises en considération dans toutes les formations.When taking a blended learning course, a learner works partially at a distance, which requires some autonomy. The aim of this study is to find out whether blended learning courses sustain the development of learner autonomy and if they do so, how they do it. The statements that 8 course designers made in a questionnaire show that their courses always help the learners to become or to be autonomous. All 8 courses provide assistance (advice, information and activities in order to foster technical, methodological, social and, of course, language autonomy. Consequently, sustaining these four types of autonomy seems to have become a standard in blended learning courses. But, on the contrary, assistance for other types of autonomy is not systematically provided: only several of these courses help the learners to develop psycho affective, informational, cognitive and metacognive autonomy.

  9. Epistemology and Empirical Investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahlström, Kristoffer

    2008-01-01

    Recently, Hilary Kornblith has argued that epistemological investigation is substantially empirical. In the present paper, I will ¿rst show that his claim is not contingent upon the further and, admittedly, controversial assumption that all objects of epistemological investigation are natural kinds....... Then, I will argue that, contrary to what Kornblith seems to assume, this methodological contention does not imply that there is no need for attending to our epistemic concepts in epistemology. Understanding the make-up of our concepts and, in particular, the purposes they ¿ll, is necessary...

  10. Empirical studies on changes in oil governance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemal, Mohammad

    Regulation of the oil and gas sector is consequential to the economies of oil-producing countries. In the literature, there are two types of regulation: indirect regulation through taxes and tariffs or direct regulation through the creation of a National Oil Company (NOC). In the 1970s, many oil-producing countries nationalized their oil and gas sectors by creating and giving ownership rights of oil and gas resources to NOCs. In light of the success of Norway in regulating its oil and gas resources, over the past two decades several countries have changed their oil governance by changing the rights given to NOC from ownership right to mere access rights like other oil companies. However, empirical literature on these changes in oil governance is quite thin. Thus, this dissertation will explore three research questions to investigate empirically these changes in oil governance. First, I investigate empirically the impact of the changes in oil governance on aggregate domestic income. By employing a difference-in-difference method, I will show that a country which changed its oil governance increases its GDP per-capita by 10%. However, the impact is different for different types of political institution. Second, by observing the changes in oil governance in Indonesia , I explore the impact of the changes on learning-by-doing and learning spillover effect in offshore exploration drilling. By employing an econometric model which includes interaction terms between various experience variables and changes in an oil governance dummy, I will show that the change in oil governance in Indonesia enhances learning-by-doing by the rigs and learning spillover in a basin. Lastly, the impact of the changes in oil governance on expropriation risk and extraction path will be explored. By employing a difference-in-difference method, this essay will show that the changes in oil governance reduce expropriation and the impact of it is different for different sizes of resource stock.

  11. Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Laabidi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays learning technologies transformed educational systems with impressive progress of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT. Furthermore, when these technologies are available, affordable and accessible, they represent more than a transformation for people with disabilities. They represent real opportunities with access to an inclusive education and help to overcome the obstacles they met in classical educational systems. In this paper, we will cover basic concepts of e-accessibility, universal design and assistive technologies, with a special focus on accessible e-learning systems. Then, we will present recent research works conducted in our research Laboratory LaTICE toward the development of an accessible online learning environment for persons with disabilities from the design and specification step to the implementation. We will present, in particular, the accessible version “MoodleAcc+” of the well known e-learning platform Moodle as well as new elaborated generic models and a range of tools for authoring and evaluating accessible educational content.

  12. An expert system prototype for aiding in the development of software functional requirements for NASA Goddard's command management system: A case study and lessons learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebowitz, Jay

    1986-01-01

    At NASA Goddard, the role of the command management system (CMS) is to transform general requests for spacecraft opeerations into detailed operational plans to be uplinked to the spacecraft. The CMS is part of the NASA Data System which entails the downlink of science and engineering data from NASA near-earth satellites to the user, and the uplink of command and control data to the spacecraft. Presently, it takes one to three years, with meetings once or twice a week, to determine functional requirements for CMS software design. As an alternative approach to the present technique of developing CMS software functional requirements, an expert system prototype was developed to aid in this function. Specifically, the knowledge base was formulated through interactions with domain experts, and was then linked to an existing expert system application generator called 'Knowledge Engineering System (Version 1.3).' Knowledge base development focused on four major steps: (1) develop the problem-oriented attribute hierachy; (2) determine the knowledge management approach; (3) encode the knowledge base; and (4) validate, test, certify, and evaluate the knowledge base and the expert system prototype as a whole. Backcasting was accomplished for validating and testing the expert system prototype. Knowledge refinement, evaluation, and implementation procedures of the expert system prototype were then transacted.

  13. AIDS Myths and Misunderstandings

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 21, 2014 Select a Language: Fact Sheet 158 AIDS Myths and Misunderstandings WHY ARE THERE SO MANY ... support this belief. Myth: Current medications can cure AIDS. It’s no big deal if you get infected. ...

  14. First aid kit

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001958.htm First aid kit To use the sharing features on this ... ahead, you can create a well-stocked home first aid kit. Keep all of your supplies in one ...

  15. First Aid and Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español First Aid & Safety Keeping your child safe is your top ... do in an emergency, how to stock a first-aid kit, where to call for help, and more. ...

  16. Poisoning first aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007579.htm Poisoning first aid To use the sharing features on this page, ... burns Stupor Unconsciousness (coma) Unusual breath odor Weakness First Aid Seek immediate medical help. For poisoning by swallowing ...

  17. HIV/AIDS Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Partner Spotlight Awareness Days Get Tested Find an HIV testing site near you. Enter ZIP code or ... AIDS Get Email Updates on AAA Anonymous Feedback HIV/AIDS Media Infographics Syndicated Content Podcasts Slide Sets ...

  18. Shock: First Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... et al., eds. American Medical Association Handbook of First Aid and Emergency Care. New York: Random House; 2009. Accessed July 21, 2017. Piazza GM, et al. First Aid Manual. 3rd ed. London, England; New York, N. ...

  19. Types of Hearing Aids

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... aids : Most parts are contained in a small plastic case that rests behind the ear; the case ... certain situations (for example, background noise and whistle reduction). They also have greater flexibility in hearing aid ...

  20. First Aid: Influenza (Flu)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Educators Search English Español First Aid: The Flu KidsHealth / For Parents / First Aid: The Flu Print ... tiredness What to Do If Your Child Has Flu Symptoms: Call your doctor. Encourage rest. Keep your ...

  1. Empirical microeconomics action functionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baaquie, Belal E.; Du, Xin; Tanputraman, Winson

    2015-06-01

    A statistical generalization of microeconomics has been made in Baaquie (2013), where the market price of every traded commodity, at each instant of time, is considered to be an independent random variable. The dynamics of commodity market prices is modeled by an action functional-and the focus of this paper is to empirically determine the action functionals for different commodities. The correlation functions of the model are defined using a Feynman path integral. The model is calibrated using the unequal time correlation of the market commodity prices as well as their cubic and quartic moments using a perturbation expansion. The consistency of the perturbation expansion is verified by a numerical evaluation of the path integral. Nine commodities drawn from the energy, metal and grain sectors are studied and their market behavior is described by the model to an accuracy of over 90% using only six parameters. The paper empirically establishes the existence of the action functional for commodity prices that was postulated to exist in Baaquie (2013).

  2. Training in Good Psychiatric Management for Borderline Personality Disorder in Residency: An Aide to Learning Supportive Psychotherapy for Challenging-to-Treat Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernanke, Joel; McCommon, Benjamin

    2018-01-01

    Given many competing demands, psychotherapy training to competency is difficult during psychiatric residency. Good Psychiatric Management for borderline personality disorder (GPM) offers an evidence-based, simplified, psychodynamically informed framework for the outpatient management of patients with borderline personality disorder, one of the most challenging disorders psychiatric residents must learn to treat. In this article, we provide an overview of GPM, and show that training in GPM meets a requirement for training in supportive psychotherapy; builds on psychodynamic psychotherapy training; and applies to other severe personality disorders, especially narcissistic personality disorder. We describe the interpersonal hypersensitivity model used in GPM as a straightforward way for clinicians to collaborate with patients in organizing approaches to psychoeducation, treatment goals, case management, use of multiple treatment modalities, and safety. A modification of the interpersonal hypersensitivity model that includes intra-personal hypersensitivity can be used to address narcissistic problems often present in borderline personality disorder. We argue that these features make GPM ideally suited for psychiatry residents in treating their most challenging patients, provide clinical examples to illustrate these points, and report the key lessons learned by a psychiatry resident after a year of GPM supervision.

  3. Automated diagnosis of focal liver lesions using bidirectional empirical mode decomposition features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, U Rajendra; Koh, Joel En Wei; Hagiwara, Yuki; Tan, Jen Hong; Gertych, Arkadiusz; Vijayananthan, Anushya; Yaakup, Nur Adura; Abdullah, Basri Johan Jeet; Bin Mohd Fabell, Mohd Kamil; Yeong, Chai Hong

    2018-03-01

    Liver is the heaviest internal organ of the human body and performs many vital functions. Prolonged cirrhosis and fatty liver disease may lead to the formation of benign or malignant lesions in this organ, and an early and reliable evaluation of these conditions can improve treatment outcomes. Ultrasound imaging is a safe, non-invasive, and cost-effective way of diagnosing liver lesions. However, this technique has limited performance in determining the nature of the lesions. This study initiates a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system to aid radiologists in an objective and more reliable interpretation of ultrasound images of liver lesions. In this work, we have employed radon transform and bi-directional empirical mode decomposition (BEMD) to extract features from the focal liver lesions. After which, the extracted features were subjected to particle swarm optimization (PSO) technique for the selection of a set of optimized features for classification. Our automated CAD system can differentiate normal, malignant, and benign liver lesions using machine learning algorithms. It was trained using 78 normal, 26 benign and 36 malignant focal lesions of the liver. The accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity of lesion classification were 92.95%, 90.80%, and 97.44%, respectively. The proposed CAD system is fully automatic as no segmentation of region-of-interest (ROI) is required. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. AIDS, haemophiliacs and, Haitians

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    19 Feb 1983 ... deal with immunological changes in haemophiliacs similar to those in AIDS and indicate that a number of these patients may be at special risk, a finding supported by a report> of 3 ca es of AIDS identified in heterosexual haemophiliacs. An even more baffling finding is that AIDS is more prevalent in ...

  5. Severe Bleeding: First Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 12, 2017. Jevon P, et al. Part 5 — First-aid treatment for severe bleeding. Nursing Times. 2008;104:26. Oct. 19, 2017 Original article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/first-aid/first-aid-severe-bleeding/basics/ART-20056661 . Mayo ...

  6. Puncture Wounds: First Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Skin problems. In: American Medical Association Handbook of First Aid and Emergency Care. New York, N.Y.: Random House; 2009. Jan. 12, 2018 Original article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/first-aid/first-aid-puncture-wounds/basics/ART-20056665 . Mayo ...

  7. Determinants of State Aid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buiren, K.; Brouwer, E.

    2010-01-01

    From economic theory we derive a set of hypotheses on the determination of state aid. Econometric analysis on EU state aid panel data is carried out to test whether the determinants we expect on the basis of theory, correspond to the occurrence of state aid in practice in the EU. We find that

  8. What 'empirical turn in bioethics'?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Samia

    2010-10-01

    Uncertainty as to how we should articulate empirical data and normative reasoning seems to underlie most difficulties regarding the 'empirical turn' in bioethics. This article examines three different ways in which we could understand 'empirical turn'. Using real facts in normative reasoning is trivial and would not represent a 'turn'. Becoming an empirical discipline through a shift to the social and neurosciences would be a turn away from normative thinking, which we should not take. Conducting empirical research to inform normative reasoning is the usual meaning given to the term 'empirical turn'. In this sense, however, the turn is incomplete. Bioethics has imported methodological tools from empirical disciplines, but too often it has not imported the standards to which researchers in these disciplines are held. Integrating empirical and normative approaches also represents true added difficulties. Addressing these issues from the standpoint of debates on the fact-value distinction can cloud very real methodological concerns by displacing the debate to a level of abstraction where they need not be apparent. Ideally, empirical research in bioethics should meet standards for empirical and normative validity similar to those used in the source disciplines for these methods, and articulate these aspects clearly and appropriately. More modestly, criteria to ensure that none of these standards are completely left aside would improve the quality of empirical bioethics research and partly clear the air of critiques addressing its theoretical justification, when its rigour in the particularly difficult context of interdisciplinarity is what should be at stake.

  9. Computer-aided trauma simulation system with haptic feedback is easy and fast for oral-maxillofacial surgeons to learn and use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schvartzman, Sara C; Silva, Rebeka; Salisbury, Ken; Gaudilliere, Dyani; Girod, Sabine

    2014-10-01

    Computer-assisted surgical (CAS) planning tools have become widely available in craniomaxillofacial surgery, but are time consuming and often require professional technical assistance to simulate a case. An initial oral and maxillofacial (OM) surgical user experience was evaluated with a newly developed CAS system featuring a bimanual sense of touch (haptic). Three volunteer OM surgeons received a 5-minute verbal introduction to the use of a newly developed haptic-enabled planning system. The surgeons were instructed to simulate mandibular fracture reductions of 3 clinical cases, within a 15-minute time limit and without a time limit, and complete a questionnaire to assess their subjective experience with the system. Standard landmarks and linear and angular measurements between the simulated results and the actual surgical outcome were compared. After the 5-minute instruction, all 3 surgeons were able to use the system independently. The analysis of standardized anatomic measurements showed that the simulation results within a 15-minute time limit were not significantly different from those without a time limit. Mean differences between measurements of surgical and simulated fracture reductions were within current resolution limitations in collision detection, segmentation of computed tomographic scans, and haptic devices. All 3 surgeons reported that the system was easy to learn and use and that they would be comfortable integrating it into their daily clinical practice for trauma cases. A CAS system with a haptic interface that capitalizes on touch and force feedback experience similar to operative procedures is fast and easy for OM surgeons to learn and use. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. All rights reserved.

  10. Aid and development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarp, Finn

    2006-01-01

    evolved since World War II in response to a dramatically changing global political and economic context. I review the aid process and associated trends in the volume and distribution of aid and categorize some of the key goals, principles and institutions of the aid system. The evidence on whether aid has...... been effective in furthering economic growth and development is discussed in some detail. I add perspective and identify some critical unresolved issues. I finally turn to the current development debate and discuss some key concerns, I believe should be kept in mind in formulating any agenda for aid...

  11. Readiness of Adults to Learn Using E-Learning, M-Learning and T-Learning Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilkonis, Rytis; Bakanoviene, Tatjana; Turskiene, Sigita

    2013-01-01

    The article presents results of the empirical research revealing readiness of adults to participate in the lifelong learning process using e-learning, m-learning and t-learning technologies. The research has been carried out in the framework of the international project eBig3 aiming at development a new distance learning platform blending virtual…

  12. Aid is dead. Long live aid!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Michel Severino

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The concepts, targets, tools, institutions and modes of operation of official development assistance have been overtaken by the pace of change in a world marked by the combined momentum of demography, technology and economic growth.Aid can however recover, as social consequences of the globalization call for new forms of regulation. It will then be necessary to modify and diversify our target-setting processes, to update operating procedures, and to find better ways of measuring policy implementation. Aid volumes will certainly continue to grow, and we must transform the way aid is financed. Public and private aid stakeholders must recognize the importance of these transformations and be ready to support them, by questioning the methods as well as the objectives of the policies they are implementing. Otherwise, they will severely impede the emergence of the policies we need if we are to build a better world.

  13. EGG: Empirical Galaxy Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, C.; Elbaz, D.; Pannella, M.; Merlin, E.; Castellano, M.; Fontana, A.; Bourne, N.; Boutsia, K.; Cullen, F.; Dunlop, J.; Ferguson, H. C.; Michałowski, M. J.; Okumura, K.; Santini, P.; Shu, X. W.; Wang, T.; White, C.

    2018-04-01

    The Empirical Galaxy Generator (EGG) generates fake galaxy catalogs and images with realistic positions, morphologies and fluxes from the far-ultraviolet to the far-infrared. The catalogs are generated by egg-gencat and stored in binary FITS tables (column oriented). Another program, egg-2skymaker, is used to convert the generated catalog into ASCII tables suitable for ingestion by SkyMaker (ascl:1010.066) to produce realistic high resolution images (e.g., Hubble-like), while egg-gennoise and egg-genmap can be used to generate the low resolution images (e.g., Herschel-like). These tools can be used to test source extraction codes, or to evaluate the reliability of any map-based science (stacking, dropout identification, etc.).

  14. Aid Effectiveness on Growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doucouliagos, Hristos; Paldam, Martin

    The AEL (aid effectiveness literature) is econo¬metric studies of the macroeconomic effects of development aid. It contains about 100 papers of which 68 are reduced form estimates of theeffect of aid on growth in the recipient country. The raw data show that growth is unconnected to aid......, but the AEL has put so much structure on the data that all results possible have emerged. The present meta study considers both the best-set of the 68 papers and the all-set of 543 regressions published. Both sets have a positive average aid-growth elasticity, but it is small and insignificant: The AEL has...... betweenstudies is real. In particular, the aid-growth association is stronger for Asian countries, and the aid-growth association is shown to have been weaker in the 1970s....

  15. Fractures (Broken Bones): First Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    First aid Fractures (broken bones) Fractures (broken bones): First aid By Mayo Clinic Staff A fracture is a ... 10, 2018 Original article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/first-aid/first-aid-fractures/basics/ART-20056641 . Mayo Clinic ...

  16. Computer-Aided Corrosion Program Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDowell, Louis

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews Computer-Aided Corrosion Program Management at John F. Kennedy Space Center. The contents include: 1) Corrosion at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC); 2) Requirements and Objectives; 3) Program Description, Background and History; 4) Approach and Implementation; 5) Challenges; 6) Lessons Learned; 7) Successes and Benefits; and 8) Summary and Conclusions.

  17. Toward a computer-aided methodology for discourse analysis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    aided methods to discourse analysis”. This project aims to develop an e-learning environment dedicated to documenting, evaluating and teaching the use of corpus linguistic tools suitable for interpretative text analysis. Even though its roots are in ...

  18. An Instructor's Diagnostic Aid for Feedback in Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Dee H.; Uliano, Kevin C.

    1988-01-01

    Instructor's Diagnostic Aid for Feedback in Training (IDAFT) is a computer-assisted method based on error analysis, domains of learning, and events of instruction. Its use with Navy team instructors is currently being explored. (JOW)

  19. The potential impact of computer-aided assessment technology in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The potential impact of computer-aided assessment technology in higher education. ... Further more 'Increased number of students in Higher Education and the ... benefits, limitations, impacts on student learning and strategies for developing ...

  20. Lessons on Stigma: Teaching about HIV/AIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenstein, Bronwen; DeCoster, Jamie

    2014-01-01

    Teaching about the sociology of HIV/AIDS involves teaching about the causes and effects of stigma. We describe a Sociology of HIV/AIDS course at the University of Alabama in which stigma reduction was assessed as a primary objective. The syllabus involved theory-based instruction, class visits, service learning, and student research on community…